Science.gov

Sample records for deep transcranial magnetic

  1. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Deep Brain Stimulation in the treatment of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Ferrara, L.; Fernandez, F.; Salas, R.; de Erausquin, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a major social, economic, and public health problem. Alcoholism can lead to damage of the gastrointestinal, nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems and it can be lethal, costing hundreds of billions to the health care system. Despite the existence of cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychosocial interventions, and spiritually integrated treatment to treat it, alcohol dependence has a high relapse rate and poor prognosis, albeit with high interindividual variability. In this review, we discuss the use of two neuromodulation techniques, namely repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and deep brain stimulation (DBS), and their advantages and disadvantages compared to first-line pharmacological treatment for alcohol dependence. We also discuss rTMS and DBS targets for alcohol dependence treatment, considering experimental animal and human evidence, with careful consideration of methodological issues preventing the identification of feasible targets for neuromodulation treatments, as well as inter-individual variability factors influencing alcoholism prognosis. Lastly, we anticipate future research aiming to tailor the treatment to each individual patient by combining neurofunctional, neuroanatomical and neurodisruptive techniques optimizing the outcome. PMID:25598743

  2. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Russell J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  3. Efficacy of Add-On Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Comorbid Alcohol Dependence and Dysthymic Disorder: Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Serata, Daniele; Casale, Antonio Del; Bersani, Francesco S.; Solfanelli, Andrea; Scatena, Paola; Raccah, Ruggero N.; Brugnoli, Roberto; Digiacomantonio, Vittorio; Carbonetti, Paolo; Fensore, Claudio; Tatarelli, Roberto; Angeletti, Gloria; Ferracuti, Stefano; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Craving for alcohol is associated with abnormal activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) has shown promise in the treatment of depression. There are few treatment options for treatment-resistant dysthymic disorder comorbid with alcohol use disorder. Objective: To investigate the possible anticraving efficacy of bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex high-frequency dTMS in 3 patients with comorbid long-term DSM-IV-TR dysthymic disorder and alcohol use disorder. Method: Three patients with alcohol use disorder with dysthymic disorder in their detoxification phase (abstaining for > 1 month) underwent twenty 20-minute sessions of 20 Hz dTMS over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex over 28 days between 2011 and 2012. Alcohol craving was rated with the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale and depressive symptoms with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Results: All 3 patients responded unsatisfactorily to initial intravenous antidepressant and antianxiety combinations but responded after 10 dTMS sessions, improving on both anxiety-depressive symptoms and craving. This improvement enabled us to reduce antidepressant dosages after dTMS cycle completion. Discussion: High-frequency bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex dTMS with left prevalence was found to produce significant anticraving effects in alcohol use disorder comorbid with dysthymic disorder. The potential of dTMS for reducing craving in patients with substance use disorder deserves to be further investigated. PMID:23724355

  4. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  7. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dougall, Nadine; Maayan, Nicola; Soares-Weiser, Karla; McDermott, Lisa M; McIntosh, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    People with schizophrenia typically experience auditory hallucinations or delusions during acute episodes. Although effective drug treatments are available, many have intractable symptoms that do not recover between acute episodes. One proposed alternative to drug treatments is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). To date, many research trials to assess effectiveness of TMS for people with symptoms of schizophrenia have been conducted worldwide. However, there is a lack of consensus on whether TMS should be recommended to be adopted in routine clinical practice. We conducted a systematic review of the literature for all relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TMS with sham or standard treatment. Forty-one trials (1473 participants) survived eligibility criteria and had extractable data. We found significant differences in favor of temporoparietal TMS compared with sham TMS for global state (7 RCTs, n = 224, MD: -0.5, 95% CI: -0.76 to -0.23) and for positive symptoms measured on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (5 RCTs, n = 127, MD: -6.09, 95% CI: -10.95 to -1.22). However, we also found that the quality of trial reporting was frequently suboptimal and the risks of bias were strong or unascertainable for many trial aspects; this led to many results being graded as very low-quality evidence. On that basis, we were unable to definitively support or refute the routine use of TMS in clinical practice. Future definitive trials of TMS with rigorous processes and high-quality reporting are needed. PMID:26392626

  8. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation used in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Bouché, Christophe; Marigaux, Sandrine; Pattedoie, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is a non-invasive treatment technique, using electromagnetism properties. It has been used for around twenty years in neurology (treatment of neuropathic pain, certain abnormal movements, Parkinson's disease), and in psychiatry (obsessive compulsive disorder, hallucinations, mood disorders, etc.). The presence and support of a nurse during the sessions is essential. PMID:26548388

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Meeus, O M; De Ridder, D; Van de Heyning, P H

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), a new and highly promising technique in tinnitus modulation. We conducted a Pubmed and Web of Science search using the words 'Tinnitus', 'TMS' and 'Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation'. We report on the most relevant studies relating to the effects and stimulation parameters of TMS in tinnitus patients. It has already proved possible to reduce tinnitus using TMS and rTMS in selected patient populations with specific stimulation parameters. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors were shown to determine the amount of tinnitus reduction. Though many studies point out that tinnitus reduction can be obtained using TMS, a lot of questions still remain concerning stimulation parameters and optimal patient selection. PMID:19670596

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation studies of visuospatial attentional control

    E-print Network

    Kastner, Sabine

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation studies of visuospatial attentional control Sara M Szczepanski. Introduction and context Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique that involves is generated, inducing current flow in the brain region directly underneath the coil. The magnetic pulse

  11. Computational electromagnetic methods for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Luis J.

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive technique used both as a research tool for cognitive neuroscience and as a FDA approved treatment for depression. During TMS, coils positioned near the scalp generate electric fields and activate targeted brain regions. In this thesis, several computational electromagnetics methods that improve the analysis, design, and uncertainty quantification of TMS systems were developed. Analysis: A new fast direct technique for solving the large and sparse linear system of equations (LSEs) arising from the finite difference (FD) discretization of Maxwell's quasi-static equations was developed. Following a factorization step, the solver permits computation of TMS fields inside realistic brain models in seconds, allowing for patient-specific real-time usage during TMS. The solver is an alternative to iterative methods for solving FD LSEs, often requiring run-times of minutes. A new integral equation (IE) method for analyzing TMS fields was developed. The human head is highly-heterogeneous and characterized by high-relative permittivities (107). IE techniques for analyzing electromagnetic interactions with such media suffer from high-contrast and low-frequency breakdowns. The novel high-permittivity and low-frequency stable internally combined volume-surface IE method developed. The method not only applies to the analysis of high-permittivity objects, but it is also the first IE tool that is stable when analyzing highly-inhomogeneous negative permittivity plasmas. Design: TMS applications call for electric fields to be sharply focused on regions that lie deep inside the brain. Unfortunately, fields generated by present-day Figure-8 coils stimulate relatively large regions near the brain surface. An optimization method for designing single feed TMS coil-arrays capable of producing more localized and deeper stimulation was developed. Results show that the coil-arrays stimulate 2.4 cm into the head while stimulating 3.0 times less volume than Figure-8 coils. Uncertainty quantification (UQ): The location/volume/depth of the stimulated region during TMS is often strongly affected by variability in the position and orientation of TMS coils, as well as anatomical differences between patients. A surrogate model-assisted UQ framework was developed and used to statistically characterize TMS depression therapy. The framework identifies key parameters that strongly affect TMS fields, and partially explains variations in TMS treatment responses.

  12. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Aphasia Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I; Ho, Michael; Treglia, Ethan; Kaplan, Elina; Bhashir, Shahid; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been reported to improve naming in chronic stroke patients with nonfluent aphasia since 2005. In Part 1, we review the rationale for applying slow, 1 Hz, rTMS to the undamaged right hemisphere in chronic nonfluent aphasia patients following a left hemisphere stroke; and present a TMS protocol used with these patients that is associated with long-term, improved naming post- TMS. In Part, 2 we present results from a case study with chronic nonfluent aphasia where TMS treatments were followed immediately by speech therapy (constraint-induced language therapy). In Part 3, some possible mechanisms associated with improvement following a series of TMS treatments in stroke patients with aphasia are discussed. PMID:22202188

  13. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed magnetic fields of sufficient magnitude to induce neural action potentials in the prefrontal cortex to treat the symptoms of major depressive disorder without inducing seizure in...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed magnetic fields of sufficient magnitude to induce neural action potentials in the prefrontal cortex to treat the symptoms of major depressive disorder without inducing seizure in...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed magnetic fields of sufficient magnitude to induce neural action potentials in the prefrontal cortex to treat the symptoms of major depressive disorder without inducing seizure in...

  16. Numerical dosimetry of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique capable of stimulating neurons by means of electromagnetic induction. TMS can be used to map brain function and shows promise for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Calculation of fields induced in the brain are necessary to accurately identify stimulated neural tissue during TMS. This allows the development of novel TMS coil designs capable of stimulating deeper brain regions and increasing the localization of stimulation that can be achieved. We have performed numerical calculations of magnetic and electric field with high-resolution anatomically realistic human head models to find these stimulated brain regions for a variety of proposed TMS coil designs. The realistic head models contain heterogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, yielding superior results to those obtained from the simplified homogeneous head models that are commonly employed. The attenuation of electric field as a function of depth in the brain and the localization of stimulating field have been methodically investigated. In addition to providing a quantitative comparison of different TMS coil designs the variation of induced field between subjects has been investigated. We also show the differences in induced fields between adult, adolescent and child head models to preemptively identify potential safety issues in the application of pediatric TMS.

  17. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to SMA worsens complex movements in Parkinson's disease

    E-print Network

    Pullman, Seth L.

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to SMA worsens complex movements in Parkinson the therapeutic potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for Parkinson's disease (PD analysis, timed motor performance tests, United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), patient self

  18. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, F. A.; Matuszczak, M.; Teitelbaum, J.; Gillman, L. M.; Kazina, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Our goal was to perform a systematic review on the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of status epilepticus (SE) and refractory status epilepticus (RSE). Methods. MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Healthstar, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, clinicaltrials.gov (inception to August 2015), and gray literature were searched. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using Oxford and GRADE methodology. Results. We identified 11 original articles. Twenty-one patients were described, with 13 adult and 8 pediatric. All studies were retrospective. Seizure reduction/control with rTMS occurred in 15 of the 21 patients (71.4%), with 5 (23.8%) and 10 (47.6%) displaying partial and complete responses, respectively. Seizures recurred after rTMS in 73.3% of the patients who had initially responded. All studies were an Oxford level 4, GRADE D level of evidence. Conclusions. Oxford level 4, GRADE D evidence exists to suggest a potential impact on seizure control with the use of rTMS for FSE and FRSE, though durability of the therapy is short-lived. Routine use of rTMS in this context cannot be recommended at this time. Further prospective study of this intervention is warranted. PMID:26682065

  19. Comparison of Coil Designs for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive treatment for neurological disorders using time varying magnetic field. The electric field generated by the time varying magnetic field is used to depolarize the brain neurons which can lead to measurable effects. TMS provides a surgical free method for the treatment of neurological brain disorders like depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury and Parkinson's disease. Before using TMS on human subjects, it is appropriate that its effects are verified on animals such as mice. The magnetic field intensity and stimulated region of the brain can be controlled by the shape, position and current in the coils. There are few reports on the designs of the coils for mice. In this paper, different types of coils are developed and compared using an anatomically realistic mouse model derived from MRI images. Parameters such as focality, depth of the stimulation, electric field strength on the scalp and in the deep brain regions, are taken into account. These parameters will help researchers to determine the most suitable coil design according to their need. This should result in improvements in treatment of specific disorders. Carver Charitable Trust.

  20. Use of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberman, Lindsay M.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The clinical, social and financial burden of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is staggering. We urgently need valid and reliable biomarkers for diagnosis and effective treatments targeting the often debilitating symptoms. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is beginning to be used by a number of centers worldwide and may represent a novel…

  1. Non invasive brain stimulation : modeling and experimental analysis of transcranial magnetic stimulations and transcranial DC stimulation as a modality for neuropathology treatment

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Timothy A. (Timothy Andrew), 1974-

    2006-01-01

    This thesis will explore the use of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and Transcranial DC Stimulation (tDCS) as modalities for neuropathology treatment by means of both experimental and modeling paradigms. The first ...

  2. Improved transcranial magnetic stimulation coil design with realistic head modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    We are investigating Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a noninvasive technique based on electromagnetic induction which causes stimulation of the neurons in the brain. TMS can be used as a pain-free alternative to conventional electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) which is still widely implemented for treatment of major depression. Development of improved TMS coils capable of stimulating subcortical regions could also allow TMS to replace invasive deep brain stimulation (DBS) which requires surgical implantation of electrodes in the brain. Our new designs allow new applications of the technique to be established for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications of psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Calculation of the fields generated inside the head is vital for the use of this method for treatment. In prior work we have implemented a realistic head model, incorporating inhomogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, allowing the site of neuronal activation to be accurately calculated. We will show how we utilize this model in the development of novel TMS coil designs to improve the depth of penetration and localization of stimulation produced by stimulator coils.

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of major depression

    PubMed Central

    Janicak, Philip G; Dokucu, Mehmet E

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Even when the diagnosis is properly made, standard treatment approaches (eg, psychotherapy, medications, or their combination) are often inadequate to control acute symptoms or maintain initial benefit. Additional obstacles involve safety and tolerability problems, which frequently preclude an adequate course of treatment. This leaves an important gap in our ability to properly manage major depression in a substantial proportion of patients, leaving them vulnerable to ensuing complications (eg, employment-related disability, increased risk of suicide, comorbid medical disorders, and substance abuse). Thus, there is a need for more effective and better tolerated approaches. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a neuromodulation technique increasingly used to partly fill this therapeutic void. In the context of treating depression, we critically review the development of transcranial magnetic stimulation, focusing on the results of controlled and pragmatic trials for depression, which consider its efficacy, safety, and tolerability. PMID:26170668

  4. Quiet transcranial magnetic stimulation: Status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L K; Goetz, Stefan M

    2015-08-01

    A significant limitation of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is that the magnetic pulse delivery is associated with a loud clicking sound as high as 140 dB resulting from electromagnetic forces. The loud noise significantly impedes both basic research and clinical applications of TMS. It effectively makes TMS less focal since every click activates auditory cortex, brainstem, and other connected regions, synchronously with the magnetic pulse. The repetitive clicking sound can induce neuromodulation that can interfere with and confound the intended effects at the TMS target. As well, there are known concerns regarding blinding of TMS studies, hearing loss, induction of tinnitus, as well as tolerability. Addressing this need, we are developing a quiet TMS (qTMS) device that incorporates two key concepts: First, the dominant frequency components of the TMS pulse sound (typically 2-5 kHz) are shifted to higher frequencies that are above the human hearing upper threshold of about 20 kHz. Second, the TMS coil is designed electrically and mechanically to generate suprathreshold electric field pulses while minimizing the sound emitted at audible frequencies (<; 20 kHz). The enhanced acoustic properties of the coil are accomplished with a novel, layered coil design. We summarize a proof-of-concept qTMS prototype demonstrating noise loudness reduction by 19 dB(A) with ultrabrief pulses at conventional amplitudes. Further, we outline next steps to accomplish further sound reduction and suprathreshold pulse amplitudes. PMID:26736241

  5. Efficacy of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in the Treatment of Schizophrenia: A Review of the Literature to Date

    PubMed Central

    Green Bernacki, Carolyn; Helmer, Amanda; Pinninti, Narsimha; O’reardon, John P.

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed the literature on transcranial magnetic stimulation and its uses and efficacy in schizophrenia. Multiple sources were examined on transcranial magnetic stimulation efficacy in relieving positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Literature review was conducted via Ovid Medline and PubMed databases. We found multiple published studies and metaanalyses that give evidence that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can have benefit in relieving positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia, particularly auditory hallucinations. These findings should encourage the psychiatric community to expand research into other applications for which transcranial magnetic stimulation may be used to treat patients with psychiatric disability. PMID:26351619

  6. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  7. Possible Mechanisms Underlying the Therapeutic Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chervyakov, Alexander V.; Chernyavsky, Andrey Yu.; Sinitsyn, Dmitry O.; Piradov, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an effective method used to diagnose and treat many neurological disorders. Although repetitive TMS (rTMS) has been used to treat a variety of serious pathological conditions including stroke, depression, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, pain, and migraines, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term TMS remain unclear. In the present review, the effects of rTMS on neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity are described, including the classic interpretations of TMS effects on synaptic plasticity via long-term potentiation and long-term depression. We also discuss the effects of rTMS on the genetic apparatus of neurons, glial cells, and the prevention of neuronal death. The neurotrophic effects of rTMS on dendritic growth and sprouting and neurotrophic factors are described, including change in brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration under the influence of rTMS. Also, non-classical effects of TMS related to biophysical effects of magnetic fields are described, including the quantum effects, the magnetic spin effects, genetic magnetoreception, the macromolecular effects of TMS, and the electromagnetic theory of consciousness. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of TMS effects according to dynamical systems theory. Evidence suggests that a rTMS-induced magnetic field should be considered a separate physical factor that can be impactful at the subatomic level and that rTMS is capable of significantly altering the reactivity of molecules (radicals). It is thought that these factors underlie the therapeutic benefits of therapy with TMS. Future research on these mechanisms will be instrumental to the development of more powerful and reliable TMS treatment protocols. PMID:26136672

  8. Effect of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Neuronal Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unsal, Ahmet; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    The human brain contains around 100 billion nerve cells controlling our day to day activities. Consequently, brain disorders often result in impairments such as paralysis, loss of coordination and seizure. It has been said that 1 in 5 Americans suffer some diagnosable mental disorder. There is an urgent need to understand the disorders, prevent them and if possible, develop permanent cure for them. As a result, a significant amount of research activities is being directed towards brain research. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a promising tool for diagnosing and treating brain disorders. It is a non-invasive treatment method that produces a current flow in the brain which excites the neurons. Even though TMS has been verified to have advantageous effects on various brain related disorders, there have not been enough studies on the impact of TMS on cells. In this study, we are investigating the electrophysiological effects of TMS on one dimensional neuronal culture grown in a circular pathway. Electrical currents are produced on the neuronal networks depending on the directionality of the applied field. This aids in understanding how neuronal networks react under TMS treatment.

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation facilitates neurorehabilitation after pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongyang; Kobilo, Tali; Robertson, Courtney; Tong, Shanbao; Celnik, Pablo; Pelled, Galit

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability among children in the United States. Affected children will often suffer from emotional, cognitive and neurological impairments throughout life. In the controlled cortical impact (CCI) animal model of pediatric TBI (postnatal day 16-17) it was demonstrated that injury results in abnormal neuronal hypoactivity in the non-injured primary somatosensory cortex (S1). It materializes that reshaping the abnormal post-injury neuronal activity may provide a suitable strategy to augment rehabilitation. We tested whether high-frequency, non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivered twice a week over a four-week period can rescue the neuronal activity and improve the long-term functional neurophysiological and behavioral outcome in the pediatric CCI model. The results show that TBI rats subjected to TMS therapy showed significant increases in the evoked-fMRI cortical responses (189%), evoked synaptic activity (46%), evoked neuronal firing (200%) and increases expression of cellular markers of neuroplasticity in the non-injured S1 compared to TBI rats that did not receive therapy. Notably, these rats showed less hyperactivity in behavioral tests. These results implicate TMS as a promising approach for reversing the adverse neuronal mechanisms activated post-TBI. Importantly, this intervention could readily be translated to human studies. PMID:26440604

  10. Characteristics of bowl-shaped coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keita; Suyama, Momoko; Takiyama, Yoshihiro; Kim, Dongmin; Saitoh, Youichi; Sekino, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has recently been used as a method for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Daily TMS sessions can provide continuous therapeutic effectiveness, and the installation of TMS systems at patients' homes has been proposed. A figure-eight coil, which is normally used for TMS therapy, induces a highly localized electric field; however, it is challenging to achieve accurate coil positioning above the targeted brain area using this coil. In this paper, a bowl-shaped coil for stimulating a localized but wider area of the brain is proposed. The coil's electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed using finite element methods, and the analysis showed that the bowl-shaped coil induced electric fields in a wider area of the brain model than a figure-eight coil. The expanded distribution of the electric field led to greater robustness of the coil to the coil-positioning error. To improve the efficiency of the coil, the relationship between individual coil design parameters and the resulting coil characteristics was numerically analyzed. It was concluded that lengthening the outer spherical radius and narrowing the width of the coil were effective methods for obtaining a more effective and more uniform distribution of the electric field.

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the treatment of substance addiction

    PubMed Central

    Gorelick, David A.; Zangen, Abraham; George, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive method of brain stimulation used to treat a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, but is still in the early stages of study as addiction treatment. We identified 19 human studies using repetitive TMS (rTMS) to manipulate drug craving or use, which exposed a total of 316 adults to active rTMS. Nine studies involved tobacco, six alcohol, three cocaine, and one methamphetamine. The majority of studies targeted high-frequency (5–20 Hz; expected to stimulate neuronal activity) rTMS pulses to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Only five studies were controlled clinical trials: two of four nicotine trials found decreased cigarette smoking; the cocaine trial found decreased cocaine use. Many aspects of optimal treatment remain unknown, including rTMS parameters, duration of treatment, relationship to cue-induced craving, and concomitant treatment. The mechanisms of rTMS potential therapeutic action in treating addictions are poorly understood, but may involve increased dopamine and glutamate function in corticomesolimbic brain circuits and modulation of neural activity in brain circuits that mediate cognitive processes relevant to addiction, such as response inhibition, selective attention, and reactivity to drug-associated cues. rTMS treatment of addiction must be considered experimental at this time, but appears to have a promising future. PMID:25069523

  12. Modulating functional and dysfunctional mentalizing by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schuwerk, Tobias; Langguth, Berthold; Sommer, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Mentalizing, the ability to attribute mental states to others and oneself, is a cognitive function with high relevance for social interactions. Recent neuroscientific research has increasingly contributed to attempts to decompose this complex social cognitive function into constituting neurocognitive building blocks. Additionally, clinical research that focuses on social cognition to find links between impaired social functioning and neurophysiological deviations has accumulated evidence that mentalizing is affected in most psychiatric disorders. Recently, both lines of research have started to employ transcranial magnetic stimulation: the first to modulate mentalizing in order to specify its neurocognitive components, the latter to treat impaired mentalizing in clinical conditions. This review integrates findings of these two different approaches to draw a more detailed picture of the neurocognitive basis of mentalizing and its deviations in psychiatric disorders. Moreover, we evaluate the effectiveness of hitherto employed stimulation techniques and protocols, paradigms and outcome measures. Based on this overview we highlight new directions for future research on the neurocognitive basis of functional and dysfunctional social cognition. PMID:25477838

  13. Transcranial magnetic stimulation facilitates neurorehabilitation after pediatric traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hongyang; Kobilo, Tali; Robertson, Courtney; Tong, Shanbao; Celnik, Pablo; Pelled, Galit

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability among children in the United States. Affected children will often suffer from emotional, cognitive and neurological impairments throughout life. In the controlled cortical impact (CCI) animal model of pediatric TBI (postnatal day 16–17) it was demonstrated that injury results in abnormal neuronal hypoactivity in the non-injured primary somatosensory cortex (S1). It materializes that reshaping the abnormal post-injury neuronal activity may provide a suitable strategy to augment rehabilitation. We tested whether high-frequency, non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivered twice a week over a four-week period can rescue the neuronal activity and improve the long-term functional neurophysiological and behavioral outcome in the pediatric CCI model. The results show that TBI rats subjected to TMS therapy showed significant increases in the evoked-fMRI cortical responses (189%), evoked synaptic activity (46%), evoked neuronal firing (200%) and increases expression of cellular markers of neuroplasticity in the non-injured S1 compared to TBI rats that did not receive therapy. Notably, these rats showed less hyperactivity in behavioral tests. These results implicate TMS as a promising approach for reversing the adverse neuronal mechanisms activated post-TBI. Importantly, this intervention could readily be translated to human studies. PMID:26440604

  14. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator with Controllable Pulse Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10–310 ?s and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1–56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation by up to 82% and 57%, and decreases coil heating by up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3,000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications, and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency. PMID:21540487

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for geriatric depression: Promises and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Sabesan, Priyadharshini; Lankappa, Sudheer; Khalifa, Najat; Krishnan, Vasudevan; Gandhi, Rahul; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2015-01-01

    As the global population gets older, depression in the elderly is emerging as an important health issue. A major challenge in treating geriatric depression is the lack of robust efficacy for many treatments that are of significant benefit to depressed working age adults. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel physical treatment approach used mostly in working age adults with depression. Many TMS trials and clinics continue to exclude the elderly from treatment citing lack of evidence in this age group. In this review, we appraise the evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of rTMS in the elderly. A consistent observation supporting a high degree of tolerability and safety among the elderly patients emerged across the Randomised Controlled Trials and the uncontrolled trials. Further, there is no reliable evidence negating the utility of rTMS in the elderly with depression. We also identified several factors other than age that moderate the observed variations in the efficacy of rTMS in the elderly. These factors include but not limited to: (1) brain atrophy; (2) intensity and number of pulses (dose-response relationship); and (3) clinical profile of patients. On the basis of the current evidence, the practice of excluding elderly patients from TMS clinics and trials cannot be supported. PMID:26110119

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for geriatric depression: Promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Priyadharshini; Lankappa, Sudheer; Khalifa, Najat; Krishnan, Vasudevan; Gandhi, Rahul; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2015-06-22

    As the global population gets older, depression in the elderly is emerging as an important health issue. A major challenge in treating geriatric depression is the lack of robust efficacy for many treatments that are of significant benefit to depressed working age adults. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel physical treatment approach used mostly in working age adults with depression. Many TMS trials and clinics continue to exclude the elderly from treatment citing lack of evidence in this age group. In this review, we appraise the evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of rTMS in the elderly. A consistent observation supporting a high degree of tolerability and safety among the elderly patients emerged across the Randomised Controlled Trials and the uncontrolled trials. Further, there is no reliable evidence negating the utility of rTMS in the elderly with depression. We also identified several factors other than age that moderate the observed variations in the efficacy of rTMS in the elderly. These factors include but not limited to: (1) brain atrophy; (2) intensity and number of pulses (dose-response relationship); and (3) clinical profile of patients. On the basis of the current evidence, the practice of excluding elderly patients from TMS clinics and trials cannot be supported. PMID:26110119

  17. Noninvasive techniques for probing neurocircuitry and treating illness: vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)

    PubMed Central

    George, Mark S; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Although the preceding chapters discuss much of the new knowledge of neurocircuitry of neuropsychiatric diseases, and an invasive approach to treatment, this chapter describes and reviews the noninvasive methods of testing circuit-based theories and treating neuropsychiatric diseases that do not involve implanting electrodes into the brain or on its surface. These techniques are transcranial magnetic stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial direct current stimulation. Two of these approaches have FDA approval as therapies. PMID:19693003

  18. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation improves consciousness disturbance in stroke patients: A quantitative electroencephalography spectral power analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ying; Zhang, Tong

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is a noninvasive treatment technique that can directly alter cortical excitability and improve cerebral functional activity in unconscious patients. To investigate the effects and the electrophysiological changes of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation cortical treatment, 10 stroke patients with non-severe brainstem lesions and with disturbance of consciousness were treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. A quantitative electroencephalography spectral power analysis was also performed. The absolute power in the alpha band was increased immediately after the first repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment, and the energy was reduced in the delta band. The alpha band relative power values slightly decreased at 1 day post-treatment, then increased and reached a stable level at 2 weeks post-treatment. Glasgow Coma Score and JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised score were improved. Relative power value in the alpha band was positively related to Glasgow Coma Score and JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised score. These data suggest that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is a noninvasive, safe, and effective treatment technology for improving brain functional activity and promoting awakening in unconscious stroke patients. PMID:25337097

  19. Cortical excitability and response variability of transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    van der Kamp, W; Zwinderman, A H; Ferrari, M D; van Dijk, J G

    1996-03-01

    The magnetic evoked potential (MEP) following transcranial magnetic stimulation is subject to several sources of variability. In this study, relationships between stimulus intensity and MEP latency, amplitude, duration, and area of the hypothenar muscles were assessed in 12 right- and 14 left-handed subjects. Effects of handedness, coil orientation, intensity of stimulation, and intersubject variability on these relationships were analyzed. The intraindividual variability was analyzed as the standard deviation (SD) and the coefficient of variation (CV) of four trials. The mean response threshold was significantly lower (p < 0.0001) for preferential stimulation (32%) than for nonpreferential stimulation (45%). With increasing stimulus intensities, MEP amplitudes still increased at 100% intensity in some subjects while in others the stimulus response-relations saturated. MEP amplitudes at an intensity of 20% above threshold ranged between 6 and 100% of MEP amplitude at maximum intensity. Differences between dominant and non-dominant hands were not seen, regardless of handedness. The SD of latency, amplitude, duration, or area depended on stimulus intensity. The CV however, was influenced by the intensity of stimulation: The CV for amplitude decreased from 46% at threshold to 10% at higher intensities. The variability of the MEP amplitude is only related to stimulus intensity when it is expressed in relation to it but not when it is expressed in absolute terms. The stimulus-response relation offers a more extensive measure of cortical excitability than the use of thresholds alone for the measurement of cortical excitability. The question can be raised whether high intensities should be used for clinical testing rather than threshold-related intensities. PMID:8849971

  20. Low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation is beneficial for enhancing synaptic plasticity in the aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhan-chi; Luan, Feng; Xie, Chun-yan; Geng, Dan-dan; Wang, Yan-yong; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In the aging brain, cognitive function gradually declines and causes a progressive reduction in the structural and functional plasticity of the hippocampus. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an emerging and novel neurological and psychiatric tool used to investigate the neurobiology of cognitive function. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation (?1 Hz) ameliorates synaptic plasticity and spatial cognitive deficits in learning-impaired mice. However, the mechanisms by which this treatment improves these deficits during normal aging are still unknown. Therefore, the current study investigated the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal pathway, synaptic protein markers, and spatial memory behavior in the hippocampus of normal aged mice. The study also investigated the downstream regulator, Fyn kinase, and the downstream effectors, synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 (both synaptic markers), to determine the possible mechanisms by which transcranial magnetic stimulation regulates cognitive capacity. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with low intensity (110% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1 Hz) increased mRNA and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B, and Fyn in the hippocampus of aged mice. The treatment also upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 in the hippocampus of these mice. In conclusion, brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling may play an important role in sustaining and regulating structural synaptic plasticity induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation in the hippocampus of aging mice, and Fyn may be critical during this regulation. These responses may change the structural plasticity of the aging hippocampus, thereby improving cognitive function. PMID:26199608

  1. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, N. R.; Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/-20 V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG1) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG2) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  2. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    SciTech Connect

    Bouda, N. R. Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M.

    2015-05-07

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/?20?V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG{sub 1}) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG{sub 2}) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  3. Locating the Human Frontal Eye Fields With Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Zhigang

    The variability in the location and function of the human frontal eye ®elds (FEFs) was assessed using transcranial in the execution of contralateral saccadic eye movements. The location of this functionally de®ned FEF region these shifts of attention and saccadic eye movements to select relevant information has been a topic

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of posterior parietal cortex affects decisions of hand choice

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Lucia

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation of posterior parietal cortex affects decisions of hand choice, Pasadena, CA, and approved August 26, 2010 (received for review May 10, 2010) Deciding which hand to use task, we provide evidence that hand choice entails a com- petitive decision process between

  5. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Primary Motor Cortex Interferes with Motor Learning by Observing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Liana E.; Wilson, Elizabeth T.; Gribble, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    Neural representations of novel motor skills can be acquired through visual observation. We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to test the idea that this "motor learning by observing" is based on engagement of neural processes for learning in the primary motor cortex (M1). Human subjects who observed another person learning…

  6. Functional neuroimaging of the baboon during concurrent image-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation

    E-print Network

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Functional neuroimaging of the baboon during concurrent image-guided transcranial magnetic different TMS variables, therefore we developed a baboon model to facilitate testing of some of the current healthy, adult baboons. Published by Elsevier Inc. Introduction Over the past three decades, researchers

  7. Low and High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Spasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Angela C.; Dionisio, Karen; Pitskel, Naomi Bass; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Orsati, Fernanda; Ferreira, Merari J. L.; Boggio, Paulo S.; Lima, Moises C.; Rigonatti, Sergio P.; Fregni, Felipe

    2007-01-01

    The development of non-invasive techniques of cortical stimulation, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), has opened new potential avenues for the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. We hypothesized that an increase in the activity in the motor cortex by cortical stimulation would increase its inhibitory influence on spinal…

  8. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in a Finger-tapping Task Separates Motor from Timing

    E-print Network

    Moses, Elisha

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in a Finger- tapping Task Separates Motor from Timing Mechanisms and Induces Frequency Doubling Nava Levit-Binnun1 , Nestor Z. Handzy1 , Avi Peled2,3 , Ilan Modai2 the motor processes in charge of execution of the motor commands. We speculate that the TMS is causing

  9. Sensor probes and phantoms for advanced transcranial magnetic stimulation system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Patel, Prashil; Trivedi, Sudhir; Du, Xiaoming; Hong, Elliot; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has become one of the most widely used noninvasive method for brain tissue stimulation and has been used as a treatment tool for various neurological and psychiatric disorders including migraine, stroke, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, tinnitus and depression. In the process of developing advanced TMS deep brain stimulation tools, we need first to develop field measurement devices like sensory probes and brain phantoms, which can be used to calibrate the TMS systems. Currently there are commercially available DC magnetic or electric filed measurement sensors, but there is no instrument to measure transient fields. In our study, we used a commercial figure-8 shaped TMS coil to generate transient magnetic field and followed induced field and current. The coil was driven by power amplified signal from a pulse generator with tunable pulse rate, amplitude, and duration. In order to obtain a 3D plot of induced vector electric field, many types of probes were designed to detect single component of electric-field vectors along x, y and z axis in the space around TMS coil. We found that resistor probes has an optimized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) near 3k ohm but it signal output is too weak compared with other techniques. We also found that inductor probes can have very high output for Curl E measurement, but it is not the E-field distribution we are interested in. Probes with electrical wire wrapped around iron coil can directly measure induced E-field with high sensitivity, which matched computer simulation results.

  10. Direct comparison of corticospinal volleys in human subjects to transcranial magnetic and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, D; Hicks, R; Gandevia, S C; Stephen, J; Woodforth, I; Crawford, M

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of graded transcranial magnetic and anodal electrical stimulation of the human motor cortex were compared in human subjects undergoing orthopaedic operations on the spine, before and after withdrawal of volatile anaesthesia. Corticospinal volleys were recorded from the spinal cord in the low-cervical and low-thoracic regions (six subjects) or the mid-thoracic region (two subjects) using bipolar electrodes inserted into the epidural space. 2. Electrical stimuli were delivered using anode at the vertex and cathode 7 cm laterally. The corticospinal volley at threshold consisted of a single deflection with a mean latency to peak of 4.17 ms at the rostral recording site. With further increases in stimulus strength the latency of this D wave shortened in two steps, first by 0.89 ms (seven subjects) and then by a further 0.8 ms (two subjects), indicating that the site of activation of some corticospinal neurones had shifted to deep subcortical sites. 3. When volatile anaesthetics were given, a corticospinal volley could not be defined in three subjects with magnetic stimuli of 70, 80 and 100% maximal stimulator output with the coil at the vertex (Novametrix Magstim 200, round coil, external diameter 14 cm). In the remaining five subjects, the component of lowest threshold was a D wave recorded at the rostral site at 4.0 ms when stimulus intensity was, on average, 70%. With stimuli of 90-100% a total of five small I waves could be defined in the five subjects (i.e. on average one I wave per subject). 4. After cessation of volatile anaesthetics in seven subjects, the thresholds for D and I waves were lower and their amplitudes were greater. The D wave remained the component of lowest threshold in all subjects, appearing at the low-cervical level with magnetic stimuli of 50%. However, in three subjects I waves also appeared at D wave threshold, and the D wave was smaller than with electrical stimulation at I wave threshold. There was no consistent change in latency of the magnetic D wave as stimulus intensity was increased to 100%. 5. These findings suggest that the previously reported difference in latency of the EMG potentials produced in upper-limb muscles by anodal stimulation and magnetic stimulation of the human motor cortex is not because the corticospinal volley induced by magnetic stimulation lacks a D wave.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8068071

  11. Fundamentals of Transcranial Electric and Magnetic Stimulation Dose: Definition, Selection, and Reporting Practices

    PubMed Central

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Wagner, Timothy A.; Miranda, Pedro C.; Nitsche, Michael A.; Paulus, Walter; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Bikson, Marom

    2011-01-01

    The growing use of transcranial electric and magnetic (EM) brain stimulation in basic research and in clinical applications necessitates a clear understanding of what constitutes the dose of EM stimulation and how it should be reported. The biological effects of EM stimulation are mediated through an electromagnetic field injected (via electric stimulation) or induced (via magnetic stimulation) in the body. Therefore, transcranial EM stimulation dose ought to be defined by all parameters of the stimulation device that affect the electromagnetic field generated in the body, including the stimulation electrode or coil configuration parameters: shape, size, position, and electrical properties, as well as the electrode or coil current (or voltage) waveform parameters: pulse shape, amplitude, width, polarity, and repetition frequency; duration of and interval between bursts or trains of pulses; total number of pulses; and interval between stimulation sessions and total number of sessions. Knowledge of the electromagnetic field generated in the body may not be sufficient but is necessary to understand the biological effects of EM stimulation. We believe that reporting of EM stimulation dose should be guided by the principle of reproducibility: sufficient information about the stimulation parameters should be provided so that the dose can be replicated. This paper provides fundamental definition and principles for reporting of dose that encompass any transcranial EM brain stimulation protocol. PMID:22305345

  12. Non-invasive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) of the Motor Cortex for Neuropathic Pain—At the Tipping Point?

    PubMed Central

    Treister, Roi; Lang, Magdalena; Klein, Max M.; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2013-01-01

    The term “neuropathic pain” (NP) refers to chronic pain caused by illnesses or injuries that damage peripheral or central pain-sensing neural pathways to cause them to fire inappropriately and signal pain without cause. Neuropathic pain is common, complicating diabetes, shingles, HIV, and cancer. Medications are often ineffective or cause various adverse effects, so better approaches are needed. Half a century ago, electrical stimulation of specific brain regions (neuromodulation) was demonstrated to relieve refractory NP without distant effects, but the need for surgical electrode implantation limited use of deep brain stimulation. Next, electrodes applied to the dura outside the brain’s surface to stimulate the motor cortex were shown to relieve NP less invasively. Now, electromagnetic induction permits cortical neurons to be stimulated entirely non-invasively using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Repeated sessions of many TMS pulses (rTMS) can trigger neuronal plasticity to produce long-lasting therapeutic benefit. Repeated TMS already has US and European regulatory approval for treating refractory depression, and multiple small studies report efficacy for neuropathic pain. Recent improvements include “frameless stereotactic” neuronavigation systems, in which patients’ head MRIs allow TMS to be applied to precise underlying cortical targets, minimizing variability between sessions and patients, which may enhance efficacy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation appears poised for the larger trials necessary for regulatory approval of a NP indication. Since few clinicians are familiar with TMS, we review its theoretical basis and historical development, summarize the neuropathic pain trial results, and identify issues to resolve before large-scale clinical trials. PMID:24228166

  13. Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Performing Eye-Hand Integration Tasks: Four Preliminary Studies with Children Showing Low-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panerai, Simonetta; Tasca, Domenica; Lanuzza, Bartolo; Trubia, Grazia; Ferri, Raffaele; Musso, Sabrina; Alagona, Giovanna; Di Guardo, Giuseppe; Barone, Concetta; Gaglione, Maria P.; Elia, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    This report, based on four studies with children with low-functioning autism, aimed at evaluating the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered on the left and right premotor cortices on eye-hand integration tasks; defining the long-lasting effects of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; and…

  14. Electromagnetic Field Modeling of Transcranial Electric and Magnetic Stimulation: Targeting, Individualization, and Safety of Convulsive and Subconvulsive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhi-De

    The proliferation of noninvasive transcranial electric and magnetic brain stimulation techniques and applications in recent years has led to important insights into brain function and pathophysiology of brain-based disorders. Transcranial electric and magnetic stimulation encompasses a wide spectrum of methods that have developed into therapeutic interventions for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Although these methods are at different stages of development, the physical principle underlying these techniques is the similar. Namely, an electromagnetic field is induced in the brain either via current injection through scalp electrodes or via electromagnetic induction. The induced electric field modulates the neuronal transmembrane potentials and, thereby, neuronal excitability or activity. Therefore, knowledge of the induced electric field distribution is key in the design and interpretation of basic research and clinical studies. This work aims to delineate the fundamental physical limitations, tradeoffs, and technological feasibility constraints associated with transcranial electric and magnetic stimulation, in order to inform the development of technologies that deliver safer, and more spatially, temporally, and patient specific stimulation. Part I of this dissertation expounds on the issue of spatial targeting of the electric field. Contrasting electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) configurations that differ markedly in efficacy, side effects, and seizure induction efficiency could advance our understanding of the principles linking treatment parameters and therapeutic outcome and could provide a means of testing hypotheses of the mechanisms of therapeutic action. Using the finite element method, we systematically compare the electric field characteristics of existing forms of ECT and MST. We introduce a method of incorporating a modality-specific neural activation threshold in the electric field models that can inform dosage requirements in convulsive therapies. Our results indicate that the MST electric field is more focal and more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. Further, the conventional ECT current amplitude is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. One of the factors important to clinical outcome is seizure expression. However, it is unknown how the induced electric field is related to seizure onset and propagation. In this work, we explore the effect of the electric field distribution on the quantitative ictal electroencephalography and current source density in ECT and MST. We further demonstrate how the ECT electrode shape, size, spacing, and current can be manipulated to yield more precise control of the induced electric field. If desirable, ECT can be made as focal as MST while using simpler stimulation equipment. Next, we demonstrate how the electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be controlled. We present the most comprehensive comparison of TMS coil electric field penetration and focality to date. The electric field distributions of more than 50 TMS coils were simulated. We show that TMS coils differ markedly in their electric field characteristics, but they all are subject to a consistent depth-focality tradeoff. Specifically, the ability to directly stimulate deeper brain structures is obtained at the expense of inducing wider electric field spread. Figure-8 type coils are fundamentally more focal compared to circular type coils. Understanding the depth-focality tradeoff can help researchers and clinicians to appropriately select coils and interpret TMS studies. This work also enables the development of novel TMS coils with electronically switchable active and sham modes as well as for deep TMS. Design considerations of these coils are extensively discussed. Part II of the dissertation aims to quantify the effect of individual, sex, and age differences in head geometry and conductivity on the induced neural stimulation strength and focality of ECT and MST. Across and within ECT studies, there is

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain: guidelines for pain treatment research

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Max M.; Treister, Roi; Raij, Tommi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Park, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Turo; Lenz, Fred; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Lang, Magdalena; Hallett, Mark; Fox, Michael; Cudkowicz, Merit; Costello, Ann; Carr, Daniel B.; Ayache, Samar S.; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recognizing that electrically stimulating the motor cortex could relieve chronic pain sparked development of noninvasive technologies. In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromagnetic coils held against the scalp influence underlying cortical firing. Multiday repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce long-lasting, potentially therapeutic brain plasticity. Nearby ferromagnetic or electronic implants are contraindications. Adverse effects are minimal, primarily headaches. Single provoked seizures are very rare. Transcranial magnetic stimulation devices are marketed for depression and migraine in the United States and for various indications elsewhere. Although multiple studies report that high-frequency rTMS of the motor cortex reduces neuropathic pain, their quality has been insufficient to support Food and Drug Administration application. Harvard's Radcliffe Institute therefore sponsored a workshop to solicit advice from experts in TMS, pain research, and clinical trials. They recommended that researchers standardize and document all TMS parameters and improve strategies for sham and double blinding. Subjects should have common well-characterized pain conditions amenable to motor cortex rTMS and studies should be adequately powered. They recommended standardized assessment tools (eg, NIH's PROMIS) plus validated condition-specific instruments and consensus-recommended metrics (eg, IMMPACT). Outcomes should include pain intensity and qualities, patient and clinician impression of change, and proportions achieving 30% and 50% pain relief. Secondary outcomes could include function, mood, sleep, and/or quality of life. Minimum required elements include sample sources, sizes, and demographics, recruitment methods, inclusion and exclusion criteria, baseline and posttreatment means and SD, adverse effects, safety concerns, discontinuations, and medication-usage records. Outcomes should be monitored for at least 3 months after initiation with prespecified statistical analyses. Multigroup collaborations or registry studies may be needed for pivotal trials. PMID:25919472

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain: guidelines for pain treatment research.

    PubMed

    Klein, Max M; Treister, Roi; Raij, Tommi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Park, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Turo; Lenz, Fred; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Lang, Magdalena; Hallett, Mark; Fox, Michael; Cudkowicz, Merit; Costello, Ann; Carr, Daniel B; Ayache, Samar S; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2015-09-01

    Recognizing that electrically stimulating the motor cortex could relieve chronic pain sparked development of noninvasive technologies. In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromagnetic coils held against the scalp influence underlying cortical firing. Multiday repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce long-lasting, potentially therapeutic brain plasticity. Nearby ferromagnetic or electronic implants are contraindications. Adverse effects are minimal, primarily headaches. Single provoked seizures are very rare. Transcranial magnetic stimulation devices are marketed for depression and migraine in the United States and for various indications elsewhere. Although multiple studies report that high-frequency rTMS of the motor cortex reduces neuropathic pain, their quality has been insufficient to support Food and Drug Administration application. Harvard's Radcliffe Institute therefore sponsored a workshop to solicit advice from experts in TMS, pain research, and clinical trials. They recommended that researchers standardize and document all TMS parameters and improve strategies for sham and double blinding. Subjects should have common well-characterized pain conditions amenable to motor cortex rTMS and studies should be adequately powered. They recommended standardized assessment tools (eg, NIH's PROMIS) plus validated condition-specific instruments and consensus-recommended metrics (eg, IMMPACT). Outcomes should include pain intensity and qualities, patient and clinician impression of change, and proportions achieving 30% and 50% pain relief. Secondary outcomes could include function, mood, sleep, and/or quality of life. Minimum required elements include sample sources, sizes, and demographics, recruitment methods, inclusion and exclusion criteria, baseline and posttreatment means and SD, adverse effects, safety concerns, discontinuations, and medication-usage records. Outcomes should be monitored for at least 3 months after initiation with prespecified statistical analyses. Multigroup collaborations or registry studies may be needed for pivotal trials. PMID:25919472

  17. Assessing and Stabilizing Aberrant Neuroplasticity in Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Potential Role of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Desarkar, Pushpal; Rajji, Tarek K.; Ameis, Stephanie H.; Daskalakis, Zafiris Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Exciting developments have taken place in the neuroscience research in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and results from these studies indicate that brain in ASD is associated with aberrant neuroplasticity. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has rapidly evolved to become a widely used, safe, and non-invasive neuroscientific tool to investigate a variety of neurophysiological processes, including neuroplasticity. The diagnostic and therapeutic potential of TMS in ASD is beginning to be realized. In this article, we briefly reviewed evidence of aberrant neuroplasticity in ASD, suggested future directions in assessing neuroplasticity using repetitive TMS (rTMS), and discussed the potential of rTMS in rectifying aberrant neuroplasticity in ASD. PMID:26441685

  18. [Present and future of the transcranial magnetic stimulation].

    PubMed

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Granadillo, Elías; Bayona, Edgardo A

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic stimulation has called the attention of neuroscientists and the public due to the possibility to stimulate and "control" the nervous system in a non-invasive way. It has helped to make more accurate diagnosis, and apply more effective treatments and rehabilitation protocols in several diseases that affect the nervous system. Likewise, this novel tool has increased our knowledge about complex neural behavior, its connections as well as its plastic modulation. Magnetic stimulation applied in simple or paired-pulse protocols is a useful alternative in the diagnosis of diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, epilepsy, dystonia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebrovascular disease, and sleep disorders. From the therapeutic perspective, magnetic stimulation applied repetitively has been found useful, with different degrees of efficacy, in treating resistant depression, tinnitus, psychogenic dysphonia, Alzheimer disease, autism, Parkinson disease, dystonia, stroke, epilepsy, generalized anxiety as well as post traumatic stress disorder, auditory hallucinations, chronic pain, aphasias, obsessive-compulsive disorders, L-dopa induced dyskynesia, mania and Rasmussen syndrome, among others. The potential of magnetic stimulation in neurorehabilitation is outstanding, with excellent range of safety and, in practical terms, without side effects. PMID:23781715

  19. The Ferrier Lecture 2004 What can transcranial magnetic stimulation tell us about how the brain works?

    PubMed Central

    Cowey, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a technique whereby parts of the cerebral cortex and underlying white matter can be excited by a brief electrical current induced by a similarly brief, rapidly fluctuating magnetic field which is itself produced by rapidly discharging a current through an insulated coil held against the scalp. When combined with magnetic resonance structural and functional images of the subject's brain, the stimulation can be directed at specific cortical areas. Over a period of only 15 years, TMS has revealed hitherto unsuspected aspects of brain function, such as the role of distant parts of the brain in recovery from stroke, and has helped to resolve several previously intractable disputes, such as the neuronal basis of conscious awareness. This article describes and discusses the origins and nature of TMS, its applications and limitations, and its especial usefulness in conjunction with other techniques of evaluating or imaging brain activity. PMID:16147516

  20. Evoked potentials and transcranial magnetic stimulation in migraine: published data and viewpoint on their pathophysiologic significance.

    PubMed

    Schoenen, Jean; Ambrosini, Anna; Sándor, Peter S; Maertens de Noordhout, Alain

    2003-06-01

    Migraine is a disorder in which central nervous sytem dysfunction might play a pivotal role. Electroneurophysiology seems thus particularly suited to study its pathophysiology. We have extensively reviewed evoked potential and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies performed in migraineurs in order to identify their pathophysiologic significance. Publications available to us were completed by a Medline search. Retrieved and personal data were compared with respect to methodology and interpreted according to present knowledge on cortical information processing. Results are in part contradictory which appears to be method-, patient- and disease- related. Nonetheless, both evoked potential and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies demonstrate that the cerebral cortex, and possibly subcortical structures, are dysfunctioning interictally in both migraine with and without aura. These electrophysiologic abnormalities tend to normalise just before and during an attack and some of them seem to have a clear familial and predisposing character. Besides the studies of magnetophosphenes which have yielded contrasting results, chiefly because the method is not sufficiently reliable, most recent electrophysiologic investigations of cortical activities in migraine favour deficient habituation and decreased preactivation cortical excitability as the predominant interictal dysfunctions. We propose that the former is a consequence of the latter and that it could favour both interictal cognitive disturbances as well as a cerebral metabolic disequilibrium that may play a role in migraine pathogenesis. To summarize, electrophysiologic studies demonstrate in migraine between attacks a cortical, and possibly subcortical, dysfunction of which the hallmark is deficient habituation. PMID:12804664

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation as an antidepressant alternative in a patient with Brugada syndrome and recurrent syncope.

    PubMed

    Alampay, Miguel M; Haigney, Mark C; Flanagan, Michael C; Perito, Robert M; Love, Kathleen M; Grammer, Geoffrey G

    2014-11-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a common occult cause of sudden cardiac arrest in otherwise healthy-appearing adults. The pathognomonic electrocardiographic pattern may be unmasked only by certain medications, many of which are unknown. We report a case of a depressed but otherwise healthy man with an asymptomatic right bundle branch block on electrocardiography who experienced antidepressant-induced BrS and ultimately recovered with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). After an initial trial of nortriptyline, the patient's depressive symptoms improved; however, he experienced a syncopal event and was subsequently diagnosed as having BrS. Cross titration to bupropion, which had not previously been known to exacerbate BrS, was followed by another cardiac event. As a result, the patient was referred for TMS as a substitute for pharmacotherapy. After 31 TMS sessions over 8 weeks, the patient demonstrated significant improvement by subjective report and objective reduction in his Patient Health Questionnaire-9 scores from 10 (moderate) to 1 (minimal). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a Food and Drug Administration-approved nonpharmacologic treatment for depression. Given the potential lethality of BrS with known and unknown psychopharmacologic agents, providers should consider TMS as first-line therapy in this patient population. Bupropion should be added to the list of agents known to exacerbate this disease. PMID:25444490

  2. BRAIN initiative: transcranial magnetic stimulation automation and calibration.

    PubMed

    Todd, Garth D; Abdellatif, Ahmed; Sabouni, Abas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduced an automated TMS system with robot control and optical sensor combined with neuronavigation software. By using the robot, the TMS coil can be accurately positioned over any preselected brain region. The neuronavigation system provides an accurate positioning of a magnetic coil in order to induce a specific cortical excitation. An infrared optical measurement device is also used in order to detect and compensate for head movements of the patient. This procedure was simulated using a PC based robotic simulation program. The proposed automated robot system is integrated with TMS numerical solver and allows users to actually see the depth, location, and shape of the induced eddy current on the computer monitor. PMID:25570006

  3. The Observation of Manual Grasp Actions Affects the Control of Speech: A Combined Behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentilucci, Maurizio; Campione, Giovanna Cristina; Volta, Riccardo Dalla; Bernardis, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Does the mirror system affect the control of speech? This issue was addressed in behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) experiments. In behavioral experiment 1, participants pronounced the syllable /da/ while observing (1) a hand grasping large and small objects with power and precision grasps, respectively, (2) a foot interacting…

  4. Modulation of N400 in Chronic Non-Fluent Aphasia Using Low Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barwood, Caroline H. S.; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai; Lloyd, David; Riek, Stephan; O'Sullivan, John D.; Coulthard, Alan; Wong, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Low frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) has previously been applied to language homologues in non-fluent populations of persons with aphasia yielding significant improvements in behavioral language function up to 43 months post stimulation. The present study aimed to investigate the electrophysiological correlates…

  5. A Preliminary Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study of Cortical Inhibition and Excitability in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enticott, Peter G.; Rinehart, Nicole J.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Method: Participants were diagnosed by…

  6. Cortical Inhibition in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: New Insights from the Electroencephalographic Response to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruckmann, Sarah; Hauk, Daniela; Roessner, Veit; Resch, Franz; Freitag, Christine M.; Kammer, Thomas; Ziemann, Ulf; Rothenberger, Aribert; Weisbrod, Matthias; Bender, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the most frequent neuropsychiatric disorders in childhood. Transcranial magnetic stimulation studies based on muscle responses (motor-evoked potentials) suggested that reduced motor inhibition contributes to hyperactivity, a core symptom of the disease. Here we employed the N100 component of the…

  7. Control of proliferation rate of N27 dopaminergic neurons using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yiwen; Hadimani, Ravi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to investigate possible treatments for a variety of neurological disorders. However, the effect that magnetic fields have on neurons has not been well documented in the literature. We have investigated the effect of different orientation of magnetic field generated by TMS coils with a monophasic stimulator on the proliferation rate of N27 neuronal cells cultured in flasks and multi-well plates. The proliferation rate of neurons would increase by exposed horizontally adherent N27 cells to a magnetic field pointing upward through the neuronal proliferation layer compared with the control group. On the other hand, proliferation rate would decrease in cells exposed to a magnetic field pointing downward through the neuronal growth layer compared with the control group. We confirmed results obtained from the Trypan-blue and automatic cell counting methods with those from the CyQuant and MTS cell viability assays. Our findings could have important implications for the preclinical development of TMS treatments of neurological disorders and represents a new method to control the proliferation rate of neuronal cells.

  8. Assessment and modulation of neuroplasticity in rehabilitation with transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Shahid; Mizrahi, Ilan; Weaver, Kayleen; Fregni, Felipe; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive efforts towards the improvement of outcomes after acquired brain injury functional recovery is often limited. One reasons is the challenge in assessing and guiding plasticity after brain injury. In this context, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) - a noninvasive tool of brain stimulation - could play a major role. TMS has shown to be a reliable tool to measure plastic changes in the motor cortex associated with interventions in the motor system; such as motor training and motor cortex stimulation. In addition, as illustrated by the experience in promoting recovery from stroke, TMS a promising therapeutic tool to minimize motor, speech, cognitive, and mood deficits. In this review, we will focus on stroke to discuss how TMS can provide insights into the mechanisms of neurological recovery, and can be used for measurement and modulation of plasticity after an acquired brain insult. PMID:21172687

  9. Long-term repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation therapy: new research questions arising from one tinnitus case?

    PubMed

    Labar, Douglas Richard; Cortes, Mar; Edwards, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus may become refractory to treatment and disabling. Brain transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has shown promise as a therapy, but has been employed primarily short-term. We treated a patient with 5 weeks of weekly repetitive TMS (rTMS), followed by 6 months of monthly rTMS. He was a 75-year-old dentist with chronic tinnitus from occupational noise exposure. Physical examination and MRIs of the auditory canals and brain had revealed no lesions. The patient showed a general gradual, progressive improvement on per cent of severe tinnitus diary days (from baseline 100% to 33%), tinnitus handicap inventory (from baseline score 70 to 18), and mini-tinnitus questionnaire (from baseline score 17 to 6). No changes occurred in serial audiograms. Transient adverse events were a headache during stimulation, and dizziness 30 min after treatment. Implications and questions for future non-invasive neuromodulation clinical research raised by our case are discussed. PMID:25538216

  10. Simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and single neuron recording in alert non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Jerel K.; Grigsby, Erinn M.; Prevosto, Vincent; Petraglia, Frank W.; Rao, Hrishikesh; Deng, Zhi-De; Peterchev, Angel V.; Sommer, Marc A.; Egner, Tobias; Platt, Michael L.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used, noninvasive method for stimulating nervous tissue, yet its mechanisms of effect are poorly understood. Here we report novel methods for studying the influence of TMS on single neurons in the brain of alert non-human primates. We designed a TMS coil that focuses its effect near the tip of a recording electrode and recording electronics that enable direct acquisition of neuronal signals at the site of peak stimulus strength minimally perturbed by stimulation artifact in intact, awake monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We recorded action potentials within ~1 ms after 0.4 ms TMS pulses and observed changes in activity that differed significantly for active stimulation as compared to sham stimulation. The methodology is compatible with standard equipment in primate laboratories, allowing for easy implementation. Application of these new tools will facilitate the refinement of next generation TMS devices, experiments, and treatment protocols. PMID:24974797

  11. A Review of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation as a Treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Clark, Caroline; Cole, Jeffrey; Winter, Christine; Williams, Kathy; Grammer, Geoffrey

    2015-10-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may fail to achieve adequate relief despite treatment with psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, or complementary medicine treatments. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation procedure that can alter neuronal activity through administration of various pulse sequences and frequencies. TMS may theoretically have promise in correcting alterations observed in patients with PTSD. While the precise treatment location and pulse sequences remain undefined, current evidence suggests two promising targets, the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the medial prefrontal cortex. The beneficial effects may be due to the secondary or indirect regulation of other brain structures that may be involved in the mood regulatory network. TMS may be an effective part of a comprehensive treatment program for PTSD, although significant work remains to define optimal treatment parameters and clarify how it fits within a broader traditional treatment program. PMID:26324821

  12. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in multiple system and late onset cerebellar atrophies.

    PubMed

    Cruz Martínez, A; Arpa, J; Alonso, M; Palomo, F; Villoslada, C

    1995-09-01

    Central motor conduction time (CMCT) after transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the cortex, electromyography and nerve conduction velocity were performed in 24 patients with multiple system (MSA) and late onset cerebellar atrophy (LOCA) (often olivopontocerebellar atrophy--OPCA -). CMCT was abnormal in 7 patients with OPCA and one with LOCA. CMCT abnormalities (43% of cases) and increased threshold (68%) were more often found within OPCA group than in another multisystem atrophy and LOCA. Reduction in amplitude of the response after TMS was significantly correlated with cerebral hemispheres's atrophy. Increased threshold was correlated with upper vermal hemisphere atrophy and enlargement of the fourth ventricle. Electrophysiologic signs of mixed peripheral neuropathy were found in 8 patients. TMS abnormalities were not related to peripheral nerve involvement. Marked variation in CMCT suggests heterogeneity in these diseases. However, the percentage of CMCT abnormalities in OPCA group suggests that TMS seems to play a role in the neurophysiological diagnosis of these heterogeneous disorders. PMID:7484075

  13. Effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation during voluntary and non-voluntary stepping movements in humans.

