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Sample records for deep impurity levels

  1. The origin of deep-level impurity transitions in hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Du, X. Z.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2015-01-12

    Deep ultraviolet photoluminescence (PL) emission spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the origin of the widely observed deep level impurity related donor-acceptor pair (DAP) transition with an emission peak near 4.1 eV in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). A set of h-BN epilayers were grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) under different ammonia (NH{sub 3}) flow rates to explore the role of nitrogen vacancies (V{sub N}) in the deep-level transitions. The emission intensity of the DAP transition near 4.1 eV was found to decrease exponentially with an increase of the NH{sub 3} flow rate employed during the MOCVD growth, implying that impurities involved are V{sub N}. The temperature-dependent PL spectra were measured from 10 K up to 800 K, which provided activation energies of ∼0.1 eV for the shallow impurity. Based on the measured energy level of the shallow impurity (∼0.1 eV) and previously estimated bandgap value of about 6.5 eV for h-BN, we deduce a value of ∼2.3 eV for the deep impurity involved in this DAP transition. The measured energy levels together with calculation results and formation energies of the impurities and defects in h-BN suggest that V{sub N} and carbon impurities occupying the nitrogen sites, respectively, are the most probable shallow donor and deep acceptor impurities involved in this DAP transition.

  2. Shallow-deep transitions of impurities in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, V.; Singh, Vijay A.

    2003-03-01

    We study the hydrogenic impurity in a quantum dot (QD). We employ the effective mass theory with realistic barrier and variable effective mass. The model is simple, but it predicts features not previously observed. We observe that the shallow hydrogenic impurity becomes deeper as the dot size (R) is reduced and with further reduction of the dot size it becomes shallow and at times resonant with the conduction band. Such a shallow-deep (SHADE) transition is investigated and a critical size in terms of the impurity Bohr radius (aI*) is identified. A relevant aspect of a QD is reduction in the dielectric constant, epsilon, as its size decreases. Employing a size dependent epsilon(R), we demonstrate that the impurity level gets exceptionally deep in systems for which aI* is small. Thus, carrier "freeze out" is a distinct possibility in a wide class of materials such as ZnS, CdS, etc. The behavior of the impurity level with dot size is understood on the basis of simple scaling arguments. Calculations are presented for III-V (AlGaAs) and II-VI (ZnS, CdS) QDs. We speculate that the deepening of the impurity level is related to the high luminescence efficiency of QDs. It is suggested that quantum dots offer an opportunity for defect engineering.

  3. Shallow-deep transitions of impurities in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, V.; Singh, Vijay A.

    2001-06-01

    We study the hydrogenic impurity in a quantum dot (QD). We employ the effective mass theory with realistic barrier and variable effective mass. The model is simple, but it predicts features not previously observed. We observe that the shallow hydrogenic impurity becomes deeper as the dot size (R) is reduced and with further reduction of the dot size it becomes shallow and at times resonant with the conduction band. Such a shallow-deep (SHADE) transition is investigated and a critical size in terms of the impurity Bohr radius (aI*) is identified. A relevant aspect of a QD is reduction in the dielectric constant, ɛ, as its size decreases. Employing a size dependent ɛ(R), we demonstrate that the impurity level gets exceptionally deep in systems for which aI* is small. Thus, carrier "freeze out" is a distinct possibility in a wide class of materials such as ZnS, CdS, etc. The behavior of the impurity level with dot size is understood on the basis of simple scaling arguments. Calculations are presented for III-V (AlGaAs) and II-VI (ZnS, CdS) QDs. We speculate that the deepening of the impurity level is related to the high luminescence efficiency of QDs. It is suggested that quantum dots offer an opportunity for defect engineering.

  4. Energy levels of isoelectronic impurities by large scale LDA calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingbo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2002-11-22

    Isoelectronic impurity states are localized states induced by stoichiometric single atom substitution in bulk semiconductor. Photoluminescence spectra indicate deep impurity levels of 0.5 to 0.9eV above the top of valence band for systems like: GaN:As, GaN:P, CdS:Te, ZnS:Te. Previous calculations based on small supercells seemingly confirmed these experimental results. However, the current ab initio calculations based on thousand atom supercells indicate that the impurity levels of the above systems are actually much shallower(0.04 to 0.23 eV), and these impurity levels should be compared with photoluminescence excitation spectra, not photoluminescence spectra.

  5. Deep impurity trapping concepts for power semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    High voltage semiconductor switches using deep impurity doped silicon now appear feasible for high voltage (1-100 kV), high power (10 Kw) switching and protection functions for future space power applications. Recent discoveries have demonstrated several practical ways of gating deep impurity doped silicon devices in planar configurations and of electrically controlling their characteristics, leading to a vast array of possible circuit applications. A new family of semiconductor switching devices and transducers are possible based on this technology. New deep impurity devices could be simpler than conventional p-n junction devices and yet use the same basic materials and processing techniques. In addition, multiple functions may be possible on a single device as well as increased ratings.

  6. Double-injection, deep-impurity switch development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selim, F. A.; Whitson, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of device design and process techniques for the fabrication of a double-injection, deep-impurity (DI)(2) silicon switch that operates in the 1-10 kV range with conduction current of 10 and 1A, respectively. Other major specifications include a holding voltage of 0 to 5 volts at 1 A anode current, 10 microsecond switching time, and power dissipation of 50 W at 75 C. This report describes work that shows how the results obtained at the University of Cincinnati under NASA Grant NSG-3022 have been applied to larger area and higher voltage devices. The investigations include theoretical, analytical, and experimental studies of device design and processing. Methods to introduce deep levels, such as Au diffusion and electron irradiation, have been carried out to "pin down' the Fermi level and control device-switching characteristics. Different anode, cathode, and gate configurations are presented. Techniques to control the surface electric field of planar structures used for (DI)(2) switches are examined. Various sections of this report describe the device design, wafer-processing techniques, and various measurements which include ac and dc characteristics, 4-point probe, and spreading resistance.

  7. Double-injection, deep-impurity switch development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The overall objective of this program was the development of device design and process techniques for the fabrication of a double-injection, deep-impurity (DI) sup 2 silicon switch that operates in the 2-10 kV range with conduction current values of 5 A at 2 kV and 1 A at 10 kV. Other major specifications include a holding voltage of 10 V with no gate current, 10 microsec switching time, and power dissipation of 50 W at 75 C. It was decided to concentrate on the lateral circular devices in order to optimize the gold diffusion. This resulted in devices that are much better switches (approx.1 micro sec switching time), and in a gold diffusion process that is much more controllable than those previously developed. Some results with injection-gated devices were also obtained. The current conduction for V less than VT was analyzed and seen to agree, for the most part, with Lampert's theory. Various sections of this report describe the device designs, wafer-processing techniques, and various measurements which include ac and dc characteristics and four-point probe.

  8. Advanced development of double-injection, deep-impurity semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanes, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    Deep-impurity, double-injection devices, commonly refered to as (DI) squared devices, represent a class of semiconductor switches possessing a very high degree of tolerance to electron and neutron irradiation and to elevated temperature operation. These properties have caused them to be considered as attractive candidates for space power applications. The design, fabrication, and testing of several varieties of (DI) squared devices intended for power switching are described. All of these designs were based upon gold-doped silicon material. Test results, along with results of computer simulations of device operation, other calculations based upon the assumed mode of operation of (DI) squared devices, and empirical information regarding power semiconductor device operation and limitations, have led to the conculsion that these devices are not well suited to high-power applications. When operated in power circuitry configurations, they exhibit high-power losses in both the off-state and on-state modes. These losses are caused by phenomena inherent to the physics and material of the devices and cannot be much reduced by device design optimizations. The (DI) squared technology may, however, find application in low-power functions such as sensing, logic, and memory, when tolerance to radiation and temperature are desirable (especially is device performance is improved by incorporation of deep-level impurities other than gold.

  9. Quantum wire hybridized with a single-level impurity.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Igor V; Yudson, Vladimir I; Yurkevich, Igor V

    2008-06-27

    We have studied low-temperature properties of interacting electrons in a one-dimensional quantum wire (Luttinger liquid) side-hybridized with a single-level impurity. The hybridization induces a backscattering of electrons in the wire which strongly affects its low-energy properties. Using a one-loop renormalization group approach valid for a weak electron-electron interaction, we have calculated a transmission coefficient through the wire, T(epsilon), and a local density of states, nu(epsilon) at low energies epsilon. In particular, we have found that the antiresonance in T(epsilon) has a generalized Breit-Wigner shape with the effective width Gamma(epsilon) which diverges at the Fermi level. PMID:18643692

  10. Impurity effects on energy levels and far-infrared spectra of nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Pan; Jia-Lin, Zhu

    2003-11-01

    The effects of a positively charged impurity on the energy levels and far-infrared spectra of one and two electrons in semiconductor nanorings under magnetic fields are studied. The effects of the nanoring size and the impurity position are also discussed. It is shown that the electron-electron interaction and electron-impurity one in nanorings are strongly dependent on the nanoring size and the impurity position. Based on the studies of the impurity and field effects, the impurity-induced Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the far-infrared spectra are found. The results predict a possibility of observing phenomena related to electron-impurity interaction in a nanoring in the future.

  11. Deep Inelastic Scattering at the Amplitude Level

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-08-04

    The deep inelastic lepton scattering and deeply virtual Compton scattering cross sections can be interpreted in terms of the fundamental wavefunctions defined by the light-front Fock expansion, thus allowing tests of QCD at the amplitude level. The AdS/CFT correspondence between gauge theory and string theory provides remarkable new insights into QCD, including a model for hadronic wavefunctions which display conformal scaling at short distances and color confinement at large distances.

  12. Donor level of interstitial hydrogen in semiconductors: Deep level transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovsky, Vl.; Dobaczewski, L.; Nielsen, K. Bonde; Kolkovsky, V.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted; Weber, J.

    2009-12-01

    The behaviour of hydrogen in crystalline semiconductors has attracted considerable interest during several decades. Due to its high diffusion rate and ability to react with a wide variety of lattice imperfections such as intrinsic point defects, impurities, interfaces and surfaces, hydrogen is an impurity of fundamental importance in semiconductor materials. It has been already evidenced in previous investigations that the most fundamental hydrogen-related defects in-group IV semiconductors are interstitial hydrogen atoms occupying the bond-centre site ( BC) or the interstitial tetrahedral site ( T). Using first-principles calculations Van de Walle predicted similar properties of isolated hydrogen in other II-VI and III-V semiconductors. Another interesting prediction shown in that work was the existence of a universal alignment for the hydrogen electronic (-/+) level. Until now there is no direct experimental information regarding the individual isolated hydrogen states in compound semiconductors and most reported properties have been inferred indirectly. In the present work in-situ conventional deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and high-resolution Laplace DLTS techniques are used to analyse hydrogen-related levels after low-temperature proton implantation in different II-VI and III-V semiconductors including GaAs, ZnO and CdTe. From these experimental observations the donor level of isolated hydrogen is found to keep almost a constant value in the absolute energy scale taking into account different band-offsets calculated for the whole group of semiconductors.

  13. Cryogenic Laser Calorimetry for Impurity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swimm, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a one-year effort to determine the applicability of laser-calorimetric spectroscopy to the study of deep-level impurities in silicon are presented. Critical considerations for impurity analysis by laser-calorimetric spectroscopy are discussed, the design and performance of a cryogenic laser calorimeter is described, and measurements of background absorption in high-purity silicon are presented.

  14. Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Volume 1: Characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Davis, J. R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R. B.; Blais, P. D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R. E.; Mollenkopf, H. C.; Mccormick, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. Discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, conventional solar cell I-V techniques, and descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are presented and discussed. The tabulated data include lists of impurity segregation coefficients, ingot impurity analyses and estimated concentrations, typical deep level impurity spectra, photoconductive and open circuit decay lifetimes for individual metal-doped ingots, and a complete tabulation of the cell I-V characteristics of nearly 200 ingots.

  15. Impurities in silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Metallic impurities, both singly and in combinations, affect the performance of silicon solar cells. Czochralski silicon web crystals were grown with controlled additions of secondary impurities. The primary electrical dopants were boron and phosphorus. The silicon test ingots were grown under controlled and carefully monitored conditions from high-purity charge and dopant material to minimize unintentional contamination. Following growth, each crystal was characterized by chemical, microstructural, electrical, and solar cell tests to provide a detailed and internally consistent description of the relationships between silicon impurity concentration and solar cell performance. Deep-level spectroscopy measurements were used to measure impurity concentrations at levels below the detectability of other techniques and to study thermally-induced changes in impurity activity. For the majority of contaminants, impurity-induced performance loss is due to a reduction of the base diffusion length. From these observations, a semi-empirical model which predicts cell performance as a function of metal impurity concentration was formulated. The model was then used successfully to predict the behavior of solar cells bearing as many as 11 different impurities.

  16. Deep levels in AgGaSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, I.H.; Yu, P.Y.

    1994-08-01

    The photoluminescence spectra of AgGaSe{sub 2} obtained at 77 K is reported. Two emission peaks have been observed and their pressure dependence studied. One of these peaks has been identified with emission involving one of the two deep level peak D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} observed previously in absorption measurement [App. Phys. Lett. 64,1717 (1994)]. A simple model for the capture of carriers into these deep levels has been proposed.

  17. The effects of deep level traps on the electrical properties of semi-insulating CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, Gangqiang; Yang, Jian; Xu, Lingyan; Feng, Tao; Wang, Ning; Jie, Wanqi

    2014-01-28

    Deep level traps have considerable effects on the electrical properties and radiation detection performance of high resistivity CdZnTe. A deep-trap model for high resistivity CdZnTe was proposed in this paper. The high resistivity mechanism and the electrical properties were analyzed based on this model. High resistivity CdZnTe with high trap ionization energy E{sub t} can withstand high bias voltages. The leakage current is dependent on both the deep traps and the shallow impurities. The performance of a CdZnTe radiation detector will deteriorate at low temperatures, and the way in which sub-bandgap light excitation could improve the low temperature performance can be explained using the deep trap model.

  18. Electronic energy levels of nanorings with impurities and Aharonov-Bohm effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, S.

    2011-10-01

    By modeling impurities along a nanoring as general potential forms the Schrödinger equation for ballistic electrons is shown to separate in cylindrical coordinates. We find an analytical eigenvalue equation for N delta-function-barrier impurities in the presence of magnetic flux. Previous calculations of the electronic states of a one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) nanoring for only one or two impurities modeled by equal square barriers is explicitly extended to three and four different or equal impurities modeled as delta-barrier, square-barrier, or delta-well potential forms. This is shown to be generalizable to any number N. Effects on the energy spectra due to magnetic flux and different kinds and numbers of impurities are compared in 1D and 2D nanorings.

  19. Investigation of Deep Levels in GaInNas

    SciTech Connect

    Abulfotuh, F.; Balcioglu, A.; Friedman, D.; Geisz, J.; Kurtz, S.

    1998-11-12

    This paper presents and discusses the first Deep-Level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) data obtained from measurements carried out on both Schottky barriers and homojunction devices of GaInNAs. The effect of N and In doping on the electrical properties of the GaNInAs devices, which results in structural defects and interface states, has been investigated. Moreover, the location and densities of deep levels related to the presence of N, In, and N+In are identified and correlated with the device performance. The data confirmed that the presence of N alone creates a high density of shallow hole traps related to the N atom and structural defects in the device. Doping by In, if present alone, also creates low-density deep traps (related to the In atom and structural defects) and extremely deep interface states. On the other hand, the co-presence of In and N eliminates both the interface states and levels related to structural defects. However, the device still has a high density of the shallow and deep traps that are responsible for the photocurrent loss in the GaNInAs device, together with the possible short diffusion length.

  20. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2009-07-01

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

  1. Impurity gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, S.T.

    1995-06-01

    Transition metal impurities are well known to cause detrimental effects when present in the active regions of Si devices. Their presence degrades minority carrier lifetime, provides recombination-generation centers, increases junction leakage current and reduces gate oxide integrity. Thus, gettering processes are used to reduce the available metal impurities from the active region of microelectronic circuits. Gettering processes are usually divided into intrinsic (or internal) and extrinsic (or external) categories. Intrinsic refers to processing the Si wafer in a way to make available internal gettering sites, whereas extrinsic implies externally introduced gettering sites. Special concerns have been raised for intrinsic gettering. Not only will the formation of the precipitated oxide and denuded zone be difficult to achieve with the lower thermal budgets, but another inherent limit may set in. In this or any process which relies on the precipitation of metal silicides the impurity concentration can only be reduced as low as the solid solubility limit. However, the solubilities of transition metals relative to silicide formation are typically found to be {approx_gt}10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3} at temperatures of 800 C and above, and thus inadequate to getter to the needed concentration levels. It is thus anticipated that future microelectronic device processing will require one or more of the following advances in gettering technology: (1) new and more effective gettering mechanisms; (2) quantitative models of gettering to allow process optimization at low process thermal budgets and metal impurity concentrations, and/or (3) development of front side gettering methods to allow for more efficient gettering close to device regions. These trend-driven needs provide a driving force for qualitatively new approaches to gettering and provide possible new opportunities for the use of ion implantation in microelectronics processing.

  2. Deep UV Positive Resists For Two-Level Photoresist Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichmanis, E.; Smolinsky, G.

    1984-05-01

    Interest has steadily grown during the past few years in materials that are resistant to dry etching techniques that can be used in multilevel resist processes. This is perhaps a result of the greater demands placed on resist technology by increased device complexity and resolution requirements. The most well known multilevel resist methods are the two-level PCM (portable conformable mask, first described by B. J. Lin ) and the BTL trilevel processes. In the latter, the pattern defined in the top level is transfered first to a thin silicon dioxide layer and subsequently to the substrate by dry etching. A two-level photoresist process employing 200-300 nm irradiation of the upper layer followed by transfer of the resultant image into the lower layer by dry etching, combines the attractive features of both deep UV lithography and multilevel resist 3processing. Deep UV lithography affords improved resolution due to decreased diffraction, while multilevel processing2alleviates the problems associated with substrate topography and sur-face reflectivity. An outline of this resist processing scheme is shown in Figure 1. The substrate is coated first with a thick layer of an organic polymer that effectively planarizes the wafer surface. A layer of photoresist is then applied. Deep UV exposure and routine development of the top layer generates the desired pattern which is transferred to the substrate by oxygen RIE. One means of iiproving the resistance of a material to RIE is incorporation of silicon. Taylor and Wolf have reported that the addition of silicon containing compounds to organic polymers improves their resistance to erosion by an oxygen discharge, presumably by the formation of a protective layer of SiO2. Dialkyl siloxane polymers have been Eeported to be usable as negative deep UV resists in the two-level process described above. Anotheg negative, oxygen RIE resistant, deep UV resist has been reported by MacDonald et al. This material, a copolymer of

  3. Large impurity effects in rubrene crystals: First-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetseris, L.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2008-01-01

    Carrier mobilities of rubrene films are among the highest values reported for any organic semiconductor. Here, we probe with first-principles calculations the sensitivity of rubrene crystals on impurities. We find that isolated oxygen impurities create distinct peaks in the electronic density of states consistent with observations of defect levels in rubrene and that increased O content changes the position and shape of rubrene energy bands significantly. We also establish a dual role of hydrogen as individual H species and H impurity pairs create and annihilate deep carrier traps, respectively. The results are relevant to the performance and reliability of rubrene-based devices.

  4. Group-IV Impurity Defect Levels in beta-Gallium Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Beta-Gallium Oxide (β-Ga2O3) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor with a significant potential as a native substrate for electronic devices. One avenue for tuning its carrier concentration and electronic properties is doping with group-IV impurity atoms. This work presents a first-principles understanding of the effects of C, Si, Ge and Sn dopants at Ga sites. C is found to act like a bistable center whereas the other dopants preserve the symmetry of the Ga site. Hybrid functionals are used to describe accurately the effects that occur mainly in the conduction band. A Brillouin zone unfolding is used that enables a direct comparison to possible spectroscopy experiments. We delineate the effects on bandgap modulation induced by charge density on the one hand, and by conduction band resonances and effective masses on the other hand.

  5. Where is the level of neutral buoyancy for deep convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hanii; Luo, Zhengzhao

    2012-08-01

    This study revisits an old concept in meteorology - level of neutral buoyancy (LNB). The classic definition of LNB is derived from the parcel theory and can be estimated from the ambient sounding (LNB_sounding) without having to observe any actual convective cloud development. In reality, however, convection interacts with the environment in complicated ways; it will eventually manage to find its own effective LNB and manifests it through detraining masses and developing anvils (LNB_observation). This study conducts a near-global survey of LNB_observation for tropical deep convection using CloudSat data and makes comparison with the corresponding LNB_sounding. The principal findings are as follows: First, although LNB_sounding provides a reasonable upper bound for convective development, correlation between LNB_sounding and LNB_observation is low suggesting that ambient sounding contains limited information for accurately predicting the actual LNB. Second, maximum mass outflow is located more than 3 km lower than LNB_sounding. Hence, from convective transport perspective, LNB_sounding is a significant overestimate of the “destination” height level of the detrained mass. Third, LNB_observation is consistently higher over land than over ocean, although LNB_sounding is similar between land and ocean. This difference is likely related to the contrasts in convective strength and environment between land and ocean. Finally, we estimate the bulk entrainment rates associated with the observed deep convection, which can serve as an observational basis for adjusting GCM cumulus parameterization.

  6. Human-level control through deep reinforcement learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnih, Volodymyr; Kavukcuoglu, Koray; Silver, David; Rusu, Andrei A.; Veness, Joel; Bellemare, Marc G.; Graves, Alex; Riedmiller, Martin; Fidjeland, Andreas K.; Ostrovski, Georg; Petersen, Stig; Beattie, Charles; Sadik, Amir; Antonoglou, Ioannis; King, Helen; Kumaran, Dharshan; Wierstra, Daan; Legg, Shane; Hassabis, Demis

    2015-02-01

    The theory of reinforcement learning provides a normative account, deeply rooted in psychological and neuroscientific perspectives on animal behaviour, of how agents may optimize their control of an environment. To use reinforcement learning successfully in situations approaching real-world complexity, however, agents are confronted with a difficult task: they must derive efficient representations of the environment from high-dimensional sensory inputs, and use these to generalize past experience to new situations. Remarkably, humans and other animals seem to solve this problem through a harmonious combination of reinforcement learning and hierarchical sensory processing systems, the former evidenced by a wealth of neural data revealing notable parallels between the phasic signals emitted by dopaminergic neurons and temporal difference reinforcement learning algorithms. While reinforcement learning agents have achieved some successes in a variety of domains, their applicability has previously been limited to domains in which useful features can be handcrafted, or to domains with fully observed, low-dimensional state spaces. Here we use recent advances in training deep neural networks to develop a novel artificial agent, termed a deep Q-network, that can learn successful policies directly from high-dimensional sensory inputs using end-to-end reinforcement learning. We tested this agent on the challenging domain of classic Atari 2600 games. We demonstrate that the deep Q-network agent, receiving only the pixels and the game score as inputs, was able to surpass the performance of all previous algorithms and achieve a level comparable to that of a professional human games tester across a set of 49 games, using the same algorithm, network architecture and hyperparameters. This work bridges the divide between high-dimensional sensory inputs and actions, resulting in the first artificial agent that is capable of learning to excel at a diverse array of challenging tasks.

  7. Human-level control through deep reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Mnih, Volodymyr; Kavukcuoglu, Koray; Silver, David; Rusu, Andrei A; Veness, Joel; Bellemare, Marc G; Graves, Alex; Riedmiller, Martin; Fidjeland, Andreas K; Ostrovski, Georg; Petersen, Stig; Beattie, Charles; Sadik, Amir; Antonoglou, Ioannis; King, Helen; Kumaran, Dharshan; Wierstra, Daan; Legg, Shane; Hassabis, Demis

    2015-02-26

    The theory of reinforcement learning provides a normative account, deeply rooted in psychological and neuroscientific perspectives on animal behaviour, of how agents may optimize their control of an environment. To use reinforcement learning successfully in situations approaching real-world complexity, however, agents are confronted with a difficult task: they must derive efficient representations of the environment from high-dimensional sensory inputs, and use these to generalize past experience to new situations. Remarkably, humans and other animals seem to solve this problem through a harmonious combination of reinforcement learning and hierarchical sensory processing systems, the former evidenced by a wealth of neural data revealing notable parallels between the phasic signals emitted by dopaminergic neurons and temporal difference reinforcement learning algorithms. While reinforcement learning agents have achieved some successes in a variety of domains, their applicability has previously been limited to domains in which useful features can be handcrafted, or to domains with fully observed, low-dimensional state spaces. Here we use recent advances in training deep neural networks to develop a novel artificial agent, termed a deep Q-network, that can learn successful policies directly from high-dimensional sensory inputs using end-to-end reinforcement learning. We tested this agent on the challenging domain of classic Atari 2600 games. We demonstrate that the deep Q-network agent, receiving only the pixels and the game score as inputs, was able to surpass the performance of all previous algorithms and achieve a level comparable to that of a professional human games tester across a set of 49 games, using the same algorithm, network architecture and hyperparameters. This work bridges the divide between high-dimensional sensory inputs and actions, resulting in the first artificial agent that is capable of learning to excel at a diverse array of challenging tasks

  8. Deep levels in n-GaN Doped with Carbon Studied by Deep Level and Minority Carrier Transient Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Unhi; Yamada, Yujiro; Tokuda, Yutaka; Shiojima, Kenji

    2012-04-01

    Electron and hole traps in the carbon doping of n-type GaN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition were investigated by deep level and minority carrier transient spectroscopies. Four electron traps were observed in the samples. Of these traps, the electron trap concentration of E2 (Ec-0.40 eV) rose with increasing C incorporation. Two hole traps H1 (Ev + 0.86 eV) and H2 also showed the dependence of C doping concentration. According to these results, traps E2, H1, and H2 correspond to C-related defects. Moreover, the energy level of H1 was consistent with an ionization energy of 0.9 eV of CN acting as a deep acceptor, which might give rise to conventional yellow luminescence and current collapse of GaN-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). This was confirmed by photoluminescence (PL) spectra that the integrated intensity of yellow luminescence (YL) band was largely dependent on C incorporation. Therefore, we speculated that hole trap H1 might be responsible for a broad YL band in the samples.

  9. Impurities in rock-salt: consequences for the temperature increases at the disposal of high-level nuclear waste. [Kainite, Kieserite

    SciTech Connect

    van den Broek, W.M.G.T.

    1982-06-01

    In part A the thermal properties of halite and the other materials occurring in rock-salt (the 'impurities') are collected. Except for sylvite (the specific heat of this salt is about 70% of the value for halite) all specific heats are larger than the specific heat of halite. The consequences for the temperature increases at the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in rock-salt are discussed for impurity concentrations of 1, 5, 10 and 15%. If the presence and distribution of the impurities are not taken into account, then - under the most unfavorable conditions - extra temperature increases of about 3% per cent impurity may occur. If, however, the geological composition and its geometry for the disposal region are known, the temperature increases can be calculated more accurately: they may or may not differ from those for pure halite. In part B the measurement of the thermal conductivity for four salts (kainite, kieserite, carnallite, and polyhalite) is described.

  10. Deep levels and radiation effects in p-InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. A.; Singh, A.; Jiao, K.; Lee, B.

    1989-01-01

    A survey was conducted on past studies of hole traps in InP. An experiment was designed to evaluate hole traps in Zn-doped InP after fabrication, after electron irradiation and after annealing using deep level transient spectroscopy. Data similar to that of Yamaguchi was seen with observation of both radiation-induced hole and electron traps at E sub A=0.45 eV and 0.03 eV, respectively. Both traps are altered by annealing. It is also shown that trap parameters for surface-barrier devices are influenced by many factors such as bias voltage, which probes traps at different depths below the surface. These devices require great care in data evaluation.

  11. Deep level study of Mg-doped GaN using deep level transient spectroscopy and minority carrier transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Tran Thien; Pozina, Galia; Amano, Hiroshi; Monemar, Bo; Janzén, Erik; Hemmingsson, Carl

    2016-07-01

    Deep levels in Mg-doped GaN grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), undoped GaN grown by MOCVD, and halide vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE)-grown GaN have been studied using deep level transient spectroscopy and minority charge carrier transient spectroscopy on Schottky diodes. One hole trap, labeled HT1, was detected in the Mg-doped sample. It is observed that the hole emission rate of the trap is enhanced by increasing electric field. By fitting four different theoretical models for field-assisted carrier emission processes, the three-dimensional Coulombic Poole-Frenkel (PF) effect, three-dimensional square well PF effect, phonon-assisted tunneling, and one-dimensional Coulombic PF effect including phonon-assisted tunneling, it is found that the one-dimensional Coulombic PF model, including phonon-assisted tunneling, is consistent with the experimental data. Since the trap exhibits the PF effect, we suggest it is acceptorlike. From the theoretical model, the zero field ionization energy of the trap and an estimate of the hole capture cross section have been determined. Depending on whether the charge state is -1 or -2 after hole emission, the zero field activation energy Ei 0 is 0.57 eV or 0.60 eV, respectively, and the hole capture cross section σp is 1.3 ×10-15c m2 or 1.6 ×10-16c m2 , respectively. Since the level was not observed in undoped GaN, it is suggested that the trap is associated with an Mg related defect.

