Science.gov

Sample records for deep hawk-i survey

  1. The Hawk-I UDS and GOODS Survey (HUGS): Survey design and deep K-band number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Paris, D.; Targett, T. A.; Boutsia, K.; Castellano, M.; Galametz, A.; Grazian, A.; McLure, R.; Merlin, E.; Pentericci, L.; Wuyts, S.; Almaini, O.; Caputi, K.; Chary, R.-R.; Cirasuolo, M.; Conselice, C. J.; Cooray, A.; Daddi, E.; Dickinson, M.; Faber, S. M.; Fazio, G.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Giavalisco, M.; Grogin, N. A.; Hathi, N.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lucas, R. A.; Nonino, M.; Rix, H. W.; Renzini, A.; Rosario, D.; Santini, P.; Scarlata, C.; Sommariva, V.; Stark, D. P.; van der Wel, A.; Vanzella, E.; Wild, V.; Yan, H.; Zibetti, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a new, ultra-deep, near-infrared imaging survey executed with the Hawk-I imager at the ESO VLT, of which we make all the data (images and catalog) public. This survey, named HUGS (Hawk-I UDS and GOODS Survey), provides deep, high-quality imaging in the K and Y bands over the portions of the UKIDSS UDS and GOODS-South fields covered by the CANDELS HST WFC3/IR survey. In this paper we describe the survey strategy, the observational campaign, the data reduction process, and the data quality. We show that, thanks to exquisite image quality and extremely long exposure times, HUGS delivers the deepest K-band images ever collected over areas of cosmological interest, and in general ideally complements the CANDELS data set in terms of image quality and depth. In the GOODS-S field, the K-band observations cover the whole CANDELS area with a complex geometry made of 6 different, partly overlapping pointings, in order to best match the deep and wide areas of CANDELS imaging. In the deepest region (which includes most of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field) exposure times exceed 80 hours of integration, yielding a 1 - σ magnitude limit per square arcsec of ≃28.0 AB mag. The seeing is exceptional and homogeneous across the various pointings, confined to the range 0.38-0.43 arcsec. In the UDS field the survey is about one magnitude shallower (to match the correspondingly shallower depth of the CANDELS images) but includes also Y-band band imaging (which, in the UDS, was not provided by the CANDELS WFC3/IR imaging). In the K-band, with an average exposure time of 13 hours, and seeing in the range 0.37-0.43 arcsec, the 1 - σ limit per square arcsec in the UDS imaging is ≃27.3 AB mag. In the Y-band, with an average exposure time ≃8 h, and seeing in the range 0.45-0.5 arcsec, the imaging yields a 1 - σ limit per square arcsec of ≃28.3 AB mag. We show that the HUGS observations are well matched to the depth of the CANDELS WFC3/IR data, since the majority

  2. CANDELS MULTIWAVELENGTH CATALOGS: SOURCE IDENTIFICATION AND PHOTOMETRY IN THE CANDELS UKIDSS ULTRA-DEEP SURVEY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Fontana, Adriano; Castellano, Marco; Ferguson, Henry C.; Dahlen, Tomas; Grogin, Norman; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandy M.; Guo, Yicheng; Kocevski, Dale D.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Peth, Michael; Almaini, Omar; Collaboration: CANDELS team; and others

    2013-06-01

    We present the multiwavelength-ultraviolet to mid-infrared-catalog of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Ultra-Deep Survey field observed as part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). Based on publicly available data, the catalog includes the CANDELS data from the Hubble Space Telescope (near-infrared WFC3 F125W and F160W data and visible ACS F606W and F814W data); u-band data from CFHT/Megacam; B, V, R{sub c} , i', and z' band data from Subaru/Suprime-Cam; Y and K{sub s} band data from VLT/HAWK-I; J, H, and K band data from UKIDSS (Data Release 8); and Spitzer/IRAC data (3.6, 4.5 {mu}m from SEDS; 5.8 and 8.0 {mu}m from SpUDS). The present catalog is F160W-selected and contains 35, 932 sources over an area of 201.7 arcmin{sup 2} and includes radio- and X-ray-detected sources and spectroscopic redshifts available for 210 sources.

  3. ESO imaging survey: infrared deep public survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, L. F.; Miralles, J.-M.; da Costa, L.; Madejsky, R.; Jørgensen, H. E.; Mignano, A.; Arnouts, S.; Benoist, C.; Dietrich, J. P.; Slijkhuis, R.; Zaggia, S.

    2006-09-01

    This paper is part of the series presenting the final results obtained by the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) project. It presents new J and Ks data obtained from observations conducted at the ESO 3.5 m New Technology Telescope (NTT) using the SOFI camera. These data were taken as part of the Deep Public Survey (DPS) carried out by the ESO Imaging Survey program, significantly extending the earlier optical/infrared EIS-DEEP survey presented in a previous paper of this series. The DPS-IR survey comprises two observing strategies: shallow Ks observations providing nearly full coverage of pointings with complementary multi-band (in general {UBVRI}) optical data obtained using ESO's wide-field imager (WFI) and deeper J and Ks observations of the central parts of these fields. Currently, the DPS-IR survey provides a coverage of roughly 2.1 square degrees ( 300 SOFI pointings) in Ks with 0.63 square degrees to fainter magnitudes and also covered in J, over three independent regions of the sky. The goal of the present paper is to briefly describe the observations, the data reduction procedures, and to present the final survey products which include fully calibrated pixel-maps and catalogs extracted from them. The astrometric solution with an estimated accuracy of ⪉0.15 arcsec is based on the USNO catalog and limited only by the accuracy of the reference catalog. The final stacked images presented here number 89 and 272, in J and K_s, respectively, the latter reflecting the larger surveyed area. The J and Ks images were taken with a median seeing of 0.77 arcsec and 0.8 arcsec. The images reach a median 5σ limiting magnitude of JAB˜23.06 as measured within an aperture of 2´´, while the corresponding limiting magnitude in KsAB is 21.41 and 22.16 mag for the shallow and deep strategies. Although some spatial variation due to varying observing conditions is observed, overall the observed limiting magnitudes are consistent with those originally proposed. The quality of the data

  4. Oceanic crust deep seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, J. H.; White, R. S.

    In September 1991, the British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) collected 578 km of deep seismic reflection profiles over the oceanic crust beneath the Cape Verde abssyal plain in approximately 4900 m of water (Fig. 1). The survey, under the direction of J. H. McBride, was undertaken in response to a proposal made by R. S. White at the 1990 BIRPS open syndicate meeting in Birmingham, England, and was acquired using GECO-PRAKLA'S M/V Bin Hai 511. The survey consisted of two strike lines parallel to magnetic sea-floor lineations and nine orthogonal crossing lines oriented parallel to the spreading direction (Fig. 2). Adjacent lines are spaced at 4 km. For the first time, this provides the ability to map oceanic crust in “3D,” since the line spacing is less than or equal to the Fresnel-zone diameter for the lower crust.

  5. Deep Extragalactic X-Ray Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, W. N.; Hasinger, G.

    2005-09-01

    Deep surveys of the cosmic X-ray background are reviewed in the context of observational progress enabled by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the X-Ray Multi-Mirror Mission-Newton. The sources found by deep surveys are described along with their redshift and luminosity distributions, and the effectiveness of such surveys at selecting active galactic nuclei (AGN) is assessed. Some key results from deep surveys are highlighted, including (a) measurements of AGN evolution and the growth of supermassive black holes, (b) constraints on the demography and physics of high-redshift AGN, (c) the X-ray AGN content of infrared and submillimeter galaxies, and (d) X-ray emission from distant starburst and normal galaxies. We also describe some outstanding problems and future prospects for deep extragalactic X-ray surveys.

  6. The ALFA ZOA Deep Survey: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, T. P.; Henning, P. A.; Minchin, R. F.; Momjian, E.; Butcher, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The Arecibo L-band Feed Array Zone of Avoidance (ALFA ZOA) Deep Survey is the deepest and most sensitive blind H i survey undertaken in the ZOA. ALFA ZOA Deep will cover about 300 square degrees of sky behind the Galactic Plane in both the inner (30^\\circ ≤slant l≤slant 75^\\circ ;b≤slant | 2^\\circ | ) and outer (175^\\circ ≤slant l≤slant 207^\\circ ;-2^\\circ ≤slant b≤slant +1^\\circ ) Galaxy, using the Arecibo Radio Telescope. First results from the survey have found 61 galaxies within a 15 square degree area centered on l=192^\\circ and b = -2°. The survey reached its expected sensitivity of rms = 1 mJy at 9 km s-1 channel resolution, and is shown to be complete above integrated flux, FHi = 0.5 Jy km s-1. The positional accuracy of the survey is 28″ and detections are found out to a recessional velocity of nearly 19,000 km s-1. The survey confirms the extent of the Orion and Abell 539 clusters behind the plane of the Milky Way and discovers expansive voids, at 10,000 and 18,000 km s-1. Twenty-six detections (43%) have a counterpart in the literature, but only two of these have known redshifts. Counterparts are 20% less common beyond vhel = 10,000 km s-1 and 33% less common at extinctions higher than AB = 3.5 mag. The ALFA ZOA Deep survey is able to probe large scale structure beyond redshifts that even the most modern wide-angle surveys have been able to detect in the ZOA at any wavelength.

  7. Pan-STARRS-1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Mark

    2015-08-01

    The Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System-1 (Pan-STARRS-1, PS1) has been in full science operation since Spring 2010 and concluded the observing program for the PS1 Science Consortium (PS1SC) in early 2014. The Medium Deep Survey (MDS) component of the program regularly visited 10 fields (~7 sq. deg. each) with significant multi-wavelength overlap from previous and concurrent surveys (e.g. SDSS, DEEP2, CDFS, COSMOS, GALEX) for 25% of the total time allocation. The cadence generally includes the g,r,i,z filters for a MDS field every 3 days over the 6-8 month season the field is visible, with the y filter done primarily during bright time. The nightly stacks of eight exposures typically reach depths of r,i~23.5 mag. Development work continued to improve the single exposure processing though to deep stacks during the transient event discovery and other science consortium programs over the course of the survey, the culmination of those improvements being applied in a more uniformly reprocessed dataset used for the public data release. A summary of the MDS public data release products will be presented.For details on PS1 and the Science Collaboration, visit http://ps1sc.org/

  8. The VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfield, David G.; Jarvis, M. J.; VIDEO Consortium

    2010-01-01

    The VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey is a 12 sq. degree, Z,Y,J,H,Ks survey, to be carried out with the new ESO Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). The survey is specifically designed to enable galaxy and cluster/structure evolution to be traced as a function of both epoch and environment from the present day out to redshift z=4, and AGN and the most massive galaxies up to and into the epoch of reionization. With its depth and area, VIDEO will be able to fully probe the epoch of activity in the Universe, where AGN and starburst activity were at their peak and the first galaxy clusters were beginning to virialise. VIDEO therefore offers a unique data set with which to investigate the interplay between AGN, starbursts and environment, and the role of feedback at a time when it is most crucial. The three survey fields (ELAIS-S1, XMM-LSS, and CDF-S) have been chosen to maximise overlap with complementary multiwavelength data, and, as an ESO public survey, for future follow-up from southern facilities including the VLT, APEX, and ALMA. We have also recently established an agreement with the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Survey which will allow rest-frame optical light curves to be measured for distant supernovae, thus negating some of the biases inherent to optical surveys.

  9. The VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, M. J.; Häußler, B.; McAlpine, K.

    2013-12-01

    The VIDEO survey is designed to answer key questions regarding the formation and evolution of galaxies, in particular the role of accretion onto black holes and how galaxy evolution may vary depending on environment. VIDEO undertakes deep near-infrared imaging over three well-observed extragalactic fields allowing in-depth study of galaxy evolution over 1 < z < 4, linking the shallower VST and VISTA surveys with the UltraVISTA survey. The area and depth of the VIDEO survey enables the detection of the bulk of the luminosity density arising from galaxies over 90% of the history of the Universe, as well as the most massive galaxies at all epochs and any associated accretion activity. A few scientific highlights from the early VIDEO data are provided.

  10. DeepSurveyCam--A Deep Ocean Optical Mapping System.

    PubMed

    Kwasnitschka, Tom; Köser, Kevin; Sticklus, Jan; Rothenbeck, Marcel; Weiß, Tim; Wenzlaff, Emanuel; Schoening, Timm; Triebe, Lars; Steinführer, Anja; Devey, Colin; Greinert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Underwater photogrammetry and in particular systematic visual surveys of the deep sea are by far less developed than similar techniques on land or in space. The main challenges are the rough conditions with extremely high pressure, the accessibility of target areas (container and ship deployment of robust sensors, then diving for hours to the ocean floor), and the limitations of localization technologies (no GPS). The absence of natural light complicates energy budget considerations for deep diving flash-equipped drones. Refraction effects influence geometric image formation considerations with respect to field of view and focus, while attenuation and scattering degrade the radiometric image quality and limit the effective visibility. As an improvement on the stated issues, we present an AUV-based optical system intended for autonomous visual mapping of large areas of the seafloor (square kilometers) in up to 6000 m water depth. We compare it to existing systems and discuss tradeoffs such as resolution vs. mapped area and show results from a recent deployment with 90,000 mapped square meters of deep ocean floor. PMID:26828495

  11. DeepSurveyCam—A Deep Ocean Optical Mapping System

    PubMed Central

    Kwasnitschka, Tom; Köser, Kevin; Sticklus, Jan; Rothenbeck, Marcel; Weiß, Tim; Wenzlaff, Emanuel; Schoening, Timm; Triebe, Lars; Steinführer, Anja; Devey, Colin; Greinert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Underwater photogrammetry and in particular systematic visual surveys of the deep sea are by far less developed than similar techniques on land or in space. The main challenges are the rough conditions with extremely high pressure, the accessibility of target areas (container and ship deployment of robust sensors, then diving for hours to the ocean floor), and the limitations of localization technologies (no GPS). The absence of natural light complicates energy budget considerations for deep diving flash-equipped drones. Refraction effects influence geometric image formation considerations with respect to field of view and focus, while attenuation and scattering degrade the radiometric image quality and limit the effective visibility. As an improvement on the stated issues, we present an AUV-based optical system intended for autonomous visual mapping of large areas of the seafloor (square kilometers) in up to 6000 m water depth. We compare it to existing systems and discuss tradeoffs such as resolution vs. mapped area and show results from a recent deployment with 90,000 mapped square meters of deep ocean floor. PMID:26828495

  12. Pan-STARRS-1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Mark; PS1-IPP Team, PS1 Science Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System-1 (Pan-STARRS-1, PS1) has been in full operation since Spring 2010 and concluded the PS1 Science Consortium (PS1SC) observational program in early 2014. The Medium Deep Survey (MDS) component of the program, allocated 25% of the time, regularly visited 10 fields (~7 sq. deg. each) with significant multi-wavelength overlap from previous and concurrent surveys (e.g. SDSS, DEEP2, CDFS, COSMOS, GALEX). The cadence generally includes the g,r,i,z filters for a MDS field every 3 days with a nightly stack depth of r,i~23.5 mag and the y filter primarily during bright time over the 6-8 month season the field is visible. While regularly producing data for the transient event discovery and science consortium programs, development work continued to improve the single exposures though production of deep stacks for reprocessing into the final and public release. The data products, to be publicly available after the post-observing proprietary period, will be summarized.For details on PS1 and the Science Collaboration, visit http://ps1sc.org/

  13. Deep multicolor surveys of the galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szokoly, Gyula Pal

    1999-10-01

    I present various surveys that benefit from the tremendous improvements in observational astronomy in recent years and I develop new techniques to analyze data obtained in these new generation of surveys. In participation of upcoming, very deep near-infrared galaxy surveys, I constructed a survey aimed at determining the near-infrared luminosity function of galaxies. The evolutionary effects are much weaker at the red end of the atmospheric window ranging from the near- ultraviolet to about 2.2 μ m than in the optical and UV bands, as the infrared light coming from a galaxy is dominated by the old stellar population, while optical luminosity is strongly affected by the star formation history of galaxies. Measuring the luminosity function of galaxies is essential to interpret future surveys. Utilizing my deep, large area, multi-color optical galaxy survey, I studied the structure evolution of the Universe on cosmologically relevant scales. The multicolor nature of the survey (B, V, R and I bands) made it possible to estimate the radial distance to a very large number of galaxies very efficiently. Using these photometric redshifts, one can reduce the effects of galaxy evolution by analyzing galaxies at roughly the same redshift (lookback time). Due to the large area (about 1.5 square degrees) and very faint limiting magnitude (I = 23.8), structure evolution can be studied with a very high precision. I also propose a new object detection technique to replace traditional methods that use a single band or an arbitrarily co-added image. Our new technique uses all available bands of a survey and provides a nearly optimal way to take advantage of all the information available. We demonstrate the strength of this technique using the Hubble Deep Field, where we show that we can extend the detection limit significantly. We also show that this method can identify a significant number of objects that traditional techniques usually can not detect. Finally I propose a new

  14. SEDS: The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Survey Design, Photometry, and Deep IRAC Source Counts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Arendt, A.; Barmby, P.; Barro, G; Bell, E. F.; Bouwens, R.; Cattaneo, A.; Croton, D.; Dave, R.; Dunlop, J. S.; Egami, E.; Faber, S.; Finlator, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hernquist, L.; Hora, J. L.; Illingworth, G.; Kashlinsky, A; Koekmoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Moseley, H.

    2013-01-01

    The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) is a very deep infrared survey within five well-known extragalactic science fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the Hubble Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. SEDS covers a total area of 1.46 deg(exp 2) to a depth of 26 AB mag (3sigma) in both of the warm Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands at 3.6 and 4.5 micron. Because of its uniform depth of coverage in so many widely-separated fields, SEDS is subject to roughly 25% smaller errors due to cosmic variance than a single-field survey of the same size. SEDS was designed to detect and characterize galaxies from intermediate to high redshifts (z = 2-7) with a built-in means of assessing the impact of cosmic variance on the individual fields. Because the full SEDS depth was accumulated in at least three separate visits to each field, typically with six-month intervals between visits, SEDS also furnishes an opportunity to assess the infrared variability of faint objects. This paper describes the SEDS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. Deep IRAC counts for the more than 300,000 galaxies detected by SEDS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. Discrete IRAC sources contribute 5.6 +/- 1.0 and 4.4 +/- 0.8 nW / square m/sr at 3.6 and 4.5 micron to the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB). IRAC sources cannot contribute more than half of the total CIB flux estimated from DIRBE data. Barring an unexpected error in the DIRBE flux estimates, half the CIB flux must therefore come from a diffuse component.

  15. The VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Matt J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bruce, V. A.; Geach, J. E.; McAlpine, K.; McLure, R. J.; González-Solares, E.; Irwin, M.; Lewis, J.; Yoldas, A. Kupcu; Andreon, S.; Cross, N. J. G.; Emerson, J. P.; Dalton, G.; Dunlop, J. S.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Le, Fèvre O.; Karouzos, M.; Meisenheimer, K.; Oliver, S.; Rawlings, S.; Simpson, C.; Smail, I.; Smith, D. J. B.; Sullivan, M.; Sutherland, W.; White, S. V.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the first data release of the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey. VIDEO is a ˜12 deg2 survey in the near-infrared Z, Y, J, H and Ks bands, specifically designed to enable the evolution of galaxies and large structures to be traced as a function of both epoch and environment from the present day out to z = 4, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the most massive galaxies up to and into the epoch of reionization. With its depth and area, VIDEO will be able to fully explore the period in the Universe where AGN and starburst activity were at their peak and the first galaxy clusters were beginning to virialize. VIDEO therefore offers a unique data set with which to investigate the interplay between AGN, starbursts and environment, and the role of feedback at a time when it was potentially most crucial. We provide data over the VIDEO-XMM3 tile, which also covers the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Deep-1 field (CFHTLS-D1). The released VIDEO data reach a 5σ AB-magnitude depth of Z = 25.7, Y = 24.5, J = 24.4, H = 24.1 and Ks = 23.8 in 2 arcsec diameter apertures (the full depth of Y = 24.6 will be reached within the full integration time in future releases). The data are compared to previous surveys over this field and we find good astrometric agreement with the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and source counts in agreement with the recently released UltraVISTA survey data. The addition of the VIDEO data to the CFHTLS-D1 optical data increases the accuracy of photometric redshifts and significantly reduces the fraction of catastrophic outliers over the redshift range 0 < z < 1 from 5.8 to 3.1 per cent in the absence of an i-band luminosity prior. However, we expect that the main improvement in photometric redshifts will come in the redshift range 1 < z < 4 due to the sensitivity to the Balmer and 4000 Å breaks provided by the near-infrared VISTA filters. All

  16. Ubercalibration of the Deep Lens Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, D.; Ryan, R.; Thorman, P.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the internal photometric calibration of the Deep Lens Survey, which consists of five widely separated fields observed by two different observatories. Adopting the global linear least-squares ('ubercal') approach developed for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we derive flat-field corrections for all observing runs, which indicate that the original sky flats were non-uniform by up to 0.13 mag peak-to-valley in z band, and by up to half of that amount in BVR. We show that the application of these corrections reduces spatial non-uniformities in corrected exposures to the 0.01-0.02 mag level. We conclude with some lessons learned in applying ubercal to a survey structured very differently from SDSS, with isolated fields, multiple observatories and shift-and-stare rather than drift-scan imaging. Although the size of the error caused by using sky or dome flats is instrument and wavelength dependent, users of wide-field cameras should not assume that it is small. Pipeline developers should facilitate routine application of this procedure, and surveys should include it in their plans from the outset.

  17. MOIRCS Deep Survey. I: DRG Number Counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajisawa, Masaru; Konishi, Masahiro; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchimoto, Yuka; Katsuno; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Ichikawa, Takashi; Ouchi, Masami; Omata, Koji; Tanaka, Ichi; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Yamada, Toru

    2006-12-01

    We used very deep near-infrared imaging data taken with the Multi-Object InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph (MOIRCS) on the Subaru Telescope to investigate the number counts of Distant Red Galaxies (DRGs). We observed a 4' × 7' field in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N), and our data reached J=24.6 and K=23.2 (5σ, Vega magnitude). The surface density of DRGs selected by J - K > 2.3 is 2.35 ± 0.31 arcmin-2 at K < 22 and 3.54 ± 0.38 arcmin-2 at K < 23, respectively. These values are consistent with those in the GOODS-South and FIRES. Our deep and wide data suggest that the number counts of DRGs turn over at K ˜ 22, and the surface density of the faint DRGs with K > 22 is smaller than that expected from the number counts at the brighter magnitude. The result indicates that while there are many bright galaxies at 2 < z < 4 with the relatively old stellar population and/or heavy dust extinction, the number of faint galaxies with a similar red color is relatively small. Different behavior patterns of the number counts of the DRGs and bluer galaxies with 2 < zphot < 4 at K > 22 suggest that the mass-dependent color distribution, where most of the low-mass galaxies are blue, while more massive galaxies tend to have redder colors, had already been established at that epoch.

  18. The BMW Deep X-Ray Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Luigi; Moretti, Alberto; Campana, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; Dell'Antonio, Ian; Lazzati, Davide; Longhetti, Marcella; Molinari, Emilio; Panzera, Maria Rosa; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    We briely describe the main features and first results of the BMW survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. The sky coverage, surface density and first deep CCD images of the candidates indicate that this sample can represent an excellent complement to the existing PSPC deep cluster surveys.

  19. The Gemini Deep Planet Survey - GDPS

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R; Marois, C; Nadeau, D; Oppenheimer, B R; Roche, P F; Rigaut, F; Graham, J R; Jayawardhana, R; Johnstone, D; Kalas, P G; Macintosh, B; Racine, R

    2007-06-01

    We present the results of the Gemini Deep Planet Survey, a near-infrared adaptive optics search for giant planets and brown dwarfs around nearby young stars. The observations were obtained with the Altair adaptive optics system at the Gemini North telescope and angular differential imaging was used to suppress the speckle noise of the central star. Detection limits for the 85 stars observed are presented, along with a list of all faint point sources detected around them. Typically, the observations are sensitive to angular separations beyond 0.5-inch with 5{sigma} contrast sensitivities in magnitude difference at 1.6 {micro}m of 9.6 at 0.5-inch, 12.9 at 1-inch, 15 at 2-inch, and 16.6 at 5-inch. For the typical target of the survey, a 100 Myr old K0 star located 22 pc from the Sun, the observations are sensitive enough to detect planets more massive than 2 M{sub Jup} with a projected separation in the range 40-200 AU. Depending on the age, spectral type, and distance of the target stars, the minimum mass that could be detected with our observations can be {approx}1 M{sub Jup}. Second epoch observations of 48 stars with candidates (out of 54) have confirmed that all candidates are unrelated background stars. A detailed statistical analysis of the survey results, which provide upper limits on the fractions of stars with giant planet or low mass brown dwarf companions, is presented. Assuming a planet mass distribution dn/dm {proportional_to} m{sup -1.2} and a semi-major axis distribution dn/da {proportional_to} a{sup -1}, the upper limits on the fraction of stars with at least one planet of mass 0.5-13 M{sub Jup} are 0.29 for the range 10-25 AU, 0.13 for 25-50 AU, and 0.09 for 50-250 AU, with a 95% confidence level; this result is weakly dependent on the semi-major axis distribution power-law index. Without making any assumption on the mass and semi-major axis distributions, the fraction of stars with at least one brown dwarf companion having a semi-major axis in the

  20. Deep Surveys for Inner Oort Cloud Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Chadwick A.; Tholen, David J.; Sheppard, Scott S.

    2015-11-01

    We are undertaking two deep wide-field surveys to discover extremely distant solar system objects. While our target solar system population is the Inner Oort Cloud objects such as 2012 VP113 and Sedna, we are also sensitive to other populations with high perihelia such as the Scattered Kuiper Belt Objects and the highest perihelion Kuiper Belt Objects which have similar arguments of perihelion to the Inner Oort Cloud Objects. These unusual populations are thought to consist primarily of highly eccentric objects which spend most of their orbits hundreds or thousands of AU from the sun. Large aperture telescopes are needed to reach the faintness limits, red magnitudes of 23.5 to 25, required for detection of even the large members of the population. In addition, wide fields of view are also needed since the sky density of the detectable members of the populations approach 1 in 100 square degrees even with large telescopes.Our primary discovery instruments are the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4 meter Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on Subaru Telescope at Maunakea. Each of these instruments has a tremendously wide field of view considering the size of the telescope they are mounted on. DECam has a field of view of about 3 square degrees and HSC has a field of view of about 1.75 square degrees. We will present our survey progress in terms of sky area covered and new objects discovered and highlight some of our more interesting findings.

  1. GRAAL: a seeing enhancer for the NIR wide-field imager Hawk-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paufique, J.; Bruton, A.; Glindemann, A.; Jost, A.; Kolb, J.; Jochum, L.; Le Louarn, M.; Kiekebusch, M.; Hubin, N.; Madec, P.-Y.; Conzelmann, R.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Donaldson, R.; Arsenault, R.; Tordo, S.

    2010-07-01

    We describe the design and development status of GRAAL, the Ground-layer adaptive optics assisted by Laser, which will deliver enhanced images to the Hawk-I instrument on the VLT. GRAAL is an adaptive optics module, part of AOF, the Adaptive optics facility, using four Laser- and one natural guide-stars to measure the turbulence, and correcting for it by deforming the adaptive secondary mirror of a Unit telescope in the Paranal observatory. The outstanding feature of GRAAL is the extremely wide field of view correction, over 10 arcmin diameter, with an image enhancement of about 20% in average in K band. When observing GRAAL will provide FWHM better than 0.3" 40% of the time. Besides the Adaptive optics facility deformable mirror and Laser guide stars, the system uses subelectron L3-CCD and a real-time computing platform, SPARTA. GRAAL completed early this year a final design phase shared internally and outsourced for its mechanical part by the Spanish company NTE. It is now in manufacturing, with a first light in the laboratory planned in 2011.

  2. A very deep IRAS survey at the north ecliptic pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Hacking, P. B.; Condon, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    The data from approximately 20 hours observation of the 4- to 6-square degree field surrounding the north ecliptic pole have been combined to produce a very deep IR survey at the four IRAS bands. Scans from both pointed and survey observations were included in the data analysis. At 12 and 25 microns the deep survey is limited by detector noise and is approximately 50 times deeper than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). At 60 microns the problems of source confusion and Galactic cirrus combine to limit the deep survey to approximately 12 times deeper than the PSC. These problems are so severe at 100 microns that flux values are only given for locations corresponding to sources selected at 60 microns. In all, 47 sources were detected at 12 microns, 37 at 25 microns, and 99 at 60 microns. The data-analysis procedures and the significance of the 12- and 60-micron source-count results are discussed.

  3. The variable sky of deep synoptic surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgway, Stephen T.; Matheson, Thomas; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Olsen, Knut A.; Howell, Steve B.

    2014-11-20

    The discovery of variable and transient sources is an essential product of synoptic surveys. The alert stream will require filtering for personalized criteria—a process managed by a functionality commonly described as a Broker. In order to understand quantitatively the magnitude of the alert generation and Broker tasks, we have undertaken an analysis of the most numerous types of variable targets in the sky—Galactic stars, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and asteroids. It is found that the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be capable of discovering ∼10{sup 5} high latitude (|b| > 20°) variable stars per night at the beginning of the survey. (The corresponding number for |b| < 20° is orders of magnitude larger, but subject to caveats concerning extinction and crowding.) However, the number of new discoveries may well drop below 100 per night within less than one year. The same analysis applied to GAIA clarifies the complementarity of the GAIA and LSST surveys. Discovery of AGNs and QSOs are each predicted to begin at ∼3000 per night and decrease by 50 times over four years. Supernovae are expected at ∼1100 per night, and after several survey years will dominate the new variable discovery rate. LSST asteroid discoveries will start at >10{sup 5} per night, and if orbital determination has a 50% success rate per epoch, they will drop below 1000 per night within two years.

  4. The Deep Ecliptic Survey -- A Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millis, R. L.; Buie, M. W.; Wasserman, L. H.; Elliot, J. L.; Kern, S. D.; Wagner, R. M.; Chiang, E.; Trilling, D.

    2001-11-01

    We are conducting a survey of the Kuiper Belt using the 4-m telescopes and MOSAIC cameras at KPNO and CTIO. This program has resulted in the discovery of well over 200 KBOs and Centaurs including 28978 = 2001 KX76, the intrinsically brightest KBO (Millis, et al., IAUC 7657, 2001); 1998 WW31, subsequently found to be a binary (Veillet, IAUC 7610, 2001); 2000 CR105, a scattered disk object with a perihelion distance of at least 44 AU (Gladman, et al., Science News 159, 213, 2001); and 2000 OO67, a scattered disk object with an aphelion distance in excess of 1000 AU (Marsden, MPEC P43, 2001). Beginning with semester 2001B, this program has been granted survey status at the national observatories and will receive 20 nights per year for the next 3 years. In this paper, we will summarize the results to date from the survey, discuss plans for dissemination of the survey data and results, highlight certain problems we are facing, and propose ways in which the community can cooperate to increase the overall productivity of Kuiper Belt searches. This work is supported at Lowell Observatory by NASA Grants NAG5-8990 and NAG5-11058 and at MIT by NASA Grant NAG5-10444.

  5. Galaxy formation from deep surveys with Herschel-PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D.

    2011-11-01

    Deep far-infrared photometric surveys studying galaxy evolution and the nature of the cosmic infrared background are a key strength of the Herschel mission. The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) guaranteed time key program obtains deep photometric surveys of some of the key extragalactic multiwavelength fields at wavelengths between 70 and 160 μm. This contribution gives an overview of first science results, illustrating the potential of Herschel in providing calorimetric star formation rates for various high redshift galaxy populations, thus testing and superseding previous extrapolations from other wavelengths, and enabling a wide range of galaxy evolution studies.

  6. The BMW Deep X-ray Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, A.; Guzzo, L.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Lazzati, D.; Longhetti, M.; Molinari, E.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.; dell'Antonio, I.

    We describe the main features of the BMW survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. The sky coverage, surface density and first deep optical CCD images of the candidates indicate that this sample can represent an excellent complement to the existing PSPC deep cluster surveys and will provide us with a fully independent probe of the evolution of the cluster abundance, in addition to significantly increasing the number of clusters known at z>0.6.

  7. A Deep Optical Survey of the Ecliptic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1997-01-01

    This was an observing-intensive investigation into the newly discovered regions of the solar system beyond Neptune. The research was focussed on the use of unique imaging facilities on telescopes atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii, although other observatories (in Arizona and Chile) were also occasionally used. We secured about 20 nights of telescope time per year for our 'Medium Depth Wide Area' survey (JLC96). In this, we covered 5 sq. deg. of sky to apparent red magnitude 24.2. We used a high quantum efficiency Tektronix 2048x2048 CCD for all observations in this program. We secured observing time at the UH 2.2 meter for testing the suitability of a much larger array CCD camera for survey work (an 8192x8192 pixel device). We obtained observing runs at the twin Schmidt telescopes of Kitt Peak National Observatory and Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Observatory in order to assess the number of bright Kuiper Belt objects, Centaurs and gas giant Trojans.

  8. Initial results from a ROSAT deep survey in Lynx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. F.; Windhorst, R. A.; Maccacaro, T.; Burstein, D.; Franklin, B. E.; Griffiths, R. E.; Koo, D. C.; Mathis, D. F.; Morgan, W. A.; Neuschaefer, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results from a deep (70 ksec) Rosat survey of the high galactic latitude selected area Lynx.3A are presented. Lynx.3A sensitivity was previously studied in both the optical radio, with deep Westerbork surveys and deep multicolor Charge Couple Device (CCD) images form the Palomar 200 inch Four-Shooter. About 70 x-ray sources were detected within the central 40 foot diameter region of the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC), observed surface densities of approximately 200 x-ray sources/sq deg are suggested, and these x-ray sources alone account for approximately 30 percent of the cosmic x-ray background (0.9 to 2.2 keV). An initial look at the observed x-ray logN - logS curve is presented, but a detailed assessment requires further study. The 4 sigma limit of about 7 times 10 to the minus 15th power erg/s.sq cm (0.5 to 2.0 keV) is considerably deeper then the Einstein deep surveys, and of comparable sensitivity to the deepest current Rosat surveys. Cross correlation with our Four Shooter optical catalogs yields at least one likely optical candidate for nearly all of the Rosat x-ray sources; a number of the likely optical identifications have colors of quasi-stellar objects (and stellar PSF), but in other cases galaxies/groups are also viable candidates.

  9. Cosmic Shear Tomography from the Deep Lens Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, Myungkook J.; Tyson, J. Anthony; Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Michael; Schmidt, Samuel; Wittman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The Deep Lens Survey (DLS) is designed as a pre-cursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. Both instrumental and astrophysical systematics are carefully addressed with the state-of-the-art techniques. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing >10 sq. deg cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9-year results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) reduces the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ~50%. Our constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also the predictions of a LCDM universe.

  10. The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Stern, D.; Brodwin, M.; Griffith, R.; Eisenhardt, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Bock, J.; Borys, C.; Brand, K.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cool, R.; Cooray, A.; Croft, S.; Dey, A.; Eisenstein, D.; Gonzalez, A.; Gorjian, V.; Grogin, N.; Ivison, R.; Jacob, J.; Jannuzi, B.; Mainzer, A.; Moustakas, L.; Rottgering, H.; Seymour, N.; Smith, H.; Stanford, A.; Stauffer, J. R.; Sullivan, I.; van Breugel, W.; Wright, E. L.; Willner, S. P.

    2009-05-01

    The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is four-epoch infrared survey of ten square degrees in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The four epochs, which span the interval from 2003 to 2008, make it possible to identify nearby, high-proper-motion targets, as well as infrared-variable objects. SDWFS is a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy program (PID 40839). The SDWFS catalogs are publicly available, and contain roughly 7e5, 5e5, 1e5, and 1e5 distinct sources brighter than the 5-sigma survey limits of 19.8, 18.8, 16.5, and 15.8 Vega magnitudes at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns, respectively. In this contribution we describe the SDWFS survey and some initial findings. This work was supported by NASA grant number 1314516, administered by JPL.

  11. A very deep IRAS survey. III - VLA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacking, Perry; Beichman, C. A.; Condon, J. J.; Houck, J. R.

    1989-04-01

    The 60-micron fluxes and positions of sources (primarily starburst galaxies) found in a deep IRAS survey by Hacking and Houck (1987) are compared with 1.49 HGz maps made by the Very Large Array. The radio results are consistent with radio measurements of brighter IRAS galaxies and provide evidence that infrared cirrus does not contaminate the 60-micron sample. The flux-independent ratio of infrared to radio flux densities implies that the 1.4 GHz luminosity function for spiral galaxies is evolving at less than (1 + z) to the power of 4 relative to the 60-micron luminosity function.

  12. Applying galactic archeology to massive galaxies using deep imaging surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2015-04-01

    Various programs aimed at exploring the still largely unknown low surface brightness Universe with deep imaging optical surveys have recently started. They open a new window for studies of galaxy evolution, pushing the technique of galactic archeology outside the Local Group (LG). The method, based on the detection and analysis of the diffuse light emitted by collisional debris or extended stellar halos (rather than on stellar counts as done for LG systems), faces however a number of technical difficulties, like the contamination of the images by reflection halos and Galactic cirrus. I review here the on-going efforts to address them and highlight the preliminary promising results obtained with a systematic survey with MegaCam on the CFHT of nearby massive early-type galaxies done as part of the ATLAS3D, NGVS and MATLAS collaborations.

  13. Weak lensing survey of galaxy clusters in the CFHTLS Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, R.; Soucail, G.

    2007-02-01

    Aims: We present a weak lensing search of galaxy clusters in the 4 deg2 of the CFHT Legacy Survey Deep. This work aims at building a mass-selected sample of clusters with well controlled selection effects. This present survey is a preliminary step toward a full implementation in the forthcoming 170 deg2 of the CFHTLS Wide survey. Methods: We use the deep i' band images observed under subarcsecond seeing conditions to perform weak lensing mass reconstructions and to identify high convergence peaks. Thanks to the availability of deep u^*g'r'i'z' exposures, sources are selected from their photometric redshifts in the weak lensing analysis. We also use lensing tomography to derive an estimate of the lens redshift. After considering the raw statistics of peaks we check whether they can be associated to a clear optical counterpart or to published X-ray selected clusters. Results: Among the 14 peaks found above a signal-to-noise detection threshold ν=3.5, nine are secure detections with estimated redshift 0.1⪉ z_l⪉0.7 and a velocity dispersion 450⪉σ_v⪉ 700 {km s}-1. This low mass range is accessible thanks to the high density of background sources. Considering the intersection between the shear-selected clusters and XMM-LSS X-ray clusters in the D1 field, we observe that the ICM gas in these low-mass clusters (T_X˜1{-}2 keV) is not hotter than the temperature inferred from shear, this trend being different for published massive clusters. A more extended weak lensing survey, with higher statistics of mass structures will be a promising way to bypass several of the problems related to standard detection methods based on the complex physics of baryons. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of

  14. Constraints on star-forming galaxies at z >= 6.5 from HAWK-I Y-band imaging of GOODS-South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Samantha; Bunker, Andrew; Jarvis, Matt J.; Chiu, Kuenley; Bonfield, David

    2010-05-01

    We present the results of our search for high-redshift Lyman-break galaxies over the GOODS-South field. We use Hubble Space Telescope (HST)-ACS data in B, V, i' & z', Very Large Telescope (VLT)-ISAAC J and Ks, Spitzer-Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm data in conjunction with the new HAWK-I Y-band science verification data to search for dropout galaxies in the redshift range 6 < z < 9. We survey ~119arcmin2 to YAB = 25.7 (5σ), of which 37.5arcmin2 reaches YAB = 25.9. Candidate z' and Y dropouts were selected on the basis of a colour cut of (Y - J)AB > 0.75mag and (z' - Y)AB > 1.0mag, respectively. We find no robust Y-drops (z ~ 9) brighter than JAB < 25.4. In our search for z'-band dropouts (z ~ 6.5- 7.5), we identify four possible candidates, two with z'-drop colours and clear Spitzer-IRAC detections and two less likely candidates. We also identify two previously known Galactic T-dwarf stellar contaminants with these colours, and two likely transient objects seen in the Y-band data. The implications if all or none of our candidates is real on the ultraviolet galaxy luminosity functions at z > 6.5 are explored. We find our number of z'-drop candidates to be insufficient based on the expected number of z' drops in a simple no-evolution scenario from the z = 3 Lyman-break galaxy luminosity function but we are consistent with the observed luminosity function at z ~ 6 (if all our candidates are real). However, if one or both of our best z'-drop candidates are not z > 6.5 galaxies, this would demand evolution of the luminosity function at early epochs, in the sense that the number density of ultraviolet luminous star-forming galaxies at z > 7 is less than at z ~ 6. We show that the future surveys to be conducted with the European Southern Observatory VISTA telescope over the next 5yr will be able to measure the bulk of the luminosity function for both z' and Y dropouts and thus provide the strongest constraints on the level of star-formation within

  15. Hα Emitting Galaxies in the Deep And Wide Narrowband Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Alicia; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; DAWN collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present new measurements of the Hα luminosity function (LF) and star formation rate (SFR) volume density for galaxies at z∼0.62. Our results are part of the Deep And Wide Narrowband Survey (DAWN), a unique infrared imaging program with large areal coverage (∼1.1 deg2 over 5 fields) and sensitivity (9.9 × 10‑18 erg/cm2/s at 5σ). The present sample, based on a single DAWN field, contains 85 Hα emission-line candidates at z∼0.62, 25% of which have spectroscopic confirmations. These candidates have been selected through comparison of narrow and broad-band images and through matching with existing catalogs in the COSMOS field. The dust-corrected LF is well described by a Schechter function. We calculate a SFR density of ρSFR =10(‑1.15±0.07) M○ / yr/ Mpc3. We compare our results to already existing surveys at similar redshifts and find that our faint slope of the LF is flatter than that of most other surveys and that our SFR density is higher than that reported from similar surveys at z<2.

  16. Deep Near-Infrared Survey toward the M17 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhibo; Yao, Yongqiang; Yang, Ji; Ando, Minoru; Kato, Daisuke; Kawai, Toshihide; Kurita, Mikio; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nakajima, Yasushi; Nagashima, Chie; Sato, Shuji; Tamura, Motohide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Sugitani, Koji

    2002-09-01

    We conducted a deep JHKs-band imaging survey of the M17 region, using a near-infrared camera, the Simultaneous 3-color InfraRed Imager for Unbiased Survey (SIRIUS), mounted on the InfraRed Survey Facility (IRSF) 1.4 m telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory. This survey covers an area of ~200 arcmin2 with 10 σ limiting magnitudes of J~18.7, H~18.2, and Ks~17.5. The near-infrared (NIR) images reveal an unprecedented view of the region. The NIR nebulae are highly structured, with two nebular bars corresponding to, but a little larger than, the H II region defined by Felli, Massi, & Churchwell, constructing a conical shape. Fine structures are found all over the nebular area. The central region contains a congregation of intermediate- to high-mass stars. From the slope of the Ks-band luminosity function and the frequency of young stellar objects (YSOs) we infer that the central cluster has an age less than 3 Myr. The central OB cluster provides tremendous energy that heats and ionizes its surrounding materials, triggering the star formation of second-generation in the nebular bars. The second generation stars are so numerous that could they affect the star formation efficiency in the whole region. To the southwest of the central cluster and the nebular bars, where a giant molecular cloud core is located, a large number of red stars are detected. We argue that these red stars are most probably associated YSOs with intrinsic color excesses, not normal field stars reddened by the molecular cloud in front of them. Being located beyond the photodissociation region, the star-forming process in the molecular region could be independent of the impact of the central cluster.

  17. ESO imaging survey. Deep public survey: Multi-color optical data for the Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnouts, S.; Vandame, B.; Benoist, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; da Costa, L.; Schirmer, M.; Mignani, R. P.; Slijkhuis, R.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hook, R.; Madejsky, R.; Rité, C.; Wicenec, A.

    2001-11-01

    This paper presents multi-passband optical data obtained from observations of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), located at alpha ~ 3h 32m, delta ~ -27o 48'. The observations were conducted at the ESO/MPG 2.2 m telescope at La Silla using the 8kx8k Wide-Field Imager (WFI). This data set, taken over a period of one year, represents the first field to be completed by the ongoing Deep Public Survey (DPS) being carried out as a part of the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) project. This paper describes the optical observations, the techniques employed for un-supervised pipeline processing and the general characteristics of the final data set. Image processing has been performed using multi-resolution image decomposition techniques adapted to the EIS pipeline. The automatic processing steps include standard de-bias and flat-field, automatic removal of satellite tracks, de-fringing/sky-subtraction, image stacking/mosaicking and astrometry. Stacking of dithered images is carried out using pixel-based astrometry which enables the efficient removal of cosmic rays and image defects, yielding remarkably clean final images. The final astrometric calibration is based on a pre-release of the GSC-II catalog and has an estimated intrinsic accuracy of la 0.10 arcsec, with all passbands sharing the same solution. The paper includes data taken in six different filters (U'UBVRI). The data cover an area of about 0.25 square degrees reaching 5sigma limiting magnitudes of U'AB=26.0, UAB=25.7, BAB=26.4, VAB=25.4, RAB=25.5 and IAB= 24.7 mag, as measured within a 2 x FWHM aperture. The optical data covers an area of ~ 0.1 square degrees for which moderately deep observations in two near-infrared bands are also available, reaching 5sigma limiting magnitudes of JAB ~ 23.4 and KAB ~ 22.6. The current optical/infrared data also fully encompass the region of the deep X-ray observations recently completed by the Chandra telescope. The optical data presented here, as well as the infrared data released

  18. Simulation of deep one- and two-dimensional redshift surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. Richard, III

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that slice or pencil-beam redshift surveys of galaxies can be simulated in a box with nonequal sides. This method saves a lot of computer time and memory while providing essentially the same results as from whole-cube simulations. A 2457.6/h Mpc-long rod (out to a redshift z = 0.58 in two opposite directions) is simulated using the standard biased cold dark matter model as an example to mimic the recent deep pencil-beam surveys by Broadhurst et al. (1990). The structures (spikes) seen in these simulated samples occur when the narrow pencil-beam pierces walls, filaments, and clusters appearing randomly along the line-of-sight. A statistical test for goodness of fit to a periodic lattice has been applied to the observations and the simulations. It is found that the statistical significance level (P = 15.4 percent) is not strong enough to reject the null hypothesis that the observations and the simulations were drawn at random from the same set.

  19. Optical galaxy clusters in the Deep Lens Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascaso, B.; Wittman, D.; Dawson, W.

    2014-04-01

    We present the first sample of 882 optically selected galaxy clusters in the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), selected with the Bayesian Cluster Finder. We create mock DLS data to assess completeness and purity rates, and find that both are at least 70 per cent within 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 1.2 for clusters with M200 ≥ 1.2 × 1014 M⊙. We verified the integrity of the sample by performing several comparisons with other optical, weak lensing, X-ray and spectroscopic surveys which overlap the DLS footprint: the estimated redshifts are consistent with the spectroscopic redshifts of known clusters (for z > 0.25 where saturation in the DLS is not an issue); our richness estimates in combination with a previously calibrated richness-mass relation yield individual cluster mass estimates consistent with available Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey dynamical mass estimates; synthetic mass maps made from the optical mass estimates are correlated (>3σ significance) with the weak lensing mass maps; and the mass function thus derived is consistent with theoretical predictions for the cold dark matter scenario. With the verified sample, we investigated correlations between the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) properties and the host cluster properties within a broader range in redshift (0.25 ≤ z ≤ 0.8) and mass (≥2.4 × 1014 M⊙) than in previous work. We find that the slope of the BCG magnitude-redshift relation throughout this redshift range is consistent with that found at lower redshifts. This result supports an extrapolation to higher redshift of passive evolution of the BCG within the hierarchical scenario.

  20. A Deep XMM-Newton Legacy Survey of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin

    We propose for financial support that will allow us to reduce and analyze all XMM- Newton data relevant to an A09 deep XMM-Newton legacy survey of M33 covering the entire optical disk with a total of 700000 seconds of exposure time. These data will allow us to determine how the temperature and energetics of the hot interstellar medium (ISM) are affected by star formation, constrain the nature and dynamical masses of new pulsating and eclipsing X-ray binaries, and perform detailed statistical and spectral studies on the largest known extragalactic population of X-ray supernova remnants (SNRs). The support proposed here is crucial for the full analysis and publication of the entire data set. Measurements and model fitting of the spectra and timing of all of the discrete sources detected in our data will constrain the nature and dynamical masses of new pulsating and eclipsing X-ray binaries, as well as provide new insight into the origins of the X-ray SNRs. Spatially-resolved, spectral studies of the diffuse emission will allow us to determine how the temperature and energetics of the hot interstellar medium (ISM) are affected by star formation. Several members of our team have already performed similar analysis to those proposed using data from the deep Chandra ACIS-I survey of M33 (ChASeM33), and we intend to hire a postdoctoral research associate who has experience working with large XMM-Newton data sets. Therefore the techniques for making the measurements are well-understood; however, the deep Chandra ACIS-I survey of M33 does not provide sufficient soft response for detailed spectral measurements of the diffuse gas emission from dozens of individual star forming regions. To reliably determine the temperature structure of the interstellar gas of these regions, our simulations show that we need to go a factor of 10 deeper in the soft X-ray band than existing X-ray data, which will be achieved with our proposed observations. Furthermore, XMM-Newton studies of X

  1. Identifying Luminous AGN in Deep Surveys: Revised IRAC Selection Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donley, Jennifer; Koekemoer, A. M.; Brusa, M.; Capak, P.; Cardamone, C. N.; Civano, F.; Ilbert, O.; Impey, C. D.; Kartaltepe, J.; Miyaji, T.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Trump, J. R.; Zamorani, G.

    2012-01-01

    Spitzer IRAC selection is a powerful tool for identifying luminous AGN. The AGN selection wedges currently in use, however, are heavily contaminated by star-forming galaxies, especially at high redshift. Using the large samples of luminous AGN and high-redshift star-forming galaxies in COSMOS, we redefine the AGN selection criteria for use in deep IRAC surveys. The new IRAC criteria are designed to be both highly complete and reliable, and incorporate the best aspects of the current AGN selection wedges and of infrared power-law selection while excluding high redshift star-forming galaxies selected via the BzK, DRG, LBG, and SMG criteria. At QSO-luminosities of log L(2-10 keV)>44, the new IRAC criteria recover 75% of the hard X-ray and IRAC-detected XMM-COSMOS sample, yet only 37% of the IRAC AGN candidates have X-ray counterparts, a fraction that rises to 51% in regions with Chandra exposures of 50-160 ks. X-ray stacking of the individually X-ray non-detected AGN candidates leads to a hard X-ray signal indicative of heavily obscured to mildly Compton-thick obscuration (log NH >= 23.7). While IRAC selection recovers a substantial fraction of luminous unobscured and obscured AGN, it is incomplete to low-luminosity and host-dominated AGN.

  2. The UKIDSS Deep eXtra-Galactic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, A. M.

    The UKIDSS Deep eXtra-Galactic (DXS) will image an area of 35 sq.deg. at high Galactic latitudes in the J and K-band filters to a depth K = 21.0 (with 5 sq.deg. also imaged in H-band). When completed in 2012, the DXS will have used 118 nights to survey 4 of the best-studied extra-galactic fields: XMM-LSS, the Lockman Hole, SSA22 and ELAIS-N1. The principal goals of the DXS are to identify and measure the abundance of galaxy clusters at 0.8 < z < 1.5; to measure galaxy clustering in well defined samples at z > 1 (and hence measure the evolution of bias, a key test of hierarchical models); and to provide a multi-wavelength census of the luminosity density in star formation and AGN. Here, we describe some of the recent science highlights. Specifically, the discovery of a supercluster at z = 0.9 which spans >30 Mpc and has properties similar to local super-clusters (such as Hercules) and some of the first wide-field (˜3-sq.deg.) clustering measurements in EROs and DRGs.

  3. Asteroid Size-Frequency Distribution (The ISO Deep Asteroid Survey)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    2001-01-01

    A total of six deep exposures (using AOT CAM01 with a 6" PFOV) through the ISOCAM LW10 filter (IRAS Band 1, i.e., 12 micro-m) were obtained on an approximately 15 arcminute square field centered on the ecliptic plane. Point sources were extracted using the technique described by Desert, et al. Two known asteroids appear in these frames and 20 sources moving with velocities appropriate for main belt asteroids are present. Most of the asteroids detected have flux densities less than 1 mJy, i.e., between 150 and 350 times fainter than any of the asteroids observed by Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). These data provide the first direct measurement of the 12 micro-m sky-plane density for asteroids on the ecliptic equator. The median zodiacal foreground, as measured by ISOCAM during this survey, is found to be 22.1 +/- 1.5 mJy per pixel, i.e., 26.2 +/- 1.7 MJy/sr. The results presented here imply that the actual number of kilometer-sized asteroids is significantly greater than previously believed and in reasonable agreement with the Statistical Asteroid Model.

  4. The Secret Lives Of Galaxies Unveiled In Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    Two of NASA's Great Observatories, bolstered by the largest ground-based telescopes around the world, are beginning to harvest new clues to the origin and evolution of galaxies. It's a bit like finding a family scrapbook containing snapshots that capture the lives of family members from infancy through adolescence to adulthood. "This is the first time the cosmic tale of how galaxies build themselves has been traced reliably to such early times in the universe's life," said Mauro Giavalisco, head of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) portion of the survey, and research astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore. The HST has joined forces with the Chandra X-ray Observatory to survey a relatively broad swath of sky encompassing tens of thousands of galaxies stretching far back into time. The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), scheduled for launch in August, will soon join this unprecedented survey. Called the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), astronomers are studying galaxy formation and evolution over a wide range of distances and ages. The project is tracing the assembly history of galaxies, the evolution of their stellar populations, and the gusher of energy from star formation and active nuclei powered by immense black holes. HST astronomers report the sizes of galaxies clearly increase continuously from the time the universe was about 1 billion years old to an age of 6 billion years. This is approximately half the current age of the universe, 13.7 billion years. GOODS astronomers also find the star birth rate rose mildly, by about a factor of three, between the time the universe was about one billion years old and 1.5 billion years old, and remained high until about 7 billion years ago, when it quickly dropped to one-tenth the earlier "baby boomer" rate. This is further evidence major galaxy building trailed off when the universe was about half its current age. GOODS Chandra Deep Fields South Chandra Deep Field

  5. The Secret Lives Of Galaxies Unveiled In Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    Two of NASA's Great Observatories, bolstered by the largest ground-based telescopes around the world, are beginning to harvest new clues to the origin and evolution of galaxies. It's a bit like finding a family scrapbook containing snapshots that capture the lives of family members from infancy through adolescence to adulthood. "This is the first time the cosmic tale of how galaxies build themselves has been traced reliably to such early times in the universe's life," said Mauro Giavalisco, head of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) portion of the survey, and research astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore. The HST has joined forces with the Chandra X-ray Observatory to survey a relatively broad swath of sky encompassing tens of thousands of galaxies stretching far back into time. The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), scheduled for launch in August, will soon join this unprecedented survey. Called the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), astronomers are studying galaxy formation and evolution over a wide range of distances and ages. The project is tracing the assembly history of galaxies, the evolution of their stellar populations, and the gusher of energy from star formation and active nuclei powered by immense black holes. HST astronomers report the sizes of galaxies clearly increase continuously from the time the universe was about 1 billion years old to an age of 6 billion years. This is approximately half the current age of the universe, 13.7 billion years. GOODS astronomers also find the star birth rate rose mildly, by about a factor of three, between the time the universe was about one billion years old and 1.5 billion years old, and remained high until about 7 billion years ago, when it quickly dropped to one-tenth the earlier "baby boomer" rate. This is further evidence major galaxy building trailed off when the universe was about half its current age. GOODS Chandra Deep Fields South Chandra Deep Field

  6. On the use of seismic reflection surveys from oil exploration in deep crustal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotstein, Y.; Trachtman, P.

    1986-09-01

    A very large number of seismic reflection surveys is carried out by the oil industry throughout the world. Some of these surveys are designed to study deep oil traps and may use field parameters which, for the most part, are not significantly different from those used in deep crustal reflection studies. The one parameter which always varies is the record length (listening time). In the case of a vibratory source, the record length can be increased at the processing stage by the equivalent reduction of vibration time through partial correlation. We have used an oil exploration survey from a deep sedimentary basin in the coastal plain of Israel and extended its record length using this technique. We show that if a survey with appropriated field parameters, i.e., a survey for a deep target is chosen, deep crustal reflectors can be traced. Since a COCORP type deep crustal reflection study was also carried out in the same region, we can compare the two sets of results. We note that in this case the extended oil exploration record is at least equivalent to, and probably of better quality than, the COCORP type survey. This result is due mostly to a better S/N ratio in the oil exploration survey where input power was significantly larger than in special purpose study. This result indicates the as yet untapped potential of oil exploration data in deep continental crustal studies.

  7. Deep near-infrared survey of the Southern Sky (DENIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deul, E.

    1992-01-01

    DENIS (Deep Near-Infrared Survey of the Southern Sky) will be the first complete census of astronomical sources in the near-infrared spectral range. The challenges of this novel survey are both scientific and technical. Phenomena radiating in the near-infrared range from brown dwarfs to galaxies in the early stages of cosmological evolution, the scientific exploitation of data relevant over such a wide range requires pooling expertise from several of the leading European astronomical centers. The technical challenges of a project which will provide an order of magnitude more sources than given by the IRAS space mission, and which will involve advanced data-handling and image-processing techniques, likewise require pooling of hardware and software resources, as well as of human expertise. The DENIS project team is composed of some 40 scientists, computer specialists, and engineers located in 5 European Community countries (France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, and Spain), with important contributions from specialists in Australia, Brazil, Chile, and Hungary. DENIS will survey the entire southern sky in 3 colors, namely in the I band at a wavelength of 0.8 micron, in the 1.25 micron J band, and in the 2.15 micron K' band. The sensitivity limits will be 18th magnitude in the I band, 16th in the J band, and 14.5th in the K' band. The angular resolution achieved will be 1 arcsecond in the I band, and 3.0 arcseconds in the J and K' bands. The European Southern Observatory 1 m telescope on La Silla will be dedicated to survey use during operations expected to last four years, commencing in late 1993. DENIS aims to provide the astronomical community with complete digitized infrared images of the full southern sky and a catalogue of extracted objects, both of the best quality and in readily accessible form. This will be achieved through dedicated software packages and specialized catalogues, and with assistance from the Leiden and Paris Data Analysis Centers. The data

  8. A deep imaging survey of the Pleiades with ROSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, J. R.; Caillault, J.-P.; Gagne, M.; Prosser, C. F.; Hartmann, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained deep ROSAT images of three regions within the Pleiades open cluster. We have detected 317 X-ray sources in these ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) images, 171 of which we associate with certain or probable members of the Pleiades cluster. We detect nearly all Pleiades members with spectral types later than G0 and within 25 arcminutes of our three field centers where our sensitivity is highest. This has allowed us to derive for the first time the luminosity function for the G, K, amd M dwarfs of an open cluster without the need to use statistical techniques to account for the presence of upper limits in the data sample. Because of our high X-ray detection frequency down to the faint limit of the optical catalog, we suspect that some of our unidentified X-ray sources are previously unknown, very low-mass members of Pleiades. A large fraction of the Pleiades members detected with ROSAT have published rotational velocities. Plots of L(sub X)/L(sub Bol) versus spectroscopic rotational velocity show tightly correlated `saturation' type relations for stars with ((B - V)(sub 0)) greater than or equal to 0.60. For each of several color ranges, X-ray luminosities rise rapidly with increasing rotation rate until c sin i approximately equal to 15 km/sec, and then remains essentially flat for rotation rates up to at least v sin i approximately equal to 100 km/sec. The dispersion in rotation among low-mass stars in the Pleiades is by far the dominant contributor to the dispersion in L(sub X) at a given mass. Only about 35% of the B, A, and early F stars in the Pleiades are detected as X-ray sources in our survey. There is no correlation between X-ray flux and rotation for these stars. The X-ray luminosity function for the early-type Pleiades stars appears to be bimodal -- with only a few exceptions, we either detect these stars at fluxes in the range found for low-mass stars or we derive X-ray limits below the level found for most Pleiades

  9. EXTENDED PHOTOMETRY FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: A TESTBED FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J. E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains {approx}27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES.

  10. DEEP 21 cm H I OBSERVATIONS AT z {approx} 0.1: THE PRECURSOR TO THE ARECIBO ULTRA DEEP SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Freudling, Wolfram; Zwaan, Martin; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Meyer, Martin; Catinella, Barbara; Minchin, Robert; Calabretta, Mark; Momjian, Emmanuel; O'Neil, Karen

    2011-01-20

    The 'ALFA Ultra Deep Survey' (AUDS) is an ongoing 21 cm spectral survey with the Arecibo 305 m telescope. AUDS will be the most sensitive blind survey undertaken with Arecibo's 300 MHz Mock spectrometer. The survey searches for 21 cm H I line emission at redshifts between 0 and 0.16. The main goals of the survey are to investigate the H I content and probe the evolution of H I gas within that redshift region. In this paper, we report on a set of precursor observations with a total integration time of 53 hr. The survey detected a total of eighteen 21 cm emission lines at redshifts between 0.07 and 0.15 in a region centered around {alpha}{sub 2000} {approx} 0{sup h}, {delta} {approx} 15{sup 0}42'. The rate of detection is consistent with the one expected from the local H I mass function. The derived relative H I density at the median redshift of the survey is {rho}{sub H{sub I}}[z = 0.125] = (1.0 {+-} 0.3){rho}{sub 0}, where {rho}{sub 0} is the H I density at zero redshift.

  11. CANDELS: THE COSMIC ASSEMBLY NEAR-INFRARED DEEP EXTRAGALACTIC LEGACY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Grogin, Norman A.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Brown, Thomas M.; Casertano, Stefano; Kocevski, Dale D.; Faber, S. M.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Alexander, David M.; Almaini, Omar; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Barden, Marco; Bell, Eric F.; Bournaud, Frederic; Cassata, Paolo; Castellano, Marco; Challis, Peter; Chary, Ranga-Ram; and others

    2011-12-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) is designed to document the first third of galactic evolution, over the approximate redshift (z) range 8-1.5. It will image >250,000 distant galaxies using three separate cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope, from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared, and will find and measure Type Ia supernovae at z > 1.5 to test their accuracy as standardizable candles for cosmology. Five premier multi-wavelength sky regions are selected, each with extensive ancillary data. The use of five widely separated fields mitigates cosmic variance and yields statistically robust and complete samples of galaxies down to a stellar mass of 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} to z Almost-Equal-To 2, reaching the knee of the ultraviolet luminosity function of galaxies to z Almost-Equal-To 8. The survey covers approximately 800 arcmin{sup 2} and is divided into two parts. The CANDELS/Deep survey (5{sigma} point-source limit H = 27.7 mag) covers {approx}125 arcmin{sup 2} within Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)-N and GOODS-S. The CANDELS/Wide survey includes GOODS and three additional fields (Extended Groth Strip, COSMOS, and Ultra-deep Survey) and covers the full area to a 5{sigma} point-source limit of H {approx}> 27.0 mag. Together with the Hubble Ultra Deep Fields, the strategy creates a three-tiered 'wedding-cake' approach that has proven efficient for extragalactic surveys. Data from the survey are nonproprietary and are useful for a wide variety of science investigations. In this paper, we describe the basic motivations for the survey, the CANDELS team science goals and the resulting observational requirements, the field selection and geometry, and the observing design. The Hubble data processing and products are described in a companion paper.

  12. A warm Spitzer survey of the LSST/DES 'Deep drilling' fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Mark; Farrah, Duncan; Brandt, Niel; Sako, Masao; Richards, Gordon; Norris, Ray; Ridgway, Susan; Afonso, Jose; Brunner, Robert; Clements, Dave; Cooray, Asantha; Covone, Giovanni; D'Andrea, Chris; Dickinson, Mark; Ferguson, Harry; Frieman, Joshua; Gupta, Ravi; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Jarvis, Matt; Kimball, Amy; Lubin, Lori; Mao, Minnie; Marchetti, Lucia; Mauduit, Jean-Christophe; Mei, Simona; Newman, Jeffrey; Nichol, Robert; Oliver, Seb; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Pierre, Marguerite; Rottgering, Huub; Seymour, Nick; Smail, Ian; Surace, Jason; Thorman, Paul; Vaccari, Mattia; Verma, Aprajita; Wilson, Gillian; Wood-Vasey, Michael; Cane, Rachel; Wechsler, Risa; Martini, Paul; Evrard, August; McMahon, Richard; Borne, Kirk; Capozzi, Diego; Huang, Jiashang; Lagos, Claudia; Lidman, Chris; Maraston, Claudia; Pforr, Janine; Sajina, Anna; Somerville, Rachel; Strauss, Michael; Jones, Kristen; Barkhouse, Wayne; Cooper, Michael; Ballantyne, David; Jagannathan, Preshanth; Murphy, Eric; Pradoni, Isabella; Suntzeff, Nicholas; Covarrubias, Ricardo; Spitler, Lee

    2014-12-01

    We propose a warm Spitzer survey to microJy depth of the four predefined Deep Drilling Fields (DDFs) for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) (three of which are also deep drilling fields for the Dark Energy Survey (DES)). Imaging these fields with warm Spitzer is a key component of the overall success of these projects, that address the 'Physics of the Universe' theme of the Astro2010 decadal survey. With deep, accurate, near-infrared photometry from Spitzer in the DDFs, we will generate photometric redshift distributions to apply to the surveys as a whole. The DDFs are also the areas where the supernova searches of DES and LSST are concentrated, and deep Spitzer data is essential to obtain photometric redshifts, stellar masses and constraints on ages and metallicities for the >10000 supernova host galaxies these surveys will find. This 'DEEPDRILL' survey will also address the 'Cosmic Dawn' goal of Astro2010 through being deep enough to find all the >10^11 solar mass galaxies within the survey area out to z~6. DEEPDRILL will complete the final 24.4 square degrees of imaging in the DDFs, which, when added to the 14 square degrees already imaged to this depth, will map a volume of 1-Gpc^3 at z>2. It will find ~100 > 10^11 solar mass galaxies at z~5 and ~40 protoclusters at z>2, providing targets for JWST that can be found in no other way. The Spitzer data, in conjunction with the multiwavelength surveys in these fields, ranging from X-ray through far-infrared and cm-radio, will comprise a unique legacy dataset for studies of galaxy evolution.

  13. Deep 20-GHz survey of the Chandra Deep Field South and SDSS Stripe 82: source catalogue and spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, Thomas M. O.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Chhetri, Rajan; Ekers, Ronald D.; Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Murphy, Tara; Norris, Ray P.; Waldram, Elizabeth M.; Whittam, Imogen H.

    2014-04-01

    We present a source catalogue and first results from a deep, blind radio survey carried out at 20 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, with follow-up observations at 5.5, 9 and 18 GHz. The Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) deep pilot survey covers a total area of 5 deg2 in the Chandra Deep Field South and in Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We estimate the survey to be 90 per cent complete above 2.5 mJy. Of the 85 sources detected, 55 per cent have steep spectra (α _{1.4}^{20} < -0.5) and 45 per cent have flat or inverted spectra (α _{1.4}^{20} ≥ -0.5). The steep-spectrum sources tend to have single power-law spectra between 1.4 and 18 GHz, while the spectral indices of the flat- or inverted-spectrum sources tend to steepen with frequency. Among the 18 inverted-spectrum (α _{1.4}^{20} ≥ 0.0) sources, 10 have clearly defined peaks in their spectra with α _{1.4}^{5.5} > 0.15 and α 9^{18} < -0.15. On a 3-yr time-scale, at least 10 sources varied by more than 15 per cent at 20 GHz, showing that variability is still common at the low flux densities probed by the AT20G-deep pilot survey. We find a strong and puzzling shift in the typical spectral index of the 15-20-GHz source population when combining data from the AT20G, Ninth Cambridge and Tenth Cambridge surveys: there is a shift towards a steeper-spectrum population when going from ˜1 Jy to ˜5 mJy, which is followed by a shift back towards a flatter-spectrum population below ˜5 mJy. The 5-GHz source-count model by Jackson & Wall, which only includes contributions from FRI and FRII sources, and star-forming galaxies, does not reproduce the observed flattening of the flat-spectrum counts below ˜5 mJy. It is therefore possible that another population of sources is contributing to this effect.

  14. The SuperCLASS Weak Lensing Deep Field Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Ian; Superclass Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    SuperCLASS is a survey of 1.75 square degrees of the Northern sky using the e-MERLIN telescope array at a frequency of 1.4GHz, aiming to reach an image noise RMS level of 4 micro-Jy/beam. The primary goal is to use the expected source density of ~1 per square arcminute (giving a total of ~10,000), ~150 milli-arcsecond resolution and presence in the survey region of 5 massive Abell clusters to measure a significant weak lensing effect in the radio band for only the second time, proving the potential of radio weak lensing as a powerful tool for mapping dark matter and constraining cosmological models. In doing this we will also learn a significant amount about the source population (star forming galaxies and radio AGN) themselves and their polarisation properties. SuperCLASS will not only require development of a pipeline for making the highly accurate determination of shapes of a large number of sources for performing standard weak lensing measurements, but will also form a test bed for new methods, such as the use of polarisation information to mitigate the biasing effect of intrinsic alignments between galaxies, which will be a key systematic for future weak lensing surveys. Whilst the challenges of the necessary shape measurement in image plane optical data are relatively well-explored, there is little experience in meeting those involved in the use of data from radio interferometers. The knowledge gained about efficient and accurate techniques for large scale radio astronomy from SuperCLASS will be invaluable in the build up to the next generation of experiments.