    PubMed

    Solopova, I A; Selionov, V A; Kazennikov, O V; Ivanenko, Y P

    2014-09-01

    Here, we compared motor evoked potentials (MEP) in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and the H-reflex during voluntary and vibration-induced air-stepping movements in humans. Both the MEPs (in mm biceps femoris, rectus femoris and tibialis anterior) and H-reflex (in m soleus) were significantly smaller during vibration-induced cyclic leg movements at matched amplitudes of angular motion and muscle activity. These findings highlight differences between voluntary and non-voluntary activation of the spinal pattern generator circuitry in humans, presumably due to an extra facilitatory effect of voluntary control/triggering of stepping on spinal motoneurons and interneurons. The results support the idea of active engagement of supraspinal motor areas in developing central pattern generator-modulating therapies. PMID:25038416

  14. A Novel Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator Inducing Near Rectangular Pulses with Controllable Pulse Width (cTMS)

    PubMed Central

    Jalinous, Reza; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device with controllable pulse width (PW) and near rectangular pulse shape (cTMS) is described. The cTMS device uses an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) with appropriate snubbers to switch coil currents up to 7 kA, enabling PW control from 5 ?s to over 100 ?s. The near-rectangular induced electric field pulses use 22–34% less energy and generate 67–72% less coil heating compared to matched conventional cosine pulses. CTMS is used to stimulate rhesus monkey motor cortex in vivo with PWs of 20 to 100 ?s, demonstrating the expected decrease of threshold pulse amplitude with increasing PW. The technological solutions used in the cTMS prototype can expand functionality, and reduce power consumption and coil heating in TMS, enhancing its research and therapeutic applications. PMID:18232369

  15. Surgical leg rotation: cortical neuroplasticity assessed through brain mapping using transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Rota, Viviana; Manfrini, Marco; Perucca, Laura; Caronni, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Rotationplasty (Borggreve-Van Nes operation) is a rare limb salvage procedure, most often applied to children presenting with sarcoma of the distal femur. In type A1 operation, the distal thigh is removed and the proximal tibia is axially rotated by 180°, remodeled, grafted onto the femoral stump, and then prosthetized. The neurovascular bundle is spared. The rotated ankle then works as a knee. The foot plantar and dorsal flexors act as knee extensors and flexors, respectively. Functional results may be excellent. Cortical neuroplasticity was studied in three men (30–31 years) who were operated on the left lower limb at ages between 7 and 11 years and were fully autonomous with a custom-made prosthesis, as well as in three age–sex matched controls. The scalp stimulation coordinates, matching the patients’ brain MRI spots, were digitized through a ‘neuronavigation’ optoelectronic system, in order to guide the transcranial magnetic stimulation coil, thus ensuring spatial precision during the procedure. Through transcranial magnetic stimulation driven by neuronavigation, the cortical representations of the contralateral soleus and vastus medialis muscles were studied in terms of amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and centering and width of the cortical areas from which the potentials could be evoked. Map centering on either hemisphere did not differ substantially across muscles and participants. In the operated patients, MEP amplitudes, the area from which MEPs could be evoked, and their product (volume) were larger for the muscles of the unaffected side compared with both the rotated soleus muscle (average effect size 0.75) and the muscles of healthy controls (average effect size 0.89). In controls, right–left differences showed an effect size of 0.38. In no case did the comparisons reach statistical significance (P>0.25). Nevertheless, the results seem consistent with cortical plasticity reflecting strengthening of the unaffected leg and a combination of cross-education and skill training of the rotated leg. PMID:25153790

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of mouse brain using high-resolution anatomical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, L. J.; Hadimani, R. L.; Kanthasamy, A. G.; Jiles, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers the possibility of non-invasive treatment of brain disorders in humans. Studies on animals can allow rapid progress of the research including exploring a variety of different treatment conditions. Numerical calculations using animal models are needed to help design suitable TMS coils for use in animal experiments, in particular, to estimate the electric field induced in animal brains. In this paper, we have implemented a high-resolution anatomical MRI-derived mouse model consisting of 50 tissue types to accurately calculate induced electric field in the mouse brain. Magnetic field measurements have been performed on the surface of the coil and compared with the calculations in order to validate the calculated magnetic and induced electric fields in the brain. Results show how the induced electric field is distributed in a mouse brain and allow investigation of how this could be improved for TMS studies using mice. The findings have important implications in further preclinical development of TMS for treatment of human diseases.

  17. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on event-related potential P300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Tetsuya; Sato, Aya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2012-04-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on brain activity. P300 latency of event-related potential (ERP) was used to evaluate the effects of low-frequency and short-term rTMS by stimulating the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), which is considered to be the related area of P300 origin. In addition, the prolonged stimulation effects on P300 latency were analyzed after applying rTMS. A figure-eight coil was used to stimulate left-right SMG, and intensity of magnetic stimulation was 80% of motor threshold. A total of 100 magnetic pulses were applied for rTMS. The effects of stimulus frequency at 0.5 or 1 Hz were determined. Following rTMS, an odd-ball task was performed and P300 latency of ERP was measured. The odd-ball task was performed at 5, 10, and 15 min post-rTMS. ERP was measured prior to magnetic stimulation as a control. Electroencephalograph (EEG) was measured at Fz, Cz, and Pz that were indicated by the international 10-20 electrode system. Results demonstrated that different effects on P300 latency occurred between 0.5-1 Hz rTMS. With 1 Hz low-frequency magnetic stimulation to the left SMG, P300 latency decreased. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 15 ms at Cz. This decrease continued for approximately 10 min post-rTMS. In contrast, 0.5 Hz rTMS resulted in delayed P300 latency. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 20 ms at Fz, and this delayed effect continued for approximately 15 min post-rTMS. Results demonstrated that P300 latency varied according to rTMS frequency. Furthermore, the duration of the effect was not similar for stimulus frequency of low-frequency rTMS.

  18. The influence of sulcus width on simulated electric fields induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, A. M.; Rampersad, S. M.; Lucka, F.; Lanfer, B.; Lew, S.; Aydin, Ü.; Wolters, C. H.; Stegeman, D. F.; Oostendorp, T. F.

    2013-07-01

    Volume conduction models can help in acquiring knowledge about the distribution of the electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation. One aspect of a detailed model is an accurate description of the cortical surface geometry. Since its estimation is difficult, it is important to know how accurate the geometry has to be represented. Previous studies only looked at the differences caused by neglecting the complete boundary between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and grey matter (Thielscher et al 2011 NeuroImage 54 234-43, Bijsterbosch et al 2012 Med. Biol. Eng. Comput. 50 671-81), or by resizing the whole brain (Wagner et al 2008 Exp. Brain Res. 186 539-50). However, due to the high conductive properties of the CSF, it can be expected that alterations in sulcus width can already have a significant effect on the distribution of the electric field. To answer this question, the sulcus width of a highly realistic head model, based on T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images, was altered systematically. This study shows that alterations in the sulcus width do not cause large differences in the majority of the electric field values. However, considerable overestimation of sulcus width produces an overestimation of the calculated field strength, also at locations distant from the target location.

  19. Comparison of current distributions in electroconvulsive therapy and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2002-05-01

    We compared current density distributions in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) by numerical calculations. The model consisted of an air region and three types of tissues with different conductivities representing the brain, the skull, and the scalp. In the ECT model, electric currents were applied through electrodes with a voltage of 100 V. In the TMS model, a figure-eight coil (6 cm diameter per coil) was placed on the vertex of the head model. An alternating current with a peak intensity of 3.0 kA and a frequency of 4.2 kHz was applied to the coil. The maximum current densities inside the brain in ECT (bilateral electrode position) and TMS were 234 and 322 A/m2, respectively. The results indicate that magnetic stimulators can generate comparable current densities to ECT. While the skull significantly affected current distributions in ECT, TMS efficiently induced eddy currents in the brain. In addition, TMS is more beneficial than ECT because the localized current distribution reduces the risk of adverse side effects.

  20. Approximating transcranial magnetic stimulation with electric stimulation in mouse: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Walter L; Lee, Won Hee; Peterchev, Angel V

    2014-01-01

    Rodent models are valuable for preclinical examination of novel therapeutic techniques, including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, comparison of TMS effects in rodents and humans is confounded by inaccurate scaling of the spatial extent of the induced electric field in rodents. The electric field is substantially less focal in rodent models of TMS due to the technical restrictions of making very small coils that can handle the currents required for TMS. We examine the electric field distributions generated by various electrode configurations of electric stimulation in an inhomogeneous high-resolution finite element mouse model, and show that the electric field distributions produced by human TMS can be approximated by electric stimulation in mouse. Based on these results and the limits of magnetic stimulation in mice, we argue that the most practical and accurate way to model focal TMS in mice is electric stimulation through either cortical surface electrodes or electrodes implanted halfway through the mouse cranium. This approach could allow much more accurate approximation of the human TMS electric field focality and strength than that offered by TMS in mouse, enabling, for example, focal targeting of specific cortical regions, which is common in human TMS paradigms. PMID:25571396

  1. Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice Using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Preliminary Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Alexandria; Zenitsky, Gary; Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive surgery-free tool used to stimulate the brain by time-varying magnetic fields. TMS is currently being investigated as a treatment for neurological disorders such as depression, Parkinson's disease and TBI. Before moving to human TMS/TBI trials, animal testing should be pursued to determine suitability and adverse effects. As an initial study, four healthy mice were treated with TMS at different power levels to determine short-term behavioral effects and set a control group baseline. The mouse's behavior was studied using the Rotorod test, which measures the animal's latency to fall off a rotating rod, and the Versamax test, which measures horizontal and vertical movement, and total distance traveled. The Rotorod test has shown for TMS power levels >=90% the mice begin to fall directly post-treatment. Similarly, the Versamax test has shown for power levels >=80% the mice are less mobile directly post-treatment. Versamax mobility was found to return to normal the day following treatment. These mice were housed in the facility for 4 months and the behavioral tests were repeated. Versamax results showed there was no significant variation in mobility indicating there are no long-term side effects of TMS treatment on the mice. This work was supported by the Barbara and James Palmer Endowment and the Carver Charitable Trust at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University.

  2. Cognitive Impairment After Sleep Deprivation Rescued by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Application in Octodon degus.

    PubMed

    Estrada, C; López, D; Conesa, A; Fernández-Gómez, F J; Gonzalez-Cuello, A; Toledo, F; Tunez, I; Blin, O; Bordet, R; Richardson, J C; Fernandez-Villalba, E; Herrero, M T

    2015-11-01

    Sleep is indispensable for maintaining regular daily life activities and is of fundamental physiological importance for cognitive performance. Sleep deprivation (SD) may affect learning capacity and the ability to form new memories, particularly with regard to hippocampus-dependent tasks. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive procedure of electromagnetic induction that generates electric currents, activating nearby nerve cells in the stimulated cortical area. Several studies have looked into the potential therapeutic use of TMS. The present study was designed to evaluate how TMS could improve learning and memory functions following SD in Octodon degus. Thirty juvenile (18 months old) females were divided into three groups (control, acute, and chronic TMS treatment-with and without SD). TMS-treated groups were placed in plastic cylindrical cages designed to keep them immobile, while receiving head magnetic stimulation. SD was achieved by gently handling the animals to keep them awake during the night. Behavioral tests included radial arm maze (RAM), Barnes maze (BM), and novel object recognition. When TMS treatment was applied over several days, there was significant improvement of cognitive performance after SD, with no side effects. A single TMS session reduced the number of errors for the RAM test and improved latency and reduced errors for the BM test, which both evaluate spatial memory. Moreover, chronic TMS treatment brings about a significant improvement in both spatial and working memories. PMID:26194615

  3. Electromagnetic characteristics of eccentric figure-eight coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takuya; Sekino, Masaki; Matsuzaki, Taiga; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Saitoh, Youichi; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    2012-04-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is effective for treatment of several neurological and psychiatric diseases. We proposed an eccentric figure-eight coil, which induces strong eddy currents in the target brain tissue. In this study, numerical analyses were carried out to obtain magnetic field distribution of the eccentric figure-eight coil and eddy current in the brain. The analyses were performed with various coil design parameters, such as the outer and inner diameters and number of turns, to investigate the influence of these parameters on the coil characteristics. Increases in the inner diameter, outer diameter, and number of turns caused increases in the maximum eddy current densities. Coil inductance, working voltage, and heat generation also became higher with the increases in these design parameters. In order to develop a compact stimulator system for use at home, we need to obtain strong eddy current density, keeping the working voltage as low as possible. Our results show that it is effective to enlarge the outer diameter.

  4. The influence of sulcus width on simulated electric fields induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, A M; Rampersad, S M; Lucka, F; Lanfer, B; Lew, S; Aydin, Ü; Wolters, C H; Stegeman, D F; Oostendorp, T F

    2013-01-01

    Volume conduction models can help in acquiring knowledge about the distribution of the electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). One aspect of a detailed model is an accurate description of the cortical surface geometry. Since its estimation is difficult, it is important to know how accurate the geometry has to be represented. Previous studies only looked at the differences caused by neglecting the complete boundary between the CSF and GM (Thielscher et al. 2011; Bijsterbosch et al. 2012), or by resizing the whole brain (Wagner et al. 2008). However, due to the high conductive properties of the CSF, it can be expected that alterations in sulcus width can already have a significant effect on the distribution of the electric field. To answer this question, the sulcus width of a highly realistic head model, based on T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI), was altered systematically. This study shows that alterations in the sulcus width do not cause large differences in the majority of the electric field values. However, considerable overestimation of sulcus width produces an overestimation of the calculated field strength, also at locations distant from the target location. PMID:23787706

  5. Treatment envelope evaluation in transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound utilizing 3D MR thermometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current clinical targets for transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (tcMRgFUS) are all located close to the geometric center of the skull convexity, which minimizes challenges related to focusing the ultrasound through the skull bone. Non-central targets will have to be reached to treat a wider variety of neurological disorders and solid tumors. Treatment envelope studies utilizing two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry have previously been performed to determine the regions in which therapeutic levels of FUS can currently be delivered. Since 2D MR thermometry was used, very limited information about unintended heating in near-field tissue/bone interfaces could be deduced. Methods In this paper, we present a proof-of-concept treatment envelope study with three-dimensional (3D) MR thermometry monitoring of FUS heatings performed in a phantom and a lamb model. While the moderate-sized transducer used was not designed for transcranial geometries, the 3D temperature maps enable monitoring of the entire sonication field of view, including both the focal spot and near-field tissue/bone interfaces, for full characterization of all heating that may occur. 3D MR thermometry is achieved by a combination of k-space subsampling and a previously described temporally constrained reconstruction method. Results We present two different types of treatment envelopes. The first is based only on the focal spot heating—the type that can be derived from 2D MR thermometry. The second type is based on the relative near-field heating and is calculated as the ratio between the focal spot heating and the near-field heating. This utilizes the full 3D MR thermometry data achieved in this study. Conclusions It is shown that 3D MR thermometry can be used to improve the safety assessment in treatment envelope evaluations. Using a non-optimal transducer, it is shown that some regions where therapeutic levels of FUS can be delivered, as suggested by the first type of envelope, are not necessarily safely treated due to the amount of unintended near-field heating occurring. The results presented in this study highlight the need for 3D MR thermometry in tcMRgFUS. PMID:25343028

  6. A Review of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Multimodal Neuroimaging to Characterize Post-Stroke Neuroplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Auriat, Angela M.; Neva, Jason L.; Peters, Sue; Ferris, Jennifer K.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2015-01-01

    Following stroke, the brain undergoes various stages of recovery where the central nervous system can reorganize neural circuitry (neuroplasticity) both spontaneously and with the aid of behavioral rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation. Multiple neuroimaging techniques can characterize common structural and functional stroke-related deficits, and importantly, help predict recovery of function. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) typically reveals increased overall diffusivity throughout the brain following stroke, and is capable of indexing the extent of white matter damage. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides an index of metabolic changes in surviving neural tissue after stroke, serving as a marker of brain function. The neural correlates of altered brain activity after stroke have been demonstrated by abnormal activation of sensorimotor cortices during task performance, and at rest, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Electroencephalography (EEG) has been used to characterize motor dysfunction in terms of increased cortical amplitude in the sensorimotor regions when performing upper limb movement, indicating abnormally increased cognitive effort and planning in individuals with stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) work reveals changes in ipsilesional and contralesional cortical excitability in the sensorimotor cortices. The severity of motor deficits indexed using TMS has been linked to the magnitude of activity imbalance between the sensorimotor cortices. In this paper, we will provide a narrative review of data from studies utilizing DTI, MRS, fMRI, EEG, and brain stimulation techniques focusing on TMS and its combination with uni- and multimodal neuroimaging methods to assess recovery after stroke. Approaches that delineate the best measures with which to predict or positively alter outcomes will be highlighted. PMID:26579069

  7. Interdisciplinary Approaches of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Applied to a Respiratory Neuronal Circuitry Model

    PubMed Central

    Vinit, Stéphane; Keomani, Emilie; Deramaudt, Thérèse B.; Spruance, Victoria M.; Bezdudnaya, Tatiana; Lane, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory related diseases associated with the neuronal control of breathing represent life-threatening issues and to date, no effective therapeutics are available to enhance the impaired function. The aim of this study was to determine whether a preclinical respiratory model could be used for further studies to develop a non-invasive therapeutic tool applied to rat diaphragmatic neuronal circuitry. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was performed on adult male Sprague-Dawley rats using a human figure-of-eight coil. The largest diaphragmatic motor evoked potentials (MEPdia) were recorded when the center of the coil was positioned 6 mm caudal from Bregma, involving a stimulation of respiratory supraspinal pathways. Magnetic shielding of the coil with mu metal reduced magnetic field intensities and improved focality with increased motor threshold and lower amplitude recruitment curve. Moreover, transynaptic neuroanatomical tracing with pseudorabies virus (applied to the diaphragm) suggest that connections exist between the motor cortex, the periaqueductal grey cell regions, several brainstem neurons and spinal phrenic motoneurons (distributed in the C3-4 spinal cord). These results reveal the anatomical substrate through which supraspinal stimulation can convey descending action potential volleys to the spinal motoneurons (directly or indirectly). We conclude that MEPdia following a single pulse of TMS can be successfully recorded in the rat and may be used in the assessment of respiratory supraspinal plasticity. Supraspinal non-invasive stimulations aimed to neuromodulate respiratory circuitry will enable new avenues of research into neuroplasticity and the development of therapies for respiratory dysfunction associated with neural injury and disease (e.g. spinal cord injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). PMID:25406091

  8. Brain excitability and electroencephalographic activation: non-invasive evaluation in healthy humans via transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rossini, P M; Desiato, M T; Lavaroni, F; Caramia, M D

    1991-12-13

    Excitability changes of the central motor tracts as a function of the electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics has been investigated in 10 healthy volunteers. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TCS) was administered to the right motor cortex with an intensity 5-10% above threshold for the elicitation of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the left forearm muscles. Simultaneously, the right median nerve was stimulated to provoke an H-reflex in the forearm flexors and EEG activity was recorded from the left hemiscalp. Subjects were completely relaxed and were asked at random either to keep the eyes closed while maintaining mental inactivity (A) or to open their eyes and perform mental arithmetics (B). Latencies and amplitudes of MEPs and H-reflexes were statistically matched with the spectral content of the EEG. In condition A, MEPs of 119 +/- 61 microV, with up to 36% of missing responses and background EEG activity dominated by rhythms in the alpha range were found. In condition B, MEPs of 219 +/- 66 microV (P less than 0.001), with less than 16% of missing responses, 'blocking' of the background alpha rhythms, and a potentiation of the faster ones' relative power were observed. Changes of the H-reflex characteristics were neither statistically significant nor related to MEP amplitude and EEG spectral profile fluctuations. PMID:1815819

  9. Field modeling for transcranial magnetic stimulation: A useful tool to understand the physiological effects of TMS?

    PubMed

    Thielscher, Axel; Antunes, Andre; Saturnino, Guilherme B

    2015-08-01

    Electric field calculations based on numerical methods and increasingly realistic head models are more and more used in research on Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). However, they are still far from being established as standard tools for the planning and analysis in practical applications of TMS. Here, we start by delineating three main challenges that need to be addressed to unravel their full potential. This comprises (i) identifying and dealing with the model uncertainties, (ii) establishing a clear link between the induced fields and the physiological stimulation effects, and (iii) improving the usability of the tools for field calculation to the level that they can be easily used by non-experts. We then introduce a new version of our pipeline for field calculations (www.simnibs.org) that substantially simplifies setting up and running TMS and tDCS simulations based on Finite-Element Methods (FEM). We conclude with a brief outlook on how the new version of SimNIBS can help to target the above identified challenges. PMID:26736240

  10. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for stroke rehabilitation-potential therapy or misplaced hope?

    PubMed

    Bates, Kristyn Alissa; Rodger, Jennifer

    2015-08-19

    Repeated sessions of transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are capable of changing and modulating neural activity beyond the period of stimulation. Because many neurological disorders are thought to involve abnormal or dysfunctional neuronal activity, it is hypothesised that the therapeutic action of rTMS may occur through modulating and reversing abnormal activity and facilitating neuroplasticity.Numerous clinical studies have investigated the safety and efficacy of rTMS treatment for a wide variety of conditions including depression, anxiety disorders including obsessive compulsive disorder, Parkinson's disease, stroke, tinnitus, affective disorders, schizophrenia and chronic pain. Despite some promising results, rTMS is not currently widely used to assist in recovery from neurotrama. In this review, we argue that the therapeutic promise of rTMS is limited because the mechanisms of action of rTMS are not completely understood and therefore it is difficult to determine which treatment protocols are appropriate for specific neurological conditions. We use the application of rTMS in motor functional recovery from cerebral ischemic stroke to illustrate the difficulties in interpreting and assessing the therapeutic potential of rTMS for neurotrauma in terms of the presumed mechanisms of action of rTMS. Future directions for research will also be discussed. PMID:24595227

  11. Opportunities for concurrent transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography to characterize cortical activity in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Sumire; Bergmann, Til Ole; Borich, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States. Despite the high incidence and mortality of stroke, sensitive and specific brain-based biomarkers predicting persisting disabilities are lacking. Both neuroimaging techniques like electroencephalography (EEG) and non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have proven useful in predicting prognosis, recovery trajectories and response to rehabilitation in individuals with stroke. We propose, however, that additional synergetic effects can be achieved by simultaneously combining both approaches. Combined TMS-EEG is able to activate discrete cortical regions and directly assess local cortical reactivity and effective connectivity within the network independent of the integrity of descending fiber pathways and also outside the motor system. Studying cortical reactivity and connectivity in patients with stroke TMS-EEG may identify salient neural mechanisms underlying motor disabilities and lead to novel biomarkers of stroke pathophysiology which can then be used to assess, monitor, and refine rehabilitation approaches for individuals with significant disability to improve outcomes and quality of life after stroke. PMID:25999839

  12. Assessing consciousness in coma and related states using transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Gosseries, O; Thibaut, A; Boly, M; Rosanova, M; Massimini, M; Laureys, S

    2014-02-01

    Thanks to advances in medical care, an increased number of patients recover from coma. However, some remain in vegetative/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome or in a minimally conscious state. Detection of awareness in severely brain-injured patients is challenging because it relies on behavioral assessments, which can be affected by motor, sensory and cognitive impairments of the patients. Other means of evaluation are needed to improve the accuracy of the diagnosis in this challenging population. We will here review the different altered states of consciousness occurring after severe brain damage, and explain the difficulties associated with behavioral assessment of consciousness. We will then describe a non-invasive technique, transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with high-density electroencephalography (TMS-EEG), which has allowed us to detect the presence or absence of consciousness in different physiological, pathological and pharmacological states. Some potential underlying mechanisms of the loss of consciousness will then be discussed. In conclusion, TMS-EEG is highly promising in identifying markers of consciousness at the individual level and might be of great value for clinicians in the assessment of consciousness. PMID:24393302

  13. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on recovery of function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tazoe, Toshiki; Perez, Monica A

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of rehabilitation strategies after spinal cord injury (SCI) is to enhance the recovery of function. One possible avenue to achieve this goal is to strengthen the efficacy of the residual neuronal pathways. Noninvasive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used in patients with motor disorders as a tool to modulate activity of corticospinal, cortical, and subcortical pathways to promote functional recovery. This article reviews a series of studies published during the last decade that used rTMS in the acute and chronic stages of paraplegia and tetraplegia in humans with complete and incomplete SCI. In the studies, rTMS has been applied over the arm and leg representations of the primary motor cortex to target 3 main consequences of SCI: sensory and motor function impairments, spasticity, and neuropathic pain. Although some studies demonstrated that consecutive sessions of rTMS improve aspects of particular functions, other studies did not show similar effects. We discuss how rTMS parameters and postinjury reorganization in the corticospinal tract, motor cortical, and spinal cord circuits might be critical factors in understanding the advantages and disadvantages of using rTMS in patients with SCI. The available data highlight the limited information on the use of rTMS after SCI and the need to further understand the pathophysiology of neuronal structures affected by rTMS to maximize the potential beneficial effects of this technique in humans with SCI. PMID:25175159

  14. Preparatory inhibition of cortico-spinal excitability: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study in man.

    PubMed

    Hasbroucq, T; Kaneko, H; Akamatsu, M; Possamaï, C A

    1997-03-01

    In order to investigate the preparatory modulations of cortico-spinal excitability, reaction time (RT) methods were combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex. We analyzed the variations in the amplitude of motor potentials evoked in a prime mover (flexor digitorum sublimis) by TMS delivered during the foreperiod of a visual choice RT task. In experiment 1 (n = 10), the TMS was delivered either simultaneously with the warning signal or simultaneously with the response signal in two conditions of foreperiod duration: short (500 ms) and long (2500 ms). The peak amplitude of the motor evoked potentials diminished during the short foreperiod but not during the long foreperiod. Since RT was shorter when the foreperiod lasted 500 ms than when it lasted 2500 ms, this result suggests that the excitability of the cortico-spinal structures is minimal when the subject is optimally ready to react. In experiment 2 (n = 10), the time-course of this decrement was further explored. With this aim, only the short foreperiod was used and the TMS was delivered either 500 ms, 333 ms, 167 ms or 0 ms before the response signal. Cortico-spinal excitability decreased during the first 333 ms and then remained stable until the occurrence of the response signal. In light of previous studies, the present results suggest that the decrement of cortico-spinal excitability during the short foreperiod reflects an adaptative mechanism which increases the sensitivity of the motor structures to the forthcoming voluntary command. PMID:9088555

  15. Observation of interactive behavior increases corticospinal excitability in humans: A transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Mori, Hirotaka; Kushiro, Keisuke; Uehara, Shintaro

    2015-11-01

    In humans, observation of others' behaviors increases corticospinal excitability (CSE), which is interpreted in the contexts of motor resonance and the "mirror neuron system" (MNS). It has been suggested that observation of another individual's behavior manifests an embodied simulation of his/her mental state through the MNS. Thus, the MNS may involve understanding others' intentions of behaviors, thoughts, and emotions (i.e., social cognition), and may therefore exhibit a greater response when observing human-interactive behaviors that require a more varied and complex understanding of others. In the present study, transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied to the primary motor cortex of participants observing human-interactive behaviors between two individuals (c.f. one person reaching toward an object in another person's hand) and non-interactive individual behavior (c.f. one person reaching toward an object on a dish). We carefully controlled the kinematics of behaviors in these two conditions to exclude potential effects of MNS activity changes associated with kinematic differences between visual stimuli. Notably, motor evoked potentials, that reflect CSE, from the first dorsal interosseous muscle exhibited greater amplitude when the participants observed interactive behaviors than when they observed non-interactive behavior. These results provide neurophysiological evidence that the MNS is activated to a greater degree during observation of human-interactive behaviors that contain additional information about the individuals' mental states, supporting the view that the MNS plays a critical role in social cognition in humans. PMID:26432377

  16. Differences between Han Chinese and Caucasians in transcranial magnetic stimulation parameters.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Fisher, Karen M; Lai, Ming; Mansoor, Kashif; Bicker, R; Baker, Stuart N

    2014-02-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the difference between Han Chinese and Caucasians on various parameters measured from responses to transcranial magnetic brain stimulation (TMS). Sixteen subjects were studied in each group. A circular coil at the vertex was used for stimulation, whilst recording surface electromyograms from right first dorsal interosseous. In the passive state, motor-evoked potential (MEP) threshold, MEP recruitment, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation were measured. The MEP threshold, recruitment and silent period were also measured in the active state. Chinese subjects showed significantly higher passive thresholds (P < 0.005), less inhibition of the motor response (SICI, P < 0.0005) and a shorter silent period (P < 0.05). Differences in SICI appeared to be a consequence of the differences in passive threshold and were not seen when active threshold was used to determine the conditioning stimulus intensity. Differences in silent period may also reflect differences in cortical excitability rather than inhibitory processes, as they were not seen when the silent-period duration was expressed as a function of MEP size, rather than TMS intensity. There appears to be a significant difference in some TMS parameters between Han Chinese and Caucasian subjects. This may reflect an underlying difference in cortical excitability. PMID:24240390

  17. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Address Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Drumond Marra, Hellen Livia; Myczkowski, Martin Luiz; Maia Memória, Cláudia; Arnaut, Débora; Leite Ribeiro, Philip; Sardinha Mansur, Carlos Gustavo; Lancelote Alberto, Rodrigo; Boura Bellini, Bianca; Alves Fernandes da Silva, Adriano; Tortella, Gabriel; Ciampi de Andrade, Daniel; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente; Marcolin, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique with potential to improve memory. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which still lacks a specific therapy, is a clinical syndrome associated with increased risk of dementia. This study aims to assess the effects of high-frequency repetitive TMS (HF rTMS) on everyday memory of the elderly with MCI. We conducted a double-blinded randomized sham-controlled trial using rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Thirty-four elderly outpatients meeting Petersen's MCI criteria were randomly assigned to receive 10 sessions of either active TMS or sham, 10?Hz rTMS at 110% of motor threshold, 2,000 pulses per session. Neuropsychological assessment at baseline, after the last session (10th) and at one-month follow-up, was applied. ANOVA on the primary efficacy measure, the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test, revealed a significant group-by-time interaction (p = 0.05), favoring the active group. The improvement was kept after one month. Other neuropsychological tests were heterogeneous. rTMS at 10?Hz enhanced everyday memory in elderly with MCI after 10 sessions. These findings suggest that rTMS might be effective as a therapy for MCI and probably a tool to delay deterioration. PMID:26160997

  18. Intracortical facilitation and inhibition after transcranial magnetic stimulation in conscious humans.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, H; Kitagawa, H; Kawaguchi, Y; Tsuji, H

    1997-01-01

    1. Changes in excitability of the motor cortex induced by a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were examined by simultaneous recording of the evoked corticospinal volley and the compound surface electromyographic (EMG) response in the biceps brachii following paired-pulse TMS in five conscious subjects. The effects of a varying interstimulus interval (ISI) and a conditioning stimulus intensity were also investigated. 2. A submotor threshold conditioning stimulus inhibited the test responses at ISIs of 2-5 ms. A supramotor threshold conditioning stimulus inhibited the test responses at ISIs of 100-200 ms. Both of these inhibitions were prominent in late I waves. 3. There was a facilitation of the test responses at an ISI of 25 ms that was prominent in late I waves. The facilitation evoked by the supramotor threshold conditioning stimulus was more prominent than that evoked by the submotor threshold conditioning stimulus. 4. It is concluded that single TMS induced the triphasic changes of the motor cortex excitability in conscious humans that resulted in changes in EMG responses following paired TMS. PMID:9051592

  19. Potentiation of gamma oscillatory activity through repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Barr, Mera S; Farzan, Faranak; Rusjan, Pablo M; Chen, Robert; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2009-10-01

    Neuronal oscillations in the gamma (gamma) frequency range (30-50 Hz) have been associated with cognition. Working memory (WM), a cognitive task involving the on-line maintenance and manipulation of information, elicits increases in gamma oscillations with greater cognitive demand, particularly in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The generation and modulation of gamma oscillations have been attributed to inhibitory interneuron networks that use gamma -aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their principal neurotransmitter. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) represents a non-invasive method to stimulate the cortex that has been shown to modify cognition and GABA inhibitory mechanisms, particularly with higher frequencies (ie, 10-20 Hz). We measured the effect of high-frequency rTMS applied to the DLPFC on gamma-oscillations elicited during the N-back WM task in healthy individuals. Active rTMS significantly increased gamma-oscillations generated during the N-back conditions with the greatest cognitive demand. Further, no significant changes were found in other frequency ranges, suggesting that rTMS selectively modulates gamma-oscillations in the frontal brain regions. These findings provide important insights into the neurophysiological mechanisms that underlie higher-order cognitive processes, and suggest that rTMS may be used as a cognitive enhancing strategy in neuropsychiatric disorders that suffer from cognitive deficits. PMID:19606086

  20. Transcranial magnetic stimulation over human secondary somatosensory cortex disrupts perception of pain intensity.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Patricia L; Iannetti, Gian Domenico; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    Pain is a complex sensory experience resulting from the activity of a network of brain regions. However, the functional contribution of individual regions in this network remains poorly understood. We delivered single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (S1), secondary somatosensory cortex (S2) and vertex (control site) 120 msec after selective stimulation of nociceptive afferents using neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-perovskite (Nd:YAP) laser pulses causing painful sensations. Participants were required to judge either the intensity (medium/high) or the spatial location (proximal/distal) of the stimulus in a two-alternative forced choice paradigm. When TMS pulses were delivered over S2, participants' ability to judge pain intensity was disrupted, as compared to S1 and vertex (control) stimulation. Signal-detection analysis demonstrated a loss of sensitivity to stimulation intensity, rather than a shift in perceived pain level or response bias. We did not find any effect of TMS on the ability to localise nociceptive stimuli on the skin. The novel finding that TMS over S2 can disrupt perception of pain intensity suggests a causal role for S2 in encoding of pain intensity. PMID:23290634

  1. What have We Learned from “Perturbing” the Human Cortical Motor System with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation?

    PubMed Central

    Chouinard, Philippe A.; Paus, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, we will review different approaches that one can use with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to study both its effects on motor behavior and on neural connections in the human brain. Second, we will present evidence obtained in TMS-based studies showing that the dorsal premotor area (PMd), the ventral premotor area (PMv), the supplementary motor area (SMA), and the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) each have different roles to play in motor behavior. We highlight the importance of the PMd in response selection based on arbitrary cues and in the control of arm movements, the PMv in grasping and in the discrimination of bodily actions, the SMA in movement sequencing and in bimanual coordination, and the pre-SMA in cognitive control. We will also discuss ways in which TMS can be used to chart “true” cerebral reorganization in clinical populations and how TMS might be used as a therapeutic tool to facilitate motor recovery after stroke. We will end our review by discussing some of the methodological challenges and future directions for using this tool in basic and clinical neuroscience. PMID:21060721

  2. Determination of stimulation focality in heterogeneous head models during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Erik; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an increasingly popular tool used by both the scientific and medical community to understand and treat the brain. TMS has the potential to help people with a wide range of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and PTSD, while currently being used to treat people with chronic, drug-resistant depression. Through computer simulations, we are able to see the electric field that TMS induces in anatomical human models, but there is no measure to quantify this electric field in a way that relates to a specific patient undergoing TMS therapy. We propose a way to quantify the focality of the induced electric field in a heterogeneous head model during TMS by relating the surface area of the brain being stimulated to the total volume of the brain being stimulated. This figure would be obtained by conducting finite element analysis (FEA) simulations of TMS therapy on a patient specific head model. Using this figure to assist in TMS therapy will allow clinicians and researchers to more accurately stimulate the desired region of a patient's brain and be more equipped to do comparative studies on the effects of TMS across different patients. This work was funded by the Carver Charitable Trust.

  3. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces long-lasting changes in protein expression and histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Etiévant, Adeline; Manta, Stella; Latapy, Camille; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V.; Fecteau, Shirley; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2015-01-01

    The use of non-invasive brain stimulation like repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an increasingly popular set of methods with promising results for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Despite great enthusiasm, the impact of non-invasive brain stimulation on its neuronal substrates remains largely unknown. Here we show that rTMS applied over the frontal cortex of awaken mice induces dopamine D2 receptor dependent persistent changes of CDK5 and PSD-95 protein levels specifically within the stimulated brain area. Importantly, these modifications were associated with changes of histone acetylation at the promoter of these genes and prevented by administration of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275. These findings show that, like several other psychoactive treatments, repeated rTMS sessions can exert long-lasting effects on neuronal substrates. This underscores the need of understanding these effects in the development of future clinical applications as well as in the establishment of improved guidelines to use rTMS in non-medical settings. PMID:26585834

  4. Frontal eye field involvement in sustaining visual attention: evidence from transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Esterman, Michael; Liu, Guanyu; Okabe, Hidefusa; Reagan, Andrew; Thai, Michelle; DeGutis, Joe

    2015-05-01

    The frontal eye field (FEF), particularly the right FEF, is broadly implicated in top-down control of transient acts of attention, but less is known about its involvement in sustained attention. Although neuroimaging studies of sustained attention tasks commonly find FEF activation, it is unclear how this region contributes to moment-to-moment fluctuations in sustained performance. We sought to determine if the FEF plays a critical role in sustained attention, and if that role differs between periods of worse performance (out-of-the-zone) and periods of better performance (in-the-zone). We used offline 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to temporarily attenuate either right or left FEF excitability while participants performed a go/no-go sustained attention task (the gradual onset continuous performance task). The results demonstrate that following TMS to the right FEF, sustained attention during in-the-zone periods significantly worsened both in terms of lower accuracy and increased reaction time variability. In contrast, applying TMS to the left FEF did not significantly affect accuracy or variability. These results demonstrate that the right FEF plays a crucial role in supporting optimal sustained attention. PMID:25655445

  5. Onset Latency of Motor Evoked Potentials in Motor Cortical Mapping with Neuronavigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kallioniemi, Elisa; Pitkänen, Minna; Säisänen, Laura; Julkunen, Petro

    2015-01-01

    Cortical motor mapping in pre-surgical applications can be performed using motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes evoked with neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation. The MEP latency, which is a more stable parameter than the MEP amplitude, has not so far been utilized in motor mapping. The latency, however, may provide information about the stress in damaged motor pathways, e.g. compression by tumors, which cannot be observed from the MEP amplitudes. Thus, inclusion of this parameter could add valuable information to the presently used technique of MEP amplitude mapping. In this study, the functional cortical representations of first dorsal interosseous (FDI), abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles were mapped in both hemispheres of ten healthy righthanded volunteers. The cortical muscle representations were evaluated by the area and centre of gravity (CoG) by using MEP amplitudes and latencies. As expected, the latency and amplitude CoGs were congruent and were located in the centre of the maps but in a few subjects, instead of a single centre, several loci with short latencies were observed. In conclusion, MEP latencies may be useful in distinguishing the cortical representation areas with the most direct pathways from those pathways with prolonged latencies. However, the potential of latency mapping to identify stressed motor tract connections at the subcortical level will need to be verified in future studies with patients. PMID:26535068

  6. Assessment of standard coil positioning in transcranial magnetic stimulation in depression.

    PubMed

    Nauczyciel, Cecilia; Hellier, Pierre; Morandi, Xavier; Blestel, Sophie; Drapier, Dominique; Ferre, Jean Christophe; Barillot, Christian; Millet, Bruno

    2011-04-30

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique used in the treatment of major depression. Meta-analyses have shown that it is more efficient than a placebo and that its efficacy is enhanced by the optimum tuning of stimulation parameters. However, the stimulation target, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), is still located using an inaccurate method. In this study, a neuronavigation system was used to perform a comprehensive quantification of target localization errors. We identified and quantified 3 sources of error in the standard method: cap repositioning, interexpert variability in coil positioning and distance between the stimulated point and the expected target. For cap repositioning, the standard deviation was lower than 5mm in the 3 axes. For interexpert variability in coil positioning, the spatial dispersion of the points was higher than 10mm in 2 of the 3 axes. For interindividual anatomical variability, the distance between the actual "reference" DLPFC and its standard determination was greater than 20mm for 54% of the subjects, while one subject out of eleven was correctly targeted which means 10mm or less from the reference. Results showed that interindividual anatomical variability and interexpert variability were the two main sources of error using the standard method. Results demonstrate that a neuronavigation system is mandatory to conduct reproducible and reliable studies. PMID:20692709

  7. 76 FR 44489 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug...Neurological Devices; Classification of Repetitive Transcranial...effective date of the final classification rule, manufacturers...significant effect on the human environment. Thus...entities. Because classification of this device...

  8. Resting state connectivity in alcohol dependent patients and the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jochem M; Wingen, Guido van; Brink, Wim van den; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dependence is thought to result from an overactive neural motivation system and a deficient cognitive control system, and rebalancing these systems may mitigate excessive alcohol use. This study examines the differences in functional connectivity of the fronto-parietal cognitive control network (FPn) and the motivational network (striatum and orbitofrontal cortex) between alcohol dependent patients (ADPs) and healthy controls (HCs), and the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on these networks. This randomized controlled trial included 38 ADPs and 37 HCs, matched on age, gender and education. Participants were randomly assigned to sham or right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) stimulation with rTMS. A 3T resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scan was acquired before and after active or sham 10Hz rTMS. Group differences of within and between network connectivity and the effect of rTMS on network connectivity was assessed using independent component analysis. Results showed higher connectivity within the left FPn (p=0.012) and the left fronto-striatal motivational network (p=0.03) in ADPs versus HCs, and a further increase in connectivity within the left FPn after active stimulation in ADPs. ADPs also showed higher connectivity between the left and the right FPns (p=0.025), and this higher connectivity was related to fewer alcohol related problems (r=0.30, p=0.06). The results show higher within and between network connectivity in ADPs and a further increase in fronto-parietal connectivity after right dlPFC rTMS in ADPs, suggesting that frontal rTMS may have a beneficial influence on cognitive control and may result in lower relapse rates. PMID:26481907

  9. The Effect of Disruption of Prefrontal Cortical Function with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Visual Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Elizabeth S.; Lee, Taraz G.; Chen, Anthony J.-W.; D’Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that feedback signals from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) to extrastriate cortex are essential for goal-directed processing, maintenance, and selection of information in visual working memory (VWM). In a previous study, we found that disruption of PFC function with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in healthy individuals impaired behavioral performance on a face/scene matching task and decreased category-specific tuning in extrastriate cortex as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this study, we investigated the effect of disruption of left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) function on the fidelity of neural representations of two distinct information codes: (1) the stimulus category and (2) the goal-relevance of viewed stimuli. During fMRI scanning, subjects were presented face and scene images in pseudo-random order and instructed to remember either faces or scenes. Within both anatomical and functional regions of interest (ROIs), a multi-voxel pattern classifier was used to quantitatively assess the fidelity of activity patterns representing stimulus category: whether a face or a scene was presented on each trial, and goal relevance, whether the presented image was task relevant (i.e., a face is relevant in a “Remember Faces” block, but irrelevant in a “Remember Scenes” block). We found a reduction in the fidelity of the stimulus category code in visual cortex after left IFG disruption, providing causal evidence that lateral PFC modulates object category codes in visual cortex during VWM. In addition, we found that IFG disruption caused a reduction in the fidelity of the goal relevance code in a distributed set of brain regions. These results suggest that the IFG is involved in determining the task-relevance of visual input and communicating that information to a network of regions involved in further processing during VWM. Finally, we found that participants who exhibited greater fidelity of the goal relevance code in the non-disrupted right IFG after TMS performed the task with the highest accuracy.

  10. Solving the Orientation Specific Constraints in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation by Rotating Fields

    PubMed Central

    Neef, Nicole E.; Agudelo-Toro, Andres; Rakhmilevitch, David; Paulus, Walter; Moses, Elisha

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a promising technology for both neurology and psychiatry. Positive treatment outcome has been reported, for instance in double blind, multi-center studies on depression. Nonetheless, the application of TMS towards studying and treating brain disorders is still limited by inter-subject variability and lack of model systems accessible to TMS. The latter are required to obtain a deeper understanding of the biophysical foundations of TMS so that the stimulus protocol can be optimized for maximal brain response, while inter-subject variability hinders precise and reliable delivery of stimuli across subjects. Recent studies showed that both of these limitations are in part due to the angular sensitivity of TMS. Thus, a technique that would eradicate the need for precise angular orientation of the coil would improve both the inter-subject reliability of TMS and its effectiveness in model systems. We show here how rotation of the stimulating field relieves the angular sensitivity of TMS and provides improvements in both issues. Field rotation is attained by superposing the fields of two coils positioned orthogonal to each other and operated with a relative phase shift in time. Rotating field TMS (rfTMS) efficiently stimulates both cultured hippocampal networks and rat motor cortex, two neuronal systems that are notoriously difficult to excite magnetically. This opens the possibility of pharmacological and invasive TMS experiments in these model systems. Application of rfTMS to human subjects overcomes the orientation dependence of standard TMS. Thus, rfTMS yields optimal targeting of brain regions where correct orientation cannot be determined (e.g., via motor feedback) and will enable stimulation in brain regions where a preferred axonal orientation does not exist. PMID:24505266

  11. Testing a Neurobiological Model of Depersonalization Disorder Using Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation?

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Emma-Louise; Sierra, Mauricio; Van den Eynde, Frederique; Rothwell, John C.; David, Anthony S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Depersonalization disorder (DPD) includes changes in subjective experiencing of self, encompassing emotional numbing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has pointed to ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) inhibition of insula as a neurocognitive correlate of the disorder. Objective We hypothesized that inhibition to right VLPFC using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) would lead to increased arousal and reduced symptoms. Methods Patients with medication-resistant DSM-IV DPD (N = 17) and controls (N = 20) were randomized to receive one session of right-sided rTMS to VLPFC or temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). 1Hz rTMS was guided using neuronavigation and delivered for 15 min. Co-primary outcomes were: (a) maximum skin conductance capacity, and (b) reduction in depersonalization symptoms (Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale (CDS) [state version]). Secondary outcomes included spontaneous fluctuations (SFs) and event-related skin conductance responses. Results In patients with DPD, rTMS to VLPFC led to increased electrodermal capacity, namely maximum skin conductance deflections. Patients but not controls also showed increased SFs post rTMS. Patients who had either VLPFC or TPJ rTMS showed a similar significant reduction in symptoms. Event-related electrodermal activity did not change. Conclusions A single session of right-sided rTMS to VLPFC (but not TPJ) significantly increased physiological arousal capacity supporting our model regarding the relevance of increased VLPFC activity to emotional numbing in DPD. rTMS to both sites led to reduced depersonalization scores but since this was independent of physiological arousal, this may be a non-specific effect. TMS is a potential therapeutic option for DPD; modulation of VLPFC, if replicated, is a plausible mechanism. PMID:24439959

  12. Static field influences on transcranial magnetic stimulation: Considerations for TMS in the scanner environment

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Jeffrey M.; Jalinous, Reza; Cantarero, Gabriela L.; Desmond, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to simultaneously manipulate and monitor human cortical responses. Although tremendous efforts have been directed at characterizing the impact of TMS on image acquisition, the influence of the scanner’s static field on the TMS coil has received limited attention. Objective/Hypothesis: The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of the scanner’s static field on TMS. We hypothesized that spatial variations in the static field could account for TMS field variations in the scanner environment. Methods: Using a MRI-compatible TMS coil, we estimated TMS field strengths based on TMS-induced voltage changes measured in a search coil. We compared peak field strengths obtained with the TMS coil positioned at different locations (B0 field vs fringe field) and orientations in the static field. We also measured the scanner’s static field to derive a field map to account for TMS field variations. Results: TMS field strength scaled depending on coil location and orientation with respect to the static field. Larger TMS field variations were observed in fringe field regions near the gantry as compared to regions inside the bore or further removed from the bore. The scanner’s static field also exhibited the greatest spatial variations in fringe field regions near the gantry. Conclusions: The scanner’s static field influences TMS fields and spatial variations in the static field correlate with TMS field variations. TMS field variations can be minimized by delivering TMS in the bore or outside of the 0 - 70 cm region from the bore entrance. PMID:24656916

  13. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Clinical Applications in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flávia; Vieira, Renata Teles; Caixeta, Leonardo; Novaes, Felipe; Marinho, Tamires; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2013-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by several disabling symptoms for which effective, mechanism-based treatments remain elusive. Consequently, more advanced non-invasive therapeutic methods are required. A method that may modulate brain activity and be viable for use in clinical practice is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). It is a non-invasive procedure whereby a pulsed magnetic field stimulates electrical activity in the brain. Here, we focus on the basic foundation of rTMS, the main stimulation parametters, the factors that influence individual responses to rTMS and the experimental advances of rTMS that may become a viable clinical application to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders. The findings showed that rTMS can improve some symptoms associated with these conditions and might be useful for promoting cortical plasticity in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, these changes are transient and it is premature to propose these applications as realistic therapeutic options, even though the rTMS technique has been evidenced as a potential modulator of sensorimotor integration and neuroplasticity. Functional imaging of the region of interest could highlight the capacity of rTMS to bring about plastic changes of the cortical circuitry and hint at future novel clinical interventions. Thus, we recommend that further studies clearly determine the role of rTMS in the treatment of these conditions. Finally, we must remember that however exciting the neurobiological mechanisms might be, the clinical usefulness of rTMS will be determined by its ability to provide patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders with safe, long-lasting and substantial improvements in quality of life. PMID:25610279

  14. Motor cortex involvement during choice reaction time: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study in man.

    PubMed

    Romaiguère, P; Possamaï, C A; Hasbroucq, T

    1997-05-01

    It has been shown that transcranial magnetic stimulation can delay simple reaction time; this happens when the stimulation is delivered during the reaction time and over the cortical area which commands the prime mover of the required response. Although it is agreed that magnetic stimulation could be a useful tool for studying information processing in man, we argue that, because of the use of simple reaction time, the results reported so far are difficult to interpret within this theoretical framework. In the present paper, three experiments are reported. Six subjects participated in experiment 1 in which magnetic stimulation was delivered, at different times, during choice reaction time. The effects of the magnetic stimulation of the cortical area involved in the response (induced current passing forward over the motor representation of the responding hand), were compared to the effects of an electrical stimulation of the median nerve (H-reflex). In a first control experiment (experiment 2a; 5 subjects), the coil was placed over the ipsilateral motor cortex (induced current passing backward over the motor representation of the non-responding hand) thus minimizing the probability to excite the same neural nets as in the first experiment. In a second control experiment (experiment 2b; 4 subjects), the coil was placed a few centimeters away from the subject's scalp thus ensuring no stimulation of any neural nets. The results show that: (1) the noise and the smarting of the skin associated with the coil discharge produce an intersensory facilitation thereby shortening reaction time (experiment 2a), (2) actually, the noise produced by the stimulation is sufficient to produce such a facilitatory effect (experiment 2b), (3) a stimulation over the area at the origin of the motor command causes a reaction time delay which counteracts this intersensory facilitation effect (experiment 1), (4) in this latter case, the closer the stimulation to the actual overt response, the longer the delay and (5) there is no trace of correlation between the amplitude of the motor evoked potential and the reaction time change. PMID:9175886

  15. Probing the Pathophysiology of Auditory/Verbal Hallucinations by Combining Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Ralph E.; Hampson, Michelle; Wu, Kun; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.; Buchanan, Robert J.; Constable, R. Todd; Hawkins, Keith A.; Sahay, Neayka; Krystal, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) were used to explore the pathophysiology of auditory/verbal hallucinations (AVHs). Sixteen patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorder were studied with continuous or near continuous AVHs. For patients with intermittent hallucinations (N = 8), blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) activation maps comparing hallucination and nonhallucination periods were generated. For patients with continuous hallucinations (N = 8) correlations between BOLD signal time course in Wernicke’s area, and other regions were used to map functional coupling to the former. These maps were used to identify 3–6 cortical sites per patient that were probed with 1-Hz rTMS and sham stimulation. Delivering rTMS to left temporoparietal sites in Wernicke’s area and the adjacent supramarginal gyrus was accompanied by a greater rate of AVH improvement compared with sham stimulation and rTMS delivered to anterior temporal sites. For intermittent hallucinators, lower levels of hallucination-related activation in Broca’s area strongly predicted greater rate of response to left temporoparietal rTMS. For continuous hallucinators, reduced coupling between Wernicke’s and a right homologue of Broca’s area strongly predicted greater left temporoparietal rTMS rate of response. These findings suggest that dominant hemisphere temporoparietal areas are involved in expressing AVHs, with higher levels of coactivation and/or coupling involving inferior frontal regions reinforcing underlying pathophysiology. PMID:17298962

  16. The effect of current flow direction on motor hot spot allocation by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stephani, Caspar; Paulus, Walter; Sommer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the significance of pulse configurations and current direction for corticospinal activation using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In 11 healthy subjects (8 female), a motor map for the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) recorded from the first dorsal interosseus (FDI), abductor digiti minimi (ADM), extensor carpi radialis, and biceps brachii (BB) muscles of the dominant side was established. Starting from a manually determined hot spot of the FDI representation, we measured MEPs at equal oriented points on an hexagonal grid, with 7 MEPs recorded at each point, using the following pulse configurations: posteriorly directed monophasic (Mo-P), anteriorly directed monophasic (Mo-A), biphasic with the more relevant second cycle oriented posteriorly (Bi-P) as well as a reversed biphasic condition (Bi-A). For each pulse configuration, a hot spot was determined and a center of gravity (CoG) was calculated. We found that the factor current direction had an effect on location of the CoG-adjusted hot spot in the cranio-caudal axis but not in the latero-medial direction with anteriorly directed pulses locating the CoG more anteriorly and vice versa. In addition, the CoG for the FDI was more laterally than the cortical representations for the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) which were registered as well. The results indicate that direction of the current pulse should be taken into account for determination of the motor representation of a muscle by TMS. PMID:26733248

  17. [Clinical applications of transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of various neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2005-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used as a potential therapeutic tool in various neurological and psychiatric diseases including depression, Parkinson disease, spinocerebellar degeneration, epilepsy, urinary incontinence, movement disorders, chronic pain, migraine and chronic tinnitus, etc. Several reports showed the therapeutic effects of rTMS as a treatment of depression and Parkinson disease (PD), whereas others found no significant effects. It is by now not yet fully understood whether rTMS has a therapeutic effect on those diseases. The controversy arises from the differences of the stimulation parameters and evaluation methods of the effects in those studies. The Japanese multi-center, double blinded, sham stimulation controlled trial in 85 patients with PD showed an efficacy in both the rTMS-treated and sham stimulated patients. This result does not prove the efficacy of the rTMS in PD; on the other hand, it does not rule out the efficacy. Possible mechanism of favorable effects of rTMS is related to increasing the release of dopamine in the mesolimbic and mesostriatal system. The other Japanese multi-center, double blinded, sham stimulation controlled trial in 99 patients with spinocerebellar degeneration revealed significant therapeutic effects of rTMS in 51 patients with SCA6. We studied the effects of rTMS on seizure susceptibility in rats which prevented the development of status epilepticus of pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsions. This finding suggests the possibility of therapeutic use of rTMS in epilepsy. Further studies should be performed aiming to reveal the optimal stimulation parameters, and are necessary to reveal the therapeutic role of the rTMS in neurological and psychiatric diseases. PMID:16447738

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and preparation of visually-guided reaching movements

    PubMed Central

    Busan, Pierpaolo; Zanon, Marco; Vinciati, Federica; Monti, Fabrizio; Pizzolato, Gilberto; Battaglini, Piero P.

    2012-01-01

    To better define the neural networks related to preparation of reaching, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the lateral parietal and frontal cortex. TMS did not evoke effects closely related to preparation of reaching, suggesting that neural networks already identified by our group are not larger than previously thought. We also replicated previous TMS/EEG data by applying TMS to the parietal cortex: new analyses were performed to better support reliability of already reported findings (Zanon et al., 2010; Brain Topography 22, 307–317). We showed the existence of neural circuits ranging from posterior to frontal regions of the brain after the stimulation of parietal cortex, supporting the idea of strong connections among these areas and suggesting their possible temporal dynamic. Connection with ventral stream was confirmed. The present work helps to define those areas which are involved in preparation of natural reaching in humans. They correspond to parieto-occipital, parietal and premotor medial regions of the left hemisphere, i.e., the contralateral one with respect to the moving hand, as suggested by previous studies. Behavioral data support the existence of a discrete stream involved in reaching. Besides the serial flow of activation from posterior to anterior direction, a parallel elaboration of information among parietal and premotor areas seems also to exist. Present cortico-cortical interactions (TMS/EEG experiment) show propagation of activity to frontal, temporal, parietal and more posterior regions, exhibiting distributed communication among various areas in the brain. The neural system highlighted by TMS/EEG experiments is wider with respect to the one disclosed by the TMS behavioral approach. Further studies are needed to unravel this paucity of overlap. Moreover, the understanding of these mechanisms is crucial for the comprehension of response inhibition and changes in prepared actions, which are common behaviors in everyday life. PMID:22891059

  19. Perfusion MRI indexes variability in the functional brain effects of theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gratton, Caterina; Lee, Taraz G; Nomura, Emi M; D'Esposito, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an important tool for testing causal relationships in cognitive neuroscience research. However, the efficacy of TMS can be variable across individuals and difficult to measure. This variability is especially a challenge when TMS is applied to regions without well-characterized behavioral effects, such as in studies using TMS on multi-modal areas in intrinsic networks. Here, we examined whether perfusion fMRI recordings of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), a quantitative measure sensitive to slow functional changes, reliably index variability in the effects of stimulation. Twenty-seven participants each completed four combined TMS-fMRI sessions during which both resting state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) and perfusion Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) scans were recorded. In each session after the first baseline day, continuous theta-burst TMS (TBS) was applied to one of three locations: left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L dlPFC), left anterior insula/frontal operculum (L aI/fO), or left primary somatosensory cortex (L S1). The two frontal targets are components of intrinsic networks and L S1 was used as an experimental control. CBF changes were measured both before and after TMS on each day from a series of interleaved resting state and perfusion scans. Although TBS led to weak selective increases under the coil in CBF measurements across the group, individual subjects showed wide variability in their responses. TBS-induced changes in rCBF were related to TBS-induced changes in functional connectivity of the relevant intrinsic networks measured during separate resting-state BOLD scans. This relationship was selective: CBF and functional connectivity of these networks were not related before TBS or after TBS to the experimental control region (S1). Furthermore, subject groups with different directions of CBF change after TBS showed distinct modulations in the functional interactions of targeted networks. These results suggest that CBF is a marker of individual differences in the effects of TBS. PMID:24992641

  20. Evidence-based guidelines on the therapeutic use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS).

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Antal, Andrea; Ayache, Samar S; Baeken, Chris; Benninger, David H; Cantello, Roberto M; Cincotta, Massimo; de Carvalho, Mamede; De Ridder, Dirk; Devanne, Hervé; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Filipovi?, Saša R; Hummel, Friedhelm C; Jääskeläinen, Satu K; Kimiskidis, Vasilios K; Koch, Giacomo; Langguth, Berthold; Nyffeler, Thomas; Oliviero, Antonio; Padberg, Frank; Poulet, Emmanuel; Rossi, Simone; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Rothwell, John C; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos; Siebner, Hartwig R; Slotema, Christina W; Stagg, Charlotte J; Valls-Sole, Josep; Ziemann, Ulf; Paulus, Walter; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2014-11-01

    A group of European experts was commissioned to establish guidelines on the therapeutic use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) from evidence published up until March 2014, regarding pain, movement disorders, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, consciousness disorders, tinnitus, depression, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, craving/addiction, and conversion. Despite unavoidable inhomogeneities, there is a sufficient body of evidence to accept with level A (definite efficacy) the analgesic effect of high-frequency (HF) rTMS of the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the pain and the antidepressant effect of HF-rTMS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A Level B recommendation (probable efficacy) is proposed for the antidepressant effect of low-frequency (LF) rTMS of the right DLPFC, HF-rTMS of the left DLPFC for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, and LF-rTMS of contralesional M1 in chronic motor stroke. The effects of rTMS in a number of indications reach level C (possible efficacy), including LF-rTMS of the left temporoparietal cortex in tinnitus and auditory hallucinations. It remains to determine how to optimize rTMS protocols and techniques to give them relevance in routine clinical practice. In addition, professionals carrying out rTMS protocols should undergo rigorous training to ensure the quality of the technical realization, guarantee the proper care of patients, and maximize the chances of success. Under these conditions, the therapeutic use of rTMS should be able to develop in the coming years. PMID:25034472

  1. The Effect of 10 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Posterior Parietal Cortex on Visual Attention

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowe, Isabel; Juravle, Georgiana; Alavash, Mohsen; Gießing, Carsten; Hilgetag, Claus C.

