Science.gov

Sample records for deep space network

  1. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Summaries are given of Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  2. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Presented is Deep Space Network (DSN) progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition (TDA) research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  3. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The progress is reported of Deep Space Network (DSN) research in the following areas: (1) flight project support, (2) spacecraft/ground communications, (3) station control and operations technology, (4) network control and processing, and (5) deep space stations. A description of the DSN functions and facilities is included.

  4. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition, research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is cited. Topics covered include: tracking and ground based navigation; spacecraft/ground communication; station control and operations technology; ground communications; and deep space stations.

  5. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are considered. Progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is reported.

  6. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations. The functions and facilities of the Deep Space Network are emphasized.

  7. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The facilities, programming system, and monitor and control system for the deep space network are described. Ongoing planetary and interplanetary flight projects are reviewed, along with tracking and ground-based navigation, communications, and network and facility engineering.

  8. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A Deep Space Network progress report is presented dealing with in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  9. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A report is given of the Deep Space Networks progress in (1) flight project support, (2) tracking and data acquisition research and technology, (3) network engineering, (4) hardware and software implementation, and (5) operations.

  10. The deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized along with deep space station, ground communication, and network operations control capabilities. Mission support of ongoing planetary/interplanetary flight projects is discussed with emphasis on Viking orbiter radio frequency compatibility tests, the Pioneer Venus orbiter mission, and Helios-1 mission status and operations. Progress is also reported in tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  11. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization, of the Deep Space Network are summarized. Deep Space stations, ground communications, and network operations control capabilities are described. The network is designed for two-way communications with unmanned spacecraft traveling approximately 1600 km from earth to the farthest planets in the solar system. It has provided tracking and data acquisition support for the following projects: Ranger, Surveyor, Mariner, Pioneer, Apollo, Helios, Viking, and the Lunar Orbiter.

  12. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The various systems and subsystems are discussed for the Deep Space Network (DSN). A description of the DSN is presented along with mission support, program planning, facility engineering, implementation and operations.

  13. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress on the Deep Space Network (DSN) supporting research and technology, advanced development, engineering and implementation, and DSN operations is presented. The functions and facilities of the DSN are described.

  14. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is the largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation network in the world. Its principal responsibilities are to support unmanned interplanetary spacecraft missions and to support radio and radar astronomy observations in the exploration of the solar system and the universe. The DSN facilities and capabilities as of January 1988 are described.

  15. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Work accomplished on the Deep Space Network (DSN) was described, including the following topics: supporting research and technology, advanced development and engineering, system implementation, and DSN operations pertaining to mission-independent or multiple-mission development as well as to support of flight projects.

  16. Deep space network energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesema, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    If the Deep Space Network is to exist in a cost effective and reliable manner in the next decade, the problems presented by international energy cost increases and energy availability must be addressed. The Deep Space Network Energy Program was established to implement solutions compatible with the ongoing development of the total network.

  17. The Deep Space Network, volume 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  18. The Deep Space Network Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatti, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation that reviews the costs, and technological processing required to replace the current network of Deep Space Antennas. The concept of using an array for space communications is much less of a concern than the cost of implementing and operating such an array. Within the cost question, the cost uncertainty of the front-end components (repeated n-times) is of most importance. The activities at JPL have focused on both these aspects of the cost. A breadboard array of three antennas at JPL has been the vehicle to perform many investigations into the development of the new DSN. Several pictures of the antennas at JPL are shown.

  19. Future Plans for NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Leslie J.; Preston, Robert A.; Geldzahler, Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to space exploration, and future planned improvements to the communication capabilities that the network allows, in terms of precision, and communication power.

  20. The deep space network, volume 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The deep space instrumentation facility, the ground communications facility, and the network control system are described. Other areas reported include: Helios Mission support, DSN support of the Mariner Mars 1971 extended mission, Mariner Venus/Mercury 1973 mission support, Viking mission support, radio science, tracking and ground-based navigation, network control and data processing, and deep space stations.

  1. RFI receiver. [deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, R.

    1980-01-01

    An S-band radio frequency interference (RFI) receiver to analyze and identify sources of RFI problems in the Deep Space Network DSN tracking stations is described. The RFI receiver is a constant gain, double conversion, open loop receiver with dual sine/cosine channel outputs, providing a total of 20 MHZ monitoring capability. This receiver is computer controlled using a MODCOMP II miniprocessor. The RFI receiver has been designed to operate at a 150 Kelvin system noise temperature accomplished by cascading two low noise field effect transistor (FET) amplifiers for the receiver front-end. The first stage low noise FET amplifier is mounted at the feed horn to minimize any cable losses to achieve a lower system noise temperature. The receiver is tunable over the frequency range of 2150 to 2450 MHz in both sine/cosine output channels with a resolution of 100 kHz.

  2. Deep Space Network turbo decoder implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, J. B.; Andrews, K. S.

    2000-01-01

    A new decoder is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Deep Space Network. This unit will decode the new turbo codes, which have recently been approved by the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS).

  3. Deep Space Network turbo decoder implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Bryant, Scott H.

    2001-01-01

    A new decoder is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Deep Space Network. This unit will decode the new turbo codes, which have recently been approved by the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS). Turbo codes provide up to 0.8 dB improvement in Eb/No over the current best codes used by deep space missions.

  4. The Deep Space Network. [tracking and communication functions and facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  5. The deep space network, volume 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Progress on Deep Space Network (DSN) supporting research and technology is presented, together with advanced development and engineering, implementation, and DSN operations of flight projects. The DSN is described. Interplanetary and planetary flight projects and radio science experiments are discussed. Tracking and navigational accuracy analysis, communications systems and elements research, and supporting research are considered. Development of the ground communications and deep space instrumentation facilities is also presented. Network allocation schedules and angle tracking and test development are included.

  6. The deep space network, Volume 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Deep Space Network progress in flight project support, Tracking and Data Acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations are presented. Material is presented in each of the following categories: description of DSN; mission support; radio science; support research and technology; network engineering and implementation; and operations and facilities.

  7. NASA Deep Space Network Operations Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enari, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    The functioning of the Deep Space Network Operations Scheduling, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, CA is reviewed. The primary objectives of the Operations Scheduling are: to schedule the worldwide global allocation of ground communications, tracking facilities, and equipment; and to provide deep space telecommunications for command, tracking, telemetry, and control in support of flight mission operations and tests. Elements of the earth set are Deep Space Stations (DSS) which provide the telecommunications link between the earth and spacecraft; NASA Communications Network; Network Data Processing Area; Network Operations Control Area which provides operational direction to the DSS; Mission Control and Computing systems; and Mission Support areas which provide flight control of the spacecraft. Elements of the space set include mission priorities and requirements which determine the spacecraft queue for allocating network resources. Scheduling is discussed in terms of long-range (3 years), mid-range (8 weeks), and short-range (2 weeks).

  8. The deep space network, volume 18. [Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, Ground Communication Facility, and Network Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  9. The deep space network, volume 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The DSN progress is reported in flight project support, TDA research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations. Topics discussed include: DSN functions and facilities, planetary flight projects, tracking and ground-based navigation, communications, data processing, network control system, and deep space stations.

  10. The deep space network, volume 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Progress in the development of the DSN is reported along with TDA research and technology, network engineering, hardware, and software implementation. Included are descriptions of the DSN function and facilities, Helios mission support, Mariner Venus/Mercury 1973 mission support, Viking mission support, tracking and ground-based navigation, communications, network control and data processing, and deep space stations.

  11. The Deep Space Network, volume 39

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The functions, facilities, and capabilities of the Deep Space Network and its support of the Pioneer, Helios, and Viking missions are described. Progress in tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering and modifications, as well as hardware and software implementation and operations are reported.

  12. Helios mission support. [Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, P. S.; Rockwell, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    Activities of the Deep Space Network Operations organization in support of the Helios Project from 15 October 1977 through 15 December 1977 are described. Topics covered include: (1) Mark 3 data subsystem testing at the conjoint Deep Space Stations (DSS) 42/43 (Canberra, Australia); (2) MDS implementation at DSS 61/63 (Madrid, Spain); (3) Radio Science update, and (4) other mission-related activities.

  13. The deep space network, volume 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The progress is reported in the DSN for Nov. and Dec. 1973. Research is described for the following areas: functions and facilities, mission support for flight projects, tracking and ground-based navigation, spacecraft/ground communication, network control and operations technology, and deep space stations.

  14. Evolutionary Scheduler for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillaume, Alexandre; Lee, Seungwon; Wang, Yeou-Fang; Zheng, Hua; Chau, Savio; Tung, Yu-Wen; Terrile, Richard J.; Hovden, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A computer program assists human schedulers in satisfying, to the maximum extent possible, competing demands from multiple spacecraft missions for utilization of the transmitting/receiving Earth stations of NASA s Deep Space Network. The program embodies a concept of optimal scheduling to attain multiple objectives in the presence of multiple constraints.

  15. The deep space network, volume 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Progress on the Deep Space Network (DSN) supporting research and technology is reported. The objectives, functions and facilities of the DSN are described along with the mission support for the following: interplanetary flight projects, planetary flight projects, and manned space flight projects. Work in advanced engineering and communications systems is reported along with changes in hardware and software configurations in the DSN/MSFN tracking stations.

  16. Operability engineering in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Belinda

    1993-01-01

    Many operability problems exist at the three Deep Space Communications Complexes (DSCC's) of the Deep Space Network (DSN). Four years ago, the position of DSN Operability Engineer was created to provide the opportunity for someone to take a system-level approach to solving these problems. Since that time, a process has been developed for personnel and development engineers and for enforcing user interface standards in software designed for the DSCC's. Plans are for the participation of operations personnel in the product life-cycle to expand in the future.

  17. The Deep Space Network Advanced Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz

    2010-01-01

    The deep space network (DSN)--with its three complexes in Goldstone, California, Madrid, Spain, and Canberra, Australia--provides the resources to track and communicate with planetary and deep space missions. Each complex consists of an array of capabilities for tracking probes almost anywhere in the solar system. A number of innovative hardware, software and procedural tools are used for day-to-day operations at DSN complexes as well as at the network control at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Systems and technologies employed by the network include large-aperture antennas (34-m and 70-m), cryogenically cooled receivers, high-power transmitters, stable frequency and timing distribution assemblies, modulation and coding schemes, spacecraft transponders, radiometric tracking techniques, etc. The DSN operates at multiple frequencies, including the 2-GHz band, the 7/8-GHz band, and the 32/34-GHz band.

  18. Deep space network software cost estimation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A parametric software cost estimation model prepared for Jet PRopulsion Laboratory (JPL) Deep Space Network (DSN) Data System implementation tasks is described. The resource estimation mdel modifies and combines a number of existing models. The model calibrates the task magnitude and difficulty, development environment, and software technology effects through prompted responses to a set of approximately 50 questions. Parameters in the model are adjusted to fit JPL software life-cycle statistics.

  19. A history of the deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corliss, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) has been managed and operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) under NASA contract ever since NASA was formed in late 1958. The Tracking and data acquisition tasks of the DSN are markedly different from those of the other NASA network, STDN. STDN, which is an amalgamation of the satellite tracking network (STADAN) and the Manned Space Flight Network (MSFN), is primarily concerned with supporting manned and unmanned earth satellites. In contrast, the DSN deals with spacecraft that are thousands to hundreds of millions of miles away. The radio signals from these distant craft are many orders of magnitude weaker than those from nearby satellites. Distance also makes precise radio location more difficult; and accurate trajectory data are vital to deep space navigation in the vicinities of the other planets of the solar system. In addition to tracking spacecraft and acquiring data from them, the DSN is required to transmit many thousands of commands to control the sophisticated planetary probes and interplanetary monitoring stations. To meet these demanding requirements, the DSN has been compelled to be in the forefront of technology.

  20. Deep space network software cost estimation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A parametric software cost estimation model prepared for Deep Space Network (DSN) Data Systems implementation tasks is presented. The resource estimation model incorporates principles and data from a number of existing models. The model calibrates task magnitude and difficulty, development environment, and software technology effects through prompted responses to a set of approximately 50 questions. Parameters in the model are adjusted to fit DSN software life cycle statistics. The estimation model output scales a standard DSN Work Breakdown Structure skeleton, which is then input into a PERT/CPM system, producing a detailed schedule and resource budget for the project being planned.

  1. The Deep Space Network. An instrument for radio navigation of deep space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.; Jordan, J. F.; Berman, A. L.; Wackley, J. A.; Yunck, T. P.

    1982-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) network configurations used to generate the navigation observables and the basic process of deep space spacecraft navigation, from data generation through flight path determination and correction are described. Special emphasis is placed on the DSN Systems which generate the navigation data: the DSN Tracking and VLBI Systems. In addition, auxiliary navigational support functions are described.

  2. Deep Space Network information system architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beswick, C. A.; Markley, R. W. (Editor); Atkinson, D. J.; Cooper, L. P.; Tausworthe, R. C.; Masline, R. C.; Jenkins, J. S.; Crowe, R. A.; Thomas, J. L.; Stoloff, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an architecture for the Deep Space Network (DSN) information system in the years 2000-2010 and to provide guidelines for its evolution during the 1990s. The study scope is defined to be from the front-end areas at the antennas to the end users (spacecraft teams, principal investigators, archival storage systems, and non-NASA partners). The architectural vision provides guidance for major DSN implementation efforts during the next decade. A strong motivation for the study is an expected dramatic improvement in information-systems technologies, such as the following: computer processing, automation technology (including knowledge-based systems), networking and data transport, software and hardware engineering, and human-interface technology. The proposed Ground Information System has the following major features: unified architecture from the front-end area to the end user; open-systems standards to achieve interoperability; DSN production of level 0 data; delivery of level 0 data from the Deep Space Communications Complex, if desired; dedicated telemetry processors for each receiver; security against unauthorized access and errors; and highly automated monitor and control.

  3. Remote observing with NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Majid, W. A.; Martinez, S.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Rizzo, J. R.

    2012-09-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) communicates with spacecraft as far away as the boundary between the Solar System and the interstellar medium. To make this possible, large sensitive antennas at Canberra, Australia, Goldstone, California, and Madrid, Spain, provide for constant communication with interplanetary missions. We describe the procedures for radioastronomical observations using this network. Remote access to science monitor and control computers by authorized observers is provided by two-factor authentication through a gateway at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena. To make such observations practical, we have devised schemes based on SSH tunnels and distributed computing. At the very minimum, one can use SSH tunnels and VNC (Virtual Network Computing, a remote desktop software suite) to control the science hosts within the DSN Flight Operations network. In this way we have controlled up to three telescopes simultaneously. However, X-window updates can be slow and there are issues involving incompatible screen sizes and multi-screen displays. Consequently, we are now developing SSH tunnel-based schemes in which instrument control and monitoring, and intense data processing, are done on-site by the remote DSN hosts while data manipulation and graphical display are done at the observer's host. We describe our approaches to various challenges, our experience with what worked well and lessons learned, and directions for future development.

  4. Beam waveguides in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.; Smith, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    A beam waveguide is a mechanism for guiding electromagnetic radiation from one part of an antenna to another through a series of reflectors. Appropriate placement of reflectors on an antenna allows a beam to be guided around the elevation axis and/or below the alidade. The beam waveguide permits placement of all electronics in a room on the alidade below the elevation axis, or below the alidade; feed horn covers to be protected from the weather; and feed electronics to be in spacious rooms rather than in crowded cones, and always level rather than tipping with change in elevation angle. These factors can lead to lower costs in implementation such as Ka-band, better antenna performance at X-band, more efficient and stable performance of transmitters and receivers, and lower maintenance and operating costs. Studies are underway to determine methods for converting the major antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN) to beam waveguide operations by 1995.

  5. The Deep Space Network stability analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Greenhall, Charles A.; Hamell, Robert L.; Kuhnle, Paul F.

    1995-01-01

    A stability analyzer for testing NASA Deep Space Network installations during flight radio science experiments is described. The stability analyzer provides realtime measurements of signal properties of general experimental interest: power, phase, and amplitude spectra; Allan deviation; and time series of amplitude, phase shift, and differential phase shift. Input ports are provided for up to four 100 MHz frequency standards and eight baseband analog (greater than 100 kHz bandwidth) signals. Test results indicate the following upper bounds to noise floors when operating on 100 MHz signals: -145 dBc/Hz for phase noise spectrum further than 200 Hz from carrier, 2.5 x 10(exp -15) (tau =1 second) and 1.5 x 10(exp -17) (tau =1000 seconds) for Allan deviation, and 1 x 10(exp -4) degrees for 1-second averages of phase deviation. Four copies of the stability analyzer have been produced, plus one transportable unit for use at non-NASA observatories.

  6. The Deep Space Network: A Radio Communications Instrument for Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.; Stelzried, C. T.; Noreen, G. K.; Slobin, S. D.; Petty, S. M.; Trowbridge, D. L.; Donnelly, H.; Kinman, P. W.; Armstrong, J. W.; Burow, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Deep Space Network (DSN) is to serve as a communications instrument for deep space exploration, providing communications between the spacecraft and the ground facilities. The uplink communications channel provides instructions or commands to the spacecraft. The downlink communications channel provides command verification and spacecraft engineering and science instrument payload data.

  7. Deep Space Network Radiometric Remote Sensing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft are viewed through a troposphere that absorbs and delays radio signals propagating through it. Tropospheric water, in the form of vapor, cloud liquid, and precipitation, emits radio noise which limits satellite telemetry communication link performance. Even at X-band, rain storms have severely affected several satellite experiments including a planetary encounter. The problem will worsen with DSN implementation of Ka-band because communication link budgets will be dominated by tropospheric conditions. Troposphere-induced propagation delays currently limit VLBI accuracy and are significant sources of error for Doppler tracking. Additionally, the success of radio science programs such as satellite gravity wave experiments and atmospheric occultation experiments depends on minimizing the effect of water vapor-induced propagation delays. In order to overcome limitations imposed by the troposphere, the Deep Space Network has supported a program of radiometric remote sensing. Currently, water vapor radiometers (WVRs) and microwave temperature profilers (MTPs) support many aspects of the Deep Space Network operations and research and development programs. Their capability to sense atmospheric water, microwave sky brightness, and atmospheric temperature is critical to development of Ka-band telemetry systems, communication link models, VLBI, satellite gravity wave experiments, and radio science missions. During 1993, WVRs provided data for propagation model development, supported planetary missions, and demonstrated advanced tracking capability. Collection of atmospheric statistics is necessary to model and predict performance of Ka-band telemetry links, antenna arrays, and radio science experiments. Since the spectrum of weather variations has power at very long time scales, atmospheric measurements have been requested for periods ranging from one year to a decade at each DSN site. The resulting database would provide reliable statistics on daily

  8. Deep Space Network information system architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beswick, C. A.; Markley, R. W. (Editor); Atkinson, D. J.; Cooper, L. P.; Tausworthe, R. C.; Masline, R. C.; Jenkins, J. S.; Crowe, R. A.; Thomas, J. L.; Stoloff, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an architecture for the DSN information system in the years 2000-2010 and to provide guidelines for its evolution during the 1990's. The study scope is defined to be from the front-end areas at the antennas to the end users (spacecraft teams, principal investigators, archival storage systems, and non-NASA partners). The architectural vision provides guidance for major DSN implementation efforts during the next decade. A strong motivation for the study is an expected dramatic improvement in information-systems technologies--i.e., computer processing, automation technology (including knowledge-based systems), networking and data transport, software and hardware engineering, and human-interface technology. The proposed Ground Information System has the following major features: unified architecture from the front-end area to the end user; open-systems standards to achieve interoperability; DSN production of level 0 data; delivery of level 0 data from the Deep Space Communications Complex, if desired; dedicated telemetry processors for each receiver; security against unauthorized access and errors; and highly automated monitor and control.

  9. Statistical porcess control in Deep Space Network operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodder, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes how the Deep Space Mission System (DSMS) Operations Program Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (EL) uses Statistical Process Control (SPC) to monitor performance and evaluate initiatives for improving processes on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Deep Space Network (DSN).

  10. Deep Space Network Antenna Logic Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, Harlow; Morgan, Scott; Hames, Peter; Strain, Martha; Owen, Christopher; Shimizu, Kenneth; Wilson, Karen; Shaller, David; Doktomomtaz, Said; Leung, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The Antenna Logic Controller (ALC) software controls and monitors the motion control equipment of the 4,000-metric-ton structure of the Deep Space Network 70-meter antenna. This program coordinates the control of 42 hydraulic pumps, while monitoring several interlocks for personnel and equipment safety. Remote operation of the ALC runs via the Antenna Monitor & Control (AMC) computer, which orchestrates the tracking functions of the entire antenna. This software provides a graphical user interface for local control, monitoring, and identification of faults as well as, at a high level, providing for the digital control of the axis brakes so that the servo of the AMC may control the motion of the antenna. Specific functions of the ALC also include routines for startup in cold weather, controlled shutdown for both normal and fault situations, and pump switching on failure. The increased monitoring, the ability to trend key performance characteristics, the improved fault detection and recovery, the centralization of all control at a single panel, and the simplification of the user interface have all reduced the required workforce to run 70-meter antennas. The ALC also increases the antenna availability by reducing the time required to start up the antenna, to diagnose faults, and by providing additional insight into the performance of key parameters that aid in preventive maintenance to avoid key element failure. The ALC User Display (AUD) is a graphical user interface with hierarchical display structure, which provides high-level status information to the operation of the ALC, as well as detailed information for virtually all aspects of the ALC via drill-down displays. The operational status of an item, be it a function or assembly, is shown in the higher-level display. By pressing the item on the display screen, a new screen opens to show more detail of the function/assembly. Navigation tools and the map button allow immediate access to all screens.

  11. Considerations on communications network protocols in deep space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clare, L. P.; Agre, J. R.; Yan, T.

    2001-01-01

    Communications supporting deep space missions impose numerous unique constraints that impact the architectural choices made for cost-effectiveness. We are entering the era where networks that exist in deep space are needed to support planetary exploration. Cost-effective performance will require a balanced integration of applicable widely used standard protocols with new and innovative designs.

  12. The Future of the Deep Space Network: Technology Development for K2-Band Deep Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhanji, Alaudin M.

    1999-01-01

    Projections indicate that in the future the number of NASA's robotic deep space missions is likely to increase significantly. A launch rate of up to 4-6 launches per year is projected with up to 25 simultaneous missions active [I]. Future high resolution mapping missions to other planetary bodies as well as other experiments are likely to require increased downlink capacity. These future deep space communications requirements will, according to baseline loading analysis, exceed the capacity of NASA's Deep Space Network in its present form. There are essentially two approaches for increasing the channel capacity of the Deep Space Network. Given the near-optimum performance of the network at the two deep space communications bands, S-Band (uplink 2.025-2.120 GHz, downlink 2.2-2.3 GHz), and X-Band (uplink 7.145-7.19 GHz, downlink 8.48.5 GHz), additional improvements bring only marginal return for the investment. Thus the only way to increase channel capacity is simply to construct more antennas, receivers, transmitters and other hardware. This approach is relatively low-risk but involves increasing both the number of assets in the network and operational costs.