  15. A Deep Chandra ACIS Survey of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Kilgard, Roy E.

    2016-08-01

    We have obtained a deep X-ray image of the nearby galaxy M51 using Chandra. Here we present the catalog of X-ray sources detected in these observations and provide an overview of the properties of the point-source population. We find 298 sources within the D 25 radii of NGC 5194/5, of which 20% are variable, a dozen are classical transients, and another half dozen are transient-like sources. The typical number of active ultraluminous X-ray sources in any given observation is ˜5, and only two of those sources persist in an ultraluminous state over the 12 yr of observations. Given reasonable assumptions about the supernova remnant population, the luminosity function is well described by a power law with an index between 1.55 and 1.7, only slightly shallower than that found for populations dominated by high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which suggests that the binary population in NGC 5194 is also dominated by HMXBs. The luminosity function of NGC 5195 is more consistent with a low-mass X-ray binary dominated population. Based on observations made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under contract #NAS83060, and the data were obtained through program GO1-12115.

  16. A Deep Chandra ACIS Survey of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Kilgard, Roy E.

    2016-08-01

    We have obtained a deep X-ray image of the nearby galaxy M51 using Chandra. Here we present the catalog of X-ray sources detected in these observations and provide an overview of the properties of the point-source population. We find 298 sources within the D 25 radii of NGC 5194/5, of which 20% are variable, a dozen are classical transients, and another half dozen are transient-like sources. The typical number of active ultraluminous X-ray sources in any given observation is ∼5, and only two of those sources persist in an ultraluminous state over the 12 yr of observations. Given reasonable assumptions about the supernova remnant population, the luminosity function is well described by a power law with an index between 1.55 and 1.7, only slightly shallower than that found for populations dominated by high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which suggests that the binary population in NGC 5194 is also dominated by HMXBs. The luminosity function of NGC 5195 is more consistent with a low-mass X-ray binary dominated population. Based on observations made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under contract #NAS83060, and the data were obtained through program GO1-12115.

  17. Radio variability in the Phoenix Deep Survey at 1.4 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. J.; Drury, J. A.; Bell, M. E.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2016-09-01

    We use archival data from the Phoenix Deep Survey to investigate the variable radio source population above 1 mJy beam-1 at 1.4 GHz. Given the similarity of this survey to other such surveys we take the opportunity to investigate the conflicting results which have appeared in the literature. Two previous surveys for variability conducted with the Very Large Array (VLA) achieved a sensitivity of 1 mJy beam-1. However, one survey found an areal density of radio variables on time-scales of decades that is a factor of ˜4 times greater than a second survey which was conducted on time-scales of less than a few years. In the Phoenix deep field we measure the density of variable radio sources to be ρ = 0.98 deg-2 on time-scales of 6 months to 8 yr. We make use of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared cross-ids, and identify all variable sources as an active galactic nucleus of some description. We suggest that the discrepancy between previous VLA results is due to the different time-scales probed by each of the surveys, and that radio variability at 1.4 GHz is greatest on time-scales of 2-5 yr.

  18. A Deep Submillimeter Survey of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce-Price, D.; Richer, J. S.; Greaves, J. S.; Holland, W. S.; Jenness, T.; Lasenby, A. N.; White, G. J.; Matthews, H. E.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Dent, W. R. F.; Zylka, R.; Mezger, P.; Hasegawa, T.; Oka, T.; Omont, A.; Gilmore, G.

    2000-12-01

    We present first results from a submillimeter continuum survey of the Galactic center ``central molecular zone'' (CMZ), made with the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. SCUBA's scan-map mode has allowed us to make extremely wide field maps of thermal dust emission with unprecedented speed and sensitivity. We also discuss some issues related to the elimination of artifacts in scan-map data. Our simultaneous 850/450 μm maps have a total size of approximately 2.8d×0.5d (400×75 pc) elongated along the Galactic plane. They cover the Sagittarius A region, including Sgr A*, the circumnuclear disk, and the 20 and 50 km s-1 clouds; the area around the Pistol; Sgr B2, the brightest feature on the maps; and at their Galactic western and eastern edges the Sgr C and Sgr D regions. There are many striking features such as filaments and shell-like structures as well as point sources such as Sgr A* itself. The total mass in the CMZ is greater than that revealed in previous optically thin molecular line maps by a factor of ~3, and new details are revealed on scales down to 0.33 pc across this 400 pc-wide region.

  19. The NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Image Cutout Web Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Lindsey E.; Fitzpatrick, Mike; Tody, Doug

    A Web service for extracting multi-band science grade image cutouts from the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS) is described. The NDWFS data is stored as a multi-band database of large images on the NDWFS archive server. Given a cutout center and size the NDWFS image cutout service creates cutout images on-the-fly. The service provides high performance access to the survey data and isolates the client from the details of how the survey data is stored in the archive.

  20. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: DESIGN, OBSERVATIONS, DATA REDUCTION, AND REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Harker, Justin J.; Lai, Kamson; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan Renbin; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P. E-mail: djm70@pitt.edu E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu E-mail: koo@ucolick.org E-mail: phillips@ucolick.org; and others

    2013-09-15

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z {approx} 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude M{sub B} = -20 at z {approx} 1 via {approx}90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg{sup 2} divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R{sub AB} = 24.1. Objects with z {approx}< 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted {approx}2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z {approx} 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 A doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm{sup -1} grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R {approx} 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or

  1. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L; Guhathakurta, Puraga; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Wilmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z approx. 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z approx. 1 via approx.90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 Sq. deg divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R(sub AB) = 24.1. Objects with z approx. < 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted approx. 2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z approx. 1.45, where the [O ii] 3727 Ang. doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm(exp -1) grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R approx. 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other

  2. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Connolly, A. J.; Kaiser, N.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Lin, Lihwai; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Luppino, G. A.; Marinoni, C.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Metevier, Anne; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2013-09-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z ~ 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z ~ 1 via ~90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg2 divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R AB = 24.1. Objects with z <~ 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted ~2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z ~ 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 Å doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm-1 grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R ~ 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other artifacts that in some cases remain after data reduction. Redshift

  3. Deep 2mm Surveys with GISMO : Searching for submillimeter galaxies at the highest redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staguhn, Johannes Gunter; Kovacs, Attila; Karim, Alexander; Arendt, Richard; Benford, Dominic J.; Decarli, Roberto; Dwek, Eli; Fixsen, Dale; Gene, Hilton; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Sharp, Elmer; Walter, Fabian; Edward, Wollack

    2015-08-01

    The GISMO 2 mm camera at the IRAM 30m telescope has been available to the astronomical community for years through the semi-annual IRAM call for proposals. The 2 mm band is in particular well suited to trace the first dusty galaxies in the universe, since their redshifted SEDs peak close to GISMO's observing frequency, whereas the medium redshift galaxy foreground is almost invisible in this band. This effect makes GISMO's deep field observations a valuable complement, rather than a redundancy, to the HERSCHEL far-infrared and sub-mm surveys. Two survey projects aiming at obtaining 2mm galaxy number counts are at the core of GISMO’s science. Simple models predict an appreciable number of galaxies detected in these surveys to be be at very high redshifts (z~5-6 and above) with intrinsic luminosities of a few 10^12 L_sol.The first of these projects is the GISMO Deep Field (GDF) survey, which is centered on the Hubble Deep Field North. This survey by now has reached the confusion limit (we measure a confusion noise of 60 microJy). Our detailed statistical analysis of the GDF data provides a solid estimate of the expected rate of false detections among those source identifications. Furthermore, numerical simulations were used, to estimate the "completeness" of our set of extracted sources. A comparison of our observations with model predictions shows that our results are in good agreement with galaxy count models.The second survey covers a ~ 1/4 square degree region in the COSMOS field, in which by now we have obtained sufficient sensitivity to extract statistically relevant galaxy number counts, and by using auxiliary data, redshift distributions. We will present first results that complement those obtained in the deeper GDF.

  4. CP survey of deep water structures and subsea installations using an ROV

    SciTech Connect

    Leask, L.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The successful and efficient CP survey of a deep water structure using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) has remained an enigma to many corrosion engineers in oil companies. The location of the corrosion group within the company structure often plays a major role in the success of the project. Operators locate their corrosion departments in different groups, some in the offshore/onshore operations and others in the design group. This location often has a bearing on the financial and operational approach to the project. This paper discusses how a successful CP survey is both an achievable and exciting project with experienced pre- planning and selection of the correct equipment.

  5. Cathodic protection survey of deep-water structures and subsea installations

    SciTech Connect

    Leask, L.J. )

    1989-11-01

    The successful and efficient cathodic protection (CP) survey of a deep water structure using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) has remained an enigma to many corrosion engineers in oil companies. The location of the corrosion group within the company structure often plays a major role in the success of the project. Operators locate their corrosion departments in different groups, some in the offshore/onshore operations and others in the design group. This location often has a bearing on the financial and operational approach to the project. The author discusses how a successful CP survey is both an achievable and exciting project with experienced preplanning and selection of the correct equipment.

  6. The most distant galaxy clusters in the SPT Spitzer Deep Field Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettura, Alessandro; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Mei, S.; Brodwin, M.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Gettings, D.; Ashby, M.; Bartlett, J.; Rosati, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a sample of more than 300 galaxy cluster candidates at z>1.3 selected within 94 deg2 from the Spitzer SPT Deep Field (SSDF) survey. To discover distant clusters at z>1.3, we have used a three-filter algorithm based upon Spitzer/IRAC color ([3.6]-[4.5]>-0.1,AB) combined with a non-detection in shallow optical data. Our sample is selected to be a complete stellar mass-limited sample at z>1.3 and therefore has a well defined survey volume. The uniqueness of SSDF resides not just in its area, one of the very largest with Spitzer, but also in its coverage by deep observations for the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). Deeper observations are also planned with the new SPT camera, SPTpol, that will reach, for the first time, SZ clusters up to 2 (George et al., 2012). This field also has deep X-ray observations from the XMM XXL Survey (Pierre et al., 2012). Thanks to this rich data set, we will be able to determine accurate cluster masses for the vast majority of our SSDF clusters at 1.3

  7. CSTACK: A Web-Based Stacking Analysis Tool for Deep/Wide Chandra Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Griffiths, R. E.; C-COSMOS Team

    2008-03-01

    Stacking analysis is a strong tool to probe the average X-ray properties of X-ray faint objects as a class, each of which are fainter than the detection limit as an individual source. This is especially the case for deep/wide surveys with Chandra, with its superb spatial resolution and the existence of survey data on the fields with extensive multiwavelength coverages. We present an easy-to use web-based tool (http://saturn.phys.cmu.edu/cstack), which enables users to perform a stacking analysis on a number of Chandra survey fields.Currently supported are C-COSMOS, Extended Chandra Deep Field South (proprietary access, password protected), Chandra Deep Fields South, and North (Guest access user=password=guest). For an input list of positions (e.g. galaxies selected from an optical catalog), the WWW tool returns stacked Chandra images in soft and hard bands and statistical analysis results including bootstrap histograms. We present running examples on the C-COSMOS data. The next version will also include the use of off-axis dependent aperture size, automatic exclusions of resolved sources, and histograms of stacks on random positions.

  8. Large-scale fluctuations in the number density of galaxies in independent surveys of deep fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, S. I.; Lovyagin, N. Yu.; Baryshev, Yu. V.; Gorokhov, V. L.

    2016-06-01

    New arguments supporting the reality of large-scale fluctuations in the density of the visible matter in deep galaxy surveys are presented. A statistical analysis of the radial distributions of galaxies in the COSMOS and HDF-N deep fields is presented. Independent spectral and photometric surveys exist for each field, carried out in different wavelength ranges and using different observing methods. Catalogs of photometric redshifts in the optical (COSMOS-Zphot) and infrared (UltraVISTA) were used for the COSMOS field in the redshift interval 0.1 < z < 3.5, as well as the zCOSMOS (10kZ) spectroscopic survey and the XMM-COSMOS and ALHAMBRA-F4 photometric redshift surveys. The HDFN-Zphot and ALHAMBRA-F5 catalogs of photometric redshifts were used for the HDF-N field. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the fluctuations in the numbers of galaxies obtained for independent surveys of the same deep field reaches R = 0.70 ± 0.16. The presence of this positive correlation supports the reality of fluctuations in the density of visible matter with sizes of up to 1000 Mpc and amplitudes of up to 20% at redshifts z ~ 2. The absence of correlations between the fluctuations in different fields (the correlation coefficient between COSMOS and HDF-N is R = -0.20 ± 0.31) testifies to the independence of structures visible in different directions on the celestial sphere. This also indicates an absence of any influence from universal systematic errors (such as "spectral voids"), which could imitate the detection of correlated structures.

  9. CANDELS: The Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, anton M.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Riess, Adam G.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Alexander, David M.; Almaini, Omar; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Barden, Marco; Bell, Eric F.; Bournaud, Frederic; Brown, Thomas M.; Caputi, Karina I.; Casertano, Stefano; Cassata, Paolo; Challis, Peter; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Cheung, Edmond; Cirasuolo, Michele; DeMello, Duilla; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Straughn, Amber N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) is designed to document the first third of galactic evolution, from z approx. 8 - 1.5. It will image > 250,000 distant galaxies using three separate cameras on the Hubble Space Tele8cope, from the mid-UV to near-IR, and will find and measure Type Ia supernovae beyond z > 1.5 to test their accuracy as standard candles for cosmology. Five premier multi-wavelength sky regions are selected, each with extensive ancillary data. The use of five widely separated fields mitigates cosmic variance and yields statistically robust and complete samples of galaxies down to a stellar mass of 10(exp 9) solar mass to z approx. 2, reaching the knee of the UV luminosity function of galaxies to z approx. 8. The survey covers approximately 800 square arc minutes and is divided into two parts. The CANDELS/Deep survey (5(sigma) point-source limit H =27.7mag) covers approx. 125 square arcminutes within GOODS-N and GOODS-S. The CANDELS/Wide survey includes GOODS and three additional fields (EGS, COSMOS, and UDS) and covers the full area to a 50(sigma) point-source limit of H ? or approx. = 27.0 mag. Together with the Hubble Ultradeep Fields, the strategy creates a three-tiered "wedding cake" approach that has proven efficient for extragalactic surveys. Data from the survey are non-proprietary and are useful for a wide variety of science investigations. In this paper, we describe the basic motivations for the survey, the CANDELS team science goals and the resulting observational requirements, the field selection and geometry, and the observing design.

  10. The CfA Einstein Observatory extended deep X-ray survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primini, F. A.; Murray, S. S.; Huchra, J.; Schild, R.; Burg, R.

    1991-01-01

    All IPC exposures in the Einstein Extended Deep X-ray Survey program have been reanalyzed. The current survey covers about 2.3 sq deg with a typical limiting sensitivity of about 5 x 10 to the -14th ergs/sq cm/s in the energy range from 0.8-3.5 keV. A total of 25 IPC sources are detected above a threshold of 4.5 sigma. A total of 18 are detected independently in the HRI, leading to the identification of six with stars and 11 with extragalactic objects. The remaining sources are classified as extragalactic. The population of identified extragalactic objects is dominated by QSOs, with one or two possible clusters. The basic conclusions of the original survey remain unchanged.

  11. The infrared medium-deep survey. II. How to trigger radio AGNs? Hints from their environments

    SciTech Connect

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Chapman, Scott; Pak, Soojong; Edge, Alastair

    2014-12-10

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ∼25 deg{sup 2} and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (M{sub u} – M{sub r} ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  12. The Infrared Medium-Deep Survey. II. How to Trigger Radio AGNs? Hints from their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Chapman, Scott; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Pak, Soojong; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Edge, Alastair

    2014-12-01

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ~25 deg2 and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (Mu - Mr ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  13. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: THE VORONOI-DELAUNAY METHOD CATALOG OF GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Marc; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Noeske, Kai; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin

    2012-05-20

    We present a public catalog of galaxy groups constructed from the spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fourth data release from the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) Galaxy Redshift Survey, including the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). The catalog contains 1165 groups with two or more members in the EGS over the redshift range 0 < z < 1.5 and 1295 groups at z > 0.6 in the rest of DEEP2. Twenty-five percent of EGS galaxies and fourteen percent of high-z DEEP2 galaxies are assigned to galaxy groups. The groups were detected using the Voronoi-Delaunay method (VDM) after it has been optimized on mock DEEP2 catalogs following similar methods to those employed in Gerke et al. In the optimization effort, we have taken particular care to ensure that the mock catalogs resemble the data as closely as possible, and we have fine-tuned our methods separately on mocks constructed for the EGS and the rest of DEEP2. We have also probed the effect of the assumed cosmology on our inferred group-finding efficiency by performing our optimization on three different mock catalogs with different background cosmologies, finding large differences in the group-finding success we can achieve for these different mocks. Using the mock catalog whose background cosmology is most consistent with current data, we estimate that the DEEP2 group catalog is 72% complete and 61% pure (74% and 67% for the EGS) and that the group finder correctly classifies 70% of galaxies that truly belong to groups, with an additional 46% of interloper galaxies contaminating the catalog (66% and 43% for the EGS). We also confirm that the VDM catalog reconstructs the abundance of galaxy groups with velocity dispersions above {approx}300 km s{sup -1} to an accuracy better than the sample variance, and this successful reconstruction is not strongly dependent on cosmology. This makes the DEEP2 group catalog a promising probe of the growth of cosmic structure that can potentially be used for cosmological tests.

  14. A WSRT 21 CM deep survey of two fields in Hercules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oort, M. J. A.; van Langevelde, H. J.

    1987-10-01

    A deep 21 cm survey, carried out with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), of two fields in the constellation of Hercules is presented. These areas were observed previously at 21 cm in the Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey (LBDS), (Windhorst et al., 1984), but with a factor of three higher noise level. A complete sample is defined, containing 116 radio sources with a peak flux above 5 sigma, within the -7dB attenuation radius (0.464 deg). This complete sample is used to determine the 1412 MHz source counts down to 0.45 mJy. The counts from the current sample show the same small scale structure at about 1 mJy, as was found in previous surveys. A direct comparison is made with the LBDS observations of the same fields. It is shown that the 5 sigma peak flux cut-off in the complete sample is not stringent enough to sufficiently avoid contamination by spurious sources, especially when strong (S of not less than 100 mJy) sources are present in the field. Finally, a search was made for the variable sources.

  15. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Voronoi-Delaunay Method Catalog of Galaxy Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Marc; Marinoni, Christian; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Conroy, Charlie; Cooper, Michael C.; Faber, S.M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kaiser, Nick; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; /Maryland U.

    2012-02-14

    We use the first 25% of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey spectroscopic data to identify groups and clusters of galaxies in redshift space. The data set contains 8370 galaxies with confirmed redshifts in the range 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, over one square degree on the sky. Groups are identified using an algorithm (the Voronoi-Delaunay Method) that has been shown to accurately reproduce the statistics of groups in simulated DEEP2-like samples. We optimize this algorithm for the DEEP2 survey by applying it to realistic mock galaxy catalogs and assessing the results using a stringent set of criteria for measuring group-finding success, which we develop and describe in detail here. We find in particular that the group-finder can successfully identify {approx}78% of real groups and that {approx}79% of the galaxies that are true members of groups can be identified as such. Conversely, we estimate that {approx}55% of the groups we find can be definitively identified with real groups and that {approx}46% of the galaxies we place into groups are interloper field galaxies. Most importantly, we find that it is possible to measure the distribution of groups in redshift and velocity dispersion, n({sigma}, z), to an accuracy limited by cosmic variance, for dispersions greater than 350 km s{sup -1}. We anticipate that such measurements will allow strong constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy in the future. Finally, we present the first DEEP2 group catalog, which assigns 32% of the galaxies to 899 distinct groups with two or more members, 153 of which have velocity dispersions above 350 km s{sup -1}. We provide locations, redshifts and properties for this high-dispersion subsample. This catalog represents the largest sample to date of spectroscopically detected groups at z {approx} 1.

  16. The Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field: Survey Design and Infrared Array Camera Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, M. L. N.; Stanford, S. A.; Brodwin, M.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Martinez-Manso, J.; Bartlett, J. G.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Crawford, T. M.; Dey, A.; Dressler, A.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Galametz, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Marrone, D. P.; Mei, S.; Muzzin, A.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Stern, D.; Vieira, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) is a wide-area survey using Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) to cover 94 deg2 of extragalactic sky, making it the largest IRAC survey completed to date outside the Milky Way midplane. The SSDF is centered at (α, δ) = (23:30, -55:00), in a region that combines observations spanning a broad wavelength range from numerous facilities. These include millimeter imaging from the South Pole Telescope, far-infrared observations from Herschel/SPIRE, X-ray observations from the XMM XXL survey, near-infrared observations from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey, and radio-wavelength imaging from the Australia Telescope Compact Array, in a panchromatic project designed to address major outstanding questions surrounding galaxy clusters and the baryon budget. Here we describe the Spitzer/IRAC observations of the SSDF, including the survey design, observations, processing, source extraction, and publicly available data products. In particular, we present two band-merged catalogs, one for each of the two warm IRAC selection bands. They contain roughly 5.5 and 3.7 million distinct sources, the vast majority of which are galaxies, down to the SSDF 5σ sensitivity limits of 19.0 and 18.2 Vega mag (7.0 and 9.4 μJy) at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, respectively.

  17. The cosmological significance of low surface brightness galaxies found in a deep blind neutral hydrogen survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchin, R. F.; Disney, M. J.; Parker, Q. A.; Boyce, P. J.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Banks, G. D.; Ekers, R. D.; Freeman, K. C.; Garcia, D. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Grossi, M.; Haynes, R. F.; Knezek, P. M.; Lang, R. H.; Malin, D. F.; Price, R. M.; Putman, M.; Stewart, I. M.; Wright, A. E.

    2004-12-01

    Minchin et al. have recently placed limits on the cosmological significance of gas-rich low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies as a proportion of the total population of gas-rich galaxies by carrying out a very deep survey (HIDEEP) for neutral hydrogen (HI) with the Parkes multibeam system. Such a survey avoids the surface brightness selection effects that limit the usefulness of optical surveys for finding LSB galaxies. To complement the HIDEEP survey, we have digitally stacked eight 1-h R-band Tech Pan films from the UK Schmidt Telescope covering 36 deg2 of the survey area to reach a very deep isophotal limit of 26.5 Rmag arcsec-2. At this level, we find that all of the 129 HI sources within this area have optical counterparts and that 107 of them can be identified with individual galaxies. We have used the properties of the galaxies identified as the optical counterparts of the HI sources to estimate the significance of LSB galaxies (defined to be those at least 1.5 mag dimmer in effective surface brightness than the peak in the observed distribution seen in optical surveys). Two different methods of correcting for ease of detection do not yield significantly different results: LSB galaxies make up 62 +/- 37 per cent of gas-rich galaxies by number according to our first method (weighting by HI mass function), which includes a correction for large-scale structure, or 51 +/- 20 per cent when calculated by our second method (1/Vmax correction). We also find that LSB galaxies provide 30 +/- 10 per cent of the contribution of gas-rich galaxies to the neutral hydrogen density of the Universe, 7 +/- 3 per cent of their contribution to the luminosity density of the Universe, 9 +/- 4 of their contribution to the baryonic mass density of the Universe, 20 +/- 10 per cent of their contribution to the dynamical mass density of the Universe, and 40 +/- 20 per cent of their cross-sectional area. We do not find any `crouching giant' LSB galaxies such as Malin 1, nor do we find a

  18. A very deep IRAS survey - Constraints on the evolution of starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacking, Perry; Condon, J. J.; Houck, J. R.

    1987-05-01

    Counts of sources (primarily starburst galaxies) from a deep 60 microns IRAS survey published by Hacking and Houck (1987) are compared with four evolutionary models. The counts below 100 mJy are higher than expected if no evolution has taken place out to a redshift of approximately 0.2. Redshift measurements of the survey sources should be able to distinguish between luminosity-evolution and density-evolution models and detect as little as a 20 percent brightening or increase in density of infrared sources per billion years ago (H/0/ = 100 km/s per Mpc). Starburst galaxies cannot account for the reported 100 microns background without extreme evolution at high redshifts.

  19. Very deep IRAS survey - constraints on the evolution of starburst galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hacking, P.; Houck, J.R.; Condon, J.J.

    1987-05-01

    Counts of sources (primarily starburst galaxies) from a deep 60 microns IRAS survey published by Hacking and Houck (1987) are compared with four evolutionary models. The counts below 100 mJy are higher than expected if no evolution has taken place out to a redshift of approximately 0.2. Redshift measurements of the survey sources should be able to distinguish between luminosity-evolution and density-evolution models and detect as little as a 20 percent brightening or increase in density of infrared sources per billion years ago (H/0/ = 100 km/s per Mpc). Starburst galaxies cannot account for the reported 100 microns background without extreme evolution at high redshifts. 21 references.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AKARI NEP Deep Survey revised catalog (Murata+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Arimatsu, K.; Oi, N.; Takagi, T.; Oyabu, S.; Goto, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Malkan, M.; Pearson, C.; Malek, K.; Solarz, A.

    2013-09-01

    This is the revised catalogue of the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep survey. The survey was carried out with the InfraRed Camera (IRC) onboard AKARI which has a comprehensive mid-IR wavelength coverage in nine photometric bands at 2-24 micron. For mid-IR source extraction we used a detection image while for near-IR source detection we used optical to near-IR ground-based catalogue which is based on CFHT/MegaCam z', CFHT/WIRCam Ks and Subaru/Scam z' band detection. Here we present an AKARI source with the identification from the ground-based catalogue. For objects with multiple counterparts, all of these were listed in the catalogue with an upper limit for the AKARI flux. The magnitudes are given in the AB system. (1 data file).

  1. Attitudes and expectations of treating deep caries: a PEARL Network survey.

    PubMed

    Oen, Kay T; Thompson, Van P; Vena, Don; Caufield, Page W; Curro, Fredrick; Dasanayake, Ananda; Ship, Jonathan A; Lindblad, Anne

    2007-01-01

    A survey was conducted within a practice-based dental research network to determine dentists' treatment methods for deep caries lesions and whether the dentists' intended treatment approaches were influenced by their expectations for pulpal exposure. The survey further examined how general dentistry practices have adopted scientific evidence of caries classification, excavation, and capping techniques. Dentists were queried regarding liner use, hypersensitivity considerations, point of endodontic therapy, and anticipated vitality outcomes from Class I resin-based composite restorations over three to five years. Of the 93 practitioner-investigators who were in the network at the time of the survey, 85 (92%) completed it. Of those who responded, 62% said that they would remove all caries when presented with a case in which one would expect pulpal exposure, while 18% would partially remove caries and 21% would initiate endodontic treatment; 17% reported that they would utilize an antimicrobial agent before a liner or bonding agent during restoration. The outcomes projected for tooth vitality over the next three to five years were equivalent regardless of the caries removal approach or the use of a liner/bonding agent. When beginning the preparation, the method of treatment did not change if a pulpal exposure was anticipated, other than a threefold increase in immediate endodontic treatment. When dentists were given a direct pulp cap scenario, the projected use of a liner/bonding agent changed little while the vitality projections decreased. Overall survey findings indicate that approximately 20% of network dentists favor partial caries removal techniques and that deep caries treatment outcome studies are warranted, given the various treatments employed. PMID:17511360

  2. When is stacking confusing? The impact of confusion on stacking in deep H I galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Papastergis, Emmanouil

    2016-01-01

    We present an analytic model to predict the H I mass contributed by confused sources to a stacked spectrum in a generic H I survey. Based on the ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) correlation function, this model is in agreement with the estimates of confusion present in stacked Parkes telescope data, and was used to predict how confusion will limit stacking in the deepest Square Kilometre Array precursor H I surveys. Stacking with LADUMA (Looking At the Distant Universe with MeerKAT) and DINGO UDEEP (Deep Investigation of Neutral Gas Origins - Ultra Deep) data will only be mildly impacted by confusion if their target synthesized beam size of 10 arcsec can be achieved. Any beam size significantly above this will result in stacks that contain a mass in confused sources that is comparable to (or greater than) that which is detectable via stacking, at all redshifts. CHILES (COSMOS H I Large Extragalactic Survey) 5 arcsec resolution is more than adequate to prevent confusion influencing stacking of its data, throughout its bandpass range. FAST (Five hundred metre Aperture Spherical Telescope) will be the most impeded by confusion, with H I surveys likely becoming heavily confused much beyond z = 0.1. The largest uncertainties in our model are the redshift evolution of the H I density of the Universe and the H I correlation function. However, we argue that the two idealized cases we adopt should bracket the true evolution, and the qualitative conclusions are unchanged regardless of the model choice. The profile shape of the signal due to confusion (in the absence of any detection) was also modelled, revealing that it can take the form of a double Gaussian with a narrow and wide component.

  3. Attitudes and behaviour regarding deep dentin caries removal: a survey among German dentists.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Meyer-Lueckel, H; Dörfer, C; Paris, S

    2013-01-01

    Incomplete removal of deep caries has been shown to reduce the risks of pulp exposure and postoperative pulpal complications. It is therefore of interest whether dentists perform one- or two-step incomplete excavation, and which criteria and methods they use to assess and provide removal of deep caries. This study investigated the attitudes and behaviour of dentists in northern Germany using a new, validated questionnaire. The survey included 2,346 practitioners, 821 (35%) of whom responded. Demographic and sensitivity analysis did not indicate selection bias. 50% of dentists considered only complete excavation, even if pulp exposure was likely. If caries was to be removed incompletely, 77% considered two-step excavation. Hardness was the most important criterion to assess excavation. To treat an exposed pulp, 75% of dentists considered direct capping, 70% refused incomplete excavation fearing caries progression or pulp damage, and 59% reported to prefer more invasive treatment to facilitate restoration longevity. Over 50% recognised an influence of professional regulations on their treatment decisions. There was a moderate correlation between attitudes and behaviour of dentists, with dentists who suspected residual caries to be harmful rejecting incomplete excavation and vice versa. Cluster analysis identified two groups of dentists with opposite attitudes and behaviour, independently from dentist's age or gender. In conclusion, the majority of surveyed dentists was sceptical about leaving caries during excavation and does not practice incomplete caries removal. Therefore, benefits of partial excavation should be highlighted in under- and postgraduate education and regulatory incentives modified to promote minimally invasive techniques. PMID:23899958

  4. The Metal Abundances across Cosmic Time (MACT) Survey. I. Optical Spectroscopy in the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Malkan, Matthew A.; Rigby, Jane R.; Kashikawa, Nobunari; de los Reyes, Mithi A.; Rhoads, James E.

    2016-09-01

    Deep rest-frame optical spectroscopy is critical for characterizing and understanding the physical conditions and properties of the ionized gas in galaxies. Here, we present a new spectroscopic survey called “Metal Abundances across Cosmic Time” or { M }{ A }{ C }{ T }, which will obtain rest-frame optical spectra for ∼3000 emission-line galaxies. This paper describes the optical spectroscopy that has been conducted with MMT/Hectospec and Keck/DEIMOS for ≈1900 z = 0.1–1 emission-line galaxies selected from our narrowband and intermediate-band imaging in the Subaru Deep Field. In addition, we present a sample of 164 galaxies for which we have measured the weak [O iii]λ4363 line (66 with at least 3σ detections and 98 with significant upper limits). This nebular emission line determines the gas-phase metallicity by measuring the electron temperature of the ionized gas. This paper presents the optical spectra, emission-line measurements, interstellar properties (e.g., metallicity, gas density), and stellar properties (e.g., star formation rates, stellar mass). Paper II of the { M }{ A }{ C }{ T } survey (Ly et al.) presents the first results on the stellar mass–gas metallicity relation at z ≲ 1 using the sample with [O iii]λ4363 measurements.

  5. Deep-tow magnetic survey above large exhumed mantle domains of the eastern Southwest Indian ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, A.; Munschy, M.; Carlut, J. H.; Searle, R. C.; Sauter, D.; Cannat, M.

    2011-12-01

    The recent discovery of a new type of seafloor, the "smooth seafloor", formed with no or very little volcanic activity along the ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) shows an unexpected complexity in processes of generation of the oceanic lithosphere. There, detachment faulting is thought to be a mechanism for efficient exhumation of deep-seated mantle rocks. We present here a deep-tow geological-geophysical survey over smooth seafloor at the eastern SWIR (62-64°N) combining magnetic data, geology mapping from side-scan sonar images and results from dredge sampling. We introduce a new type of calibration approach for deep-tow fluxgate magnetometer. We show that magnetic data can be corrected from the magnetic effect of the vehicle with no recourse to its attitude (pitch, roll and heading) but only using the 3 components recorded by the magnetometer and an approximation of the scalar intensity of the Earth magnetic field. The collected dredge samples as well as the side-scan images confirm the presence of large areas of exhumed mantle-derived peridodites surrounded by a few volcanic constructions. This allows us to hypothesis that magnetic anomalies are caused by serpentinized peridotites or magmatic intrusions. We show that the magnetic signature of the smooth seafloor is clearly weaker than the surrounding volcanic areas. Moreover, the calculated magnetization of a source layer as well as the comparison between deep-tow and sea-surface magnetic data argue for strong East-West variability in the distribution of the magnetized sources. This variability may results from fluid-rocks interaction along the detachment faults as well as from the repartition of the volcanic material and thus questions the seafloor spreading origin of the corresponding magnetic anomalies. Finally, we provide magnetic arguments, as calculation of block rotation or spreading asymmetry in order to better constrain tectonic mechanisms that occur during the formation of this

  6. The 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North Survey and the 250 ks Extended Chandra Deep Field-South Survey: Improved Point-source Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y. Q.; Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Lehmer, B. D.; Yang, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present improved point-source catalogs for the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N) and the 250 ks Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDF-S) Surveys, implementing a number of recent improvements in Chandra source-cataloging methodology. For CDF-N/E-CDF-S, we provide a main catalog that contains 683/1003 X-ray sources detected with wavdetect at a false-positive probability threshold of 10‑5 that also satisfy a binomial-probability source-selection criterion of P\\lt 0.004/P < 0.002. Such an approach maximizes the number of reliable sources detected: a total of 196/275 main-catalog sources are new compared to the Alexander et al. CDF-N/Lehmer et al. E-CDF-S main catalogs. We also provide CDF-N/E-CDF-S supplementary catalogs that consist of 72/56 sources detected at the same wavdetect threshold and having P of 0.004–0.1/0.002–0.1 and {K}s≤slant 22.9/{K}s≤slant 22.3 mag counterparts. For all ≈ 1800 CDF-N and E-CDF-S sources, including the ≈ 500 newly detected ones (these being generally fainter and more obscured), we determine X-ray source positions utilizing centroid and matched-filter techniques; we also provide multiwavelength identifications, apparent magnitudes of counterparts, spectroscopic and/or photometric redshifts, basic source classifications, and estimates of observed active galactic nucleus and galaxy source densities around respective field centers. Simulations show that both the CDF-N and E-CDF-S main catalogs are highly reliable and reasonably complete. Background and sensitivity analyses indicate that the on-axis mean flux limits reached represent a factor of ≈ 1.5–2.0 improvement over the previous CDF-N and E-CDF-S limits. We make our data products publicly available.

  7. Morphology of Florida escarpment chemosynthetic brine seep community sites: deep-tow, seabeam, and GLORIA surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Paull, C.K.; Spiess, F.N.; Curray, J.R.; Twitchell, D.

    1988-02-01

    The Florida Escarpment near 26/degree/N was surveyed with Deep-Tow, Seabeam, and GLORIA in the area where chemosynthetic communities were discovered via ALVIN in the abyssal Gulf of Mexico. Seabeam bathymetry and GLORIA images indicate that the escarpment is a generally straight cliff with average slopes of about 45/degree/ from 2200 to more than 3250 m. The escarpment's face is cut by 2-km wide box canyons whose head walls are as steep as the intervening escarpment's face. The shapes of these canyons are difficult to explain with the traditional models of canyon formation. Sidescan sonar images and bottom photographs reveal that the escarpment's face is composed of a series of long, straight bedding-plain terraces which are truncated along nearly vertical orthogonal joints. Exposure of these truncated strata indicate the face of the escarpment is eroded. The contact between the basal escarpment and the flat-lying abyssal hemipelagic sediments is abrupt. Basal talus is uncommon because the abyssal floor is part of the distal Mississippi fan which is rapidly burying the escarpment. However, where talus occurs, it is in tongues of angular megabreccia of meter- and larger-sized blocks which indicate periodic catastrophic collapse. Sidescan images reveal bands of contrast in the reflective texture of the sea floor that extends 10-20 m from the base along more than 10% of the surveyed area. Photographic surveys show that these areas are associated with communities of abundant organisms. Apparently chemosynthetic communities line extensive sections of the escarpment base where reduced brines seep out into the sea floor. The morphology suggests joints and deep seeps are controlling factors in scarp retreat.

  8. Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey -- UDS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey {CANDELS}is designed to document the ?rst third of galactic evolution from z =8 to 1.5 via deep imaging of more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IRand ACS. It will also find the first Type Ia SNe beyond z > 1.5 andestablish their accuracy as standard candles for cosmology. Fivepremier multi-wavelength sky regions are selected from the SpitzerExtragalactic Deep Survey {SEDS} to provide complementary IRAC imagingdata down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource for stellar masses at allredshifts. The use of ?ve widely separated ?elds mitigates cosmicvariance and yields statistically robust and complete samples ofgalaxies down to 10^9 solar masses out to z 8.The program merges two originally separate MCT proposals. The Faberprogram incorporates a ?Wide? imaging survey in three separate fieldsto 2 orbit depth over 0.2 sq. degrees, plus a ?Deep? imaging surveyto 12 orbit depth in the two GOODS regions over 0.04 sq. degrees.In combination with ultra-deep imaging from the Hubble Ultradeep Fieldprogram {GO 11563}, the result is a three-tiered strategy that ef?cientlysamples both bright/rare and faint/common extragalactic objects. TheFerguson program adds an extensive high-redshift Type Ia SNe search,plus ultraviolet "daytime" UVIS exposures in GOODS-N to exploit theCVZ opportunity in that field.This program, GO 12064, is part of the Wide mosaic survey, which has thefollowing field centers and sizes: Field ID RA{2000} Dec{2000} WFC3 Dim. PA on sky UDS 02 17 38 -05 12 02 4x11 270 COSMOS 10 00 31 +02 24 00 4x11 180 EGS 14 19 31 +52 54 10 3x15 41 Science highlights from the Wide program: * Underlying structural properties of galaxies as revealed by WFC3-IR images sensitive to older stars {beyond the 4000-A break} and less affected by dust than ACS. A key redshift is z 2, where star-formation peaks, QSOs are most abundant, and where restframe B-band is still accessible to WFC3. Sample questions include: - Structure in young

  9. INTEGRAL/IBIS deep extragalactic survey: M81, LMC and 3C 273/Coma fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereminskiy, Ilya A.; Krivonos, Roman A.; Lutovinov, Alexander A.; Sazonov, Sergey Yu.; Revnivtsev, Mikhail G.; Sunyaev, Rashid A.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of a deep survey of three extragalactic fields, M81 (exposure of 9.7 Ms), Large Magellanic Cloud (6.8 Ms) and 3C 273/Coma (9.3 Ms), in the hard X-ray (17-60 keV) energy band with the IBIS telescope onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, based on 12 years of observations (2003-2015). The combined survey reaches a 4σ peak sensitivity of 0.18 mCrab (2.6 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2) and sensitivity better than 0.25 and 0.87 mCrab over 10 per cent and 90 per cent of its full area of 4900 deg2, respectively. We have detected in total 147 sources at S/N > 4σ, including 37 sources observed in hard X-rays for the first time. The survey is dominated by extragalactic sources, mostly active galactic nuclei (AGN). The sample of identified sources contains 98 AGN (including 64 Seyfert galaxies, seven low-ionization nuclear emission-line region galaxies, three X-ray bright optically normal galaxies, 16 blazars and eight AGN of unclear optical class), two galaxy clusters (Coma and Abell 3266), 17 objects located in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (13 high- and two low-mass X-ray binaries and two X-ray pulsars), three Galactic cataclysmic variables, one ultraluminous X-ray source (M82 X-1) and one blended source (SWIFT J1105.7+5854). The nature of 25 sources remains unknown, so that the survey's identification is currently complete at 83 per cent. We have constructed AGN number-flux relations (log N-log S) and calculated AGN number densities in the local Universe for the entire survey and for each of the three extragalactic fields.

  10. Geophysical Survey To Understand Failure Mechanisms Involved On Deep Seated Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebourg, T.; Tric, E.; Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Charmoille, A.; Bouissou, S.

    2003-04-01

    The understanding of rupture processes involve on deep seated landslides and hence the prediction of such phenomenon is difficult for two main reasons. The first one, arise from the difficulty in estimating the mechanical behaviour of the whole mountain which is very different from that of a rock sample we can study on laboratory. This is mainly true in the upper part of slope subjected to weathering (Lebourg and al., 2002). The second reason, is due to the necessity of taking into account both the 3D geometry of the phenomenon and geological discontinuities affecting the mountain slide. We propose to show geophysical research on a deep seated landslide and the way we use to integreted then into numerical models. One of main problem of study deep seatted landslides with geophysical survey is the size of the landslide and the deep of the slope. The landslides we studied are located in the French Alps (Clapière landslide and Rocbillière landslide). It concern various geological formation, triggered by hydrological sollicitations. Our geophysical methods allow us to obtain 2D and 3D imagery of the geological structures, but also the shearing surface and the hydrological system used in the numerical and physical modeling. The research of the hydrogeological system can become one of the must importante result for the administration. After the first geophysical survey, we can quantify the hydrogeological level who can initiate or accelerate the paroxism of the landslide. Numerical model and prediction can also propose a 'surveillance' on the geophysical pseudo-dynamic prospecting. Our results showed also the importance of the weathering and the complexe chenalisation of the water whithin the slope, in the initiation of the movement. Our futur goal is to study the relative influence of the mechanical behaviour of the mountain, the behaviour of the wheathering zone, faults and intial topography of the mountain on landslide to determine the key parameter controlling this

  11. A very deep IRAS survey at l(II) = 97 deg, b(II) = +30 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacking, Perry; Houck, James R.

    1987-01-01

    A deep far-infrared survey is presented using over 1000 scans made of a 4 to 6 sq. deg. field at the north ecliptic pole by the IRAS. Point sources from this survey are up to 100 times fainter than the IRAS point source catalog at 12 and 25 micrometers, and up to 10 times fainter at 60 and 100 micrometers. The 12 and 25 micrometer maps are instrumental noise-limited, and the 60 and 100 micrometer maps are confusion noise-limited. The majority of the 12 micrometer point sources are stars within the Milky Way. The 25 micrometer sources are composed almost equally of stars and galaxies. About 80% of the 60 micrometer sources correspond to galaxies on Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) enlargements. The remaining 20% are probably galaxies below the POSS detection limit. The differential source counts are presented and compared with what is predicted by the Bahcall and Soneira Standard Galaxy Model using the B-V-12 micrometer colors of stars without circumstellar dust shells given by Waters, Cote and Aumann. The 60 micrometer source counts are inconsistent with those predicted for a uniformly distributed, nonevolving universe. The implications are briefly discussed.

  12. A 6 GHz Synoptic Survey of the COSMOS Deep Field with the JVLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sink, Joseph R.; Myers, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) covers two square degrees, and is observed over a large portion of the electromagnetic spectrum from X-ray to Radio. Key science goals of COSMOS include probing the evolution of galaxies, AGN, and large scale structures of the Universe. As well as constraining cosmological models and the star and structure formation history of the Universe. The wide range of frequencies and deep surveys are suitable for many astrophysical studies.Beginning in 2013, observations of the COSMOS field in C-band (4 - 8 GHz) using the JVLA have been carried out in every configuration spanning 21 months (April 2013 - Jan 2015) for a total of 13 observations. The observations are comprised of 1 hour time blocks using a technique called On-The-Fly Mosaicking (OTFM). Using OTFM we see an increased efficiency for an allotted observation block by collecting data as the array scans across the field, rather than a pointed mosaic which requires settle down time after each new pointing. Each observation consists of 2160 1-second integrations on 432 phase centers that require calibration and image processing before they can be mosaicked to create the final image of the entire COSMOS field.The primary science goal of this survey is to identify, catalog, and study the variable and transient radio sources in the COSMOS field, comparing these to other radio, optical, IR, and X-ray observations. The main class of variables we are interested in Active Galactic Nuclei.

  13. Search for cosmic strings in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J. L.; Albin, E.; James, K. A.; Goldman, J.; Maruyama, D.; Smoot, G. F.

    2008-06-15

    We search Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Program images collected as part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey for pairs of galaxies consistent with the gravitational lensing signature of a cosmic string. Our technique includes estimates of the efficiency for finding the lensed galaxy pair. In the north (south) survey field we find no evidence out to a redshift of greater than 0.5 (0.3) for cosmic strings to a mass per unit length limit of G{mu}/c{sup 2}<3.0x10{sup -7} at 95% confidence limits (C.L.). In the combined 314.9 arcmin{sup 2} of the north and south survey fields this corresponds to a global limit on {omega}{sub strings}<0.02. Our limit on G{mu}/c{sup 2} is more than an order of magnitude lower than searches for individual strings in cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Our limit is higher than other CMB and gravitational wave searches, however, we note that it is less model dependent than these other searches.

  14. A skewer survey of the Galactic halo from deep CFHT and INT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pila-Díez, B.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Kuijken, K.; van der Burg, R. F. J.; Hoekstra, H.

    2015-07-01

    We study the density profile and shape of the Galactic halo using deep multicolour images from the MENeaCS and CCCP projects, over 33 fields selected to avoid overlap with the Galactic plane. Using multicolour selection and point spread function homogenization techniques we obtain catalogues of F stars (near-main sequence turnoff stars) out to Galactocentric distances up to 60 kpc. Grouping nearby lines of sight, we construct the stellar density profiles through the halo in eight different directions by means of photometric parallaxes. Smooth halo models are then fitted to these profiles. We find clear evidence for a steepening of the density profile power law index around R = 20 kpc, from -2.50 ± 0.04 to -4.85 ± 0.04, and for a flattening of the halo towards the poles with best-fit axis ratio 0.79 ± 0.02. Furthermore, we cannot rule out a mild triaxiality (w ≥ 0.88 ± 0.07). We recover the signatures of well-known substructure and streams that intersect our lines of sight. These results are consistent with those derived from wider but shallower surveys, and augur well for upcoming, wide-field surveys of comparable depth to our pencil beam surveys.

  15. VLA high resolution observations of weak Leiden-Berkeley Deep-Survey (LBDS) sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oort, M. J. A.; Katgert, P.; Steeman, F. W. M.; Windhorst, R. A.

    1987-06-01

    The majority of the 1-arcsec resolution snapshot maps of 133 radio sources presented from the Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey (LBDS) indicate that the sources have flux densities in the 1-100 mJy range at 1.4 GHz, with a median flux density of 5 mJy. A combination of all radio-morphological data available for the LBDS, the median angular size of a complete radio sample is found to decrease with decreasing flux density to a value as low as about 2 arcsec between 1 and 10 mJy. Definite indications are found for a decrease of intrinsic size with increasing redshift, with a relation that results in a size decrease of factor 4 with respect to the local value at the same radio power.

  16. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. III. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z = 2-4

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Kajisawa, M.; Akiyama, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Tokoku, C.; Yoshikawa, T.; Konishi, M.; Nishimura, T.; Omata, K.; Suzuki, R.; Tanaka, I.; Uchimoto, Y. K.

    2009-07-10

    We investigate the X-ray properties of the K-band-selected galaxies at redshift 2 < z < 4 by using our deep near-infrared images obtained in the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph Deep Survey project and the published Chandra X-ray source catalog. Sixty-one X-ray sources with the 2-10 keV luminosity L{sub X} = 10{sup 42}-10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} are identified with the K-selected galaxies and we found that they are exclusively (90%) associated with the massive objects with a stellar mass larger than 10{sup 10.5} M{sub sun}. Our results are consistent with the idea that the M {sub BH}/M{sub str} ratio of the galaxies at z = 2-4 is similar to the present-day value. On the other hand, the active galactic nucleus (AGN) detection rate among the very massive galaxies with a stellar mass larger than 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} is high, 33% (26/78). They are active objects in the sense that the black hole mass accretion rate is {approx}1%-50% of the Eddington limit if they indeed have similar M {sub BH}/M {sub str} ratio with those observed in the local universe. The active duration in the AGN duty cycle of the high-redshift massive galaxies seems large.

  17. Shear wave velocity analysis of a deep seated gravel landslide structure using the microtremor survey method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, L.; Xu, X.; Liao, H.; Geng, X.-Y.

    2015-09-01

    The depth and geometry of potential failure surface is the fundamental for evaluating the mechanisms of a landslide. Traditional techniques to acquire information on potential sliding surface are mainly drilling, pitting, and trenching, but these techniques are time consuming and expensive. In this study, microtremor signals and the dispersion curves of surface wave are extracted from the vertical component of microtremor records using the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method to estimate shear wave velocity structure. The results suggest that the buried depth of phyllite bedrock is approximately 47.4m, and the thickness of weathered bedrock layer is about 9.9m at about 57.3m deep, which could be interpreted as the potential sliding surface of this landslide, in accordance with borehole data. The microtremor survey method (MSM) is flexible, non-invasive, relatively quick and deployable on the landslide. It clearly demonstrat that it is an effective tool to improve the drilling success rate, and hence allow a large scale and high density investigation of structure characteristics of a deep seated landslide.

  18. Cosmic Shear Results from the Deep Lens Survey. II. Full Cosmological Parameter Constraints from Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony; Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Michael D.; Schmidt, Samuel; Wittman, David

    2016-06-01

    We present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitude {r}{lim}∼ 27 (5σ ), is designed as a precursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing \\gt 10 deg2 cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9 yr results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives {{{Ω }}}m={0.293}-0.014+0.012, {σ }8={0.833}-0.018+0.011, {H}0={68.6}-1.2+1.4 {\\text{km s}}-1 {{{Mpc}}}-1, and {{{Ω }}}b=0.0475+/- 0.0012 for ΛCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ∼50%. When we do not assume flatness for ΛCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint {{{Ω }}}k=-{0.010}-0.015+0.013 from the DLS+WMAP9 combination, which, however, is not well constrained when WMAP9 is used alone. The dark energy equation-of-state parameter w is tightly constrained when baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) data are added, yielding w=-{1.02}-0.09+0.10 with the DLS+WMAP9+BAO joint probe. The addition of supernova constraints further tightens the parameter to w=-1.03+/- 0.03. Our joint constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also with the predictions of a ΛCDM universe.

  19. Cosmic Shear Results from the Deep Lens Survey. II. Full Cosmological Parameter Constraints from Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony; Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Michael D.; Schmidt, Samuel; Wittman, David

    2016-06-01

    We present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitude {r}{lim}˜ 27 (5σ ), is designed as a precursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing \\gt 10 deg2 cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9 yr results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives {{{Ω }}}m={0.293}-0.014+0.012, {σ }8={0.833}-0.018+0.011, {H}0={68.6}-1.2+1.4 {\\text{km s}}-1 {{{Mpc}}}-1, and {{{Ω }}}b=0.0475+/- 0.0012 for ΛCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ˜50%. When we do not assume flatness for ΛCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint {{{Ω }}}k=-{0.010}-0.015+0.013 from the DLS+WMAP9 combination, which, however, is not well constrained when WMAP9 is used alone. The dark energy equation-of-state parameter w is tightly constrained when baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) data are added, yielding w=-{1.02}-0.09+0.10 with the DLS+WMAP9+BAO joint probe. The addition of supernova constraints further tightens the parameter to w=-1.03+/- 0.03. Our joint constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also with the predictions of a ΛCDM universe.

  20. The Chandra Deep Survey of the Hubble Deep Field-North Area. II. Results from the Caltech Faint Field Galaxy Redshift Survey Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, A. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Garmire, G. P.; Schneider, D. P.; Barger, A. J.; Broos, P. S.; Cowie, L. L.; Townsley, L. K.; Bautz, M. W.; Burrows, D. N.; Chartas, G.; Feigelson, E. D.; Griffiths, R. E.; Lumb, D.; Nousek, J. A.; Ramsey, L. W.; Sargent, W. L. W.

    2001-06-01

    A deep X-ray survey of the Hubble Deep Field-North (HDF-N) and its environs is performed using data collected by the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Currently a 221.9 ks exposure is available, the deepest ever presented, and here we give results on X-ray sources located in the 8.6‧×8.7‧ area covered by the Caltech Faint Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (the ``Caltech area''). This area has (1) deep photometric coverage in several optical and near-infrared bands; (2) extensive coverage at radio, submillimeter, and mid-infrared wavelengths; and (3) some of the deepest and most complete spectroscopic coverage ever obtained. It is also where the X-ray data have the greatest sensitivity; the minimum detectable fluxes in the 0.5-2 keV (soft) and 2-8 keV (hard) bands are ~1.3×10-16 and ~6.5×10-16 ergs cm-2 s-1, respectively. More than ~80% of the extragalactic X-ray background in the hard band is resolved. The 82 Chandra sources detected in the Caltech area are correlated with more than 25 multiwavelength source catalogs, and the results of these correlations as well as spectroscopic follow-up results obtained with the Keck and Hobby-Eberly Telescopes are presented. All but nine of the Chandra sources are detected optically with R<~26.5. Redshifts are available for 39% of the Chandra sources, including 96% of the sources with R<23 the redshift range is 0.1-3.5, with most sources having z<1.5. Eight of the X-ray sources are located in the HDF-N itself, including two not previously reported. A population of X-ray faint, optically bright, nearby galaxies emerges at soft-band fluxes of <~3×10-16 ergs cm-2 s-1. Our multiwavelength correlations have set the tightest constraints to date on the X-ray emission properties of μJy radio sources, mid-infrared sources detected by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), and very red (R-Ks>5.0) objects. A total of 16 of the 67 1.4 GHz μJy sources in the Caltech area are detected in the

  1. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. IV. EVOLUTION OF GALAXY STELLAR MASS FUNCTION BACK TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kajisawa, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Yamada, T.; Akiyama, M.; Tokoku, C.; Yoshikawa, T.; Tanaka, I.; Suzuki, R.; Konishi, M.; Uchimoto, Y. K.; Ouchi, M.; Iwata, I.; Hamana, T.; Onodera, M.

    2009-09-10

    We use very deep near-infrared (NIR) imaging data obtained in MOIRCS Deep Survey (MODS) to investigate the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function back to z {approx} 3. The MODS data reach J = 24.2, H = 23.1, and K = 23.1 (5{sigma}, Vega magnitude) over 103 arcmin{sup 2} (wide) and J = 25.1, H = 23.7, and K = 24.1 over 28 arcmin{sup 2} (deep) in the GOODS-North region. The wide and very deep NIR data allow us to measure the number density of galaxies down to low stellar mass (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) even at high redshift with high statistical accuracy. The normalization of the mass function decreases with redshift, and the integrated stellar mass density becomes {approx}8%-18% of the local value at z {approx} 2 and {approx}4%-9% at z {approx} 3, which are consistent with results of previous studies in general fields. Furthermore, we found that the low-mass slope becomes steeper with redshift from {alpha} {approx} -1.3 at z {approx} 1 to {alpha} {approx} -1.6 at z {approx} 3 and that the evolution of the number density of low-mass (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) galaxies is weaker than that of M* ({approx}10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) galaxies. This indicates that the contribution of low-mass galaxies to the total stellar mass density has been significant at high redshift. The steepening of the low-mass slope with redshift is an opposite trend expected from the stellar mass dependence of the specific star formation rate reported in previous studies. The present result suggests that the hierarchical merging process overwhelmed the effect of the stellar mass growth by star formation and was very important for the stellar mass assembly of these galaxies at 1 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.

  2. Deep-tow geophysical survey above large exhumed mantle domains of the eastern Southwest Indian ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, A.; Munschy, M.; Sauter, D.; Carlut, J.; Searle, R.; Cannat, M.

    2012-04-01

    The recent discovery of a new type of seafloor, the "smooth seafloor", formed with no or very little volcanic activity along the easternmost part of the ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) shows an unexpected complexity in processes of generation of the oceanic lithosphere. There, detachment faulting is thought to be a mechanism for efficient exhumation of deep-seated mantle rocks. We present here a deep-tow geological-geophysical survey over smooth seafloor at the eastern SWIR (62-64°N) combining multibeam bathymetric data, magnetic data, geology mapping from sidescan sonar (TOBI) images and results from dredge sampling. We introduce a new type of calibration approach for deep-tow fluxgate magnetometer. We show that magnetic data can be corrected from the magnetic effect of the vehicle with no recourse to its attitude (pitch, roll and heading) but only using the 3 components recorded by the magnetometer and an approximation of the scalar intensity of the Earth magnetic field. The collected dredge samples as well as the sidescan sonar images confirm the presence of large areas of exhumed mantle-derived peridodites surrounded by a few volcanic constructions. We investigate the possibility that magnetic anomalies are either caused by serpentinized peridotites and/or magmatic intrusions. We show that the magnetic signature of the smooth seafloor is clearly weaker than the surrounding volcanic areas. Moreover, the calculated magnetization of a source layer as well as the comparison between deep-tow and sea-surface magnetic data argue for strong East-West variability in the distribution of the magnetized sources. This variability may result from fluid-rock interactions along the detachment faults as well as from the occurrence of small sized and thin volcanic patches and thus questions the seafloor spreading origin of the corresponding magnetic anomalies. Finally, we provide magnetic arguments, as calculation of block rotation or spreading asymmetry in

  3. SXDF-ALMA 2-arcmin2 deep survey: 1.1-mm number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J.; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tadaki, Ken-ich; Tamura, Yoichi; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S.

    2016-06-01

    We report 1.1-mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (≥4σ) sources detected in a continuous 2.0-arcmin2 area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fitting function of the number counts, we find that ˜40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S1.1mm > 0.2 mJy.

  4. The Top 10 List of Gravitational Lens Candidates from the HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Ostrander, Eric J.

    1999-05-01

    A total of 10 good candidates for gravitational lensing have been discovered in the WFPC2 images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey (MDS) and archival primary observations. These candidate lenses are unique HST discoveries, i.e., they are faint systems with subarcsecond separations between the lensing objects and the lensed source images. Most of them are difficult objects for ground-based spectroscopic confirmation or for measurement of the lens and source redshifts. Seven are ``strong lens'' candidates that appear to have multiple images of the source. Three are cases in which the single image of the source galaxy has been significantly distorted into an arc. The first two quadruply lensed candidates were reported by Ratnatunga et al. We report on the subsequent eight candidates and describe them with simple models based on the assumption of singular isothermal potentials. Residuals from the simple models for some of the candidates indicate that a more complex model for the potential will probably be required to explain the full structural detail of the observations once they are confirmed to be lenses. We also discuss the effective survey area that was searched for these candidate lens objects.

  5. A Deep Multicolor Survey. VII. Extremely Red Objects and Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Paul

    2001-05-01

    Extremely red objects (EROs) offer a window to the universe at z~1 analogous to that provided by the Lyman break galaxies at z=3. Passive evolution and hierarchical galaxy formation models make very distinct predictions for the K (2.2 μm) surface density of galaxies at z~1, and EROs are a powerful constraint on these theories. I present a study of nine resolved EROs with R-K>=5.3 and K<=18 mag found in the 185 arcmin2 of the Deep Multicolor Survey with near-infrared imaging. Photometric redshifts for these galaxies show they all lie at z=0.8-1.3. The relatively blue J-K colors of these galaxies suggest that most are old elliptical galaxies rather than dusty starbursts. The surface density of EROs in this survey (>0.05 arcmin-2), which is a lower limit to the total z~1 galaxy surface density, is an order of magnitude below the prediction of passive galaxy evolution, yet over a factor of 2 higher than the hierarchical galaxy formation prediction for a flat, matter-dominated universe. A flat, Λ-dominated universe may bring the hierarchical galaxy formation model into agreement with the observed ERO surface density. Based on observations obtained at MDM Observatory, operated by Columbia University, Dartmouth College, the University of Michigan, and the Ohio State University.

  6. The Spitzer Ultra-Deep Survey of the HST/ERS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni; Soifer, Tom; Willner, Steven; Ashby, Matt; Hora, Joseph; Huang, Jiasheng; Wang, Zhong

    2011-02-01

    The HST WFC3 Early Release Science (ERS) observations in the GOODS South field, together with the existing HST ACS observations provide a panchromatic 10-band survey of the ERS field that cover 40-50 square arcmin over the wavelength interval 0.2 to 1.7 microns to WFC3/IR depths of AB ~ 27.3 mag (5 sigma) for point sources. Such a deep, multiwavelegth survey provides a unique opportunity to study galaxy evolution out to z ~ 8 and even possibly to z ~ 10. These early galaxies are important because they serve as beacons of the first sites of star formation, as a constraint on galaxy formation models, and as probes of reionization. The only limitation to even further progress in exploring the early universe using the ERS data is the current depth of Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data in this field. IRAC adds the unique and important capability of tracing early galaxy stellar mass growth, stellar ages, and star formation rates back to z ~ 7 - 10. In this DDT program we propose significantly increasing the IRAC depth achieved in a 5'x5' area in the ERS field to ~ 27 AB mag (5 sigma, 3.6 micron). This probe of the early Universe to such a depth by HST and Spitzer/IRAC, will have a major impact on our knowledge of the galaxy evolution and leave an important legacy for years to come.

  7. Clustering at High Redshift: Precise Constraints from a Deep, Wide-Area Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Lauer, Tod R.; Szapudi, István; Oegerle, William

    1998-10-01

    We present constraints on the evolution of large-scale structure from a catalog of 710,000 galaxies with IAB <= 24 derived from a KPNO 4 m CCD imaging survey of a contiguous 4° × 4° region. The advantage of using large contiguous surveys for measuring clustering properties on even modest angular scales is substantial: the effects of cosmic scatter are strongly suppressed. We provide highly accurate measurements of the two-point angular correlation function, ω(θ), as a function of magnitude on scales up to 1.5d. The amplitude of ω(θ) declines by a factor of ~10 over the range 16 <= I <= 20 but only by a factor of 2-3 over the range 20 < I <= 23. For a redshift dependence of the spatial correlation function, ξ(r), parameterized as ξ(r, z) = (r/r0)-γ(1 + z)-(3+ε), we find r0 = 5.2 +/- 0.4 h-1 Mpc, and ε >~ 0 for I <= 20. This is in good agreement with the results from local redshift surveys. At I > 20, our best-fit values shift toward lower r0 and more negative ε. A strong covariance between r0 and ε prevents us from rejecting ε > 0 even at faint magnitudes, but if ε > 1, we strongly reject r0 <~ 4 h-1 Mpc (comoving). The above expression for ξ(r, z) and our data give a correlation length of r0(z = 0.5) ~ 3.0 +/- 0.4 h-1 Mpc, about a factor of 2 larger than the correlation length at z = 0.5 derived from the Canada-France Redshift Survey (CFRS). The small volume sampled by the CFRS and other deep redshift probes, however, makes these spatial surveys strongly susceptible to cosmic scatter and will tend to bias their derived correlation lengths toward the low end. Our results are consistent with redshift distributions in which ~30%-50% of the galaxies at I = 23 lie at z > 1. The best-fit power-law slope of the correlation function remains independent of I magnitude for I <= 22. At fainter limits, there is a suggestive trend toward flatter slopes that occurs at fluxes consistent with similar trends seen by Neuschaffer & Windhorst and Campos and coworkers

  8. White dwarfs in the UKIRT infrared deep sky survey data release

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Kalirai, J. S.; Leggett, S. K.; Lodieu, N.; Bergeron, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    2014-06-20

    We have identified 8 to 10 new cool white dwarfs from the Large Area Survey (LAS) Data Release 9 of the United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The data set was paired with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to obtain proper motions and a broad ugrizYJHK wavelength coverage. Optical spectroscopic observations were secured at Gemini Observatory and confirm the degenerate status for eight of our targets. The final sample includes two additional white dwarf candidates with no spectroscopic observations. We rely on improved one-dimensional model atmospheres and new multi-dimensional simulations with CO5BOLD to review the stellar parameters of the published LAS white dwarf sample along with our additional discoveries. Most of the new objects possess very cool atmospheres with effective temperatures below 5000 K, including two pure-hydrogen remnants with a cooling age between 8.5 and 9.0 Gyr, and tangential velocities in the range 40 km s{sup –1} ≤v {sub tan} ≤ 60 km s{sup –1}. They are likely thick disk 10-11 Gyr old objects. In addition, we find a resolved double degenerate system with v {sub tan} ∼ 155 km s{sup –1} and a cooling age between 3.0 and 5.0 Gyr. These white dwarfs could be disk remnants with a very high velocity or former halo G stars. We also compare the LAS sample with earlier studies of very cool degenerates and observe a similar deficit of helium-dominated atmospheres in the range 5000 < T {sub eff} (K) < 6000. We review the possible explanations for the spectral evolution from helium-dominated toward hydrogen-rich atmospheres at low temperatures.

  9. COOL WHITE DWARFS FOUND IN THE UKIRT INFRARED DEEP SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, S. K.; Nitta, A.; Lodieu, N.

    2011-07-01

    We present the results of a search for cool white dwarfs in the United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS). The UKIDSS LAS photometry was paired with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to identify cool hydrogen-rich white dwarf candidates by their neutral optical colors and blue near-infrared colors, as well as faint reduced proper motion magnitudes. Optical spectroscopy was obtained at Gemini Observatory and showed the majority of the candidates to be newly identified cool degenerates, with a small number of G- to K-type (sub)dwarf contaminants. Our initial search of 280 deg{sup 2} of sky resulted in seven new white dwarfs with effective temperature T{sub eff} {approx} 6000 K. The current follow-up of 1400 deg{sup 2} of sky has produced 13 new white dwarfs. Model fits to the photometry show that seven of the newly identified white dwarfs have 4120 K {<=}T{sub eff} {<=} 4480 K, and cooling ages between 7.3 Gyr and 8.7 Gyr; they have 40 km s{sup -1} {<=} v{sub tan} {<=} 85 km s{sup -1} and are likely to be thick disk 10-11 Gyr-old objects. The other half of the sample has 4610 K {<=}T{sub eff} {<=} 5260 K, cooling ages between 4.3 Gyr and 6.9 Gyr, and 60 km s{sup -1} {<=} v{sub tan} {<=} 100 km s{sup -1}. These are either thin disk remnants with unusually high velocities, or lower-mass remnants of thick disk or halo late-F or G stars.

  10. Investigating the Local and High Redshift Universe With Deep Survey Data and Ground-Based Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel Charles

    Large multiwavelength surveys are now driving the frontiers of astronomical research. I describe results from my work using data from two large astronomical surveys: the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), which has obtained deep photometric and spectroscopic data on two square degrees of the sky using many of the most powerful telescopes in the world, and the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) Survey, which uses the highly sensitive slitless spectroscopic capability of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 to detect star-forming galaxies over most of the universe's history. First I describe my work on the evolution of the high-redshift quasar luminosity function, an important observational quantity constraining the growth of the supermassive black holes in the early universe. I show that the number density of faint quasars declines rapidly above z ˜ 3. This result is discussed in the context of cosmic reionization and the coevolution of galaxies and their central black holes. Next I present results of a multi-year campaign of near-infrared spectroscopy with FIRE, a world-class near-infrared spectrometer on the Magellan Baade 6.5 meter telescope in Chile, targeting emission-line galaxies at z ˜ 2 discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our results showed that the typical emission-line galaxy at this redshift has low-metallicity, low dust obscuration, high ionization parameter, and little evidence for significant active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution to the emission lines. We also find evidence that high redshift star-forming galaxies have enhanced nitrogen abundances. This result has interesting implications for the nature of the star formation in such galaxies -- in particular, it could mean that a large fraction of such galaxies harbor substantial populations of Wolf-Rayet stars, which are massive, evolved stars ejecting large amounts of enriched matter into the interstellar medium. Finally, I will discuss the discovery of three

  11. Successful Completion of Pre-Site Survey for Deep Drilling at El'gygytgyn Crater Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melles, M.; Minyuk, P.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Niessen, F.

    2003-12-01

    Lake El'gygytgyn, located in central Chukotka, NE Russia, is a 3.6 million year old impact crater lake with a diameter of 12 km and a water depth of 170 m. The sedimentary record of the lake has become a major focus of multi-disciplinary multi-national paleoclimatic research and is now a potential target for deep drilling. A full-length sediment core would yield a complete record of Arctic climate evolution, back one million years prior to the first major glaciation of the Northern Hemisphere. Geomorphological evidence from the catchment suggests that the crater was never glaciated during the entire Late Cenozoic. A 13.0 m long sediment core retrieved from the deepest part of the lake in 1998 revealed a basal age of approx. 300 ka, confirmed the lack of glacial erosion, and underlined the sensitivity of this lacustrine environment to reflect high resolution climatic change. The first single channel seismic survey carried out in 2000 discovered undisturbed and well-stratified sediments to a depth of 160 m below the lake floor. Refraction data from sonobuoys indicated the top of the impact breccia at about 360 m subbottom. An ICDP workshop held in 2001 recognised the unique potential of the lake for both paleoclimate and impact-related research and suggested more site survey work. This final pre-site survey expedition took place from April to September 2003. Modern process studies of the lake hydrology, limnology, meteorology, and sedimentology took place over this entire period to better understand the various proxies we are using to decipher the paleoclimate record of the sediment fill. Geomorphic and permafrost studies of lake and river terrace stratigraphies contribute to our understanding of climate dependent landscape evolution. A 16 m long sediment core from the central part of the lake presumably extents the existing record towards more than 400 ka BP. The matching of proxies from this core and the core recovered in 1998 illustrates the lateral continuity of

  12. IDENTIFYING LUMINOUS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN DEEP SURVEYS: REVISED IRAC SELECTION CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    Donley, J. L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Brusa, M.; Salvato, M.; Capak, P.; Cardamone, C. N.; Civano, F.; Ilbert, O.; Impey, C. D.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Miyaji, T.; Sanders, D. B.; Trump, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    Spitzer/IRAC selection is a powerful tool for identifying luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For deep IRAC data, however, the AGN selection wedges currently in use are heavily contaminated by star-forming galaxies, especially at high redshift. Using the large samples of luminous AGNs and high-redshift star-forming galaxies in COSMOS, we redefine the AGN selection criteria for use in deep IRAC surveys. The new IRAC criteria are designed to be both highly complete and reliable, and incorporate the best aspects of the current AGN selection wedges and of infrared power-law selection while excluding high-redshift star-forming galaxies selected via the BzK, distant red galaxy, Lyman-break galaxy, and submillimeter galaxy criteria. At QSO luminosities of log L{sub 2-10keV}(erg s{sup -1}) {>=}44, the new IRAC criteria recover 75% of the hard X-ray and IRAC-detected XMM-COSMOS sample, yet only 38% of the IRAC AGN candidates have X-ray counterparts, a fraction that rises to 52% in regions with Chandra exposures of 50-160 ks. X-ray stacking of the individually X-ray non-detected AGN candidates leads to a hard X-ray signal indicative of heavily obscured to mildly Compton-thick obscuration (log N{sub H} (cm{sup -2}) = 23.5 {+-} 0.4). While IRAC selection recovers a substantial fraction of luminous unobscured and obscured AGNs, it is incomplete to low-luminosity and host-dominated AGNs.