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) at frequencies lower than 5 Hz transiently inhibits the stimulated area. In healthy participants, such a protocol can induce a transient attentional bias to the visual hemifield ipsilateral to the stimulated hemisphere. This bias might be due to a relatively less active stimulated hemisphere and a relatively more active unstimulated hemisphere. In a previous study, Jin and Hilgetag (2008) tried to switch the attention bias from the hemifield ipsilateral to the hemifield contralateral to the stimulated hemisphere by applying high frequency rTMS. High frequency rTMS has been shown to excite, rather than inhibit, the stimulated brain area. However, the bias to the ipsilateral hemifield was still present. The participants’ performance decreased when stimuli were presented in the hemifield contralateral to the stimulation site. In the present study we tested if this unexpected result was related to the fact that participants were passively resting during stimulation rather than performing a task. Using a fully crossed factorial design, we compared the effects of high frequency rTMS applied during a visual detection task and high frequency rTMS during passive rest on the subsequent offline performance in the same detection task. Our results were mixed. After sham stimulation, performance was better after rest than after task. After active 10 Hz rTMS, participants’ performance was overall better after task than after rest. However, this effect did not reach statistical significance. The comparison of performance after rTMS with task and performance after sham stimulation with task showed that 10 Hz stimulation significantly improved performance in the whole visual field. Thus, although we found a trend to better performance after rTMS with task than after rTMS during rest, we could not reject the hypothesis that high frequency rTMS with task and high frequency rTMS during rest equally affect performance. PMID:25970438

  2. Preoperative motor mapping by navigated transcranial magnetic brain stimulation improves outcome for motor eloquent lesions

    PubMed Central

    Krieg, Sandro M.; Sabih, Jamil; Bulubasova, Lucia; Obermueller, Thomas; Negwer, Chiara; Janssen, Insa; Shiban, Ehab; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Background Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) has been proven to influence surgical indication and planning. Yet there is still no clear evidence how these additional preoperative functional data influence the clinical course and outcome. Thus, this study aimed to compare patients with motor eloquently located supratentorial lesions investigated with or without preoperative nTMS in terms of clinical outcome parameters. Methods A prospectively enrolled cohort of 100 patients with supratentorial lesions located in motor eloquent areas was investigated by preoperative nTMS (2010–2013) and matched with a control of 100 patients who were operated on without nTMS data (2006–2010) by a matched pair analysis. Results Patients in the nTMS group showed a significantly lower rate of residual tumor on postoperative MRI (OR 0.3828; 95% CI 0.2062–0.7107). Twelve percent of patients in the nTMS and 1% of patients in the non-nTMS group improved while 75% and 81% of the nTMS and non-nTMS groups, respectively, remained unchanged and 13% and 18% of patients in the nTMS and non-nTMS groups, respectively, deteriorated in postoperative motor function on long-term follow-up (P = .0057). Moreover, the nTMS group showed smaller craniotomies (nTMS 22.4 ± 8.3 cm2; non-nTMS 26.7 ± 11.3 cm2; P = .0023). Conclusions This work increases the level of evidence for preoperative motor mapping by nTMS for rolandic lesions in a group comparison study. We therefore strongly advocate nTMS to become increasingly used for these lesions. However, a randomized trial on the comparison with the gold standard of intraoperative mapping seems mandatory. PMID:24516237

  3. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; D?Ostilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C.; Murphy, David L.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach. We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with a lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results. cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (\\lt 10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in ten healthy volunteers. Significance. The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool.

  4. Conditioning effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation evoking motor-evoked potential on V-wave response.

    PubMed

    Grosprêtre, Sidney; Martin, Alain

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the collision responsible for the volitional V-wave evoked by supramaximal electrical stimulation of the motor nerve during voluntary contraction. V-wave was conditioned by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex at several inter-stimuli intervals (ISI) during weak voluntary plantar flexions (n = 10) and at rest for flexor carpi radialis muscle (FCR; n = 6). Conditioning stimulations were induced by TMS with intensity eliciting maximal motor-evoked potential (MEPmax). ISIs used were ranging from -20 to +20 msec depending on muscles tested. The results showed that, for triceps surae muscles, conditioning TMS increased the V-wave amplitude (~ +250%) and the associated mechanical response (~ +30%) during weak voluntary plantar flexion (10% of the maximal voluntary contraction -MVC) for ISIs ranging from +6 to +18 msec. Similar effect was observed at rest for the FCR with ISI ranging from +6 to +12 msec. When the level of force was increased from 10 to 50% MVC or the conditioning TMS intensity was reduced to elicit responses of 50% of MEPmax, a significant decrease in the conditioned V-wave amplitude was observed for the triceps surae muscles, linearly correlated to the changes in MEP amplitude. The slope of this correlation, as well as the electro-mechanical efficiency, was closed to the identity line, indicating that V-wave impact at muscle level seems to be similar to the impact of cortical stimulation. All these results suggest that change in V-wave amplitude is a great index to reflect changes in cortical neural drive addressed to spinal motoneurons. PMID:25501438

  5. Perfusion MRI Indexes Variability in the Functional Brain Effects of Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Caterina; Lee, Taraz G.; Nomura, Emi M.; D’Esposito, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an important tool for testing causal relationships in cognitive neuroscience research. However, the efficacy of TMS can be variable across individuals and difficult to measure. This variability is especially a challenge when TMS is applied to regions without well-characterized behavioral effects, such as in studies using TMS on multi-modal areas in intrinsic networks. Here, we examined whether perfusion fMRI recordings of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), a quantitative measure sensitive to slow functional changes, reliably index variability in the effects of stimulation. Twenty-seven participants each completed four combined TMS-fMRI sessions during which both resting state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) and perfusion Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) scans were recorded. In each session after the first baseline day, continuous theta-burst TMS (TBS) was applied to one of three locations: left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L dlPFC), left anterior insula/frontal operculum (L aI/fO), or left primary somatosensory cortex (L S1). The two frontal targets are components of intrinsic networks and L S1 was used as an experimental control. CBF changes were measured both before and after TMS on each day from a series of interleaved resting state and perfusion scans. Although TBS led to weak selective increases under the coil in CBF measurements across the group, individual subjects showed wide variability in their responses. TBS-induced changes in rCBF were related to TBS-induced changes in functional connectivity of the relevant intrinsic networks measured during separate resting-state BOLD scans. This relationship was selective: CBF and functional connectivity of these networks were not related before TBS or after TBS to the experimental control region (S1). Furthermore, subject groups with different directions of CBF change after TBS showed distinct modulations in the functional interactions of targeted networks. These results suggest that CBF is a marker of individual differences in the effects of TBS. PMID:24992641

  6. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    PubMed Central

    D’Ostilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C; Murphy, David L

    2014-01-01

    Objective This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (<10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in 10 healthy volunteers. Significance The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool. PMID:25242286

  7. Suppression of Motor Cortical Excitability in Anesthetized Rats by Low Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Paul A.; Dhamne, Sameer C.; Vahabzadeh-Hagh, Andrew M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jensen, Frances E.; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a widely-used method for modulating cortical excitability in humans, by mechanisms thought to involve use-dependent synaptic plasticity. For example, when low frequency rTMS (LF rTMS) is applied over the motor cortex, in humans, it predictably leads to a suppression of the motor evoked potential (MEP), presumably reflecting long-term depression (LTD) – like mechanisms. Yet how closely such rTMS effects actually match LTD is unknown. We therefore sought to (1) reproduce cortico-spinal depression by LF rTMS in rats, (2) establish a reliable animal model for rTMS effects that may enable mechanistic studies, and (3) test whether LTD-like properties are evident in the rat LF rTMS setup. Lateralized MEPs were obtained from anesthetized Long-Evans rats. To test frequency-dependence of LF rTMS, rats underwent rTMS at one of three frequencies, 0.25, 0.5, or 1 Hz. We next tested the dependence of rTMS effects on N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR), by application of two NMDAR antagonists. We find that 1 Hz rTMS preferentially depresses unilateral MEP in rats, and that this LTD-like effect is blocked by NMDAR antagonists. These are the first electrophysiological data showing depression of cortical excitability following LF rTMS in rats, and the first to demonstrate dependence of this form of cortical plasticity on the NMDAR. We also note that our report is the first to show that the capacity for LTD-type cortical suppression by rTMS is present under barbiturate anesthesia, suggesting that future neuromodulatory rTMS applications under anesthesia may be considered. PMID:24646791

  8. Investigating Representations of Facial Identity in Human Ventral Visual Cortex with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Silvanto, Juha; Schwarzkopf, Dietrich S.; Rees, Geraint

    2010-01-01

    The occipital face area (OFA) is face-selective. This enhanced activation to faces could reflect either generic face and shape-related processing or high-level conceptual processing of identity. Here we examined these two possibilities using a state-dependent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigm. The lateral occipital (LO) cortex which is activated non-selectively by various types of objects served as a control site. We localized OFA and LO on a per-participant basis using functional MRI. We then examined whether TMS applied to either of these regions affected the ability of participants to decide whether two successively presented and physically different face images were of the same famous person or different famous people. TMS was applied during the delay between first and second face presentations to investigate whether neuronal populations in these regions played a causal role in mediating the behavioral effects of identity repetition. Behaviorally we found a robust identity repetition effect, with shorter reaction times (RTs) when identity was repeated, regardless of the fact that the pictures were physically different. Surprisingly, TMS applied over LO (but not OFA) modulated overall RTs, compared to the No-TMS condition. But critically, we found no effects of TMS to either area that were modulated by identity repetition. Thus, we found no evidence to suggest that OFA or LO contain neuronal representations selective for the identity of famous faces which play a causal role in identity processing. Instead, these brain regions may be involved in the processing of more generic features of their preferred stimulus categories. PMID:20631842

  9. Changes in Voluntary Activation Assessed by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation during Prolonged Cycling Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Perrey, Stephane; Temesi, John; Wuyam, Bernard; Levy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel; Millet, Guillaume Y.

    2014-01-01

    Maximal central motor drive is known to decrease during prolonged exercise although it remains to be determined whether a supraspinal deficit exists, and if so, when it appears. The purpose of this study was to evaluate corticospinal excitability and muscle voluntary activation before, during and after a 4-h cycling exercise. Ten healthy subjects performed three 80-min bouts on an ergocycle at 45% of their maximal aerobic power. Before exercise and immediately after each bout, neuromuscular function was evaluated in the quadriceps femoris muscles under isometric conditions. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess voluntary activation at the cortical level (VATMS), corticospinal excitability via motor-evoked potential (MEP) and intracortical inhibition by cortical silent period (CSP). Electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve was used to measure voluntary activation at the peripheral level (VAFNES) and muscle contractile properties. Maximal voluntary force was significantly reduced after the first bout (13±9%, P<0.01) and was further decreased (25±11%, P<0.001) at the end of exercise. CSP remained unchanged throughout the protocol. Rectus femoris and vastus lateralis but not vastus medialis MEP normalized to maximal M-wave amplitude significantly increased during cycling. Finally, significant decreases in both VATMS and VAFNES (?8%, P<0.05 and ?14%, P<0.001 post-exercise, respectively) were observed. In conclusion, reductions in VAFNES after a prolonged cycling exercise are partly explained by a deficit at the cortical level accompanied by increased corticospinal excitability and unchanged intracortical inhibition. When comparing the present results with the literature, this study highlights that changes at the cortical and/or motoneuronal levels depend not only on the type of exercise (single-joint vs. whole-body) but also on exercise intensity and/or duration. PMID:24586559

  10. Modulation of corticospinal excitability by transcranial magnetic stimulation in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Oberman, Lindsay M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The developmental pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is currently not fully understood. However, multiple lines of evidence suggest that the behavioral phenotype may result from dysfunctional inhibitory control over excitatory synaptic plasticity. Consistent with this claim, previous studies indicate that adults with Asperger’s Syndrome show an abnormally extended modulation of corticospinal excitability following a train of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). As ASD is a developmental disorder, the current study aimed to explore the effect of development on the duration of modulation of corticospinal excitability in children and adolescents with ASD. Additionally, as the application of rTMS to the understanding and treatment of pediatric neurological and psychiatric disorders is an emerging field, this study further sought to provide evidence for the safety and tolerability of rTMS in children and adolescents with ASD. Corticospinal excitability was measured by applying single pulses of TMS to the primary motor cortex both before and following a 40 s train of continuous theta burst stimulation. 19 high-functioning males ages 9–18 with ASD participated in this study. Results from this study reveal a positive linear relationship between age and duration of modulation of rTMS after-effects. Specifically we found that the older participants had a longer lasting response. Furthermore, though the specific protocol employed typically suppresses corticospinal excitability in adults, more than one third of our sample had a paradoxical facilitatory response to the stimulation. Results support the safety and tolerability of rTMS in pediatric clinical populations. Data also support published theories implicating aberrant plasticity and GABAergic dysfunction in this population. PMID:25165441

  11. Effect of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Patients With Dysarthria After Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Gyu; Do, Kyung Hee; Park, Sung Jong; Chang, Min Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) could improve dysarthria in stroke patients at the subacute stage. Methods This study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial. Patients who had unilateral middle cerebral artery infarction were enrolled. In patients in the rTMS group, we found hot spots by searching for the evoked motor potential of the orbicularis oris on the non-affected side. We performed rTMS at a low frequency (1 Hz), 1,500 stimulations/day, 5 days a week for 2 weeks on the hotspots. We used the same protocol in the sham stimulation group patients as that in the rTMS group, except that the angle of the coil was perpendicular to the skull rather than tangential to it. The patients in both groups received speech therapy for 30 minutes, 5 days a week from a skilled speech therapist. The speech therapist measured the Urimal Test of Articulation and Phonology, alternative motion rates, sequential motion rates, and maximal phonation time before and after intervention sessions. Results Forty-two patients were enrolled in this study and 20 completed the study. Statistical analysis revealed significant improvements on the dysarthria scales in both groups. The sequential motion rate (SMR)-P?T?K? showed significantly greater improvement in the rTMS group patients than in the sham stimulation group. Conclusion Patients in the rTMS group showed greater improvement in articulation than did patients in the sham rTMS group. Therefore, rTMS can have a synergistic effect with speech therapy in treating dysarthria after stroke. PMID:26605178

  12. Excitability of the motor system: A transcranial magnetic stimulation study on singing and speaking.

    PubMed

    Royal, Isabelle; Lidji, Pascale; Théoret, Hugo; Russo, Frank A; Peretz, Isabelle

    2015-08-01

    The perception of movements is associated with increased activity in the human motor cortex, which in turn may underlie our ability to understand actions, as it may be implicated in the recognition, understanding and imitation of actions. Here, we investigated the involvement and lateralization of the primary motor cortex (M1) in the perception of singing and speech. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied independently for both hemispheres over the mouth representation of the motor cortex in healthy participants while they watched 4-s audiovisual excerpts of singers producing a 2-note ascending interval (singing condition) or 4-s audiovisual excerpts of a person explaining a proverb (speech condition). Subjects were instructed to determine whether a sung interval/written proverb, matched a written interval/proverb. During both tasks, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the contralateral mouth muscle (orbicularis oris) of the stimulated motor cortex compared to a control task. Moreover, to investigate the time course of motor activation, TMS pulses were randomly delivered at 7 different time points (ranging from 500 to 3500 ms after stimulus onset). Results show that stimulation of the right hemisphere had a similar effect on the MEPs for both the singing and speech perception tasks, whereas stimulation of the left hemisphere significantly differed in the speech perception task compared to the singing perception task. Furthermore, analysis of the MEPs in the singing task revealed that they decreased for small musical intervals, but increased for large musical intervals, regardless of which hemisphere was stimulated. Overall, these results suggest a dissociation between the lateralization of M1 activity for speech perception and for singing perception, and that in the latter case its activity can be modulated by musical parameters such as the size of a musical interval. PMID:26116909

  13. Excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces improvements in chronic post-stroke aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Vannest, Jennifer; Wu, Steve W.; DiFrancesco, Mark W.; Banks, Christi; Gilbert, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Aphasia affects 1/3 of stroke patients with improvements noted only in some of them. The goal of this exploratory study was to provide preliminary evidence regarding safety and efficacy of fMRI-guided excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to the residual left-hemispheric Broca’s area for chronic aphasia treatment. Material/Methods We enrolled 8 patients with moderate or severe aphasia >1 year after LMCA stroke. Linguistic battery was administered pre-/post-rTMS; a semantic decision/tone decision (SDTD) fMRI task was used to localize left-hemispheric Broca’s area. RTMS protocol consisted of 10 daily treatments of 200 seconds each using an excitatory stimulation protocol called intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS). Coil placement was targeted individually to the left Broca’s. Results 6/8 patients showed significant pre-/post-rTMS improvements in semantic fluency (p=0.028); they were able to generate more appropriate words when prompted with a semantic category. Pre-/post-rTMS fMRI maps showed increases in left fronto-temporo-parietal language networks with a significant left-hemispheric shift in the left frontal (p=0.025), left temporo-parietal (p=0.038) regions and global language LI (p=0.018). Patients tended to report subjective improvement on Communicative Activities Log (mini-CAL; p=0.075). None of the subjects reported ill effects of rTMS. Conclusions FMRI-guided, excitatory rTMS applied to the affected Broca’s area improved language skills in patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia; these improvements correlated with increased language lateralization to the left hemisphere. This rTMS protocol appears to be safe and should be further tested in blinded studies assessing its short- and long-term safety/efficacy for post-stroke aphasia rehabilitation. PMID:21358599

  14. The Use and Abuse of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Modulate Corticospinal Excitability in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Martin E.; Taylor, Janet L.; Gandevia, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of reported physiological effects induced using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to modulate human motor cortical excitability have proven difficult to replicate routinely. We conducted an online survey on the prevalence and possible causes of these reproducibility issues. A total of 153 researchers were identified via their publications and invited to complete an anonymous internet-based survey that asked about their experience trying to reproduce published findings for various TMS protocols. The prevalence of questionable research practices known to contribute to low reproducibility was also determined. We received 47 completed surveys from researchers with an average of 16.4 published papers (95% CI 10.8–22.0) that used TMS to modulate motor cortical excitability. Respondents also had a mean of 4.0 (2.5–5.7) relevant completed studies that would never be published. Across a range of TMS protocols, 45–60% of respondents found similar results to those in the original publications; the other respondents were able to reproduce the original effects only sometimes or not at all. Only 20% of respondents used formal power calculations to determine study sample sizes. Others relied on previously published studies (25%), personal experience (24%) or flexible post-hoc criteria (41%). Approximately 44% of respondents knew researchers who engaged in questionable research practices (range 32–70%), yet only 18% admitted to engaging in them (range 6–38%). These practices included screening subjects to find those that respond in a desired way to a TMS protocol, selectively reporting results and rejecting data based on a gut feeling. In a sample of 56 published papers that were inspected, not a single questionable research practice was reported. Our survey revealed that approximately 50% of researchers are unable to reproduce published TMS effects. Researchers need to start increasing study sample size and eliminating—or at least reporting—questionable research practices in order to make the outcomes of TMS research reproducible. PMID:26629998

  15. The Effect of Disruption of Prefrontal Cortical Function with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Visual Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Elizabeth S; Lee, Taraz G; Chen, Anthony J-W; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that feedback signals from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) to extrastriate cortex are essential for goal-directed processing, maintenance, and selection of information in visual working memory (VWM). In a previous study, we found that disruption of PFC function with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in healthy individuals impaired behavioral performance on a face/scene matching task and decreased category-specific tuning in extrastriate cortex as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this study, we investigated the effect of disruption of left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) function on the fidelity of neural representations of two distinct information codes: (1) the stimulus category and (2) the goal-relevance of viewed stimuli. During fMRI scanning, subjects were presented face and scene images in pseudo-random order and instructed to remember either faces or scenes. Within both anatomical and functional regions of interest (ROIs), a multi-voxel pattern classifier was used to quantitatively assess the fidelity of activity patterns representing stimulus category: whether a face or a scene was presented on each trial, and goal relevance, whether the presented image was task relevant (i.e., a face is relevant in a "Remember Faces" block, but irrelevant in a "Remember Scenes" block). We found a reduction in the fidelity of the stimulus category code in visual cortex after left IFG disruption, providing causal evidence that lateral PFC modulates object category codes in visual cortex during VWM. In addition, we found that IFG disruption caused a reduction in the fidelity of the goal relevance code in a distributed set of brain regions. These results suggest that the IFG is involved in determining the task-relevance of visual input and communicating that information to a network of regions involved in further processing during VWM. Finally, we found that participants who exhibited greater fidelity of the goal relevance code in the non-disrupted right IFG after TMS performed the task with the highest accuracy. PMID:26732764

  16. Inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex modulates early affective processing.

    PubMed

    Zwanzger, Peter; Steinberg, Christian; Rehbein, Maimu Alissa; Bröckelmann, Ann-Kathrin; Dobel, Christian; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Domschke, Katharina; Junghöfer, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) has often been suggested as a key modulator of emotional stimulus appraisal and regulation. Therefore, in clinical trials, it is one of the most frequently targeted regions for non-invasive brain stimulation such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). In spite of various encouraging reports that demonstrate beneficial effects of rTMS in anxiety disorders, psychophysiological studies exploring the underlying neural mechanisms are sparse. Here we investigated how inhibitory rTMS influences early affective processing when applied over the right dlPFC. Before and after rTMS or sham stimulation, subjects viewed faces with fearful or neutral expressions while whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) was recorded. Due to the disrupted functioning of the right dlPFC, visual processing in bilateral parietal, temporal, and occipital areas was amplified starting at around 90 ms after stimulus onset. Moreover, increased fear-specific activation was found in the right TPJ area in a time-interval between 110 and 170 ms. These neurophysiological effects were reflected in slowed reaction times for fearful, but not for neutral faces in a facial expression identification task while there was no such effect on a gender discrimination control task. Our study confirms the specific and important role of the dlPFC in regulation of early emotional attention and encourages future clinical research to use minimal invasive methods such as transcranial magnetic (TMS) or direct current stimulation (tDCS). PMID:25019678

  17. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces oscillatory power changes in chronic tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Schecklmann, Martin; Lehner, Astrid; Gollmitzer, Judith; Schmidt, Eldrid; Schlee, Winfried; Langguth, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is associated with neuroplastic changes in auditory and non-auditory cortical areas. About 10 years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of auditory and prefrontal cortex was introduced as potential treatment for tinnitus. The resulting changes in tinnitus loudness are interpreted in the context of rTMS induced activity changes (neuroplasticity). Here, we investigate the effect of single rTMS sessions on oscillatory power to probe the capacity of rTMS to interfere with tinnitus-specific cortical plasticity. We measured 20 patients with bilateral chronic tinnitus and 20 healthy controls comparable for age, sex, handedness, and hearing level with a 63-channel electroencephalography (EEG) system. Educational level, intelligence, depressivity and hyperacusis were controlled for by analysis of covariance. Different rTMS protocols were tested: Left and right temporal and left and right prefrontal cortices were each stimulated with 200 pulses at 1 Hz and with an intensity of 60% stimulator output. Stimulation of central parietal cortex with 6-fold reduced intensity (inverted passive-cooled coil) served as sham condition. Before and after each rTMS protocol 5 min of resting state EEG were recorded. The order of rTMS protocols was randomized over two sessions with 1 week interval in between. Analyses on electrode level showed that people with and without tinnitus differed in their response to left temporal and right frontal stimulation. In tinnitus patients left temporal rTMS decreased frontal theta and delta and increased beta2 power, whereas right frontal rTMS decreased right temporal beta3 and gamma power. No changes or increases were observed in the control group. Only non-systematic changes in tinnitus loudness were induced by single sessions of rTMS. This is the first study to show tinnitus-related alterations of neuroplasticity that were specific to stimulation site and oscillatory frequency. The observed effects can be interpreted within the thalamocortical dysrhythmia model assuming that slow waves represent processes of deafferentiation and that high frequencies might be indicators for tinnitus loudness. Moreover our findings confirm the role of the left temporal and the right frontal areas as relevant hubs in tinnitus related neuronal network. Our results underscore the value of combined TMS-EEG measurements for investigating disease related changes in neuroplasticity. PMID:26557055

  18. Suppression of voluntary motor activity revealed using transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex in man.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, N J; Romaiguère, P; Maskill, D W; Ellaway, P H

    1994-01-01

    1. Suppression of voluntary muscle activity of hand and arm muscles in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex has been investigated in man. 2. Suppression could be elicited by low levels of TMS without any prior excitatory response. The latency of the suppression was 3-8 ms longer than the excitation observed at a higher stimulus intensity. The duration of the suppression ranged from 8 to 26 ms. 3. A circular stimulating coil was used to determine threshold intensity for excitation and suppression of contraction of thenar muscles in response to TMS at different locations over the motor cortex. The locations for lowest threshold excitation coincided with those for lowest threshold suppression. Suppression was elicited at a lower threshold than excitation at all locations. 4. A figure-of-eight stimulating coil was positioned over the left motor cortex at the lowest threshold point for excitation of the right thenar muscles. The orientation for the lowest threshold excitatory and inhibitory responses was the same for all subjects. That orientation induced a stimulating current travelling in an antero-medial direction. Suppression was invariably elicited at lower thresholds than excitation. 5. When antagonistic muscles (second and third dorsal interosseus) were co-contracted, TMS evoked coincident suppression of voluntary EMG in the two muscles without prior excitation of either muscle. This suggests that the suppression is not mediated via corticospinal activation of spinal interneurones. 6. Test responses to electrical stimulation of the cervical spinal cord were evoked in both relaxed and activated thenar muscles. In the relaxed muscle, prior TMS at an intensity that would suppress voluntary activity failed to influence the test responses, suggesting absence of inhibition at a spinal level. However, in the activated muscle, prior TMS could reduce the test response. This may be explained by disfacilitation of motoneurones due to inhibition of corticospinal output. 7. We propose that suppression of voluntary muscle activity by TMS is due in large part to activation of a mechanism within the motor cortex that reduces the corticospinal output to the muscle. It is concluded that TMS evokes excitation and inhibition via neuronal structures lying close to one another and having similar orientations. PMID:7932215

  19. Safety study of 50 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, David H.; Lomarev, Mikhail; Wassermann, Eric; Lopez, Grisel; Houdayer, Elise; Fasano, Rebecca E.; Dang, Nguyet; Hallett, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has shown promising results in treating Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the best values for rTMS parameters are not established. 50 Hz rTMS may be superior to ? 25 Hz rTMS investigated so far. The objective of this study was to determine if 50 Hz rTMS could be delivered safely in PD patients since current safety limits are exceeded. Methods 50 Hz rTMS was applied with a circular coil on the primary motor cortex (M1). Stimulation intensity was first tested at 60% rest motor threshold [RMT] and 0.5 sec train duration and then increased in 0.5 sec steps to 2 sec, and by 10% steps to 90% RMT. Multi-channel electromyography (EMG) was recorded to control for signs of increasing time-locked EMG activity including correlates of the spread of excitation and after-discharges, or an increase of M1 excitability. Pre- and post-50 Hz rTMS assessments included EEG, Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Grooved Pegboard Test, Serial Reaction Time Task (SRTT), Folstein Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and Verbal Fluency to control for motor and cognitive side effects. Results Ten PD patients were investigated. Multi-channel EMG showed no signs of increased time-locked EMG activity including correlates of the spread of excitation and after-discharges, or increased M1 excitability in 9 patients. A PD patient with bi-temporal spikes in the pre-testing EEG had clinical and EMG correlates of spread of excitation at 90% RMT, but no seizure activity. Pre- and post-50 Hz assessment showed no changes. No adverse events were observed. 50 Hz rTMS was well tolerated except by one patient who wished to terminate the study due to facial muscle stimulation. Conclusion 50 Hz rTMS at an intensity of 90% RMT for 2 sec appears safe in patients with PD, but caution should be taken for patients with paroxysmal EEG activity. For this reason, comprehensive screening should include EEG before higher-frequency rTMS is applied. Significance This is the first study to investigate safety of 50 Hz rTMS in humans. PMID:19285918

  20. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  1. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Reflexive and Volitional Saccades as Revealed by Lesion Studies with Neurological Patients and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muri, Rene M.; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses the neurophysiology and neuroanatomy of the cortical control of reflexive and volitional saccades in humans. The main focus is on classical lesion studies and studies using the interference method of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). To understand the behavioural function of a region, it is essential to assess…

  2. Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Intensive Occupational Therapy for Poststroke Patients with Upper Limb Hemiparesis: Preliminary Study of a 15-Day Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kazushige; Momosaki, Ryo; Yokoi, Aki; Fukuda, Akiko; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Ayumi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the safety and feasibility of a 15-day protocol of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with intensive occupational therapy (OT) on motor function and spasticity in hemiparetic upper limbs in poststroke patients. Fifteen poststroke patients (age at study entry 55 [plus…

  3. Preliminary Evidence of the Effects of High-frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on Swallowing Functions in Post-Stroke Individuals with Chronic Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ivy K. Y.; Chan, Karen M. K.; Wong, C. S.; Cheung, Raymond T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of potential benefits of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the rehabilitation of dysphagia. However, the site and frequency of stimulation for optimal effects are not clear. Aims: The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the short-term effects of high-frequency 5 Hz rTMS applied to…

  4. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the supplementary motor area modifies breathing pattern in response to inspiratory loading in normal humans

    PubMed Central

    Nierat, Marie-Cécile; Hudson, Anna L.; Chaskalovic, Joël; Similowski, Thomas; Laviolette, Louis

    2015-01-01

    In awake humans, breathing depends on automatic brainstem pattern generators. It is also heavily influenced by cortical networks. For example, functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalographic data show that the supplementary motor area becomes active when breathing is made difficult by inspiratory mechanical loads like resistances or threshold valves, which is associated with perceived respiratory discomfort. We hypothesized that manipulating the excitability of the supplementary motor area with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation would modify the breathing pattern response to an experimental inspiratory load and possibly respiratory discomfort. Seven subjects (three men, age 25 ± 4) were studied. Breathing pattern and respiratory discomfort during inspiratory loading were described before and after conditioning the supplementary motor area with repetitive stimulation, using an excitatory paradigm (5 Hz stimulation), an inhibitory paradigm, or sham stimulation. No significant change in breathing pattern during loading was observed after sham conditioning. Excitatory conditioning shortened inspiratory time (p = 0.001), decreased tidal volume (p = 0.016), and decreased ventilation (p = 0.003), as corroborated by an increased end-tidal expired carbon dioxide (p = 0.013). Inhibitory conditioning did not affect ventilation, but lengthened expiratory time (p = 0.031). Respiratory discomfort was mild under baseline conditions, and unchanged after conditioning of the supplementary motor area. This is the first study to show that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation conditioning of the cerebral cortex can alter breathing pattern. A 5 Hz conditioning protocol, known to enhance corticophrenic excitability, can reduce the amount of hyperventilation induced by inspiratory threshold loading. Further studies are needed to determine whether and under what circumstances rTMS can have an effect on dyspnoea. PMID:26483701

  5. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Applications Normalized Prefrontal Dysfunctions and Cognitive-Related Metabolic Profiling in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hualong; Geng, Yuan; Han, Bing; Qiang, Jing; Li, Xiaoli; Sun, Meiyu; Wang, Qian; Wang, Mingwei

    2013-01-01

    Chronic high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that has recently received increasing interests as a therapeutic procedure for neurodegenerative diseases. To identify the metabolism mechanism underlying the improving effects of rTMS, we observed that high frequency (25Hz) rTMS for 14 days could reverse the decline of the performance of the passive avoidance task in aged mice. We further investigated the metabolite profiles in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in those mice and found that rTMS could also reverse the metabolic abnormalities of gamma-aminobutyric acid, N-acetyl aspartic, and cholesterol levels to the degree similar to the young mice. These data suggested that the rTMS could ameliorate the age-related cognitive impairment and improving the metabolic profiles in PFC, and potentially can be used to improve cognitive decline in the elderly. PMID:24278445

  6. Listening to speech recruits specific tongue motor synergies as revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation and tissue-Doppler ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    D'Ausilio, A.; Maffongelli, L.; Bartoli, E.; Campanella, M.; Ferrari, E.; Berry, J.; Fadiga, L.

    2014-01-01

    The activation of listener's motor system during speech processing was first demonstrated by the enhancement of electromyographic tongue potentials as evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over tongue motor cortex. This technique is, however, technically challenging and enables only a rather coarse measurement of this motor mirroring. Here, we applied TMS to listeners’ tongue motor area in association with ultrasound tissue Doppler imaging to describe fine-grained tongue kinematic synergies evoked by passive listening to speech. Subjects listened to syllables requiring different patterns of dorso-ventral and antero-posterior movements (/ki/, /ko/, /ti/, /to/). Results show that passive listening to speech sounds evokes a pattern of motor synergies mirroring those occurring during speech production. Moreover, mirror motor synergies were more evident in those subjects showing good performances in discriminating speech in noise demonstrating a role of the speech-related mirror system in feed-forward processing the speaker's ongoing motor plan. PMID:24778384

  7. Effect of 30 Hz theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation on the primary motor cortex in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pedapati, Ernest V.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Horn, Paul S.; Huddleston, David A.; Laue, Cameron S.; Shahana, Nasrin; Wu, Steve W.

    2015-01-01

    Fourteen healthy children (13.8 ± 2.2 years, range 10–16; M:F = 5:9) received 30 Hz intermittent theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (iTBS) with a stimulation intensity of 70% of resting motor threshold (RMT) with a total of 300 (iTBS300) pulses. All volunteers were free of neurologic, psychiatric and serious medical illnesses, not taking any neuropsychiatric medications, and did not have any contraindications to transcranial magnetic stimulation. Changes in the mean amplitudes of motor-evoked potentials from baseline following iTBS were expressed as a ratio and assessed from 1 to 10 min (BLOCK1) and 1–30 min (BLOCK2) using repeated-measures analysis of variance. All 14 subjects completed iTBS300 over the dominant primary motor cortex (M1) without any clinically reported adverse events. ITBS300 produced significant M1 facilitation [F(5, 65) = 3.165, p = 0.01] at BLOCK1 and trend level M1 facilitation at BLOCK2 [F(10, 129) = 1.69, p = 0.089]. Although iTBS300 (stimulation duration of 92 s at 70% RMT) delivered over M1 in typically developed children was well-tolerated and produced on average significant facilitatory changes in cortical excitability, the post-iTBS300 neurophysiologic response was variable in our small sample. ITBS300-induced changes may represent a potential neuroplastic biomarker in healthy children and those with neuro-genetic or neuro-psychiatric disorders. However, a larger sample size is needed to address safety and concerns of response variability. PMID:25762919

  8. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) to Treat Social Anxiety Disorder: Case Reports and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Flávia; Baczynski, Tathiana; Novaes, Felipe; Marinho, Tamires; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Budde, Henning; Sack, Alexander T.; Huston, Joseph P.; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Carta, Mauro; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio E.; Machado, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common and debilitating anxiety disorders. However, few studies had been dedicated to the neurobiology underlying SAD until the last decade. Rates of non-responders to standard methods of treatment remain unsatisfactorily high of approximately 25%, including SAD. Advances in our understanding of SAD could lead to new treatment strategies. A potential non invasive therapeutic option is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Thus, we reported two cases of SAD treated with rTMS Methods: The bibliographical search used Pubmed/Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scielo databases. The terms chosen for the search were: anxiety disorders, neuroimaging, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Results: In most of the studies conducted on anxiety disorders, except SAD, the right prefrontal cortex (PFC), more specifically dorsolateral PFC was stimulated, with marked results when applying high-rTMS compared with studies stimulating the opposite side. However, according to the “valence hypothesis”, anxiety disorders might be characterized by an interhemispheric imbalance associated with increased right-hemispheric activity. With regard to the two cases treated with rTMS, we found a decrease in BDI, BAI and LSAS scores from baseline to follow-up. Conclusion: We hypothesize that the application of low-rTMS over the right medial PFC (mPFC; the main structure involved in SAD circuitry) combined with high-rTMS over the left mPFC, for at least 4 weeks on consecutive weekdays, may induce a balance in brain activity, opening an attractive therapeutic option for the treatment of SAD. PMID:24278088

  9. Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Behavioral Recovery during Early Stage of Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyung Jae; Lee, Yong-Taek; Chung, Pil-Wook; Lee, Yun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yul

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising technique that modulates neural networks. However, there were few studies evaluating the effects of rTMS in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we assessed the effectiveness of rTMS on behavioral recovery and metabolic changes using brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in a rat model of TBI. We also evaluated the safety of rTMS by measuring brain swelling with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent lateral fluid percussion and were randomly assigned to the sham (n=10) or the rTMS (n=10) group. rTMS was applied on the fourth day after TBI and consisted of 10 daily sessions for 2 weeks with 10 Hz frequency (total pulses=3,000). Although the rTMS group showed an anti-apoptotic effect around the peri-lesional area, functional improvements were not significantly different between the two groups. Additionally, rTMS did not modulate brain metabolites in MRS, nor was there any change of brain lesion or edema after magnetic stimulation. These data suggest that rTMS did not have beneficial effects on motor recovery during early stages of TBI, although an anti-apoptosis was observed in the peri-lesional area. PMID:26425049

  10. Disturbance of visual search by stimulating to posterior parietal cortex in the brain using transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iramina, Keiji; Ge, Sheng; Hyodo, Akira; Hayami, Takehito; Ueno, Shoogo

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we applied a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the temporal aspect for the functional processing of visual attention. Although it has been known that right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in the brain has a role in certain visual search tasks, there is little knowledge about the temporal aspect of this area. Three visual search tasks that have different difficulties of task execution individually were carried out. These three visual search tasks are the "easy feature task," the "hard feature task," and the "conjunction task." To investigate the temporal aspect of the PPC involved in the visual search, we applied various stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) and measured the reaction time of the visual search. The magnetic stimulation was applied on the right PPC or the left PPC by the figure-eight coil. The results show that the reaction times of the hard feature task are longer than those of the easy feature task. When SOA=150 ms, compared with no-TMS condition, there was a significant increase in target-present reaction time when TMS pulses were applied. We considered that the right PPC was involved in the visual search at about SOA=150 ms after visual stimulus presentation. The magnetic stimulation to the right PPC disturbed the processing of the visual search. However, the magnetic stimulation to the left PPC gives no effect on the processing of the visual search.

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL SYSTEMS AND REHABILITATION ENGINEERING, VOL. 21, NO. 3, MAY 2013 383 Noninvasive Transcranial Focal Stimulation Via

    E-print Network

    Besio, Walter G.

    including transcranial magnetic stimulation(TMS)[18]­[21]andtranscra- nial direct current stimulation (t Noninvasive Transcranial Focal Stimulation Via Tripolar Concentric Ring Electrodes Lessens Behavioral Seizure developing a noninvasive transcranial focal electrical stimulation with our novel tripolar concentric ring

  12. The Effect of Variation in Permittivity of Different Tissues on Induced Electric Field in the Brain during Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadimani, Ravi; Porzig, Konstantin; Crowther, Lawrence; Brauer, Hartmut; Toepfer, Hannes; Jiles, David; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University Team; Department of Advanced Electromagnetics, Ilmenau University of Technology Team

    2013-03-01

    Estimation of electric field in the brain during Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) requires knowledge of the electric property of brain tissue. Grey and white matters have unusually high relative permittivities of ~ 106 at low frequencies. However, relative permittivity of cerebrospinal fluid is ~ 102. With such a variation it is necessary to consider the effect of boundaries. A model consisting of 2 hemispheres was used in the model with the properties of one hemisphere kept constant at ?1 = 0.1Sm-1 and ?r 1 = 10 while the properties of the second hemisphere were changed kept at ?2 = 0.1Sm-1 to 2Sm-1 and ?r 2 = 102 to 105. A 70 mm diameter double coil was used as the source of the magnetic field. The amplitude of the current in the coil was 5488 A at a frequency of 2.9 kHz. The results show that the electric field, E induced during magnetic stimulation is independent of the relative permittivity, ?r and varies with the conductivity. Thus the variation in E, calculated with homogeneous and heterogeneous head models was due to variation in conductivity of the tissues and not due to variation in permittivities.

  13. Test-retest assessment of cortical activation induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with brain atlas-guided optical topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fenghua; Kozel, F. Andrew; Yennu, Amarnath; Croarkin, Paul E.; McClintock, Shawn M.; Mapes, Kimberly S.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Liu, Hanli

    2012-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a technology that stimulates neurons with rapidly changing magnetic pulses with demonstrated therapeutic applications for various neuropsychiatric disorders. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a suitable tool to assess rTMS-evoked brain responses without interference from the magnetic or electric fields generated by the TMS coil. We have previously reported a channel-wise study of combined rTMS/fNIRS on the motor and prefrontal cortices, showing a robust decrease of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (?[HbO2]) at the sites of 1-Hz rTMS and the contralateral brain regions. However, the reliability of this putative clinical tool is unknown. In this study, we develop a rapid optical topography approach to spatially characterize the rTMS-evoked hemodynamic responses on a standard brain atlas. A hemispherical approximation of the brain is employed to convert the three-dimensional topography on the complex brain surface to a two-dimensional topography in the spherical coordinate system. The test-retest reliability of the combined rTMS/fNIRS is assessed using repeated measurements performed two to three days apart. The results demonstrate that the ?[HbO2] amplitudes have moderate-to-high reliability at the group level; and the spatial patterns of the topographic images have high reproducibility in size and a moderate degree of overlap at the individual level.

  14. Behavioral/Cognitive Bihemispheric Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    E-print Network

    Diedrichsen, Jörn

    Behavioral/Cognitive Bihemispheric Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Enhances Effector these into purposeful sequences. Although transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the primary motor cortex (M1 provided by micro- stimulation in macaques (Overduin et al., 2012) and transcranial magnetic stimulation

  15. [Related noise exposure and auditory consequence during transcranial magnetic stimulation: new insights and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Tringali, S; Perrot, X; Collet, L; Moulin, A

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive neurostimulation tool with increasing therapeutic applications in neurology, psychiatry and in the treatment of chronic tinnitus, and with a growing interest in cognitive neuroscience. One of its side effects is the loud click sound generated simultaneously to the magnetic pulse, which depends both on the equipment and rTMS intensity. This impulse sound could transiently modify peripheral hearing mechanisms, and hence hearing thresholds, both in patients and in rTMS practitioners. Furthermore, if no precautions are taken, especially in subjects with several risks factors for hearing loss, it is possible that the repetition of exposure could lead to more definitive changes in hearing thresholds. These issues are often neglected, although they could have specific relevance in rTMS treatment for tinnitus or in auditory cognitive neuroscience. This review specifically deals with noise exposure during rTMS and its potential consequences on the auditory system. It provides several practical solutions to help minimize exposure. PMID:23290173

  16. Blood flow and oxygenation changes due to low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; Faseyitan, Olufunsho K.; Turkeltaub, Peter E.; Buckley, Erin M.; Thomas, Amy; Kim, Meeri N.; Durduran, Turgut; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Hamilton, Roy H.

    2013-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) modulates processing in the human brain and is therefore of interest as a treatment modality for neurologic conditions. During TMS administration, an electric current passing through a coil on the scalp creates a rapidly varying magnetic field that induces currents in the cerebral cortex. The effects of low-frequency (1 Hz), repetitive TMS (rTMS) on motor cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF) and tissue oxygenation in seven healthy adults, during/after 20 min stimulation, is reported. Noninvasive optical methods are employed: diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for blood flow and diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) for hemoglobin concentrations. A significant increase in median CBF (33%) on the side ipsilateral to stimulation was observed during rTMS and persisted after discontinuation. The measured hemodynamic parameter variations enabled computation of relative changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption during rTMS, which increased significantly (28%) in the stimulated hemisphere. By contrast, hemodynamic changes from baseline were not observed contralateral to rTMS administration (all parameters, p>0.29). In total, these findings provide new information about hemodynamic/metabolic responses to low-frequency rTMS and, importantly, demonstrate the feasibility of DCS/DOS for noninvasive monitoring of TMS-induced physiologic effects.

  17. Extended Remediation of Sleep Deprived-Induced Working Memory Deficits Using fMRI-guided Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Luber, Bruce; Steffener, Jason; Tucker, Adrienne; Habeck, Christian; Peterchev, Angel V.; Deng, Zhi-De; Basner, Robert C.; Stern, Yaakov; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: We attempted to prevent the development of working memory (WM) impairments caused by sleep deprivation using fMRI-guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Novel aspects of our fMRI-guided rTMS paradigm included the use of sophisticated covariance methods to identify functional networks in imaging data, and the use of fMRI-targeted rTMS concurrent with task performance to modulate plasticity effects over a longer term. Design: Between-groups mixed model. Setting: TMS, MRI, and sleep laboratory study. Participants: 27 subjects (13 receiving Active rTMS, and 14 Sham) completed the sleep deprivation protocol, with another 21 (10 Active, 11 Sham) non-sleep deprived subjects run in a second experiment. Interventions: Our previous covariance analysis had identified a network, including occipital cortex, which demonstrated individual differences in resilience to the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on WM performance. Five Hz rTMS was applied to left lateral occipital cortex while subjects performed a WM task during 4 sessions over the course of 2 days of total sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: At the end of the sleep deprivation period, Sham sleep deprived subjects exhibited degraded performance in the WM task. In contrast, those receiving Active rTMS did not show the slowing and lapsing typical in sleep deprivation, and instead performed similarly to non- sleep deprived subjects. Importantly, the Active sleep deprivation group showed rTMS-induced facilitation of WM performance a full 18 hours after the last rTMS session. Conclusions: Over the course of sleep deprivation, these results indicate that rTMS applied concurrently with WM task performance affected neural circuitry involved in WM to prevent its full impact. Citation: Luber B; Steffener J; Tucker A; Habeck C; Peterchev AV; Deng ZD; Basner RC; Stern Y; Lisanby SH. Extended remediation of sleep deprived-induced working memory deficits using fMRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation. SLEEP 2013;36(6):857-871. PMID:23729929

  18. Roles of the pre-SMA and rIFG in conditional stopping revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hon Wah; Lu, Ming-Shan; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Muggleton, Neil G; Hsu, Tzu-Yu; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Although both the presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) have been demonstrated to be critical for response inhibition, there is still considerable disagreement over the roles they play in the process. In the present study, we investigated the causal relations of the pre-SMA and the rIFG in a conditional stop-signal task by applying offline theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation. The task introduced a continue condition, which requires the same motor response as in a go trial but captures attention as in a stop trial. We found great individual differences in the amount of slowing on continue trials. Temporary suppression of pre-SMA activity prolonged the continue RT in participants who slowed little in response to continue trials, whereas disruption of the rIFG did not lead to significant changes in performance irrespective of the degree of slowing. Our results contribute to the understanding of the role of the pre-SMA by providing causal evidence that it is involved in response slowing on continue trials during conditional stopping, and it is likely that its efficiency in updating motor planning and reinitiating an inhibited response was associated with the amount of slowing. PMID:26304720

  19. Role of the posterior temporal lobe during language tasks: a virtual lesion study using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Park, Hae Kyung; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2015-04-15

    Functional brain imaging studies have suggested that the superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the middle temporal gyrus (MTG) are involved in phonological and lexical-semantic processing, respectively. However, the precise role of the posterior temporal lobe is not fully understood. To clarify the functional relevance of the left posterior STG and MTG during language processing, we used neuronavigation-guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). The reaction times and error rates for 12 healthy volunteers performing auditory repetition and lexical-semantic decision tasks were compared before and during rTMS stimulation. We applied 1?Hz rTMS over the left posterior STG or MTG or sham stimulation for 10?min in a random order. Stimulation of the left posterior MTG significantly slowed the response time for the lexical-semantic decision task from 478.9±56.5 to 583.1±80.0?ms. However, stimulation over the left posterior STG or MTG did not affect the response time or the error rate for the auditory repetition task. Our results suggest that the left posterior MTG might be involved in lexical decision making. Neuronavigation-guided rTMS virtual lesion studies could help determine the functional roles of specific brain areas in language processing, and our findings provide new evidence supporting the use of neuromodulation through rTMS for patients with aphasia. PMID:25714425

  20. Impact of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Post-Stroke Dysmnesia and the Role of BDNF Val66Met SNP

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haitao; Zhang, Tong; Wen, Mei; Sun, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on dysmnesia and the impact of brain nucleotide neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). This study investigated the impact of low-frequency rTMS on post-stroke dysmnesia and the impact of BDNF Val66Met SNP. Material/Methods Forty patients with post-stroke dysmnesia were prospectively randomized into the rTMS and sham groups. BDNF Val66Met SNP was determined using restriction fragment length polymorphism. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Loewenstein Occupational Therapy of Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA), and Rivermead Behavior Memory Test (RBMT) scores, as well as plasma BDNF concentrations, were measured at baseline and at 3 days and 2 months post-treatment. Results MoCA, LOTCA, and RBMT scores were higher after rTMS. Three days after treatment, BDNF decreased in the rTMS group but it increased in the sham group (P<0.05). Two months after treatment, RMBT scores in the rTMS group were higher than in the sham group, but not MoCA and LOTCA scores. Conclusions Low-frequency rTMS may improve after-stoke memory through various pathways, which may involve polymorphisms and several neural genes, but not through an increase in BDNF levels. PMID:25770310

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and aging: Effects on spatial learning and memory after sleep deprivation in Octodon degus.

    PubMed

    Estrada, C; Fernández-Gómez, F J; López, D; Gonzalez-Cuello, A; Tunez, I; Toledo, F; Blin, O; Bordet, R; Richardson, J C; Fernandez-Villalba, E; Herrero, M T

    2015-11-01

    The benefits of neuromodulatory procedures as a possible therapeutic application for cognitive rehabilitation have increased with the progress made in non-invasive modes of brain stimulation in aged-related disorders. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive method used to examine multiple facets of the human brain and to ameliorate the impairment in cognition caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was designed to evaluate how a chronic TMS treatment could improve learning and memory functions after sleep deprivation (SD) in old Octodon degus. SD was executed by gently handling to keep the animals awake throughout the night. Thirty young and twenty-four old O. degus females were divided in six groups (control, acute and chronic TMS treatment). Behavioral tests included; Radial Arm Maze (RAM), Barnes Maze (BM) and Novel Object Recognition (NOR). Although learning and memory functions improved in young animals with only one session of TMS treatment, a significant improvement in cognitive performance was seen in old animals after 4 and 7days of TMS, depending on the task that was performed. No side effects were observed following, which showed therapeutic potential for improving age-related cognitive performance. PMID:26463507

  2. Modulation of the Left Prefrontal Cortex with High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Facilitates Gait in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Burhan, Amer M.; Subramanian, Priya; Pallaveshi, Luljeta; Barnes, Brittany; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease. Gait abnormalities are common and disabling in patients with MS with limited treatment options available. Emerging evidence suggests a role of prefrontal attention networks in modulating gait. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is known to enhance cortical excitability in stimulated cortex and its correlates. We investigated the effect of high-frequency left prefrontal rTMS on gait parameters in a 51-year-old Caucasian male with chronic relapsing/remitting MS with residual disabling attention and gait symptoms. Patient received 6?Hz, rTMS at 90% motor threshold using figure of eight coil centered on F3 location (using 10-20 electroencephalography (EEG) lead localization system). GAITRite gait analysis system was used to collect objective gait measures before and after one session and in another occasion three consecutive daily sessions of rTMS. Two-tailed within subject repeated measure t-test showed significant enhancement in ambulation time, gait velocity, and cadence after three consecutive daily sessions of rTMS. Modulating left prefrontal cortex excitability using rTMS resulted in significant change in gait parameters after three sessions. To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates the effect of rTMS applied to the prefrontal cortex on gait in MS patients. PMID:26421201

  3. Effects of postural and voluntary muscle contraction on modulation of the soleus H reflex by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-López, Jessica; Selvi, Aikaterini; Solà-Valls, Núria; Casanova-Molla, Jordi; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2015-12-01

    Modulation of spinal reflexes depends largely on the integrity of the corticospinal tract. A useful method to document the influence of descending tracts on reflexes is to examine the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on the soleus H reflex elicited by posterior tibial nerve electrical stimuli (PTS). In 12 healthy volunteers, we investigated how postural or voluntary muscle contraction modified such descending modulation. We first characterized the effects of TMS at 95 % of motor threshold for leg responses on the H reflex elicited by a preceding PTS at inter-stimuli intervals (ISIs) between 0 and 120 ms at rest and, then, during voluntary plantar flexion (pf), dorsal flexion (df), and standing still (ss). During pf, there was an increase in the facilitation of the H reflex at ISIs 0-20 ms. During df, there were no effects of TMS on the H reflex. During ss, there was inhibition at ISIs 40-60 ms. Our observations suggest that muscle contraction prevails over the baseline effects of TMS on the soleus H reflex. While contraction of the antagonist (df) suppressed most of the effects, contraction of the agonist had different effects depending on the type of activity (pf or ss). The characterization of the interaction between descending corticospinal volleys and segmental peripheral inputs provides useful information on motor control for physiological research and further understanding of the effects of spinal cord lesions. PMID:26289484

  4. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation improves both hearing function and tinnitus perception in sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dai; Ma, Yuewen

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) affects not only cochlear activity but also neural activity in the central auditory system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) above the auditory cortex has been reported to improve auditory processing and to reduce the perception of tinnitus, which results from network dysfunction involving both auditory and non-auditory brain regions. SSHL patients who were refractory to standard corticosteroid therapy (SCT) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy received 20 sessions of 1?Hz rTMS to the temporoparietal junction ipsilateral to the symptomatic ear (rTMS group). RTMS therapy administered in addition to SCT and HBO therapy resulted in significantly greater recovery of hearing function and improvement of tinnitus perception compared SCT and HBO therapy without rTMS therapy. Additionally, the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measurements obtained in a subgroup of patients suggested that the rTMS therapy could have alleviated the decrease in regional cerebral brain flow (rCBF) in SSHL patients. RTMS appears to be an effective, practical, and safe treatment strategy for SSHL. PMID:26463446

  5. Improvement of white matter and functional connectivity abnormalities by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in crossed aphasia in dextral

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haitao; Wu, Haiyan; Cheng, Hewei; Wei, Dongjie; Wang, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yong; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    As a special aphasia, the occurrence of crossed aphasia in dextral (CAD) is unusual. This study aims to improve the language ability by applying 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We studied multiple modality imaging of structural connectivity (diffusion tensor imaging), functional connectivity (resting fMRI), PET, and neurolinguistic analysis on a patient with CAD. Furthermore, we applied rTMS of 1 Hz for 40 times and observed the language function improvement. The results indicated that a significantly reduced structural and function connectivity was found in DTI and fMRI data compared with the control. The PET imaging showed hypo-metabolism in right hemisphere and left cerebellum. In conclusion, one of the mechanisms of CAD is that right hemisphere is the language dominance. Stimulating left Wernicke area could improve auditory comprehension, stimulating left Broca’s area could enhance expression, and the results outlasted 6 months by 1 Hz rTMS balancing the excitability inter-hemisphere in CAD. PMID:25419415

  6. Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Auditory Hallucinations in Patients with Schizophrenia: A Randomized Controlled, Cross-over Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Ji; Yeo, Seonguk; Hwang, Inho; Park, Jong-Il; Cui, Yin; Jin, Hong-Mei; Kim, Hyung Tae; Hwang, Tae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective A randomized double-blind cross-over trial was conducted in patients with persistent auditory hallucinations (AHs) to investigate whether bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at the temporoparietal area or Broca's area is more effective at high- or low-frequencies compared to a sham condition. Methods Twenty three patients with persistent AHs who remained stable on the same medication for 2 months were enrolled. They were randomized to one of four conditions: low-frequency (1 Hz)-rTMS to the temporoparietal area (L-TP), high-frequency (20 Hz)-rTMS to the temporoparietal area (H-TP), high-frequency (20 Hz)-rTMS to Broca's area (H-B), or sham. Results All the four rTMS conditions resulted in significant decrease in the scores under the auditory hallucination rating scale and hallucination change scale over time. However, there were no significant treatment effects or interaction between time and treatment, suggesting no superior effects of the new paradigms over the sham condition. Conclusion Our findings suggest that bilateral rTMS at the temporoparietal area or Broca's area with high- or low-frequency does not produce superior effects in reducing AHs compared to sham stimulation. PMID:25598827

  7. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induced slow wave activity modification: A possible role in disorder of consciousness differential diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Pisani, Laura Rosa; Naro, Antonino; Leo, Antonino; Aricò, Irene; Pisani, Francesco; Silvestri, Rosalia; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2015-12-15

    Slow wave activity (SWA) generation depends on cortico-thalamo-cortical loops that are disrupted in patients with chronic Disorders of Consciousness (DOC), including the Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (UWS) and the Minimally Conscious State (MCS). We hypothesized that the modulation of SWA by means of a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) could reveal residual patterns of connectivity, thus supporting the DOC clinical differential diagnosis. We enrolled 10 DOC individuals who underwent a 24hh polysomnography followed by a real or sham 5Hz-rTMS over left primary motor area, and a second polysomnographic recording. A preserved sleep-wake cycle, a standard temporal progression of sleep stages, and a SWA perturbation were found in all of the MCS patients and in none of the UWS individuals, only following the real-rTMS. In conclusion, our combined approach may improve the differential diagnosis between MCS patients, who show a partial preservation of cortical plasticity, and UWS individuals, who lack such properties. PMID:26496476

  8. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the orbitofrontal cortex for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a double-blind, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Nauczyciel, C; Le Jeune, F; Naudet, F; Douabin, S; Esquevin, A; Vérin, M; Dondaine, T; Robert, G; Drapier, D; Millet, B

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to assess the efficacy of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) by means of a double-cone coil in patients suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder. We hypothesized that low-frequency stimulation of the OFC would lead to a reduction in clinical symptoms, as measured on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). A randomized, double-blind, crossover design was implemented with two 1-week treatment periods (active stimulation versus sham stimulation) separated by a 1-month washout period. Concomitantly, a subgroup of patients underwent a positron emission tomography (PET) scan after each stimulation sequence. Statistical analyses compared the Y-BOCS scores at the end of each period. At day 7, we observed a significant decrease from baseline in the Y-BOCS scores, after both active (P<0.01) and sham stimulation (P=0.02). This decrease tended to be larger after active stimulation than after sham stimulation: -6 (-29, 0) points versus -2 (-20, 4) points (P=0.07). Active versus sham PET scan contrasts showed that stimulation was related to a bilateral decrease in the metabolism of the OFC. The OFC should definitely be regarded as a key neuroanatomical target for rTMS, as it is easier to reach than either the striatum or the subthalamic nucleus, structures favored in neurosurgical approaches. PMID:25203167

  9. Bilateral responses of prefrontal and motor cortices to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation as measured by functional near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fenghua; Kozel, Frank Andrew; Dhamne, Sameer; McClintock, Shawn M.; Croarkin, Paul; Mapes, Kimberly; Husain, Mustafa M.; Liu, Hanli

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneously acquiring cortical functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) during repeated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) offers the possibility of directly investigating the effects of rTMS on brain regions without quantifiable behavioral changes. In this study, the left motor cortex and subsequently the left prefrontal cortex were stimulated at 1 Hz while fNIRS data was simultaneously acquired. Changes in hemodynamic signals were measured on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides. In each cortex, a significantly larger decrease in the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin and a smaller increase in the concentration of deoxygenated hemoglobin during the stimulation periods were observed in both the motor and prefrontal cortices. The ipsilateral and contralateral changes showed high temporal consistency. Same experiment was repeated for each subject 2 or 3 days later. The hemodynamic responses associated with the stimulation showed good reproducibility in two sessions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous fNIRS measurement of ipsilateral and contralateral changes of either the motor or prefrontal cortex during rTMS stimulation.

  10. Changes in corticospinal excitability with short-duration high-frequency electrical muscle stimulation: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Kazuhiro; Usuda, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Afferent input caused by electrical stimulation of a peripheral nerve or a muscle modulates corticospinal excitability. However, a long duration of stimulation is required to induce these effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of short-duration high-frequency electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) on corticospinal excitability through the measurement of motor evoked potentials (MEP) in young healthy subjects. [Subjects] Eleven healthy right-handed subjects participated in this study. [Methods] EMS was applied to the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle at 100?Hz with a pulse width of 100 ?s for 120 s. The intensity of stimulation was just below the motor threshold. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied over the motor cortex, and MEP were recorded from the APB before, and immediately, 10, and 20?min after EMS. [Results] In the APB muscle, the MEP amplitude significantly decreased after EMS, and this effect lasted for 20?min. [Conclusion] The excitability of the corticospinal tract decreased after short-duration high-frequency EMS, and the effect lasted for 20?min. These results suggest that even short duration EMS can change the excitability of the corticospinal tract. PMID:26311936

  11. Multifunctional Setup for Studying Human Motor Control Using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, Electromyography, Motion Capture, and Virtual Reality.