  12. Deep-level magma ascent rates at Mt. Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Perinelli, C.; Putirka, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-level ascent rates are related to the triggering mechanisms of volcanic eruptions. Recent models and experimental studies have focused on the very shallow parts of magma plumbing systems, mostly the upper few km, and have thus far emphasized that volatile contents and volatile exsolution, are key to understanding eruption dynamics and its fingerprint in the rock texture. Massive volatile loss induces a dramatic change in the liquidus temperature, thus producing observable effects on the rates of nucleation and growth of minerals . Volatile saturation, however, may well occur at greater depths, which means that initial stages of magma ascent may be triggered by events taking place at much greater depths than those recorded by melt inclusions, likely captured at shallow levels. We present a method to evaluate ascent rates deep in a volcano plumbing system, discussing the implications for magma dehydration and using Mt. Etna as case a study. We investigate the deeper levels of magma transport by presenting detailed P-T paths for Etnean magmas, and combining these with Crystal Size Distribution (CSD)-derived cooling rates. The key to this analysis is the recognition that the slope of a P-T path, as determined from mineral-melt thermobarometry, is a result of magma cooling rate, which is in turn a function of magma ascent via the effect of pressure on volatile solubility. We also rely on a thermodynamic treatment of exsolution of non-ideal H2O-CO2 mixtures, based on the Kerric & Jacobs (1981) model, and the simplified solubility model of CO2 (Spera & Bergman, 1980) and H2O (Nicholls, 1980), recalibrated with experimental and melt inclusions data from Mt. Etna. Our modeling is able to decipher magma ascent velocity, v (dH/dt; H = depth, t = time), from ascent rate (dP/dt), and rate of cooling (dT/dt), where ρ is magma density, P is pressure, T is temperature and g is the acceleration of gravity. This equation for v provides a key to investigating the relationships

  13. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-01

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  14. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-04

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  15. Hybrid functional calculations of Copper impurities and related complexes in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharan, Abhishek; Gui, Zhigang; Janotti, Anderson

    Copper impurities affect electronic and optical properties of semiconductors. Cu is an ubiquitous impurity and can be introduced unintentionally during various processing step. In silicon, the fast-diffusing interstitial Cu donor often passivates shallow-acceptor dopants, affecting the electronic characteristics of devices, while deep levels associated with other forms of the Cu impurity degrade device performance. Here we revisit the problem of the Cu impurity in Si using first principles calculation based on a hybrid functional. We discuss the relative stability of the substitutional and interstitial forms, as well as the formation of complexes with hydrogen and oxygen impurities. The results of our calculations will be compared with recent experiments on the electrical activity of Cu impurities in Si.

  16. High temperature annealing effects on deep-level defects in a high purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, Naoya Azarov, Alexander; Svensson, Bengt G.; Ohshima, Takeshi; Moe, Anne Marie M.

    2015-07-28

    Effects of high-temperature annealing on deep-level defects in a high-purity semi-insulating 4H silicon carbide substrate have been studied by employing current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, junction spectroscopy, and chemical impurity analysis measurements. Secondary ion mass spectrometry data reveal that the substrate contains boron with concentration in the mid 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −3} range, while other impurities including nitrogen, aluminum, titanium, vanadium and chromium are below their detection limits (typically ∼10{sup 14 }cm{sup −3}). Schottky barrier diodes fabricated on substrates annealed at 1400–1700 °C exhibit metal/p-type semiconductor behavior with a current rectification of up to 8 orders of magnitude at bias voltages of ±3 V. With increasing annealing temperature, the series resistance of the Schottky barrier diodes decreases, and the net acceptor concentration in the substrates increases approaching the chemical boron content. Admittance spectroscopy results unveil the presence of shallow boron acceptors and deep-level defects with levels in lower half of the bandgap. After the 1400 °C annealing, the boron acceptor still remains strongly compensated at room temperature by deep donor-like levels located close to mid-gap. However, the latter decrease in concentration with increasing annealing temperature and after 1700 °C, the boron acceptor is essentially uncompensated. Hence, the deep donors are decisive for the semi-insulating properties of the substrates, and their thermal evolution limits the thermal budget for device processing. The origin of the deep donors is not well-established, but substantial evidence supporting an assignment to carbon vacancies is presented.

  17. High temperature annealing effects on deep-level defects in a high purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Naoya; Azarov, Alexander; Ohshima, Takeshi; Moe, Anne Marie M.; Svensson, Bengt G.

    2015-07-01

    Effects of high-temperature annealing on deep-level defects in a high-purity semi-insulating 4H silicon carbide substrate have been studied by employing current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, junction spectroscopy, and chemical impurity analysis measurements. Secondary ion mass spectrometry data reveal that the substrate contains boron with concentration in the mid 1015 cm-3 range, while other impurities including nitrogen, aluminum, titanium, vanadium and chromium are below their detection limits (typically ˜1014 cm-3). Schottky barrier diodes fabricated on substrates annealed at 1400-1700 °C exhibit metal/p-type semiconductor behavior with a current rectification of up to 8 orders of magnitude at bias voltages of ±3 V. With increasing annealing temperature, the series resistance of the Schottky barrier diodes decreases, and the net acceptor concentration in the substrates increases approaching the chemical boron content. Admittance spectroscopy results unveil the presence of shallow boron acceptors and deep-level defects with levels in lower half of the bandgap. After the 1400 °C annealing, the boron acceptor still remains strongly compensated at room temperature by deep donor-like levels located close to mid-gap. However, the latter decrease in concentration with increasing annealing temperature and after 1700 °C, the boron acceptor is essentially uncompensated. Hence, the deep donors are decisive for the semi-insulating properties of the substrates, and their thermal evolution limits the thermal budget for device processing. The origin of the deep donors is not well-established, but substantial evidence supporting an assignment to carbon vacancies is presented.

  18. Acceptor levels in ZnMgO:N probed by deep level optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, A.; Hierro, A. Muñoz, E.

    2014-02-24

    A combination of deep level optical spectroscopy and lighted capacitance voltage profiling has been used to analyze the effect of N into the energy levels close to the valence band of Zn{sub 0.9}Mg{sub 0.1}O. Three energy levels at E{sub V} + 0.47 eV, E{sub V} + 0.35 eV, and E{sub V} + 0.16 eV are observed in all films with concentrations in the range of 10{sup 15}–10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}. The two shallowest traps at E{sub V} + 0.35 eV and E{sub V} + 0.16 eV have very large concentrations that scale with the N exposure and are thus potential acceptor levels. In order to correctly quantify the deep level concentrations, a metal-insulator-semiconductor model has been invoked, explaining well the resulting capacitance-voltage curves.

  19. A fluorescent derivatization method of proteins for the detection of low-level impurities by microchip capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Christian; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Herwig, Ela; Schröttner, Evita; Allmaier, Günter; Trojer, Lukas; Vollmer, Martin; Rüfer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A novel pre-chip fluorescent derivatization method is presented for protein sizing and quantification by microchip CGE. The derivatization reaction employed a water-soluble and stable fluorescent dye and was performed under conditions that favored the formation of homogeneous reaction products. The method delivered in terms of protein sizing similar results as microchip CGE with on-chip staining but showed an extended linear dynamic range for protein quantification encompassing four orders of magnitude. The sensitivity of the method was similar to standard silver-stained planar gels. The characterization of derivatization reaction products by MS and preparative isoelectric focusing indicated that a constant degree of dye molecule tagging was obtained over a broad range of protein/dye ratios. The method allowed detecting and quantifying an impurity spiked into an antibody preparation down to a level of 0.05%. Advantages of this method compared with CGE approaches with pre-column derivatization include a shorter analysis time and an increased robustness and ease of use. PMID:20162586

  20. Development of RP UPLC-TOF/MS, stability indicating method for omeprazole and its related substances by applying two level factorial design; and identification and synthesis of non-pharmacopoeial impurities.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Sushant Bhimrao; Kumar, C Kiran; Bandichhor, Rakeshwar; Bhosale, P N

    2016-01-25

    A new UPLC-TOF/MS compatible, reverse phase-stability indicating method was developed for determination of Omeprazole (OMP) and its related substances in pharmaceutical dosage forms by implementing Design of Experiment (DoE) i.e. two level full factorial Design (2(3)+3 center points=11 experiments) to understand the Critical Method Parameters (CMP) and its relation with Critical Method Attribute (CMA); to ensure robustness of the method. The separation of eleven specified impurities including conversion product of OMP related compound F (13) and G (14) i.e. Impurity-I (1), OMP related compound-I (11) and OMP 4-chloro analog (12) was achieved in a single method on Acquity BEH shield RP18 100 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm column, with inlet filter (0.2 μm) using gradient elution and detector wavelength at 305 nm and validated in accordance with ICH guidelines and found to be accurate, precise, reproducible, robust and specific. The drug was found to degrade extensively in heat, humidity and acidic conditions and forms unknown degradation products during stability studies. The same method was used for LC-MS analysis to identify m/z and fragmentation of maximum unknown impurities (Non-Pharmacopoeial) i.e. Impurity-I (1), Impurity-III (3), Impurity-V (5) and Impurity-VIII (9) formed during stability studies. Based on the results, degradation pathway for the drug has been proposed and synthesis of identified impurities i.e. impurities (Impurity-I (1), Impurity-III (3), Impurity-V (5) and Impurity-VIII (9)) are discussed in detail to ensure in-depth understanding of OMP and its related impurities and optimum performance during lifetime of the product. PMID:26600119

  1. Low level impurities in imported wheat are a likely source of feral transgenic oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Juerg; Brodmann, Peter; Oehen, Bernadette; Bagutti, Claudia

    2015-11-01

    In Switzerland, the cultivation of genetically modified (GM) oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and the use of its seeds for food and feed are not permitted. Nevertheless, the GM oilseed rape events GT73, MS8×RF3, MS8 and RF3 have recently been found in the Rhine port of Basel, Switzerland. The sources of GM oilseed rape seeds have been unknown. The main agricultural good being imported at the Rhine port of Basel is wheat and from 2010 to 2013, 19% of all Swiss wheat imports originated from Canada. As over 90% of all oilseed rape grown in Canada is GM, we hypothesised that imports of Canadian wheat may contain low level impurities of GM oilseed rape. Therefore, waste fraction samples gathered during the mechanical cleaning of Canadian wheat from two Swiss grain mills were analysed by separating oilseed rape seeds from waste fraction samples and testing DNA of pooled seeds for the presence of transgenes by real-time PCR. Furthermore, oilseed rape seeds from each grain mill were sown in a germination experiment, and seedling DNA was tested for the presence of transgenes by real-time PCR. GT73, MS8×RF3, MS8 and RF3 oilseed rape was detected among seed samples and seedlings of both grain mills. Based on this data, we projected a mean proportion of 0.005% of oilseed rape in wheat imported from Canada. Besides Canadian wheat, the Rhine port of Basel does not import any other significant amounts of agricultural products from GM oilseed rape producing countries. We therefore conclude that Canadian wheat is the major source of unintended introduction of GM oilseed rape seeds into Switzerland. PMID:26109224

  2. Suitability of different containers for the sampling and storage of biogas and biomethane for the determination of the trace-level impurities--A review.

    PubMed

    Arrhenius, Karine; Brown, Andrew S; van der Veen, Adriaan M H

    2016-01-01

    The traceable and accurate measurement of biogas impurities is essential in order to robustly assess compliance with the specifications for biomethane being developed by CEN/TC408. An essential part of any procedure aiming to determinate the content of impurities is the sampling and the transfer of the sample to the laboratory. Key issues are the suitability of the sample container and minimising the losses of impurities during the sampling and analysis process. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art in biogas sampling with the focus on trace impurities. Most of the vessel suitability studies reviewed focused on raw biogas. Many parameters need to be studied when assessing the suitability of vessels for sampling and storage, among them, permeation through the walls, leaks through the valves or physical leaks, sorption losses and adsorption effects to the vessel walls, chemical reactions and the expected initial concentration level. The majority of these studies looked at siloxanes, for which sampling bags, canisters, impingers and sorbents have been reported to be fit-for-purpose in most cases, albeit with some limitations. We conclude that the optimum method requires a combination of different vessels to cover the wide range of impurities commonly found in biogas, which have a wide range of boiling points, polarities, water solubilities, and reactivities. The effects from all the parts of the sampling line must be considered and precautions must be undertaken to minimize these effects. More practical suitability tests, preferably using traceable reference gas mixtures, are needed to understand the influence of the containers and the sampling line on sample properties and to reduce the uncertainty of the measurement. PMID:26703250

  3. Sea-level fluctuations and deep-sea sedimentation rates.

    PubMed

    Worsley, T R; Davies, T A

    1979-02-01

    Sediment accumulation rate curves from 95 drilled cores from the Pacific basin and sea-level curves derived from continental margin seismic stratigraphy show that high biogenous sediment accumulation rates correspond to low eustatic sea levels for at least the last 48 million years. This relationship fits a simple model of high sea levels producing lower land/sea ratios and hence slower chemical erosion of the continents, and vice versa. PMID:17734144

  4. Effect of Z1/2, EH5, and Ci1 deep defects on the performance of n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers Schottky detectors: Alpha spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannan, Mohammad A.; Chaudhuri, Sandeep K.; Nguyen, Khai V.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopic performance of Schottky barrier alpha particle detectors fabricated on 50 μm thick n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers containing Z1/2, EH5, and Ci1 deep levels were investigated. The device performance was evaluated on the basis of junction current/capacitance characterization and alpha pulse-height spectroscopy. Capacitance mode deep level transient spectroscopy revealed the presence of the above-mentioned deep levels along with two shallow level defects related to titanium impurities (Ti(h) and Ti(c)) and an unidentified deep electron trap located at 2.4 eV below the conduction band minimum, which is being reported for the first time. The concentration of the lifetime killer Z1/2 defects was found to be 1.7 × 1013 cm-3. The charge transport and collection efficiency results obtained from the alpha particle pulse-height spectroscopy were interpreted using a drift-diffusion charge transport model. Based on these investigations, the physics behind the correlation of the detector properties viz., energy resolution and charge collection efficiency, the junction properties like uniformity in barrier-height, leakage current, and effective doping concentration, and the presence of defects has been discussed in details. The studies also revealed that the dominating contribution to the charge collection efficiency was due to the diffusion of charge carriers generated in the neutral region of the detector. The 10 mm2 large area detectors demonstrated an impressive energy resolution of 1.8% for 5486 keV alpha particles at an optimized operating reverse bias of 130 V.

  5. Improved Performance of the Alkaline-Side CSEX Process for Cesium Extraction from Alkaline High-Level Waste Obtained by Characterization of the Effect of Surfactant Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.

    1999-11-04

    Improved understanding and performance of the alkaline-side CSEX process has been obtained through the characterization of impurity effects that hinder complete stripping of cesium from the solvent. It is shown in this report that tests of the alkaline-side CSEX process conducted in the summer and fall of 1998 were complicated by the presence of common surfactant anions, undecyl- and dodecylsulfonate, as trace impurities in the two simulants tested. This conclusion was drawn from the results of a series of systematic extraction tests followed by a definitive identification by electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS). Based on this understanding, a straightforward preventative measure involving the addition of a lipophilic tertiary amine extractant at a small concentration to the solvent is proposed and demonstrated. As part of the task ''Fission Product Solvent Extraction'' supported by the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program within the USDOE Office of Environmental Management, the alkaline-side CSEX process has been developed for removal of radio-cesium ({sup 137}Cs) from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site and Savannah River Site (SRS). As described in a previous report, tests conducted in Fiscal Year 1998 generally demonstrated performance meeting the requirements for cesium removal from the waste to be treated at the SRS. However, discrepancies in stripping behavior were shown to arise from unidentified differences ''in the batches of waste simulant employed for testing. Various effects such as solvent impurities, kinetics, contacting method, and counting method were eliminated as possible causes of the observed discrepancies. Tests in Fiscal Year 1999 reported herein confirmed the earlier suspicion that the simulants contained lipophilic anionic impurities. Extraction tests demonstrated that the impurities could be concentrated in the solvent, and by ES-MS in the negative-ion mode it was possible to

  6. Electrical conduction and deep levels in polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Deneuville, A.; Fontaine, F.; Gheeraert, E.

    1995-12-01

    We have studied the dark conductivity (field, temperature, and frequency dependence), and the photoconductivity in undoped polycrystalline diamond films. Detailed analysis reveals that either of two alternative models can be invoked to explain all the observed features of the dark conductivity. The first model is a Hill-type hopping conduction involving the presence of discrete acceptor states located at 0.91 eV above the valence band with a density around 1017 cm-3. The second model involves the presence of a band-tail of acceptor states extending about 1 eV above the valence band. In this case, variable range hopping conduction dominates at low fields with a density of states at the Fermi level around 5×1015 cm-3 eV-1, while space charge limited currents dominate at high fields. The states controlling the dark conductivity give rise to photoconduction with a threshold around 0.85 eV and a peak at 1.1 eV. The shape of the photoconductivity spectrum suggests that lattice relaxation (with a Franck-Condon shift around 0.08 eV) occurs at these states. Peaks in the photoconductivity at 1.4 eV and at 1.9 eV give evidence for the presence of deeper states in these films.

  7. Effect of deep breathing on extracted oxygen and cerebral hemoglobin levels.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Patrick M; Zarbock, Christopher M; Burke, Broc A; Diamond, Solomon G

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between oxygen expired and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) measured hemoglobin levels in the brain. Analysis of these two signals during normal versus deep breathing provides insight into the dynamics of cerebral physiology. Intersubject variation suggests the existence of two distinct groups with respect to oxygen extraction and hemoglobin levels. PMID:22254486

  8. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide—glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01–10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  9. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide-glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01-10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  10. Impact of proton irradiation on deep level states in n-GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R.; Cinkilic, E.; Ringel, S. A.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; McSkimming, B.; Speck, J. S.

    2013-07-22

    Deep levels in 1.8 MeV proton irradiated n-type GaN were systematically characterized using deep level transient spectroscopies and deep level optical spectroscopies. The impacts of proton irradiation on the introduction and evolution of those deep states were revealed as a function of proton fluences up to 1.1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}. The proton irradiation introduced two traps with activation energies of E{sub C} - 0.13 eV and 0.16 eV, and a monotonic increase in the concentration for most of the pre-existing traps, though the increase rates were different for each trap, suggesting different physical sources and/or configurations for these states. Through lighted capacitance voltage measurements, the deep levels at E{sub C} - 1.25 eV, 2.50 eV, and 3.25 eV were identified as being the source of systematic carrier removal in proton-damaged n-GaN as a function of proton fluence.

  11. Comparative study of deep levels in HVPE and MOCVD GaN by combining O-DLTS and pulsed photo-ionization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, J.; Čeponis, T.; Gaubas, E.; Meskauskaite, D.; Reklaitis, I.; Vaitkus, J.; Grigonis, R.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2015-12-01

    Operational characteristics of sensors made of GaN significantly depend on technologically introduced defects acting as rapid traps of excess carriers which reduce charge collection efficiency of detectors. In order to reveal the prevailing defects in HVPE and MOCVD grown GaN, the carrier lifetime and photo-ionization spectra have been simultaneously measured by using microwave probed photo-conductivity transient technique. Several traps ascribed to impurities as well as vacancy and anti-site type defects have been identified in HVPE GaN material samples by combining photo-ionization and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The optical deep level transient spectroscopy technique has been applied for spectroscopy of the parameters of thermal emission from the traps ascribed to technological defects in the Schottky barrier terrace structures fabricated on MOCVD GaN.

  12. Correlation of a generation-recombination center with a deep level trap in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, X. S. E-mail: elecsj@nus.edu.sg; Lin, K.; Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.; McSkimming, B.; Speck, J. S.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Chua, S. J. E-mail: elecsj@nus.edu.sg

    2015-03-09

    We report on the identification of a deep level trap centre which contributes to generation-recombination noise. A n-GaN epilayer, grown by MOCVD on sapphire, was measured by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and noise spectroscopy. DLTS found 3 well documented deep levels at E{sub c} − 0.26 eV, E{sub c} − 0.59 eV, and E{sub c} − 0.71 eV. The noise spectroscopy identified a generation recombination centre at E{sub c} − 0.65 ± 0.1 eV with a recombination lifetime of 65 μs at 300 K. This level is considered to be the same as the one at E{sub c} − 0.59 eV measured from DLTS, as they have similar trap densities and capture cross section. This result shows that some deep levels contribute to noise generation in GaN materials.

  13. Alloy Engineering of Defect Properties in Semiconductors: Suppression of Deep Levels in Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bing; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Wei, Su-Huai; Liu, Feng

    2015-09-01

    Developing practical approaches to effectively reduce the amount of deep defect levels in semiconductors is critical for their use in electronic and optoelectronic devices, but this still remains a very challenging task. In this Letter, we propose that specific alloying can provide an effective means to suppress the deep defect levels in semiconductors while maintaining their basic electronic properties. Specifically, we demonstrate that for transition-metal dichalcogenides, such as MoSe2 and WSe2 , where anion vacancies are the most abundant defects that can induce deep levels, the deep levels can be effectively suppressed in Mo1 -xWx Se2 alloys at low W concentrations. This surprising phenomenon is associated with the fact that the band edge energies can be substantially tuned by the global alloy concentration, whereas the defect level is controlled locally by the preferred locations of Se vacancies around W atoms. Our findings illustrate a concept of alloy engineering and provide a promising approach to control the defect properties of semiconductors.

  14. Alloy Engineering of Defect Properties in Semiconductors: Suppression of Deep Levels in Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bing; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby; Wei, Suhuai; Liu, Feng

    Developing practical approaches to effectively reduce the amount of deep defect levels in semiconductors is critical for their use in electronic and optoelectronic devices, but this still remains a very challenging task. In this talk, we propose that specific alloying can provide an effective means to suppress the deep defect levels in semiconductors while maintaining their basic electronic properties. Specifically, we demonstrate that for transition-metal dichalcogenides, such as MoSe2 and WSe2, where anion vacancies are the most abundant defects that can induce deep levels, the deep levels can be effectively suppressed in MoWSe2 alloys at low W concentrations. This surprising phenomenon is associated with the fact that the band edge energies can be substantially tuned by the global alloy concentration, whereas the defect level is controlled locally by the preferred locations of Se vacancies around W atoms. Our findings illustrate a concept of alloy engineering and provide a promising approach to control the defect properties of semiconductors.

  15. The effectiveness and stability of impurity/defect interactions and their impact on minority carrier lifetime. Annual subcontract report, 1 August 1990--31 July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Rozgonyi, G.A.; Shimura, F.; Buczkowski, A.; Zhon, T.Q.

    1991-12-01

    This report covers the investigation and understanding of electrical activity of ``clean`` and metallic impurity decorated defects. A heterostructure containing a controlled number of deliberately introduced misfit dislocations is used as a model system to simulate a variety of defect/impurity interactions in photovoltaic materials. In addition, a noncontact laser/microwave deep-level transient spectroscopy technique is applied to characterize the minority carrier lifetime and determine the energy levels of defects. 59 refs.

  16. Deep levels in as-grown and electron-irradiated n-type GaN studied by deep level transient spectroscopy and minority carrier transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Tran Thien; Pozina, Galia; Son, Nguyen Tien; Kordina, Olof; Janzén, Erik; Ohshima, Takeshi; Hemmingsson, Carl

    2016-03-01

    Development of high performance GaN-based devices is strongly dependent on the possibility to control and understand defects in material. Important information about deep level defects is obtained by deep level transient spectroscopy and minority carrier transient spectroscopy on as-grown and electron irradiated n-type bulk GaN with low threading dislocation density produced by halide vapor phase epitaxy. One hole trap labelled H1 (EV + 0.34 eV) has been detected on as-grown GaN sample. After 2 MeV electron irradiation, the concentration of H1 increases and at fluences higher than 5 × 1014 cm-2, a second hole trap labelled H2 is observed. Simultaneously, the concentration of two electron traps, labelled T1 (EC - 0.12 eV) and T2 (EC - 0.23 eV), increases. By studying the increase of the defect concentration versus electron irradiation fluence, the introduction rate of T1 and T2 using 2 MeV- electrons was determined to be 7 × 10-3 cm-1 and 0.9 cm-1, respectively. Due to the low introduction rate of T1, it is suggested that the defect is associated with a complex. The high introduction rate of trap H1 and T2 suggests that the defects are associated with primary intrinsic defects or complexes. Some deep levels previously observed in irradiated GaN layers with higher threading dislocation densities are not detected in present investigation. It is therefore suggested that the absent traps may be related to primary defects segregated around dislocations.

  17. Deep-level transient spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dot superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, M. M.; Nevedomskii, V. N.; Zolotareva, R. V.; Vasil'ev, A. P.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2014-02-21

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been applied to study the carrier emission from states of a 10-layer system of tunnel-coupled vertically correlated quantum dots (VCQDs) in p-n InAs/GaAs heterostructures with different widths of GaAs spacers under varied reverse bias (U{sub r}) and filling voltage pulse U{sub f}.

  18. Deep Intuition as a Level in the Development of the Concept Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semadeni, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    To explicate certain phenomena, e.g., the possibility of deduction without definition, we hypothesize that an individual is able to understand and appreciate reasoning with a due feeling of its necessity when the concept image of each concept involved in the reasoning has reached a certain level of development; we then speak of "deep intuition".…

  19. Deep level defects in dilute GaAsBi alloys grown under intense UV illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, P. M.; Tarun, Marianne; Beaton, D. A.; Mascarenhas, A.; Alberi, K.

    2016-08-01

    Dilute GaAs1‑xBix alloys exhibiting narrow band edge photoluminescence (PL) were recently grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with the growth surface illuminated by intense UV radiation. To investigate whether the improved optical quality of these films results from a reduction in the concentration of deep level defects, p+/n and n+/p junction diodes were fabricated on both the illuminated and dark areas of several samples. Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements show that the illuminated and dark areas of both the n- and p-type GaAs1‑xBix epi-layers have similar concentrations of near mid-gap electron and hole traps, in the 1015 cm‑3 range. Thus the improved PL spectra cannot be explained by a reduction in non-radiative recombination at deep level defects. We note that carrier freeze-out above 35 K is significantly reduced in the illuminated areas of the p-type GaAs1‑xBix layers compared to the dark areas, allowing the first DLTS measurements of defect energy levels close to the valence band edge. These defect levels may account for differences in the PL spectra from the illuminated and dark areas of un-doped layers with a similar Bi fraction.

  20. Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-10-01

    A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall

  1. Thermal quenching effect of an infrared deep level in Mg-doped p-type GaN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keunjoo; Chung, Sang Jo

    2002-03-01

    The thermal quenching of an infrared deep level of 1.2-1.5 eV has been investigated on Mg-doped p-type GaN films, using one- and two-step annealing processes and photocurrent measurements. The deep level appeared in the one-step annealing process at a relatively high temperature of 900 °C, but disappeared in the two-step annealing process with a low-temperature step and a subsequent high-temperature step. The persistent photocurrent was residual in the sample including the deep level, while it was terminated in the sample without the deep level. This indicates that the deep level is a neutral hole center located above a quasi-Fermi level, estimated with an energy of EpF=0.1-0.15 eV above the valence band at a hole carrier concentration of 2.0-2.5×1017/cm3.

  2. Investigation of deep level defects in CdTe thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, H.; Castaldini, A.; Dauksta, E.; Medvid, A.; Cavallini, A.

    2014-02-21

    In the past few years, a large body of work has been dedicated to CdTe thin film semiconductors, as the electronic and optical properties of CdTe nanostructures make them desirable for photovoltaic applications. The performance of semiconductor devices is greatly influenced by the deep levels. Knowledge of parameters of deep levels present in as-grown materials and the identification of their origin is the key factor in the development of photovoltaic device performance. Photo Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy technique (PICTS) has proven to be a very powerful method for the study of deep levels enabling us to identify the type of traps, their activation energy and apparent capture cross section. In the present work, we report the effect of growth parameters and LASER irradiation intensity on the photo-electric and transport properties of CdTe thin films prepared by Close-Space Sublimation method using SiC electrical heating element. CdTe thin films were grown at three different source temperatures (630, 650 and 700 °C). The grown films were irradiated with Nd:YAG LASER and characterized by Photo-Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy, Photocurrent measurementand Current Voltage measurements. The defect levels are found to be significantly influenced by the growth temperature.

  3. Interactions of structural defects with metallic impurities in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C.; Hieslmair, H.

    1997-04-01

    Multicrystalline silicon is one of the most promising materials for terrestrial solar cells. It is critical to getter impurities from the material as well as inhibit contamination during growth and processing. Standard processing steps such as, phosphorus in-diffusion for p-n junction formation and aluminum sintering for backside ohmic contact fabrication, intrinsically possess gettering capabilities. These processes have been shown to improve L{sub n} values in regions of multicrystalline silicon with low structural defect densities but not in highly dislocated regions. Recent Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) results indirectly reveal higher concentrations of iron in highly dislocated regions while further work suggests that the release of impurities from structural defects, such as dislocations, is the rate limiting step for gettering in multicrystalline silicon. The work presented here directly demonstrates the relationship between metal impurities, structural defects and solar cell performance in multicrystalline silicon. Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) multicrystalline silicon in the as-grown state and after full solar cell processing was used in this study. Standard solar cell processing steps were carried out at ASE Americas Inc. Metal impurity concentrations and distributions were determined by use of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe (beamline 10.3.1) at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The sample was at atmosphere so only elements with Z greater than silicon could be detected, which includes all metal impurities of interest. Structural defect densities were determined by preferential etching and surface analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) in secondary electron mode. Mapped areas were exactly relocated between the XRF and SEM to allow for direct comparison of impurity and structural defect distributions.

  4. Deep-level emissions influenced by O and Zn implantations in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q. X.; Klason, P.; Willander, M.; Zhong, H. M.; Lu, W.; Yang, J. H.