  13. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Clustering of Galaxies in Early Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coil, Alison L.; Davis, Marc; Madgwick, Darren S.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Cooper, Michael; Ellis, Richard S.; Faber, S. M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kaiser, Nick; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin

    2004-07-01

    We measure the two-point correlation function ξ(rp,π) in a sample of 2219 galaxies between z=0.7 and 1.35 to a magnitude limit of RAB=24.1 from the first season of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey. From ξ(rp,π) we recover the real-space correlation function, ξ(r), which we find can be approximated within the errors by a power law, ξ(r)=(r/r0)-γ, on scales ~0.1-10 h-1 Mpc. In a sample with an effective redshift of zeff=0.82, for a ΛCDM cosmology we find r0=3.53+/-0.81 h-1 Mpc (comoving) and γ=1.66+/-0.12, while in a higher redshift sample with zeff=1.14 we find r0=3.12+/-0.72 h-1 Mpc and γ=1.66+/-0.12. These errors are estimated from mock galaxy catalogs and are dominated by the cosmic variance present in the current data sample. We find that red, absorption-dominated, passively evolving galaxies have a larger clustering scale length, r0, than blue, emission-line, actively star-forming galaxies. Intrinsically brighter galaxies also cluster more strongly than fainter galaxies at z~=1. Our results imply that the DEEP2 galaxies have an effective bias b=0.96+/-0.13 if σ8DM=1 today or b=1.19+/-0.16 if σ8DM=0.8 today. This bias is lower than that predicted by semianalytic simulations at z~=1, which may be the result of our R-band target selection. We discuss possible evolutionary effects within our survey volume, and we compare our results with galaxy-clustering studies at other redshifts, noting that our star-forming sample at z~=1 has selection criteria very similar to the Lyman break galaxies at z~=3 and that our red, absorption-line sample displays a clustering strength comparable to the expected clustering of the Lyman break galaxy descendants at z~=1. Our results demonstrate that galaxy-clustering properties as a function of color, spectral type, and luminosity seen in the local universe were largely in place by z~=1.

  14. A Wide-Field Survey in the Chandra Deep Field-South Region: A Combined GTO + GO Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    2013-09-01

    We propose to perform a wide-field (2.2 square degree) survey around the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDF-S). This survey will complement the large observational investments made in multi-square-degree surveys in the CDF-S region by Spitzer, Herschel, the Australia Telescope Compact Array, PRIMUS, Pan-STARRS, DES, LSST, and other facilities. It will allow us to identify the most-luminous active galaxies to z = 1.5-2 and to investigate large-scale structures in the CDF-S region. This is the GTO component of a GTO + GO project; the associated GO observations will be proposed as a Cycle 15 Large Project.

  15. Deep VLT/HAWKI and Keck/MOSFIRE K-band imaging of the Hubble Frontier Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammer, Gabriel; Marchesini, Danilo

    2015-08-01

    We will present recently-obtained deep K-band imaging of the first four Frontier Fields, Abell 2744 and MACS 0416 with the VLT/HAWK-I instrument and MACS-0717 and MACS-1149 with Keck/MOSFIRE. The final HAWK-I mosaics reach a depth of K~26 AB (5-sigma) with superb ground-based image quality ~0.4" FWHM across the field; shorter integrations with MOSFIRE reach K~25 AB and with FWHM~0.5". The 7'x7' HAWKI field of view provides ideal simultaneous coverage of both the HST cluster and parallel fields (with additional area also covered by Subaru optical and IRAC imaging), and the K band at 2.2 µm crucially fills the gap between the deep space-based imaging bandpasses observed with HST and Spitzer. The addition of the 2.2 µm imaging and photometry greatly improves the constraints on both the photometric redshifts and the stellar-population properties of galaxies extending well below the characteristic stellar mass across most of the age of the universe, down to, and including, the redshifts of the targeted galaxy clusters. The reduced, aligned mosaics of all the K-band fields are made freely available to the Frontier Fields community; identical deep HAWK-I observations of the final two Frontier Fields (Abell 370 and Abell S1063) have been awarded and will be obtained in the upcoming ESO observing periods.

  16. Tracing Evolution of Starbursts and AGNs using Ultra-deep Radio and mm/smm Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min S.; Gim, Hansung; Morrison, Glenn; Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Owen, Frazer; Kellermann, Ken; Aretxaga, Itziar; Giavalisco, Mauro; Hughes, David; Lowenthal, James; Miller, Neal; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro

    2015-08-01

    There is growing evidence supporting a rapid build up of metals among massive galaxies during their rapid growth via an intense starburst in the early epochs. These star formation activities may be largely obscured in the UV and optical light, as in the local universe. If the growth of supermassive blackholes occurs at or nearly the same time, the accompanying AGN activity may also be heavily obscured. Ultra-deep surveys in the radio and far-infrared can offer extinction-free view of these systems, and the advent of new facilities such as the Jansky VLA, ALMA, and LMT now allows us to probe directly the population of starburst galaxies that are responsible for the bulk of the stellar mass build-up during the epoch of galaxy growth (SFR > 10-100 M⊙/yr at z≈2 or earlier). We will present our analysis of the properties of the micro-Jansky radio sources identified by new Jansky VLA surveys of the GOODS and COSMOS fields using the rich archival data already available (Herschel, Spitzer, Chandra, ALMA, LMT, etc.). Specifically, we find evidence for two populations of microJy radio sources with distinct spectral index distribution. We explore whether this reflects differences in the underlying powering mechanisms by examining their radio-FIR correlation and X-ray properties. We also find the previously reported apparent systematic change in the "q-value" with increasing redshift, and we examine the reality of this trend in some detail. Finally, we will also examine the spatial extent of activities for a subset of the sample where high angular resolution (better than 1") information is available.

  17. SCORPIO: a deep survey of radio emission from the stellar life-cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Leto, P.; Ingallinera, A.; Buemi, C. S.; Agliozzo, C.; Cavallaro, F.; Cerrigone, L.

    2015-11-01

    Radio emission has been detected in a broad variety of stellar objects from all stages of stellar evolution. However, most of our knowledge originates from targeted observations of small samples, which are strongly biased to sources which are peculiar at other wavelengths. In order to tackle this problem we have conducted a deep 1.4 GHz survey by using the Australian Telescope Compact Array, with a net bandwidth of 1.7 GHz (1.4-3.1 GHz) , following the same observing setup as that used for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey project, this time choosing a region more appropriate for stellar work. In this paper, the Stellar Continuum Originating from Radio Physics In Ourgalaxy (SCORPIO) project is presented as well as results from the pilot experiment. The achieved rms is 30 μJy and the angular resolution ˜10 arcsec. 614 point-like sources have been extracted just from the pilot field. Only 34 of them are classified in SIMBAD or the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. About 80 per cent of the extracted sources are reported in one of the inspected catalogues and 50 per cent of them appears to belong to a reddened stellar/Galactic population. However, the evaluation of extragalactic contaminants is very difficult without further investigations. Interesting results have been obtained for extended radio sources that fall in the SCORPIO field. Many roundish-like structures (indicated as bubbles in the following) have been found, some of which are classified at other wavelengths. However, for all of these sources, our project has provided us with images of unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution.

  18. A Systematic Survey of Protoclusters at z ~ 3–6 in the CFHTLS Deep Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshikawa, Jun; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Overzier, Roderik; Malkan, Matthew A.; Furusawa, Hisanori; Ishikawa, Shogo; Onoue, Masafusa; Ota, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Niino, Yuu; Uchiyama, Hisakazu

    2016-08-01

    We present the discovery of three protoclusters at z ˜ 3–4 with spectroscopic confirmation in the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Deep Fields. In these fields, we investigate the large-scale projected sky distribution of z ˜ 3–6 Lyman-break galaxies and identify 21 protocluster candidates from regions that are overdense at more than 4σ overdensity significance. Based on cosmological simulations, it is expected that more than 76% of these candidates will evolve into a galaxy cluster of at least a halo mass of 1014 M ⊙ at z = 0. We perform follow-up spectroscopy for eight of the candidates using Subaru/FOCAS, Keck II/DEIMOS, and Gemini-N/GMOS. In total we target 462 dropout candidates and obtain 138 spectroscopic redshifts. We confirm three real protoclusters at z = 3–4 with more than five members spectroscopically identified and find one to be an incidental overdense region by mere chance alignment. The other four candidate regions at z ˜ 5–6 require more spectroscopic follow-up in order to be conclusive. A z = 3.67 protocluster, which has 11 spectroscopically confirmed members, shows a remarkable core-like structure composed of a central small region (<0.5 physical Mpc) and an outskirts region (˜1.0 physical Mpc). The Lyα equivalent widths of members of the protocluster are significantly smaller than those of field galaxies at the same redshift, while there is no difference in the UV luminosity distributions. These results imply that some environmental effects start operating as early as at z ˜ 4 along with the growth of the protocluster structure. This study provides an important benchmark for our analysis of protoclusters in the upcoming Subaru/HSC imaging survey and its spectroscopic follow-up with the Subaru/PFS that will detect thousands of protoclusters up to z ˜ 6.

  19. Initial Optical Counterpart Identifications for Chandra Deep Survey X-ray Sources towards the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J.; Laycock, S.; Baganoff, F. K.; Muno, M. P.; Garmire, G. P.; Morris, M.

    2003-03-01

    We present the initial optical counterpart identifications for the Chandra Catalog of X-ray sources towards the Galactic Center (Muno et al. ApJ submitted). 2357 X-ray point sources are detected during 590 ks of Chandra ACIS-I observations with a 17'x17' field around SgrA*. The search for their optical counterparts is conducted with moderately deep V, R, I and Hα images covering the same field taken with the Mosaic camera on the CTIO 4-m telescope in March 2000 as part of the Chandra Multiwavelength Plane (ChaMPlane) Survey. The error radius of each Chandra source is estimated with a raytrace/wavdetect simulation based on the source off-axis angle and net counts. Some 237 sources are detected below 1.2 keV and with >99% source significance in the full 17' field. They are likely sources in the foreground of the Galactic Center. 204 of the 237 sources have matching optical counterparts. For the ˜2000 sources detected in the hard band (2.5--8 keV), only ˜10% have optical matching (at R<23). And most of these ˜10% matches are likely coincident matches with foreground stars. We present our optical counterpart identification method used for the ChaMPlane Survey and the V, R, I, Hα magnitudes of the optical counterparts of this initial sample. This work is supported by NASA/SAO grant AR1-2001X, AR2-3002A and NSF grant AST-0098683.

  20. DEEP NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE PIPE NEBULA. II. DATA, METHODS, AND DUST EXTINCTION MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.; Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco

    2010-12-20

    We present a new set of high-resolution dust extinction maps of the nearby and essentially starless Pipe Nebula molecular cloud. The maps were constructed from a concerted deep near-infrared imaging survey with the ESO-VLT, ESO-NTT, CAHA 3.5 m telescopes, and 2MASS data. The new maps have a resolution three times higher than the previous extinction map of this cloud by Lombardi et al. and are able to resolve structures down to 2600 AU. We detect 244 significant extinction peaks across the cloud. These peaks have masses between 0.1 and 18.4 M{sub sun}, diameters between 1.2 and 5.7 x 10{sup 4} AU (0.06 and 0.28 pc), and mean densities of about 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}, all in good agreement with previous results. From the analysis of the mean surface density of companions we find a well-defined scale near 1.4 x 10{sup 4} AU below which we detect a significant decrease in structure of the cloud. This scale is smaller than the Jeans length calculated from the mean density of the peaks. The surface density of peaks is not uniform but instead it displays clustering. Extinction peaks in the Pipe Nebula appear to have a spatial distribution similar to the stars in Taurus, suggesting that the spatial distribution of stars evolves directly from the primordial spatial distribution of high-density material.

  1. Measuring M Dwarf Rotation in the Pan-STARRS 1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Erin R.; Williams, Peter K. G.; Berger, Edo

    2016-01-01

    The rise of large-format CCDs and automated detection methods has greatly increased the tractability of large-scale studies of stellar rotation. Studies of the relationship between stellar rotation and magnetic activity show a strong correlation, supporting the concept of a rotationally-driven dynamo. However, the number of confirmed rotation periods for stars in the fully convective regime, whose magnetic dynamos are less well understood, remains low. Here we report on ongoing work to measure rotation periods for the M dwarf stellar population observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1/MDS). We refine an initial sample of around 4.3 million sources using color cuts in each of the five Pan-STARRS 1 filters. Of these sources, we estimate there to be around 135,000 sources which are candidate M dwarfs with a spectral type of M1 or higher. We discuss the outcomes of various rotation period detection methods and present preliminary results. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  2. X-ray Properties of Clusters from the Palomar Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, B. H.; Nichol, B. C.; Romer, A. K.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1996-05-01

    Twenty of the 79 z>0.2 distant, optically selected, cluster candidates in the Palomar Deep Cluster Survey (Postman et al. 1996) were serendipitously observed by the ROSAT satellite. We have reduced the three PSPC pointings that overlapped Postman et al. (1996) fields using the Snowden et al. (1994) Extended X-ray Analysis Software and a wavelet analysis source detection algorithm. We derive count rates for the cluster candidates inside a metric aperture defined by the estimate redshift quoted in Postman et al. (1996). We find all 20 clusters observed by the PSPC to be X-ray faint; only 4 were detected at >3sigma . The luminosities derived from the measured/upper-limit count rates are significantly lower than those predicted from the richness vs luminosity distribution derived for X-ray selected clusters (Edge & Stewart 1991). This discrepancy cannot be wholly attributed to projection effects; according to Postman et al. (1996) less than 30% of their objects are ``phantom clusters''. We will present evidence to support our conclusion that optically selected clusters are younger and less evolved than their X-ray selected counterparts.

  3. A sub-millimetre survey of dust enshrouded galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borys, Colin James Kelvin

    This thesis investigates the emission of sub-millimetre- wave radiation from galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North region. The data were obtained from dedicated observing runs from our group and others using the SCUBA camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The data were combined using techniques specifically developed here for low signal-to-noise source recovery. The sources found represent over 10% of all cosmological sources SCUBA has detected since it was commissioned. The number of sub-mm galaxies we detect account for a significant fraction of the sub-mm back-ground, and we show that mild extrapolations can reproduce it entirely. We comment on their clustering properties, both with themselves and other high-redshift galaxy types. A multi-wavelength analysis of these galaxies shows that SCUBA sources do not all have similar properties, and are made of a collection including: star-forming radio galaxies; optically invisible objects; active galactic nuclei; and extremely red objects. Reasonable attempts to determine the redshift distribution of the sample show that SCUBA galaxies have a median redshift of around 2, and suggest that the global star formation rate may be dominated by such objects at redshifts beyond about 1. The thesis summarises the current state of extra-galactic sub-mm astronomy, and comments on how new surveys and detectors will allow us to place stronger constraints on the evolution properties of the high-redshift Universe.

  4. The Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey: Ultra-deep J and KS Imaging in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Wang, Wei-Hao; Hsieh, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Lihwai; Yan, Haojing; Lim, Jeremy; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2012-12-01

    We present ultra-deep J and KS imaging observations covering a 30' × 30' area of the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDFS) carried out by our Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS). The median 5σ limiting magnitudes for all detected objects in the ECDFS reach 24.5 and 23.9 mag (AB) for J and KS , respectively. In the inner 400 arcmin2 region where the sensitivity is more uniform, objects as faint as 25.6 and 25.0 mag are detected at 5σ. Thus, this is by far the deepest J and KS data sets available for the ECDFS. To combine TENIS with the Spitzer IRAC data for obtaining better spectral energy distributions of high-redshift objects, we developed a novel deconvolution technique (IRACLEAN) to accurately estimate the IRAC fluxes. IRACLEAN can minimize the effect of blending in the IRAC images caused by the large point-spread functions and reduce the confusion noise. We applied IRACLEAN to the images from the Spitzer IRAC/MUSYC Public Legacy in the ECDFS survey (SIMPLE) and generated a J+KS -selected multi-wavelength catalog including the photometry of both the TENIS near-infrared and the SIMPLE IRAC data. We publicly release the data products derived from this work, including the J and KS images and the J+KS -selected multi-wavelength catalog.

  5. Enhancing the Legacy of Spitzer and Herschel with the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Naveen

    The next frontier for comprehensive galaxy surveys is the epoch at z~1.5-3.5, the peak of star formation and black hole activity. Despite the new windows that Spitzer and Herschel have opened up into the stellar and dust emission of distant galaxies and AGN during this key epoch, these studies have been limited by the lack of spectroscopic redshifts and the unknown physical conditions (e.g., metallicities, ionization) within the targeted galaxies. To realize the full potential of Spitzer and Herschel, we require a large spectroscopic survey that will: (a) efficiently assemble spectroscopic redshifts for large samples of galaxies at z=1.4-3.8; (b) yield the physical conditions, including the ionization and metallicities of these galaxies; and (c) easily obtain spectroscopic redshifts even for very dusty/confused galaxies. To this end, our team has been allocated a large program of 47 Keck nights with the multi-object near-IR spectrograph MOSFIRE to carry out the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field Survey (MOSDEF) in three of the Hubble CANDELS fields. MOSDEF will obtain rest-optical spectra of ~1500 galaxies at redshifts z=1.4-3.8, targeting many of the optical nebular emission lines and continuum features (e.g., [OII], [OIII], H-beta, H-alpha, [NII], [SII], 4000 Angstrom break, Ca H and K, and Mbg) that until now have been inaccessible for large samples of distant galaxies, but which are routinely used to measure the SFRs, dust attenuation, metal and gas content, and ionization and dynamical properties in nearby galaxies. MOSDEF spectroscopy provides a critical supporting role for the analysis of Spitzer and Herschel observations of distant galaxies. With this transformative dataset, we will perform the following analyses. First, we will use Spitzer and Herschel imaging, aided with spectroscopic redshifts from MOSDEF, to construct individual and mean dust SEDs for galaxies at redshifts 1.4

  6. X-ray selected galaxy clusters in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, H.; Edge, A. C.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Price, P. A.; Tonry, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of a pilot study for the extended Massive Cluster Survey (eMACS), a comprehensive search for distant, X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at z > 0.5. Our pilot study applies the eMACS concept to the 71 deg2 area extended by the 10 fields of the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Medium Deep Survey (MDS). Candidate clusters are identified by visual inspection of PS1 images in the g, r, i and z bands in a 5 × 5 arcmin2 region around X-ray sources detected in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). To test and optimize the eMACS X-ray selection criteria, our pilot study uses the largest possible RASS data base, i.e. all RASS sources listed in the Bright and Faint Source Catalogues (BSC and FSC) that fall within the MDS footprint. We apply no additional constraints regarding X-ray flux, spectral hardness ratio or photon statistics and lower the redshift threshold to z > 0.3 to extend the probed luminosity range to poorer systems. Scrutiny of PS1/MDS images for 41 BSC and 200 FSC sources combined with dedicated spectroscopic follow-up observations results in a sample of 11 clusters with estimated or spectroscopic redshifts of z > 0.3. In order to assess and quantify the degree of point source contamination of the observed RASS fluxes, we examine archival Chandra data obtained in targeted and serendipitous observations of six of the 11 clusters found. As expected, the diffuse emission from all six systems is contaminated by point sources to some degree, and for half of them active galactic nucleus emission dominates. X-ray follow-up observations will thus be crucial in order to establish robust cluster luminosities for eMACS clusters. Although the small number of distant X-ray luminous clusters in the MDS does not allow us to make firm predictions for the over 20 000 deg2 of extragalactic sky covered by eMACS, the identification of two extremely promising eMACS cluster candidates at z ≳ 0.6 (both yet to be observed with Chandra) in such a small solid angle is encouraging

  7. The Chandra Deep Field North Survey. XV. Optically Bright, X-Ray-Faint Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, A. E.; Bauer, F. E.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. N.; Sargent, W. L. W.; Bautz, M. W.; Conselice, C.; Garmire, G. P.; Schneider, D. P.; Wilson, G.

    2003-08-01

    We have analyzed optically bright, X-ray-faint [OBXF; i.e., log(fX/fR)<~-2] sources identified in an 178.9 arcmin2 area having high exposure (greater than 1500 ks) within the Chandra Deep Field North 2 Ms survey. We find 43 OBXF sources in this area, making up ~15% of the X-ray sources above a 0.5-2 keV flux of ~2.3×10-17 ergs cm-2 s-1. We present spectroscopic identifications for 42 of the OBXF sources and optical spectra for 25, including five previously unpublished redshifts. Deep optical imaging data (either Hubble Space Telescope [HST] or ground-based) are presented for all the OBXF sources; we measure the optical morphologies of the 20 galaxies having HST imaging data. The OBXF population consists mainly of normal and starburst galaxies detected out to cosmologically significant distances (i.e., to a median redshift of z=0.297 and a full redshift range z=0.06-0.845). This is notable since these distances equate to look-back times of up to ~8 Gyr; we are thus provided with a window on the X-ray emission from galaxies at redshifts much closer to the cosmic star formation peak than was possible prior to the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The X-ray luminosity distribution of OBXF sources extends to higher luminosity than does that of ``normal'' galaxies, indicating that a significant fraction are likely dominated by low-luminosity active galactic nuclei or vigorous star formation. The lowest redshift galaxies (z~0.06-0.2) have very low X-ray-to-optical flux ratios [i.e., log(fX/fR)<~-3], which are consistent with those of normal galaxies in the local universe. By combining the detected X-ray counts, we find the average OBXF X-ray spectrum to be consistent with a Γ~2.0 power law. The 0.5-2 keV logN-logS for the OBXF galaxies is much steeper (α~-1.7) than for the general X-ray source population. Indeed, the number of OBXF sources has doubled between the 1 and 2 Ms surveys, rising sharply in numbers at faint fluxes. The extragalactic OBXF sources are found to

  8. Bright z ~ 3 Lyman break galaxies in deep wide field surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan

    In my thesis I investigate the luminous z ˜ 3 Lyman break galaxies in deep wide field surveys. In the first part of the thesis, I use the LBT/LUCIFER to observe a lensed high-redshift star-forming galaxy (J0900+2234) at z = 2.03. With the high S/N near-IR spectroscopic observations, I reveal the detailed physical properties of this high-redshift galaxy, including SFR, metallicity, dust extinction, dynamical mass, and electron number density. In the second part of the thesis, I select a large sample of LBGs at z ˜ 3 from our new LBT Bootes field survey, and study the bright end luminosity function (LF), stellar mass function (SMF) and clustering properties of bright LBGs (1L* < L < 2.5L*). Together with other LF and SMF measurements, the evolution of LF and SMF can be well described by continuously rising star formation history model. Using the clustering measurements in this work and other works, a tight relation between the average host galaxy halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate is found, which can be interpreted as arising from cold flow accretion. The relation also suggests that the cosmic star formation efficiency is about 5%-20% of the total cold flow mass. This cosmic star formation efficiency does not evolve with redshift (from z ˜ 5 to z ˜ 3), hosting dark matter halo mass (1011 -- 1013 M⊙ ), or galaxy luminosity (from 0.3L* to 3L* ). In the third and fourth parts, with the spectroscopic follow-up observations of the bright LBGs, I establish a sample of spectroscopically-confirmed ultraluminous LBGs (ULBGs) in NOAO Boo¨tes field. With this new ULBG sample, the rest-frame UV LF of LBG at M1700A = -23.0 was measured for the first time. I find that the ULBGs have larger outflow velocity, broader Lyalpha emission and ISM absorption line profiles, and more prominent C IV P-Cygni profile. This profile may imply a top-heavy IMF in these ULBGs. The ULBGs have larger stellar mass and SFR, but smaller dust extinction than the typical L* LBGs at z ˜ 2

  9. Assessing the deep drilling potential of Lago de Tota, Colombia, with a seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, B. W.; Wattrus, N. J.; Fonseca, H.; Velasco, F.; Escobar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reconciling orbital-scale patterns of inter-hemispheric South American climate during the Quaternary requires continuous, high-resolution paleoclimate records that span multiple glacial cycles from both hemispheres. Southern Andean Quaternary climates are represented by multi-proxy results from Lake Titicaca (Peru-Bolivia) spanning the last 400 ka and by pending results from the Lago Junin Drilling Project (Peru). Although Northern Andean sediment records spanning the last few million years have been retrieved from the Bogota and Fúquene Basins in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes, climatic reconstructions based on these cores have thus far been limited to pollen-based investigations. When viewed together with the Southern Hemisphere results, these records suggest an anti-phased hemispheric climatic response during glacial cycles. In order to better assess orbital-scale climate responses, however, independent temperature and hydroclimate proxies from the Northern Hemisphere are needed in addition to vegetation histories. As part of this objective, an effort is underway to develop a paleoclimate record from Lago de Tota (3030 m asl), the largest lake in Colombia and the third largest lake in the Andes. One of 17 highland tectonic basins in Eastern Cordillera, Lago de Tota formed during Tertiary uplift that deformed pre-foreland megasequences, synrift and back-arc megasequences. The precise age and thickness of sediments in the Lago de Tota basin has not previously been established. Here, we present results from a recent single-channel seismic reflection survey collected with a small (5 cubic inch) air gun and high-resolution CHIRP sub-bottom data. With these data, we examine the depositional history and sequence stratigraphy of Lago de Tota and assess its potential as a deep drilling target.

  10. A Rapid Radiocarbon Method for Age Surveys of Southern Ocean Deep-sea Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A.; Robinson, L. F.; Gerlach, D. S.; Jenkins, W. J.; McNichol, A. P.

    2008-12-01

    Deep-sea corals provide a unique archive of past ocean radiocarbon because they are sessile and can be dated independently using U-series nuclides. One difficulty, however, is that using current techniques it is impractical to date large numbers of corals in order to determine which specimens have the appropriate ages for radiocarbon reconstructions. Here we present results from a quick method of making graphite for radiocarbon dating that reduces the amount of sample preparation time, thus allowing us to date a greater number of corals. In addition, these rapid age surveys provide important information on coral age populations, allowing us to examine coral distributions through time. The corals used in this study come from a sample set of about 6,000 specimens of Flabellum, Balanophyllia and Desmophyllum spp. collected from the Drake Passage area (50S -70S, 120 m-1700 m depth). Replicate samples from a single coral yielded a standard deviation of 81 years (n=9). Variations in sample mass (3 to 85 mg) have no clear effect on the Fm and furthermore, a simple cleaning using methanol yields the same results as a more involved cleaning procedure that includes an oxidizing solution and perchloric acid rinse. To improve the efficiency of the method, we assumed a delta13C = 0 per mil. This assumption is likely our largest source of uncertainty, resulting in offsets of up to 200 radiocarbon years over a reasonable range of delta13C. This level of uncertainty is sufficiently low to allow distinction between corals from different time periods over the past 35 ky (e.g. Last Glacial Maximum, Younger Dryas, etc.). To date, we have found corals from Burdwood Bank dating from the modern to the Younger Dryas and corals from the Drake Passage dating from the modern to Heinrich Event 1, which will be used in future paleo-climatic reconstructions in this important part of the ocean.

  11. AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep Survey. Revision of the catalogue via a new image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Arimatsu, K.; Oi, N.; Takagi, T.; Oyabu, S.; Goto, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Malkan, M.; Pearson, C.; Małek, K.; Solarz, A.

    2013-11-01

    Context. We present the revised near- to mid-infrared catalogue of the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole deep survey. The survey has the unique advantage of continuous filter coverage from 2 to 24 μm over nine photometric bands, but the initial version of the survey catalogue leaves room for improvement in the image analysis stage; the original images are strongly contaminated by the behaviour of the detector and the optical system. Aims: The purpose of this study is to devise new image analysis methods and to improve the detection limit and reliability of the source extraction. Methods: We removed the scattered light and stray light from the Earth limb, and corrected for artificial patterns in the images by creating appropriate templates. We also removed any artificial sources due to bright sources by using their properties or masked them out visually. In addition, for the mid-infrared source extraction, we created detection images by stacking all six bands. This reduced the sky noise and enabled us to detect fainter sources more reliably. For the near-infrared source catalogue, we considered only objects with counterparts from ground-based catalogues to avoid fake sources. For our ground-based catalogues, we used catalogues based on the CFHT/MegaCam z' band, CFHT/WIRCam Ks band and Subaru/Scam z' band. Objects with multiple counterparts were all listed in the catalogue with a merged flag for the AKARI flux. Results: The detection limits of all mid-infrared bands were improved by ~20%, and the total number of detected objects was increased by ~2000 compared with the previous version of the catalogue; it now has 9560 objects. The 5σ detection limits in our catalogue are 11, 9, 10, 30, 34, 57, 87, 93, and 256 μJy in the N2, N3, N4, S7, S9W, S11, L15, L18W, and L24 bands, respectively. The astrometric accuracies of these band detections are 0.48, 0.52, 0.55, 0.99, 0.95, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, and 1.6 arcsec, respectively. The false-detection rate of all nine bands was decreased

  12. GTC/OSIRIS SPECTROSCOPIC IDENTIFICATION OF A FAINT L SUBDWARF IN THE UKIRT INFRARED DEEP SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Lodieu, N.

    2010-01-10

    We present the discovery of an L subdwarf in 234 deg{sup 2} common to the UK InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey Large Area Survey Data Release 2 and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3. This is the fifth L subdwarf announced to date, the first one identified in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey, and the faintest known. The blue optical and near-infrared colors of ULAS J135058.86+081506.8 and its overall spectra energy distribution are similar to the known mid-L subdwarfs. Low-resolution optical (700-1000 nm) spectroscopy with the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy spectrograph on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio de Canarias reveals that ULAS J135058.86+081506.8 exhibits a strong K I pressure-broadened line at 770 nm and a red slope longward of 800 nm, features characteristics of L-type dwarfs. From direct comparison with the four known L subdwarfs, we estimate its spectral type to be sdL4-sdL6 and derive a distance in the interval 94-170 pc. We provide a rough estimate of the space density for mid-L subdwarfs of 1.5 x 10{sup -4} pc{sup -3}.

  13. The XMM Deep Survey in the CDF-S. VII. UV catalogue of the Optical Monitor observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, M.; Talavera, A.; Vagnetti, F.; Trevese, D.; Comastri, A.; Paolillo, M.; Ranalli, P.; Vignali, C.

    2015-02-01

    Context. The XMM-Newton X-ray observatory has repeatedly observed the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) in 33 epochs (2001-2010) through the XMM-CDFS Deep Survey. During the X-ray observations, XMM-OM targeted the central 17 × 17 arcmin2 region of the X-ray field of view, providing simultaneous optical/UV coverage of the CDF-S. The resulting set of data can be used to build an XMM-OM catalogue of the CDF-S, filling the UV spectral coverage between the optical surveys and GALEX observations. Aims: We present the UV catalogue of the XMM-CDFS Deep Survey. Its main purpose is to provide complementary UV average photometric measurements of known optical/UV sources in the CDF-S, taking advantage of the unique characteristics of the survey (UV and X-ray simultaneous data, time monitoring ~8.5 years, multi-wavelength photometry). The data reduction is also intended to improve the standard source detection on individual observations by cataloguing faint sources by stacking their exposure images. Methods: We re-processed the XMM-OM data of the survey and stacked the exposures from consecutive observations using the standard Science Analysis System (SAS) tools to process the data obtained during single observations. Average measurements of detections with SAS good quality flags from individual observations and from stacked images were joined to compile the catalogue. Sources were validated through the cross-identification within the ESO Imaging survey (Arnouts et al. 2001) and the COMBO-17 survey (Wolf et al. 2004). Results: Photometric data of 1129 CDF-S sources are provided in the catalogue, and optical/UV/X-ray photometric and spectroscopic information from other surveys are also included. The stacking extends the detection limits by ~1 mag in the three UV bands, contributing ~30% of the catalogued UV sources. The comparison with the available measurements in similar spectral bands confirms the validity of the XMM-OM calibration. The combined COMBO-17/X-ray classification

  14. The great observatories origins deep survey. VLT/VIMOS spectroscopy in the GOODS-south field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popesso, P.; Dickinson, M.; Nonino, M.; Vanzella, E.; Daddi, E.; Fosbury, R. A. E.; Kuntschner, H.; Mainieri, V.; Cristiani, S.; Cesarsky, C.; Giavalisco, M.; Renzini, A.; GOODS Team

    2009-02-01

    Aims: We present the first results from the VIsible Multiobject Spectrograph (VIMOS) ESO/GOODS program of spectroscopy for faint galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S). This program complements the FORS2 ESO/GOODS campaign. Methods: All 3312 spectra were obtained in service mode with VIMOS at the ESO/VLT UT3. The VIMOS LR-Blue and MR grisms were used to cover different redshift ranges. Galaxies at 1.8 < z < 3.5 were observed in the GOODS VIMOS-LR-Blue campaign. Galaxies at z < 1 and Lyman Break Galaxies at z > 3.5 were observed in the VIMOS MR survey. Results: Here we report results for the first 12 masks (out of 20 total). We extracted 2344 from 6 LR-Blue masks and 968 from 6 MR masks. A large percentage, 33% of the LR-Blue and 18% of the MR spectra, are serendipitous observations. We obtained 1481 and 656 redshifts in the LR-Blue and MR campaign, respectively, for a total success rate of 70% and 75%, respectively, which decrease to 63% and 68% when also the serendipitous targets are considered. The typical redshift accuracy is σz = 0.001. The reliability of the redshift estimate varies with the quality flag. The LR-Blue quality flag A redshifts are reliable at ~95% confidence level, flag B redshifs at ~70% and quality C et ~40%. The MR redshift reliability is somewhat higher: 100% for quality flag A, ~90% for quality flag B and ~70% for flag C. By complementing our VIMOS spectroscopic catalog with all existing spectroscopic redshifts publicly available in the CDF-S, we created a redshift master catalog. By comparing this redshift compilation with different photometric redshift catalogs we estimate the completeness level of the CDF-S spectroscopic coverage in several redshift bins. Conclusions: The completeness level is very high, >60%, at z < 3.5, and it is very uncertain at higher redshift. The master catalog was used also to estimate completeness and contamination levels of different galaxy photometric selection techniques. The BzK selection method

  15. South China Sea Tectonics and Magnetics: Constraints from IODP Expedition 349 and Deep-tow Magnetic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Li, C. F.; Kulhanek, D. K.; Zhao, X.; Liu, Q.; Xu, X.; Sun, Z.; Zhu, J.

    2014-12-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is the largest low-latitude marginal sea in the world. Its formation and evolution are linked to the complex continental-oceanic tectonic interaction of the Eurasian, Pacific, and Indo-Australian plates. Despite its relatively small size and short history, the SCS has undergone nearly a complete Wilson cycle from continental break-up to seafloor spreading to subduction. In January-March 2014, Expedition 349 of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) drilled five sites in the deep basin of the SCS. Three sites (U1431, U1433, and U1434) cored into oceanic basement near the fossil spreading center on the East and Southwest Subbasins, whereas Sites U1432 and U1435 are located near the northern continent/ocean boundary of the East Subbasin. Shipboard biostratigraphy based on microfossils preserved in sediment directly above or within basement suggests that the preliminary cessation age of spreading in both the East and Southwest Subbasins is around early Miocene (16-20 Ma); however, post-cruise radiometric dating is being conducted to directly date the basement basalt in these subbasins. Prior to the IODP drilling, high-resolution near-seafloor magnetic surveys were conducted in 2012 and 2013 in the SCS with survey lines passing near the five IODP drilling sites. The deep-tow surveys revealed detailed patterns of the SCS magnetic anomalies with amplitude and spatial resolutions several times better than that of traditional sea surface measurements. Preliminary results reveal several episodes of magnetic reversal events that were not recognized by sea surface measurements. Together the IODP drilling and deep-tow magnetic surveys provide critical constraints for investigating the processes of seafloor spreading in the SCS and evolution of a mid-ocean ridge from active spreading to termination.

  16. Worldwide estimates of deep natural gas resources based on the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Crovelli, R.A.; Bartberger, C.E.; Takahashi, K.I.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey recently assessed undiscovered conventional gas and oil resources in eight regions of the world outside the U.S. The resources assessed were those estimated to have the potential to be added to reserves within the next thirty years. This study is a worldwide analysis of the estimated volumes and distribution of deep (>4.5 km or about 15,000 ft), undiscovered conventional natural gas resources based on this assessment. Two hundred forty-six assessment units in 128 priority geologic provinces, 96 countries, and two jointly held areas were assessed using a probabilistic Total Petroleum System approach. Priority geologic provinces were selected from a ranking of 937 provinces worldwide. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment Team did not assess undiscovered petroleum resources in the U.S. For this report, mean estimated volumes of deep conventional undiscovered gas resources in the U.S. are taken from estimates of 101 deep plays (out of a total of 550 conventional plays in the U.S.) from the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources. A probabilistic method was designed to subdivide gas resources into depth slices using a median-based triangular probability distribution as a model for drilling depth to estimate the percentages of estimated gas resources below various depths. For both the World Petroleum Assessment 2000 and the 1995 National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources, minimum, median, and maximum depths were assigned to each assessment unit and play; these depths were used in our analysis. Two-hundred seventy-four deep assessment units and plays in 124 petroleum provinces were identified for the U.S. and the world. These assessment units and plays contain a mean undiscovered conventional gas resource of 844 trillion cubic ft (Tcf) occuring at depths below 4.5 km. The deep undiscovered conventional gas resource (844 Tcf) is about 17% of the total world gas resource (4,928 Tcf) based on

  17. De-biased Populations of Kuiper Belt Objects from the Deep Ecliptic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, E. R.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Elliot, J. L.; Benecchi, S. D.; Buie, M. W.; Trilling, D. E.; Wasserman, L. H.

    2014-09-01

    The Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES) was a survey project that discovered hundreds of Kuiper Belt objects from 1998 to 2005. Extensive follow-up observations of these bodies has yielded 304 objects with well-determined orbits and dynamical classifications into one of several categories: Classical, Scattered, Centaur, or 16 mean-motion resonances with Neptune. The DES search fields are well documented, enabling us to calculate the probability on each frame of detecting an object with its particular orbital parameters and absolute magnitude at a randomized point in its orbit. The detection probabilities range from a maximum of 0.32 for the 3:2 resonant object 2002 GF 32 to a minimum of 1.5 × 10-7 for the faint Scattered object 2001 FU 185. By grouping individual objects together by dynamical classes, we can estimate the distributions of four parameters that define each class: semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and object size. The orbital element distributions (a, e, and i) were fit to the largest three classes (Classical, 3:2, and Scattered) using a maximum likelihood fit. Using the absolute magnitude (H magnitude) as a proxy for the object size, we fit a power law to the number of objects versus H magnitude for eight classes with at least five detected members (246 objects). The Classical objects are best fit with a power-law slope of α = 1.02 ± 0.01 (observed from 5 <= H <= 7.2). Six other dynamical classes (Scattered plus five resonances) have consistent magnitude distribution slopes with the Classicals, provided that the absolute number of objects is scaled. Scattered objects are somewhat more numerous than Classical objects, while there are only a quarter as many 3:2 objects as Classicals. The exception to the power law relation is the Centaurs, which are non-resonant objects with perihelia closer than Neptune and therefore brighter and detectable at smaller sizes. Centaurs were observed from 7.5 < H < 11, and that population is best fit by a power law

  18. De-biased populations of Kuiper belt objects from the deep ecliptic survey

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, E. R.; Benecchi, S. D.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Elliot, J. L.; Buie, M. W.; Trilling, D. E.; Wasserman, L. H.

    2014-09-01

    The Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES) was a survey project that discovered hundreds of Kuiper Belt objects from 1998 to 2005. Extensive follow-up observations of these bodies has yielded 304 objects with well-determined orbits and dynamical classifications into one of several categories: Classical, Scattered, Centaur, or 16 mean-motion resonances with Neptune. The DES search fields are well documented, enabling us to calculate the probability on each frame of detecting an object with its particular orbital parameters and absolute magnitude at a randomized point in its orbit. The detection probabilities range from a maximum of 0.32 for the 3:2 resonant object 2002 GF {sub 32} to a minimum of 1.5 × 10{sup –7} for the faint Scattered object 2001 FU {sub 185}. By grouping individual objects together by dynamical classes, we can estimate the distributions of four parameters that define each class: semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and object size. The orbital element distributions (a, e, and i) were fit to the largest three classes (Classical, 3:2, and Scattered) using a maximum likelihood fit. Using the absolute magnitude (H magnitude) as a proxy for the object size, we fit a power law to the number of objects versus H magnitude for eight classes with at least five detected members (246 objects). The Classical objects are best fit with a power-law slope of α = 1.02 ± 0.01 (observed from 5 ≤ H ≤ 7.2). Six other dynamical classes (Scattered plus five resonances) have consistent magnitude distribution slopes with the Classicals, provided that the absolute number of objects is scaled. Scattered objects are somewhat more numerous than Classical objects, while there are only a quarter as many 3:2 objects as Classicals. The exception to the power law relation is the Centaurs, which are non-resonant objects with perihelia closer than Neptune and therefore brighter and detectable at smaller sizes. Centaurs were observed from 7.5 < H < 11, and that population is best

  19. THE TAIWAN ECDFS NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY: ULTRA-DEEP J AND K{sub S} IMAGING IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD-SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Wang, Wei-Hao; Hsieh, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Lihwai; Lim, Jeremy; Ho, Paul T. P.; Yan Haojing

    2012-12-15

    We present ultra-deep J and K{sub S} imaging observations covering a 30' Multiplication-Sign 30' area of the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDFS) carried out by our Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS). The median 5{sigma} limiting magnitudes for all detected objects in the ECDFS reach 24.5 and 23.9 mag (AB) for J and K{sub S} , respectively. In the inner 400 arcmin{sup 2} region where the sensitivity is more uniform, objects as faint as 25.6 and 25.0 mag are detected at 5{sigma}. Thus, this is by far the deepest J and K{sub S} data sets available for the ECDFS. To combine TENIS with the Spitzer IRAC data for obtaining better spectral energy distributions of high-redshift objects, we developed a novel deconvolution technique (IRACLEAN) to accurately estimate the IRAC fluxes. IRACLEAN can minimize the effect of blending in the IRAC images caused by the large point-spread functions and reduce the confusion noise. We applied IRACLEAN to the images from the Spitzer IRAC/MUSYC Public Legacy in the ECDFS survey (SIMPLE) and generated a J+K{sub S} -selected multi-wavelength catalog including the photometry of both the TENIS near-infrared and the SIMPLE IRAC data. We publicly release the data products derived from this work, including the J and K{sub S} images and the J+K{sub S} -selected multi-wavelength catalog.

  20. Overview of North Ecliptic Pole Deep Multi-wavelength Survey as a Probe of the Cosmic Noon Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhara, Hideo; Oi, Nagisa

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the North Ecliptic Pole deep (0.5 deg2, NEP-Deep) multi-wavelength survey covering from X-ray to radio-wave is presented. The NEP-Deep provides us with several thousands of 15 μm or 18 μm selected sample of galaxies, which is the largest sample ever made at these wavelengths. A continuous filter coverage in the mid-infrared wavelength (7, 9, 11, 15, 18, and 24 μm) is unique and vital to diagnose the contributions from starbursts and AGNs in the galaxies out to z=2. The goal of the project is to resolve the nature of the cosmic star formation history at the cosmic noon era (e.g. z=1--2), and to find a clue to understand its decline from z=1 to present universe by utilizing the unique power of the multiwavelength survey. To achieve the goal we use a few diagnostic physical parameters unique to the NEP dataset: specific star-formation rate, dust attenuation, and obscured AGN fraction, etc.It is also noteworthy that the NEP is the legacy field thanks to its high visibility by the space observatories, such as eROSITA, Euclid, JWST, and SPICA. SPICA, the next generation large cooled space telescope is extremely powerful to study the rise and fall of the cosmic star-formation history in the universe.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: EIS: optical deep public survey (Mignano+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignano, A.; Miralles, J.-M.; da Costa, L.; Olsen, L. F.; Prandoni, I.; Arnouts, S.; Benoist, C.; Madejsky, R.; Slijkhuis, R.; Zaggia, S.

    2007-01-01

    The subdirectory "cat" includes the science grade catalogs extracted for each of the 3 regions (DEEP1, DEEP2, DEEP3), divided in 11 fields, discussed in this paper and the log-files associated with each catalog. The catalog files are in FITS format containing the primary HDU and 4 tables (MASKS, FILTER, OBJECTS and FIELDS) with the format described in Dietrich et al., 2006. The log files contain information about parameters used in the extraction process as well as parameters for quality assessment of the catalogs. The subdirectory "ima" includes includes the science grade images extracted for each of the 3 regions (DEEP1, DEEP2, DEEP3), divided in 11 fields, discussed in this paper and the log-files associated with each image. The images are in FITS format with two extensions, the first one giving the actual image and the second one being a weight map. The details of the field naming convention can be found at http://www.eso.org/science/eis (6 data files).

  2. The ROSAT Deep Survey. 2; Optical Identification, Photometry and Spectra of X-Ray Sources in the Lockman Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M.; Hasinger, G.; Gunn, J.; Schneider, D.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Lehmann, I.; MacKenty, J.; Truemper, J.; Zamorani, G.

    1998-01-01

    The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with fluxes in the 0.5 - 2 keV band larger than 5.5 x 10(exp -15)erg/sq cm/s in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper 1). We have obtained deep broad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the positions of the X-ray sources. We define systematically the process leading to the optical identifications of the X-ray sources. For this purpose, we introduce five identification (ID) classes that characterize the process in each case. Among the 50 X-ray sources, we identify 39 AGNs, 3 groups of galaxies, 1 galaxy and 3 galactic stars. Four X-ray sources remain unidentified so far; two of these objects may have an unusually large ratio of X-ray to optical flux.

  3. The WIRCam Deep Survey. I. Counts, colours, and mass-functions derived from near-infrared imaging in the CFHTLS deep fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielby, R.; Hudelot, P.; McCracken, H. J.; Ilbert, O.; Daddi, E.; Le Fèvre, O.; Gonzalez-Perez, V.; Kneib, J.-P.; Marmo, C.; Mellier, Y.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Willott, C. J.

    2012-09-01

    We present a new near-infrared imaging survey in the four CFHTLS deep fields: the WIRCam Deep Survey or "WIRDS". WIRDS comprises extremely deep, high quality (FWHM ~ 0.6″) J, H, and Ks imaging covering a total effective area of 2.1 deg2 and reaching AB 50% completeness limits of ≈ 24.5. We combine our images with the CFHTLS to create a unique eight-band ugrizJHKS photometric catalogues in the four CFHTLS deep fields; these four separate fields allow us to make a robust estimate of the effect of cosmic variance for all our measurements. We use these catalogues in combination with ≈ 9800 spectroscopic redshifts to estimate precise photometric redshifts (σΔz/(1 + z) ≲ 0.03 at i < 25), galaxy types, star-formation rates and stellar masses for a unique sample of ≈ 1.8 million galaxies. Our JHKs number counts are consistent with previous studies. We apply the "BzK" selection to our gzK filter set and find that the star forming BzK selection successfully selects 76% of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.4 < z < 2.5 in our photometric catalogue, based on our photometric redshift measurement. Similarly the passive BzK selection returns 52% of the passive 1.4 < z < 2.5 population identified in the photometric catalogue. We present the mass functions of the total galaxy population as a function of redshift up to z = 2 and present fits using double Schechter functions. A mass-dependent evolution of the mass function is seen with the numbers of galaxies with masses of M ≲ 1010.75 still evolving at z ≲ 1, but galaxies of higher mass reaching their present day numbers by z ~ 0.8-1. This is consistent with the present picture of downsizing in galaxy evolution. We compare our results with the predictions of the GALFORM semi-analytical galaxy formation model and find that the simulations provide a relatively successful fit to the observed mass functions at intermediate masses (i.e. 10 ≲ log (M/M⊙) ≲ 11). However, as is common with semi

  4. Ultra-deep K S-band Imaging of the Hubble Frontier Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammer, Gabriel B.; Marchesini, Danilo; Labbé, Ivo; Spitler, Lee; Lange-Vagle, Daniel; Barker, Elizbeth A.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Kodama, Tadayuki; Lundgren, Britt; Martis, Nicholas; Muzzin, Adam; Stefanon, Mauro; Toft, Sune; van der Wel, Arjen; Vulcani, Benedetta; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2016-09-01

    We present an overview of the “KIFF” project, which provides ultra-deep K s -band imaging of all six of the Hubble Frontier Fields clusters, Abell 2744, MACS-0416, Abell S1063, Abell 370, MACS-0717, and MACS-1149. All of these fields have recently been observed with large allocations of Directors’ Discretionary Time with the Hubble and Spitzer telescopes, covering 0.4\\lt λ \\lt 1.6 μ {{m}} and 3.6–4.5 μ {{m}}, respectively. VLT/HAWK-I integrations of the first four fields reach 5σ limiting depths of {K}s∼ 26.0 (AB, point sources) and have excellent image quality (FWHM ∼ 0.″4). The MACS-0717 and MACS-1149 fields are observable from the northern hemisphere, and shorter Keck/MOSFIRE integrations on those fields reach limiting depths of K s = 25.5 and 25.1, with a seeing FWHM of ∼ 0.″4 and 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5. In all cases the K s -band mosaics cover the primary cluster and parallel HST/ACS+WFC3 fields. The total area of the K s -band coverage is 490 arcmin2. The K s -band at 2.2 μ {{m}} crucially fills the gap between the reddest HST filter (1.6 μ {{m}} ∼ H band) and the IRAC 3.6 μ {{m}} passband. While reaching the full depths of the space-based imaging is not currently feasible from the ground, the deep K s -band images provide important constraints on both the redshifts and the stellar population properties of galaxies extending well below the characteristic stellar mass across most of the age of the universe, down to and including the redshifts of the targeted galaxy clusters (z≲ 0.5). Reduced, aligned mosaics of all six survey fields are provided.

  5. Trends in Continuous Deep Sedation until Death between 2007 and 2013: A Repeated Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joachim; Rietjens, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background Continuous deep sedation until death is a highly debated medical practice, particularly regarding its potential to hasten death and its proper use in end-of-life care. A thorough analysis of important trends in this practice is needed to identify potentially problematic developments. This study aims to examine trends in the prevalence and practice characteristics of continuous deep sedation until death in Flanders, Belgium between 2007 and 2013, and to study variation on physicians’ degree of palliative training. Methods Population-based death certificate study in 2007 and 2013 in Flanders, Belgium. Reporting physicians received questionnaires about medical practices preceding the patient’s death. Patient characteristics, clinical characteristics (drugs used, duration, artificial nutrition/hydration, intention and consent), and palliative care training of attending physician were recorded. We posed the following question regarding continuous deep sedation: ‘Was the patient continuously and deeply sedated or kept in a coma until death by the use of one or more drugs’. Results After the initial rise of continuous deep sedation to 14.5% in 2007 (95%CI 13.1%-15.9%), its use decreased to 12.0% in 2013 (95%CI 10.9%-13.2%). Compared with 2007, in 2013 opioids were less often used as sole drug and the decision to use continuous deep sedation was more often preceded by patient request. Compared to non-experts, palliative care experts more often used benzodiazepines and less often opioids, withheld artificial nutrition/hydration more often and performed sedation more often after a request from or with the consent of the patient or family. Conclusion Worldwide, this study is the first to show a decrease in the prevalence of continuous deep sedation. Despite positive changes in performance and decision-making towards more compliance with due care requirements, there is still room for improvement in the use of recommended drugs and in the involvement of

  6. The Chandra Deep Field-South Survey: 4 Ms Source Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y. Q.; Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Bauer, F. E.; Lehmer, B. D.; Broos, P. S.; Schneider, D. P.; Alexander, D. M.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Gilli, R.; Hasinger, G.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Koekemoer, A.; Liu, T.; Mainieri, V.; Paolillo, M.; Rafferty, D. A.; Rosati, P.; Shemmer, O.; Silverman, J. D.; Smail, I.; Tozzi, P.; Vignali, C.

    2011-07-01

    We present source catalogs for the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S), which is the deepest Chandra survey to date and covers an area of 464.5 arcmin2. We provide a main Chandra source catalog, which contains 740 X-ray sources that are detected with WAVDETECT at a false-positive probability threshold of 10-5 in at least one of three X-ray bands (0.5-8 keV, full band; 0.5-2 keV, soft band; and 2-8 keV, hard band) and also satisfy a binomial-probability source-selection criterion of P < 0.004 (i.e., the probability of sources not being real is less than 0.004); this approach is designed to maximize the number of reliable sources detected. A total of 300 main-catalog sources are new compared to the previous 2 Ms CDF-S main-catalog sources. We determine X-ray source positions using centroid and matched-filter techniques and obtain a median positional uncertainty of ≈0farcs42. We also provide a supplementary catalog, which consists of 36 sources that are detected with WAVDETECT at a false-positive probability threshold of 10-5, satisfy the condition of 0.004 < P < 0.1, and have an optical counterpart with R < 24. Multiwavelength identifications, basic optical/infrared/radio photometry, and spectroscopic/photometric redshifts are provided for the X-ray sources in the main and supplementary catalogs. Seven hundred sixteen (≈97%) of the 740 main-catalog sources have multiwavelength counterparts, with 673 (≈94% of 716) having either spectroscopic or photometric redshifts. The 740 main-catalog sources span broad ranges of full-band flux and 0.5-8 keV luminosity; the 300 new main-catalog sources span similar ranges although they tend to be systematically lower. Basic analyses of the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of the sources indicate that >75% of the main-catalog sources are active galactic nuclei (AGNs); of the 300 new main-catalog sources, about 35% are likely normal and starburst galaxies, reflecting the rise of normal and starburst galaxies at the very

  7. THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD-SOUTH SURVEY: 4 Ms SOURCE CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y. Q.; Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Broos, P. S.; Schneider, D. P.; Bauer, F. E.; Lehmer, B. D.; Alexander, D. M.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Fabian, A. C.; Hasinger, G.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Koekemoer, A.; Liu, T.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Paolillo, M.; Rafferty, D. A.

    2011-07-01

    We present source catalogs for the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S), which is the deepest Chandra survey to date and covers an area of 464.5 arcmin{sup 2}. We provide a main Chandra source catalog, which contains 740 X-ray sources that are detected with WAVDETECT at a false-positive probability threshold of 10{sup -5} in at least one of three X-ray bands (0.5-8 keV, full band; 0.5-2 keV, soft band; and 2-8 keV, hard band) and also satisfy a binomial-probability source-selection criterion of P < 0.004 (i.e., the probability of sources not being real is less than 0.004); this approach is designed to maximize the number of reliable sources detected. A total of 300 main-catalog sources are new compared to the previous 2 Ms CDF-S main-catalog sources. We determine X-ray source positions using centroid and matched-filter techniques and obtain a median positional uncertainty of {approx}0.''42. We also provide a supplementary catalog, which consists of 36 sources that are detected with WAVDETECT at a false-positive probability threshold of 10{sup -5}, satisfy the condition of 0.004 < P < 0.1, and have an optical counterpart with R < 24. Multiwavelength identifications, basic optical/infrared/radio photometry, and spectroscopic/photometric redshifts are provided for the X-ray sources in the main and supplementary catalogs. Seven hundred sixteen ({approx}97%) of the 740 main-catalog sources have multiwavelength counterparts, with 673 ({approx}94% of 716) having either spectroscopic or photometric redshifts. The 740 main-catalog sources span broad ranges of full-band flux and 0.5-8 keV luminosity; the 300 new main-catalog sources span similar ranges although they tend to be systematically lower. Basic analyses of the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of the sources indicate that >75% of the main-catalog sources are active galactic nuclei (AGNs); of the 300 new main-catalog sources, about 35% are likely normal and starburst galaxies, reflecting the rise of normal and

  8. A deep redshift survey of field galaxies. Comments on the reality of the Butcher-Oemler effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, David C.; Kron, Richard G.

    1987-01-01

    A spectroscopic survey of over 400 field galaxies has been completed in three fields for which we have deep UBVI photographic photometry. The galaxies typically range from B=20 to 22 and possess redshifts z from 0.1 to 0.5 that are often quite spiky in distribution. Little, if any, luminosity evolution is observed up to redshifts z approx 0.5. By such redshifts, however, an unexpectedly large fraction of luminous galaxies has very blue intrinsic colors that suggest extensive star formation; in contrast, the reddest galaxies still have colors that match those of present-day ellipticals.

  9. Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey -- GOODS-North Field, Late Visits of SNe Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Sandra

    2012-10-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey {CANDELS}is designed to document the |*|rst third of galactic evolution from z =8 to 1.5 via deep imaging of more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IRand ACS. It will also find the first Type Ia SNe beyond z > 1.5 andestablish their accuracy as standard candles for cosmology. Fivepremier multi-wavelength sky regions selected from the SpitzerExtragalactic Deep Survey {SEDS} provide complementary IRAC imagingdata down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource for stellar masses at allredshifts. The use of |*|ve widely separated |*|elds mitigates cosmicvariance and yields statistically robust and complete samples ofgalaxies down to 10^9 solar masses out to z 8.The program merges two originally separate MCT proposals. The Faberprogram incorporates a |*|Wide|*| imaging survey in three separate fieldsto 2 orbit depth over 0.2 sq. degrees, plus a |*|Deep|*| imaging surveyto 12 orbit depth in the two GOODS regions over 0.04 sq. degrees.When combined with ultra-deep imaging from the Hubble Ultradeep Fieldprogram {GO 11563}, the result is a three-tiered strategy that ef|*|cientlysamples both bright/rare and faint/common extragalactic objects. TheFerguson program adds an extensive high-redshift Type Ia SNe search,plus ultraviolet "daytime" UVIS exposures in GOODS-N to exploit theCVZ opportunity in that field.This program, GO 12060, is part of the GOODS-S Deep survey. Special Deepscience highlights include: * Detection and counts of early galaxies to z 7-8 as revealed by red-sensitive WFC3-IR images beyond the Lya break - Measurement of the luminosity function of infant galaxies down to 10^9 solar masses out to z = 7-8 - Measurement of the faint-end LF slope to assess the contribution of faint galaxies to cosmic reionization * The physics of early star formation - Propertes of the earliest star-forming regions - sizes, star-formation rates, stellar masses and radiation densities, dust contents - In concert with Spitzer

  10. Bent-tailed radio sources in the australia telescope large area survey of the Chandra deep field south

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghan, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, supplemented by the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South. Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 BT sources, 4 diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (1 relic, 2 halos, and 1 unclassified object), and a further 7 complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range 10{sup 22} ≤ P {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≤ 10{sup 26} W Hz{sup –1}, with redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kiloparsecs up to about 1 Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here, one is the most distant BT source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be associated with known clusters: a wide-angle tail source in A3141 and a putative radio relic which appears at the infall region between the galaxy group MZ 00108 and the galaxy cluster AMPCC 40. Further observations are required to confirm the relic detection, which, if successful, would demonstrate this to be the least powerful relic yet seen with P {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} = 9 × 10{sup 22} W Hz{sup –1}. Using these data, we predict future 1.4 GHz all-sky surveys with a resolution of ∼10 arcsec and a sensitivity of 10 μJy will detect of the order of 560,000 extended low-surface-brightness radio sources of which 440,000 will have a BT morphology.

  11. Bent-tailed Radio Sources in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey of the Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, supplemented by the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South. Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 BT sources, 4 diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (1 relic, 2 halos, and 1 unclassified object), and a further 7 complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range 1022 <= P 1.4 GHz <= 1026 W Hz-1, with redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kiloparsecs up to about 1 Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here, one is the most distant BT source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be associated with known clusters: a wide-angle tail source in A3141 and a putative radio relic which appears at the infall region between the galaxy group MZ 00108 and the galaxy cluster AMPCC 40. Further observations are required to confirm the relic detection, which, if successful, would demonstrate this to be the least powerful relic yet seen with P 1.4 GHz = 9 × 1022 W Hz-1. Using these data, we predict future 1.4 GHz all-sky surveys with a resolution of ~10 arcsec and a sensitivity of 10 μJy will detect of the order of 560,000 extended low-surface-brightness radio sources of which 440,000 will have a BT morphology.

  12. A Survey of z ~ 6 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Deep Stripe. I. A Flux-Limited Sample at zAB < 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Annis, James; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Chiu, Kuenley; Lin, Huan; Lupton, Robert H.; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.

    2008-03-01

    We present the discovery of five quasars at z ~ 6 selected from 260 deg2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern survey, a deep imaging survey obtained by repeatedly scanning a stripe along the celestial equator. The five quasars with 20 < zAB < 21 are 1-2 magnitudes fainter than the luminous z ~ 6 quasars discovered in the SDSS main survey. One of them was independently discovered by the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey. These quasars, combined with another z ~ 6 quasar known in this region, make a complete flux-limited quasar sample at zAB < 21. The sample spans the redshift range 5.85 <= z <= 6.12 and the luminosity range -26.5 <= M 1450 <= -25.4 (H 0 = 70 km s-1 Mpc-1, Ω m = 0.3, and ΩΛ = 0.7). We use the 1/Va method to determine that the comoving quasar spatial density at langzrang = 6.0 and langM 1450rang = -25.8 is (5.0 ± 2.1) × 10-9 Mpc-3 mag-1. We model the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ~ 6 as a power law Φ(L 1450) vprop L β 1450. The slope β calculated from a combination of our sample and the luminous SDSS quasar sample is -3.1 ± 0.4, significantly steeper than the slope of the QLF at z ~ 4. Based on the derived QLF, we find that the quasar/active galactic nucleus (AGN) population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z ~ 6 unless the IGM is very homogeneous and the luminosity (L*1450) at which the QLF power law breaks is very low. Based on observations obtained with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium; the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution; the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and was made possible by the generous financial

  13. A deep survey of the Galactic plane at very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Yeuk Chun

    The Cygnus region of the Galactic plane contains many known supernova remnants, pulsars, X-Ray sources and GeV emitters which makes it a prime candidate for a Very High Energy (VHE) survey study in the Northern Hemisphere. VERITAS, an array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes located in southern Arizona, USA, is the most sensitive very high energy gamma-ray telescope in operation today. Between April 2007 and Fall 2009, VERITAS carried out an extensive survey of the Cygnus region between 67 and 82 degrees in Galactic longitude and between -1 and 4 degrees in Galactic latitude. The survey, comprising more than 140 hours of observations, reached an average VHE flux sensitivity of better than 5% of the Crab Nebula flux at energies above 200 GeV, making it the most sensitive VHE gamma-ray survey ever done in the northern Hemisphere. The survey data set revealed two highly probable gamma-ray sources in the region. A detailed description of the observational strategy and analysis methodology of the survey are given and a discussion of the scientific implications resulting from the survey is provided.

  14. Explained: Why many surveys of distant galaxies miss 90% of their targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-03-01

    Astronomers have long known that in many surveys of the very distant Universe, a large fraction of the total intrinsic light was not being observed. Now, thanks to an extremely deep survey using two of the four giant 8.2-metre telescopes that make up ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and a unique custom-built filter, astronomers have determined that a large fraction of galaxies whose light took 10 billion years to reach us have gone undiscovered. The survey also helped uncover some of the faintest galaxies ever found at this early stage of the Universe. Astronomers frequently use the strong, characteristic "fingerprint" of light emitted by hydrogen known as the Lyman-alpha line, to probe the amount of stars formed in the very distant Universe [1]. Yet there have long been suspicions that many distant galaxies go unnoticed in these surveys. A new VLT survey demonstrates for the first time that this is exactly what is happening. Most of the Lyman-alpha light is trapped within the galaxy that emits it, and 90% of galaxies do not show up in Lyman-alpha surveys. "Astronomers always knew they were missing some fraction of the galaxies in Lyman-alpha surveys," explains Matthew Hayes, the lead author of the paper, published this week in Nature, "but for the first time we now have a measurement. The number of missed galaxies is substantial." To figure out how much of the total luminosity was missed, Hayes and his team used the FORS camera at the VLT and a custom-built narrowband filter [2] to measure this Lyman-alpha light, following the methodology of standard Lyman-alpha surveys. Then, using the new HAWK-I camera, attached to another VLT Unit Telescope, they surveyed the same area of space for light emitted at a different wavelength, also by glowing hydrogen, and known as the H-alpha line. They specifically looked at galaxies whose light has been travelling for 10 billion years (redshift 2.2 [3]), in a well-studied area of the sky, known as the GOODS-South field. "This is

  15. Joint US-Japan Observations with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO): Deep Surveys and Observations of High-Z Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, David B.

    1997-01-01

    Several important milestones were passed during the past year of our ISO observing program: (1) Our first ISO data were successfully obtained. ISOCAM data were taken for our primary deep field target in the 'Lockman Hole'. Thirteen hours of integration (taken over 4 contiguous orbits) were obtained in the LW2 filter of a 3 ft x 3 ft region centered on the position of minimum HI column density in the Lockman Hole. The data were obtained in microscanning mode. This is the deepest integration attempted to date (by almost a factor of 4 in time) with ISOCAM. (2) The deep survey data obtained for the Lockman Hole were received by the Japanese P.I. (Yoshi Taniguchi) in early December, 1996 (following release of the improved pipeline formatted data from Vilspa), and a copy was forwarded to Hawaii shortly thereafter. These data were processed independently by the Japan and Hawaii groups during the latter part of December 1996, and early January, 1997. The Hawaii group made use of the U.S. ISO data center at IPAC/Caltech in Pasadena to carry out their data reduction, while the Japanese group used a copy of the ISOCAM data analysis package made available to them through an agreement with the head of the ISOCAM team, Catherine Cesarsky. (3) Results of our LW2 Deep Survey in the Lockman Hole were first reported at the ISO Workshop "Taking ISO to the Limits: Exploring the Faintest Sources in the Infrared" held at the ISO Science Operations Center in Villafranca, Spain (VILSPA) on 3-4 February, 1997. Yoshi Taniguchi gave an invited presentation summarizing the results of the U.S.-Japan team, and Dave Sanders gave an invited talk summarizing the results of the Workshop at the conclusion of the two day meeting. The text of the talks by Taniguchi and Sanders are included in the printed Workshop Proceedings, and are published in full on the Web. By several independent accounts, the U.S.-Japan Deep Survey results were one of the highlights of the Workshop; these data showed

  16. The middle-aged universe: Results from high-z supernovae and the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coil, Alison Laurel

    2004-12-01

    This thesis presents observational results detailing the state of the Universe ~5-9 billion years ago, focusing primarily on the spatial distribution and clustering of galaxies. We first present optical spectra, obtained with the Keck 10-m telescope, of two high-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at maximum light, discovered by the High-z Supernova Search Team: SN 1999ff at z = 0.455 and SN 1999fv at z ~= 1.2. We compare our high- z spectra with low- z normal and peculiar SNe Ia as well as with SNe Ic, Ib, and II and find that are no significant differences between SN 1999ff and SN1999fv and normal SNe la at low redshift. This solidifies the use of type Ia SNe as standard candles at cosmological distances. We then develop and test mock galaxy catalogs to be used for the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, which will obtain redshifts for ~50,000 galaxies between 0.7 < z < 1.5, mapping the galaxy distribution in a comoving volume of roughly 7 x 10 6 Mpc 3 h -3 . Using data from the first observing season of the DEEP2 Redshift Survey, we measure the amplitude of galaxy clustering using the two-point correlation function, x( r ), for a sample of 2219 galaxies between 0.7 < z < 1.35. We find that galaxies are significantly less clustered at z ~ 1 relative to z ~ 0; r 0 ~ 3.0-3.5 h -1 Mpc (comoving). We find that red, absorption-dominated, passively-evolving galaxies have a larger clustering scale length than blue, emission-line, actively star-forming galaxies. Intrinsically brighter galaxies also cluster more strongly than fainter galaxies at z ~= 1. Our results imply that the DEEP2 galaxies have an effective bias b ~ 1.0-1.2, lower than what is predicted by semi-analytic simulations at z ~= 1, which may be the result of our R -band target selection. Our results demonstrate that galaxy clustering properties as a function of color, spectral type and luminosity seen in the local Universe were largely in place by z ~= 1. We also present measurements of the projected angular

  17. The Fornax Deep Survey with VST. I. The Extended and Diffuse Stellar Halo of NGC 1399 out to 192 kpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iodice, E.; Capaccioli, M.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Spavone, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Paolillo, M.; Peletier, R. F.; Cantiello, M.; Lisker, T.; Wittmann, C.; Venhola, A.; Hilker, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Pota, V.; Schipani, P.