    PubMed

    Talkington, William J; Pollard, Bradley S; Olesh, Erienne V; Gritsenko, Valeriya

    2015-01-01

    The study of neuromuscular control of movement in humans is accomplished with numerous technologies. Non-invasive methods for investigating neuromuscular function include transcranial magnetic stimulation, electromyography, and three-dimensional motion capture. The advent of readily available and cost-effective virtual reality solutions has expanded the capabilities of researchers in recreating "real-world" environments and movements in a laboratory setting. Naturalistic movement analysis will not only garner a greater understanding of motor control in healthy individuals, but also permit the design of experiments and rehabilitation strategies that target specific motor impairments (e.g. stroke). The combined use of these tools will lead to increasingly deeper understanding of neural mechanisms of motor control. A key requirement when combining these data acquisition systems is fine temporal correspondence between the various data streams. This protocol describes a multifunctional system's overall connectivity, intersystem signaling, and the temporal synchronization of recorded data. Synchronization of the component systems is primarily accomplished through the use of a customizable circuit, readily made with off the shelf components and minimal electronics assembly skills. PMID:26384034

  12. Empathy Moderates the Effect of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex on Costly Punishment

    PubMed Central

    Heinisch, Christine; Tas, Cumhur; Wischniewski, Julia; Güntürkün, Onur

    2012-01-01

    Humans incur considerable costs to punish unfairness directed towards themselves or others. Recent studies using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) suggest that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is causally involved in such strategic decisions. Presently, two partly divergent hypotheses are discussed, suggesting either that the right DLPFC is necessary to control selfish motives by implementing culturally transmitted social norms, or is involved in suppressing emotion-driven prepotent responses to perceived unfairness. Accordingly, we studied the role of the DLPFC in costly (i.e. third party) punishment by applying rTMS to the left and right DLPFC before playing a Dictator Game with the option to punish observed unfair behavior (DG-P). In addition, sham stimulation took place. Individual differences in empathy were assessed with the German version of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Costly punishment increased (non-significantly) upon disruption of the right – but not the left – DLPFC as compared to sham stimulation. However, empathy emerged as a highly significant moderator variable of the effect of rTMS over the right, but not left, DLPFC, suggesting that the right DLPFC is involved in controlling prepotent emotional responses to observed unfairness, depending on individual differences in empathy. PMID:23028601

  13. Increases in frontostriatal connectivity are associated with response to dorsomedial repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in refractory binge/purge behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Katharine; Woodside, Blake; Lam, Eileen; Olmsted, Marion; Colton, Patricia; Giacobbe, Peter; Downar, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional treatments for eating disorders are associated with poor response rates and frequent relapse. Novel treatments are needed, in combination with markers to characterize and predict treatment response. Here, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) was used to identify predictors and correlates of response to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) at 10 Hz for eating disorders with refractory binge/purge symptomatology. Methods 28 subjects with anorexia nervosa, binge?purge subtype or bulimia nervosa underwent 20–30 sessions of 10 Hz dmPFC rTMS. rs-fMRI data were collected before and after rTMS. Subjects were stratified into responder and nonresponder groups using a criterion of ?50% reduction in weekly binge/purge frequency. Neural predictors and correlates of response were identified using seed-based functional connectivity (FC), using the dmPFC and adjacent dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as regions of interest. Results 16 of 28 subjects met response criteria. Treatment responders had lower baseline FC from dmPFC to lateral orbitofrontal cortex and right posterior insula, and from dACC to right posterior insula and hippocampus. Responders had low baseline FC from the dACC to the ventral striatum and anterior insula; this connectivity increased over treatment. However, in nonresponders, frontostriatal FC was high at baseline, and dmPFC-rTMS suppressed FC in association with symptomatic worsening. Conclusions Enhanced frontostriatal connectivity was associated with responders to dmPFC-rTMS for binge/purge behavior. rTMS caused paradoxical suppression of frontostriatal connectivity in nonresponders. rs-fMRI could prove critical for optimizing stimulation parameters in a future sham-controlled trial of rTMS in disordered eating. PMID:26199873

  14. Effect of Epidural Electrical Stimulation and Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Rats With Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yong-Soon; Cho, Kang Hee; Kim, Eun-Sil; Lee, Mi-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of epidural electrical stimulation (EES) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on motor recovery and brain activity in a rat model of diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) compared to the control group. Methods Thirty rats weighing 270-285 g with diffuse TBI with 45 kg/cm2 using a weight-drop model were assigned to one of three groups: the EES group (ES) (anodal electrical stimulation at 50 Hz), the rTMS group (MS) (magnetic stimulation at 10 Hz, 3-second stimulation with 6-second intervals, 4,000 total stimulations per day), and the sham-treated control group (sham) (no stimulation). They were pre-trained to perform a single-pellet reaching task (SPRT) and a rotarod test (RRT) for 14 days. Diffuse TBI was then induced and an electrode was implanted over the dominant motor cortex. The changes in SPRT success rate, RRT performance time rate and the expression of c-Fos after two weeks of EES or rTMS were tracked. Results SPRT improved significantly from day 8 to day 12 in the ES group and from day 4 to day 14 in the MS group (p<0.05) compared to the sham group. RRT improved significantly from day 6 to day 11 in ES and from day 4 to day 9 in MS compared to the sham group. The ES and MS groups showed increased expression of c-Fos in the cerebral cortex compared to the sham group. Conclusion ES or MS in a rat model of diffuse TBI can be used to enhance motor recovery and brain activity. PMID:26161348

  15. Safety, ethical considerations, and application guidelines for the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation in clinical practice and research?

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Simone; Hallett, Mark; Rossini, Paolo M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on a consensus conference, which took place in Certosa di Pontignano, Siena (Italy) on March 7–9, 2008, intended to update the previous safety guidelines for the application of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in research and clinical settings. Over the past decade the scientific and medical community has had the opportunity to evaluate the safety record of research studies and clinical applications of TMS and repetitive TMS (rTMS). In these years the number of applications of conventional TMS has grown impressively, new paradigms of stimulation have been developed (e.g., patterned repetitive TMS) and technical advances have led to new device designs and to the real-time integration of TMS with electroencephalography (EEG), positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thousands of healthy subjects and patients with various neurological and psychiatric diseases have undergone TMS allowing a better assessment of relative risks. The occurrence of seizures (i.e., the most serious TMS-related acute adverse effect) has been extremely rare, with most of the few new cases receiving rTMS exceeding previous guidelines, often in patients under treatment with drugs which potentially lower the seizure threshold. The present updated guidelines review issues of risk and safety of conventional TMS protocols, address the undesired effects and risks of emerging TMS interventions, the applications of TMS in patients with implanted electrodes in the central nervous system, and safety aspects of TMS in neuroimaging environments. We cover recommended limits of stimulation parameters and other important precautions, monitoring of subjects, expertise of the rTMS team, and ethical issues. While all the recommendations here are expert based, they utilize published data to the extent possible. PMID:19833552

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging/angiography and transcranial Doppler velocities in sickle cell anemia: results from the SWiTCH trial.

    PubMed

    Helton, Kathleen J; Adams, Robert J; Kesler, Karen L; Lockhart, Alex; Aygun, Banu; Driscoll, Catherine; Heeney, Matthew M; Jackson, Sherron M; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Miller, Scott T; Sarnaik, Sharada A; Schultz, William H; Ware, Russell E

    2014-08-01

    The Stroke With Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea (SWiTCH) trial compared standard (transfusions/chelation) to alternative (hydroxyurea/phlebotomy) treatment to prevent recurrent stroke and manage iron overload in children chronically transfused over 7 years before enrollment. Standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and transcranial Doppler (TCD) exams were performed at entry and exit, with a central blinded review. A novel MRA vasculopathy grading scale demonstrated frequent severe baseline left/right vessel stenosis (53%/41% ?Grade 4); 31% had no vessel stenosis on either side. Baseline parenchymal injury was prevalent (85%/79% subcortical, 53%/37% cortical, 50%/35% subcortical and cortical). Most children had low or uninterpretable baseline middle cerebral artery TCD velocities, which were associated with worse stenoses (incidence risk ratio [IRR] = 5.1, P ? .0001 and IRR = 4.1, P < .0001) than normal velocities; only 2% to 12% had any conditional/abnormal velocity. Patients with adjudicated stroke (7) and transient ischemic attacks (19 in 11 standard/8 alternative arm subjects) had substantial parenchymal injury/vessel stenosis. At exit, 1 child (alternative arm) had a new silent infarct, and another had worse stenosis. SWiTCH neuroimaging data document severe parenchymal and vascular abnormalities in children with SCA and stroke and support concerns about chronic transfusions lacking effectiveness for preventing progressive cerebrovascular injury. The novel SWiTCH vasculopathy grading scale warrants validation testing and consideration for use in future clinical trials. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00122980. PMID:24914136

  17. LONG-TERM EFFICACY OF REPEATED DAILY PREFRONTAL TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION (TMS) IN TREATMNT-RESISTANT DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Mantovani, Antonio; Pavlicova, Martina; Avery, David; Nahas, Ziad; McDonald, William M.; Wajdik, Chandra D.; Holtzheimer, Paul E.; George, Mark S.; Sackeim, Harold A.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2015-01-01

    Background A few studies have examined the durability of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) antidepressant benefit once patients remitted. This study examined the long-term durability of clinical benefit from TMS using a protocol-specified TMS taper and either continuation pharmacotherapy or naturalistic follow-up. Methods Patients were remitters from an acute double-blind sham-controlled trial of TMS (n = 18), or from an open-label extension in patients who did not respond to the acute trial (n = 43). Long-term durability of TMS acute effect was examined in remitters over a 12-week follow-up. Relapse, defined as 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-24) = 20, was the primary outcome. Results Of 61 remitters in the acute trial, five entered naturalistic follow-up and 50 entered the TMS taper. Thirty-two patients completed TMS taper and 1-, 2-, and 3-month follow-up. At 3-month visit, 29 of 50 (58%) were classified as in remission (HDRS-24 = 10), two of 50 (4%) as partial responders (30%= HDRS-24 reduction <50% from baseline), and one of 50 (2%) met criteria for relapse. During the entire 3-month follow-up, five of the 37 patients relapsed (relapse rate = 13.5%), but four of them regained remission by the end of the study. The average time to relapse in these five patients was 7.2 ± 3.3 weeks. Patients who relapsed had higher depression scores at 1 month. Conclusions While one third of the sample was lost to follow-up, our results demonstrate that most patients contributing to observations experienced persistence of benefit from TMS followed by pharmacotherapy or no medication. Longer follow-up and more rigorous studies are needed to explore the true long-term durability of remission PMID:22689290

  18. [French guidelines on the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS): safety and therapeutic indications].

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, J-P; André-Obadia, N; Poulet, E; Devanne, H; Haffen, E; Londero, A; Cretin, B; Leroi, A-M; Radtchenko, A; Saba, G; Thai-Van, H; Litré, C-F; Vercueil, L; Bouhassira, D; Ayache, S-S; Farhat, W-H; Zouari, H-G; Mylius, V; Nicolier, M; Garcia-Larrea, L

    2011-12-01

    During the past decade, a large amount of work on transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been performed, including the development of new paradigms of stimulation, the integration of imaging data, and the coupling of TMS techniques with electroencephalography or neuroimaging. These accumulating data being difficult to synthesize, several French scientific societies commissioned a group of experts to conduct a comprehensive review of the literature on TMS. This text contains all the consensual findings of the expert group on the mechanisms of action, safety rules and indications of TMS, including repetitive TMS (rTMS). TMS sessions have been conducted in thousands of healthy subjects or patients with various neurological or psychiatric diseases, allowing a better assessment of risks associated with this technique. The number of reported side effects is extremely low, the most serious complication being the occurrence of seizures. In most reported seizures, the stimulation parameters did not follow the previously published recommendations (Wassermann, 1998) [430] and rTMS was associated to medication that could lower the seizure threshold. Recommendations on the safe use of TMS / rTMS were recently updated (Rossi et al., 2009) [348], establishing new limits for stimulation parameters and fixing the contraindications. The recommendations we propose regarding safety are largely based on this previous report with some modifications. By contrast, the issue of therapeutic indications of rTMS has never been addressed before, the present work being the first attempt of a synthesis and expert consensus on this topic. The use of TMS/rTMS is discussed in the context of chronic pain, movement disorders, stroke, epilepsy, tinnitus and psychiatric disorders. There is already a sufficient level of evidence of published data to retain a therapeutic indication of rTMS in clinical practice (grade A) in chronic neuropathic pain, major depressive episodes, and auditory hallucinations. The number of therapeutic indications of rTMS is expected to increase in coming years, in parallel with the optimisation of stimulation parameters. PMID:22153574

  19. The Role of Right Inferior Parietal Cortex in Auditory Spatial Attention: A Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Karhson, Debra S.; Mock, Jeffrey R.; Golob, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral studies support the concept of an auditory spatial attention gradient by demonstrating that attentional benefits progressively diminish as distance increases from an attended location. Damage to the right inferior parietal cortex can induce a rightward attention bias, which implicates this region in the construction of attention gradients. This study used event-related potentials (ERPs) to define attention-related gradients before and after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the right inferior parietal cortex. Subjects (n = 16) listened to noise bursts at five azimuth locations (left to right: -90°, -45°, 0° midline, +45°, +90°) and responded to stimuli at one target location (-90°, +90°, separate blocks). ERPs as a function of non-target location were examined before (baseline) and after 0.9 Hz rTMS. Results showed that ERP attention gradients were observed in three time windows (frontal 230–340, parietal 400–460, frontal 550–750 ms). Significant transient rTMS effects were seen in the first and third windows. The first window had a voltage decrease at the farthest location when attending to either the left or right side. The third window had on overall increase in positivity, but only when attending to the left side. These findings suggest that rTMS induced a small contraction in spatial attention gradients within the first time window. The asymmetric effect of attended location on gradients in the third time window may relate to neglect of the left hemispace after right parietal injury. Together, these results highlight the role of the right inferior parietal cortex in modulating frontal lobe attention network activity. PMID:26636333

  20. Cognitive and Anatomical Underpinnings of the Conceptual Knowledge for Common Objects and Familiar People: A Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Fabio; Fabbro, Franco; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have addressed the issue of how knowledge of common objects is organized in the brain, whereas the cognitive and anatomical underpinnings of familiar people knowledge have been less explored. Here we applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left and right temporal poles before asking healthy individuals to perform a speeded word-to-picture matching task using familiar people and common objects as stimuli. We manipulated two widely used semantic variables, namely the semantic distance and the familiarity of stimuli, to assess whether the semantic organization of familiar people knowledge is similar to that of common objects. For both objects and faces we reliably found semantic distance and familiarity effects, with less accurate and slower responses for stimulus pairs that were more closely related and less familiar. However, the effects of semantic variables differed across categories, with semantic distance effects larger for objects and familiarity effects larger for faces, suggesting that objects and faces might share a partially comparable organization of their semantic representations. The application of rTMS to the left temporal pole modulated, for both categories, semantic distance, but not familiarity effects, revealing that accessing object and face concepts might rely on overlapping processes within left anterior temporal regions. Crucially, rTMS of the left temporal pole affected only the recognition of pairs of stimuli that could be discriminated at specific levels of categorization (e.g., two kitchen tools or two famous persons), with no effect for discriminations at either superordinate or individual levels. Conversely, rTMS of the right temporal pole induced an overall slowing of reaction times that positively correlated with the visual similarity of the stimuli, suggesting a more perceptual rather than semantic role of the right anterior temporal regions. Results are discussed in the light of current models of face and object semantic representations in the brain. PMID:23704999

  1. Descending motor pathways and cortical physiology after spinal cord injury assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Orioli, Andrea; Tezzon, Frediano; Schwenker, Kerstin; Christova, Monica; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-09-01

    We performed here a systematic review of the studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a research and clinical tool in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by TMS represent a highly accurate diagnostic test that can supplement clinical examination and neuroimaging findings in the assessment of SCI functional level. MEPs allows to monitor the changes in motor function and evaluate the effects of the different therapeutic approaches. Moreover, TMS represents a useful non-invasive approach for studying cortical physiology, and may be helpful in elucidating the pathophysiological mechanisms of brain reorganization after SCI. Measures of motor cortex reactivity, e.g., the short interval intracortical inhibition and the cortical silent period, seem to point to an increased cortical excitability. However, the results of TMS studies are sometimes contradictory or divergent, and should be replicated in a larger sample of subjects. Understanding the functional changes at brain level and defining their effects on clinical outcome is of crucial importance for development of evidence-based rehabilitation therapy. TMS techniques may help in identifying neurophysiological biomarkers that can reliably assess the extent of neural damage, elucidate the mechanisms of neural repair, predict clinical outcome, and identify therapeutic targets. Some researchers have begun to therapeutically use repetitive TMS (rTMS) in patients with SCI. Initial studies revealed that rTMS can induce acute and short duration beneficial effects especially on spasticity and neuropathic pain, but the evidence is to date still very preliminary and well-designed clinical trials are warranted. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury. PMID:25251591

  2. A Pilot Study of EEG Source Analysis Based Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Li, Bei; Feng, Yanmei; Cui, Biao; Wu, Hongmin; Shi, Haibo; Yin, Shankai

    2015-01-01

    Objective Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) is a novel therapeutic tool to induce a suppression of tinnitus. However, the optimal target sites are unknown. We aimed to determine whether low-frequency rTMS induced lasting suppression of tinnitus by decreasing neural activity in the cortex, navigated by high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) source analysis, and the utility of EEG for targeting treatment. Methods In this controlled three-armed trial, seven normal hearing patients with tonal tinnitus received a 10-day course of 1-Hz rTMS to the cortex, navigated by high-density EEG source analysis, to the left temporoparietal cortex region, and to the left temporoparietal with sham stimulation. The Tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) and a visual analog scale (VAS) were used to assess tinnitus severity and loudness. Measurements were taken before, and immediately, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after the end of the interventions. Results Low-frequency rTMS decreased tinnitus significantly after active, but not sham, treatment. Responders in the EEG source analysis-based rTMS group, 71.4% (5/7) patients, experienced a significant reduction in tinnitus loudness, as evidenced by VAS scores. The target site of neuronal generators most consistently associated with a positive response was the frontal lobe in the right hemisphere, sourced using high-density EEG equipment, in the tinnitus patients. After left temporoparietal rTMS stimulation, 42.8% (3/7) patients experienced a decrease in tinnitus loudness. Conclusions Active EEG source analysis based rTMS resulted in significant suppression in tinnitus loudness, showing the superiority of neuronavigation-guided coil positioning in dealing with tinnitus. Non-auditory areas should be considered in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. This knowledge in turn can contribute to investigate the pathophysiology of tinnitus. PMID:26430749

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation: potential treatment for co-occurring alcohol, traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorders

    PubMed Central

    Herrold, Amy A.; Kletzel, Sandra L.; Harton, Brett C.; Chambers, R. Andrew; Jordan, Neil; Pape, Theresa Louise-Bender

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD), mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) commonly co-occur (AUD + mTBI + PTSD). These conditions have overlapping symptoms which are, in part, reflective of overlapping neuropathology. These conditions become problematic because their co-occurrence can exacerbate symptoms. Therefore, treatments must be developed that are inclusive to all three conditions. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is non-invasive and may be an ideal treatment for co-occurring AUD + mTBI + PTSD. There is accumulating evidence on rTMS as a treatment for people with AUD, mTBI, and PTSD each alone. However, there are no published studies to date on rTMS as a treatment for co-occurring AUD + mTBI + PTSD. This review article advances the knowledge base for rTMS as a treatment for AUD + mTBI + PTSD. This review provides background information about these co-occurring conditions as well as rTMS. The existing literature on rTMS as a treatment for people with AUD, TBI, and PTSD each alone is reviewed. Finally, neurobiological findings in support of a theoretical model are discussed to inform TMS as a treatment for co-occurring AUD + mTBI + PTSD. The peer-reviewed literature was identified by targeted literature searches using PubMed and supplemented by cross-referencing the bibliographies of relevant review articles. The existing evidence on rTMS as a treatment for these conditions in isolation, coupled with the overlapping neuropathology and symptomology of these conditions, suggests that rTMS may be well suited for the treatment of these conditions together. PMID:25422632

  4. Dynamics of EEG Rhythms Support Distinct Visual Selection Mechanisms in Parietal Cortex: A Simultaneous Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Spadone, Sara; Tosoni, Annalisa; Sestieri, Carlo; Romani, Gian Luca; Della Penna, Stefania; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), we have recently shown a functional anatomical distinction in human parietal cortex between regions involved in maintaining attention to a location [ventral intraparietal sulcus (vIPS)] and a region involved in shifting attention between locations [medial superior parietal lobule (mSPL)]. In particular, while rTMS interference over vIPS impaired target discrimination at contralateral attended locations, interference over mSPL affected performance following shifts of attention regardless of the visual field (Capotosto et al., 2013). Here, using rTMS interference in conjunction with EEG recordings of brain rhythms during the presentation of cues that indicate to either shift or maintain spatial attention, we tested whether this functional anatomical segregation involves different mechanisms of rhythm synchronization. The transient inactivation of vIPS reduced the amplitude of the expected parieto-occipital low-? (8–10 Hz) desynchronization contralateral to the cued location. Conversely, the transient inactivation of mSPL, compared with vIPS, reduced the high-? (10–12 Hz) desynchronization induced by shifting attention into both visual fields. Furthermore, rTMS induced a frequency-specific delay of task-related modulation of brain rhythms. Specifically, rTMS over vIPS or mSPL during maintenance (stay cues) or shifting (shift cues) of spatial attention, respectively, caused a delay of ? parieto-occipital desynchronization. Moreover, rTMS over vIPS during stay cues caused a delay of ? (2–4 Hz) frontocentral synchronization. These findings further support the anatomo-functional subdivision of the dorsal attention network in subsystems devoted to shifting or maintaining covert visuospatial attention and indicate that these mechanisms operate in different frequency channels linking frontal to parieto-occipital visual regions. PMID:25589765

  5. Changes in motor cortex excitability associated with temporal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in tinnitus: hints for cross-modal plasticity?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Motor cortex excitability was found to be changed after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the temporal cortex highlighting the occurrence of cross-modal plasticity in non-invasive brain stimulation. Here, we investigated the effects of temporal low-frequency rTMS on motor cortex plasticity in a large sample of tinnitus patients. In 116 patients with chronic tinnitus different parameters of cortical excitability were assessed before and after ten rTMS treatment sessions. Patients received one of three different protocols all including 1 Hz rTMS over the left temporal cortex. Treatment response was defined as improvement by at least five points in the tinnitus questionnaire (TQ). Variables of interest were resting motor threshold (RMT), short-interval intra-cortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF), and cortical silent period (CSP). Results After rTMS treatment RMT was decreased by about 1% of stimulator output near-significantly in the whole group of patients. SICI was associated with significant changes with respect to treatment response. The group of treatment responders showed a decrease of SICI over the course of treatment, the group of non-responders the reverse pattern. Conclusions Minor RMT changes during rTMS treatment do not necessarily suggest the need for systematic re-examination of the RMT for safety and efficacy issues. Treatment response to rTMS was shown to be related to changes in SICI that might reflect modulation of GABAergic mechanisms directly or indirectly related to rTMS treatment effects. PMID:24898574

  6. [Biological correlates of prefrontal activating and temporoparietal inhibiting treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)].

    PubMed

    Mobascher, A; Arends, M; Eschweiler, G W; Brinkmeyer, J; Agelink, M W; Kornischka, J; Winterer, G; Cordes, Joachim

    2009-08-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a tool that enables clinicians and neuroscientists to modulate cortical activity in a non-invasive way. High-frequency rTMS has predominantly an activating effect on the stimulated brain region while low-frequency rTMS has an inhibitory effect. In addition to its usefulness as a research tool and in neurological diagnostics, rTMS may prove useful as a therapeutic option in psychiatry, especially in disorders that are associated with regional changes in cortical activity. For instance, rTMS is under current investigation in the treatment of depression and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. A hypofrontality or a fronto-limbic imbalance associated with both syndromes could be corrected by activating, high frequency rTMS. Conversely, a regional hyperactivity in the temporo-parietal cortex has been described in subjects suffering from auditory hallucinations and tinnitus. Low frequency, inhibitory rTMS is currently evaluated as a therapeutic option in these subjects. In addition to the effects on the directly stimulated brain area, other biological effects of rTMS may exert a beneficial influence on brain function. Amongst these are a modulation of cortico-cortical circuits (e. g. fronto-cingular and fronto-parietotemporal circuits), effects on monoaminergic neuromodulation and neuroendocrine effects. The current knowledge about the therapeutically relevant neurophysiological and neuroendocrine effects of rTMS are reviewed. An improved understanding of the neurophysiological basis of the therapeutic effects of rTMS and of the pathophysiology underlying neuropsychiatric diseases may lead to optimized therapeutic rTMS applications and new clinical indications for rTMS. PMID:19533575

  7. Twelve-month, prospective, open-label study of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for major depressive disorder in partial remission

    PubMed Central

    Charnsil, Chawanun; Suttajit, Sirijit; Boonyanaruthee, Vudhichai; Leelarphat, Samornsri

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as adjunctive treatment in patients with partial remission of major depressive disorder. Methods This was a 12-month, prospective, open-label study in patients meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria for nonpsychotic major depressive disorder who responded to 8 weeks of medication treatment but did not reach remission. All patients were assigned to receive 10 sessions of rTMS applied at the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. During the course of rTMS, the patients were still taking their usual medication. Patients were followed up for 12 months to determine the long-term antidepressant effect. Results There were nine patients (seven women and two men) who met the inclusion criteria and agreed to receive rTMS. The mean Hamilton rating scale for depression (HAM-D) score prior to treatment with rTMS was 12.89 ± 2.15. At 12 months after treatment, the mean HAM-D score was 6.45 ± 1.67 using a Friedman test, and in patients with partial remission of major depressive disorder, the HAM-D score significantly decreased after treatment with rTMS at 12 months (P = 0.001). Seven patients (77.78%) had reached the stage of remission (HAM-D < 8) after treating with rTMS at 12 months. There were no serious adverse events. One patient had vertigo after the first session of treatment and one patient felt scalp contractions during treatment, and both fully recovered within half an hour with no medical intervention. Conclusion For patients with major depressive disorder in partial remission, high frequency rTMS at the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may provide benefits in adjunctive treatment with well tolerability. Also, follow-up findings show a long duration of benefit. PMID:22973105

  8. Repetition suppression in transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor-evoked potentials is modulated by cortical inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kallioniemi, E; Pääkkönen, A; Julkunen, P

    2015-12-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be applied to modulate cortical phenomena. The modulation effect is dependent on the applied stimulation frequency. Repetition suppression (RS) has been demonstrated in the motor system using TMS with short suprathreshold 1-Hz stimulation trains repeated at long inter-train intervals. RS has been reported to occur in the resting motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) with respect to the first pulse in a train of stimuli. Although this RS in the motor system has been described in previous studies, the neuronal origin of the phenomenon is still poorly understood. The present study evaluated RS in three TMS-induced motor responses; resting and active MEPs as well as corticospinal silent periods (SPs) in order to clarify the mechanism behind TMS-induced RS. We studied 10 healthy right-handed subjects using trains of four stimuli with stimulation intensities of 120% of the resting motor threshold (rMT) and 120% of the silent period threshold for an SP duration of 30ms (SPT30). Inter-trial interval was 20s, with a 1-s inter-stimulus interval within the trains. We confirmed that RS appears in resting MEPs (p<0.001), whereas active MEPs did not exhibit RS (p>0.792). SPs, on the contrary, lengthened (p<0.001) indicating modulation of cortical inhibition. The effects of the two stimulation intensities exhibited a similar trend; however, the SPT30 evoked a more profound inhibitory effect compared to that achieved by rMT. Moreover, the resting MEP amplitudes and SP durations correlated (rho?-0.674, p<0.001) and the pre-TMS EMG level did not differ between stimuli in resting MEPs (F=0.0, p?0.999). These results imply that the attenuation of response size seen in resting MEPs might originate from increasing activity of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons which relay the characteristics of SPs. PMID:26427962

  9. Neurobiological mechanisms of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in depression: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Noda, Y; Silverstein, W K; Barr, M S; Vila-Rodriguez, F; Downar, J; Rajji, T K; Fitzgerald, P B; Mulsant, B H; Vigod, S N; Daskalakis, Z J; Blumberger, D M

    2015-12-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent mental illnesses worldwide and a leading cause of disability, especially in the setting of treatment resistance. In recent years, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has emerged as a promising alternative strategy for treatment-resistant depression and its clinical efficacy has been investigated intensively across the world. However, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of the antidepressant effect of rTMS are still not fully understood. This review aims to systematically synthesize the literature on the neurobiological mechanisms of treatment response to rTMS in patients with depression. Medline (1996-2014), Embase (1980-2014) and PsycINFO (1806-2014) were searched under set terms. Three authors reviewed each article and came to consensus on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. All eligible studies were reviewed, duplicates were removed, and data were extracted individually. Of 1647 articles identified, 66 studies met both inclusion and exclusion criteria. rTMS affects various biological factors that can be measured by current biological techniques. Although a number of studies have explored the neurobiological mechanisms of rTMS, a large variety of rTMS protocols and parameters limits the ability to synthesize these findings into a coherent understanding. However, a convergence of findings suggest that rTMS exerts its therapeutic effects by altering levels of various neurochemicals, electrophysiology as well as blood flow and activity in the brain in a frequency-dependent manner. More research is needed to delineate the neurobiological mechanisms of the antidepressant effect of rTMS. The incorporation of biological assessments into future rTMS clinical trials will help in this regard. PMID:26349810

  10. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Cervical Dystonia: Effect of Site and Repetition in a Randomized Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pirio Richardson, Sarah; Tinaz, Sule; Chen, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing due to sustained muscle contraction, which leads to pain and significant disability. New therapeutic targets are needed in this disorder. The objective of this randomized, sham-controlled, blinded exploratory study is to identify a specific motor system target for non-invasive neuromodulation and to evaluate this target in terms of safety and tolerability in the cervical dystonia (CD) population. Eight CD subjects were given 15-minute sessions of low-frequency (0.2 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the primary motor cortex (MC), dorsal premotor cortex (dPM), supplementary motor area (SMA), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and a sham condition with each session separated by at least two days. The Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) score was rated in a blinded fashion immediately pre- and post-intervention. Secondary outcomes included physiology and tolerability ratings. The mean change in TWSTRS severity score by site was 0.25 ± 1.7 (ACC), -2.9 ± 3.4 (dPM), -3.0 ± 4.8 (MC), -0.5 ± 1.1 (SHAM), and -1.5 ± 3.2 (SMA) with negative numbers indicating improvement in symptom control. TWSTRS scores decreased from Session 1 (15.1 ± 5.1) to Session 5 (11.0 ± 7.6). The treatment was tolerable and safe. Physiology data were acquired on 6 of 8 subjects and showed no change over time. These results suggest rTMS can modulate CD symptoms. Both dPM and MC are areas to be targeted in further rTMS studies. The improvement in TWSTRS scores over time with multiple rTMS sessions deserves further evaluation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01859247 PMID:25923718

  11. Finding the Right Words: Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Improves Discourse Productivity in Non-fluent Aphasia After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Jared; Norise, Catherine; Faseyitan, Olufunsho; Coslett, H. Branch; Turkeltaub, Peter E.; Hamilton, Roy H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Loss of fluency is a significant source of functional impairment in many individuals with aphasia. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) administered to the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) has been shown to facilitate naming in persons with chronic left hemisphere stroke and non-fluent aphasia. However, changes in fluency in aphasic subjects receiving rTMS have not been adequately explored. Aims To determine whether rTMS improves fluency in individuals with chronic nonfluent aphasia, and to identify aspects of fluency that are modulated in persons who respond to rTMS. Methods & Procedures Ten individuals with left hemisphere MCA strokes and mild to moderate non-fluent aphasia participated in the study. Before treatment, subjects were asked to describe the Cookie Theft picture in three separate sessions. During treatment, all subjects received 1200 pulses of 1 Hz rTMS daily in 10 sessions over two weeks at a site that had previously been shown to improve naming. Subjects repeated the Cookie Theft description two months after treatment. Five subjects initially received sham stimulation instead of real TMS. Two months after sham treatment, these individuals received real rTMS. Performance both at baseline and after stimulation was coded using Quantitative Production Analysis (Saffran, Berndt & Schwartz, 1989) and Correct Information Unit (Nicholas & Brookshire, 1993) analysis. Outcomes & Results Across all subjects (n=10), real rTMS treatment resulted in a significant increase in multiple measures of discourse productivity compared to baseline performance. There was no significant increase in measures of sentence productivity or grammatical accuracy. There was no significant increase from baseline in the sham condition (n=5) on any study measures. Conclusions Stimulation of the right IFG in patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia facilitates discourse production. We posit that this effect may be attributable to improved lexical-semantic access. PMID:23280015

  12. Changes in temporal integration mitigate the disruptive effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation over visual cortex in humans.

    PubMed

    Ledgeway, Timothy; Heslip, David; McGraw, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has become a popular method for studying the functional properties, connectivity and chronometry of brain regions associated with visual encoding. However comparatively little is known about the precise mechanisms by which TMS influences on-going visual processing, though studies suggest it may suppress the processing of the signals associated with a task and/or induce increased levels of internal noise. To investigate this issue single-pulse TMS was applied over left-hemisphere V1 in eight observers during a forced-choice, orientation-identification task (horizontal vs. vertical) using a Gabor target (2 c/deg, centred 6 deg in the right visual field). Stimulus contrast was set to each observer's threshold, corresponding to 79% correct performance, measured in the absence of TMS. When TMS was applied over V1 performance decreased in all observers (~ 10% on average) compared to accuracy levels obtained during stimulation over a control site (Cz). Unexpectedly we found accuracy levels improved during V1 stimulation across a block of 200 trials in most (5/8) subjects, but remained stable during control site stimulation. Furthermore, no recovery was found when a brief, external, visual noise mask was used instead of a TMS pulse. These results show that the magnitude of TMS disruption can dissipate with repeated stimulation. To explore the potential mechanism underlying this recovery phenomenon we also measured the critical flicker fusion threshold (CFFT), using an LED driven by a square-wave temporal waveform of variable frequency, both prior to and following the same TMS protocol. For observers that previously exhibited TMS recovery, occipital simulation extended temporal integration periods by an average of 12% (by 3-8 ms). This suggests that the visual system can dynamically adapt to increased internal noise levels, by increasing the temporal interval over which visual stimuli are integrated, thus minimising the deleterious effects of TMS-induced cortical activity on sensory judgments. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326497

  13. Risk of seizures in transcranial magnetic stimulation: a clinical review to inform consent process focused on bupropion

    PubMed Central

    Dobek, Christine E; Blumberger, Daniel M; Downar, Jonathan; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel

    2015-01-01

    Objective When considering repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for major depressive disorder, clinicians often face a lack of detailed information on potential interactions between rTMS and pharmacotherapy. This is particularly relevant to patients receiving bupropion, a commonly prescribed antidepressant with lower risk of sexual side effects or weight increase, which has been associated with increased risk of seizure in particular populations. Our aim was to systematically review the information on seizures occurred with rTMS to identify the potential risk factors with attention to concurrent medications, particularly bupropion. Data sources We conducted a systematic review through the databases PubMed, PsycINFO, and EMBASE between 1980 and June 2015. Additional articles were found using reference lists of relevant articles. Reporting of data follows Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Study selection Two reviewers independently screened articles reporting the occurrence of seizures during rTMS. Articles reporting seizures in epilepsy during rTMS were excluded. A total of 25 rTMS-induced seizures were included in the final review. Data extraction Data were systematically extracted, and the authors of the applicable studies were contacted when appropriate to provide more detail about the seizure incidents. Results Twenty-five seizures were identified. Potential risk factors emerged such as sleep deprivation, polypharmacy, and neurological insult. High-frequency-rTMS was involved in a percentage of the seizures. None of these seizures reported had patients taking bupropion in the literature review. One rTMS-induced seizure was reported from the Food and Drug Administration in a sleep-deprived patient who was concurrently taking bupropion, sertraline, and amphetamine. Conclusion During the consent process, potential risk factors for an rTMS-induced seizure should be carefully screened for and discussed. Data do not support considering concurrent bupropion treatment as contraindication to undergo rTMS. PMID:26664122

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation intensity affects exercise-induced changes in corticomotoneuronal excitability and inhibition and voluntary activation.

    PubMed

    Bachasson, D; Temesi, J; Gruet, M; Yokoyama, K; Rupp, T; Millet, G Y; Verges, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex during voluntary contractions elicits electrophysiological and mechanical responses in the target muscle. The effect of different TMS intensities on exercise-induced changes in TMS-elicited variables is unknown, impairing data interpretation. This study aimed to investigate TMS intensity effects on maximal voluntary activation (VATMS), motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), and silent periods (SPs) in the quadriceps muscles before, during, and after exhaustive isometric exercise. Eleven subjects performed sets of ten 5-s submaximal isometric quadriceps contractions at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) strength until task failure. Three different TMS intensities (I100, I75, I50) eliciting MEPs of 53±6%, 38±5% and 25±3% of maximal compound action potential (Mmax) at 20% MVC were used. MEPs and SPs were assessed at both absolute (40% baseline MVC) and relative (50%, 75%, and 100% MVC) force levels. VATMS was assessed with I100 and I75. When measured at absolute force level, MEP/Mmax increased during exercise at I50, decreased at I100 and remained unchanged at I75. No TMS intensity effect was observed at relative force levels. At both absolute and relative force levels, SPs increased at I100 and remained stable at I75 and I50. VATMS assessed at I75 tended to be lower than at I100. TMS intensity affects exercise-induced changes in MEP/Mmax (only when measured at absolute force level), SPs, and VATMS. These results indicate a single TMS intensity assessing maximal voluntary activation and exercise-induced changes in corticomotoneuronal excitability/inhibition may be inappropriate. PMID:26642805

  15. Modulation of amplitude and latency of motor evoked potential by direction of transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aya; Torii, Tetsuya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Itoh, Yuji; Iramina, Keiji

    2014-05-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of monophasic magnetic stimulation to the motor cortex. The effects of magnetic stimulation were evaluated by analyzing the motor evoked potentials (MEPs). The amplitude and latency of MEPs on the abductor pollicis brevis muscle were used to evaluate the effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation. A figure eight-shaped flat coil was used to stimulate the region over the primary motor cortex. The intensity of magnetic stimulation was 120% of the resting motor threshold, and the frequency of magnetic stimulation was 0.1 Hz. In addition, the direction of the current in the brain was posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP). The latency of MEP was compared with PA and AP on initial magnetic stimulation. The results demonstrated that a stimulus in the AP direction increased the latency of the MEP by approximately 2.5 ms. MEP amplitude was also compared with PA and AP during 60 magnetic stimulations. The results showed that a stimulus in the PA direction gradually increased the amplitude of the MEP. However, a stimulus in the AP direction did not modulate the MEP amplitude. The average MEP amplitude induced from every 10 magnetic pulses was normalized by the average amplitude of the first 10 stimuli. These results demonstrated that the normalized MEP amplitude increased up to approximately 150%. In terms of pyramidal neuron indirect waves (I waves), magnetic stimulation inducing current flowing backward to the anterior preferentially elicited an I1 wave, and current flowing forward to the posterior elicited an I3 wave. It has been reported that the latency of the I3 wave is approximately 2.5 ms longer than the I1 wave elicitation, so the resulting difference in latency may be caused by this phenomenon. It has also been reported that there is no alteration of MEP amplitude at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. However, this study suggested that the modulation of MEP amplitude depends on stimulation strength and stimulation direction.

  16. Prime mover muscle in finger lift or finger flexion reaction times: identification with transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tomberg, C; Caramia, M D

    1991-08-01

    When recording the onset of the electromyographic (EMG) voluntary response in reaction time (RT) studies, the electrodes should be placed on the muscle which is first and foremost involved in executing the response. It is thus necessary to identify which is the prime mover muscle among active synergic muscles. This has been investigated for index finger lift or flexion RTs by delivering a magnetic stimulus to motor cortical areas prior to the subject's voluntary response. The EMG responses to the magnetic stimulus were selectively facilitated either in the extensor indicis proprius muscle (in index lift RTs) or in the first dorsal interosseous muscle (in index flexion RTs). These effects are robust and provide a method for identifying the prime mover muscle in voluntary movements. PMID:1714827

  17. Low Intensity Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Does Not Induce Cell Survival or Regeneration in a Mouse Optic Nerve Crush Model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Alexander D.; Makowiecki, Kalina; Bartlett, Carole; Rodger, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Low intensity repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (LI-rTMS), a non-invasive form of brain stimulation, has been shown to induce structural and functional brain plasticity, including short distance axonal sprouting. However, the potential for LI-rTMS to promote axonal regeneration following neurotrauma has not been investigated. This study examined the effect of LI-rTMS on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival, axon regeneration and levels of BDNF in an optic nerve crush neurotrauma model. Adult C57Bl/6J mice received a unilateral intraorbital optic nerve crush. Mice received 10 minutes of sham (handling control without stimulation) (n=6) or LI-rTMS (n = 8) daily stimulation for 14 days to the operated eye. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess RGC survival (?-3 Tubulin) and axon regeneration across the injury (GAP43). Additionally, BDNF expression was quantified in a separate cohort by ELISA in the retina and optic nerve of injured (optic nerve crush) (sham n = 5, LI-rTMS n = 5) and non-injured mice (sham n = 5, LI-rTMS n = 5) that received daily stimulation as above for 7 days. Following 14 days of LI-rTMS there was no significant difference in mean RGC survival between sham and treated animals (p>0.05). Also, neither sham nor LI-rTMS animals showed GAP43 positive labelling in the optic nerve, indicating that regeneration did not occur. At 1 week, there was no significant difference in BDNF levels in the retina or optic nerves between sham and LI-rTMS in injured or non-injured mice (p>0.05). Although LI-rTMS has been shown to induce structural and molecular plasticity in the visual system and cerebellum, our results suggest LI-rTMS does not induce neuroprotection or regeneration following a complete optic nerve crush. These results help define the therapeutic capacity and limitations of LI-rTMS in the treatment of neurotrauma. PMID:25993112

  18. Dorsolateral prefrontal transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with major depression locally affects alpha power of REM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Pellicciari, Maria Concetta; Cordone, Susanna; Marzano, Cristina; Bignotti, Stefano; Gazzoli, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Sleep alterations are among the most important disabling manifestation symptoms of Major Depression Disorder (MDD). A critical role of sleep importance is also underlined by the fact that its adjustment has been proposed as an objective marker of clinical remission in MDD. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) represents a relatively novel therapeutic tool for the treatment of drug-resistant depression. Nevertheless, besides clinical evaluation of the mood improvement after rTMS, we have no clear understanding of what are the neurophysiological correlates of such treatment. One possible marker underlying the clinical outcome of rTMS in MDD could be cortical changes on wakefulness and sleep activity. The aim of this open-label study was to evaluate the efficacy of a sequential bilateral rTMS treatment over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to improve the mood in MDD patients, and to determine if rTMS can induce changes on the sleep structure, and if those changes can be used as a surrogate marker of the clinical state of the patient. Ten drug-resistant depressed patients participated to ten daily sessions of sequential bilateral rTMS with a low-frequency TMS (1 Hz) over right-DLPFC and a subsequent high-frequency (10 Hz) TMS over left-DLPFC. The clinical and neurophysiological effects induced by rTMS were evaluated, respectively by means of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and by comparing the sleep pattern modulations and the spatial changes of EEG frequency bands during both NREM and REM sleep, before and after the real rTMS treatment. The sequential bilateral rTMS treatment over the DLPFC induced topographical-specific decrease of the alpha activity during REM sleep over left-DLPFC, which is significantly associated to the clinical outcome. In line with the notion of a left frontal hypoactivation in MDD patients, the observed local decrease of alpha activity after rTMS treatment during the REM sleep suggests that alpha frequency reduction could be considered as a marker of up-regulation of cortical activity induced by rTMS, as well as a surrogate neurophysiological correlate of the clinical outcome. PMID:23935577

  19. Utilizing Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Improve Language Function in Stroke Patients with Chronic Non-fluent Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Gabriella; Norise, Catherine; Faseyitan, Olufunsho; Naeser, Margaret A.; Hamilton, Roy H.

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been shown to significantly improve language function in patients with non-fluent aphasia1. In this experiment, we demonstrate the administration of low-frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS) to an optimal stimulation site in the right hemisphere in patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia. A battery of standardized language measures is administered in order to assess baseline performance. Patients are subsequently randomized to either receive real rTMS or initial sham stimulation. Patients in the real stimulation undergo a site-finding phase, comprised of a series of six rTMS sessions administered over five days; stimulation is delivered to a different site in the right frontal lobe during each of these sessions. Each site-finding session consists of 600 pulses of 1 Hz rTMS, preceded and followed by a picture-naming task. By comparing the degree of transient change in naming ability elicited by stimulation of candidate sites, we are able to locate the area of optimal response for each individual patient. We then administer rTMS to this site during the treatment phase. During treatment, patients undergo a total of ten days of stimulation over the span of two weeks; each session is comprised of 20 min of 1 Hz rTMS delivered at 90% resting motor threshold. Stimulation is paired with an fMRI-naming task on the first and last days of treatment. After the treatment phase is complete, the language battery obtained at baseline is repeated two and six months following stimulation in order to identify rTMS-induced changes in performance. The fMRI-naming task is also repeated two and six months following treatment. Patients who are randomized to the sham arm of the study undergo sham site-finding, sham treatment, fMRI-naming studies, and repeat language testing two months after completing sham treatment. Sham patients then cross over into the real stimulation arm, completing real site-finding, real treatment, fMRI, and two- and six-month post-stimulation language testing. PMID:23852365

  20. Neural correlates associated with symptom provocation in pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder after a single session of sham-controlled repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pedapati, Ernest; DiFrancesco, Mark; Wu, Steve; Giovanetti, Cathy; Nash, Tiffany; Mantovani, Antonio; Ammerman, Robert; Harris, Elana

    2015-09-30

    Treatments for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) could be enhanced if the physiological changes engendered by treatment were known. This study examined neural correlates of a provocation task in youth with OCD, before and after sham-controlled repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We hypothesized that rTMS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex would inhibit activity in cortico-striato-thalamic (CST) circuits associated with OCD to a greater extent than sham rTMS. After baseline (Time 1) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a provocation task, subjects received one session of either fMRI-guided sham (SG; n=8) or active (AG; n=10) 1-Hz rTMS over the rDLPFC for 30min. During rTMS, subjects were presented with personalized images that evoked OCD-related anxiety. Following stimulation, fMRI and the provocation task were repeated (Time 2). Contrary to our prediction for the provocation task, the AG was associated with no changes in BOLD response from Times 1 to 2. In contrast, the SG had a significant increase at Time 2 in BOLD response in the right inferior frontal gyrus and right putamen, which persisted after adjusting for age, gender, and time to scanner as covariates. This study provides an initial framework for TMS interrogation of the CST circuit in pediatric OCD. PMID:26228567

  1. Head-to-Head Comparison of Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation, Transcranial AC Stimulation, and Transcranial DC Stimulation for Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, Sven; Fregni, Felipe; De Ridder, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external sound stimulus. This phantom sound has been related to plastic changes and hyperactivity in the auditory cortex. Different neuromodulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have been used in an attempt to modify local and distant neuroplasticity as to reduce tinnitus symptoms. Recently, two techniques of pulsed electrical stimulation using weak electrical currents – transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) – have also shown significant neuromodulatory effects. In the present study we conducted the first head-to-head comparison of three different transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) techniques, namely tDCS, tACS, and tRNS in 111 tinnitus patients by placing the electrodes overlying the auditory cortex bilaterally. The results demonstrated that tRNS induced the larger transient suppressive effect on the tinnitus loudness and the tinnitus related distress as compared to tDCS and tACS. Both tDCS and tACS induced small and non-significant effects on tinnitus symptoms, supporting the superior effects of tRNS as a method for tinnitus suppression. PMID:24391599

  2. Head-to-Head Comparison of Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation, Transcranial AC Stimulation, and Transcranial DC Stimulation for Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, Sven; Fregni, Felipe; De Ridder, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external sound stimulus. This phantom sound has been related to plastic changes and hyperactivity in the auditory cortex. Different neuromodulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have been used in an attempt to modify local and distant neuroplasticity as to reduce tinnitus symptoms. Recently, two techniques of pulsed electrical stimulation using weak electrical currents - transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) - have also shown significant neuromodulatory effects. In the present study we conducted the first head-to-head comparison of three different transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) techniques, namely tDCS, tACS, and tRNS in 111 tinnitus patients by placing the electrodes overlying the auditory cortex bilaterally. The results demonstrated that tRNS induced the larger transient suppressive effect on the tinnitus loudness and the tinnitus related distress as compared to tDCS and tACS. Both tDCS and tACS induced small and non-significant effects on tinnitus symptoms, supporting the superior effects of tRNS as a method for tinnitus suppression. PMID:24391599

  3. Ketamine, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, and Depression Specific Yoga and Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy in Management of Treatment Resistant Depression: Review and Some Data on Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Basant; Parikh, Tapan; Makani, Ramkrishna; Sahoo, Madhusmita

    2015-01-01

    Depression affects about 121 million people worldwide and prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) in US adults is 6.4%. Treatment resistant depression (TRD) accounts for approximately 12-20% of all depression patients and costs $29-$48 billion annually. Ketamine and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have useful roles in TRD, but their utility in long term is unknown. As per the latest literature, the interventions using Yoga and meditation including the mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) have been useful in treatment of depression and relapse prevention. We present a review of rTMS, ketamine, and MBCT and also report efficacy of a depression specific, innovative, and translational model of Yoga and mindfulness based cognitive therapy (DepS Y-MBCT), developed by the first author. DepS Y-MBCT as an adjunctive treatment successfully ameliorated TRD symptoms in 27/32 patients in an open label pilot trial in TRD patients. Considering the limitations of existing treatment options, including those of ketamine and rTMS when used as the sole modality of treatment, we suggest a "tiered approach for TRD" by combining ketamine and rTMS (alone or along with antidepressants) for rapid remission of acute depression symptoms and to use DepS Y-MBCT for maintaining remission and preventing relapse. PMID:26509083

  4. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Changes Cerebral Oxygenation on the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Bulimia Nervosa: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sutoh, Chihiro; Koga, Yasuko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kanahara, Nobuhisa; Numata, Noriko; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Daisuke; Iyo, Masaomi; Nakazato, Michiko; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that food craving in eating disorders can be weakened with high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The aims of this study were to assess cerebral oxygenation change induced with rTMS and to assess the short-term impact of rTMS on food craving and other bulimic symptoms in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN). Eight women diagnosed with BN according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria participated in this study. We measured haemoglobin concentration changes in the DLPFC with near-infrared spectroscopy during cognitive tasks measuring self-regulatory control in response to food photo stimuli, both at baseline and after a single session of rTMS. Subjective ratings for food cravings demonstrated significant reduction. A significant decrease in cerebral oxygenation of the left DLPFC was also observed after a single session of rTMS. Measurement with NIRS after rTMS intervention may be applicable for discussing the mechanisms underlying rTMS modulation in patients with BN. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. PMID:26481583

  5. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Provides Means to Assess Cortical Plasticity and Excitability in Humans with Fragile X Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Oberman, Lindsay; Ifert-Miller, Fritz; Najib, Umer; Bashir, Shahid; Woollacott, Ione; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph; Picker, Jonathan; Rotenberg, Alexander; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability. In vitro electrophysiologic data from mouse models of FXS suggest that loss of fragile X mental retardation protein affects intracortical excitability and synaptic plasticity. Specifically, the cortex appears hyperexcitable, and use-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic strength are abnormal. Though animal models provide important information, FXS and other neurodevelopmental disorders are human diseases and as such translational research to evaluate cortical excitability and plasticity must be applied in the human. Transcranial magnetic stimulation paradigms have recently been developed to non-invasively investigate cortical excitability using paired pulse stimulation, as well as LTP- and LTD-like synaptic plasticity in response to theta burst stimulation (TBS) in vivo in the human. TBS applied on consecutive days can be used to measure metaplasticity (the ability of the synapse to undergo a second plastic change following a recent induction of plasticity). The current study investigated intracortical inhibition, plasticity and metaplasticity in full mutation females with FXS, participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and neurotypical controls. Results suggest that intracortical inhibition is normal in participants with FXS, while plasticity and metaplasticity appear abnormal. ASD participants showed abnormalities in plasticity and metaplasticity, as well as heterogeneity in intracortical inhibition. Our findings highlight the utility of non-invasive neurophysiological measures to translate insights from animal models to humans with neurodevelopmental disorders, and thus provide direct confirmation of cortical dysfunction in patients with FXS and ASD. PMID:21423512

  6. Deception rate in a "lying game": different effects of excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of right and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex not found with inhibitory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Karton, Inga; Palu, Annegrete; Jõks, Kerli; Bachmann, Talis

    2014-11-01

    Knowing the brain processes involved in lying is the key point in today's deception detection studies. We have previously found that stimulating the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) affects the rate of spontaneous lying in simple behavioural tasks. The main idea of this study was to examine the role of rTMS applied to the DLPFC in the behavioural conditions where subjects were better motivated to lie compared to our earlier studies and where all possible conditions (inhibition of left and right DLPFC with 1-Hz and sham; excitation of left and right DLPFC with 10-Hz and sham) were administered to the same subjects. It was expected that excitation of the left DLPFC with rTMS decreases and excitation of the right DLPFC increases the rate of lying and that inhibitory stimulation reverses the effects. As was expected, excitation of the left DLPFC decreased lying compared to excitation of the right DLPFC, but contrary to the expectation, inhibition had no different effects. These findings suggest that propensity to lie can be manipulated by non-invasive excitatory brain stimulation by TMS targeted at DLPFC and the direction of the effect depends on the cortical target locus. PMID:25233864

  7. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Ameliorates Anxiety-Like Behavior and Impaired Sensorimotor Gating in a Rat Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua-ning; Bai, Yuan-han; Chen, Yun-chun; Zhang, Rui-guo; Wang, Huai-hai; Zhang, Ya-hong; Gan, Jing-li; Peng, Zheng-wu; Tan, Qing-rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been employed for decades as a non-pharmacologic treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although a link has been suggested between PTSD and impaired sensorimotor gating (SG), studies assessing the effects of rTMS against PTSD or PTSD with impaired SG are scarce. Aim To assess the benefit of rTMS in a rat model of PTSD. Methods Using a modified single prolonged stress (SPS&S) rat model of PTSD, behavioral parameters were acquired using open field test (OFT), elevated plus maze test (EPMT), and prepulse inhibition trial (PPI), with or without 7 days of high frequency (10Hz) rTMS treatment of SPS&S rats. Results Anxiety-like behavior, impaired SG and increased plasma level of cortisol were observed in SPS&S animals after stress for a prolonged time. Interestingly, rTMS administered immediately after stress prevented those impairment. Conclusion Stress-induced anxiety-like behavior, increased plasma level of cortisol and impaired PPI occur after stress and high-frequency rTMS has the potential to ameliorate this behavior, suggesting that high frequency rTMS should be further evaluated for its use as a method for preventing PTSD. PMID:25659132

  8. Effect of the stimulus frequency and pulse number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the inter-reversal time of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Kazuhisa; Ge, Sheng; Katayama, Yoshinori; Ueno, Shoogo; Iramina, Keiji

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the stimulus frequency and pulses number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the inter-reversal time (IRT) of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule (SPL). The spinning wheel illusion was used as the ambiguous figures stimulation in this study. To investigate the rTMS effect over the right SPL during perceptual reversal, 0.25 Hz 60 pulse, 1 Hz 60 pulse, 0.5 Hz 120 pulse, 1 Hz 120 pulse, and 1 Hz 240 pulse biphasic rTMS at 90% of resting motor threshold was applied over the right SPL and the right posterior temporal lobe (PTL), respectively. As a control, a no TMS was also conducted. It was found that rTMS on 0.25 Hz 60 pulse and 1 Hz 60 pulse applied over the right SPL caused shorter IRT. In contrast, it was found that rTMS on 1 Hz 240-pulse applied over the right SPL caused longer IRT. On the other hand, there is no significant difference between IRTs when the rTMS on 0.5 Hz 120 pulse and 1 Hz 120 pulse were applied over the right SPL. Therefore, the applying of rTMS over the right SPL suggests that the IRT of perceptual reversal is effected by the rTMS conditions such as the stimulus frequency and the number of pulses.

  9. Meta-analysis of the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on negative and positive symptoms in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Catarina; Fregni, Felipe; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence suggests that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can alleviate negative and positive symptoms of refractory schizophrenia. However, trials to date have been small and results are mixed. Methods We performed meta-analyses of all prospective studies of the therapeutic application of rTMS in refractory schizophrenia assessing the effects of high-frequency rTMS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to treat negative symptoms, and low-frequency rTMS to the left temporo-parietal cortex (TPC) to treat auditory hallucinations (AH) and overall positive symptoms. Results When analyzing controlled (active arms) and uncontrolled studies together, the effect sizes showed significant and moderate effects of rTMS on negative and positive symptoms (based on PANSS-N or SANS, and PANSS-P or SAPS, respectively). However, the analysis for the sham-controlled studies revealed a small non-significant effect size for negative (0.27, p=0.417) and for positive symptoms (0.17, p=0.129). When specifically analyzing AH (based on AHRS, HCS or SAH), the effect size for the sham-controlled studies was large and significant (1.04; p=0.002). Conclusions These meta-analyses support the need for further controlled, larger trials to assess the clinical efficacy of rTMS on negative and positive symptoms of schizophrenia, while suggesting the need for exploration for alternative stimulation protocols. PMID:19138833

  10. Ketamine, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, and Depression Specific Yoga and Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy in Management of Treatment Resistant Depression: Review and Some Data on Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Basant; Parikh, Tapan; Makani, Ramkrishna; Sahoo, Madhusmita

    2015-01-01

    Depression affects about 121 million people worldwide and prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) in US adults is 6.4%. Treatment resistant depression (TRD) accounts for approximately 12–20% of all depression patients and costs $29–$48 billion annually. Ketamine and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have useful roles in TRD, but their utility in long term is unknown. As per the latest literature, the interventions using Yoga and meditation including the mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) have been useful in treatment of depression and relapse prevention. We present a review of rTMS, ketamine, and MBCT and also report efficacy of a depression specific, innovative, and translational model of Yoga and mindfulness based cognitive therapy (DepS Y-MBCT), developed by the first author. DepS Y-MBCT as an adjunctive treatment successfully ameliorated TRD symptoms in 27/32 patients in an open label pilot trial in TRD patients. Considering the limitations of existing treatment options, including those of ketamine and rTMS when used as the sole modality of treatment, we suggest a “tiered approach for TRD” by combining ketamine and rTMS (alone or along with antidepressants) for rapid remission of acute depression symptoms and to use DepS Y-MBCT for maintaining remission and preventing relapse. PMID:26509083

  11. The use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool for the measurement of bihemispheric transcranial electric stimulation effects on primary motor cortex metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Sara; Beaulé, Vincent; Proulx, Sébastien; Lafleur, Louis-Philippe; Doyon, Julien; Marja?ska, Ma?gorzata; Théoret, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulation technique that has been increasingly used over the past decade in the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders such as stroke and depression. Yet, the mechanisms underlying its ability to modulate brain excitability to improve clinical symptoms remains poorly understood 33. To help improve this understanding, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) can be used as it allows the in vivo quantification of brain metabolites such as ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate in a region-specific manner 35. In fact, a recent study demonstrated that 1H-MRS is indeed a powerful means to better understand the effects of tDCS on neurotransmitter concentration 34. This article aims to describe the complete protocol for combining tDCS (NeuroConn MR compatible stimulator) with 1H-MRS at 3 T using a MEGA-PRESS sequence. We will describe the impact of a protocol that has shown great promise for the treatment of motor dysfunctions after stroke, which consists of bilateral stimulation of primary motor cortices 27,30,31. Methodological factors to consider and possible modifications to the protocol are also discussed. PMID:25490453

  12. Improvement in Paretic Arm Reach-to-Grasp following Low Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Depends on Object Size: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tretriluxana, Jarugool; Kantak, Shailesh; Tretriluxana, Suradej; Wu, Allan D.; Fisher, Beth E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (LF-rTMS) delivered to the nonlesioned hemisphere has been shown to improve limited function of the paretic upper extremity (UE) following stroke. The outcome measures have largely included clinical assessments with little investigation on changes in kinematics and coordination. To date, there is no study investigating how the effects of LF-rTMS are modulated by the sizes of an object to be grasped. Objective. To investigate the effect of LF-rTMS on kinematics and coordination of the paretic hand reach-to-grasp (RTG) for two object sizes in chronic stroke. Methods. Nine participants received two TMS conditions: real rTMS and sham rTMS conditions. Before and after the rTMS conditions, cortico-motor excitability (CE) of the nonlesioned hemisphere, RTG kinematics, and coordination was evaluated. Object sizes were 1.2 and 7.2?cm in diameter. Results. Compared to sham rTMS, real rTMS significantly reduced CE of the non-lesioned M1. While rTMS had no effect on RTG action for the larger object, real rTMS significantly improved movement time, aperture opening, and RTG coordination for the smaller object. Conclusions. LF-rTMS improves RTG action for only the smaller object in chronic stroke. The findings suggest a dissociation between effects of rTMS on M1 and task difficulty for this complex skill. PMID:26664827

  13. The Role of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Phasic Alertness: Evidence from a Contingent Negative Variation and Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Mannarelli, Daniela; Pauletti, Caterina; Grippo, Antonello; Amantini, Aldo; Augugliaro, Vito; Currà, Antonio; Missori, Paolo; Locuratolo, Nicoletta; De Lucia, Maria C.; Rinalduzzi, Steno; Fattapposta, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Phasic alertness represents the ability to increase response readiness to a target following an external warning stimulus. Specific networks in the frontal and parietal regions appear to be involved in the alert state. In this study, we examined the role of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during the attentional processing of a stimulus using a cued double-choice reaction time task. The evaluation of these processes was conducted by means of Event-Related Potentials (ERPs), in particular by using the Contingent Negative Variation (CNV), and repetitive 1-Hz Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS). Transient virtual inhibition of the right DLPFC induced by real 1-Hz rTMS stimulation led to a significant decrease in total CNV and W1-CNV areas if compared with the basal and post-sham rTMS conditions. Reaction times (RTs) did not decrease after inhibitory rTMS, but they did improve after sham stimulation. These results suggest that the right DLPFC plays a crucial role in the genesis and maintenance of the alerting state and learning processes. PMID:26090234

  14. Bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment-resistant depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.Q.; Zhu, D.; Zhou, X.Y.; Liu, Y.Y.; Qin, B.; Ren, G.P.; Xie, P.