    2005-11-01

    A set of bulk ZnO samples implanted with O and Zn at various densities were investigated by photoluminescence. The implantation concentration of O and Zn is varied between 1×1017/cm3 and 5×1019/cm3. The samples were thermally treated in an oxygen gas environment after the implantation. The results clearly show the influence of O and Zn implantations on the deep-level emission. By comparing the photoluminescence spectra for the samples with different implantations, we can conclude that the VZn is responsible to the observed deep-level emission. In addition, a novel transition at the emission energy of 3.08eV at 77K appears in the O-implanted sample with 5×1019/cm3 implantation concentration. The novel emission is tentatively identified as O-antisite OZn.

  5. Deep-level emissions influenced by O and Zn implantations in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Q.X.; Klason, P.; Willander, M.; Zhong, H.M.; Lu, W.; Yang, J.H.

    2005-11-21

    A set of bulk ZnO samples implanted with O and Zn at various densities were investigated by photoluminescence. The implantation concentration of O and Zn is varied between 1x10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3} and 5x10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}. The samples were thermally treated in an oxygen gas environment after the implantation. The results clearly show the influence of O and Zn implantations on the deep-level emission. By comparing the photoluminescence spectra for the samples with different implantations, we can conclude that the V{sub Zn} is responsible to the observed deep-level emission. In addition, a novel transition at the emission energy of 3.08 eV at 77 K appears in the O-implanted sample with 5x10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} implantation concentration. The novel emission is tentatively identified as O-antisite O{sub Zn}.

  6. Non-Contact, No Wafer Preparation Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy Based on Surface Photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, Jacek; Morawski, Andrzej; Edelman, Piotr

    1992-08-01

    We discuss a novel approach to Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) in which the emission of trapped minority carriers is analyzed employing the surface photovoltage (SPV) transient as measured in a non-contact manner on the native depletion barrier on semiconductor surfaces. Optical excitation is used as the trap-filling pulse. Experiments done on n-type GaAs demonstrate that the SPV-DLTS is suitable for wafer-scale, non-contact determination of deep level defects on semiconductor surfaces. The SPV approach can monitor emission rates up to 106 s-1 which is 102 to 103 above the limit of standard capacitance DLTS. The sensitivity of the method is comparable to that of the oplical capacitance DLTS.

  7. Revisiting radiative deep-level transitions in CuGaSe2 by photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindler, Conrad; Regesch, David; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2016-07-01

    Recent defect calculations suggest that the open circuit voltage of CuGaSe2 solar cells can be limited by deep intrinsic electron traps by GaCu antisites and their complexes with Cu-vacancies. To gain experimental evidence, two radiative defect transitions at 1.10 eV and 1.24 eV are characterized by steady-state photoluminescence on epitaxial-grown CuGaSe2 thin films. Cu-rich samples are studied, since they show highest crystal quality, exciton luminescence, and no potential fluctuations. Variations of the laser intensity and temperature dependent measurements suggest that emission occurs from two deep donor-like levels into the same shallow acceptor. At 10 K, power-law exponents of 1 (low excitation regime) and 1/2 (high excitation regime) are observed identically for both transitions. The theory and a fitting function for the double power law is derived. It is concluded that the acceptor becomes saturated by excess carriers which changes the exponent of all transitions. Activation energies determined from the temperature quenching depend on the excitation level and show unexpected values of 600 meV and higher. The thermal activation of non-radiative processes can explain the distortion of the ionization energies. Both the deep levels play a major role as radiative and non-radiative recombination centers for electrons and can be detrimental for photovoltaic applications.

  8. Impure placebo is a useless concept.

    PubMed

    Louhiala, Pekka; Hemilä, Harri; Puustinen, Raimo

    2015-08-01

    Placebos are allegedly used widely in general practice. Surveys reporting high level usage, however, have combined two categories, 'pure' and 'impure' placebos. The wide use of placebos is explained by the high level usage of impure placebos. In contrast, the prevalence of the use of pure placebos has been low. Traditional pure placebos are clinically ineffective treatments, whereas impure placebos form an ambiguous group of diverse treatments that are not always ineffective. In this paper, we focus on the impure placebo concept and demonstrate problems related to it. We also show that the common examples of impure placebos are not meaningful from the point of view of clinical practice. We conclude that the impure placebo is a scientifically misleading concept and should not be used in scientific or medical literature. The issues behind the concept, however, deserve serious attention in future research. PMID:26215744

  9. Deep level domain spectroscopy of low frequency oscillations in semi-insulating InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhouse, C.; Young, L.

    1992-11-01

    It is known that low frequency current oscillations occur in semi-insulating GaAs due to the formation and transit of high field domains caused by enhanced trapping of hot electrons by deep levels and that power density spectra of the current show peaks whose temperature dependence gives information on deep levels. In the present work Fe-compensated InP was investigated. The peaks rose from an approximately {1}/{f}{3}/{2} background and by estimating and removing this and by averaging many spectra, no less than 14 frequency peaks were resolved which gave straight lines on an Arrhenius plot of log( {T 2}/{2f}) vs{1}/{T}. Although the amplitude of the current oscillations is not so large as to preclude multiple domain propagation, it seems more likely that the domains are caused by hot electron trapping by one level only, rather than that several traps should have the necessary characteristics to launch domains. The multiplicity of peaks could be partly due to harmonics of the basic high field domain oscillation and partly due to conductivity modulation by other levels whose occupancies are changed by the passage of the domains: the task, if so, is to determine which peaks are which. The activation energies from the Arrhenius plots fell into groups close to 0.30, 0.39, 0.41, 0.44 and 0.49 eV. The 14 peaks thus are believed to arise from 5 deep levels. Evidence was found that the 0.49 eV level is iron-related and is responsible for producing the high field domains and for drain current drift in InP metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  10. Bismuth-induced deep levels and carrier compensation in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2008-01-01

    First-principles calculations show that Bi on Cd site in CdTe can be either a donor, Bi_Cd+, or an acceptor, Bi_Cd- , depending on the Fermi level. The can bind a substitutional O (O_Te) with large binding energy of 1.40 eV. The calculated (0/-) transition level for B_Cd- - O_Te complex is in good agreement with the observed deep hole trapping level. Bi can also substitute Te to form an acceptor. The amphoteric nature of Bi in CdTe results in the pinning of the Fermi level and the high resistivity. We also discuss the origin of p-type CdTe at high Bi doping level.

  11. Investigation of the origin of deep levels in CdTe doped with Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Saucedo, E.; Franc, J.; Elhadidy, H.; Horodysky, P.; Ruiz, C. M.; Bermudez, V.; Sochinskii, N. V.

    2008-05-01

    Combining optical (low temperature photoluminescence), electrical (thermoelectric effect spectroscopy), and structural (synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction) methods, the defect structure of CdTe doped with Bi was studied in crystals with dopant concentration in the range of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 19} at./cm{sup 3}. The semi-insulating state observed in crystals with low Bi concentration is assigned to the formation of a shallow donor level and a deep donor recombination center. Studying the evolution of lattice parameter with temperature, we postulate that the deep center is formed by a Te-Te dimer and their formation is explained by a tetrahedral to octahedral distortion, due to the introduction of Bi in the CdTe lattice. We also shows that this model agrees with the electrical, optical, and transport charge properties of the samples.

  12. Identification of process related trace level impurities in the actinide decorporation agent 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO): Nozzle–skimmer fragmentation via ESI LC–QTOFMS

    SciTech Connect

    Panyala, Nagender R.; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2014-08-12

    We report that 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) is a chelating ligand and decorporation agent that can remove radioactive lanthanides and actinides from the body. Identification of trace impurities in drug samples is gaining much interest due to their significant influence on drug activity. In this study, trace impurities were detected in manufactured lots of 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) by a developed method of Liquid Chromatography coupled with photo-diode array UV detection and Electrospray Ionization-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass spectrometry (LC-QTOFMS), via induced-in-source or collision-induced mass fragmentation (Nozzle-Skimmer Fragmentation). Molecular ions were fragmented within the nozzle-skimmer region of electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometer equipped with a Time of Flight detector. Eight major (detected at levels higher than a 0.1% threshold) and seven minor trace impurities were identified. The respective structures of these impurities were elucidated via analysis of the generated fragment ions using mass fragmentation and elemental composition software. Proposed structures of impurities were further confirmed via isotopic modeling.

  13. Identification of process related trace level impurities in the actinide decorporation agent 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO): Nozzle–skimmer fragmentation via ESI LC–QTOFMS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Panyala, Nagender R.; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2014-08-12

    We report that 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) is a chelating ligand and decorporation agent that can remove radioactive lanthanides and actinides from the body. Identification of trace impurities in drug samples is gaining much interest due to their significant influence on drug activity. In this study, trace impurities were detected in manufactured lots of 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) by a developed method of Liquid Chromatography coupled with photo-diode array UV detection and Electrospray Ionization-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass spectrometry (LC-QTOFMS), via induced-in-source or collision-induced mass fragmentation (Nozzle-Skimmer Fragmentation). Molecular ions were fragmented within the nozzle-skimmer region of electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometer equipped with a Timemore » of Flight detector. Eight major (detected at levels higher than a 0.1% threshold) and seven minor trace impurities were identified. The respective structures of these impurities were elucidated via analysis of the generated fragment ions using mass fragmentation and elemental composition software. Proposed structures of impurities were further confirmed via isotopic modeling.« less

  14. Identification of process related trace level impurities in the actinide decorpration agent 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO): Nozzle-Skimmer fragmentation via ESI LC-QTOFMS

    PubMed Central

    Panyala, Nagender R.; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) is a chelating ligand and decorporation agent that can remove radioactive lanthanides and actinides from the body. Identification of trace impurities in drug samples is gaining much interest due to their significant influence on drug activity. In this study, trace impurities were detected in manufactured lots of 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) by a developed method of Liquid Chromatography coupled with photo-diode array UV detection and Electrospray Ionization-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass spectrometry (LC-QTOFMS), via induced-in-source or collision-induced mass fragmentation (Nozzle-Skimmer Fragmentation). Molecular ions were fragmented within the nozzle-skimmer region of electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometer equipped with a Time of Flight detector. Eight major (detected at levels higher than a 0.1% threshold) and seven minor trace impurities were identified. The respective structures of these impurities were elucidated via analysis of the generated fragment ions using mass fragmentation and elemental composition software. Proposed structures of impurities were further confirmed via isotopic modeling. PMID:25165012

  15. Influence of impurities on the crystallization of dextrose monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markande, Abhay; Nezzal, Amale; Fitzpatrick, John; Aerts, Luc; Redl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The effects of impurities on dextrose monohydrate crystallization were investigated. Crystal nucleation and growth kinetics in the presence of impurities were studied using an in-line focused beam reflectance monitoring (FBRM) technique and an in-line process refractometer. Experimental data were obtained from runs carried out at different impurity levels between 4 and 11 wt% in the high dextrose equivalent (DE) syrup. It was found that impurities have no significant influence on the solubility of dextrose in water. However, impurities have a clear influence on the nucleation and growth kinetics of dextrose monohydrate crystallization. Nucleation and growth rate were favored by low levels of impurities in the syrup.

  16. Influence of growth temperature and temperature ramps on deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, A. M.; Kelchner, K.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The dependence of deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on bulk m-plane GaN substrates as a function of growth temperature (Tg) and Tg ramping method was investigated using deep level optical spectroscopy. Understanding the influence of Tg on GaN deep level incorporation is important for InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs) because GaN quantum barrier (QB) layers are grown much colder than thin film GaN to accommodate InGaN QW growth. Deep level spectra of low Tg (800 °C) GaN films grown under QB conditions were compared to deep level spectra of high Tg (1150 °C) GaN. Reducing Tg, increased the defect density significantly (>50×) through introduction of emergent deep level defects at 2.09 eV and 2.9 eV below the conduction band minimum. However, optimizing growth conditions during the temperature ramp when transitioning from high to low Tg substantially reduced the density of these emergent deep levels by approximately 40%. The results suggest that it is important to consider the potential for non-radiative recombination in QBs of LED or LD active regions, and tailoring the transition from high Tg GaN growth to active layer growth can mitigate such non-radiative channels.

  17. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    DOEpatents

    Freund, S.M.; Maier, W.B. II; Holland, R.F.; Beattie, W.H.

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (approx. 2 ppM) present in commercial Xe and ppM levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  18. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    DOEpatents

    Freund, Samuel M.; Maier, II, William B.; Holland, Redus F.; Beattie, Willard H.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (.about.2 ppm) present in commercial Xe and ppm levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  19. Deep-ocean contribution to sea level and energy budget not detectable over the past decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovel, W.; Willis, J. K.; Landerer, F. W.; Fukumori, I.

    2014-11-01

    As the dominant reservoir of heat uptake in the climate system, the world's oceans provide a critical measure of global climate change. Here, we infer deep-ocean warming in the context of global sea-level rise and Earth's energy budget between January 2005 and December 2013. Direct measurements of ocean warming above 2,000 m depth explain about 32% of the observed annual rate of global mean sea-level rise. Over the entire water column, independent estimates of ocean warming yield a contribution of 0.77 +/- 0.28 mm yr-1 in sea-level rise and agree with the upper-ocean estimate to within the estimated uncertainties. Accounting for additional possible systematic uncertainties, the deep ocean (below 2,000 m) contributes -0.13 +/- 0.72 mm yr-1 to global sea-level rise and -0.08 +/- 0.43 W m-2 to Earth's energy balance. The net warming of the ocean implies an energy imbalance for the Earth of 0.64 +/- 0.44 W m-2 from 2005 to 2013.

  20. Deep Ocean Contribution to Sea Level and Energy Budget Not Detectable over the Past Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovel, W.; Willis, J. K.; Landerer, F. W.; Fukumori, I.

    2014-12-01

    As the dominant reservoir of heat uptake in the climate system, the world's oceans provide a critical measure of global climate change. Here, we infer deep ocean warming in the context of global sea level rise and Earth's energy budget between January 2005 and December 2013 based on satellite altimetry, GRACE and Argo floats. Direct measurements of ocean warming above 2000m depth explain 0.9 +/- 0.15 mm/yr of the observed 2.78 +/- 0.32 mm/yr rate of global mean sea level rise. Over the entire water column, independent estimates of ocean warming yield a contribution of 0.77+/-0.28 mm/yr in sea level rise and agree with the upper ocean estimate to within the estimated uncertainties. Accounting for additional possible systematic uncertainties, the deep ocean (below 2000m) contributes -0.13 +/- 0.72 mm/yr to global sea level rise and -0.08 +/- 0.43 W/m2 to Earth's energy balance. The net warming of the ocean implies an energy imbalance for the Earth of 0.64 ± 0.44 W/m2 from 2005 to 2013.

  1. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  2. Springback assessment based on level set interpolation and shape manifolds in deep drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Quilliec, Guenhael; Raghavan, Balaji; Breitkopf, Piotr; Rassineux, Alain; Villon, Pierre; Roelandt, Jean-Marc

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce an original shape representation approach for automatic springback characterization. It is based on the generation of parameterized Level Set functions. The central idea is the concept of the shape manifold representing the design domain in the reduced-order shape-space. Performing Proper Orthogonal Decomposition on the shapes followed by using the Diffuse Approximation allows us to efficiently reduce the problem dimensionality and to interpolate uniquely between admissible input shapes, while also determining the smallest number of parameters needed to characterize the final formed shape. We apply this methodology to the problem of springback assessment for the deep drawing operation of metal sheets.

  3. Deep-level magma dehydration and ascent rates at Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Perinelli, C.; Putirka, K.

    2012-04-01

    Magma ascent velocity, v (dH/dt; H = depth, t = time),can be determined from ascent rate (dP/dt), and rate of cooling (dT/dt): v= 1/(rgpg) (dP/dT)(dT/dt) where r is magma density, P is pressure, T is temperature and g is the acceleration of gravity. This equation for v provides a key to investigating the relationships between initial ascent rate of magma and the depths of magma dehydration, and v can be calculated using pressure and temperature (P - PH2O - T) estimates from mineral-liquid thermobarometry, and cooling rates inferred from Crystal Size Distribution (CSD) theory. For recent Mt. Etna lava flows, both dP/dT and dT/dt have been well characterized based, respectively, on clinopyroxene thermobarometry, and clinopyroxene CSDs (the latter yields dT/dt = 2x10-6 °C/s). Deep-level (>20 km) magma ascent rates range from practically 0 (where clinopyroxene P - T estimates form a cluster, and so dP/dT ≈ 0), to about 10 m/hr for flows that yield very steep P - T trajectories. Many lava flows at Mt. Etna yield P - T paths that follow a hydrous (about 3% water) clinopyroxene saturation surface, which closely approximates water contents obtained from melt inclusions. Independent assessments of deep level water content yield ascent rates of ~1 m/hr, in agreement with the slowest rates derived for magma effusion or vapor-driven ascent (~0.001 to >0.2 m/s, or 3.6 to 720 m/hr). Changes in P - T slopes, as obtained by pyroxene thermobarometry, indicate an upward acceleration of magma, which may be due to the onset of deep-level magma dehydration linked to the non-ideal behavior of water and CO2 mixtures that induce a deep-level maximum of water loss at P ≈ 0.4 MPa at T ≈ 1200 ° C for a CO2 content >1000ppm. Melt inclusion data on CO2 and H2O contents are successfully reproduced and interpreted in a context of magma dehydration induced by a CO2 flux possibly deriving by decarbonation reaction of the carbonate fraction of the Capo D'Orlando flysch.

  4. Characterization of deep level defects and thermally stimulated depolarization phenomena in La-doped TlInS{sub 2} layered semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu. Suleymanov, Rauf A.; Mikailzade, Faik A.; Kargın, Elif Orhan; Odrinsky, Andrei P.

    2015-06-14

    Lanthanum-doped high quality TlInS{sub 2} (TlInS{sub 2}:La) ferroelectric-semiconductor was characterized by photo-induced current transient spectroscopy (PICTS). Different impurity centers are resolved and identified. Analyses of the experimental data were performed in order to determine the characteristic parameters of the extrinsic and intrinsic defects. The energies and capturing cross section of deep traps were obtained by using the heating rate method. The observed changes in the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) near the phase transition points in TlInS{sub 2}:La ferroelectric-semiconductor are interpreted as a result of self-polarization of the crystal due to the internal electric field caused by charged defects. The TSDC spectra show the depolarization peaks, which are attributed to defects of dipolar origin. These peaks provide important information on the defect structure and localized energy states in TlInS{sub 2}:La. Thermal treatments of TlInS{sub 2}:La under an external electric field, which was applied at different temperatures, allowed us to identify a peak in TSDC which was originated from La-dopant. It was established that deep energy level trap BTE43, which are active at low temperature (T ≤ 156 K) and have activation energy 0.29 eV and the capture cross section 2.2 × 10{sup −14} cm{sup 2}, corresponds to the La dopant. According to the PICTS results, the deep level trap center B5 is activated in the temperature region of incommensurate (IC) phases of TlInS{sub 2}:La, having the giant static dielectric constant due to the structural disorders. From the PICTS simulation results for B5, native deep level trap having an activation energy of 0.3 eV and the capture cross section of 1.8 × 10{sup −16} cm{sup 2} were established. A substantial amount of residual space charges is trapped by the deep level localized energy states of B5 in IC-phase. While the external electric field is applied, permanent dipoles

  5. Characterization of deep level defects and thermally stimulated depolarization phenomena in La-doped TlInS2 layered semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu.; Suleymanov, Rauf A.; Mikailzade, Faik A.; Kargın, Elif Orhan; Odrinsky, Andrei P.

    2015-06-01

    Lanthanum-doped high quality TlInS2 (TlInS2:La) ferroelectric-semiconductor was characterized by photo-induced current transient spectroscopy (PICTS). Different impurity centers are resolved and identified. Analyses of the experimental data were performed in order to determine the characteristic parameters of the extrinsic and intrinsic defects. The energies and capturing cross section of deep traps were obtained by using the heating rate method. The observed changes in the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) near the phase transition points in TlInS2:La ferroelectric-semiconductor are interpreted as a result of self-polarization of the crystal due to the internal electric field caused by charged defects. The TSDC spectra show the depolarization peaks, which are attributed to defects of dipolar origin. These peaks provide important information on the defect structure and localized energy states in TlInS2:La. Thermal treatments of TlInS2:La under an external electric field, which was applied at different temperatures, allowed us to identify a peak in TSDC which was originated from La-dopant. It was established that deep energy level trap BTE43, which are active at low temperature (T ≤ 156 K) and have activation energy 0.29 eV and the capture cross section 2.2 × 10-14 cm2, corresponds to the La dopant. According to the PICTS results, the deep level trap center B5 is activated in the temperature region of incommensurate (IC) phases of TlInS2:La, having the giant static dielectric constant due to the structural disorders. From the PICTS simulation results for B5, native deep level trap having an activation energy of 0.3 eV and the capture cross section of 1.8 × 10-16 cm2 were established. A substantial amount of residual space charges is trapped by the deep level localized energy states of B5 in IC-phase. While the external electric field is applied, permanent dipoles, which are originated from the charged B5 deep level defects, are aligned in the

  6. Halogenated persistent organic pollutants in relation to trophic level in deep sea fish.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynda; Russell, Marie; Walsham, Pam; Hussy, Ines; Lacaze, Jean-Pierre; Phillips, Lesley; Dalgarno, Eric; Packer, Gill; Neat, Francis; Moffat, Colin F

    2014-11-15

    The bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in deep sea fish from the Rockall fishing area was investigated. Predator and prey species were analysed for stable isotopes, fatty acids, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). δ(15)N indicated that black scabbard was at the highest trophic level and the prey the lowest. The fatty acid signatures indicated that black scabbard and black dogfish fed at a higher trophic level compared to the roundnose grenadier. PCBs and PBDEs were detected in the liver of all three predator species. PCB concentrations were significantly higher in the roundnose grenadier, possibly due to their longer life span. PCB concentrations were compared to OSPAR assessment criteria, concentrations were above background but below Environmental Assessment Criteria for all but one congener. PCB concentrations were below food safety levels in the flesh, but exceeded the limit for liver in the roundnose grenadier and black dogfish. PMID:25287221

  7. Formation of copper(I) from trace levels of copper(II) as an artifactual impurity in the HPLC analysis of olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Baertschi, Steven W; Olsen, Bernard A; Wozniak, Timothy J; Toltl, Nick; O'Shea, Colette; Jansen, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    An analytical artifact peak appearing to be an impurity was observed intermittently among several laboratories performing HPLC analyses of olanzapine drug substance and formulation samples. The artifact peak was identified as Cu(I) that was formed from the reaction of trace amounts of Cu(II) with olanzapine in the sample solution. Unlike Cu(II), Cu(I) was retained under the ion-pairing HPLC conditions used for analysis. A reaction mechanism was postulated whereby Cu(II) present in the sample solution oxidizes olanzapine to a radical-cation, resulting in formation of Cu(I) and three oxidation products of olanzapine including a previously unknown oxidation product that was identified as hydroxy-olanzapine. Acetonitrile in the sample solution was necessary for the reaction to occur. As little as 100 ppb Cu(II) in the sample solution produced a Cu(I) peak, that by peak area, corresponded to about 0.1% relative to the olanzapine peak. The hydroxy-olanzapine oxidation product was also detectable, but the relative peak area was much smaller. To prevent formation of the Cu(I) artifact peak, EDTA was added to the sample solvent to complex any trace Cu(II) that might be present. The addition of EDTA was shown to prevent Cu(I) formation when Cu(II) was present at levels of 4ppm in the sample solution. PMID:27023131

  8. Analytical advances in pharmaceutical impurity profiling.

    PubMed

    Holm, René; Elder, David P

    2016-05-25

    Impurities will be present in all drug substances and drug products, i.e. nothing is 100% pure if one looks in enough depth. The current regulatory guidance on impurities accepts this, and for drug products with a dose of less than 2g/day identification of impurities is set at 0.1% levels and above (ICH Q3B(R2), 2006). For some impurities, this is a simple undertaking as generally available analytical techniques can address the prevailing analytical challenges; whereas, for others this may be much more challenging requiring more sophisticated analytical approaches. The present review provides an insight into current development of analytical techniques to investigate and quantify impurities in drug substances and drug products providing discussion of progress particular within the field of chromatography to ensure separation of and quantification of those related impurities. Further, a section is devoted to the identification of classical impurities, but in addition, inorganic (metal residues) and solid state impurities are also discussed. Risk control strategies for pharmaceutical impurities aligned with several of the ICH guidelines, are also discussed. PMID:26690047

  9. Milankovitch tuning of deep-sea records: Implications for maximum rates of change of sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Wolfgang H.

    2013-02-01

    The analysis of several stacked and tuned records from the deep-sea floor yields two rather different sets of values for rates of sea-level rise. One of these reflects "regular" growth and decay and the other represents rapid decay of polar ice. Typical rise rates during rapid decay are near 1.2 m per century; with higher values seemingly following an abundance distribution that may be described by a standard deviation of 0.4 m per century (one third of the typical value). Distributions are based on a millennium resolution, leaving room for higher values for selected centuries within any millennium. Nevertheless, rise values beyond 5 m per century seem highly unusual. The quality of the match between deep-sea record (taken as differential) and Milankovitch forcing is excellent for the last 400,000 years (that is, the time since the "mid-Brunhes Event," a period that may be referred to as the "Emiliani Chron") but is poor in certain time spans before that. Difficulties associated with precise dating and a changing level of instability of polar ice prevent identification of trigger events for deglaciation. What is observable is that during periods of rapid decay, once sea level started to rise, it kept doing so for millennia (presumably till suitable ice masses were used up). Thus, it seems that a rise of sea level is itself a positive feedback on rapid melting of ice. Negative feedback, if real (as assumed in certain hypotheses about the origin of the Younger Dryas) is an unexpected exception that presumably relies on a high threshold value of sea-level rise.

  10. Deep levels in virtually unstrained InGaAs layers deposited on GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, D.; Gombia, E.; Mosca, R.; Bosacchi, A.; Franchi, S.

    1998-09-01

    The dislocation-related deep levels in InxGa1-xAs layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates have been investigated. Virtually unstrained InGaAs layers with mole fraction x of 0.10, 0.20, and 0.30 have been obtained by properly designing the In composition of linearly graded InxGa1-xAs buffers. Two electron traps, labeled as E2 and E3, whose activation energy scales well with the energy gap, have been found. Unlike E2, E3 shows: (i) a logarithmic dependence of the deep level transient spectroscopy amplitude on the filling pulse width and (ii) an increase of concentration as the buffer/InGaAs interface is approached. These findings, together with the observation that, in compressively strained In0.2Ga0.8As, the E3-related concentration is definitely higher than that of virtually unstrained In0.2Ga0.8As, indicate that this trap is likely originated by extended defects like threading dislocations.

  11. Sea-level and deep-sea-temperature variability over the past 5.3 million years.

    PubMed

    Rohling, E J; Foster, G L; Grant, K M; Marino, G; Roberts, A P; Tamisiea, M E; Williams, F

    2014-04-24

    Ice volume (and hence sea level) and deep-sea temperature are key measures of global climate change. Sea level has been documented using several independent methods over the past 0.5 million years (Myr). Older periods, however, lack such independent validation; all existing records are related to deep-sea oxygen isotope (δ(18)O) data that are influenced by processes unrelated to sea level. For deep-sea temperature, only one continuous high-resolution (Mg/Ca-based) record exists, with related sea-level estimates, spanning the past 1.5 Myr. Here we present a novel sea-level reconstruction, with associated estimates of deep-sea temperature, which independently validates the previous 0-1.5 Myr reconstruction and extends it back to 5.3 Myr ago. We find that deep-sea temperature and sea level generally decreased through time, but distinctly out of synchrony, which is remarkable given the importance of ice-albedo feedbacks on the radiative forcing of climate. In particular, we observe a large temporal offset during the onset of Plio-Pleistocene ice ages, between a marked cooling step at 2.73 Myr ago and the first major glaciation at 2.15 Myr ago. Last, we tentatively infer that ice sheets may have grown largest during glacials with more modest reductions in deep-sea temperature. PMID:24739960

  12. Electron Traps Detected in p-type GaAsN Using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S.; Friedman, D.; Ptak, A.; Ahrenkiel, R.; Crandall, R.

    2005-01-01

    The GaAsN alloy can have a band gap as small as 1.0 eV when the nitrogen composition is about 2%. Indium can also be added to the alloy to increase lattice matching to GaAs and Ge. These properties are advantageous for developing a highly-efficient, multi-junction solar cell. However, poor GaAsN cell properties, such as low open-circuit voltage, have led to inadequate performance. Deep-level transient spectroscopy of p-type GaAsN has identified an electron trap having an activation energy near 0.2 eV and a trap density of at least 1016 cm-3. This trap level appears with the addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs, which also corresponds to an increased drop in open-circuit voltage.

  13. Effect of iodine impurity on relaxation of photoexcited silver chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Vostrikova, Yu. V. Klyuev, V. G.

    2008-03-15

    The time and temperature dependences of relaxation of excited AgCl and AgCl:I crystals is studied by the method of photostimulated flash of luminescence. The presence of iodine impurity in silver chloride gives rise to hole recombination (luminescence) centers and hole traps in the band gap. It is shown that the main contribution to the decrease in the concentration of electrons localized at deep traps is made by the recombination of electrons with holes released thermally from shallow localization levels (iodine-related centers). Estimation of activation energy for the relaxation process showed that these energies for the AgCl and AgCl:I samples under study are the same within the experimental error and are equal to E{sub rel1} = 0.01 {+-} 0.0005 eV for the initial stage of relaxation and E{sub rel2} = 0.09 {+-} 0.005 eV for the final state. This fact indicates that the majority of hole traps involved in the relaxation process in AgCl are related to iodine impurity. In the course of thermal relaxation in AgCl, relocalization of nonequilibrium charge carriers from shallow levels to deep levels is observed. The depth of the corresponding trap is E{sub arl} = 0.174 {+-} 0.03 eV.