    2016-03-01

    We have started a new, deep multi-imaging survey of the Fornax cluster, dubbed the Fornax Deep Survey (FDS), at the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). In this paper we present the deep photometry inside two square degrees around the bright galaxy NGC 1399 in the core of the cluster. We found that the core of the Fornax cluster is characterized by a very extended and diffuse envelope surrounding the luminous galaxy NGC 1399: we map the surface brightness out to 33 arcmin (˜192 kpc) from the galaxy center and down to μg ˜ 31 mag arcsec-2 in the g band. The deep photometry allows us to detect a faint stellar bridge in the intracluster region on the west side of NGC 1399 and toward NGC 1387. By analyzing the integrated colors of this feature, we argue that it could be due to the ongoing interaction between the two galaxies, where the outer envelope of NGC 1387 on its east side is stripped away. By fitting the light profile, we found that there exists a physical break radius in the total light distribution at R = 10 arcmin (˜58 kpc) that sets the transition region between the bright central galaxy and the outer exponential halo, and that the stellar halo contributes 60% of the total light of the galaxy (Section 3.5). We discuss the main implications of this work on the build-up of the stellar halo at the center of the Fornax cluster. By comparing with the numerical simulations of the stellar halo formation for the most massive bright cluster galaxies (i.e., 13\\lt {log}{M}200/{M}⊙ \\lt 14), we find that the observed stellar halo mass fraction is consistent with a halo formed through the multiple accretion of progenitors with stellar mass in the range 108-1011 M⊙. This might suggest that the halo of NGC 1399 has also gone through a major merging event. The absence of a significant number of luminous stellar streams and tidal tails out to 192 kpc suggests that the epoch of this strong interaction goes back to an early formation epoch. Therefore, different from the Virgo

  18. Multiparametrical survey to understand the dynamic of monitored deep seated Landslide (La Clapière DSL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palis, Edouard; Lebourg, Thomas; Vidal, Maurin; Vitard, Clement; Tric, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    The geology and the structure of a deep seated landslide (La Clapiere with 65 million m3, south eastern France) explains the complex hydrology of the site which plays a key-role in the destabilization and the multiphase dynamics of the slope (water circulation within the sliding mass, fluid exchanges between superficial and deep layers aquifer through faults). To understand fluid circulations within the unstable slope, a pluri-annual multi parametric survey was set up, but since 18 months the survey combines new research multiparametric station. The landslide (La Clapiere) is located in the Argentera-Mercantour massif, and it has been instrumented since 1982 by academic researchers and since 2003 by the Multidisciplinary Observatory of Versant Instabilities (OMIV, the French National Observation Service (SNO)). A permanent electrical tomography monitoring was installed on the landslide since November 2012 to complement the actual monitoring system (GPS, seismic, pluviometric and hydrogeologic data). The aim of this study is to analyze the temporal evolution of resistivity, positioning and pluviometry during the November 2012 to March 2013 period. A qualitative and statistical approach by clustering, principal component analysis (PCA), and probability density function (Pdf) of resistivity data, coupled with pluviometric and GPS data provides a better understanding of the dynamics in this place. Rainfall induces strong accelerations of the rockslide movement. This new statistical study also explained the major roles of the fault and the basement of the landslide, and the time chronology of the water flow in the massif.

  19. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: galaxies in the deep 850 μm survey, and the star-forming `main sequence'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, M. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Roseboom, I.; Geach, J. E.; Cirasuolo, M.; Aretxaga, I.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Banerji, M.; Bourne, N.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Chapman, S.; Hughes, D. H.; Jenness, T.; McLure, R. J.; Symeonidis, M.; Werf, P. van der

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the properties of the galaxies selected from the deepest 850-μm survey undertaken to date with (Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2) SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope as part of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. A total of 106 sources (>5σ) were uncovered at 850 μm from an area of ≃150 arcmin2 in the centre of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA/Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) field, imaged to a typical depth of σ850 ≃ 0.25 mJy. We utilize the available multifrequency data to identify galaxy counterparts for 80 of these sources (75 per cent), and to establish the complete redshift distribution for this sample, yielding bar{z} = 2.38± 0.09. We have also been able to determine the stellar masses of the majority of the galaxy identifications, enabling us to explore their location on the star formation rate:stellar mass (SFR:M*) plane. Crucially, our new deep 850-μm-selected sample reaches flux densities equivalent to SFR ≃ 100 M⊙ yr-1, enabling us to confirm that sub-mm galaxies form the high-mass end of the `main sequence' (MS) of star-forming galaxies at z > 1.5 (with a mean specific SFR of sSFR = 2.25 ± 0.19 Gyr-1 at z ≃ 2.5). Our results are consistent with no significant flattening of the MS towards high masses at these redshifts. However, our results add to the growing evidence that average sSFR rises only slowly at high redshift, resulting in log10sSFR being an apparently simple linear function of the age of the Universe.

  20. Development of novel electromagnetic antenna for deep target marine CSEM survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Majid Niaz; Yahya, Noorhana; Shafie, Afza; Nasir, Nadeem; Kashif, Muhammad; Zaid, Hasnah Mohd

    2012-09-01

    Marine controlled source electromagnetic method (MCSEM) is a new and versatile method for hydrocarbon detection. Deep sea hydrocarbon reservoir exploration is still challenging and expensive. Due to unreliability for the detection of DHIs using seismic data, new methods have been investigated. Sea bed logging (SBL) is a new technique for the detection of deep target hydrocarbon and has potential to reduce the risks of DHIs (direct hydrocarbon indicators) in deep sea environment. The magnitude of EM waves is very important for the detection of deep target hydrocarbon reservoir below 4000m from the sea floor. Nanotechnology has been introduced very effective and shows promising results in many research fields. Ferrite magnetic materials play an important role in many applications due to its versatile magnetic properties. The aluminum based EM antenna is developed and NiZn, YIG ferrite as magnetic feeders are used to increase the field strength from EM antenna. FESEM images show that grain size increases with the increase of sintering temperature and ranges from 30 to 60nm for Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4 where as grain size increases from 45 to 110nm for Y3Fe5O12 samples. Due to better magnetic properties, samples (Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4-PVDF) sintered at 950°C and (Y3Fe5O12-PVDF) sintered at 1350°C were used as magnetic feeders for the EM antenna. It was investigated that magnitude of EM waves from the novel EM antenna with (Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4-PVDF) sintered at 950°C and Y3Fe5O12-PVDF) sintered at 1150°C increases up to 143% and 220% respectively in the lab scale environment. Modeling results by using CST software shows that new EM antenna with magnetic feeders has an ability to increase the D, E, B and H field components. This novel EM antenna with magnetic feeders may be used for the deep target hydrocarbon detection due to enhanced field strength. This new EM transmitter based on nanotechnology may open new horizons for oil and gas industry for deep target hydrocarbon reservoir.

  1. SMUVS: Spitzer Matching survey of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep Stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputi, Karina; Ashby, Matthew; Fazio, Giovanni; Huang, Jiasheng; Dunlop, James; Franx, Marijn; Le Fevre, Olivier; Fynbo, Johan; McCracken, Henry; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Muzzin, Adam; Ilbert, Olivier; Somerville, Rachel; Wechsler, Risa; Behroozi, Peter; Lu, Yu

    2014-12-01

    We request 2026.5 hours to homogenize the matching ultra-deep IRAC data of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes, producing a final area of ~0.6 square degrees with the deepest near- and mid-IR coverage existing in any such large area of the sky (H, Ks, [3.6], [4.5] ~ 25.3-26.1 AB mag; 5 sigma). The UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes are contained within the larger COSMOS field, which has a rich collection of multi-wavelength, ancillary data, making it ideal to study different aspects of galaxy evolution with high statistical significance and excellent redshift accuracy. The UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes are the region of the COSMOS field where these studies can be pushed to the highest redshifts, but securely identifying high-z galaxies, and determining their stellar masses, will only be possible if ultra-deep mid-IR data are available. Our IRAC observations will allow us to: 1) extend the galaxy stellar mass function at redshifts z=3 to z=5 to the intermediate mass regime (M~5x10^9-10^10 Msun), which is critical to constrain galaxy formation models; 2) gain a factor of six in the area where it is possible to effectively search for z>=6 galaxies and study their properties; 3) measure, for the first time, the large-scale structure traced by an unbiased galaxy sample at z=5 to z=7, and make the link to their host dark matter haloes. This cannot be done in any other field of the sky, as the UltraVISTA ultra-deep stripes form a quasi-contiguous, regular-shape field, which has a unique combination of large area and photometric depth. 4) provide a unique resource for the selection of secure z>5 targets for JWST and ALMA follow up. Our observations will have an enormous legacy value which amply justifies this new observing-time investment in the COSMOS field. Spitzer cannot miss this unique opportunity to open up a large 0.6 square-degree window to the early Universe.

  2. Deep seismic survey images crustal structure of Tornquist Zone beneath southern Baltic Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The Tornquist Zone is Europe's longest tectonic lineament and bisects the continent in a NW-SE direction from the North Sea (off NW Denmark) to the Black Sea. New deep seismic reflection and coincident refraction data have been collected across its 50 km wide, intensely faulted and inverted NW part. The marine reflection profile in the area north of Bornholm Island shows a tilted block structure in the rigid upper crust, whereas the lower crust seems to be more gently uplifted. A complex transition from the highly reflective lower crust to the mantle is indicated by mantle reflections and a curious wide-angle event recorded by a landstation on Bornholm Island. The authors suggest that deep-reaching inversion tectonics, induced by Alpine and Carpathian orogeny, were responsible for the development of the gross crust-mantle structure of the Tornquist Zone in the study area, which seems to be similar to that in Poland.

  3. Ectoparasitism on deep-sea fishes in the western North Atlantic: In situ observations from ROV surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quattrini, Andrea; Demopoulos, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    A complete understanding of how parasites influence marine ecosystem functioning requires characterizing a broad range of parasite-host interactions while determining the effects of parasitism in a variety of habitats. In deep-sea fishes, the prevalence of parasitism remains poorly understood. Knowledge of ectoparasitism, in particular, is limited because collection methods often cause dislodgment of ectoparasites from their hosts. High-definition video collected during 43 remotely operated vehicle surveys (2013–2014) provided the opportunity to examine ectoparasitism on fishes across habitats (open slope, canyon, seamount, cold seep) and depths (494–4689 m) off the northeastern U.S., while providing high-resolution images and valuable observations of fish behavior. Only 9% (n = 125 individuals) of all observed fishes (25 species) were confirmed with ectoparasites, but higher percentages (∼33%) were observed for some of the most abundant fish species (e.g., Antimora rostrata). Ectoparasites included two copepod families (Lernaeopodidae, Sphyriidae) that infected four host species, two isopod families (Cymothoidae, Aegidae) that infected three host species, and one isopod family (Gnathiidae) that infected 19 host species. Hyperparasitism was also observed. As host diversity declined with depth, ectoparasite diversity declined; only gnathiids were observed at depths down to 3260 m. Thus, gnathiids appear to be the most successful group to infect a diversity of fishes across a broad depth range in the deep sea. For three dominant fishes (A. rostrata, Nezumia bairdii, Synaphobranchus spp.), the abundance and intensity of ectoparasitism peaked in different depths and habitats depending on the host species examined. Notably, gnathiid infections were most intense on A. rostrata, particularly in submarine canyons, suggesting that these habitats may increase ectoparasite infections. Although ectoparasitism is often overlooked in deep-sea benthic communities

  4. Ectoparasitism on deep-sea fishes in the western North Atlantic: In situ observations from ROV surveys.

    PubMed

    Quattrini, Andrea M; Demopoulos, Amanda W J

    2016-12-01

    A complete understanding of how parasites influence marine ecosystem functioning requires characterizing a broad range of parasite-host interactions while determining the effects of parasitism in a variety of habitats. In deep-sea fishes, the prevalence of parasitism remains poorly understood. Knowledge of ectoparasitism, in particular, is limited because collection methods often cause dislodgment of ectoparasites from their hosts. High-definition video collected during 43 remotely operated vehicle surveys (2013-2014) provided the opportunity to examine ectoparasitism on fishes across habitats (open slope, canyon, seamount, cold seep) and depths (494-4689 m) off the northeastern U.S., while providing high-resolution images and valuable observations of fish behavior. Only 9% (n = 125 individuals) of all observed fishes (25 species) were confirmed with ectoparasites, but higher percentages (∼33%) were observed for some of the most abundant fish species (e.g., Antimora rostrata). Ectoparasites included two copepod families (Lernaeopodidae, Sphyriidae) that infected four host species, two isopod families (Cymothoidae, Aegidae) that infected three host species, and one isopod family (Gnathiidae) that infected 19 host species. Hyperparasitism was also observed. As host diversity declined with depth, ectoparasite diversity declined; only gnathiids were observed at depths down to 3260 m. Thus, gnathiids appear to be the most successful group to infect a diversity of fishes across a broad depth range in the deep sea. For three dominant fishes (A. rostrata, Nezumia bairdii, Synaphobranchus spp.), the abundance and intensity of ectoparasitism peaked in different depths and habitats depending on the host species examined. Notably, gnathiid infections were most intense on A. rostrata, particularly in submarine canyons, suggesting that these habitats may increase ectoparasite infections. Although ectoparasitism is often overlooked in deep-sea benthic communities, our

  5. Spectroscopic CCD surveys for quasars at large redshift. I - A deep PFUEI survey. [Prime Focus Universal Extragalactic Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M.; Schneider, D. P.; Gunn, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    A survey for faint quasars has been conducted using slitless spectroscopy with the PFUEI at the 200 inch (5 m) telescope. The survey covers a total of 0.91 sq deg in 113 fields at galactic latitudes above 30 deg. Calibrated spectra in the range 4500-7200 A were obtained for more than 9000 objects. Emission-line candidates were selected on the basis of two criteria: the equivalent width must exceed 50 A, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detection of the line versus the sky background should be larger than 7. Among 45 candidates so selected, subsequent slit spectroscopy confirmed 27 emission-line objects. Among these, 17 are emission-line galaxies with redshifts in the range 0.04-0.31, and 10 are quasars with redshifts between 0.91 and 2.66. The well-defined selection criteria for these objects, together with the distribution of rest frame equivalent widths of the emission lines, allow derivation of the area of sky covered as a function of the continuum limiting magnitude. The observed number of quasars in the redshift range 0.7-2.7 agrees well with that predicted by the luminosity function models published by Schmidt and Green in 1983. It is concluded that quasars with an absolute magnitude of M(B) = -25 suffer a redshift cutoff near or below a redshift of 3.

  6. THE VLA-COSMOS SURVEY. IV. DEEP DATA AND JOINT CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Schinnerer, E.; Sargent, M. T.; Bondi, M.; Smolcic, V.; Bertoldi, F.; Datta, A.; Carilli, C. L.; Blain, A.; Scoville, N. Z.; Ciliegi, P.; Koekemoer, A.

    2010-06-15

    In the context of the VLA-COSMOS Deep project, additional VLA A array observations at 1.4 GHz were obtained for the central degree of the COSMOS field and combined with the existing data from the VLA-COSMOS Large project. A newly constructed Deep mosaic with a resolution of 2.''5 was used to search for sources down to 4{sigma} with 1{sigma} {approx} 12 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} in the central 50' x 50'. This new catalog is combined with the catalog from the Large project (obtained at 1.''5 x 1.''4 resolution) to construct a new Joint catalog. All sources listed in the new Joint catalog have peak flux densities of {>=}5{sigma} at 1.''5 and/or 2.''5 resolution to account for the fact that a significant fraction of sources at these low flux levels are expected to be slightly resolved at 1.''5 resolution. All properties listed in the Joint catalog, such as peak flux density, integrated flux density, and source size, are determined in the 2.''5 resolution Deep image. In addition, the Joint catalog contains 43 newly identified multi-component sources.

  7. Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey -- GOODS-South Field, Non-SNe-Searched Visits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Sandra

    2011-10-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey {CANDELS}is designed to document the ?rst third of galactic evolution from z =8 to 1.5 via deep imaging of more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IRand ACS. It will also find the first Type Ia SNe beyond z > 1.5 andestablish their accuracy as standard candles for cosmology. Fivepremier multi-wavelength sky regions selected from the SpitzerExtragalactic Deep Survey {SEDS} provide complementary IRAC imagingdata down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource for stellar masses at allredshifts. The use of ?ve widely separated ?elds mitigates cosmicvariance and yields statistically robust and complete samples ofgalaxies down to 10^9 solar masses out to z 8.The program merges two originally separate MCT proposals. The Faberprogram incorporates a ?Wide? imaging survey in three separate fieldsto 2 orbit depth over 0.2 sq. degrees, plus a ?Deep? imaging surveyto 12 orbit depth in the two GOODS regions over 0.04 sq. degrees.When combined with ultra-deep imaging from the Hubble Ultradeep Fieldprogram {GO 11563}, the result is a three-tiered strategy that ef?cientlysamples both bright/rare and faint/common extragalactic objects. TheFerguson program adds an extensive high-redshift Type Ia SNe search,plus ultraviolet "daytime" UVIS exposures in GOODS-N to exploit theCVZ opportunity in that field.This program, GO 12064, is part of the Wide mosaic survey, which has thefollowing field centers and sizes: Field ID RA{2000} Dec{2000} WFC3 Dim. PA on sky UDS 02 17 38 -05 12 02 4x11 270 COSMOS 10 00 31 +02 24 00 4x11 180 EGS 14 19 31 +52 54 10 3x15 41 Science highlights from the Wide program: * Underlying structural properties of galaxies as revealed by WFC3-IR images sensitive to older stars {beyond the 4000-A break} and less affected by dust than ACS. A key redshift is z 2, where star-formation peaks, QSOs are most abundant, and where restframe B-band is still accessible to WFC3. Sample questions include: - Structure in young vs. old

  8. CHILES Con Pol: Probing galaxy evolution, the dark Universe, and cosmic magnetism with a deep 1000 hour Jansky VLA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Chiles Con Pol Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We recently started a 1000 hour campaign to observe 0.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field in full polarization continuum at 1.4 GHz with the Jansky VLA, as part of a joint program with the spectral line COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES). When complete, we expect our CHILES Continuum Polarization (CHILES Con Pol) survey to reach an unprecedented SKA-era sensitivity of 0.7 uJy per 4 arcsecond FWHM beam. Here we present the key goals of CHILES Con Pol, which are to (i) produce a source catalog of legacy value to the astronomical community, (ii) measure differential source counts in total intensity, linear polarization, and circular polarization in order to constrain the redshift and luminosity distributions of source populations, (iii) perform a novel weak lensing study using radio polarization as an indicator of intrinsic alignment to better study dark energy and dark matter, and (iv) probe the unknown origin of cosmic magnetism by measuring the strength and structure of intergalactic magnetic fields in the filaments of large scale structure. The CHILES Con Pol source catalog will be a useful resource for upcoming wide-field surveys by acting as a training set for machine learning algorithms, which can then be used to identify and classify radio sources in regions lacking deep multiwavelength coverage.

  9. CANDIDATE CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AT z > 1.3 IDENTIFIED IN THE SPITZER SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE DEEP FIELD SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rettura, A.; Stern, D.; Martinez-Manso, J.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Mei, S.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Bartlett, J. G.

    2014-12-20

    We present 279 galaxy cluster candidates at z > 1.3 selected from the 94 deg{sup 2} Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) survey. We use a simple algorithm to select candidate high-redshift clusters of galaxies based on Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data combined with shallow all-sky optical data. We identify distant cluster candidates adopting an overdensity threshold that results in a high purity (80%) cluster sample based on tests in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the Boötes field. Our simple algorithm detects all three 1.4 < z ≤ 1.75 X-ray detected clusters in the Boötes field. The uniqueness of the SSDF survey resides not just in its area, one of the largest contiguous extragalactic fields observed with Spitzer, but also in its deep, multi-wavelength coverage by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), Herschel/SPIRE, and XMM-Newton. This rich data set will allow direct or stacked measurements of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect decrements or X-ray masses for many of the SSDF clusters presented here, and enable a systematic study of the most distant clusters on an unprecedented scale. We measure the angular correlation function of our sample and find that these candidates show strong clustering. Employing the COSMOS/UltraVista photometric catalog in order to infer the redshift distribution of our cluster selection, we find that these clusters have a comoving number density n{sub c}=(0.7{sub −0.6}{sup +6.3})×10{sup −7} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup −3} and a spatial clustering correlation scale length r {sub 0} = (32 ± 7) h {sup –1} Mpc. Assuming our sample is comprised of dark matter halos above a characteristic minimum mass, M {sub min}, we derive that at z = 1.5 these clusters reside in halos larger than M{sub min}=1.5{sub −0.7}{sup +0.9}×10{sup 14} h{sup −1} M{sub ⊙}. We find that the mean mass of our cluster sample is equal to M{sub mean}=1.9{sub −0.8}{sup +1.0}×10{sup 14} h{sup −1} M{sub ⊙}; thus, our sample contains the progenitors of

  10. Candidate Clusters of Galaxies at z > 1.3 Identified in the Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettura, A.; Martinez-Manso, J.; Stern, D.; Mei, S.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Brodwin, M.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Stanford, S. A.; Bartlett, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    We present 279 galaxy cluster candidates at z > 1.3 selected from the 94 deg2 Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) survey. We use a simple algorithm to select candidate high-redshift clusters of galaxies based on Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data combined with shallow all-sky optical data. We identify distant cluster candidates adopting an overdensity threshold that results in a high purity (80%) cluster sample based on tests in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the Boötes field. Our simple algorithm detects all three 1.4 < z <= 1.75 X-ray detected clusters in the Boötes field. The uniqueness of the SSDF survey resides not just in its area, one of the largest contiguous extragalactic fields observed with Spitzer, but also in its deep, multi-wavelength coverage by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), Herschel/SPIRE, and XMM-Newton. This rich data set will allow direct or stacked measurements of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect decrements or X-ray masses for many of the SSDF clusters presented here, and enable a systematic study of the most distant clusters on an unprecedented scale. We measure the angular correlation function of our sample and find that these candidates show strong clustering. Employing the COSMOS/UltraVista photometric catalog in order to infer the redshift distribution of our cluster selection, we find that these clusters have a comoving number density nc = (0.7+6.3-0.6) × 10-7 h3 {Mpc}-3 and a spatial clustering correlation scale length r 0 = (32 ± 7) h -1 Mpc. Assuming our sample is comprised of dark matter halos above a characteristic minimum mass, M min, we derive that at z = 1.5 these clusters reside in halos larger than Mmin = 1.5+0.9-0.7 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ . We find that the mean mass of our cluster sample is equal to Mmean = 1.9+1.0-0.8 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ ; thus, our sample contains the progenitors of present-day massive galaxy clusters.

  11. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Evolution of Void Statistics from z ~ 1 to z ~ 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Charlie; Coil, Alison L.; White, Martin; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Yan, Renbin; Cooper, Michael C.; Gerke, Brian F.; Davis, Marc; Koo, David C.

    2005-12-01

    We present measurements of the void probability function (VPF) at z~1 using data from the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) Redshift Survey and its evolution to z~0 using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We measure the VPF as a function of galaxy color and luminosity in both surveys and find that it mimics trends displayed in the two-point correlation function, ξ: namely, that samples of brighter, red galaxies have larger voids (i.e., are more strongly clustered) than fainter, blue galaxies. We also clearly detect evolution in the VPF with cosmic time, with voids being larger in comoving units at z~0. We find that the reduced VPF matches the predictions of a ``negative binomial'' model for galaxies of all colors, luminosities, and redshifts studied. This model lacks a physical motivation but produces a simple analytic prediction for sources of any number density and integrated two-point correlation function, ξ¯. This implies that differences in the VPF across different galaxy populations are consistent with being due entirely to differences in the population number density and ξ¯. We compare the VPF at z~1 to N-body ΛCDM simulations and find good agreement between the DEEP2 data and mock galaxy catalogs. Interestingly, we find that the dark matter particle reduced VPF follows the physically motivated ``thermodynamic'' model, while the dark matter halo reduced VPF more closely follows the negative binomial model. The robust result that all galaxy populations follow the negative binomial model appears to be due primarily to the clustering of dark matter halos. The reduced VPF is insensitive to changes in the parameters of the halo occupation distribution, in the sense that halo models with the same ξ¯ will produce the same VPF. For the wide range of galaxies studied, the VPF therefore does not appear to provide useful constraints on galaxy evolution models that cannot be gleaned from studies of ξ¯ alone.

  12. CHILES Con Pol: An ultra-deep JVLA survey probing galaxy evolution and cosmic magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; van Gorkom, Jacqueline; Rupen, Michael P.; Greiner, Maksim; Ensslin, Torsten A.; Bonzini, Margherita; Padovani, Paolo; Harrison, Ian; Brown, Michael L.; Gim, Hansung; Yun, Min S.; Maddox, Natasha; Stewart, Adam; Fender, Rob P.; Tremou, Evangelia; Chomiuk, Laura; Peters, Charee; Wilcots, Eric M.; Lazio, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    We are undertaking a 1000 hour campaign with the Karl G. Jansky VLA to survey 0.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field in full polarization continuum at 1.4 GHz. Our observations are part of a joint program with the spectral line COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES). When complete, we expect our CHILES Continuum Polarization (CHILES Con Pol) survey to reach an SKA-era sensitivity of 500 nJy per 4 arcsecond resolving beam, the deepest view of the radio sky yet. CHILES Con Pol will open new and fertile parameter space, with sensitivity to star formation rates of 10 Msun per year out to an unprecedented redshift of z=2, and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and sub-millimeter galaxies out to redshifts of z=8 and beyond. This rich resource will extend the utility of radio band studies beyond the usual radio quasar and radio galaxy populations, opening sensitivity to the starforming and radio-quiet AGN populations that form the bulk of extragalactic sources detected in the optical, X-ray, and infrared bands. In this talk I will outline the key science of CHILES Con Pol, including galaxy evolution and novel measurements of intergalactic magnetic fields. I will present initial results from the first 180 hours of the survey and describe our forthcoming Data Release 1. I invite the astronomical community to consider unique science that can be pursued with CHILES Con Pol radio data.

  13. A Survey Analysis of Alcohol Use at a Black University in the Deep South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenier, Charles E.; Borskey, Erma J.; Folse, Debbie W.

    1998-01-01

    Presents findings from a scientific survey of student drug and alcohol behavior at Southern University, an all-black university. Results indicate that alcohol and wine coolers are the drinks of choice. Most of the students are moderate drinkers; however, 13% can be classified as relatively high risk. (MKA)

  14. Feasibility of a time-domain electromagnetic survey for mapping deep-sea hydrothermal deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, H.; KIM, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) surveying has already become a popular tool for hydrocarbon exploration. Possible targets of the marine CSEM survey, other than hydrocarbon, may be marine hydrothermal mineral deposits. In transient EM (TEM) measurements, secondary fields which contain information on hydrothermal deposits in the seafloor can be measured in the absence of strong primary fields. The TEM system is useful to the development of compact, autonomous instruments which are well suited to submersible-based surveys. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of applying an in-loop TEM system to the detection of marine hydrothermal deposits through a one-dimensional modeling and inversion study. The feasibility study showed that TEM responses are very sensitive to a highly conductive layer. Time-domain target responses are larger and appear earlier in horizontal magnetic fields than in vertical ones. An inverse problem is formulated with the Gauss-Newton method and solved with the damped and smoothness-constrained least-squares approach. The test example for a marine hydrothermal TEM survey demonstrated that the depth extent, conductivity and thickness of the highly conductive layer are well resolved.

  15. A DEEP, WIDE-FIELD H{alpha} SURVEY OF NEARBY CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Shoko; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.; Moss, Chris

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of a wide-field H{alpha} imaging survey of eight nearby (z = 0.02-0.03) Abell clusters. We have measured H{alpha} fluxes and equivalent widths for 465 galaxies, of which 360 are new detections. The survey was designed to obtain complete emission-line-selected inventories of star-forming galaxies in the inner regions of these clusters, extending to star formation rates below 0.1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This paper describes the observations, data processing, and source identification procedures, and presents an H{alpha} and R-band catalog of detected cluster members and other candidates. Future papers in the series will use these data to study the completeness of spectroscopically based star formation surveys, and to quantify the effects of cluster environment on the present-day populations of star-forming galaxies. The data will also provide a valuable foundation for imaging surveys of redshifted H{alpha} emission in more distant clusters.

  16. Regional Comparisons from a Global Survey of Deep-Ocean Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxel, J. H.; Dziak, R. P.; Matsumoto, H.; Lau, T. K.; Mellinger, D. K.; Fowler, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    A NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab archive of continuous deep-ocean sound recordings from hydrophones deployed in the equatorial East Pacific (EEP), central Mid-Atlantic (CMA), northern Mid-Atlantic (NMA), Bering Sea (BS), Antarctic Peninsula (ANP), and Indian Ocean (IO) provides insight into the overall structure for the deep-water global sound field. The hydrophones are moored in the SOFAR channel, taking advantage of the efficient propagation characteristics that enable the instruments to effectively monitor large sections of the global oceans. Although not always concurrent, the deployment of the hydrophone arrays from 1996 to present allows for an up-to-date assessment of the global-scale distribution of ocean sound levels in discrete frequency bands. Comparisons of intra- and inter-annual time-averaged ambient-sound levels reveal strong latitudinal variations, where higher latitudes correspond with higher noise levels. Seismic and volcanic activity dominate the lower frequency bands (0-10 Hz) within all of the hydrophone arrays. Of interest is the periodic nature of broad-band ice noise observed in the ANP acoustic data, suggesting a climate link for these signals related to ice breakup during seasonal warming events (Matsumoto et al., 2008). In addition, the multi-species marine-mammal vocalizations observed in all of our hydrophone datasets dominate sound-energy levels at specific frequencies.

  17. A Deep Percolation Model for Estimating Ground-Water Recharge: Documentation of Modules for the Modular Modeling System of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaccaro, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    A daily water-budget model for estimating ground-water recharge, the Deep Percolation Model, was modularized for inclusion into the U.S. Geological Survey's Modular Modeling System. The model was modularized in order to facilitate estimation of ground-water recharge under a large range in climatic, landscape, and land-use and land-cover conditions. The model can be applied to areas as large as regions or as small as a field plot. An overview of the Modular Modeling System and the Deep Percolation Model is presented. Data requirements, parameters, and variables for the model are described. The modules that compose the Deep Percolation Model are documented.

  18. Mapping the deep: The past and future promise of transneptunian surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, M.

    2014-07-01

    Exploring the populations and structure of the outer Solar System requires us to examine the sky. The improving sophistication of astronomical techniques have brought us in the last century from painstaking naked-eye examination of photographic plates to identify moving sources, to supercomputer-powered image subtraction that can pull moving sources from the depths of the Galactic plane. Such advances in our ability to discover new objects have allowed us to build an understanding of the Solar System's distant populations. The continued effort to survey the sky for new discoveries has explored the phase space of much of the transneptunian (TNO) size distribution. At the largest end, from wide-field surveys with small-to-medium optical telescopes in both North and Southern Hemispheres, the dwarf planets are now complete to m˜19.5 (Schwamb et al. 2014) and nearing completion to m˜21.5. Infrared surveys such as WISE have constrained the absence of a brown dwarf or large gas giant planet such that there can be no Saturn out to 28,000 au and no Jupiter out to 82,000 au (Luhman 2014). Similarly, pulsar timing measurements exclude line-of-sight shifts of the Solar System's barycentre due to any lurking giant planet (Verbiest et al. 2008); such timing measurements will only be improved by the Square Kilometre Array's all-sky decadal measurements of pulsars (Seto & Cooray 2007). The smaller, more abundant TNOs have been slowly constrained by surveys on larger facilities (as listed in Kavelaars et al and Petit et al. 2008): their part of the size distribution has a clear change in slope near H of 7 (Fraser et al. 2014). Characterisation of objects for their size, albedo, thermal properties and density has followed more slowly: Spitzer and Herschel have given us thermal properties; broad-band photometric surveys have shown that the colours of TNOs present distinct surface classes, ranging from the reddest in the Solar System to fully neutral reflectors; while large

  19. Documentation for the machine-readable version of a deep objective-prism survey for large Magellanic cloud members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This catalog contains 1273 proven or probable Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) members, as found on deep objective-prism plates taken with the Curtis Schmidt telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The stars are generally brighter than about photographic magnitude 14. Approximate spectral types were determined by examination of the 580 A/mm objective-prism spectra; approximate 1975 positions were obtained by measuring relative to the 1975 coordinate grids on the Uppsala-Mount Stromlo Atlas of the LMC (Gascoigne and Westerlund 1961), and approximate photographic magnitudes were determined by averaging image density measures from the plates and image-diameter measures on the 'B' charts. The machine-readable version of the LMC survey catalog is described to enable users to read and process the tape file without problems or guesswork.

  20. The optical identification content of the Einstein Observatory deep X-ray survey of a region in Pavo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Murray, S. S.; Giacconi, R.; Bechtold, J.; Murdin, P.; Smith, M.; Macgillivray, H. T.; Ward, M.; Danziger, J.; Lub, J.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented from the Einstein deep X-ray survey in Pavo, with correlated optical and radio observations of a complete sample of candidate identifications. There are 16 X-ray sources detected with positional accuracy better than 10 arcsec, of which five are identified, with a further seven (and a maximum nine) probable identifications. Of the identified sources, four are QSOs with J-magnitude about 20 (one is an inverted spectrum radio source) and one is associated with extended emission from a pair or cluster of galaxies. Of the probable identifications, one is a galaxy and the rest are a subset of a yellow stellar object population which may also be QSOs. Identifications with QSOs and QSO candidates with J less than 24 account for 60-80 percent of the detected sources.

  1. Mass and Light Correlated with Galaxies on Local and Cosmic Scales: Weak Gravitational Lensing in the Deep Lens Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ami

    In this dissertation, we describe the results of applying weak gravitational lensing techniques to probe the connection between luminous galaxies and the dark matter halos in which they live. Specifically, we study galaxy-shear correlations in the Deep Lens Survey, and we investigate how this function changes with observable galaxy properties such as stellar mass, luminosity, color, and redshift. In Chapter 3, we examine the galaxy-shear correlation function on a large range of scales from small radii where the dominant contribution is from halos associated with individual galaxies to large radii where the dominant contribution is from neighboring galaxies and large-scale structure. We study the lensing signal for galaxies binned by luminosity and find that more luminous galaxies are more massive. More interestingly, the galaxy-shear correlation function shows features consistent with satellite and 2-halo terms from the halo model and cannot be fit with a single power law out to 15 Mpc. We also find more correlated large scale structure mass at lower redshift, consistent with the paradigm of bottom-up hierarchical structure formation. In Chapter 4, we focus on a subset of the survey with ancillary infrared data that allow estimates of stellar mass. We study the lensing signal for galaxies binned by stellar mass and infer the nature and evolution of the relationship between virial mass and stellar mass. We show that stellar mass and virial mass scale such that galaxies with smaller stellar masses also have smaller virial masses. This work has implications for the idea of downsizing, but does not yet have the S/N to provide competitive constraints. In the process of making lensing measurements on the Deep Lens Survey, we have also investigated errors related to the two most important variables: shapes and photometric redshifts. we discuss our findings in the context of the survey characteristics in Chapter 2 and in the simulations section of Chapter 3. While neither

  2. THE VERY LARGE ARRAY 1.4 GHz SURVEY OF THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH: SECOND DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Neal A.; Bonzini, Margherita; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Padovani, Paolo; Rosati, Piero; Fomalont, Edward B.; Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Tozzi, Paolo; Vattakunnel, Shaji

    2013-04-01

    Deep radio observations at 1.4 GHz for the Extended Chandra Deep Field South were performed in 2007 June through September and presented in a first data release. The survey was made using six separate pointings of the Very Large Array with over 40 hr of observation per pointing. In the current paper, we improve on the data reduction to produce a second data release (DR2) mosaic image. This DR2 image covers an area of about a third of a square degree, reaches a best rms sensitivity of 6 {mu}Jy, and has a typical sensitivity of 7.4 {mu}Jy per 2.''8 by 1.''6 beam. We also present a more comprehensive catalog, including sources down to peak flux densities of five or more times the local rms noise along with information on source sizes and relevant pointing data. We discuss in some detail the consideration of whether sources are resolved under the complication of a radio image created as a mosaic of separate pointings each suffering some degree of bandwidth smearing, and the accurate evaluation of the flux densities of such sources. Finally, the radio morphologies and optical/near-IR counterpart identifications are used to identify 17 likely multiple-component sources and arrive at a catalog of 883 radio sources, which is roughly double the number of sources contained in the first data release.

  3. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey COADD: 275 deg{sup 2} of deep Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging on stripe 82

    SciTech Connect

    Annis, James; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Dodelson, Scott; Hao, Jiangang; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E.; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Lampeitl, Hubert; Lin, Huan; Miknaitis, Gajus; Yanny, Brian; Strauss, Michael A.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Becker, Andrew C.; Ivezić, Željko; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie

    2014-10-20

    We present details of the construction and characterization of the coaddition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 ugriz imaging data. This survey consists of 275 deg{sup 2} of repeated scanning by the SDSS camera over –50° ≤ α ≤ 60° and –1.°25 ≤ δ ≤ +1.°25 centered on the Celestial Equator. Each piece of sky has ∼20 runs contributing and thus reaches ∼2 mag fainter than the SDSS single pass data, i.e., to r ∼ 23.5 for galaxies. We discuss the image processing of the coaddition, the modeling of the point-spread function (PSF), the calibration, and the production of standard SDSS catalogs. The data have an r-band median seeing of 1.''1 and are calibrated to ≤1%. Star color-color, number counts, and PSF size versus modeled size plots show that the modeling of the PSF is good enough for precision five-band photometry. Structure in the PSF model versus magnitude plot indicates minor PSF modeling errors, leading to misclassification of stars as galaxies, as verified using VVDS spectroscopy. There are a variety of uses for this wide-angle deep imaging data, including galactic structure, photometric redshift computation, cluster finding and cross wavelength measurements, weak lensing cluster mass calibrations, and cosmic shear measurements.

  4. The VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey. Galaxy luminosity function per morphological type up to z = 1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbert, O.; Lauger, S.; Tresse, L.; Buat, V.; Arnouts, S.; Le Fèvre, O.; Burgarella, D.; Zucca, E.; Bardelli, S.; Zamorani, G.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J.-P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pello, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; Ciliegi, P.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.

    2006-07-01

    Aims.We have computed the evolution of the rest-frame B-band luminosity function (LF) for bulge and disk-dominated galaxies since z=1.2. Methods: .We use a sample of 605 spectroscopic redshifts with IAB≤ 24 in the Chandra Deep Field South from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey, 3555 galaxies with photometric redshifts from the COMBO-17 multi-color data, coupled with multi-color HST/ACS images from the Great Observatories Origin Deep Survey. We split the sample in bulge- and disk-dominated populations on the basis of asymmetry and concentration parameters measured in the rest-frame B-band. Results: .We find that at z=0.4-0.8, the LF slope is significantly steeper for the disk-dominated population (α=-1.19 ± 0.07) compared to the bulge-dominated population (α=-0.53 ± 0.13). The LF of the bulge-dominated population is composed of two distinct populations separated in rest-frame color: 68% of red (B-I)AB>0.9 and bright galaxies showing a strongly decreasing LF slope α=+0.55 ± 0.21, and 32% of blue (B-I)AB<0.9 and more compact galaxies which populate the LF faint-end. We observe that red bulge-dominated galaxies are already well in place at z≃1, but the volume density of this population is increasing by a factor 2.7 between z˜ 1 and z˜ 0.6. It may be related to the building-up of massive elliptical galaxies in the hierarchical scenario. In addition, we observe that the blue bulge-dominated population is dimming by 0.7 mag between z˜ 1 and z˜ 0.6. Galaxies in this faint and more compact population could possibly be the progenitors of the local dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  5. A deep survey for Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars. I - Motivation, search technique, and first results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Smith, Lindsey F.; Potter, Michael; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from a survey of large areas of the southern Milky Way for Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars to 17-18th magnitude, carried out using direct narrowband and broadband Schmidt plates. Thirteen new WR stars were detected in an about 40-deg-sq region in Carina, where 24 WR stars were already known; the new stars were found to be significantly redder, fainter, and farther away than the known stars. Of the new WR stars, 11 are of subtype WN, and two are WC, compared to the 17 WN and seven WC stars among the previously known WR stars in the same area.

  6. VLA observations of unidentified Leiden-Berkeley Deep-Survey sources - Luminosity and redshift dependence of spectral properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapahi, Vijay K.; Kulkarni, Vasant K.

    1990-01-01

    VLA observations of a complete subset of the Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey sources that have S(1.4 GHz) greater than 10 mJy and are not optically identified down to F=22 mag are reported. By comparing the spectral and structural properties of the sources with samples from the literature, an attempt was made to disentangle the luminosity and redshift dependence of the spectral indices of extended emission in radio galaxies and of the incidence of compact steep-spectrum sources. It is found that the fraction of compact sources among those with a steep spectrum is related primarily to redshift, being much larger at high redshifts for sources of similar radio luminosity. Only a weak and marginally significant dependence of spectral indices of the extended sources on luminosity and redshift is found in samples selected at 1.4 and 2.7 GHz. It is pointed out that the much stronger correlation of spectral indices with luminosity may be arising partly from spectral curvature, and partly due to the preferential inclusion of very steep-spectrum sources from high redshift in low-frequency surveys.

  7. Toughening up DELORES: the evolution of the British Antarctic Survey DEep LOok Radio Echo Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Edward

    2014-05-01

    DELORES is a ground-based radar designed to map the bed and internal structure of thick ice sheets. It is a monopulse radar driven by a ± 2 kV transmitter and using resistively-loaded wire dipole antennae. The recording system is based on a DC-powered digital oscilloscope. All the electronics are housed in weatherproof boxes mounted on sledges and the whole system is towed behind a snowmobile. In the 2013/14 Antarctic field season alone DELORES systems collected over 4000 km of radargrams over ice up to 2.5 km thick. The main operating area has been West Antarctica where surface conditions have varied from deep, soft snow to iron-hard sastrugi. The majority of deployments have been with two-person field teams at locations over 1000 km from support facilities. Therefore the principle design criteria has been 'tough and simple', i.e. make the system robust enough not to break and simple enough to fix with basic tools if it does. Here we describe how the engineering design has evolved over the past eight years and what future developments are planned to achieve greater reliability and versatility.

  8. ALMACAL I: First Dual-band Number Counts from a Deep and Wide ALMA Submillimeter Survey, Free from Cosmic Variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteo, I.; Zwaan, M. A.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, I.; Biggs, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    We have exploited ALMA calibration observations to carry out a novel, wide, and deep submillimeter (submm) survey, almacal. These calibration data comprise a large number of observations of calibrator fields in a variety of frequency bands and array configurations. By gathering together data acquired during multiple visits to many ALMA calibrators, it is possible to reach noise levels which allow the detection of faint, dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) over a significant area. In this paper, we outline our survey strategy and report the first results. We have analyzed data for 69 calibrators, reaching depths of ∼25 μJy beam‑1 at sub-arcsec resolution. Adopting a conservative approach based on ≥5σ detections, we have found 8 and 11 DSFGs in ALMA bands 6 and 7, respectively, with flux densities S 1.2 mm ≥ 0.2 mJy. The faintest galaxies would have been missed by even the deepest Herschel surveys. Our cumulative number counts have been determined independently at 870 μm and 1.2 mm from a sparse sampling of the astronomical sky, and are thus relatively free of cosmic variance. The counts are lower than reported previously by a factor of at least 2×. Future analyses will yield large, secure samples of DSFGs with redshifts determined via the detection of submm spectral lines. Uniquely, our strategy then allows for morphological studies of very faint DSFGs—representative of more normal star-forming galaxies than conventional submm galaxies—in fields where self-calibration is feasible, yielding milliarcsecond spatial resolution.

  9. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. V. A UNIVERSAL RELATION FOR STELLAR MASS AND SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Takashi; Kajisawa, Masaru; Yamada, Toru; Akiyama, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Onodera, Masato

    2010-02-01

    We present a universal linear correlation between the stellar mass and surface brightness (SB) of galaxies at 0.3 < z < 3, using a deep K-band-selected catalog in the GOODS-North region. The correlation has a nearly constant slope, independent of redshift and color of galaxies in the rest-z frame. Considering unresolved compact galaxies, the tight correlation gives a lower boundary of SB for a given stellar mass; lower SB galaxies are prohibited over the boundary. The universal slope suggests that the stellar mass in galaxies was built up over their cosmic histories in a similar manner irrelevant to galaxy mass, as opposed to the scenario that massive galaxies mainly accumulated their stellar mass by major merging. In contrast, SB shows a strong dependence on redshift for a given stellar mass. It evolves as approx(1 + z){sup -2.0a}pprox{sup -0.8}, in addition to dimming as (1 + z){sup 4} by the cosmological expansion effect. The brightening depends on galaxy color and stellar mass. The blue population (rest-frame U - V < 0), which is dominated by young and star-forming galaxies, evolves as approx(1 + z){sup -0.8+}-{sup 0.3} in the rest-V band. On the other hand, the red population (U - V>0) and the massive galaxies (M{sub *}>10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) show stronger brightening, (1 + z){sup -1.5+}-{sup 0.1}. By comparison with galaxy evolution models, the phenomena are well understood by the pure luminosity evolution of galaxies out to z approx 3.

  10. Deep CCD Photometry and RR Lyrae Survey for the Outer-Halo Globular Cluster NGC 6229

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Borissova, J.; Spassova, N.; Ferraro, F. R.; Buonanno, R.; Sweigart, A. V.

    1997-12-01

    Deep BV CCD photometry for a large field covering the outer-halo Galactic globular cluster NGC 6229 is presented. For the first time, a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaching below the main-sequence turnoff has been obtained for this cluster. Previous results regarding the overall morphology of the horizontal and giant branches are confirmed. In addition, several candidate blue straggler stars are identified. However, a preliminary analysis of the cluster's CMD suggests that the putative extreme horizontal branch population suggested by Borissova et al. (1997, AJ, 113, 692) may not be present. Unfortunately, the innermost cluster regions could not be studied due to crowding. Comparison of the cluster CMD locus with the latest isochrones from VandenBerg (1997, private communication) is also presented, as is a study of the cluster age relative to a few well-studied reference globulars, using both the ``horizontal" and ``vertical" methods. We also report on an investigation of the variable stars in NGC 6229. We obtained new light curves and re-derived the periods, amplitudes and mean V and B-V magnitudes for 17 RR Lyrae stars listed in Sawyer Hogg's (1973, Publ. David Dunlap Obs., 3, No. 6) catalog. We obtained the first light curves for the RR Lyrae candidates No. 155 and No. 88 (Carney et al. 1991, AJ, 101, 1699), and confirm variability of their star No. 134, as well as of the RR Lyrae stars V3, V8 and V12 suspected by Borissova et al. (1997). A search for variable stars in our 5 x 5 arcmin field does not lead to any new variable candidates.

  11. A deep Spitzer survey of circumstellar disks in the young double cluster, h and χ Persei

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutier, Ryan; Currie, Thayne; Jayawardhana, Ray; Rieke, George H.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Balog, Zoltan E-mail: currie@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-12-01

    We analyze very deep Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) photometry of ∼12, 500 members of the 14 Myr old Double Cluster, h and χ Persei, building upon our earlier, shallower Spitzer Cycle 1 studies. Numerous likely members show infrared (IR) excesses at 8 μm and 24 μm, indicative of circumstellar dust. The frequency of stars with 8 μm excess is at least 2% for our entire sample, slightly lower (higher) for B/A stars (later type, lower mass stars). Optical spectroscopy also identifies gas in about 2% of systems, but with no clear trend between the presence of dust and gas. Spectral energy distribution modeling of 18 sources with detections at optical wavelengths through MIPS 24 μm reveals a diverse set of disk evolutionary states, including a high fraction of transitional disks, though similar data for all disk-bearing members would provide constraints. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we combine our results with those for other young clusters to study the global evolution of dust/gas disks. For nominal cluster ages, the e-folding times (τ{sub 0}) for the frequency of warm dust and gas are 2.75 Myr and 1.75 Myr, respectively. Assuming a revised set of ages for some clusters, these timescales increase to 5.75 and 3.75 Myr, respectively, implying a significantly longer typical protoplanetary disk lifetime than previously thought. In both cases, the transitional disk duration, averaged over multiple evolutionary pathways, is ≈1 Myr. Finally, 24 μm excess frequencies for 4-6 M {sub ☉} stars appear lower than for 1-2.5 M {sub ☉} stars in other 10-30 Myr old clusters.

  12. Deep optical survey of the stellar content of Sh2-311 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ram Kesh; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Jose, J.; Ogura, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Samal, M. R.; Eswaraiah, C.; Chandola, H. C.

    2015-01-01

    The stellar content in and around Sh2-311 region have been studied using the deep optical observations as well as near-infrared (NIR) data from 2MASS. The region contains three clusters, viz. NGC 2467, Haffner 18 and Haffner 19. We have made an attempt to distinguish the stellar content of these individual regions as well as to re-determine their fundamental parameters such as distance, reddening, age, onto the basis of a new and more extended optical and infrared photometric data set. NGC 2467 and Haffner 19 are found to be located in the Perseus arm at the distances of 5.0 ± 0.4 kpc and 5.7 ± 0.4 kpc, respectively, whereas Haffner 18 is located at the distance of 11.2 ± 1.0 kpc. The clusters NGC 2467 and Haffner 19 might have formed from the same molecular cloud, whereas the cluster Haffner 18 is located in the outer galactic arm, i.e. the Norma-Cygnus arm. We identify 8 class II young stellar objects (YSOs) using the NIR (J-H)/(H-K) two colour diagram. We have estimated the age and mass of the YSOs identified in the present work and those by Snider et al. (2009) using the V/(V-I) colour-magnitude diagram. The estimated ages and mass range of the majority of the YSOs are ≲1 Myr and ∼0.4-3.5 M⊙, respectively, indicating that these sources could be T-Tauri stars or their siblings. Spatial distribution of the YSOs shows that some of the YSOs are distributed around the HII region Sh2-311, suggesting a triggered star formation at its periphery.

  13. Atwater Valley Deep-Towed Sidescan Sonar Imagery and Bathymetric Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Joan M. Gardner; Mike Czarnecki; Rick Hagen; Clyde Nishimura; Warren Wood; Chad Vaughn; Jody Bruton; Pat Hart; Emil Bergeron; Deborah Hutchinson

    2005-11-22

    The purpose of this project was to conduct detailed surface mapping of one of the areas drilled by the Joint Industry Project with ChevronTexaco to understand gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico. The gently sloping, mostly flat floor of the Mississippi Canyon is interrupted by mounds and depressions that presumably reflect the complex geology and geohydrology related to turbidite deposition and pervasive salt tectonism. The seafloor mounds we mapped in this study occur in approximately 1300 water depth along the floor of the Mississippi Canyon in lease block areas Atwater Valley 13 and 14. High resolution sidescan sonar (100 kHz and 500 kHz) backscatter imagery, and chirp sub-bottom profiler data were collected using the DT1 deep-towed oceanographic mapping instrument, concentrating on the region directly adjacent to and surrounding two mounds identified as, mounds D and F, and in the region directly adjacent to and surrounding the mounds. The backscatter data have been mosaiced and normalized to provide information on the shape and extent of the mounds, the possible lateral extent of fauna, such as mussel and clam fields on the mounds, possible seep related flows and the occurrence of carbonate material. The extent of a mudflow can be mapped on the southeastern side of mound F. The backscatter data show extremely high-resolution detail about the shape, relief, and morphology of the mounds. This information, coupled with porewater chemistry , DTAGS and heatflow data form a coherent picture of possible mechanics for fluid venting and flora/fauna of the seeps in this region.

  14. AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm Deep Surveys: Number Counts and Clustering of Millimeter-bright Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, B.; Kohno, K.; Aretxaga, I.; Austermann, J. E.; Ezawa, H.; Hughes, D. H.; Ikarashi, S.; Iono, D.; Kawabe, R.; Matsuo, H.; Matsuura, S.; Nakanishi, K.; Oshima, T.; Perera, T.; Scott, K. S.; Shirahata, M.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Tamura, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tosaki, T.; Wilson, G. W.; Yun, M. S.

    2010-10-01

    We present number counts and clustering properties of millimeter-bright galaxies uncovered by the AzTEC camera mounted on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). We surveyed the AKARI Deep Field South (ADF-S), the Subaru/XMM Newton Deep Field (SXDF), and the SSA22 fields with an area of ~0.25 deg2 each with an rms noise level of ~0.4-1.0 mJy. We constructed differential and cumulative number counts, which provide currently the tightest constraints on the faint end. The integration of the best-fit number counts in the ADF-S find that the contribution of 1.1 mm sources with fluxes >=1 mJy to the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at 1.1 mm is 12-16%, suggesting that the large fraction of the CIB originates from faint sources of which the number counts are not yet constrained. We estimate the cosmic star-formation rate density contributed by 1.1 mm sources with >=1 mJy using the best-fit number counts in the ADF-S and find that it is lower by about a factor of 5-10 compared to those derived from UV/optically-selected galaxies at z~2-3. The average mass of dark halos hosting bright 1.1 mm sources was calculated to be 1013-1014 Msolar. Comparison of correlation lengths of 1.1 mm sources with other populations and with a bias evolution model suggests that dark halos hosting bright 1.1 mm sources evolve into systems of clusters at present universe and the 1.1 mm sources residing the dark halos evolve into massive elliptical galaxies located in the center of clusters.

  15. A deep proper motion catalog within the Sloan digital sky survey footprint

    SciTech Connect

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy M.; Hippel, Ted von; Kilic, Mukremin; Liebert, James W.; Williams, Kurtis A.; DeGenarro, Steven; Jeffery, Elizabeth E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil E-mail: ted.vonhippel@erau.edu E-mail: jamesliebert@gmail.com E-mail: studiofortytwo@yahoo.com

    2014-12-01

    A new proper motion catalog is presented, combining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with second epoch observations in the r band within a portion of the SDSS imaging footprint. The new observations were obtained with the 90prime camera on the Steward Observatory Bok 90 inch telescope, and the Array Camera on the U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 1.3 m telescope. The catalog covers 1098 square degrees to r = 22.0, an additional 1521 square degrees to r = 20.9, plus a further 488 square degrees of lesser quality data. Statistical errors in the proper motions range from 5 mas year{sup −1} at the bright end to 15 mas year{sup −1} at the faint end, for a typical epoch difference of six years. Systematic errors are estimated to be roughly 1 mas year{sup −1} for the Array Camera data, and as much as 2–4 mas year{sup −1} for the 90prime data (though typically less). The catalog also includes a second epoch of r band photometry.

  16. Deep Photometry of Galaxies in the VEGAS Survey: The Case of NGC 4472

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spavone, M.

    The VST-VEGAS project is aimed at observing and studying a rich sample of nearby early-type galaxies in order to systematically characterize their properties over a wide baseline of sizes and out to the faint outskirts where data are rather scarce so far. The external regions of galaxies more easily retain signatures about the formation and evolution mechanisms which shaped them, as their relaxation time are longer, and they are more weakly influenced by processes such as mergers, secular evolution, central black hole activity, and supernova feedback on the ISM, which tend to level age and metallicity gradients. The collection of a wide photometric dataset of a large number of galaxies in various environmental conditions, may help to shed light on these questions. To this end VEGAS exploits the potential of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) which provides high quality images of 1 deg2 field of view in order to satisfy both the requirement of high resolution data and the need of studying nearby, and thus large, objects. We present a detailed study of the surface photometry of the elliptical galaxy NGC4472 and of smaller ETGs in its field, performed by using new g and i bands images to constrain the formation history of this nearby giant galaxy, and to investigate the presence of very faint substructures in its surroundings.

  17. Morphological Survey of Microbial Mats Near Deep-Sea Thermal Vents †

    PubMed Central

    Jannasch, Holger W.; Wirsen, Carl O.

    1981-01-01

    A microscopic survey is presented of the most commonly observed and morphologically conspicuous microorganisms found attached to natural surfaces or to artificial materials deposited in the immediate vicinity of thermal submarine vents at the Galapagos Rift ocean spreading zone at a depth of 2,550 meters. Of special interest were the following findings: (i) all surfaces intermittently exposed to H2S-containing hydrothermal fluid were covered by layers, ca. 5 to 10 μm thick, of procaryotic, gram-negative cells interspaced with amorphous metal (Mn-Fe) deposits; (ii) although some of the cells were encased by dense metal deposits, there was little apparent correlation between metal deposition and the occurrence of microbial mats, (iii) highly differentiated forms appeared to be analogues of certain cyanobacteria, (iv) isolates from massive mats of a prosthecate bacterium could be identified as Hyphomicrobium spp., (v) intracellular membrane systems similar to those found in methylotrophic and nitrifying bacteria were observed in approximately 20% of the cells composing the mats, (vi) thiosulfate enrichments made from mat material resulted in isolations of different types of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria including the obligately chemolithotrophic genus Thiomicrospira. Images PMID:16345722

  18. A Pilot Deep Survey for X-Ray Emission from fuvAGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, R.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Stute, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in three of six fuvAGB stars observed—the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long timescales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ˜(0.002-0.2) L⊙ and the X-ray-emitting plasma temperatures are ˜(35-160) × 106 K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively cool (<20,000 K). In addition, the high X-ray luminosities specifically argue against emission originating in the coronae of main-sequence companions. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  19. Spectroscopic identification of a redshift 1.55 supernova host galaxy from the Subaru Deep Field Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Graur, Or; Hjorth, Jens; Maoz, Dan; Poznanski, Dovi

    2014-03-01

    Context. The Subaru Deep Field (SDF) Supernova Survey discovered ten Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the redshift range 1.5 < z < 2.0, determined solely from photometric redshifts of the host galaxies. However, photometric redshifts might be biased, and the SN sample could be contaminated by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Aims: We aim to obtain the first robust redshift measurement and classification of a z > 1.5 SDF SN Ia host galaxy candidate. Methods: We use the X-shooter (U-to-K-band) spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope to allow the detection of different emission lines in a wide spectral range. Results: We measure a spectroscopic redshift of 1.54563 ± 0.00027 of hSDF0705.25, consistent with its photometric redshift of 1.552 ± 0.018. From the strong emission-line spectrum we rule out AGN activity, thereby confirming the optical transient as a SN. The host galaxy follows the fundamental metallicity relation showing that the properties of this high-redshift SN Ia host galaxy is similar to other field galaxies. Conclusions: Spectroscopic confirmation of additional SDF SN hosts would be required to confirm the cosmic SN rate evolution measured in the SDF. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 089.A-0739.

  20. The Host Galaxy Properties of Variability Selected AGN in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinis, S.; Gezari, S.; Kumar, S.; Burgett, W. S.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-07-01

    We study the properties of 975 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected by variability in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium deep Survey. Using complementary multi-wavelength data from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared, we use spectral energy distribution fitting to determine the AGN and host properties at z < 1 and compare to a well-matched control sample. We confirm the trend previously observed: that the variability amplitude decreases with AGN luminosity, but we also observe that the slope of this relation steepens with wavelength, resulting in a “redder when brighter” trend at low luminosities. Our results show that AGNs are hosted by more massive hosts than control sample galaxies, while the rest frame dust-corrected NUV ‑ r color distribution of AGN hosts is similar to control galaxies. We find a positive correlation between the AGN luminosity and star formation rate (SFR), independent of redshift. AGN hosts populate the entire range of SFRs within and outside of the Main Sequence of star-forming galaxies. Comparing the distribution of AGN hosts and control galaxies, we show that AGN hosts are less likely to be hosted by quiescent galaxies and more likely to be hosted by Main Sequence or starburst galaxies.

  1. The ALMA Patchy Deep Survey: a blind search for [C II] emitters at z ˜ 4.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Nagao, T.; Iono, D.; Hatsukade, B.; Kohno, K.; Tamura, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Shimizu, I.

    2015-07-01

    We present a result of a blind search for [C II] 158 μm emitters at z ˜ 4.5 using Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 0 archival data. We collected extragalactic data covering at 330-360 GHz (band 7) from 8 Cycle 0 projects from which initial results have been already published. The total number of fields is 243 and the total on-source exposure time is 19.2 h. We searched for line emitters in continuum-subtracted data cubes with spectral resolutions of ˜50, 100, 300 and 500 km s-1. We could not detect any new line emitters above a 6σ significance level. This result provides upper limits to the [C II] luminosity function at z ˜ 4.5 over L_[C II] ˜ 10^8-10^{10} L_{⊙} or star formation rate, SFR ˜ 10-1000 M_^{⊙}yr-1. These limits are at least two orders of magnitude larger than the [C II] luminosity functions expected from the z ˜ 4 UV luminosity function or from numerical simulation. However, this study demonstrates that we would be able to better constrain the [C II] luminosity function and to investigate possible contributions from dusty galaxies to the cosmic star formation rate density by collecting Cycle 1+2 archival data as the ALMA Patchy Deep Survey.

  2. The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey. VLT/VIMOS spectroscopy in the GOODS-south field: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestra, I.; Mainieri, V.; Popesso, P.; Dickinson, M.; Nonino, M.; Rosati, P.; Teimoorinia, H.; Vanzella, E.; Cristiani, S.; Cesarsky, C.; Fosbury, R. A. E.; Kuntschner, H.; Rettura, A.

    2010-03-01

    Context. We present the full data set of the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) spectroscopic campaign of the ESO/GOODS program in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), which complements the FORS2 ESO/GOODS spectroscopic campaign. Aims: The ESO/GOODS spectroscopic programs are aimed at reaching signal-to-noise ratios adequate to measure redshifts for galaxies with AB magnitudes in the range ~24-25 in the B and R band using VIMOS, and in the z band using FORS2. Methods: The GOODS/VIMOS spectroscopic campaign is structured in two separate surveys using two different VIMOS grisms. The VIMOS Low Resolution Blue (LR-Blue) and Medium Resolution (MR) orange grisms have been used to cover different redshift ranges. The LR-Blue campaign is aimed at observing galaxies mainly at 1.8 < z < 3.5, while the MR campaign mainly aims at galaxies at z < 1 and Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z > 3.5. Results: The full GOODS/VIMOS spectroscopic campaign consists of 20 VIMOS masks. This release adds 8 new masks to the previous release (12 masks, Popesso et al. 2009, A&A, 494, 443). In total we obtained 5052 spectra, 3634 from the 10 LR-Blue masks and 1418 from the 10 MR masks. A significant fraction of the extracted spectra comes from serendipitously observed sources: ~21% in the LR-Blue and ~16% in the MR masks. We obtained 2242 redshifts in the LR-Blue campaign and 976 in the MR campaign for a total success rate of 62% and 69% respectively, which increases to 66% and 73% if only primary targets are considered. The typical redshift uncertainty is estimated to be σz ≃ 0.00084 (~255 km s-1) for the LR-Blue grism and σz ≃ 0.00040 (~120 km s-1) for the MR grism. By complementing our VIMOS spectroscopic catalog with all existing spectroscopic redshifts publicly available in the CDFS, we compiled a redshift master catalog with 7332 entries, which we used to investigate large scale structures out to z ≃ 3.7. We produced stacked spectra of LBGs in a few bins of equivalent width

  3. The DEEP Groth Strip Survey. VIII. The Evolution of Luminous Field Bulges at Redshift z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, David C.; Simard, Luc; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Gebhardt, Karl; Bouwens, Rychard J.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Crosby, Timothy; Faber, S. M.; Harker, Justin; Sarajedini, Vicki L.; Vogt, Nicole P.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Phillips, Andrew J.; Im, Myungshin; Wu, K. L.

    2005-04-01

    We present a candidate sample of luminous bulges (including ellipticals) found within the Groth Strip Survey (GSS), with spectroscopic redshifts of 0.73

  4. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys: Initial Results and Catalog from the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullaney, J. R.; Del-Moro, A.; Aird, J.; Alexander, D. M.; Civano, F. M.; Hickox, R. C.; Lansbury, G. B.; Ajello, M.; Assef, R.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Balok´, M.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Boggs, S. E.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Elvis, M.; Forster, K.; Gandhi, P.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Koss, M.; LaMassa, S. M.; Luo, B.; Madsen, K. K.; Puccetti, S.; Saez, C.; Stern, D.; Treister, E.; Urry, C. M.; Wik, D. R.; Zappacosta, L.; Zhang, W.

    2015-08-01

    We present the initial results and the source catalog from the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (hereafter, ECDFS)—currently the deepest contiguous component of the NuSTAR extragalactic survey program. The survey covers the full ≈30‧ × 30‧ area of this field to a maximum depth of ≈360 ks (≈ 220 ks when corrected for vignetting at 3-24 keV), reaching sensitivity limits of ≈ 1.3× {10}-14 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 (3-8 keV), ≈ 3.4× {10}-14 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 (8-24 keV), and ≈ 3.0× {10}-14 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 (3-24 keV). A total of 54 sources are detected over the full field, although five of these are found to lie below our significance threshold once contaminating flux from neighboring (i.e., blended) sources is taken into account. Of the remaining 49 that are significant, 19 are detected in the 8-24 keV band. The 8-24 to 3-8 keV band ratios of the 12 sources that are detected in both bands span the range 0.39-1.7, corresponding to a photon index range of {{Γ }}≈ 0.5-2.3, with a median photon index of \\bar{{{Γ }}}=1.70+/- 0.52. The redshifts of the 49 sources in our main sample span the range z=0.21-2.7, and their rest-frame 10-40 keV luminosities (derived from the observed 8-24 keV fluxes) span the range {L}10-40 {keV}≈ (0.7-300)× {10}43 {erg} {{{s}}}-1, sampling below the “knee” of the X-ray luminosity function out to z˜ 0.8-1. Finally, we identify one NuSTAR source that has neither a Chandra nor an XMM-Newton counterpart, but that shows evidence of nuclear activity at infrared wavelengths and thus may represent a genuine, new X-ray source detected by NuSTAR in the ECDFS.

  5. OT2_sserje01_2: THE HERSCHEL-AKARI NEP DEEP SURVEY: the cosmological history of stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serjeant, S.

    2011-09-01

    We propose a far-IR and submm mapping survey of the premier AKARI deep field in the North Ecliptic Pole, in PACS/SPIRE parallel mode. This is the only major deep infrared field not yet covered by Herschel guaranteed or open time key projects. The outstanding and unparalleled continuous mid-IR photometric coverage from AKARI, far better than equivalent Spitzer surveys, enables a wide range of galaxy evolution diagnostics unachievable in any other survey field (including Herschel HerMES/PEP fields), by spanning the wavelengths of redshifted PAH and silicate features and the peak energy output of AGN dust tori. The investment by AKARI in the NEP represents ~10 percent of the entire pointed observations available throughout the lifetime of AKARI. Our proposal remedies the remarkable omission from Herschel's legacy surveys of the premier extragalactic deep field from another IR space telescope. We will simultaneously identify and find photometric redshifts for the Herschel point source population, make stacking analysis detections of the galaxies which dominate the submm extragalactic background light as a function of redshift, determine the bolometric power outputs of the galaxies that dominate the submm background, compare the UV/optical/mid-IR continuum/PAH/far-IR/submm/radio star formation rate estimator in the most comprehensive IR survey data set to date, and track the coupled stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion throughout most of the history of the Universe. In OT1 the HOTAC concluded "The science output from the proposed survey will be outstanding [...] The panel was convinced that these observations should be done" but it since became clear that priority 2 time is very unlikely to be executed, so we request reclassification to priority 1.

  6. The Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC): Deep Near-Infrared Imaging and the Selection of Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadri, Ryan; Marchesini, Danilo; van Dokkum, Pieter; Gawiser, Eric; Franx, Marijn; Lira, Paulina; Rudnick, Gregory; Urry, C. Megan; Maza, José; Kriek, Mariska; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Castander, Francisco J.; Christlein, Daniel; Coppi, Paolo S.; Hall, Patrick B.; Herrera, David; Infante, Leopoldo; Taylor, Edward N.; Treister, Ezequiel; Willis, Jon P.

    2007-09-01

    We present deep near-infrared JHK imaging of four 10' × 10' fields. The observations were carried out as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC) with ISPI on the CTIO 4 m telescope. The typical point-source limiting depths are J ~ 22.5, H ~ 21.5, and K ~ 21 (5 σ Vega). The effective seeing in the final images is ~1.0″. We combine these data with MUSYC UBVRIz imaging to create K-selected catalogs that are unique for their uniform size, depth, filter coverage, and image quality. We investigate the rest-frame optical colors and photometric redshifts of galaxies that are selected using common color selection techniques, including distant red galaxies (DRGs), star-forming and passive BzKs, and the rest-frame UV-selected BM, BX, and Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). These techniques are effective at isolating large samples of high-redshift galaxies, but none provide complete or uniform samples across the targeted redshift ranges. The DRG and BM/BX/LBG criteria identify populations of red and blue galaxies, respectively, as they were designed to do. The star-forming BzKs have a very wide redshift distribution, extending down to z ~ 1, a wide range of colors, and may include galaxies with very low specific star formation rates. In comparison, the passive BzKs are fewer in number, have a different distribution of K magnitudes, and have a somewhat different redshift distribution. By combining either the DRG and BM/BX/LBG criteria, or the star-forming and passive BzK criteria, it appears possible to define a reasonably complete sample of galaxies to our flux limit over specific redshift ranges. However, the redshift dependence of both the completeness and sampled range of rest-frame colors poses an ultimate limit to the usefulness of these techniques.

  7. Private, commercial and student-oriented low-cost deep-space missions: A global survey of activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridenoure, Rex; Polk, Kevin

    1999-11-01

    Primary mission objectives for most deepspace missions to date have emphasized acquiring scientific data and expanding our understanding of the solar system; some contemporary missions target advanced technology demonstration with science as a secondary objective. All missions so far have been sponsored by one or more government agencies, organizations or consortia. Now a new class of deep-space missions is emerging: those motivated and sponsored by private, commercial and student-oriented interests and organizations. Several such missions — the first to actually be executed — are likely to occur in the 2000-2005 period. Underlying motivations for these unconventional ventures are summarized. For context, this survey starts with similar activities during 1970-95. Lunar Prospector is perhaps the most visible success story here: it was initially a privately financed venture before being selected as a NASA Discovery mission. Why few of these early efforts succeeded in meeting their objectives — and why some did — is explored. Next, a worldwide snapshot of current activity in this arena is provided, highlighting the most visible and credible developments, most of which are in the U.S. and Europe. Principal mission attributes, team composition and unconventional features are summarized for each. All are still in the conceptual or preliminary design phase, but least one (NEAP is expected to move into development and implementation this year. Implications of this emerging trend to the conventional space-science mission community are addressed. Included here are the continued need for science instruments and scientific talent, the prospect of expanding the array of space technologies and infrastructure, new teaming relationships and funding mechanisms, and various cost and risk issues.

  8. Combining resources to obtain a comprehensive survey of the bovine embryo transcriptome through deep sequencing and microarrays.