    2015-01-01

    There has been concern regarding the use of controversial paradigms for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to manage treatment-resistant depression (TRD). This meta-analysis assessed the efficacy of bilateral rTMS compared with unilateral and sham rTMS in patients with TRD. PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, EAGLE and NTIS databases were searched to identify relevant studies, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on bilateral rTMS for TRD patients were included. The response was defined as the primary outcome, and remission was the secondary outcome. Ten RCTs that included 634 patients met the eligibility criteria. The risk ratio (RRs) of both the primary and secondary outcomes of bilateral rTMS showed non-significant increases compared to unilateral rTMS (RR=1.01, P=0.93; odds ratio [OR]=0.77, P=0.22). Notably, the RR of the primary bilateral rTMS outcome was significantly increased compared to that for sham rTMS (RR=3.43, P=0.0004). The results of our analysis demonstrated that bilateral rTMS was significantly more effective than sham rTMS but not unilateral rTMS in patients with TRD. Thus, bilateral rTMS may not be a useful paradigm for patients with TRD. PMID:25590350

  15. Bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment-resistant depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Q; Zhu, D; Zhou, X Y; Liu, Y Y; Qin, B; Ren, G P; Xie, P

    2015-03-01

    There has been concern regarding the use of controversial paradigms for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to manage treatment-resistant depression (TRD). This meta-analysis assessed the efficacy of bilateral rTMS compared with unilateral and sham rTMS in patients with TRD. PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, EAGLE and NTIS databases were searched to identify relevant studies, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on bilateral rTMS for TRD patients were included. The response was defined as the primary outcome, and remission was the secondary outcome. Ten RCTs that included 634 patients met the eligibility criteria. The risk ratio (RRs) of both the primary and secondary outcomes of bilateral rTMS showed non-significant increases compared to unilateral rTMS (RR=1.01, P=0.93; odds ratio [OR]=0.77, P=0.22). Notably, the RR of the primary bilateral rTMS outcome was significantly increased compared to that for sham rTMS (RR=3.43, P=0.0004). The results of our analysis demonstrated that bilateral rTMS was significantly more effective than sham rTMS but not unilateral rTMS in patients with TRD. Thus, bilateral rTMS may not be a useful paradigm for patients with TRD. PMID:25590350

  16. Detection of cerebral blood flow changes during repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation by recording hemoglobin in the brain cortex, just beneath the stimulation coil, with near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hada, Yasushi; Abo, Masahiro; Kaminaga, Tatsuro; Mikami, Masahiro

    2006-09-01

    Many studies measured cerebral blood flow changes in the stimulated primary motor cortex during repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) using PET, SPECT, and fMRI; however, most of these procedures are associated with problems related to temporal resolution and magnetic field artifacts that are produced by rTMS. In this study of 12 healthy right-handed volunteers, we measured the hemoglobin (Hb) concentration change in the stimulated primary motor cortex during and after rTMS using rTMS coil and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with high temporal sampling (every 125 ms). The left primary motor cortex that controls the right first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle was stimulated 10 times with an angle figure-of-eight coil at a frequency of 0.5 or 2 Hz, at intensity of 80% or 120% of resting motor threshold (RMT). We used 4 stimulus conditions: (1) 2 Hz-120% RMT, (2) 2 Hz-80% RMT, (3) 0.5 Hz-120% RMT, and (4) 0.5 Hz-80% RMT. We observed small intensity-dependent increments in total- and oxy-Hb concentrations around 5 s at the 120% RMT condition. Greater decrements in total- and oxy-Hb concentrations and increment of deoxy-Hb concentration were observed during and after rTMS at all conditions, both at the supra-threshold and sub-threshold stimulus intensities. Our results emphasize the suitability of NIRS combined with rTMS for detecting changes in cerebral blood flow. PMID:16765065

  17. Multiple blocks of intermittent and continuous theta-burst stimulation applied via transcranial magnetic stimulation differently affect sensory responses in rat barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Thimm, Andreas; Funke, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Cortical sensory processing varies with cortical state and the balance of inhibition to excitation. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to modulate human cortical excitability. In a rat model, we recently showed that intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) applied to the corpus callosum, to activate primarily supragranular cortical pyramidal cells but fewer subcortical neurons, strongly reduced the cortical expression of parvalbumin (PV), indicating reduced activity of fast-spiking interneurons. Here, we used the well-studied rodent barrel cortex system to test how iTBS and continuous TBS (cTBS) modulate sensory responses evoked by either single or double stimuli applied to the principal (PW) and/or adjacent whisker (AW) in urethane-anaesthetized rats. Compared to sham stimulation, iTBS but not cTBS particularly enhanced late (>18 ms) response components of multi-unit spiking and local field potential responses in layer 4 but not the very early response (<18 ms). Similarly, only iTBS diminished the suppression of the second response evoked by paired PW or AW–PW stimulation at 20 ms intervals. The effects increased with each of the five iTBS blocks applied. With cTBS a mild effect similar to that of iTBS was first evident after 4–5 stimulation blocks. Enhanced cortical c-Fos and zif268 expression but reduced PV and GAD67 expression was found only after iTBS, indicating increased cortical activity due to lowered inhibition. We conclude that iTBS but less cTBS may primarily weaken a late recurrent-type cortical inhibition mediated via a subset of PV+ interneurons, enabling stronger late response components believed to contribute to the perception of sensory events. PMID:25504571

  18. Motor Cortex and Motor Cortical Interhemispheric Communication in Walking After Stroke: The Roles of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Animal Models in Our Current and Future Understanding.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Charalambos C; Bowden, Mark G; Adkins, DeAnna L

    2016-01-01

    Despite the plethora of human neurophysiological research, the bilateral involvement of the leg motor cortical areas and their interhemispheric interaction during both normal and impaired human walking is poorly understood. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we have expanded our understanding of the role upper-extremity motor cortical areas play in normal movements and how stroke alters this role, and probed the efficacy of interventions to improve post-stroke arm function. However, similar investigations of the legs have lagged behind, in part, due to the anatomical difficulty in using TMS to stimulate the leg motor cortical areas. Additionally, leg movements are predominately bilaterally controlled and require interlimb coordination that may involve both hemispheres. The sensitive, but invasive, tools used in animal models of locomotion hold great potential for increasing our understanding of the bihemispheric motor cortical control of walking. In this review, we discuss 3 themes associated with the bihemispheric motor cortical control of walking after stroke: (a) what is known about the role of the bihemispheric motor cortical control in healthy and poststroke leg movements, (b) how the neural remodeling of the contralesional hemisphere can affect walking recovery after a stroke, and (c) what is the effect of behavioral rehabilitation training of walking on the neural remodeling of the motor cortical areas bilaterally. For each theme, we discuss how rodent models can enhance the present knowledge on human walking by testing hypotheses that cannot be investigated in humans, and how these findings can then be back-translated into the neurorehabilitation of poststroke walking. PMID:25878201

  19. Effect of Parietal Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Spatial Working Memory in Healthy Elderly Persons - Comparison of Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Young and Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Kaori; Tomioka, Hiroi; Kawasaki, Shingo; Noda, Yumiko; Yamagata, Bun; Iwanami, Akira; Mimura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study, we succeeded in improving the spatial working memory (WM) performance in healthy young persons by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the parietal cortex and simultaneously measuring the oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) level using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Since an improvement in WM was observed when TMS was applied to the right parietal cortex, the oxy-Hb distribution seemed to support a model of hemispheric asymmetry (HA). In the present study, we used the same study design to evaluate healthy elderly persons and investigated the effect of TMS on WM performance in the elderly, comparing the results with those previously obtained from young persons. The application of TMS did not affect WM performance (both reaction time and accuracy) of 38 elderly participants (mean age ?=?72.5 years old). To investigate the reason for this result, we conducted a three-way ANOVA examining oxy-Hb in both young and elderly participants. For the right parietal TMS site in the elderly, TMS significantly decreased the oxy-Hb level during WM performance; this result was the opposite of that observed in young participants. An additional three-way ANOVA was conducted for each of the 52 channels, and a P value distribution map was created. The P value maps for the young participants showed a clearly localized TMS effect for both the WM and control task, whereas the P map for the elderly participants showed less significant channels and localization. Further analysis following the time course revealed that right-side parietal TMS had almost no effect on the frontal cortex in the elderly participants. This result can most likely be explained by age-related differences in HA arising from the over-recruitment of oxy-Hb, differentiation in the parietal cortex, and age-related alterations of the frontal-parietal networks. PMID:25019944

  20. Reduced Mirror Neuron Activity in Schizophrenia and Its Association With Theory of Mind Deficits: Evidence From a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Urvakhsh Meherwan; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Basavaraju, Rakshathi; Gangadhar, Bangalore N.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Background: The “mirror-neuron system” has been proposed to be a neurophysiological substrate for social cognition (SC) ability. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms to compare putative mirror neuron activity (MNA) in 3 groups: antipsychotic-naive, medicated schizophrenia patients, and healthy comparison subjects. We also explored the association between MNA and SC ability in patients. Methods: Fifty-four consenting right-handed schizophrenia patients (33 antipsychotic naive) and 45 matched healthy comparison subjects completed a TMS experiment to assess putative premotor MNA. We used 4 TMS paradigms of eliciting motor-evoked potentials (MEP) in the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. These were applied while the subjects observed a goal-directed action involving the FDI (actual action and its video) and a static image. The difference in the amplitude of the MEP while they observed the static image and the action provided a measure of MNA. Subjects also underwent SC assessments (theory of mind [ToM], emotion processing, and social perception). Results: Two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant group × occasion interaction effect in 3 TMS paradigms, indicating deficient motor facilitation during action observation relative to rest state in antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients as compared with the other two groups. Among patients, there were significant direct correlations between measures of MNA and ToM performance. Conclusions: Antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients have poorer MNA than medicated patients and healthy controls. Measures of putative MNA had significant and consistent associations with ToM abilities. These findings suggest a possibility of deficient mirror neuron system underlying SC deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:24214933

  1. Efficacy of Adjunctive High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Right Prefrontal Cortex in Adolescent Mania: A Randomized Sham-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Vijay; Sinha, Vinod Kumar; Praharaj, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the efficacy of adjunctive right prefrontal high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment in adolescent mania patients as compared to sham stimulation. Methods Twenty six right handed patients aged 12–17 years diagnosed with bipolar mania were randomized to receive daily sessions of active or sham rTMS (20 Hz, 110% of motor threshold, 20 trains, 10 s intertrain interval) over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for 10 days. Mania was rated using Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) at baseline, and after 5th and 10th rTMS. Results For YMRS scores, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant main effect (F=44.49, degree of freedom [df]=1.2/29.29, p<0.001, Greenhouse-Geisser corrected, effect size ?2=0.65), but the interaction effect was not significant (F=0.03, df=1.2/29.29, p=0.912, Greenhouse-Geisser corrected). For CGI-Severity, repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant main effect (F=24.49, df=1.42/34.21, p<0.001, Greenhouse-Geisser corrected, effect size ?2=0.51), but the interaction effect was not significant (F=0.06, df=1.2/29.29, p=0.881, Greenhouse-Geisser corrected). Conclusion High-frequency right prefrontal rTMS was found to be ineffective as add-on to standard pharmacotherapy in adolescent mania. PMID:26598581

  2. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation enhances spatial learning and synaptic plasticity via the VEGF and BDNF-NMDAR pathways in a rat model of vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Xing, M; Wang, Y; Tao, H; Cheng, Y

    2015-12-17

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on learning and memory in a rat model of vascular dementia (VaD) and to analyze the associated mechanisms. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion (2-VO) was used to establish a rat model of VaD. High-frequency (5Hz) rTMS was performed on rats for four weeks. Spatial learning and memory abilities were evaluated using the Morris water maze (MWM), and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus was assessed via long-term potentiation (LTP). Hippocampal expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and three subunits of the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR), NR1, NR2A and NR2B, was analyzed by Western blotting. Compared with the VaD group, escape latency was decreased (P<0.05) and the time spent in the target quadrant and the percentage of swimming distance within that quadrant were increased (P<0.05) in the rTMS group. LTP at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses was enhanced by rTMS (P<0.05). VEGF expression was up-regulated following 2-VO and was further increased by rTMS (P<0.05). BDNF, NR1 and NR2B expression was decreased in the VaD group and increased by rTMS (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in NR2A expression among the three groups. These results suggest that rTMS improved learning and memory in the VaD model rats via the up-regulation of VEGF, BDNF and NMDARs. In addition, NR2B may be more important than NR2A for LTP induction in the hippocampus during rTMS treatment of VaD. PMID:26518460

  3. The dorsal premotor cortex exerts a powerful and specific inhibitory effect on the ipsilateral corticofacial system: a dual-coil transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Parmigiani, Sara; Barchiesi, Guido; Cattaneo, Luigi

    2015-11-01

    A rich pattern of connectivity is present in non-human primates between the dorsal premotor cortex (PMCd) and the motor cortex (M1). By analogy, similar connections are hypothesized in humans between the PMCd and the ipsilateral hand-related M1. However, the technical difficulty of applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with a dual-coil paradigm to two cortical regions in such close spatial proximity renders their in vivo demonstration difficult. The present work aims at assessing in humans the existence of short-latency influences of the left PMCd on the ipsilateral corticofacial system by means of TMS. A dual-coil TMS paradigm was used with 16 participants. Test TMS pulses were applied to the left orofacial M1, and conditioning TMS pulses were applied to three distinct points of the ipsilateral PMCd along the caudal part of the superior frontal sulcus. The inter-stimulus interval (ISI) between condTMS and testTMS varied in 2-ms steps between 2 and 8 ms. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the active orbicularis oris muscle were recorded. CondTMS exerted a robust effect on the corticofacial system only when applied to one specific portion of the PMCd and only at one specific ISI (6 ms). The effect consisted in a systematic suppression of facial MEPs compared to those obtained by testTMS alone. No other effect was found. We provide evidence for a specific short-latency inhibitory effect of the PMCd on the ipsilateral M1, likely witnessing direct corticocortical connectivity in humans. We also describe a novel paradigm to test ipsilateral PMCd-M1 in humans. PMID:26233241

  4. Effect of Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Naming Abilities in Early-Stroke Aphasic Patients: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Waldowski, Konrad; Seniów, Joanna; Le?niak, Marcin; Iwa?ski, Szczepan; Cz?onkowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Functional brain imaging studies with aphasia patients have shown increased cortical activation in the right hemisphere language homologues, which hypothetically may represent a maladaptive strategy that interferes with aphasia recovery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the Broca's homologues in combination with speech/language therapy improves naming in early-stroke aphasia patients. Methods. 26 right-handed aphasic patients in the early stage (up to 12 weeks) of a first-ever left hemisphere ischemic stroke were randomized to receive speech and language therapy combined with real or sham rTMS. Prior to each 45-minute therapeutic session (15 sessions, 5 days a week), 30 minutes of 1-Hz rTMS was applied. Outcome measures were obtained at baseline, immediately after 3 weeks of experimental treatment and 15 weeks; posttreatment using the Computerized Picture Naming Test. Results. Although both groups significantly improved their naming abilities after treatment, no significant differences were noted between the rTMS and sham stimulation groups. The additional analyses have revealed that the rTMS subgroup with a lesion including the anterior part of language area showed greater improvement primarily in naming reaction time 15 weeks after completion of the therapeutic treatment. Improvement was also demonstrated in functional communication abilities. Conclusions. Inhibitory rTMS of the unaffected right inferior frontal gyrus area in combination with speech and language therapy cannot be assumed as an effective method for all poststroke aphasia patients. The treatment seems to be beneficial for patients with frontal language area damage, mostly in the distant time after finishing rTMS procedure. PMID:23213288

  5. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Promotes Neural Stem Cell Proliferation via the Regulation of MiR-25 in a Rat Model of Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinghui; Zhao, Xiuxiu; Lou, Jicheng; Chen, Hong; Huang, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has increasingly been studied over the past decade to determine whether it has a therapeutic benefit on focal cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism of rTMS in this process remains unclear. In the current study, we investigated the effects of rTMS on the proliferation of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) and explored microRNAs (miRNAs) that were affected by rTMS. Our data showed that 10 Hz rTMS significantly increased the proliferation of adult NSCs after focal cerebral ischemia in the subventricular zone (SVZ), and the expression of miR-25 was obviously up-regulated in the ischemic cortex after rTMS. p57, an identified miR-25 target gene that regulates factors linked to NSC proliferation, was also evaluated, and it exhibited down-regulation. To further verify the role of miR-25, rats were injected with a single dose of antagomir-25 and were subjected to focal cerebral ischemia followed by rTMS treatment. The results confirmed that miR-25 could be repressed specifically and could drive the up-regulation of its target gene (p57), which resulted in the inhibition of adult NSC proliferation in the SVZ after rTMS. Thus, our studies strongly indicated that 10 Hz rTMS can promote the proliferation of adult NSCs in the SVZ after focal cerebral ischemia by regulating the miR-25/p57 pathway. PMID:25302788

  6. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for the treatment of depression in Parkinson disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Xie, Cheng-Long; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Dan; Pan, Jia-Lin; Zhou, Yi; Lin, Shi-Yi; Xue, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Wen-Wen

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for the treatment of depression in patients with Parkinson disease in order to arrive at qualitative and quantitative conclusions about the efficacy of rTMS. We included randomized controlled trials examining the effects of rTMS compared with sham-rTMS or selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The quality of included studies was strictly evaluated. Data analyses were performed using the RevMan5.1 software. Eight studies including 312 patients met all inclusion criteria. The results showed that rTMS could evidently improve the HRSD score compared with sham-rTMS (p < 0.00001). However, we found similar antidepressant efficacy between rTMS and SSRIs groups in terms of HRSD and BDI score (p = 0.65; p = 0.75, respectively). Furthermore, patients who received rTMS could evidently show improvement on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), ADL score, and UPDRS motor score compared with sham-rTMS or SSRIs (p < 0.05, p = 0.05, respectively). The subgroup analysis by frequency of rTMS evidenced that the efficacy of low-frequency rTMS was superior to sham-rTMS (p < 0.0001) in terms of the outcome measure according to HAMD scale. Meanwhile, the high-frequency rTMS has the same antidepressant efficacy as SSRIs (p = 0.94). The current meta-analysis provided evidence that rTMS was superior to sham-rTMS and had similar antidepressant efficacy as SSRIs, and may have the additional advantage of some improvement in motor function. PMID:26209930

  7. Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Right Wernicke's Area Improves Comprehension in Subacute Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Dae Sang; Kim, Dae-Yul; Chun, Min Ho; Jung, Seung Eun; Park, Sung Jong

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the appearance of right-sided language-related brain activity in right-handed patients after a stroke. Non-invasive brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have been shown to modulate excitability in the brain. Moreover, rTMS and…

  8. The Effects of Different Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Protocols on Cortical Gene Expression in a Rat Model of Cerebral Ischemic-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ljubisavljevic, Milos R.; Javid, Asma; Oommen, Joji; Parekh, Khatija; Nagelkerke, Nico; Shehab, Safa; Adrian, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Although repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in treatment of stroke in humans has been explored over the past decade the data remain controversial in terms of optimal stimulation parameters and the mechanisms of rTMS long-term effects. This study aimed to explore the potential of different rTMS protocols to induce changes in gene expression in rat cortices after acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury. The stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with subsequent reperfusion. Changes in the expression of 96 genes were examined using low-density expression arrays after MCAO alone and after MCAO combined with 1Hz, 5Hz, continuous (cTBS) and intermittent (iTBS) theta-burst rTMS. rTMS over the lesioned hemisphere was given for two weeks (with a 2-day pause) in a single daily session and a total of 2400 pulses. MCAO alone induced significant upregulation in the expression of 44 genes and downregulation in 10. Two weeks of iTBS induced significant increase in the expression of 52 genes. There were no downregulated genes. 1Hz and 5Hz had no significant effects on gene expression, while cTBS effects were negligible. Upregulated genes included those involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, injury response and cellular repair, structural remodeling, neuroprotection, neurotransmission and neuronal plasticity. The results show that long-term rTMS in acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury induces complex changes in gene expression that span multiple pathways, which generally promote the recovery. They also demonstrate that induced changes primarily depend on the rTMS frequency (1Hz and 5Hz vs. iTBS) and pattern (cTBS vs. iTBS). The results further underlines the premise that one of the benefits of rTMS application in stroke may be to prime the brain, enhancing its potential to cope with the injury and to rewire. This could further augment its potential to favorably respond to rehabilitation, and to restore some of the loss functions. PMID:26431529

  9. Design of a placebo-controlled, randomized study of the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of chronic tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Landgrebe, Michael; Binder, Harald; Koller, Michael; Eberl, Yvonne; Kleinjung, Tobias; Eichhammer, Peter; Graf, Erika; Hajak, Goeran; Langguth, Berthold

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic tinnitus is a frequent condition, which can have enormous impact on patient's life and which is very difficult to treat. Accumulating data indicate that chronic tinnitus is related to dysfunctional neuronal activity in the central nervous system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive method which allows to focally modulate neuronal activity. An increasing amount of studies demonstrate reduction of tinnitus after repeated sessions of low-frequency rTMS and indicate that rTMS might represent a new promising approach for the treatment of tinnitus. However available studies have been mono-centric and are characterized by small sample sizes. Therefore, this multi-center trial will test the efficacy of rTMS treatment in a large sample of chronic tinnitus patients. Methods/Design This is a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind multi-center trial of two weeks 1 Hz rTMS-treatment in chronic tinnitus patients. Eligible patients will be randomized to either 2 weeks real or sham rTMS treatment. Main eligibility criteria: male or female individuals aged 18–70 years with chronic tinnitus (duration > 6 months), tinnitus-handicap-inventory-score ? 38, age-adjusted normal sensorineural hearing (i.e. not more than 5 dB below the 10% percentile of the appropriate age and gender group (DIN EN ISO 7029), conductive hearing loss ? 15dB. The primary endpoint is a change of tinnitus severity according to the tinnitus questionnaire of Goebel and Hiller (baseline vs. end of treatment period). A total of 138 patients are needed to detect a clinical relevant change of tinnitus severity (i.e. 5 points on the questionnaire of Goebel and Hiller; alpha = 0.05; 1-beta = 0.80). Assuming a drop-out rate of less than 5% until the primary endpoint, 150 patients have to be randomized to guarantee the target number of 138 evaluable patients. The study will be conducted by otorhinolaryngologists and psychiatrists of 7 university hospitals and 1 municipal hospital in Germany. Discussion This study will provide important information about the efficacy of rTMS in the treatment of chronic tinnitus. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89848288 PMID:18412944

  10. Efficacy and safety of the Chinese herbal medicine shuganjieyu with and without adjunctive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for geriatric depression: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    XIE, Minmin; JIANG, Wenhai; YANG, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background Pharmacological treatment of geriatric depression is often ineffective because patients cannot tolerate adequate doses of antidepressant medications. Aim Examine the efficacy and safety of shuganjieyu – the first Chinese herbal medicine approved for the treatment of depression by China’s drug regulatory agency -- with and without adjunctive treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of geriatric depression. Methods Sixty-five inpatients 60 or older who met ICD-10 criteria for depression were randomly assigned to an experimental group (shuganjieyu + rTMS) (n=36) or a control group (shuganjieyu + sham rTMS)(n=29). All participants received 4 capsules of shuganjieyu daily for 6 weeks. rTMS (or sham rTMS) was administered 20 minutes daily, five days a week for 4 weeks. Blinded raters used the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and the Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale to assess clinical efficacy and safety at baseline and 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after starting treatment. Over the six-week trial, there was only one dropout from the experimental group and two dropouts from the control group. Results None of the patients had serious side effects, but 40% in the experimental group and 50% in the control group experienced minor side effects that all resolved spontaneously. Both groups showed substantial stepwise improvement in depressive symptoms over the 6 weeks. Repeated measures ANOVA found no differences between the two groups. After 6 weeks, 97% of the experimental group had experienced a 25% or greater drop in the level of depression, but only 20% had experience a 50% or greater drop in the level of depression; the corresponding values in the control group were 96% and 19%. There were some minor, non-significant differences in the onset of the treatment effect between the different types of depressive symptoms, but by the second week of treatment all five HAMD-17 subscale scores had improved significantly in both groups Conclusion The Chinese herbal medicine shuganjieyu is effective and safe in the treatment of geriatric depression, but only a minority of patients have greater than 50% improvement in their depressive symptoms after 6 weeks of treatment. Adjunctive use of rTMS with shuganjieyu does not improve the overall outcome and does not significantly speed up the onset of action of shuganjieyu. PMID:26120260

  11. MRI can Predict the Response to Therapeutic Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Emara, Tamer; El Nahas, Nevine; Elkader, Hanaa Abd; Ashour, Samia; El Etrebi, Anwar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggest that purposeful modulation of excitability by up regulation in primary motor area (M1) in the lesioned hemisphere or down regulation of excitability in M1 intact hemisphere can influence function in the paretic hand.. Objectives: 1- To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) delineation of lesion has an impact on the modality and site of rTMS stimulation, and 2- To determine whether MRI can predict the degree of recovery of motor function after rTMS treatment. Methods: A total of 60 ischemic stroke patients were recruited. Physical examination, mini mental state examination, activities of daily living assessment, motor subscale of the activity index (AI) and fine hand movement assessment were performed initially and then 2 weeks later (after the end of therapeutic course), then at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. MRI was performed for all patients and used to localize the site and extent of lesion. The patients were divided to 3 group consisting of 20 patients each: group 1 received repetitive rTMS 5hz at 90% motor threshold for 2.5min on the infarcted hemisphere, group 2 received rTMS 1hz at 110% motor threshold for 2.5min on the intact hemisphere, and group 3 received sham stimulation. All patients received standard physical therapy following each rTMS session. Results: Patients with total anterior circulation stroke demonstrated on MRI showed no significant improvement when compared to those with partial anterior circulation, lacunar or posterior circulation strokes. The patients with cortical strokes experienced less improvement when compared with those with subcortical strokes especially with 1 hz stimulation to intact hemisphere. Conclusion: MRI can help predict the response to rTMS for stroke rehabilitation and assist the clinician choose the mode and site of rTMS application. PMID:22518248

  12. Transcranial focused ultrasound as a possible treatment for major depression.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2015-04-01

    Antidepressants are currently used as initial therapies for major depressive disorder (MDD). However, despite the remarkable increase in medications validated as effective in MDD, treatments are still plagued by inadequate responses in part of MDD patients. For MDD with inadequate responses to medications, brain stimulation methods such as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), and deep brain stimulation (DBS) have been used as alternative strategies for treatment of depression, although each of these modalities has an indication for MDD treatment resistance and suffers from a limitation or weakness. Thus, development of new strategies based on novel theories of MDD may help to develop faster and more effective treatments for MDD. Recent studies have suggested that decreased brain brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may be involved in the pathogenesis of MDD. Moreover, increasing brain BDNF and adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been implicated in some of the therapeutic mechanisms of antidepressants. Transcranial focused ultrasound (tFUS), a novel technique to deliver highly focused acoustic energy to a small brain region, has been used for targeted drug delivery by increasing blood-brain barrier permeability, and it can noninvasively focally modulate human cortical function. Recent animal studies have demonstrated that tFUS stimulation can increase BDNF and neurogenesis in mice. Furthermore, the increase blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability may increase delivery of serum BDNF to the brain. From the above evidence, tFUS can increase brain BDNF levels and neurogenesis in the hippocampus, suggesting it could be an alternative strategy for the treatment of MDD. Further investigations into the frequency and duration of tFUS stimulation are needed to verify the efficacy of this intervention in depressive disorders. PMID:25665863

  13. Automated cortical projection of head-surface locations for transcranial functional brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Masako; Dan, Ippeita

    2005-05-15

    Recent advancements in two noninvasive transcranial neuroimaging techniques, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), signify the increasing importance of establishing structural compatibility between transcranial methods and conventional tomographic methods, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). The transcranial data obtained from the head surface should be projected onto the cortical surface to present the transcranial brain-mapping data on the same platform as tomographic methods. Thus, we developed two transcranial projection algorithms that project given head-surface points onto the cortical surface in structural images, and computer programs based on them. The convex-hull algorithm features geometric handling of the cortical surface, while the balloon-inflation algorithm is faster, and better reflects the local cortical structure. The automatic cortical projection methods proved to be as effective as the manual projection method described in our previous study. These methods achieved perfect correspondence between any given point on the head surface or a related nearby point in space, and its cortical projection point. Moreover, we developed a neighbor-reference method that enables transcranial cortical projection of a given head-surface point in reference to three neighboring points and one additional standard point, even when no structural image of the subject is available. We also calculated an error factor associated with these probabilistic estimations. The current study presents a close topological link between transcranial and tomographic brain-mapping modalities, which could contribute to inter-modal data standardization. PMID:15862201

  14. Treatments in context: transcranial direct current brain stimulation as a potential treatment in pediatric psychosis

    PubMed Central

    David, Christopher N; Rapoport, Judith L; Gogtay, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    Childhood-onset schizophrenia is a chronic, severe form of schizophrenia, and is typically treatment resistant. Even after optimized pharmacotherapy, a majority (over 70%) of these pediatric patients present lasting psychotic symptoms and impaired cognition, necessitating the need for novel treatment modalities. Recent work in transcranial magnetic stimulation suggests moderate efficacy in symptom reduction in adult patients with schizophrenia; however, the transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment is cumbersome for this severely ill population. Transcranial direct current stimulation may provide a safe and effective adjuvant treatment for continued residual symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:23545058

  15. Language Lateralization in Children Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Sonography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haag, Anja; Moeller, Nicola; Knake, Susanne; Hermsen, Anke; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Rosenow, Felix; Hamer, Hajo M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Language lateralization with functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) and lexical word generation has been shown to have high concordance with the Wada test and functional magnetic resonance imaging in adults. We evaluated a nonlexical paradigm to determine language dominance in children. Method: In 23 right-handed children (12…

  16. Laser scattering by transcranial rat brain illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Marcelo V. P.; Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka T.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.

    2012-06-01

    Due to the great number of applications of Low-Level-Laser-Therapy (LLLT) in Central Nervous System (CNS), the study of light penetration through skull and distribution in the brain becomes extremely important. The aim is to analyze the possibility of precise illumination of deep regions of the rat brain, measure the penetration and distribution of red (? = 660 nm) and Near Infra-Red (NIR) (? = 808 nm) diode laser light and compare optical properties of brain structures. The head of the animal (Rattus Novergicus) was epilated and divided by a sagittal cut, 2.3 mm away from mid plane. This section of rat's head was illuminated with red and NIR lasers in points above three anatomical structures: hippocampus, cerebellum and frontal cortex. A high resolution camera, perpendicularly positioned, was used to obtain images of the brain structures. Profiles of scattered intensities in the laser direction were obtained from the images. There is a peak in the scattered light profile corresponding to the skin layer. The bone layer gives rise to a valley in the profile indicating low scattering coefficient, or frontal scattering. Another peak in the region related to the brain is an indication of high scattering coefficient (?s) for this tissue. This work corroborates the use of transcranial LLLT in studies with rats which are subjected to models of CNS diseases. The outcomes of this study point to the possibility of transcranial LLLT in humans for a large number of diseases.

  17. Magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein with deep eutectic solvent immobilized magnetic graphene oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi; Ding, Xueqin; Huang, Yanhua; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2016-02-01

    As a new type of green solvent, four kinds of choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized, and then a core-shell structure magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4-NH2@GO) nanoparticles have been prepared and coated with the ChCl-based DESs. Magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) based Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES was studied for the first time for the extraction of proteins. The characteristic results of vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES. The concentrations of proteins in studies were determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The advantages of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES in protein extraction were compared with Fe3O4-NH2@GO and Fe3O4-NH2, and Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol was selected as the suitable extraction solvent. The influence factors of the extraction process such as the pH value, the temperature, the extraction time, the concentration of protein and the amount of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol were evaluated. Desorption experimental result showed 98.73% of BSA could be eluted from the solid extractant with 0.1mol/L Na2HPO4 solution contained 1mol/L NaCl. Besides, the conformation of BSA was not changed during the elution by the investigation of circular dichromism (CD) spectra. Furthermore, the analysis of real sample demonstrated that the prepared magnetic nanoparticles did have extraction ability on proteins in bovine whole blood. PMID:26653436

  18. Arrays of carbon nanoscrolls as deep subwavelength magnetic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannopapas, Vassilios; Tzavala, Marilena; Tsetseris, Leonidas

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that an array of carbon nanoscrolls acts as a hyperbolic magnetic metamaterial in the terahertz regime with genuine subwavelength operation corresponding to a wavelength-to-structure ratio of about 200. Due to the low sheet resistance of graphene, the electromagnetic losses in an array of carbon nanoscrolls are almost negligible, offering a very sharp magnetic resonance of extreme positive and negative values of the effective magnetic permeability. The latter property leads to superior imaging properties for arrays of carbon nanoscrolls which can operate as magnetic endoscopes in the terahertz range where magnetic materials are scarce. Our optical modeling is supplemented with ab initio density functional calculations of the self-winding of a single layer of graphene onto a carbon nanotube so as to form a carbon nanoscroll. The latter process is viewed as a means to realize ordered arrays of carbon nanoscrolls in the laboratory based on arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes which are now routinely fabricated.

  19. Transcranial sonography (TCS) of brain parenchyma in movement disorders: quality standards, diagnostic applications and novel technologies.

    PubMed

    Walter, U; Školoudík, D

    2014-08-01

    Transcranial B-mode sonography (TCS) of brain parenchyma is being increasingly used as a diagnostic tool in movement disorders. Compared to other neuroimaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, TCS can be performed today with portable machines and has the advantages of noninvasiveness and high resistance to movement artifacts. In distinct brain disorders TCS detects abnormalities that cannot be visualized or can only be visualized with significant effort with other imaging methods. In the field of movement disorders, TCS has been established mainly as a tool for the early and differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. The postoperative position control of deep brain stimulation electrodes, especially in the subthalamic nucleus, can reliably and safely be performed with TCS.? The present update review summarizes the current methodological standards and defines quality criteria of adequate TCS imaging and assessment of diagnostically relevant deep brain structures such as substantia nigra, brainstem raphe, basal ganglia and ventricles. Finally, an overview is given on recent technological advances including TCS-MRI fusion imaging and upcoming technologies of digitized image analysis aiming at a more investigator-independent assessment of deep brain structures on TCS. PMID:24764215

  20. Estimation of the iron loss in deep-sea permanent magnet motors considering seawater compressive stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongxiang; Wei, Yanyu; Zou, Jibin; Li, Jianjun; Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea permanent magnet motor equipped with fluid compensated pressure-tolerant system is compressed by the high pressure fluid both outside and inside. The induced stress distribution in stator core is significantly different from that in land type motor. Its effect on the magnetic properties of stator core is important for deep-sea motor designers but seldom reported. In this paper, the stress distribution in stator core, regarding the seawater compressive stress, is calculated by 2D finite element method (FEM). The effect of compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel sheet, that is, permeability, BH curves, and BW curves, is also measured. Then, based on the measured magnetic properties and calculated stress distribution, the stator iron loss is estimated by stress-electromagnetics-coupling FEM. At last the estimation is verified by experiment. Both the calculated and measured results show that stator iron loss increases obviously with the seawater compressive stress. PMID:25177717

  1. Estimation of the Iron Loss in Deep-Sea Permanent Magnet Motors considering Seawater Compressive Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yanyu; Zou, Jibin; Li, Jianjun; Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea permanent magnet motor equipped with fluid compensated pressure-tolerant system is compressed by the high pressure fluid both outside and inside. The induced stress distribution in stator core is significantly different from that in land type motor. Its effect on the magnetic properties of stator core is important for deep-sea motor designers but seldom reported. In this paper, the stress distribution in stator core, regarding the seawater compressive stress, is calculated by 2D finite element method (FEM). The effect of compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel sheet, that is, permeability, BH curves, and BW curves, is also measured. Then, based on the measured magnetic properties and calculated stress distribution, the stator iron loss is estimated by stress-electromagnetics-coupling FEM. At last the estimation is verified by experiment. Both the calculated and measured results show that stator iron loss increases obviously with the seawater compressive stress. PMID:25177717

  2. Ages and magnetic structures of the South China Sea constrained by deep tow magnetic surveys and IODP Expedition 349

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Feng; Xu, Xing; Lin, Jian; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Jian; Yao, Yongjian; Zhao, Xixi; Liu, Qingsong; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Wang, Jian; Song, Taoran; Zhao, Junfeng; Qiu, Ning; Guan, Yongxian; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Williams, Trevor; Bao, Rui; Briais, Anne; Brown, Elizabeth A.; Chen, Yifeng; Clift, Peter D.; Colwell, Frederick S.; Dadd, Kelsie A.; Ding, Weiwei; Almeida, Iván. Hernández; Huang, Xiao-Long; Hyun, Sangmin; Jiang, Tao; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Li, Qianyu; Liu, Chuanlian; Liu, Zhifei; Nagai, Renata H.; Peleo-Alampay, Alyssa; Su, Xin; Tejada, Maria Luisa G.; Trinh, Hai Son; Yeh, Yi-Ching; Zhang, Chuanlun; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Guo-Liang

    2014-12-01

    analyses of deep tow magnetic anomalies and International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 349 cores show that initial seafloor spreading started around 33 Ma in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS), but varied slightly by 1-2 Myr along the northern continent-ocean boundary (COB). A southward ridge jump of ˜20 km occurred around 23.6 Ma in the East Subbasin; this timing also slightly varied along the ridge and was coeval to the onset of seafloor spreading in the Southwest Subbasin, which propagated for about 400 km southwestward from ˜23.6 to ˜21.5 Ma. The terminal age of seafloor spreading is ˜15 Ma in the East Subbasin and ˜16 Ma in the Southwest Subbasin. The full spreading rate in the East Subbasin varied largely from ˜20 to ˜80 km/Myr, but mostly decreased with time except for the period between ˜26.0 Ma and the ridge jump (˜23.6 Ma), within which the rate was the fastest at ˜70 km/Myr on average. The spreading rates are not correlated, in most cases, to magnetic anomaly amplitudes that reflect basement magnetization contrasts. Shipboard magnetic measurements reveal at least one magnetic reversal in the top 100 m of basaltic layers, in addition to large vertical intensity variations. These complexities are caused by late-stage lava flows that are magnetized in a different polarity from the primary basaltic layer emplaced during the main phase of crustal accretion. Deep tow magnetic modeling also reveals this smearing in basement magnetizations by incorporating a contamination coefficient of 0.5, which partly alleviates the problem of assuming a magnetic blocking model of constant thickness and uniform magnetization. The primary contribution to magnetic anomalies of the SCS is not in the top 100 m of the igneous basement.

  3. Gravity and magnetic anomalies and the deep structure of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, Brazil

    E-print Network

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Gravity and magnetic anomalies and the deep structure of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, Brazil A. B profile across the Parnaiba cratonic basin in NorthEast Brazil. The purpose of this project is to acquire margin of Parnaíba Basin, Brazil. Geophysics 64: 337-356. Ussami N, Cogo de Sa N, Molina EC. 1993

  4. Magnetic Properties of the Lower Oceanic Crust from Hess Deep (IODP Expedition 345)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, S. A.; Morris, A.; Horst, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hess Deep is located at a tectonic window created by rifting of the Cocos-Nazca into East Pacific Rise crust. IODP Expedition 345 drilled into this window to recover lower oceanic crust primitive plutonic rock lithologies such as gabbros, troctolites, and olivine gabbronorites. Differences in ferromagnetic carriers impact the ferromagnetic properties and the contribution of oceanic crust to magnetic anomalies. 57 samples have been magnetically examined using low-temperature magnetic remanence, hysteresis properties, and low field susceptibility. Results show varying properties based on lithology and alteration processes. Secondary processes such as metamorphism, hydrothermal alteration and cataclasis can alter the magnetic history and properties of these once primitive rocks. The least altered samples consistently show pure stiochemetric magnetic magnetite as the main ferromagnetic carrier. Whereas, altered samples may contain multiple ferromagnetic carriers, such as pyrrhotite and magnetite.

  5. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex for Treating Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Double-Blind and Sham-Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Berlim, Marcelo T; Van den Eynde, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    Objective Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has yielded promising results as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, to date, no quantitative review of its clinical utility has been published. Method: We searched for randomized and sham-controlled trials from 1995 to March 2013 using MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CENTRAL, and SCOPUS. We then performed an exploratory random effects meta-analysis. Results: Studies on rTMS applied to the right DLPFC included 64 adults with PTSD. The pooled Hedges g effect size for pre and post changes in clinician-rated and self-reported PTSD symptoms were, respectively, 1.65 (P < 0.001) and 1.91 (P < 0.001), indicating significant and large-sized differences in outcome favouring active rTMS. Also, there were significant pre and post decreases with active rTMS in overall anxiety (Hedges g = 1.24; P = 0.02) and depressive (Hedges g = 0.85; P < 0.001) symptoms. Dropout rates at study end did not differ between active and sham rTMS groups. Regarding rTMS applied to the left DLPFC, there is only one study published to date (using a high frequency protocol), and its results showed that active rTMS seems to be superior overall to sham rTMS. Conclusions: Our exploratory meta-analysis shows that active rTMS applied to the DLPFC seems to be effective and acceptable for treating PTSD. However, the small number of subjects included in the analyses limits the generalizability of these findings. Future studies should include larger samples and deliver optimized stimulation parameters. PMID:25565694

  6. The Impact of Accelerated Right Prefrontal High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on Cue-Reactivity: An fMRI Study on Craving in Recently Detoxified Alcohol-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Herremans, Sarah C.; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; De Raedt, Rudi; Matthys, Frieda; Buyl, Ronald; De Mey, Johan; Baeken, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In alcohol-dependent patients craving is a difficult-to-treat phenomenon. It has been suggested that high-frequency (HF) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may have beneficial effects. However, exactly how this application exerts its effect on the underlying craving neurocircuit is currently unclear. In an effort to induce alcohol craving and to maximize detection of HF-rTMS effects to cue-induced alcohol craving, patients were exposed to a block and event-related alcohol cue-reactivity paradigm while being scanned with fMRI. Hence, we assessed the effect of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) stimulation on cue-induced and general alcohol craving, and the related craving neurocircuit. Twenty-six recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients were included. First, we evaluated the impact of one sham-controlled stimulation session. Second, we examined the effect of accelerated right DLPFC HF-rTMS treatment: here patients received 15 sessions in an open label accelerated design, spread over 4 consecutive days. General craving significantly decreased after 15 active HF-rTMS sessions. However, cue-induced alcohol craving was not altered. Our brain imaging results did not show that the cue-exposure affected the underlying craving neurocircuit after both one and fifteen active HF-rTMS sessions. Yet, brain activation changes after one and 15 HF-rTMS sessions, respectively, were observed in regions associated with the extended reward system and the default mode network, but only during the presentation of the event-related paradigm. Our findings indicate that accelerated HF-rTMS applied to the right DLPFC does not manifestly affect the craving neurocircuit during an alcohol-related cue-exposure, but instead it may influence the attentional network. PMID:26295336

  7. Changes in magnetic remanence during simulated deep sedimentary burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Jackson, Mike

    1993-05-01

    Macroscopic hydrostatic compaction of granular rocks causes grain-scale differential stresses as the externally applied load is transmitted through grain contacts. We have compacted rock analogues containing calcite and one of two types of magnetite, bonded with Portland cement. The first type of magnetite is chemically precipitated to give grain sizes in the range 20 nm to 2 ?m; these particles were stress-free before compaction. The second type of magnetite was crushed and sieved to a mean grain size of 40 ?m; these particles began the experiments in a pre-stressed state. Compaction under confining pressures up to 220 MPa (equivalent to sedimentary compaction at up to 8 km depth) produced strong irreversible changes in the coercivity (and to some extent in other hysteresis parameters) of the samples with initially stress-free magnetite. In contrast, the pre-stressed magnetite exhibited only minimal changes. Composite isothermal remanent magnetisations with orthogonal components in the coercivity ranges 0-30 mT and 30-600 mT were applied prior to compaction. For both sets of samples, the low coercivity component was preferentially progressively demagnetised with increasing compaction stress. This was most efficient for the initially stress-free magnetite. The high coercivity component showed weaker decreases and some spurious increases but there was essentially no change for the samples with pre-stressed magnetite. The changes in magnetic properties of the chemically precipitated magnetite are attributed to the development of dislocation-related impediments to domain wall translation. In contrast, the defect density of the pre-stressed magnetite was acquired under higher differential stresses when it was initially crushed and this was unmodified by the lower experimental stresses. These results may be relevant to the changes expected during rapid sedimentary burial in the absence of pore fluids at low geothermal gradients. One might predict that sedimentary burial could progressively clean out early, soft components of natural remanence, particularly if the magnetite was low in defects (e.g. authigenic).

  8. South China Sea Tectonics and Magnetics: Constraints from IODP Expedition 349 and Deep-tow Magnetic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Li, C. F.; Kulhanek, D. K.; Zhao, X.; Liu, Q.; Xu, X.; Sun, Z.; Zhu, J.

    2014-12-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is the largest low-latitude marginal sea in the world. Its formation and evolution are linked to the complex continental-oceanic tectonic interaction of the Eurasian, Pacific, and Indo-Australian plates. Despite its relatively small size and short history, the SCS has undergone nearly a complete Wilson cycle from continental break-up to seafloor spreading to subduction. In January-March 2014, Expedition 349 of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) drilled five sites in the deep basin of the SCS. Three sites (U1431, U1433, and U1434) cored into oceanic basement near the fossil spreading center on the East and Southwest Subbasins, whereas Sites U1432 and U1435 are located near the northern continent/ocean boundary of the East Subbasin. Shipboard biostratigraphy based on microfossils preserved in sediment directly above or within basement suggests that the preliminary cessation age of spreading in both the East and Southwest Subbasins is around early Miocene (16-20 Ma); however, post-cruise radiometric dating is being conducted to directly date the basement basalt in these subbasins. Prior to the IODP drilling, high-resolution near-seafloor magnetic surveys were conducted in 2012 and 2013 in the SCS with survey lines passing near the five IODP drilling sites. The deep-tow surveys revealed detailed patterns of the SCS magnetic anomalies with amplitude and spatial resolutions several times better than that of traditional sea surface measurements. Preliminary results reveal several episodes of magnetic reversal events that were not recognized by sea surface measurements. Together the IODP drilling and deep-tow magnetic surveys provide critical constraints for investigating the processes of seafloor spreading in the SCS and evolution of a mid-ocean ridge from active spreading to termination.

  9. Magnetic field effect on tunnel ionization of deep impurities by terahertz radiation S.D. Ganichev1

    E-print Network

    Ganichev, Sergey

    Magnetic field effect on tunnel ionization of deep impurities by terahertz radiation S.D. Ganichev1-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia Abstract: A suppression of tunnelling ionization of deep impurities in terahertz frequency electric fields by a mag- netic field is observed. It is shown that the ionization

  10. Widespread Magnetofossil Occurrences in Deep-sea Sediments and Implications for Paleo- and Environmental Magnetism (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Roberts, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    Recent progress in rock magnetism has enabled quantitative estimation of magnetizations carried by magnetofossils. Using FORC diagrams, IRM component analyses, ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy, low-temperature magnetometry, and transmission electron microscopy, it has been found that magnetofossils are widespread in deep-sea sediments and are often a dominant constituent of magnetic mineral assemblages. Some studies have documented a relationship between increased magnetofossil abundances and enhanced oceanic productivity induced by iron fertilization via eolian dust. The morphology of magnetosomes, which is species specific, may reflect a preference of magnetotactic bacteria for particular redox conditions. Dominant magnetofossil morphologies in sediments (cubo-octahedral vs. elongated) can be detected with rock magnetic techniques. Thus, magnetofossil abundance and morphology have considerable potential as paleoenvironmental indicators. It is widely held that magnetotactic bacteria live at or below the oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ) in chemically stratified aquatic environments. If so, it is expected that sediments that contain magnetofossils would have acquired their remanent magnetization at around the OATZ, and that the magnetization carried by magnetofossils will be delayed with respect to a pDRM carried by detrital magnetic minerals if the OATZ lies below the surface mixed layer and the pDRM acquisition zone. However, magnetofossils often dominate the magnetic mineral assemblage even in marine red clays that lack an OATZ. Changes in the relative abundance of biogenic and detrital magnetic components can be estimated from the ratio of ARM susceptibility to SIRM; a smaller average magnetic grain size and weaker magnetostatic interactions in the biogenic component causes higher ARM susceptibility. In relative paleointensity estimations, the kARM/SIRM ratio sometimes anti-correlates with normalized intensity regardless of the choice of normalizer (ARM or IRM). This implies that changes in relative abundance of biogenic magnetite may not be well compensated for by the widely used normalizers and may contaminate relative paleointensity records.

  11. Magnetic properties of Archean gneisses from the northeastern North China Craton: the relationship between magnetism and metamorphic grade in the deep continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongcai; Liu, Qingsheng; Zhao, Weihua; Li, Zhiyong; Zheng, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic mineralogy of crustal rocks has important implications for understanding continental crustal evolution and origin of regional magnetic anomalies. However, magnetic properties of the deep continental crust are still poorly understood. In this paper, measurements of density (?), mass-specific magnetic susceptibility (?), natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and magnetic hysteresis loops, temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility (?-T), chemical and mineral analyses were conducted on Archean gneiss samples from the Jixian petrophysical section in the Precambrian terrain, northeastern North China Craton, with the aim of refining understanding of magnetic phase transformations in the deep crustal rocks. Results show that density and rock magnetic properties change distinctly with metamorphic facies. The dominant magnetic mineral is magnetite, while a little hematite is present in a few samples. Together with geochemical and mineralogical compositions, it is inferred that progressive increase in metamorphic grade from east to west is the major cause for magnetic enhancement of the lower crust in the studied section. Therefore, we conclude that study of magnetic phases of deep crustal rocks can offer important insights into the history of high metamorphic grade terranes.

  12. Analysis of vector magnetic anomalies over the Bayonnaise Knoll caldera obtained from a deep-sea magnetic exploration by AUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, K.; Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Harada, M.; Kasaya, T.

    2011-12-01

    Geophysical surveys near the seafloor are very effective methods in order to investigate fine structures of the oceanic crust. Such surveys have increased in researches and developments of the seafloor, and will be more and more necessary in the future. For example, seabed resources like hydrothermal deposits have recently focused attention behind the international situation for natural resources like a competition of resources development. In order to estimate accurate abundance of those resources, the above detailed investigations should be needed because of low resolution of geophysical surveys on the sea and low efficiency of exploratory drilling. From such a viewpoint, we have been developing a measurement system for magnetic explorations using an AUV and a deep-tow system. The magnetic exploration system consists of two 3-axis flux-gate magnetometers, one/two Overhauser magnetometer(s), an optical fiber gyro, a main unit (control, communication, recording), and an onboard unit. These devices except for the onboard unit are installed in pressure cases (depth limit: 6000m). Thus this system can measure three components and total intensity of the geomagnetic field in the deep sea. In 2009, the first test of the magnetic exploration system was carried out in the Kumano Basin using AUV Urashima and towing vehicle Yokosuka Deep-Tow during the R/V Yokosuka YK09-09 cruise. In this test, we sank a small magnetic target to the seafloor, and examined how the system worked. As a result, we successfully detected magnetic anomaly of the target to confirm the expected performance of that in the sea. In 2010, the magnetic exploration system was further tested in the Bayonnaise Knoll area both using a titanium towing frame during the R/V Bosei-maru cruise and using AUV Urashima during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise. The purpose of these tests was to evaluate the performance of the system in an actual hydrothermal deposit area for practical applications of that. The Bayonnaise Knoll is a submarine caldera with an outer rim of 2.5-3 km and a floor of 840-920 m, which is located in the Izu-Ogasawara arc. A large hydrothermal deposit, Hakurei deposit, lies in the southeast part of the caldera. In the R/V Bosei-maru cruise, we observed three components of magnetic anomalies at depths of 400-570 m along SE-NW and WE tracks across the caldera. In the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise, we observed three components and total intensity of magnetic anomalies at altitudes of 60-100 m around the Hakurei deposit and at depth of 500 m above the caldera. The analysis of these data is now energetically pushed forward. A 3D gridded data set of the vector magnetic anomaly in the latter cruise was made by solving the Laplace's equation in the areas where observation data were not available, which is the unique procedure for analysis of the vector anomalies. Several magnetization solutions have been so far obtained by successive approximation and inversion methods. We will here present the measurement of the geomagnetic field and analysis of magnetization structure in Bayonnaise Knoll caldera. Note that this study has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  13. Deep structure of the Mount Amram igneous complex, interpretation of magnetic and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirman, Boris; Rybakov, Michael; Beyth, Michael; Mushkin, Amit; Ginat, Hanan

    2015-03-01

    The Mt Amram igneous complex (AIC) represents northern tip of the Neoproterozoic Arabian Nubian Shield (ANS). For the first time the AIC deep structure was studied using the gravity, aero and ground magnetic, magnetic susceptibility and density measurements and geological data. Analysing all available data at the Amram area we concluded what only monzonite body can be reason for gravity high and coinciding reduced to pole (RTP) maximum. Geological knowledge allowed suggesting its intrusive character and compact body form. Cluster of inverse solutions (Werner deconvolution) localized this body as initial model for forward modelling. Further iterations (23/4-D forward modelling) clarified the monzonite geometry and properties; the modelling allowed also to investigate the non-uniqueness and estimate also the confident intervals for final solution. The research consists three interconnected stages. At the detailed scale, ground magnetic data suggested three magmatic blocks of few hundred meters shifted dextral about 100 m along the Zefunut fault. Estimated accuracy for geometry of the magnetic bodies is a few tens metres. At the middle scale, quantitative gravity and magnetic interpretations provide model of the monzonite body, which is an order of magnitude more than the volume of the felsic rhyolites and granite rocks. Boundary of the whole monzonite body was estimated with accuracy as a hundred meters. As a result we suggest that the parent magma for the AIC is the monzonite, similar to the model suggested for the Timna Igneous Complex 12 km north of the AIC. The model developed can be applied to evaluate the subsurface volumes of the mafic magmatic rocks in adjacent locations. At the regional scale for exposed the Sinai and Arab Saudi Precambrian crystalline shield our approach allows to understand the apparent contradiction between geological predominantly granite composition (low magnetic rocks) and magnetic data. The aeromagnetic data show number strong magnetic anomalies suggesting the presence large volume of high magnetic (mainly basic) rocks at the depth. This problem is proposed for future research.

  14. [Transcranial magnetotherapy for the correction of initial manifestations of diabetic retinopathy in children].

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, N V; Bolotova, N V; Kamenskikh, T G; Ra?gorodski?, Iu M; Kolbenev, I O; Luk'ianov, V F

    2009-01-01

    This study included 45 children at the age from 5 to 17 years with type I diabetes mellitus complicated by diabetic retinopathy. All the patients showed retinal thickening at the macula and reduced amplitude of local electroretinogram suggesting compromised capillary circulation. The capillary blood flow was corrected by transcranial magnetotherapy with the use of an AMO-ATOS Ogolovie unit. The results of the treatment were evaluated from characteristics of laser Doppler flometry. A course of transcranial magnetotherapy comprising 10 daily seances resulted in a significant increase of microcirculation index, respiratory rhythm, and myogenic tone (by 1.64, 1.35, and 1.16 times respectively). In addition, morphometric and electrophysiological properties of the retina underwent positive changes. Transcranial exposure to the traveling magnetic field is recommended for the correction of intraocular microcirculation and prevention of diabetic macular oedema. PMID:19639694

  15. Development of marine magnetic vector measurement system using AUV and deep-towed vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, K.; Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Harada, M.; Kasaya, T.; Nishimura, K.; Baba, H.

    2012-04-01

    Marine magnetic survey is one of useful methods in order to investigate the nature of the oceanic crust. Most of the data are, however, intensity of the geomagnetic field without its direction. Therefore we cannot properly apply a physical formula describing the relation between magnetic field and magnetization to analyses of the data. With this problem, Isezaki (1986) developed a shipboard three-component magnetometer which measures the geomagnetic vector at the sea. On the other hand, geophysical surveys near the seafloor have been more and more necessary in order to show the details of the oceanic crust. For instance, development of seabed resources like hydrothermal deposits needs higher resolution surveys compared with conventional surveys at the sea for accurate estimation of abundance of the resources. From these viewpoints, we have been developing a measurement system of the deep-sea geomagnetic vector using AUV and deep-towed vehicle. The measurement system consists of two 3-axis flux-gate magnetometers, an Overhauser magnetometer, an optical fiber gyro, a main unit (control, communication, recording), and an onboard unit. These devices except for the onboard unit are installed in pressure cases (depth limit: 6000m). Thus this measurement system can measure three components and intensity of the geomagnetic field in the deep-sea. In 2009, the first test of the measurement system was carried out in the Kumano Basin using AUV Urashima and towing vehicle Yokosuka Deep-Tow during the R/V Yokosuka YK09-09 cruise. In this test, we sank a small magnetic target to the seafloor, and examined how the system worked. As a result, we successfully detected magnetic anomaly of the target to confirm the expected performance of that in the sea. In 2010, the measurement system was tested in the Bayonnaise Knoll area both using a titanium towing frame during the R/V Bosei-maru cruise and using AUV Urashima during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise. The purpose of these tests was to evaluate the performance of the system in an actual hydrothermal deposit area for practical applications of that. The Bayonnaise Knoll is a submarine caldera with an outer rim of 2.5-3 km and a floor of 840-920 m, which is located in the Izu-Ogasawara arc. A large hydrothermal deposit, Hakurei deposit lies in the southeast part of the caldera. In the R/V Bosei-maru cruise, we observed three components of magnetic anomalies at depths of 400-570 m along SE-NW and WE tracks across the caldera. In the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise, we observed three components and intensity of magnetic anomalies at altitudes of 60-100 m around the Hakurei deposit and at depth of 500 m above the caldera. From these tests, we have succeeded in measuring the geomagnetic vector and intensity using the AUV and the deep-towed vehicle, and also have obtained detailed magnetic anomaly in the Hakurei deposit area. We will here present the outlines of the measurement system and the tests in the sea. Note that this study has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  16. Transcranial ultrasound improves mood in human subjects

    E-print Network

    Lin, Kevin K.

    outgrowth in cultured cortical neurons8 Ultrasound can accelerate neuronal development Transcranial is generally considered safe when used for imaging, including fetal ultrasound. At the cellular level microtubules?) Conclusions · Ultrasound accelerates microtubule-related neuronal development · Low

  17. Search for Magnetic Monopoles with Deep Underwater Cherenkov Detectors at Lake Baikal

    E-print Network

    The BAIKAL Collaboration

    1996-01-30

    The deep underwater Cherenkov neutrino telescope NT-200 is currently under construction at Lake Baikal. The "subdetectors" NT-36 (1993-95) and NT-72 (1995-96) have been operating successfully over 3 years. Various techniques have been developed to search for magnetic monopoles with these arrays. Here we describe a method used to detect superheavy slowly moving (beta = v/c = 0.00001 - 0.001) monopoles catalyzing baryon decay. We present results obtained from the preliminary analysis of the data taken with NT-36 detector in 1993. Furthermore, possibilities to observe faster (beta = 0.2 - 1) monopoles via other effects are discussed.

  18. Search for magnetic monopoles with deep underwater Cherenkov detectors at Lake Baikal

    E-print Network

    Belolaptikov, I A; Borisovets, B A; Budnev, N M; Chensky, A G; Danilchenko, I A; Djilkibaev, J A M; Dobrynin, V I; Domogatsky, G V; Doroshenko, A A; Fialkovsky, S V; Gaponenko, O N; Garus, A A; Gress, O A; Gress, T A; Heukenkamp, H; Karle, A; Klabukov, A M; Klimov, A I; Klimushin, S I; Koshechkin, A P; Kulepov, V F; Kuzmichov, L A; Lubsandorzhiev, B K; Mikolajski, T; Milenin, M B; Mirgazov, R R; Moroz, A V; Moseiko, N I; Nikiforov, S A; Osipova, E A; Panfilov, A I; Parfenov, Yu V; Pavlov, A A; Petukhov, D P

    1996-01-01

    The deep underwater Cherenkov neutrino telescope NT-200 is currently under construction at Lake Baikal. The "subdetectors" NT-36 (1993-95) and NT-72 (1995-96) have been operating successfully over 3 years. Various techniques have been developed to search for magnetic monopoles with these arrays. Here we describe a method used to detect superheavy slowly moving (beta = v/c = 0.00001 - 0.001) monopoles catalyzing baryon decay. We present results obtained from the preliminary analysis of the data taken with NT-36 detector in 1993. Furthermore, possibilities to observe faster (beta = 0.2 - 1) monopoles via other effects are discussed.