  14. Effects of Pressure on Optically Active Deep Levels in Phosphorus Doped ZnSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, B. A.; Iota, V.

    1998-03-01

    We report high pressure photoluminescence (PL) and PL-excitation (PLE) studies at 8K of the 'midgap' emission in P-doped ZnSe using a diamond-cell with He medium. The dominant emission at low pressure is due to donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) transitions between shallow donors and deep trigonally relaxed P_Se acceptors.(J. Davies, et al., J. Luminescence 18/19, 322 (1979)) Its PL and PLE peaks shift by 8.2meV/kbar and 5.9meV/kbar, respectively -- Stokes shift decreasing with pressure. At 35kbar a new PL band, shifting to lower energy (-5.4meV/kbar), emerges from above the absorption edge, and concurrently the original DAP PL quenches. This shows that a resonant level, a deep donor or possibly a P_Se antibonding state,(R. Watts, et al., Phys. Rev. B3), 404 (1971) crosses the conduction edge into the gap. A third PL band is seen only with internse UV excitation. It occurs initially as a high energy shoulder of the original DAP peak, but shifts more rapidly upward (9.4meV/kbar) until it crosses the edge and quenches at 40kbar. We discuss candidates for this band, including donor-P_Se complexes, and we compare our results to similar work on the Zn vacancy in ZnSe. (figures)

  15. Influence of growth temperature and temperature ramps on deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, A. M.; Kelchner, K.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.

    2013-12-02

    The dependence of deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on bulk m-plane GaN substrates as a function of growth temperature (T{sub g}) and T{sub g} ramping method was investigated using deep level optical spectroscopy. Understanding the influence of T{sub g} on GaN deep level incorporation is important for InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs) because GaN quantum barrier (QB) layers are grown much colder than thin film GaN to accommodate InGaN QW growth. Deep level spectra of low T{sub g} (800 °C) GaN films grown under QB conditions were compared to deep level spectra of high T{sub g} (1150 °C) GaN. Reducing T{sub g}, increased the defect density significantly (>50×) through introduction of emergent deep level defects at 2.09 eV and 2.9 eV below the conduction band minimum. However, optimizing growth conditions during the temperature ramp when transitioning from high to low T{sub g} substantially reduced the density of these emergent deep levels by approximately 40%. The results suggest that it is important to consider the potential for non-radiative recombination in QBs of LED or LD active regions, and tailoring the transition from high T{sub g} GaN growth to active layer growth can mitigate such non-radiative channels.

  16. Intrinsic deep hole trap levels in Cu2O with self-consistent repulsive Coulomb energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bolong

    2016-03-01

    The large error of the DFT+U method on full-filled shell metal oxides is due to the residue of self-energy from the localized d orbitals of cations and p orbitals of the anions. U parameters are selfconsistently found to achieve the analytical self-energy cancellation. The improved band structures based on relaxed lattices of Cu2O are shown based on minimization of self-energy error. The experimentally reported intrinsic p-type trap levels are contributed by both Cu-vacancy and the O-interstitial defects in Cu2O. The latter defect has the lowest formation energy but contributes a deep hole trap level while the Cuvacancy has higher energy cost but acting as a shallow acceptor. Both present single-particle levels spread over nearby the valence band edge, consistent to the trend of defects transition levels. By this calculation approach, we also elucidated the entanglement of strong p-d orbital coupling to unravel the screened Coulomb potential of fully filled shells.

  17. Characterization of a Dominant Electron Trap in GaNAs Using Deep-Level Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, S. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2006-08-01

    Dilute-nitrogen GaNAs epitaxial layers grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition were characterized by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). For all samples, the dominant DLTS signal corresponds to an electron trap having an activation energy of about 0.25 to 0.35 eV. The minority-carrier trap density in the p-type material is quantified based on computer simulation of the devices. The simulations show that only about 2% of the traps in the depleted layer are filled during the transient. The fraction of the traps that are filled depends strongly on the depth of the trap, but only weakly on the doping of the layers and on the conduction-band offset. The simulations provide a pathway to obtain semi-quantitative data for analysis of minority-carrier traps by DLTS.

  18. Promoting and Studying Deep-Level Discourse During Large-Lecture Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sissi; Demaree, Dedra

    2010-10-01

    At Oregon State University, the introductory calculus-based physics sequence utilizes social engagement as a learning tool. The reformed curriculum is modeled after the Interactive Science Learning Environment from Rutgers University, and makes use of Peer Instruction as a pedagogical tool to facilitate interactions. Over the past two years we have utilized a number of techniques to understand how to facilitate activities that promote productive discussion within the large lecture classroom. We specifically seek student discussion that goes beyond agreement on conceptual questions, encouraging deeper discussions such as what assumptions are appropriate, or how different assumptions would change the chosen answer to a given question. We have quantitative analysis of engagement based on video data, qualitative analysis of dialogue from audio data, and classroom observations by an external researcher. In this paper we share a subset of what we have learned about how to engage students in deep-level discussions during lecture.

  19. Valence band offset at the Si/SiSn interface by applying deep level transient spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio; Tonkikh, Alexander; Zakharov, Nikolay; Eisenschmidt, Christian; Werner, Peter

    2016-02-19

    A set of Si1-x Sn x /Si(001) quantum wells (QWs) is grown by applying molecular beam epitaxy. The activation energies of holes in these QWs are studied by deep-level transient spectroscopy. It is observed that the holes activation energies increase monotonically with the Sn fraction (x). The valence band offset between pseudomorphic Si1-x Sn x and Si obeys the dependence ΔE(v) = 1.69x eV, while the offset between the average valence bands of unstrained Si1-x Sn x /Si heterojunction was deduced and obeys the dependence ΔE(v(av)) = 1.27x eV. PMID:26775681

  20. On the capability of deep level transient spectroscopy for characterizing multi-crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mchedlidze, T.; Nacke, M.; Hieckmann, E.; Weber, J.

    2014-01-07

    The suitability of the deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique in exploring locations with high and degraded carrier lifetimes containing grain-boundaries (GBs) in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers was studied. The types and locations of GBs were determined in mc-Si samples by electron backscatter diffraction. Mesa-type Schottky diodes were prepared at (along) GBs and at reference, GB-free locations. Detected DLTS signals varied strongly along the same GB. Experiments with dislocation networks, model structures for GBs, showed that GB-related traps may be explored only using special arrangement of a GB and the diode contacts. Iron-related carrier traps were detected in locations with degraded carrier lifetimes. Densities of the traps for near-GB and for GB free locations were compared to the lifetime measurement results.

  1. Behavior of the Fe impurity in Hg{sup 3}In{sup 2}Te{sup 6} crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Grushka, O. G. Savchuk, A. I.; Chupyra, S. N.; Bilichuk, S. V.

    2015-07-15

    Optical and photoelectric measurements reveal that doping with iron leads to the formation of a deep level at E{sup c}–0.69 eV in Hg{sup 3}In{sup 2}Te{sup 6} crystals. When light is absorbed by Fe{sup 2+} impurity centers, both electronic transitions of the impurity-level–conduction-band type and optical transitions between ground and excited states of the aforementioned centers (intracenter transitions) are observed. Investigations of transport phenomena point to the acceptor properties of Fe{sup 2+} centers.

  2. Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase III summary and seventeenth quarterly report, Volume 2: analysis of impurity behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Blais, P.D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

    1980-01-23

    The object of this phase of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the properties of silicon and on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study encompassed topics including thermochemical (gettering) treatments, base doping concentration, base doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary-impurity interaction, non-uniformity of impurity distribution, long term effects of impurities, as well as synergic and complexing phenomena. The program approach consists in: (1) the growth of doubly and multiply-doped silicon single crystals containing a baseline boron or phosphorus dopant and specific impurities which produce deep levels in the forbidden band gap; (2) assessment of these crystals by chemical, microstructural, electrical and solar cell tests; (3) correlation of the impurity type and concentration with crystal quality and device performance; and (4) delineation of the role of impurities and processing on subsequent silicon solar cell performance. The overall results reported are based on the assessment of nearly 200 silicon ingots. (WHK)

  3. Effect of Z{sub 1/2}, EH{sub 5}, and Ci1 deep defects on the performance of n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers Schottky detectors: Alpha spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mannan, Mohammad A.; Chaudhuri, Sandeep K.; Nguyen, Khai V.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2014-06-14

    Spectroscopic performance of Schottky barrier alpha particle detectors fabricated on 50 μm thick n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers containing Z{sub 1/2}, EH{sub 5}, and Ci1 deep levels were investigated. The device performance was evaluated on the basis of junction current/capacitance characterization and alpha pulse-height spectroscopy. Capacitance mode deep level transient spectroscopy revealed the presence of the above-mentioned deep levels along with two shallow level defects related to titanium impurities (Ti(h) and Ti(c)) and an unidentified deep electron trap located at 2.4 eV below the conduction band minimum, which is being reported for the first time. The concentration of the lifetime killer Z{sub 1/2} defects was found to be 1.7 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}. The charge transport and collection efficiency results obtained from the alpha particle pulse-height spectroscopy were interpreted using a drift-diffusion charge transport model. Based on these investigations, the physics behind the correlation of the detector properties viz., energy resolution and charge collection efficiency, the junction properties like uniformity in barrier-height, leakage current, and effective doping concentration, and the presence of defects has been discussed in details. The studies also revealed that the dominating contribution to the charge collection efficiency was due to the diffusion of charge carriers generated in the neutral region of the detector. The 10 mm{sup 2} large area detectors demonstrated an impressive energy resolution of 1.8% for 5486 keV alpha particles at an optimized operating reverse bias of 130 V.

  4. Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase III summary and seventeenth quarterly report, Volume 1: characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Blais, P.D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The object of Phase III of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study encompassed a variety of tasks including: (1) a detailed examination of thermal processing effects, such as HCl and POCl/sub 3/ gettering on impurity behavior, (2) completion of the data base and modeling for impurities in n-base silicon, (3) extension of the data base on p-type material to include elements likely to be introduced during the production, refining, or crystal growth of silicon, (4) effects on cell performance on anisotropic impurity distributions in large CZ crystals and silicon webs, and (5) a preliminary assessment of the permanence of the impurity effects. Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. For example, discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, and conventional solar cell I-V techniques, as well as descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are included. Considerable data are tabulated on the composition, electrical, and solar cell characteristics of impurity-doped silicon.

  5. Impurities in snowpacks.

    PubMed

    Sommerfeld, R A

    1989-04-01

    Snow can be involved in the acquisition, transport, storage and release of atmospheric impurities. Because it can store impurities for periods of time ranging from hours to millenia, it provides a medium for monitoring atmospheric impurities for a wide range of time scales.In most climates, snow is involved in the precipitation process. It can acquire atmospheric impurities either as aerosols or as gases. The aereosols can be included in the body of the snow crystals or adhered to their surfaces. Gases may be included in bubbles, particularly in the case of rime, or adsorbed on the ice surfaces. The amount of ice surface in a small storm is about 10(10) m(2).Snow on the ground can store the impurities acquired in the precipitation process and can acquire additional impurities as dry deposition. The low temperatures and the fact that ice is a solid reduces biological activity and rates of inorganic reactions. However, the assumption that there is no activity in the winter is not well found. Exchange is possible between different layers of the snow and between the snow and the atmosphere, resulting in relocation of gases and aerosols. These processes also insure that the impurities reside on the exterior surfaces of the ice particles that form the snowpack. Biological activity is possible near the ground-snow interface in most climates.The seasonal snowpack releases its impurities when it melts. Because below freezing processes relocate any internal impurities to the ice surfaces within the snowpack, the impurities are available to the first melt water. Pulses of both acidic and alkalinic impurities have been observed with the initial snow melt water. However, the monitoring of such pulses is difficult and the measurements are inconsistent.Impurities are incorporated for longer periods of time in perennial snowpacks and finally in ice fields. These can be glaciers, or, at the largest scale, continental ice sheets. Coring such ice is expensive but provides data on

  6. Challenges to Standardization: A Case Study Using Coastal and Deep-Ocean Water Level Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, A. D.; Stroker, K. J.; Mungov, G.; McLean, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Sea levels recorded at coastal stations and inferred from deep-ocean pressure observations at the seafloor are submitted for archive in multiple data and metadata formats. These formats include two forms of schema-less XML and a custom binary format accompanied by metadata in a spreadsheet. The authors report on efforts to use existing standards to make this data more discoverable and more useful beyond their initial use in detecting tsunamis. An initial review of data formats for sea level data around the globe revealed heterogeneity in presentation and content. In the absence of a widely-used domain-specific format, we adopted the general model for structuring data and metadata expressed by the Network Common Data Form (netCDF). netCDF has been endorsed by the Open Geospatial Consortium and has the advantages of small size when compared to equivalent plain text representation and provides a standard way of embedding metadata in the same file. We followed the orthogonal time-series profile of the Climate and Forecast discrete sampling geometries as the convention for structuring the data and describing metadata relevant for use. We adhered to the Attribute Convention for Data Discovery for capturing metadata to support user search. Beyond making it possible to structure data and metadata in a standard way, netCDF is supported by multiple software tools in providing programmatic cataloging, access, subsetting, and transformation to other formats. We will describe our successes and failures in adhering to existing standards and provide requirements for either augmenting existing conventions or developing new ones. Some of these enhancements are specific to sea level data, while others are applicable to time-series data in general.

  7. Alloy Engineering of Defect Properties in Semiconductors: Suppression of Deep Levels in 2D Transition-metal Dichalcogenides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Bing; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby G; Wei, Su-Huai; Liu, Feng

    2015-09-18

    Developing practical approaches to effectively reduce the deep defect levels in semiconductors is critical for their use in electronic and optoelectronic devices, but this is still a very challenging task. In this Letter, we propose that specific alloying can provide an effective means to suppress the deep defect levels in semiconductors while maintaining their basic electronic properties. Specifically, we demonstrate that for such 2D transition-metal dichalcogenides as MoSe2 and WSe2, in which the most abundant defects that can induce deep levels are anion vacancies, the deep levels can be effectively suppressed in Mo1-xWxSe2 alloys at low W concentrations. This surprisingmore » phenomenon is associated with the fact that the global alloy concentration can substantially tune the band edge energies, whereas the preferred locations of Se vacancies around W atoms control the defect level locally. Our findings illustrate a new concept of alloy engineering and provide a promising approach to control the defect properties of semiconductors.« less

  8. Alloy Engineering of Defect Properties in Semiconductors: Suppression of Deep Levels in 2D Transition-metal Dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Bing; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby G; Wei, Su-Huai; Liu, Feng

    2015-09-18

    Developing practical approaches to effectively reduce the deep defect levels in semiconductors is critical for their use in electronic and optoelectronic devices, but this is still a very challenging task. In this Letter, we propose that specific alloying can provide an effective means to suppress the deep defect levels in semiconductors while maintaining their basic electronic properties. Specifically, we demonstrate that for such 2D transition-metal dichalcogenides as MoSe2 and WSe2, in which the most abundant defects that can induce deep levels are anion vacancies, the deep levels can be effectively suppressed in Mo1-xWxSe2 alloys at low W concentrations. This surprising phenomenon is associated with the fact that the global alloy concentration can substantially tune the band edge energies, whereas the preferred locations of Se vacancies around W atoms control the defect level locally. Our findings illustrate a new concept of alloy engineering and provide a promising approach to control the defect properties of semiconductors.

  9. High levels of natural radioactivity in biota from deep-sea hydrothermal vents: a preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Charmasson, Sabine; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Le Faouder, Antoine; Agarande, Michèle; Loyen, Jeanne; Desbruyères, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Hydrothermal deep-sea vent fauna is naturally exposed to a peculiar environment enriched in potentially toxic species such as sulphides, heavy metals and natural radionuclides. It is now well established that some of the organisms present in such an environment accumulate metals during their lifespan. Though only few radionuclide measurements are available, it seems likely that hydrothermal vent communities are exposed to high natural radiation doses. Various archived biological samples collected on the East Pacific Rise and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in 1996, 2001 and 2002 were analysed by ICP-MS in order to determine their uranium contents ((238)U, (235)U and (234)U). In addition (210)Po-Pb were determined in 2 samples collected in 2002. Vent organisms are characterized by high U, and Po-Pb levels compared to what is generally encountered in organisms from outside hydrothermal vent ecosystems. Though the number of data is low, the results reveal various trends in relation to the site, the location within the mixing zone and/or the organisms' trophic regime. PMID:19362761

  10. Thermal-Mechanical Modeling of Deep Borehole Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, B. W.; Clayton, D. J.; Herrick, C. G.; Hadgu, T.

    2010-12-01

    Disposal of high-level radioactive waste, including spent nuclear fuel, in deep (3 to 5 km) boreholes is a potential option for safely isolating these wastes from the surface and near-surface environment. Existing drilling technology permits reliable and cost-effective construction of such deep boreholes. Conditions favorable for deep borehole disposal in crystalline basement rocks, including low permeability, high salinity, and geochemically reducing conditions, exist at depth in many locations, particularly in geologically stable continental regions. Isolation of waste depends, in part, on the effectiveness of borehole seals and potential alteration of permeability in the disturbed host rock surrounding the borehole. Coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic processes induced by heat from the radioactive waste may impact the disturbed zone near the borehole and borehole wall stability. Numerical simulations of the coupled thermal-mechanical response in the host rock surrounding the borehole were conducted with three software codes or combinations of software codes. Software codes used in the simulations were FEHM, JAS3D, Aria, and Adagio. Simulations were conducted for disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies and for the higher heat output of vitrified waste from the reprocessing of fuel. Simulations were also conducted for both isotropic and anisotropic ambient horizontal stress in the host rock. Physical, thermal, and mechanical properties representative of granite host rock at a depth of 4 km were used in the models. Simulation results indicate peak temperature increases at the borehole wall of about 30 °C and 180 °C for disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Peak temperatures near the borehole occur within about 10 years and decline rapidly within a few hundred years and with distance. The host rock near the borehole is placed under additional compression. Peak mechanical stress is increased by about 15 MPa (above the assumed ambient

  11. Thermal-mechanical modeling of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Bill Walter; Hadgu, Teklu

    2010-12-01

    Disposal of high-level radioactive waste, including spent nuclear fuel, in deep (3 to 5 km) boreholes is a potential option for safely isolating these wastes from the surface and near-surface environment. Existing drilling technology permits reliable and cost-effective construction of such deep boreholes. Conditions favorable for deep borehole disposal in crystalline basement rocks, including low permeability, high salinity, and geochemically reducing conditions, exist at depth in many locations, particularly in geologically stable continental regions. Isolation of waste depends, in part, on the effectiveness of borehole seals and potential alteration of permeability in the disturbed host rock surrounding the borehole. Coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic processes induced by heat from the radioactive waste may impact the disturbed zone near the borehole and borehole wall stability. Numerical simulations of the coupled thermal-mechanical response in the host rock surrounding the borehole were conducted with three software codes or combinations of software codes. Software codes used in the simulations were FEHM, JAS3D, Aria, and Adagio. Simulations were conducted for disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies and for the higher heat output of vitrified waste from the reprocessing of fuel. Simulations were also conducted for both isotropic and anisotropic ambient horizontal stress in the host rock. Physical, thermal, and mechanical properties representative of granite host rock at a depth of 4 km were used in the models. Simulation results indicate peak temperature increases at the borehole wall of about 30 C and 180 C for disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Peak temperatures near the borehole occur within about 10 years and decline rapidly within a few hundred years and with distance. The host rock near the borehole is placed under additional compression. Peak mechanical stress is increased by about 15 MPa (above the assumed ambient

  12. Perceived Deep-Level Dissimilarity: Personality Antecedents and Impact on Overall Job Attitude, Helping, Work Withdrawal, and Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Hui; Chuang, Aichia; Joshi, Aparna

    2008-01-01

    The current research extends three research areas in relational demography: considering deep-level dissimilarity in theory building, assessing dissimilarity perceptions directly in theory testing, and examining the antecedents of dissimilarity perceptions. The results, based on two field studies using diverse samples, demonstrate the effects of…

  13. Transforming Passive Receptivity of Knowledge into Deep Learning Experiences at the Undergraduate Level: An Example from Music Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferenc, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses transformation of passive knowledge receptivity into experiences of deep learning in a lecture-based music theory course at the second-year undergraduate level through implementation of collaborative projects that evoke natural critical learning environments. It presents an example of such a project, addresses key features…

  14. Passivation of impurities in semiconductors by hydrogen and light metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislason, Hafliði P.

    1997-01-01

    Books as well as numerous articles have been written about hydrogen passivation in classical semiconductors such as Si and GaAs. The subject has gained a renewed interest recently since hydrogen is widely considered to saturate the hole conductivity of the wide bandgap semiconductors GaN and ZnSe which are currently most promising for blue light emitting devices. Other group-I impurities are capable of compensating the electrical conductivity of semiconductors both through directly neutralising (passivating) the impurity or providing space charge of polarity opposite to that of the dominating one. The paper reviews the similarities and differences between hydrogen and its light metallic neighbour in the periodic table, lithium. Also we provide a comparison with the heavier interstitial copper which is known for its ability to passivate shallow acceptors. Finally fundamental differences between shallow-level and deep level passivation will be addressed.

  15. Increased Levels of NF-kB-Dependent Markers in Cancer-Associated Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Malaponte, Grazia; Signorelli, Salvatore S; Bevelacqua, Valentina; Polesel, Jerry; Taborelli, Martina; Guarneri, Claudio; Fenga, Concettina; Umezawa, Kazou; Libra, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Several studies highlight the role of inflammatory markers in thrombosis as well as in cancer. However, their combined role in cancer-associated deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and the molecular mechanisms, involved in its pathophysiology, needs further investigations. In the present study, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1β), matrix metalloproteases-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue factor (TF), fibrinogen and soluble P-selectin, were analyzed in plasma and in monocyte samples from 385 cancer patients, of whom 64 were concomitantly affected by DVT (+). All these markers were higher in cancer patients DVT+ than in those DVT-. Accordingly, significantly higher NF-kB activity was observed in cancer patients DVT+ than DVT-. Significant correlation between data obtained in plasma and monocyte samples was observed. NF-kB inhibition was associated with decreased levels of all molecules in both cancer DVT+ and DVT-. To further demonstrate the involvement of NF-kB activation by the above mentioned molecules, we treated monocyte derived from healthy donors with a pool of sera from cancer patients with and without DVT. These set of experiments further suggest the significant role played by some molecules, regulated by NF-kB, and detected in cancer patients with DVT. Our data support the notion that NF-kB may be considered as a therapeutic target for cancer patients, especially those complicated by DVT. Treatment with NF-kB inhibitors may represent a possible strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of DVT in cancer patients. PMID:26192925

  16. Increased Levels of NF-kB-Dependent Markers in Cancer-Associated Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Bevelacqua, Valentina; Polesel, Jerry; Taborelli, Martina; Guarneri, Claudio; Fenga, Concettina; Umezawa, Kazou; Libra, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Several studies highlight the role of inflammatory markers in thrombosis as well as in cancer. However, their combined role in cancer-associated deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and the molecular mechanisms, involved in its pathophysiology, needs further investigations. In the present study, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1β), matrix metalloproteases-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue factor (TF), fibrinogen and soluble P-selectin, were analyzed in plasma and in monocyte samples from 385 cancer patients, of whom 64 were concomitantly affected by DVT (+). All these markers were higher in cancer patients DVT+ than in those DVT-. Accordingly, significantly higher NF-kB activity was observed in cancer patients DVT+ than DVT-. Significant correlation between data obtained in plasma and monocyte samples was observed. NF-kB inhibition was associated with decreased levels of all molecules in both cancer DVT+ and DVT-. To further demonstrate the involvement of NF-kB activation by the above mentioned molecules, we treated monocyte derived from healthy donors with a pool of sera from cancer patients with and without DVT. These set of experiments further suggest the significant role played by some molecules, regulated by NF-kB, and detected in cancer patients with DVT. Our data support the notion that NF-kB may be considered as a therapeutic target for cancer patients, especially those complicated by DVT. Treatment with NF-kB inhibitors may represent a possible strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of DVT in cancer patients. PMID:26192925

  17. Trade Study of System Level Ranked Radiation Protection Concepts for Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerro, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    A strategic focus area for NASA is to pursue the development of technologies which support exploration in space beyond the current inhabited region of low earth orbit. An unresolved issue for crewed deep space exploration involves limiting crew radiation exposure to below acceptable levels, considering both solar particle events and galactic cosmic ray contributions to dosage. Galactic cosmic ray mitigation is not addressed in this paper, but by addressing credible, easily implemented, and mass efficient solutions for the possibility of solar particle events, additional margin is provided that can be used for cosmic ray dose accumulation. As a result, NASA s Advanced Engineering Systems project office initiated this Radiation Storm Shelter design activity. This paper reports on the first year results of an expected 3 year Storm Shelter study effort which will mature concepts and operational scenarios that protect exploration astronauts from solar particle radiation events. Large trade space definition, candidate concept ranking, and a planned demonstration comprised the majority of FY12 activities. A system key performance parameter is minimization of the required increase in mass needed to provide a safe environment. Total system mass along with operational assessments and other defined protection system metrics provide the guiding metrics to proceed with concept developments. After a downselect to four primary methods, the concepts were analyzed for dosage severity and the amount of shielding mass necessary to bring dosage to acceptable values. Besides analytical assessments, subscale models of several concepts and one full scale concept demonstrator were created. FY12 work terminated with a plan to demonstrate test articles of two selected approaches. The process of arriving at these selections and their current envisioned implementation are presented in this paper.

  18. Analysis of generation and annihilation of deep level defects in a silicon-irradiated bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, K. V.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ravindra, M.; Damle, R.

    2007-08-01

    A commercial bipolar junction transistor (2 N 2219 A, npn), irradiated with 120 MeV Si9+ ions with a fluence of the order of 1012 ions cm-2, is studied for radiation-induced gain degradation and deep level defects. I-V measurements are made to study the gain degradation as a function of ion fluence. Properties such as activation energy, trap concentration and capture cross section of deep levels are studied by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Minority carrier trap energy levels with energies ranging from EC - 0.160 eV to EC - 0.581 eV are observed in the base-collector junction of the transistor. Majority carrier trap levels are also observed with energies ranging from EV + 0.182 eV to EV + 0.401 eV. The identification of the defect type is made on the basis of its finger prints such as activation energy, annealing temperature and capture cross section by comparing with those reported in the literature. New energy levels for the defects A-center, di-vacancy and Si-interstitial are also observed. The irradiated transistor is subjected to isothermal and isochronal annealing. The defects are seen to anneal above 250 °C. The defects generated in the base region of the transistor by displacement damage appear to be responsible for transistor gain degradation.

  19. Identifying a Threshold Impurity Level for Organic Solar Cells: Enhanced First-Order Recombination Via Well-Defined PC84BM Traps in Organic Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Sarah R.; Leong, Wei Lin; Banerji, Natalie; Dennler, Gilles; Heeger, Alan J.

    2011-06-21

    Small amounts of impurity, even one part in one thousand, in polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells can alter the electronic properties of the device, including reducing the open circuit voltage, the short circuit current and the fill factor. Steady state studies show a dramatic increase in the trap-assisted recombination rate when [6,6]-phenyl C₈₄ butyric acid methyl ester (PC₈₄BM) is introduced as a trap site in polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells made of a blend of the copolymer poly[N-9"-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole) (PCDTBT) and the fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl C₆₁ butyric acid methyl ester (PC₆₀BM). The trap density dependent recombination studied here can be described as a combination of bimolecular and Shockley–Read–Hall recombination; the latter is dramatically enhanced by the addition of the PC₈₄BM traps. This study reveals the importance of impurities in limiting the efficiency of organic solar cell devices and gives insight into the mechanism of the trap-induced recombination loss.

  20. High-temperature molecular beam epitaxial growth of AlGaN/GaN on GaN templates with reduced interface impurity levels

    SciTech Connect

    Koblmueller, G.; Chu, R. M.; Raman, A.; Mishra, U. K.; Speck, J. S.

    2010-02-15

    We present combined in situ thermal cleaning and intentional doping strategies near the substrate regrowth interface to produce high-quality AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on semi-insulating (0001) GaN templates with low interfacial impurity concentrations and low buffer leakage. By exposing the GaN templates to an optimized thermal dissociation step in the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy environment, oxygen, carbon, and, to lesser extent, Si impurities were effectively removed from the regrowth interface under preservation of good interface quality. Residual Si was further compensated by C-doped GaN via CBr{sub 4} to yield highly resistive GaN buffer layers. Improved N-rich growth conditions at high growth temperatures were then utilized for subsequent growth of the AlGaN/GaN device structure, yielding smooth surface morphologies and low residual oxygen concentration with large insensitivity to the (Al+Ga)N flux ratio. Room temperature electron mobilities of the two-dimensional electron gas at the AlGaN/GaN interface exceeded >1750 cm{sup 2}/V s and the dc drain current reached {approx}1.1 A/mm at a +1 V bias, demonstrating the effectiveness of the applied methods.