    PubMed

    Robert, Claude; Nieminen, Julie; Dufort, Isabelle; Gagné, Dominic; Grant, Jason R; Cagnone, Gaël; Plourde, Dany; Nivet, Anne-Laure; Fournier, Éric; Paquet, Éric; Blazejczyk, Michal; Rigault, Philippe; Juge, Nicolas; Sirard, Marc-André

    2011-09-01

    While most assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are considered routine for the reproduction of species of economical importance, such as the bovine, the impact of these manipulations on the developing embryo remains largely unknown. In an effort to obtain a comprehensive survey of the bovine embryo transcriptome and how it is modified by ART, resources were combined to design an embryo-specific microarray. Close to one million high-quality reads were produced from subtracted bovine embryo libraries using Roche 454 Titanium deep sequencing technology, which enabled the creation of an augmented bovine genome catalog. This catalog was enriched with bovine embryo transcripts, and included newly discovered indel type and 3'UTR variants. Using this augmented bovine genome catalog, the EmbryoGENE Bovine Microarray was designed and is composed of a total of 42,242 probes, including 21,139 known reference genes; 9,322 probes for novel transcribed regions (NTRs); 3,677 alternatively spliced exons; 3,353 3'-tiling probes; and 3,723 controls. A suite of bioinformatics tools was also developed to facilitate microrarray data analysis and database creation; it includes a quality control module, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) and microarray analysis software. Results obtained during this study have already led to the identification of differentially expressed blastocyst targets, NTRs, splice variants of the indel type, and 3'UTR variants. We were able to confirm microarray results by real-time PCR, indicating that the EmbryoGENE bovine microarray has the power to detect physiologically relevant changes in gene expression. PMID:21812063

  9. THE BLACK HOLE-BULGE MASS RELATION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD-SOUTH SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, Malte; Silverman, John D.

    2013-04-10

    We present results from a study to determine whether relations-established in the local universe-between the mass of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies are in place at higher redshifts. We identify a well-constructed sample of 18 X-ray-selected, broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South Survey with 0.5 < z < 1.2. This redshift range is chosen to ensure that Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging is available with at least two filters that bracket the 4000 A break, thus providing reliable stellar mass estimates of the host galaxy by accounting for both young and old stellar populations. We compute single-epoch, virial black hole (BH) masses from optical spectra using the broad Mg II emission line. For essentially all galaxies in our sample, their total stellar mass content agrees remarkably well, given their BH masses, with local relations of inactive galaxies and active SMBHs. We further decompose the total stellar mass into bulge and disk components separately with full knowledge of the HST point-spread function. We find that {approx}80% of the sample is consistent with the local M{sub BH}-M{sub *,{sub Bulge}} relation even with 72% of the host galaxies showing the presence of a disk. In particular, bulge-dominated hosts are more aligned with the local relation than those with prominent disks. We further discuss the possible physical mechanisms that are capable of building up the stellar mass of the bulge from an extended disk of stars over the subsequent 8 Gyr.

  10. A very high-resolution, deep-towed, multichannel seismic survey of gas, gas hydrates and gas hydrate-related features in marine sediments off Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Bialas, J.

    2003-04-01

    A very high-resolution, deep-towed, multichannel seismic survey was carried out in the Yaquina Basin off Peru in 2002 (RV Sonne cruise SO162) in order (1) to test the newly developed deep tow system and verify the lateral and vertical resolution of the recorded data and (2) to image small-scale features related to the occurrence of gas, gas hydrates and fluid flow in the finely layered hemipelagic sediments of the Yaquina Basin. The deep tow streamer configuration used for this survey had an overall length of 75 m and consisted of a 50 m lead-in cable and 26 digital nodes separated by 1 m long cables. As seismic sources a conventional GI-gun of 0.7 l volume and a Prakla-type air gun of 1.6 l volume were used and excited frequencies between about 20 - 300 Hz, leading to an average vertical resolution of 2.5 - 5 m. A towing depth of 100 m above sea floor allowed to obtain data with a lateral resolution that is about 3 times higher in 1000 m water depth than can be achieved with a conventional surface-towed system due to the reduction of the size of the Fresnel zone by the hybrid, deep-towed system. Two completely different areas were studied in the Yaquina Basin. The first area is located on the Peruvian continental margin in about 1000 m water depth. Here, the deep tow seismic line crosses a formerly recorded MCS line (RV Sonne cruise SO146, 2000) along which a weak BSR was observed. In the newly acquired deep tow data several very small-scale normal faults, which might act as pathways for fluid flow, could be resolved in addition to the BSR. In the second area a small 3D grid of closely spaced parallel profile lines covers an area where some chemoherms were already found on the sea floor in about 1000 m water depth during the former RV Sonne cruise SO146, too. An analysis of the newly acquired deep tow data shows these outcropping chemoherms and several additional buried chemoherms and their internal structures in great detail. Furthermore, the surrounding finely

  11. WINGS: A WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey. II. Deep optical photometry of 77 nearby clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Marmo, C.; Fasano, G.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moles, M.; Pignatelli, E.; Poggianti, B. M.; Valentinuzzi, T.

    2009-04-01

    Context: This is the second paper of a series devoted to the WIde Field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS). WINGS is a long term project which is gathering wide-field, multi-band imaging and spectroscopy of galaxies in a complete sample of 77 X-ray selected, nearby clusters (0.04 < z < 0.07) located far from the galactic plane (|b|≥ 20°). The main goal of this project is to establish a local reference for evolutionary studies of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Aims: This paper presents the optical (B,V) photometric catalogs of the WINGS sample and describes the procedures followed to construct them. We have paid special care to correctly treat the large extended galaxies (which includes the brightest cluster galaxies) and the reduction of the influence of the bright halos of very bright stars. Methods: We have constructed photometric catalogs based on wide-field images in B and V bands using SExtractor. Photometry has been performed on images in which large galaxies and halos of bright stars were removed after modeling them with elliptical isophotes. Results: We publish deep optical photometric catalogs (90% complete at V ~ 21.7, which translates to ˜ M^*_V+6 at mean redshift), giving positions, geometrical parameters, and several total and aperture magnitudes for all the objects detected. For each field we have produced three catalogs containing galaxies, stars and objects of “unknown” classification (~6%). From simulations we found that the uncertainty of our photometry is quite dependent of the light profile of the objects with stars having the most robust photometry and de Vaucouleurs profiles showing higher uncertainties and also an additional bias of ~-0.2^m. The star/galaxy classification of the bright objects (V < 20) was checked visually making negligible the fraction of misclassified objects. For fainter objects, we found that simulations do not provide reliable estimates of the possible misclassification and therefore we have compared our data

  12. New Measurements of the Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations in Deep SpitzerllRAC Survey Data and their Cosmological Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Arendt, R. G.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.; Mather, J.; Moseley, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    We extend the previous measurements of CIB fluctuations to angular scales of less than or equal to 1 degree new data obtained in the course of the 2,000+ hour Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Two fields with completed observations of approximately equal to 12 hr/pixel are analyzed for source-subtracted CIB fluctuations at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers. The fields, EGS and UDS, cover a total area of approximately 0.25 deg and lie at high Galactic and Ecliptic latitudes, thus minimizing cirrus and zodiacal light contributions to the fluctuations. The observations have been conducted at 3 distinct epochs separated by about 6 months. As in our previous studies, the fields were assembled using the self-calibration method which is uniquely suitable for probing faint diffuse backgrounds. The assembled fields were cleaned off the bright sources down to the low shot noise levels corresponding to AB mag approximately equal to 25, Fourier-transformed and their power spectra evaluated. The noise was estimated from the time-differenced data and subtracted from the signal isolating the fluctuations remaining above the noise levels. The power spectra of the source-subtracted fields remain identical (within the observational uncertainties) for the three epochs of observations indicating that zodiacal light contributes negligibly to the fluctuations. By comparing to the measurements for the same regions at 8 micrometers we demonstrate that Galactic cirrus cannot account for the levels of the fluctuations either. The signal appears isotropically distributed on the sky as required by its origin in the CIB fluctuations. This measurement thus extends our earlier results to the important range of sub-degree scales. We find that the CIB fluctuations continue to diverge to more than 10 times those of known galaxy populations on angular scales out to less than or equal to 1 degree. The low shot noise levels remaining in the diffuse maps indicate that the large scale fluctuations arise from spatial

  13. Properties of distant galaxies and QSO absortion line systems: A deep multicolor imaging survey of the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahata, Noriaki

    2001-03-01

    I present a study on statistical properties of faint galaxy population identified in the Hubble Deep Fields (HDFs). The broad-band imaging observations of the HDFs present the deepest images of the universe ever obtained. Based on the available optical and near-infrared space- and ground-based imaging data of the HDFs, I conducted photometry and photometric redshift measurements of all the objects detected in the HDFs. First, I developed and improved three kinds of techniques that allowed to optimally determine the photometry and redshift of faint galaxies identified in the HDFs. They are (1) optimal photometry technique, (2) non-negative least-squares image reconstruction technique, and (3) photometric redshift technique. Using these techniques, I constructed a catalog of 5,318 galaxies and 47 stars across ˜12 arcmin2 of the total survey area of the HDFs. The redshift range of the galaxies spans 0 < z < 10 and beyond. Next, based on the HDF observations, I studied a history of cosmic star formation toward high redshifts (0 < z < 10). The study was motivated by previous measurements of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity density by other groups. Previous conclusions were that the UV luminosity density increases with increasing redshift up to z ˜ 1--2 and then decreases or remains constant (e.g., Madau et al. 1996, 1998). On the other hand, previous work neglected the effect of cosmological surface brightness dimming, that could dominate the measurements at high redshifts. I revisited this problem by considering the distribution of star formation rate intensity (calculated from the rest-frame 1500 A luminosity of galaxies) and thereby making explicit the surface brightness threshold of the HDF observations. The results of the analysis include (1) by neglecting cosmological surface brightness dimming effects, previous measurements have missed a dominant fraction of the UV luminosity density at z ≳ 2, (2) the UV luminosity density plausibly increases monotonically

  14. ChaMPlane DEEP GALACTIC BULGE SURVEY. I. FAINT ACCRETION-DRIVEN BINARIES IN THE LIMITING WINDOW

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Berg, Maureen; Hong, Jae Sub; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2009-08-01

    We have carried out a deep X-ray and optical survey with Chandra and HST of low-extinction regions in the Galactic bulge. Here we present the results of a search for low-luminosity (L{sub X} {approx}< 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1}) accreting binaries among the Chandra sources in the region closest to the Galactic center, at an angular offset of 1.{sup 0}4, that we have named the Limiting Window. Based on their blue optical colors, excess H{alpha} fluxes, and high X-ray-to-optical flux ratios, we identify three likely accreting binaries; these are probably white dwarfs accreting from low-mass companions (cataclysmic variables; CVs) although we cannot exclude that they are quiescent neutron-star or black-hole low-mass X-ray binaries. Distance estimates put these systems farther than {approx}> 2 kpc. Based on their H{alpha}-excess fluxes and/or high X-ray-to-optical flux ratios, we find 22 candidate accreting binaries; however, the properties of some can also be explained if they are dMe stars or active galaxies. We investigate the CV number density toward the bulge and find that the number of observed candidate CVs is consistent with or lower than the number expected for a constant CV-to-star ratio that is fixed to the local value. Our conclusions are limited by uncertainties in the extinction (for which we see a {approx} 30% variation in our 6.'6 x 6.'6 field) and selection effects. The X-ray properties of two likely CVs are similar to those of the faint, hard X-ray sources in the Galactic center region that have been suggested to be (mainly) magnetic CVs. If our candidates belong to the same population, they would be the first members to be optically identified; optical or infrared identification of their Galactic center analogs would be impossible due to the higher obscuration. We speculate that all Galactic hard X-ray sources in our field can be explained by magnetic CVs.

  15. VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS): Witnessing the assembly of a massive cluster at z ~ 3.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaux, B. C.; Cucciati, O.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Le Fèvre, O.; Zamorani, G.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zucca, E.; Amorín, R.; Bardelli, S.; Capak, P.; Cassarà, L. P.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cuby, J. G.; de la Torre, S.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Moreau, C.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Salvato, M.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Wang, P. W.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Fotopoulou, S.; Gal, R. R.; Kocevski, D. D.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Lubin, L. M.; Mellier, Y.; Sadibekova, T.; Scoville, N.

    2014-12-01

    Using new spectroscopic observations obtained as part of the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS), we performed a systematic search for overdense environments in the early universe (z> 2) and report here on the discovery of Cl J0227-0421, a massive protocluster at z = 3.29. This protocluster is characterized by both the large overdensity of spectroscopically confirmed members, δgal = 10.5 ± 2.8, and a significant overdensity in photometric redshift members. The halo mass of this protocluster is estimated by a variety of methods to be ~3 × 1014ℳ⊙ at z ~ 3.3, which, evolved to z = 0 results in a halo mass rivaling or exceeding that of the Coma cluster. The properties of 19 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies are compared with a large sample of VUDS/VVDS galaxies in lower density field environments at similar redshifts. We find tentative evidence for an excess of redder, brighter, and more massive galaxies within the confines of the protocluster relative to the field population, which suggests that we may be observing the beginning ofenvironmentally induced quenching. The properties of these galaxies are investigated, including a discussion of the brightest protocluster galaxy, which appears to be undergoing vigorous coeval nuclear and starburst activity. The remaining member galaxies appear to have characteristics that are largely similar to the field population. Though we find weaker evidence of the suppression of the median star formation rates among and differences in the stacked spectra of member galaxies with respect to the field, we defer any conclusions about these trends to future work with the ensemble of protostructures that are found in the full VUDS sample. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under Large Program 185.A-0791.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgData are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130

  16. A DEEP HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE H-BAND IMAGING SURVEY OF MASSIVE GAS-RICH MERGERS. II. THE QUEST QSOs

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, S.; Kim, D.-C.; Rupke, D. S. N. E-mail: ddk3wc@mail.astro.virginia.edu

    2009-08-10

    We report the results from a deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) NICMOS H-band imaging survey of 28 z < 0.3 QSOs from the Palomar-Green (PG) sample. This program is part of QUEST (Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study) and complements a similar set of data on 26 highly nucleated ULIRGs presented in Paper I. Our analysis indicates that the fraction of QSOs with elliptical hosts is higher among QSOs with undetected far-infrared (FIR) emission, small infrared excess (L {sub IR}/L {sub B} < 10), and luminous hosts. The hosts of FIR-faint QSOs show a tendency to have less pronounced merger-induced morphological anomalies and larger QSO-to-host luminosity ratios on average than the hosts of FIR-bright QSOs, consistent with late-merger evolution from FIR-bright to FIR-faint QSOs. The spheroid sizes ({approx} 0.3-5.5 kpc) and total host luminosities ({approx} 0.6-7.2 L* {sub H}) of the radio-quiet PG QSOs in our sample are statistically indistinguishable from the ULIRG hosts presented in Paper I, while those of radio-loud PG QSOs are systematically larger and more luminous. ULIRGs and PG QSOs with elliptical hosts fall near, but not exactly on, the fundamental plane of inactive spheroids. We confirm the systematic trend noted in Paper I for objects with small ({approx}< 2 kpc) spheroids to be up to {approx} 1 mag brighter than inactive spheroids. The host colors and wavelength dependence of their sizes support the idea that these deviations are at least in part due to non-nuclear star formation. However, the amplitudes of these deviations depend mainly on host sizes, and possibly on infrared excess, but not on merger phase, QSO-to-host luminosity ratio, optical spectral type, active galactic nucleus fractional contribution to the bolometric luminosity, or host R - H color. Taken at face value (i.e., no correction for extinction or the presence of a young stellar population), the H-band spheroid-host luminosities imply black hole masses {approx} (5-200) x 10{sup 7} M {sub sun} and sub

  17. Size evolution of star-forming galaxies with 2 Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, B.; Le Fèvre, O.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Lemaux, B. C.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Maccagni, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Amorín, R.; Bardelli, S.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Hathi, N. P.; Koekemoer, A.; Pforr, J.; Tresse, L.; Dunlop, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The size of a galaxy encapsulates the signature of the different physical processes driving its evolution. The distribution of galaxy sizes in the Universe as a function of cosmic time is therefore a key to understand galaxy evolution. Aims: We aim to measure the average sizes and size distributions of galaxies as they are assembling before the peak in the comoving star formation rate density of the Universe to better understand the evolution of galaxies across cosmic time. Methods: We used a sample of ~1200 galaxies in the COSMOS and ECDFS fields with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts 2 ≤ zspec ≤ 4.5 in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS), representative of star-forming galaxies with iAB ≤ 25. We first derived galaxy sizes by applying a classical parametric profile-fitting method using GALFIT. We then measured the total pixel area covered by a galaxy above a given surface brightness threshold, which overcomes the difficulty of measuring sizes of galaxies with irregular shapes. We then compared the results obtained for the equivalent circularized radius enclosing 100% of the measured galaxy light r100T ~2.2 to those obtained with the effective radius re,circ measured with GALFIT. Results: We find that the sizes of galaxies computed with our non-parametric approach span a wide range but remain roughly constant on average with a median value r100T ~2.2 kpc for galaxies with 2

  18. Evolution of star formation in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey field - I. Luminosity functions and cosmic star formation rate out to z = 1.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Alyssa B.; Simpson, Chris; Collins, Chris A.; James, Phil A.; Baldry, Ivan K.; Ouchi, Masami; Jarvis, Matt J.; Bonfield, David G.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Best, Philip N.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.; Smith, Daniel J. B.

    2013-07-01

    We present new results on the cosmic star formation history in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS)-Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field out to z = 1.6. We compile narrow-band data from the Subaru Telescope and the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) in conjunction with broad-band data from the SXDS and UDS, to make a selection of 5725 emission-line galaxies in 12 redshift slices, spanning 10 Gyr of cosmic time. We determine photometric redshifts for the sample using 11-band photometry, and use a spectroscopically confirmed subset to fine tune the resultant redshift distribution. We use the maximum-likelihood technique to determine luminosity functions in each redshift slice and model the selection effects inherent in any narrow-band selection statistically, to obviate the retrospective corrections ordinarily required. The deep narrow-band data are sensitive to very low star formation rates (SFRs), and allow an accurate evaluation of the faint end slope of the Schechter function, α. We find that α is particularly sensitive to the assumed faintest broad-band magnitude of a galaxy capable of hosting an emission line, and propose that this limit should be empirically motivated. For this analysis, we base our threshold on the limiting observed equivalent widths of emission lines in the local Universe. We compute the characteristic SFR of galaxies in each redshift slice, and the integrated SFR density, ρSFR. We find our results to be in good agreement with the literature and parametrize the evolution of the SFR density as ρSFR ∝ (1 + z)4.58 confirming a steep decline in star formation activity since z ˜ 1.6.

  19. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. VI. NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF K-SELECTED STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Kajisawa, Masaru; Tokoku, Chihiro; Yamada, Toru; Ichikawa, Takashi; Alexander, David M.; Ohta, Kouji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tanaka, Ichi; Omata, Koji; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Uchimoto, Yuka K.; Konishi, Masahiro; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Brandt, Niel

    2010-07-20

    We present the results of near-infrared multi-object spectroscopic observations for 37 BzK-color-selected star-forming galaxies conducted with MOIRCS on the Subaru Telescope. The sample is drawn from the K{sub s} -band-selected catalog of the MOIRCS Deep Survey in the GOODS-N region. About half of our samples are selected from the publicly available 24 {mu}m-source catalog of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. H{alpha} emission lines are detected from 23 galaxies, of which the median redshift is 2.12. We derived the star formation rates (SFRs) from extinction-corrected H{alpha} luminosities. The extinction correction is estimated from the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of multiband photometric data covering UV to near-infrared wavelengths. The Balmer decrement of the stacked emission lines shows that the amount of extinction for the ionized gas is larger than that for the stellar continuum. From a comparison of the extinction-corrected H{alpha} luminosity and other SFR indicators, we found that the relation between the dust properties of stellar continuum and ionized gas is different depending on the intrinsic SFR (differential extinction). We compared SFRs estimated from extinction-corrected H{alpha} luminosities with stellar masses estimated from SED fitting. The comparison shows no correlation between SFR and stellar mass. Some galaxies with stellar mass smaller than {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub sun} show SFRs higher than {approx}100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The specific SFRs (SSFRs) of these galaxies are remarkably high; galaxies which have SSFR higher than {approx}10{sup -8} yr{sup -1} are found in eight of the present sample. From the best-fit parameters of SED fitting for these high-SSFR galaxies, we find that the average age of the stellar population is younger than 100 Myr, which is consistent with the implied high SSFR. The large SFR implies the possibility that the high-SSFR galaxies significantly

  20. A Determination of the Intergalactic Redshift Dependent UV-Optical-NIR Photon Density Using Deep Galaxy Survey Data and the Gamma-Ray Opacity of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the intensity and photon spectrum of the intergalactic background light (IBL) as a function of red shift using an approach based on observational data obtained at in different wavelength bands from local to deep galaxy surveys. Our empirically based approach allows us, for the firs.t time, to obtain a completely model independent determination of the IBL and to quantify its uncertainties. Using our results on the IBL, we then place upper and lower limits on the opacity of the universe to gamma-rays, independent of previous constraints.

  1. The VVDS-VLA deep field. II. Optical and near infrared identifications of VLA S1.4 GHz > 80 μ Jy sources in the VIMOS VLT deep survey VVDS-02h field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciliegi, P.; Zamorani, G.; Bondi, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Bolzonella, M.; Gregorini, L.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Radovich, M.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Parma, P.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Merluzzi, P.; Paltani, S.; Pollo, A.; Zucca, E.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; Gavignaud, I.; Pellò, R.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper we present the optical and near-infrared identifications of the 1054 radio sources detected in the 20 cm deep radio survey down to a 5σ flux limit of ~80 μJy obtained with the VLA in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey VVDS-02h deep field. Using U,B,V,R,I and K data, with limiting magnitudes of UAB˜25.4, BAB˜26.5, VAB˜26.2, RAB˜25.9 IAB˜25.0, JAB˜24.2, KAB˜23.9 (50% completeness) we identified 718 radio sources (~74% of the whole sample). The photometric redshift analysis shows that, in each magnitude bin, the radio sample has a higher median photometric redshift than the whole optical sample, while the median (V-I)AB color of the radio sources is redder than the median color of the whole optical sample. These results suggest that radio detection is preferentially selecting galaxies with higher intrinsic optical luminosity. From the analysis of the optical properties of the radio sources as function of the radio flux, we found that while about 35% of the radio sources are optically unidentified in the higher radio flux bin (S> 1.0 mJy), the percentage of unidentified sources decreases to about 25% in the faintest bins (S< 0.5 mJy). The median IAB magnitude for the total sample of radio sources, i.e. including also the unidentified ones, is brighter in the faintest radio bins than in the bin with higher radio flux. This suggests that most of the faintest radio sources are likely to be associated to relatively lower radio luminosity objects at relatively modest redshift, rather than radio-powerful, AGN type objects at high redshift. Using a classification in early-type and late-type galaxies based on the (B-I)AB color and the photometric redshift, we found that the majority of the radio sources below ~0.15 mJy are indeed late-type star forming galaxies. Finally, the radio sources without optical counterpart in our deep imaging have a median radio flux of 0.15 mJy, equal to that of identified sources. Given the very faint optical limits, these

  2. A LABOCA Survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South—Submillimeter Properties of Near-infrared Selected Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, T. R.; Weiβ, A.; Walter, F.; Smail, I.; Zheng, X. Z.; Knudsen, K. K.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Kovács, A.; Bell, E. F.; de Breuck, C.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dickinson, M.; Gawiser, E.; Lutz, D.; Rix, H.-W.; Schinnerer, E.; Alexander, D.; Bertoldi, F.; Brandt, N.; Chapman, S. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kreysa, E.; Kurczynski, P.; Menten, K.; Siringo, G.; Swinbank, M.; van der Werf, P.

    2010-08-01

    Using the 330 hr ESO-MPG 870 μm survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S) obtained with the Large Apex BOlometer CAmera (LABOCA) on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX), we have carried out a stacking analysis at submillimeter (submm) wavelengths of a sample of 8266 near-infra-red (near-IR) selected (K vega <= 20) galaxies, including 893 BzK galaxies, 1253 extremely red objects (EROs), and 737 distant red galaxies (DRGs), selected from the Multi-wavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). We measure average 870 μm fluxes of 0.22 ± 0.01 mJy (22.0σ), 0.48 ± 0.04 mJy (12.0σ), 0.39 ± 0.03 mJy (13.0σ), and 0.43 ± 0.04 mJy (10.8σ) for the K vega <= 20, BzK, ERO, and DRG samples, respectively. For the BzK, ERO, and DRG sub-samples, which overlap to some degree and are likely to be at z ~= 1-2, this implies an average far-IR luminosity of ~(1-5) × 1011 Lsun and star formation rate (SFR) of ~20-90 Msun . Splitting the BzK galaxies into star-forming (sBzK) and passive (pBzK) galaxies, the former is significantly detected (0.50 ± 0.04 mJy, 12.5σ) while the latter is only marginally detected (0.34 ± 0.10 mJy, 3.4σ), thus confirming that the sBzK and pBzK criteria to some extent select obscured, star-forming, and truly passive galaxies, respectively. The K vega <= 20 galaxies are found to contribute 7.27 ± 0.34 Jy deg-2 (16.5% ± 5.7%) to the 870 μm extragalactic background light (EBL). sBzK and pBzK galaxies contribute 1.49 ± 0.22 Jy deg-2 (3.4% ± 1.3%) and 0.20 ± 0.14 Jy deg-2 (0.5% ± 0.3%) to the EBL. We present the first delineation of the average submm signal from the K vega <= 20 selected galaxies and their contribution to the submm EBL as a function of (photometric) redshift, and find a decline in the average submm signal (and therefore IR luminosity and SFR) by a factor ~2-3 from z ~ 2 to z ~ 0. This is in line with a cosmic star formation history in which the star formation activity in galaxies increases significantly at z >~ 1. A

  3. Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z = 7 IN THE SUBARU/XMM-NEWTON DEEP SURVEY FIELD: PHOTOMETRIC CANDIDATES AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, Kazuaki; Ouchi, Masami; Iye, Masanori; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Furusawa, Hisanori; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Totani, Tomonori; Nagashima, Masahiro; Harayama, Atsushi; Kodaka, Natsuki; Tajitsu, Akito; Hattori, Takashi

    2010-10-10

    We conducted a deep narrowband NB973 (FWHM = 200 A centered at 9755 A) survey of z = 7 Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field, using the fully depleted CCDs newly installed on the Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam, which is twice more sensitive to z = 7 Ly{alpha} at {approx}1 {mu}m than the previous CCDs. Reaching the depth 0.5 mag deeper than our previous survey in the Subaru Deep Field that led to the discovery of a z = 6.96 LAE, we detected three probable z = 7 LAE candidates. Even if all the candidates are real, the Ly{alpha} luminosity function (LF) at z = 7 shows a significant deficit from the LF at z = 5.7 determined by previous surveys. The LAE number and Ly{alpha} luminosity densities at z = 7 are {approx}7.7%-54% and {approx}5.5%-39%, respectively, of those at z = 5.7, to the Ly{alpha} line luminosity limit of L(Ly{alpha}) {approx}> 9.2 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. This could be due to evolution of the LAE population at these epochs as a recent galaxy evolution model predicts that the LAE modestly evolves from z = 5.7 to 7. However, even after correcting for this effect of galaxy evolution on the decrease in LAE number density, the z = 7 Ly{alpha} LF still shows a deficit from z = 5.7 LF. This might reflect the attenuation of Ly{alpha} emission by neutral hydrogen remaining at the epoch of reionization and suggests that reionization of the universe might not be complete yet at z = 7. If we attribute the density deficit to reionization, the intergalactic medium transmission for Ly{alpha} photons at z = 7 would be 0.4 {<=} T {sup IGM}{sub Ly{alpha} {<=}} 1, supporting the possible higher neutral fraction at the earlier epochs at z > 6 suggested by the previous surveys of z = 5.7-7 LAEs, z {approx} 6 quasars, and z > 6 gamma-ray bursts.

  4. The evolution of the near-infrared galaxy luminosity function and colour bimodality up to z ~= 2 from the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey Early Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirasuolo, M.; McLure, R. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Almaini, O.; Foucaud, S.; Smail, Ian; Sekiguchi, K.; Simpson, C.; Eales, S.; Dye, S.; Watson, M. G.; Page, M. J.; Hirst, P.

    2007-09-01

    We present new results on the cosmological evolution of the near-infrared (near-IR) galaxy luminosity function (LF), derived from the analysis of a new sample of ~22000KAB <= 22.5 galaxies selected over an area of 0.6 deg2 from the Early Data Release of the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS). Our study has exploited the multiwavelength coverage of the UDS field provided by the new UKIDSS WFCAM K- and J-band imaging, the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey and the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic survey. The unique combination of large area and depth provided by this new survey minimizes the complicating effect of cosmic variance and has allowed us, for the first time, to trace the evolution of the brightest sources out to z ~= 2 with good statistical accuracy. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the characteristic luminosity of the near-IR LF brightens by ~=1 mag between z = 0 and z ~= 2, while the total density decreases by a factor of ~=2. Using the rest-frame (U - B) colour to split the sample into red and blue galaxies, we confirm the classic luminosity-dependent colour bimodality at z <~ 1. However, the strength of the colour bimodality is found to be a decreasing function of redshift, and seems to disappear by z >~ 1.5. Due to the large size of our sample, we are able to investigate the differing cosmological evolution of the red and blue galaxy populations. It is found that the space density of the brightest red galaxies (MK <= - 23) stays approximately constant with redshift, and that these sources dominate the bright end of the LF at redshifts z <~ 1. In contrast, the brightening of the characteristic luminosity and mild decrease in space density displayed by the blue galaxy population leads them to dominate the bright end of the LF at redshifts z >~ 1.

  5. A survey of surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    A new era for the field of Galactic structure is about to be opened with the advent of wide-area digital sky surveys. In this article, the author reviews the status and prospects for research for 3 new ground-based surveys: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Deep Near-Infrared Survey of the Southern Sky (DENIS) and the Two Micron AU Sky Survey (2MASS). These surveys will permit detailed studies of Galactic structure and stellar populations in the Galaxy with unprecedented detail. Extracting the information, however, will be challenging.

  6. COSMIC SHEAR RESULTS FROM THE DEEP LENS SURVEY. I. JOINT CONSTRAINTS ON {Omega} {sub M} AND {sigma}{sub 8} WITH A TWO-DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony; Schneider, Michael D.; Wittman, David; Schmidt, Samuel; Hilbert, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    We present a cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), a deep BVRz multi-band imaging survey of five 4 deg{sup 2} fields with two National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) 4 m telescopes at Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo. For both telescopes, the change of the point-spread-function (PSF) shape across the focal plane is complicated, and the exposure-to-exposure variation of this position-dependent PSF change is significant. We overcome this challenge by modeling the PSF separately for individual exposures and CCDs with principal component analysis (PCA). We find that stacking these PSFs reproduces the final PSF pattern on the mosaic image with high fidelity, and the method successfully separates PSF-induced systematics from gravitational lensing effects. We calibrate our shears and estimate the errors, utilizing an image simulator, which generates sheared ground-based galaxy images from deep Hubble Space Telescope archival data with a realistic atmospheric turbulence model. For cosmological parameter constraints, we marginalize over shear calibration error, photometric redshift uncertainty, and the Hubble constant. We use cosmology-dependent covariances for the Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis and find that the role of this varying covariance is critical in our parameter estimation. Our current non-tomographic analysis alone constrains the {Omega} {sub M}-{sigma}{sub 8} likelihood contour tightly, providing a joint constraint of {Omega} {sub M} = 0.262 {+-} 0.051 and {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.868 {+-} 0.071. We expect that a future DLS weak-lensing tomographic study will further tighten these constraints because explicit treatment of the redshift dependence of cosmic shear more efficiently breaks the {Omega} {sub M}-{sigma}{sub 8} degeneracy. Combining the current results with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7 year (WMAP7) likelihood data, we obtain {Omega} {sub M} = 0.278 {+-} 0.018 and {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.815 {+-} 0.020.

  7. The Swift serendipitous survey in deep XRT GRB fields (SwiftFT). I. The X-ray catalog and number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puccetti, S.; Capalbi, M.; Giommi, P.; Perri, M.; Stratta, G.; Angelini, L.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Chincarini, G.; Cusumano, G.; Gehrels, N.; Moretti, A.; Nousek, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: An accurate census of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) is a key step in investigating the nature of the correlation between the growth and evolution of super massive black holes and galaxy evolution. X-ray surveys provide one of the most efficient ways of selecting AGN. Methods: We searched for X-ray serendipitous sources in over 370 Swift-XRT fields centered on gamma ray bursts detected between 2004 and 2008 and observed with total exposures ranging from 10 ks to over 1 Ms. This defines the Swift Serendipitous Survey in deep XRT GRB fields, which is quite broad compared to existing surveys (~33 square degrees) and medium depth, with a faintest flux limit of 7.2 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5 to 2 keV energy range (4.8 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 at 50% completeness). The survey has a high degree of uniformity thanks to the stable point spread function and small vignetting correction factors of the XRT, moreover is completely random on the sky as GRBs explode in totally unrelated parts of the sky. Results: In this paper we present the sample and the X-ray number counts of the high Galactic-latitude sample, estimated with high statistics over a wide flux range (i.e., 7.2 × 10-16 ÷ ~ 5 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band and 3.4 × 10-15 ÷ ~ 6 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 2-10 keV band). We detect 9387 point-like sources with a detection Poisson probability threshold of ≤ 2 × 10-5, in at least one of the three energy bands considered (i.e. 0.3-3 keV, 2-10 keV, and 0.3-10 keV), for the total sample, while 7071 point-like sources are found at high Galactic-latitudes (i.e. |b| ≥ 20 deg). The large number of detected sources resulting from the combination of large area and deep flux limits make this survey a new important tool for investigating the evolution of AGN. In particular, the large area permits finding rare high-luminosity objects like QSO2, which are poorly sampled by other surveys, adding precious information for the luminosity function

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Deep GALEX NUV survey of the Kepler field. I. (Olmedo+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, M.; Lloyd, J.; Mamajek, E. E.; Chavez, M.; Bertone, E.; Martin, D. C.; Neill, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    As part of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Complete All-Sky UV Survey Extension (CAUSE) survey, Cornell University funded 300 orbits to complete the spatial coverage of the Kepler field through 2012 August-September (PI J. Lloyd). The GALEX-CAUSE Kepler Catalog (GCK) has 660928 NUV sources which are contained in Table 4. A subsample of this catalog is contained in Table 5, composed of 327 GCK objects with counter-parts in the Kepler Input Catalog hosting confirmed exoplanets. (2 data files).

  9. Comparison of galaxy clusters selected by weak-lensing, optical spectroscopy, and X-rays in the deep lens survey F2 field

    SciTech Connect

    Starikova, Svetlana; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Murray, Stephen S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.

    2014-05-10

    We compare galaxy clusters selected in Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the 4 deg{sup 2} Deep Lens Survey (DLS) F2 field to the cluster samples previously selected in the same field from a sensitive weak-lensing shear map derived from the DLS and from a detailed galaxy redshift survey—the Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS). Our Chandra and XMM-Newton observations cover 1.6 deg{sup 2} of the DLS F2 field, including all 12 weak-lensing peaks above a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.5, along with 16 of the 20 SHELS clusters with published velocity dispersions >500 km s{sup –1}. We detect 26 extended X-ray sources in this area and confirm 23 of them as galaxy clusters using the optical imaging. Approximately 75% of clusters detected in either X-ray or spectroscopic surveys are found in both; these follow the previously established scaling relations between velocity dispersion, L {sub X}, and T {sub X}. A lower percentage, 60%, of clusters are in common between X-ray and DLS samples. With the exception of a high false-positive rate in the DLS weak-lensing search (5 out of 12 DLS candidates appear to be false), differences between the three cluster detection methods can be attributed primarily to observational uncertainties and intrinsic scatter between different observables and cluster mass.

  10. The XMM deep survey in the CDF-S. VIII. X-ray properties of the two brightest sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasawa, K.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Vito, F.; Brandt, W. N.; Carrera, F. J.; Lanzuisi, G.; Falocco, S.; Vagnetti, F.

    2015-02-01

    We present results from the deep XMM-Newton observations of the two brightest X-ray sources in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), PID 203 (z = 0.544) and PID 319 (z = 0.742). The long exposure of 2.5 Ms over a 10 year period (net 4 yr with a 6 yr gap) makes it possible to obtain high quality X-ray spectra of these two Type I AGN with X-ray luminosity of 1044 erg s-1, which is the typical luminosity for low-redshift PG quasars, and track their X-ray variability both in flux and spectral shape. Both sources showed X-ray flux variability of ~10-20% in rms, which is similar in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-7 keV) bands. PID 203, which has evidence for optical extinction, shows modest amount of absorption (NH≤ 1 × 1021 cm-2) in the X-ray spectrum. Fe K emission is strongly detected in both objects with EW ~ 0.2 keV. The lines in both objects are moderately broad and exhibit marginal evidence for variability in shape and flux, indicating that the bulk of the line emission comes from their accretion disks rather than distant tori.

  11. A DETERMINATION OF THE INTERGALACTIC REDSHIFT-DEPENDENT ULTRAVIOLET-OPTICAL-NIR PHOTON DENSITY USING DEEP GALAXY SURVEY DATA AND THE GAMMA-RAY OPACITY OF THE UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Scully, Sean T. E-mail: malkan@astro.ucla.edu

    2012-12-20

    We calculate the intensity and photon spectrum of the intergalactic background light (IBL) as a function of redshift using an approach based on observational data obtained in many different wavelength bands from local to deep galaxy surveys. This allows us to obtain an empirical determination of the IBL and to quantify its observationally based uncertainties. Using our results on the IBL, we then place 68% confidence upper and lower limits on the opacity of the universe to {gamma}-rays, free of the theoretical assumptions that were needed for past calculations. We compare our results with measurements of the extragalactic background light and upper limits obtained from observations made by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  12. A Determination of the Intergalactic Redshift Dependent UV-Optical-NIR Photon Density Using Deep Galaxy Survey Data and the Gamma-ray Opacity of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Scully, Sean T.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the intensity and photon spectrum of the intergalactic background light (IBL) as a function of redshift using an approach based on observational data obtained in many different wavelength bands from local to deep galaxy surveys. This allows us to obtain an empirical determination of the IBL and to quantify its observationally based uncertainties. Using our results on the IBL, we then place 68% confidence upper and lower limits on the opacity of the universe to gamma-rays, free of the theoretical assumptions that were needed for past calculations. We compare our results with measurements of the extragalactic background light and upper limits obtained from observations made by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  13. The Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC): Deep Medium-band Optical Imaging and High-quality 32-band Photometric Redshifts in the ECDF-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardamone, Carolin N.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Urry, C. Megan; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Gawiser, Eric; Brammer, Gabriel; Taylor, Edward; Damen, Maaike; Treister, Ezequiel; Cobb, Bethany E.; Bond, Nicholas; Schawinski, Kevin; Lira, Paulina; Murayama, Takashi; Saito, Tomoki; Sumikawa, Kentaro

    2010-08-01

    We present deep optical 18-medium-band photometry from the Subaru telescope over the ~30' × 30' Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). This field has a wealth of ground- and space-based ancillary data, and contains the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. We combine the Subaru imaging with existing UBVRIzJHK and Spitzer IRAC images to create a uniform catalog. Detecting sources in the MUSYC "BVR" image we find ~40,000 galaxies with R AB < 25.3, the median 5σ limit of the 18 medium bands. Photometric redshifts are determined using the EAzY code and compared to ~2000 spectroscopic redshifts in this field. The medium-band filters provide very accurate redshifts for the (bright) subset of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, particularly at 0.1 < z < 1.2 and at z >~ 3.5. For 0.1 < z < 1.2, we find a 1σ scatter in Δz/(1 + z) of 0.007, similar to results obtained with a similar filter set in the COSMOS field. As a demonstration of the data quality, we show that the red sequence and blue cloud can be cleanly identified in rest-frame color-magnitude diagrams at 0.1 < z < 1.2. We find that ~20% of the red sequence galaxies show evidence of dust emission at longer rest-frame wavelengths. The reduced images, photometric catalog, and photometric redshifts are provided through the public MUSYC Web site. Based (in part) on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  14. Deep structure of the Texas Gulf passive margin and its Ouachita-Precambrian basement: Results of the COCORP San Marcos arch survey

    SciTech Connect

    Culotta, R.; Latham, T.; Oliver, J.; Brown, L.; Kaufman, S. ); Sydow, M. )

    1992-02-01

    This COCORP deep seismic survey provides a comprehensive image of the southeast-Texas part of the Gulf passive margin and its accreted Ouachita arc foundation. Beneath the updip limit of the Cenozoic sediment wedge, a prominent antiformal structure is imaged within the interior zone of the buried late Paleozoic Ouachita orogen. The structure appears to involve Precambrian Grenville basement. The crest of the antiform is coincident with the Cretaceous-Tertiary Luling-Mexia-Talco fault zone. Some of these faults dip to the northwest, counter to the general regional pattern of down-to-the-basin faulting, and appear to sole into the top of the antiform, suggesting that the Ouachita structure has been reactivated as a hingeline to the subsiding passive margin. The antiform may be tied via this fault system and the Ouachita gravity gradient to the similar Devils River, Waco, and Benton uplifts, interpreted as Precambrian basement-cored massifs. Above the Paleozoic sequence, a possible rift-related graben is imaged near the updip limit of Jurassic salt. Paleoshelf edges of the major Tertiary depositional sequences are marked by expanded sections disrupted by growth faults and shale diapirs. Within the Wilcox Formation, the transect crosses the mouth of the 900-m-deep Yoakum Canyon, a principal pathway of sediment delivery from the Laramide belt to the Gulf. Beneath the Wilcox, the Comanchean (Lower Cretaceous) shelf edge, capped by the Stuart City reef, is imaged as a pronounced topographic break onlapped by several moundy sediment packages. Because this segment of the line parallels strike, the topographic break may be interpreted as a 2,000-m-deep embayment in the Cretaceous shelf-edge, and possibly a major submarine canyon older and deeper than the Yoakum Canyon.

  15. THE MULTIWAVELENGTH SURVEY BY YALE-CHILE (MUSYC): DEEP MEDIUM-BAND OPTICAL IMAGING AND HIGH-QUALITY 32-BAND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE ECDF-S

    SciTech Connect

    Cardamone, Carolin N.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Urry, C. Megan; Brammer, Gabriel; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Gawiser, Eric; Bond, Nicholas; Taylor, Edward; Damen, Maaike; Treister, Ezequiel; Cobb, Bethany E.; Schawinski, Kevin; Lira, Paulina; Murayama, Takashi; Saito, Tomoki; Sumikawa, Kentaro

    2010-08-15

    We present deep optical 18-medium-band photometry from the Subaru telescope over the {approx}30' x 30' Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). This field has a wealth of ground- and space-based ancillary data, and contains the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. We combine the Subaru imaging with existing UBVRIzJHK and Spitzer IRAC images to create a uniform catalog. Detecting sources in the MUSYC 'BVR' image we find {approx}40,000 galaxies with R {sub AB} < 25.3, the median 5{sigma} limit of the 18 medium bands. Photometric redshifts are determined using the EAzY code and compared to {approx}2000 spectroscopic redshifts in this field. The medium-band filters provide very accurate redshifts for the (bright) subset of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, particularly at 0.1 < z < 1.2 and at z {approx}> 3.5. For 0.1 < z < 1.2, we find a 1{sigma} scatter in {Delta}z/(1 + z) of 0.007, similar to results obtained with a similar filter set in the COSMOS field. As a demonstration of the data quality, we show that the red sequence and blue cloud can be cleanly identified in rest-frame color-magnitude diagrams at 0.1 < z < 1.2. We find that {approx}20% of the red sequence galaxies show evidence of dust emission at longer rest-frame wavelengths. The reduced images, photometric catalog, and photometric redshifts are provided through the public MUSYC Web site.

  16. THE DEEP LOOK AT THE HARD X-RAY SKY: THE SWIFT-INTEGRAL X-RAY (SIX) SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bottacini, Eugenio; Ajello, Marco

    2012-08-01

    The supermassive black holes at the center of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are surrounded by obscuring matter that can block nuclear radiation. Depending on the amount of blocked radiation, the flux from the AGN can be too faint to be detected by currently flying hard X-ray (above 15 keV) missions. At these energies only {approx}1% of the intensity of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) can be resolved into point-like sources that are AGNs. In this work, we address the question of undetected sources contributing to the CXB with a very sensitive and new hard X-ray survey: the Swift-INTEGRAL X-ray survey, which is obtained with the new approach of combining the Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL/IBIS X-ray observations. We merge the observations of both missions, which enhances the exposure time and reduces systematic uncertainties. As a result, we obtain a new survey over a wide sky area of 6200 deg{sup 2} that is more sensitive than the surveys of Swift/BAT or INTEGRAL/IBIS alone. Our sample comprises 113 sources: 86 AGNs (Seyfert-like and blazars), 5 galaxies, 2 clusters of galaxies, 3 Galactic sources, 3 previously detected unidentified X-ray sources, and 14 unidentified sources. The scientific outcome from the study of the sample has been properly addressed to study the evolution of AGNs at redshift below 0.4. We do not find any evolution using the 1/V{sub max} method. Our sample of faint sources is a suitable target for the new generation hard X-ray telescopes with focusing techniques.

  17. The Deep Look at the Hard X-Ray Sky: The Swift-INTEGRAL X-Ray (SIX) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottacini, Eugenio; Ajello, Marco; Greiner, Jochen

    2012-08-01

    The supermassive black holes at the center of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are surrounded by obscuring matter that can block nuclear radiation. Depending on the amount of blocked radiation, the flux from the AGN can be too faint to be detected by currently flying hard X-ray (above 15 keV) missions. At these energies only ~1% of the intensity of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) can be resolved into point-like sources that are AGNs. In this work, we address the question of undetected sources contributing to the CXB with a very sensitive and new hard X-ray survey: the Swift-INTEGRAL X-ray survey, which is obtained with the new approach of combining the Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL/IBIS X-ray observations. We merge the observations of both missions, which enhances the exposure time and reduces systematic uncertainties. As a result, we obtain a new survey over a wide sky area of 6200 deg2 that is more sensitive than the surveys of Swift/BAT or INTEGRAL/IBIS alone. Our sample comprises 113 sources: 86 AGNs (Seyfert-like and blazars), 5 galaxies, 2 clusters of galaxies, 3 Galactic sources, 3 previously detected unidentified X-ray sources, and 14 unidentified sources. The scientific outcome from the study of the sample has been properly addressed to study the evolution of AGNs at redshift below 0.4. We do not find any evolution using the 1/V max method. Our sample of faint sources is a suitable target for the new generation hard X-ray telescopes with focusing techniques.

  18. The Hubble Space Telescope Medium Deep Survey with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera. 1: Methodology and results on the field near 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Casertano, S.; Im, M.; Wyckoff, E. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Gilmore, G. F.; Elson, R. A. W.; Glazebrook, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present results from the Medium Deep Survey (MDS), a Key Project using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Wide Field Camera (WFC) images of random fields have been taken in 'parallel mode' with an effective resolution of 0.2 sec full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the V(F555W) and I(F785LP) filters. The exposures presented here were targeted on a field away from 3C 273, and resulted in approximately 5 hr integration time in each filter. Detailed morphological structure is seen in galaxy images with total integrated magnitudes down to V approximately = 22.5 and I approximately = 21.5. Parameters are estimated that best fit the observed galaxy images, and 143 objects are identified (including 23 stars) in the field to a fainter limiting magnitude of I approximately = 23.5. We outline the extragalactic goals of the HST Medium Deep Survey, summarize our basic data reduction procedures, and present number (magnitude) counts, a color-magnitude diagram for the field, surface brightness profiles for the brighter galaxies, and best-fit half-light radii for the fainter galaxies as a function of apparent magnitude. A median galaxy half-light radius of 0.4 sec is measured, and the distribution of galaxy sizes versus magnitude is presented. We observe an apparent deficit of galaxies with half-light radii between approximately 0.6 sec and 1.5 sec, with respect to standard no-evolution or mild evolution cosmological models. An apparent excess of compact objects (half-light radii approximately 0.1 sec) is also observed with respect to those models. Finally, we find a small excess in the number of faint galaxy pairs and groups with respect to a random low-redshift field sample.

  19. SXDF-ALMA 2 arcmin2 deep survey: Resolving and characterizing the infrared extragalactic background light down to 0.5 mJy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuki; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Aretxaga, Itziar; Dunlop, James S.; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hughes, David; Ikarashi, Soh; Ishii, Shun; Ivison, Rob J.; Izumi, Takuma; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kodama, Tadayuki; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Umehata, Hideki; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Yabe, Kiyoto; Yun, Min S.

    2016-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength analysis of five submillimeter sources (S1.1mm = 0.54-2.02 mJy) that were detected during our 1.1 mm deep continuum survey in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF)-UDS-CANDELS field (2 arcmin2, 1σ = 0.055 mJy beam-1) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The two brightest sources correspond to a known single-dish (AzTEC) selected bright submillimeter galaxy (SMG), whereas the remaining three are faint SMGs newly uncovered by ALMA. If we exclude the two brightest sources, the contribution of the ALMA-detected faint SMGs to the infrared extragalactic background light is estimated to be ˜ 4.1^{+5.4}_{-3.0}Jy deg-2, which corresponds to ˜ 16^{+22}_{-12}% of the infrared extragalactic background light. This suggests that their contribution to the infrared extragalactic background light is as large as that of bright SMGs. We identified multiwavelength counterparts of the five ALMA sources. One of the sources (SXDF-ALMA3) is extremely faint in the optical to near-infrared region despite its infrared luminosity (L_IR˜eq 1× 10^{12} L_{⊙} or SFR ≃ 100 M⊙ yr-1). By fitting the spectral energy distributions at the optical-to-near-infrared wavelengths of the remaining four ALMA sources, we obtained the photometric redshifts (zphoto) and stellar masses (M*): zphoto ≃ 1.3-2.5, M* ≃ (3.5-9.5) × 1010 M⊙. We also derived their star formation rates (SFRs) and specific SFRs as ≃30-200 M⊙ yr-1 and ≃0.8-2 Gyr-1, respectively. These values imply that they are main sequence star-forming galaxies.

  20. Ages and magnetic structures of the South China Sea constrained by deep tow magnetic surveys and IODP Expedition 349

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Feng; Xu, Xing; Lin, Jian; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Jian; Yao, Yongjian; Zhao, Xixi; Liu, Qingsong; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Wang, Jian; Song, Taoran; Zhao, Junfeng; Qiu, Ning; Guan, Yongxian; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Williams, Trevor; Bao, Rui; Briais, Anne; Brown, Elizabeth A.; Chen, Yifeng; Clift, Peter D.; Colwell, Frederick S.; Dadd, Kelsie A.; Ding, Weiwei; Almeida, Iván. Hernández; Huang, Xiao-Long; Hyun, Sangmin; Jiang, Tao; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Li, Qianyu; Liu, Chuanlian; Liu, Zhifei; Nagai, Renata H.; Peleo-Alampay, Alyssa; Su, Xin; Tejada, Maria Luisa G.; Trinh, Hai Son; Yeh, Yi-Ching; Zhang, Chuanlun; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Guo-Liang

    2014-12-01

    analyses of deep tow magnetic anomalies and International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 349 cores show that initial seafloor spreading started around 33 Ma in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS), but varied slightly by 1-2 Myr along the northern continent-ocean boundary (COB). A southward ridge jump of ˜20 km occurred around 23.6 Ma in the East Subbasin; this timing also slightly varied along the ridge and was coeval to the onset of seafloor spreading in the Southwest Subbasin, which propagated for about 400 km southwestward from ˜23.6 to ˜21.5 Ma. The terminal age of seafloor spreading is ˜15 Ma in the East Subbasin and ˜16 Ma in the Southwest Subbasin. The full spreading rate in the East Subbasin varied largely from ˜20 to ˜80 km/Myr, but mostly decreased with time except for the period between ˜26.0 Ma and the ridge jump (˜23.6 Ma), within which the rate was the fastest at ˜70 km/Myr on average. The spreading rates are not correlated, in most cases, to magnetic anomaly amplitudes that reflect basement magnetization contrasts. Shipboard magnetic measurements reveal at least one magnetic reversal in the top 100 m of basaltic layers, in addition to large vertical intensity variations. These complexities are caused by late-stage lava flows that are magnetized in a different polarity from the primary basaltic layer emplaced during the main phase of crustal accretion. Deep tow magnetic modeling also reveals this smearing in basement magnetizations by incorporating a contamination coefficient of 0.5, which partly alleviates the problem of assuming a magnetic blocking model of constant thickness and uniform magnetization. The primary contribution to magnetic anomalies of the SCS is not in the top 100 m of the igneous basement.

  1. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: CLUSTERING DEPENDENCE ON GALAXY STELLAR MASS AND STAR FORMATION RATE AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael; Davis, Marc; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-04-10

    We present DEEP2 galaxy clustering measurements at z {approx} 1 as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR). We find a strong positive correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude on 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc scales for blue, star-forming galaxies with 9.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11 and no dependence for red, quiescent galaxies with 10.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11.5. Using recently re-calibrated DEEP2 SFRs from restframe B-band magnitude and optical colors, we find that within the blue galaxy population at z {approx} 1 the clustering amplitude increases strongly with increasing SFR and decreasing sSFR. For red galaxies there is no significant correlation between clustering amplitude and either SFR or sSFR. Blue galaxies with high SFR or low sSFR are as clustered on large scales as red galaxies. We find that the clustering trend observed with SFR can be explained mostly, but not entirely, by the correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude for blue galaxies. We also show that galaxies above the star-forming 'main sequence' are less clustered than galaxies below the main sequence, at a given stellar mass. These results are not consistent with the high-sSFR population being dominated by major mergers. We also measure the clustering amplitude on small scales ({<=}0.3 h {sup -1} Mpc) and find an enhanced clustering signal relative to the best-fit large-scale power law for red galaxies with high stellar mass, blue galaxies with high SFR, and both red and blue galaxies with high sSFR. The increased small-scale clustering for galaxies with high sSFRs is likely linked to triggered star formation in interacting galaxies. These measurements provide strong constraints on galaxy evolution and halo occupation distribution models at z {approx} 1.

  2. The ATLAS 5.5 GHz survey of the extended Chandra Deep Field South: the second data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, M. T.; Bell, M. E.; Hopkins, A. M.; Norris, R. P.; Seymour, N.

    2015-11-01

    We present a new image of the 5.5 GHz radio emission from the extended Chandra Deep Field South. Deep radio observations at 5.5 GHz were obtained in 2010 and presented in the first data release. A further 76 h of integration has since been obtained, nearly doubling the integration time. This paper presents a new analysis of all the data. The new image reaches 8.6 μJy rms, an improvement of about 40 per cent in sensitivity. We present a new catalogue of 5.5 GHz sources, identifying 212 source components, roughly 50 per cent more than were detected in the first data release. Source counts derived from this sample are consistent with those reported in the literature for S5.5 GHz > 0.1 mJy but significantly lower than published values in the lowest flux density bins (S5.5 GHz < 0.1 mJy), where we have more detected sources and improved statistical reliability. The 5.5 GHz radio sources were matched to 1.4 GHz sources in the literature and we find a mean spectral index of -0.35 ± 0.10 for S5.5 GHz > 0.5 mJy, consistent with the flattening of the spectral index observed in 5 GHz sub-mJy samples. The median spectral index of the whole sample is αmed = -0.58, indicating that these observations may be starting to probe the star-forming population. However, even at the faintest levels (0.05 < S5.5 GHz < 0.1 mJy), 39 per cent of the 5.5 GHz sources have flat or inverted radio spectra. Four flux density measurements from our data, across the full 4.5-6.5 GHz bandwidth, are combined with those from literature and we find 10 per cent of sources (S5.5 GHz ≳ 0.1 mJy) show significant curvature in their radio spectral energy distribution spanning 1.4-9 GHz.

  3. SPLAT: Using Spectral Indices to Identify and Characterize Ultracool Stars, Brown Dwarfs and Exoplanets in Deep Surveys and as Companions to Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganze, Christian; Burgasser, Adam J.; Martin, Eduardo; Konopacky, Quinn; Masters, Daniel C.

    2016-06-01

    The majority of ultracool dwarf stars and brown dwarfs currently known were identified in wide-field red optical and infrared surveys, enabling measures of the local, typically isolated, population in a relatively shallow (<100 pc radius) volume. Constraining the properties of the wider Galactic population (scale height, radial distribution, Population II sources), and close brown dwarf and exoplanet companions to nearby stars, requires specialized instrumentation, such as high-contrast, coronagraphic spectrometers (e.g., Gemini/GPI, VLT/Sphere, Project 1640); and deep spectral surveys (e.g., HST/WFC3 parallel fields, Euclid). We present a set of quantitative methodologies to identify and robustly characterize sources for these specific populations, based on templates and tools developed as part of the SpeX Prism Library Analysis Toolkit. In particular, we define and characterize specifically-tuned sets spectral indices that optimize selection of cool dwarfs and distinguish rare populations (subdwarfs, young planetary-mass objects) based on low-resolution, limited-wavelength-coverage spectral data; and present a template-matching classification method for these instruments. We apply these techniques to HST/WFC3 parallel fields data in the WISPS and HST-3D programs, where our spectral index set allows high completeness and low contamination for searches of late M, L and T dwarfs to distances out to ~3 kpc.The material presented here is based on work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX15AI75G.

  4. Preliminary results of the Deep Freeze 85 marine geologic and geophysical survey of the Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf and South Orkney Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.B.; Bartek, L.; Griffith, T.; Herron, M.; Kennedy, D.; Singer, J.; Smith, M.

    1985-01-01

    Seismic profiles from the South Orkney Plateau show a relatively thick (>0.7 seconds), laminated sequence resting on block faulted acoustic basement and deformed strata. This represents the rifting of the plateau from the Antarctic Peninsula and subsequent pelagic sedimentation. A glacial erosional surface and associated glacial trough were identified on the platform, and possible basal till collected in at least one piston core. Seismic lines from the continental shelf north of the South Shetland Plateau show gently folded reflectors that have been truncated by a widespread erosional unconformity and probable moraines situated near the shelf edge. A line across the Bransfield Strait, a modern back-arc basin, shows the structural features of the basin and thick (>1.0 second) laminated sediments within the center of the basin. One of several deep channels which dissect the shelf was surveyed, but the origin of these features remains uncertain. Geophysical data and piston cores were acquired in several of the bays and fjords of the peninsula region. This is the first detailed survey of Antarctic bays and fjords. The preliminary results show striking differences in sedimentation between Antarctic fjords and those of Arctic and Subarctic regions, the most important difference being the limited role of meltwater runoff in the supply of sediment to Antarctic fjords.

  5. Investigating the Clustering and Color of Galaxies in the COMBO-17 Chandra Deep Field South Survey and Possible Effects on Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berlanga Medina, J. E.; Shields, D. W.; Kennefick, J.; Kennefick, D.; Berrier, J.; Seigar, M. S.; Lacy, C. H. S.; AGES

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies by the Arkansas Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) collaboration have shown that there is a strong correlation between the pitch angles of field spiral galaxies and the mass of the galaxy's supermassive black holes (SMBHs). For this reason, we are interested in the consistency of measures of average pitch angle across galaxies in different environments. Since galaxies in clusters are more susceptible to galaxy harassment and other effects, we are particularly interested in whether environmental pressures in clusters may have an effect on pitch angle. We have measured the pitch angles of 125 galaxies lying in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS). Upon cross-referencing this set with the larger COMBO-17 Survey, we identified several over-dense regions which have been identified as possible clusters in recent literature. Initial results show that when comparing the pitch angle of galaxies in and out of over-dense regions, there seems to be little to no difference on average, suggesting environmental effect of clusters on pitch angle may be limited. Additionally, there appears to be no appreciable difference between the pitch angles of red and blue galaxies at this point in our study. We also plan to look for evidence of variation of pitch angle with cluster age. This work is funded in part by a grant from NASA EPSCoR.

  6. Absolute magnetization of the seafloor at a basalt-hosted hydrothermal site: Insights from a deep-sea submersible survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szitkar, Florent; Dyment, Jérôme; Fouquet, Yves; Choi, Yujin; Honsho, Chie

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of high-resolution vector magnetic data acquired by deep-sea submersibles (DSSs) requires the development of specific approaches adapted to their uneven tracks. We present a method that takes advantage of (1) the varying altitude of the DSS above the seafloor and (2) high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data acquired separately, at higher altitude, by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, to estimate the absolute magnetization intensity and the magnetic polarity of the shallow subseafloor along the DSS path. We apply this method to data collected by DSS Nautile on a small active basalt-hosted hydrothermal site. The site is associated with a lack of magnetization, in agreement with previous findings at the same kind of sites: the contrast between nonmagnetic sulfide deposits/stockwork zone and strongly magnetized basalt is sufficient to explain the magnetic signal observed at such a low altitude. Both normal and reversed polarities are observed in the lava flows surrounding the site, suggesting complex history of accumulating volcanic flows.

  7. The VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey: ~10 000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts to study galaxy assembly at early epochs 2 < z ≃ 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Amorin, R.; Bardelli, S.; Capak, P.; Cassarà, L.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cuby, J. G.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Lemaux, B. C.; Moreau, C.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Salvato, M.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Wang, P. W.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Fotopoulou, S.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Scoville, N.

    2015-04-01

    We present the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS), a spectroscopic redshift survey of ~10 000 very faint galaxies to study the main phase of galaxy assembly in 2 < z ≃ 6. The survey covers 1 deg2 in three separate fields: COSMOS, ECDFS, and VVDS-02h, with the selection of targets based on an inclusive combination of photometric redshifts and colour properties. Spectra covering 3650 < λ < 9350 Å are obtained with VIMOS on the ESO-VLT with integration times of 14h. Here we present the survey strategy, target selection, data processing, and the redshift measurement process with an emphasis on the specific methods used to adapt to this high-redshift range. We discuss the spectra quality and redshift reliability and derive a success rate in redshift measurement of 91%, or 74% by limiting the dataset to the most reliable measurements, down to a limiting magnitude iAB = 25. Measurements are performed all the way down to iAB = 27. The mean redshift of the main sample is z ~ 3 and extends over a broad redshift range mainly in 2 < z < 6. At 3 < z < 5, the galaxies cover a wide range of luminosities -23 < MNUV < -20.5, stellar mass 109M⊙ < M∗ < 1011M⊙, and star formation rates 1M⊙/yr < SFR < 103M⊙/yr. We discuss the spectral properties of galaxies using individual as well asstacked spectra. The comparison between spectroscopic and photometric redshifts as well as colour selection demonstrate the effectiveness of our selection scheme. From about ~ 90% of the data analysed so far, we expect to assemble >6000 galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshifts in 2 < z < 6 when complete. This makes the VUDS the largest survey at these redshifts and offers the opportunity for unprecedented studies of the star-forming galaxy population and its distribution in large-scale structures during the main phase of galaxy assembly. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under Large Program 185.A-0791.Staged releases of the

  8. THE LABOCA SURVEY OF THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH: TWO MODES OF STAR FORMATION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS HOSTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, D.; Shao, L.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Mainieri, V.; Rafferty, D.; Brandt, W. N.; Hasinger, G.; Weiss, A.; Menten, K. M.; Walter, F.; Greve, T. R.; Smail, I.; Coppin, K.; Alexander, D. M.; Chapman, S.; Gawiser, E.; Kurczynski, P.; Ivison, R. J.; Koekemoer, A. M.

    2010-04-01

    We study the co-existence of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in Chandra X-ray-selected AGN by analyzing stacked 870 {mu}m submillimeter emission from a deep and wide map of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), obtained with the LABOCA instrument at the APEX telescope. The total X-ray sample of 895 sources with median redshift z {approx} 1 drawn from the combined (E)CDFS X-ray catalogs is detected at >11sigma significance at a mean submillimeter flux of 0.49 +- 0.04 mJy, corresponding to a typical star formation rate (SFR) around 30 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} for a T = 35 K, beta = 1.5 graybody far-infrared spectral energy distribution. The good signal-to-noise ratio permits stacking analyses for major subgroups, splitting the sample by redshift, intrinsic luminosity, and AGN obscuration properties. We observe a trend of SFR increasing with redshift. An increase of SFR with AGN luminosity is indicated at the highest L{sub 2-10{sub keV}} {approx}> 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} luminosities only. Increasing trends with X-ray obscuration as expected in some AGN evolutionary scenarios are not observed for the bulk of the X-ray AGN sample but may be present for the highest intrinsic luminosity objects with L{sub 2-10{sub keV}} {approx}> 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. This behavior suggests a transition between two modes in the co-existence of AGN activity and star formation. For the bulk of the sample, the X-ray luminosity and obscuration of the AGN are not intimately linked to the global SFR of their hosts. The hosts are likely massive and forming stars secularly, at rates similar to the pervasive star formation seen in massive galaxies without an AGN at similar redshifts. In these systems, star formation is not linked to a specific state of the AGN and the period of moderately luminous AGN activity may not highlight a major evolutionary transition of the galaxy. The change indicated toward more intense star formation, and a more pronounced increase

  9. AN ALMA SURVEY OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH: NEAR-INFRARED MORPHOLOGIES AND STELLAR SIZES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Simpson, J. M.; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Edge, A. C.; Biggs, A. D.; Ivison, R. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Chapman, S. C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Dannerbauer, H.; Greve, T. R.; Karim, A.; Menten, Karl M.; Schinnerer, E.; Walter, F.; Wardlow, J. L.; and others

    2015-02-01

    We analyze Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/H {sub 160}-band observations of a sample of 48 Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array detected submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South field, to study their stellar morphologies and sizes. We detect 79% ± 17% of the SMGs in the H {sub 160}-band imaging with a median sensitivity of 27.8 mag, and most (80%) of the nondetections are SMGs with 870 μm fluxes of S {sub 870} < 3 mJy. With a surface brightness limit of μ {sub H} ∼ 26 mag arcsec{sup –2}, we find that 82% ± 9% of the H {sub 160}-band-detected SMGs at z = 1-3 appear to have disturbed morphologies, meaning they are visually classified as either irregulars or interacting systems, or both. By determining a Sérsic fit to the H {sub 160} surface brightness profiles, we derive a median Sérsic index of n = 1.2 ± 0.3 and a median half-light radius of r{sub e} = 4.4{sub −0.5}{sup +1.1} kpc for our SMGs at z = 1-3. We also find significant displacements between the positions of the H {sub 160} component and 870 μm emission in these systems, suggesting that the dusty starburst regions and less-obscured stellar distribution are not colocated. We find significant differences in the sizes and the Sérsic index between our z = 2-3 SMGs and z ∼ 2 quiescent galaxies, suggesting that a major transformation of the stellar light profile is needed in the quenching processes if SMGs are progenitors of the red-and-dead z ∼ 2 galaxies. Given the short-lived nature of SMGs, we postulate that the majority of the z = 2-3 SMGs with S {sub 870} ≳ 2 mJy are early/mid-stage major mergers.

  10. A deep survey of heavy element lines in planetary nebulae - I. Observations and forbidden-line densities, temperatures and abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamis, Y. G.; Barlow, M. J.; Liu, X.-W.; Danziger, I. J.; Storey, P. J.

    2003-10-01

    We present deep optical spectrophotometry of 12 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) and three Magellanic Cloud PNe. Nine of the Galactic PNe were observed by scanning the slit of the spectrograph across the nebula, yielding relative line intensities for the entire nebula that are suitable for comparison with integrated nebular fluxes measured in other wavelength regions. In this paper we use the fluxes of collisionally excited lines (CELs) from the nebulae to derive electron densities and temperatures, and ionic abundances. We find that the nebular electron densities derived from optical CEL ratios are systematically higher than those derived from the ratios of the infrared (IR) fine-structure (FS) lines of [OIII]. The latter have lower critical densities than the typical nebular electron densities derived from optical CELs, indicating the presence of significant density variations within the nebulae, with the IR CELs being biased towards lower density regions. We find that for several nebulae the electron temperatures obtained from [OII] and [NII] optical CELs are significantly affected by recombination excitation of one or more of the CELs. When allowance is made for recombination excitation, much better agreement is obtained with the electron temperatures obtained from optical [OIII] lines. We also compare electron temperatures obtained from the ratio of optical nebular to auroral [OIII] lines with temperatures obtained from the ratio of [OIII] optical lines to [OIII] IR FS lines. We find that when the latter are derived using electron densities based on the [OIII]52 μm/88 μm line ratio, they yield values that are significantly higher than the optical [OIII] electron temperatures. In contrast to this, [OIII] optical/IR temperatures derived using the higher electron densities obtained from optical [ClIII]λ5517/λ5537 ratios show much closer agreement with optical [OIII] electron temperatures, implying that the observed [OIII] optical/IR ratios are significantly

  11. COMOVING SPACE DENSITY AND OBSCURED FRACTION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE SUBARU/XMM-NEWTON DEEP SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroi, Kazuo; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Watson, Mike G.

    2012-10-10

    We study the comoving space density of X-ray-selected luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the obscured AGN fraction at high redshifts (3 < z < 5) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey field. From an X-ray source catalog with high completeness of optical identification thanks to deep optical images, we select a sample of 30 AGNs at z > 3 with intrinsic (de-absorbed and rest-frame 2-10 keV) luminosities of L{sub X} = 10{sup 44-45} erg s{sup -1} detected in the 0.5-2 keV band, consisting of 20 and 10 objects with spectroscopic and photometric redshifts, respectively. Utilizing the 1/V{sub max} method, we confirm that the comoving space density of luminous AGNs decreases with redshift above z > 3. When combined with the Chandra-COSMOS result of Civano et al., the density decline of AGNs with L{sub X} = 10{sup 44-45} erg s{sup -1} is well represented by a power law of (1 + z){sup -6.2{+-}0.9}. We also determine the fraction of X-ray obscured AGNs with N{sub H} > 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} in the Compton-thin population to be 0.54{sup +0.17}{sub -0.19}, by carefully taking into account observational biases including the effects of photon statistics for each source. This result is consistent with an independent determination of the type-2 AGN fraction based on optical properties, for which the fraction is found to be 0.59 {+-} 0.09. Comparing our result with that obtained in the local universe, we conclude that the obscured fraction of luminous AGNs increases significantly from z = 0 to z > 3 by a factor of 2.5 {+-} 1.1.