  13. Deep Space Network, Cryogenic HEMT LNAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, J. Javier

    2006-01-01

    Exploration of the Solar System with automated spacecraft that are more than ten astronomical units (1 AU = 149,597,870.691 km) from earth requires very large antennae employing extremely sensitive receivers. A key figure of merit in the specification of the spacecraft-to-earth telecommunications link is the ratio of the antenna gain to operatio nal noise temperature (G/Top) of the system. The Deep Space Network (DSN) receivers are cryogenic, low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) which addres s the need to maintain Top as low as technology permits. Historicall y, the extra-ordinarily sensitive receive systems operated by the DSN have required ctyogenically cooled, ruby masers, operating at a physi cal temperature near the boiling point of helium, as the LNA. Althoug h masers continue to be used today, they are hand crafted at JPL and expensive to manufacture and maintain. Recent advances in the developm ent of indium phosphide (InP) based high electron mobility transistor s (HEMTs) combined with cryogenic cooling near the boiling point of h ydrogen have made this alternate technology comparable with and a fraction of the cost of maser technology. InP HEMT LNA modules are demons trating noise temperatures less than ten times the quantum noise limi t (10hf/k) from 1 to 100 GHz. To date, the lowest noise LNA modules developed for the DSN have demonstrated noise temperatures of 3.5 K and 8.5 K at 8.5 K at 32 GHz, respectively. Front-end receiver packages employing these modules have demonstrated operating system noise temperatures of 17 K at 8.4 GHz (on a 70m antenna at zenith) and 39 K at 3 2 GHz (on a 34m antenna at zenith). The development and demonstration of cryogenic, InP HEMT based front-end amplifiers for the DSN requir es accurate component and module characterization, and modeling from 1 to 100 GHz at physical temperatures down to 12 K. The characterizati on and modeling begins with the HEMT chip, proceeds to the multi-stag e HEMT LNA module, and culminates with the

  14. Sub-microradian pointing for deep space optical telecommunications network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, G.; Lee, S.; Alexander, J.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation will cover innovative hardware, algorithms, architectures, techniques and recent laboratory results that are applicable to all deep space optical communication links, such as the Mars Telecommunication Network to future interstellar missions.

  15. Transforming the deep space network into the Interplanetary Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, William J.; Cesarone, Robert J.; Abraham, Douglas S.; Doms, Peter E.; Doyle, Richard J.; Edwards, Charles D.; Hooke, Adrian J.; Lesh, James R.; Miller, Richard B.

    2006-04-01

    Space exploration missions are undergoing a significant transformation as are the expectations of their scientific investigators and the public who participate in these great voyages of exploration. The early reconnaissance missions are giving way to a new data-intensive era of long duration observational outposts, landed vehicles, sample returns, and multi-spacecraft fleets and constellations. Mars exploration has already become a special case of the new operational mode; other destinations will follow. These changes will require orders of magnitude increases in data rates, highly automated and standardized data communications between the remote locations and Earth, more transparent and responsive mission operations procedures, and the ability to engage the public by giving them Internet-based visibility into the missions as they unfold. The new area will demand a new paradigm for the Deep Space Network, with increased emphasis on data networking and the data processing applications that allow users to become more intimately engaged with the conduct of the mission. We call this new paradigm the Interplanetary Network. Its vision is seamless connectivity between scientists and their instruments, new data analysis and visualization tools that will greatly enhance and enable new modes of space exploration, and the involvement of the public via web-based “telepresence.”

  16. The Deep Space Network: An instrument for radio science research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.

    1981-01-01

    Doppler and ranging data routinely generated at the Deep Space Stations of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory Deep Space Network serve as an excellent source of radio science information. Important radio science experiments based on Deep Space Network generated radio metric data have included confirmation of Einstein's Theory of Relativity, measurement of the masses and gravitational harmonics of the planets out to Saturn, and measurement of electron density distribution and turbulence in the solar corona. In response to an increased level of radio science requirements, the Deep Space Network chose in 1976 to implement a new radio science system, which was completed in late 1978. Key features include (1) highly phase stable open loop receivers, (2) reduction of recorded data bandwidth through use of programmed local oscillators, and (3) real time digitization and recording on computer compatible tape.

  17. The Telecommunications and Data Acquisition Report. [Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, E. C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    In space communications, radio navigation, radio science, and ground based radio and radar astronomy, activities of the Deep Space Network and its associated Ground Communications Facility in planning, in supporting research and technology, in implementation, and in operations are reported. Also included is TDA funded activity at JPL on data and information systems and reimbursable DSN work performed for other space agencies through NASA.

  18. Radio frequency interference protection of communications between the Deep Space Network and deep space flight projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The increasing density of electrical and electronic circuits in Deep Space Station systems for computation, control, and numerous related functions has combined with the extension of system performance requirements calling for higher speed circuitry along with broader bandwidths. This has progressively increased the number of potential sources of radio frequency interference inside the stations. Also, the extension of spectrum usage both in power and frequency as well as the greater density of usage at all frequencies for national and international satellite communications, space research, Earth resource operations and defense, and particularly the huge expansion of airborne electronic warfare and electronic countermeasures operations in the Mojave area have greatly increased the potential number and severity of radio frequency interference incidents. The various facets of this problem and the efforts to eliminate or minimize the impact of interference on Deep Space Network support of deep space flight projects are described.

  19. The Telecommunications and Data Acquisition Report. [Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, E. C. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This publication, one of a series formerly titled The Deep Space Network Progress Report, documents DSN progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations. In addition, developments in Earth-based radio technology as applied to geodynamics, astrophysics and the radio search for extraterrestrial intelligence are reported.

  20. Telecommunications technology development for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H.; Resch, G. M.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    The telecommunications technology that is currently being developed for the Deep Space Network (DSN), a system providing communications and navigation support for NASA's deep space missions, is discussed. The major areas of development include Ka-band (32 GHz) technology, beam waveguide antennas, low-noise amplifiers, coding, navigation techniques, high-power transmitters, and optical technology. The expected payoffs of the new technology during the mid-1990's and later are examined.

  1. Telecommunications technology development for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, J. H.; Resch, G. M.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1989-10-01

    The telecommunications technology that is currently being developed for the Deep Space Network (DSN), a system providing communications and navigation support for NASA's deep space missions, is discussed. The major areas of development include Ka-band (32 GHz) technology, beam waveguide antennas, low-noise amplifiers, coding, navigation techniques, high-power transmitters, and optical technology. The expected payoffs of the new technology during the mid-1990's and later are examined.

  2. An OSI architecture for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuser, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents an Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) architecture developed for the Deep Space Network. An historical review is provided to establish the context for current United States Government policy on interprocessor communication standards. An introduction to the OSI architecture, its seven-layer approach, and an overview of application service entities are furnished as a tutorial. Finally, the results of a prototype system developed for monitor and control of a Deep Space Station are also presented.

  3. The Deep Space Network: An instrument for radio astronomy research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.; Levy, G. S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Walken, P. R.; Chandlee, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network operates and maintains the Earth-based two-way communications link for unmanned spacecraft exploring the solar system. It is NASA's policy to also make the Network's facilities available for radio astronomy observations. The Network's microwave communication systems and facilities are being continually upgraded. This revised document, first published in 1982, describes the Network's current radio astronomy capabilities and future capabilities that will be made available by the ongoing Network upgrade. The Bibliography, which includes published papers and articles resulting from radio astronomy observations conducted with Network facilities, has been updated to include papers to May 1987.

  4. Summary of DSN (Deep Space Network) reimbursable launch support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanelli, N. A.; Wyatt, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    The Deep Space Network is providing ground support to space agencies of foreign governments as well as to NASA and other agencies of the Federal government which are involved in space activities. DSN funding for support of missions other than NASA are on either a cooperative or a reimbursable basis. Cooperative funding and support are accomplished in the same manner as NASA sponsored missions. Reimbursable launch funding and support methods are described.

  5. The deep space network, volume 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    DSN progress during Jan. and Feb. 1973 is reported. Areas of accomplishment include: flight project support, TDA research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations.

  6. Clocks and timing in the NASA Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauf, J.; Calhoun, M.; Diener, W.; Gonzalez, J.; Kirk, A.; Kuhnle, P.; Tucker, B.; Kirby, C.; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    A new timing system has been developed for the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) and is currently in the final stages of integration, testing and implementation in all three DSN sites. The DSN is a distributed antenna network for deep space communication, whose facilities are continuously engaged in spacecraft tracking, Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) or Radio Astronomy activities. Its primary components consist of three Deep Space Communication Centers (DSCC) separated nearly equidistant around the Earth in California, USA; Spain; and Australia. Within each DSCC, synchronized, low jitter timing signals must be distributed to many users over distances of up to 30 kilometers. The design criteria for the timing system required state of the art stability and jitter performance, but also extremely high operability and reliability. This paper describes some of the key features and recent system performance data as measured both in the laboratory and the operational DSN.

  7. The deep space network, volume 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the DSN are summarized, and the instrumentation facility, ground communication facility, and the network control system are described. The requirements for supporting planetary flight projects are discussed along with the research and technology for tracking, navigation, network control, and data processing.

  8. Neural network based satellite tracking for deep space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amoozegar, F.; Ruggier, C.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a survey of neural network trends as applied to the tracking of spacecrafts in deep space at Ka-band under various weather conditions and examine the trade-off between tracing accuracy and communication link performance.

  9. RFI prevention for colocated antennas. [deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Potential radio frequency interference problems related to the colocation of antennas for the Mark 4-A Deep Space network are analyzed. Cases discussed include effects of S-band uplinks on X-band downlinks and S-band downlinks, planetary radar at Goldstone, future X-band uplink, radiometer measurements, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence instrument, and radio astronomy projects. Remedial actions are suggested.

  10. The Deep Space Network Tracking System, Mark 4-A, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wackley, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) Tracking System provides highly precise measurements of spacecraft Doppler and range. It was recently extensively modified as part of the Mark 4-A implementation. The DSN Tracking System as currently implemented, its performance in support of Voyager 2, and plans for new implementation are described.

  11. Automating Deep Space Network scheduling and conflict resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Clement, Bradley

    2005-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is a central part of NASA's infrastructure for communicating with active space missions, from earth orbit to beyond the solar system. We describe our recent work in modeling the complexities of user requirements, and then scheduling and resolving conflicts on that basis. We emphasize our innovative use of background 'intelligent' assistants' that carry out search asynchrnously while the user is focusing on various aspects of the schedule.

  12. A Deep Space Network Portable Radio Science Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeling, Andre P.; Sigman, Elliott H.; Chandra, Kumar; Trinh, Joseph T.; Navarro, Robert; Rogstad, Stephen P.; Goodhart, Charles E.; Proctor, Robert C.; Finley, Susan G.; White, Leslie A.

    2009-01-01

    The Radio Science Receiver (RSR) is an open-loop receiver installed in NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN), which digitally filters and records intermediate-frequency (IF) analog signals. The RSR is an important tool for the Cassini Project, which uses it to measure perturbations of the radio-frequency wave as it travels between the spacecraft and the ground stations, allowing highly detailed study of the composition of the rings, atmosphere, and surface of Saturn and its satellites.

  13. The Deep Space Network information system in the year 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, R. W.; Beswick, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN), the largest, most sensitive scientific communications and radio navigation network in the world, is considered. Focus is made on the telemetry processing, monitor and control, and ground data transport architectures of the DSN ground information system envisioned for the year 2000. The telemetry architecture will be unified from the front-end area to the end user. It will provide highly automated monitor and control of the DSN, automated configuration of support activities, and a vastly improved human interface. Automated decision support systems will be in place for DSN resource management, performance analysis, fault diagnosis, and contingency management.

  14. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Deep Space Network Antenna Coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegege, Obadiah; Fuentes, Michael; Meyer, Nicholas; Sil, Amy

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to understand NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) coverage gaps and any limitations to provide redundant communication coverage for future deep space missions, especially for manned missions to Moon and Mars. The DSN antennas are required to provide continuous communication coverage for deep space flights, interplanetary missions, and deep space scientific observations. The DSN consists of ground antennas located at three sites: Goldstone in USA, Canberra in Australia, and Madrid in Spain. These locations are not separated by the exactly 120 degrees and some DSN antennas are located in the bowl-shaped mountainous terrain to shield against radiofrequency interference resulting in a coverage gap in the southern hemisphere for the current DSN architecture. To analyze the extent of this gap and other coverage limitations, simulations of the DSN architecture were performed. In addition to the physical properties of the DSN assets, the simulation incorporated communication forward link calculations and azimuth/elevation masks that constrain the effects of terrain for each DSN antenna. Analysis of the simulation data was performed to create coverage profiles with the receiver settings at a deep space altitudes ranging from 2 million to 10 million km and a spherical grid resolution of 0.25 degrees with respect to longitude and latitude. With the results of these simulations, two- and three-dimensional representations of the area without communication coverage and area with coverage were developed, showing the size and shape of the communication coverage gap projected in space. Also, the significance of this communication coverage gap is analyzed from the simulation data.

  15. Gravitational wave searches using the DSN (Deep Space Network)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, S. J.; Armstrong, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The Deep Space Network Doppler spacecraft link is currently the only method available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the 0.01 to 0.001 Hz frequency range. The DSN's role in the worldwide search for gravitational waves is described by first summarizing from the literature current theoretical estimates of gravitational wave strengths and time scales from various astrophysical sources. Current and future detection schemes for ground based and space based detectors are then discussed. Past, present, and future planned or proposed gravitational wave experiments using DSN Doppler tracking are described. Lastly, some major technical challenges to improve gravitational wave sensitivities using the DSN are discussed.

  16. Precision Pulsar Timing with NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Walid; Lazio, Joseph; Teitelbaum, Lawrence

    2015-08-01

    Millisecond pulsars are a class of radio pulsars with extremely stable rotations. The excellent timing stability of millisecond pulsars can be used to study a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. In particular, observations of a large sample of these pulsars can be used to detect the presence of low-frequency gravitational waves. We have developed a precision pulsar timing backend for the Deep Space Network (DSN), which will allow the use of short gaps in tracking schedules to observe and time pulses from an ensemble of millisecond pulsars. The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) operates clusters of large dish antennas (up to 70-m in diameter), located roughly equi-distant around the Earth, for communication and tracking of deep-space spacecraft. The backend system will be capable of removing entirely the dispersive effects of propagation of radio waves through the interstellar medium in real-time. We will describe our development work, initial results, and prospects for future observations over the next few years.

  17. A distributed data base management system. [for Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, A. I.

    1975-01-01

    Major system design features of a distributed data management system for the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) designed for continuous two-way deep space communications are described. The reasons for which the distributed data base utilizing third-generation minicomputers is selected as the optimum approach for the DSN are threefold: (1) with a distributed master data base, valid data is available in real-time to support DSN management activities at each location; (2) data base integrity is the responsibility of local management; and (3) the data acquisition/distribution and processing power of a third-generation computer enables the computer to function successfully as a data handler or as an on-line process controller. The concept of the distributed data base is discussed along with the software, data base integrity, and hardware used. The data analysis/update constraint is examined.

  18. Evolution of the large Deep Space Network antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbriale, William A.

    1991-12-01

    The evolution of the largest antenna of the US NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) is described. The design, performance analysis, and measurement techniques, beginning with its initial 64-m operation at S-band (2295 MHz) in 1966 and continuing through the present ka-band (32-GHz) operation at 70 m, is described. Although their diameters and mountings differ, these parabolic antennas all employ a Cassegrainian feed system, and each antenna dish surface is constructed of precision-shaped perforated-aluminum panels that are secured to an open steel framework

  19. Relocation of the Deep Space Network Maintenance Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutler, K. F.

    1981-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory maintains a Deep Space Network (DSN) maintenance center (DMC), whose task is to engineer and manage the repair and calibration program for the electronic and mechanical equipment used in the tracking stations located at Madrid, Spain, and Canberra, Australia. The DMC also manages the Goldstone complex maintenance facility (GCMF), whose task is to repair and calibrate the Goldstone electronic and mechanical equipment. The rationale for moving the facility to Barstow, California, and the benefits derived from the move are discussed.

  20. Deep space network resource scheduling approach and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggemeyer, William C.; Bowling, Alan

    1987-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) resource scheduling is the process of distributing ground-based facilities to track multiple spacecraft. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has carried out extensive research to find ways of automating this process in an effort to reduce time and manpower costs. This paper presents a resource-scheduling system entitled PLAN-IT with a description of its design philosophy. The PLAN-IT's current on-line usage and limitations in scheduling the resources of the DSN are discussed, along with potential enhancements for DSN application.

  1. Frequency Domain Beamforming for a Deep Space Network Downlink Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a frequency domain beamformer to array up to 8 antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network currently in development. The objective of this array is to replace and enhance the capability of the DSN 70m antennas with multiple 34m antennas for telemetry, navigation and radio science use. The array will coherently combine the entire 500 MHz of usable bandwidth available to DSN receivers. A frequency domain beamforming architecture was chosen over a time domain based architecture to handle the large signal bandwidth and efficiently perform delay and phase calibration. The antennas of the DSN are spaced far enough apart that random atmospheric and phase variations between antennas need to be calibrated out on an ongoing basis in real-time. The calibration is done using measurements obtained from a correlator. This DSN Downlink Array expands upon a proof of concept breadboard array built previously to develop the technology and will become an operational asset of the Deep Space Network. Design parameters for frequency channelization, array calibration and delay corrections will be presented as well a method to efficiently calibrate the array for both wide and narrow bandwidth telemetry.

  2. Telecommunications technology development for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, J. H.; Resch, G. M.; Stelzried, C. T.

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Office of Space Operations, and provides, communications and navigation support for NASA's deep space missions, lunar and high Earth orbiters. It has continuously evolving facilities whose instruments are also used for planetary radar, radio science, and radio astronomy. Over the past 30 years, the communications and navigation performance has increased many orders of magnitude. The receiving sensitivity and radio metric data accuracy are near the present-day achievable limits and are upgraded as mission needs, technology developments, and resources direct. Despite the technological evolution that is continuously underway, operations are highly reliable and versatile for the various mission requirements. Advanced technologies are being aggressively developed to improve future DSN capabilities. These advanced technologies, will be implemented into the DSN and will provide greater freedom to trade-off communications and navigational capability against mass and power on a spacecraft. The major areas that are currently being developed include Ka-Band (32 GHz) technology, beam waveguide antennas, low noise amplifiers, coding, navigation techniques, high power transmitters, and optical technology. This paper discusses the technology that is currently being developed for the DSN and its expected dividends during the mid-1990s and later.

  3. Telemetry, tracking, and command consolidation in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Odea, J. Andrew; Bryant, Scott H.; Guerreo, Ana Maria P.; Louie, John J.

    2001-01-01

    Currently, in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), telemetry, tracking, and command (TT&C) functions are distributed between multiple subsystem computers. Control design of these subsystems did not consider the interaction necessary between the functions, which create opportunities for loss of data. Also, the current controller design can force the use of equipment that is not needed for the task at hand, to the detriment of others. As part of the Network Simplification Project (NSP), the TTC implementation has been re-examined, New telemetry and commanding equipment is being built, and the control of the TT&C functions is being consolidated into two controllers, Uplink and Downlink. The new equipment uses commercial components, as opposed to the custom built equipment it is replacing, which improves reliability and simplifies maintenance.

  4. Automated monitor and control for deep space network subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, P.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of automating monitor and control loops for Deep Space Network (DSN) subsystems is considered and an overview of currently available automation techniques is given. The use of standard numerical models, knowledge-based systems, and neural networks is considered. It is argued that none of these techniques alone possess sufficient generality to deal with the demands imposed by the DSN environment. However, it is shown that schemes that integrate the better aspects of each approach and are referenced to a formal system model show considerable promise, although such an integrated technology is not yet available for implementation. Frequent reference is made to the receiver subsystem since this work was largely motivated by experience in developing an automated monitor and control loop for the advanced receiver.

  5. Optical subnet concepts for the deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, K.; Wonica, D.; Wilhelm, M.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes potential enhancements to the Deep Space Network, based on a subnet of receiving stations that will utilize optical communications technology in the post-2010 era. Two optical subnet concepts are presented that provide full line-of-sight coverage of the ecliptic, 24 hours a day, with high weather availability. The technical characteristics of the optical station and the user terminal are presented, as well as the effects of cloud cover, transmittance through the atmosphere, and background noise during daytime or nighttime operation on the communications link. In addition, this article identifies candidate geographic sites for the two network concepts and includes a link design for a hypothetical Pluto mission in 2015.

  6. The deep space network. [tracking and communication support for space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the deep space network are summarized. Progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is reported. Interface support for the Mariner Venus Mercury 1973 flight and Pioneer 10 and 11 missions is included.

  7. Deep Space Networking Experiments on the EPOXI Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Space Communications & Navigation Program within the Space Operations Directorate is operating a program to develop and deploy Disruption Tolerant Networking [DTN] technology for a wide variety of mission types by the end of 2011. DTN is an enabling element of the Interplanetary Internet where terrestrial networking protocols are generally unsuitable because they rely on timely and continuous end-to-end delivery of data and acknowledgments. In fall of 2008 and 2009 and 2011 the Jet Propulsion Laboratory installed and tested essential elements of DTN technology on the Deep Impact spacecraft. These experiments, called Deep Impact Network Experiment (DINET 1) were performed in close cooperation with the EPOXI project which has responsibility for the spacecraft. The DINET 1 software was installed on the backup software partition on the backup flight computer for DINET 1. For DINET 1, the spacecraft was at a distance of about 15 million miles (24 million kilometers) from Earth. During DINET 1 300 images were transmitted from the JPL nodes to the spacecraft. Then, they were automatically forwarded from the spacecraft back to the JPL nodes, exercising DTN's bundle origination, transmission, acquisition, dynamic route computation, congestion control, prioritization, custody transfer, and automatic retransmission procedures, both on the spacecraft and on the ground, over a period of 27 days. The first DINET 1 experiment successfully validated many of the essential elements of the DTN protocols. DINET 2 demonstrated: 1) additional DTN functionality, 2) automated certain tasks which were manually implemented in DINET 1 and 3) installed the ION SW on nodes outside of JPL. DINET 3 plans to: 1) upgrade the LTP convergence-layer adapter to conform to the international LTP CL specification, 2) add convergence-layer "stewardship" procedures and 3) add the BSP security elements [PIB & PCB]. This paper describes the planning and execution of the flight experiment and the

  8. Deep Space Network Revitalization: Operations for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph I.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) supports unmanned space missions through a Deep Space Network (DSN) that is developed and operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL and its subcontractors. The DSN capabilities have been incrementally upgraded since its establishment in the late '50s and are delivered from three Deep Space Communications Complexes (DSCC's) near Goldstone, California, Madrid, Spain, and Canberra, Australia. At present each DSCC includes large antennas with diameters from 11 meters to 70 meters, that operate largely in S-band and X-band frequencies. In addition each DSCC includes all the associated electronics to receive and process the low-level telemetry signals, and radiate the necessary command with high-power transmitters. To accommodate support of the rapidly increasing number of missions by NASA and other space agencies, and to facilitate maintaining and increasing the level of service in a shrinking budget environment, JPL has initiated a bold road map with three key components: 1. A Network Simplification Project (NSP) to upgrade aging electronics, replacing them with modem commercially based components. NSP and related replacement tasks are projected to reduce the cost of operating the DSN by 50% relative to the 1997 levels. 2. Upgrade of all 34-m and 70-m antennas to provision of Ka-Band telemetry downlink capability, complemented by an existing X-band uplink capability. This will increase the effective telemetry downlink capacity by a factor of 4, without building any new antennas. 3. Establishment of an optical communications network to support for high data rate unmanned missions that cannot be accommodated with radiofrequency (RF) communications, as well as establish a path toward support of manned missions at Mars. In this paper we present the mission loading projected for 1998-2008 and the elements of the JPL road map that will enable supporting it with a reduced budget. Particular emphasis will be on

  9. Coherent Frequency Reference System for the NASA Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Blake C.; Lauf, John E.; Hamell, Robert L.; Gonzaler, Jorge, Jr.; Diener, William A.; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) requires state-of-the-art frequency references that are derived and distributed from very stable atomic frequency standards. A new Frequency Reference System (FRS) and Frequency Reference Distribution System (FRD) have been developed, which together replace the previous Coherent Reference Generator System (CRG). The FRS and FRD each provide new capabilities that significantly improve operability and reliability. The FRS allows for selection and switching between frequency standards, a flywheel capability (to avoid interruptions when switching frequency standards), and a frequency synthesis system (to generate standardized 5-, 10-, and 100-MHz reference signals). The FRS is powered by redundant, specially filtered, and sustainable power systems and includes a monitor and control capability for station operations to interact and control the frequency-standard selection process. The FRD receives the standardized 5-, 10-, and 100-MHz reference signals and distributes signals to distribution amplifiers in a fan out fashion to dozens of DSN users that require the highly stable reference signals. The FRD is also powered by redundant, specially filtered, and sustainable power systems. The new DSN Frequency Distribution System, which consists of the FRS and FRD systems described here, is central to all operational activities of the NASA DSN. The frequency generation and distribution system provides ultra-stable, coherent, and very low phase-noise references at 5, l0, and 100 MHz to between 60 and 100 separate users at each Deep Space Communications Complex.