  1. Study of radiation induced deep-level defects in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced deep-level defects (both electron and hole traps) in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs p-n junction solar cells are investigated along with the correlation between the measured defect parameters and the solar cell performance parameters. The range of proton energies studied was from 50 KeV to 10 MeV and the proton fluence was varied from 10 to the 10th power to 10 to the 13th power P/sq cm. Experimental tools employed include deep-level transient spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage, current voltage, and SEM-EBIC methods. Defect and recombination parameters such as defect density and energy level, capture cross section, carrier lifetimes and effective hole diffusion lengths in n-GaAs LPE layers were determined from these measurements.

  2. Characterization of deep acceptor level in as-grown ZnO thin film by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghar, M.; K., Mahmood; A. Hasan, M.; T. Ferguson, I.; Tsu, R.; Willander, M.

    2014-09-01

    We report deep level transient spectroscopy results from ZnO layers grown on silicon by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The hot probe measurements reveal mixed conductivity in the as-grown ZnO layers, and the current—voltage (I—V) measurements demonstrate a good quality p-type Schottky device. A new deep acceptor level is observed in the ZnO layer having activation energy of 0.49 ±0.03 eV and capture cross-section of 8.57 × 10-18 cm2. Based on the results from Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) of the ZnO layer, the observed acceptor trap level is tentatively attributed to a nitrogen-zinc vacancy complex in ZnO.

  3. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device is disclosed. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500 C to about 700 C for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal. 1 fig.

  4. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500.degree. C. to about 700.degree. C. for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal.

  5. Development of an LC-MS method for ultra trace-level determination of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxl (TEMPO), a potential genotoxic impurity within active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Justin; Cohen, Ryan D; Tian, Ye; Boulineau, Fabien

    2015-10-10

    TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) is a stable free radical which has been widely used for various research and industrial applications, including the manufacture of many active pharmaceutical ingredients. TEMPO has been identified as a potential genotoxic impurity resulting in the need for analytical methodology to accurately determine its level at several orders of magnitude less than typical impurity quantitation limits. TEMPO can undergo disproportionation to form both oxidized and reduced TEMPO, making individual determination unreliable. To overcome this challenge, all TEMPO related species were converted to the reduced form through reduction with sodium ascorbate. Given the ultra-trace (0.5 ppm) level requirements and the lack of UV response in the reduced form, a single quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) was utilized. In order to implement a highly sensitive MS method in a GMP environment, several approaches were employed to optimize accuracy and robustness including: internal standard correction for drift elimination, six-level standard addition to reduce matrix effects, and weighted linear regression to cover a broad analytical range. The method was fully validated according to ICH guidelines. The method is specific, linear, accurate, precise, and robust within a range of 0.5-100 ppm. PMID:25921639

  6. Impurity control in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchi, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The control of impurities in TFTR will be a particularly difficult problem due to the large energy and particle fluxes expected in the device. As part of the TFTR Flexibility Modification (TEM) project, a program has been implemented to address this problem. Transport code simulations are used to infer an impurity limit criterion as a function of the impurity atomic number. The configurational designs of the limiters and associated protective plates are discussed along with the consideration of thermal and mechanical loads due to normal plasma operation, neutral beams, and plasma disruptions. A summary is given of the materials-related research, which has been a collaborative effort involving groups at Argonne National Laboratory, Sandia Laboratories, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Conceptual designs are shown for getterng systems capable of regenerating absorbed tritium. Research on this topic by groups at the previously mentioned laboratories and SAES Research Laboratory is reviewed.

  7. High water level impedes the adaptation of Polygonum hydropiper to deep burial: Responses of biomass allocation and root morphology

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ying; Xie, Yong H.; Deng, Zheng M.; Tang, Yue; Pan, Dong D.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the individual effects of sedimentation or inundation on the performance of wetland plants, but few have examined the combined influence of these processes. Wetland plants might show greater morphological plasticity in response to inundation than to sedimentation when these processes occur simultaneously since inundation can negate the negative effects of burial on plant growth. Here, we evaluate this hypothesis by assessing growth of the emergent macrophyte Polygonum hydropiper under flooding (0 and 40 cm) and sedimentation (0, 5, and 10 cm), separately and in combination. Deep burial and high water level each led to low oxidation-reduction potential, biomass (except for 5-cm burial), and growth of thick, short roots. These characteristics were generally more significant under high water level than under deep burial conditions. More biomass was allocated to stems in the deep burial treatments, but more to leaves in the high water level treatments. Additionally, biomass accumulation was lower and leaf mass ratio was higher in the 40-cm water level + 10-cm burial depth treatment than both separate effects. Our data indicate that inundation plays a more important role than sedimentation in determining plant morphology, suggesting hierarchical effects of environmental stressors on plant growth. PMID:25002329

  8. Origin and annealing of deep-level defects in GaNAs grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelczuk, Ł.; Stokowski, H.; Dąbrowska-Szata, M.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2016-05-01

    Deep-level defects were investigated by deep level transient spectroscopy on the as-grown and annealed GaNAs layers of various nitrogen (N) contents. The unintentionally doped (uid) GaNAs layers were grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy with N = 1.4%, 2.0%, 2.2%, and 2.4% on GaAs substrate. The possible origin and evolution of the deep-level defects upon annealing were analyzed with the use of the GaNAs band gap diagram concept [Kudrawiec et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 082109 (2012)], which assumes that the activation energy of donor traps decreases with N-related downward shift of the conduction band. On the basis of this diagram and in comparison with previous results, the N-related traps were associated with (N-As)As or (N-N)As split interstitials. It was also proposed that one of the electron traps and the hole trap, lying at the same level position in the bandgap of the annealed uid-GaNAs layers, can both act as one generation-recombination center partially responsible for poor optical properties of this alloy.

  9. Influence of EL2 deep level on photoconduction of semi-insulating GaAs under ultrashort pulse photoinjection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Xie, Guangyong

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the influence of EL2 deep level on photoconduction of in semi-insulating GaAs (SI-GaAs), a 3 mm-electrode-gap lateral SI-GaAs photoconductive chip was manufactured and tested by using ultrashort pulse laser with 1064 nm wavelength, 10 ns pulsewidth, 3.0 mm light spot diameter and single pulse energy mean of 3.0 mJ. Based on the experimental results and the theory of trapping effect, the photon absorption process of EL2 defects in SI-GaAs is analyzed. For the influence of EL2 deep level, the lifetime of the electron gets shorter and the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) is significant. With increasing of voltage, the decay time constant of photoconduction is reduced and the decay index gets bigger for the ultrashort pulse photoinjection.

  10. Correlation of current-voltage-temperature analysis with deep level defects in epitaxial GaN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Anurag G.; Aggarwal, Neha; Krishna T. C., Shibin; Singh, Manju; Rakshit, Rajib; Gupta, Govind

    2015-06-01

    The effect of temperature on the nature of metal-semiconductor system in a Au contact deposited on c-plane and a-plane GaN film was investigated by current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The I-V measurements have been obtained systematically at different temperatures ranging from room temperature (300 K) to low temperature (78 K). Photoluminescence measurements were obtained to investigate correlation between the growth conditions, the substrate used for the growth of GaN film, and the presence of deep level defects therein by equating with the yellow band luminescence. The resistance-voltage-temperature analysis indicates that a gradual shift of the nature of contact towards Schottky behavior takes place while moving from room temperature to low temperature. Additionally, memory effect like aberration is present at low temperature, which can be attributed to the presence of deep-level defects and carrier recombination therein.

  11. Studies of deep level transient spectroscopy of DX centers in GaAlAs: Te under uniaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming-Fu |; Yu, Y.P. |; Weber, E.R.; Haller, E.E. |; Hansen, W.L.; Bauser, E.

    1991-11-01

    DX centers in Al{sub 0.38}Ga{sub 0.62}As doped with Te have been studied by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) as a function of uniaxial stress. No splitting nor broadening of the DLTS peaks were observed. However, the peak positions and heights depend on the stress and its directions. The results have been analyzed by comparison with existing models and hydrostatic pressure measurements.

  12. Nonradiative coherent carrier captures and defect reaction at deep-level defects via phonon-kick mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Wakita, Masaki; Suzuki, Kei; Shinozuka, Yuzo

    2014-02-21

    We simulated the time evolution of electron-lattice coupling mode, and a series of nonradiative carrier captures by a deep-level defect in a semiconductor. For lattice relaxation energy of the order of the band gap, a series of coherent (athermal) electron and hole captures by a defect is possible for high carrier densities, which results in an inflation in the induced lattice vibration, which in turn enhances a defect reaction.

  13. Study of deep level characteristics in the neutrons irradiated Si structures by combining pulsed and steady-state spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Kalendra, V.; Ceponis, T.; Uleckas, A.; Tekorius, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Velicka, A.

    2012-11-01

    The standard methods, such as capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy (C-DLTS) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) techniques are unsuitable for the analysis of heavily irradiated devices. In this work, therefore, several steady-state and pulsed techniques have been combined to comprehensively evaluate parameters of radiation defects and functional characteristics of the irradiated Si pin detectors. In order to understand defects created by radiation and evaluate their evolution with fluence, C-DLTS and TSC techniques have been employed to make a baseline identification of the radiation induced traps after irradiation with a rather small neutron fluence of 1012 cm-2. The steady-state photo-ionization spectroscopy (PIS) technique has been involved to correlate thermal- and photo- activation energies for definite radiation defects. A contactless technique for simultaneous measurements of the carrier lifetime and the parameters of deep levels based on microwave probed pulsed photo-conductivity (MW-PC) spectroscopy has been applied to correlate carrier capture cross-sections and densities of the identified different radiation defects. A technique for spectroscopy of deep levels in junction structures (BELIV) based on measurements of barrier capacitance charging current transient changes due to additional spectrally resolved pulsed illumination has been applied to evaluate the functional characteristics of the irradiated diodes. Pulsed spectroscopic measurements were implemented by combining the analysis of generation current and of barrier capacitance charging transients modified by a single fs pulse of illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator of varied wavelength in the range from 0.5 to 10 μm. Several deep levels with activation energy in the range of 0.18-0.8 eV have been resolved from spectral analysis in the samples of Si grown by magnetic field applied Czochralski (MCz) technology.

  14. Impurity effects in silicon for high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Rohatgi, A.

    1986-01-01

    Model analyses indicate that sophisticated solar cell designs including, e.g., back surface fields, optical reflectors, surface passivation, and double layer antireflective coatings can produce devices with conversion efficiencies above 20 percent (AM1). To realize this potential, the quality of the silicon from which the cells are made must be improved; and these excellent electrical properties must be maintained during device processing. As the cell efficiency rises, the sensitivity to trace contaminants also increases. For example, the threshold Ti impurity concentration at which cell performance degrades is more than an order of magnitude lower for an 18-percent cell. Similar behavior occurs for numerous other metal species which introduce deep level traps that stimulate the recombination of photogenerated carriers in silicon. Purification via crystal growth in conjunction with gettering steps to preserve the large diffusion length of the as-grown material can lead to the production of devices with efficiencies aboved 18 percent, as has been verified experimentally.

  15. Effects of impurities on silicon solar-cell performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Model analyses indicate that sophisticated solar cell designs (back surface fields, optical reflectors, surface passivation, and double layer antireflective coatings) can produce devices with conversion efficiencies above 20%. To realize this potential, the quality of the silicon from which the cells are made must be improved; and these excellent electrical properties must be maintained during device processing. As the cell efficiency rises, the sensitivity to trace contaminants also increases. For example, the threshold Ti impurity concentraion at which cell performance degrades is more than an order of magnitude lower for an 18% cell than for a 16% cell. Similar behavior occurs for numerous other metal species which introduce deep level traps that stimulate the recombination of photogenerated carriers in silicon. Purification via crystal growth in conjunction with gettering steps to preserve the large diffusion length of the as grown material can lead to the production of devices with efficiencies above 18%, as verified experimentally.

  16. Dynamical impurity problems

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class.

  17. Dispersion retrieval from multi-level ultra-deep reactive-ion-etched microstructures for terahertz slow-wave circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Baik, Chan-Wook Young Ahn, Ho; Kim, Yongsung; Lee, Jooho; Hong, Seogwoo; Hee Choi, Jun; Kim, Sunil; Hun Lee, Sang; Min Kim, Jong; Hwang, Sungwoo; Yeon Jun, So; Yu, SeGi; Lawrence Ives, R.

    2014-01-13

    A multi-level microstructure is proposed for terahertz slow-wave circuits, with dispersion relation retrieved by scattering parameter measurements. The measured return loss shows strong resonances above the cutoff with negligible phase shifts compared with finite element analysis. Splitting the circuit into multi levels enables a low aspect ratio configuration that alleviates the loading effect of deep-reactive-ion etching on silicon wafers. This makes it easier to achieve flat-etched bottom and smooth sidewall profiles. The dispersion retrieved from the measurement, therefore, corresponds well to the theoretical estimation. The result provides a straightforward way to the precise determination of dispersions in terahertz vacuum electronics.

  18. Studies of deep level centers determining the diffusion length in epitaxial layers and crystals of undoped n-GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Hwan; Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Yakimov, E. B.; Tarelkin, S. A.; Turutin, A. V.; Shemerov, I. V.; Pearton, S. J.

    2016-05-01

    A wide variety of parameters were measured for undoped n-GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy and compared to n-GaN films grown by conventional and lateral overgrowth metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The parameters included deep level electron and hole trap spectra, microcathodoluminescence, electron beam induced current, diffusion length, and electron capture cross section from the dependence of the low temperature persistent photocapacitance on forward bias injection pulse duration. The results show a prominent role of electron traps with levels near Ec-0.56 eV in limiting the lifetime and diffusion length values in all these materials.

  19. Gas chromatographic analysis of trace gas impurities in tungsten hexafluoride.

    PubMed

    Laurens, J B; de Coning, J P; Swinley, J M

    2001-03-01

    Highly reactive fluorinated gaseous matrices require special equipment and techniques for the gas chromatographic analysis of trace impurities in these gases. The impurities that were analysed at the low-microg/l levels included oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen. This paper describes the use of a system utilising backflush column switching to protect the columns and detectors in the analysis of trace gas impurities in tungsten hexafluoride. Two separate channels were used for the analysis of H2, O2, N2, CO, CO2 and SF6 impurities with pulsed discharge helium ionisation detection. PMID:11269587

  20. Large Deep-Ocean Impacts, Sea-Floor Hiatuses, and Apparent Short Term Sea-Level Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrum, J. T.

    2001-12-01

    Widespread discontinuities and unconformities in deep-sea sedimentary records (hiatuses) often correspond to rapid fluctuations in eustatic sea level. Such global paleoceanographic events have been attributed to vertical tectonic movements, to changes in ocean basin configuration and volume, and to glacial versus non-glacial climates. Alternatively, megatsunami waves generated by large deep-ocean impacts cause widespread erosion of the sea floor centered on the impact site. At the shoreline, run-up heights can exceed 1 km on a global scale. These high-energy events might be the source of some sea-floor hiatuses as well as stratigraphic intervals currently interpreted as short-term regression and transgression (r-t) pulses in sea level. A widespread hiatus, probable impact ejecta, ocean chemistry and sediment changes, and r-t pulse occurring at ~68-67 Ma indicate that a large oceanic impact might have preceded the Chicxulub impact by a few million years. The hiatus proximal to the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary is most pronounced in the northern Pacific basin and, because tsunami amplitude is proportional to water depth, could not have been caused by the shallow-water (<=100 m) Chicxulub impact at ~65 Ma. Thus K-T time likely experienced two large bolide impacts, one of which occurred in the deep ocean.

  1. Exploring the Deep-Level Reasoning Questions Effect during Vicarious Learning among Eighth to Eleventh Graders in the Domains of Computer Literacy and Newtonian Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gholson, Barry; Witherspoon, Amy; Morgan, Brent; Brittingham, Joshua K.; Coles, Robert; Graesser, Arthur C.; Sullins, Jeremiah; Craig, Scotty D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper tested the deep-level reasoning questions effect in the domains of computer literacy between eighth and tenth graders and Newtonian physics for ninth and eleventh graders. This effect claims that learning is facilitated when the materials are organized around questions that invite deep-reasoning. The literature indicates that vicarious…

  2. Defect levels in Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x)4 solar cells probed by current-mode deep level transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sandip; Chaudhuri, Sandeep K.; Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2014-05-01

    Defect levels in kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) solar cells have been investigated by current-mode deep level transient spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out on two CZTSSe cells with photoconversion efficiencies of 4.1% and 7.1% measured under AM 1.5 illumination. The absorber layer of the 4.1% efficiency cell was prepared by annealing evaporated ZnS/Cu/Sn stacked precursor under S/Se vapor, while the absorber of the 7.1% efficiency cell was prepared by co-evaporation of the constituent elements. The 4.1% efficiency CZTSSe cell with a S/(S + Se) ratio of 0.58 exhibited two dominant deep acceptor levels at Ev + 0.12 eV, and Ev + 0.32 eV identified as CuZn(-/0) and CuSn(2-/-) antisite defects, respectively. The 7.1% efficiency cell with purely Se composition S/(S + Se) = 0 showed only one shallow level at Ev + 0.03 eV corresponding to Cu-vacancy (VCu). Our results revealed that VCu is the primary defect center in the high-efficiency kesterite solar cell in contrast to the detrimental CuZn and CuSn antisites found in the low efficiency CZTSSe cells limiting the device performance.

  3. Evaluation of hydraulic characteristics of a deep artesian aquifer from natural water-level fluctuations, Miami, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Frederick W.

    1974-01-01

    Knowledge of tho hydraulic characteristics of aquifer systems is fundamental to defining the vertical and horizontal controls on fluid movement, information which is needed for assessing the environmental impact of subsurface waste storage. To meet this objective, natural water-level fluctuations in the 2,947-foot deep Peninsula Utilities disposal well near Miami, Florida were analyzed to obtain estimates of the hydraulic diffusivity, hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, transmissivity, and the storage coefficient of the Boulder Zone. The fluctuations are caused chiefly by oceanic and earth tides, and by changes in atmospheric pressure. The oceanic tidal fluctuations probably result from loading due to tides in Biscayne Bay.

  4. Deep electronic levels in high-pressure Bridgman Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te

    SciTech Connect

    Szeles, C.; Shan, Y.Y.; Lynn, K.G.; Eissler, E.E.

    1995-12-01

    The behavior of deep electronic levels was studied as a function of Zn concentration in CdZnTe crystals grown by the high-pressure Bridgman technique using thermoelectric effect spectroscopy. A significant increase of the thermal ionization energies of hole traps was observed with the increasing Zn content of the ternary compound. The effect explains the stronger hole trapping and the resulting much shorter hole lifetime usually observed in CdZnTe as compared to CdTe. The behavior also suggests increased carrier recombination and explains the strong deterioration of electron collection in detectors fabricated from CdZnTe of high Zn concentration.

  5. Deep level transient spectroscopy studies of n-type ZnO single crystals grown by different techniques.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, L; Kolkovsky, Vl; Lavrov, E V; Weber, J

    2011-08-24

    In the present study single-crystalline ZnO samples grown from the vapor phase, the melt, and a high-temperature aqueous solution (hydrothermal growth) are investigated before and after hydrogen plasma treatments, by means of deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and high-resolution Laplace DLTS. Dominant DLTS peaks are found to appear in the range of 120-350 K for all materials. The DLTS spectra depend on the procedure of growth of the ZnO. The thermal stabilities of the defects in an oxygen atmosphere and in an oxygen-lean atmosphere are analyzed. The origin of the DLTS peaks is discussed. PMID:21813951

  6. Electronic properties of deep-level defects in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy and capacitance voltage techniques as well as analysis of the forward current voltage (I-V) characteristics and SEM-EIC data were carried out for proton irradiated GaAs solar cells over a wide range of proton energies and proton fluences. Defect and recombination parameters such as defect energy levels and density, carrier capture cross sections and lifetimes as well as diffusion lengths in the undoped n-GaAs LPE layers were determined. Good correlation between these defect parameters and solar cell performance parameters was obtained for GaAs solar cells irradiated by 200 and 290 KeV protons. It was found that 200 to 290 KeV protons will produce the most defects and damages to the GaAs solar cell structure used. The influence of the low temperature (200 to 400 C) periodic thermal annealing on the deep level defects and the performance of the 200 KeV proton irradiated cells is discussed.

  7. Deep-level defects and turn-on capacitance recovery characteristics in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yoshitaka; Irokawa, Yoshihiro; Sumiya, Masatomo

    2015-06-01

    We report on turn-on capacitance recovery measurements as a simple short-time method of evaluating carrier-trapping phenomena in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the bulk region of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures, employing their Schottky barrier diodes. Using this technique, we have investigated an in-depth relation between deep-level defects and 2DEG carrier trapping in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure with a GaN buffer layer containing a high C concentration. Steady-state photo-capacitance spectroscopy measurements revealed three C-related deep-level defects located at ~2.07, ~2.80 and ~3.23 eV below the conduction band in the GaN buffer layer. Additionally, turn-on capacitance recovery measurements showed a large decrease in recovery time under white-light optical illuminations with long-pass filters between 370 and 390 nm. It is concluded that the ~3.23 eV level is mainly responsible for the 2DEG carrier-trapping phenomena in the GaN buffer layer of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure.

  8. Deep levels in high resistivity GaN detected by thermally stimulated luminescence and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Yanqin; Li, Jingbo; Hou, Qifeng; Wang, Xiaoliang; Xiao, Hongling; Wang, Cuimei; Li, Jinmin

    2009-08-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence spectroscopy has been applied to study the deep centres in unintentionally doped high resistivity GaN epilayers grown by the metal organic chemical vapour deposition method on c-sapphire substrates. Two trap states with activation energies of 0.12 and 0.62 eV are evaluated from two luminescence peaks at 141.9 and 294.7 K in the luminescence curve. Our spectroscopy measurement, in combination with more accurate first-principles studies, provided insights into the microscopic origin of these levels. Our investigations suggest that the lower level at 0.12 eV might originate from CN, which behaves as a hole trap state; the deeper level at 0.62 eV can be correlated with VGa that corresponds to the yellow luminescence band observed in low-temperature photoluminescence spectra.

  9. Current Collapse and Deep Levels of AlGaN/GaN Heterostructures monitored by LFN Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacano, M.; Tanuma, N.; Yagi, S.; Okumura, H.; Matsui, T.; Sikula, J.

    2009-04-01

    The correlation between the current collapse in the IV characteristics of AlGaN/GaN HFETs and the traps monitored through the unpassivated and SiN-passivation processes of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures by the low frequency noise measurements is reported: the noise level of E1(47 meV) trap decreased by 10 dBA/√Hz by the SiN passivation process together with the current collapse recovery in IV curves, while E2(131 meV) and E3(235 meV) levels became apparent after SiN passivation, indicating the remarkable suppression of the E1 trap by the passivation. The commercially available AlGaAs/GaAs LED heads for the page and FAX printers found several deep levels introduced during the contact formation processes, which could not be assigned by the DLTS measurements.

  10. Characterization of the deep levels responsible for non-radiative recombination in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, M. La Grassa, M.; Vaccari, S.; Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.

    2014-03-17

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of the deep levels related to non-radiative recombination in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The study is based on combined optical and deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, carried out on LEDs with identical structure and with different values of the non-radiative recombination coefficient. Experimental data lead to the following, relevant, results: (i) LEDs with a high non-radiative recombination coefficient have a higher concentration of a trap (labeled as “e{sub 2}”) with an activation energy of 0.7 eV, which is supposed to be located close to/within the active region; (ii) measurements carried out with varying filling pulse duration suggest that this deep level behaves as a point-defect/dislocation complex. The Arrhenius plot of this deep level is critically compared with the previous literature reports, to identify its physical origin.

  11. Relationship of deep defects to oxygen and hydrogen content in nanocrystalline silicon photovoltaic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hugger, Peter G.; Cohen, J. David; Yan Baojie; Yue Guozhen; Yang, Jeffrey; Guha, Subhendu

    2010-12-20

    We report measurements of the structural and compositional properties of a range of hydrogenated nanocrystalline films. We employed Raman spectroscopy for crystallinity and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) for impurity characterizations. The crystalline volume fractions and impurity levels are correlated with the deep state densities determined by drive level capacitance profiling. Those defects were found to have a thermal emission energy of 0.65{+-}.05 eV. We found that the overall crystallinity correlated reasonably well with the density of such defect states and also found a strong correlation between the defect density and the levels of oxygen impurities. Possible origins of these defects are discussed.

  12. High level science products from deep ACS and WFC3/IR imaging over the CDF-S/GOODS-S region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Garth

    2013-10-01

    The CDF-S, with its extensive datasets that include the well-known HUDF, GOODS and CANDELS fields, is a remarkable resource for studying distant galaxies. CDF-S is a unique region in the sky. An astonishing 6 Msec of Hubble data {nearly 2600 orbits of WFC3 and ACS data alone}, 6 Msec of Spitzer IRAC images, and 4 Msec of Chandra data, plus ground-based spectra, imaging and, now, ALMA observations, make this one of Hubble's key legacy areas. Remarkably, while the major areas, HUDF, GOODS and CANDELS are available as high-level data products, over 40% { 1000 orbits} of HST data are unavailable to the community as high-level science products and catalogs in MAST. This includes several deep fields, including the parallel field HUDF09-2 which reaches as deep in ACS { 400 orbits} as the HUDF. We propose to use our extensive experience processing and delivering HST ACS and WFC3/IR datasets to STScI MAST to now deliver a complete processed and aligned dataset of all deep fields and the deeper, but as-yet-unused, SNe follow-up and parallel datasets across the CDF-S. The same will be done for the much smaller but similar dataset on the HDF-N region. These data products will add substantially to our understanding of the build up of galaxies to z 6 in the first Gyr during reionization, and their impact on reionization, the development of galaxies over the subsequent Gyr to to the peak of the star formation rate in the universe around 2-3 Gyr after the Big Bang at z 2-3, and the transition of early star-forming galaxies to the full splendor of the Hubble sequence since z 2. These Hubble Legacy Field datasets will be of great value as the Frontier Fields are used by the community.

  13. Influence of the Deep Water Horizon Oil Spill on Atmospheric Hydrocarbon Levels over the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Meinardi, S.; Leifer, I.; Rowland, F. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    The waters of the Gulf of Mexico recently were impacted negatively by the large oil spill that occurred after an explosion at the BP Deep Water Horizon rig on April 20, 2010. In response to this disaster, and out of concern for the multitude of chemical pollutants being emitted, we collected 96 air samples in the Gulf region aboard the 65 ft vessel “R/V Eugenie” during 20-23 May, 2010. Sample analysis was by high sensitivity gas chromatographic analysis with special attention to the presence of possible toxic components. Analysis of each canister included straight-chain saturated hydrocarbons from C1 (methane) to C12 (dodecane), aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and toluene, as well as higher molecular weight species. High levels of C5-C12 alkanes and cyclo-alkanes, typical of crude oil, were observed in the atmosphere downwind of the spill location. However, the most soluble components, especially methane and benzene, were largely absent from the near-surface atmosphere implying dissolution in the deep sea, where they could impact negatively oxygen levels.

  14. Growth temperature dependence of Si doping efficiency and compensating deep level defect incorporation in Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M. Moseley, Michael W.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Wierer, Jonathan J.

    2015-05-14

    The growth temperature dependence of Si doping efficiency and deep level defect formation was investigated for n-type Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N. It was observed that dopant compensation was greatly reduced with reduced growth temperature. Deep level optical spectroscopy and lighted capacitance-voltage were used to understand the role of acceptor-like deep level defects on doping efficiency. Deep level defects were observed at 2.34 eV, 3.56 eV, and 4.74 eV below the conduction band minimum. The latter two deep levels were identified as the major compensators because the reduction in their concentrations at reduced growth temperature correlated closely with the concomitant increase in free electron concentration. Possible mechanisms for the strong growth temperature dependence of deep level formation are considered, including thermodynamically driven compensating defect formation that can arise for a semiconductor with very large band gap energy, such as Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N.

  15. Quasiparticle interference from magnetic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derry, Philip G.; Mitchell, Andrew K.; Logan, David E.

    2015-07-01

    Fourier transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy (FT-STS) measures the scattering of conduction electrons from impurities and defects, giving information about the electronic structure of both the host material and adsorbed impurities. We interpret such FT-STS measurements in terms of the quasiparticle interference (QPI), here investigating in detail the QPI due to single magnetic impurities adsorbed on a range of representative nonmagnetic host surfaces, and contrasting with the case of a simple scalar impurity or point defect. We demonstrate how the electronic correlations present for magnetic impurities markedly affect the QPI, showing, e.g., a large intensity enhancement due to the Kondo effect, and universality at low temperatures/scanning energies. The commonly used joint density of states interpretation of FT-STS measurements is also considered, and shown to be insufficient in many cases, including that of magnetic impurities.

  16. Deep uncertainty about the modes and tails of sea-level projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruckert, Kelsey; Guan, Yawen; Forest, Chris; Keller, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Sea-levels are generally rising around the world, posing nontrivial risks. Managing these risks hinges on sea-level rise projections and their associated uncertainties. Deriving sea-level projections presents nontrivial methodological challenges. Previous studies projecting sea-level rise have broken new ground, but typically adopt a single calibration method. Here we use a simple sea-level rise model to analyze and quantify the structural uncertainties driven by the choice of calibration method. In particular, we analyze a frequentist bootstrap method and a Bayesian approach (one with and one without the consideration of heteroskedastic errors). We show that the Bayesian approach with a heteroskedastic likelihood function performs best in hindcast experiments with respect to producing credible intervals with appropriate coverage. The choice of calibration method has considerable impacts on the modes and tails of the projections. Specifically, the modes vary across methods by more than 0.5 meters, in the year 2100. Arguably more important, the projected sea-levels with 1 in 100 and 1 in 10,000 exceedance probabilities vary by 2.5 and 3.5 meters. This structural uncertainty introduced by the choice of the statistical method has considerable implications for the design of sea-level rise adaptation strategies.