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Medium Deep Survey. 2: Deconvolution of Wide Field Camera field galaxy images in the 13 hour + 43 deg field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, R. A.; Schmidtke, P. C.; Pascarelle, S. M.; Gordon, J. M.; Griffiths, R. E.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Gilmore, G.; Glazebrook, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present isophotal profiles of six faint field galaxies from some of the first deep images taken for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey (MDS). These have redshifts in the range z = 0.126 to 0.402. The images were taken with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) in `parallel mode' and deconvolved with the Lucy method using as the point-spread function nearby stars in the image stack. The WFC deconvolutions have a dynamic range of 16 to 20 dB (4 to 5 mag) and an effective resolution approximately less than 0.2 sec (FWHM). The multiorbit HST images allow us to trace the morphology, light profiles, and color gradients of faint field galaxies down to V approximately equal to 22 to 23 mag at sub-kpc resolution, since the redshift range covered is z = 0.1 to 0.4. The goals of the MDS are to study the sub-kpc scale morphology, light profiles, and color gradients for a large samole of faint field galaxies down to V approximately equal to 23 mag, and to trace the fraction of early to late-type galaxies as function of cosmic time. In this paper we study the brighter MDS galaxies in the 13 hour + 43 deg MDS field in detail, and investigate to what extent model fits with pure exponential disks or a(exp 1/4) bulges are justified at V approximately less than 22 mag. Four of the six field galaxies have light profiles that indicate (small) inner bulges following r(exp 1/4) laws down to 0.2 sec resolution, plus a dominant surrounding exponential disk with little or no color gradients. Two occur in a group at z = 0.401, two are barred spiral galaxies at z = 0.179 and z = 0.302, and two are rather subluminous (and edge-on) disk galaxies at z = 0.126 and z = 0.179. Our deep MDS images can detect galaxies down to V, I approximately less than 25 to 26 mag, and demonstrate the impressive potential of HST--even with its pre-refurbished optics--to resolve morphological details in galaxies at cosmologically significant distances (v approximately less than 23 mag). Since the median

  13. The MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) Survey: Rest-frame Optical Spectroscopy for ~1500 H-selected Galaxies at 1.37 < z < 3.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriek, Mariska; Shapley, Alice E.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Siana, Brian; Coil, Alison L.; Mobasher, Bahram; Freeman, William R.; de Groot, Laura; Price, Sedona H.; Sanders, Ryan; Shivaei, Irene; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Aird, James; Azadi, Mojegan; Kassis, Marc; Bullock, James S.; Conroy, Charlie; Davé, Romeel; Kereš, Dušan; Krumholz, Mark

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey. The MOSDEF survey aims to obtain moderate-resolution (R = 3000-3650) rest-frame optical spectra (˜3700-7000 Å) for ˜1500 galaxies at 1.37≤ z≤ 3.80 in three well-studied CANDELS fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-N. Targets are selected in three redshift intervals: 1.37≤ z≤ 1.70, 2.09≤ z≤ 2.61, and 2.95≤ z≤ 3.80, down to fixed {H}{AB} (F160W) magnitudes of 24.0, 24.5, and 25.0, respectively, using the photometric and spectroscopic catalogs from the 3D-HST survey. We target both strong nebular emission lines (e.g., [O ii] λ λ 3727,3730, Hβ, [O iii] λ λ 4960,5008, Hα, [N ii] λ λ 6550,6585, and [S ii] λ λ 6718,6733) and stellar continuum and absorption features (e.g., Balmer lines, Ca-ii H and K, Mgb, 4000 Å break). Here we present an overview of our survey, the observational strategy, the data reduction and analysis, and the sample characteristics based on spectra obtained during the first 24 nights. To date, we have completed 21 masks, obtaining spectra for 591 galaxies. For ˜80% of the targets we derive a robust redshift from either emission or absorption lines. In addition, we confirm 55 additional galaxies, which were serendipitously detected. The MOSDEF galaxy sample includes unobscured star-forming, dusty star-forming, and quiescent galaxies and spans a wide range in stellar mass (˜ {10}9-{10}11.5 {M}⊙ ) and star formation rate (˜ {10}0-{10}3 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1). The spectroscopically confirmed sample is roughly representative of an H-band limited galaxy sample at these redshifts. With its large sample size, broad diversity in galaxy properties, and wealth of available ancillary data, MOSDEF will transform our understanding of the stellar, gaseous, metal, dust, and black hole content of galaxies during the time when the universe was most active.

  14. The Subaru-XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS). VIII. Multi-wavelength identification, optical/NIR spectroscopic properties, and photometric redshifts of X-ray sources†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Masayuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Watson, Mike G.; Furusawa, Hisanori; Takata, Tadafumi; Simpson, Chris; Morokuma, Tomoki; Yamada, Toru; Ohta, Kouji; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Yabe, Kiyoto; Tamura, Naoyuki; Moritani, Yuuki; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Maihara, Toshinori; Dalton, Gavin; Lewis, Ian; Lee, Hanshin; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Macaulay, Edward; Clarke, Frazer; Silverman, John D.; Croom, Scott; Ouchi, Masami; Hanami, Hitoshi; Díaz Tello, Jorge; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    We report on the multi-wavelength identification of the X-ray sources found in the Subaru-XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) using deep imaging data covering the wavelength range between the far-UV and mid-IR (MIR). We select a primary counterpart of each X-ray source by applying the likelihood ratio method to R-band, 3.6 μm, near-UV, and 24 μm source catalogs as well as matching catalogs of active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates selected in 1.4 GHz radio and i '-band variability surveys. Once candidates for Galactic stars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources in a nearby galaxy, and clusters of galaxies are removed there are 896 AGN candidates in the sample. We conduct spectroscopic observations of the primary counterparts with multi-object spectrographs in the optical and NIR; 65% of the X-ray AGN candidates are spectroscopically identified. For the remaining X-ray AGN candidates, we evaluate their photometric redshift with photometric data in 15 bands. Utilizing the multi-wavelength photometric data of the large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs, we evaluate the stellar masses, M*, of the host galaxies of the narrow-line AGNs. The distribution of the stellar mass is remarkably constant from z = 0.1 to 4.0. The relation between M* and 2-10 keV luminosity can be explained with strong cosmological evolution of the relationship between the black hole mass and M*. We also evaluate the scatter of the UV-MIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of the X-ray AGNs as a function of X-ray luminosity and absorption by the nucleus. The scatter is compared with galaxies which have redshift and stellar mass distribution matched with the X-ray AGN. The UV-NIR (near-IR) SEDs of obscured X-ray AGNs are similar to those of the galaxies in the matched sample. In the NIR-MIR range, the median SEDs of X-ray AGNs are redder, but the scatter of the SEDs of the X-ray AGN broadly overlaps that of the galaxies in the matched sample.

  15. The DEEP Groth Strip Survey. II. Hubble Space Telescope Structural Parameters of Galaxies in the Groth Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Luc; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Vogt, Nicole P.; Sarajedini, Vicki L.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Koo, David C.; Im, Myungshin; Illingworth, Garth D.; Faber, S. M.

    2002-09-01

    The quantitative morphological classification of distant galaxies is essential to the understanding of the evolution of galaxies over the history of the universe. This paper presents Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 F606W and F814W photometric structural parameters for 7450 galaxies in the ``Groth Strip.'' These parameters are based on a two-dimensional bulge+disk surface brightness model and were obtained using an automated reduction and analysis pipeline described in detail here. A first set of fits was performed separately in each bandpass, and a second set of fits was performed simultaneously on both bandpasses. The information produced by these two types of fits can be used to explore different science goals. Systematic and random fitting errors in all structural parameters as well as bulge and disk colors are carefully characterized through extensive sets of simulations. The results of these simulations are given in catalogs similar to the real science catalogs so that both real and simulated measurements can be sampled according to the same selection criteria to show biases and errors in the science data subset of interest. The effects of asymmetric structures on the recovered bulge+disk fitting parameters are also explored through simulations. The full multidimensional photometric survey selection function of the Groth Strip is also computed. This selection function, coupled to bias maps from simulations, provides a complete and objective reproduction of the observational limits, and these limits can be applied to theoretical predictions from galaxy evolution models for direct comparisons with the data. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under contract with NASA.

  16. OTELO SURVEY: DEEP BVRI BROADBAND PHOTOMETRY OF THE GROTH STRIP. II. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF X-RAY EMITTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Povic, M.; Perez GarcIa, A. M.; Bongiovanni, A.; Castaneda, H.; Lorenzo, M. Fernandez; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Alfaro, E.; Gallego, J.; Gonzalez-Serrano, J. I.; Gonzalez, J. J. E-mail: miguel.sanchez@sciops.esa.in

    2009-11-20

    The Groth field is one of the sky regions that will be targeted by the OSIRIS Tunable Filter Emission Line Object survey in the optical 820 nm and 920 nm atmospheric windows. In the present paper, public Chandra X-ray data with total exposure time of 200 ks are analyzed and combined with optical broadband data of the Groth field, in order to study a set of optical structural parameters of the X-ray emitters and its relation with X-ray properties. To this aim, we processed the raw, public X-ray data using the Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations, and determined and analyzed different structural parameters, in order to produce a morphological classification of X-ray sources. We present the morphology of 340 X-ray emitters with optical counterpart detected. Objects have been classified by X-ray type using a diagnostic diagram relating X-ray-to-optical ratio (X/O) to hardness ratio. We did not find any clear correlation between X-ray and morphological types. We analyzed the angular clustering of X-ray sources with optical counterpart using two-point correlation functions. A significant positive angular clustering was obtained from a preliminary analysis of four subsamples of the X-ray sources catalog. The clustering signal of the optically extended counterparts is similar to that of strongly clustered populations like red and very red galaxies, suggesting that the environment plays an important role in active galactic nuclei phenomena. Finally, we combined optical structural parameters with other X-ray and optical properties, and we confirmed an anticorrelation between the X/O ratio and the Abraham concentration index, which might suggest that early-type galaxies have lower Eddington rates than those of late-type galaxies.

  17. A new deep, hard X-ray survey of M31: Identifying Black Holes and Neutron Stars in the X-ray Binary Population of our Nearest Neighbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Lehmer, Bret; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel; Venters, Tonia M.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Eracleous, Michael; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pooley, David A.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray binaries (XRBs) trace old and new stellar populations in galaxies, and thus star formation history and star formation rate. X-ray emission from XRBs may be responsible for significant amounts of heating of the early Intergalactic Medium (IGM) at Cosmic Dawn and may also play a significant role in reionization. Until recently, the hard emission from these populations could only be studied for XRBs in our own galaxy, where it is often difficult to measure accurate distances and thus luminosities. The launch of NuSTAR, the first focusing hard X-ray observatory, has allowed us to resolve the brightest XRBs (down to LX ~ few times 10^38 erg/s) in galaxies like NGC 253, M83, and M82 up to 4 Mpc away. To reach much lower X-ray luminosities that are more typical of XRBs in the Milky Way (Lx <~ 10^37 erg/s), we have observed M31 in 4 NuSTAR fields for more than 1 Ms total exposure, covering younger stellar population in a swath of the disk (within the footprint of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) Survey) and the older populations of the bulge. We detect 120 sources in the 4-25 keV band and over 40 hard band (12-25 keV) accreting black holes and neutron stars, distinguished by their spectral shape in this band. The luminosity function (LF) of the hard band detected sources are compared to Swift/BAT-derived LFs of the Milky Way population, which reveals an excess of luminous sources in M31 when correcting for star formation rate and stellar mass. We also discuss implications for this updated understanding of XRB populations on early-Universe measurements in, e.g., the 7 Ms Chandra Deep Field survey.

  18. Twenty-Three High-Redshift Supernovae from the Institute for Astronomy Deep Survey: Doubling the Supernova Sample at z > 0.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barris, Brian J.; Tonry, John L.; Blondin, Stéphane; Challis, Peter; Chornock, Ryan; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Garnavich, Peter; Holland, Stephen T.; Jha, Saurabh; Kirshner, Robert P.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Leibundgut, Bruno; Li, Weidong; Matheson, Thomas; Miknaitis, Gajus; Riess, Adam G.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Smith, R. Chris; Sollerman, Jesper; Spyromilio, Jason; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Aussel, Hervé; Chambers, K. C.; Connelley, M. S.; Donovan, D.; Henry, J. Patrick; Kaiser, Nick; Liu, Michael C.; Martín, Eduardo L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2004-02-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of 23 high-redshift supernovae (SNe) spanning a range of z=0.34-1.03, nine of which are unambiguously classified as Type Ia. These SNe were discovered during the IfA Deep Survey, which began in 2001 September and observed a total of 2.5 deg2 to a depth of approximately m~25-26 in RIZ over 9-17 visits, typically every 1-3 weeks for nearly 5 months, with additional observations continuing until 2002 April. We give a brief description of the survey motivations, observational strategy, and reduction process. This sample of 23 high-redshift SNe includes 15 at z>=0.7, doubling the published number of objects at these redshifts, and indicates that the evidence for acceleration of the universe is not due to a systematic effect proportional to redshift. In combination with the recent compilation of Tonry et al. (2003), we calculate cosmological parameter density contours that are consistent with the flat universe indicated by the cosmic microwave background (Spergel et al. 2003). Adopting the constraint that Ωtotal=1.0, we obtain best-fit values of (Ωm,ΩΛ)=(0.33,0.67) using 22 SNe from this survey augmented by the literature compilation. We show that using the empty-beam model for gravitational lensing does not eliminate the need for ΩΛ>0. Experience from this survey indicates great potential for similar large-scale surveys while also revealing the limitations of performing surveys for z>1 SNe from the ground. CFHT: Based in part on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. CTIO: Based in part on observations taken at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. Keck: Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership

  19. The Deep2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Mean Ages and Metallicities ofRed Field Galaxies at Z ~; 0.9 from Stacked Keck/Deimos Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Faber, S.M.; Konidaris, Nicholas; Graves,Genevieve; Willmer, Christopher N.A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Coil, AlisonL.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Harker, Justin; Koo, David C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Yan, Renbin

    2006-10-19

    As part of the DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey, we analyze absorption line strengths in stacked Keck/DEIMOS spectra of red field galaxies with weak to no emission lines, at redshifts 0.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 1. Comparison with models of stellar population synthesis shows that red galaxies at z {approx} 0:9 have mean luminosity-weighted ages of the order of only 1 Gyr and at least solar metallicities. These ages cannot be reconciled with a scenario where all stars evolved passively after forming at very high z. Rather, a significant fraction of stars can be no more than 1 Gyr old, which means that some star formation in the stacked populations continued to at least z {approx} 1:2. Furthermore, a comparison of these distant galaxies with a local SDSS sample, using stellar populations synthesis models, shows that the drop in the equivalent width of H{delta} from z {approx} 0:9 to 0.1 is less than predicted by passively evolving models. This admits of two interpretations: either each individual galaxy experiences continuing low-level star formation, or the red-sequence galaxy population from z {approx} 0:9 to 0.1 is continually being added to by new galaxies with younger stars.

  20. An Empirical Determination of the Intergalactic Background Light from UV to FIR Wavelengths Using FIR Deep Galaxy Surveys and the Gamma-Ray Opacity of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Scully, Sean T.; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2016-08-01

    We have previously calculated the intergalactic background light (IBL) as a function of redshift from the Lyman limit in the far-ultraviolet to a wavelength of 5 μm in the near-infrared range, based purely on data from deep galaxy surveys. Here, we use similar methods to determine the mid- and far-infrared IBL from 5 to 850 μm. Our approach enables us to constrain the range of photon densities by determining the uncertainties in observationally determined luminosity densities and spectral gradients. By also including the effect of the 2.7 K cosmic background photons, we determine upper and lower limits on the opacity of the universe to γ-rays up to PeV energies within a 68% confidence band. Our direct results on the IBL are consistent with those from complimentary γ-ray analyses using observations from the Fermi γ-ray space telescope and the H.E.S.S. air Čerenkov telescope. Thus, we find no evidence of previously suggested processes for the modification of γ-ray spectra other than that of absorption by pair production alone.

  1. He II emitters in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey: Population III star formation or peculiar stellar populations in galaxies at 2 < z < 4.6?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cucciati, O.; Garilli, B.; Zamorani, G.; Adami, C.; Bardelli, S.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B.; Maccagni, D.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to identify He II emitters at 2 < z < 4.6 and to constrain the source of the hard ionizing continuum that powers the He II emission. Methods: We assembled a sample of 277 galaxies with a highly reliable spectroscopic redshift at 2 < z < 4.6 from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) Deep and Ultra-Deep data, and we identified 39 He II λ1640 emitters. We studied their spectral properties, measuring the fluxes, equivalent widths (EW), and full width at half maximum (FWHM) for most relevant lines, including He II λ1640, Lyα line, Si II λ1527, and C IV λ1549. Results: About 10% of galaxies at z ~ 3 and iAB ≤ 24.75 show He II in emission, with rest frame equivalent widths EW0 ~ 1-7 Å, equally distributed between galaxies with Lyα in emission or in absorption. We find 11 (3.9% of the global population) reliable He II emitters with unresolved He II lines (FWHM0 < 1200 km s-1), 13 (4.6% of the global population) reliable emitters with broad He II emission (FWHM0 > 1200 km s-1), 3 active galactic nuclei (AGN), and an additional 12 possible He II emitters. The properties of the individual broad emitters are in agreement with expectations from a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) model. Instead, the properties of the narrow emitters are not compatible with this model, nor with predictions of gravitational cooling radiation produced by gas accretion, unless this is severely underestimated by current models by more than two orders of magnitude. Rather, we find that the EW of the narrow He II line emitters are in agreement with expectations for a Population III (PopIII) star formation, if the episode of star formation is continuous, and we calculate that a PopIII star formation rate (SFR) of 0.1-10 M⊙ yr-1 alone is enough to sustain the observed He II flux. Conclusions: We conclude that narrow He II emitters are powered either by the ionizing flux from a stellar population rare at z ~ 0 but much more common at z ~ 3, or by PopIII star formation. As proposed by

  2. Lake Nam Co (Tibet, China) - a suitable target for a deep drilling project as confirmed by a preliminary airgun seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, V.; Daut, G.; Wenau, S.; Gernhardt, F.; Wang, J.; Schwenk, T.; Haberzettl, T.; Zhu, L.; Maeusbacher, R.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Nam Co, located on the central Tibetan Plateau at the intersection of the Westerlies and the Indian Ocean Summer Monsoon, is well suited to study the monsoonal regime over different time scales. High-resolution and continuous sedimentary records from the Tibetan Plateau are still rare and only few reach back to the Last Glacial Maximum. For Nam Co, numerous multiproxy studies unravel the regional paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental history for the past 24,000 years. These promising results demonstrate the potential of Lake Nam Co as a geoarchive, but nature, thickness and geologic time of the sediment fill have not yet been determined. Therefore the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research (Chinese Academy of Sciences) and the Universities of Bremen and Jena jointly carried out an airgun multichannel seismic survey at Nam Co in June/July 2014. As main equipment, a micro GI Gun(2 x 0.1 L) was used in conjunction with a 64 m long seismic streamer (32 channels/2 m spacing) to achieve deep signal penetration, to confirm a thick sediment infill and to prove the suitability for deep coring of several hundred meters. Although only few lines could be shot due to technical and weather issues, several lines particularly from the deepest part of the lake provide new insight. Preliminary data processing and interpretation reveal a well layered sediment cover of >700 m in the center of the lake. Seismic facies appears to vary in a cyclic manner, indicating a coupling to climatically-driven changes in lake level and sediment delivery. From a comparison with the Holocene/Late Glacial sedimentary and seismic record, several similar units could be imaged. Furthermore, rapid sedimentation is confirmed from the continuous cover of growth faults and doming, and continuous sedimentation throughout glacial/interglacial cycles appears likely due to the absence of erosional unconformities. By tentatively assigning these units to marine isotope stages, different seismostratigraphies can

  3. The VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey: Lyα emission and stellar populations of star-forming galaxies at 2 < z < 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathi, N. P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Ilbert, O.; Cassata, P.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Lemaux, B. C.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Amorín, R.; Bardelli, S.; Cassarà, L. P.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Guaita, L.; Koekemoer, A.; Paltani, S.; Pforr, J.; Ribeiro, B.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Capak, P.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cuby, J. G.; de la Torre, S.; Dunlop, J.; Fotopoulou, S.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Wang, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate spectral and photometric properties of 854 faint (iAB ≲ 25 mag) star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2 < z < 2.5 using the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS) spectroscopic data and deep multi-wavelength photometric data in three extensively studied extragalactic fields (ECDFS, VVDS, COSMOS). These SFGs were targeted for spectroscopy as a result of their photometric redshifts. The VUDS spectra are used to measure the UV spectral slopes (β) as well as Lyα equivalent widths (EW). On average, the spectroscopically measured β (-1.36 ± 0.02), is comparable to the photometrically measured β (-1.32 ± 0.02), and has smaller measurement uncertainties. The positive correlation of β with the spectral energy distribution (SED)-based measurement of dust extinction Es(B-V) emphasizes the importance of β as an alternative dust indicator at high redshifts. To make a proper comparison, we divide these SFGs into three subgroups based on their rest-frame Lyα EW: SFGs with no Lyα emission (SFGN; EW ≤ 0 Å), SFGs with Lyα emission (SFGL; EW > 0 Å), and Lyα emitters (LAEs; EW ≥ 20 Å). The fraction of LAEs at these redshifts is ~10%, which is consistent with previous observations. We compared best-fitSED-estimated stellar parameters of the SFGN, SFGL and LAE samples. For the luminosities probed here (~ L∗), we find that galaxies with and without Lyα in emission have small but significant differences in their SED-based properties. We find that LAEs have less dust, and lower star-formation rates (SFR) compared to non-LAEs. We also find that LAEs are less massive compared to non-LAEs, though the difference is smaller and less significant compared to the SFR and Es(B-V). When we divide the LAEs according to their Spitzer/IRAC 3.6 μm fluxes, we find that the fraction of IRAC-detected (m3.6 ≲ 25 mag) LAEs is much higher than the fraction of IRAC-detected narrow band (NB)-selected LAEs at z ≃ 2-3. This could imply that UV-selected LAEs

  4. A NEW INFRARED COLOR CRITERION FOR THE SELECTION OF 0 < z < 7 AGNs: APPLICATION TO DEEP FIELDS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR JWST SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Messias, H.; Afonso, J.; Salvato, M.; Mobasher, B.; Hopkins, A. M.

    2012-08-01

    It is widely accepted that observations at mid-infrared (mid-IR) wavelengths enable the selection of galaxies with nuclear activity, which may not be revealed even in the deepest X-ray surveys. Many mid-IR color-color criteria have been explored to accomplish this goal and tested thoroughly in the literature. Besides missing many low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs), one of the main conclusions is that, with increasing redshift, the contamination by non-active galaxies becomes significant (especially at z {approx}> 2.5). This is problematic for the study of the AGN phenomenon in the early universe, the main goal of many of the current and future deep extragalactic surveys. In this work new near- and mid-IR color diagnostics are explored, aiming for improved efficiency-better completeness and less contamination-in selecting AGNs out to very high redshifts. We restrict our study to the James Webb Space Telescope wavelength range (0.6-27 {mu}m). The criteria are created based on the predictions by state-of-the-art galaxy and AGN templates covering a wide variety of galaxy properties, and tested against control samples with deep multi-wavelength coverage (ranging from the X-rays to radio frequencies). We show that the colors K{sub s} - [4.5], [4.5] - [8.0], and [8.0] - [24] are ideal as AGN/non-AGN diagnostics at, respectively, z {approx}< 1, 1 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.5, and z {approx}> 2.5-3. However, when the source redshift is unknown, these colors should be combined. We thus develop an improved IR criterion (using K{sub s} and IRAC bands, KI) as a new alternative at z {approx}< 2.5. KI does not show improved completeness (50%-60% overall) in comparison to commonly used Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) based AGN criteria, but is less affected by non-AGN contamination (revealing a >50%-90% level of successful AGN selection). We also propose KIM (using K{sub s} , IRAC, and MIPS 24 {mu}m bands, KIM), which aims to select AGN hosts from local distances to as far

  5. Evolution of clustering length, large-scale bias, and host halo mass at 2 < z < 5 in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS)⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkalec, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Pollo, A.; de la Torre, S.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B. C.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Amorín, R.; Bardelli, S.; Cassarà, L. P.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Capak, P.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cuby, J. G.; Dunlop, J.; Fotopoulou, S.; Koekemoer, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Pforr, J.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Wang, P. W.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of galaxy clustering for galaxies in the redshift range 2.0 Deep Survey (VUDS). We present the projected (real-space) two-point correlation function wp(rp) measured by using 3022 galaxies with robust spectroscopic redshifts in two independent fields (COSMOS and VVDS-02h) covering in total 0.8deg2. We quantify how the scale dependent clustering amplitude r0 changes with redshift making use of mock samples to evaluate and correct the survey selection function. Using a power-law model ξ(r) = (r/r0)- γ we find that the correlation function for the general population is best fit by a model with a clustering length r0 = 3.95+0.48-0.54 h-1 Mpc and slope γ = 1.8+0.02-0.06 at z ~ 2.5, r0 = 4.35 ± 0.60 h-1 Mpc and γ = 1.6+0.12-0.13 at z ~ 3.5. We use these clustering parameters to derive the large-scale linear galaxy bias bLPL, between galaxies and dark matter. We find bLPL = 2.68 ± 0.22 at redshift z ~ 3 (assuming σ8 = 0.8), significantly higher than found at intermediate and low redshifts for the similarly general galaxy populations. We fit a halo occupation distribution (HOD) model to the data and we obtain that the average halo mass at redshift z ~ 3 is Mh = 1011.75 ± 0.23 h-1M⊙. From this fit we confirm that the large-scale linear galaxy bias is relatively high at bLHOD = 2.82 ± 0.27. Comparing these measurements with similar measurements at lower redshifts we infer that the star-forming population of galaxies at z ~ 3 should evolve into the massive and bright (Mr< -21.5)galaxy population, which typically occupy haloes of mass ⟨ Mh ⟩ = 1013.9 h-1M⊙ at redshift z = 0. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under Large Program 185.A-0791.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. The SCUBA HAlf Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES) - V. Submillimetre properties of near-infrared-selected galaxies in the Subaru/XMM -Newton deep field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, T.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Shimasaku, K.; Coppin, K.; Pope, A.; Ivison, R. J.; Hanami, H.; Serjeant, S.; Clements, D. L.; Priddey, R. S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Takata, T.; Aretxaga, I.; Chapman, S. C.; Eales, S. A.; Farrah, D.; Granato, G. L.; Halpern, M.; Hughes, D. H.; van Kampen, E.; Scott, D.; Sekiguchi, K.; Smail, I.; Vaccari, M.

    2007-11-01

    We have studied the submillimetre (submm) properties of the following classes of near-infrared-selected (NIR-selected) massive galaxies at high redshifts: BzK-selected star-forming galaxies (BzKs); distant red galaxies (DRGs); and extremely red objects (EROs). We used the SCUBA HAlf Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES), the largest uniform submm survey to date. Partial overlap of SIRIUS/NIR images and SHADES in Subaru/XMM-Newton deep field has allowed us to identify four submm-bright NIR-selected galaxies, which are detected in the mid-IR, 24μ m, and the radio, 1.4GHz. We find that all of our submm-bright NIR-selected galaxies satisfy the BzK selection criteria, i.e. BzK ≡ (z - K)AB - (B - z)AB >= -0.2, except for one galaxy whose B - z and z - K colours are however close to the BzK colour boundary. Two of the submm-bright NIR-selected galaxies satisfy all of the selection criteria we considered, i.e. they belong to the BzK-DRG-ERO overlapping population, or `extremely red' BzKs. Although these extremely red BzKs are rare (0.25 arcmin-2), up to 20 per cent of this population could be submm galaxies. This fraction is significantly higher than that found for other galaxy populations studied here. Via a stacking analysis, we have detected the 850-μ m flux of submm-faint BzKs and EROs in our SCUBA maps. While the contribution of z ~ 2 BzKs to the submm background is about 10-15 per cent and similar to that from EROs typically at z ~ 1, BzKs have a higher fraction (~30 per cent) of submm flux in resolved sources compared with EROs and submm sources as a whole. From the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting analysis for both submm-bright and submm-faint BzKs, we found no clear signature that submm-bright BzKs are experiencing a specifically luminous evolutionary phase, compared with submm-faint BzKs. An alternative explanation might be that submm-bright BzKs are more massive than submm-faint ones.

  7. An alma survey of sub-millimeter galaxies in the extended Chandra deep field south: Sub-millimeter properties of color-selected galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Hodge, J. A.; Rix, H.-W.; Schinnerer, E.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Karim, A.; Simpson, J. M.; Chapman, S.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Cox, P.; Dannerbauer, H.; Greve, T. R.; Ivison, R.; Knudsen, K. K.; Lindroos, L.; Van der Werf, P.; Weiß, A.

    2014-01-10

    We study the sub-millimeter properties of color-selected galaxies via a stacking analysis applied for the first time to interferometric data at sub-millimeter wavelengths. We base our study on 344 GHz ALMA continuum observations of ∼20''-wide fields centered on 86 sub-millimeter sources detected in the LABOCA Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) Sub-millimeter Survey. We select various classes of galaxies (K-selected, star-forming sBzK galaxies, extremely red objects, and distant red galaxies) according to their optical/near-infrared fluxes. We find clear, >10σ detections in the stacked images of all these galaxy classes. We include in our stacking analysis Herschel/SPIRE data to constrain the dust spectral energy distribution of these galaxies. We find that their dust emission is well described by a modified blackbody with T {sub dust} ≈ 30 K and β = 1.6 and infrared luminosities of (5-11) × 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉} or implied star formation rates of 75-140 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We compare our results with those of previous studies based on single-dish observations at 870 μm and find that our flux densities are a factor 2-3 higher than previous estimates. The discrepancy is observed also after removing sources individually detected in ALESS maps. We report a similar discrepancy by repeating our analysis on 1.4 GHz observations of the whole ECDFS. Hence, we find tentative evidence that galaxies that are associated in projected and redshift space with sub-mm bright sources are brighter than the average population. Finally, we put our findings in the context of the cosmic star formation rate density as a function of redshift.

  8. Microclimate controls on weathering: Insights into deep critical zone evolution from seismic refraction surveys in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, N.; Kirby, E.; Nyblade, A.; Brantley, S. L.; Clarke, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of regolith is fundamental to the functioning and structure of the critical zone - the physically and chemically altered material formed from in situ parent bedrock that is available for transport. Understanding how regolith production and transport respond to perturbations in climate and/or tectonic forcing remains a first-order question. At the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHO), high resolution LiDAR-derived topographic data and depths to hand auger refusal reveal a systematic asymmetry in hillslope gradient and mobile regolith thickness; both are greater on north-facing hillslopes. Hydrologic and geochemical studies at the SSHO also suggest asymmetric sediment transport, fluid flow, and mineral weathering with respect to hillslope aspect. Here, we combine shallow seismic surveys completed along 4 hillslope transects (2 north-facing and 2-south facing), 2 ridgetops transects, and subsurface observations in boreholes to investigate the role of climate in inducing fracturing and priming the development of the observed asymmetry. Comparisons of shallow p-wave velocities with borehole and pit observations lead us to hypothesize the presence of three distinct layers at SSHO: 1) a deep, high velocity layer that is consistent with unweathered shale bedrock; 2) an intermediate velocity layer that is consistent with fractured and chemically altered bedrock which overlies unaltered bedrock, and 3) a shallow, slow velocity layer that is consistent with mobile material or shallow soil. Shallow p-wave velocity profiles suggest differences in thickness for both the mobile and immobile regolith material with respect to aspect. Patterns of p-wave velocities with depth are consistent with patterns of fracture densities observed in boreholes and with predictive cracking intensity models related to frost action. The models and data are consistent with climate as a primary driver for the development of asymmetry in the subsurface architecture at

  9. Deep-sea survey for the detection of methane at the “Santa Maria di Leuca” cold-water coral mounds (Ionian Sea, South Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etiope, G.; Savini, A.; Lo Bue, N.; Favali, P.; Corselli, C.

    2010-03-01

    The "Santa Maria di Leuca" Cold-Water Coral (CWC) province (northern Ionian Sea) was investigated for the first time to detect eventual occurrence of methane anomalies as a possible indication of hydrocarbon seepage stimulating the coral growth. Most coral mounds have developed in correspondence with tectonic scarps and faults, orthogonal to the southern margin and trending NW-SE, which could be potential sites of gas escape. A visual and instrumental inspection was performed by using a new deep-sea probe equipped with video-cameras, sonar, CTD, methane sensors, and a water sampler. Eight areas were explored by 10 surveys, depths ranging from 380 to 1100 m, for a total of more than 26 h of continuous video and instrumental recording. Sediments were also sampled by gravity corers and analysed in laboratory. The images allowed to assess distribution, abundance and geometry of the colonies, most of which are developed on morphological highs often characterised by tectonic scarps. All data indicate however the lack of a significant occurrence of methane, both in seawater and sediments. No direct or indirect expressions of gas seepage were recognised on the seabed. Weak methane anomalies were detected only in seawater at the base of some fault-linked scarps, where more reducing conditions and bacterial methanogenesis are possibly enhanced by less water circulation. The faults are not fluid-bearing as previously suggested by high-resolution geophysical signatures. The development of the coral colonies thus cannot be attributed to seeping fluids, but to a favourable physiographic position with exposure to nutrient-rich currents.

  10. The case for a deep-atmospheric in situ mission to address the highest priority Decadal Survey questions for Venus (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Garvin, J. B.; Glaze, L. S.; Campbell, B. A.; Fisher, M. E.; Flores, A.; Gilmore, M. S.; Johnson, N.; Kiefer, W. S.; Lorenz, R. D.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Ravine, M. A.; Webster, C. R.; Zolotov, M. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Current understanding of Venus lags behind that for Mars, with a major disparity of information concerning noble and trace gases and the small scale surface processes needed for comparative studies of terrestrial planet evolution. Despite global surface mapping by Magellan, discoveries by Venera landers, and ongoing atmospheric observations by the Venus Express (VEx) orbiter, significant questions about Venus remain unanswered. To place Venus into its proper context with respect to Mars and Earth, it is necessary to obtain new measurements that address top issues identified in the National Research Council (NRC) Solar System Decadal Survey: (1) evolution of the atmosphere, history of climate, and evidence of past hydrologic cycles; (2) history of volatiles and sedimentary cycles; and (3) planetary surface evolution. To answer these questions, new measurements are needed. First and foremost, in situ noble gas measurements are needed to constrain solar system formation and Venus evolution. In particular, the isotopic ratios of Xe and Kr can provide unique insights into planetary accretion. Isotopic measurements of nitrogen (15N/14N) will place important constraints on atmospheric loss processes. Current knowledge of this ratio has a substantial uncertainty of ×20%. VEx observations of hydrogen isotopes indicate the D/H ratio above the clouds is substantially greater than measured by Pioneer Venus, and varies with height. High precision measurements of the vertical distribution of the D/H isotopic ratio below the cloud layers will provide constraints on models of the climate history of water on Venus. The majority of atmospheric mass is located below the clouds. Current data suggest intense interaction among atmospheric gases down to the surface. The haze within the cloud region of unknown composition plays a central role in the radiative balance. Photochemically-derived species (H2SO4, OCS, CO, Sn) are subjected to thermochemical reactions below the clouds

  11. A deep x-ray survey of the Pleiades cluster and the B6-A3 main sequence stars in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caillault, Jean-Pierre

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained deep ROSAT images of three regions within the Pleiades open cluster. We have detected 317 X-ray sources in these ROSAT PSPC images, 171 of which we associate with certain probable members of the Pleiades cluster. We detect nearly all Pleiades members with spectral types later than G0 and within 25 arcminutes of our three field centers where our sensitivity is highest. This has allowed us to derive for the first time the luminosity function for the G, K, and M dwarfs of an open cluster without the need to use statistical techniques to account for the presence of upper limits in the data sample. Because of our high X-ray detection frequency down to the faint limit of the optical catalog, we suspect that some of our unidentified X-ray sources are previously unknown, very low-mass members of the Pleiades. A large fraction of the Pleiades members detected with ROSAT have published rotational velocities. Plots of L(sub x)/L(sub bol) versus spectroscopic rotational velocity show tightly correlated 'saturation' type relations for stars with (B - V)(sub O) greater than 0.60. For each of several color ranges, X-ray luminosities rise rapidly with increasing rotation rate until v sin i approximately equals 15 km/s, and then remain essentially flat for rotation rates up to at least v sin i approximately equal to 100 km/s. The dispersion in rotation among low-mass stars in the Pleiades is by far the dominant contributor to the dispersion in L(subx) at a given mass. Only about 35 percent of the B.A. and early F stars in the Pleiades are detected as X-ray sources in our survey. There is no correlation between X-ray flux and rotation for these stars. The X-ray luminosity function for the early-type Pleiades stars appears to be bimodal, with only a few exceptions. We either detect these stars at fluxes in the range found for low-mass stars or we derive X-ray limits below the level found for most Pleiades dwarfs. The X-ray spectra for the early-type Pleiades stars

  12. z {approx} 4 H{alpha} EMITTERS IN THE GREAT OBSERVATORIES ORIGINS DEEP SURVEY: TRACING THE DOMINANT MODE FOR GROWTH OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Hyunjin; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Dickinson, Mark; Lin Lihwai; Yan, Chi-Hung; Spinrad, Hyron; Stern, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We present evidence for strong H{alpha} emission in galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range of 3.8 < z < 5.0 over the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields. Among 74 galaxies detected in the Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands, more than 70% of the galaxies show clear excess at 3.6 {mu}m compared to the expected flux density from stellar continuum only. We provide evidence that this 3.6 {mu}m excess is due to H{alpha} emission redshifted into the 3.6 {mu}m band, and classify these 3.6 {mu}m excess galaxies to be H{alpha} emitter (HAE) candidates. The selection of HAE candidates using an excess in broadband filters is sensitive to objects whose rest-frame H{alpha} equivalent width (EW) is larger than 350 A. The H{alpha} inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of the HAEs range between 20 and 500 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and are a factor of {approx}6 larger than SFRs inferred from the UV continuum. The ratio between the H{alpha} luminosity and UV luminosity of HAEs is also on average larger than that of local starbursts. Possible reasons for such strong H{alpha} emission in these galaxies include different dust extinction properties, young stellar population ages, extended star formation histories, low metallicity, and a top-heavy stellar initial mass function. Although the correlation between UV slope {beta} and L{sub H{alpha}}/L{sub UV} raises the possibility that HAEs prefer a dust extinction curve which is steeper in the UV, the most dominant factor that results in strong H{alpha} emission appears to be star formation history. The H{alpha} EWs of HAEs are large despite their relatively old stellar population ages constrained by spectral energy distribution fitting, suggesting that at least 60% of HAEs produce stars at a constant rate. Under the assumption that the gas supply is sustained, HAEs are able to produce {approx}> 50% of the stellar mass density that is encompassed in massive (M{sub *} > 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) galaxies at z {approx} 3

  13. WHERE DO WET, DRY, AND MIXED GALAXY MERGERS OCCUR? A STUDY OF THE ENVIRONMENTS OF CLOSE GALAXY PAIRS IN THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lihwai; Cooper, Michael C.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Jian, Hung-Yu; Chiueh, Tzihong; Koo, David C.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Croton, Darren J.; Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2010-08-01

    We study the environments of wet, dry, and mixed galaxy mergers at 0.75 < z < 1.2 using close pairs in the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey. We find that the typical environment of dry and mixed merger candidates is denser than that of wet mergers, mostly due to the color-density relation. While the galaxy companion rate (N{sub c}) is observed to increase with overdensity, using N-body simulations, we find that the fraction of pairs that will eventually merge decreases with the local density, predominantly because interlopers are more common in dense environments. After taking into account the merger probability of pairs as a function of local density, we find only marginal environment dependence of the galaxy merger rate for wet mergers. On the other hand, the dry and mixed merger rates increase rapidly with local density due to the increased population of red galaxies in dense environments, implying that the dry and mixed mergers are most effective in overdense regions. We also find that the environment distribution of K+A galaxies is similar to that of wet mergers alone and of wet+mixed mergers, suggesting a possible connection between K+A galaxies and wet and/or wet+mixed mergers. Based on our results, we therefore expect that the properties, including structures and masses, of red-sequence galaxies should be different between those in underdense regions and those in overdense regions since the dry mergers are significantly more important in dense environments. We conclude that, as early as z {approx} 1, high-density regions are the preferred environment in which dry mergers occur, and that present-day red-sequence galaxies in overdense environments have, on average, undergone 1.2 {+-} 0.3 dry mergers since this time, accounting for (38 {+-} 10)% of their mass accretion in the last 8 billion years. The main uncertainty in this finding is the conversion from the pair fraction to the galaxy merger rate, which is possibly as large as a factor of 2. Our findings

  14. The properties and evolution of a K-band selected sample of massive galaxies at z ~ 0.4-2 in the Palomar/DEEP2 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conselice, C. J.; Bundy, K.; Trujillo, I.; Coil, A.; Eisenhardt, P.; Ellis, R. S.; Georgakakis, A.; Huang, J.; Lotz, J.; Nandra, K.; Newman, J.; Papovich, C.; Weiner, B.; Willmer, C.

    2007-11-01

    We present the results of a study on the properties and evolution of massive (M* > 1011Msolar) galaxies at z ~ 0.4-2 utilizing Keck spectroscopy, near-infrared Palomar imaging, and Hubble, Chandra and Spitzer data covering fields targeted by the DEEP2 galaxy spectroscopic survey. Our sample is K-band selected and stellar mass limited, based on wide-area near-infrared imaging from the Palomar Observatory Wide-Field Infrared Survey, which covers 1.53 deg2 to a 5σ depth of Ks,vega ~ 20.5. Our primary goal is to obtain a broad census of massive galaxies through measuring how their number and mass densities, morphology, as well as their star formation and active galactic nucleus content evolve from z ~ 0.4-2. Our major findings include: (i) statistically the mass and number densities of M* > 1011Msolar galaxies show little evolution between z = 0 and 1 and from z ~ 0 to 2 for M* > 1011.5Msolar galaxies. We however find significant evolution within 1 < z < 1.5 for 1011 Msolar < M* < 1011.5Msolar galaxies. (ii) After examining the structures of our galaxies using Hubble ACS imaging, we find that M* > 1011Msolar selected galaxies show a nearly constant elliptical fraction of ~70-90 per cent at all redshifts. The remaining objects tend to be peculiars possibly undergoing mergers at z > 0.8, while spirals dominate the remainder at lower redshifts. A significant fraction (~25 per cent) of these early-types contain minor structural anomalies. (iii) We find that only a fraction (~60 per cent) of massive galaxies with M* > 1011Msolar are on the red sequence at z ~ 1.4, while nearly 100 per cent evolve on to it by z ~ 0.4. (iv) By utilizing Spitzer MIPS imaging and [OII] line fluxes we argue that M* > 1011.5Msolar galaxies have a steeply declining star formation rate (SFR) density ~ (1 + z)6. By examining the contribution of star formation to the evolution of the mass function, as well as the merger history through the CAS parameters, we determine that M* > 1011Msolar galaxies

  15. Discovery of a rich proto-cluster at z = 2.9 and associated diffuse cold gas in the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Zamorani, G.; Lemaux, B. C.; Bardelli, S.; Cimatti, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zucca, E.; Amorin, R.; Capak, P.; Cassarà, L. P.; Castellano, M.; Cuby, J. G.; de la Torre, S.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Moreau, C.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Salvato, M.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Wang, P. W.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Fotopoulou, S.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Scoville, N.

    2014-10-01

    High-density environments are crucial places for studying the link between hierarchical structure formation and stellar mass growth in galaxies. In this work, we characterise a massive proto-cluster at z = 2.895 that we found in the COSMOS field using the spectroscopic sample of the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS). This is one of the rare structures at z ~ 3 not identified around an active galactic nucleus (AGN) or a radio galaxy, thus it represents an ideal laboratory for investigating the formation of galaxies in dense environments. The structure comprises 12 galaxies with secure spectroscopic redshift in an area of ~ 7' × 8', in a total z range of Δz = 0.016. The measured galaxy number overdensity is δg = 12 ± 2. This overdensity has a total mass of M ~ 8.1 × 1014 M⊙ in a volume of 13 × 15 × 17 Mpc3. Simulations indicate that such an overdensity at z ~ 2.9 is a proto-cluster, which will collapse in a cluster of total mass Mz = 0 ~ 2.5 × 1015 M⊙ at z = 0, i.e. a massive cluster in the local Universe. We analysed the properties of the galaxies within the overdensity, and we compared them with acontrol sample at the same redshift but outside the overdensity. We could not find any statistically significant difference between the properties (stellar mass, star formation rate, specific star formation rate, NUV-r and r - K colours) of the galaxies inside and outside the overdensity, but this result might be due to the lack of statistics or possibly to the specific galaxy population sampled by VUDS, which could be less affected by environment than the other populations not probed by the survey. The stacked spectrum of galaxies in the background of the overdensity shows a significant absorption feature at the wavelength of Lyα redshifted at z = 2.895 (λ = 4736 Å), with a rest frame equivalent width (EW) of 4 ± 1.4 Å. Stacking only background galaxies without intervening sources at z ~ 2.9 along their line of sight, we find that this absorption feature has

  16. Deep Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1989-01-01

    Summarizes research to find the nature of deep earthquakes occurring hundreds of kilometers down in the earth's mantle. Describes further research problems in this area. Presents several illustrations and four references. (YP)

  17. Beowawe geothermal-resource assessment. Final report. Shallow-hole temperature survey geophysics and deep test hole Collins 76-17

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, N.O.

    1983-03-01

    Geothermal resource investigation field efforts in the Beowawe Geysers Area, Eureka County, Nevada are described. The objectives included acquisition of geotechnical data for understanding the nature and extent of the geothermal resource boundaries south of the known resource area. Fourteen shallow (<500 feet) temperature-gradient holes plus geophysics were used to select the site for a deep exploratory well, the Collins 76-17, which was completed to a total depth of 9005 feet. Maximum downhole recorded temperature was 311/sup 0/F, but no flow could be induced.

  18. Magnetic signature of large exhumed mantle domains of the Southwest Indian Ridge: results from a deep-tow geophysical survey over 0 to 11 Ma old seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, A.; Sauter, D.; Munschy, M.; Carlut, J.; Searle, R.; Cannat, M.; Manatschal, G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the magnetic signature of an ultramafic seafloor in the eastern part of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). There, detachment faulting, continuous over 11 Myrs, exhumed large areas of mantle derived rocks. These exhumed mantle domains occur in the form of a smooth rounded topography with broad ridges locally covered by a thin highly discontinuous volcanic carapace. We present high-resolution data combining deep-tow magnetics, side-scan sonar images and dredged samples collected within two exhumed mantle domains between 62° E and 65° E. We show that, despite an ultraslow spreading rate, volcanic areas within robust magmatic segments are characterized by well defined seafloor spreading anomalies. By contrast, the exhumed mantle domains, including a few thin volcanic patches, reveal a weak and highly variable magnetic pattern. The analysis of the magnetic properties of the dredged samples and careful comparison between the nature of the seafloor, the deep-tow magnetic anomalies and the seafloor equivalent magnetization suggest that the serpentinized peridotites do not carry a sufficiently stable remanent magnetization to produce seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies in exhumed mantle domains.

  19. Magnetic signature of large exhumed mantle domains of the Southwest Indian Ridge - results from a deep-tow geophysical survey over 0 to 11 Ma old seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, A.; Sauter, D.; Munschy, M.; Carlut, J.; Searle, R.; Cannat, M.; Manatschal, G.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the magnetic signature of ultramafic seafloor in the eastern part of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). There, detachment faulting, continuous over 11 Myr, exhumed large areas of mantle-derived rocks. These exhumed mantle domains occur in the form of a smooth rounded topography with broad ridges locally covered by a thin highly discontinuous volcanic carapace. We present high-resolution data combining deep-tow magnetics, side-scan sonar images and dredged samples collected within two exhumed mantle domains between 62° E and 65° E. We show that, despite an ultra-slow spreading rate, volcanic areas within robust magmatic segments are characterized by well-defined seafloor spreading anomalies. By contrast, the exhumed mantle domains, including a few thin volcanic patches, reveal a weak and highly variable magnetic pattern. The analysis of the magnetic properties of the dredged samples and careful comparison between the nature of the seafloor, the deep-tow magnetic anomalies and the seafloor equivalent magnetization suggest that the serpentinized peridotites do not carry a sufficiently stable remanent magnetization to produce seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies in exhumed mantle domains.

  20. Phylogenetic survey of metabolically active microbial communities associated with the deep-sea coral Lophelia pertusa from the Apulian plateau, Central Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Michail M.; Cappello, Simone; Crisafi, Ermanno; Tursi, Angelo; Savini, Alessandra; Corselli, Cesare; Scarfi, Simona; Giuliano, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Living deep-water coral assemblages were discovered recently inhabiting the Mediterranean Sea between the depths of 300 and 1000 m off the Cape of Santa Maria di Leuca (Apulian platform, Ionian Sea). This living assemblage was dominated by two colonial scleractinian corals, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. Two other corals, Desmophyllum crystagalli and Stenocyathus vermiformis were also recovered from this site, but were much less common. The composition of the metabolically active fraction of the microbial community associated with living specimens of L. pertusa was determined. Dead corals, proximal sediments and overlying seawater were also sampled and analyzed. Complementary 16S ribosomal DNA (crDNA) was obtained from total RNA extracted from all samples that had been subjected to reverse transcription-PCR amplification. Domain-specific 16S PCR primers were used to construct four different 16S crDNA libraries containing 45 Archaea and 201 Bacteria clones. Using Archaea-specific primers, no amplification products were obtained from any coral samples (live and dead). Living specimens of L. pertusa seem to possess a specific microbial community different from that of dead coral and sediment samples. The majority of all coral-associated riboclones was related to the Holophaga-Acidobacterium and Nitrospira divisions (80%). Moreover, more than 12% of all coral-associated riboclones formed a separate deep-branching cluster within the α- Proteobacteria with no known close relatives. The metabolically active fraction of the bacterial community colonizing the dead corals was dominated by Proteobacteria related to the gamma and epsilon subdivisions (74% and 26% of all clones, respectively). Phylogenetic analysis of the Archaea clone library retrieved from proximal sediments indicated an exclusive dominance by the members of Crenarchaea Marine Group I (MGI), a lineage of unculturable microorganisms, widely distributed in marine habitats. In contrast, bacterial

  1. A Rest-frame Optical View on z ~ 4 Galaxies. I. Color and Age Distributions from Deep IRAC Photometry of the IUDF10 and GOODS Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oesch, P. A.; Labbé, I.; Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Gonzalez, V.; Franx, M.; Trenti, M.; Holden, B. P.; van Dokkum, P. G.; Magee, D.

    2013-08-01

    We present a study of rest-frame UV-to-optical color distributions for z ~ 4 galaxies based on the combination of deep HST/ACS+WFC3/IR data with Spitzer/IRAC imaging. In particular, we use new, ultra-deep data from the IRAC Ultradeep Field program (IUDF10), together with previous, public IRAC data over the GOODS fields. Our sample contains a total of ~2600 galaxies selected as B-dropout Lyman-break Galaxies in the HUDF and its deep parallel field HUDF09-2, as well as GOODS-North/South. This sample is used to investigate the UV continuum slopes β and Balmer break colors (J 125 - [4.5]) as a function of rest-frame optical luminosity (using [4.5] to avoid optical emission lines). We find that galaxies at Mz < -21.5 (roughly corresponding to L^*_{z\\sim 4}) are significantly redder than their lower luminosity counterparts. The UV continuum slopes and the J 125 - [4.5] colors are well correlated, indicating that the dust reddening at these redshifts is better described by an SMC-like extinction curve, rather than the typically assumed Calzetti reddening. After dust correction, we find that the galaxy population shows mean stellar population ages in the range 108.5 to 109 yr, with a dispersion of ~0.5 dex, and only weak trends as a function of luminosity. Only a small fraction of galaxies shows Balmer break colors consistent with extremely young ages, younger than 100 Myr. Under the assumption of smooth star-formation histories, this fraction is 12%-19% for galaxies at Mz < -19.75. Our results are consistent with a gradual build-up of stars and dust in galaxies at z > 4 with only a small fraction of stars being formed in short, intense bursts of star-formation. Based on data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope operated by AURA, Inc. for NASA under contract NAS5-26555. Based on observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  2. Deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  3. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech. PMID:26017442

  4. Accelerated Evolution of the Lyα Luminosity Function at z >~ 7 Revealed by the Subaru Ultra-deep Survey for Lyα Emitters at z = 7.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Furusawa, Hisanori; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Naito, Yoshiaki; Momose, Rieko; Yuma, Suraphong; Iye, Masanori

    2014-12-01

    We present the ultra-deep Subaru narrowband imaging survey for Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 7.3 in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) and Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) fields (~0.5 deg2) with a total integration time of 106 hr. Exploiting our new sharp bandwidth filter, NB101, installed on the Suprime-Cam, we have reached L(Lyα) = 2.4 × 1042 erg s-1 (5σ) for z = 7.3 LAEs, about four times deeper than previous Subaru z >~ 7 studies, which allows us to reliably investigate the evolution of the Lyα luminosity function (LF) for the first time down to the luminosity limit same as those of Subaru z = 3.1-6.6 LAE samples. Surprisingly, we only find three and four LAEs in the SXDS and COSMOS fields, respectively, while one expects a total of ~65 LAEs by our survey in the case of no Lyα LF evolution from z = 6.6 to 7.3. We identify a decrease of the Lyα LF from z = 6.6 to 7.3 at the >90% confidence level from our z = 7.3 Lyα LF with the best-fit Schechter parameters of L*{Lyα } = 2.7+8.0-1.2 × 1042 {erg} {s}-1 and φ * = 3.7+17.6-3.3 × 10-4 {Mpc}-3 for a fixed α = -1.5. Moreover, the evolution of the Lyα LF is clearly accelerated at z > 6.6 beyond the measurement uncertainties including cosmic variance. Because no such accelerated evolution of the UV-continuum LF or the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) is found at z ~ 7, but suggested only at z > 8, this accelerated Lyα LF evolution is explained by physical mechanisms different from a pure SFR decrease but related to the Lyα production and escape in the process of cosmic reionization. Because a simple accelerating increase of intergalactic medium neutral hydrogen absorbing Lyα cannot be reconciled with Thomson scattering of optical depth measurements from WMAP and Planck, our findings may support new physical pictures suggested by recent theoretical studies, such as the existence of HI clumpy clouds within cosmic ionized bubbles that are selectively absorbing Lyα and the large ionizing photon escape

  5. A deep/wide 1-2 GHz snapshot survey of SDSS Stripe 82 using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in a compact hybrid configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, I.; Jarvis, M. J.; Baker, A. J.; Bannister, K. W.; Carvalho, C. S.; Hardcastle, M.; Hilton, M.; Moodley, K.; Smirnov, O. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; White, S. V.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    We have used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to image ˜100 deg2 of SDSS Stripe 82 at 1-2 GHz. The survey consists of 1026 snapshot observations of 2.5 min duration, using the hybrid CnB configuration. The survey has good sensitivity to diffuse, low surface brightness structures and extended radio emission, making it highly synergistic with existing 1.4 GHz radio observations of the region. The principal data products are continuum images, with 16 × 10 arcsec resolution, and a catalogue containing 11 782 point and Gaussian components resulting from fits to the thresholded Stokes-I brightness distribution, forming approximately 8948 unique radio sources. The typical effective 1σ noise level is 88 μJy beam-1. Spectral index estimates are included, as derived from the 1 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth. Astrometric and photometric accuracy are in excellent agreement with existing narrowband observations. A large-scale simulation is used to investigate clean bias, which we extend into the spectral domain. Clean bias remains an issue for snapshot surveys with the VLA, affecting our total intensity measurements at the ˜1σ level. Statistical spectral index measurements are in good agreement with existing measurements derived from matching separate surveys at two frequencies. At flux densities below ˜35σ the median in-band spectral index measurements begin to exhibit a bias towards flatness that is dependent on both flux density and the intrinsic spectral index. In-band spectral curvature measurements are likely to be unreliable for all but the very brightest components. Image products and catalogues are publicly available via an FTP server.

  6. A New Search for Variability-Selected Active Galaxies Within the VST SUDARE-VOICE Survey: The Chandra Deep Field South and the SERVS-SWIRE Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falocco, S.; De Cicco, D.; Paolillo, M.; Covone, G.; Longo, G.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Vaccari, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Pignata, G.; Cappellaro, E.; Trevese, D.; Vagnetti, F.; Salvato, M.; Radovich, M.; Hsu, L.; Brandt, W. N.; Capaccioli, M.; Napolitano, N.; Baruffolo, A.; Cascone, E.; Schipani, P.

    This work makes use of the VST observations to select variable sources. We use also the IR photometry, SED fitting and X-ray information where available to confirm the nature of the AGN candidates. The IR data, available over the full survey area, allow to confirm the consistency of the variability selection with the IR color selection method, while the detection of variability may prove useful to detect the presence of an AGN in IR selected starburst galaxies.

  7. A deep/wide 1-2 GHz snapshot survey of SDSS Stripe 82 using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in a compact hybrid configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, I.; Jarvis, M. J.; Baker, A. J.; Bannister, K. W.; Carvalho, C. S.; Hardcastle, M.; Hilton, M.; Moodley, K.; Smirnov, O. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; White, S. V.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    We have used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to image ~100 sq. deg. of SDSS Stripe 82 at 1-2 GHz. The survey consists of 1,026 snapshot observations of 2.5 minutes duration, using the hybrid CnB configuration. The survey has good sensitivity to diffuse, low surface brightness structures and extended radio emission, making it highly synergistic with existing 1.4 GHz radio observations of the region. The principal data products are continuum images, with 16 x 10 arcsecond resolution, and a catalogue containing 11,782 point and Gaussian components resulting from fits to the thresholded Stokes-I brightness distribution, forming approximately 8,948 unique radio sources. The typical effective 1{\\sigma} noise level is 88 {\\mu}Jy / beam. Spectral index estimates are included, as derived from the 1 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth. Astrometric and photometric accuracy are in excellent agreement with existing narrowband observations. A large-scale simulation is used to investigate clean bias, which we extend into the spectral domain. Clean bias remains an issue for snapshot surveys with the VLA, affecting our total intensity measurements at the ~1{\\sigma} level. Statistical spectral index measurements are in good agreement with existing measurements derived from matching separate surveys at two frequencies. At flux densities below ~35{\\sigma} the median in-band spectral index measurements begin to exhibit a bias towards flatness that is dependent on both flux density and the intrinsic spectral index. In-band spectral curvature measurements are likely to be unreliable for all but the very brightest components. Image products and catalogues are publicly available via an FTP server.

  8. Debris in the deep: Using a 22-year video annotation database to survey marine litter in Monterey Canyon, central California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlining, Kyra; von Thun, Susan; Kuhnz, Linda; Schlining, Brian; Lundsten, Lonny; Jacobsen Stout, Nancy; Chaney, Lori; Connor, Judith

    2013-09-01

    Anthropogenic marine debris is an increasing concern because of its potential negative impacts on marine ecosystems. This is a global problem that will have lasting effects for many reasons, including: (1) the input of debris into marine environments is likely to continue (commensurate with population increase and globalization), (2) accumulation, and possibly retention, of debris will occur in specific areas due to hydrography and geomorphology, and (3) the most common types of debris observed to date will likely persist for centuries. Due to the technical challenges and prohibitive costs of conducting research in the deep sea, little is known about the abundance, types, sources, and impacts of human refuse on this vast habitat, and the extreme depths to which this debris is penetrating has only recently been exposed. We reviewed 1149 video records of marine debris from 22 years of remotely operated vehicle deployments in Monterey Bay, covering depths from 25 m to 3971 m. We characterize debris by type, examine patterns of distribution, and discuss potential sources and dispersal mechanisms. Debris was most abundant within Monterey Canyon where aggregation and downslope transport of debris from the continental shelf are enhanced by natural canyon dynamics. The majority of debris was plastic (33%) and metal (23%). The highest relative frequencies of plastic and metal observations occurred below 2000 m, indicating that previous studies may greatly underestimate the extent of anthropogenic marine debris on the seafloor due to limitations in observing deeper regions. Our findings provide evidence that submarine canyons function to collect debris and act as conduits for debris transport from coastal to deep-sea habitats.

  9. The XMM deep survey in the CDF-S. IX. An X-ray outflow in a luminous obscured quasar at z ≈ 1.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignali, C.; Iwasawa, K.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Lanzuisi, G.; Ranalli, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Mainieri, V.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Carrera, F. J.; Fritz, J.; Brusa, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Bauer, F. E.; Fiore, F.; Tombesi, F.

    2015-11-01

    In active galactic nuclei (AGN)-galaxy co-evolution models, AGN winds and outflows are often invoked to explain why super-massive black holes and galaxies stop growing efficiently at a certain phase of their lives. They are commonly referred to as the leading actors of feedback processes. Evidence of ultra-fast (v ≳ 0.05c) outflows in the innermost regions of AGN has been collected in the past decade by sensitive X-ray observations for sizable samples of AGN, mostly at low redshift. Here we present ultra-deep XMM-Newton and Chandra spectral data of an obscured (NH≈ 2 × 1023 cm-2), intrinsically luminous (L2-10 keV≈ 4 × 1044 erg s-1) quasar (named PID352) at z ≈ 1.6 (derived from the X-ray spectral analysis) in the Chandra Deep Field-South. The source is characterized by an iron emission and absorption line complex at observed energies of E ≈ 2-3 keV. While the emission line is interpreted as being due to neutral iron (consistent with the presence of cold absorption), the absorption feature is due to highly ionized iron transitions (FeXXV, FeXXVI) with an outflowing velocity of , as derived from photoionization models. The mass outflow rate - ~2 M⊙ yr-1 - is similar to the source accretion rate, and the derived mechanical energy rate is ~9.5 × 1044 erg s-1, corresponding to 9% of the source bolometric luminosity. PID352 represents one of the few cases where indications of X-ray outflowing gas have been observed at high redshift thus far. This wind is powerful enough to provide feedback on the host galaxy.

  10. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  11. Deep Lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-01

    A deep lysimeter including a hollow vessel having a chamber, a fill conduit extending into the chamber through apertures, a semi-permeable member mounted on the vessel and in fluid communication with the fill conduit, and a line connection for retrieving the lysimeter.

  12. The ESO-Spitzer Imaging extragalactic Survey (ESIS). I. WFIB, V, R deep observations of ELAIS-S1 and comparison to Spitzer and GALEX data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, S.; Rubele, S.; Franceschini, A.; Held, E. V.; Rizzi, L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Jarrett, T. H.; Rodighiero, G.; Oliver, S. J.; Dias, J. E.; Buttery, H. J.; Fiore, F.; La Franca, F.; Puccetti, S.; Fang, F.; Shupe, D.; Surace, J.; Gruppioni, C.

    2006-06-01

    Context.The ESO-Spitzer extragalactic Imaging Survey (ESIS) is the optical follow up of the Spitzer Wide-Area InfraRed Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey in the ELAIS-S1 area. Aims.The multiwavelength study of galaxy emission is the key to understand the interplay of the various components of galaxies and to trace their role in cosmic evolution. ESIS provides optical identification and colors of Spitzer IR galaxies and builds the bases for photometric redshift estimates. Methods.This paper presents B, V, R Wide Field Imager observations of the first 1.5 square degree of the ESIS survey. Data reduction is described including astrometric calibration, illumination and color corrections. Synthetic sources are simulated in scientific and super-sky-flat images, with the purpose of estimating completeness and photometric accuracy for the survey. Number counts and color distributions are compared to literature observational and theoretical data, including non-evolutionary, PLE, evolutionary and semi-analytic ΛCDM galaxy models, as well as Milky Way stellar predictions. The ELAIS-S1 area benefits from extensive follow-up from X-ray to radio frequencies: some potential uses of the multi-wavelength observations are illustrated. Results.Object coordinates are defined with an accuracy as good as ~0.15 [arcsec] rms with respect to GSC 2.2; flux uncertainties are ~2, 10, 20% at mag. 20, 23, 24 respectively (Vega); we reach 95% completeness at B, V˜ 25 and R˜ 24.5. ESIS galaxy number counts are in good agreement with previous works and are best reproduced by evolutionary and hierarchical ΛCDM scenarios. Optical-Spitzer color-color plots promise to be very powerful tools to disentangle different classes of sources (e.g. AGNs, starbursts, quiescent galaxies). Ultraviolet GALEX data are matched to optical and Spitzer samples, leading to a discussion of galaxy properties in the UV-to-24 μm color space. The spectral energy distribution of a few objects, from the X-rays to the far-IR are

  13. Survey report of NOAA Ship McArthur II cruises AR-04-04, AR-05-05 and AR-06-03: habitat classification of side scan sonar imagery in support of deep-sea coral/sponge explorations at the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Intelmann, Steven S.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Bowlby, C. Edward; Brancato, Mary Sue; Hyland, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Habitat mapping and characterization has been defined as a high-priority management issue for the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS), especially for poorly known deep-sea habitats that may be sensitive to anthropogenic disturbance. As a result, a team of scientists from OCNMS, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), and other partnering institutions initiated a series of surveys to assess the distribution of deep-sea coral/sponge assemblages within the sanctuary and to look for evidence of potential anthropogenic impacts in these critical habitats. Initial results indicated that remotely delineating areas of hard bottom substrate through acoustic sensing could be a useful tool to increase the efficiency and success of subsequent ROV-based surveys of the associated deep-sea fauna. Accordingly, side scan sonar surveys were conducted in May 2004, June 2005, and April 2006 aboard the NOAA Ship McArthur II to: (1) obtain additional imagery of the seafloor for broader habitat-mapping coverage of sanctuary waters, and (2) help delineate suitable deep-sea coral-sponge habitat, in areas of both high and low commercial-fishing activities, to serve as sites for surveying-in more detail using an ROV on subsequent cruises, Several regions of the sea floor throughout the OCNMS were surveyed and mosaicked at 1-meter pixel resolution. Imagery from the side scan sonar mapping efforts was integrated with other complementary data from a towed camera sled, ROVs, sedentary samples, and bathymetry records to describe geological and biological (where possible) aspects of habitat. Using a hierarchical deep-water marine benthic classification scheme (Greene et al. 1999), we created a preliminary map of various habitat polygon features for use in a geographical information system (GIS). This report provides a description of the mapping and groundtruthing efforts as well as results of the image classification procedure for each of the areas surveyed.

  14. A New Deep, Hard X-ray Survey of M31: Monitoring Black Hole and Neutron Star Accretion States in the X-ray Binary Population of Our Nearest Neighbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Lehmer, Bret; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel; Venters, Tonia M.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Eracleous, Michael; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pooley, David A.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray binaries (XRBs) trace old and new stellar populations in galaxies, and thus star formation history and star formation rate. X-ray emission from XRBs may be responsible for significant amounts of heating of the early Intergalactic Medium at Cosmic Dawn and may also play a significant role in reionization. Until recently, the hard emission from these populations could only be studied for XRBs in our own galaxy, where it is often difficult to measure accurate distances and thus luminosities. The launch of NuSTAR, the first focusing hard X-ray observatory, has allowed us to resolve the brightest XRBs (down to LX ~ few times 1038 erg/s) in galaxies like NGC 253, M83, and M82 up to 4 Mpc away. To reach much lower X-ray luminosities that are more typical of XRBs in the Milky Way (LX <~ 1037 erg/s), we have observed M31 in 3 NuSTAR fields, up to 5 visits apiece for more than 1 Ms total exposure, mostly within the footprint of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) Survey. Our monitoring campaign reveals over 40 accreting black holes and neutron stars -- distinguished from each other by their spectral shape in the hard band -- some of which undergo state changes over the month-long timescales captured by our legacy survey to date. We also discuss implications for this updated understanding of XRB populations on early-Universe measurements in, e.g., the 7 Ms Chandra Deep Field survey.

  15. Metal-Poor, Strongly Star-Forming Galaxies in the DEEP2 Survey: The Relationship Between Stellar Mass, Temperature-Based Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Chun; Rigby, Jane R.; Cooper, Michael; Yan, Renbin

    2015-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 28 redshift (z) approximately 0.8 metal-poor galaxies in DEEP2. These galaxies were selected for their detection of the weak [O (sub III)] lambda 4363 emission line, which provides a "direct" measure of the gas-phase metallicity. A primary goal for identifying these rare galaxies is to examine whether the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) between stellar mass, gas metallicity, and star formation rate (SFR) extends to low stellar mass and high SFR. The FMR suggests that higher SFR galaxies have lower metallicity (at fixed stellar mass). To test this trend, we combine spectroscopic measurements of metallicity and dust-corrected SFRs, with stellar mass estimates from modeling the optical photometry. We find that these galaxies are 1.05 plus or minus 0.61 decimal exponent (dex) above the redshift (z) approximately equal to 1 stellar mass-SFR relation, and 0.23 plus or minus 0.23 decimal exponent (dex) below the local mass-metallicity relation. Relative to the FMR, the latter offset is reduced to 0.01 decimal exponent (dex), but significant dispersion remains (0.29 decimal exponent (dex) with 0.16 decimal exponent (dex) due to measurement uncertainties). This dispersion suggests that gas accretion, star formation and chemical enrichment have not reached equilibrium in these galaxies. This is evident by their short stellar mass doubling timescale of approximately 100 (sup plus 310) (sub minus 75) million years that suggests stochastic star formation. Combining our sample with other redshift (z) of approximately 1 metal-poor galaxies, we find a weak positive SFR-metallicity dependence (at fixed stellar mass) that is significant at 97.3 percent confidence. We interpret this positive correlation as recent star formation that has enriched the gas, but has not had time to drive the metal-enriched gas out with feedback mechanisms.