  10. Deep Space Network equipment performance, reliability, and operations management information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, T.; Lin, J.; Chatillon, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Deep Space Mission System (DSMS) Operations Program Office and the DeepSpace Network (DSN) facilities utilize the Discrepancy Reporting Management System (DRMS) to collect, process, communicate and manage data discrepancies, equipment resets, physical equipment status, and to maintain an internal Station Log. A collaborative effort development between JPL and the Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex delivered a system to support DSN Operations.

  11. Deep Space Network Capabilities for Receiving Weak Probe Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Johnston, Doug; Preston, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Planetary probes can encounter mission scenarios where communication is not favorable during critical maneuvers or emergencies. Launch, initial acquisition, landing, trajectory corrections, safing. Communication challenges due to sub-optimum antenna pointing or transmitted power, amplitude/frequency dynamics, etc. Prevent lock-up on signal and extraction of telemetry. Examples: loss of Mars Observer, nutation of Ulysses, Galileo antenna, Mars Pathfinder and Mars Exploration Rovers Entry, Descent, and Landing, and the Cassini Saturn Orbit Insertion. A Deep Space Network capability to handle such cases has been used successfully to receive signals to characterize the scenario. This paper will describe the capability and highlight the cases of the critical communications for the Mars rovers and Saturn Orbit Insertion and preparation radio tracking of the Huygens probe at (non-DSN) radio telescopes.

  12. Overview of arraying techniques in the deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1991-01-01

    Four different arraying schemes that can be used by the Deep Space Network are functionally discussed and compared. These include symbol stream combining (SSC), baseband combining (BC), carrier arraying (CA), and full spectrum combining (FSC). In addition, sibeband aiding (SA) is also included and compared even though it is not an arraying scheme, since it uses a single antenna. Moreover, combinations of these schemes are discussed, such as carrier arraying with sideband aiding and baseband combining (CA/SA/BC) or carrier arraying with symbol stream combining (CA/SSC). Complexity versus performance is traded off and the benefits to the reception of existing spacecraft signals are discussed. Recommendations are made as to the best techniques for particular configurations.

  13. An OSI architecture for the deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuser, W. Randy; Cooper, Lynne P.

    1993-01-01

    The flexibility and robustness of a monitor and control system are a direct result of the underlying inter-processor communications architecture. A new architecture for monitor & Control at the Deep Space Network Communications Complexes has been developed based on the Open System Interconnection (OSI) standards. The suitability of OSI standards for DSN M&C has been proven in the laboratory. The laboratory success has resulted in choosing an OSI-based architecture for DSS-13 M&C. DSS-13 is the DSN experimental station and is not part of the 'operational' DSN; it's role is to provide an environment to test new communications concepts can be tested and conduct unique science experiments. Therefore, DSS-13 must be robust enough to support operational activities, while also being flexible enough to enable experimentation. This paper describes the M&C architecture developed for DSS-13 and the results from system and operational testing.

  14. New tracking implementation in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Bryant, Scott H.

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Network Simplification Project, the tracking system of the Deep Space Network is being upgraded. This upgrade replaces the discrete logic sequential ranging system with a system that is based on commercial Digital Signal Processor boards. The new implementation allows both sequential and pseudo-noise types of ranging. The other major change is a modernization of the data formatting. Previously, there were several types of interfaces, delivering both intermediate data and processed data (called 'observables'). All of these interfaces were bit-packed blocks, which do not allow for easy expansion, and many of these interfaces required knowledge of the specific hardware implementations. The new interface supports four classes of data: raw (direct from the measuring equipment), derived (the observable data), interferometric (multiple antenna measurements), and filtered (data whose values depend on multiple measurements). All of the measurements are reported at the sky frequency or phase level, so that no knowledge of the actual hardware is required. The data is formatted into Standard Formatted Data Units, as defined by the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems, so that expansion and cross-center usage is greatly enhanced.

  15. Enhancing the Radio Astronomy Capabilities at NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Teitelbaum, Lawrence; Franco, Manuel M.; Garcia-Miro, Cristina; Horiuchi, Shinji; Jacobs, Christopher; Kuiper, Thomas; Majid, Walid

    2015-08-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) is well known for its role in commanding and communicating with spacecraft across the solar system that produce a steady stream of new discoveries in Astrophysics, Heliophysics, and Planetary Science. Equipped with a number of large antennas distributed across the world, the DSN also has a history of contributing to a number of leading radio astronomical projects. This paper summarizes a number of enhancements that are being implemented currently and that are aimed at increasing its capabilities to engage in a wide range of science observations. These enhancements include* A dual-beam system operating between 18 and 27 GHz (~ 1 cm) capable of conducting a variety of molecular line observations, searches for pulsars in the Galactic center, and continuum flux density (photometry) of objects such as nearby protoplanetary disks* Enhanced spectroscopy and pulsar processing backends for use at 1.4--1.9 GHz (20 cm), 18--27 GHz (1 cm), and 38--50 GHz (0.7 cm)* The DSN Transient Observatory (DTN), an automated, non-invasive backend for transient searching* Larger bandwidths (>= 0.5 GHz) for pulsar searching and timing; and* Improved data rates (2048 Mbps) and better instrumental response for very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) observations with the new DSN VLBI processor (DVP), which is providing unprecedented sensitivity for maintenance of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) and development of future versions.One of the results of these improvements is that the 70~m Deep Space Station 43 (DSS-43, Tidbinbilla antenna) is now the most sensitive radio antenna in the southern hemisphere. Proposals to use these systems are accepted from the international community.Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics & Space Administration.

  16. The Network Information Management System (NIMS) in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wales, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    In an effort to better manage enormous amounts of administrative, engineering, and management data that is distributed worldwide, a study was conducted which identified the need for a network support system. The Network Information Management System (NIMS) will provide the Deep Space Network with the tools to provide an easily accessible source of valid information to support management activities and provide a more cost-effective method of acquiring, maintaining, and retrieval data.

  17. Software for Allocating Resources in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Borden, Chester; Zendejas, Silvino; Baldwin, John

    2003-01-01

    TIGRAS 2.0 is a computer program designed to satisfy a need for improved means for analyzing the tracking demands of interplanetary space-flight missions upon the set of ground antenna resources of the Deep Space Network (DSN) and for allocating those resources. Written in Microsoft Visual C++, TIGRAS 2.0 provides a single rich graphical analysis environment for use by diverse DSN personnel, by connecting to various data sources (relational databases or files) based on the stages of the analyses being performed. Notable among the algorithms implemented by TIGRAS 2.0 are a DSN antenna-load-forecasting algorithm and a conflict-aware DSN schedule-generating algorithm. Computers running TIGRAS 2.0 can also be connected using SOAP/XML to a Web services server that provides analysis services via the World Wide Web. TIGRAS 2.0 supports multiple windows and multiple panes in each window for users to view and use information, all in the same environment, to eliminate repeated switching among various application programs and Web pages. TIGRAS 2.0 enables the use of multiple windows for various requirements, trajectory-based time intervals during which spacecraft are viewable, ground resources, forecasts, and schedules. Each window includes a time navigation pane, a selection pane, a graphical display pane, a list pane, and a statistics pane.

  18. (abstract) Deep Space Network Radiometric Remote Sensing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft are viewed through a troposphere that absorbs and delays radio signals propagating through it. Tropospheric water, in the form of vapor, cloud liquid,and precipitation , emits radio noise which limits satellite telemetry communication link performance. Even at X-band, rain storms have severely affected several satellite experiments including a planetary encounter. The problem will worsen with DSN implementation of Ka-band becausecommunication link budgets will be dominated by tropospheric conditions. Troposphere-induced propagation delays currently limit VLBI accuracy and are significant sources of error for Doppler tracking. Additionally, the success of radio science programs such as satellite gravity wave experiments and atmospheric occultation experiments depends on minimizing the effect of watervapor-induced prop agation delays. In order to overcome limitations imposed by the troposphere, the Deep Space Network has supported a program of radiometric remote sensing. Currently, water vapor radiometers (WVRs) and microwave temperature profilers (MTPs) support many aspects of the Deep Space Network operations and research and development programs. Their capability to sense atmospheric water, microwave sky brightness, and atmospheric temperature is critical to development of Ka-band telemetry systems, communication link models, VLBI, satellite gravity waveexperiments, and r adio science missions. During 1993, WVRs provided data for propagation mode development, supp orted planetary missions, and demonstrated advanced tracking capability. Collection of atmospheric statistics is necessary to model and predict performance of Ka-band telemetry links, antenna arrays, and radio science experiments. Since the spectrum of weather variations has power at very long time scales, atmospheric measurements have been requested for periods ranging from one year to a decade at each DSN site. The resulting database would provide reliable statistics on daily

  19. Deep Space Telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Resch, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing load on NASA's deep Space Network, the new capabilities for deep space missions inherent in a next-generation radio telescope, and the potential of new telescope technology for reducing construction and operation costs suggest a natural marriage between radio astronomy and deep space telecommunications in developing advanced radio telescope concepts.

  20. Media Calibration in the Deep Space Network: A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naudet, Charles J.; Keihm, Steve; Lanyi, Gabor; Linfield, Roger; Resch, George; Riley, Lance; Rosenberger, Hans; Tanner, Alan

    2002-01-01

    A new media calibration system (MCS) has been implemented at the Goldstone complex of the DSN (Deep Space Network). It is intended to calibrate the delay of radio signals imposed by the neutral atmosphere. The system provides periodic measurements of both the static dry and fluctuating wet components of this delay. In particular, the system will calibrate the fluctuations in line of sight path delay due to atmospheric water vapor that we believe will dominate the error budget for several radio science and radio astronomy experiments. We have compared two of these media calibration systems with a connected element interferometer on a 21 km baseline. In this report we describe a total of 30 observations in which a radio source was tracked for an hour or more and the delay residuals then calibrated using the MCS. The accuracy of the comparison appears to be limited by systematic errors in the interferometer, which are under investigation. However, our results do indicate that the MCS can meet or exceed the two-way Allan standard deviation specification of 1.5 x 10( exp -15) on time scales of 2,000 - 10,000 sec, as required by the Cassini GWE (Gravitational Wave Experiment) for two way Doppler tracking.

  1. Toward an embedded training tool for Deep Space Network operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Randall W., Jr.; Sturdevant, Kathryn F.; Johnson, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    There are three issues to consider when building an embedded training system for a task domain involving the operation of complex equipment: (1) how skill is acquired in the task domain; (2) how the training system should be designed to assist in the acquisition of the skill, and more specifically, how an intelligent tutor could aid in learning; and (3) whether it is feasible to incorporate the resulting training system into the operational environment. This paper describes how these issues have been addressed in a prototype training system that was developed for operations in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). The first two issues were addressed by building an executable cognitive model of problem solving and skill acquisition of the task domain and then using the model to design an intelligent tutor. The cognitive model was developed in Soar for the DSN's Link Monitor and Control (LMC) system; it led to several insights about learning in the task domain that were used to design an intelligent tutor called REACT that implements a method called 'impasse-driven tutoring'. REACT is one component of the LMC training system, which also includes a communications link simulator and a graphical user interface. A pilot study of the LMC training system indicates that REACT shows promise as an effective way for helping operators to quickly acquire expert skills.

  2. Identifying Trends in Deep Space Network Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A computer program has been developed that analyzes Deep Space Network monitor data, looking for changes of trends in critical parameters. This program represents a significant improvement over the previous practice of manually plotting data and visually inspecting the resulting graphs to identify trends. This program uses proven numerical techniques to identify trends. When a statistically significant trend is detected, then it is characterized by means of a symbol that can be used by pre-existing model-based reasoning software. The program can perform any of the following functions: Given an expectation that data in a given list should exhibit an upward, downward, constant, or unknown trend, it can determine whether the data do or do not follow such a trend. Given a list of data, it can identify which of the aforementioned trends the data follow. Given two lists of data, it can determine whether or not both follow the same trend. This program can be executed on a variety of computers. It can be distributed in either source code or binary code form. It must be run in conjunction with any one of a number of Lisp compilers that are available commercially or as shareware.

  3. The Deep Space Network: Noise temperature concepts, measurements, and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelzried, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    The use of higher operational frequencies is being investigated for improved performance of the Deep Space Network. Noise temperature and noise figure concepts are used to describe the noise performance of these receiving systems. The ultimate sensitivity of a linear receiving system is limited by the thermal noise of the source and the quantum noise of the receiver amplifier. The atmosphere, antenna and receiver amplifier of an Earth station receiving system are analyzed separately and as a system. Performance evaluation and error analysis techniques are investigated. System noise temperature and antenna gain parameters are combined to give an overall system figure of merit G/T. Radiometers are used to perform radio ""star'' antenna and system sensitivity calibrations. These are analyzed and the performance of several types compared to an idealized total power radiometer. The theory of radiative transfer is applicable to the analysis of transmission medium loss. A power series solution in terms of the transmission medium loss is given for the solution of the noise temperature contribution.

  4. Forecasting of Weather Effects for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, Ricardo; Benjauthrit, Boonsieng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a proposed approach for Ka-band link management for deep space applications using daily weather forecasts and discusses the tools that will be employed for operations. Performance metrics are also presented. The proposed approach will be tested in a two-year experiment campaign.

  5. Deep space antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Three 26-m tracking antennas operated by the NASA Deep Space Network at Goldstone, Calif.; Madrid, Spain; and near Canberra, Australia, will cease operations on Dec. 1, 1981. The stations will continue to operate 64-m and 34-m deep space tracking antennas. Ending operation of the 26-m antennas will cause a reduction of about 30%; of the Deep Space Network tracking and data acquisition capability. This means less support for NASA planetary spacecraft. Currently, the Deep Space Network is supporting Voyagers 1 and 2, Helios 1, the Mars Viking 1 Lander and Pioneers 6 through 12.

  6. Enabling Planetary Geodesy With the Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, R. S.; Asmar, S. W.; Armstrong, J. W.; Buccino, D.; Folkner, W. M.; Iess, L.; Konopliv, A. S.; Lazio, J.

    2015-12-01

    For five decades of planetary exploration, missions have carried out Radio Science experiments that led to numerous discoveries in planetary geodesy. The interior structures of many planets, large moons, asteroids and comet nuclei have been modeled based on their gravitational fields and dynamical parameters derived from precision Doppler and range measurements, often called radio metrics. Advanced instrumentation has resulted in the high level of data quality that enabled scientific breakthroughs. This instrumentation scheme, however, is distributed between elements on the spacecraft and others at the stations of the Deep Space Network (DSN), making the DSN a world-class science instrument. The design and performance of the DSN stations directly determines the quality of the science observables and radio link-based planetary geodesy observations are established by methodologies and capabilities of the DSN. In this paper, we summarize major recent discoveries in planetary geodesy at the rocky planets and the Moon, Saturnian and Jovian satellites, Phobos, and Vesta; experiments and analysis in progress at Ceres and Pluto; upcoming experiments at Jupiter, Saturn and Mars (InSight), and the long-term outlook for approved future missions with geodesy objectives. The DSN's role will be described along the technical advancements in DSN transmitters, receivers, atomic clocks, and other specialized instrumentation, such as the Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer, Advanced Ranging Instrument, as well as relevant mechanical and electrical components. Advanced techniques for calibrations of known noise sources and Earth's troposphere, ionosphere, and interplanetary plasma are also presented. A typical error budget will be presented to aid future investigations in carrying out trade-off studies in the end-to-end system performance.

  7. Request-Driven Schedule Automation for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Tran, Daniel; Arroyo, Belinda; Call, Jared; Mercado, Marisol

    2010-01-01

    The DSN Scheduling Engine (DSE) has been developed to increase the level of automated scheduling support available to users of NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN). We have adopted a request-driven approach to DSN scheduling, in contrast to the activity-oriented approach used up to now. Scheduling requests allow users to declaratively specify patterns and conditions on their DSN service allocations, including timing, resource requirements, gaps, overlaps, time linkages among services, repetition, priorities, and a wide range of additional factors and preferences. The DSE incorporates a model of the key constraints and preferences of the DSN scheduling domain, along with algorithms to expand scheduling requests into valid resource allocations, to resolve schedule conflicts, and to repair unsatisfied requests. We use time-bounded systematic search with constraint relaxation to return nearby solutions if exact ones cannot be found, where the relaxation options and order are under user control. To explore the usability aspects of our approach we have developed a graphical user interface incorporating some crucial features to make it easier to work with complex scheduling requests. Among these are: progressive revelation of relevant detail, immediate propagation and visual feedback from a user s decisions, and a meeting calendar metaphor for repeated patterns of requests. Even as a prototype, the DSE has been deployed and adopted as the initial step in building the operational DSN schedule, thus representing an important initial validation of our overall approach. The DSE is a core element of the DSN Service Scheduling Software (S(sup 3)), a web-based collaborative scheduling system now under development for deployment to all DSN users.

  8. Office of Tracking and Data Acquisition. [deep space network and spacecraft tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Office of Tracking and Data Acquisition (OTDA) and its two worldwide tracking network facilities, the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network and the Deep Space Network, are described. Other topics discussed include the NASA communications network, the tracking and data relay satellite system, other OTDA tracking activities, and OTDA milestones.

  9. Deep Space Network turbo decoder infusion: enhanced performance and lower decoder complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollara, F.; Andrews, K.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the effort to deploy turbo decoders in the Deep Space Network to service missions launching in 2003 and later, and the implications of these new capabilities for the design of future missions.

  10. NASA's Deep Space Network and ESA's Tracking Network Collaboration to Enable Solar System Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, Sami; Accomazzo, Andrea; Firre, Daniel; Ferri, Paolo; Liebrecht, Phil; Mann, Greg; Morse, Gary; Costrell, Jim; Kurtik, Susan; Hell, Wolfgang; Warhaut, Manfred

    2016-07-01

    Planetary missions travel vast distances in the solar system to explore and answer important scientific questions. To return the data containing their discoveries, communications challenges have to be overcome, namely the relatively low transmitter power, typically 20 Watts at X-band, and the one-over-the-square of the distance loss of the received power, among other factors. These missions were enabled only when leading space agencies developed very large communications antennas to communicate with them as well as provide radio-metric navigation tools. NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) and ESA's ESTRACK network are distributed geographically in order to provide global coverage and utilize stations ranging in size from 34 m to 70 m in diameter. With the increasing number of missions and significant loading on networks' capacity, unique requirements during critical events, and long-baseline interferometry navigation techniques, it became obvious that collaboration between the networks was necessary and in the interest of both agencies and the advancement of planetary and space sciences. NASA and ESA established methods for collaboration that include a generic cross-support agreement as well as mission-specific memoranda of understanding. This collaboration also led to the development of international inter-operability standards. As a result of its success, the DSN-ESTRACK cross support approach is serving as a model for other agencies with similar stations and an interest in collaboration. Over recent years, many critical events were supported and some scientific breakthroughs in planetary science were enabled. This paper will review selected examples of the science resulting from this work and the overall benefits for deep space exploration, including lessons learned, from inter-agency collaboration with communications networks.

  11. Major technological innovations introduced in the large antennas of the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) is the largest and most sensitive scientific, telecommunications and radio navigation network in the world. Its principal responsibilities are to provide communications, tracking, and science services to most of the world's spacecraft that travel beyond low Earth orbit. The network consists of three Deep Space Communications Complexes. Each of the three complexes consists of multiple large antennas equipped with ultra sensitive receiving systems. A centralized Signal Processing Center (SPC) remotely controls the antennas, generates and transmits spacecraft commands, and receives and processes the spacecraft telemetry.

  12. Propagation Effects of Importance to the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network (DSN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slobin, Steve

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents Propagation Effects of Importance To The NASA/JPL Deep Space Network (DSN). The topics include: 1) DSN Antennas; 2) Deep Space Telecom Link Basics; 3) DSN Propagation Region of Interest; 4) Ka-Band Weather Effects Models and Examples; 5) Existing Goldstone Ka-Band Atmosphere Attenuation Model; 6) Existing Goldstone Atmosphere Noise Temperature Model; and 7) Ka-Band delta (G/T) Relative to Vacuum Condition. This paper summarizes the topics above.

  13. Deep Space Network and Lunar Network Communication Coverage of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Charles H.; Cheung, Kar-Ming

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we describe the communication coverage analysis for the lunar network and the Earth ground stations. The first part of this article focuses on the direct communication coverage of the Moon from the Earth's ground stations. In particular, we assess the coverage performance of the Moon based on the existing Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas and the complimentary coverage of other potential stations at Hartebeesthoek, South Africa and at Santiago, Chile. We also address the coverage sensitivity based on different DSN antenna scenarios and their capability to provide single and redundant coverage of the Moon. The second part of this article focuses on the framework of the constrained optimization scheme to seek a stable constellation six relay satellites in two planes that not only can provide continuous communication coverage to any users on the Moon surface, but can also deliver data throughput in a highly efficient manner.