  17. Impurity profile of rifaximin produced in China.

    PubMed

    Liuchao; Maixi; Wangchao; Wan, Chunpeng

    2012-04-01

    Impurity profiles of rifaximin produced in China were investigated systematically by LCMS methods. Eleven impurities from the raw materials of rifaximin produced in China were detected. We adopted the Diagnostic fragment-ion-based extension strategy (DFIBES) for deducing the structure of unknown impurities. Impurity 1 was the 30-hydroxylated product of rifaximin. Impurity 2 was the 25-deacetyled rifaximin. Impurity 6 was the isomeride of rifaximin. Impurity 9 was rifamycin-O. PMID:22570932

  18. First-principles study of carbon impurities in CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2, present in non-vacuum synthesis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, J.; Saniz, R.; Partoens, B.; Lamoen, D.

    2015-01-01

    A first-principles study of the structural and electronic properties of carbon impurities in CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 is presented. Carbon is present in organic molecules in the precursor solutions used in non-vacuum growth methods for CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 based photovoltaic cells. These growth methods make more efficient use of material, time, and energy than traditional vacuum methods. The formation energies of several carbon impurities are calculated using the hybrid HSE06 functional. CCu acts as a shallow donor, CIn and interstitial C yield deep donor levels in CuInSe2, while in CuGaSe2 CGa and interstitial C act as deep amphoteric defects. So, these defects reduce the majority carrier (hole) concentration in p-type CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 by compensating the acceptor levels. The deep defects are likely to act as recombination centers for the photogenerated charge carriers and are thus detrimental for the performance of the photovoltaic cells. On the other hand, the formation energies of the carbon impurities are high, even under C-rich growth conditions. Thus, few C impurities will form in CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, the deposition of the precursor solution in non-vacuum growth methods presents conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium. In this case, our calculations show that C impurities formed in non-equilibrium tend to segregate from CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 by approaching thermodynamic equilibrium, e.g., via thorough annealing.

  19. First-principles study of carbon impurities in CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2}, present in non-vacuum synthesis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bekaert, J. Saniz, R.; Partoens, B.; Lamoen, D.

    2015-01-07

    A first-principles study of the structural and electronic properties of carbon impurities in CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2} is presented. Carbon is present in organic molecules in the precursor solutions used in non-vacuum growth methods for CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2} based photovoltaic cells. These growth methods make more efficient use of material, time, and energy than traditional vacuum methods. The formation energies of several carbon impurities are calculated using the hybrid HSE06 functional. C{sub Cu} acts as a shallow donor, C{sub In} and interstitial C yield deep donor levels in CuInSe{sub 2}, while in CuGaSe{sub 2} C{sub Ga} and interstitial C act as deep amphoteric defects. So, these defects reduce the majority carrier (hole) concentration in p-type CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2} by compensating the acceptor levels. The deep defects are likely to act as recombination centers for the photogenerated charge carriers and are thus detrimental for the performance of the photovoltaic cells. On the other hand, the formation energies of the carbon impurities are high, even under C-rich growth conditions. Thus, few C impurities will form in CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2} in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, the deposition of the precursor solution in non-vacuum growth methods presents conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium. In this case, our calculations show that C impurities formed in non-equilibrium tend to segregate from CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2} by approaching thermodynamic equilibrium, e.g., via thorough annealing.

  20. Effect of antimony on the deep-level traps in GaInNAsSb thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Muhammad Monirul Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro

    2014-09-15

    Admittance spectroscopy has been performed to investigate the effect of antimony (Sb) on GaInNAs material in relation to the deep-level defects in this material. Two electron traps, E1 and E2 at an energy level 0.12 and 0.41 eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}), respectively, were found in undoped GaInNAs. Bias-voltage dependent admittance confirmed that E1 is an interface-type defect being spatially localized at the GaInNAs/GaAs interface, while E2 is a bulk-type defect located around mid-gap of GaInNAs layer. Introduction of Sb improved the material quality which was evident from the reduction of both the interface and bulk-type defects.

  1. TRANSPORT OF LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE SOIL AT DEEP-OCEAN DISPOSAL SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transport studies were conducted to assess ocean disposal of soil contaminated with low-level natural radioisotopes. he experimental approach involved characterization of the soil for parameters affecting transport and fate of radionuclides- Radioactivity was associated with disc...

  2. Influence of deep level defects on carrier lifetime in CdZnTe:In

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Rongrong; Jie, Wanqi Wang, Ning; Zha, Gangqiang; Xu, Yadong; Wang, Tao; Fu, Xu

    2015-03-07

    The defect levels and carrier lifetime in CdZnTe:In crystal were characterized with photoluminescence, thermally stimulated current measurements, as well as contactless microwave photoconductivity decay (MWPCD) technique. An evaluation equation to extract the recombination lifetime and the reemission time from MWPCD signal is developed based on Hornbeck-Haynes trapping model. An excellent agreement between defect level distribution and carrier reemission time in MWPCD signal reveals the tail of the photoconductivity decay is controlled by the defect level reemission effect. Combining {sup 241}Am gamma ray radiation response measurement and laser beam induced transient current measurement, it predicted that defect level with the reemission time shorter than the collection time could lead to better charge collection efficiency of CdZnTe detector.

  3. Shear-deformation-potential constant of the conduction-band minima of Si: Experimental determination by the deep-level capacitance transient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Fu; Zhao, Xue-Shu; Gu, Zong-Quan; Chen, Jian-Xin; Li, Yan-Jin; Wang, Jian-Qing

    1991-06-01

    The shear-deformation-potential constant Ξu of the conduction-band minima of Si has been measured by a method which we called deep-level capacitance transient under uniaxial stress. The uniaxial-stress (F) dependence of the electron emission rate en from deep levels to the split conduction-band minima of Si has been analyzed. Theoretical curves are in good agreement with experimental data for the S0 and S+ deep levels in Si. The values of Ξu obtained by the method are 11.1+/-0.3 eV at 148.9 K and 11.3+/-0.3 eV at 223.6 K. The analysis and the Ξu values obtained are also valuable for symmetry determination of deep electron traps in Si.

  4. Analysis of the Effects of Impurities in Silicon. [to determine solar cell efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Lafky, W. M.; Burkholder, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    A solar cell fabrication and analysis program to determine the effects on the resultant solar cell efficiency of impurities incorporated into silicon is conducted. Flight quality technologies and quality assurance are employed to assure that variations in cell performance are due to the impurities incorporated in the silicon. The type and level of impurity doping in each test lot is given and the mechanism responsible for the degradation of cell performance is identified and correlated to the doped impurities.

  5. The effect of secondary impurities on solar cell performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. E.; Gutsche, H. W.; Wang, M. S.; Gupta, K. P.; Tucker, W. F.; Dowdy, J. D.; Crepin, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Czochralski and float zone sigle crystals of silicon were doped with the primary impurities B or P so that a resistivity of 0.5 ohm cm resulted, and in addition doped with certain secondary impurities including Al, C, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, O, Ti, V, and Zr. The actual presence of these impurities was confirmed by analysis of the crystals. Solar cell performance was evaluated and found to be degraded most significantly by Ti, V, and Zr and to some extent by most of the secondary impurities considered. These results are of significance to the low cost silicon program, since any such process would have to yield at least tolerable levels of these impurities.

  6. Influence of surface states on deep level transient spectroscopy in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Zhu; Xiao-Hua, Ma; Wei-Wei, Chen; Bin, Hou; Jie-Jie, Zhu; Meng, Zhang; Li-Xiang, Chen; Yan-Rong, Cao; Yue, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) as a method to investigate deep traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure or high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) has been widely utilized. The DLTS measurements under different bias conditions are carried out in this paper. Two hole-like traps with active energies of E v + 0.47 eV, and E v + 0.10 eV are observed, which are related to surface states. The electron traps with active energies of E c ‑ 0.56 eV are located in the channel, those with E c ‑ 0.33 eV and E c ‑ 0.88 eV are located in the AlGaN layer. The presence of surface states has a strong influence on the detection of electron traps, especially when the electron traps are low in density. The DLTS signal peak height of the electron trap is reduced and even disappears due to the presence of plentiful surface state. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CBA00606), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant No. NCET-12-0915), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61334002 and 61404097).

  7. Deep-level transient spectroscopy on an amorphous InGaZnO{sub 4} Schottky diode

    SciTech Connect

    Chasin, Adrian Bhoolokam, Ajay; Nag, Manoj; Genoe, Jan; Heremans, Paul; Simoen, Eddy; Gielen, Georges

    2014-02-24

    The first direct measurement is reported of the bulk density of deep states in amorphous IGZO (indium-gallium-zinc oxide) semiconductor by means of deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The device under test is a Schottky diode of amorphous IGZO semiconductor on a palladium (Pd) Schottky-barrier electrode and with a molybdenum (Mo) Ohmic contact at the top. The DLTS technique allows to independently measure the energy and spatial distribution of subgap states in the IGZO thin film. The subgap trap concentration has a double exponential distribution as a function energy, with a value of ∼10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} eV{sup −1} at the conduction band edge and a value of ∼10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} eV{sup −1} at an energy of 0.55 eV below the conduction band. Such spectral distribution, however, is not uniform through the semiconductor film. The spatial distribution of subgap states correlates well with the background doping density distribution in the semiconductor, which increases towards the Ohmic Mo contact, suggesting that these two properties share the same physical origin.

  8. Resonance energy transfer based on shallow and deep energy levels of biotin-polyethylene glycol/polyamine stabilized CdS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, W.; Tokuhiro, Y.; Umezu, I.; Sugimura, A.; Nagasaki, Y.

    2006-10-01

    Fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(2-(N ,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) stabilized CdS quantum dots (QDs) and texas-red streptavidin was observed. We propose a four-state model to explain photoluminescence (PL) process of CdS QDs and suggest that there are two emission processes originated from shallow and deep trap energy levels corresponding to fast and slow components of PL decay, respectively. Energy transfer mechanism was discussed based on Dexter theory [J. Chem. Phys. 21, 863 (1953)] and the proposed four-state model. It is found that the energy transfer efficiency of deep energy level is higher than that of shallow energy level. The calculated distance between QD and texas red with the parameters of shallow energy level is the same with that of deep level, which indicates that the proposed model is reasonable for explaining the PL dynamics of CdS QDs.

  9. Isolation and structural elucidation of two impurities from a diacerein bulk drug.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Chaudhari; Golak, Maikap; Adwait, Deo; Krishna, Vivek; Himani, Agrawal; Umesh, Peshawe; Amol, Gawande; Srinivas, Sompalli; Sharad, Mane; Deepali, Jadhav; Atul, Chaudhari

    2009-02-20

    Two impurities were found in the crude sample of diacerein. The level of these impurities 1.14% and 1.24% were detected by isocratic reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The molecular weights of the impurities were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) analysis. These impurities were isolated from crude sample of diacerein by reverse-phase preparative liquid chromatography. These impurities were characterized as 5-acetoxy-4-hydroxy-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracene-2-carboxylic acid (Impurity-1) and 4-acetoxy-5-hydroxy-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracene-2-carboxylic acid (Impurity-2) respectively. Structural elucidation of both the impurities were carried out by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT, 1D NOESY, MS and IR spectroscopy. PMID:19131202

  10. Interactive Sea Level Rise App & Online Viewer Offers Deep Dive Into Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, M.; Porter, D. F.; Ryan, W. B. F.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Climate has captured the attention of the public but its complexity can cause interested individuals to turn to opinion pieces, news articles or blogs for information. These platforms often oversimplify or present heavily interpreted or personalized perspectives. Data interactives are an extremely effective way to explore complex geoscience topics like climate, opening windows of understanding for the user that have previously been closed. Layering data onto maps through programs like GeoMapApp and the Earth Observer App has allowed users to dig directly into science data, but with only limited scaffolding. The interactive 'Polar Explorer: Sea Level Explorer App' provides a richly layered introduction to a range of topics connected to sea level rise. Each map is supported with a pop up and a short audio file of supplementary material, and an information page that includes the data source and links for further reading. This type of learning platform works well for both the formal and informal learning environment. Through science data displayed as map visualizations the user is invited into topics through an introductory question, such as "Why does sea level change?" After clicking on that question the user moves to a second layer of questions exploring the role of the ocean, the atmosphere, the contribution from the world's glaciers, world's ice sheets and other less obvious considerations such as the role of post-glacial rebound, or the mining of groundwater. Each question ends in a data map, or series of maps, that offer opportunities to interact with the topic. Under the role of the ocean 'Internal Ocean Temperature' offers the user a chance to touch to see temperature values spatially over the world's ocean, or to click through a data series starting at the ocean surface and diving to 5000 meters of depth showing how temperature changes with depth. Other sections, like the role of deglaciation of North America, allow the user to click and see change through

  11. Influence of a deep-level-defect band formed in a heavily Mg-doped GaN contact layer on the Ni/Au contact to p-GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Jing; Zhao, De-Gang; Jiang, De-Sheng; Chen, Ping; Zhu, Jian-Jun; Liu, Zong-Shun; Le, Ling-Cong; Yang, Jing; He, Xiao-Guang; Zhang, Li-Qun; Liu, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Shu-Ming; Yang, Hui

    2015-09-01

    The influence of a deep-level-defect (DLD) band formed in a heavily Mg-doped GaN contact layer on the performance of Ni/Au contact to p-GaN is investigated. The thin heavily Mg-doped GaN (p++-GaN) contact layer with DLD band can effectively improve the performance of Ni/Au ohmic contact to p-GaN. The temperature-dependent I-V measurement shows that the variable-range hopping (VRH) transportation through the DLD band plays a dominant role in the ohmic contact. The thickness and Mg/Ga flow ratio of p++-GaN contact layer have a significant effect on ohmic contact by controlling the Mg impurity doping and the formation of a proper DLD band. When the thickness of the p++-GaN contact layer is 25 nm thick and the Mg/Ga flow rate ratio is 10.29%, an ohmic contact with low specific contact resistivity of 6.97× 10- 4 Ω·cm2 is achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61474110, 61377020, 61376089, 61223005, and 61176126), the National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars of China (Grant No. 60925017), One Hundred Person Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Basic Research Project of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20130362).

  12. Impurity Extraction by Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G.; Kincaid, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The goals are to model and to measure the phase equilibrium properties of a finely divided fluid containing a large number of chemically similar species. The objective is to develop an accurate, usable model for such phenomena as pollutant extraction of rain clouds, industrial separation in spray towers, and separation in emulsions. The project was designed as a hierarchy of complementary theoretical and experimental steps. A theory was developed to describe the segregation of complex impurities at the interface of a solvent. This phenomenon is important in phase behavior when a large fraction of molecules in a material are near an interface, the situation in a finely divided material. The theory will be modified to account for the effect of surface curvature on the surface tension. The study of mixtures differs from pure fluids not only because of the surface effects but also because composition differences between the droplet and the surrounding vapor can stabilize a droplet with respect to a bulk phase.

  13. The impurity of radioiodinated triolein

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, J. A.; Kinloch, J. D.

    1964-01-01

    Commercially supplied radioiodinated triolein has been shown by thin-layer chromatography and silicic acid column chromatography to contain impurities, consisting mainly of diglycerides and monoglycerides, but also a small amount of free fatty acid. The effect of these impurities on the radioiodinated triolein absorption test requires further investigation. Images PMID:14149942

  14. Stabilization of the Particle-Hole Pfaffian Order by Landau-Level Mixing and Impurities That Break Particle-Hole Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Zucker, P T; Feldman, D E

    2016-08-26

    Numerical results suggest that the quantum Hall effect at ν=5/2 is described by the Pfaffian or anti-Pfaffian state in the absence of disorder and Landau-level mixing. Those states are incompatible with the observed transport properties of GaAs heterostructures, where disorder and Landau-level mixing are strong. We show that the recent proposal of a particle-hole (PH)-Pfaffian topological order by Son is consistent with all experiments. The absence of particle-hole symmetry at ν=5/2 is not an obstacle to the existence of the PH-Pfaffian order since the order is robust to symmetry breaking. PMID:27610872

  15. Injection deep level transient spectroscopy: An improved method for measuring capture rates of hot carriers in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R. M.; Seager, C. H.; Lang, D. V.; Campbell, J. M.

    2015-07-02

    In this study, an improved method for measuring the cross sections for carrier trapping at defects in semiconductors is described. This method, a variation of deep level transient spectroscopy(DLTS) used with bipolar transistors, is applied to hot carrier trapping at vacancy-oxygen, carbon-oxygen, and three charge states of divacancy centers (V2) in n- and p-type silicon. Unlike standard DLTS, we fill traps by injecting carriers into the depletion region of a bipolar transistor diode using a pulse of forward bias current applied to the adjacent diode. We show that this technique is capable of accurately measuring a wide range of capture cross sections at varying electric fields due to the control of the carrier density it provides. Because this technique can be applied to a variety of carrier energy distributions, it should be valuable in modeling the effect of radiation-induced generation-recombination currents in bipolar devices.

  16. Injection deep level transient spectroscopy: An improved method for measuring capture rates of hot carriers in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, R. M.; Seager, C. H.; Lang, D. V.; Campbell, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    An improved method for measuring the cross sections for carrier trapping at defects in semiconductors is described. This method, a variation of deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) used with bipolar transistors, is applied to hot carrier trapping at vacancy-oxygen, carbon-oxygen, and three charge states of divacancy centers (V2) in n- and p-type silicon. Unlike standard DLTS, we fill traps by injecting carriers into the depletion region of a bipolar transistor diode using a pulse of forward bias current applied to the adjacent diode. We show that this technique is capable of accurately measuring a wide range of capture cross sections at varying electric fields due to the control of the carrier density it provides. Because this technique can be applied to a variety of carrier energy distributions, it should be valuable in modeling the effect of radiation-induced generation-recombination currents in bipolar devices.

  17. Injection deep level transient spectroscopy: An improved method for measuring capture rates of hot carriers in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R. M.; Seager, C. H.; Lang, D. V.; Campbell, J. M.

    2015-07-07

    An improved method for measuring the cross sections for carrier trapping at defects in semiconductors is described. This method, a variation of deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) used with bipolar transistors, is applied to hot carrier trapping at vacancy-oxygen, carbon-oxygen, and three charge states of divacancy centers (V{sub 2}) in n- and p-type silicon. Unlike standard DLTS, we fill traps by injecting carriers into the depletion region of a bipolar transistor diode using a pulse of forward bias current applied to the adjacent diode. We show that this technique is capable of accurately measuring a wide range of capture cross sections at varying electric fields due to the control of the carrier density it provides. Because this technique can be applied to a variety of carrier energy distributions, it should be valuable in modeling the effect of radiation-induced generation-recombination currents in bipolar devices.

  18. On the behaviour and origin of the major deep level (EL2) in GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Parsey, J. M.; Kaminska, M.; Wada, K.; Gatos, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    In an extensive crystal growth and characterization study of Bridgman-grown GaAs it was established that the following factors affect the concentration of the EL2 level: (1) the As pressure during growth; (2) the partial pressure of Ga2O; (3) the concentration of shallow donors and acceptors; and (4) the post-growth cooling cycle. The role of these factors is qualitatively and quantitatively explained by attributing the 0.82 eV donor state to the antisite defect As-sub-Ga formed as a result of Ga-vacancy migration during the post-growth cooling of the crystals.

  19. Deep levels induced by reactive ion etching in n- and p-type 4H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Koutarou; Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu; Krieger, Michael

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the authors investigate deep levels, which are induced by reactive ion etching (RIE) of n-type/p-type 4H-SiC, by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The capacitance of a Schottky contact fabricated on as-etched p-type SiC is abnormally small due to compensation or deactivation of acceptors extending to a depth of {approx}14 {mu}m, which is nearly equal to the epilayer thickness. The value of the capacitance can recover to that of a Schottky contact on as-grown samples after annealing at 1000 deg. C. However, various kinds of defects, IN2 (E{sub C}-0.30 eV), EN (E{sub C}-1.6 eV), IP1 (E{sub V}+0.30 eV), IP2 (E{sub V}+0.39 eV), IP4 (HK0: E{sub V}+0.72 eV), IP5 (E{sub V}+0.85 eV), IP7 (E{sub V}+1.3 eV), and EP (E{sub V}+1.4 eV), remain at a high concentration (average of total defect concentration in the region ranging from 0.3 {mu}m to 1.0 {mu}m:{approx}5x10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}) even after annealing at 1000 deg. C. The concentration of all these defects generated by RIE, except for the IP4 (HK0) center, remarkably decreases by thermal oxidation. In addition, the HK0 center can also be reduced significantly by a subsequent annealing at 1400 deg. C in Ar.

  20. Identification of intrinsic deep level defects responsible for electret behavior in TlGaSe2 layered semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu.; Mikailzade, Faik A.; Uzun, Talip; Odrinsky, Andrei P.; Yakar, Emin; Aliyeva, Vafa B.; Babayev, Sardar S.; Mammadov, Tofig G.

    2016-02-01

    Unusual behavior of pyroelectric current signal polarity near the Curie point (Tc) was observed for TlGaSe2 a ferroelectric-semiconductor. It has been revealed that the polarity of the spontaneous polarization near Tc depends on the sample poling prehistory. In particular, applying an external electric field only in the temperature range of the paraelectric state during cooling regime in darkness brought to the depolarization current at Tc with the sign opposite to the external field polarity. Otherwise, if the sample was poled in the temperature interval of the incommensurate phase, pyroelectric current exhibits a peak at Tc with the polarity that is the same as for the external poling electric field. These observations indicate that internal electric field is present in the bulk and near-surface layer regions of the electrically poled single crystal TlGaSe2. Possible mechanisms and origins responsible for the internal electric fields in TlGaSe2 are discussed. It is shown that the formation of internal electric fields in TlGaSe2 is due to charging of intrinsic native defects during the poling process. Characteristics of electrically active intrinsic defects in TlGaSe2 were investigated by using of Photo-Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy (PICTS) technique. Six deep defect levels in the band gap of TlGaSe2 were determined, which were localized both in the bulk and on the surface of the sample and could be electrically charged. The correlation between polarization effects and PICTS results has been established. It was shown that native deep defects (A3-A6) localized in the bulk of crystal are responsible for hetero-charge formation and negative sign of the pyroelectric current peak observed around the Curie temperature after poling the sample in the temperature intervals well above Tc. It was also shown that the positive sign pyrocurrent observed near the Curie point is attributed to the homo-charge formed by native A2-trapping centers which are localized near

  1. Effect of impurity doping in gapped bilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Qi; Yan, Baoming; Jia, Zhenzhao; Niu, Jingjing; Yu, Dapeng; Wu, Xiaosong

    2015-10-19

    Impurity doping plays a pivotal role in semiconductor electronics. We study the doping effect in a two-dimensional semiconductor, gapped bilayer graphene. By employing in situ deposition of calcium on the bilayer graphene, dopants are controllably introduced. Low temperature transport results show a variable range hopping conduction near the charge neutrality point persisting up to 50 K, providing evidence for the impurity levels inside the gap. Our experiment confirms a predicted peculiar effect in the gapped bilayer graphene, i.e., formation of in-gap states even if the bare impurity level lies in the conduction band. The result provides perspective on the effect of doping and impurity levels in semiconducting bilayer graphene.

  2. Chronic Deep Brain Stimulation of the Hypothalamic Nucleus in Wistar Rats Alters Circulatory Levels of Corticosterone and Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Calleja-Castillo, Juan Manuel; De La Cruz-Aguilera, Dora Luz; Manjarrez, Joaquín; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Morales-Espinoza, Gabriel; Moreno-Aguilar, Julia; Hernández, Maria Eugenia; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic option for several diseases, but its effects on HPA axis activity and systemic inflammation are unknown. This study aimed to detect circulatory variations of corticosterone and cytokines levels in Wistar rats, after 21 days of DBS-at the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMHvl), unilateral cervical vagotomy (UCVgX), or UCVgX plus DBS. We included the respective control (C) and sham (S) groups (n = 6 rats per group). DBS treated rats had higher levels of TNF-α (120%; P < 0.01) and IFN-γ (305%; P < 0.001) but lower corticosterone concentration (48%; P < 0.001) than C and S. UCVgX animals showed increased corticosterone levels (154%; P < 0.001) versus C and S. UCVgX plus DBS increased IL-1β (402%; P < 0.001), IL-6 (160%; P < 0.001), and corsticosterone (178%; P < 0.001 versus 48%; P < 0.001) compared with the C and S groups. Chronic DBS at VMHvl induced a systemic inflammatory response accompanied by a decrease of HPA axis function. UCVgX rats experienced HPA axis hyperactivity as result of vagus nerve injury; however, DBS was unable to block the HPA axis hyperactivity induced by unilateral cervical vagotomy. Further studies are necessary to explore these findings and their clinical implication. PMID:24235973

  3. Precision liquid-level measurement in deep tanks using a swept-RF resonant cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, T. C.

    1992-03-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) has several large, temporary-liquid-storage tanks (50 feet diameter and 30 feet height). The tanks are located in separate underground cells. Because of the huge tank storage capacity per inch (1225 gallons), extremely accurate liquid depth measurement is required to observe normal additions (or to become aware of other than large leaks). In roughly 1970, Glenn Booman, then the header of the advanced instrumentation group of ICPP, began a program to develop what in a few years became known as 'IRF tank probes'. The initial probe was installed in tank WM-189 in 1975 and ten more were installed in other tanks in 1976. Though the RF components were fairly costly at that time, they were readily available and the system has, in general, operated without incident. Three of the most desirable features of the system not found in most other continuous reading level systems are that it exhibits no hysteresis, no creep and requires no calibration. In the years since installation the RF distribution system has been upgraded and the method of data processing has been changed somewhat. Presently, the need for more probes for more tanks has renewed interest. The original development work was never fully documented. The present talk is taken from a report being written to comprehensively describe the theory and operation of the RF probe.

  4. Distribution Coefficients of Impurities in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. V.

    2014-04-01

    Impurities dissolved in very pure metals at the level of parts per million often cause an elevation or depression of the freezing temperature of the order of millikelvins. This represents a significant contribution to the uncertainty of standard platinum resistance thermometer calibrations. An important parameter for characterizing the behavior of impurities is the distribution coefficient , which is the ratio of the solid solubility to liquid solubility. A knowledge of for a given binary system is essential for contemporary methods of evaluating or correcting for the effect of impurities, and it is therefore of universal interest to have the most complete set of values possible. A survey of equilibrium values of (in the low concentration limit) reported in the literature for the International Temperature Scale of 1990 fixed points of Hg, Ga, In, Sn, Zn, Al, Au, Ag, and Cu is presented. In addition, thermodynamic calculations of using MTDATA are presented for 170 binary systems. In total, the combined values of from all available sources for 430 binary systems are presented. In addition, by considering all available values of for impurities in 25 different metal solvents (1300 binary systems) enough data are available to characterize patterns in the value of for a given impurity as a function of its position in the periodic table. This enables prediction of for a significant number of binary systems for which data and calculations are unavailable. By combining data from many sources, values of for solutes (atomic number from 1 to 94) in ITS-90 fixed points from Hg to Cu are suggested, together with some tentative predicted values where literature data and calculations are unavailable.

  5. System-Level Analysis Modeling of Impacts of Operation Schemes of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage on Deep Groundwater and Carbon Dioxide Leakage Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Lee, S.; Park, J.; Kim, J.; Kihm, J.

    2013-12-01

    The objectives of this study are to predict quantitatively groundwater and carbon dioxide flow in deep saline sandstone aquifers under various carbon dioxide injection schemes (injection rate, injection period) and to analyze integratively impacts of such carbon dioxide injection schemes on deep groundwater (brine) and carbon dioxide leakage risk through abandoned wells or faults. In order to achieve the first objective, a series of process-level prediction modeling of groundwater and carbon dioxide flow in a deep saline sandstone aquifer under several carbon dioxide injection schemes was performed using a multiphase thermo-hydrological numerical model TOUGH2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The prediction modeling results show that the extent of carbon dioxide plume is significantly affected by such carbon dioxide injection schemes. In order to achieve the second objective, a series of system-level analysis modeling of deep groundwater and carbon dioxide leakage risk through an abandoned well or a fault under several carbon dioxide injection schemes was then performed using a brine and carbon dioxide leakage risk analysis model CO2-LEAK (Kim, 2012). The analysis modeling results show that the rates and amounts of deep groundwater and carbon dioxide leakage through an abandoned well or a fault increase as the carbon dioxide injection rate increases. However, the rates and amounts of deep groundwater and carbon dioxide leakage through an abandoned well or a fault decrease as the carbon dioxide injection period increases. These system-level analysis modeling results for deep groundwater and carbon dioxide leakage risk can be utilized as baseline data for establishing guidelines to mitigate anticipated environmental adverse effects on shallower groundwater systems (aquifers) when deep groundwater and carbon dioxide leakage occur. This work was supported by the Geo-Advanced Innovative Action (GAIA) Program funded by the Korea Environmental Industry and Technology Institute

  6. High-barrier Schottky contact on n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layer and studies of defect levels by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Khai V.; Pak, Rahmi O.; Oner, Cihan; Mannan, Mohammad A.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2015-08-01

    High barrier Schottky contact has been fabricated on 50 μm n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers grown on 350 μm thick substrate 8° off-cut towards the [11̅20] direction. The 4H-SiC epitaxial wafer was diced into 10 x 10 mm2 samples. The metal-semiconductor junctions were fabricated by photolithography and dc sputtering with ruthenium (Ru). The junction properties were characterized through current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. Detectors were characterized by alpha spectroscopy measurements in terms of energy resolution and charge collection efficiency using a 0.1 μCi 241Am radiation source. It was found that detectors fabricated from high work function rare transition metal Ru demonstrated very low leakage current and significant improvement of detector performance. Defect characterization of the epitaxial layers was conducted by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) to thoroughly investigate the defect levels in the active region. The presence of a new defect level induced by this rare transition metal-semiconductor interface has been identified and characterized.