  16. An ALMA survey of submillimeter galaxies in the extended Chandra deep field south: The redshift distribution and evolution of submillimeter galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J. M.; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Thomson, A. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Bertoldi, F.; Karim, A.; De Breuck, C.; Chapman, S. C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Da Cunha, E.; Hodge, J. A.; Schinnerer, E.; Dannerbauer, H.; Greve, T. R.; Ivison, R. J.; Knudsen, K. K.; Poggianti, B. M.; and others

    2014-06-20

    We present the first photometric redshift distribution for a large sample of 870 μm submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) with robust identifications based on observations with ALMA. In our analysis we consider 96 SMGs in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, 77 of which have 4-19 band photometry. We model the SEDs for these 77 SMGs, deriving a median photometric redshift of z {sub phot} = 2.3 ± 0.1. The remaining 19 SMGs have insufficient photometry to derive photometric redshifts, but a stacking analysis of Herschel observations confirms they are not spurious. Assuming that these SMGs have an absolute H-band magnitude distribution comparable to that of a complete sample of z ∼ 1-2 SMGs, we demonstrate that they lie at slightly higher redshifts, raising the median redshift for SMGs to z {sub phot} = 2.5 ± 0.2. Critically we show that the proportion of galaxies undergoing an SMG-like phase at z ≥ 3 is at most 35% ± 5% of the total population. We derive a median stellar mass of M {sub *} = (8 ± 1) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, although there are systematic uncertainties of up to 5 × for individual sources. Assuming that the star formation activity in SMGs has a timescale of ∼100 Myr, we show that their descendants at z ∼ 0 would have a space density and M{sub H} distribution that are in good agreement with those of local ellipticals. In addition, the inferred mass-weighted ages of the local ellipticals broadly agree with the look-back times of the SMG events. Taken together, these results are consistent with a simple model that identifies SMGs as events that form most of the stars seen in the majority of luminous elliptical galaxies at the present day.

  17. Deep Seismic Reflection Profiling in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attoh, K.; Brown, L. D.

    2006-05-01

    Africa represents one of the true frontiers for systematic deep seismic reflection profiling of the type pioneered by COCORP, LITHOPROBE, BIRPS, DEKORP, and ECORS in the northern hemisphere. However, there have been a number of notable individual surveys that have sampled key components of the African lithosphere, and several systematic regional geophysical initiatives which suggest African is fertile ground for future efforts. Among the latter are the KRISP refraction/wide-angle program to probe the East African Rift system in the 1990's, the Kaapvaal Experiment to image the deep lithosphere with passive techniques and most recently the EAGLE active/passive experiments in the Afar. Examples of true multichannel deep reflection surveys to delineate crustal structure include the transects of the Limpopo Belt, a Neoarchean mobile zone that sutures the Kaapval and Zimbabwe cratons, deep oil prospecting surveys in the Nosop basin of southern Botswana that reveal dramatic basement reflectors off the NW margin of the Kaapvaal craton, and most recently deep vibroseis surveys within the Kaapvaal craton that indicate a crustal stack of tectonic slivers as well as tectonic shingling of the upper mantle. The passive margin of western Africa, with its strategic oil resources, has been a target of several deep studies using marine seismic surveys, including the PROBE initiative of the late 1980's and more recent deep surveys offshore Angola. Reprocessing of lines from oil exploration grids reveal Proterozoic mid-lower crustal features offshore of Ghana. Among the potentially rich targets for future surveys in Africa are the West African and Congo cratons and their suturing Pan-African (Neoproterozoic) mobile belts. This suite of cratonic lithosphere elements is largely largely untouched by modern high resolution seismic methodologies. New initiatives such as LEGENDS ( targeting the East African Orogen) and exploitation of existing oil industry seismic data for deep information

  18. A search for fast optical transients in the Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: M-dwarf flares, asteroids, limits on extragalactic rates, and implications for LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Leibler, C. N.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Soderberg, A. M.; Rest, A.; Price, P. A.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Metcalfe, N.; Stubbs, C. W.

    2013-12-10

    We present a search for fast optical transients (τ ∼ 0.5 hr-1 day) using repeated observations of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS) fields. Our search takes advantage of the consecutive g {sub P1} r {sub P1} observations (16.5 minutes in each filter), by requiring detections in both bands, with non-detections on preceding and subsequent nights. We identify 19 transients brighter than 22.5 AB mag (S/N ≳ 10). Of these, 11 events exhibit quiescent counterparts in the deep PS1/MDS templates that we identify as M4-M9 dwarfs at d ≈ 0.2-1.2 kpc. The remaining eight transients lack quiescent counterparts, exhibit mild but significant astrometric shifts between the g {sub P1} and r {sub P1} images, colors of (g – r){sub P1} ≈ 0.5-0.8 mag, non-varying light curves, and locations near the ecliptic plane with solar elongations of about 130°, which are all indicative of main-belt asteroids near the stationary point of their orbits. With identifications for all 19 transients, we place an upper limit of R {sub FOT}(τ ∼ 0.5 hr) ≲ 0.12 deg{sup –2} day{sup –1} (95% confidence level) on the sky-projected rate of extragalactic fast transients at ≲ 22.5 mag, a factor of 30-50 times lower than previous limits; the limit for a timescale of ∼1 day is R {sub FOT} ≲ 2.4 × 10{sup –3} deg{sup –2} day{sup –1}. To convert these sky-projected rates to volumetric rates, we explore the expected peak luminosities of fast optical transients powered by various mechanisms, and find that non-relativistic events are limited to M ≈ –10 to ≈ – 14 mag for a timescale of ∼0.5 hr to ∼1 day, while relativistic sources (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, magnetar-powered transients) can reach much larger luminosities. The resulting volumetric rates are ≲ 13 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –10 mag), ≲ 0.05 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –14 mag), and ≲ 10{sup –6} Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –24 mag), significantly above the nova, supernova

  19. ISOGAL: A deep survey of the obscured inner Milky Way with ISO at 7 mu m and 15 mu m and with DENIS in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omont, A.; Gilmore, G. F.; Alard, C.; Aracil, B.; August, T.; Baliyan, K.; Beaulieu, S.; Bégon, S.; Bertou, X.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Borsenberger, J.; Burgdorf, M.; Caillaud, B.; Cesarsky, C.; Chitre, A.; Copet, E.; de Batz, B.; Egan, M. P.; Egret, D.; Epchtein, N.; Felli, M.; Fouqué, P.; Ganesh, S.; Genzel, R.; Glass, I. S.; Gredel, R.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Guglielmo, F.; Habing, H. J.; Hennebelle, P.; Jiang, B.; Joshi, U. C.; Kimeswenger, S.; Messineo, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. A.; Moneti, A.; Morris, M.; Ojha, D. K.; Ortiz, R.; Ott, S.; Parthasarathy, M.; Pérault, M.; Price, S. D.; Robin, A. C.; Schultheis, M.; Schuller, F.; Simon, G.; Soive, A.; Testi, L.; Teyssier, D.; Tiphène, D.; Unavane, M.; van Loon, J. T.; Wyse, R.

    2003-06-01

    The ISOGAL project is an infrared survey of specific regions sampling the Galactic Plane selected to provide information on Galactic structure, stellar populations, stellar mass-loss and the recent star formation history of the inner disk and Bulge of the Galaxy. ISOGAL combines 7 and 15 μm ISOCAM observations -- with a resolution of 6 arcsec at worst -- with DENIS IJKs data to determine the nature of the sources and the interstellar extinction. We have observed about 16 square degrees with a sensitivity approaching 10-20 mJy, detecting ˜105 sources, mostly AGB stars, red giants and young stars. The main features of the ISOGAL survey and the observations are summarized in this paper, together with a brief discussion of data processing and quality. The primary ISOGAL products are described briefly (a full desciption is given in Schuller et al. 2003): viz. the images and the ISOGAL-DENIS five-wavelength point source catalogue. The main scientific results already derived or in progress are summarized. These include astrometrically calibrated 7 and 15 μm images, determining structures of resolved sources; identification and properties of interstellar dark clouds; quantification of the infrared extinction law and source dereddening; analysis of red giant and (especially) AGB stellar populations in the central Bulge, determining luminosity, presence of circumstellar dust and mass-loss rate, and source classification, supplemented in some cases by ISO/CVF spectroscopy; detection of young stellar objects of diverse types, especially in the inner Bulge with information about the present and recent star formation rate; identification of foreground sources with mid-IR excess. These results are the subject of about 25 refereed papers published or in preparation. This is paper No. 20 in a refereed journal based on data from the ISOGAL project. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France

  20. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. VIII. EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS IN GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kajisawa, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Yamada, T.; Akiyama, M.; Uchimoto, Y. K.; Yoshikawa, T.; Onodera, M.

    2010-11-01

    We study the evolution of star formation activity of galaxies at 0.5 < z < 3.5 as a function of stellar mass, using very deep NIR data taken with the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru telescope in the GOODS-North region. The NIR imaging data reach K{approx} 23-24 Vega magnitude and they allow us to construct a nearly stellar-mass-limited sample down to {approx}10{sup 9.5-10} M{sub sun} even at z {approx} 3. We estimated star formation rates (SFRs) of the sample with two indicators, namely, the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m flux and the rest-frame 2800 A luminosity. The SFR distribution at a fixed M{sub star} shifts to higher values with increasing redshift at 0.5 < z < 3.5. More massive galaxies show stronger evolution of SFR at z {approx}> 1. We found galaxies at 2.5 < z < 3.5 show a bimodality in their SSFR distribution, which can be divided into two populations by a constant SSFR of {approx}2 Gyr{sup -1}. Galaxies in the low-SSFR group have SSFRs of {approx}0.5-1.0 Gyr{sup -1}, while the high-SSFR population shows {approx}10 Gyr{sup -1}. The cosmic SFR density (SFRD) is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11} M{sub sun} at 0.5 < z < 3.5, while the contribution of massive galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 11-11.5} M{sub sun} shows a strong evolution at z>1 and becomes significant at z {approx} 3, especially in the case with the SFR based on MIPS 24 {mu}m. In galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11.5} M{sub sun}, those with a relatively narrow range of SSFR ({approx}<1 dex) dominates the cosmic SFRD at 0.5 < z < 3.5. The SSFR of galaxies that dominate the SFRD systematically increases with redshift. At 2.5 < z < 3.5, the high-SSFR population, which is relatively small in number, dominates the SFRD. Major star formation in the universe at higher redshift seems to be associated with a more rapid growth of stellar mass of galaxies.

  1. THE GREAT OBSERVATORIES ORIGINS DEEP SURVEY: CONSTRAINTS ON THE LYMAN CONTINUUM ESCAPE FRACTION DISTRIBUTION OF LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES AT 3.4 < z < 4.5

    SciTech Connect

    Vanzella, E.; Nonino, M.; Fontanot, F.; Cristiani, S.; Tozzi, P.; Giavalisco, M.; Inoue, A. K.; Grazian, A.; Giallongo, E.; Boutsia, K.; Fontana, A.; Pentericci, L.; Dickinson, M.; Stern, D.; Ferguson, H.; Spinrad, H.; Rosati, P.

    2010-12-10

    We use ultra-deep ultraviolet VLT/VIMOS intermediate-band and VLT/FORS1 narrowband imaging in the GOODS Southern field to derive limits on the distribution of the escape fraction (f{sub esc}) of ionizing radiation for L {>=} L*{sub z=3} Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at redshift 3.4-4.5. Only one LBG, at redshift z = 3.795, is detected in its Lyman continuum (LyC; S/N {approx_equal} 5.5), the highest redshift galaxy currently known with a direct detection. Its ultraviolet morphology is quite compact (R{sub eff} = 0.8 kpc physical). Three out of seven active galactic nuclei are also detected in their LyC, including one at redshift z = 3.951 and z{sub 850} = 26.1. From stacked data (LBGs), we set an upper limit to the average f{sub esc} in the range 5%-20%, depending on how the data are selected (e.g., by magnitude and/or redshift). We undertake extensive Monte Carlo simulations that take into account intergalactic attenuation, stellar population synthesis models, dust extinction, and photometric noise in order to explore the moments of the distribution of the escaping radiation. Various distributions (exponential, log-normal, and Gaussian) are explored. We find that the median f{sub esc} is lower than {approx_equal}6% with an 84% percentile limit not larger than 20%. If this result remains valid for fainter LBGs down to current observational limits, then the LBG population might be not sufficient to account for the entire photoionization budget at the redshifts considered here, with the exact details dependent upon the assumed ionizing background and QSO contribution thereto. It is possible that f{sub esc} depends on the UV luminosity of the galaxies, with fainter galaxies having higher f{sub esc}, and estimates of f{sub esc} from a sample of faint LBGs from HUDF (i{sub 775} {<=}28.5) are in broad quantitative agreement with such a scenario.

  2. Deep crustal structure of the North-West African margin from combined wide-angle and reflection seismic data (MIRROR seismic survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biari, Y.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Sahabi, M.; Aslanian, D.; Schnurle, P.; Berglar, K.; Moulin, M.; Mehdi, K.; Graindorge, D.; Evain, M.; Benabdellouahed, M.; Reichert, C.

    2015-08-01

    The structure of the Moroccan and Nova Scotia conjugate rifted margins is of key importance for understanding the Mesozoic break-up and evolution of the northern central Atlantic Ocean basin. Seven combined multichannel reflection (MCS) and wide-angle seismic (OBS) data profiles were acquired along the Atlantic Moroccan margin between the latitudes of 31.5° and 33° N during the MIRROR seismic survey in 2011, in order to image the transition from continental to oceanic crust, to study the variation in crustal structure, and to characterize the crust under the West African Coast Magnetic Anomaly (WACMA). The data were modeled using a forward modeling approach. The final models image crustal thinning from 36 km thickness below the continent to approximately 8 km in the oceanic domain. A 100 km wide zone characterized by rough basement topography and high seismic velocities up to 7.4 km/s in the lower crust is observed westward of the West African Coast Magnetic Anomaly. No basin underlain by continental crust has been imaged in this region, as has been identified north of our study area. Comparison to the conjugate Nova Scotian margin shows a similar continental crustal thickness and layer geometry, and the existence of exhumed and serpentinized upper mantle material on the Canadian side only. The oceanic crustal thickness is lower on the Canadian margin.

  3. The Infrared Medium-Deep Survey. V. A New Selection Strategy for Quasars at z > 5 Based on Medium-Band Observations with SQUEAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Yiseul; Im, Myungshin; Pak, Soojong; Hyun, Minhee; Kim, Sanghyuk; Kim, Yongjung; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin

    2016-02-01

    Multiple color selection techniques are successful in identifying quasars from wide-field broad-band imaging survey data. Among the quasars that have been discovered so far, however, there is a redshift gap at 5 ≲ z ≲ 5.7 due to the limitations of filter sets in previous studies. In this work, we present a new selection technique of high redshift quasars using a sequence of medium-band filters: nine filters with central wavelengths from 625 to 1025 nm and bandwidths of 50 nm. Photometry with these medium-bands traces the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a source, similar to spectroscopy with resolution R ˜ 15. By conducting medium-band observations of high redshift quasars at 4.7 ≤ z ≤ 6.0 and brown dwarfs (the main contaminants in high redshift quasar selection) using the SED camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse (SQUEAN) on the 2.1-m telescope at the McDonald Observatory, we show that these medium-band filters are superior to multi-color broad-band color section in separating high redshift quasars from brown dwarfs. In addition, we show that redshifts of high redshift quasars can be determined to an accuracy of Δ{z}/(1+{z}) = 0.002 - 0.026. The selection technique can be extended to z ˜ 7, suggesting that the medium-band observation can be powerful in identifying quasars even at the re-ionization epoch.

  4. Exploitation of "Excess" Data Now Routinely Collected by Large N, Continuously Recorded Oil Exploration Surveys: From Microseismicity to Deep Crustal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The rapidly expanding use by the oil and gas industry of "nodal", large channel capacity areal arrays that record continuously for extended periods of time is generating large volumes of data in excess of that needed for the conventional CMP reflection imaging that is the primary goal of such surveys. These excess data, once considered as simply "noise", have recently been recognized to have utility not only for the exploration seismologist but also for addressing a diverse range of phenomena. The most widely recognized use for these "noise" records is surface wave tomographic imaging of near surface velocity structure via seismic interferometry of ambient natural noise. Such results are proving to be of great value in enhancing conventional 3D exploration imagery, but they should be appreciated in their own right for the information they provide on the shallow subsurface to the hydrologist, engineer and tectonicist. Another relatively dramatic application is the delineation of local structure by tracing the propagation of body and surface waves from local and teleseismic events across these dense arrays. Here I would like draw attention to three other promising uses for such data: a) detection and mapping of microseismicity below the detection thresholds of conventional earthquake monitoring networks, especially in areas of low conventional seismicity; b) reflection and refraction imaging of structure using cultural, as opposed to natural, energy sources, and c) systematic mapping of the basement in 3D using the existing exploration sources recorded at travel times longer than that typically harvested for resource purposes. We conclude by emphasizing that these potentially invaluable "extras" are now being recorded routinely around the world, but there is as yet no mechanism in place to ensure they are exploited rather than simply deleted.

  5. Deep smarts.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Dorothy; Swap, Walter

    2004-09-01

    When a person sizes up a complex situation and rapidly comes to a decision that proves to be not just good but brilliant, you think, "That was smart." After you watch him do this a few times, you realize you're in the presence of something special. It's not raw brainpower, though that helps. It's not emotional intelligence, either, though that, too, is often involved. It's deep smarts. Deep smarts are not philosophical--they're not"wisdom" in that sense, but they're as close to wisdom as business gets. You see them in the manager who understands when and how to move into a new international market, in the executive who knows just what kind of talk to give when her organization is in crisis, in the technician who can track a product failure back to an interaction between independently produced elements. These are people whose knowledge would be hard to purchase on the open market. Their insight is based on know-how more than on know-what; it comprises a system view as well as expertise in individual areas. Because deep smarts are experienced based and often context specific, they can't be produced overnight or readily imported into an organization. It takes years for an individual to develop them--and no time at all for an organization to lose them when a valued veteran walks out the door. They can be taught, however, with the right techniques. Drawing on their forthcoming book Deep Smarts, Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap say the best way to transfer such expertise to novices--and, on a larger scale, to make individual knowledge institutional--isn't through PowerPoint slides, a Web site of best practices, online training, project reports, or lectures. Rather, the sage needs to teach the neophyte individually how to draw wisdom from experience. Companies have to be willing to dedicate time and effort to such extensive training, but the investment more than pays for itself. PMID:15449858

  6. Accelerated evolution of the Lyα luminosity function at z ≳ 7 revealed by the Subaru ultra-deep survey for Lyα emitters at z = 7.3

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Naito, Yoshiaki; Momose, Rieko; Yuma, Suraphong; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Furusawa, Hisanori; Iye, Masanori

    2014-12-10

    We present the ultra-deep Subaru narrowband imaging survey for Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 7.3 in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) and Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) fields (∼0.5 deg{sup 2}) with a total integration time of 106 hr. Exploiting our new sharp bandwidth filter, NB101, installed on the Suprime-Cam, we have reached L(Lyα) = 2.4 × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1} (5σ) for z = 7.3 LAEs, about four times deeper than previous Subaru z ≳ 7 studies, which allows us to reliably investigate the evolution of the Lyα luminosity function (LF) for the first time down to the luminosity limit same as those of Subaru z = 3.1-6.6 LAE samples. Surprisingly, we only find three and four LAEs in the SXDS and COSMOS fields, respectively, while one expects a total of ∼65 LAEs by our survey in the case of no Lyα LF evolution from z = 6.6 to 7.3. We identify a decrease of the Lyα LF from z = 6.6 to 7.3 at the >90% confidence level from our z = 7.3 Lyα LF with the best-fit Schechter parameters of L{sub Lyα}{sup ∗}=2.7{sub −1.2}{sup +8.0}×10{sup 42} erg s{sup −1} and ϕ{sup ∗}=3.7{sub −3.3}{sup +17.6}×10{sup −4} Mpc{sup −3} for a fixed α = –1.5. Moreover, the evolution of the Lyα LF is clearly accelerated at z > 6.6 beyond the measurement uncertainties including cosmic variance. Because no such accelerated evolution of the UV-continuum LF or the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) is found at z ∼ 7, but suggested only at z > 8, this accelerated Lyα LF evolution is explained by physical mechanisms different from a pure SFR decrease but related to the Lyα production and escape in the process of cosmic reionization. Because a simple accelerating increase of intergalactic medium neutral hydrogen absorbing Lyα cannot be reconciled with Thomson scattering of optical depth measurements from WMAP and Planck, our findings may support new physical pictures suggested by recent theoretical studies, such as the existence of HI clumpy clouds within

  7. The LSST Deep Drilling Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. L.; Brandt, W. N.; Cook, K. H.; Lacy, M.; Dhital, S.; LSST Deep Drilling Interest Group

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 10% of LSST's survey time will be dedicated to mini-surveys designed to enhance science beyond the Wide, Fast Deep (WFD) mode of typical LSST operations. One planned type of mini-survey is the Deep Drilling (DD) program, which proposes to survey a limited number of fields to deeper limiting magnitudes and with higher cadence than the WFD baseline. By observing more frequently and using many filters during each sequence, the DD program will provide rich data sets for discovering and characterizing supernovae and other transient objects. By observing to much deeper limiting magnitudes, the DD program delivers higher SNR for galaxy shape and photometric redshift measurements, providing a clean calibration sample to correct for biases within the WFD, and will also detect objects to much higher redshifts. Deep drilling fields will be targeted towards a wide range of science goals, including discovering faint (r=27) solar system objects to explore planetesimal size distributions, characterizing L and T dwarfs by adding deeper i band exposures, and obtaining dense light curves for variable stars and transients within our Local Group. A DD Interest Group, drawn from the LSST Science Collaborations, has been tasked with exploring deep drilling program implementations. Members of this group have written a series of white papers, available on the web, detailing their various science goals and observational requirements. The LSST Operations Simulation group has completed a first set of runs to investigate how these requirements mesh with the overall survey; preliminary analysis of these runs is presented here. The first four DD pointings have been announced by the LSST Science Council to provide opportunities for precovery or multiwavelength surveys, and are discussed here. Further refinement of the DD program to optimize science return of both DD and WFD fields will continue until shortly before the start of LSST operations.

  8. The luminosity function at the end of the main sequence: Results of a deep, large-area, CCD survey for cool dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Mcgraw, John T.; Hess, Thomas R.; Liebert, James; Mccarthy, Donald W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The luminosity function at the end of the main sequence is determined from V, R, and I data taken by the charge coupled devices (CCD)/Transit Instrument, a dedicated telescope surveying an 8.25 min wide strip of sky centered at delta = +28 deg, thus sampling Galactic latitudes of +90 deg down to -35 deg. A selection of 133 objects chosen via R - I and V - I colors has been observed spectroscopically at the 4.5 m Multiple Mirror Telescope to assess contributions by giants and subdwarfs and to verify that the reddest targets are objects of extremely late spectral class. Eighteen dwarfs of type M6 or later have been discovered, with the latest being of type M8.5. Data used for the determination of the luminosity function cover 27.3 sq. deg down to a completeness limit of R = 19.0. This luminosity function, computed at V, I, and bolometric magnitudes, shows an increase at the lowest luminosities, corresponding to spectral types later than M6- an effect suggested in earlier work by Reid & Gilmore and Legget & Hawkins. When the luminosity function is segregated into north Galactic and south Galactic portions, it is found that the upturn at faint magnitudes exists only in the southern sample. In fact, no dwarfs with M(sub I) is greater than or equal to 12.0 are found within the limiting volume of the 19.4 sq deg northern sample, in stark contrast to the smaller 7.9 sq deg area at southerly latitudes where seven such dwarfs are found. This fact, combined with the fact that the Sun is located approximately 10-40 pc north of the midplane, suggests that the latest dwarfs are part of a young population with a scale height much smaller than the 350 pc value generally adopted for other M dwarfs. These objects comprise a young population either because the lower metallicities prevelant at earlier epochs inhibited the formation of late M dwarfs or because the older counterparts of this population have cooled beyond current detection limits. The latter scenario would hold if these

  9. Deep reflection structure imaged by the 2008 3D seismic reflection Survey at the RIDGE- 2000 East Pacific Rise Integrated Studies Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedimović, M. R.; Carbotte, S. M.; Mutter, J. C.; Canales, P. J.; Carton, H.; Aghaei, O.; Marjanović, M.; Newman, K. R.; Hu, M.; Stowe, L.

    2008-12-01

    The first multi-source and multi-streamer 3D seismic reflection experiment carried out using academic resources was done aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth in Summer 2008 during cruise MGL0812. The targeted area was the RIDGE-2000 Integrated Studies Site at the East Pacific Rise. Our primary 3D survey grid extends from about 9° 57'N to 9° 42'N, with a smaller grid just to the south covering approximately from 9° 40'N to 9° 37.5'N. Additionally, about 1 and 0.5 km wide across-ridge-axis swaths of data were collected at 9° 36'N and 9°30'N respectively, as well as an along-ridge-axis swath about 1 km wide and extending from 10° 05'N to 9° 40'N. We here focus on a preliminary analysis of the reflection structure imaged within the lower crust and uppermost mantle. Moho reflection arrivals are imaged through much of the investigated area. The character of Moho reflection events varies from simple, single reflection wavelet to more complex arrivals indicating spatial changes in structure within the Moho transition zone. Particularly strong Moho reflections are observed in the southern half of the main 3D grid. In places, Moho reflection event appears to extend across the ridge axis potentially suggesting "zero-age" Moho development. Weak Moho arrivals are found at the north end of the main 3D box and within the smaller box to the south. Most notable place lacking Moho reflections is the Lamont seamount area where Moho is not observed on either side of the ridge axis, although the area lacking Moho reflections is wider on the western ridge flank. Further south, along the across-ridge-axis swaths, Moho reflections again become more pronounced. A suit of what mostly appear to be reflection events is recognized between the AMC and Moho. Many of them do not appear to be multiples, and their origin is not well understood. Possible origins for these events include: lower boundary of the AMC, S-converted waves, and lower crustal melt lenses. Along sections of the two 3D

  10. THE VLA SURVEY OF CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH. V. EVOLUTION AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SUB-MILLIJANSKY RADIO SOURCES AND THE ISSUE OF RADIO EMISSION IN RADIO-QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Padovani, P.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Miller, N.; Kellermann, K. I.; Tozzi, P.

    2011-10-10

    We present the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions of the radio sources belonging to the Chandra Deep Field South Very Large Array survey, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 43 {mu}Jy at the field center and redshift {approx}5 and which includes the first radio-selected complete sample of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use a new, comprehensive classification scheme based on radio, far- and near-IR, optical, and X-ray data to disentangle star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from AGNs and radio-quiet from radio-loud AGNs. We confirm our previous result that SFGs become dominant only below 0.1 mJy. The sub-millijansky radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of SFGs and radio-quiet AGNs evolving at a similar, strong rate; non-evolving low-luminosity radio galaxies; and declining radio powerful (P {approx}> 3 x 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1}) AGNs. Our results suggest that radio emission from radio-quiet AGNs is closely related to star formation. The detection of compact, high brightness temperature cores in several nearby radio-quiet AGNs can be explained by the coexistence of two components, one non-evolving and AGN related and one evolving and star formation related. Radio-quiet AGNs are an important class of sub-millijansky sources, accounting for {approx}30% of the sample and {approx}60% of all AGNs, and outnumbering radio-loud AGNs at {approx}< 0.1 mJy. This implies that future, large area sub-millijansky surveys, given the appropriate ancillary multiwavelength data, have the potential of being able to assemble vast samples of radio-quiet AGNs, bypassing the problems of obscuration that plague the optical and soft X-ray bands.

  11. The VLA Survey of Chandra Deep Field South. V. Evolution and Luminosity Functions of Sub-millijansky Radio Sources and the Issue of Radio Emission in Radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, P.; Miller, N.; Kellermann, K. I.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Tozzi, P.

    2011-10-01

    We present the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions of the radio sources belonging to the Chandra Deep Field South Very Large Array survey, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 43 μJy at the field center and redshift ~5 and which includes the first radio-selected complete sample of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use a new, comprehensive classification scheme based on radio, far- and near-IR, optical, and X-ray data to disentangle star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from AGNs and radio-quiet from radio-loud AGNs. We confirm our previous result that SFGs become dominant only below 0.1 mJy. The sub-millijansky radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of SFGs and radio-quiet AGNs evolving at a similar, strong rate; non-evolving low-luminosity radio galaxies; and declining radio powerful (P >~ 3 × 1024 W Hz-1) AGNs. Our results suggest that radio emission from radio-quiet AGNs is closely related to star formation. The detection of compact, high brightness temperature cores in several nearby radio-quiet AGNs can be explained by the coexistence of two components, one non-evolving and AGN related and one evolving and star formation related. Radio-quiet AGNs are an important class of sub-millijansky sources, accounting for ~30% of the sample and ~60% of all AGNs, and outnumbering radio-loud AGNs at <~ 0.1 mJy. This implies that future, large area sub-millijansky surveys, given the appropriate ancillary multiwavelength data, have the potential of being able to assemble vast samples of radio-quiet AGNs, bypassing the problems of obscuration that plague the optical and soft X-ray bands.

  12. Deep learning in neural networks: an overview.

    PubMed

    Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, deep artificial neural networks (including recurrent ones) have won numerous contests in pattern recognition and machine learning. This historical survey compactly summarizes relevant work, much of it from the previous millennium. Shallow and Deep Learners are distinguished by the depth of their credit assignment paths, which are chains of possibly learnable, causal links between actions and effects. I review deep supervised learning (also recapitulating the history of backpropagation), unsupervised learning, reinforcement learning & evolutionary computation, and indirect search for short programs encoding deep and large networks. PMID:25462637

  13. Deep pockets for deep seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Peter Auster, a fisheries ecologist with the National Undersea Research Center in Connecticut, plans to assess degradation of the deep-shelf seafloor from bottom trawling. Magnus Ngoile, an official with Tanzania's National Environmental Management Council, will work on building capacity of poor villagers to protect their coastline. And Alison Rieser, a lawyer with the University of Maine School of Law, will produce a textbook to educate scientists on how to apply the law for marine conservation.These individuals are among 11 recipients of the Pew Charitable Trust's 10th annual marine conservation fellowships, announced on July 12. With each recipient receiving an award of $150,000, the program is the world's largest award for marine conservationists. Other 1999 recipients will be involved with areas including investigating marine pollution in the Arctic region, examining economic incentives for conservation in Baja, Mexico, and establishing a marine conservation biology training program for minority students.

  14. Observing Handbook and Catalogue of Deep-Sky Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Skiff, Brian A.

    1998-09-01

    List of charts, tables and figures; Prolegomenon; Part I. Amateur Observing: Telescopes; Eyepieces; Finderscopes and finding; Star atlases; Gadgets; Looking through the telescope; Lighting and the recording of notes; Observing locations; Instruments used in the survey of deep-sky objects; Observing sites for the survey; Part II. Deep-Sky Data Sources: Galaxies; Open clusters; Globular clusters; Planetary nebulae; Galactic nebulae; Double stars; Part III. Observations: Notes on references for deep-sky observers; Catalogue; Appendix of double stars.

  15. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Deep Vein Thrombosis Overview What is deep vein thrombosis? Deep vein thrombosis (also called DVT) is a blood clot in a vein deep inside your body. These clots usually occur in your leg veins. While DVT is a fairly common condition, it is ...

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  17. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the lower leg or ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a ...

  18. The Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: The role of galaxy group environment in the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation and quiescent fraction out to z ∼ 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lihwai; Chen, Chin-Wei; Coupon, Jean; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Jian, Hung-Yu; Foucaud, Sebastien; Norberg, Peder; Bower, R. G.; Cole, Shaun; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Draper, P.; Heinis, Sebastien; Phleps, Stefanie; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Burgett, William; Chambers, K. C.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W.; and others

    2014-02-10

    Using a large optically selected sample of field and group galaxies drawn from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS), we present a detailed analysis of the specific star formation rate (SSFR)—stellar mass (M {sub *}) relation, as well as the quiescent fraction versus M {sub *} relation in different environments. While both the SSFR and the quiescent fraction depend strongly on stellar mass, the environment also plays an important role. Using this large galaxy sample, we confirm that the fraction of quiescent galaxies is strongly dependent on environment at a fixed stellar mass, but that the amplitude and the slope of the star-forming sequence is similar between the field and groups: in other words, the SSFR-density relation at a fixed stellar mass is primarily driven by the change in the star-forming and quiescent fractions between different environments rather than a global suppression in the star formation rate for the star-forming population. However, when we restrict our sample to the cluster-scale environments (M > 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}), we find a global reduction in the SSFR of the star-forming sequence of 17% at 4σ confidence as opposed to its field counterpart. After removing the stellar mass dependence of the quiescent fraction seen in field galaxies, the excess in the quiescent fraction due to the environment quenching in groups and clusters is found to increase with stellar mass, although deeper and larger data from the full PS1/MDS will be required to draw firm conclusions. We argue that these results are in favor of galaxy mergers to be the primary environment quenching mechanism operating in galaxy groups whereas strangulation is able to reproduce the observed trend in the environment quenching efficiency and stellar mass relation seen in clusters. Our results also suggest that the relative importance between mass quenching and environment quenching depends on stellar mass—the mass quenching plays a dominant role in producing quiescent

  19. Taoism and Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvan, Richard; Bennett, David

    1988-01-01

    Contrasted are the philosophies of Deep Ecology and ancient Chinese. Discusses the cosmology, morality, lifestyle, views of power, politics, and environmental philosophies of each. Concludes that Deep Ecology could gain much from Taoism. (CW)

  20. Deep Ecology and Subjectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Grover

    1988-01-01

    Describes Deep Ecology and criticizes its limitations. Discusses mysticism, the bomb, freedom, subjectivity and power as they are addressed by Deep Ecology. Stresses the need to teach ecological balance. (CW)

  1. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You were treated for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). This is a condition in which a blood clot forms in a vein that is not on ... especially if it gets worse upon taking a deep breath in You cough up blood

  2. Deep venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep venous thrombosis is a condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a part ... M, et al. Executive Summary: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis. 9th ed. American College of Chest ...

  3. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  4. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis? Español Deep vein thrombosis (throm-BO-sis), or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Blood clots occur when blood ...

  5. Deep Web video

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2009-06-01

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  6. Deep Web video

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2012-03-28

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  7. Deep Space Telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Resch, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing load on NASA's deep Space Network, the new capabilities for deep space missions inherent in a next-generation radio telescope, and the potential of new telescope technology for reducing construction and operation costs suggest a natural marriage between radio astronomy and deep space telecommunications in developing advanced radio telescope concepts.

  8. Deep drilling; Probing beneath the earth's surface

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.250

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on boreholes from 4.5 to greater than 10 kilometers deep that are pushing back the boundaries of earth science as they yield information that is used to refine seismic surveys, chart the evolution of sedimentary basins and shield volcanos, and uncover important clues on the origin and migration of mantle-derived water and gas.

  9. Surveying Future Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlstrom, John E.

    2016-06-01

    The now standard model of cosmology has been tested and refined by the analysis of increasingly sensitive, large astronomical surveys, especially with statistically significant millimeter-wave surveys of the cosmic microwave background and optical surveys of the distribution of galaxies. This talk will offer a glimpse of the future, which promises an acceleration of this trend with cosmological information coming from new surveys across the electromagnetic spectrum as well as particles and even gravitational waves.

  10. USGS assesses deep undiscovered gas resource

    SciTech Connect

    Dyman, T.S.; Schmoker, J.W.; Root, D.H.

    1998-04-20

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) estimated in 1995 that 1,412 tcf of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or developed in US onshore areas. A significant part of that resource base, 114 tcf, is undiscovered gas in deep sedimentary basins assessed by the USGS in onshore areas and state waters. This article contains: (1) descriptions of the deep gas plays supplied by USGS province geologists; (2) estimates of undiscovered technically-recoverable gas from these plays; and, (3) comparisons of the USGS estimates with other recent deep gas assessments. For detailed discussions of the deep gas plays and maps illustrating the play outlines, refer to the 1995 USGS National Petroleum Assessment CD-ROM.

  11. Deep Imaging of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, G.

    2010-10-01

    With the development of high contrast imaging instruments and techniques, vast efforts have been devoted during the past decade to detect and characterize lighter, cooler and closer companions to nearby stars, and ultimately image new planetary systems. Complementary to other observing techniques (radial velocity, transit, micro-lensing, pulsar-timing and astrometry), this approach has opened a new astrophysical window to study the physical properties and the formation and evolution mechanisms of giant planets at orbits larger than a few AUs. In this review, I will briefly present the main motivations to use deep imaging to search for exoplanets and review the constant progress achieved thanks to improved performances of advanced instrumentation and data analysis techniques. I will describe the main classes of stars identified and observed so far to increase the chances of detection. I will also detail the classical strategy adopted to identify false alarms and characterize true companions. I will review the current status of the different deep imaging surveys as well as the main results that recently led to the discovery of giant planets probably formed like the ones of our solar system. Finally, I will rise the questions and uncertainties related to the formation mechanisms, the physical properties and the frequency of these planetary mass companions to conclude with the exciting and attractive perspectives offered with the future generation of deep imaging instruments.

  12. Use of Data Envelopment Analysis in an Evaluation of the Efficiency of the DEEP Program for Economic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Arthur M., Jr.; Medewitz, Jeanette N.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes data from the National Assessment of Economic Education Survey using data envelopment analysis. Determines whether high school economics classes in the Developmental Economic Education Program (DEEP) produce higher achievement levels than non-DEEP classes. Calculates technical efficiency of DEEP and non-DEEP classes. Reports results…

  13. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Presented is Deep Space Network (DSN) progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition (TDA) research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  14. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Summaries are given of Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  15. Deep space antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Three 26-m tracking antennas operated by the NASA Deep Space Network at Goldstone, Calif.; Madrid, Spain; and near Canberra, Australia, will cease operations on Dec. 1, 1981. The stations will continue to operate 64-m and 34-m deep space tracking antennas. Ending operation of the 26-m antennas will cause a reduction of about 30%; of the Deep Space Network tracking and data acquisition capability. This means less support for NASA planetary spacecraft. Currently, the Deep Space Network is supporting Voyagers 1 and 2, Helios 1, the Mars Viking 1 Lander and Pioneers 6 through 12.

  16. A deep reef in deep trouble

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menza, Charles; Kendall, M.; Rogers, C.; Miller, J.

    2007-01-01

    The well-documented degradation of shallower reefs which are often closer to land and more vulnerable to pollution, sewage and other human-related stressors has led to the suggestion that deeper, more remote offshore reefs could possibly serve as sources of coral and fish larvae to replenish the shallower reefs. Yet, the distribution, status, and ecological roles of deep (>30 m) Caribbean reefs are not well known. In this report, an observation of a deep reef which has undergone a recent extensive loss of coral cover is presented. In stark contrast to the typical pattern of coral loss in shallow reefs, the deeper corals were most affected. This report is the first description of such a pattern of coral loss on a deep reef.

  17. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory

  18. Deep-diving dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, John

    2012-08-01

    Dysbaric bone necrosis demonstrated in ichthyosaurs may be the result of prolonged deep diving rather than rapid ascent to escape predators. The bone lesions show structural and anatomical similarity to those that may occur in human divers and in the deep diving sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus.

  19. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition, research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is cited. Topics covered include: tracking and ground based navigation; spacecraft/ground communication; station control and operations technology; ground communications; and deep space stations.

  20. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The progress is reported of Deep Space Network (DSN) research in the following areas: (1) flight project support, (2) spacecraft/ground communications, (3) station control and operations technology, (4) network control and processing, and (5) deep space stations. A description of the DSN functions and facilities is included.

  1. Deep-diving dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Hayman, John

    2012-08-01

    Dysbaric bone necrosis demonstrated in ichthyosaurs may be the result of prolonged deep diving rather than rapid ascent to escape predators. The bone lesions show structural and anatomical similarity to those that may occur in human divers and in the deep diving sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus. PMID:22824942

  2. Delving into the Deep Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, S. L.; Sogin, M. L.; Boetius, A.; Briggs, B. R.; Brazelton, W. J.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Edwards, K. J.; Fisk, M. R.; Gaidos, E.; Gralnick, J.; Hinrichs, K.; Lazar, C.; Lavalleur, H.; Lever, M. A.; Marteinsson, V.; Moser, D. P.; Orcutt, B.; Pedersen, K.; Popa, R.; Ramette, A.; Schrenk, M. O.; Sylvan, J. B.; Smith, A. R.; Teske, A.; Walsh, E. A.; Colwell, F. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Census of Deep Life organized an international survey of microbial community diversity in terrestrial and marine deep subsurface environments. Habitats included subsurface continental fractured rock aquifers, volcanic and metamorphic subseafloor sedimentary units from the open ocean, subsurface oxic and anoxic sediments and underlying basaltic oceanic crust, and their overlying water columns. Our survey employed high-throughput pyrosequencing of the hypervariable V4-V6 16S rRNA gene of bacteria and archaea. We detected 1292 bacterial genera representing 40 phyla, and 99 archaeal genera from 30 phyla. Of these, a core group of thirteen bacterial genera occurred in every environment. A genus of the South African Goldmine Group (Euryarchaeota) was always present whenever archaea were detected. Members of the rare biosphere in one system often represented highly abundant taxa in other environments. Dispersal could account for this observation but mechanisms of transport remain elusive. Ralstonia (Betaproteobacteria) represented highly abundant taxa in marine communities and terrestrial rock, but generally low abundance organisms in groundwater. Some of these taxa could represent sample contamination, and their extensive distribution in several systems requires further assessment. An unknown Sphingobacteriales (Bacteroidetes) genus, Stenotrophomonas (Gammaproteobacteria), Acidovorax and Aquabacterium (both Betaproteobacteria), a Chlorobiales genus, and a TM7 genus were in the core group as well but more prevalent in terrestrial environments. Similarly, Bacillus (Firmicutes), a new cyanobacterial genus, Bradyrhizobium and Sphingomonas (both Alphaproteobacteria), a novel Acidobacteriaceae genus, and Variovorax (Betaproteobacteria) frequently occurred in marine systems but represented low abundance taxa in other environments. Communities tended to cluster by biome and material, and many genera were unique to systems. For example, certain Rhizobiales

  3. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Danish leafy crops. Part I: PAH in kale and beets relate to point sources of PAH. Part II: a survey of PAH in commercial grown fresh and deep-frozen kale

    SciTech Connect

    Vahl, M.; Beck, J.; Stoebet, M.

    1982-01-01

    Part I discusses the investigation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) has been to demonstrate the possible pollution of leafy vegetables from expected PAH-emmissions, and to compare with similar investigations in Scandinavia. Part II is a survey has been to establish levels of PAH to which consumers are normally exposed from intake of fruits and above ground parts of vegetables.

  5. Low Frequency Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Philip M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose to survey the sky from 10-100 GHz covering greater than 50% of the sky in intensity and polarizatiton. This will allow us to mep out the synchrotron and free - free background as well as the spinning dust component to sufficient sensitivity to allow detailed modeling and removal of the galactic foregrounds allowing for deeper polarization surveys searching for signatures of inflation. While most measurements have concentrated on the region above 100 GHz this reggion is more complex in dust contmination that originally thought. Dust is best measured at high frequencies but the atmosphere greatly hinders extremely deep dust surveys due to water vapor. Surveys ar low frequency will be complimentary to the higher frequency measurements.

  6. Deep Moonquakes: Remaining Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    2004-01-01

    We have recently reexamined more than 9000 United States previously unidentified seismic events catalogued during the Apollo landing missions and positively identified for the first time about 30 deep moonquake nests on the far side of the Moon. Although only a few of them are currently locatable, the relative arrival times among stations for the rest and presence or absence of seismic signals at particular stations suggest that either (a) the region within about $40\\deg$ of the antipode is aseismic or (b) the deep interior of the Moon severely attenuates or deflects seismic waves. Aside from the obvious question of how to distinguish between such hypothetical models, this effort raised several more general questions concerning the use of deep moonquake signals to infer the structure and dynamics of the deep interior of the Moon. Among more important ones are: (1) How reliable are the seismic arrival picks from which to compute the seismic velocity variations in the Moon? (2) How do the possible lateral variations in seismic velocity affect the computed radial variation in seismic velocity at depth? (3) Can we tell more about the distribution and mechanism of deep moonquakes from the newly expanded database of identified deep moonquakes? Questions (1) and (2) are especially important because the inferred deep internal structure of the Moon depends critically on their answers. Answering these questions may demand additional data collected on future lunar missions, but some may be resolved with further examination of the existing data.

  7. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  8. Deep venous reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Maleti, Oscar; Lugli, Marzia; Tripathi, Ramesh K

    2015-03-01

    Surgical correction of deep venous reflux is a valuable adjunct in treatment of selected patient with lower limb venous ulcer. Deep venous obstruction and superficial reflux is must be corrected first. Sustained venous ulcer healing and reduced ambulatory venous hypertension can be achieved in patients with both primary and secondary deep venous insufficiency. When direct valve repair is possible, valvuloplasty is the best option, but when this is not feasible, other techniques can be used, including femoral vein transposition into the great saphenous vein, vein valve transplant, neovalve construction, or nonautologous artificial venous valve. PMID:26358308

  9. The deep Ionian Basin revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugend, Julie; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Arsenikos, Stavros; Frizon de Lamotte, Dominique; Blanpied, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The deep Eastern Mediterranean Basins (Ionian and Herodotus) are characterized by thick sedimentary sequences overlying an extremely thinned basement evidenced from different geophysical methods. Yet, the nature of the crust (continental or oceanic) and the timing of the extreme crustal and lithosphere thinning in the different sub-basins remain highly controversial, casting doubts on the tectonic setting related to the formation of this segment of the North Gondwana paleo-margin. We focus on the Ionian Basin located at the western termination of the Eastern Mediterranean with the aim of identifying, characterizing and mapping the deepest sedimentary sequences. We present tentative age correlations relying on calibrations and observations from the surrounding margins and basins (Malta shelf and Escarpment, Cyrenaica margin, Sirte Basin, Apulian Platform). Two-ship deep refraction seismic data (Expanding Spread Profiles from the PASIPHAE cruise) combined with reprocessed reflection data (from the ARCHIMEDE survey) enabled us to present a homogeneous seismic stratigraphy across the basin and to investigate the velocity structure of its basement. Based on our results, and on a review of geological and geophysical observations, we suggest an Upper Triassic-Early Dogger age for the formation of the deep Ionian Basin. The nature of the underlying basement remains uncertain, both highly-thinned continental and slow-spreading type oceanic crust being compatible with the available constraints. The narrow size and relatively short-lived evolution of the Ionian Basin lead us to suggest that it is more likely the remnant of an immature oceanic basin than of a stable oceanic domain. Eventually, upscaling these results at the scale of the Eastern Mediterranean Basins highlights the complex interaction observed between two propagating oceans: The Central Atlantic and Neo-Tethys.

  10. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are considered. Progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is reported.

  11. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress on the Deep Space Network (DSN) supporting research and technology, advanced development, engineering and implementation, and DSN operations is presented. The functions and facilities of the DSN are described.

  12. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The various systems and subsystems are discussed for the Deep Space Network (DSN). A description of the DSN is presented along with mission support, program planning, facility engineering, implementation and operations.

  13. Nurturing Deep Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Rachael

    2002-01-01

    Argues that the missing ingredient in school reform is soul, that is, deep connections among students, teachers, and administrators. Discusses five principles of leadership with soul: Personalize, pacing, permission, protection, and paradox. (PKP)

  14. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A report is given of the Deep Space Networks progress in (1) flight project support, (2) tracking and data acquisition research and technology, (3) network engineering, (4) hardware and software implementation, and (5) operations.

  15. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A Deep Space Network progress report is presented dealing with in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  16. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations. The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are emphasized.

  17. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The facilities, programming system, and monitor and control system for the deep space network are described. Ongoing planetary and interplanetary flight projects are reviewed, along with tracking and ground-based navigation, communications, and network and facility engineering.

  18. Reading Knee-Deep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Freire told his audience at a seminar at the University of Massachusetts, "You need to read knee-deep in texts, for deeper than surface meanings, and you need to know the words to be able to do it" (quoted in Cleary, 2003). In a children's literature class, fifteen teachers and I traveled along a path that moved us toward reading knee-deep as we…

  19. Exploration for deep coal

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-15

    The most important factor in safe mining is the quality of the roof. The article explains how the Rosebud Mining Co. conducts drilling and exploration in 11 deep coal mine throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rosebud uses two Atlas Copco CS10 core drilling rigs mounted on 4-wheel drive trucks. The article first appeared in Atlas Copco's in-house magazine, Deep Hole Driller. 3 photos.

  20. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized along with deep space station, ground communication, and network operations control capabilities. Mission support of ongoing planetary/interplanetary flight projects is discussed with emphasis on Viking orbiter radio frequency compatibility tests, the Pioneer Venus orbiter mission, and Helios-1 mission status and operations. Progress is also reported in tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  1. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization, of the Deep Space Network are summarized. Deep Space stations, ground communications, and network operations control capabilities are described. The network is designed for two-way communications with unmanned spacecraft traveling approximately 1600 km from earth to the farthest planets in the solar system. It has provided tracking and data acquisition support for the following projects: Ranger, Surveyor, Mariner, Pioneer, Apollo, Helios, Viking, and the Lunar Orbiter.

  2. Deep source gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    Three separate emplacement concepts could explain the occurrence of gas at extreme depths: abiogenesis (a primordial, nonbiologic origin source); subducted, organic-origin gas (involving the deep, tectonic subduction emplacement of hydrocarbon-generating ocean sediments); and deep sedimentary basin gas (the more conventional emplacement of sedimentary rocks by deep downwarping of the Earth's crust). Of these concepts, Deep Source Gas research focuses on the subducted, organic-origin concept. The purpose of Deep Source Gas research is to verify natural gas arising from depths in excess of 30,000 feet, to relate these occurrences to conceptual models, to define the limits of target areas, to quantify the resource, and to determine the significance of the gas to the nation's reserves. The research emphasizes an Earth science study (geology, geochemistry, and geophysics) of the Cordilleran Geologic Province of western North America. This area is considered a prospective source largely because of known and suspected plate tectonic structures and their youthful emplacement, which increase the likelihood of a timely entrapment of deep-source generated hydrocarbons. Detailed geochemical studies indicate that the deep-source-gas generating capacity of the Aleutian Trench area of southern Alaska is high. Furthermore, geophysical studies show that an apparent fossil subduction zone exists in western Washington. This zone appears to have very thick sedimentary rock units, the existence of which will be evaluated through a more detailed seismic study and possibly through drilling activities. Structural observations made in the northern Brooks Range and central Alaskan Range indicate that overthrusting and compressional features may serve as large-scale target areas for deep source gas generation and occurrence. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Galaxy and cluster redshift surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The present evaluation of galaxy and cluster redshift surveys gives attention to the CfA redshift survey and a deep Abell cluster redshift survey. These data support a structure in which galaxies lie on thin sheets which nearly surround vast, low-density voids. Voids such as that in Bootes are a common feature of galaxy distribution, posing a serious challenge for models. The Huchra et al. (1988) deep-cluster survey exhibits a correlation function amplitude that is a factor of about 2 smaller than that of the earlier Bahcall and Soneira (1983) sample; the difference may not be significant, however, because the cluster samples are sufficiently small to be dominated by single systems.

  4. The CIRCEE-HR survey in the Calabrian arc and offshore E Sicily (Ionian Sea and Southern Italy): investigating active faults, recent deformation and the deep marine paleoseismic record (turbidites)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, M.; Babonneau, N.; Cattaneo, A.; Gallais, F.; Graindorge, D.; San Pedro, L.

    2013-12-01

    (CIRCEE-HR - Calabrian arc Ionian sea Research and Catastrophic historical EarthquakE s in southern italy - a High Resolution seismic survey) We report on a recent marine geophysical and geological survey conducted onboard the R/V Le Suroit from 2-24 October in the Ionian Sea, offshore Eastern Sicily. The primary aim of the CIRCEE-HR cruise proposal was to conduct a neo-tectonic study of the Calabrian subduction zone offshore Southern Italy, a region struck repeatedly by the most destructive earthquakes in European history. The CIRCEE-HR survey targeted the region struck by the 1693 Catania earthquake (60,000 killed) and the 1908 Messina earthquakes, which produced intensity X-XI shaking and tsunamis. The 1908 (normal faulting mechanism) earthquake triggered a turbidite flow that ruptured submarine cables. The source of some strong historical earthquakes (1169, 1542, 1693) remains unknown. Several crustal scale structures have been proposed as being seismogenic: the Malta escarpment, a lithospheric tear fault (STEP), the subduction fault plane and other related faults. The main objectives of the cruise were therefore to seek evidence of active faults associated with these structures, and to characterize the degree of activity of the Calabria accretionary wedge (sedimentary deformation, dewatering processes) in order to better assess its seismogenic potential. Another major objective is to try to determine the typical recurrence interval for large earthquakes in the region (by coring and dating of turbidites triggered by great earthquakes). The Augias mega-turbidite dated either 3.5 ka (Cita et al., 1996) or 365 AD (Polonia et al., 2013) covers the entire floor of the Ionian abyssal plain with a thickness of 10-15m representing a volume of > 100km3. This layer serves as a stratigraphic marker to identify recent deformation in the abyssal domain. The methods applied were 72-channel high-resolution seismic profiles and sub-bottom profiling (chirp) (with 1200km of

  5. Erbium-doped fiber lasers as deep-sea hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, P. E.; Beverini, N.; Bouhadef, B.; Castorina, E.; Falchini, E.; Falciai, R.; Flaminio, V.; Maccioni, E.; Morganti, M.; Sorrentino, F.; Stefani, F.; Trono, C.

    2006-11-01

    The present work describes the development of a hydrophone prototype for deep-sea acoustic detection. The base-sensitive element is a single-mode erbium-doped fiber laser. The high sensitivity of these sensors makes them particularly suitable for a wide range of deep-sea acoustic applications, including geological and marine mammals surveys and above all as acoustic detectors in under-water telescopes for high-energy neutrinos.

  6. Deep gas poses opportunities, challenges to U.S. operators

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, S.R.; Kuuskraa, J.A.; Kuuskraa, V.A.

    1998-05-04

    The previous article in this series on emerging natural gas resources introduced deep gas--natural gas in deep onshore sedimentary basins (below 15,000 ft)--by presenting a 1996 US Geological Survey assessment for this resource. The USGS estimated that 114 tcf of technically recoverable conventional and nonconventional deep gas remains to be discovered in the Rocky Mountains (57 tcf), Gulf Coast (27 tcf), Alaska (18 tcf), West Texas/New Mexico (4 tcf), and Midcontinent (3 tcf), among others. This article, third in this series and the second on deep gas, takes a closer look at this large and challenging resource by addressing the following key questions: (1) Where are the locations and what are the differences among the major deep gas basins? (2) How successful and active have the deep gas plays been? (3) What obstacles and rewards are likely for developers of deep gas? This article concludes with reviews and case studies of three specific deep gas basins: the mature Anadarko basin, the emerging Green River basin, and the frontier Wind River basin. Reviews of these basins highlight the challenges in finding and producing deep gas, as well as the results and rewards.

  7. The deep oval window.

    PubMed

    Kapur, T R

    1991-09-01

    This article presents the results of an analysis of the variable and surgically important relationship between the oval window, the fossular walls and the related posterior tympanic recesses in 50 temporal bones. The visual impressions of superficial and deep oval windows seem to correspond fairly closely to the depth of the inferior wall of the fossula fenestra vestibuli (FFV). The depth of the superior and anterior walls of the FFV by themselves, did not appear to have such a dominating relationship in determining the deep oval window. There does not appear to be a well defined posterior wall in the vast majority of the specimens (86 per cent). In the event of scar tissue forming between the superior, inferior and anterior walls, the gap between the postero-superior part of the promontory and the posterior tympanic wall (posterior communication) could allow aeration of the region of the deep oval window in such an instance. Closure of this gap by a solid shelf of ponticulus or scar tissue could cause a localized malaeration of the fossula in most cases of deep oval windows. This is an entirely new concept of the likely problems of malaeration of a deep oval window which could arise due to anatomical variations and of the possible safety valve mechanism which could prevent such malaeration and its consequences. PMID:1919338

  8. Deep Mixing Statistics in the Globular Cluster NGC5466

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Using VIRUS-P in conjunction with the 2.7m telescope at McDonald Observatory, we obtained a sample of red giants from the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 5466. The flux of the CN and CH absorption features was calculated using the band indices S3839 and SCH respectively. The results indicate that none of the red giants in this sample exhibit deep mixing abundances. To date all similarly surveyed globular clusters show at least some stars with deep mixing abundances. We discuss the cluster properties of NGC 5466 and how this lack of deep mixing stars makes NGC 5466 different from other metal-poor globular clusters.

  9. An Empirical Determination of the Intergalactic Background Light Using Near-Infrared Deep Galaxy Survey Data Out to 5 Micrometers and the Gamma-Ray Opacity of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Sean T.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-01-01

    We extend our previous model-independent determination of the intergalactic background light, based purely on galaxy survey data, out to a wavelength of 5 micrometers. Our approach enables us to constrain the range of photon densities, based on the uncertainties from observationally determined luminosity densities and colors. We further determine a 68% confidence upper and lower limit on the opacity of the universe to gamma-rays up to energies of 1.6/(1 + z) terraelectron volts. A comparison of our lower limit redshift-dependent opacity curves to the opacity limits derived from the results of both ground-based air Cerenkov telescope and Fermi-LAT observations of PKS 1424+240 allows us to place a new upper limit on the redshift of this source, independent of IBL modeling.

  10. Deep space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Srinivasan, Meera; Shaw, Matthew; Piazzolla, Sabino; Wright, Malcolm W.; Farr, William H.

    2016-03-01

    A number of laser communication link demonstrations from near Earth distances extending out to lunar ranges have been remarkably successful, demonstrating the augmented channel capacity that is accessible with the use of lasers for communications. The next hurdle on the path to extending laser communication and its benefits throughout the solar system and beyond is to demonstrate deep-space laser communication links. In this paper, concepts and technology development being advanced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in order to enable deep-space link demonstrations to ranges of approximately 3 AU in the next decade, will be discussed.

  11. The study of deep-sea cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Hoving, Henk-Jan T; Perez, Jose Angel A; Bolstad, Kathrin S R; Braid, Heather E; Evans, Aaron B; Fuchs, Dirk; Judkins, Heather; Kelly, Jesse T; Marian, José E A R; Nakajima, Ryuta; Piatkowski, Uwe; Reid, Amanda; Vecchione, Michael; Xavier, José C C

    2014-01-01

    "Deep-sea" cephalopods are here defined as cephalopods that spend a significant part of their life cycles outside the euphotic zone. In this chapter, the state of knowledge in several aspects of deep-sea cephalopod research are summarized, including information sources for these animals, diversity and general biogeography and life cycles, including reproduction. Recommendations are made for addressing some of the remaining knowledge deficiencies using a variety of traditional and more recently developed methods. The types of oceanic gear that are suitable for collecting cephalopod specimens and images are reviewed. Many groups of deep-sea cephalopods require taxonomic reviews, ideally based on both morphological and molecular characters. Museum collections play a vital role in these revisions, and novel (molecular) techniques may facilitate new use of old museum specimens. Fundamental life-cycle parameters remain unknown for many species; techniques developed for neritic species that could potentially be applied to deep-sea cephalopods are discussed. Reproductive tactics and strategies in deep-sea cephalopods are very diverse and call for comparative evolutionary and experimental studies, but even in the twenty-first century, mature individuals are still unknown for many species. New insights into diet and trophic position have begun to reveal a more diverse range of feeding strategies than the typically voracious predatory lifestyle known for many cephalopods. Regular standardized deep-sea cephalopod surveys are necessary to provide insight into temporal changes in oceanic cephalopod populations and to forecast, verify and monitor the impacts of global marine changes and human impacts on these populations. PMID:24880796

  12. Teaching for Deep Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Tracy Wilson; Colby, Susan A.

    2007-01-01

    The authors have been engaged in research focused on students' depth of learning as well as teachers' efforts to foster deep learning. Findings from a study examining the teaching practices and student learning outcomes of sixty-four teachers in seventeen different states (Smith et al. 2005) indicated that most of the learning in these classrooms…

  13. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is the largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation network in the world. Its principal responsibilities are to support unmanned interplanetary spacecraft missions and to support radio and radar astronomy observations in the exploration of the solar system and the universe. The DSN facilities and capabilities as of January 1988 are described.

  14. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Work accomplished on the Deep Space Network (DSN) was described, including the following topics: supporting research and technology, advanced development and engineering, system implementation, and DSN operations pertaining to mission-independent or multiple-mission development as well as to support of flight projects.

  15. Living with Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Deep Vein Thrombosis NHLBI Resources Pulmonary Embolism (Health Topics) Non-NHLBI Resources Deep Vein Thrombosis (MedlinePlus) Pulmonary Embolism (MedlinePlus) Clinical Trials ...

  16. Project DEEP STEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschliman, D. P.; Clay, R. G.; Donaldson, A. B.; Eisenhawer, S. W.; Fox, R. L.; Johnson, D. R.; Mulac, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of Project DEEP STEAM is to develop the technology to economically produce heavy oils from deep reservoirs. The tasks included in this project are the development of thermally efficient delivery systems and downhole steam generation systems. During the period January 1-March 31, 1981, effort has continued on a low pressure combustion downhole generator (Rocketdyne), and on two high pressure designs (Foster-Miller Associates, Sandia National Laboratories). The Sandia design was prepared for deployment in the Wilmington Field at Long Beach, California. Progress continued on the Min-Stress II packer concept at L'Garde, Inc., and on the extruded metal packer at Foster-Miller. Initial bare string field data are reported on the insulated tubular test at Lloydminster, Saskatchewan, Canada.

  17. Deep gluteal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Hal David; Reddy, Manoj; Gómez-Hoyos, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Deep gluteal syndrome describes the presence of pain in the buttock caused from non-discogenic and extrapelvic entrapment of the sciatic nerve. Several structures can be involved in sciatic nerve entrapment within the gluteal space. A comprehensive history and physical examination can orientate the specific site where the sciatic nerve is entrapped, as well as several radiological signs that support the suspected diagnosis. Failure to identify the cause of pain in a timely manner can increase pain perception, and affect mental control, patient hope and consequently quality of life. This review presents a comprehensive approach to the patient with deep gluteal syndrome in order to improve the understanding of posterior hip anatomy, nerve kinematics, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, differential diagnosis and treatment considerations. PMID:27011826

  18. Deep depth undex simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, R. R.; Malakhoff, A.

    1985-01-29

    A deep depth underwater simulator is illustrated for determining the dual effects of nuclear type underwater explosion shockwaves and hydrostatic pressures on a test vessel while simulating, hydrostatically, that the test vessel is located at deep depths. The test vessel is positioned within a specially designed pressure vessel followed by pressurizing a fluid contained between the test and pressure vessels. The pressure vessel, with the test vessel suspended therein, is then placed in a body of water at a relatively shallow depth, and an explosive charge is detonated at a predetermined distance from the pressure vessel. The resulting shockwave is transmitted through the pressure vessel wall so that the shockwave impinging on the test vessel is representative of nuclear type explosive shockwaves transmitted to an underwater structure at great depths.

  19. Canberra Deep Dish Communications Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    View of Canberra 70m (230 ft.) antenna with flags from the three Deep Space Network sites. The Canberra Deep Space Communications Complex, located outside Canberra, Australia, is one of the three complexes which comprise NASA's Deep Space Network. The other complexes are located in Goldstone, California, and Madrid, Spain.

  20. Deep-Sarsa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrecut, M.; Ali, M. K.

    In this paper we discuss the application of reinforcement learning algorithms to the problem of autonomous robot navigation. We show that the autonomous navigation using the standard delayed reinforcement learning algorithms is an ill posed problem and we present a more efficient algorithm for which the convergence speed is greatly improved. The proposed algorithm (Deep-Sarsa) is based on a combination between the Depth-First Search (a graph searching algorithm) and Sarsa (a delayed reinforcement learning algorithm).

  1. Understanding deep convolutional networks.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Stéphane

    2016-04-13

    Deep convolutional networks provide state-of-the-art classifications and regressions results over many high-dimensional problems. We review their architecture, which scatters data with a cascade of linear filter weights and nonlinearities. A mathematical framework is introduced to analyse their properties. Computations of invariants involve multiscale contractions with wavelets, the linearization of hierarchical symmetries and sparse separations. Applications are discussed. PMID:26953183

  2. Project DEEP STEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. W.

    Development of technology for thermally efficient downhole delivery of surface generated steam and for downhole steam generators are the major elements of Project DEEP STEAM. Specific activities include development of advanced concept thermal packers, evaluation of the thermal performance of insulated tubing designs in a test tower and in a field environment, and development of downhole steam generator concepts. Field tests were performed in both technology areas and the results and status are presented.

  3. Project DEEP STEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Development of technology for thermally efficient downhole delivery of surface-generated steam and for downhole steam generators are the major elements of Project DEEP STEAM. Specific activities include development of advanced concept thermal packers, evaluation of the thermal performance of insulated tubing designs in a test tower and in a field environment, and development of downhole steam generator concepts. Field tests have been performed in both technology areas and the results and status are presented.

  4. Fast rise times and the physical mechanism of deep earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, H.; Williams, Q.

    1991-01-01

    A systematic global survey of the rise times and stress drops of deep and intermediate earthquakes is reported. When the rise times are scaled to the seismic moment release of the events, their average is nearly twice as fast for events deeper than about 450 km as for shallower events.

  5. Student Deep Learning in Bachelor English Programs within Pakistani Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tahir, Khazima

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contrast undergraduate students' descriptions about transformational teaching practices, and student deep learning in bachelor English programs in selected universities within Pakistan. This study utilized a survey to gather responses from five hundred and twenty three students. A paired sample t test was utilized…

  6. The Experience of Deep Learning by Accounting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Martin; Baskerville, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This study examines how to support accounting students to experience deep learning. A sample of 81 students in a third-year undergraduate accounting course was studied employing a phenomenographic research approach, using ten assessed learning tasks for each student (as well as a focus group and student surveys) to measure their experience of how…

  7. Neural network based satellite tracking for deep space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amoozegar, F.; Ruggier, C.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a survey of neural network trends as applied to the tracking of spacecrafts in deep space at Ka-band under various weather conditions and examine the trade-off between tracing accuracy and communication link performance.

  8. "Suntelligence" Survey

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the American Academy of Dermatology's "Suntelligence" sun-smart survey. Please answer the following questions to measure ... be able to view a ranking of major cities suntelligence based on residents' responses to this survey. ...

  9. Imagining Deep Time (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talasek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Imagining Deep Time '...the mind seemed to grow giddy by looking so far into the abyss of time.' John Playfair (1748 -1819), scientist and mathematician "Man cannot afford to conceive of nature and exclude himself." Emmit Gowin, photographer 'A person would have to take themselves out of the human context to begin to think in terms of geologic time. They would have to think like a rock.' Terry Falke, photographer The term Deep Time refers to the vastness of the geological time scale. First conceived in the 18th century, the development of this perspective on time has been pieced together like a jigsaw puzzle of information and observations drawn from the study of the earth's structure and discovered fossilized flora and fauna. Deep time may possibly be the greatest contribution made by the discipline of geology forever impacting our perception of earth and our relationship to it. How do we grasp such vast concepts as deep time which relates to the origins of the earth or cosmic time which relates to the origins of the universe - concepts that exist far beyond the realm of human experience? Further more how do we communicate this? The ability to visualize is a powerful tool of discovery and communication for the scientist and it is part and parcel of the work of visual artists. The scientific process provides evidence yet it is imagination on the part of the scientists and artists alike that is needed to interpret that information. This exhibition represents an area where both rational and intuitive thinking come together to explore this question of how we relate to the vastness of time. The answer suggested by the combination of art work assembled here suggests that we do so through a combination of visual metaphors (cycles, circles, arrows, trajectories) and visual evidence (rock formations, strata, fossils of fauna and flora) while being mediated through various technologies. One provides factual and empirical evidence while the other provides a way of grasping

  10. Survey Says

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    Survey Says is a lesson plan designed to teach college students how to access Internet resources for valid data related to the sexual health of young people. Discussion questions based on the most recent available data from two national surveys, the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance-United States, 2003 (CDC, 2004) and the National Survey of…

  11. Theory Survey or Survey Theory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Jodi

    2010-01-01

    Matthew Moore's survey of political theorists in U.S. American colleges and universities is an impressive contribution to political science (Moore 2010). It is the first such survey of political theory as a subfield, the response rate is very high, and the answers to the survey questions provide new information about how political theorists look…

  12. Deep Space Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Andrew T. (Inventor); Riedel, Joseph E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single, compact, lower power deep space positioning system (DPS) configured to determine a location of a spacecraft anywhere in the solar system, and provide state information relative to Earth, Sun, or any remote object. For example, the DPS includes a first camera and, possibly, a second camera configured to capture a plurality of navigation images to determine a state of a spacecraft in a solar system. The second camera is located behind, or adjacent to, a secondary reflector of a first camera in a body of a telescope.

  13. Deep shadow occulter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for occulting light. The occulter shape suppresses diffraction at any given size or angle and is practical to build because it can be made binary to avoid scatter. Binary structures may be fully opaque or fully transmitting at specific points. The diffraction suppression is spectrally broad so that it may be used with incoherent white light. An occulter may also include substantially opaque inner portion and an at least partially transparent outer portion. Such occulters may be used on the ground to create a deep shadow in a short distance, or may be used in space to suppress starlight and reveal exoplanets.

  14. Obscured accretion from AGN surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignali, Cristian

    2014-07-01

    Recent models of super-massive black hole (SMBH) and host galaxy joint evolution predict the presence of a key phase where accretion, traced by obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) emission, is coupled with powerful star formation. Then feedback processes likely self-regulate the SMBH growth and quench the star-formation activity. AGN in this important evolutionary phase have been revealed in the last decade via surveys at different wavelengths. On the one hand, moderate-to-deep X-ray surveys have allowed a systematic search for heavily obscured AGN, up to very high redshifts (z~5). On the other hand, infrared/optical surveys have been invaluable in offering complementary methods to select obscured AGN also in cases where the nuclear X-ray emission below 10 keV is largely hidden to our view. In this review I will present my personal perspective of the field of obscured accretion from AGN surveys.

  15. The First Pan-Starrs Medium Deep Field Variable Star Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather

    2013-01-01

    We present the first Pan-Starrs 1 Medium Deep Field Variable Star Catalog (PS1-MDF-VSC). The Pan-Starrs 1 (PS1) telescope is a 1.8 meter survey telescope with a 1.4 Gigapixel camera, and is located in Haleakala, Hawaii. The Medium Deep survey, which consists of 10 fields located uniformly across the sky, totalling 70 square degrees, is observed each night, in 2-3 filters per field, with 8 exposures per filter. We have located and classified several hundred periodic variable stars within the Medium Deep fields, and we present the first catalog listing the properties of these variable stars.