  19. Recovery of iron from copper slag by deep reduction and magnetic beneficiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke-qing; Ping, Shuo; Wang, Hong-yu; Ni, Wen

    2013-11-01

    Aiming at recovering iron from high-iron-content copper slag, this article introduced a combination technology of deep reduction and magnetic beneficiation, investigated the iron recovery efficiency and optimized the technical conditions. When coke powder with 86wt% fixed carbon was used as a reductant, iron was successfully extracted from the copper slag. Under the optimized condition of the coke powder content of 14wt%, the calcium-to-silicon mass ratio (Ca/Si) of 0.2, the roasting temperature of 1300°C, the roasting time of 3 h, the grinding time of 20 min, and the magnetic field intensity of 61 kA·m-1, the iron recovery rate of the copper slag can reach 91.82%, and the extracted iron powder has an iron grade of 96.21%. With the characteristics of high iron grade and low impurity content, the extracted iron powder can be used as high-quality raw materials of weathering steel.

  20. Design and testing of planar magnetic micromotors fabricated by deep x-ray lithography and electroplating

    SciTech Connect

    Guckel, H.; Christenson, T.R.; Skrobis, K.J.; Klein, J.; Karnowsky, M.

    1993-05-01

    The successful design and testing of a three-phase planar integrated magnetic micromotor is presented. Fabrication is based on a modified deep X-ray lithography and electroplating or LIGA process. Maximum rotational speeds of 33,000 rpm are obtained in air with a rotor diameter of 285 {mu}m and do not change when operated in vacuum. Real time rotor response is obtained with an integrated shaft encoder. Long lifetime is evidenced by testing to over 5(10){sup 7} ration cycles without changes in performance. Projected speeds of the present motor configuration are in the vicinity of 100 krpm and are limited by torque ripple. Higher speeds, which are attractive for sensor applications. require constant torque characteristic excitation as is evidenced by ultracentrifuge and gyroscope design. Further understanding of electroplated magnetic material properties will drive these performance improvements.

  1. Deep-subwavelength imaging of both electric and magnetic localized optical fields by plasmonic campanile nanoantenna.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Niccolò; La China, Federico; Bao, Wei; Riboli, Francesco; Gerardino, Annamaria; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Pagliano, Francesco; Fiore, Andrea; Schuck, P James; Cabrini, Stefano; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Gurioli, Massimo; Intonti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring the electromagnetic field at the nanoscale has led to artificial materials exhibiting fascinating optical properties unavailable in naturally occurring substances. Besides having fundamental implications for classical and quantum optics, nanoscale metamaterials provide a platform for developing disruptive novel technologies, in which a combination of both the electric and magnetic radiation field components at optical frequencies is relevant to engineer the light-matter interaction. Thus, an experimental investigation of the spatial distribution of the photonic states at the nanoscale for both field components is of crucial importance. Here we experimentally demonstrate a concomitant deep-subwavelength near-field imaging of the electric and magnetic intensities of the optical modes localized in a photonic crystal nanocavity. We take advantage of the "campanile tip", a plasmonic near-field probe that efficiently combines broadband field enhancement with strong far-field to near-field coupling. By exploiting the electric and magnetic polarizability components of the campanile tip along with the perturbation imaging method, we are able to map in a single measurement both the electric and magnetic localized near-field distributions. PMID:26045401

  2. Deep-subwavelength imaging of both electric and magnetic localized optical fields by plasmonic campanile nanoantenna

    PubMed Central

    Caselli, Niccolò; La China, Federico; Bao, Wei; Riboli, Francesco; Gerardino, Annamaria; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Pagliano, Francesco; Fiore, Andrea; Schuck, P. James; Cabrini, Stefano; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Gurioli, Massimo; Intonti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring the electromagnetic field at the nanoscale has led to artificial materials exhibiting fascinating optical properties unavailable in naturally occurring substances. Besides having fundamental implications for classical and quantum optics, nanoscale metamaterials provide a platform for developing disruptive novel technologies, in which a combination of both the electric and magnetic radiation field components at optical frequencies is relevant to engineer the light-matter interaction. Thus, an experimental investigation of the spatial distribution of the photonic states at the nanoscale for both field components is of crucial importance. Here we experimentally demonstrate a concomitant deep-subwavelength near-field imaging of the electric and magnetic intensities of the optical modes localized in a photonic crystal nanocavity. We take advantage of the “campanile tip”, a plasmonic near-field probe that efficiently combines broadband field enhancement with strong far-field to near-field coupling. By exploiting the electric and magnetic polarizability components of the campanile tip along with the perturbation imaging method, we are able to map in a single measurement both the electric and magnetic localized near-field distributions. PMID:26045401

  3. Modulation of Antisaccades by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Zhigang

    indicated by a target (`') that appeared in the left or right visual field. When the pointing to the contralateral visual field due to disruption of processing in the FEF. Keywords: eye movements, inhibition, reflexive saccades, TMS, voluntary saccades Introduction Eye movements allow a fast and efficient

  4. Structural setting and magnetic properties of pseudotachylyte in a deep crustal shear zone, western Canadian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, O. F.; Mahan, K. H.; Brown, L. L.; Regan, S.; Williams, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic slip commonly produces pseudotachylytes, a glassy vein-filling substance that is typically interpreted as either a frictional melt or an ultra-triturated cataclasite. In either form, pseudotachylytes are commonly magnetite enriched, even in magnetite-free host rocks, and therefore are potentially useful as high fidelity recorders of natural magnetic fields at the time of slip in a wide array of lithologies. Pseudotachylytes generally have high magnetic susceptibility and thus should preserve the dominant field present as the material passes the Curie temperatures of magnetic minerals, primarily magnetite. Two potential sources have been proposed for the dominant magnetic field recorded: the earth's magnetic field at the time of slip or the temporary and orders of magnitude more intense field created by the presence of coseismic currents along the failure plane. Pseudotachylytes of the Cora Lake shear zone (CLsz) in the Athabasca Granulite Terrain, western Canadian shield, are consistently hosted in high strain ultramylonitic orthogneiss. Sinistral and extensional oblique-slip in the CLsz occurred at high-pressure granulite-grade conditions of ~1.0 GPa and >800°C and may have persisted to somewhat lower P-T conditions (~0.8 GPa, 700 °C) during ductile deformation. Pseudotachylyte-bearing slip surfaces have sinistral offset, matching the larger shear zone, and clasts of wall rock in the more brecciated veins display field evidence for ductile shear along the same plane prior to brittle failure. The presence of undeformed pseudotachylyte in kinematically compatible fracture arrays localized in ultramylonite indicates that brittle failure may have occurred in the waning stages of shear zone activity and at similar deep crustal conditions. Field-documented occurrences of pseudotachylyte include 2 cm-thick veins that run subparallel to mylonitic foliation and contain small flow-aligned clasts and large, heavily brecciated foliation-crosscutting zones up to seven centimeters thick. Field studies of pseudotachylytes in the Cora Lake shear zone confirm high magnetic susceptibility, both by strongly interfering with hand-held compasses and by testing with a hand-held magnetic susceptibility meter (over 7 x10-2 SI). More detailed laboratory analyses are planned in order to clarify the spatial association between veins of pseudotachylyte and areas of magnetic susceptibility. Investigation is also currently underway to determine if the remnant field preserved in these pseudotachylytes dominantly reflects a signature of the Earth's paleomagnetic field or that of a lightning-like coseismic current.

  5. Clinical utility of magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI) for realtime guidance of deep hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, P. R.; Craciunescu, Oana I.; Maccarini, P. F.; Wyatt, Cory; Arunachalam, K.; Arabe, O.; Stakhursky, V.; Soher, B.; MacFall, J. R.; Li, Z.; Joines, William T.; Rangarao, S.; Cheng, K. S.; Das, S. K.; Martins, Carlos D.; Charles, Cecil; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Wong, T.; Jones, E.; Vujaskovic, Z.

    2009-02-01

    A critical need has emerged for volumetric thermometry to visualize 3D temperature distributions in real time during deep hyperthermia treatments used as an adjuvant to radiation or chemotherapy for cancer. For the current effort, magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI) is used to measure 2D temperature rise distributions in four cross sections of large extremity soft tissue sarcomas during hyperthermia treatments. Novel hardware and software techniques are described which improve the signal to noise ratio of MR images, minimize motion artifact from circulating coupling fluids, and provide accurate high resolution volumetric thermal dosimetry. For the first 10 extremity sarcoma patients, the mean difference between MRTI region of interest and adjacent interstitial point measurements during the period of steady state temperature was 0.85°C. With 1min temporal resolution of measurements in four image planes, this noninvasive MRTI approach has demonstrated its utility for accurate monitoring and realtime steering of heat into tumors at depth in the body.

  6. [Transcranial Doppler and color duplex ultrasound. Familiar and new uses].

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, R W; Baumgartner, I B

    1996-04-01

    Transcranial Doppler and color-coded duplex sonography provide reliable information on cross-flow through the circle of Willis, stenoses, occlusions and vasospasm of the major basal cerebral arteries. The CO2 and acetazolamide tests allow quantitative evaluation of the hemodynamic impact of obstructive cerebrovascular disease. Furthermore, transcranial Doppler sonography is used for detection of enhanced intracranial pressure, confirmation of brain death, detection of cerebral microemboli ("high intensity transient signals" = "HITS"), and patent foramen ovale. In the future, cerebral microemboli may become a marker for embolic activity of both occlusive carotid artery and cardiac disease. Transcranial color-coded duplex sonography identifies intracranial hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformations, and hydrocephalus, but is inferior to neuroradiological techniques. Transpulmonary contrast agents make the examination of patients with inadequate insonation windows feasible, and increase diagnostic confidence in transcranial ultrasonography. Transcranial power-based color-coded duplex sonography ("power Doppler") may further improve transcranial ultrasonography, and visualize flow in smaller vessels. PMID:8685694

  7. The value of transcranial Doppler derived pulsatility index for diagnosing cerebral small-vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Abbas; Ahmadi, Mohammad Javad; Shemshaki, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The pulsatility index (PI), measured by transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography, can reflect vascular resistance induced by cerebral small-vessel disease (SVD). We evaluated the value of TCD-derived PI for diagnosing SVD as compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: Fifty-six consecutive cases with SVD (based on MRI) and 48 controls with normal MRI underwent TCD. Based on MRI findings, patients were categorized into five subgroups of preventricular hyperintensity (PVH), deep white matter hyperintensity (DWMH), lacunar, pontin hyperintensity (PH), and PVH+DWMH+lacunar. The sensitivity and specificity of TCD in best PI cut-off points were calculated in each group. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of TCD in comparison with MRI with best PI cut-off points were as follows: In PVH with PI = 0.83, the sensitivity and specificity was 90% and 98%, respectively. In DWMH with PI = 0.79, the sensitivity and specificity was 75% and 87.5%, respectively. In lacunar with PI = 0.80, the sensitivity and specificity was 73% and 90%, respectively. In PH with PI = 0.69, the sensitivity and specificity was 92% and 87.5%, respectively. And, in PVH+DWMH+lacunar subgroup with PI = 0.83, the sensitivity and specificity was 90% and 96%, respectively. Conclusions: Increased TCD derived PI can accurately indicate the SVD. Hence, TCD can be used as a non-invasive and inexpensive method for diagnosing SVD, and TCD-derived PI can be considered as a physiologic index of the disease as well. PMID:25802823

  8. rarefied, less opaque flux tube or sheet. The dark facular lane is the manifestation of the cool deep layers of the magnetic flux concentration.

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Oskar

    rarefied, less opaque flux tube or sheet. The dark facular lane is the manifestation of the cool deep layers of the magnetic flux concentration. 2. Results from a basic model and from numerical equilibrium, Ti = Te, while in deep layers, the tube interior is cooler than the external atmosphere at equal

  9. Acute seizure suppression by transcranial direct current stimulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dhamne, Sameer C; Ekstein, Dana; Zhuo, Zhihong; Gersner, Roman; Zurakowski, David; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jensen, Frances E; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a focal neuromodulation technique that suppresses cortical excitability by low-amplitude constant electrical current, and may have an antiepileptic effect. Yet, tDCS has not been tested in status epilepticus (SE). Furthermore, a combined tDCS and pharmacotherapy antiseizure approach is unexplored. We therefore examined in the rat pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) SE model whether cathodal tDCS (1) suppresses seizures, (2) augments lorazepam (LZP) efficacy, and (3) enhances GABAergic cortical inhibition. Methods Experiment 1 aimed to identify an effective cathodal tDCS intensity. Rats received intraperitoneal PTZ followed by tDCS (sham, cathodal 1 mA, or cathodal 0.1 mA; for 20 min), and then a second PTZ challenge. In Experiment 2, two additional animal groups received a subtherapeutic LZP dose after PTZ, and then verum or sham tDCS. Clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) epileptic activity were compared between all groups. In Experiment 3, we measured GABA-mediated paired-pulse inhibition of the motor evoked potential by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) in rats that received PTZ or saline, and either verum or sham tDCS. Results Cathodal 1 mA tDCS (1) reduced EEG spike bursts, and suppressed clinical seizures after the second PTZ challenge, (2) in combination with LZP was more effective in seizure suppression and improved the clinical seizure outcomes compared to either tDCS or LZP alone, and (3) prevented the loss of ppTMS motor cortex inhibition that accompanied PTZ injection. Interpretation These results suggest that cathodal 1 mA tDCS alone and in combination with LZP can suppress seizures by augmenting GABAergic cortical inhibition. PMID:26339678

  10. Regional Personalized Electrodes to Select Transcranial Current Stimulation Target

    PubMed Central

    Tecchio, Franca; Cancelli, A.; Cottone, C.; Tomasevic, L.; Devigus, B.; Zito, G.; Ercolani, Matilde; Carducci, F.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Personalizing transcranial stimulations promises to enhance beneficial effects for individual patients. Objective: To stimulate specific cortical regions by developing a procedure to bend and position custom shaped electrodes; to probe the effects on cortical excitability produced when the properly customized electrode is targeting different cortical areas. Method: An ad hoc neuronavigation procedure was developed to accurately shape and place the personalized electrodes on the basis of individual brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) on bilateral primary motor (M1) and somatosensory (S1) cortices. The transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) protocol published by Feurra et al. (2011b) was used to test the effects on cortical excitability of the personalized electrode when targeting S1 or M1. Results: Neuronal excitability as evaluated by tACS was different when targeting M1 or S1, with the General Estimating Equation model indicating a clear tCS Effect (p?

  11. Survival Of Magnetic Paleoclimatic Signals From Shallow To Deep Water Marine Redoxomorphic Sediments Across The Northwest Iberian Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed Falcon, K. J.; Rey, D.; Rubio, B.

    2013-05-01

    The magnetic properties of marine sediments on the North Atlantic Iberian continental Margin are strongly dependent on the organic matter input to the sediments and the onset of reductive diagenesis. An onshore-offshore gradient in the intensity of early diagenesis was recently described for the Ría de Vigo, matched by similar patterns in the adjacent rias of Pontevedra and Muros. In the ria environments of NW Iberia, early diagenetic dissolution of magnetic minerals can lead to magnetite half-lives of a few decades, and virtually obliterates any paleoenvironmental signal carried by magnetic minerals, rendering magnetic properties especially useful for the study of early diagenesis dynamics. Early diagenesis has also been identified in sediments of the adjacent continental shelf and deeper environments of the Galician Bank and Iberian Abyssal Plain. However, in these settings, slower dissolution of magnetic minerals allows the preservation of paleoclimatic signatures on different temporal scales. For instance, magnetic properties of continental shelf sediments reveal periods of enhanced rainfall and continental sediment input to the shelf, coincident with the Roman Warm Period and Medieval Climatic Optimum. On the contrary, cold periods are associated with less detrital input. Furthermore, levels of intensified diagenesis are also recorded during cold periods, which have been interpreted as periods of intensified coastal upwelling probably related to long-term North Atlantic Oscillation positive state. At the Galician Bank and Iberian Abyssal Plain sediments early diagenesis is also pervasive, although a paleoceanographic record of changes in the concentration of magnetic minerals transported by water masses flowing from the Portuguese Margin can still be identified. In addition to the progressive dissolution of magnetic minerals with depth, bulk magnetic properties in these deep marine settings show strong dependence on the pelagic carbonate sedimentation and low-magnetic turbiditic sediments that originate in the Galician Bank. Thin levels of highly magnetic sediments have been identified as Heinrich events, which provide an easily identifiable chronostratigraphic marker and a very fast and cost-effective tool for core correlation on a regional scale. These case-studies on the magnetic properties of sediments from the NW Iberian Margin provide examples of the range of applications of environmental magnetism in marine sediments with variable degrees of early diagenetic alteration of their magnetic mineral assemblage.

  12. Absolute magnetization of the seafloor at a basalt-hosted hydrothermal site: Insights from a deep-sea submersible survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szitkar, Florent; Dyment, Jérôme; Fouquet, Yves; Choi, Yujin; Honsho, Chie

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of high-resolution vector magnetic data acquired by deep-sea submersibles (DSSs) requires the development of specific approaches adapted to their uneven tracks. We present a method that takes advantage of (1) the varying altitude of the DSS above the seafloor and (2) high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data acquired separately, at higher altitude, by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, to estimate the absolute magnetization intensity and the magnetic polarity of the shallow subseafloor along the DSS path. We apply this method to data collected by DSS Nautile on a small active basalt-hosted hydrothermal site. The site is associated with a lack of magnetization, in agreement with previous findings at the same kind of sites: the contrast between nonmagnetic sulfide deposits/stockwork zone and strongly magnetized basalt is sufficient to explain the magnetic signal observed at such a low altitude. Both normal and reversed polarities are observed in the lava flows surrounding the site, suggesting complex history of accumulating volcanic flows.

  13. Transcranial direct current stimulation: State of the art 2008

    E-print Network

    Miall, Chris

    Transcranial direct current stimulation: State of the art 2008 Michael A. Nitsche, MDa , Leonardo G. Beyond this, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of different cortical areas has been shown direct currents is a promising tool in human neuroscience and neurobehavioral research. To facilitate

  14. Feature Analysis for Parkinson's Disease Detection Based on Transcranial

    E-print Network

    Lübeck, Universität zu

    Feature Analysis for Parkinson's Disease Detection Based on Transcranial Sonography Image Lei Chen1 of Luebeck, Germany Abstract. Transcranial sonography (TCS) is a new tool for the diag- nosis of Parkinson validation results show that the local features could be used for PD detection. Keywords: Parkinson's Disease

  15. Quantitative evaluation of equine deep digital flexor tendon morphology using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Murray, Rachel C; Roberts, Bridget L; Schramme, Michael C; Dyson, Sue J; Branch, Marion

    2004-01-01

    Injury of the distal aspect of the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) is a recognized cause of lameness, but diagnosis is difficult. This study aimed to improve understanding of DDFT morphology and pathology using retrospective evaluation of magnetic resonance (MR) images. We hypothesized that: (1) The distal aspect of the DDFT in normal horses would have a repeatable proximal/distal pattern and symmetry between limbs and between lobes; (2) DDFT dimensions would be related to bodyweight, navicular bone dimensions and hoof size; (3) this symmetry and pattern would be lost in DDFT injury; and (4) DDFT size would increase with injury. MR images of 64 live horse limbs, 26 with no identified DDFT lesion and 38 with identified DDFT abnormalities, and 19 normal cadaver limbs were analyzed. Using standardized transverse images, measurements of DDFT cross-sectional area, medial-lateral (ML) width and dorsal-palmar depth were obtained at six preselected sites. A uniform distal to proximal shape pattern was identified in all horses. The flattened crescent shape at the insertion changed to a deeper bilobed shape more proximally, with the mid-navicular area having the greatest cross-sectional area. Strong ML (P < 0.0006) and left/right symmetry (P < 0.02) were observed. In addition, there was a strong association between DDFT cross-sectional area and horse weight (P = 0.005) and between DDFT and navicular bone ML width (P = 0.004). Symmetry between sides or between lobes was lost at sites with a unilateral lesion and correlation between horse weight and DDFT cross-sectional area was lost in the presence of lesions. DDFTs with core lesions had a consistent increase in cross-sectional area overall, but other lesion types had no significant increase in size. The shape and symmetry seen in normal tendons could be related to the mechanical demands placed upon individual lobes. The limited increase in cross-sectional area with injury may be explained by the restrictive structures of the hoof, possibly explaining the ongoing pain seen in such lesions. PMID:15072140

  16. Characterization of deep geothermal energy resources using Electro-Magnetic methods, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, Sian; Harcout-Menou, Virginie; De Ridder, Fjo; Claessens, Bert; Laenen, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Sedimentary basins in Northwest Europe have significant potential for low to medium enthalpy, deep geothermal energy resources. These resources are currently assessed using standard exploration techniques (seismic investigations followed by drilling of a borehole). This has enabled identification of geothermal resources but such techniques are extremely costly. The high cost of exploration remains one of the main barriers to geothermal project development due to the lack of capital in the geothermal industry. We will test the possibility of using the Electro-Magnetic (EM) methods to aid identification of geothermal resources in conjunction with more traditional exploration methods. An EM campaign could cost a third of a seismic campaign and is also often a passive technology, resulting in smaller environmental impacts than seismic surveys or drilling. EM methods image changes in the resistivity of the earth's sub-surface using natural or induced frequency dependant variations of electric and magnetic fields. Changes in resistivity can be interpreted as representing different subsurface properties including changes in rock type, chemistry, temperature and/or hydraulic transmissivity. While EM techniques have proven to be useful in geothermal exploration in high enthalpy areas in the last 2-3 years only a handful of studies assess their applicability in low enthalpy sedimentary basins. Challenges include identifying which sub-surface features cause changes in electrical resistivity as low enthalpy reservoirs are unlikely to exhibit the hydrothermally altered clay layer above the geothermal aquifer that is typical for high enthalpy reservoirs. Yet a principal challenge is likely to be the high levels of industrialisation in the areas of interest. Infrastructure such as train tracks and power cables can create a high level of background noise that can obfuscate the relevant signal. We present our plans for an EM campaign in the Flemish region of Belgium. Field techniques will be developed to increase the signal-noise ratio and identify background noise. Firstly, surface noise will be filtered off by non-parametric approaches such as proper orthogonal decomposition. Secondly, the EM signal and newly acquired seismic data will be combined to obtain a multi-dimensional earth model via an inversion process. Typically, these identification procedures are non-unique, resulting in multiple possible scenarios that cannot be distinguished based on the information at hand. To this end standard approaches) use a regularisation term including an apriori model. Here, Bayesian approaches will also be used, in which expert knowledge is used to guide the outcome to reasonable solutions. We will assess the reduction in uncertainty and therefore risks that EM methods can provide when used in combination with seismic surveys for geothermal exploration prior to drilling. It may also be possible to use this technique for monitoring the evolution of geothermal systems. Such techniques may prove to be extremely valuable for the future development of geothermal energy resources.

  17. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Rasulo, F A; De Peri, E; Lavinio, A

    2008-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler is an innovative, flexible, accessible tool for the bedside monitoring of static and dynamic cerebral flow and treatment response. Introduced by Rune Aaslid in 1982, it has become indispensable in clinical practice. The main obstacle to ultrasound penetration of the skull is bone. Low frequencies, 1-2 MHz, reduce the attenuation of the ultrasound wave caused by bone. Transcranial Doppler also provides the advantage of acoustic windows representing specific points of the skull where the bone is thin enough to allow ultrasounds to penetrate. There are four acoustic windows: transtemporal, transorbital, suboccipital and retromandibular. The identification of each intracranial vessel is based on the following elements: (a) velocity and direction; (b) depth of signal capture; (c) possibility of following the vessel its whole length; (d) spatial relationship with other vessels; and (e) response to homolateral and contralateral carotid compression. The main fields of clinical application of transcranial Doppler are assessment of vasospasm, detection of stenosis of the intracranial arteries, evaluation of cerebrovascular autoregulation, non-invasive estimation of intracranial pressure, measure of effective downstream pressure and assessment of brain death. Mean flow velocity is directly proportional to flow and inversely proportional to the section of the vessel. Any circumstance that leads to a variation of one of these factors can thus affect mean velocity. The main pathological condition affecting flow velocity is the vasospasm. Vasospasm is a frequent complication of subarachnoid haemorrhage, it often remains clinically silent and the factors that make it symptomatic are largely unknown. Threshold velocities above which vasospasm comes into place are well defined as regards the median cerebral artery, while there is no consensus for the other vessels. Nevertheless, an increase in velocity alone is not sufficient to arrive at a diagnosis of vasospasm; a condition of hyperaemia also presents with an increase in flow velocity. The Lindegaard Index has therefore been introduced, which is defined by the ratio between the mean flow velocity in the median cerebral artery and the mean flow velocity in the internal carotid artery. Criteria for diagnosis of a stenosis >50% of an intracranial vessel with transcranial Doppler include: (a) segmentary acceleration of flow velocity; (b) drop in velocity below the stenotic segment; (c) asymmetry; and (d) circumscribed flow disturbances (turbulence and musical murmur). The transcranial Doppler enables us to assess both components of self-regulation. The static component is measured by observing changes in flow velocity caused by pharmacologically induced episodes of hypertension and hypotension. The dynamic component of autoregulation can be measured using a method devised by Aaslid known as the 'cuff test'. A very effective and safe device for measuring cerebral autoregulation is the transient hyperaemic response test. This test is based on the compensatory vasodilatation of the arterioles, which occurs after brief compression of the common carotid. Csonyka proposed the following formula based on clinical observation for the calculation of cerebral perfusion pressure: CPP = MAP x FVd/FVm + 14. Brain death is defined as the irreversible cessation of all functions of the whole brain. The clinical criteria are usually considered sufficient to establish a diagnosis of brain death; however, they might not be sufficient in patients who have been on sedatives or when there are ethical or legal controversies. Many authors have demonstrated the existence of a transcranial Doppler pattern, which is typical of brain death. PMID:18289437

  18. Electronic and magnetic structures of the postperovskite-type Fe2O3 and implications for planetary magnetic records and deep interiors.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sang-Heon; Bengtson, Amelia; Morgan, Dane; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Catalli, Krystle; Zhao, Jiyong; Lerche, Michael; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2009-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that high pressure (P) induces the metallization of the Fe(2+)-O bonding, the destruction of magnetic ordering in Fe, and the high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) transition of Fe in silicate and oxide phases at the deep planetary interiors. Hematite (Fe(2)O(3)) is an important magnetic carrier mineral for deciphering planetary magnetism and a proxy for Fe in the planetary interiors. Here, we present synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction combined with ab initio calculations for Fe(2)O(3) revealing the destruction of magnetic ordering at the hematite --> Rh(2)O(3)-II type (RhII) transition at 70 GPa and 300 K, and then the revival of magnetic ordering at the RhII --> postperovskite (PPv) transition after laser heating at 73 GPa. At the latter transition, at least half of Fe(3+) ions transform from LS to HS and Fe(2)O(3) changes from a semiconductor to a metal. This result demonstrates that some magnetic carrier minerals may experience a complex sequence of magnetic ordering changes during impact rather than a monotonic demagnetization. Also local Fe enrichment at Earth's core-mantle boundary will lead to changes in the electronic structure and spin state of Fe in silicate PPv. If the ultra-low-velocity zones are composed of Fe-enriched silicate PPv and/or the basaltic materials are accumulated at the lowermost mantle, high electrical conductivity of these regions will play an important role for the electromagnetic coupling between the mantle and the core. PMID:19279204

  19. Transcranial photoacoustic tomography of the monkey brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Liming; Huang, Chao; Guo, Zijian; Anastasio, Mark; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    A photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system using a virtual point ultrasonic transducer was developed for transcranial imaging of monkey brains. The virtual point transducer provided a 10 times greater field-of-view (FOV) than finiteaperture unfocused transducers, which enables large primate imaging. The cerebral cortex of a monkey brain was accurately mapped transcranially, through up to two skulls ranging from 4 to 8 mm in thickness. The mass density and speed of sound distributions of the skull were estimated from adjunct X-ray CT image data and utilized with a timereversal algorithm to mitigate artifacts in the reconstructed image due to acoustic aberration. The oxygenation saturation (sO2) in blood phantoms through a monkey skull was also imaged and quantified, with results consistent with measurements by a gas analyzer. The oxygenation saturation (sO2) in blood phantoms through a monkey skull was also imaged and quantified, with results consistent with measurements by a gas analyzer. Our experimental results demonstrate that PAT can overcome the optical and ultrasound attenuation of a relatively thick skull, and the imaging aberration caused by skull can be corrected to a great extent.

  20. Rock-magnetic property of deep-sea sediments in the NE equatorial Pacific: a stratigraphic correlation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, J. Y.; Kim, W.; Hyeong, K.; Park, C. K.; Moon, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    To diagnose sedimentation environments through the geologic time, two sediments cores were recovered in the Northeast equatorial Pacific (PC120201: 9°57?N and 131°42?W in 5,080 m water depth; KODOS 02-01-02: 16°12?N and 125°59?W in 4,550 m water depth). Successive AF demagnetization reveals a well constrained characteristic component between AF fields of 15-50 mT with the maximum angular deviation of <10°. The component flips eight times in PC120201 and three times in KODOS 02-01-02 showing distinctive antipodal declination and inclination. In the reference geologic time scale, the eight and three reversal events correspond to the age of about 4.5 Ma and 1.8 Ma, respectively. However, 10Be based age correction shows 13.4 Ma at 465 cm depth in PC120201 and variable sedimentation rates of 0.1-2.44 mm/kyr, indicating many of magnetic reversal records are buried. In KODOS 02-01-02, rock-magnetic properties (i.e., magnetic concentration, grain size, and mineralogy) above 250 cm, composed of siliceous ooze and pelagic red clay, show gradual down-core increase of magnetic concentration and grain size. Such variation is well correlated with the down-core variation to 215 cm of PC120201. From the correlation, the estimated age at 215 cm depth of KODOS 02-01-02 is ~7 Ma and a sedimentation rate is ~0.36 mm/kyr. At this time, we test the possibility of rock-magnetic properties as an alternative age dating tool for deep-sea sediments. When detailed mineralogical data are complemented, rock-magnetic properties will answer the question about sediments provenance in spatial and temporal terms.

  1. Violation of the Guiding Center Approximation for Energetic Ions in the Deep Inner Magnetosphere during Magnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibahara, K.; Nose, M.

    2009-12-01

    During a magnetic storm, the ring current is developed in the inner magnetosphere. It is believed that the decrease of Dst index during a strom is mainly due to the development of the ring current. Recent numerical simulations have revealed how the ring current grows and decays (Lemon et al., 2004; Zaharia et al., 2006) in the self-consistent field with the guiding center approximation (GCA). This approximation breaks down if the spatial scale of the magnetic field change is comparable to the gyroradius. From the following two reasons, we suspect an approach to treat motion of ring current oxygen ions with the GCA. (1) During magnetic storms a dominant part of energy density of the ring current is carried by oxygen ions (Daglis at al., 1999) which are 16 times heavier than protons; that is, gyroradius of oxygen ions is 4 times larger than that of protons with the same kinetic energy. (2) Magnetic field configuration becomes far deviated from dipole field even in the deep inner magnetosphere. In this study, we examine whether the GCA is valid for ring current ions, in particular for oxygen ions. We compared energetic ion trajectories computed by the Lorentz equation and those by the GCA equation (Northrop, 1963). We used the TS04 (Tsyganenko and Sitnov, 2005) magnetic field model as well as the Volland-Stern (Volland 1973; Stern 1975) electric field model. In case of integration of the Lorentz equation, we found that some of ions have different trajectories from those of the GCA equation. Most remarkable results can be summarized as follows. First, ions having a pitch angle of ~90 degrees do not conserve the first adiabatic invariant and gradually increase their amplitude of bouncing motion around the magnetic equator. Second, an ion with a large gyroradius (i.e, an energetic oxygen ion) can be accelerated thorough the meandering motion even in the deep inner magnetosphere. Above-mentioned results lead some interest phenomena, for example, pitch angle distribution or the development of the ring current. Therefore, we suggest that GCA may not describe the ring current development and decay appropriately.

  2. Transcranial direct current stimulation for major depression: a general system for quantifying transcranial electrotherapy dosage.

    PubMed

    Bikson, Marom; Bulow, Peter; Stiller, John W; Datta, Abhishek; Battaglia, Fortunato; Karnup, Sergei V; Postolache, Teodor T

    2008-09-01

    There has been a recent resurgence of interest in therapeutic modalities using transcranial weak electrical stimulation through scalp electrodes, such as trans-cranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), as a means of experimentally modifying and studying brain function and possibly treating psychiatric conditions. A range of electrotherapy paradigms have been investigated, but no consistent method has been indicated for reporting reproducible stimulation "dosage." Anecdotal reports, case studies, and limited clinical trials with small numbers suggest that tDCS may be effective in treating some patients with depression, but methods for selecting the optimal stimulation parameters ("dosage") are not clear, and there is no conclusive indication that tDCS is an effective treatment for depression. Larger, controlled studies are necessary to determine its safety and efficacy in a clinical setting. If tDCS can be established as an effective treatment for depression, it would represent a particularly attractive electrotherapy option, as it is a relatively benign and affordable treatment modality. An accurate system for describing reproducible treatment parameters is essential so that further studies can yield evidence-based guidelines for the clinical use of transcranial current stimulation. Development of appropriate parameters requires a biophysical understanding of how electrotherapy affects brain function and should include different paradigms for different clinical applications. As with any dosage guidelines, such a system does not supersede physician judgment on safety. PMID:18782510

  3. Individual differences in transcranial electrical stimulation current density

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Michael J; Goodman, Theodore; Pierson, Ronald; Shepherd, Shane; Wang, Qiang; Groshong, Bennett; Wiley, David F

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (TCES) is effective in treating many conditions, but it has not been possible to accurately forecast current density within the complex anatomy of a given subject's head. We sought to predict and verify TCES current densities and determine the variability of these current distributions in patient-specific models based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Two experiments were performed. The first experiment estimated conductivity from MRIs and compared the current density results against actual measurements from the scalp surface of 3 subjects. In the second experiment, virtual electrodes were placed on the scalps of 18 subjects to model simulated current densities with 2 mA of virtually applied stimulation. This procedure was repeated for 4 electrode locations. Current densities were then calculated for 75 brain regions. Comparison of modeled and measured external current in experiment 1 yielded a correlation of r = .93. In experiment 2, modeled individual differences were greatest near the electrodes (ten-fold differences were common), but simulated current was found in all regions of the brain. Sites that were distant from the electrodes (e.g. hypothalamus) typically showed two-fold individual differences. MRI-based modeling can effectively predict current densities in individual brains. Significant variation occurs between subjects with the same applied electrode configuration. Individualized MRI-based modeling should be considered in place of the 10-20 system when accurate TCES is needed. PMID:24285948

  4. An electronically steered, wearable transcranial doppler ultrasound system

    E-print Network

    Pietrangelo, Sabino Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This thesis details the design of a transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound system to measure cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). TCD sonography has been clinically indicated in a variety ...

  5. Integrated Analysis on Gravity and Magnetic Fields of the Hailar Basin, NE China: Implications for Basement Structure and Deep Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Wang, L.; Dong, P.; Scientific Team Of Applied Geophysics

    2010-12-01

    The Hailar Basin is one of the most representative basins among the Northeast China Basin Group, which is situated in the east of East Asia Orogene between the Siberia Plate and the North China Plate. Based on the detailed analysis of the Bouguer gravity anomaly, aeromagnetic anomaly as well as petrophysical data, we studied the features of gravity-magnetic fields in the basin and its neighboring areas. A combined approach of Wavelet Multi-scale Decomposition and Power Spectrum Analysis was adopted to quantitatively grade the gravity and magnetic anomalies into four levels. Accordingly, the apparent depths of the source fields can be assessed. The results reveal the crustal density and magnetic structures of the Hailar Basin. Low-order wavelet details of gravity-magnetic anomalies were carried out on studying basin basement structure. Seven major basement faults of the basin were identified, and the basement lithology was discussed and predicted. Three major uplifts and 14 depressions were delineated according to basement depth inversion by the Park method. High-order wavelet approximations of gravity-magnetic anomalies were carried out on studying deep tectonics of the basin. The average Moho depth of the study area is about 40 km, with a mantle uplift located in the northeast of the basin. The average depth of the Curie interface is about 19 km, while the uplift of the Curie interface is in the basin center and its east and west sides are depressions. Finally, inversion of Bouguer gravity anomalies was conducted on an across-basin GGT profile using the Wavelet Multi-scale Decomposition. The inversion results are consistent with those of GGT seismic inversion, suggesting that the Wavelet Multi-scale Decomposition can be applied to distinguish major crustal density interfaces.

  6. Cryogenic Design of a Large Superconducting Magnet for Astro-particle Shielding on Deep Space Travel Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Romain; Baudouy, Bertrand

    The Space Radiation Superconducting Shield (SR2S) European project aims at studying a large superconducting toroid magnet to protect the human habitat from the ionizing radiations coming from Galactic Cosmic Ray during long term missions in deep space. Titanium clad MgB2 conductor is used to afford a bending power greater than 5 T.m at 10 K. A specific cryogenic design is needed to cool down this 10 m long and 12.8 m in diameter magnet. A passive cooling system, using a V-groove sunshield, is considered to reduce the heat flux coming from the Sun or Mars. An active configuration, using pulse tube cryocoolers, will be linked to the 80 K thermal screen intercepting most of the heat fluxes coming from the human habitat. The toroid magnet will be connected also to cryocoolers to absorb the few watts reaching its surface. Two kinds of thermal link are being considered to absorb the heat on the 80 K thermal screen. The first one is active, with a pump circulating helium gas in a network of exchange tubes. The second one is passive using long cryogenic pulse heat pipe (PHP) with the evaporator on the surface of the thermal screen and the condenser attached to the pulse tube.

  7. Hands-Free Transcranial Color Doppler Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Robert; Madala, Srihdar; Sattler, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Current transcranial color Doppler (TCD) transducer probes are bulky and difficult to move in tiny increments to search and optimize TCD signals. This invention provides miniature motions of a TCD transducer probe to optimize TCD signals. The mechanical probe uses spherical bearing in guiding and locating the tilting crystal face. The lateral motion of the crystal face as it tilts across the full range of motion was achieved by minimizing the distance between the pivot location and the crystal face. The smallest commonly available metal spherical bearing was used with an outer diameter of 12 mm, a 3-mm tall retaining ring, and 5-mm overall height. Small geared motors were used that would provide sufficient power in a very compact package. After confirming the validity of the basic positioning concept, optimization design loops were completed to yield the final design.

  8. [Transcranial direct current stimulation for depressive disorders].

    PubMed

    Aust, S; Palm, U; Padberg, F; Bajbouj, M

    2015-12-01

    Major depressive disorders are one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders worldwide but approximately 20-30?% of patients do not respond to standard guideline conform treatment. Recent neuroimaging studies in depressive patients revealed altered activation patterns in prefrontal brain areas and that successful cognitive behavioral therapy and psychopharmacological interventions are associated with a reversal of these neural alterations. Therefore, a direct modulation of prefrontal brain activation by non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) seems to be a promising and innovative approach for the treatment of depressive disorders. In addition, recent neuropsychological findings indicated an augmentation of positive tDCS effects by simultaneous external activation of the stimulated brain area, for example by cognitive training tasks. Based on these findings, the possibility to augment cognitive-emotional learning processes during cognitive behavioral therapy by simultaneous tDCS to increase antidepressive therapeutic effects is discussed in this article. PMID:26573660

  9. Do low field magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities correlate with macroscopical and histological changes within the equine deep digital flexor tendon?

    PubMed

    Sherlock, C E; Mair, T S; Ireland, J; Blunden, T

    2015-02-01

    Correlating magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and histopathological findings is essential to validate low field MR imaging in lame horses. This study aimed to compare signal changes in the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) of the distal limb on low field MR imaging with macroscopical and histological findings. Cadaver limbs from lame horses with DDFT lesions were selected. The DDFT MR imaging findings and histopathological results were graded, and macroscopical abnormalities were recorded. There was a strong correlation between MR imaging and histopathology grades (rs?=?0.76, p?

  10. Changes in basal ganglia processing of cortical input following magnetic stimulation in Parkinsonism

    E-print Network

    Bar-Gad, Izhar

    Changes in basal ganglia processing of cortical input following magnetic stimulation Available online 31 July 2012 Keywords: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) Parkinson's disease Primate Basal ganglia Motor cortex Parkinsonism is associated with major changes in neuronal activity throughout

  11. Deep-tow study of magnetic anomalies in the Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone 

    E-print Network

    Tominaga, Masako

    2006-10-30

    and correlatability of the JQZ magnetic anomalies implying that they are seafloor spreading lineations and (2) good correlations made new GPTS models extending back to 169.4 Ma; and (3) the origin of the JQZ may be a combination of rapid polarity reversals...

  12. The Chandra Deep Field-North Survey. XVII. Evolution of Magnetic Activity in Old Late-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, E. D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Micela, G.; Bauer, F. E.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. N.; Favata, F.; Sciortino, S.; Garmire, G. P.

    2004-08-01

    The extremely sensitive Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N) pencil-beam X-ray survey is used to identify and characterize the X-ray emission from old high-latitude main-sequence Galactic stars. Our principal goal is to investigate the expected long-term decay of magnetic activity of late-type stars due to the gradual spin-down of stellar rotation from a magnetized stellar wind. Thirteen X-ray sources are associated with late-type stars; 11 of these constitute a well-defined sample for statistical analysis. This sample consists of two G, two K0-K4, and seven M2-M5 stars with median V-band magnitude around 19 and median distance around 300 pc. X-ray luminosities are typically logLX~=27 ergs s-1 but are substantially higher in two cases. The combination of large-amplitude variations on timescales of hours and plasma temperatures around 5-30 MK indicates that the observed X-ray emission is dominated by magnetic reconnection flares rather than quiescent coronal emission. These X-ray properties are quantitatively similar to those seen in the active contemporary Sun. The CDF-N stellar sample is compared to simulations based on convolution of X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) with the known spatial distribution of old-disk stars. The model indicates that the CDF-N stars are the most magnetically active old-disk stars. A substantial decline in X-ray luminosities over the 1Gyrmagnetic activity-and presumably the interior magnetic dynamos responsible for the reconnecting fields at the stellar surface-exhibit long-term decay over the age of the Galactic disk. The model that best fits the magnitudes, spectral types, and X-ray luminosities of the sample has LX~t-2 ergs s-1, which is faster than the t-1 decay rate predicted from widely accepted rotational spin-down rates and X-ray-activity relations. Based in part on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  13. Transcranial electrical brain stimulation modulates neuronal tuning curves in perception of numerosity and duration

    E-print Network

    Penny, Will

    Magnitude judgement Numerosity Duration Time Computational modelling Transcranial direct current stimulationTranscranial electrical brain stimulation modulates neuronal tuning curves in perception (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation method with many putative applications and reported

  14. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Modulates Repetition

    E-print Network

    Gosselin, Frédéric

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Modulates Repetition and learning of unfamiliar faces remains unclear. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) transiently Direct Current Stimulation of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Modulates Repetition Suppression

  15. [Transcranial alternating current stimulation : Entrainment and function control of neuronal networks].

    PubMed

    Vosskuhl, J; Strüber, D; Herrmann, C S

    2015-12-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is a new technique for the modulation of oscillatory brain activity as measured in the electroencephalogram (EEG). In contrast to well-established stimulation techniques, such as transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation, tACS applies a sinusoidal alternating current at a specific frequency. This enables the modulation of the amplitude and frequency of endogenous brain oscillations as well as related cognitive processes. Therefore, the use of tACS has the possibility to evaluate well-known correlations between brain oscillations and cognitive processes in terms of causality. Such causal relationships have been documented in numerous neurocognitive studies on sensory, motor and perceptual processes; however, the clinical application of tACS is still in its infancy. In principle, any pathology that can reliably be connected with brain oscillations of a defined frequency is treatable. A current main focus of clinical research is on symptoms of Parkinson's disease and to a lesser degree, tinnitus. For an effective application of tACS it is important to choose the electrode positions as well as the frequency, intensity and duration of the stimulation in a theory-based and symptom-related manner. A successful therapeutic intervention requires the persistence of the tACS effect after stimulation has ceased. A mechanism that offers not only an explanation to the origin of persistent tACS effects but is also of high therapeutic benefit is neural plasticity. Therefore, one current focus of research aims at a better understanding of tACS after effects. PMID:26440521

  16. Magnetic graphene oxide modified with choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvent for the solid-phase extraction of protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanhua; Wang, Yuzhi; Pan, Qi; Wang, Ying; Ding, Xueqin; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-06-01

    Four kinds of green deep eutectic solvents (DESs) based on choline chloride (ChCl) have been synthesized and coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4@GO) to form Fe3O4@GO-DES for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein. X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to characterize Fe3O4@GO-DES, and the results indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4@GO-DES. The UV-vis spectrophotometer was used to measure the concentration of protein after extraction. Single factor experiments proved that the extraction amount was influenced by the types of DESs, solution temperature, solution ionic strength, extraction time, protein concentration and the amount of Fe3O4@GO-DES. Comparison of Fe3O4@GO and Fe3O4@GO-DES was carried out by extracting bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, bovine hemoglobin and lysozyme. The experimental results showed that the proposed Fe3O4@GO-DES performs better than Fe3O4@GO in the extraction of acidic protein. Desorption of protein was carried out by eluting the solid extractant with 0.005 mol L(-1) Na2HPO4 contained 1 mol L(-1) NaCl. The obtained elution efficiency was about 90.9%. Attributed to the convenient magnetic separation, the solid extractant could be easily recycled. PMID:26002214

  17. Neural consequences of transcranial direct current stimulation in the primary visual cortex of awake, behaving macaques

    E-print Network

    Krekelberg, Bart

    Neural consequences of transcranial direct current stimulation in the primary visual cortex of awake, behaving macaques Kohitij Kar, and Bart Krekelberg Transcranial direct current stimulation (t and neural consequences of transcranial stimulation, this animal model has the potential to provide unique

  18. An Automated Method for High-Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modeling*

    E-print Network

    Parra, Lucas C.

    An Automated Method for High-Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modeling* Yu Huang1 stimulation (tDCS) therapy. I. INTRODUCTION Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applies weak transcranial stimulation with electric currents requires accurate models of the current flow from scalp

  19. Transcranial electrical stimulation affects adaptation of MT/V5 neurons in awake, behaving macaques

    E-print Network

    Krekelberg, Bart

    directions). In the stimulation conditions we applied transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS; 10Transcranial electrical stimulation affects adaptation of MT/V5 neurons in awake, behaving macaques of action of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) are poorly understood. We partially attribute

  20. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Does Not Affect Model-

    E-print Network

    Smittenaar, Peter

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Does Not Affect be achieved by anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the same region. We tested 22 healthy adult setup, these data suggest that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over right dorsolateral

  1. Transcranial direct current stimulation over posterior parietal cortex modulates visuospatial localization

    E-print Network

    Krekelberg, Bart

    Transcranial direct current stimulation over posterior parietal cortex modulates visuospatial, our goal was to determine whether modulation of the PPC via transcranial direct current stimulation (t localization. We used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the PPC of healthy human volunteers

  2. Improved Cognitive Function After Transcranial, Light-Emitting Diode Treatments in Chronic, Traumatic Brain Injury: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Saltmarche, Anita; Krengel, Maxine H.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Knight, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases, where cognition improved following treatment with red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs), applied transcranially to forehead and scalp areas, are presented. Background: Significant benefits have been reported following application of transcranial, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to humans with acute stroke and mice with acute TBI. These are the first case reports documenting improved cognitive function in chronic, TBI patients treated with transcranial LED. Methods: Treatments were applied bilaterally and to midline sagittal areas using LED cluster heads [2.1? diameter, 61 diodes (9?×?633?nm, 52?×?870?nm); 12–15?mW per diode; total power: 500?mW; 22.2?mW/cm2; 13.3?J/cm2 at scalp (estimated 0.4?J/cm2 to cortex)]. Results: Seven years after closed-head TBI from a motor vehicle accident, Patient 1 began transcranial LED treatments. Pre-LED, her ability for sustained attention (computer work) lasted 20 min. After eight weekly LED treatments, her sustained attention time increased to 3 h. The patient performs nightly home treatments (5 years); if she stops treating for more than 2 weeks, she regresses. Patient 2 had a history of closed-head trauma (sports/military, and recent fall), and magnetic resonance imaging showed frontoparietal atrophy. Pre-LED, she was on medical disability for 5 months. After 4 months of nightly LED treatments at home, medical disability discontinued; she returned to working full-time as an executive consultant with an international technology consulting firm. Neuropsychological testing after 9 months of transcranial LED indicated significant improvement (+1, +2SD) in executive function (inhibition, inhibition accuracy) and memory, as well as reduction in post-traumatic stress disorder. If she stops treating for more than 1 week, she regresses. At the time of this report, both patients are continuing treatment. Conclusions: Transcranial LED may improve cognition, reduce costs in TBI treatment, and be applied at home. Controlled studies are warranted. PMID:21182447

  3. Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with a 1.9-nm-deep nitrogen-vacancy sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Loretz, M.; Degen, C. L.; Pezzagna, S.; Meijer, J.

    2014-01-20

    We present nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements performed with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers located down to about 2 nm from the diamond surface. NV centers were created by shallow ion implantation followed by a slow, nanometer-by-nanometer removal of diamond material using oxidative etching in air. The close proximity of NV centers to the surface yielded large {sup 1}H NMR signals of up to 3.4 ?T-rms, corresponding to ?330 statistically polarized or ?10 fully polarized proton spins in a (1.8 nm){sup 3} detection volume.

  4. Transcranial direct current stimulation in psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tortella, Gabriel; Casati, Roberta; Aparicio, Luana V M; Mantovani, Antonio; Senço, Natasha; D’Urso, Giordano; Brunelin, Jerome; Guarienti, Fabiana; Selingardi, Priscila Mara Lorencini; Muszkat, Débora; Junior, Bernardo de Sampaio Pereira; Valiengo, Leandro; Moffa, Adriano H; Simis, Marcel; Borrione, Lucas; Brunoni, André R

    2015-01-01

    The interest in non-invasive brain stimulation techniques is increasing in recent years. Among these techniques, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been the subject of great interest among researchers because of its easiness to use, low cost, benign profile of side effects and encouraging results of research in the field. This interest has generated several studies and randomized clinical trials, particularly in psychiatry. In this review, we provide a summary of the development of the technique and its mechanism of action as well as a review of the methodological aspects of randomized clinical trials in psychiatry, including studies in affective disorders, schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder, child psychiatry and substance use disorder. Finally, we provide an overview of tDCS use in cognitive enhancement as well as a discussion regarding its clinical use and regulatory and ethical issues. Although many promising results regarding tDCS efficacy were described, the total number of studies is still low, highlighting the need of further studies aiming to replicate these findings in larger samples as to provide a definite picture regarding tDCS efficacy in psychiatry. PMID:25815258

  5. Transcranial random noise stimulation-induced plasticity is NMDA-receptor independent but sodium-channel blocker and benzodiazepines sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Chaieb, Leila; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background: Application of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) between 0.1 and 640 Hz of the primary motor cortex (M1) for 10 min induces a persistent excitability increase lasting for at least 60 min. However, the mechanism of tRNS-induced cortical excitability alterations is not yet fully understood. Objective: The main aim of this study was to get first efficacy data with regard to the possible neuronal effect of tRNS. Methods: Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to measure levels of cortical excitability before and after combined application of tRNS at an intensity of 1 mA for 10 min stimulation duration and a pharmacological agent (or sham) on eight healthy male participants. Results: The sodium channel blocker carbamazepine showed a tendency toward inhibiting MEPs 5–60 min poststimulation. The GABAA agonist lorazepam suppressed tRNS-induced cortical excitability increases at 0–20 and 60 min time points. The partial NMDA receptor agonist D-cycloserine, the NMDA receptor antagonist dextromethorphan and the D2/D3 receptor agonist ropinirole had no significant effects on the excitability increases seen with tRNS. Conclusions: In contrast to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), aftereffects of tRNS are seem to be not NMDA receptor dependent and can be suppressed by benzodiazepines suggesting that tDCS and tRNS depend upon different mechanisms. PMID:25914617

  6. Ambient-Pressure Bulk Superconductivity Deep in the Magnetic State of CeRhIn5

    SciTech Connect

    Paglione,J.; Ho, P.; Maple, M.; Tanatar, M.; Taillefer, L.; Lee, Y.; Petrovic, C.

    2008-01-01

    Specific heat, magnetic susceptibility and electrical transport measurements were performed at ambient pressure on high-quality single crystal specimens of CeRhIn5 down to ultra-low temperatures. We report signatures of an anomaly observed in all measured quantities consistent with a bulk phase transition to a superconducting state at T{sub c}=110 mK. Occurring far below the onset of antiferromagnetism at T{sub N}=3.8 K, this transition appears to involve a significant portion of the available low-temperature density of electronic states, exhibiting an entropy change in line with that found in other members of the 115 family of superconductors tuned away from quantum criticality.

  7. The contribution of interindividual factors to variability of response in transcranial direct current stimulation studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lucia M.; Uehara, Kazumasa; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for investigating and modulating human cognitive and motor function in healthy populations. It has also been used in many studies seeking to improve deficits in disease populations. With the slew of studies reporting “promising results” for everything from motor recovery after stroke to boosting memory function, one could be easily seduced by the idea of tDCS being the next panacea for all neurological ills. However, huge variability exists in the reported effects of tDCS, with great variability in the effect sizes and even contradictory results reported. In this review, we consider the interindividual factors that may contribute to this variability. In particular, we discuss the importance of baseline neuronal state and features, anatomy, age and the inherent variability in the injured brain. We additionally consider how interindividual variability affects the results of motor-evoked potential (MEP) testing with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which, in turn, can lead to apparent variability in response to tDCS in motor studies. PMID:26029052

  8. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Improves Ipsilateral Selective Muscle Activation in a Frequency Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Kazumasa; Coxon, James P.; Byblow, Winston D.

    2015-01-01

    Failure to suppress antagonist muscles can lead to movement dysfunction, such as the abnormal muscle synergies often seen in the upper limb after stroke. A neurophysiological surrogate of upper limb synergies, the selectivity ratio (SR), can be determined from the ratio of biceps brachii (BB) motor evoked potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation prior to forearm pronation versus elbow flexion. Surprisingly, cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (c-TDCS) over ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) reduces (i.e. improves) the SR in healthy adults, and chronic stroke patients. The ability to suppress antagonist muscles may be exacerbated at high movement rates. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the selective muscle activation of the biceps brachii (BB) is dependent on altering frequency demands, and whether the c-tDCS improvement of SR is dependent on task frequency. Seventeen healthy participants performed repetitive isometric elbow flexion and forearm pronation at three rates, before and after c-tDCS or sham delivered to ipsilateral left M1. Ipsilateral c-tDCS improved the SR in a frequency dependent manner by selectively suppressing BB antagonist excitability. Our findings confirm that c-tDCS is an effective tool for improving selective muscle activation, and provide novel evidence for its efficacy at rates of movement where it is most likely to benefit task performance. PMID:25816204

  9. Estimating the Deep Solar Meridional Circulation Using Magnetic Observations and a Dynamo Model: A Variational Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching Pui; Jouve, Laurène; Brun, Allan Sacha; Fournier, Alexandre; Talagrand, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    We show how magnetic observations of the Sun can be used in conjunction with an axisymmetric flux-transport solar dynamo model in order to estimate the large-scale meridional circulation throughout the convection zone. Our innovative approach rests on variational data assimilation, whereby the distance between predictions and observations (measured by an objective function) is iteratively minimized by means of an optimization algorithm seeking the meridional flow that best accounts for the data. The minimization is performed using a quasi-Newton technique, which requires knowledge of the sensitivity of the objective function to the meridional flow. That sensitivity is efficiently computed via the integration of the adjoint flux-transport dynamo model. Closed-loop (also known as twin) experiments using synthetic data demonstrate the validity and accuracy of this technique for a variety of meridional flow configurations, ranging from unicellular and equatorially symmetric to multicellular and equatorially asymmetric. In this well-controlled synthetic context, we perform a systematic study of the behavior of our variational approach under different observational configurations by varying their spatial density, temporal density, and noise level, as well as the width of the assimilation window. We find that the method is remarkably robust, leading in most cases to a recovery of the true meridional flow to within better than 1%. These encouraging results are a first step toward using this technique to (i) better constrain the physical processes occurring inside the Sun and (ii) better predict solar activity on decadal timescales.

  10. CHILES Con Pol: An ultra-deep JVLA survey probing galaxy evolution and cosmic magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; van Gorkom, Jacqueline; Rupen, Michael P.; Greiner, Maksim; Ensslin, Torsten A.; Bonzini, Margherita; Padovani, Paolo; Harrison, Ian; Brown, Michael L.; Gim, Hansung; Yun, Min S.; Maddox, Natasha; Stewart, Adam; Fender, Rob P.; Tremou, Evangelia; Chomiuk, Laura; Peters, Charee; Wilcots, Eric M.; Lazio, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    We are undertaking a 1000 hour campaign with the Karl G. Jansky VLA to survey 0.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field in full polarization continuum at 1.4 GHz. Our observations are part of a joint program with the spectral line COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES). When complete, we expect our CHILES Continuum Polarization (CHILES Con Pol) survey to reach an SKA-era sensitivity of 500 nJy per 4 arcsecond resolving beam, the deepest view of the radio sky yet. CHILES Con Pol will open new and fertile parameter space, with sensitivity to star formation rates of 10 Msun per year out to an unprecedented redshift of z=2, and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and sub-millimeter galaxies out to redshifts of z=8 and beyond. This rich resource will extend the utility of radio band studies beyond the usual radio quasar and radio galaxy populations, opening sensitivity to the starforming and radio-quiet AGN populations that form the bulk of extragalactic sources detected in the optical, X-ray, and infrared bands. In this talk I will outline the key science of CHILES Con Pol, including galaxy evolution and novel measurements of intergalactic magnetic fields. I will present initial results from the first 180 hours of the survey and describe our forthcoming Data Release 1. I invite the astronomical community to consider unique science that can be pursued with CHILES Con Pol radio data.