  7. Metallic impurities in gallium nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Krueger, J.; Kisielowski, C.

    1997-04-01

    Transition metals are often encountered in trace amounts in semiconductors. They have been extensively studied in most elemental and compound systems, since they form deep donor and/or acceptor levels which usually degrade the electronic and optical material properties. Only very little is known about transition metals in recent III-V semiconducting materials, such as GaN, AlN and InN. These few studies have been done exclusively on Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) or Hybrid Vapor Phase Epitaxy HVPE-grown GaN. Preliminary x-ray fluorescence studies at the Advanced Light Source, beamline 10.3.1, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have revealed that GaN materials grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) have Fe, Ni and Cr as the dominant transition metal contaminants. This finding is commensurate with the extremely high concentrations of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen (up to 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}) measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Preliminary work using the mapping capabilities of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe revealed the metal impurities were inhomogeneously distributed over the film. Future work of this collaboration will be to find a correlation between the existence of transition metals in MBE films, as revealed by x-ray fluorescence, and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra taken in the infrared region. Also, the authors will make use of the 1 {mu}m spatial resolution of x-ray microprobe to locate the contaminants in relation to structural defects in the GaN films. Because of the large strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the GaN films and the substrates, the films grow in a columnar order with high densities of grain boundaries and dislocations. These structural defects offer preferential sites for metal precipitation or agglomeration which could degrade the optical properties of this material more so than if the impurities were left dissolved in the GaN.

  8. Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N.

    2013-05-20

    We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of {+-}0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

  9. Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N.

    2013-05-01

    We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of ±0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

  10. Mobile impurities in ferromagnetic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantian, Adrian; Schollwoeck, Ulrich; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Recent work has shown that mobile impurities in one dimensional interacting systems may exhibit behaviour that differs strongly from that predicted by standard Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory, with the appearance of power-law divergences in the spectral function signifying sublinear diffusion of the impurity. Using time-dependent matrix product states, we investigate a range of cases of mobile impurities in systems beyond the analytically accessible examples to assess the existence of a new universality class of low-energy physics in one-dimensional systems. Correspondence: Adrian.Kantian@unige.ch This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  11. Thermal stability of deep level defects induced by high energy proton irradiation in n-type GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Farzana, E.; Sun, W. Y.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; McSkimming, B.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S.

    2015-10-21

    The impact of annealing of proton irradiation-induced defects in n-type GaN devices has been systematically investigated using deep level transient and optical spectroscopies. Moderate temperature annealing (>200–250 °C) causes significant reduction in the concentration of nearly all irradiation-induced traps. While the decreased concentration of previously identified N and Ga vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.13 eV, 0.16 eV, and 2.50 eV generally followed a first-order reaction model with activation energies matching theoretical values for N{sub I} and V{sub Ga} diffusion, irradiation-induced traps at E{sub C} − 0.72 eV, 1.25 eV, and 3.28 eV all decrease in concentration in a gradual manner, suggesting a more complex reduction mechanism. Slight increases in concentration are observed for the N-vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.20 eV and 0.25 eV, which may be due to the reconfiguration of other N-vacancy related defects. Finally, the observed reduction in concentrations of the states at E{sub C} − 1.25 and E{sub C} − 3.28 eV as a function of annealing temperature closely tracks the detailed recovery behavior of the background carrier concentration as a function of annealing temperature. As a result, it is suggested that these two levels are likely to be responsible for the underlying carrier compensation effect that causes the observation of carrier removal in proton-irradiated n-GaN.

  12. Recent trends in the impurity profile of pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Pilaniya, Kavita; Chandrawanshi, Harish K.; Pilaniya, Urmila; Manchandani, Pooja; Jain, Pratishtha; Singh, Nitin

    2010-01-01

    Various regulatory authorities such as the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH), the United States Food and Drug administration (FDA), and the Canadian Drug and Health Agency (CDHA) are emphasizing on the purity requirements and the identification of impurities in Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs). The various sources of impurity in pharmaceutical products are — reagents, heavy metals, ligands, catalysts, other materials like filter aids, charcoal, and the like, degraded end products obtained during \\ after manufacturing of bulk drugs from hydrolysis, photolytic cleavage, oxidative degradation, decarboxylation, enantiomeric impurity, and so on. The different pharmacopoeias such as the British Pharmacopoeia, United State Pharmacopoeia, and Indian Pharmacopoeia are slowly incorporating limits to allowable levels of impurities present in APIs or formulations. Various methods are used to isolate and characterize impurities in pharmaceuticals, such as, capillary electrophoresis, electron paramagnetic resonance, gas–liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, high performance liquid chromatography, solid-phase extraction methods, liquid–liquid extraction method, Ultraviolet Spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, supercritical fluid extraction column chromatography, mass spectrometry, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and RAMAN spectroscopy. Among all hyphenated techniques, the most exploited techniques for impurity profiling of drugs are Liquid Chromatography (LC)-Mass Spectroscopy (MS), LC-NMR, LC-NMR-MS, GC-MS, and LC-MS. This reveals the need and scope of impurity profiling of drugs in pharmaceutical research. PMID:22247862

  13. Chronological Changes of C-Reactive Protein Levels Following Uncomplicated, Two-Staged, Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-hun; Ha, Sang-woo; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The occurrence of acute cerebral infection following deep brain stimulation (DBS) is currently being reported with elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) level. The aim of the present study was to establish normal range of the magnitude and time-course of CRP increases following routine DBS procedures in the absence of clinical and laboratory signs of infection. Methods A retrospective evaluation of serial changes of plasma CRP levels in 46 patients undergoing bilateral, two-staged DBS was performed. Because DBS was performed as a two-staged procedure involving; implantation of lead and internal pulse generator (IPG), CRP was measured preoperatively and postoperatively every 2 days until normalization of CRP (post-lead implantation day 2 and 4, post-IPG implantation day 2, 4, and 6). Results Compared with preoperative CRP levels (0.12±0.17 mg/dL, n=46), mean CRP levels were significantly elevated after lead insertion day 2 and 4 (1.68±1.83 mg/dL, n=46 and 0.76±0.38 mg/dL, n=16, respectively, p<0.001). The mean CRP levels at post-lead implantation day 2 were further elevated at post-IPG implantation day 2 (3.41±2.56 mg/dL, n=46, respectively, p<0.01). This elevation in post-IPG day 2 rapidly declined in day 4 (1.24±1.29 mg/dL, n=46, p<0.05) and normalized to preoperative value at day 6 (0.42±0.33 mg/dL, n=46, p>0.05). Mean CRP levels after IPG implantation were significantly higher in patients whose IPGs were implanted at post-lead day 3 than those at post-lead day 5-6 (3.99±2.80 mg/dL, n=30, and 2.31±1.56 mg/dL, n=16, respectively, p<0.05). However, there was no difference in post-IPG day 2 and 4 between them (p>0.05). Conclusion The mean postoperative CRP levels were highest on post-IPG insertion day 2 and decreased rapidly, returning to the normal range on post-IPG implantation day 6. The duration of post-lead implantation period influenced the magnitude of CRP elevation at post-IPG insertion day 2. Information about the normal response of CRP

  14. Extrinsic germanium Blocked Impurity Bank (BIB) detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabach, Timothy N.; Huffman, James E.; Watson, Dan M.

    1989-01-01

    Ge:Ga blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detectors with long wavelength thresholds greater than 190 microns and peak quantum efficiencies of 4 percent, at an operating temperature of 1.8 K, have been fabricated. These proof of concept devices consist of a high purity germanium blocking layer epitaxially grown on a Ga-doped Ge substrate. This demonstration of BIB behavior in germanium enables the development of far infrared detector arrays similar to the current silicon-based devices. Present efforts are focussed on improving the chemical vapor deposition process used to create the blocking layer and on the lithographic processing required to produce monolithic detector arrays in germanium. Approaches to test the impurity levels in both the blocking and active layers are considered.

  15. Metal impurities in food and drugs.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, Darrell R; Destefano, Anthony J; Cecil, Todd L; Zaidi, Kahkashan; Williams, Roger L

    2010-05-01

    The major metals of potential health concern found in food, drugs (medicines), and dietary supplements are lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic. Other metals, such as chromium, copper, manganese, molybdenum, vanadium, nickel, osmium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, palladium, and platinum, may be used or introduced during manufacturing and may be controlled in the final article as impurities. Screening for metals in medicines and dietary supplements rarely indicates the presence of toxic metal impurities at levels of concern. The setting of heavy metal limits is appropriate for medicines and is appropriate for supplements when heavy metals are likely or certain to contaminate a given product. Setting reasonable health-based limits for some of these metals is challenging because of their ubiquity in the environment, limitations of current analytical procedures, and other factors. Taken together, compendial tests for metals in food and drugs present an array of issues that challenge compendial scientists. PMID:20217462

  16. A New Method for Reconstructing Sea-Level and Deep-Sea-Temperature Variability over the Past 5.3 Million Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohling, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ice volume (and hence sea level) and deep-sea temperature are key measures of global climate change. Sea level has been documented using several independent methods over the past 0.5 million years (Myr). Older periods, however, lack such independent validation; all existing records are related to deep-sea oxygen isotope (d18O) data that are influenced by processes unrelated to sea level. For deep-sea temperature, only one continuous high-resolution (Mg/Ca-based) record exists, with related sea-level estimates, spanning the past 1.5 Myr. We have recently presented a novel sea-level reconstruction, with associated estimates of deep-sea temperature, which independently validates the previous 0-1.5 Myr reconstruction and extends it back to 5.3 Myr ago. A serious of caveats applies to this new method, especially in older times of its application, as is always the case with new methods. Independent validation exercises are needed to elucidate where consistency exists, and where solutions drift away from each other. A key observation from our new method is that a large temporal offset existed during the onset of Plio-Pleistocene ice ages, between a marked cooling step at 2.73 Myr ago and the first major glaciation at 2.15 Myr ago. This observation relies on relative changes within the dataset, which are more robust than absolute values. I will discuss our method and its main caveats and avenues for improvement.

  17. Correlation of proton irradiation induced threshold voltage shifts to deep level traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Cardwell, D.; Sasikumar, A.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Speck, J. S.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of proton irradiation on the threshold voltage (VT) of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is systematically investigated to enhance the understanding of a primary component of the degradation of irradiated high electron mobility transistors. The value of VT was found to increase monotonically as a function of 1.8 MeV proton fluence in a sub-linear manner reaching 0.63 V at a fluence of 1 × 1014 cm-2. Silvaco Atlas simulations of VT shifts caused by GaN buffer traps using experimentally measured introduction rates, and energy levels closely match the experimental results. Different buffer designs lead to different VT dependences on proton irradiation, confirming that deep, acceptor-like defects in the GaN buffer are primarily responsible for the observed VT shifts. The proton irradiation induced VT shifts are found to depend on the barrier thickness in a linear fashion; thus, scaling the barrier thickness could be an effective way to reduce such degradation.

  18. Injection deep level transient spectroscopy: An improved method for measuring capture rates of hot carriers in semiconductors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fleming, R. M.; Seager, C. H.; Lang, D. V.; Campbell, J. M.

    2015-07-02

    In this study, an improved method for measuring the cross sections for carrier trapping at defects in semiconductors is described. This method, a variation of deep level transient spectroscopy(DLTS) used with bipolar transistors, is applied to hot carrier trapping at vacancy-oxygen, carbon-oxygen, and three charge states of divacancy centers (V2) in n- and p-type silicon. Unlike standard DLTS, we fill traps by injecting carriers into the depletion region of a bipolar transistor diode using a pulse of forward bias current applied to the adjacent diode. We show that this technique is capable of accurately measuring a wide range of capturemore » cross sections at varying electric fields due to the control of the carrier density it provides. Because this technique can be applied to a variety of carrier energy distributions, it should be valuable in modeling the effect of radiation-induced generation-recombination currents in bipolar devices.« less

  19. Relative contributions of ocean mass and deep steric changes to sea level rise between 1993 and 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purkey, Sarah G.; Johnson, Gregory C.; Chambers, Don P.

    2014-11-01

    Regional and global trends of Sea Level Rise (SLR) owing to mass addition centered between 1996 and 2006 are assessed through a full-depth SLR budget using full-depth in situ ocean data and satellite altimetry. These rates are compared to regional and global trends in ocean mass addition estimated directly using data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) from 2003 to 2013. Despite the two independent methods covering different time periods with differing spatial and temporal resolution, they both capture the same large-scale mass addition trend patterns including higher rates of mass addition in the North Pacific, South Atlantic, and the Indo-Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, and lower mass addition trends in the Indian, North Atlantic, South Pacific, and the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. The global mean trend of ocean mass addition is 1.5 (±0.4) mm yr-1 for 1996-2006 from the residual method and the same for 2003-2013 from the GRACE method. Furthermore, the residual method is used to evaluate the error introduced into the mass budget if the deep steric contributions below 700, 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 m are neglected, revealing errors of 65%, 38%, 13%, 8%, and 4% respectively. The two methods no longer agree within error bars when only the steric contribution shallower than 1000 m is considered.

  20. Investigation of deep level defects in epitaxial semiconducting zinc sulpho-selenide. Progress report, June 15, 1980-June 14, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, B.W.

    1981-02-15

    High conductivity ZnSe single crystalline films have been heteroepitaxially deposited on GaAs substrates using open tube chemical vapor transport. Unintentionally doped films had net donor densities of 10/sup 14/ - 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and resistivities of 1 to 10/sup 3/ ohm cm. Resistivity was found to be strongly dependent upon zinc partial pressure during deposition. Electron mobilities of the order of 50 to 200 cm/sup 2//V sec were observed which suggested that the films are highly compensated. Properties of the deep level defects in heteroepitaxially grown ZnSe have been investigated using transient capacitance spectroscopy. A series of electron traps were observed with activation energies of 0.33, 0.35, 0.42, 0.71 and 0.86 eV in Au/ZnSe Schottky diodes. Trap concentration ranged from 10/sup 12/ to 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ and depended on the zinc partial pressure. A model for the defect structure of ZnSe was proposed. Growth studies of ZnS/sub x/Se/sub 1-x/ on GaAs were begun.

  1. Building a conceptual framework to culturally adapt health promotion and prevention programs at the deep structural level.

    PubMed

    Wang-Schweig, Meme; Kviz, Frederick J; Altfeld, Susan J; Miller, Arlene M; Miller, Brenda A

    2014-07-01

    The debate on the effectiveness and merit for the amount of time, effort, and resources to culturally adapt health promotion and prevention programs continues. This may be due, in large part, to the lack of theory in commonly used methods to match programmatic content and delivery to the culture of a population, particularly at the deep structural level. This paper asserts that prior to the cultural adaptation of prevention programs, it is necessary to first develop a conceptual framework. We propose a multiphase approach to address key challenges in the science of cultural adaptation by first identifying and exploring relevant cultural factors that may affect the targeted health-related behavior prior to proceeding through steps of a stage model. The first phase involves developing an underlying conceptual framework that integrates cultural factors to ground this process. The second phase employs the different steps of a stage model. For Phase I of our approach, we offer four key steps and use our research study as an example of how these steps were applied to build a framework for the cultural adaptation of a family-based intervention to prevent adolescent alcohol use, Guiding Good Choices (GGC), to Chinese American families. We then provide a summary of the preliminary evidence from a few key relationships that were tested among our sample with the greater purpose of discussing how these findings might be used to culturally adapt GGC. PMID:24396122

  2. Three-Dimensional Geologic Modeling of a Prospective Deep Underground Laboratory Site for High-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. Y.; Lee, S.; Park, S. U.; Kim, J. M.; Kihm, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    A series of three-dimensional geologic modeling was performed using a geostatistical geologic model GOCAD (ASGA and Paradigm) to characterize quantitatively and to visualize realistically a prospective deep underground laboratory site for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Korea. The necessity of a deep underground laboratory arises from its in-situ conditions for related deep scientific experiments. However, the construction and operation of such a deep underground laboratory take great efforts and expenses owing to its larger depth and thus higher geologic uncertainty. For these reasons, quantitative characterization and realistic visualization of geologic formations and structures of a deep underground laboratory site is crucial before its construction and operation. The study area for the prospective deep underground laboratory site is mainly consists of Precambrian metamorphic rocks as a complex. First, various topographic and geologic data of the study area were collected from literature and boreholes and preliminarily analyzed. Based on the preliminary analysis results, a three-dimensional structural model, which consists of the boundaries between the geologic formations and structures, was established, and a three-dimensional grid model, which consists of hexahedral grid blocks, was produced. Three-dimensional geologic formation model was then established by polymerizing these two models. Finally, a series of three-dimensional lithofacies modeling was performed using the sequential indicator simulation (SIS) and truncated Gaussian simulation (TGS). The volume fractions of metamorphic rocks predicted using the TGS are more similar to the actual data observed in boreholes than those predicted using the SIS. These three-dimensional geologic modeling results can improve a quantitative and realistic understanding of geologic characteristics of the prospective deep underground laboratory site for high-level radioactive waste disposal and thus can provide

  3. Individual and Partner-Level Factors Associated with Condom Non-Use Among African American STI Clinic Attendees in the Deep South: An Event-Level Analysis.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Brandon D L; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G; MacCarthy, Sarah; Mena, Leandro; Chan, Philip A; Towey, Caitlin; Barnett, Nancy; Parker, Sharon; Barnes, Arti; Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Rose, Jennifer S; Nunn, Amy S

    2016-06-01

    The US HIV/AIDS epidemic is concentrated in the Deep South, yet factors contributing to HIV transmission are not fully understood. We examined relationships between substance use, sexual partnership characteristics, and condom non-use in an African American sample of STI clinic attendees in Jackson, Mississippi. We assessed condom non-use at last intercourse with up to three recent sexual partners reported by participants between January and June 2011. Participant- and partner-level correlates of condom non-use were examined using generalized estimating equations. The 1295 participants reported 2880 intercourse events, of which 1490 (51.7 %) involved condom non-use. Older age, lower educational attainment, reporting financial or material dependence on a sex partner, sex with a primary partner, and higher frequency of sex were associated with increased odds of condomless sex. HIV prevention efforts in the South should address underlying socioeconomic disparities and structural determinants that result in partner dependency and sexual risk behavior. PMID:26683032

  4. A biosphere modeling methodology for dose assessments of the potential Yucca Mountain deep geological high level radioactive waste repository.

    PubMed

    Watkins, B M; Smith, G M; Little, R H; Kessler, J

    1999-04-01

    Recent developments in performance standards for proposed high level radioactive waste disposal at Yucca Mountain suggest that health risk or dose rate limits will likely be part of future standards. Approaches to the development of biosphere modeling and dose assessments for Yucca Mountain have been relatively lacking in previous performance assessments due to the absence of such a requirement. This paper describes a practical methodology used to develop a biosphere model appropriate for calculating doses from use of well water by hypothetical individuals due to discharges of contaminated groundwater into a deep well. The biosphere model methodology, developed in parallel with the BIOMOVS II international study, allows a transparent recording of the decisions at each step, from the specification of the biosphere assessment context through to model development and analysis of results. A list of features, events, and processes relevant to Yucca Mountain was recorded and an interaction matrix developed to help identify relationships between them. Special consideration was given to critical/potential exposure group issues and approaches. The conceptual model of the biosphere system was then developed, based on the interaction matrix, to show how radionuclides migrate and accumulate in the biosphere media and result in potential exposure pathways. A mathematical dose assessment model was specified using the flexible AMBER software application, which allows users to construct their own compartment models. The starting point for the biosphere calculations was a unit flux of each radionuclide from the groundwater in the geosphere into the drinking water in the well. For each of the 26 radionuclides considered, the most significant exposure pathways for hypothetical individuals were identified. For 14 of the radionuclides, the primary exposure pathways were identified as consumption of various crops and animal products following assumed agricultural use of the contaminated

  5. Student Perceptions of Science Teacher Actions in Two Culturally Diverse Middle-Level Science Classrooms: A Case Study in the American Deep South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, J. Randy

    The purpose of this study was to give voice to students' perceptions in two science classrooms taught by two white teachers in an urban multicultural middle-level school situated in the American Deep South. Student participants were 35 students of different ethnicities in grades 7 and 8. The theoretical reference used is social contextual, a…

  6. Revealing substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps in p-type InP using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Darwich, R.; Mani, A. A.

    2010-08-15

    New substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps have been revealed using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy. Our measurements show that the hole traps H4 and H5 can have at least three components for each. Moreover, the activation energies are deduced and the microscopic nature of these substructures is discussed.

  7. Revealing substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps in p-type InP using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwich, R.; Mani, A. A.

    2010-08-01

    New substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps have been revealed using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy. Our measurements show that the hole traps H4 and H5 can have at least three components for each. Moreover, the activation energies are deduced and the microscopic nature of these substructures is discussed.

  8. Deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  9. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech. PMID:26017442

  10. Isolation and characterization of a potential process related impurity of phenazopyridine HCl by preparative HPLC followed by MS-MS and 2D-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Maurya, Pawan K; Raju, A Narasa

    2009-07-12

    During the process development of phenazopyridine HCl bulk drug, a potential impurity was detected in the routine impurity profiles by HPLC. Using MS-MS and multidimensional NMR techniques, the trace level impurity was unambiguously identified to be 3-phenyl-5-phenylazo-pyridine-2,6-diamine after its isolation from phenazopyridine HCl by semi-preparative HPLC. The formation of the impurity was discussed. To our knowledge, it is a novel impurity not reported elsewhere. PMID:19376664

  11. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  12. Tuning of deep level emission in highly oriented electrodeposited ZnO nanorods by post growth annealing treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simimol, A.; Manikandanath, N. T.; Anappara, Aji A.; Chowdhury, Prasanta; Barshilia, Harish C.

    2014-08-01

    Highly dense and c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods with hexagonal wurtzite facets were deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates by a simple and cost-effective electrodeposition method at low bath temperature (80 °C). The as-grown samples were then annealed at various temperatures (TA = 100-500 °C) in different environments (e.g., zinc, oxygen, air, and vacuum) to understand their photoluminescence (PL) behavior in the ultra-violet (UV) and the visible regions. The PL results revealed that the as-deposited ZnO nanorods consisted of oxygen vacancy (VO), zinc interstitial (Zni), and oxygen interstitial (Oi) defects and these can be reduced significantly by annealing in different environments at optimal annealing temperatures. However, the intensity of deep level emission increased for TA greater than the optimized values for the respective environments due to the introduction of various defect centers. For example, for TA ≥ 450 °C in the oxygen and air environments, the density of Oi defects increased, whereas, the green emission associated with VO is dominant in the vacuum annealed (TA = 500 °C) ZnO nanorods. The UV peak red shifted after the post-growth annealing treatments in all the environments and the vacuum annealed sample exhibited highest UV peak intensity. The observations from the PL data are supported by the micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present study gives new insight into the origin of different defects that exist in the electrodeposited ZnO nanorods and how these defects can be precisely controlled in order to get the desired emissions for the opto-electronic applications.

  13. Tuning of deep level emission in highly oriented electrodeposited ZnO nanorods by post growth annealing treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Simimol, A.; Manikandanath, N. T.; Chowdhury, Prasanta; Barshilia, Harish C.; Anappara, Aji A.

    2014-08-21

    Highly dense and c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods with hexagonal wurtzite facets were deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates by a simple and cost-effective electrodeposition method at low bath temperature (80 °C). The as-grown samples were then annealed at various temperatures (T{sub A} = 100–500 °C) in different environments (e.g., zinc, oxygen, air, and vacuum) to understand their photoluminescence (PL) behavior in the ultra-violet (UV) and the visible regions. The PL results revealed that the as-deposited ZnO nanorods consisted of oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}), zinc interstitial (Zn{sub i}), and oxygen interstitial (O{sub i}) defects and these can be reduced significantly by annealing in different environments at optimal annealing temperatures. However, the intensity of deep level emission increased for T{sub A} greater than the optimized values for the respective environments due to the introduction of various defect centers. For example, for T{sub A} ≥ 450 °C in the oxygen and air environments, the density of O{sub i} defects increased, whereas, the green emission associated with V{sub O} is dominant in the vacuum annealed (T{sub A} = 500 °C) ZnO nanorods. The UV peak red shifted after the post-growth annealing treatments in all the environments and the vacuum annealed sample exhibited highest UV peak intensity. The observations from the PL data are supported by the micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present study gives new insight into the origin of different defects that exist in the electrodeposited ZnO nanorods and how these defects can be precisely controlled in order to get the desired emissions for the opto-electronic applications.

  14. EFFECT OF FUEL IMPURITIES ON FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Colon-Mercado, H.

    2010-09-28

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that produces electricity during the combination of hydrogen and oxygen to produce water. Proton exchange membranes fuel cells are favored for portable applications as well as stationary ones due to their high power density, low operating temperature, and low corrosion of components. In real life operation, the use of pure fuel and oxidant gases results in an impractical system. A more realistic and cost efficient approach is the use of air as an oxidant gas and hydrogen from hydrogen carriers (i.e., ammonia, hydrocarbons, hydrides). However, trace impurities arising from different hydrogen sources and production increases the degradation of the fuel cell. These impurities include carbon monoxide, ammonia, sulfur, hydrocarbons, and halogen compounds. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has set maximum limits for trace impurities in the hydrogen stream; however fuel cell data is needed to validate the assumption that at those levels the impurities will cause no degradation. This report summarizes the effect of selected contaminants tested at SRNL at ISO levels. Runs at ISO proposed concentration levels show that model hydrocarbon compound such as tetrahydrofuran can cause serious degradation. However, the degradation is only temporary as when the impurity is removed from the hydrogen stream the performance completely recovers. Other molecules at the ISO concentration levels such as ammonia don't show effects on the fuel cell performance. On the other hand carbon monoxide and perchloroethylene shows major degradation and the system can only be recovered by following recovery procedures.

  15. Temperature Dependent Capacitance-Voltage And Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy Study Of Self-Assembled Ge Quantum Dots Embedded In P-type Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio; Chen Gang; Jantsch, Wolfgang

    2011-12-23

    Temperature dependent Capacitance-Voltage (TCV) and Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) techniques were used to study how Ge Quantum Dots (QDs) embedded in Silicon trap charge. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is used to obtain the density of QDs, which is in the order of 3x10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. Three shallow levels, with activation energies of 40, 65 and 90 meV, and densities around 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, are found and are related to Boron. Four deep levels, with activation energies of 110, 150, 330 and 380 meV, and densities between 2x10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} and 5x10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, are also found. TCV results suggest they are related to the Ge QDs.

  16. Endohedral impurities in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Clougherty, Dennis P

    2003-01-24

    A generalization of the Anderson model that includes pseudo-Jahn-Teller impurity coupling is proposed to describe distortions of an endohedral impurity in a carbon nanotube. Within mean-field theory, spontaneous axial symmetry breaking is found when the vibronic coupling strength g exceeds a critical value. The effective potential is found to have O(2) symmetry, in agreement with numerical calculations. For metallic zigzag nanotubes endohedrally doped with transition metals in the dilute limit, the low-energy properties of the system may display two-channel Kondo behavior; however, strong vibronic coupling is seen to exponentially suppress the Kondo energy scale. PMID:12570507

  17. Endohedral Impurities in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis

    2003-03-01

    A generalization of the Anderson model that includes pseudo-Jahn-Teller impurity coupling is proposed to describe distortions of an endohedral impurity in a carbon nanotube. Treating the distortion within mean-field theory, spontaneous axial symmetry breaking is found when the vibronic coupling strength g exceeds a critical value g_c. The effective potential in the symmetry-broken state is found to have O(2) symmetry, in agreement with numerical calculations. The consequences of such a distortion on electronic transport will be discussed.

  18. Endohedral Impurities in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis P.

    2003-01-01

    A generalization of the Anderson model that includes pseudo-Jahn-Teller impurity coupling is proposed to describe distortions of an endohedral impurity in a carbon nanotube. Within mean-field theory, spontaneous axial symmetry breaking is found when the vibronic coupling strength g exceeds a critical value. The effective potential is found to have O(2) symmetry, in agreement with numerical calculations. For metallic zigzag nanotubes endohedrally doped with transition metals in the dilute limit, the low-energy properties of the system may display two-channel Kondo behavior; however, strong vibronic coupling is seen to exponentially suppress the Kondo energy scale.

  19. ALUMINUM IMPURITY DIFFUSION IN MAGNESIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Sarah; Warren, Andrew; Coffey, Kevin; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Todd, Peter J; Sohn, Yong Ho; Klimov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    The Al impurity diffusion in polycrystalline Mg (99.9%) via depth profiling with secondary ion mass spectrometry was studied in the temperature range of 673-573K, utilizing the thin film method and thin film solution to the diffusion equation. Multiple samples were utilized and multiple profiles were obtained to determine statistically confident coefficient with maximum standard deviation of 16%. Activation energy and pre-exponential factor of Al impurity diffusion in Mg was determined as 155 kJ/mole and 3.9 x 10-3 m2/sec.