  14. NASA Near Earth Network (NEN), Deep Space Network (DSN) and Space Network (SN) Support of CubeSat Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaire, Scott H.; Altunc, Serhat; Bussey, George; Shaw, Harry; Horne, Bill; Schier, Jim

    2015-01-01

    There has been a historical trend to increase capability and drive down the Size, Weight and Power (SWAP) of satellites and that trend continues today. Small satellites, including systems conforming to the CubeSat specification, because of their low launch and development costs, are enabling new concepts and capabilities for science investigations across multiple fields of interest to NASA. NASA scientists and engineers across many of NASAs Mission Directorates and Centers are developing exciting CubeSat concepts and welcome potential partnerships for CubeSat endeavors. From a communications and tracking point of view, small satellites including CubeSats are a challenge to coordinate because of existing small spacecraft constraints, such as limited SWAP and attitude control, low power, and the potential for high numbers of operational spacecraft. The NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Programs Near Earth Network (NEN), Deep Space Network (DSN) and the Space Network (SN) are customer driven organizations that provide comprehensive communications services for space assets including data transport between a missions orbiting satellite and its Mission Operations Center (MOC). The NASA NEN consists of multiple ground antennas. The SN consists of a constellation of geosynchronous (Earth orbiting) relay satellites, named the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The DSN currently makes available 13 antennas at its three tracking stations located around the world for interplanetary communication. The presentation will analyze how well these space communication networks are positioned to support the emerging small satellite and CubeSat market. Recognizing the potential support, the presentation will review the basic capabilities of the NEN, DSN and SN in the context of small satellites and will present information about NEN, DSN and SN-compatible flight radios and antenna development activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and across

  15. Temperature control simulation for a microwave transmitter cooling system. [deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal performance of a temperature control system for the antenna microwave transmitter (klystron tube) of the Deep Space Network antenna tracking system is discussed. In particular the mathematical model is presented along with the details of a computer program which is written for the system simulation and the performance parameterization. Analytical expressions are presented.

  16. Microwave analog fiber-optic link for use in the deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, R. T., Jr.; Lutes, G. F.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    A novel fiber-optic system with dynamic range of up to 150 dB-Hz for transmission of microwave analog signals is described. The design, analysis, and laboratory evaluations of this system are reported, and potential applications in the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network are discussed.

  17. The Deep Space Network as an instrument for radio science research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, S. W.; Renzetti, N. A.

    1993-01-01

    Radio science experiments use radio links between spacecraft and sensor instrumentation that is implemented in the Deep Space Network. The deep space communication complexes along with the telecommunications subsystem on board the spacecraft constitute the major elements of the radio science instrumentation. Investigators examine small changes in the phase and/or amplitude of the radio signal propagating from a spacecraft to study the atmospheric and ionospheric structure of planets and satellites, planetary gravitational fields, shapes, masses, planetary rings, ephemerides of planets, solar corona, magnetic fields, cometary comae, and such aspects of the theory of general relativity as gravitational waves and gravitational redshift.

  18. Publications of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, January through December 1974. [deep space network, Apollo project, information theory, and space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Formalized technical reporting is described and indexed, which resulted from scientific and engineering work performed, or managed, by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The five classes of publications included are technical reports, technical memorandums, articles from the bimonthly Deep Space Network Progress Report, special publications, and articles published in the open literature. The publications are indexed by author, subject, and publication type and number.

  19. Estimating the Deep Space Network modification costs to prepare for future space missions by using major cost drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Donald S.; Sherif, Josef; Buchanan, Harry R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper develops a cost model to do long range planning cost estimates for Deep Space Network (DSN) support of future space missions. The paper focuses on the costs required to modify and/or enhance the DSN to prepare for future space missions. The model is a function of eight major mission cost drivers and estimates both the total cost and the annual costs of a similar future space mission. The model is derived from actual cost data from three space missions: Voyager (Uranus), Voyager (Neptune), and Magellan. Estimates derived from the model are tested against actual cost data for two independent missions, Viking and Mariner Jupiter/Saturn (MJS).

  20. Deep space network support of the manned space flight network for Apollo, volume 3. [support for Apollo 14, 15, 16, and 17 flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) activities in support of Project Apollo during the period of 1971 and 1972 are reported. Beginning with the Apollo 14 mission and concluding with the Apollo 17 mission, the narrative includes, (1) a mission description, (2) the NASA support requirements placed on the DSN, and, (3) a comprehensive account of the support activities provided by each committed DSN deep space communication station. Associated equipment and activities of the three elements of the DSN (the Deep Space Instrumentation Facility (DSIF), the Space Flight Operations Facility (SFOF), and the Ground Communications Facility (GCF)) used in meeting the radio-metric and telemetry demands of the missions are documented.

  1. Implementation of an Antenna Array Signal Processing Breadboard for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The Deep Space Network Large Array will replace/augment 34 and 70 meter antenna assets. The array will mainly be used to support NASA's deep space telemetry, radio science, and navigation requirements. The array project will deploy three complexes in the western U.S., Australia, and European longitude each with 400 12m downlink antennas and a DSN central facility at JPL. THis facility will remotely conduct all real-time monitor and control for the network. Signal processing objectives include: provide a means to evaluate the performance of the Breadboard Array's antenna subsystem; design and build prototype hardware; demonstrate and evaluate proposed signal processing techniques; and gain experience with various technologies that may be used in the Large Array. Results are summarized..

  2. Application of the Deep Space Network (DSN) to the testing of general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Levy, G. S.; Renzetti, N. A.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network, a precision telecommunications and radio navigation facility, is described in detail. The first spacecraft relativity test with Mariner 6 and Mariner 7 at solar conjunction is discussed as well as more accurate tests using the Mariner 9 anchored to Mars. Consideration is also given to solar system tests of relativistic celestial mechanics and future prospects. It is noted that the NASA Mars Observer orbital mission is under development and is expected to reach Mars in 1991.

  3. Near Earth Architectural Options for a Future Deep Space Optical Communications Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, B. L.; Liebrecht, P. E.; Fitzgerald, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    In the near future the National Aeronautics and Space Administration anticipates a significant increase in demand for long-haul communications services from deep space to Earth. Distances will range from 0.1 to 40 AU, with data rate requirements in the 1's to 1000's of Mbits/second. The near term demand is driven by NASA's Space Science Enterprise which wishes to deploy more capable instruments onboard spacecraft and increase the number of deep space missions. The long term demand is driven by missions with extreme communications challenges such as very high data rates from the outer planets, supporting sub-surface exploration, or supporting NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space Enterprise beyond Earth orbit. Laser communications is a revolutionary communications technology that will dramatically increase NASA's ability to transmit information across the solar system. Lasercom sends information using beams of light and optical elements, such as telescopes and optical amplifiers, rather than RF signals, amplifiers, and antennas. This paper provides an overview of different network options at Earth to meet NASA's deep space lasercom requirements. It is based mainly on work done for the Mars Laser Communications Demonstration Project, a joint project between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology (JPL), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL). It reports preliminary conclusions from the Mars Lasercom Study conducted at MIT/LL and on additional work done for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System Continuation Study at GSFC. A lasercom flight terminal will be flown on the Mars Telesat Orbiter (MTO) to be launched by NASA in 2009, and will be the first high rate deep space demonstration of this revolutionary technology.

  4. Identification of Abnormal System Noise Temperature Patterns in Deep Space Network Antennas Using Neural Network Trained Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Thomas; Pham, Timothy; Liao, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a fuzzy logic function trained by an artificial neural network to classify the system noise temperature (SNT) of antennas in the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). The SNT data were classified into normal, marginal, and abnormal classes. The irregular SNT pattern was further correlated with link margin and weather data. A reasonably good correlation is detected among high SNT, low link margin and the effect of bad weather; however we also saw some unexpected non-correlations which merit further study in the future.

  5. Deep Space Network-Wide Portal Development: Planning Service Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doneva, Silviya

    2011-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is an international network of antennas that supports interplanetary spacecraft missions and radio and radar astronomy observations for the exploration of the solar system and the universe. DSN provides the vital two-way communications link that guides and controls planetary explorers, and brings back the images and new scientific information they collect. In an attempt to streamline operations and improve overall services provided by the Deep Space Network a DSN-wide portal is under development. The project is one step in a larger effort to centralize the data collected from current missions including user input parameters for spacecraft to be tracked. This information will be placed into a principal repository where all operations related to the DSN are stored. Furthermore, providing statistical characterization of data volumes will help identify technically feasible tracking opportunities and more precise mission planning by providing upfront scheduling proposals. Business intelligence tools are to be incorporated in the output to deliver data visualization.

  6. Cryogenic Design of the Deep Space Network Large Array Low-Noise Amplifier System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britcliffe, M. J.; Hanson, T. R.; Franco, M. M.

    2004-05-01

    This article describes the cryogenic design and performance of a prototype low-noise amplifier (LNA) system for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Large Array task. The system is used to cool a dual-frequency feed system equipped with high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) low-noise amplifiers and the associated support electronics. The LNA/feed system operates at a temperature under 18 K. The system is designed to be manufactured at minimum cost. The design considerations, including the cryocooler to be used, vacuum system, microwave interconnects, mechanical components, and radiation shielding, are discussed.

  7. Cryogenic, low-noise high electron mobility transistor amplifiers for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The rapid advances recently achieved by cryogenically cooled high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) low-noise amplifiers (LNA's) in the 1- to 10-GHz range are making them extremely competitive with maser amplifiers. In order to address future spacecraft navigation, telemetry, radar, and radio science needs, the Deep Space Network is investing both maser and HEMT amplifiers for its Ka-band (32-GHz) downlink capability. This article describes the current state cryogenic HEMT LNA development at Ka-band for the DSN. Noise performance results at S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.5 GHz) for HEMT's and masers are included for completeness.

  8. A two-year history of atomic frequency standards syntonization in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    The frequency and timing system (FTS) of the Deep Space Network (DSN) consists of a collection of three sets of clocks driven by independent atomic oscillators. The synchronization of the output frequencies (syntonization) of these oscillators (reference frequency standards) is reported. There is an implied specification of a + or - 5.5 X 10 to the 12th power related to the DSN time synchronization specification of a + or - 100 microseconds. Both the syntonization within the three sets and the syntonization of the sets to the international standard (International Atomic Time) are considered.

  9. Cryogenic, low-noise high electron mobility transistor amplifiers for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, J. J.

    1993-11-01

    The rapid advances recently achieved by cryogenically cooled high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) low-noise amplifiers (LNA's) in the 1- to 10-GHz range are making them extremely competitive with maser amplifiers. In order to address future spacecraft navigation, telemetry, radar, and radio science needs, the Deep Space Network is investing both maser and HEMT amplifiers for its Ka-band (32-GHz) downlink capability. This article describes the current state cryogenic HEMT LNA development at Ka-band for the DSN. Noise performance results at S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.5 GHz) for HEMT's and masers are included for completeness.

  10. The 26-meter antenna s-x conversion project. [Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Programmatic and management aspects of converting an existing 26-meter S-band subnet to a 34-meter S- and X-band subnet of the Deep Space Network are described. The stations involved were DSS 12 near Barstow, DSS 44 in Australia, and DSS 62 in Spain. The main subsystems affected by the conversion were the antenna mechanical, antenna microwave, and receiver-exciter. Antenna mechanial modifications and electronic additions and changes are described. The design and analysis of critical areas are considered and antenna performance is discussed.

  11. Automating Mid- and Long-Range Scheduling for the NASA Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Tran, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    NASA has recently deployed a new mid-range scheduling system for the antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN), called Service Scheduling Software, or S(sup 3). This system was designed and deployed as a modern web application containing a central scheduling database integrated with a collaborative environment, exploiting the same technologies as social web applications but applied to a space operations context. This is highly relevant to the DSN domain since the network schedule of operations is developed in a peer-to-peer negotiation process among all users of the DSN. These users represent not only NASA's deep space missions, but also international partners and ground-based science and calibration users. The initial implementation of S(sup 3) is complete and the system has been operational since July 2011. This paper describes some key aspects of the S(sup 3) system and on the challenges of modeling complex scheduling requirements and the ongoing extension of S(sup 3) to encompass long-range planning, downtime analysis, and forecasting, as the next step in developing a single integrated DSN scheduling tool suite to cover all time ranges.

  12. The Future of NASA's Deep Space Network and Applications to Planetary Probe Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Leslie J.; Preston, Robert A.; Vrotsos, Peter

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) has been an invaluable tool in the world's exploration of space. It has served the space-faring community for more than 45 years. The DSN has provided a primary communication pathway for planetary probes, either through direct- to-Earth links or through intermediate radio relays. In addition, its radiometric systems are critical to probe navigation and delivery to target. Finally, the radio link can also be used for direct scientific measurement of the target body ('radio science'). This paper will examine the special challenges in supporting planetary probe missions, the future evolution of the DSN and related spacecraft technology, the advantages and disadvantages of radio relay spacecraft, and the use of the DSN radio links for navigation and scientific measurements.

  13. Experimental Evaluation of Optically Polished Aluminum Panels on the Deep Space Network's 34 Meter Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V.

    2011-01-01

    The potential development of large aperture ground?based "photon bucket" optical receivers for deep space communications has received considerable attention recently. One approach currently under investigation is to polish the aluminum reflector panels of 34?meter microwave antennas to high reflectance, and accept the relatively large spotsize generated by state of?the?art polished aluminum panels. Theoretical analyses of receiving antenna pointing, temporal synchronization and data detection have been addressed in previous papers. Here we describe the experimental effort currently underway at the Deep Space Network (DSN) Goldstone Communications Complex in California, to test and verify these concepts in a realistic operational environment. Two polished aluminum panels (a standard DSN panel polished to high reflectance, and a custom designed aluminum panel with much better surface quality) have been mounted on the 34 meter research antenna at Deep?Space Station 13 (DSS?13), and a remotely controlled CCD camera with a large CCD sensor in a weather?proof container has been installed next to the subreflector, pointed directly at the custom polished panel. The point?spread function (PSF) generated by the Vertex polished panel has been determined to be smaller than the sensor of the CCD camera, hence a detailed picture of the PSF can be obtained every few seconds, and the sensor array data processed to determine the center of the intensity distribution. In addition to estimating the center coordinates, expected communications performance can also been evaluated with the recorded data. The results of preliminary pointing experiments with the Vertex polished panel receiver using the planet Jupiter to simulate the PSF generated by a deep?space optical transmitter are presented and discussed in this paper.

  14. The Deep Space Network in the Common Platform Era: A Prototype Implementation at DSS-13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), an effort is underway to improve network performance and simplify its operation and maintenance. This endeavor, known as the "Common Platform," has both short- and long-term objectives. The long-term work has not begun yet; however, the activity to realize the short-term goals has started. There are three goals for the long-term objective: 1. Convert the DSN into a digital network where signals are digitized at the output of the down converters at the antennas and are distributed via a digital IF switch to the processing platforms. 2. Employ a set of common hardware for signal processing applications, e.g., telemetry, tracking, radio science and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). 3. Minimize in-house developments in favor of purchasing commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment. The short-term goal is to develop a prototype of the above at NASA's experimental station known as DSS-13. This station consists of a 34m beam waveguide antenna with cryogenically cooled amplifiers capable of handling deep space research frequencies at S-, X-, and Ka-bands. Without the effort at DSS-13, the implementation of the long-term goal can potentially be risky because embarking on the modification of an operational network without prior preparations can, among other things, result in unwanted service interruptions. Not only are there technical challenges to address, full network implementation of the Common Platform concept includes significant cost uncertainties. Therefore, a limited implementation at DSS-13 will contribute to risk reduction. The benefits of employing common platforms for the DSN are lower cost and improved operations resulting from ease of maintenance and reduced number of spare parts. Increased flexibility for the user is another potential benefit. This paper will present the plans for DSS-13 implementation. It will discuss key issues such as the Common Platform architecture, choice of COTS equipment, and the

  15. The scheduling of tracking times for interplanetary spacecraft on the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is a network of tracking stations, located throughout the globe, used to track spacecraft for NASA's interplanetary missions. This paper describes a computer program, DSNTRAK, which provides an optimum daily tracking schedule for the DSN given the view periods at each station for a mission set of n spacecraft, where n is between 2 and 6. The objective function is specified in terms of relative total daily tracking time requirements between the n spacecraft. Linear programming is used to maximize the total daily tracking time and determine an optimal daily tracking schedule consistent with DSN station capabilities. DSNTRAK is used as part of a procedure to provide DSN load forecasting information for proposed future NASA mission sets.

  16. Uplink-Downlink: A History of the Deep Space Network, 1957-1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgway, Douglas J.; Launius, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In these pages, the informed reader will discover a simple description of what the Deep Space Network (DSN) is about, and how it works an aspect of NASA's spectacular planetary program that seldom found its way into the popular media coverage of those major events. Future historical researchers will find a complete record of the origin and birth of the DSN, its subsequent development and expansion over the ensuing four decades, and a description of the way in which the DSN was used to fulfill the purpose for which it was created. At the same time, the specialist reader is provided with an abundant source of technical references that address every aspect of the advanced telecommunications technology on which the success of the DSN depended. And finally, archivists, educators, outreach managers, and article writers will have ready recourse to the inner workings of the DSN and how they related to the more publicly visible events of the planetary space program.

  17. Long-range planning cost model for support of future space missions by the deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherif, J. S.; Remer, D. S.; Buchanan, H. R.

    1990-01-01

    A simple model is suggested to do long-range planning cost estimates for Deep Space Network (DSP) support of future space missions. The model estimates total DSN preparation costs and the annual distribution of these costs for long-range budgetary planning. The cost model is based on actual DSN preparation costs from four space missions: Galileo, Voyager (Uranus), Voyager (Neptune), and Magellan. The model was tested against the four projects and gave cost estimates that range from 18 percent above the actual total preparation costs of the projects to 25 percent below. The model was also compared to two other independent projects: Viking and Mariner Jupiter/Saturn (MJS later became Voyager). The model gave cost estimates that range from 2 percent (for Viking) to 10 percent (for MJS) below the actual total preparation costs of these missions.

  18. A federated information management system for the Deep Space Network. M.S. Thesis - Univ. of Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobinson, E.

    1982-01-01

    General requirements for an information management system for the deep space network (DSN) are examined. A concise review of available database management system technology is presented. It is recommended that a federation of logically decentralized databases be implemented for the Network Information Management System of the DSN. Overall characteristics of the federation are specified, as well as reasons for adopting this approach.

  19. Proposed upgrade of the Deep Space Network research and development station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joel G.

    1987-01-01

    Continued exploration of the solar system will require continued evolution of capabilities to support deep space communication and navigation. That evolution will rely, as it has in the past, on the development, demonstration, and field testing of communication and navigation technologies. The existing Deep Space Network (DSN) research and development station, DSS 13, at the Venus site, Goldstone, California was instrumental in those prior developments. However, the present antenna is no longer able to provide the necessary support for technology. The 26 meter antenna has good performance at S-band, fair performance at X-band, but is unusable at the anticipated Ka-band. It is not suitable for conversion to beam waveguides, and is not usable as a test bed for demonstrating high efficiency because of structural pliancy. Additionally, its size and age are increasingly a liability in demonstrations. A 34 meter beam waveguide version of the existing DSN high efficiency (HEF) antennas was proposed for FY-88 Construction of Facilities budget. The antenna is to be built at the Venus site, adjacent to the old antenna, and serve as the DSN research and development antenna through the end of the century.

  20. Antennas for the array-based Deep Space Network: current status and future designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Gama, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Development of very large arrays1,2 of small antennas has been proposed as a way to increase the downlink capability of the NASA Deep Space Network DSN) by two or three orders of magnitude thereby enabling greatly increased science data from currently configured missions or enabling new mission concepts. The current concept is for an array of 400 x 12-m antennas at each of three longitudes. The DSN array will utilize radio astronomy sources for phase calibration and will have wide bandwidth correlation processing for this purpose. NASA has undertaken a technology program to prove the performance and cost of a very large DSN array. Central to that program is a 3-element interferometer to be completed in 2005. This paper describes current status of the low cost 6-meter breadboard antenna to be used as part of the interferometer and the RF design of the 12-meter antenna.

  1. An Analysis of Near Fields of 34m Antennas of JPL/NASA Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Juan, Nuria Llombart

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of calculating near fields of the 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antennas of the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network (DSN). Calculating the near fields of DSN antennas are of interest in receive mode where the transmitting signals from nearby flying objects such as helicopters and airplanes could interfere with the operation of sensitive RF receiving system of DSN antennas, and in the transmit mode where fields from high-powered DSN antennas interfere with receivers on nearby flying objects, as well as safety considerations for the operators and visitors to the grounds surrounding the antenna sites. A complete and detailed analysis has been performed using PO/PTD techniques, including surface errors and support struts effects. Some results are presented, including comparisons with preliminary field tests.

  2. Block 4 receiver tracking loop performance in the presence of a CW RFI. [deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    A model that allows one to predict the tracking performance of the Block 4 receiver in the presence of a continuous wave radio frequency interference is discussed. Experimental and analytical results are provided for a typical Deep Space Network operational mode. Simulation and experimental results show good agreement with theoretical prediction for the static phase error and out-of-lock values. Predicted phase jitter is consistently lower than the experimental and simulated results by a factor of one-half for small interference to signal ratio (ISR) when the offset frequency is small. For large ISR, good agreement is observed. The analytical model assumes a noiseless condition, which is valid only when the loop is operated at strong signal levels. Experimental data indicate, however, that even at the minimum operating signal level of 10-dB carrier margin, reasonably good prediction can still be obtained. A curve of protection criteria that extends the current recommendation is also presented.

  3. Single- and dual-carrier microwave noise abatement in the deep space network. [microwave antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathker, D. A.; Brown, D. W.; Petty, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA/JPL Deep Space Network (DSN) microwave ground antenna systems are presented which simultaneously uplink very high power S-band signals while receiving very low level S- and X-band downlinks. Tertiary mechanisms associated with elements give rise to self-interference in the forms of broadband noise burst and coherent intermodulation products. A long-term program to reduce or eliminate both forms of interference is described in detail. Two DSN antennas were subjected to extensive interference testing and practical cleanup program; the initial performance, modification details, and final performance achieved at several planned stages are discussed. Test equipment and field procedures found useful in locating interference sources are discussed. Practices deemed necessary for interference-free operations in the DSN are described. Much of the specific information given is expected to be easily generalized for application in a variety of similar installations. Recommendations for future investigations and individual element design are given.

  4. Project Report: Design and Analysis for the Deep Space Network BWG Type 2 Antenna Feed Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The following report explains in detail the solid modeling design process and structural analysis of the LNA (Low Noise Amplifier) feed platform to be constructed and installed on the new BWG (Beam Wave Guide) Type-2 tracking antenna in Canberra, Australia, as well as all future similar BWG Type-2 antennas builds. The Deep Space Networks new BWG Type-2 antennas use beam waveguides to funnel and 'extract' the desired signals received from spacecraft, and the feed platform supports and houses the LNA(Low Noise Amplifier) feed-cone and cryogenic cooling equipment used in the signal transmission and receiving process. The mandated design and construction of this platform to be installed on the new tracking antenna will be used and incorporated on all future similar antenna builds.

  5. Software cost/resource modeling: Deep space network software cost estimation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A parametric software cost estimation model prepared for JPL deep space network (DSN) data systems implementation tasks is presented. The resource estimation model incorporates principles and data from a number of existing models, such as those of the General Research Corporation, Doty Associates, IBM (Walston-Felix), Rome Air Force Development Center, University of Maryland, and Rayleigh-Norden-Putnam. The model calibrates task magnitude and difficulty, development environment, and software technology effects through prompted responses to a set of approximately 50 questions. Parameters in the model are adjusted to fit JPL software lifecycle statistics. The estimation model output scales a standard DSN work breakdown structure skeleton, which is then input to a PERT/CPM system, producing a detailed schedule and resource budget for the project being planned.