  16. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Edouard E. Exline, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Edouard E. Exline, Photographer September 22, 1935 DETAIL OF BUCKET. - Pounding Mill, Pioneer Museum, Route 441 (moved from Deep Creek), Cherokee, Swain County, NC

  17. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Edouard E. Exline, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Edouard E. Exline, Photographer September 22, 1935 DETAIL OF ROCKER. - Pounding Mill, Pioneer Museum, Route 441 (moved from Deep Creek), Cherokee, Swain County, NC

  18. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Edouard E. Exline, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Edouard E. Exline, Photographer September 22, 1935 GENERAL VIEW PESTLE IN LOWERED POSITION. - Pounding Mill, Pioneer Museum, Route 441 (moved from Deep Creek), Cherokee, Swain County, NC

  19. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Edouard E. Exline, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Edouard E. Exline, Photographer September 22, 1935 GENERAL VIEW, PESTLE IN RAISED POSITION. - Pounding Mill, Pioneer Museum, Route 441 (moved from Deep Creek), Cherokee, Swain County, NC

  20. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Edouard E. Exline, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Edouard E. Exline, Photographer September 22, 1935 DETAIL OF PESTLE AND MORTAR. - Pounding Mill, Pioneer Museum, Route 441 (moved from Deep Creek), Cherokee, Swain County, NC

  1. The UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS): Origins and Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Andy

    UKIDSS is now roughly half finished, covering several thousand square degrees, and expected to complete by the middle of 2012. So far 13.5 billion rows of data have been downloaded by several hundred users, resulting in 154 publications concerning high-z quasars, the nearest and coolest brown dwarfs, the evolution of galaxies, the sub-stellar mass function, and many other topics. I summarise the origins and status of UKIDSS, and briefly describe some scientific highlights.

  2. Deep learning for image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoppin, Ryan; Rizki, Mateen

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of deep learning and introduces the several subfields of deep learning including a specific tutorial of convolutional neural networks. Traditional methods for learning image features are compared to deep learning techniques. In addition, we present our preliminary classification results, our basic implementation of a convolutional restricted Boltzmann machine on the Mixed National Institute of Standards and Technology database (MNIST), and we explain how to use deep learning networks to assist in our development of a robust gender classification system.

  3. Deep drawing of uranium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R J; Lundberg, M R

    1987-01-19

    A procedure was developed to fabricate uranium forming blanks with high ''draw-ability'' so that cup shapes could be easily and uniformly deep drawn. The overall procedure involved a posttreatment to develop optimum mechanical and structural properties in the deep-drawn cups. The fabrication sequence is casting high-purity logs, pucking cast logs, cross-rolling pucks to forming blanks, annealing and outgassing forming blanks, cold deep drawing to hemispherical shapes, and stress relieving, outgassing, and annealing deep-drawn parts to restore ductility and impart dimensional stability. The fabrication development and the resulting fabrication procedure are discussed in detail. The mechanical properties and microstructural properties are discussed.

  4. Neurological effects of deep diving.

    PubMed

    Grønning, Marit; Aarli, Johan A

    2011-05-15

    Deep diving is defined as diving to depths more than 50 m of seawater (msw), and is mainly used for occupational and military purposes. A deep dive is characterized by the compression phase, the bottom time and the decompression phase. Neurological and neurophysiologic effects are demonstrated in divers during the compression phase and the bottom time. Immediate and transient neurological effects after deep dives have been shown in some divers. However, the results from the epidemiological studies regarding long term neurological effects from deep diving are conflicting and still not conclusive. Prospective clinical studies with sufficient power and sensitivity are needed to solve this very important issue. PMID:21377169

  5. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, George W. Phillips, Photographer GENERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, George W. Phillips, Photographer GENERAL VIEW, PESTLE IN LOWERED POSITION (PHOTOGRAPHED IN ITS ORIGINAL LOCATION ON THE CINDY BAUMGARTNER PLACE, DEEP CREEK, N.C. BEFORE BEING REMOVED TO ITS PRESENT LOCATION). - Pounding Mill, Pioneer Museum, Route 441 (moved from Deep Creek), Cherokee, Swain County, NC

  6. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, George W. Phillips, Photographer GENERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, George W. Phillips, Photographer GENERAL VIEW, PESTLE IN RAISED POSITION (PHOTOGRAPHED IN ITS ORIGINAL LOCATION ON THE CINDY BAUMGARTNER PLACE, DEEP CREEK, N.C. BEFORE BEING REMOVED TO ITS PRESENT LOCATION). - Pounding Mill, Pioneer Museum, Route 441 (moved from Deep Creek), Cherokee, Swain County, NC

  7. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834

  8. Groth Deep Locations Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer photographed this ultraviolet color blowup of the Groth Deep Image on June 22 and June 23, 2003. Hundreds of galaxies are detected in this portion of the image, and the faint red galaxies are believed to be 6 billion light years away. The white boxes show the location of these distant galaxies, of which more than a 100 can be detected in this image. NASA astronomers expect to detect 10,000 such galaxies after extrapolating to the full image at a deeper exposure level.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer mission is led by the California Institute of Technology, which is also responsible for the science operations and data analysis. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., a division of Caltech, manages the mission and built the science instrument. The mission was developed under NASA's Explorers Program, managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The mission's international partners include South Korea and France.

  9. Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Joel S.; Mink, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has provided remarkable benefits for people with a variety of neurologic conditions. Stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus can dramatically relieve tremor associated with essential tremor or Parkinson disease (PD). Similarly, stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or the internal segment of the globus pallidus can substantially reduce bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and gait difficulties in people with PD. Multiple groups are attempting to extend this mode of treatment to other conditions. Yet, the precise mechanism of action of DBS remains uncertain. Such studies have importance that extends beyond clinical therapeutics. Investigations of the mechanisms of action of DBS have the potential to clarify fundamental issues such as the functional anatomy of selected brain circuits and the relationship between activity in those circuits and behavior. Although we review relevant clinical issues, we emphasize the importance of current and future investigations on these topics. PMID:16776585

  10. Method of deep drilling

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, Stirling A.

    1984-01-01

    Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

  11. Neptune's deep atmosphere revealed

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I. ); Atreya, S.K. ); Romani, P.N.

    1989-08-01

    The brightness temperature of Uranus at 20 cm is 260 {plus minus} 10K, while for Neptune it is 318 {plus minus} 16K. Since NH{sub 3} is the dominant absorber at this wavelength the authors have modeled the microwave spectra of Neptune based upon an assumed deep gaseous mixing ratio of NH{sub 3} and subsequent loss into clouds. The difference between the two brightness temperatures implies that the NH{sub 3} mixing ratio below the level of cloud formation on Neptune compared to Uranus is lower by nearly 2 order of magnitude. An alternative explanation is that the 20 cm radiation from Neptune is a combination of thermal plus synchrotron emission as proposed by de Pater and Goertz (1989).

  12. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  13. Redshift surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    Present-day understanding of the large-scale galaxy distribution is reviewed. The statistics of the CfA redshift survey are briefly discussed. The need for deeper surveys to clarify the issues raised by recent studies of large-scale galactic distribution is addressed.

  14. SURVEY INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, C J

    1954-01-19

    This pulse-type survey instrument is suitable for readily detecting {alpha} particles in the presence of high {beta} and {gamma} backgrounds. The instruments may also be used to survey for neutrons, {beta} particles and {gamma} rays by employing suitably designed interchangeable probes and selecting an operating potential to correspond to the particular probe.

  15. A Deep Imaging Survey of NGC 6475 and a Deep Survey of the Young Open Cluster Alpha Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John R.

    1997-01-01

    We have published three papers directly related to the x-ray data (see below), and one other paper directly related to the optical photometry obtained in connection to the ROSAT data analysis (also listed below). In addition, we have used the x-ray data in combination with the optical photometry and with high resolution optical spectra that we have obtained (to derive spectroscopic rotational velocities) to address questions related to the dependence of coronal activity on the rotation rate, mass, and other characteristics of the target stars. The overall goal of our ROSAT projects has been to determine the time evolution of coronal activity in low mass stars, and from that behavior place constraints on the physical processes involved in generating coronal activity. NGC 6475 and Alpha Persei are important parts of that process. We are now beginning to address how these data constrain theoretical models of angular momentum evolution and dynamo magnetic field generation (see paper by Stauffer et al. and Krishnamurthi et al. listed below in the "related papers" section). We are still working on two papers pertaining to this grant (rotational velocities and chromospheric activity of Alpha Persei x-ray sources and rotational velocities and lithium abundances of NGC 6475 sources), but we will publish those papers using funds from other grants.

  16. The NASA SETI sky survey - Recent developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Michael J.; Gulkis, Samuel; Olsen, Edward T.; Renzetti, Nicholas A.

    1988-01-01

    NASA's Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project utilizes two complimentary search strategies: a sky survey and a targeted search. The SETI team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory have primary responsibility to develop and carry out the sky survey part of the Microwave Observing Project. The paper describes progress that has been made to develop the major elements of the survey including a two-million channel wideband spectrum analyzer system that is being developed and constructed by JPL for the Deep Space Network. The new system will be a multiuser instrument that will serve as a prototype for the SETI Sky Survey processor. This system will be used to test the signal detection and observational strategies on deep-space network antennas in the near future.

  17. The NASA SETI sky survey - Recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Michael J.; Gulkis, Samuel; Olsen, Edward T.; Renzetti, Nicholas A.

    1988-10-01

    NASA's Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project utilizes two complimentary search strategies: a sky survey and a targeted search. The SETI team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory have primary responsibility to develop and carry out the sky survey part of the Microwave Observing Project. The paper describes progress that has been made to develop the major elements of the survey including a two-million channel wideband spectrum analyzer system that is being developed and constructed by JPL for the Deep Space Network. The new system will be a multiuser instrument that will serve as a prototype for the SETI Sky Survey processor. This system will be used to test the signal detection and observational strategies on deep-space network antennas in the near future.

  18. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  19. Deep Ecology: Beyond Mere Environmentalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Suzanne

    1994-01-01

    Outlines the principles of deep ecology, a movement that questions the societal values that have resulted in damage to the earth's life-supporting biosphere. In contrast to shallow reform, deep ecology encourages individuals to examine their values and relationship to nature to address the environmental crisis. (LP)

  20. Context and Deep Learning Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Tom; Ravenscroft, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Conceptual clarification is essential if we are to establish a stable and deep discipline of technology enhanced learning. The technology is alluring; this can distract from deep design in a surface rush to exploit the affordances of the new technology. We need a basis for design, and a conceptual unit of organization, that are applicable across…

  1. Deep space network energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesema, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    If the Deep Space Network is to exist in a cost effective and reliable manner in the next decade, the problems presented by international energy cost increases and energy availability must be addressed. The Deep Space Network Energy Program was established to implement solutions compatible with the ongoing development of the total network.

  2. Deep sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, N.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical cycle of sulfur in near-surface reservoirs has been a subject of intense studies for decades. It has been shown that sulfur isotopic compositions of sedimentary sulfides and sulfates record interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere, with δ34S of sedimentary sulfides continuously decreasing from 0‰ toward present-day values of ~-30 to -40‰ over the Phanerozoic (e.g., Canfield, 2004). It has also been shown that microbial reduction of the present-day seawater sulfate (δ34S=+21‰) results in large shifts in isotopic compositions of secondary pyrites in altered oceanic crust (to δ34S=-70‰: Rouxel et al., 2009). How much of these near surface isotopic variations survive during deep geochemical cycle of sulfur interacting with the mantle infinite reservoir with δ34S=0‰? Could extent of their survival be used as a tracer of processes and dynamics involved in deep geochemical cycle? As a first step toward answering these questions, δ34S was determined in-situ using a Cameca IMS 1280 ion microprobe at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in materials representing various domains of deep geochemical cycle. They include pyrites in altered MORB as potential subducting materials and pyrites in UHP eclogites as samples that have experienced subduction zone processes, and mantle-derived melts are represented by olivine-hosted melt inclusions in MORB and those in IAB, and undegassed submarine OIB glasses. Salient features of the results include: (1) pyrites in altered MORB (with O. Rouxel; from ODP site 801 and ODP Hole 1301B) range from -70 to +19‰, (2) pyrites in UHP eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region, Norway (with B. Hacker and A. Kylander-Clark) show a limited overall range from -3.4 to + 2.8‰ among five samples, with one of them covering almost the entire range, indicating limited scale lengths of isotopic equilibration during subduction, (3) olivine-hosted melt inclusions in arc basalts from Galunggung (-2

  3. A Deep Look at the Fornax Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, dense cluster centers are cannibalistic environments, with larger galaxies stripping stars from smaller interlopers in minor mergers and dynamical harassment. A recent survey of the Fornax cluster, one example of such an environment, reveals how this cluster may have been built.Clues in HalosContext for the southern constellation Fornax (the furnace). The Fornax cluster is marked with a red circle. [ESO, IAU and Sky Telescope]Deep surveys of dense cluster environments are necessary because the imprint of mass assembly is hidden in galactic halos, the faint outer regions of galaxies. Deep observations can reveal answers to questions about how the galaxies in these extreme environments formed and evolved for instance, did the majority of the galaxies stars form in situ, or were they accreted from interactions with other galaxies?The Fornax Deep Survey (FDS) is just such a campaign. FDS uses the European Southern Observatorys VLT Survey Telescope to obtain deep photometry of the entire 26 square degrees of the Fornax cluster, a spectacular galaxy cluster located 65 million light-years away.Central ObservationsThe FDS team plans to release the full results from the survey soon. For now, in an initial study led by Enrichetta Iodice (INAFs Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte, Italy), the team presents their first findings from the two square degrees around NGC 1399, a supergiant elliptical galaxy in the cluster center.The two main results from this study are:The discovery of a faint stellar bridge between NGC 1399 and a nearby galaxy, NGC 1387.The characterization of NGC 1399s light profile, which shows that the galaxy consists of two main components separated by a strong break. The bright central galaxy is likely composed of stars that formed in situ, whereas the exponential outer component is a stellar halo composed of stars likely captured from accretion events.What do these points tell us about the history of the center of the Fornax cluster? These

  4. RESOLVE and ECO: Survey Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; Berlind, Andreas A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Norman, Dara J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey is a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass as well as star formation and galaxy interactions within >50,000 cubic Mpc of the nearby cosmic web, reaching down to dwarf galaxies of baryonic mass ~10^9 Msun and spanning multiple large-scale filaments, walls, and voids. RESOLVE is surrounded by the ~10x larger Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog, with matched custom photometry and environment metrics enabling analysis of cosmic variance with greater statistical power. For the ~1500 galaxies in its two equatorial footprints, RESOLVE goes beyond ECO in providing (i) deep 21cm data with adaptive sensitivity ensuring HI mass detections or upper limits <10% of the stellar mass and (ii) 3D optical spectroscopy including both high-resolution ionized gas or stellar kinematic data for each galaxy and broad 320-725nm spectroscopy spanning [OII] 3727, Halpha, and Hbeta. RESOLVE is designed to complement other radio and optical surveys in providing diverse, contiguous, and uniform local/global environment data as well as unusually high completeness extending into the gas-dominated dwarf galaxy regime. RESOLVE also offers superb reprocessed photometry including full, deep NUV coverage and synergy with other equatorial surveys as well as unique northern and southern facilities such as Arecibo, the GBT, and ALMA. The RESOLVE and ECO surveys have been supported by funding from NSF grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614.

  5. The Porcupine Survey: A Distributed Survey and WISE Followup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Mainzer, A. K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Cohen, M.

    2007-10-01

    Spitzer post-cryogen observations to perform a moderate depth survey distributed around the sky are proposed. Field centers are chosen to be WISE brown dwarf candidates, which will typically be 160 μJy at 4.7 μm and randomly distributed around the sky. The Spitzer observations will give much higher sensitivity, higher angular resolution, and a time baseline to measure both proper motions and possibly parallaxes. The distance and velocity data obtained on the WISE brown dwarf candidates will greatly improve our knowledge of the mass and age distribution of brown dwarfs. The outer parts of the Spitzer fields surrounding the WISE positions will provide a deep survey in many narrow fields of view distributed around the sky, and the volume of this survey will contain many more distant brown dwarfs, and many extragalactic objects.

  6. Deep inelastic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nucleon structure as seen in the context of deep inelastic scattering is discussed. The lectures begin with consideration of the quark-parton model. The model forms the basis of understanding lepton-nucleon inelastic scattering. As improved data in lepton-nucleon scattering at high energies became available, the quark-parton model failed to explain some crucial features of these data. At approximately the same time a candidate theory of strong interactions based on a SU(3) gauge theory of color was being discussed in the literature, and new ideas on the explanation of inelastic scattering data became popular. A new theory of strong interactions, now called quantum chromodynamics provides a new framework for understanding the data, with a much stronger theoretical foundation, and seems to explain well the features of the data. The lectures conclude with a look at some recent experiments which provide new data at very high energies. These lectures are concerned primarily with charged lepton inelastic scattering and to a lesser extent with neutrino results. Furthermore, due to time and space limitations, topics such as final state hadron studies, and multi-muon production are omitted here. The lectures concentrate on the more central issues: the quark-parton model and concepts of scaling, scale breaking and the ideas of quantum chromodynamics, the Q/sup 2/ dependence of structure function, moments, and the important parameter R.

  7. Deep mine cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Conan, J.

    1984-11-06

    A deep mine cooling system comprising a compressor supplied with air and rotatively driven by a motor and an expansion turbine supplied with compressed air from said compressor and driving an actuating unit, wherein the compressed air, after leaving the compressor but prior to reaching the expansion turbine, passes through a steam generator whose output provides the energy required to operate an absorption refrigeration machine used to cool utility water for mining, said compressed air on leaving the steam generator going to a first heat exchanger in which it yields calories to a water circuit comprising a second heat exchanger, said second heat exchanger giving off the calories absorbed by the water in the first heat exchanger to the air fed by the second heat exchanger to a drying cell that is regenerated by said air from the second heat exchanger, said drying cell being part of a set of two cells working in alternation, the other cell in the set receiving the compressed air from the first heat exchanger, such that the compressed air is fed to said expansion turbine after leaving said drying unit, and wherein the air exhausted from said expansion turbine is sent to a third heat exchanger after which it is distributed according to the needs of the mine, said third exchanger being traversed by the water collected in the mine, cooled in said exchanger and circulated upon leaving said exchanger to meet the cool water requirements of the mine.

  8. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  9. DEEP-South: Network Construction, Test Runs and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Myung-Jin; Yim, Hong-Suh; Choi, Young-Jun; Bae, Young-Ho; Roh, Dong-Goo; Park, Jintae; Moon, Bora

    2016-01-01

    Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) which consists of three identical 1.6 m wide-field telescopes with 18k × 18k CCDs, is the first optical survey system of its kind. The combination of fast optics and the mosaic CCD delivers seeing limited images over a 4 square degrees field of view. The main science goal of KMTNet is the discovery and characterization of exoplanets, yet it also offers various other science applications including DEep Ecliptic Patrol of SOUTHern sky (DEEP-South). The aim of DEEP-South is to discover and characterize asteroids and comets, including Near Earth Objects (NEOs). We started test runs last February after commissioning, and will return to normal operations in October 2015. A summary of early results from the test runs will be presented.

  10. Surveying System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Sunrise Geodetic Surveys are setting up their equipment for a town survey. Their equipment differs from conventional surveying systems that employ transit rod and chain to measure angles and distances. They are using ISTAC Inc.'s Model 2002 positioning system, which offers fast accurate surveying with exceptional signals from orbiting satellites. The special utility of the ISTAC Model 2002 is that it can provide positioning of the highest accuracy from Navstar PPS signals because it requires no knowledge of secret codes. It operates by comparing the frequency and time phase of a Navstar signal arriving at one ISTAC receiver with the reception of the same set of signals by another receiver. Data is computer processed and translated into three dimensional position data - latitude, longitude and elevation.

  11. X-ray Properties of Deep Radio-Selected Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the research supported by the ADP grant entitled 'X-ray Properties of Deep Radio-Selected Quasars'. The primary effort consisted of correlating the ROSAT All-Sky Survey catalog with the April 1997 release of the FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters) radio catalog. We found that a matching radius of 60 sec excluded most false matches while retaining most of the true radio-X-ray sources. The correlation of the approx. 80,000 source RASS and approx. 268,000 FIRST catalogs matched 2,588 FIRST sources with 1,649 RASS sources out of a possible 5,520 RASS sources residing in the FIRST survey area. This number is much higher than expected from our previous experience of correlating the RASS with radio surveys and indicates we detected new classes of objects not seen in the correlations with less sensitive radio surveys.

  12. Microbial Life in the Deep Subsurface: Deep, Hot and Radioactive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeStefano, Andrea L.; Ford, Jill C.; Winsor, Seana K.; Allen, Carlton C.; Miller, Judith; McNamara, Karen M.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies, motivated in part by the search for extraterrestrial life, continue to expand the recognized limits of Earth's biosphere. This work explored evidence for life a high-temperature, radioactive environment in the deep subsurface.

  13. Viral infections as controlling factors for the deep biosphere? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, B.; Engelhardt, T.; Sahlberg, M.; Cypionka, H.

    2009-12-01

    The marine deep biosphere represents the largest biotope on Earth. Throughout the last years, we have obtained interesting insights into its microbial community composition. However, one component that was completely overlooked so far is the viral inventory of deep-subsurface sediments. While viral infections were identified to have a major impact on the benthic microflora of deep-sea surface sediments (Danavaro et al. 2008), no studies were performed on deep-biosphere samples, so far. As grazers probably play only a minor role in anoxic and highly compressed deep sediments, viruses might be the main “predators” for indigenous microorganisms. Furthermore, the release of cell components, called “the viral shunt”, could have a major impact on the deep biosphere in providing labile organic compounds to non-infected microorganisms in these generally nutrient depleted sediments. However, direct counting of viruses in sediments is highly challenging due to the small size of viruses and the high background of small particles. Even molecular surveys using “universal” PCR primers that target phage-specific genes fail due to the vast phage diversity. One solution for this problem is the lysogenic viral life cycle as many bacteriophages integrate their DNA into the host genome. It is estimated that up to 70% of cultivated bacteria contain prophages within their genome. Therefore, culture collections (Batzke et al. 2007) represent an archive of the viral composition within the respective habitat. These prophages can be induced to become free phage particles in stimulation experiments in which the host cells are set under certain stress situations such as a treatment with UV exposure or DNA-damaging antibiotics. The study of the viral component within the deep biosphere offers to answer the following questions: To which extent are deep-biosphere populations controlled by viral infections? What is the inter- and intra-specific diversity and the host-specific viral

  14. Deep Learning in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Gawehn, Erik; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks had their first heyday in molecular informatics and drug discovery approximately two decades ago. Currently, we are witnessing renewed interest in adapting advanced neural network architectures for pharmaceutical research by borrowing from the field of "deep learning". Compared with some of the other life sciences, their application in drug discovery is still limited. Here, we provide an overview of this emerging field of molecular informatics, present the basic concepts of prominent deep learning methods and offer motivation to explore these techniques for their usefulness in computer-assisted drug discovery and design. We specifically emphasize deep neural networks, restricted Boltzmann machine networks and convolutional networks. PMID:27491648

  15. Jack Dymond's Deep Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, R. E.; Delaney, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Most people do not know that Jack Dymond was a major influence on several aspects of current deep-sea research. Along with Margaret Leinen and Jack, we were part of the first Alvin dive program on the Endeavour hydrothermal field in 1984. Jack was working with Rick, on a sediment-trap study of the overall carbon fluxes in the vicinity of the Endeavour hydrothermal systems in an effort to address a question that Cindy Lee had posed about the overall carbon production from hydrothermal vents. At the time we were recognizing and naming many of the 20- to 40-meter-high sulfide structures in the Endeavour field (Hulk, Grotto, Dante, Dudley, Bastille), Jack commented that it was a shame that the world could not see these magnificent edifices or watch endlessly awesome black smokers. His feeling was that some vent sites should be converted to National Parks to preserve them from invasion by enthusiastic scientists, yet he clearly had the vision that the public should be given a sense of the grandeur involved locally, as well as the vastness of the 70,000-km ridge-crest system running through every ocean. Within a year we started talking about the RIDGE Program, and Jack was an early and enthusiastic participant in the design and development of RIDGE. Jack was among the first to encourage multi-disciplinary research at the hydrothermal vent sites. Recognizing that deep currents are important to vent processes, he urged physical oceanographers to work with the chemists, biologists, and geologists and was personally responsible for Rick becoming interested in studying vents. We, the co-authors of this abstract, became close friends as a result of having been introduced to each other by Jack. Several years ago, we co-authored the first paper ever written on the possible influence of hydrothermal activity on the circulation of the Europan Ocean, a paper that we here dedicate to the memory of Jack. Finally, it was in part because of Jack's conviction that the world should know

  16. Deep UV LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Schowalter, Leo

    2014-06-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) photons interact strongly with a broad range of chemical and biological molecules; compact DUV light sources could enable a wide range of applications in chemi/bio-sensing, sterilization, agriculture, and industrial curing. The much shorter wavelength also results in useful characteristics related to optical diffraction (for lithography) and scattering (non-line-of-sight communication). The family of III-N (AlGaInN) compound semiconductors offers a tunable energy gap from infrared to DUV. While InGaN-based blue light emitters have been the primary focus for the obvious application of solid state lighting, there is a growing interest in the development of efficient UV and DUV light-emitting devices. In the past few years we have witnessed an increasing investment from both government and industry sectors to further the state of DUV light-emitting devices. The contributions in Semiconductor Science and Technology 's special issue on DUV devices provide an up-to-date snapshot covering many relevant topics in this field. Given the expected importance of bulk AlN substrate in DUV technology, we are pleased to include a review article by Hartmann et al on the growth of AlN bulk crystal by physical vapour transport. The issue of polarization field within the deep ultraviolet LEDs is examined in the article by Braut et al. Several commercial companies provide useful updates in their development of DUV emitters, including Nichia (Fujioka et al ), Nitride Semiconductors (Muramoto et al ) and Sensor Electronic Technology (Shatalov et al ). We believe these articles will provide an excellent overview of the state of technology. The growth of AlGaN heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy, in contrast to the common organo-metallic vapour phase epitaxy, is discussed by Ivanov et al. Since hexagonal boron nitride (BN) has received much attention as both a UV and a two-dimensional electronic material, we believe it serves readers well to include the

  17. Lunar deep drill apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Proposed as a baseline configuration, this rotary drill apparatus is designed to produce 100-mm diameter holes in the lunar surface at depths up to 50 meters. The drill is intended to acquire samples for scientific analysis, mineral resource location, calibration of electronic exploration devices, and foundation analysis at construction sites. It is also intended to prepare holes for emplacement of scientific instruments, the setting of structural anchors, and explosive methods in excavation and mining activities. Defined as a deep drill because of the modular drill string, it incorporates an automatic rod changer. The apparatus is teleoperated from a remote location, such as earth, utilizing supervisory control techniques. It is thus suitable for unmanned and man-tended operation. Proven terrestrial drilling technology is used to the extent it is compatible with the lunar environment. Augers and drive tubes form holes in the regolith and may be used to acquire loose samples. An inertial cutting removal system operates intermittently while rock core drilling is in progress. The apparatus is carried to the work site by a three-legged mobile platform which also provides a 2-meter feed along the hole centerline, an off-hole movement of approximately .5 meters, an angular alignment of up to 20 deg. from gravity vertical, and other dexterity required in handling rods and samples. The technology can also be applied using other carriers which incorporate similar motion capabilities. The apparatus also includes storage racks for augers, rods, and ancillary devices such as the foot-plate that holds the down-hole tooling during rod changing operations.

  18. Quasars Candidates in the Hubble Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, A.; Kennefick, J. D.; Martini, P. L.; Omser, P. S.

    1996-12-01

    The Hubble Deep Field gives us an unprecedented view of our universe and an opportunity to study a wide range of questions in galaxy evolution and cosmology. Here, we will focus on the search for faint quasars and AGN in the crude combined images using a multicolor imaging analysis that has proven very successful in recent years. To produce a catalog of objects in the field, we used the FOCAS package for object detection with particular care to the set of input parameters used to minimize spurious detections. For each detected source we measured aperture magnitudes in several different apertures using the IRAF PHOT routine. For object classification we have chosen not to use the built in FOCAS routines, instead we have developed classification schemes that closely resemble those of Flynn at al. (1996) to distinguish resolved from unresolved objects in the Hubble Deep Field. We generated synthetic quasar spectra in the range 2.0surveys and extrapolations from current models. Our initial extrapolations, based on the luminosity function of Boyle (1991) and Warren at al. (1994), suggest the Hubble Deep Field may contain of order 10 quasars.

  19. The Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS): Survey Definition and Goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauduit, J.-C.; Lacy, M.; Farrah, D.; Surace, J. A.; Jarvis, M.; Oliver, S.; Maraston, C.; Vaccari, M.; Marchetti, L.; Zeimann, G.; Gonzáles-Solares, E. A.; Pforr, J.; Petric, A. O.; Henriques, B.; Thomas, P. A.; Afonso, J.; Rettura, A.; Wilson, G.; Falder, J. T.; Geach, J. E.; Huynh, M.; Norris, R. P.; Seymour, N.; Richards, G. T.; Stanford, S. A.; Alexander, D. M.; Becker, R. H.; Best, P. N.; Bizzocchi, L.; Bonfield, D.; Castro, N.; Cava, A.; Chapman, S.; Christopher, N.; Clements, D. L.; Covone, G.; Dubois, N.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dyke, E.; Edge, A.; Ferguson, H. C.; Foucaud, S.; Franceschini, A.; Gal, R. R.; Grant, J. K.; Grossi, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hickey, S.; Hodge, J. A.; Huang, J.-S.; Ivison, R. J.; Kim, M.; LeFevre, O.; Lehnert, M.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lubin, L. M.; McLure, R. J.; Messias, H.; Martínez-Sansigre, A.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Nielsen, D. M.; Ouchi, M.; Parish, G.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Pierre, M.; Rawlings, S.; Readhead, A.; Ridgway, S. E.; Rigopoulou, D.; Romer, A. K.; Rosebloom, I. G.; Rottgering, H. J. A.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Sajina, A.; Simpson, C. J.; Smail, I.; Squires, G. K.; Stevens, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Trichas, M.; Urrutia, T.; van Kampen, E.; Verma, A.; Xu, C. K.

    2012-07-01

    We present the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS), an 18 deg2 medium-deep survey at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the postcryogenic Spitzer Space Telescope to ≈2 μJy (AB = 23.1) depth of five highly observed astronomical fields (ELAIS-N1, ELAIS-S1, Lockman Hole, Chandra Deep Field South, and XMM-LSS). SERVS is designed to enable the study of galaxy evolution as a function of environment from z ~ 5 to the present day and is the first extragalactic survey that is both large enough and deep enough to put rare objects such as luminous quasars and galaxy clusters at z gsim 1 into their cosmological context. SERVS is designed to overlap with several key surveys at optical, near- through far-infrared, submillimeter, and radio wavelengths to provide an unprecedented view of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies. In this article, we discuss the SERVS survey design, the data processing flow from image reduction and mosaicking to catalogs, and coverage of ancillary data from other surveys in the SERVS fields. We also highlight a variety of early science results from the survey. Since this article was published online on 4 August 2012, corrections have been made. An erratum appears in the October 2012 issue of the journal. The current online version was corrected on 10 October 2012.

  20. Exploration of a deep carbonate hydrogeothermal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hartmann, H.; Thomas, R.; Schulz, R.

    2009-04-01

    Geothermal energy is an increasing part of the worldwide energy supply. Deep aquifers for hydrogeothermal use must have very high porosities to provide a sufficient flow rate. The exploration of these hydrogeothermal reservoirs have to include all information which helps to predict these areas of high porosity and high permeability: lithology, facies, and structural framework. Therefore exploration techniques known from hydrocarbon exploration are used: 2D and 3D seismic surveys, including log data. A constraint is the amount of exploration costs. By which geophysical means it is possible to build a geological model which predicts the petrophysical parameters with a sufficient high possibility? There are three geological provinces in Germany with hydrogeothermal potential: the North German Basin, the Upper Rhine Graben, and the Southern German Molasse Basin. Within the Southern German Molasse Basin the hydrogeothermal aquifer comprises carbonate rocks of the Upper Jurassic which were lowered to a depth of approximately 3500 m. The interpretation of a 3D seismic survey shows the distribution of carbonate facies, structural framework, and karst formation. All three aspects are related among each other: faults can facilitate karst formation especially where reefs had been formed. Seismic attributes were used to enhance the visualization of these geologic features. The result is an overall understanding of geologic processes which formed areas of high porosity. In this way the advantage of 3D seismic surveys is obvious. Mapping of these areas can be done also within 3D seismic surveys. The appropriate choice of the seismic method depends on the exploration stage and the extent of the reservoirs. Elongated reservoirs which may be formed by carbonate solution along faults may be explored by 2D seismic lines to lower the costs of a geothermal project.

  1. The Kilo-Degree Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, J. T. A.; Kuijken, K.; Applegate, D.; Begeman, K.; Belikov, A.; Blake, C.; Bout, J.; Boxhoorn, D.; Buddelmeijer, H.; Buddendiek, A.; Cacciato, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Choi, A.; Cordes, O.; Covone, G.; Dall'Ora, M.; Edge, A.; Erben, T.; Franse, J.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Harnois-Deraps, J.; Helmich, E.; Herbonnet, R.; Heymans, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Hoekstra, H.; Huang, Z.; Irisarri, N.; Joachimi, B.; Köhlinger, F.; Kitching, T.; La Barbera, F.; Lacerda, P.; McFarland, J.; Miller, L.; Nakajima, R.; Napolitano, N. R.; Paolillo, M.; Peacock, J.; Pila-Diez, B.; Puddu, E.; Radovich, M.; Rifatto, A.; Schneider, P.; Schrabback, T.; Sifon, C.; Sikkema, G.; Simon, P.; Sutherland, W.; Tudorica, A.; Valentijn, E.; van der Burg, R.; van Uitert, E.; van Waerbeke, L.; Velander, M.; Kleijn, G. V.; Viola, M.; Vriend, W.-J.

    2013-12-01

    The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS), a 1500-square-degree optical imaging survey with the recently commissioned OmegaCAM wide-field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), is described. KiDS will image two fields in u-,g-,r- and i-bands and, together with the VIKING survey, produce nine-band (u- to K-band) coverage over two fields. For the foreseeable future the KiDS/VIKING combination of superb image quality with wide wavelength coverage will be unique for surveys of its size and depth. The survey has been designed to tackle some of the most fundamental questions of cosmology and galaxy formation of today. The main science driver is mapping the dark matter distribution in the Universe and putting constraints on the expansion of the Universe and the equation of state of dark energy, all through weak gravitational lensing. However, the deep and wide imaging data will facilitate a wide variety of science cases.

  2. The Deep Space Network, volume 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  3. Deep Space 1 (fact sheet)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    Exerting less force than does a single sheet of paper resting in your hand, Deep Space 1's ion propulsion system will slowly, yet continuously accelerate the spacecraft well beyond speeds attainable by conventional chemical propulsion.

  4. Deep Space Telecommunications Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Descriptive and analytical information useful for the optimal design, specification, and performance evaluation of deep space telecommunications systems is presented. Telemetry, tracking, and command systems, receiver design, spacecraft antennas, frequency selection, interference, and modulation techniques are addressed.

  5. A ubiquitous thermoacidophilic archaeon from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reysenbach, A.-L.; Liu, Yajing; Banta, A.B.; Beveridge, T.J.; Kirshtein, J.D.; Schouten, S.; Tivey, M.K.; Von Damm, K. L.; Voytek, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are important in global biogeochemical cycles, providing biological oases at the sea floor that are supported by the thermal and chemical flux from the Earth's interior. As hot, acidic and reduced hydrothermal fluids mix with cold, alkaline and oxygenated sea water, minerals precipitate to form porous sulphide-sulphate deposits. These structures provide microhabitats for a diversity of prokaryotes that exploit the geochemical and physical gradients in this dynamic ecosystem. It has been proposed that fluid pH in the actively venting sulphide structures is generally low (pH < 4.5), yet no extreme thermoacidophile has been isolated from vent deposits. Culture-independent surveys based on ribosomal RNA genes from deep-sea hydrothermal deposits have identified a widespread euryarchaeotal lineage, DHVE2 (deep-sea hydrothermal vent euryarchaeotic 2). Despite the ubiquity and apparent deep-sea endemism of DHVE2, cultivation of this group has been unsuccessful and thus its metabolism remains a mystery. Here we report the isolation and cultivation of a member of the DHVE2 group, which is an obligate thermoacidophilic sulphur- or iron-reducing heterotroph capable of growing from pH 3.3 to 5.8 and between 55 and 75??C. In addition, we demonstrate that this isolate constitutes up to 15% of the archaeal population, providing evidence that thermoacidophiles may be key players in the sulphur and iron cycling at deep-sea vents. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. A ubiquitous thermoacidophilic archaeon from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Liu, Yitai; Banta, Amy B; Beveridge, Terry J; Kirshtein, Julie D; Schouten, Stefan; Tivey, Margaret K; Von Damm, Karen L; Voytek, Mary A

    2006-07-27

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are important in global biogeochemical cycles, providing biological oases at the sea floor that are supported by the thermal and chemical flux from the Earth's interior. As hot, acidic and reduced hydrothermal fluids mix with cold, alkaline and oxygenated sea water, minerals precipitate to form porous sulphide-sulphate deposits. These structures provide microhabitats for a diversity of prokaryotes that exploit the geochemical and physical gradients in this dynamic ecosystem. It has been proposed that fluid pH in the actively venting sulphide structures is generally low (pH < 4.5), yet no extreme thermoacidophile has been isolated from vent deposits. Culture-independent surveys based on ribosomal RNA genes from deep-sea hydrothermal deposits have identified a widespread euryarchaeotal lineage, DHVE2 (deep-sea hydrothermal vent euryarchaeotic 2). Despite the ubiquity and apparent deep-sea endemism of DHVE2, cultivation of this group has been unsuccessful and thus its metabolism remains a mystery. Here we report the isolation and cultivation of a member of the DHVE2 group, which is an obligate thermoacidophilic sulphur- or iron-reducing heterotroph capable of growing from pH 3.3 to 5.8 and between 55 and 75 degrees C. In addition, we demonstrate that this isolate constitutes up to 15% of the archaeal population, providing evidence that thermoacidophiles may be key players in the sulphur and iron cycling at deep-sea vents. PMID:16871216

  7. Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Three 34m (110 ft.) diameter Beam Waveguide antennas located at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex, situated in the Mojave Desert in California. This is one of three complexes which comprise NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). The DSN provides radio communications for all of NASA's interplanetary spacecraft and is also utilized for radio astronomy and radar observations of the solar system and the universe.

  8. Deep Percolation in Devegetated Hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, B. A.; Hinckley, E. S.

    2011-12-01

    Deep percolation has recently been recognized as a critical component in hillslope hydrology studies. In devegetated hillslopes where vegetation is killed and, in some cases, removed, deep percolation may be substantially enhanced beyond pre-disturbance magnitudes. We discuss two examples of devegetated hillslopes where water balance partitioning shifted to favor increased deep percolation fluxes for some hydrologic conditions. The first is the Coos Bay Experimental Catchment in Oregon, USA, where commercial forestry resulted in the complete removal of trees. An intensive field campaign in the 1990's resulted in a long term record of precipitation, discharge, piezometric response, and groundwater levels. Hydrologic response modeling confirms hypotheses from the field-data analysis and points to unresolved questions regarding feedbacks between deep percolation and near-surface hydrologic processes. The second example is the area burned by the Fourmile Canyon Fire in Colorado, USA, where a severe wildland fire removed all vegetation from a north-aspect hillslope in 2010. Precipitation, atmospheric conditions, soil-water content, matric potential, and runoff have been measured since the fire devegetated the site. Subsurface sampling of the vadose zone is accomplished using suction lysimeters to capture total nitrate, ammonium, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Darcian flux calculations of net infiltration from the shallow soil into fractured granodiorite bedrock are used to estimate solute fluxes to a deeper groundwater system. Virtual experiments using numerical models of unsaturated fluid flow and solute transport further elucidate the temporal dynamics of deep percolation and associated solute fluxes during spring snowmelt and frontal rainstorms, which are the major hydrologic drivers of deep percolation in this fire-impacted system. Together, these examples serve to illustrate the critical importance of deep percolation in disturbed landscapes. The

  9. Ultra-deep catalog of X-ray groups in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finoguenov, A.; Tanaka, M.; Cooper, M.; Allevato, V.; Cappelluti, N.; Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Ziparo, F.; Ranalli, P.; Silverman, J.; Brandt, W. N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Mulchaey, J.; Howes, L.; Schmid, C.; Wilman, D.; Comastri, A.; Hasinger, G.; Mainieri, V.; Luo, B.; Tozzi, P.; Rosati, P.; Capak, P.; Popesso, P.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We present the detection, identification and calibration of extended sources in the deepest X-ray dataset to date, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S). Methods: Ultra-deep observations of ECDF-S with Chandra and XMM-Newton enable a search for extended X-ray emission down to an unprecedented flux of 2 × 10-16 ergs s-1 cm-2. By using simulations and comparing them with the Chandra and XMM data, we show that it is feasible to probe extended sources of this flux level, which is 10 000 times fainter than the first X-ray group catalogs of the ROSAT all sky survey. Extensive spectroscopic surveys at the VLT and Magellan have been completed, providing spectroscopic identification of galaxy groups to high redshifts. Furthermore, available HST imaging enables a weak-lensing calibration of the group masses. Results: We present the search for the extended emission on spatial scales of 32'' in both Chandra and XMM data, covering 0.3 square degrees and model the extended emission on scales of arcminutes. We present a catalog of 46 spectroscopically identified groups, reaching a redshift of 1.6. We show that the statistical properties of ECDF-S, such as log N - log S and X-ray luminosity function are broadly consistent with LCDM, with the exception that dn/dz/dΩ test reveals that a redshift range of 0.2 < z < 0.5 in ECDF-S is sparsely populated. The lack of nearby structure, however, makes studies of high-redshift groups particularly easier both in X-rays and lensing, due to a lower level of clustered foreground. We present one and two point statistics of the galaxy groups as well as weak-lensing analysis to show that the detected low-luminosity systems are indeed low-mass systems. We verify the applicability of the scaling relations between the X-ray luminosity and the total mass of the group, derived for the COSMOS survey to lower masses and higher redshifts probed by ECDF-S by means of stacked weak lensing and clustering analysis, constraining any possible

  10. FORT UNION DEEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-09-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback

  11. FORT UNION DEEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-03-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback

  12. Drug Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Wanda E.; And Others

    Results of a survey of student perceptions of drugs and drug use that was conducted at Bowie State College are presented. Studies that have been conducted on college students' use of alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine in the last five years are reviewed, along with additional studies relating to the general population and the following drugs:…

  13. Complexity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

    To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

  14. Making sense of deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Goldman, D; Domschke, K

    2014-10-01

    This review, the first of an occasional series, tries to make sense of the concepts and uses of deep sequencing of polynucleic acids (DNA and RNA). Deep sequencing, synonymous with next-generation sequencing, high-throughput sequencing and massively parallel sequencing, includes whole genome sequencing but is more often and diversely applied to specific parts of the genome captured in different ways, for example the highly expressed portion of the genome known as the exome and portions of the genome that are epigenetically marked either by DNA methylation, the binding of proteins including histones, or that are in different configurations and thus more or less accessible to enzymes that cleave DNA. Deep sequencing of RNA (RNASeq) reverse-transcribed to complementary DNA is invaluable for measuring RNA expression and detecting changes in RNA structure. Important concepts in deep sequencing include the length and depth of sequence reads, mapping and assembly of reads, sequencing error, haplotypes, and the propensity of deep sequencing, as with other types of 'big data', to generate large numbers of errors, requiring monitoring for methodologic biases and strategies for replication and validation. Deep sequencing yields a unique genetic fingerprint that can be used to identify a person, and a trove of predictors of genetic medical diseases. Deep sequencing to identify epigenetic events including changes in DNA methylation and RNA expression can reveal the history and impact of environmental exposures. Because of the power of sequencing to identify and deliver biomedically significant information about a person and their blood relatives, it creates ethical dilemmas and practical challenges in research and clinical care, for example the decision and procedures to report incidental findings that will increasingly and frequently be discovered. PMID:24925306

  15. The XMM Large Scale Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Marguerite

    2005-10-01

    We propose to complete, by an additional 5 deg2, the XMM-LSS Survey region overlying the Spitzer/SWIRE field. This field already has CFHTLS and Integral coverage, and will encompass about 10 deg2. The resulting multi-wavelength medium-depth survey, which complements XMM and Chandra deep surveys, will provide a unique view of large-scale structure over a wide range of redshift, and will show active galaxies in the full range of environments. The complete coverage by optical and IR surveys provides high-quality photometric redshifts, so that cosmological results can quickly be extracted. In the spirit of a Legacy survey, we will make the raw X-ray data immediately public. Multi-band catalogues and images will also be made available on short time scales.

  16. Deep space optical communications experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, P.; Katz, J.; Gagliardi, R.

    1983-01-01

    An optical communications experiment between a deep space vehicle and an earth terminal is under consideration for later in this decade. The experimental link would be incoherent (direct detection) and would employ two-way cooperative pointing. The deep space optical transceiver would ride piggyback on a spacecraft with an independent scientific objective. Thus, this optical transceiver is being designed for minimum spacecraft impact - specifically, low mass and low power. The choices of laser transmitter, coding/modulation scheme, and pointing mechanization are discussed. A representative telemetry link budget is presented.

  17. The Pan-STARRS Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter Chambers, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    The 4 year Pan-STARRS1 Science Mission has now completed and the data will be publicly release by the time of the IAU Assembly. The full data set, including catalogs (100TB database), images (2PB), and metadata, will be available from the STScI MAST archive. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys include: (1) The 3pi Steradian Survey, (2) The Medium Deep survey of 10 PS1 footprints (7 sq deg each) spaced around the sky; (3) A solar system survey of the ecliptic optimized for the discovery of Near Earth Objects, (4) a Stellar Transit Survey in the galactic bulge; and (5) a time domain Survey of M31.The characteristics of the Pan-STARRS Surveys will be presented, including image quality, depth, cadence, and coverage. Science results span most fields of astronomy from Near Earth Objects to cosmology.The 2nd mission, the Pan-STARRS NEO Survey, is currently underway on PS1 and it will be supplemented by PS2 as it becomes fully operational. PS2 is currently undergoing commissioning and is expected to begin full time science observations with an functional capability similar to PS1 by summer of 2015. The status of PS2 and commissioning data from PS2 will be presented along with a full description of the Pan-STARRS NEO Survey. The prospects for future (beyond 2017) wide field surveys in the Northern Hemisphere will also be discussed.The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys have been made possible through contributions of the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Hawaii; the Pan-STARRS Project Office; the Max-Planck Society and its participating institutes: the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching; The Johns Hopkins University; Durham University; the University of Edinburgh; Queen's University Belfast; the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network Incorporated; the National Central University of Taiwan; the Space Telescope Science Institute; the National Aeronautics

  18. The Pan-STARRS Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Kenneth C.; Pan-STARRS Team

    2016-01-01

    The 4 year Pan-STARRS1 Science Mission has now completed and the final data processing and database ingest is underway. We expect to have the public release of the PS1 Survey data at approximately the time of the AAS Meeting. The full data set, including catalogs (150 Terabyte database), images (2 Petabytes), and metadata, will be available from the STScI MASTarchive. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys include: (1) The 3pi Steradian Survey, (2) The Medium Deep survey of 10 PS1 footprints (7 sq deg each) spaced around the sky; (3) A solar system survey of the ecliptic optimized for the discovery of Near Earth Objects, (4) a Stellar Transit Survey in the galactic bulge; and (5) a time domain Survey of M31. The characteristics of the Pan-STARRS1 Surveys will be presented, including image quality, depth, cadence, and coverage. Science results span most fields of astronomy from Near Earth Objects to cosmology. The 2nd mission, the Pan-STARRS NEO Survey, is currently underway on PS1 and it will be supplemented by PS2 observations as PS2 becomes fully operational. We will also report on the status of PS2 and the prospects for future wide field surveys in the Northern Hemisphere. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys have been made possible through contributions of the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Hawaii; the Pan-STARRS Project Office; the Max-Planck Society and its participating institutes: the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching; The Johns Hopkins University; Durham University; the University of Edinburgh; Queen's University Belfast; the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network Incorporated; the National Central University of Taiwan; the Space Telescope Science Institute; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX08AR22G issued through the Planetary Science Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate; the National

  19. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Stefano; Civano, Francesca M.; Elvis, Martin; Urry, C. Megan; Comastri, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The COSMOS field is the only large (2 sq. deg.) field for which complete, deep, panchromatic data exist and which all large telescopes can observe due to its equatorial location. In 2013, the COSMOS survey was greatly extended, thanks to the Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey, the second largest extragalactic Chandra project ever approved. This survey is aimed at studying the formation of the structures in the high redshift Universe and understanding the role active super massive black holes played in their evolution. With 56 overlapping ACIS-I pointings of 50-ksec depth each, the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey uniformly covers the 1.7 sq. deg. COSMOS/HST field to ~160 ksec depth, with a total of 2.8 Ms exposure time. This triples the area of the earlier deep C-COSMOS survey (limiting flux ~3e-16 ergs/cm2/s in the 0.5-2 keV band), and together these two projects cover a total area of 2.2 sq. deg., yielding a sample of ~4200 X-ray sources. We present the survey properties, the procedure adopted to obtain our final catalog and the first scientific highlights, focusing on the high redshift (z>3) sample.

  20. Extragalactic Surveys with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boydstun, Kristen; Ajello, M.; Alexander, D.; Assef, R. J.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Balokovic, M.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Christensen, F.; Civano, F. M.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W.; Del Moro, A.; Elvis, M.; Fiore, F.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F.; Helfand, D. J.; Hickox, R. C.; LaMassa, S. M.; Lansbury, G.; Luo, B.; Madsen, K.; Markwardt, C.; Mullaney, J.; Puccetti, S.; Saez, C.; Stern, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Treister, E.; Urry, C. M.; Walton, D.; Zhang, W.; NuSTAR Science Team

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), launched in June 2012, is opening the high energy X-ray sky for sensitive study for the first time. Soft X-ray telescopes like Chandra and XMM-Newton have peered deep into the X-ray universe at low energies and have resolved much of the X-ray background below a few keV. However, extrapolating such work to higher energies indicates that a significant population of heavily-obscured AGN remain undetected in the soft X-rays, but should be detectable in the hard X-ray band. By focusing X-rays at higher energy, up to 79 keV, NuSTAR will study the X-ray background at its 30 keV peak. The NuSTAR mission baselines three nested extragalactic surveys, a very deep 200 ks), pencil-beam survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDFS) field, a moderate depth 50 ks) survey of the COSMOS field, and a shallow 10 ks) survey of 100 bright Swift/BAT AGN. We discuss plans, predictions and early results of the ECDFS and COSMOS programs. Discussion of the Swift/BAT program is presented in the companion poster by T.-N. Lu.

  1. The Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauduit, Jean-Christophe; Lacy, M.; Farrah, D.; Surace, J.; Jarvis, M.; Oliver, S.; Maraston, C.; SERVS Team

    2012-01-01

    We present details of the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS), an 18 square degrees medium-deep survey at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the post-cryogenic Spitzer Space Telescope to ≈ 2 μJy (AB=23.1) depth of five highly observed astronomical fields (Elais-N1, Elais-S1, Lockman Hole, Chandra-Deep Fied South and XMM). Data will be made available to the community in the Spring of 2012. SERVS is designed to enable the study of galaxy evolution as a function of environment from z ≈ 5 to the present day, and is the first extragalactic survey both large enough and deep enough to put rare objects such as luminous quasars and galaxy clusters at z ≥ 1 into their cosmological context. SERVS is designed to overlap with several key surveys at optical, near- through far-infrared, submillimeter and radio wavelengths to provide a coherent picture of the formation of massive galaxies.

  2. Multiple Surveys of Students and Survey Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.; Weitzer, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews the literature on survey fatigue and summarizes a research project that indicates that administering multiple surveys in one academic year can significantly suppress response rates in later surveys. (Contains 4 tables.)

  3. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

  4. First Scientific Results from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Bejar, V. J.; Lodieu, N.; Rebolo, R.; VHS Collaboration

    2013-12-01

    The first Galactic and extragalactic results from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) are presented. The aim of the VHS is to carry out a near-infrared survey which, when combined with other VISTA public surveys, will result in coverage of the whole southern celestial hemisphere (~20 000 square degrees) to a depth 30 times fainter than the Two Micron All Sky Survey in at least two wavebands (J and Ks). The VHS vision includes a deep optical survey over the same area and this is now being realised with the VST surveys and the Dark Energy Survey, which has recently started. A summary of the survey progress is presented, with some follow-up results on low-mass stars and high-redshift quasars.

  5. The deep sea is a major sink for microplastic debris.

    PubMed

    Woodall, Lucy C; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Paterson, Gordon L J; Coppock, Rachel; Sleight, Victoria; Calafat, Antonio; Rogers, Alex D; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E; Thompson, Richard C

    2014-12-01

    Marine debris, mostly consisting of plastic, is a global problem, negatively impacting wildlife, tourism and shipping. However, despite the durability of plastic, and the exponential increase in its production, monitoring data show limited evidence of concomitant increasing concentrations in marine habitats. There appears to be a considerable proportion of the manufactured plastic that is unaccounted for in surveys tracking the fate of environmental plastics. Even the discovery of widespread accumulation of microscopic fragments (microplastics) in oceanic gyres and shallow water sediments is unable to explain the missing fraction. Here, we show that deep-sea sediments are a likely sink for microplastics. Microplastic, in the form of fibres, was up to four orders of magnitude more abundant (per unit volume) in deep-sea sediments from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean than in contaminated sea-surface waters. Our results show evidence for a large and hitherto unknown repository of microplastics. The dominance of microfibres points to a previously underreported and unsampled plastic fraction. Given the vastness of the deep sea and the prevalence of microplastics at all sites we investigated, the deep-sea floor appears to provide an answer to the question-where is all the plastic? PMID:26064573

  6. The deep sea is a major sink for microplastic debris

    PubMed Central

    Woodall, Lucy C.; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Paterson, Gordon L.J.; Coppock, Rachel; Sleight, Victoria; Calafat, Antonio; Rogers, Alex D.; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Marine debris, mostly consisting of plastic, is a global problem, negatively impacting wildlife, tourism and shipping. However, despite the durability of plastic, and the exponential increase in its production, monitoring data show limited evidence of concomitant increasing concentrations in marine habitats. There appears to be a considerable proportion of the manufactured plastic that is unaccounted for in surveys tracking the fate of environmental plastics. Even the discovery of widespread accumulation of microscopic fragments (microplastics) in oceanic gyres and shallow water sediments is unable to explain the missing fraction. Here, we show that deep-sea sediments are a likely sink for microplastics. Microplastic, in the form of fibres, was up to four orders of magnitude more abundant (per unit volume) in deep-sea sediments from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean than in contaminated sea-surface waters. Our results show evidence for a large and hitherto unknown repository of microplastics. The dominance of microfibres points to a previously underreported and unsampled plastic fraction. Given the vastness of the deep sea and the prevalence of microplastics at all sites we investigated, the deep-sea floor appears to provide an answer to the question—where is all the plastic? PMID:26064573

  7. Lessons from Earth's Deep Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soreghan, G. S.

    2005-01-01

    Earth is a repository of data on climatic changes from its deep-time history. Article discusses the collection and study of these data to predict future climatic changes, the need to create national study centers for the purpose, and the necessary cooperation between different branches of science in climatic research.

  8. Electrochemical Machining Removes Deep Obstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catania, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) is effective way of removing obstructing material between two deep holes supposed to intersect but do not because of misalignment of drilling tools. ECM makes it possible to rework costly castings otherwise scrapped. Method fast even for tough or hard alloys and complicated three-dimensional shapes.

  9. Ploughing the deep sea floor.

    PubMed

    Puig, Pere; Canals, Miquel; Company, Joan B; Martín, Jacobo; Amblas, David; Lastras, Galderic; Palanques, Albert

    2012-09-13

    Bottom trawling is a non-selective commercial fishing technique whereby heavy nets and gear are pulled along the sea floor. The direct impact of this technique on fish populations and benthic communities has received much attention, but trawling can also modify the physical properties of seafloor sediments, water–sediment chemical exchanges and sediment fluxes. Most of the studies addressing the physical disturbances of trawl gear on the seabed have been undertaken in coastal and shelf environments, however, where the capacity of trawling to modify the seafloor morphology coexists with high-energy natural processes driving sediment erosion, transport and deposition. Here we show that on upper continental slopes, the reworking of the deep sea floor by trawling gradually modifies the shape of the submarine landscape over large spatial scales. We found that trawling-induced sediment displacement and removal from fishing grounds causes the morphology of the deep sea floor to become smoother over time, reducing its original complexity as shown by high-resolution seafloor relief maps. Our results suggest that in recent decades, following the industrialization of fishing fleets, bottom trawling has become an important driver of deep seascape evolution. Given the global dimension of this type of fishery, we anticipate that the morphology of the upper continental slope in many parts of the world’s oceans could be altered by intensive bottom trawling, producing comparable effects on the deep sea floor to those generated by agricultural ploughing on land. PMID:22951970

  10. A Deep-Sea Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montes, Georgia E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity that simulates exploration techniques used in deep-sea explorations and teaches students how this technology can be used to take a closer look inside volcanoes, inspect hazardous waste sites such as nuclear reactors, and explore other environments dangerous to humans. (DDR)

  11. Creating food for deep space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-07-01

    Explorers and scientists have to eat, whether they're on top of a mountain, deep in the sea, or in space. NASA scientists are working to develop a viable food program by 2030 that could feed six crew members for a 3-year mission to Mars.

  12. Deep Impact on Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Deep Impact awaits launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. on Jan. 12, 2005.

    The spacecraft will travel to comet Tempel 1 and release an impactor, creating a crater on the surface of the comet. Scientists believe the exposed materials may give clues to the formation of our solar system.

  13. Diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Douketis, J. D.; Ginsberg, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a common disease, can be difficult to diagnose because its clinical features are nonspecific. Venography is the standard test, but other less expensive, easily performed, noninvasive tests are available. At present, duplex ultrasonography is the noninvasive test of choice. PMID:8616289

  14. Digging Deeper: The Deep Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Laura

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the Deep Web, defined as Web content in searchable databases of the type that can be found only by direct query. Discusses the problems of indexing; inability to find information not indexed in the search engine's database; and metasearch engines. Describes 10 sites created to access online databases or directly search them. Lists ways…

  15. ALHAMBRA survey: morphological classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pović, M.; Huertas-Company, M.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Aguerri, J. A. López; Husillos, C.; Molino, A.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Large Homogeneous Area Medium Band Redshift Astronomical (ALHAMBRA) survey is a photometric survey designed to study systematically cosmic evolution and cosmic variance (Moles et al. 2008). It employs 20 continuous medium-band filters (3500 - 9700 Å), plus JHK near-infrared (NIR) bands, which enable measurements of photometric redshifts with good accuracy. ALHAMBRA covers > 4 deg2 in eight discontinuous regions (~ 0.5 deg2 per region), of theseseven fields overlap with other extragalactic, multiwavelength surveys (DEEP2, SDSS, COSMOS, HDF-N, Groth, ELAIS-N1). We detect > 600.000 sources, reaching the depth of R(AB) ~ 25.0, and photometric accuracy of 2-4% (Husillos et al., in prep.). Photometric redshifts are measured using the Bayesian Photometric Redshift (BPZ) code (Benítez et al. 2000), reaching one of the best accuracies up to date of δz/z <= 1.2% (Molino et al., in prep.). To deal with the morphological classification of galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey (Pović et al., in prep.), we used the galaxy Support Vector Machine code (galSVM; Huertas-Company 2008, 2009), one of the new non-parametric methods for morphological classification, specially useful when dealing with low resolution and high-redshift data. To test the accuracy of our morphological classification we used a sample of 3000 local, visually classified galaxies (Nair & Abraham 2010), moving them to conditions typical of our ALHAMBRA data (taking into account the background, redshift and magnitude distributions, etc.), and measuring their morphology using galSVM. Finally, we measured the morphology of ALHAMBRA galaxies, obtaining for each source seven morphological parameters (two concentration indexes, asymmetry, Gini, M20 moment of light, smoothness, and elongation), probability if the source belongs to early- or late-type, and its error. Comparing ALHAMBRA morph COSMOS/ACS morphology (obtained with the same method) we expect to have qualitative separation in two main morphological

  16. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Wolhart

    2005-06-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

  17. Deep Crustal Structure Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, Gail; Eddy, Drew; van Avendonk, Harm; Norton, Ian; Karner, Garry; Johnson, Chris; Kneller, Erik; Snedden, John

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin between the US and Mexico that opened up soon after the breakup of Pangea. Although the area has been heavily surveyed with seismic reflection profiles, the deep structure of the region is poorly understood because of lack of penetration beneath the thick sediments and salt. We present the results of two wide-angle seismic refraction profiles in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico that constrain seismic velocities and thicknesses of the sediments and crust from the continental shelf to deep ocean basin. Profile GUMBO 3 extends 523 km from offshore Alabama south-southwest via the De Soto Canyon to the central Gulf of Mexico, while GUMBO 4 extends 507 km from the northwestern Florida peninsula across the Florida Escarpment to the central Gulf of Mexico. On both profiles, ocean bottom seismometers were positioned at 12-km spacing, and recorded air gun shots at offsets >100 km. We use a tomographic inversion of first-arrival and secondary travel time picks from these data to build a layered velocity model (water, sediments, crystalline crust, mantle) along each profile. On GUMBO 3 and GUMBO 4 the thickness of crystalline crust from the continental shelf to the deep basin decreases from ~25 km to ~7 km (GUMBO 4) or ~8 km (GUMBO 3) over a horizontal distance of ~150 km. Velocities of 7-7.5 km/s are observed at the base of the crust along most of GUMBO 3, while velocities of 6.5-7 km/s are observed at similar depths along GUMBO 4. We suggest that higher lower crustal velocities, and thicker oceanic crust, on GUMBO 3 compared to GUMBO 4 may be explained by elevated syn-rift mantle temperatures in the vicinity of the De Soto Canyon and South Georgia Rift during rifting and continental breakup. We have integrated seismic refraction, seismic reflection, and well data to interpret sequence stratigraphic units along GUMBO 3 and GUMBO 4. We have constructed a geologic history of the late-Jurassic/early-Cretaceous, beginning first with Louann

  18. Laser Surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has produced a laser-aided system for surveying land boundaries in difficult terrain. It does the job more accurately than conventional methods, takes only one-third the time normally required, and is considerably less expensive. In surveying to mark property boundaries, the objective is to establish an accurate heading between two "corner" points. This is conventionally accomplished by erecting a "range pole" at one point and sighting it from the other point through an instrument called a theodolite. But how do you take a heading between two points which are not visible to each other, for instance, when tall trees, hills or other obstacles obstruct the line of sight? That was the problem confronting the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service. The Forest Service manages 187 million acres of land in 44 states and Puerto Rico. Unfortunately, National Forest System lands are not contiguous but intermingled in complex patterns with privately-owned land. In recent years much of the private land has been undergoing development for purposes ranging from timber harvesting to vacation resorts. There is a need for precise boundary definition so that both private owners and the Forest Service can manage their properties with confidence that they are not trespassing on the other's land.

  19. Farmland Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A 1981 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) study estimated that the nation is converting farmland to non-agricultural uses at the rate of 3 million acres a year. Seeking information on farmland loss in Florida, the state legislature, in 1984, directed establishment of a program for development of accurate data to enable intelligent legislation of state growth management. Thus was born Florida's massive Mapping and Monitoring of Agricultural Lands Project (MMALP). It employs data from the NASA-developed Landsat Earth resources survey satellite system as a quicker, less expensive alternative to ground surveying. The 3 year project involved inventory of Florida's 36 million acres classifying such as cropland, pastureland, citrus, woodlands, wetland, water and populated areas. Direction was assigned to Florida Department of Community Affairs (DCA) with assistance from the DOT. With the cooperation of the USDA, Soil Conservation Service, DCA decided that combining soil data with the Landsat land cover data would make available to land use planners a more comprehensive view of a county's land potential.

  20. A SUCCESSFUL BROADBAND SURVEY FOR GIANT Ly{alpha} NEBULAE. I. SURVEY DESIGN AND CANDIDATE SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2012-04-01

    Giant Ly{alpha} nebulae (or Ly{alpha} 'blobs') are likely sites of ongoing massive galaxy formation, but the rarity of these powerful sources has made it difficult to form a coherent picture of their properties, ionization mechanisms, and space density. Systematic narrowband Ly{alpha} nebula surveys are ongoing, but the small redshift range covered and the observational expense limit the comoving volume that can be probed by even the largest of these surveys and pose a significant problem when searching for such rare sources. We have developed a systematic search technique designed to find large Ly{alpha} nebulae at 2 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 within deep broadband imaging and have carried out a survey of the 9.4 deg{sup 2} NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Booetes field. With a total survey comoving volume of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 8} h{sup -3}{sub 70} Mpc{sup 3}, this is the largest volume survey for Ly{alpha} nebulae ever undertaken. In this first paper in the series, we present the details of the survey design and a systematically selected sample of 79 candidates, which includes one previously discovered Ly{alpha} nebula.

  1. The Panchromatic Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Ultraviolet Coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, M.; Grogin, N. A.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Siana, B. D.; Atek, H.; Bond, N. A.; Brown, T. M.; Coe, D. A.; Colbert, J. W.; De Mello, D. F.; Ferguson, H. C.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Gardner, J. P.; Gawiser, E. J.; Giavalisco, M.; Gronwall, C.; Hanish, D.; Kurczynski, P.; Lee, K.; Ravindranath, S.; Ryan, R. E.; Scarlata, C.; Voyer, E.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present intial results from the UVUDF project: a Cycle 19 HST Treasury program that obtained ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The data consist of 30 orbits with WFC3/UVIS in each of F225W, F275W, and F336W, divided between three epochs. The science goals of the UVUDF project are to: (i) Investigate the episode of peak star formation activity in galaxies at 1 < z < 2.5; (ii) Study the star formation properties of moderate redshift starburst galaxies; (iii) Probe the evolution of massive galaxies by resolving sub-galactic units (clumps); (iv) Examine the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from galaxies at 2-3; and (v) Measure the star formation rate efficiency of neutral atomic-dominated hydrogen gas at 1-3. In addition to the first UVUDF science results, we discuss technical lessons learned that may be of interst in planning future deep UV surveys with HST.

  2. WBUCS: A Web Simulator for Deep Galaxy Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, D. K.; Bouwens, R.; Illingworth, G. D.

    2005-12-01

    Today's deep high resolution multiwavelength surveys contain a wealth of information about galaxies at different epochs. Fully exploiting this information to trace out galaxy assembly requires the ability to archive galaxy samples and resimulate these samples at different redshifts. Here we describe some of the tools developed for these ends as well as a simulator now available on the web for demonstration use. Based upon a pixel-by-pixel modeling of object SEDs and their selection volumes, this simulator will provide users with the ability to make realistic multicolor simulations of galaxy fields from galaxy samples at all redshifts: from z˜0 samples selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to z˜1-6 samples selected from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey. Users only need specify the passbands, noise, and PSFs, or equivalently the exposure times on well-known instruments like HST or ground-based telescopes. As such, this simulator will provide the community with a real world virtual observatory, useful both at the proposal stage and for making comparisons with observations in hand. The engine for the simulator is the well-known BUCS (Bouwens' Universe Construction Set) library developed for galaxy evolution studies, while the web interface is analogous to that used for the popular web archives. The purpose of this poster is to introduce this effort to the computational community as a whole.

  3. Deep Space 1 in Cleanroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA. Deep Space 1 used a unique ion drive propulsion system. Unlike the fireworks of most chemical rockets using solid or liquid fuels, the ion drive emits only an eerie blue glow as ionized (electrically charged) atoms of xenon are pushed out of the engine. Xenon is the same gas found in photo flash tubes and many lighthouse bulbs. The almost imperceptible thrust from the system is equivalent to the pressure exerted by a sheet of paper held in the palm of your hand. The ion engine is very slow to pick up speed, but over the long haul it can deliver 10 times as much thrust per pound of fuel as more traditional rockets. Previous ion propulsion systems, like those found on some communications satellites, were not used as the main engines, but only to keep the satellites on track. Deep Space 1 is the first spacecraft to use this important technology as its primary means of propulsion. The importance of ion propulsion is its great efficiency,' says Dr. Marc Rayman, project manager for Deep Space 1. 'It uses very little propellant, and that means it weighs less so it can use a less expensive launch vehicle and ultimately go much faster than other spacecraft. This opens the solar system to many future exciting missions which otherwise would have been unaffordable or even impossible,' added Dr. Rayman. The ion particles travel out at about 68,000 miles per hour. However, Deep Space 1 doesn't move that fast in the other direction, because it is much heavier than the ion particles. By the end of the mission, the ion engine will have changed the spacecraft's speed by about 6,800 mph (over 11,000 kph). The technology is so efficient that it only consumes about 3.5 ounces (100 g) of xenon per day, taking about four days to expend just one pound (0.4 kg

  4. Infrastructure Survey 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Group of Eight (Go8) conducted a survey on the state of its buildings and infrastructure. The survey is the third Go8 Infrastructure survey, with previous surveys being conducted in 2007 and 2009. The current survey updated some of the information collected in the previous surveys. It also collated data related to aspects of the…

  5. Eco-Philosophy and Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skolimowski, Henryk

    1988-01-01

    Criticizes the Deep Ecology Movement as a new ecological world view. Discusses the limits of this philosophy including its views of destiny, evolution and cosmology. Concludes that although its intentions are admirable, Deep Ecology leaves too much unanswered. (CW)

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation Tested for Early Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160137.html Deep Brain Stimulation Tested for Early Alzheimer's Although treatment seems ... 2016 THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Deep brain stimulation appears safe for people with early Alzheimer's ...

  7. Environmental projects. Volume 4: Asbestos survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushner, L.

    1988-01-01

    The Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC), near Barstow, California, operates in support of six large parabolic dish antennas. Many of the buildings and structures