  11. Transcranial Doppler sonography in adult hydrocephalic patients.

    PubMed

    Rainov, N G; Weise, J B; Burkert, W

    2000-03-01

    Transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) is a noninvasive technique for measurement of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the major arteries of the circle of Willis. Dynamic changes in the pulsatility index (PI) and the resistance index (RI), as calculated from TCD data, allow for an assessment of the forces acting on the terminal vasculature of the brain. The present study was designed to investigate a possible relationship between TCD parameters and intracranial pressure (ICP) changes in adult patients with hypertensive hydrocephalus. Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) was studied by TCD in 29 hydrocephalus patients and in 20 healthy controls. ICP was measured in the patient group before ventricular shunting and was correlated with TCD data. The mean CBFV in hydrocephalic patients prior to ventriculoperitoneal shunting was significantly lower than in the control group. Compared to normal persons, systolic and end-diastolic CBFV values in patients were significantly decreased, suggesting an increased distal cerebrovascular resistance. PI and RI values in patients with elevated ICP prior to shunting were significantly increased in comparison to those of normal persons. There was a statistically significant positive correlation of preshunting ICP and mean preshunting values of RI (r=0.50, P<0.01) in hydrocephalic patients, but no significant correlation between PI and ICP, and between CBFV and ICP. Immediately after shunting, ICP returned to normal, and PI and RI values decreased significantly, while the mean CBFV increased. In a subgroup of hydrocephalic patients with a preshunting ICP value >35 mm Hg (n=6), the changes described above were more pronounced than in the subgroup with preshunting ICP values <35 mm Hg, which suggests an exponential degree of influence of ICP on TCD parameters. In conclusion, TCD may provide a tool for assessment of ICP in adult patients with occlusive hydrocephalus, although an exact noninvasive measurement of ICP by TCD seems impossible. Changes in the RI and PI indices appear to be useful indicators of elevated ICP. PMID:10809485

  12. Hands-Free Transcranial Color Doppler Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Robert; Madala, Srihdar; Sattler, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Current transcranial color Doppler (TCD) transducer probes are bulky and difficult to move in tiny increments to search and optimize TCD signals. This invention provides miniature motions of a TCD transducer probe to optimize TCD signals. The mechanical probe uses a spherical bearing in guiding and locating the tilting crystal face. The lateral motion of the crystal face as it tilts across the full range of motion was achieved by minimizing the distance between the pivot location and the crystal face. The smallest commonly available metal spherical bearing was used with an outer diameter of 12 mm, a 3-mm tall retaining ring, and 5-mm overall height. Small geared motors were used that would provide sufficient power in a very compact package. After confirming the validity of the basic positioning concept, optimization design loops were completed to yield the final design. A parallel motor configuration was used to minimize the amount of space wasted inside the probe case while minimizing the overall case dimensions. The distance from the front edge of the crystal to the edge of the case was also minimized to allow positioning of the probe very close to the ear on the temporal lobe. The mechanical probe is able to achieve a +/-20deg tip and tilt with smooth repeatable action in a very compact package. The enclosed probe is about 7 cm long, 4 cm wide, and 1.8 cm tall. The device is compact, hands-free, and can be adjusted via an innovative touchscreen. Positioning of the probe to the head is performed via conventional transducer gels and pillows. This device is amendable to having advanced software, which could intelligently focus and optimize the TCD signal.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Techniques Applied to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Celis Alonso, Benito; Hidalgo-Tobón, Silvia S.; Menéndez-González, Manuel; Salas-Pacheco, José; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) affects at least 10 million people worldwide. It is a neurodegenerative disease, which is currently diagnosed by neurological examination. No neuroimaging investigation or blood biomarker is available to aid diagnosis and prognosis. Most effort toward diagnosis using magnetic resonance (MR) has been focused on the use of structural/anatomical neuroimaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, deep brain stimulation, a current strategy for treating PD, is guided by MR imaging (MRI). For clinical prognosis, diagnosis, and follow-up investigations, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, DTI, spectroscopy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation have been used. These techniques represent the state of the art in the last 5?years. Here, we focus on MR techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26191037

  14. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Transcranial Electric Stimulation Entrains Cortical Neuronal

    E-print Network

    Koch, Christof

    Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Transcranial Electric Stimulation Entrains Cortical NeuronalDepartment of Bioengineering, ImperialCollege,London,LondonSW72AZ,UnitedKingdom,and5DepartmentofBrainandCognitive, was sufficient to phase-bias neuronal spiking. Intracellular recordings showed that both spiking and subthreshold

  15. Aging affects transcranial magnetic modulation of hippocampal evoked potentials

    E-print Network

    Segal, Menahem

    of mood and emotional dysfunction. Clinical stud- ies [15,17,20,22] suggest an antidepressant efficacy-term effect on reactivity of the hippocampus to perforant path stimulation. Since the efficacy of antidepressants is highly age-dependent, we studied possible age-related effects of TMS on hippocampal evoked

  16. Detection of microemboli by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, D G; Georgiadis, D; Kelman, A W; Cowburn, P; Stirling, S; Lees, K R; Faichney, A; Mallinson, A; Quin, R; Bone, I; Pettigrew, L; Brodie, E; MacKay, T; Wheatley, D J

    1996-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound detection of abnormally high-pitched signals within the arterial waveform offers a new method for diagnosis, and potentially for prediction, of embolic complications in at-risk patients. The nature of Doppler "microembolic" signals is of particular interest in patients with prosthetic heart valves, where a high prevalence of these signals is observed. Monitoring the middle cerebral artery with 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TC-2000, Nicolet Biomedical; Warwick, UK), we looked for microemboli signals in 150 patients (95 women and 55 men), and found 1 or more signals during a 30-min recording in 89% of 70 patients with Bjork-Shiley valves (principally monostrut), 54% of 50 patients with Medtronic-Hall valves, and 50% of 30 patients with Carpentier-Edwards valves (p < 0.001, chi 2). In the patients with Bjork-Shiley valves, the mean number of signals per hour was 59 (range, 42-86; 95% confidence interval), which was significantly higher than the mean in patients with Medtronic-Hall and Carpentier-Edwards valves (1.5[range, 0.5-2.5] and 1 [range, 0-5.3], respectively; both p < 0.04, multiple comparisons. Bonferroni correction). In the patients undergoing serial pre- and postoperative studies, the causative role of the valve implant was emphasized. There was no correlation between the number of emboli signals and a prior history of neurologic deficit, cardiac rhythm, previous cardiac surgery, or the intensity of oral anticoagulation, in patients with prosthetic heart valves. In Bjork-Shiley patients, dual (mitral and aortic) valves were associated with more signals than were single valves. In Medtronic-Hall patients, the signal count was greater for valves in the aortic position than it was for valves in the mitral position. Comparative studies of Doppler emboli signals in other clinical settings suggest a difference in composition or size of the underlying maternal between prosthetic valve patients and patients with carotid stenosis. These studies also suggest that the signals are of gaseous origin in valve patients. The clinical significance of continuing microembolism remains to be determined. PMID:8969029

  17. DEEP, LOW-MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XII. CK BOOTIS WITH POSSIBLE CYCLIC MAGNETIC ACTIVITY AND ADDITIONAL COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.-G.; Qian, S.-B.; Soonthornthum, B. E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn

    2012-05-15

    We present precision CCD photometry, a period study, and a two-color simultaneous Wilson code solution of the short-period contact binary CK Bootis. The asymmetric light curves were modeled by a dark spot on the primary component. The result identifies that CK Boo is an A-type W UMa binary with a high fillout of f = 71.7({+-} 4.4)%. From the O - C curve, it is found that the orbital period changes in a complicated mode, i.e., a long-term increase with two sinusoidal variations. One cyclic oscillation with a period of 10.67({+-} 0.20) yr may result from magnetic activity cycles, which are identified by the variability of Max. I - Max. II. Another sinusoidal variation (i.e., A = 0.0131 days({+-} 0.0009 days) and P{sub 3} = 24.16({+-} 0.64) yr) may be attributed to the light-time effect due to a third body. This kind of additional companion can extract angular momentum from the central binary system. The orbital period secularly increases at a rate of dP/dt = +9.79 ({+-}0.80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} days yr{sup -1}, which may be interpreted by conservative mass transfer from the secondary to the primary. This kind of deep, low-mass ratio overcontact binaries may evolve into a rapid-rotating single star, only if the contact configuration do not break down at J{sub spin} > (1/3)J{sub orb}.

  18. Random calibration for accelerating MR-ARFI guided ultrasonic focusing in transcranial therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Liutkus, Antoine; Aubry, Jean-François; Marsac, Laurent; Tanter, Mickael; Daudet, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound is a promising therapeutic modality. It consists of placing transducers around the skull and emitting shaped ultrasound waves that propagate through the skull and then concentrate on one particular location within the brain. However, the skull bone is known to distort the ultrasound beam. In order to compensate for such distortions, a number of techniques have been proposed recently, for instance using Magnetic Resonance Imaging feedback. In order to fully determine the focusing distortion due to the skull, such methods usually require as many calibration signals as transducers, resulting in a lengthy calibration process. In this paper, we investigate how the number of calibration sequences can be significantly reduced, based on random measurements and optimization techniques. Experimental data with six human skulls demonstrate that the number of measurements can be up to three times lower than with the standard methods, while restoring 90% of the focusing efficiency.

  19. Models of distribution of deep faults within the Caspian Sea on the basis of abnormals of gravitational, magnetic fields and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletayeva, Yelena

    2010-05-01

    In tectonic plan the Caspian Sea is characterized by a rather complicated structure with various elements - south-marginal part of the Eastern-European ancient platform, Scythian-Turanian young platform and alpine Mediterranean belt. The mentioned elements are different both by folding basement structure and peculiarities of sedimentary cover due to it study of regional faults of the Caspian Sea is of great geological interest. As a result of it there was conducted a typization of basic anomalies according to geophysical fields (gravitational, magnetic and seismic) and compiled models of faults system distribution by features of gravitational and magnetic fields anomalies. Use of features for blocks and zone of deep faults distinguishing by anomalies of seismic fields allowed to tracing their quantitative parameters (limit of depths distribution, line of dip, inclination, amplitude of vertical displacement by basic boundaries), as well as revealing some patterns of forms and structures in consolidated crust by profile sections. On the base of data obtained by each of the methods separately there was compiled deep faults network model with indication of their quantitative parameters that enables to receive the most reliable ideas about deep faults and blocks of the earth crust of the Caspian sea.

  20. Red and NIR light dosimetry in the human deep brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitzschke, A.; Lovisa, B.; Seydoux, O.; Zellweger, M.; Pfleiderer, M.; Tardy, Y.; Wagnières, G.

    2015-04-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) appears promising to treat the hallmarks of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in cellular or animal models. We measured light propagation in different areas of PD-relevant deep brain tissue during transcranial, transsphenoidal illumination (at 671 and 808 nm) of a cadaver head and modeled optical parameters of human brain tissue using Monte-Carlo simulations. Gray matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, ventricles, thalamus, pons, cerebellum and skull bone were processed into a mesh of the skull (158 × 201 × 211 voxels; voxel side length: 1 mm). Optical parameters were optimized from simulated and measured fluence rate distributions. The estimated ?eff for the different tissues was in all cases larger at 671 than at 808 nm, making latter a better choice for light delivery in the deep brain. Absolute values were comparable to those found in the literature or slightly smaller. The effective attenuation in the ventricles was considerably larger than literature values. Optimization yields a new set of optical parameters better reproducing the experimental data. A combination of PBM via the sphenoid sinus and oral cavity could be beneficial. A 20-fold higher efficiency of light delivery to the deep brain was achieved with ventricular instead of transcranial illumination. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to illuminate deep brain tissues transcranially, transsphenoidally and via different application routes. This opens therapeutic options for sufferers of PD or other cerebral diseases necessitating light therapy.

  1. Magnetotelluric and Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of Regional and Local Variability of Deep Saline Permafrost in Adventdalen, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V.; Binley, A. M.; Keating, K.; Van Dam, R. L.; Christiansen, H. H.; Cohen, S.; McGuffy, C.

    2014-12-01

    In most Arctic areas the interplay between permafrost and parameters such as climate variability and geological history is not well understood or documented. Nevertheless, knowledge on the thermal state of permafrost, its thickness and ice/water content is crucial for a credible assessment of the impacts of surface warming on a suite of environmental processes such as groundwater flow to riverbeds and the release of methane from areas of degrading permafrost. We carried out geophysical surveys using non-invasive Magnetotelluric (MT) and Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR) techniques to map permafrost occurrence in Adventdalen, Svalbard, a river valley in a typical coastal Arctic landscape. MT, which is sensitive to changes in the electrical conductivity and can be used to distinguish saline, fresh, and frozen soils, was used to determine the total thickness of permafrost (potentially several 100s of meters). SNMR, which is directly sensitive the volume of liquid water, was used to determine the unfrozen water content and the heterogeneity of permafrost at depths of up to ~100 m. We collected measurements in transects across and along the valley which is filled with Holocene estuarine sediments. MT observations suggest that permafrost thickens substantially to up to several hundreds of meters along the ~12 km long transect from the coastal area inland. The electrical resistivities observed are relatively low (~200-400 ?m) when compared to permafrost environments in Alpine settings, which is most likely attributed to a high salinity of pore waters in our study area. In the parts of the valley above the marine limit (~70 m above sea-level) SNMR did not detect any unfrozen water content. However, closely spaced SNMR transects across the valley several kilometers from the coast show a substantial signal, potentially due to unfrozen water content in supra-permafrost taliks near the main river channel. This is the first study to illustrate the ability of combining MT and SNMR data to map permafrost characteristics in saline environments. Combining these geophysical measurements with auxiliary data on the pore water salinities, temperature and the geological makeup of the study area will allow a thorough determination of ice-content and thermal state of deep permafrost in this coastal permafrost environment.

  2. Transcranial Extracellular Impedance Control (tEIC) Modulates Behavioral Performances

    PubMed Central

    Matani, Ayumu; Nakayama, Masaaki; Watanabe, Mayumi; Furuyama, Yoshikazu; Hotta, Atsushi; Hoshino, Shotaro

    2014-01-01

    Electric brain stimulations such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) electrophysiologically modulate brain activity and as a result sometimes modulate behavioral performances. These stimulations can be viewed from an engineering standpoint as involving an artificial electric source (DC, noise, or AC) attached to an impedance branch of a distributed parameter circuit. The distributed parameter circuit is an approximation of the brain and includes electric sources (neurons) and impedances (volume conductors). Such a brain model is linear, as is often the case with the electroencephalogram (EEG) forward model. Thus, the above-mentioned current stimulations change the current distribution in the brain depending on the locations of the electric sources in the brain. Now, if the attached artificial electric source were to be replaced with a resistor, or even a negative resistor, the resistor would also change the current distribution in the brain. In light of the superposition theorem, which holds for any linear electric circuit, attaching an electric source is different from attaching a resistor; the resistor affects each active electric source in the brain so as to increase (or decrease in some cases of a negative resistor) the current flowing out from each source. From an electrophysiological standpoint, the attached resistor can only control the extracellular impedance and never causes forced stimulation; we call this technique transcranial extracellular impedance control (tEIC). We conducted a behavioral experiment to evaluate tEIC and found evidence that it had real-time enhancement and depression effects on EEGs and a real-time facilitation effect on reaction times. Thus, tEIC could be another technique to modulate behavioral performance. PMID:25047913

  3. Transcranial low level laser (light) therapy for traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Gupta, Asheesh; Vecchio, Daniela; de Arce, Vida J Bil; Huang, Shih-Fong; Xuan, Weijun; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    We review the use of transcranial low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) as a possible treatment for traumatic-brain injury (TBI). The basic mechanisms of LLLT at the cellular and molecular level and its effects on the brain are outlined. Many interacting processes may contribute to the beneficial effects in TBI including neuroprotection, reduction of inflammation and stimulation of neurogenesis. Animal studies and clinical trials of transcranial-LLLT for ischemic stroke are summarized. Several laboratories have shown that LLLT is effective in increasing neurological performance and memory and learning in mouse models of TBI. There have been case report papers that show beneficial effects of transcranial-LLLT in a total of three patients with chronic TBI. Our laboratory has conducted three studies on LLLT and TBI in mice. One looked at pulsed-vs-continuous wave laser-irradiation and found 10 Hz to be superior. The second looked at four different laser-wavelengths (660, 730, 810, and 980 nm); only 660 and 810 nm were effective. The last looked at different treatment repetition regimens (1, 3 and 14-daily laser-treatments). PMID:22807422

  4. Transcranial phase aberration correction using beam simulations and MR-ARFI

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Urvi Kaye, Elena; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery is a noninvasive technique for causing selective tissue necrosis. Variations in density, thickness, and shape of the skull cause aberrations in the location and shape of the focal zone. In this paper, the authors propose a hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to achieve aberration correction for transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. The technique uses ultrasound beam propagation simulations with MR Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI) to correct skull-caused phase aberrations. Methods: Skull-based numerical aberrations were obtained from a MR-guided focused ultrasound patient treatment and were added to all elements of the InSightec conformal bone focused ultrasound surgery transducer during transmission. In the first experiment, the 1024 aberrations derived from a human skull were condensed into 16 aberrations by averaging over the transducer area of 64 elements. In the second experiment, all 1024 aberrations were applied to the transducer. The aberrated MR-ARFI images were used in the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to find 16 estimated aberrations. These estimated aberrations were subtracted from the original aberrations to result in the corrected images. Each aberration experiment (16-aberration and 1024-aberration) was repeated three times. Results: The corrected MR-ARFI image was compared to the aberrated image and the ideal image (image with zero aberrations) for each experiment. The hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique resulted in an average increase in focal MR-ARFI phase of 44% for the 16-aberration case and 52% for the 1024-aberration case, and recovered 83% and 39% of the ideal MR-ARFI phase for the 16-aberrations and 1024-aberration case, respectively. Conclusions: Using one MR-ARFI image and noa priori information about the applied phase aberrations, the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique improved the maximum MR-ARFI phase of the beam's focus.

  5. Lasting EEG/MEG Aftereffects of Rhythmic Transcranial Brain Stimulation: Level of Control Over Oscillatory Network Activity.

    PubMed

    Veniero, Domenica; Vossen, Alexandra; Gross, Joachim; Thut, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    A number of rhythmic protocols have emerged for non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) in humans, including transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (otDCS), and repetitive (also called rhythmic) transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). With these techniques, it is possible to match the frequency of the externally applied electromagnetic fields to the intrinsic frequency of oscillatory neural population activity ("frequency-tuning"). Mounting evidence suggests that by this means tACS, otDCS, and rTMS can entrain brain oscillations and promote associated functions in a frequency-specific manner, in particular during (i.e., online to) stimulation. Here, we focus instead on the changes in oscillatory brain activity that persist after the end of stimulation. Understanding such aftereffects in healthy participants is an important step for developing these techniques into potentially useful clinical tools for the treatment of specific patient groups. Reviewing the electrophysiological evidence in healthy participants, we find aftereffects on brain oscillations to be a common outcome following tACS/otDCS and rTMS. However, we did not find a consistent, predictable pattern of aftereffects across studies, which is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of reported online effects. This indicates that aftereffects are partially dissociated from online, frequency-specific (entrainment) effects during tACS/otDCS and rTMS. We outline possible accounts and future directions for a better understanding of the link between online entrainment and offline aftereffects, which will be key for developing more targeted interventions into oscillatory brain activity. PMID:26696834

  6. Lasting EEG/MEG Aftereffects of Rhythmic Transcranial Brain Stimulation: Level of Control Over Oscillatory Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Veniero, Domenica; Vossen, Alexandra; Gross, Joachim; Thut, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    A number of rhythmic protocols have emerged for non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) in humans, including transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (otDCS), and repetitive (also called rhythmic) transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). With these techniques, it is possible to match the frequency of the externally applied electromagnetic fields to the intrinsic frequency of oscillatory neural population activity (“frequency-tuning”). Mounting evidence suggests that by this means tACS, otDCS, and rTMS can entrain brain oscillations and promote associated functions in a frequency-specific manner, in particular during (i.e., online to) stimulation. Here, we focus instead on the changes in oscillatory brain activity that persist after the end of stimulation. Understanding such aftereffects in healthy participants is an important step for developing these techniques into potentially useful clinical tools for the treatment of specific patient groups. Reviewing the electrophysiological evidence in healthy participants, we find aftereffects on brain oscillations to be a common outcome following tACS/otDCS and rTMS. However, we did not find a consistent, predictable pattern of aftereffects across studies, which is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of reported online effects. This indicates that aftereffects are partially dissociated from online, frequency-specific (entrainment) effects during tACS/otDCS and rTMS. We outline possible accounts and future directions for a better understanding of the link between online entrainment and offline aftereffects, which will be key for developing more targeted interventions into oscillatory brain activity. PMID:26696834

  7. Improving executive function using transcranial infrared laser stimulation Nathaniel J. Blanco1

    E-print Network

    Maddox, W. Todd

    , low-level light therapy, transcranial infrared laser stimulation, Wisconsin Card Sorting Task-fluence monochromatic or quasimonochromatic light from lasers or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in the red to near-infraredImproving executive function using transcranial infrared laser stimulation Nathaniel J. Blanco1

  8. Categorization is modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation over left prefrontal cortex

    E-print Network

    Thompson-Schill, Sharon

    Categorization is modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation over left prefrontal cortex transcranial direct current stimulation alters performance of healthy subjects on a simple categoriza- tion of multiple catego- ries. A given object, such as a pillow may be--depending on current task demands

  9. The Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Fatigue During Maximal Intensity Exercise

    E-print Network

    Deckert, Jake Andrew

    2015-05-31

    The Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Fatigue During Maximal Intensity Exercise Jake A. Deckert1, Trent J. Herda1, Philip M. Gallagher1, & Joseph P. Weir1, FACSM, 1University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas Transcranial Direct...

  10. Original Research Task-specific facilitation of cognition by cathodal transcranial direct current

    E-print Network

    Miall, Chris

    using transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) during two cognitive tasks that require comparableOriginal Research Task-specific facilitation of cognition by cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum Q6 Paul A. Pope*, R. Chris Miall Behavioural Brain Sciences, School

  11. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Enhances Verbal Working Memory Training Performance over Time

    E-print Network

    Chein, Jason

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Enhances Verbal Working Memory Training Performance over., Anatal, A., Feredoes, E., et al. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of prefrontal cortex en the inconsistent findings produced by these studies. Trans- cranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been

  12. An in vivo 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei in Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Lindie; Jacobson, Joseph L.; Jacobson, Sandra W.; Hess, Aaron T.; van der Kouwe, Andre; Avison, Malcolm J.; Molteno, Christopher D.; Stanton, Mark E.; Stanley, Jeffrey A.; Peterson, Bradley S.; Meintjes, Ernesta M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure has been linked to impairment in cerebellar structure and function, including eyeblink conditioning. The deep cerebellar nuclei, which play a critical role in cerebellar-mediated learning, receive extensive inputs from brain stem and cerebellar cortex and provide the point of origin for most of the output fibers to other regions of the brain. We used in vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to examine effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on neurochemistry in this important cerebellar region. Methods MRS data from the deep cerebellar nuclei were acquired from 37 children with heavy prenatal alcohol exposure and 17 non- or minimally exposed controls from the Cape Coloured (mixed ancestry) community in Cape Town, South Africa. Results Increased maternal alcohol consumption around time of conception was associated with lower N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels in the deep nuclei (r=?0.33, p<0.05). Higher levels of alcohol consumption during pregnancy were related to lower levels of the choline-containing metabolites (r=?0.37, p<0.01), glycerophosphocholine plus phosphocholine (Cho). Alcohol consumption levels both at conception (r=0.35, p<0.01) and during pregnancy (r=0.38, p<0.01) were related to higher levels of glutamate plus glutamine (Glx). All these effects continued to be significant after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusions The lower NAA levels seen in relation to prenatal alcohol exposure may reflect impaired neuronal integrity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Our finding of lower Cho points to disrupted Cho metabolism of membrane phospholipids, reflecting altered neuropil development with potentially reduced content of dendrites and synapses. The alcohol-related alterations in Glx may suggest a disruption of the glutamate–glutamine cycling involved in glutamatergic excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:24655149

  13. Tests for orbital influences on the geomagnetic field, and Quarternary magnetic records from North Atlantic and Arctic deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Chuang

    This dissertation investigated the possible connection between orbital variations and the Earth's magnetic field, and the origin of orbital periods in sedimentary relative paleointensity (RPI) records, using previously published data. Circular statistic methods were utilized to test whether there is any consistent relationship between the phase of orbital parameters and the timing of geomagnetic reversals or excursions. The results indicate no discernable tendency, disagreeing with orbital forcing on the geodynamo. Numerical simulations further indicate that precision of the current polarity timescales need to be improved for any firm relationship to be established. Wavelet analyses methods were employed to investigate the origin of orbital periods in the RPI records. In some records, significant coherence at orbital periods occurs between RPI and a particular magnetic grain-size proxy. Therefore, orbital periods in some RPI records are attributed to lithologic 'contamination' resulted from incomplete normalization of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) record. Comparison of RPI records from different regions of the world in both the time and time-frequency domains imply that the 'contamination' does not debilitate most RPI records as a global signal that is primarily of geomagnetic origin. Calibrated RPI and oxygen isotope stack records (PISO-1500) were developed by simultaneously matching and stacking both RPI and oxygen isotope data for 13 pairs of high-resolution global records. Wavelet analyses on the PISO-1500 RPI stack record failed to show significant orbital periods, and no tendencies were found for RPI minima in the stack to occur at particular phases of orbital variations. The generation of high-resolution paleomagnetic data is often associated with processing large volumes of measurement data. MATLAB(TM) software with graphical user interfaces was developed in this dissertation work to improve the efficiency of processing large volumes of paleomagnetic data and facilitates the calculation of paleomagnetic directions and RPI proxies. This new software incorporates new methods of analysis, particularly in the generation of RPI proxies. U-channel NRM measurements at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1304 yield continuous high resolution paleomagnetic records for the last ˜1.5 Ma. Sediments from IODP Site U1304 clearly recorded the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary, the Jaramillo subchron, and the Cobb Mountain subchron, as well as the Kamikatsura excursion and the Gardar excursion. Age model for the site is established by correlating IODP Site U1304 RPI record to the PISO-1500 RPI stack using automated dynamic programming method with limited number of tie points. No significant orbital periods were detected in RPI record from the site. Various evidences indicate that the episodic deposits of laminated diatom ooze throughout the IODP Site U1304 sediments, appear to dilute the magnetic concentrations of the sediments with elevated sedimentation rates, but do not debilitate the reliability of the acquired paleomagnetic direction and intensity data. Rock magnetic experiments carried out under various temperature ranges, along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) observations as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, on bulk Arctic deep-sea sediments and magnetic extracts from seven cores collected by the Healy-Oden Trans-Arctic Expedition 2005 (HOTRAX05), indicate that (titano)magnetite and titanomaghemite are the magnetic remanence carriers. It appears that the titanomaghemite carries a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) that is partially self-reversed relative to the detrital remanent magnetization (DRM) carried by the host titanomagnetite, causing the apparent magnetic 'excursions' in the Arctic deep-sea sediment records. The partial self-reversal could have been accomplished by ionic ordering during oxidation, thereby changing the balance of the magnetic moments in the ferrimagnetic sublattices that characterize titanomagnetite and titanomaghemit

  14. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Treating Depression in a Patient With Right Hemispheric Dominance: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Pedro; da Silva, Mailu Enokibara; Cordeiro, Quirino

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 66-year-old male patient with major depressive disorder for the last 6 months. The patient had been diagnosed with dyslexia during childhood and was left-handed. The intervention protocol consisted in 10 consecutive daily transcranial direct current stimulation sessions. However, after 5 days of stimulation, the patient presented with intensification of depressive symptoms and panic attacks. It was hypothetized that the intensification of symptoms may have been due to stimulation protocol itself. Considering the patient was left-handed and presented comorbidity with dyslexia, there was a plausible hypothesis of right hemispheric dominance. This was corroborated by the Edinburgh Handedness Scale. In fact, dyslexic patients present right hemisphere dominance more frequently. The patient also presented a single photon emission computed tomography with a hypoperfusion area over the left posterior parietal lobe. After the patients agreement, a 10-day experimental repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation low-frequency protocol over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was started to inhibit the area, which was hypothetically hyperactivated following the rationale of right dominance. The patient presented amelioration of depressive and anxious symptoms. Given the hemispheric reversal we show in the present case study, however, it seems that therapies that are beneficial to right-handers could be detrimental to left-handers. PMID:25203287

  15. Modulating Memory Performance in Healthy Subjects with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Over the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Smirni, Daniela; Turriziani, Patrizia; Mangano, Giuseppa Renata; Cipolotti, Lisa; Oliveri, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Objective The role of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex (DLPFC) in recognition memory has been well documented in lesion, neuroimaging and repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the left and the right DLPFC during the delay interval of a non-verbal recognition memory task. Method 36 right-handed young healthy subjects participated in the study. The experimental task was an Italian version of Recognition Memory Test for unknown faces. Study included two experiments: in a first experiment, each subject underwent one session of sham tDCS and one session of left or right cathodal tDCS; in a second experiment each subject underwent one session of sham tDCS and one session of left or right anodal tDCS. Results Cathodal tDCS over the right DLPFC significantly improved non verbal recognition memory performance, while cathodal tDCS over the left DLPFC had no effect. Anodal tDCS of both the left and right DLPFC did not modify non verbal recognition memory performance. Conclusion Complementing the majority of previous studies, reporting long term memory facilitations following left prefrontal anodal tDCS, the present findings show that cathodal tDCS of the right DLPFC can also improve recognition memory in healthy subjects. PMID:26679936

  16. Deep TMS on alcoholics: effects on cortisolemia and dopamine pathway modulation. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ceccanti, Marco; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Attilia, Maria Luisa; Raccah, Ruggero; Fiore, Marco; Zangen, Abraham; Ceccanti, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    The hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and dopamine have a key role in transition from alcohol social use to addiction. The medial prefrontal cortex was shown to modulate dopaminergic activity and cortisol releasing factor (CRF) release in hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic systems. The recent advancements in non-invasive neurostimulation technologies has enabled stimulation of deeper brain regions using H-coil transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in humans. This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled pilot study aims to evaluate H-coil efficacy in stimulating the medial prefrontal cortex. Cortisolemia and prolactinemia were evaluated as effectiveness markers. Alcohol intake and craving were considered as secondary outcomes. Eighteen alcoholics were recruited and randomized into 2 homogeneous groups: 9 in the real stimulation group and 9 in the sham stimulation group. Repetitive TMS (rTMS) was administered through a magnetic stimulator over 10 sessions at 20 Hz, directed to the medial prefrontal cortex. rTMS significantly reduced blood cortisol levels and decreased prolactinemia, thus suggesting dopamine increase. Craving visual analogic scale (VAS) in treated patients decreased, as well as mean number of alcoholic drinks/day and drinks on days of maximum alcohol intake (DMAI). In the sham group there was no significant effect observed on cortisolemia, prolactinemia, mean number of alcoholic drinks/day, or drinks/DMAI. Thus, deep rTMS could be considered a potential new treatment for alcoholism. PMID:25730614

  17. Modulating Cognition Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have emerged recently that demonstrate the possibility of modulating, and in some cases enhancing, cognitive processes by exciting brain regions involved in working memory and attention using transcranial electrical brain stimulation. Some researchers now believe the cerebellum supports cognition, possibly via a remote neuromodulatory effect on the prefrontal cortex. This paper describes a procedure for investigating a role for the cerebellum in cognition using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and a selection of information-processing tasks of varying task difficulty, which have previously been shown to involve working memory, attention and cerebellar functioning. One task is called the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT) and the other a novel variant of this task called the Paced Auditory Serial Subtraction Task (PASST). A verb generation task and its two controls (noun and verb reading) were also investigated. All five tasks were performed by three separate groups of participants, before and after the modulation of cortico-cerebellar connectivity using anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS over the right cerebellar cortex. The procedure demonstrates how performance (accuracy, verbal response latency and variability) could be selectively improved after cathodal stimulation, but only during tasks that the participants rated as difficult, and not easy. Performance was unchanged by anodal or sham stimulation. These findings demonstrate a role for the cerebellum in cognition, whereby activity in the left prefrontal cortex is likely dis-inhibited by cathodal tDCS over the right cerebellar cortex. Transcranial brain stimulation is growing in popularity in various labs and clinics. However, the after-effects of tDCS are inconsistent between individuals and not always polarity-specific, and may even be task- or load-specific, all of which requires further study. Future efforts might also be guided towards neuro-enhancement in cerebellar patients presenting with cognitive impairment once a better understanding of brain stimulation mechanisms has emerged. PMID:25741744

  18. Intracranial treatment envelope mapping of transcranial focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, Matthew D. C.; Hananel, Arik; Kassell, Neal F.; Snell, John W.

    2012-11-01

    Presented here are the results of a volumetric, thermal treatment envelope map for transcranial focused ultrasound. The aim was to determine the treatable volume of the intracranial cavity in order to identify potential clinical applications and direct future research efforts. It was determined that thalamic targets are optimal for both transcranical MRg-FUS systems used in this work, which operate at 220 kHz and 650 kHz, respectively. It is hoped that future research efforts will focus on expanding these treatment envelopes in order to expand the possible neurosurgical applications for this technology.

  19. Insights into Oceanic Crust Accretion from a Comparison of Rock Magnetic and Silicate Fabrics from Lower Crustal Gabbros from Hess Deep Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, A. J.; Morris, A.; Friedman, S. A.; Cheadle, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms of lower crustal accretion remain a long-standing question for those who study fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges. One of the goals of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 345 is to test accretionary models by investigating the structure of the lower oceanic crust exposed within the Hess Deep Rift. Located near the tip of the westward-propagating Cocos-Nazca spreading center, Hess Deep Rift exposes crust formed at the East Pacific Rise. During IODP Expedition 345, primitive gabbroic rocks were recovered from a dismembered lower crustal section at ~4850 meters below sealevel. Constraints on physical processes during magmatic accretion are provided by the relative orientation and strength of rock fabrics. We present anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) fabric data from gabbros recovered from the two deepest holes (U1415J and U1415P). AMS measurements provide petrofabric data that may be used to constrain magma emplacement and subsequent magmatic flow. Bulk susceptibility ranges from 1.15 x 10-4 to 5.73 x 10-2 SI, with a majority of the samples having susceptibility greater than 10-3 SI, suggesting magnetite is the dominant contributor to the AMS signal. Low-temperature demagnetization data show Verwey transitions near 125K indicating the presence of nearly stoichiometric magnetite in most samples. AMS reveals dominantly oblate fabrics with a moderate degree of anisotropy (P') ranging from 1.01 to 1.38 (average P' = 1.13). Fabric strength varies within each of the petrologically-defined units recovered from different crustal blocks. Additional remanence anisotropy fabric analyses of a few specimens reveal nearly identical directions of principal axes compared to AMS, but with larger degrees of anisotropy. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data from one sample shows a moderate plagioclase crystallographic preferred orientation best defined by a b-axis maxima that is coincident with the AMS minimum principal axis. This comparison between silicate and magnetic fabric data suggests that AMS is a good proxy for bulk silicate fabrics in these samples from Hess Deep. By integrating AMS and EBSD, both sensitive indicators of magnetic and silicate fabrics in gabbroic rocks, we seek a better understanding of the formation of gabbro in oceanic crust.

  20. Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985. PMID:23787954

  1. Image reconstruction in transcranial photoacoustic computed tomography of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuhashi, Kenji; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) holds great promise for transcranial brain imaging. However, the strong reflection, scattering, attenuation, and mode-conversion of photoacoustic waves in the skull pose serious challenges to establishing the method. The lack of an appropriate model of solid media in conventional PACT imaging models, which are based on the canonical scalar wave equation, causes a significant model mismatch in the presence of the skull and thus results in deteriorated reconstructed images. The goal of this study was to develop an image reconstruction algorithm that accurately models the skull and thereby ameliorates the quality of reconstructed images. The propagation of photoacoustic waves through the skull was modeled by a viscoelastic stress tensor wave equation, which was subsequently discretized by use of a staggered grid fourth-order finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The matched adjoint of the FDTD-based wave propagation operator was derived for implementing a back-projection operator. Systematic computer simulations were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the back-projection operator for reconstructing images in a realistic three-dimensional PACT brain imaging system. The results suggest that the proposed algorithm can successfully reconstruct images from transcranially-measured pressure data and readily be translated to clinical PACT brain imaging applications.

  2. Transcranial Propagation with an Ultrasonic Mono-element Focused Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, P. C.; Jiménez, N.; Konofagou, E.; Camarena, F.; Redondo, J.

    Focused Ultrasound is the only truly transient, local and non-invasive technique able to induce safe Blood-Brain Barrier Opening (BBBO), technique used in Parkinson or Alzheimer diseases research. However, the presence of the skull in the path usually affects the focus characteristics (gain, beam width, shape and maxima location). In this work, transcranial acoustic wave propagation generated by a mono-element focused transducer has been modeled using 2D and 3D FDTD methods. Skull structure of the non-human primate under test can be compared in terms of density and sound speed with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) films. Then, focus aberration and the phenomena that cause it are characterized, providing a better control of the beam focus using the BBBO technique. Results throw that focal axial displacements are constant with the angle of incidence for PMMA flat films. In normal incidence, a shift of 6 mm is given for axial displacement in the 2D transcranial propagation. Moreover, if the skull geometry under the action of the ultrasonic beam can be compared with the curvature radius of the transducer, displacements should be constant with angle independency, like those seeing in the homogenous flat films with the same thickness.

  3. Ultrasound measurement of transcranial distance during head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torikoshi, S.; Wilson, M. H.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Murthy, G.; Yost, W. T.; Cantrell, J. H.; Chang, D. S.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity elevates blood pressure and flow in the head, which may increase intracranial volume (ICV) and intracranial pressure (ICP). Rhesus monkeys exposed to simulated microgravity in the form of 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) experience elevated ICP. With humans, twenty-four hours of 6 degree HDT bed rest increases cerebral blood flow velocity relative to pre-HDT upright posture. Humans exposed to acute 6 degree HDT experiments increased ICP, measured with the tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) technique. Other studies suggest that increased ICP in humans and cats causes measurable cranial bone movement across the sagittal suture. Due to the slightly compliant nature of the cranium, elevation of the ICP will increase ICV and transcranial distance. Currently, several non-invasive approaches to monitor ICP are being investigated. Such techniques include TMD and modal analysis of the skull. TMD may not be reliable over a large range of ICP and neither method is capable of measuring the small changes in pressure. Ultrasound, however, may reliably measure small distance changes that accompany ICP fluctuations. The purpose of our study was to develop and evaluate an ultrasound technique to measure transcranial distance changes during HDT.

  4. DEEP X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG HIGH-MAGNETIC-FIELD RADIO PULSAR J1119-6127 AND SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.2-0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ho, W. C. G.; Weltevrede, P.; Bogdanov, S.; Shannon, R.; Gonzalez, M. E.

    2012-12-10

    High-magnetic-field radio pulsars are important transition objects for understanding the connection between magnetars and conventional radio pulsars. We present a detailed study of the young radio pulsar J1119-6127, which has a characteristic age of 1900 yr and a spin-down-inferred magnetic field of 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, and its associated supernova remnant G292.2-0.5, using deep XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray Observatory exposures of over 120 ks from each telescope. The pulsar emission shows strong modulation below 2.5 keV with a single-peaked profile and a large pulsed fraction of 0.48 {+-} 0.12. Employing a magnetic, partially ionized hydrogen atmosphere model, we find that the observed pulse profile can be produced by a single hot spot of temperature 0.13 keV covering about one-third of the stellar surface, and we place an upper limit of 0.08 keV for an antipodal hot spot with the same area. The non-uniform surface temperature distribution could be the result of anisotropic heat conduction under a strong magnetic field, and a single-peaked profile seems common among high-B radio pulsars. For the associated remnant G292.2-0.5, its large diameter could be attributed to fast expansion in a low-density wind cavity, likely formed by a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, similar to two other high-B radio pulsars.

  5. A Noninvasive Imaging Approach to Understanding Speech Changes following Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narayana, Shalini; Jacks, Adam; Robin, Donald A.; Poizner, Howard; Zhang, Wei; Franklin, Crystal; Liotti, Mario; Vogel, Deanie; Fox, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the use of noninvasive functional imaging and "virtual" lesion techniques to study the neural mechanisms underlying motor speech disorders in Parkinson's disease. Here, we report the use of positron emission tomography (PET) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to explain exacerbated speech impairment following…

  6. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Perilesional Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Aphasia: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Ulm, Lena; McMahon, Katie; Copland, David; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Meinzer, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms by which transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) impacts on language processing in post-stroke aphasia. This was addressed in a proof-of-principle study that explored the effects of tDCS application in aphasia during simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We employed a single subject, cross-over, sham-tDCS controlled design, and the stimulation was administered to an individualized perilesional stimulation site that was identified by a baseline fMRI scan and a picture naming task. Peak activity during the baseline scan was located in the spared left inferior frontal gyrus and this area was stimulated during a subsequent cross-over phase. tDCS was successfully administered to the target region and anodal- vs. sham-tDCS resulted in selectively increased activity at the stimulation site. Our results thus demonstrate that it is feasible to precisely target an individualized stimulation site in aphasia patients during simultaneous fMRI, which allows assessing the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS application. The functional imaging results of this case report highlight one possible mechanism that may have contributed to beneficial behavioral stimulation effects in previous clinical tDCS trials in aphasia. In the future, this approach will allow identifying distinct patterns of stimulation effects on neural processing in larger cohorts of patients. This may ultimately yield information about the variability of tDCS effects on brain functions in aphasia. PMID:26500522

  7. Modulation of GABA and resting state functional connectivity by transcranial direct current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bachtiar, Velicia; Near, Jamie; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Stagg, Charlotte J

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that network level functional connectivity in the human brain could be related to levels of inhibition in a major network node at baseline (Stagg et al., 2014). In this study, we build upon this finding to directly investigate the effects of perturbing M1 GABA and resting state functional connectivity using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a neuromodulatory approach that has previously been demonstrated to modulate both metrics. FMRI data and GABA levels, as assessed by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, were measured before and after 20 min of 1 mA anodal or sham tDCS. In line with previous studies, baseline GABA levels were negatively correlated with the strength of functional connectivity within the resting motor network. However, although we confirm the previously reported findings that anodal tDCS reduces GABA concentration and increases functional connectivity in the stimulated motor cortex; these changes are not correlated, suggesting they may be driven by distinct underlying mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08789.001 PMID:26381352

  8. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Perilesional Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Aphasia: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Ulm, Lena; McMahon, Katie; Copland, David; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Meinzer, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms by which transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) impacts on language processing in post-stroke aphasia. This was addressed in a proof-of-principle study that explored the effects of tDCS application in aphasia during simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We employed a single subject, cross-over, sham-tDCS controlled design, and the stimulation was administered to an individualized perilesional stimulation site that was identified by a baseline fMRI scan and a picture naming task. Peak activity during the baseline scan was located in the spared left inferior frontal gyrus and this area was stimulated during a subsequent cross-over phase. tDCS was successfully administered to the target region and anodal- vs. sham-tDCS resulted in selectively increased activity at the stimulation site. Our results thus demonstrate that it is feasible to precisely target an individualized stimulation site in aphasia patients during simultaneous fMRI, which allows assessing the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS application. The functional imaging results of this case report highlight one possible mechanism that may have contributed to beneficial behavioral stimulation effects in previous clinical tDCS trials in aphasia. In the future, this approach will allow identifying distinct patterns of stimulation effects on neural processing in larger cohorts of patients. This may ultimately yield information about the variability of tDCS effects on brain functions in aphasia. PMID:26500522

  9. Transcranial LED therapy for cognitive dysfunction in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: Two case reports

    E-print Network

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases are presented, where cognitive function improved following treatment with transcranial light emitting diodes (LEDs). At age 59, P1 had closed-head injury from a motor vehicle ...

  10. Manipulating neuronal activity with low frequency transcranial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michele Elizabeth

    Stimulation of the rodent cerebral cortex is used to investigate the underlying biological basis for the restorative effects of slow wave sleep. Neuronal activation by optogenetic and ultrasound stimulation elicits changes in action potentials across the cerebral cortex that are recorded as electroencephalograms. Optogenetic stimulation requires an invasive implantation procedure limiting its application in human studies. We sought to determine whether ultrasound stimulation could be as effective as optogenetic techniques currently used, in an effort to further understand the physiological and metabolic requirements of sleep. We successfully recorded electroencephalograms in response to transcranial ultrasound stimulation of the barrel cortex at 1 and 7 Hz frequencies, comparing them to those recorded in response to optogenetic stimuli applied at the same frequencies. Our results showed application of a 473 nm blue LED positioned 6 cm above the skull and ultrasound stimulation at an output voltage of 1000 mVpp produced electroencephalograms with physiological responses of similar amplitude. We concluded that there exists an intensity-proportionate response in the optogenetic stimulation, but not with ultrasound stimulation at the frequencies we surveyed. Activation of neuronal cells in response to optogenetic stimulation in a Thy1-ChR2 transgenic mouse line is specifically targeted to pyramidal cells in the cerebral cortex. ChR2 responses to optogenetic stimulation are mediated by a focal activation of neuronal ion channels. We measured electrophysiological responses to ultrasound stimulation, comparing them to those recorded from optogenetic stimuli. Our results show striking similarities between ultrasound-induced responses and optogenetically-induced responses, which may indicate that transcranial ultrasound stimulation is also mediated by ion channel dependent processes in cerebral cortical neurons. The biophysical substrates for electrical excitability of neurons impose temporal constraints on their response to stimulation. If ultrasound-mediated responses are, in fact, ion channel mediated responses, ultrasound-induced responses should exhibit time-dependence characteristics similar to those of optogenetically-triggered responses. Minimal stimulus duration thresholds and the temporal limits of paired pulse facilitation for ultrasound stimulation were identical to those of optogenetic stimulation. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate an electrophysiological basis for low-frequency transcranial ultrasound stimulation of cerebral cortical neuronal activity.

  11. Schematic relief of the near-surface and deep-seated magnetic basement, using local-power spectra, Gabal El-Erediya area, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, Ahmed A.; Rabie, Said I.

    1992-01-01

    The use of Fourier's transformation and the representation of magnetic anomalies in the form of frequencies (power-spectra) have enabled a thorough analysis of the magnetic anomalies and the estimation of depths at which their source exit. The method applied computes the spectrum of anomalies in the potential (magnetic) field from the data of a profile and of a two-dimensional map. The average interpreted depths from the power spectrum are assigned to the centre of the profile and to the center of the map. As an example, the interpretation of the total aeromagnetic survey of Gabal (G.) El Erediya area, Eastern Desert, Egypt was tried. The two average depths estimated for the near-surface and deep-seated interfaces using the profiles in both the N-S and E-W directions are 0.55 and 1.60 km, while those estimated using the two-dimensional map are 0.59 and 1.31 km respectively. It was found that the area under study consists of a series of simple and complex alternating NW-SE and ENE-WSW trending horsts (or uplifted blocks) and grabens (or downfaulted blocks). The previous trend parallels the Red Sea and some segments of the River Nile, while the latter trend parallels the shear zone of Safaga-Qena. The shorter wavelength (ENE) seems to suffer rejuvenation, i.e., more than one tectonic event and is consequently more ancient. Meanwhile, the longer wavelength (NW) appears to undergo only one tectonic event and is accordingly more recent.

  12. Transcranial Doppler-guided deairing of a pediatric ventricular assist device: experience with twins.

    PubMed

    Erdoes, Gabor; Kadner, Alexander; Hutter, Damian; Eberle, Balthasar

    2015-01-01

    We report the intraoperative courses of 2 consecutive Berlin Heart Excor® Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device implantations, in which transcranial Doppler ultrasonography helped to detect macroscopically undetected residual air bubbles captured in the pump after air removal had been correctly performed according to manufacturer's specifications. Our experience with these cases suggests that a beat-to beat deairing maneuver guided by transcranial Doppler is a useful strategy for reducing cerebral exposure to perioperative gaseous microembolism. PMID:25612271

  13. Cortical Control of Affective Networks

    E-print Network

    Kumar, S.

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation and deep brain stimulation have emerged as therapeutic modalities for treatment refractory depression; however, little remains known regarding the circuitry that mediates the therapeutic ...

  14. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and language

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Alessia; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fumagalli, Manuela; Mameli, Francesca; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Ardolino, Gianluca; Priori, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a non-invasive neuromodulation technique inducing prolonged brain excitability changes and promoting cerebral plasticity, is a promising option for neurorehabilitation. Here, we review progress in research on tDCS and language functions and on the potential role of tDCS in the treatment of post-stroke aphasia. Currently available data suggest that tDCS over language-related brain areas can modulate linguistic abilities in healthy individuals and can improve language performance in patients with aphasia. Whether the results obtained in experimental conditions are functionally important for the quality of life of patients and their caregivers remains unclear. Despite the fact that important variables are yet to be determined, tDCS combined with rehabilitation techniques seems a promising therapeutic option for aphasia. PMID:23138766

  15. [Transcranial direct current stimulation: a new tool for neurostimulation].

    PubMed

    Thibaut, A; Chatelle, C; Gosseries, O; Laureys, S; Bruno, M-A

    2013-02-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a safe method to modulate cortical excitability. Anodal stimulation can improve the stimulated area's functions whereas cathodal stimulation reduces them. Currently, a lot of clinical trials have been conducted to study the effect of tDCS on post-stroke motor and language deficits, in depression, chronic pain, memory impairment and tinnitus in order to decrease symptoms. Results showed that, if an effect is observed with tDCS, it does not persist over time. Current studies suggest that direct current stimulation is a promising technique that helps to improve rehabilitation after stroke, to enhance cognitive deficiencies, to reduce depression and to relieve chronic pain. Moreover, it is a safe, simple and cheap device that could be easily integrated in a rehabilitation program. PMID:22959705

  16. [Optimization of enuresis therapy in children using transcranial magnetotherapy].

    PubMed

    Otpushchennikova, T V; Kazanskaia, I V; Volkov, S V; Ra?gorodskaia, Iu M

    2010-01-01

    A total of 58 children (age from 6 to 14 years) suffering from nocturnal enuresis (NE) were divided into two groups. The study group received basic therapy (driptan dose was reduced to 2.5 mg twice a day) in combination with transcranial bitemporal magnetotherapy (TcMT). The control group received placebo TcMT and basic therapy. It is shown that addition of TcMT to reduced basic therapy lowered the score of imperative voiding symptoms 1.3-fold, number of enuresis patients 1.7-fold, volume of the bladder 6.8 months after the treatment 1.9-fold, corrected vegetative status and activity of the subcortical nervous center in 24% children according to cardiointervalography versus the controls. Thus, TcMT improves clinical effect in NE patients in 2-fold reduction of pharmacological burden. PMID:20886733

  17. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates efficiency of reading processes

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Jennifer M.; Doruk, Deniz; Mascio, Bryan; Fregni, Felipe; Cerruti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that offers promise as an investigative method for understanding complex cognitive operations such as reading. This study explores the ability of a single session of tDCS to modulate reading efficiency and phonological processing performance within a group of healthy adults. Half the group received anodal or cathodal stimulation, on two separate days, of the left temporo-parietal junction while the other half received anodal or cathodal stimulation of the right homologue area. Pre- and post-stimulation assessment of reading efficiency and phonological processing was carried out. A larger pre-post difference in reading efficiency was found for participants who received right anodal stimulation compared to participants who received left anodal stimulation. Further, there was a significant post-stimulation increase in phonological processing speed following right hemisphere anodal stimulation. Implications for models of reading and reading impairment are discussed. PMID:25852513

  18. Transcranial two-photon imaging of the living mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Grutzendler, Jaime; Yang, Guang; Pan, Feng; Parkhurst, Christopher N; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2011-09-01

    This protocol describes imaging of the living mouse brain through a thinned skull using two-photon microscopy. This transcranial two-photon laser-scanning microscope (TPLSM) imaging method allows high-resolution imaging of fluorescently labeled neurons, microglia, astrocytes, and blood vessels, as well as subcellular structures such as dendritic spines and axonal varicosities. The surgical procedure that is required to allow imaging thins the cranium so that it becomes optically transparent. Once learned, the surgery can be performed in ?30 min, and imaging can follow immediately. The procedure can be repeated multiple times, allowing brain cells and tissues to be studied in the same animals over short or long time intervals, depending on the design of the experiment. Two-photon imaging through a thinned and intact skull avoids side effects caused by skull removal and is a minimally invasive method for studying the living mouse brain under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:21880826

  19. Neuroticism and vigilance revisited: A transcranial doppler investigation.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Arielle R; Becker, Alexandra; VanAndel, Aaron; Nelson, Andrew; Shaw, Tyler H

    2015-11-01

    Selecting for vigilance assignments remains an important factor in human performance research. The current study revisits the potential relationship between vigilance performance and trait neuroticism, in light of two possible theories. The first theory suggests that neuroticism impairs vigilance performance by competing for available resources. The second theory, attentional control theory, posits that high neuroticism can result in similar or superior performance levels due to the allocation of compensatory effort. In the present study, Transcranial Doppler Sonography was used to investigate the neurophysiological underpinnings of neuroticism during a 12-min abbreviated vigilance task. Performance results were not modified by level of neuroticism, but high neuroticism was associated with higher initial CBFV levels and a greater CBFV decrement over time. These findings indicate that participants higher in neuroticism recruited additional cognitive resources in order to achieve similar performance, suggesting that there is more of an effect on processing efficiency than effectiveness. PMID:26057404

  20. An unusual death by transcranial stab wound: homicide or suicide?

    PubMed

    Saint-Martin, Pauline; Prat, Sebastien; Bouyssy, Marie; Sarraj, Saad; O'Byrne, Patrick

    2008-09-01

    Penetrating stab wounds of the brain are uncommonly seen in modern times and occur almost exclusively in homicides. We report an unusual death by self-stabbing. A 24-year-old man was found dead at home, the handle of a kitchen knife protruding from his forehead. Data such as the psychiatric history of the victim, the multiplicity and site of wounds, the implement used, the presence of hesitation, and defense wounds were studied to elucidate the manner of death, and the suicidal nature of the event was established after police investigation. Atypical injuries require a careful forensic investigation, and medico-legal aspects of the differentiation between homicide and suicide are discussed in this particular case. A review of the literature revealed few cases of suicidal transcranial stab wounds. PMID:18725787

  1. Prehospital stroke diagnostics based on neurological examination and transcranial ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcranial color-coded sonography (TCCS) has proved to be a fast and reliable tool for the detection of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusions in a hospital setting. In this feasibility study on prehospital sonography, our aim was to investigate the accuracy of TCCS for neurovascular emergency diagnostics when performed in a prehospital setting using mobile ultrasound equipment as part of a neurological examination. Methods Following a ‘911 stroke code’ call, stroke neurologists experienced in TCCS rendezvoused with the paramedic team. In patients with suspected stroke, TCCS examination including ultrasound contrast agents was performed. Results were compared with neurovascular imaging (CTA, MRA) and the final discharge diagnosis from standard patient-centered stroke care. Results We enrolled ‘232 stroke code’ patients with follow-up data available in 102 patients with complete TCCS examination. A diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made in 73 cases; 29 patients were identified as ‘stroke mimics’. MCA occlusion was diagnosed in ten patients, while internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion/high-grade stenosis leading to reversal of anterior cerebral artery flow was diagnosed in four patients. The initial working diagnosis ‘any stroke’ showed a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 48%. ‘Major MCA or ICA stroke’ diagnosed by mobile ultrasound showed an overall sensitivity of 78% and specificity of 98%. Conclusions The study demonstrates the feasibility and high diagnostic accuracy of emergency transcranial ultrasound assessment combined with neurological examinations for major ischemic stroke. Future combination with telemedical support, point-of-care analysis of blood serum markers, and probability algorithms of prehospital stroke diagnosis including ultrasound may help to speed up stroke treatment. PMID:24572006

  2. Integrated Analysis on Gravity and Magnetic Fields of the Hailar Basin, NE China: Implications for Basement Structure and Deep Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Liangshu; Dong, Ping; Wu, YongJing; Li, Changbo; Hu, Bo; Wang, Chong

    2012-11-01

    The Hailar Basin is one of the typical basins among the NE China Basin Groups, which is situated in the east of East Asia Orogene between the Siberia Plate and the North China Plate. Based on the detailed analysis of magnetic, gravity, petrophysical, geothermal and seismological data, we separate the Gravity and Magnetic Anomalies (GMA) into four orders using Wavelet Multi-scale Decomposition (WMD). The apparent depths of causative sources were then assessed by Power Spectrum Analysis (PSA) of each order. Low-order wavelet detail anomalies were used to study the basin's basement structure such as major faults, the basement lithology, uplifts and depressions. High-order ones were used for the inversion of Moho and Curie discontinuities using the Parker method. The results show that the Moho uplifting area of the Hailar Basin is located at the NE part of the basin, the Curie uplifting area is at the NW part, and neither of them is consistent with the basin's sedimentary center. This indicates that the Hailar Basin may differ in basin building pattern from other middle and eastern basins of the basin groups, and the Hailar Basin might be of a passive type. When the Pacific Plate was subducting to NE China, the frontier of the plate lying on the mantle transition zone didn't pass through the Great Khingan Mountains region, so there is not an obvious magma upwelling or lithospheric extension in the Hailar Basin area. Finally, based on the seismological data and results of WMD, a probable 2D crust model is derived from an across-basin profile using the 2D forward modeling of the Bouguer gravity anomaly. The results agree with those from seismic inversion, suggesting WMD is suitable for identifying major crustal density interfaces.

  3. Opening of the Gulf of Mexico and the Nature of the Crust in the Deep Gulf: New Evidence from Seafloor Spreading Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, D. L.; Eskamani, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    The seafloor spreading history in the Gulf of Mexico is poorly constrained due to a lack of recognized seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies, a paucity of deep penetrating seismic data, and absence of drilling to constrain crystalline ocean floor composition and ages. We have identified lineated magnetic anomalies in the eastern Gulf on profiles collected during the Woods Hole R/V Farnella FRNL85-2 cruise that correlate with magnetic chrons M21R to M10. Forward modeling shows that these anomalies formed during creation of weakly magnetized new seafloor in the eastern Gulf between 149-134 Ma at an average half-spreading rate of 3.2 cm/yr. The oldest anomalies are located against stretched continental crust beneath the western Florida shelf on the east and the Yucatan shelf on the west. The youngest anomalies form a juxtaposed conjugate pair that mark the location of an extinct spreading ridge between Yucatan and Florida. Seismic velocities of the crust in the eastern Gulf and the amplitude of the magnetic anomalies are similar to the Iberian and Newfoundland rifted margins, where the early stages of continental breakup were accommodated by exhumation of subcontinental lithosphere rather than creation of new basaltic oceanic crust. We infer that the eastern Gulf of Mexico is underlain by exhumed sub-continental peridotitic mantle intruded by lesser volumes of basaltic igneous rocks generated by decompression melting of the asthenosphere during the late stages of opening of the Gulf. The long wavelength characteristics of the magnetic and gravity fields in the eastern Gulf, as well as the seismic velocity structure of the crust, differ from those in the central and western Gulf, which are more similar to typical magmatic rifted margins. This suggests that the character of the Gulf changes along strike, from a magmatic western portion to an amagmatic eastern portion. Paleogeographic restoration of the lineated magnetic anomaly pattern suggests a 4-phase model for opening of the Gulf. During phase 1 (Early Permian-Late Triassic), Yucatan and associated tectonic blocks that now comprise eastern Mexico were translated eastward from the Pacific realm into positions near the modern western Gulf. During phase 2 (Late Triassic-ca. 160 Ma) Yucatan and the South Florida block were translated southeastward relative to North America, rotating 6.7? counterclockwise about a pole located at 34?N, 74?W. This resulted in ca. 430 km of southeastward extension on the North American coastal plain, 120 km of southward extension on the northern Yucatan shelf, and displacement of the South Florida Block from a pre-rift position on the northwest Florida shelf to its modern position. During phase 3 (ca. 160-149 Ma), Yucatan rotated counterclockwise 46? relative to North America about a pole located at 27.6?N, 84.0?W. Phase 3 may have coincided with seafloor spreading in the central and western Gulf, but predated seafloor spreading in the eastern Gulf. During phase 4 (149-134 Ma), Yucatan moved southwestward relative to North America, rotating counterclockwise 2.2? about a pole located at 17.6?N, 74.2?W and completing opening of the Gulf.

  4. Transcranial direct current stimulation reverses neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal inhibition of human pharyngeal motor cortex on swallowing.

    PubMed

    Vasant, Dipesh H; Mistry, Satish; Michou, Emilia; Jefferson, Samantha; Rothwell, John C; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2014-02-15

    The human cortical swallowing system exhibits bilateral but functionally asymmetric representation in health and disease as evidenced by both focal cortical inhibition (pre-conditioning with 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; rTMS) and unilateral stroke, where disruption of the stronger (dominant) pharyngeal projection alters swallowing neurophysiology and behaviour. Moreover, excitatory neurostimulation protocols capable of reversing the disruptive effects of focal cortical inhibition have demonstrated therapeutic promise in post-stroke dysphagia when applied contralaterally. In healthy participants (n = 15, 8 males, mean age (±SEM) 35 ± 9 years), optimal parameters of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) (anodal, 1.5 mA, 10 min) were applied contralaterally after 1 Hz rTMS pre-conditioning to the strongest pharyngeal projection. Swallowing neurophysiology was assessed in both hemispheres by intraluminal recordings of pharyngeal motor-evoked responses (PMEPs) to single-pulse TMS as a measure of cortical excitability. Swallowing behaviour was examined using a pressure-based reaction time protocol. Measurements were made before and for up to 60 min post intervention. Subjects were randomised to active or sham tDCS after 1 Hz rTMS on separate days and data were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Active tDCS increased PMEPs bilaterally (F1,14 = 7.4, P = 0.017) reversing the inhibitory effects of 1 Hz rTMS in the pre-conditioned hemisphere (F1,14 = 10.1, P = 0.007). Active tDCS also enhanced swallowing behaviour, increasing the number of correctly timed challenge swallows compared to sham (F1,14 = 6.3, P = 0.025). Thus, tDCS to the contralateral pharyngeal motor cortex reverses the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal cortical inhibition on swallowing in healthy individuals and has therapeutic potential for dysphagia rehabilitation. PMID:24247983

  5. DEEP RADIO CONTINUUM IMAGING OF THE DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY IC 10: TRACING STAR FORMATION AND MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Heesen, V.; Brinks, E.; Rau, U.; Rupen, M. P.; Hunter, D. A.

    2011-09-20

    We exploit the vastly increased sensitivity of the Expanded Very Large Array to study the radio continuum and polarization properties of the post-starburst, dwarf irregular galaxy IC 10 at 6 cm, at a linear resolution of {approx}50 pc. We find close agreement between radio continuum and H{alpha} emission, from the brightest H II regions to the weaker emission in the disk. A quantitative analysis shows a strictly linear correlation, where the thermal component contributes 50% to the total radio emission, the remainder being due to a non-thermal component with a surprisingly steep radio spectral index of between -0.7 and -1.0 suggesting substantial radiation losses of the cosmic-ray electrons. We confirm and clearly resolve polarized emission at the 10%-20% level associated with a non-thermal superbubble, where the ordered magnetic field is possibly enhanced due to the compression of the expanding bubble. A fraction of the cosmic-ray electrons has likely escaped because the measured radio emission is a factor of three lower than what is suggested by the H{alpha}-inferred star formation rate.