  6. LS-44: An improved deep space network station location set for Viking navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koble, H. M.; Pease, G. E.; Yip, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Improved estimates for the spin axis and longitude components of the Deep Space Network station locations were obtained from post-flight processing of radio metric data received from various Mariner planetary missions. The use of an upgraded set of ionospheric calibrations and the incorporation of near-Venus and near-Mercury radio metric data from the Mariner 10 spacecraft are the principal contributing effects to the improvement. These new estimates, designated Location Set (LS) 44, have supported Viking navigation activities in the vicinity of Mars. As such, the station locations were determined relative to the planetary positions inherent in JPL Development Ephemeris (DE) 84, which was used throughout the Viking mission. The article also presents and discusses a version of LS 44 based upon the latest planetary ephemeris, DE 96.

  7. The Impact of Traffic Prioritization on Deep Space Network Mission Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Esther; Segui, John; Gao, Jay; Clare, Loren; Abraham, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    A select number of missions supported by NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) are demanding very high data rates. For example, the Kepler Mission was launched March 7, 2009 and at that time required the highest data rate of any NASA mission, with maximum rates of 4.33 Mb/s being provided via Ka band downlinks. The James Webb Space Telescope will require a maximum 28 Mb/s science downlink data rate also using Ka band links; as of this writing the launch is scheduled for a June 2014 launch. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, launched June 18, 2009, has demonstrated data rates at 100 Mb/s at lunar-Earth distances using NASA's Near Earth Network (NEN) and K-band. As further advances are made in high data rate space telecommunications, particularly with emerging optical systems, it is expected that large surges in demand on the supporting ground systems will ensue. A performance analysis of the impact of high variance in demand has been conducted using our Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE) simulation tool. A comparison is made regarding the incorporation of Quality of Service (QoS) mechanisms and the resulting ground-to-ground Wide Area Network (WAN) bandwidth necessary to meet latency requirements across different user missions. It is shown that substantial reduction in WAN bandwidth may be realized through QoS techniques when low data rate users with low-latency needs are mixed with high data rate users having delay-tolerant traffic.

  8. Observing the Moon at Microwave Frequencies Using a Large-Diameter Deep Space Network Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, David D.; Imbriale, William; Keihm, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    The Moon radiates energy at infrared and microwave wavelengths, in addition to reflecting sunlight at optical wavelengths. As a result, an antenna pointed at or near the Moon will result in an increase in system operating noise temperature, which needs to be accounted for in RF telecommunications, radio science or radiometric link calculations. The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) may use its large-diameter antennas in future lunar robotic or human missions, and thus it is important to understand the nature of this temperature incre ase as a function of observing frequency, lunar phase, and angular position of the antenna beam on the lunar disk. This paper reports on a comprehensive lunar noise temperature measurement campaign and associated theoretical treatment for a 34-m diameter Deep Space Network antenna observing an extended source such as the Moon. A set of measurements over a wide range of lunar phase angles was acquired at DSS-13, a 34-m diameter beam waveguide antenna (BWG) located at Goldstone, California at 2.3 GHz (S-band), 8.4 GHz (X-band) and 32 GHz (Ka-band). For validation purposes, independent predictions of noise temperature increase were derived using a physical optics characterization of the 34-m diameter antenna gain patterns and Apollo model-based brightness temperature maps of the Moon as input. The model-based predictions of noise temperature increase were compared with the measurements at all three frequencies. In addition, a methodology is presented that relates noise temperature increase due to the Moon to disk-centered or disk-averaged brightness temperature of the Moon at the microwave frequencies of interest. Comparisons were made between the measurements and models in the domain of lunar disk-centered and disk-averaged brightness temperatures. It is anticipated that the measurements and associated theoretical development will be useful in developing telecommunications strategies for future high-rate Ka-band communications where large

  9. An Analysis of Database Replication Technologies with Regard to Deep Space Network Application Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Andrea M.

    2011-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) has three communication facilities which handle telemetry, commands, and other data relating to spacecraft missions. The network requires these three sites to share data with each other and with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for processing and distribution. Many database management systems have replication capabilities built in, which means that data updates made at one location will be automatically propagated to other locations. This project examines multiple replication solutions, looking for stability, automation, flexibility, performance, and cost. After comparing these features, Oracle Streams is chosen for closer analysis. Two Streams environments are configured - one with a Master/Slave architecture, in which a single server is the source for all data updates, and the second with a Multi-Master architecture, in which updates originating from any of the servers will be propagated to all of the others. These environments are tested for data type support, conflict resolution, performance, changes to the data structure, and behavior during and after network or server outages. Through this experimentation, it is determined which requirements of the DSN can be met by Oracle Streams and which cannot.

  10. Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Three 34m (110 ft.) diameter Beam Waveguide antennas located at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex, situated in the Mojave Desert in California. This is one of three complexes which comprise NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). The DSN provides radio communications for all of NASA's interplanetary spacecraft and is also utilized for radio astronomy and radar observations of the solar system and the universe.

  11. The Status of the Deep Space Network for the Cassini Radio Science Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    ...The Frequency and Timing System (FTS) of the DSN as it existed before the Cassini program easily met the requirements for all of the NASA deep space missions. These requirements and the performance of the present DSN FTS are given.

  12. Using The Global Positioning System For Earth Orbiter and Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.; Haines, Bruce J.; Young, Lawrence E.; Dunn, Charles; Srinivasan, Jeff; Sweeney, Dennis; Nandi, Sumita; Spitzmesser, Don

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) can play a major role in supporting orbit and trajectory determination for spacecraft in a wide range of applications, including low-Earth, high-earth, and even deep space (interplanetary) tracking.

  13. The Evolution of Technology in the Deep Space Network: A History of the Advanced Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layland, J. W.; Rauch, L. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) of 1995 might be described as the evolutionary result of 45 years of deep space communication and navigation, together with the synergistic activities of radio science and radar and radio astronomy. But the evolution of the DSN did not just happen - it was carefully planned and created. The evolution of the DSN has been an ongoing engineering activity, and engineering is a process of problem solving under constraints, one of which is technology. In turn, technology is the knowledge base providing the capability and experience for practical application of various areas of science, when needed. The best engineering solutions result from optimization under the fewest constraints, and if technology needs are well anticipated (ready when needed), then the most effective engineering solution is possible. Throughout the history of the DSN it has been the goal and function of DSN advanced technology development (designated the DSN Advanced Systems Program from 1963 through 1994) to supply the technology needs of the DSN when needed, and thus to minimize this constraint on DSN engineering. Technology often takes considerable time to develop, and when that happens, it is important to have anticipated engineering needs; at times, this anticipation has been by as much as 15 years. Also, on a number of occasions, mission malfunctions or emergencies have resulted in unplanned needs for technology that has, in fact, been available from the reservoir of advanced technology provided by the DSN Advanced Systems Program. Sometimes, even DSN engineering personnel fail to realize that the organization of JPL permits an overlap of DSN advanced technology activities with subsequent engineering activities. This can result in the flow of advanced technology into DSN engineering in a natural and sometimes almost unnoticed way. In the following pages, we will explore some of the many contributions of the DSN Advanced Systems Program that were provided to DSN

  14. Ka-band (32-GHz) performance of 70-meter antennas in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Bhanji, A. M.; Blank, S.; Lobb, V. B.; Levy, R.; Rocci, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    Two models are provided of the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70 m antenna performance at Ka-band (32 GHz) and, for comparison purposes, one at X-band (8.4 GHz). The baseline 70 m model represents expected X-band and Ka-band performance at the end of the currently ongoing 64 m to 70 m mechanical upgrade. The improved 70 m model represents two sets of Ka-band performance estimates (the X-band performance will not change) based on two separately developed improvement schemes: the first scheme, a mechanical approach, reduces tolerances of the panels and their settings, the reflector structure and subreflector, and the pointing and tracking system. The second, an electronic/mechanical approach, uses an array feed scheme to compensate fo lack of antenna stiffness, and improves panel settings using microwave holographic measuring techniques. Results are preliminary, due to remaining technical and cost uncertainties. However, there do not appear to be any serious difficulties in upgrading the baseline DSN 70 m antenna network to operate efficiently in an improved configuration at 32 GHz (Ka-band). This upgrade can be achieved by a conventional mechanical upgrade or by a mechanical/electronic combination. An electronically compensated array feed system is technically feasible, although it needs to be modeled and demonstrated. Similarly, the mechanical upgrade requires the development and demonstration of panel actuators, sensors, and an optical surveying system.

  15. An Automation Language for Managing Operations (ALMO) in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, P. F.; Pechkam, P.

    1999-04-01

    Configuring a set of devices for pre- and post-track activities in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) involves hundreds of keyboard entries, manual operations, and parameter extractions and confirmations, making it tedious and error prone. This article presents a language called Automation Language for Managing Operations (ALMO), which automates operations of communications links in the DSN. ALMO was developed in response to a number of deficiencies that were identified with the previous languages and techniques used to manage DSN link operations. These included a need to (1) provide visibility to the information that resides in the different link devices in order to recognize an anomaly and alert the operator when it occurs, (2) provide an intuitive and simple language capable of representing the full spectrum of operations procedures, (3) mitigate the variations in operating procedures experienced between different tracking complexes and supports, and (4) automate overall operation, reducing cost by minimizing work hours required to configure devices and perform activities. With ALMO, for the first time in DSN operations, operators are able to capture sequences of activities into simple instructions that can be easily interpreted by both human and machine. Additionally, the device information, which used to be viewable only via screen displays, is now accessible for operator use in automating their tasks, thus reducing the time it takes to perform such tasks while minimizing the chance of error. ALMO currently is being used operationally at the Deep Space Communications Complex in Canberra, Australia. Link operators at the Madrid, Spain, and Goldstone, California, communications complexes also have received training in the use of ALMO.

  16. Ka-Band High-Rate Telemetry System Upgrade for the NASA Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBelle, Remi; Bernardo, Abner; Bowen, James; Britcliffe, Michael; Bucknam, Neil; Link, Christopher; Long, Ezra; Manalo, Leslie; O'Dea, James A.; Rochblatt, David; Sosnowski, John; Veruttipong, Watt

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) has a new requirement to support high-data-rate Category A (Cat A) missions (within 2 million kilometers of Earth) with simultaneous S-band uplink, S-band downlink and Ka-band downlink. The S-band links are required for traditional TT&C (Telemetry, Tracking, and Command) support to the spacecraft, while the Ka-band link is intended for high-data-rate science returns. The new Ka-band system combines the use of proven DSN cryogenic designs, for low system temperature, and high data rate capability using commercial telemetry receivers. The initial Cat A support is required for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in 2013 and possibly other missions. The upgrade has been implemented into 3 different 34-meter Beam Waveguide (BWG) antennas in the DSN, one at each of the complexes in Canberra (Australia), Goldstone (California) and Madrid (Spain). System test data is presented to show that the requirements were met and the DSN is ready for Cat A Ka-band operational support.

  17. Ka-band high-rate telemetry system upgrade for the NASA deep space network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBelle, R.; Rochblatt, D.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) has a new requirement to support high-data-rate Category A (Cat A) missions (within 2 million kilometers of the Earth) with simultaneous S-band uplink, S-band downlink and Ka-band downlink. The S-band links are required for traditional telemetry, tracking & command (TT&C) support to the spacecraft, while the Ka-band link is intended for high-data-rate science returns. The new Ka-band system combines the use of proven DSN cryogenic designs, for low system temperature, and high-data-rate capability using commercial telemetry receivers. The initial Cat A support is required for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in 2014 and possibly other missions. The upgrade has been implemented into 3 different 34-meter Beam Waveguide (BWG) antennas in the DSN, one at each of the complexes in Canberra (Australia), Goldstone (California) and Madrid (Spain). System test data are presented to show that the requirements were met and the DSN is ready for Cat A Ka-band operational support.

  18. Automating Mid- and Long-Range Scheduling for NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Tran, Daniel; Arroyo, Belinda; Sorensen, Sugi; Tay, Peter; Carruth, Butch; Coffman, Adam; Wallace, Mike

    2012-01-01

    NASA has recently deployed a new mid-range scheduling system for the antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN), called Service Scheduling Software, or S(sup 3). This system is architected as a modern web application containing a central scheduling database integrated with a collaborative environment, exploiting the same technologies as social web applications but applied to a space operations context. This is highly relevant to the DSN domain since the network schedule of operations is developed in a peer-to-peer negotiation process among all users who utilize the DSN (representing 37 projects including international partners and ground-based science and calibration users). The initial implementation of S(sup 3) is complete and the system has been operational since July 2011. S(sup 3) has been used for negotiating schedules since April 2011, including the baseline schedules for three launching missions in late 2011. S(sup 3) supports a distributed scheduling model, in which changes can potentially be made by multiple users based on multiple schedule "workspaces" or versions of the schedule. This has led to several challenges in the design of the scheduling database, and of a change proposal workflow that allows users to concur with or to reject proposed schedule changes, and then counter-propose with alternative or additional suggested changes. This paper describes some key aspects of the S(sup 3) system and lessons learned from its operational deployment to date, focusing on the challenges of multi-user collaborative scheduling in a practical and mission-critical setting. We will also describe the ongoing project to extend S(sup 3) to encompass long-range planning, downtime analysis, and forecasting, as the next step in developing a single integrated DSN scheduling tool suite to cover all time ranges.

  19. Amplitude Scintillation due to Atmospheric Turbulence for the Deep Space Network Ka-Band Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C.; Wheelon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Fast amplitude variations due to atmospheric scintillation are the main concerns for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Ka-band downlink under clear weather conditions. A theoretical study of the amplitude scintillation variances for a finite aperture antenna is presented. Amplitude variances for weak scattering scenarios are examined using turbulence theory to describe atmospheric irregularities. We first apply the Kolmogorov turbulent spectrum to a point receiver for three different turbulent profile models, especially for an exponential model varying with altitude. These analytic solutions then are extended to a receiver with a finite aperture antenna for the three profile models. Smoothing effects of antenna aperture are expressed by gain factors. A group of scaling factor relations is derived to show the dependences of amplitude variances on signal wavelength, antenna size, and elevation angle. Finally, we use these analytic solutions to estimate the scintillation intensity for a DSN Goldstone 34-m receiving station. We find that the (rms) amplitude fluctuation is 0.13 dB at 20-deg elevation angle for an exponential model, while the fluctuation is 0.05 dB at 90 deg. These results will aid us in telecommunication system design and signal-fading prediction. They also provide a theoretical basis for further comparison with other measurements at Ka-band.

  20. A Statistical Comparison of Meteorological Data Types Derived from Deep Space Network Water Vapor Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D. D.; Keihm, S.; Slobin, S.

    2015-11-01

    Water vapor radiometers measure the sky brightness along a path through the atmosphere. This sky brightness is a combination of the atmospheric "noise" temperature and the cosmic background. By removing the cosmic contribution, the remaining atmospheric noise temperature contribution can be used to infer atmospheric attenuation and atmospheric noise temperature used in telecommunications link budgets. Water vapor radiometer (WVR) data also have been used to calibrate or experimentally characterize atmospheric error sources in phase data gathered from radio science and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiments. A previous article reported on the comparison of atmospheric attenuation derived from WVR data with that estimated from International Telecommunication Union (ITU) models for the three Deep Space Network (DSN) sites. The focus of this current article is to examine and cross-compare the statistics of the meteorological data types (integrated precipitable water vapor, integrated liquid water content, and wet path delay) extracted from the WVR measurements for all three DSN sites. In this article, we will also compare some of the statistical estimates against those available using ITU models and prediction methods.

  1. New Algorithms for Estimating Spacecraft Position Using Scanning Techniques for Deep Space Network Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Lingli; Fathpour, Nanaz; Mehra, Raman K.

    2005-01-01

    As more and more nonlinear estimation techniques become available, our interest is in finding out what performance improvement, if any, they can provide for practical nonlinear problems that have been traditionally solved using linear methods. In this paper we examine the problem of estimating spacecraft position using conical scan (conscan) for NASA's Deep Space Network antennas. We show that for additive disturbances on antenna power measurement, the problem can be transformed into a linear one, and we present a general solution to this problem, with the least square solution reported in literature as a special case. We also show that for additive disturbances on antenna position, the problem is a truly nonlinear one, and we present two approximate solutions based on linearization and Unscented Transformation respectively, and one 'exact' solution based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. Simulations show that, with the amount of data collected in practice, linear methods perform almost the same as MCMC methods. It is only when we artificially reduce the amount of collected data and increase the level of noise that nonlinear methods show significantly better accuracy than that achieved by linear methods, at the expense of more computation.

  2. Table-driven configuration and formatting of telemetry data in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Evan

    1994-01-01

    With a restructured software architecture for telemetry system control and data processing, the NASA/Deep Space Network (DSN) has substantially improved its ability to accommodate a wide variety of spacecraft in an era of 'better, faster, cheaper'. In the new architecture, the permanent software implements all capabilities needed by any system user, and text tables specify how these capabilities are to be used for each spacecraft. Most changes can now be made rapidly, outside of the traditional software development cycle. The system can be updated to support a new spacecraft through table changes rather than software changes, reducing the implementation, test, and delivery cycle for such a change from three months to three weeks. The mechanical separation of the text table files from the program software, with tables only loaded into memory when that mission is being supported, dramatically reduces the level of regression testing required. The format of each table is a different compromise between ease of human interpretation, efficiency of computer interpretation, and flexibility.

  3. Forecasting of loading on the Deep Space Network for proposed future NASA mission sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a computer program, DSNLOAD, which provides the Deep Space Network (DSN) loading information given a proposed future NASA mission set. The DSNLOAD model includes required pre- and post-calibration periods, and station 'overhead' such as maintenance or 'down' time. The analysis is presented which transforms station view period data for the mission set into loading matrices used to assess loading requirement. Assessment of future loading on the DSN for a set of NASA missions by estimating the tracking situation and presenting the DSN loading data, and a flowchart for selecting a possible future mission, determining a heliocentric orbit for the mission, generating view period schedules, and converting these schedules into basic loading data for each mission for each station are given. The tracking schedule model which considers the tracking schedule to be represented by passes of maximum required length and centered within the view period of available tracking time for each mission is described, and, finally, an example of typical loading study is provided.

  4. Planetary Radar Imaging with the Deep-Space Network's 34 Meter Uplink Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor; Tsao, P.; Lee, D.; Cornish, T.; Jao, J.; Slade, M.

    2011-01-01

    A coherent Uplink Array consisting of two or three 34-meter antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network has been developed for the primary purpose of increasing EIRP at the spacecraft. Greater EIRP ensures greater reach, higher uplink data rates for command and configuration control, as well as improved search and recovery capabilities during spacecraft emergencies. It has been conjectured that Doppler-delay radar imaging of lunar targets can be extended to planetary imaging, where the long baseline of the uplink array can provide greater resolution than a single antenna, as well as potentially higher EIRP. However, due to the well known R4 loss in radar links, imaging of distant planets is a very challenging endeavor, requiring accurate phasing of the Uplink Array antennas, cryogenically cooled low-noise receiver amplifiers, and sophisticated processing of the received data to extract the weak echoes characteristic of planetary radar. This article describes experiments currently under way to image the planets Mercury and Venus, highlights improvements in equipment and techniques, and presents planetary images obtained to date with two 34 meter antennas configured as a coherently phased Uplink Array.

  5. Planetary Radar Imaging with the Deep-Space Network's 34 Meter Uplink Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Tsao, P.; Lee, D.; Cornish, T.; Jao, J.; Slade, M.

    2011-01-01

    A coherent uplink array consisting of up to three 34-meter antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network has been developed for the primary purpose of increasing EIRP at the spacecraft. Greater EIRP ensures greater reach, higher uplink data rates for command and configuration control, as well as improved search and recovery capabilities during spacecraft emergencies. It has been conjectured that Doppler-delay radar imaging of lunar targets can be extended to planetary imaging, where the long baseline of the uplink array can provide greater resolution than a single antenna, as well as potentially higher EIRP. However, due to the well known R-4 loss in radar links, imaging of distant planets is a very challenging endeavor, requiring accurate phasing of the Uplink Array antennas, cryogenically cooled low-noise receiver amplifiers, and sophisticated processing of the received data to extract the weak echoes characteristic of planetary radar. This article describes experiments currently under way to image the planets Mercury and Venus, highlights improvements in equipment and techniques, and presents planetary images obtained to date with two 34 meter antennas configured as a coherently phased Uplink Array.

  6. Time Analyzer for Time Synchronization and Monitor of the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Steven; Gonzalez, Jorge, Jr.; Calhoun, Malcolm; Tjoelker, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A software package has been developed to measure, monitor, and archive the performance of timing signals distributed in the NASA Deep Space Network. Timing signals are generated from a central master clock and distributed to over 100 users at distances up to 30 kilometers. The time offset due to internal distribution delays and time jitter with respect to the central master clock are critical for successful spacecraft navigation, radio science, and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) applications. The instrument controller and operator interface software is written in LabView and runs on the Linux operating system. The software controls a commercial multiplexer to switch 120 separate timing signals to measure offset and jitter with a time-interval counter referenced to the master clock. The offset of each channel is displayed in histogram form, and "out of specification" alarms are sent to a central complex monitor and control system. At any time, the measurement cycle of 120 signals can be interrupted for diagnostic tests on an individual channel. The instrument also routinely monitors and archives the long-term stability of all frequency standards or any other 1-pps source compared against the master clock. All data is stored and made available for

  7. Service Quality Assessment for NASA's Deep Space Network: No Longer a Luxury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkley, Erik; Wolgast, Paul; Zendejas, Silvino

    2010-01-01

    When NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) was established almost a half century ago, the concept of computer-based service delivery was impractical or infeasible due to the state of information technology As a result, the interface the DSN exposes to its customers tends to be equipment-centric, lacking a clear demarcation between the DSN and the mission operation systems (MOS) of its customers. As the number of customers has continued to increase, the need to improve efficiency and minimize costs has grown. This growth has been the impetus for a DSN transformation from an equipment-forrent provider to a provider of standard services. Service orientation naturally leads to requirements for service management, including proactive measurement of service quality and service levels as well as the efficiency of internal processes and the performance of service provisioning systems. DSN System Engineering has surveyed industry offerings to determine if commercial successes in decision support and Business Intelligence (BI) solutions can be applied to the DSN. A pilot project was initiated, and subsequently executed to determine the feasibility of repurposing a commercial Business Intelligence platform for engineering analysis in conjunction with the platform's intended business reporting and analysis functions.

  8. Study of Electrical Activity in Martian Dust Storms with the Deep Space Network antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Majid, W. A.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Tamppari, L. K.; Renno, N. O.; Ruf, C.; Trinh, J. T.