  20. Some logistical considerations in designing a system of deep boreholes for disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Genetha Anne; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter

    2012-09-01

    Deep boreholes could be a relatively inexpensive, safe, and rapidly deployable strategy for disposing Americas nuclear waste. To study this approach, Sandia invested in a three year LDRD project entitled %E2%80%9CRadionuclide Transport from Deep Boreholes.%E2%80%9D In the first two years, the borehole reference design and backfill analysis were completed and the supporting modeling of borehole temperature and fluid transport profiles were done. In the third year, some of the logistics of implementing a deep borehole waste disposal system were considered. This report describes what was learned in the third year of the study and draws some conclusions about the potential bottlenecks of system implementation.

  1. Ecological niches of Arctic deep-sea copepods: Vertical partitioning, dietary preferences and different trophic levels minimize inter-specific competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakmann, Silke; Kochzius, Marc; Auel, Holger

    2009-05-01

    The biodiversity of pelagic deep-sea ecosystems has received growing scientific interest in the last decade, especially in the framework of international marine biodiversity initiatives, such as Census of Marine Life (CoML). While a growing number of deep-sea zooplankton species has been identified and genetically characterized, little information is available on the mechanisms minimizing inter-specific competition and thus allowing closely related species to co-occur in the deep-sea pelagic realm. Focussing on the two dominant calanoid copepod families Euchaetidae and Aetideidae in Fram Strait, Arctic Ocean, the present study strives to characterize ecological niches of co-occurring species, with regard to vertical distribution, dietary composition as derived from lipid biomarkers, and trophic level on the basis of stable isotope signatures. Closely related species were usually restricted to different depth layers, resulting in a multi-layered vertical distribution pattern. Thus, vertical partitioning was an important mechanism to avoid inter-specific competition. Species occurring in the same depth strata usually belonged to different genera. They differed in fatty acid composition and trophic level, indicating different food preferences. Herbivorous Calanus represent major prey items for many omnivorous and carnivorous species throughout the water column. The seasonal and ontogenetic vertical migration of Calanus acts as a short-cut in food supply for pelagic deep-sea ecosystems in the Arctic.

  2. Role of sea-level change in deep water deposition along a carbonate shelf margin, Early and Middle Permian, Delaware Basin: implications for reservoir characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shunli; Yu, Xinghe; Li, Shengli; Giles, Katherine A.

    2015-04-01

    The architecture and sedimentary characteristics of deep water deposition can reflect influences of sea-level change on depositional processes on the shelf edge, slope, and basin floor. Outcrops of the northern slope and basin floor of the Delaware Basin in west Texas are progressively exposed due to canyon incision and road cutting. The outcrops in the Delaware Basin were measured to characterize gravity flow deposits in deep water of the basin. Subsurface data from the East Ford and Red Tank fields in the central and northeastern Delaware Basin were used to study reservoir architectures and properties. Depositional models of deep water gravity flows at different stages of sea-level change were constructed on the basis of outcrop and subsurface data. In the falling-stage system tracts, sandy debris with collapses of reef carbonates are deposited on the slope, and high-density turbidites on the slope toe and basin floor. In the low-stand system tracts, deep water fans that consist of mixed sand/mud facies on the basin floor are comprised of high- to low-density turbidites. In the transgression and high-stand system tracts, channel-levee systems and elongate lobes of mud-rich calciturbidite deposits formed as a result of sea level rise and scarcity of sandy sediment supply. For the reservoir architecture, the fan-like debris and high-density turbidites show high net-to-gross ratio of 62 %, which indicates the sandiest reservoirs for hydrocarbon accumulation. Lobe-like deep water fans with net-to-gross ratio of 57 % facilitate the formation of high quality sandy reservoirs. The channel-levee systems with muddy calciturbidites have low net-to-gross ratio of 30 %.

  3. Study of the effects of impurities on the properties of silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of defects across the back-surface-field junction on the performance of high efficiency and thin solar cells, using a developed-perimeter device model for the three-dimensional defects is investigated. Significant degradation of open-circuit voltage can occur even if there are only a few defects distributed in the bulk of the solar cell. Two features in the thickness dependences of the fill factor and efficiency in impurity-doped back-surface-field solar cells are discovered in the exact numerical solution which are associated with the high injection level effect in the base and not predicted by the low-level analytical theory. What are believed to be the most accurate recombination parameters at the Ti center to date are also given and a theory is developed which is capable of distinguishing an acceptor-like deep level from a donor-like deep level using the measured values of the thermal emission and capture cross sections.

  4. Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1--x}N/GaN band offsets determined by deep-level emission

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, D. R.; Chen, C. H.; Chen, Y. F.; Jiang, H. X.; Lin, J. Y.

    2001-08-15

    We present studies of the compositional dependence of the optical properties of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N(0deep acceptor pair recombination has also been observed in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N. As aluminum concentration increases, the color of the band changes from yellow (2.2 eV) to blue (2.6 eV). The shift was less than that of the band gap. Together with previously published studies, it implies that the deep acceptor level is pinned to a common reference level to both materials, thus the deep level responsible for the yellow emission is used as a common reference level to determine the band alignment in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN heterojunctions. Combining with the near-band-edge modulation spectra, the estimated ratio of conduction-to-valence band discontinuity is 65:35. Our results are close to the values obtained from PL measurements on Al{sub 0.14}Ga{sub 0.86}N/GaN quantum wells and those calculated by linear muffin-tin orbital method and linearized augmented plane wave method. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Cell-level temperature distributions in skeletal muscle post spinal cord injury as related to deep tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Ruschkewitz, Yael; Gefen, Amit

    2010-02-01

    Deep tissue injury (DTI) is a severe pressure ulcer, which initiates in skeletal muscle tissue under intact skin. Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) are especially vulnerable to DTI, due to their impaired motosensory capacities. The underlying mechanisms that lead to DTI are, however, still poorly understood. This study focuses on cell-level temperature distributions in muscles of patients with SCI, which typically contain thinner muscle fibers and fewer capillaries. It has been shown previously by our group that ischemic muscles of rat models of DTI cool down mildly and locally, which is very likely to slow the diffusivity of metabolites in the ischemic regions. However, it is unclear how these temperature decreases affect diffusivity at the scale of individual muscle cells in the microanatomy of SCI patients. We hypothesize that a 2 degrees C drop in the temperature of inflowing capillary blood, as shown in our animal studies, has a substantial effect on lowering the diffusivity of metabolites in skeletal muscle, but the pathological microanatomy in the chronic phase of SCI is less dominant in affecting the local temperatures in and around muscle cells. In order to test this hypothesis, two-dimensional finite element (FE) models of cross sections through the microanatomy of muscle tissue were developed using COMSOL Multiphysics software for normal and SCI muscles. The models included muscle cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and capillaries, each with its own geometrical, thermal, and heat production properties. The SCI model configuration specifically included reduced cross section of myofibrils in favor of more ECM, less capillaries, and decreased blood inflow rate. After a 20-s heat transfer simulation, it was found that temperatures around the cells of the SCI muscle were approximately 2 degrees C lower than that in the normal muscle, that is, heat production from the muscle cell metabolism did not compensate for the lower inflowing blood temperature in

  6. Probing deep level centers in GaN epilayers with variable-frequency capacitance-voltage characteristics of Au /GaN Schottky contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. X.; Xu, S. J.; Shi, S. L.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.; Zhao, D. G.; Yang, H.; Tao, X. M.

    2006-10-01

    Under identical preparation conditions, Au /GaN Schottky contacts were prepared on two kinds of GaN epilayers with significantly different background electron concentrations and mobility as well as yellow emission intensities. Current-voltage (I-V) and variable-frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics show that the Schottky contacts on the GaN epilayer with a higher background carrier concentration and strong yellow emission exhibit anomalous reverse-bias I-V and C-V characteristics. This is attributed to the presence of deep level centers. Theoretical simulation of the low-frequency C-V curves leads to a determination of the density and energy level position of the deep centers.

  7. Deep level traps in GaN LEDs grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy on an 8 inch Si(111) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Xuan Sang; Goh, Xuan Long; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zeng; Arehart, Aaron R.; Ringel, Steven A.; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Chua, Soo Jin

    2016-06-01

    Deep level traps present in GaN LED grown on 8 in. Si substrate were revealed by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). One electron trap located at E C ‑ 0.7 eV was revealed in the n-GaN barrier layer. Two electron traps and one hole trap were observed in the p-GaN layer. They are located at E C ‑ 0.60 eV, E C ‑ 0.79 eV and E V + 0.70 eV. The total trap density in both the n-GaN barrier layer and the p-GaN layer of the LED is in order of 1014 cm‑3, which is comparable with that found in GaN epi-layer grown on sapphire.

  8. Evidence for two distinct defects contributing to the H4 deep-level transient spectroscopy peak in electron-irradiated InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massarani, B.; Awad, F. G.; Kaaka, M.; Darwich, R.

    1998-12-01

    Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been used to study the dominant deep-level H4 produced in InP by electron irradiation. The characteristics of the H4 peak in Zn-doped InP has been studied as a function of pulse duration (tp) before and after annealing. Our results show that at least two traps contribute to the H4 peak: one is a fast trap (labeled H4F) and the other is a slow trap (labeled H4S). This is shown through several results concerning the activation energy, the capture cross section, the full width at half-maximum, and the peak temperature shift. It is shown that both traps are irradiation defects created in the P sublattice.

  9. Control of impurities in toroidal plasma devices

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for plasma impurity control in closed flux plasma systems such as Tokamak reactors is disclosed. Local axisymmetrical injection of hydrogen gas is employed to reverse the normally inward flow of impurities into the plasma.

  10. Impurity tolerant electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Paffett, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    This project has two central goals. The primary research effort addresses fundamental aspects of Pt electrocatalyst poisoning by CO and an understanding of practical schemes for improving the CO tolerance of electrocatalytic materials. The second mission of this work is an attempt to address, on a fundamental level, the surface chemical properties that enhance the direct electrooxidation of methanol at binary Pt alloy electrode surfaces. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Impurity/defect interactions during MeV Si{sup +} ion implantation annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Koveshnikov, S.; Christensen, K.

    1995-08-01

    Ion implantation of dopant atoms at MeV energies is currently being explored in several integrated circuit device manufacturing processes. MeV implantation offers immediate advantages such as vertical well modulation, latch-up protection, device structure isolation, and reduced temperature processing. Simultaneously, it presents an opportunity to achieve {open_quotes}proximity{close_quotes} gettering of impurities from the active device region by placing high impurity solubility and/or secondary defect gettering sites within microns of the surface. If the MeV implanted species is a dopant ion, all three gettering mechanisms, i.e, segregation, relaxation and injection, can be involved in the gettering process, complicating the analysis and optimization of the process. However, investigation of gettering using non-dopant Si{sup +} ion damage allows the relaxation component of the gettering process to be isolated and examined separately. In general, gettering is verified by a reduction in impurity concentration in the region of interest, usually the device region, and/or a build-up of concentration/precipitation in a non-device sink region. An alternate and more meaningful approach is to use simple devices as materials characterization probes via changes in the electrical activity of the gettering sites. Device space charge probes also allow the evolution of the defect sites upon contamination to be tracked. We report here results of the electrical, structural, and chemical characterization of MeV implanted Si{sup +} damage using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). The damage has been characterized both as a function of annealing from 600 to 1100{degrees}C for 1 hr, and after contamination with Fe followed by low temperature gettering annealing.

  12. Metal concentrations and metallothionein-like protein levels in deep-sea fishes captured near hydrothermal vents in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge off Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Company, R.; Felícia, H.; Serafim, A.; Almeida, A. J.; Biscoito, M.; Bebianno, M. J.

    2010-07-01

    The knowledge of metal contamination in deep-sea fishes living in the surroundings of hydrothermal vents is very scarce, along with the detoxification mechanisms that allow them to live near one of the most metal contaminated marine environments. Six deep-sea fish species, although not vent endemic were collected near three Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) hydrothermal vents (Menez Gwen, Lucky Strike and Rainbow) and the gills, muscle and liver were selected for this study due to their importance in metal metabolism and storage. The concentrations of seven metals (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ni) and a metal-related biomarker (metallothionein-like proteins-MTL) were assessed. Major differences in metal accumulation among fish species are related to their feeding habits and vent site of their capture. The liver and gills are in general the most important tissues for metal accumulation compared to the muscle, but tissue partitioning is very dependent on the fish species considered. Compared to other deep-sea fishes, fish capture in the vicinity of hydrothermal vents accumulates higher amounts of metals in general. However, MTL levels are not considerably different from what is found in commercial coastal fishes, and is poorly correlated with metal concentrations in the tissues. Therefore, MTL may not constitute one major detoxification system for deep-sea species living in the vicinity of three important MAR vent sites.

  13. Magnetoplasmons bound to short-range impurities in graphene: Symmetries and optics

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Andrea M.; Roemer, Rudolf A.; Dzyubenko, Alexander B.

    2011-10-15

    We consider a graphene sheet in the presence of a strong perpendicular magnetic field with a single short-range {delta} impurity situated at one of the carbon sites. We study the neutral inter-Landau level collective excitations, magnetoplasmons, which become localized on the impurity. Some of these excitations involve a pseudospin flip (intervalley transitions), since the impurity can scatter electrons between the two valleys. We propose a classification of states of the excitations in graphene and introduce the appropriate quantum numbers. The energies and optical strengths of collective excitations are calculated for a range of integer filling factors and impurity strengths. We establish a set of symmetries matching the energies and absorption strengths of collective excitations for different sublattice locations of the impurity, filling factors, circular light polarizations, and signs of the impurity potential.

  14. Impurity control studies using SOL flow in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, M.R.; Hogan, J.T.; Isler, R.C.

    1998-11-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated the efficacy of using induced scrape-off-layer (SOL) flow to preferentially enrich impurities in the divertor plasma. This SOL flow is produced through simultaneous deuterium gas injection at the midplane and divertor exhaust. Using this SOL flow, an improvement in enrichment (defined as the ratio of impurity fraction in the divertor to that in the plasma core) has been observed for all impurities in trace-level experiments (i.e., impurity level is non-perturbative), with the degree of improvement increasing with impurity atomic number. In the case of argon, exhaust gas enrichment using a modest SOL flow is as high as 17. Using this induced SOL flow technique and argon injection, radiative ELMing H-mode plasmas have been produced that combine high radiation losses (P{sub rad}/P{sub input} > 70%), low core fuel dilution (Z{sub eff} < 1.9), and good core confinement ({tau}{sub E} > 1.0 {tau}{sub E},ITER93H).

  15. Effects of thermal annealing on deep-level defects and minority-carrier electron diffusion length in Be-doped InGaAsN

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, S.Y.; Yoon, S.F.; Wang, S.Z.

    2005-04-01

    We report the effects of ex situ thermal annealing on the deep-level defects and the minority-carrier electron diffusion length in Be-doped, p-type In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01} grown by solid source molecular-beam epitaxy. Deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements reveal two majority-carrier hole traps, HT1 (0.18 eV) and HT4 (0.59 eV), and two minority-carrier electron traps, ET1 (0.09 eV) and ET3 (0.41 eV), in the as-grown sample. For the sample with postgrowth thermal annealing, the overall deep-level defect-concentration is decreased. Two hole traps, HT2 (0.39 eV) and HT3 (0.41 eV), and one electron trap, ET2 (0.19 eV), are observed. We found that the minority-carrier electron diffusion length increases by {approx}30% and the leakage current of the InGaAsN/GaAs p-n junction decreases by 2-3 orders after thermal annealing. An increase of the net acceptor concentration after annealing is also observed and can be explained by a recently proposed three-center-complex model.

  16. Deep-level defects introduced by 1 MeV electron radiation in AlInGaP for multijunction space solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Khan, A.; Takamoto, T.; Agui, T.; Kamimura, K.; Kaneiwa, M.; Imaizumi, M.; Ohshima, T.; Itoh, H.

    2005-11-01

    Presented in this paper are 1 MeV electron irradiation effects on wide-band-gap (1.97 eV) (Al0.08Ga0.92)0.52In0.48P diodes and solar cells. The carrier removal rate estimated in p-AlInGaP with electron fluence is about 1 cm-1, which is lower than that in InP and GaAs. From high-temperature deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, a deep-level defect center such as majority-carrier (hole) trap H2 (Eν+0.90+/-0.05 eV) was observed. The changes in carrier concentrations (Δp) and trap densities as a function of electron fluence were compared, and as a result the total introduction rate, 0.39 cm-1, of majority-carrier trap centers (H1 and H2) is different from the carrier removal rate, 1 cm-1, in p-AlInGaP. From the minority-carrier injection annealing (100 mA/cm2), the annealing activation energy of H2 defect is ΔE=0.60 eV, which is likely to be associated with a vacancy-phosphorus Frenkel pair (Vp-Pi). The recovery of defect concentration and carrier concentration in the irradiated p-AlInGaP by injection relates that a deep-level defect H2 acts as a recombination center as well as compensator center.

  17. Effect of precursor solutions stirring on deep level defects concentration and spatial distribution in low temperature aqueous chemical synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Alnoor, Hatim Chey, Chan Oeurn; Pozina, Galia; Willander, Magnus; Nur, Omer; Liu, Xianjie; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2015-08-15

    Hexagonal c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) with 120-300 nm diameters are synthesized via the low temperature aqueous chemical route at 80 °C on silver-coated glass substrates. The influence of varying the precursor solutions stirring durations on the concentration and spatial distributions of deep level defects in ZnO NRs is investigated. Room temperature micro-photoluminesnce (μ-PL) spectra were collected for all samples. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of the as-synthesized NRs reveal a significant change in the intensity ratio of the near band edge emission (NBE) to the deep-level emission (DLE) peaks with increasing stirring durations. This is attributed to the variation in the concentration of the oxygen-deficiency with increasing stirring durations as suggested from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Spatially resolved CL spectra taken along individual NRs revealed that stirring the precursor solutions for relatively short duration (1-3 h), which likely induced high super saturation under thermodynamic equilibrium during the synthesis process, is observed to favor the formation of point defects moving towards the tip of the NRs. In contrary, stirring for longer duration (5-15 h) will induce low super saturation favoring the formation of point defects located at the bottom of the NRs. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to control the concentration and spatial distribution of deep level defects in ZnO NRs by varying the stirring durations of the precursor solutions.

  18. Detection of surface impurity phases in high T.sub.C superconductors using thermally stimulated luminescence

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Jahan, Muhammad S.

    1989-01-01

    Detection of surface impurity phases in high-temperature superconducting materials. Thermally stimulated luminescence has been found to occur in insulating impurity phases which commonly exist in high-temperature superconducting materials. The present invention is sensitive to impurity phases occurring at a level of less than 1% with a probe depth of about 1 .mu.m which is the region of interest for many superconductivity applications. Spectroscopic and spatial resolution of the emitted light from a sample permits identification and location of the impurity species. Absence of luminescence, and thus of insulating phases, can be correlated with low values of rf surface resistance.

  19. Spectroscopic studies of impurity densities and impurity transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, K.

    1992-06-01

    Spectrometers and spectra, mainly from JET, are discussed with respect to diagnostic potential and calibration problems. Spatial scan facilities or multichord diagnostics are essential for transport investigations, and several possibilities are shown. The interpretation of spectral line radiation usually requires the availability of impurity transport codes, which calculate the ionization balance in the presence of transport, the line emissivities and the total impurity radiation. Some atomic physics prerequisites of such codes are discussed. Theoretical and experimental approaches to the transport problem are investigated using ASDEX and JET results for anomalous transport. The occasional observation of neoclassical accumulation, for example after pellet injection, is presented and respective modeling is described. Some H mode transport phenomena are mentioned.

  20. Fundamental aspects of metallic impurities and impurity interactions in silicon during device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, K.

    1995-08-01

    A review on the behavior of metallic impurities in silicon can be considerably simplified by a restriction on pure, dislocation-free, monocrystalline silicon. In this case interactions between different impurities and between impurities and grown-in lattice defects can be reduced. This restriction is observed in Chapter 1 for discussing the general behavior of metallic impurities in silicon.

  1. Particle fueling and impurity control in PDX

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Budny, R.; Couture, P.; Darrow, D.; Dylla, H.; Goldston, R.; Grek, B.; Hawryluk, R.

    1984-12-01

    Fueling requirements and impurity levels in neutral-beam-heated discharges in the PDX tokamak have been compared for plasmas formed with conventional graphite rail limiters, a particle scoop limiter, and an open or closed poloidal divertor. Gas flows necessary to obtain a given density are highest for diverted discharges and lowest for the scoop limiter. Hydrogen pellet injection provides an efficient alternate fueling technique, and a multiple pellet injector has produced high density discharges for an absorbed neutral beam power of up to 600 kW, above which higher speeds or more massive pellets are required for penetration to the plasma core. Power balance studies indicate that 30 to 40% of the total input power is radiated while approx. 15% is absorbed by the limiting surface, except in the open divertor case, where 60% flows to the neutralizer plate. In all operating configurations, Z/sub eff/ usually rises at the onset of neutral beam injection. Both open divertor plasmas and those formed on a well conditioned water-cooled limiter have Z/sub eff/ less than or equal to 2 at the end of neutral injection. A definitive comparison of divertors and limiters for impurity control purposes requires longer beam pulses or higher power levels than available on present machines.

  2. Observation of impurity accumulation and concurrent impurity influx in PBX

    SciTech Connect

    Sesnic, S.S.; Fonck, R.J.; Ida, K.; Bol, K.; Couture, P.; Gammel, G.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.

    1986-07-01

    Impurity studies in L- and H-mode discharges in PBX have shown that both types of discharges can evolve into either an impurity accumulative or nonaccumulative case. In a typical accumulative discharge, Zeff peaks in the center to values of about 5. The central metallic densities can be high, n/sub met//n/sub e/ approx. = 0.01, resulting in central radiated power densities in excess of 1 W/cm/sup 3/, consistent with bolometric estimates. The radial profiles of metals obtained independently from the line radiation in the soft x-ray and the VUV regions are very peaked. Concurrent with the peaking, an increase in the impurity influx coming from the edge of the plasma is observed. At the beginning of the accumulation phase the inward particle flux for titanium has values of 6 x 10/sup 10/ and 10 x 10/sup 10/ particles/cm/sup 2/s at minor radii of 6 and 17 cm. At the end of the accumulation phase, this particle flux is strongly increased to values of 3 x 10/sup 12/ and 1 x 10/sup 12/ particles/cm/sup 2/s. This increased flux is mainly due to influx from the edge of the plasma and to a lesser extent due to increased convective transport. Using the measured particle flux, an estimate of the diffusion coefficient D and the convective velocity v is obtained.

  3. Strain-level genomic variation in natural populations of Lebetimonas from an erupting deep-sea volcano

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Julie L; Huber, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria are ubiquitous in sulfidic, oxygen-poor habitats, including hydrothermal vents, marine oxygen minimum zones, marine sediments and sulfidic caves and have a significant role in cycling carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur in these environments. The isolation of diverse strains of Epsilonproteobacteria and the sequencing of their genomes have revealed that this group has the metabolic potential to occupy a wide range of niches, particularly at dynamic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. We expand on this body of work by examining the population genomics of six strains of Lebetimonas, a vent-endemic, thermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacterium, from a single seamount in the Mariana Arc. Using Lebetimonas as a model for anaerobic, moderately thermophilic organisms in the warm, anoxic subseafloor environment, we show that genomic content is highly conserved and that recombination is limited between closely related strains. The Lebetimonas genomes are shaped by mobile genetic elements and gene loss as well as the acquisition of novel functional genes by horizontal gene transfer, which provide the potential for adaptation and microbial speciation in the deep sea. In addition, these Lebetimonas genomes contain two operons of nitrogenase genes with different evolutionary origins. Lebetimonas expressed nifH during growth with nitrogen gas as the sole nitrogen source, thus providing the first evidence of nitrogen fixation in any Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. In this study, we provide a comparative overview of the genomic potential within the Nautiliaceae as well as among more distantly related hydrothermal vent Epsilonproteobacteria to broaden our understanding of microbial adaptation and diversity in the deep sea. PMID:24257443

  4. A near-uniform fluctuation of ocean bottom pressure and sea level across the deep ocean basins of the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumori, Ichiro; Wang, Ou; Llovel, William; Fenty, Ian; Forget, Gael

    2015-05-01

    Across the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas, a basin-wide mode of ocean bottom pressure and sea level fluctuation is identified using satellite and in situ observations in conjunction with a global ocean circulation model and its adjoint. The variation extends across the interconnected deep ocean basins of these semi-enclosed Arctic seas, collectively called the Arctic Mediterranean, with spatially near-uniform amplitude and phase. The basin-wide fluctuation is barotropic and dominates the region's large-scale variability from sub-monthly to interannual timescales. The fluctuation results from bifurcating coastally trapped waves generated by winds along the continental slopes of the Arctic Mediterranean and its neighboring seas, including the North Atlantic Ocean. The winds drive Ekman transport across the large bathymetric gradients, forcing mass divergence between the shallow coastal area and the deep ocean basins and creating ocean bottom pressure anomalies of opposite signs in the two regions. The anomalies rapidly propagate away as barotropic coastally trapped waves with the coast and continental slope as respective boundaries. The waves subsequently bifurcate at the shallow straits connecting the Arctic Mediterranean with the rest of the globe. The straits transmit the shallow anomalies but not the deep variations, thereby inhibiting the anomalies' mutual cancelation by geographically separating the two. Anomalies that enter the deep Arctic basins equilibrate uniformly across the domain characterized by a homogeneous depth-integrated planetary potential vorticity distribution. The potential vorticity's steep gradient that borders the basins shields the region from neighboring shallow variations, giving rise to the observed spatially confined fluctuation. Compensating anomalies outside the Arctic adjust similarly across the rest of the globe but are comparatively negligible in amplitude because of the global ocean's larger area relative to that of the deep

  5. Deep levels in a-plane, high Mg-content Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Guer, Emre; Tabares, G.; Hierro, A.; Chauveau, J. M.

    2012-12-15

    Deep level defects in n-type unintentionally doped a-plane Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O, grown by molecular beam epitaxy on r-plane sapphire were fully characterized using deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) and related methods. Four compositions of Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O were examined with x = 0.31, 0.44, 0.52, and 0.56 together with a control ZnO sample. DLOS measurements revealed the presence of five deep levels in each Mg-containing sample, having energy levels of E{sub c} - 1.4 eV, 2.1 eV, 2.6 V, and E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and 0.6 eV. For all Mg compositions, the activation energies of the first three states were constant with respect to the conduction band edge, whereas the latter two revealed constant activation energies with respect to the valence band edge. In contrast to the ternary materials, only three levels, at E{sub c} - 2.1 eV, E{sub v} + 0.3 eV, and 0.6 eV, were observed for the ZnO control sample in this systematically grown series of samples. Substantially higher concentrations of the deep levels at E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and E{sub c} - 2.1 eV were observed in ZnO compared to the Mg alloyed samples. Moreover, there is a general invariance of trap concentration of the E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and 0.6 eV levels on Mg content, while at least and order of magnitude dependency of the E{sub c} - 1.4 eV and E{sub c} - 2.6 eV levels in Mg alloyed samples.

  6. Evolution of the Danube Deep-Sea Fan since the Last Glacial Maximum: insights into water level fluctuations in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, Adriana-Maria; Toucanne, Samuel; Dennielou, Bernanrd; Jorry, Stephan; Panin, Nicolae; Lericolais, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    cal BP). The feeding of the northern channel-levee system continued until the marine invasion ca 9,000 yr ago, while no turbidite activity in the Danube deep-sea fan and the Viteaz canyon is observed thereafter. These results are of primary importance to understand sediment transfer from source (Danube River) to sink (Danube deep-sea fan) in Central Europe since the last glacial period, and we will discuss our results in the light of recent reconstructions of past terrestrial environmental (Soulet et al., 2013) and sea-level changes in the Black Sea region (Lericolais et al., 2009).

  7. Proton irradiation effects on deep level states in Mg-doped p-type GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.

    2015-01-12

    The impact of proton irradiation on the deep level states throughout the Mg-doped p-type GaN bandgap is investigated using deep level transient and optical spectroscopies. Exposure to 1.8 MeV protons of 1 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} and 3 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} fluences not only introduces a trap with an E{sub V} + 1.02 eV activation energy but also brings monotonic increases in concentration for as-grown deep states at E{sub V} + 0.48 eV, E{sub V} + 2.42 eV, E{sub V} + 3.00 eV, and E{sub V} + 3.28 eV. The non-uniform sensitivities for individual states suggest different physical sources and/or defect generation mechanisms. Comparing with prior theoretical calculations reveals that several traps are consistent with associations to nitrogen vacancy, nitrogen interstitial, and gallium vacancy origins, and thus are likely generated through displacing nitrogen and gallium atoms from the crystal lattice in proton irradiation environment.

  8. Volatile impurities in the ceramic form for the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.D.

    2000-03-02

    The primary goal for the impurity tests performed at SRS was to determine the maximum level of volatile impurities that can be accommodated into the ceramic form without significantly affecting product properties. The properties investigated in this study are the apparent porosity and the phase assemblage.

  9. Effect of hydrogenic impurity on the third-harmonic generation in a quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongmin; Guo, Kangxian; Mou, Sen; Xiao, Bo; Liao, Lei

    2014-12-01

    The third-harmonic generation (THG) coefficients in a quantum well with hydrogenic impurity are theoretically investigated with the compact-density-matrix approach and iterative method. The wave functions and the energy levels can be obtained by using variational method and numerical method. Numerical results show that the THG coefficients are strongly affected by the hydrogenic impurity.

  10. Self-pumping impurity control

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, J.N.; Mattas, R.F.

    1983-12-21

    It is an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for removing impurities from the plasma in a fusion reactor without an external vacuum pumping system. It is also an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for removing the helium ash from a fusion reactor. It is another object of the present invention to provide an apparatus which removes helium ash and minimizes tritium recycling and inventory.