    2012-09-01

    Evidence for non-thermal emission produced by electrostatic discharges in a deep Martian dust storm has been reported by Ruf et al. 2009 [1]. Such discharges had been detected with an innovative kurtosis detector installed in a 34m radio telescope of the Deep Space Network (DSN) in June of 2006. The kurtosis (the fourth central moment of the signal normalized by the square of the second central moment) is extremely sensitive to the presence of non-thermal radiation, but is insensitive to variations in the intensity of the thermal radiation and instrument gain. The non-thermal radiation was detected while a 35 Km deep Martian dust storm was within the field of view of the radio telescope and presented signatures of modulation by the Martian Schumann Resonance. Encouraged by this discovery, several attempts have been made within the DSN to confirm the detection using the R&D antenna (DSS-13) and other antennas in the Madrid and Goldstone complexes, but using a very limited receiver, in terms of recorded data rates, the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receiver (VSR). We are planning to initiate an extensive monitoring of Mars emission in a noninterfering basis while our antennas are tracking various Mars probes, using the Wideband Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receiver (WVSR). The WVSR is a very flexible open-loop digital backend that is used for radio science and spacecraft navigation support in the DSN. This instrument allows us to sample a larger bandwidth than with previously used detectors. The processing to look for the kurtosis signature will be performed in software, limited only by the computer capacity. Additionally there are plans to develop an even more powerful custom-built detector based in CASPER technology and Graphic Processing Units for enhance computational power. This contribution will describe how we plan to select the target Mars tracking passes from the DSN schedule. An automated process will generate

  9. Interference Effects of Deep Space Network Transmitters on IMT-2000/UMTS Receivers at S-Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C.; Sue, M.; Peng, T.; Kinman, P.; Tan, H.

    2000-04-01

    International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT)-2000 and its European member, Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS), are planning to deploy mobile radio services in the S-band (around 2 GHz) in the next few years. NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) has been operating powerful S-band transmitters at three worldwide sites. The DSN's uplink frequency (2110 to 2120 MHz) is part of the spectrum to be used by the UMTS terrestrial system for the forward links (2110 to 2170 MHz). It is necessary to determine if the DSN transmitters would interfere with nearby IMT-2000/UMTS receivers through transhorizontal propagation. Under normal conditions, interference causes three types of losses that will reduce the power level as received by a victim receiver: free-space loss, diffraction loss over the spherical Earth, and diffraction loss over mountain peaks. In this article, simplified topographic mountain-peak profiles along the radial direction are used to calculate the losses for all three DSN sites. In addition, there are unusual propagation modes under which the interference can have favorable propagation channels to reach areas beyond the line of sight. They are, respectively, the ducting mode (one-dimensional loss) and rain scattering (rain as a reflector). These two modes are strongly time-percent dependent. The propagation loss for these special modes also is calculated. All losses are combined to estimate the minimum "coordination distance" beyond which the interference will be attenuated below the threshold level of the IMT-2000/UMTS receiver. We find that for 85 percent of the time this distance is about 70 km from the DSN site. The radial distance can be reduced to as small as 30 km in the direction of a large mountain shadow. For 15 percent of the time, ducting and rain scattering can greatly increase the distance to several hundreds of kilometers.

  10. Deep Space Network (DSN), Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) computer-human interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellman, Alvin; Carlton, Magdi

    1993-01-01

    The Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) of the DSN is responsible for scheduling the resources of DSN, and monitoring all multi-mission spacecraft tracking activities in real-time. Operations performs this job with computer systems at JPL connected to over 100 computers at Goldstone, Australia and Spain. The old computer system became obsolete, and the first version of the new system was installed in 1991. Significant improvements for the computer-human interfaces became the dominant theme for the replacement project. Major issues required innovating problem solving. Among these issues were: How to present several thousand data elements on displays without overloading the operator? What is the best graphical representation of DSN end-to-end data flow? How to operate the system without memorizing mnemonics of hundreds of operator directives? Which computing environment will meet the competing performance requirements? This paper presents the technical challenges, engineering solutions, and results of the NOCC computer-human interface design.

  11. Field demonstration of X-band photonic antenna remoting in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Lutes, G.; Logan, R. T., Jr.; Maleki, L.

    1994-01-01

    We designed a photonic link for antenna remoting based on our integrated system analysis. With this 12-km link, we successfully demonstrated photonic antenna-remoting capability at X-band (8.4 GHz) at one of NASA's Deep Space Stations while tracking the Magellan spacecraft.

  12. Current Applications of Analog Fiber Optics in the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, G.

    1993-01-01

    Analog fiber optic technology. Enables a fully integrated Deep Space Communications complex. Enables sharing of expensive subsystems. Enables RF carrier arraying of antennas separated by tens of kilometers. Provides improved complex reliability and flexibility. Enables improved performance. Provides significant cost reductions.

  13. RL-34 ring laser gyro laboratory evaluation for the Deep Space Network antenna application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The overall results of this laboratory evaluation are quite encouraging. The gyro data is in good agreement with the system's overall pointing performance, which is quite close to the technical objectives for the Deep Space Network (DSN) application. The system can be calibrated to the levels required for millidegree levels of pointing performance, and initialization performance is within the required 0.001 degree objective. The blind target acquisition performance is within a factor of two of the 0.0001 degree objective, limited only by a combination of the slow rate (0.5 deg/sec) and the existing production quantization logic (0.38 arc-sec/pulse). Logic circuitry exists to better this performance such that it will better the objective by 50 percent. Representative data with this circuitry has been provided for illustration. Target tracking performance is about twice the one millidegree objective, with several factors contributing. The first factor is the bias stability of the gyros, which is exceptional, but will limit performance to the 0.001 and 0.002 degree range for long tracking periods. The second contributing factor is the accelerometer contributions when the system is elevated. These degrade performance into the 0.003 to 0.004 degree range, which could be improved upon with some additional changes. Finally, we have provided a set of recommendations to improve performance closer to the technical objectives. These recommendations include gyro, electronics, and system configurational changes that form the basis for additional work to achieve the desired performance. In conclusion, we believe that the RL-34 ring laser gyro-based advanced navigation system demonstrated performance consistent with expectations and technical objectives, and it has the potential for even further enhancement for the DSN application.

  14. Evaluation of current tropospheric mapping functions by Deep Space Network very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovers, O. J.; Lanyi, G. E.

    1994-01-01

    To compare the validity of current algorithms that map zenith tropospheric delay to arbitrary elevation angles, 10 different tropospheric mapping functions are used to analyze the current data base of Deep Space Network Mark 3 intercontinental very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) data. This analysis serves as a stringent test because of the high proportion of low-elevation observations necessitated by the extremely long baselines. Postfit delay and delay-rate residuals are examined, as well as the scatter of baseline lengths about the time-linear model that characterizes tectonic motion. Among the functions that utilize surface meteorological data as input parameters, the Lanyi 1984 mapping shows the best performance both for residuals and baselines, through the 1985 Davis function is statistically nearly identical. The next best performance is shown by the recent function of Niell, which is based on an examination of global atmospheric characteristics as a function of season and uses no weather data at the time of the measurements. The Niell function shows a slight improvement in residuals relative to Lanyi, but also an increase in baseline scatter that is significant for the California-Spain baseline. Two variants of the Chao mapping function, as well as the Chao tables used with the interpolation algorithm employed in the Orbit Determination Program software, show substandard behavior for both VLBI residuals and baseline scatter. The length of the California-Australia baseline (10,600 km) in the VLBI solution can vary by as much as 5 to 10 cm for the 10 mapping functions.

  15. Evaluation of current tropospheric mapping functions by Deep Space Network very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovers, O. J.; Lanyi, G. E.

    1994-11-01

    To compare the validity of current algorithms that map zenith tropospheric delay to arbitrary elevation angles, 10 different tropospheric mapping functions are used to analyze the current data base of Deep Space Network Mark 3 intercontinental very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) data. This analysis serves as a stringent test because of the high proportion of low-elevation observations necessitated by the extremely long baselines. Postfit delay and delay-rate residuals are examined, as well as the scatter of baseline lengths about the time-linear model that characterizes tectonic motion. Among the functions that utilize surface meteorological data as input parameters, the Lanyi 1984 mapping shows the best performance both for residuals and baselines, through the 1985 Davis function is statistically nearly identical. The next best performance is shown by the recent function of Niell, which is based on an examination of global atmospheric characteristics as a function of season and uses no weather data at the time of the measurements. The Niell function shows a slight improvement in residuals relative to Lanyi, but also an increase in baseline scatter that is significant for the California-Spain baseline. Two variants of the Chao mapping function, as well as the Chao tables used with the interpolation algorithm employed in the Orbit Determination Program software, show substandard behavior for both VLBI residuals and baseline scatter. The length of the California-Australia baseline (10,600 km) in the VLBI solution can vary by as much as 5 to 10 cm for the 10 mapping functions.

  16. A small satellite design for deep space network testing and training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcwilliams, Dennis; Slatton, Clint; Norman, Cassidy; Araiza, Joe; Jones, Jason; Tedesco, Mark; Wortman, Michael; Opiela, John; Lett, Pat; Clavenna, Michael

    1993-01-01

    With the continuing exploration of the Solar System and the reemphasis on Earth focused missions, the need for faster data transmission rates has grown. Ka-band could allow a higher data delivery rate over the current X-band, however the adverse effects of the Earth's atmosphere on Ka are as yet unknown. The Deep Space Network and Jet Propulsion Lab have proposed to launch a small satellite that would simultaneously transmit X and Ka signals to test the viability of switching to Ka-band. The Mockingbird Design Team at the University of Texas at Austin applied small satellite design principles to achieve this objective. The Mockingbird design, named BATSAT, incorporates simple, low-cost systems designed for university production and testing. The BATSAT satellite is a 0.64 m diameter, spherical panel led satellite, mounted with solar cells and omni-directional antennae. The antennae configuration negates the need for active attitude control or spin stabilization. The space-frame truss structure was designed for 11 g launch loads while allowing for easy construction and solar-panel mounting. The communication system transmits at 1 mW by carrying the required Ka and X-band transmitters, as well as an S band transmitter used for DSN training. The power system provides the 8.6 W maximum power requirements via silicon solar arrays and nickel-cadmium batteries. The BATSAT satellite will be lofted into an 1163 km, 70 deg orbit by the Pegasus launch system. This orbit fulfills DSN dish slew rate requirements while keeping the satellite out of the heaviest regions of the Van Allen radiation belts. Each of the three DSN stations capable of receiving Ka-band (Goldstone, Canberra, and Madrid) will have an average of 85 minutes of view-time per day over the satellites ten year design life. Mockingbird Designs hopes that its small satellite design will not only be applicable to this specific mission scenario, but that it could easily be modified for instrument capability for

  17. A small satellite design for deep space network testing and training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Dennis; Slatton, Clint; Norman, Cassidy; Araiza, Joe; Jones, Jason; Tedesco, Mark; Wortman, Michael; Opiela, John; Lett, Pat; Clavenna, Michael

    1993-05-01

    With the continuing exploration of the Solar System and the reemphasis on Earth focused missions, the need for faster data transmission rates has grown. Ka-band could allow a higher data delivery rate over the current X-band, however the adverse effects of the Earth's atmosphere on Ka are as yet unknown. The Deep Space Network and Jet Propulsion Lab have proposed to launch a small satellite that would simultaneously transmit X and Ka signals to test the viability of switching to Ka-band. The Mockingbird Design Team at the University of Texas at Austin applied small satellite design principles to achieve this objective. The Mockingbird design, named BATSAT, incorporates simple, low-cost systems designed for university production and testing. The BATSAT satellite is a 0.64 m diameter, spherical panel led satellite, mounted with solar cells and omni-directional antennae. The antennae configuration negates the need for active attitude control or spin stabilization. The space-frame truss structure was designed for 11 g launch loads while allowing for easy construction and solar-panel mounting. The communication system transmits at 1 mW by carrying the required Ka and X-band transmitters, as well as an S band transmitter used for DSN training. The power system provides the 8.6 W maximum power requirements via silicon solar arrays and nickel-cadmium batteries. The BATSAT satellite will be lofted into an 1163 km, 70 deg orbit by the Pegasus launch system. This orbit fulfills DSN dish slew rate requirements while keeping the satellite out of the heaviest regions of the Van Allen radiation belts. Each of the three DSN stations capable of receiving Ka-band (Goldstone, Canberra, and Madrid) will have an average of 85 minutes of view-time per day over the satellites ten year design life. Mockingbird Designs hopes that its small satellite design will not only be applicable to this specific mission scenario, but that it could easily be modified for instrument capability for

  18. High-Resolution Bistatic Radar Imaging With The Deep-Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M.; Benner, L.; Slade, M. A.; Teitelbaum, L.; Brozovic, M.; Nolan, M. C.; Taylor, P. A.; Ghigo, F. D.; Ford, J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent upgrades to the Deep Space Network's Goldstone Solar System Radar allow the transmitted waveform to be modulated at up to 40 MHz, providing resolution as fine as 3.75 m in line-of-sight distance for near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and the Moon. Bistatic observations, transmitting with an antenna at Goldstone and receiving with either another Goldstone antenna or a larger antenna such as the Arecibo Observatory or the Green Bank Telescope, give the highest possible sensitivity combined with high resolution. High-resolution bistatic radar projects have revealed spin state changes and the presence of boulders on many NEAs. Examples include radar imaging campaigns on the NEAs 2005 YU55, Toutatis, 2012 DA14, and 2014 HQ124. In the near future, a new high-resolution transmitter on Goldstone's DSS-13 antenna will be able to transmit a signal modulated at 80 MHz, improving line-of-sight resolution by a factor of two to 1.875 m. This will allow many new projects: seeing previously-invisible surface details; measuring the size distributions of boulders and possibly craters on small NEAs; obtaining better estimates of the masses and densities of asteroids from radiation pressure perturbations to their trajectories; improved trajectory predictions for small spacecraft targets and potential Earth impactors; and possibly imaging the reconfiguration of asteroids' surfaces due to tides during extremely close Earth flybys. Somewhat further into the future, a 1.875-m-resolution transmitter may be installed on a 34-m antenna at the DSN's Canberra complex. This would allow radar imaging of objects in the far southern sky, which current radars cannot see. It would also facilitate rapid follow-up of newly discovered radar targets and before-and-after observations of NEAs making flybys close enough to cause tidal reconfiguration, which move very quickly across the sky at closest approach. As with the current 3.75-m-resolution system, these future high-resolution transmitters will

  19. Power Spectrum of Atmospheric Scintillation for the Deep Space Network Goldstone Ka-Band Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C.; Wheelon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic signal fluctuations due to atmospheric scintillations may impair the Ka-band (around 32-GHz) link sensitivities for a low-margin Deep Space Network (DSN) receiving system. The ranges of frequency and power of the fast fluctuating signals (time scale less than 1 min) are theoretically investigated using the spatial covariance and turbulence theory. Scintillation power spectrum solutions are derived for both a point receiver and a finite-aperture receiver. The aperture-smoothing frequency ((omega(sub s)), corner frequency ((omega(sub c)), and damping rate are introduced to define the shape of the spectrum for a finite-aperture antenna. The emphasis is put on quantitatively describing the aperture-smoothing effects and graphically estimating the corner frequency for a large aperture receiver. Power spectral shapes are analyzed parametrically in detail through both low- and high-frequency approximations. It is found that aperture-averaging effects become significant when the transverse correlation length of the scintillation is smaller than the antenna radius. The upper frequency or corner frequency for a finite-aperture receiver is controlled by both the Fresnel frequency and aperture-smoothing frequency. Above the aperture-smoothing frequency, the spectrum rolls off at a much faster rate of exp (-omega(sup 2)/omega(sup 2, sub s), rather than omega(sup -8/3), which is customary for a point receiver. However, a relatively higher receiver noise level can mask the fast falling-off shape and make it hard to be identified. We also predict that when the effective antenna radius a(sub r) less than or = 6 m, the corner frequency of its power spectrum becomes the same as that for a point receiver. The aperture-smoothing effects are not obvious. We have applied these solutions to the scenario of a DSN Goldstone 34-m-diameter antenna and predicted the power spectrum shape for the receiving station. The maximum corner frequency for the receiver (with omega(sub s) = 0

  20. Bistatic radar observations of the moon using the Clementine spacecraft and Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberg, Christopher L.

    2000-09-01

    The author prepared, executed, and analyzed the data from a series of spotlight-mode bistatic radar (BSR) observations of the Moon's North and South Poles. The Ballistic Missile Defense Organization Clementine spacecraft served as an S-band transmitter, and 70-m antennas of the NASA/Deep Space Network received the reflections. An average value of circular polarization ratio (CPR) for both poles of 0.344 (<0.031 standard deviation) was found, but varied between 0.20 to 0.6 over small regions. The North Pole average CPR was 0.359 (<0.0308 standard deviation). The South Pole average CPR was 0.333 (<0.0238 standard deviation). By analyzing the CPR response versus bistatic angle, the author discovered a slight CPR enhancement approaching 1 dB (0.11 dB standard deviation) for Orbit 234 of the South Pole. This CPR enhancement could result from the coherent backscatter opposition effect (CBOE). Radar observable CBOE would be consistent with radar scattering from theoretically predicted, but never observed, ice accumulations. The beta-zero BSR track and CPR enhancement correlate with areas of permanent shadow within the South Pole-Aitken Basin and with high hydrogen accumulations reported by Lunar Prospector. The author found that BSR beta-zero radar tracks through periodically solar illuminated areas yielded no enhancements in his data. The effect of angle of incidence on CPR for the South Pole was considered, and Orbit 234 was found to have a slightly elevated CPR compared to the other orbits. Previous radar observations of the Moon employed earth- based monostatic radars or rudimentary orbiting bistatic techniques. These methods only used the quasi-specular (QS) reflection component of scattering. This work is the first successful experiment to (a)collect data from lunar bistatic radar scattering using other than the dominant QS component, (b)use spotlight-mode bistatic radar technique outside of earth, and (c)return useful S-band bistatic scattering data from lunar

  1. Deep space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Srinivasan, Meera; Shaw, Matthew; Piazzolla, Sabino; Wright, Malcolm W.; Farr, William H.

    2016-03-01

    A number of laser communication link demonstrations from near Earth distances extending out to lunar ranges have been remarkably successful, demonstrating the augmented channel capacity that is accessible with the use of lasers for communications. The next hurdle on the path to extending laser communication and its benefits throughout the solar system and beyond is to demonstrate deep-space laser communication links. In this paper, concepts and technology development being advanced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in order to enable deep-space link demonstrations to ranges of approximately 3 AU in the next decade, will be discussed.

  2. Maintenance of time and frequency in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Deep Space Network using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, P. A.; Borutzki, S. E.; Kirk, A.

    1984-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN), managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA, must maintain time and frequency within specified limits in order to accurately track the spacecraft engaged in deep space exploration. Various methods are used to coordinate the clocks among the three tracking complexes. These methods include Loran-C, TV Line 10, Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Calculations are made to obtain frequency offsets and Allan variances. These data are analyzed and used to monitor the performance of the hydrogen masers that provide the reference frequencies for the DSN Frequency and Timing System (DFT). Areas of discussion are: (1) a brief history of the GPS timing receivers in the DSN, (2) a description of the data and information flow, (3) data on the performance of the DSN master clocks and GPS measurement system, and (4) a description of hydrogen maser frequency steering using these data.

  3. Experimental Evaluation of the "Polished Panel Optical Receiver" Concept on the Deep Space Network's 34 Meter Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.

    2012-01-01

    The potential development of large aperture ground-based "photon bucket" optical receivers for deep space communications has received considerable attention recently. One approach currently under investigation proposes to polish the aluminum reflector panels of 34-meter microwave antennas to high reflectance, and accept the relatively large spotsize generated by even state-of-the-art polished aluminum panels. Here we describe the experimental effort currently underway at the Deep Space Network (DSN) Goldstone Communications Complex in California, to test and verify these concepts in a realistic operational environment. A custom designed aluminum panel has been mounted on the 34 meter research antenna at Deep-Space Station 13 (DSS-13), and a remotely controlled CCD camera with a large CCD sensor in a weather-proof container has been installed next to the subreflector, pointed directly at the custom polished panel. Using the planet Jupiter as the optical point-source, the point-spread function (PSF) generated by the polished panel has been characterized, the array data processed to determine the center of the intensity distribution, and expected communications performance of the proposed polished panel optical receiver has been evaluated.

  4. Pros and Cons of Using Arrays of Small Antennas Versus Large Single Dish Antennas for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagri, Durgadas S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly describes pros and cons of using arrays of small antennas instead of large single dish antennas for spacecraft telemetry, command, and tracking (TT and C) - communications and navigation (C and N) - and science support that the Deep Space Network (DSN) normally provides. It considers functionality and performance aspects, mainly for TT and C, though it also considers science. It only briefly comments on the cost aspects that seem to favor arrays of small antennas over large single antennas, at least for receiving (downlinks).

  5. Radio interferometric determination of intercontinental baselines and earth orientation utilizing deep space network antennas - 1971 to 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovers, O. J.; Thomas, J. B.; Fanselow, J. L.; Cohen, E. J.; Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Rogstad, D. H.; Skjerve, L. J.; Spitzmesser, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Progress has been made toward the realization of the potential of radio interferometry for measuring crustal motions and global rotations of the earth with accuracies at the centimeter level. In this connection, a series of experiments, primarily with NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas, has been conducted to develop two generations of very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) systems. A description is presented of the employed techniques, an analysis of the experiments, and the results of geophysical significance. Attention is given to the interferometry technique, the geometric delay model, propagation media calibrations, and the observing strategy.

  6. Generalized probability model for calculation of interference to the Deep Space Network due to circularly Earth-orbiting satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggier, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    The probability of exceeding interference power levels and the duration of interference at the Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna is calculated parametrically when the state vector of an Earth-orbiting satellite over the DSN station view area is not known. A conditional probability distribution function is derived, transformed, and then convolved with the interference signal uncertainties to yield the probability distribution of interference at any given instant during the orbiter's mission period. The analysis is applicable to orbiting satellites having circular orbits with known altitude and inclination angle.

  7. Deep Space Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Andrew T. (Inventor); Riedel, Joseph E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single, compact, lower power deep space positioning system (DPS) configured to determine a location of a spacecraft anywhere in the solar system, and provide state information relative to Earth, Sun, or any remote object. For example, the DPS includes a first camera and, possibly, a second camera configured to capture a plurality of navigation images to determine a state of a spacecraft in a solar system. The second camera is located behind, or adjacent to, a secondary reflector of a first camera in a body of a telescope.

  8. Detection Performance of Upgraded "Polished Panel" Optical Receiver Concept on the Deep-Space Network's 34 Meter Research Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.

    2012-01-01

    The development and demonstration of a "polished panel" optical receiver concept on the 34 meter research antenna of the Deep Space Network (DSN) has been the subject of recent papers. This concept would enable simultaneous reception of optical and microwave signals by retaining the original shape of the main reflector for microwave reception, but with the aluminum panels polished to high reflectivity to enable focusing of optical signal energy as well. A test setup has been installed on the DSN's 34 meter research antenna at Deep Space Station 13 (DSS-13) of NASA's Goldstone Communications Complex in California, and preliminary experimental results have been obtained. This paper describes the results of our latest efforts to improve the point-spread function (PSF) generated by a custom polished panel, in an attempt to reduce the dimensions of the PSF, thus enabling more precise tracking and improved detection performance. The design of the new mechanical support structure and its operation are described, and the results quantified in terms of improvements in collected signal energy and optical communications performance, based on data obtained while tracking the planet Jupiter with the 34 meter research antenna at DSS-13.

  9. The Deep Space Network's X/X/Ka Feed: Modifications for 100 kW CW Uplink Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Khayatian, Behrouz; Sosnowski, John B.

    2010-01-01

    The Deep Space Network, which provides communication services for NASA's robotic missions, consists of a number of 34m beam waveguide antennas and conventional 70m dual-reflector antennas located around the globe, [1]. The 34m beam waveguide antennas employ a three-band feed covering the deep space uplink band near 7.2 GHz, and downlink bands at 8.45 and 32 GHz. Simultaneous uplink commanding at 25 kW CW and ultra low noise reception in both bands is supported along with monopulse tracking at 32 GHz, [2]. An existing uplink capability of 25 kW is also available on the 70m antennas using a more conventional X/X diplexing feed. In order to provide an equivalent uplink capability with the 34m antennas the X/X/Ka feed is currently being modified for 100 kW CW operation, [3]. Here we will discuss both the existing feed and the 100 kW modifications which are underway.

  10. Understanding deep convolutional networks.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Stéphane

    2016-04-13

    Deep convolutional networks provide state-of-the-art classifications and regressions results over many high-dimensional problems. We review their architecture, which scatters data with a cascade of linear filter weights and nonlinearities. A mathematical framework is introduced to analyse their properties. Computations of invariants involve multiscale contractions with wavelets, the linearization of hierarchical symmetries and sparse separations. Applications are discussed. PMID:26953183

  11. The Deep Space Atomic Clock Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.; Koch, Timothy; Kuang, Da; Lee, Karen; Murphy, David; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert; Seubert, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the space flight performance of a small, low-mass, high-stability mercury-ion atomic clock with long term stability and accuracy on par with that of the Deep Space Network. The timing stability introduced by DSAC allows for a 1-Way radiometric tracking paradigm for deep space navigation, with benefits including increased tracking via utilization of the DSN's Multiple Spacecraft Per Aperture (MSPA) capability and full ground station-spacecraft view periods, more accurate radio occultation signals, decreased single-frequency measurement noise, and the possibility for fully autonomous on-board navigation. Specific examples of navigation and radio science benefits to deep space missions are highlighted through simulations of Mars orbiter and Europa flyby missions. Additionally, this paper provides an overview of the mercury-ion trap technology behind DSAC, details of and options for the upcoming 2015/2016 space demonstration, and expected on-orbit clock performance.

  12. Availability analysis of the traveling-wave maser amplifiers in the deep space network. Part 1: The 70-meter antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issa, T. N.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the reliability and availability analyses of the individual S- and X-band traveling-wave maser (TWM) assemblies and their operational configurations in the 70-meter antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) are described. For the period 1990 through 1991, the TWM availability parameters for the Telemetry Data System are: mean time between failures (MTBF), 930 hr; mean time to restore services (MTTRS), 1.4 hr; and the average availability, 99.85 percent. In previously published articles, the performance analysis of the TWM assemblies was confined to the determination of the parameters specified above. However, as the mean down time (MDT) for the repair of TWM's increases, the levels of the TWM operational availabilities and MTTRS are adversely affected. A more comprehensive TWM availability analysis is presented to permit evaluation of both MTBF and MDT effects. Performance analysis of the TWM assemblies, based on their station monthly failure reports, indicates that the TWM's required MTBF and MDT levels of 3000 hr and 36 to 48 hr, respectively, have been achieved by the TWM's only at the Canberra Deep Space Station (DSS 43). The Markov Process technique is employed to develop suitable availability measures for the S- and X-band TWM configurations when each is operated in a two-assembly standby mode. The derived stochastic expressions allow for the evaluation of those configurations' simultaneous availability for the Antenna Microwave Subsystem. The application of these expressions to demonstrate the impact of various levels of TWM maintainability (or MDT) on their configurations' operational availabilities is presented for each of the 70-m antenna stations.

  13. Availability analysis of the traveling-wave maser amplifiers in the deep space network. Part 1: The 70-meter antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, T. N.

    1992-08-01

    The results of the reliability and availability analyses of the individual S- and X-band traveling-wave maser (TWM) assemblies and their operational configurations in the 70-meter antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) are described. For the period 1990 through 1991, the TWM availability parameters for the Telemetry Data System are: mean time between failures (MTBF), 930 hr; mean time to restore services (MTTRS), 1.4 hr; and the average availability, 99.85 percent. In previously published articles, the performance analysis of the TWM assemblies was confined to the determination of the parameters specified above. However, as the mean down time (MDT) for the repair of TWM's increases, the levels of the TWM operational availabilities and MTTRS are adversely affected. A more comprehensive TWM availability analysis is presented to permit evaluation of both MTBF and MDT effects. Performance analysis of the TWM assemblies, based on their station monthly failure reports, indicates that the TWM's required MTBF and MDT levels of 3000 hr and 36 to 48 hr, respectively, have been achieved by the TWM's only at the Canberra Deep Space Station (DSS 43). The Markov Process technique is employed to develop suitable availability measures for the S- and X-band TWM configurations when each is operated in a two-assembly standby mode. The derived stochastic expressions allow for the evaluation of those configurations' simultaneous availability for the Antenna Microwave Subsystem. The application of these expressions to demonstrate the impact of various levels of TWM maintainability (or MDT) on their configurations' operational availabilities is presented for each of the 70-m antenna stations.

  14. Monitor and Control of the Deep-Space network via Secure Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamarra, N.

    1997-01-01

    (view graph) NASA lead center for robotic space exploration. Operating division of Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Current missions, Voyagers, Galileo, Pathfinder, Global Surveyor. Upcoming missions, Cassini, Mars and New Millennium.

  15. Sequence-of-events-driven automation of the deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, R., Jr.; Fayyad, K.; Smyth, C.; Santos, T.; Chen, R.; Chien, S.; Bevan, R.

    1996-01-01

    In February 1995, sequence-of-events (SOE)-driven automation technology was demonstrated for a Voyager telemetry downlink track at DSS 13. This demonstration entailed automated generation of an operations procedure (in the form of a temporal dependency network) from project SOE information using artificial intelligence planning technology and automated execution of the temporal dependency network using the link monitor and control operator assistant system. This article describes the overall approach to SOE-driven automation that was demonstrated, identifies gaps in SOE definitions and project profiles that hamper automation, and provides detailed measurements of the knowledge engineering effort required for automation.

  16. Deep space network radio science system for Voyager Uranus and Galileo missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, T. K.; Donivan, F. F.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is presented of major new requirements, challenges and conceptual designs for the DSN Radio Science System in the 1985 to 1988 period. The Voyager Uranus encounter is being supported with larger combined aperture, higher sample rate, and a centrally controlled network. The Galileo mission will be provided with a high resolution S-Band Faraday rotation detection capability and a high-stability Doppler system with X-Band uplink for gravitational wave search.

  17. Development of Cooperative Communication Techniques for a Network of Small Satellites and Cubesats in Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babuscia, Alessandra; Cheung, Kar-Ming; Divsalar, Dariush; Lee, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to address this problem by proposing cooperative communication approaches in which multiple CubeSats communicate cooperatively together to improve the link performance with respect to the case of a single satellite transmitting. Three approaches are proposed: a beam-forming approach, a coding approach, and a network approach. The approaches are applied to the specific case of a proposed constellation of CubeSats at the Lunar Lagrangian point L1 which aims to perform radio astronomy at very low frequencies (30 KHz -3 MHz). The paper describes the development of the approaches, the simulation and a graphical user interface developed in Matlab which allows to perform trade-offs across multiple constellation's configurations.

  18. Terrestrial Propagation of 2-Gigahertz Emissions Transmitted from the Deep Space Network 70-Meter Antenna at Robledo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. M.; Sue, M. K.; Peng, T. K.; Smith, E. K.

    2002-10-01

    This article presents a case study of potential interference from a 2-GHz transmitter in the Deep Space Network (DSN) station in Robledo, Spain, to the International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT)-2000 mobile receivers in the city of Madrid about 50 km away. This study has included the effect of terrain between Robledo and Madrid in evaluating the propagation modes, which include diffraction over the terrain, ducting through the atmosphere, and scattering by rain. It is a complete revision of a previous study wherein preliminary analysis of these phenomena was presented without taking the specific terra in into account. The predicted results concerning diffraction are consistent with measurements and with predictions of the Longley-Rice model. Because of attenuation by the hills, the expected power received through diffraction by a mobile receiver on ground level in Madrid is lower than the interference thresholds (-109 dBm) when the DSN antenna transmits at the normal power of 20 kW. The hills near the DSN antenna also provide much attenuation to the emissions propagated through atmospheric ducting. Considering the low duty cycle (12 percent or less) of about 2 GHz (S-band) transmissions at Robledo, the expected power of emissions propagated through atmospheric ducting does not exceed the receiver interference thresholds more than 0.1 percent of the time. The corresponding effect of rain scattering is estimated to be 0.01 percent of the time. These percentages decrease at larger distances.

  19. Conceptual Design of a Communication-Based Deep Space Navigation Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzalone, Evan J.; Chuang, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    As the need grows for increased autonomy and position knowledge accuracy to support missions beyond Earth orbit, engineers must push and develop more advanced navigation sensors and systems that operate independent of Earth-based analysis and processing. Several spacecraft are approaching this problem using inter-spacecraft radiometric tracking and onboard autonomous optical navigation methods. This paper proposes an alternative implementation to aid in spacecraft position fixing. The proposed method Network-Based Navigation technique takes advantage of the communication data being sent between spacecraft and between spacecraft and ground control to embed navigation information. The navigation system uses these packets to provide navigation estimates to an onboard navigation filter to augment traditional ground-based radiometric tracking techniques. As opposed to using digital signal measurements to capture inherent information of the transmitted signal itself, this method relies on the embedded navigation packet headers to calculate a navigation estimate. This method is heavily dependent on clock accuracy and the initial results show the promising performance of a notional system.

  20. Deep Space Network Scheduling Using Multi-Objective Optimization with Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique to incorporate uncertainty modeling within an evolutionary algorithm approach to multi-objective scheduling, with the goal of identifying a Pareto frontier (tradeoff curve) that recognizes the likelihood of events that can impact the schedule outcome. Our approach is particularly applicable to the generation of multiobjective optimized robust schedules, where objectives are assigned a service level, for example that we require an objective value to be greater than or equal to X with Y% confidence. We have demonstrated that such an approach can, for example, minimize scheduling on less reliable resources, based solely on a resource reliability model and not on any ad hoc heuristics. We have also investigated an alternative method of optimizing for robustness, in which we add to the set of objectives a failure risk objective to minimize. We compare the advantages and disadvantages of these two approaches. Future plans for further developing this technology include its application to space-based observatory scheduling problems.

  1. Deep Space 1 (fact sheet)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    Exerting less force than does a single sheet of paper resting in your hand, Deep Space 1's ion propulsion system will slowly, yet continuously accelerate the spacecraft well beyond speeds attainable by conventional chemical propulsion.

  2. Deep Space Telecommunications Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Descriptive and analytical information useful for the optimal design, specification, and performance evaluation of deep space telecommunications systems is presented. Telemetry, tracking, and command systems, receiver design, spacecraft antennas, frequency selection, interference, and modulation techniques are addressed.

  3. Iris Transponder-Communications and Navigation for Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Courtney B.; Smith, Amy E.; Aguirre, Fernando H.

    2014-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed the Iris CubeSat compatible deep space transponder for INSPIRE, the first CubeSat to deep space. Iris is 0.4 U, 0.4 kg, consumes 12.8 W, and interoperates with NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) on X-Band frequencies (7.2 GHz uplink, 8.4 GHz downlink) for command, telemetry, and navigation. This talk discusses the Iris for INSPIRE, it's features and requirements; future developments and improvements underway; deep space and proximity operations applications for Iris; high rate earth orbit variants; and ground requirements, such as are implemented in the DSN, for deep space operations.

  4. The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The primary objectives during this portion of the extended mission were to assure survival of the spacecraft for a third Mercury encounter through conservation of attitude control gas and to conduct trajectory correction maneuvers (TCMs) as necessary to target the spacecraft for a solar occultation zone pass. Special support activities included TCMs 6 and 7 conducted on October 30, 1974 and on February 12-13, 1975, respectively. This period also saw the DSN interface organization involved in (1) the allocation of sufficient coverage to assure accurate orbit determination solutions, (2) monitoring of DSN implementation for Viking to assure maintenance of compatible interfaces and capabilities required for Mariner 10, and (3) the development of encounter coverage, sequences, and readiness test plans.

  5. Deep space optical communications experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, P.; Katz, J.; Gagliardi, R.

    1983-01-01

    An optical communications experiment between a deep space vehicle and an earth terminal is under consideration for later in this decade. The experimental link would be incoherent (direct detection) and would employ two-way cooperative pointing. The deep space optical transceiver would ride piggyback on a spacecraft with an independent scientific objective. Thus, this optical transceiver is being designed for minimum spacecraft impact - specifically, low mass and low power. The choices of laser transmitter, coding/modulation scheme, and pointing mechanization are discussed. A representative telemetry link budget is presented.

  6. Floating into Deep Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Frenais, R.; Saraceno, T.; Powell, J.

    2014-04-01

    Is it possible for spaceflight to become more sustainable? Artist and architect Tomas Saraceno proposes a long-term artscience research project based on his initial work with solar balloons to join with the efforts of engineers such as John Powell, working on the Airship to Orbit experiments, which describe a three stage process of using airships to fly to a large suborbital "Dark Sky Station' then literally floating into orbit with additional electrical and chemical propulsion. (See: http://www.jpaerospace.com) In his artworks Tomás Saraceno proposes cell-like flying cities as possible architectonic living spaces in direct reference to Buckminster Fuller's Cloud Nine (circa 1960). The fantastic architectural utopia Cloud Nine consists of a freely floating sphere measuring one mile in diameter that offers living space to several autonomous communities encompassing thousands of inhabitants each. The notion of the cloud is essential to the artist's work. The cloud as metaphor stands for artistic intention, for the meaning of territory and border in today's (urban) society, and for exploring possibilities for the sustainable development of the human living environment. In Saraceno's work this environment is not limited to the earth, but is explicitly conceived to reach into outer space. (Biomimetic Constructions- On the works of Tomás Saraceno By Katharina Schlüter) Saraceno is also interested in human factors experiments using his existing constructions as analogue environments for living on Mars and is proposing carry out a series of workshops, experiments and solar balloon launces in White Sands desert in early 2016 in collaboration with the curator Dr Rob La Frenais, the Rubin Center at The University of Texas at El Paso and various scientific partners.

  7. Creating food for deep space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-07-01

    Explorers and scientists have to eat, whether they're on top of a mountain, deep in the sea, or in space. NASA scientists are working to develop a viable food program by 2030 that could feed six crew members for a 3-year mission to Mars.

  8. The Deep Impact Network Experiment Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, J. Leigh; Clare, Loren; Wang, Shin-Ywan

    2009-01-01

    Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) promises solutions in solving space communications challenges arising from disconnections as orbiters lose line-of-sight with landers, long propagation delays over interplanetary links, and other phenomena. DTN has been identified as the basis for the future NASA space communications network backbone, and international standardization is progressing through both the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) and the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). JPL has developed an implementation of the DTN architecture, called the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION). ION is specifically implemented for space use, including design for use in a real-time operating system environment and high processing efficiency. In order to raise the Technology Readiness Level of ION, the first deep space flight demonstration of DTN is underway, using the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft. Called the Deep Impact Network (DINET), operations are planned for Fall 2008. An essential component of the DINET project is the Experiment Operations Center (EOC), which will generate and receive the test communications traffic as well as "out-of-DTN band" command and control of the DTN experiment, store DTN flight test information in a database, provide display systems for monitoring DTN operations status and statistics (e.g., bundle throughput), and support query and analyses of the data collected. This paper describes the DINET EOC and its value in the DTN flight experiment and potential for further DTN testing.

  9. Deep Space 1 in Cleanroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA. Deep Space 1 used a unique ion drive propulsion system. Unlike the fireworks of most chemical rockets using solid or liquid fuels, the ion drive emits only an eerie blue glow as ionized (electrically charged) atoms of xenon are pushed out of the engine. Xenon is the same gas found in photo flash tubes and many lighthouse bulbs. The almost imperceptible thrust from the system is equivalent to the pressure exerted by a sheet of paper held in the palm of your hand. The ion engine is very slow to pick up speed, but over the long haul it can deliver 10 times as much thrust per pound of fuel as more traditional rockets. Previous ion propulsion systems, like those found on some communications satellites, were not used as the main engines, but only to keep the satellites on track. Deep Space 1 is the first spacecraft to use this important technology as its primary means of propulsion. The importance of ion propulsion is its great efficiency,' says Dr. Marc Rayman, project manager for Deep Space 1. 'It uses very little propellant, and that means it weighs less so it can use a less expensive launch vehicle and ultimately go much faster than other spacecraft. This opens the solar system to many future exciting missions which otherwise would have been unaffordable or even impossible,' added Dr. Rayman. The ion particles travel out at about 68,000 miles per hour. However, Deep Space 1 doesn't move that fast in the other direction, because it is much heavier than the ion particles. By the end of the mission, the ion engine will have changed the spacecraft's speed by about 6,800 mph (over 11,000 kph). The technology is so efficient that it only consumes about 3.5 ounces (100 g) of xenon per day, taking about four days to expend just one pound (0.4 kg

  10. Potential Interference to the Deep Space Network Stations in Spain from NPOESS in the 25.5- to 27.0-GHz Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, H.

    2008-08-01

    A new Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) station, located about 70 km east of the Deep Space Network (DSN) Madrid complex (Robledo), is planned to support National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) satellites. The 26.7-GHz NPOESS Ka-band downlink to this proposed station can potentially interfere with the DSN Madrid station that may support the future lunar and Sun-Earth Lagrange point missions operating in the 25.5- to 27.0-GHz band. A preliminary compatibility analysis has been conducted to assess the potential impact to the DSN Madrid complex from the NPOESS Ka-band downlink to the planned INTA station.

  11. The operational performance of hydrogen masers in the deep space network: The performance of laboratory reference frequency standards in an operational environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen masers used as aids in meeting the routine frequency and time operational requirements within the 64 m antenna Deep Space Network. Both the operational syntonation (frequency synchronization) and the the clock (epoch) synchronization requirements were established through the use of specifically calibrated H-P E215061A flying clock. The sync/synt to UTC was maintained using LORAN and TV in simultaneous reception mode. The sync/synt within the 64 m net was maintained through the use of very long base interferometry. Results indicate that the hydrogen masers perform well within the required specifications.

  12. Deep Space C3: High Power Uplinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodis, Mary Anne; Abraham, Douglas S.; Morabito, David D.

    2003-12-01

    The uplink transmitters of the Deep Space Network (DSN) perform three key functions in support of space missions: navigation, command uplink, and emergency recovery. The transmitters range in frequency from S-band to Ka-band, and range in RF transmit power from 200W to 400kW. Future improvements to the uplink transmitters will focus on higher frequency transmitters for high data rate communications, high power X-band uplinks for emergency recovery, and/or in-phase uplink arraying for either application.

  13. PTTI applications to deep space navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curkendall, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Radio metric deep space navigation relies nearly exclusively upon coherent, two way, Doppler and ranging for all precise applications. These data types and the navigational accuracies they can produce are reviewed. The deployment of hydrogen maser frequency standards and the development of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) systems within the Deep Space Network are used in the development of non-coherent, one way data forms that promise much greater inherent navigational accuracy. The underlying structure between each data class and clock performance is charted. VLBI observations of the natural radio sources are the planned instrument for the synchronization task. This method and a navigational scheme using differential measurements between the spacecraft and nearby quasars are described.

  14. NASA Integrated Space Communications Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Wallace; Wright, Nate; Prior, Mike; Bhasin, Kul

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Integrated Network for Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) has been in the definition phase since 2010. It is intended to integrate NASA s three existing network elements, i.e., the Space Network, Near Earth Network, and Deep Space Network, into a single network. In addition to the technical merits, the primary purpose of the Integrated Network is to achieve a level of operating cost efficiency significantly higher than it is today. Salient features of the Integrated Network include (a) a central system element that performs service management functions and user mission interfaces for service requests; (b) a set of common service execution equipment deployed at the all stations that provides return, forward, and radiometric data processing and delivery capabilities; (c) the network monitor and control operations for the entire integrated network are conducted remotely and centrally at a prime-shift site and rotating among three sites globally (a follow-the-sun approach); (d) the common network monitor and control software deployed at all three network elements that supports the follow-the-sun operations.

  15. A common-aperture X- and S-band four-function feedcone. [hornfeed design for antennas of Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withington, J. R.; Williams, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    Williams and Withington (1979) have considered a prototype X-S-band feedhorn which enabled simultaneous X- and S-band reception from a Cassegrain antenna. This feedhorn has quite successfully demonstrated an alternate method to the standard Deep Space Network (DSN) system of multiple subreflectors and dichroic plate for dual-band reception. In connection with a Network Consolidation Program, involving centralized control of existing antennas and construction of new reflector antennas, a second-generation feedhorn/combiner was conceived to show that this common-aperture feedhorn system was capable of performing all necessary functions the DSN would be called upon to perform with existing and future X-S-band spacecraft. Attention is given to the feedhorn concept, the combiner concept, the first and the second generation of the horn, Sand X-band tuning, and planned capabilities. The feedhorn greatly extends the state of the art in DSN performance and will enhance DSN capabilities in the future.

  16. Deep Space 1 Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The completely assembled Deep Space 1 (DS-1) technology demonstrator spacecraft. The DS-1 spacecraft incorporates a number of advanced technology concepts in its mission, but none so 'high profile' as its Ion propulsion system. The name itself evokes visions of Star Trek and science fiction fantasy, although the idea actually dates from the 1950s. However, unlike the 'Warp Drive' propulsion system that zings the fictional starship Enterprise across the cosmos in minutes, the almost imperceptible thrust from the ion propulsion system is equivalent to the pressure exerted by a sheet of paper held in the palm of your hand. The ion engine is very slow to pick up speed, but over the long haul it can deliver 10 times as much thrust per pound of fuel as more traditional rockets. Unlike the fireworks of most chemical rockets using solid or liquid fuels, the ion drive emits only an eerie blue glow as ionized (electrically charged) atoms of xenon are pushed out of the engine. Xenon is the same gas found in photo flash tubes and many lighthouse bulbs. Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

  17. Science and Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever wondered about the science goals of various deep space missions? Or why scientists want such seemingly complicated spacecraft and operations scenarios? With a focus on outer planets) this talk will cover the scientific goals and results of several recent and future missions) how scientists approach a requirements flow down) and how the disparate needs of mission engineers and scientists can come together for mission success. It will also touch on several up and coming technologies and how they will change mission architectures in the future.

  18. COTS-Based Fault Tolerance in Deep Space: Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses of a Bus Network Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Ann T.; Chau, Savio N.; Alkalai, Leon

    2000-01-01

    Using COTS products, standards and intellectual properties (IPs) for all the system and component interfaces is a crucial step toward significant reduction of both system cost and development cost as the COTS interfaces enable other COTS products and IPs to be readily accommodated by the target system architecture. With respect to the long-term survivable systems for deep-space missions, the major challenge for us is, under stringent power and mass constraints, to achieve ultra-high reliability of the system comprising COTS products and standards that are not developed for mission-critical applications. The spirit of our solution is to exploit the pertinent standard features of a COTS product to circumvent its shortcomings, though these standard features may not be originally designed for highly reliable systems. In this paper, we discuss our experiences and findings on the design of an IEEE 1394 compliant fault-tolerant COTS-based bus architecture. We first derive and qualitatively analyze a -'stacktree topology" that not only complies with IEEE 1394 but also enables the implementation of a fault-tolerant bus architecture without node redundancy. We then present a quantitative evaluation that demonstrates significant reliability improvement from the COTS-based fault tolerance.

  19. Emergency Communications for NASA's Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin; Lee, Charles H.; Morabito, David D.; Cesarone, Robert J.; Abraham, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to communicate with spacecraft during emergencies is a vital service that NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) provides to all deep space missions. Emergency communications is characterized by low data rates(typically is approximately10 bps) with the spacecraft using either a low-gain antenna (LGA, including omnidirectional antennas) or,in some cases, a medium-gain antenna (MGA). Because of the use of LGAs/MGAs for emergency communications, the transmitted power requirements both on the spacecraft andon the ground are substantially greater than those required for normal operations on the high-gain antenna (HGA) despite the lower data rates. In this paper, we look at currentand future emergency communications capabilities available to NASA's deep-space missions and discuss their limitations in the context of emergency mode operations requirements.These discussions include the use of the DSN 70-m diameter antennas, the use of the 34-m diameter antennas either alone or arrayed both for the uplink (Earth-to-spacecraft) and the downlink (spacecraft-to-Earth), upgrades to the ground transmitters, and spacecraft power requirements both with unitygain (0 dB) LGAs and with antennas with directivity (>0 dB gain, either LGA or MGA, depending on the gain). Also discussed are the requirements for forward-error-correctingcodes for both the uplink and the downlink. In additional, we introduce a methodology for proper selection of a directionalLGA/MGA for emergency communications.

  20. DSS-13 - Using an OSI process control standard for monitor and control. [Deep Space Network experimental station applying Open System interconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuser, W. R.; Chen, Richard L.; Stockett, Michael H.

    1993-01-01

    The flexibility and robustness of a monitor and control (M&C) system are a direct result of the underlying inter-processor communications architecture. A new architecture for M&C at the Deep Space Communications Complexes has been developed based on the manufacturing message specification (MMS) process control standard of the open system interconnection (OSI) suite of protocols. This architecture has been tested both in a laboratory environment and under operational conditions at the Deep Space Network experimental station (DSS-13). The DSS-13 experience in the application of OSI standards to support M&C has been extremely successful. MMS meets the functional needs of the station and provides a level of flexibility and responsiveness previously unknown in that environment. The architecture is robust enough to meet current operational needs and flexible enough to provide a migration path for new subsystems. This paper describes the architecture of the DSS-13 M&C system, discuss how MMS was used and the requirements this imposed on other parts of the system, and provides results from systems and operational testing at DSS-13.

  1. VOIP over Space Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okino, C.; Kwong, W.; Pang, Jackson; Gao, Jerry; Clare, L.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Voice over Internet Protocol (VOIP) over a space networking environment. The topics include: 1) Drivers for VOIP in Space; 2) Challenges in the Space Networking Environment: Long Latencies, Path errors, Simplex paths, Asymmetric paths, QoS requirements, Team-based operations, and Overhead concerns; 3) Possible VOIPOSN approaches; 4) Study of BER, code type and voice frame length on PESQ-MOS; 5) Codec Latency Trade Space; and 6) Testbed.

  2. Ka-band (32 GHz) allocations for deep space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, N. F.

    1987-01-01

    At the 1979 World Administrative Conference, two new bands were allocated for deep space telecommunications: 31.8 to 32.3 GHz, space-to-Earth, and 34.2 to 34.7 GHz, Earth-to-space. These bands provide opportunity for further development of the Deep Space Network and its support of deep space research. The history of the process by which JPL/NASA developed the rationale, technical background, and statement of requirement for the bands are discussed. Based on this work, United States proposals to the conference included the bands, and subsequent U.S. and NASA participation in the conference led to successful allocations for deep space telecommunications in the 30 GHz region of the spectrum. A detailed description of the allocations is included.

  3. Recycling used lubricating oil at the deep space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison is made of the lubricating oil recycling methods used in the Deep Space Station 43 test and the basic requirements which could favor recycling of oil for continuous reuse. The basic conditions for successful recycling are compared to the conditions that exist in the Deep Space Network (DSN). This comparison shows that to recycle used oil in the DSN would not only be expensive but also nonproductive.

  4. Deep networks for motor control functions.

    PubMed

    Berniker, Max; Kording, Konrad P

    2015-01-01

    The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body's state (forward and inverse models), and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories with a function; a representation across space and time. Since the output of this function includes time, it necessarily requires more parameters than a typical dynamical model. To avoid the problems of local minima these extra parameters introduce, we exploit recent advances in machine learning to build our function using a stacked autoencoder, or deep network. With initial and target states as inputs, this deep network can be trained to output an accurate temporal profile of the optimal command and state trajectory for a point-to-point reach of a non-linear limb model, even when influenced by varying force fields. In a manner that mirrors motor babble, the network can also teach itself to learn through trial and error. Lastly, we demonstrate how this network can learn to optimize a cost objective. This functional approach to motor control is a sharp departure from the standard dynamical approach, and may offer new insights into the neural implementation of motor control. PMID:25852530

  5. Deep networks for motor control functions

    PubMed Central

    Berniker, Max; Kording, Konrad P.

    2015-01-01

    The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body's state (forward and inverse models), and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories with a function; a representation across space and time. Since the output of this function includes time, it necessarily requires more parameters than a typical dynamical model. To avoid the problems of local minima these extra parameters introduce, we exploit recent advances in machine learning to build our function using a stacked autoencoder, or deep network. With initial and target states as inputs, this deep network can be trained to output an accurate temporal profile of the optimal command and state trajectory for a point-to-point reach of a non-linear limb model, even when influenced by varying force fields. In a manner that mirrors motor babble, the network can also teach itself to learn through trial and error. Lastly, we demonstrate how this network can learn to optimize a cost objective. This functional approach to motor control is a sharp departure from the standard dynamical approach, and may offer new insights into the neural implementation of motor control. PMID:25852530

  6. Simulator of Space Communication Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clare, Loren; Jennings, Esther; Gao, Jay; Segui, John; Kwong, Winston

    2005-01-01

    Multimission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE) is a suite of software tools that simulates the behaviors of communication networks to be used in space exploration, and predict the performance of established and emerging space communication protocols and services. MACHETE consists of four general software systems: (1) a system for kinematic modeling of planetary and spacecraft motions; (2) a system for characterizing the engineering impact on the bandwidth and reliability of deep-space and in-situ communication links; (3) a system for generating traffic loads and modeling of protocol behaviors and state machines; and (4) a system of user-interface for performance metric visualizations. The kinematic-modeling system makes it possible to characterize space link connectivity effects, including occultations and signal losses arising from dynamic slant-range changes and antenna radiation patterns. The link-engineering system also accounts for antenna radiation patterns and other phenomena, including modulations, data rates, coding, noise, and multipath fading. The protocol system utilizes information from the kinematic-modeling and link-engineering systems to simulate operational scenarios of space missions and evaluate overall network performance. In addition, a Communications Effect Server (CES) interface for MACHETE has been developed to facilitate hybrid simulation of space communication networks with actual flight/ground software/hardware embedded in the overall system.

  7. The JPL roadmap for Deep Space navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Abraham, Douglas S.; Berry, David; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Cesarone, Robert J.; Wood, Lincoln

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the tentative set of deep space missions that will be supported by NASA's Deep Space Mission System in the next twenty-five years, and extracts the driving set of navigation capabilities that these missions will require. There will be many challenges including the support of new mission navigation approaches such as formation flying and rendezvous in deep space, low-energy and low-thrust orbit transfers, precise landing and ascent vehicles, and autonomous navigation. Innovative strategies and approaches will be needed to develop and field advanced navigation capabilities.

  8. Deep Space Network Support for the Galileo Mission to Jupiter: Jupiter Orbital Operations From Post-Jupiter Orbit Insertion Through the End of the Prime Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, P. E.; Yetter, B. G.; Torres, R. G.; Mudgway, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) support for the Galileo mission to Jupiter began at launch in October 1989 and continued through the end of the prime mission in December 1997. The tracking and data acquisition support that was provided by the DSN up to the time that the spacecraft arrived at Jupiter (December 1995) is described in earlier issues of this publication [1,2,3]. This article, the final one of the series, covers the period from January 1996 through December 1997 and describes DSN support for the Galileo orbital operations at Jupiter, which included 10 satellite encounters over a period of 17 months. For a substantial portion of this period, the DSN was operated in the fully arrayed configuration for Galileo passes. This involved real-time combining of spacecraft signals from the DSN 70-m and 34-m antennas at Canberra with those from the 70-m antenna at Goldstone. The combined signals were enhanced further by the addition of the signal from the Australian 64-m radio astronomy antenna at Parkes, located 260-km northwest of Canberra. This article describes the implementation and remarkable performance of this very complex arrangement under real-time operational conditions.

  9. Life Support for Deep Space and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.; Hodgson, Edward W.; Kliss, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    How should life support for deep space be developed? The International Space Station (ISS) life support system is the operational result of many decades of research and development. Long duration deep space missions such as Mars have been expected to use matured and upgraded versions of ISS life support. Deep space life support must use the knowledge base incorporated in ISS but it must also meet much more difficult requirements. The primary new requirement is that life support in deep space must be considerably more reliable than on ISS or anywhere in the Earth-Moon system, where emergency resupply and a quick return are possible. Due to the great distance from Earth and the long duration of deep space missions, if life support systems fail, the traditional approaches for emergency supply of oxygen and water, emergency supply of parts, and crew return to Earth or escape to a safe haven are likely infeasible. The Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) maintenance approach used by ISS is unsuitable for deep space with ORU's as large and complex as those originally provided in ISS designs because it minimizes opportunities for commonality of spares, requires replacement of many functional parts with each failure, and results in substantial launch mass and volume penalties. It has become impractical even for ISS after the shuttle era, resulting in the need for ad hoc repair activity at lower assembly levels with consequent crew time penalties and extended repair timelines. Less complex, more robust technical approaches may be needed to meet the difficult deep space requirements for reliability, maintainability, and reparability. Developing an entirely new life support system would neglect what has been achieved. The suggested approach is use the ISS life support technologies as a platform to build on and to continue to improve ISS subsystems while also developing new subsystems where needed to meet deep space requirements.

  10. Spaceport operations for deep space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Alan C.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station Freedom is designed with the capability to cost-effectively evolve into a transportation node which can support manned lunar and Mars missions. To extend a permanent human presence to the outer planets (moon outposts) and to nearby star systems, additional orbiting space infrastructure and great advances in propulsion system and other technologies will be required. To identify primary operations and management requirements for these deep space missions, an interstellar design concept was developed and analyzed. The assembly, test, servicing, logistics resupply, and increment management techniques anticipated for lunar and Mars missions appear to provide a pattern which can be extended in an analogous manner to deep space missions. A long range, space infrastructure development plan (encompassing deep space missions) coupled with energetic, breakthrough level propulsion research should be initiated now to assist in making the best budget and schedule decisions.

  11. Deep Space Atomic Clock Ticks Toward Success

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Todd Ely, principal investigator for NASA's Deep Space Atomic Clock at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., spotlights the paradigm-busting innovations now in development to revol...

  12. Habitat Demonstration Unit - Deep Space Habitat Configuration

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animated video shows the process of transporting, assembling and testing the Habitat Demonstration Unit - Deep Space Habitat (HDU DSH) configuration, which will be deployed during the 2011 Des...

  13. Antenna arraying performance for deep space telecommunications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelzried, C. T.; Berman, A. L.; Noreen, G. K.

    1983-01-01

    Antenna arraying is a crucial Deep Space Network technique in maximizing the science return of planetary and comet encounters. The equations which describe the total figure of merit for a multiple system of arrayed antennas are developed. An example is given for three Canberra DSN antennas and the Parkes 64-m antenna to be arrayed for the Voyager 2 Uranus flyby.

  14. Antenna arraying performance for deep space telecommunications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzried, C. T.; Berman, A. L.; Noreen, G. K.

    1983-02-01

    Antenna arraying is a crucial Deep Space Network technique in maximizing the science return of planetary and comet encounters. The equations which describe the total figure of merit for a multiple system of arrayed antennas are developed. An example is given for three Canberra DSN antennas and the Parkes 64-m antenna to be arrayed for the Voyager 2 Uranus flyby.

  15. A Study of Near to Far Fields of JPL Deep Space Network (DSN) Antennas for RFI Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of calculating the gain and power distribution of DSN antennas in the Fresnel (middle zone) and Fraunhofer (far zone) as a function of the distance from the DSN antenna and the off-boresight angle. Calculating the near and mid fields of DSN antennas are of interest in the receive mode where the transmitting signals from nearby flying objects such as helicopters and airplanes transmitting in the DSN frequency range, interfere with the operation of sensitive RF receiving system of the DSN antennas, and in the transmit mode where fields from high-powered DSN antennas interfere with receivers on nearby flying objects such as helicopters or other systems. Computing the exact fields of a large DSN antenna is, in general, a very complicated and arduous task. Even far-field calculations, which are less complicated compared to near and mid zone fields, take considerable computer time. These calculations become even more involved and time-consuming in very near field and back field regions. We provide two approaches for addressing the radio frequency interference (RFI) issue. In this paper, actual fields in mid and far zones are calculated using a relatively simple formulation that is accurate enough for the purposes of RFI analysis. In a future paper, we study and develop simple reference models that provide upper limit bounds or envelopes of the far field patterns as a function of the antenna diameter and frequency, which can be used for obtaining the field at any given point in space.

  16. Usuda Deep Space Center support for ICE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The planning, implementation and operations that took place to enable the Usuda, Japan, Deep Space Center to support the International Cometary Explorer (ICE) mission are summarized. The results show that even on very short notification our two countries can provide mutual support to help ensure mission success. The data recovery at the Usuda Deep Space Center contributed significantly to providing the required continuity of the experimental data stream at the encounter of the Comet Giacobini-Zinner.

  17. Low Gravity Issues of Deep Space Refueling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the technologies required to develop deep space refueling of cryogenic propellants and low cost flight experiments to develop them. Key technologies include long term storage, pressure control, mass gauging, liquid acquisition, and fluid transfer. Prior flight experiments used to mature technologies are discussed. A plan is presented to systematically study the deep space refueling problem and devise low-cost experiments to further mature technologies and prepare for full scale flight demonstrations.

  18. Space Network Devices Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center through a contract with Spectrum Astro, Inc., has been developing space network hardware as an enabling technology using open systems interconnect (OSI) standards for space-based communications applications. The OSI standard is a well-recognized layered reference model that specifies how data should be sent node to node in a communications network. Because of this research and technology development, a space-qualifiable Ethernet-based network interface card (similar to the type found in a networked personal computer) and the associated four-port hub were designed and developed to flight specifications. During this research and development, there also have been many lessons learned for determining approaches for migrating existing spacecraft architectures to an OSI-network-based platform. Industry has recognized the benefits of targeting hardware developed around OSI standards such as Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) or similar protocols for use in future generations of space communication systems. Some of these tangible benefits include overall reductions in mission schedule and cost and in system complexity. This development also brings us a step closer to the realization of a principal investigator on a terrestrial Internet site being able to interact with space platform assets in near real time. To develop this hardware, Spectrum Astro first conducted a technology analysis of alternatives study. For this analysis, they looked at the features of three protocol specifications: Ethernet (IEEE 802.3), Firewire (IEEE 1394), and Spacewire (IEEE 1355). A thorough analysis was performed on the basis of criteria such as current protocol performance and suitability for future space applications. Spectrum Astro also projected future influences such as cost, hardware and software availability, throughput performance, and integration procedures for current and transitive space architectures. After a thorough analysis

  19. Space Station-based deep-space optical communication experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Schwartz, Jon A.

    1988-01-01

    A series of three experiments proposed for advanced optical deep-space communications is described. These proposed experiments would be carried out aboard the Space Station to test and evaluate the capability of optical instruments to conduct data communication and spacecraft navigation for deep-space missions. Techniques for effective data communication, precision spacecraft ranging, and accurate angular measurements will be developed and evaluated in a spaceborne environment.

  20. Deep learning in neural networks: an overview.

    PubMed

    Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, deep artificial neural networks (including recurrent ones) have won numerous contests in pattern recognition and machine learning. This historical survey compactly summarizes relevant work, much of it from the previous millennium. Shallow and Deep Learners are distinguished by the depth of their credit assignment paths, which are chains of possibly learnable, causal links between actions and effects. I review deep supervised learning (also recapitulating the history of backpropagation), unsupervised learning, reinforcement learning & evolutionary computation, and indirect search for short programs encoding deep and large networks. PMID:25462637

  1. Deep Space 1 is prepared for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility check equipment on Deep Space 1 to prepare it for launch aboard a Boeing Delta 7326 rocket in October. The first flight in NASA's New Millennium Program, Deep Space 1 is designed to validate 12 new technologies for scientific space missions of the next century. Onboard experiments include an ion propulsion engine and software that tracks celestial bodies so the spacecraft can make its own navigation decisions without the intervention of ground controllers. Most of its mission objectives will be completed within the first two months. A near-Earth asteroid, 1992 KD, has also been selected for a possible flyby.

  2. Deep Space 1 is prepared for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility check out Deep Space 1 to prepare it for launch aboard a Boeing Delta 7326 rocket in October. The first flight in NASA's New Millennium Program, Deep Space 1 is designed to validate 12 new technologies for scientific space missions of the next century. Onboard experiments include an ion propulsion engine and software that tracks celestial bodies so the spacecraft can make its own navigation decisions without the intervention of ground controllers. Most of its mission objectives will be completed within the first two months. A near-Earth asteroid, 1992 KD, has also been selected for a possible flyby.

  3. Deep Space 1 is prepared for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility test equipment on Deep Space 1 to prepare it for launch aboard a Boeing Delta 7326 rocket in October. The first flight in NASA's New Millennium Program, Deep Space 1 is designed to validate 12 new technologies for scientific space missions of the next century. Onboard experiments include an ion propulsion engine and software that tracks celestial bodies so the spacecraft can make its own navigation decisions without the intervention of ground controllers. Most of its mission objectives will be completed within the first two months. A near-Earth asteroid, 1992 KD, has also been selected for a possible flyby.

  4. Deep Space 1 is prepared for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility remove a solar panel from Deep Space 1 as part of the preparations for launch aboard a Boeing Delta 7326 rocket in October. The first flight in NASA's New Millennium Program, Deep Space 1 is designed to validate 12 new technologies for scientific space missions of the next century. Onboard experiments include an ion propulsion engine and software that tracks celestial bodies so the spacecraft can make its own navigation decisions without the intervention of ground controllers. Most of its mission objectives will be completed within the first two months. A near- Earth asteroid, 1992 KD, has also been selected for a possible flyby.

  5. Deep Space 1 is prepared for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility prepare Deep Space 1 for launch aboard a Boeing Delta 7326 rocket in October. The first flight in NASA's New Millennium Program, Deep Space 1 is designed to validate 12 new technologies for scientific space missions of the next century. Onboard experiments include an ion propulsion engine and software that tracks celestial bodies so the spacecraft can make its own navigation decisions without the intervention of ground controllers. Most of its mission objectives will be completed within the first two months. A near- Earth asteroid, 1992 KD, has also been selected for a possible flyby.

  6. Strategic Technologies for Deep Space Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Deep space transportation capability for science and exploration is fundamentally limited by available propulsion technologies. Traditional chemical systems are performance plateaued and require enormous Initial Mass in Low Earth Orbit (IMLEO) whereas solar electric propulsion systems are power limited and unable to execute rapid transits. Nuclear based propulsion and alternative energetic methods, on the other hand, represent potential avenues, perhaps the only viable avenues, to high specific power space transport evincing reduced trip time, reduced IMLEO, and expanded deep space reach. Here, key deep space transport mission capability objectives are reviewed in relation to STMD technology portfolio needs, and the advanced propulsion technology solution landscape is examined including open questions, technical challenges, and developmental prospects. Options for potential future investment across the full compliment of STMD programs are presented based on an informed awareness of complimentary activities in industry, academia, OGAs, and NASA mission directorates.

  7. Analysis of Near-field of Circular Aperture Antennas with Application to Study of High Intensity Radio Frequency (HIRF) Hazards to Aviation from JPL/NASA Deep Space Network Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Statman, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This work includes a simplified analysis of the radiated near to mid-field from JPL/NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) reflector antennas and uses an averaging technique over the main beam region and beyond for complying with FAA regulations in specific aviation environments. The work identifies areas that require special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN transmitters. The paper derives the maximum averaged power densities allowed and identifies zones where mitigation measures are required.

  8. Management of space networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, R. W.; Williams, B. F.

    1993-01-01

    NASA has proposed missions to the Moon and Mars that reflect three areas of emphasis: human presence, exploration, and space resource development for the benefit of Earth. A major requirement for such missions is a robust and reliable communications architecture. Network management--the ability to maintain some degree of human and automatic control over the span of the network from the space elements to the end users on Earth--is required to realize such robust and reliable communications. This article addresses several of the architectural issues associated with space network management. Round-trip delays, such as the 5- to 40-min delays in the Mars case, introduce a host of problems that must be solved by delegating significant control authority to remote nodes. Therefore, management hierarchy is one of the important architectural issues. The following article addresses these concerns, and proposes a network management approach based on emerging standards that covers the needs for fault, configuration, and performance management, delegated control authority, and hierarchical reporting of events. A relatively simple approach based on standards was demonstrated in the DSN 2000 Information Systems Laboratory, and the results are described.

  9. Deep Space Chronicle: A Chronology of Deep Space and Planetary Probes 1958-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siddiqi, Asif A.; Launius, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This monograph contains brief descriptions of all robotic deep space missions attempted since the opening of the space age in 1957. The missions are listed strictly chronologically in order of launch date (not by planetary encounter).

  10. Deep Space 1's ion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center, Florida. - Deep Space 1 is lifted from its work platform, giving a closeup view of the experimental solar-powered ion propulsion engine. The ion propulsion engine is the first non-chemical propulsion to be used as the primary means of propelling a spacecraft. The first flight in NASA's New Millennium Program, Deep Space 1 is designed to validate 12 new technologies for scientific space missions of the next century. Another onboard experiment includes software that tracks celestial bodies so the spacecraft can make its own navigation decisions without the intervention of ground controllers. Deep Space 1 will complete most of its mission objectives within the first two months, but may also do a flyby of a near-Earth asteroid, 1992 KD, in July 1999. Deep Space 1 will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7326 rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, in October. Delta II rockets are medium capacity expendable launch vehicles derived from the Delta family of rockets built and launched since 1960. Since then there have been more than 245 Delta launches.