  6. Children having magnetic resonance imaging: A preparatory storybook and audio/visual media are preferable to anesthesia or deep sedation.

    PubMed

    Törnqvist, Erna; Månsson, Åsa; Hallström, Inger

    2015-09-01

    As a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination lasts about 45 minutes and as the technique is sensitive to motion, children are often given sedation or anesthesia. The aim of this study was to examine whether children aged three to nine years could undergo MRI while awake and achieve adequate image quality if age-adjusted routines were used. A two-group controlled experimental design was used. Thirty-six children were assigned to a control group and underwent MRI with the prevalent routines. Thirty-three children were assigned to an intervention group and underwent the MRI while awake. The age-adjusted routine included a booklet and a story book, a model of the MRI scanner with the MRI sound, and a DVD film during the examination. In the control group, 30 children underwent the examination under anesthesia and 6 underwent the examination while they were awake. All had acceptable examinations. In the intervention group, 33 children had their examination while awake and 30 of them had acceptable examinations. The parents' satisfaction with the care was assessed to be equal or higher in the intervention group and the costs were calculated to be lower. Thus, many children receiving age-appropriate preparation and distraction can undergo MRI examinations while awake. PMID:24486815

  7. Demonstration of transverse-magnetic deep-ultraviolet stimulated emission from AlGaN multiple-quantum-well lasers grown on a sapphire substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Hang E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu; Kao, Tsung-Ting; Satter, Md. Mahbub; Shen, Shyh-Chiang; Yoder, P. Douglas; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D. E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu; Wei, Yong O.; Wang, Shuo; Xie, Hongen; Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate transverse-magnetic (TM) dominant deep-ultraviolet (DUV) stimulated emission from photo-pumped AlGaN multiple-quantum-well lasers grown pseudomorphically on an AlN/sapphire template by means of photoluminescence at room temperature. The TM-dominant stimulated emission was observed at wavelengths of 239, 242, and 243?nm with low thresholds of 280, 250, and 290?kW/cm{sup 2}, respectively. In particular, the lasing wavelength of 239?nm is shorter compared to other reports for AlGaN lasers grown on foreign substrates including sapphire and SiC. The peak wavelength difference between the transverse-electric (TE)-polarized emission and TM-polarized emission was approximately zero for the lasers in this study, indicating the crossover of crystal-field split-off hole and heavy-hole valence bands. The rapid variation of polarization between TE- and TM-dominance versus the change in lasing wavelength from 243 to 249?nm can be attributed to a dramatic change in the TE-to-TM gain coefficient ratio for the sapphire-based DUV lasers in the vicinity of TE-TM switch.

  8. tDCS and Flexible Tool Use 1 Noninvasive Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Over the Left Prefrontal Cortex

    E-print Network

    Thompson-Schill, Sharon

    tDCS and Flexible Tool Use 1 Noninvasive Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Over the Left (inhibitory) transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) will facilitate performance in a flexible use direct current stimulation, prefrontal cortex, cognitive control Abstract Recent neuroscience evidence

  9. Transcranial alternating current stimulation affects motion adaptation in V1 and MT neurons in awake, behaving macaques

    E-print Network

    Krekelberg, Bart

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation affects motion adaptation in V1 and MT neurons of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) range from treating depression to augmenting human during which we presented a random dot stimulus moving in one of the eight directions. In the stimulation

  10. Transcranial Doppler screening in sickle cell disease: The implications of using peak systolic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Naffaa, Lena N; Tandon, Yasmeen K; Irani, Neville

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare time average maximum mean velocity (TAMV) and peak systolic velocity (PSV) criteria of Trans Cranial Doppler (TCD) in their ability to predict abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) in patients with sickle cell disease. METHODS: A retrospective evaluation was performed of the outcomes in all patients with a Transcranial Doppler examination at our institution since the implementation of the hospital picture archiving and communication system (PACS) system in January 2003 through December 2012. All ultrasound imaging exams were performed by the same technologist with a 3 MHz transducer. Inclusion criteria was based upon the Transcranial Doppler procedure code in our PACS which had an indication of sickle cell disease in the history. The patient’s age and gender along with the vessel with the highest time averaged mean velocity as well as the highest peak systolic velocity was recorded for analysis. A subset of the study cohort also had subsequent MR imaging and Angiograms performed within 6 mo of the TCD examination. MRI results were categorized as having a disease related abnormality (vessel narrowing, collateral formation/moya-moya, or abnormal fluid attenuation inversion recovery signal in parenchyma indicative of prior stroke) or normal. The MRI results formed the comparison standards for TCD exams in evaluating intracranial injury. Sensitivity and specificity for the two TCD criteria (TAMV and PSV) were calculated to determine which could be a better predictor for intracranial vasculopathy /clinically occult strokes. RESULTS: The study cohort for our institution was 110 patients with a total of 291 TCD examinations. These patients had a mean age of 7.6 years with a range from 2-18 years of age. Sixty-two of the 110 patients (56%) had two or more TCD exams. Thirty-seven patients (34%) had at least one MRI following a TCD examination. Of the 291 TCD examinations, 46 (16%) were conditional or abnormal by TAMV criteria. One hundred and sixteen (40%) were conditional or abnormal by PSV criteria. All studies that were abnormal by TAMV were also abnormal by PSV criteria. Seventy of the 116 (60%) studies which were conditional or abnormal by peak systolic criteria would not have been identified by time averaged mean maximum velocity criteria. The most frequent location of highest velocity measurement was noted to be in the middle cerebral artery regardless of whether it was measured by PSV or TAMV. From the 37 patients having one or more MRIs, 43 MRI exams were performed within 6 mo of a TCD examination. Twenty two (51%) MRIs had a disease related abnormality reported. When evaluating conditional or abnormal exams by PSV criteria against follow-up MRI/MRA, the sensitivity was 73% [16/(16 + 6)] and specificity was 81% [17/(4 + 17)]. When evaluating conditional or abnormal exams by TAMV criteria by follow-up MRI/MRA as the gold standard, the sensitivity was 41% [9/(9 + 13)] and the specificity was 100% [21/(21 + 0)]. In using conditional or abnormal criteria from PSV and TAMV to predict abnormalities on follow-up MRI/MR Angiogram, PSV was more sensitive (73% vs 41%) while TAMV was more specific (100% vs 81%). CONCLUSION: Based on the data obtained at our institution and using the assumption that the best screening test is the one with the highest sensitivity, the peak systolic velocity could be the measurement of choice for TCD screening. PMID:25729487

  11. Transcranial direct current stimulation as a treatment for auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Koops, Sanne; van den Brink, Hilde; Sommer, Iris E C

    2015-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are a symptom of several psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. In a significant minority of patients, AH are resistant to antipsychotic medication. Alternative treatment options for this medication resistant group are scarce and most of them focus on coping with the hallucinations. Finding an alternative treatment that can diminish AH is of great importance. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a safe and non-invasive technique that is able to directly influence cortical excitability through the application of very low electric currents. A 1-2 mA direct current is applied between two surface electrodes, one serving as the anode and the other as the cathode. Cortical excitability is increased in the vicinity of the anode and reduced near the cathode. The technique, which has only a few transient side effects and is cheap and portable, is increasingly explored as a treatment for neurological and psychiatric symptoms. It has shown efficacy on symptoms of depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, and stroke. However, the application of tDCS as a treatment for AH is relatively new. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge in this field and guidelines for future research. PMID:25798123

  12. Simulation and measurement of transcranial near infrared light penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Lan; Monge, Manuel; Ozgur, Mehmet H.; Murphy, Kevin; Louie, Stan; Miller, Carol A.; Emami, Azita; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-03-01

    We are studying the transmission of LED array-emitted near-infrared (NIR) light through human tissues. Herein, we simulated and measured transcranial NIR penetration in highly scattering human head tissues. Using finite element analysis, we simulated photon diffusion in a multilayered 3D human head model that consists of scalp, skull, cerebral spinal fluid, gray matter and white matter. The optical properties of each layer, namely scattering and absorption coefficient, correspond to the 850 nm NIR light. The geometry of the model is minimally modified from the IEEE standard and the multiple LED emitters in an array were evenly distributed on the scalp. Our results show that photon distribution produced by the array exhibits little variation at similar brain depth, suggesting that due to strong scattering effects of the tissues, discrete spatial arrangements of LED emitters in an array has the potential to create a quasi-radially symmetrical illumination field. Measurements on cadaveric human head tissues excised from occipital, parietal, frontal and temporal regions show that illumination with an 850 nm LED emitter rendered a photon flux that closely follows simulation results. In addition, prolonged illumination of LED emitted NIR showed minimal thermal effects on the brain.

  13. Transcranial Current Stimulation of the Temporoparietal Junction Improves Lie Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sowden, Sophie; Wright, Gordon R.T.; Banissy, Michael J.; Catmur, Caroline; Bird, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ability to detect deception is of vital importance in human society, playing a crucial role in communication, cooperation, and trade between societies, businesses, and individuals. However, numerous studies have shown, remarkably consistently, that we are only slightly above chance when it comes to detecting deception [1]. Here we investigate whether inconsistency between one’s own opinion and the stated opinion of another impairs judgment of the veracity of that statement, in the same way that one’s own mental, affective, and action states, when inconsistent, can interfere with representation of those states in another [2]. Within the context of lie detection, individuals may be less accurate when judging the veracity of another’s opinion when it is inconsistent with their own opinion. Here we present a video-mediated lie-detection task to confirm this prediction: individuals correctly identified truths or lies less often when the other’s expressed opinion was inconsistent with their own (experiment 1). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) has previously been shown to improve the ability to selectively represent the self or another [3–5]. We therefore predicted that TPJ stimulation would enable lie detectors to inhibit their own views, enhance those of the other, and improve their ability to determine whether another was presenting their true opinion. Experiment 2 confirmed this second prediction: anodal tDCS of the TPJ improved lie detection specifically when one’s own and others’ views were conflicting. PMID:26344092

  14. Transcranial direct current stimulation as a treatment for auditory hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Koops, Sanne; van den Brink, Hilde; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are a symptom of several psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. In a significant minority of patients, AH are resistant to antipsychotic medication. Alternative treatment options for this medication resistant group are scarce and most of them focus on coping with the hallucinations. Finding an alternative treatment that can diminish AH is of great importance. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a safe and non-invasive technique that is able to directly influence cortical excitability through the application of very low electric currents. A 1–2 mA direct current is applied between two surface electrodes, one serving as the anode and the other as the cathode. Cortical excitability is increased in the vicinity of the anode and reduced near the cathode. The technique, which has only a few transient side effects and is cheap and portable, is increasingly explored as a treatment for neurological and psychiatric symptoms. It has shown efficacy on symptoms of depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, and stroke. However, the application of tDCS as a treatment for AH is relatively new. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge in this field and guidelines for future research. PMID:25798123

  15. Errorless and errorful learning modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Errorless learning is advantageous over trial and error learning (errorful learning) as errors are avoided during learning resulting in increased memory performance. Errorful learning challenges the executive control system of memory processes as the erroneous items compete with the correct items during retrieval. The left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is a core region involved in this executive control system. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can modify the excitability of underlying brain functioning. Results In a single blinded tDCS study one group of young healthy participants received anodal and another group cathodal tDCS of the left DLPFC each compared to sham stimulation. Participants had to learn words in an errorless and an errorful manner using a word stem completion paradigm. The results showed that errorless compared to errorful learning had a profound effect on the memory performance in terms of quality. Anodal stimulation of the left DLPFC did not modulate the memory performance following errorless or errorful learning. By contrast, cathodal stimulation hampered memory performance after errorful learning compared to sham, whereas there was no modulation after errorless learning. Conclusions Concluding, the study further supports the advantages of errorless learning over errorful learning. Moreover, cathodal stimulation of the left DLPFC hampered memory performance following the conflict-inducing errorful learning as compared to no modulation after errorless learning emphasizing the importance of the left DLPFC in executive control of memory. PMID:21781298

  16. Shaping memory accuracy by left prefrontal transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zwissler, Bastian; Sperber, Christoph; Aigeldinger, Sina; Schindler, Sebastian; Kissler, Johanna; Plewnia, Christian

    2014-03-12

    Human memory is dynamic and flexible but is also susceptible to distortions arising from adaptive as well as pathological processes. Both accurate and false memory formation require executive control that is critically mediated by the left prefrontal cortex (PFC). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) enables noninvasive modulation of cortical activity and associated behavior. The present study reports that tDCS applied to the left dorsolateral PFC (dlPFC) shaped accuracy of episodic memory via polaritiy-specific modulation of false recognition. When applied during encoding of pictures, anodal tDCS increased whereas cathodal stimulation reduced the number of false alarms to lure pictures in subsequent recognition memory testing. These data suggest that the enhancement of excitability in the dlPFC by anodal tDCS can be associated with blurred detail memory. In contrast, activity-reducing cathodal tDCS apparently acted as a noise filter inhibiting the development of imprecise memory traces and reducing the false memory rate. Consistently, the largest effect was found in the most active condition (i.e., for stimuli cued to be remembered). This first evidence for a polarity-specific, activity-dependent effect of tDCS on false memory opens new vistas for the understanding and potential treatment of disturbed memory control. PMID:24623779

  17. Shaping Memory Accuracy by Left Prefrontal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zwissler, Bastian; Sperber, Christoph; Aigeldinger, Sina; Schindler, Sebastian; Kissler, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Human memory is dynamic and flexible but is also susceptible to distortions arising from adaptive as well as pathological processes. Both accurate and false memory formation require executive control that is critically mediated by the left prefrontal cortex (PFC). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) enables noninvasive modulation of cortical activity and associated behavior. The present study reports that tDCS applied to the left dorsolateral PFC (dlPFC) shaped accuracy of episodic memory via polaritiy-specific modulation of false recognition. When applied during encoding of pictures, anodal tDCS increased whereas cathodal stimulation reduced the number of false alarms to lure pictures in subsequent recognition memory testing. These data suggest that the enhancement of excitability in the dlPFC by anodal tDCS can be associated with blurred detail memory. In contrast, activity-reducing cathodal tDCS apparently acted as a noise filter inhibiting the development of imprecise memory traces and reducing the false memory rate. Consistently, the largest effect was found in the most active condition (i.e., for stimuli cued to be remembered). This first evidence for a polarity-specific, activity-dependent effect of tDCS on false memory opens new vistas for the understanding and potential treatment of disturbed memory control. PMID:24623779

  18. Pediatric stroke and transcranial direct current stimulation: methods for rational individualized dose optimization

    PubMed Central

    Gillick, Bernadette T.; Kirton, Adam; Carmel, Jason B.; Minhas, Preet; Bikson, Marom

    2014-01-01

    Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been investigated mainly in adults and doses may not be appropriate in pediatric applications. In perinatal stroke where potential applications are promising, rational adaptation of dosage for children remains under investigation. Objective: Construct child-specific tDCS dosing parameters through case study within a perinatal stroke tDCS safety and feasibility trial. Methods: 10-year-old subject with a diagnosis of presumed perinatal ischemic stroke and hemiparesis was identified. T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans used to derive computerized model for current flow and electrode positions. Workflow using modeling results and consideration of dosage in previous clinical trials was incorporated. Prior ad hoc adult montages vs. de novo optimized montages provided distinct risk benefit analysis. Approximating adult dose required consideration of changes in both peak brain current flow and distribution which further tradeoff between maximizing efficacy and adding safety factors. Electrode size, position, current intensity, compliance voltage, and duration were controlled independently in this process. Results: Brain electric fields modeled and compared to values previously predicted models (Datta et al., 2011; Minhas et al., 2012). Approximating conservative brain current flow patterns and intensities used in previous adult trials for comparable indications, the optimal current intensity established was 0.7 mA for 10 min with a tDCS C3/C4 montage. Specifically 0.7 mA produced comparable peak brain current intensity of an average adult receiving 1.0 mA. Electrode size of 5 × 7 cm2 with 1.0 mA and low-voltage tDCS was employed to maximize tolerability. Safety and feasibility confirmed with subject tolerating the session well and no serious adverse events. Conclusion: Rational approaches to dose customization, with steps informed by computational modeling, may improve guidance for pediatric stroke tDCS trials. PMID:25285077

  19. Measurement of Transcranial Distance During Head-Down Tilt Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torikoshi, Shigeyo; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Murthy, G.; Bowley, S.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity probably elevates blood pressure and flow in the head which may increase intracranial volume (ICV) and pressure (ICP). Due to the slightly compliant nature of the cranium, any increase of ICP will increase ICV and transcranial distance. We used a noninvasive ultrasound technique to measure transcranial distance (frontal to occipital) during head-down tilt. Seven subjects (ages 26-53) underwent the following tilt angles: 90 deg. upright, 30 deg., 0 deg., -6 deg., -10 deg., -6 deg., 0 deg., 30 deg., and 90 deg. Each angle was maintained for 1 min. Ultrasound wave frequency was collected continuously and transcranial distance was calculated (Delta(x) = x(Delta)f/f, where x is path length and f is frequency of the wave) for each tilt angle. Frequency decreased from 503.687 kHz (90 deg. upright) to 502.619 kHz (-10 deg.). These frequencies translated to an increased transcranial distance of 0.403 mm. Although our data suggest a significant increase in transcranial distance during head-down tilt, this apparent increase may result, in part, from head-down tilt-induced subcutaneous edema or cutaneous blood volume elevation. In three subjects, when the above protocol was repeated with an ace bandage wrapped around the head to minimize such edema, the increased transcranial distance from 90 deg. to -10 deg. was reduced by 0.174 mm. Further development of the technique to quantify bone-to-bone expansion unconfounded by cutaneous fluid is necessary. Therefore, this ultrasound technique may provide measurements of changes in cranial dimensions during microgravity.

  20. Transcranial LED therapy for cognitive dysfunction in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: two case reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Saltmarche, Anita; Krengel, Maxine H.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Knight, Jeffrey A.

    2010-02-01

    Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases are presented, where cognitive function improved following treatment with transcranial light emitting diodes (LEDs). At age 59, P1 had closed-head injury from a motor vehicle accident (MVA) without loss of consciousness and normal MRI, but unable to return to work as development specialist in internet marketing, due to cognitive dysfunction. At 7 years post-MVA, she began transcranial LED treatments with cluster heads (2.1" diameter with 61 diodes each - 9x633nm, 52x870nm; 12-15mW per diode; total power, 500mW; 22.2 mW/cm2) on bilateral frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital and midline sagittal areas (13.3 J/cm2 at scalp, estimated 0.4 J/cm2 to brain cortex per area). Prior to transcranial LED, focused time on computer was 20 minutes. After 2 months of weekly, transcranial LED treatments, increased to 3 hours on computer. Performs nightly home treatments (now, 5 years, age 72); if stops treating >2 weeks, regresses. P2 (age 52F) had history of closed-head injuries related to sports/military training and recent fall. MRI shows fronto-parietal cortical atrophy. Pre-LED, was not able to work for 6 months and scored below average on attention, memory and executive function. Performed nightly transcranial LED treatments at home (9 months) with similar LED device, on frontal and parietal areas. After 4 months of LED treatments, returned to work as executive consultant, international technology consulting firm. Neuropsychological testing (post- 9 months of transcranial LED) showed significant improvement in memory and executive functioning (range, +1 to +2 SD improvement). Case 2 reported reduction in PTSD symptoms.

  1. Novel methods to optimize the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation: a systematic review of transcranial direct current stimulation patents.

    PubMed

    Malavera, Alejandra; Vasquez, Alejandra; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-11-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that has been extensively studied. While there have been initial positive results in some clinical trials, there is still variability in tDCS results. The aim of this article is to review and discuss patents assessing novel methods to optimize the use of tDCS. A systematic review was performed using Google patents database with tDCS as the main technique, with patents filling date between 2010 and 2015. Twenty-two patents met our inclusion criteria. These patents attempt to address current tDCS limitations. Only a few of them have been investigated in clinical trials (i.e., high-definition tDCS), and indeed most of them have not been tested before in human trials. Further clinical testing is required to assess which patents are more likely to optimize the effects of tDCS. We discuss the potential optimization of tDCS based on these patents and the current experience with standard tDCS. PMID:26415093

  2. The Presto 1000: A novel automated transcranial Doppler ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Han, Seunggu J; Rutledge, William Caleb; Englot, Dario J; Winkler, Ethan A; Browne, Janet L; Pflugrath, Lauren; Cronsier, David; Abla, Adib A; Kliot, Michel; Lawton, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    We examined the reliability and ease of use of a novel automated transcranial Doppler (TCD) system in comparison to a conventional TCD system. TCD ultrasound allows non-invasive monitoring of cerebral blood flow, and can predict arterial vasospasm after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The Presto 1000 TCD system (PhysioSonics, Bellevue, WA, USA) is designed for monitoring flow through the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) via temporal windows. The Presto 1000 system was tested across multiple preclinical and clinical settings in parallel with a control predicate TCD system. In a phantom flow generating device, both the Presto 1000 and Spencer system (Spencer Technologies, Redmond, WA, USA) were able to detect velocities with high accuracy. In nine volunteer patients, the Presto system was able to locate the MCA in 14 out of 18 temporal windows, in an average of 12.5s. In the SAH cohort of five patients with a total of 25 paired measurements, the mean absolute difference in flow velocities of the M1 segment, as measured by the two systems, was 17.5cm/s. These data suggest that the Presto system offers an automated TCD that can reliably localize and detect flow of the MCA, with relative ease of use. The system carries the additional benefit of requiring minimal training for the operator, and can be used by many providers across multiple bedside settings. The mean velocities that were generated warrant further validation across an extended group of patients, and the predictive value for vasospasm should be checked against the current standard of angiography. PMID:26238693

  3. Transcranial electrostimulation effects on rat opioid and neurotransmitter levels.

    PubMed

    Warner, R L; Johnston, C; Hamilton, R; Skolnick, M H; Wilson, O B

    1994-01-01

    A specific form of Transcranial Electrostimulation Treatment (TCET) has been shown to induce analgesia, alleviate symptoms of opiate withdrawal and alter nociceptive responses in neurons in the midbrain and hypothalamus of rats. TCET consists of a 10Hz, charge balanced, 10 mu A current passed for 30 minutes between electrodes placed in the ears. Both serotonin (5HT) and endogenous opioids have been strongly implicated in TCET responses. This study directly measured brain levels of several neurotransmitters and their metabolites in anesthetized rats stimulated with either 10 mu A TCET or 0 mu A (Sham). Neurotransmitters measured in selected homogenized brain areas by high performance liquid chromatography were 5HT and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5HIAA); norepinephrine (NE) and its metabolite, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenethyleneglycol (MHPG); and dopamine (DA). Levels of NE and DA were significantly higher in the hypothalamic region of TCET rats than of control rats. The midbrains of TCET rats contained significantly elevated levels of DA, MHPG, 5HT and 5HIAA. In the hindbrain no significant differences were observed. Thus, TCET appears to cause an increase in the synthesis or release of 5HT, DA and NE in the midbrain and DA and 5HT in the hypothalamus. In a separate experiment, beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity was measured in blood plasma taken from rats at intervals before, during and after a 30 minute TCET treatment, but no demonstrable TCET effect was observed. The lack of change in serum endorphin levels suggests that TCET-induced opioid activity may be confined to the central nervous system, a reasonable theory because the current passes only through the head. PMID:7906003

  4. Neurological and psychological applications of transcranial lasers and LEDs.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Julio C; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2013-08-15

    Transcranial brain stimulation with low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) is the use of directional low-power and high-fluency monochromatic or quasimonochromatic light from lasers or LEDs in the red-to-near-infrared wavelengths to modulate a neurobiological function or induce a neurotherapeutic effect in a nondestructive and non-thermal manner. The mechanism of action of LLLT is based on photon energy absorption by cytochrome oxidase, the terminal enzyme in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Cytochrome oxidase has a key role in neuronal physiology, as it serves as an interface between oxidative energy metabolism and cell survival signaling pathways. Cytochrome oxidase is an ideal target for cognitive enhancement, as its expression reflects the changes in metabolic capacity underlying higher-order brain functions. This review provides an update on new findings on the neurotherapeutic applications of LLLT. The photochemical mechanisms supporting its cognitive-enhancing and brain-stimulatory effects in animal models and humans are discussed. LLLT is a potential non-invasive treatment for cognitive impairment and other deficits associated with chronic neurological conditions, such as large vessel and lacunar hypoperfusion or neurodegeneration. Brain photobiomodulation with LLLT is paralleled by pharmacological effects of low-dose USP methylene blue, a non-photic electron donor with the ability to stimulate cytochrome oxidase activity, redox and free radical processes. Both interventions provide neuroprotection and cognitive enhancement by facilitating mitochondrial respiration, with hormetic dose-response effects and brain region activational specificity. This evidence supports enhancement of mitochondrial respiratory function as a generalizable therapeutic principle relevant to highly adaptable systems that are exquisitely sensitive to energy availability such as the nervous system. PMID:23806754

  5. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Behaviour and Electrophysiology of Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Miranka; Rahman, Rasha Abdel; Kuenecke, Janina; Koenig, Thomas; Horn, Helge; Sommer, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (A-tDCS) over the left dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC) has been shown to improve language production. The present study examined neurophysiological underpinnings of this effect. In a single-blinded within-subject design, we traced effects of A-tDCS compared to sham stimulation over the left…

  6. Validation of finite element model of transcranial electrical stimulation using scalp potentials: implications for clinical dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Abhishek; Zhou, Xiang; Su, Yuzhou; Parra, Lucas C.; Bikson, Marom

    2013-06-01

    Objective. During transcranial electrical stimulation, current passage across the scalp generates voltage across the scalp surface. The goal was to characterize these scalp voltages for the purpose of validating subject-specific finite element method (FEM) models of current flow. Approach. Using a recording electrode array, we mapped skin voltages resulting from low-intensity transcranial electrical stimulation. These voltage recordings were used to compare the predictions obtained from the high-resolution model based on the subject undergoing transcranial stimulation. Main results. Each of the four stimulation electrode configurations tested resulted in a distinct distribution of scalp voltages; these spatial maps were linear with applied current amplitude (0.1 to 1 mA) over low frequencies (1 to 10 Hz). The FEM model accurately predicted the distinct voltage distributions and correlated the induced scalp voltages with current flow through cortex. Significance. Our results provide the first direct model validation for these subject-specific modeling approaches. In addition, the monitoring of scalp voltages may be used to verify electrode placement to increase transcranial electrical stimulation safety and reproducibility.

  7. MULTIPLE FEATURE EXTRACTION FOR EARLY PARKINSON RISK ASSESSMENT BASED ON TRANSCRANIAL SONOGRAPHY IMAGE

    E-print Network

    Lübeck, Universität zu

    diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is of great importance, since clinical symptoms do not occur untilMULTIPLE FEATURE EXTRACTION FOR EARLY PARKINSON RISK ASSESSMENT BASED ON TRANSCRANIAL SONOGRAPHY for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) at a very early state. The TCS im- age of mesencephalon shows

  8. Cerebral Lateralization and General Intelligence: Gender Differences in a Transcranial Doppler Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Njemanze, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated cerebral lateralization during Raven's progressive matrices (RPM) paradigm in female and male subjects. Bilateral simultaneous transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound was used to measure mean blood flow velocities (MBFV) in the right and left middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) in 24 (15 females and 9 males) right-handed…

  9. Atypical Cerebral Lateralisation in Adults with Compensated Developmental Dyslexia Demonstrated Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illingworth, Sarah; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD) is a relatively new and non-invasive technique that assesses cerebral lateralisation through measurements of blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. In this study fTCD was used to compare functional asymmetry during a word generation task between a group of 30 dyslexic adults and a…

  10. Coming Unbound: Disrupting Automatic Integration of Synesthetic Color and Graphemes by Transcranial

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Lucia

    Coming Unbound: Disrupting Automatic Integration of Synesthetic Color and Graphemes by Transcranial automatically evokes the perception of a specific color, an ex- perience known as color­grapheme synesthesia parietal lobe is critical for the integration of color and shape in color­grapheme synesthesia

  11. In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced bloodbrain barrier opening in mice

    E-print Network

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood­brain barrier cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood­brain barrier opening in mice Yao-Sheng Tung1 ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles was studied in order to better identify the underlying

  12. Functional Transcranial Doppler Sonography and a Spatial Orientation Paradigm Identify the Non-Dominant Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorst, J.; Haag, A.; Knake, S.; Oertel, W. H.; Hamer, H. M.; Rosenow, F.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) during word generation is well established for language lateralization. In this study, we evaluated a fTCD paradigm to reliably identify the non-dominant hemisphere. Methods: Twenty-nine right-handed healthy subjects (27.1 [plus or minus] 7.6 years) performed the "cube perspective test"…

  13. Transcranial alternating current stimulation affects human BOLD responses during motion adaptation

    E-print Network

    Krekelberg, Bart

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation affects human BOLD responses during motion adaptation the visual motion adaptation paradigm from Huk et al. [3] to quantify motion adaptation in the BOLD signal of the dot. In each session both gratings initially moved inward for 30s (long adapter). Subsequent trials

  14. Transcranial Doppler screening of Medicaid-insured children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bundy, David G; Abrams, Michael T; Strouse, John J; Mueller, Carl H; Miller, Marlene R; Casella, James F

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler screening reduces the risk of stroke in children with sickle cell disease. We tested the effect of informational letters sent to parents and doctors of Medicaid-insured children on improving screening efficiency. The letters did not improve the low baseline screening rates, suggesting the need for more aggressive outreach. Hematologist visits were correlated with increased screening rates. PMID:25444529

  15. The application of sparse arrays in high frequency transcranial focused ultrasound therapy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Pajek, Daniel Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Transcranial focused ultrasound is an emerging therapeutic modality that can be used to perform noninvasive neurosurgical procedures. The current clinical transcranial phased array operates at 650 kHz, however the development of a higher frequency array would enable more precision, while reducing the risk of standing waves. However, the smaller wavelength and the skull's increased distortion at this frequency are problematic. It would require an order of magnitude more elements to create such an array. Random sparse arrays enable steering of a therapeutic array with fewer elements. However, the tradeoffs inherent in the use of sparsity in a transcranial phased array have not been systematically investigated and so the objective of this simulation study is to investigate the effect of sparsity on transcranial arrays at a frequency of 1.5 MHz that provides small focal spots for precise exposure control. Methods: Transcranial sonication simulations were conducted using a multilayer Rayleigh-Sommerfeld propagation model. Element size and element population were varied and the phased array's ability to steer was assessed. Results: The focal pressures decreased proportionally as elements were removed. However, off-focus hotspots were generated if a high degree of steering was attempted with very sparse arrays. A phased array consisting of 1588 elements 3 mm in size, a 10% population, was appropriate for steering up to 4 cm in all directions. However, a higher element population would be required if near-skull sonication is desired. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the development of a sparse, hemispherical array at 1.5 MHz could enable more precision in therapies that utilize lower intensity sonications.

  16. Latin American Consensus on the use of transcranial Doppler in the diagnosis of brain death

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler evaluates cerebral hemodynamics in patients with brain injury and is a useful technical tool in diagnosing cerebral circulatory arrest, usually present in the brain-dead patient. This Latin American Consensus was formed by a group of 26 physicians experienced in the use of transcranial Doppler in the context of brain death. The purpose of this agreement was to make recommendations regarding the indications, technique, and interpretation of the study of transcranial ultrasonography in patients with a clinical diagnosis of brain death or in the patient whose clinical diagnosis presents difficulties; a working group was formed to enable further knowledge and to strengthen ties between Latin American physicians working on the same topic. A review of the literature, concepts, and experiences were exchanged in two meetings and via the Internet. Questions about pathophysiology, equipment, techniques, findings, common problems, and the interpretation of transcranial Doppler in the context of brain death were answered. The basic consensus statements are the following: cerebral circulatory arrest is the final stage in the evolution of progressive intracranial hypertension, which is visualized with transcranial Doppler as a "pattern of cerebral circulatory arrest". The following are accepted as the standard of cerebral circulatory arrest: reverberant pattern, systolic spikes, and absence of previously demonstrated flow. Ultrasonography should be used - in acceptable hemodynamic conditions - in the anterior circulation bilaterally (middle cerebral artery) and in the posterior (basilar artery) territory. If no ultrasonographic images are found in any or all of these vessels, their proximal arteries are acceptable to be studied to look for a a pattern of cerebral circulatory arrest. PMID:25295818

  17. Latin American consensus on the use of transcranial Doppler in the diagnosis of brain death.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler evaluates cerebral hemodynamics in patients with brain injury and is a useful technical tool in diagnosing cerebral circulatory arrest, usually present in the brain-dead patient. This Latin American Consensus was formed by a group of 26 physicians experienced in the use of transcranial Doppler in the context of brain death. The purpose of this agreement was to make recommendations regarding the indications, technique, and interpretation of the study of transcranial ultrasonography in patients with a clinical diagnosis of brain death or in the patient whose clinical diagnosis presents difficulties; a working group was formed to enable further knowledge and to strengthen ties between Latin American physicians working on the same topic. A review of the literature, concepts,and experiences were exchanged in two meetings and via the Internet. Questions about pathophysiology, equipment, techniques, findings, common problems, and the interpretation of transcranial Doppler in the context of brain death were answered. The basic consensus statements are the following: cerebral circulatory arrest is the final stage in the evolution of progressive intracranial hypertension, which is visualized with transcranial Doppler as a "pattern of cerebral circulatory arrest". The following are accepted as the standard of cerebral circulatory arrest: reverberant pattern, systolic spikes, and absence of previously demonstrated flow. Ultrasonography should be used - in acceptable hemodynamic conditions - in the anterior circulation bilaterally (middle cerebral artery) and in the posterior (basilar artery) territory. If no ultrasonographic images are found in any or all of these vessels, their proximal arteries are acceptable to be studied to look for a a pattern of cerebral circulatory arrest. PMID:25295818

  18. On a Babcock-Leighton Solar Dynamo Model with a Deep-seated Generating Layer for the Toroidal Magnetic Field. IV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durney, Bernard R.

    1997-09-01

    The study is continued of a dynamo model of the Babcock-Leighton type (i.e., the surface eruptions of toroidal magnetic field are the source for the poloidal field) with a thin, deep seated layer (GL), for the generation of the toroidal field, B?. The partial differential equations satisfied by B? and by the vector potential for the poloidal field are integrated in time with the help of a second order time- and space-centered finite different scheme. Axial symmetry is assumed; the gradient of the angular velocity in the GL is such that within this layer a transition to uniform rotation takes place; the meridional motion, transporting the poloidal field to the GL, is poleward and about 3 m s-1 at the surface; the radial diffusivity ?r equals 5 × 109 cm2 s-1, and the horizontal diffusivity ?? is adjusted to achieve marginal stability. The initial conditions are: a negligible poloidal field, and a maximum value of |B?| in the GL equal to 1.5 × Bcr, where Bcr is a prescribed field. For every time step the maximum value of |B?| in the GL is computed. If this value exceeds Bcr, then there is eruption of a flux tube (at the latitude corresponding to this maximum) that rises radially to the surface. Only one eruption is allowed per time step (?t) and B? in the GL is unchanged as a consequence of the eruption. The ensemble of eruptions is the source for the poloidal field, i.e., no use is made of a mean field equation relating the poloidal with the toroidal field. For a given value of ?t, and since the problem is linear, the solutions scale with Bcr. Therefore, the equations need to be solved for one value of Bcr only. Since only one eruption is allowed per time step, the dependence of the solutions on ?t needs to be studied. Let Ft be an arbitrary numerical factor (= 3 for example) and compare the solutions of the equations for (Bcr, ?t) and (Bcr, ?t/3). It is clear that there will be 3 times as many eruptions in the second case (with the shorter time step) than in the first case. However, if the erupted flux in case one is multiplied by 3, then the solutions for this case become nearly identical to those of case two (?t is shorter than any typical time of the system, and the difference due to the unequal time steps is negligible). Therefore, varying the time step is equivalent to keeping ?t fixed while multiplying the erupted flux by an appropriate factor. In the numerical calculations ?t was set equal to 105 s. The factor Ft can then be interpreted as the number of eruptions per 105 s. The integration of the equations shows that there is a transition in the nature of the solutions for Ft ~ 2.5. For Ft < 2.5, the eruptions occur only at high latitudes, whereas for Ft > 2.5, the eruptions occur for ? greater than ~ ?/4, where ? is the polar angle. Furthermore, for Ft < 2.5, the toroidal field, |B?|, in the GL can become considerably larger than Bcr, while this ceases to be the case for Ft > 2.5. The factor Ft is an arbitrary parameter in the model and an appeal to observations is necessary. We set Bcr = 103 G. In the model, the magnetic flux of erupting magnetic tubes, is then about 3 × 1021 G, of the order of the solar values. For this value of Bcr and for the value of Ft (~2.5) at which the transition takes place, the total erupted flux in 10 years is about 0.85 × 1025 Mx in remarkable agreement with the total erupted flux during a solar cycle. Concerning the dynamo models studied here, a major drawback encountered in previous papers has been the eruptions at high latitudes, which entail unrealistically large values for the radial magnetic field at the poles. The results of this paper provide a major step forward in the resolution of this difficulty.

  19. Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation Enhances Visual Learning In Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Herpich, Florian; Melnick, Michael; Huxlin, Krystel; Tadin, Duje; Agosta, Sara; Battelli, Lorella

    2015-09-01

    Recent psychophysical studies have demonstrated that visuo-perceptual functions can improve over multiple training sessions, both in healthy adults (Sagi, 2011) and in hemianopic stroke patients (Das et al., 2014). To date, rehabilitative therapies for hemianopic patients have shown significant improvements only after many weeks of daily training. Recent studies using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have shown enhancement of visual performance in normal subjects. Notably, when current is applied in a random noise mode (tRNS), effects are seen earlier and are longer lasting. Here, we asked whether tDCS or tRNS can be used to boost visual perceptual learning of global direction discrimination, thus providing a proof-of-concept for the potential use of this approach in pathological populations. We tested 40 healthy, visually-intact subjects, aged 19-26 who were randomly assigned to 4 training groups: "anodal tDCS", high frequency "hf-tRNS", "sham" and "no-stimulation". All subjects were trained to discriminate the left or right global motion direction of random-dot stimuli for 10 days (one session/day). Before and after training, we measured the subjects' direction range and motion signal thresholds. Brain stimulation was delivered concurrently with the training task. For the active stimulation conditions, anodal tDCS was delivered over the occipital pole, while for hf-tRNS and sham, electrodes were positioned bilaterally over the left and right occipital poles. On average, all subjects improved over the two-weeks training period. However, the hf-tRNS group attained a direction range threshold of 162.88° (subtracting day10 from day1), while the "tDCS", "sham" and "no stimulation" subjects attained a threshold of 53.57°, 126.6° and 88°, respectively. Paired sampled t-tests indicated a significant effect of hf-tRNS on performance relative to the other groups (p = .03). These results indicate that hf-tRNS may be a more effective intervention to boost visual perceptual learning than tDCS or no stimulation during visual training. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26325728

  20. Transcranial low-level laser therapy enhances learning, memory, and neuroprogenitor cells after traumatic brain injury in mice

    E-print Network

    Xuan, Weijun

    The use of transcranial low-level laser (light) therapy (tLLLT) to treat stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) is attracting increasing attention. We previously showed that LLLT using an 810-nm laser 4 h after controlled ...

  1. Improved Cognitive Function After Transcranial, Light-Emitting Diode Treatments in Chronic, Traumatic Brain Injury: Two Case Reports

    E-print Network

    Naeser, Margaret A.

    Objective: Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases, where cognition improved following treatment with red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs), applied transcranially to forehead and scalp areas, are ...

  2. Deep learning.

    PubMed

    LeCun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-28

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech. PMID:26017442

  3. Deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  4. Classification of methods in transcranial Electrical Stimulation (tES) and evolving strategy from historical approaches to contemporary innovations

    PubMed Central

    Guleyupoglu, Berkan; Schestatsky, Pedro; Edwards, Dylan; Fregni, Felipe; Bikson, Marom

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial Electrical Stimulation (tES) encompasses all methods of non-invasive current application to the brain used in research and clinical practice. We present the first comprehensive and technical review, explaining the evolution of tES in both terminology and dosage over the past 100 years of research to present day. Current transcranial Pulsed Current Stimulation (tPCS) approaches such as Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) descended from Electrosleep (ES) through Cranial Electro-stimulation Therapy (CET), Transcerebral Electrotherapy (TCET), and NeuroElectric Therapy (NET) while others like Transcutaneous Cranial Electrical Stimulation (TCES) descended from Electroanesthesia (EA) through Limoge, and Interferential Stimulation. Prior to a contemporary resurgence in interest, variations of trans-cranial Direct Current Stimulation were explored intermittently, including Polarizing current, Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS), and Transcranial Micropolarization. The development of these approaches alongside Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) and pharmacological developments are considered. Both the roots and unique features of contemporary approaches such as transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) and transcranial Random Noise Stimulation (tRNS) are discussed. Trends and incremental developments in electrode montage and waveform spanning decades are presented leading to the present day. Commercial devices, seminal conferences, and regulatory decisions are noted. We conclude with six rules on how increasing medical and technological sophistication may now be leveraged for broader success and adoption of tES. PMID:23954780

  5. In Vivo Application and Localization of Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Using Dual-Mode Ultrasound Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Haritonova, Alyona; Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2015-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has been proposed for a variety of transcranial applications, including neuromodulation, tumor ablation, and blood brain barrier opening. A flurry of activity in recent years has generated encouraging results demonstrating its feasibility in these and other applications. To date, monitoring of FUS beams have been primarily accomplished using MR guidance, where both MR thermography and elastography have been used. The recent introduction of real-time dual-mode ultrasound array (DMUA) systems offers a new paradigm in transcranial focusing. In this paper, we present first experimental results of ultrasound-guided transcranial FUS (tFUS) application in a rodent brain, both ex vivo and in vivo. DMUA imaging is used for visualization of the treatment region for placement of the focal spot within the brain. This includes the detection and localization of pulsating blood vessels at or near the target point(s). In addition, DMUA imaging is used to monitor and localize the FUS-tissue interactions in real-time. In particular, a concave (40-mm radius of curvature), 32-element, 3.5 MHz DMUA prototype was used for imaging and tFUS application in ex vivo and in vivo rat model. The ex vivo experiments were used to evaluate the point spread function (psf) of the transcranial DMUA imaging at various points within the brain. In addition, DMUA-based transcranial ultrasound thermography measurements were compared with thermocouple measurements of subtherapeutic tFUS heating in rat brain ex vivo. The ex vivo setting was also used to demonstrate the DMUA capability to produce localized thermal lesions. The in vivo experiments were designed to demonstrate the ability of the DMUA to apply, monitor, and localize subtherapeutic tFUS patterns that could be beneficial in transient blood brain barrier opening. The results show that, while the DMUA focus is degraded due to the propagation through the skull, it still produces localized heating effects within sub-millimeter volume. In addition, DMUA transcranial echo data from brain tissue allow for reliable estimation of temperature change. PMID:26670845

  6. In Vivo application and localization of transcranial focused ultrasound using dual-mode ultrasound arrays.

    PubMed

    Haritonova, Alyona; Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2015-12-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has been proposed for a variety of transcranial applications, including neuromodulation, tumor ablation, and blood-brain barrier opening. A flurry of activity in recent years has generated encouraging results demonstrating its feasibility in these and other applications. To date, monitoring of FUS beams has been primarily accomplished using MR guidance, where both MR thermography and elastography have been used. The recent introduction of real-time dual-mode ultrasound array (DMUA) systems offers a new paradigm in transcranial focusing. In this paper, we present first experimental results of ultrasound-guided transcranial FUS (tFUS) application in a rodent brain, both ex vivo and in vivo. DMUA imaging is used for visualization of the treatment region for placement of the focal spot within the brain. This includes the detection and localization of pulsating blood vessels at or near the target point(s). In addition, DMUA imaging is used to monitor and localize the FUS-tissue interactions in real time. In particular, a concave (40 mm radius of curvature), 32-element, 3.5-MHz DMUA prototype was used for imaging and tFUS application in ex vivo and in vivo rat models. The ex vivo experiments were used to evaluate the point spread function of the transcranial DMUA imaging at various points within the brain. In addition, DMUA-based transcranial ultrasound thermography measurements were compared with thermocouple measurements of subtherapeutic tFUS heating in rat brain ex vivo. The ex vivo setting was also used to demonstrate the capability of DMUA to produce localized thermal lesions. The in vivo experiments were designed to demonstrate the ability of the DMUA to apply, monitor, and localize subtherapeutic tFUS patterns that could be beneficial in transient blood-brain barrier opening. The results show that although the DMUA focus is degraded due to the propagation through the skull, it still produces localized heating effects within a sub-millimeter volume. In addition, DMUA transcranial echo data from brain tissue allow for reliable estimation of temperature change. PMID:26670845

  7. Deep Lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2004-06-01

    A deep lysimeter including a hollow vessel having a chamber, a fill conduit extending into the chamber through apertures, a semi-permeable member mounted on the vessel and in fluid communication with the fill conduit, and a line connection for retrieving the lysimeter.

  8. Deep-Sky Companions: The Secret Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, Stephen James; Motta, Photographs by Mario

    2011-06-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. About this book; 2. The secret deep; Appendix A. The secret deep: basic data; Appendix B. Twenty additional secret deep objects; Appendix C. Deep-sky lists: comparison table; Appendix D. Photo credits; Index; The Secret Deep checklist.

  9. Transcranial Doppler Sonography in Pediatric Neurocritical Care: A Review of Clinical Applications and Case Illustrations in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    LaRovere, Kerri L; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Transcranial Doppler sonography is a noninvasive, real-time physiologic monitor that can detect altered cerebral hemodynamics during catastrophic brain injury. Recent data suggest that transcranial Doppler sonography may provide important information about cerebrovascular hemodynamics in children with traumatic brain injury, intracranial hypertension, vasospasm, stroke, cerebrovascular disorders, central nervous system infections, and brain death. Information derived from transcranial Doppler sonography in these disorders may elucidate underlying pathophysiologic characteristics, predict outcomes, monitor responses to treatment, and prompt a change in management. We review emerging applications for transcranial Doppler sonography in the pediatric intensive care unit with case illustrations from our own experience. PMID:26573100

  10. [Effects of transcranial magnetotherapy on electroencephalographic parameters in females with overactive urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Ne?mark, A I; Klyzhina, E A; Ne?mark, B A; Mel'nik, M A

    2007-01-01

    Urodynamic parameters and bioelectric brain activity were studied in 30 females aged 24-66 years with overactive bladder (OAB) before and after transcranial magnetotherapy. It was found that OAB patients have disorders of bioelectric brain activity by two types of EEG patterns (I.A. Svyatogor classification)--thalamic and stem, Patients with thalamic type EEG benefit more from magnetotherapy higher efficacy of which manifests with regress of clinical symptoms and urodynamic improvement. PMID:18254224

  11. Montage Matters: The Influence of Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation on Human Physiological Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Arpan R.; Pogosyan, Alek; Brown, Peter; Brittain, John-Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Background Classically, studies adopting non-invasive transcranial electrical stimulation have placed greater importance on the position of the primary “stimulating” electrode than the secondary “reference” electrode. However, recent current density modeling suggests that ascribing a neutral role to the reference electrode may prove an inappropriate oversimplification. Hypothesis We set out to test the hypothesis that the behavioral effects of transcranial electrical stimulation are critically dependent on the position of the return (“reference”) electrode. Methods We examined the effect of transcranial alternating current stimulation (sinusoidal waveform with no direct current offset at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 2000 ?A and a frequency matched to each participant's peak tremor frequency) on physiological tremor in a group of healthy volunteers (N = 12). We implemented a sham-controlled experimental protocol where the position of the stimulating electrode remained fixed, overlying primary motor cortex, whilst the position of the return electrode varied between two cephalic (fronto-orbital and contralateral primary motor cortex) and two extracephalic (ipsilateral and contralateral shoulder) locations. We additionally controlled for the role of phosphenes in influencing motor output by assessing the response of tremor to photic stimulation, through self-reported phosphene ratings. Results Altering only the position of the return electrode had a profound behavioral effect: only the montage with extracephalic return contralateral to the primary stimulating electrode significantly entrained physiological tremor (15.9% ± 6.1% increase in phase stability, 1 S.E.M.). Photic stimulation also entrained tremor (11.7% ± 5.1% increase in phase stability). Furthermore, the effects of electrical stimulation are distinct from those produced from direct phosphene induction, in that the latter were only seen with the fronto-orbital montage that did not affect the tremor. Conclusion The behavioral effects of transcranial alternating current stimulation appear to be critically dependent on the position of the reference electrode, highlighting the importance of electrode montage when designing experimental and therapeutic protocols. PMID:25499037

  12. A PVDF Receiver for Ultrasound Monitoring of Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) shows great promise for use in the area of transcranial therapy. Currently dependent on MRI for monitoring, transcranial FUS would benefit from a real-time technique to monitor acoustic emissions during therapy. A polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) receiver with an active area of 17.8 mm2 and a film thickness of 110 ?m was constructed. A compact preamplifier was designed to fit within the receiver to improve the receiver SNR and allow the long transmission line needed to remove the receiver electronics outside of the MRI room. The receiver was compared with a 0.5 mm commercial needle hydrophone, and focused and unfocused piezoceramics. The receiver was found to have a higher sensitivity than the needle hydrophone, a more wideband response than the piezoceramic and sufficient threshold for detection of microbubble emissions. Sonication of microbubbles directly and through a fragment of human skull demonstrated the ability of the receiver to detect harmonic bubble emissions, and showed potential for use in a larger scale array. Monitoring of disruption of the blood brain barrier in rats showed functionality in vivo, and the ability to detect subharmonic, harmonic and wideband emissions during therapy. The receiver shows potential for monitoring acoustic emissions during treatments and providing additional parameters to assist treatment planning. Future work will focus on developing a multi-element array for transcranial treatment monitoring. PMID:20515709

  13. Modulation of transcranial focusing thermal deposition in nonlinear HIFU brain surgery by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xin; Wang, Yizhe; Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Wenzheng; Wang, Peiguo; Luo, Mingyan; Jian, Xiqi

    2015-05-01

    As the skull induces strong aberrations in phase and amplitude during transcranial treatment of brain surgery, high-intensity focused ultrasound suffers degradation in beam shape and deposits significant heat in the skull which may cause thermal damage to the bone and surrounding tissue. The goal of this study is to optimize the transcranial pressure and thermal fields to reduce thermal damage to the skull and simultaneously concentrate more energy in the focal region and make its size controllable during transcranial brain tumor treatment by modulating the excitation signals of the transducer array (including the phase and amplitude) and superposing the signals used to reduce peak pressure in the skull. A 3D numerical model was developed based on the reconstructed images from high-resolution CT scans of a human skull and a 64-element phased array to simulate acoustic propagation and thermal behavior calculated by the finite-difference time domain method. The simulation showed that more energy was focused at the setting target with little temperature elevation in the skull after correcting phase and amplitude and reducing peak pressure in the skull; through modulating the input intensity of arrays, the volume of focal regions located off-axis could be made equal to the volume achieved with on-axis focusing.

  14. Investigation of effective system designs for transcranial photoacoustic tomography of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuhashi, Kenji; Schoonover, Robert W.; Huang, Chao; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) holds great promise for transcranial brain imaging. However, the strong reflection, scattering and attenuation of acoustic waves in the skull present significant challenges to developing this method. We report on a systematic computer-simulation study of transcranial brain imaging using PACT. The goal of this study was to identify an effective imaging system design that can be translated for clinical use. The propagation of photoacoustic waves through a model skull was studied by use of an elastic finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The acoustic radiation pattern from a photoacoustic source just beneath the skull was observed with a ring transducer array that was level with the source. The observed radiation pattern was found to contain stronger contributions from waves that were converted to shear waves in skull than longitudinal waves that did not undergo mode conversion. Images reconstructed from the pressure data that contain shear wave components possess better resolution than images reconstructed from the data that only contain the longitudinal wave signals. These observations revealed that the detection system should be designed to capture photoacoustic signals that travel through the skull in the form of shear waves as well as in the form of longitudinal waves. A preliminary investigation on the effect of the presence of absorption in the skull is also reported. This study provides an insight into the wave phenomena in transcranial PACT imaging, as well as a concrete detection design strategy that mitigates the degraded resolution of reconstructed images.

  15. Clinician accessible tools for GUI computational models of transcranial electrical stimulation: BONSAI and SPHERES.

    PubMed

    Truong, Dennis Q; Hüber, Mathias; Xie, Xihe; Datta, Abhishek; Rahman, Asif; Parra, Lucas C; Dmochowski, Jacek P; Bikson, Marom

    2014-01-01

    Computational models of brain current flow during transcranial electrical stimulation (tES), including transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), are increasingly used to understand and optimize clinical trials. We propose that broad dissemination requires a simple graphical user interface (GUI) software that allows users to explore and design montages in real-time, based on their own clinical/experimental experience and objectives. We introduce two complimentary open-source platforms for this purpose: BONSAI and SPHERES. BONSAI is a web (cloud) based application (available at neuralengr.com/bonsai) that can be accessed through any flash-supported browser interface. SPHERES (available at neuralengr.com/spheres) is a stand-alone GUI application that allow consideration of arbitrary montages on a concentric sphere model by leveraging an analytical solution. These open-source tES modeling platforms are designed go be upgraded and enhanced. Trade-offs between open-access approaches that balance ease of access, speed, and flexibility are discussed. PMID:24776786

  16. Efficacy of Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Over the Left Orbitofrontal Cortex in a Patient With Treatment-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Mondino, Marine; Haesebaert, Frédéric; Poulet, Emmanuel; Saoud, Mohamed; Brunelin, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling and frequent neuropsychiatric disorder. Forty percent to 60% of patients with OCD fail to respond to available treatments. Neuroimaging studies have highlighted an association between the severity of obsessive and compulsive symptoms and an increased activity of the left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in patients with OCD. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a powerful and easy-to-use tool to modulate brain activity. Cathodal tDCS (c-tDCS) is assumed to decrease cortical excitability in the targeted brain region. We hypothesized that c-tDCS applied over the left OFC alleviates symptoms in patients with treatment-resistant OCD. We report here the case of a patient who received 10 sessions (2 mA, 20 minutes) of c-tDCS. The tDCS sessions were delivered twice a day with a 2-hour interval, with the cathode (35 cm) placed over the left OFC and the anode (100 cm) placed over the contralateral occipital region. No adverse event was reported. One month after the completion of the tDCS sessions, we observed a 26% reduction in severity of obsessive and compulsive symptoms measured using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale scores. These findings are consistent with a previous study reporting a similar reduction in obsessive and compulsive symptoms after a low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was given to the left OFC. Our results indicate that c-tDCS applied over the left OFC may be a suitable and safe treatment in patients with treatment-resistant OCD. PMID:25651393

  17. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePLUS

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the lower leg or thigh. If the vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep ...

  18. Magnetic characterization of a hydrogen phase trapped inside deep dislocation cores in a hydrogen-cycled PdH{sub x} (x {approx} 4.5 x 10{sup -4}) single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lipson, A. G. Heuser, B. J.; Castano, C. H.; Lyakhov, B. F.; Tsivadze, A. Yu.

    2006-09-15

    The magnetic characterization of Pd single crystals deformed by cycling in a hydrogen atmosphere has been performed. Based on evidence obtained from thermal desorption analysis, it is shown that the condensed hydrogen phase formed inside deep dislocation cores in PdH{sub x} (x = H/Pd {approx} 4.5 x 10{sup -4}) is tightly bound with a Pd matrix. The activation energy of hydrogen desorption from these cores was found to be as high as e = 1.6eV/H-atom, suggesting the occurrence of a strong band overlapping between Pd and H atoms. SQUID measurements carried out in a weak magnetic field (H < 5.0 Oe) showed an anomalous diamagnetic contribution to the DC and AC magnetic susceptibilities of the PdH{sub x} sample at T < 30 K resulting in the presence of the hydrogen phase. It is suggested that the anomalous diamagnetic response in PdH{sub x} is caused by the presence of a hydrogen dominant phase, tightly bound with a Pd matrix inside the dislocation cores (nanotubes)

  19. Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  20. Influence of Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the Right Angular Gyrus on Brain Activity during Rest

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Benjamin; Jung, Stefanie; Mingoia, Gianluca; Weyer, David; Domahs, Frank; Willmes, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Although numerous studies examined resting-state networks (RSN) in the human brain, so far little is known about how activity within RSN might be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation applied over parietal cortex. Investigating changes in RSN in response to parietal cortex stimulation might tell us more about how non-invasive techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulate intrinsic brain activity, and further elaborate our understanding of how the resting brain responds to external stimulation. Here we examined how activity within the canonical RSN changed in response to anodal tDCS applied over the right angular gyrus (AG). We hypothesized that changes in resting-state activity can be induced by a single tDCS session and detected with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Significant differences between two fMRI sessions (pre-tDCS and post-tDCS) were found in several RSN, including the cerebellar, medial visual, sensorimotor, right frontoparietal, and executive control RSN as well as the default mode and the task positive network. The present results revealed decreased and increased RSN activity following tDCS. Decreased RSN activity following tDCS was found in bilateral primary and secondary visual areas, and in the right putamen. Increased RSN activity following tDCS was widely distributed across the brain, covering thalamic, frontal, parietal and occipital regions. From these exploratory results we conclude that a single session of anodal tDCS over the right AG is sufficient to induce large-scale changes in resting-state activity. These changes were localized in sensory and cognitive areas, covering regions close to and distant from the stimulation site. PMID:24760013

  1. The Contribution of Primary Motor Cortex Is Essential for Probabilistic Implicit Sequence Learning: Evidence from Theta Burst Magnetic Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Leonora; Teo, James T.; Obeso, Ignacio; Rothwell, John C.; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2010-01-01

    Theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TBS) is considered to produce plastic changes in human motor cortex. Here, we examined the inhibitory and excitatory effects of TBS on implicit sequence learning using a probabilistic serial reaction time paradigm. We investigated the involvement of several cortical regions associated with implicit…

  2. The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Visual Extinction Studied with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battelli, Lorella; Alvarez, George A.; Carlson, Thomas; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    Interhemispheric competition between homologous areas in the human brain is believed to be involved in a wide variety of human behaviors from motor activity to visual perception and particularly attention. For example, patients with lesions in the posterior parietal cortex are unable to selectively track objects in the contralesional side of…

  3. 76 FR 44489 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... flexibility in how they meet those requirements. Cf. Papike v. Tambrands, Inc., 107 F.3d 737, 740-42 (9th Cir... SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 882 Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification... distribution before May 28, 1976, the date of enactment of the Medical Device Amendments of 1976,...

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in ALS Utility of central motor conduction tests

    E-print Network

    Pullman, Seth L.

    ) measures as clinical correlates and longitudinal markers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods amplitude, can objectively discriminate corticospinal tract involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis minimi; ALS amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; ANOVA analysis of variance; CI confidence interval; CMAP

  5. When Nominal Features Are Marked on Verbs: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finocchiaro, C.; Fierro, B.; Brighina, F.; Giglia, G.; Francolini, M.; Caramazza, A.

    2008-01-01

    It has been claimed that verb processing (as opposed to noun processing) is subserved by specific neural circuits in the left prefrontal cortex. In this study, we took advantage of the unusual grammatical characteristics of clitic pronouns in Italian (e.g., "lo" and "la" in "portalo" and "portala" "bring it [masculine]/[feminine]",…

  6. The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Visual Extinction Studied with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    E-print Network

    Battelli, Lorella

    Interhemispheric competition between homologous areas in the human brain is believed to be involved in a wide variety of human behaviors from motor activity to visual perception and particularly attention. For example, ...

  7. Neocerebellar Kalman filter linguistic processor: from grammaticalization to transcranial magnetic stimulation 

    E-print Network

    Argyropoulos, Giorgos Panagiotis

    2011-06-29

    The present work introduces a synthesis of neocerebellar state estimation and feedforward control with multi-level language processing. The approach combines insights from clinical, imaging, and modelling work on the ...

  8. Long-Term Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Hippocampal Reactivity to Afferent Stimulation

    E-print Network

    Segal, Menahem

    in efficacy of central modula- tory systems. Key words: rat; hippocampus; serotonin; norepinephrine; TMS) suggest antide- pressant efficacy for TMS in humans. Despite its growing usage, few studies on possible. Indeed, the great majority of the antidepressant drugs block the reuptake of serotonin or norepinephrine

  9. Multiscale coupling of transcranial direct current stimulation to neuron electrodynamics: modeling the influence of the transcranial electric field on neuronal depolarization.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Edward T; Turner, James C; Vogel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) continues to demonstrate success as a medical intervention for neurodegenerative diseases, psychological conditions, and traumatic brain injury recovery. One aspect of tDCS still not fully comprehended is the influence of the tDCS electric field on neural functionality. To address this issue, we present a mathematical, multiscale model that couples tDCS administration to neuron electrodynamics. We demonstrate the model's validity and medical applicability with computational simulations using an idealized two-dimensional domain and then an MRI-derived, three-dimensional human head geometry possessing inhomogeneous and anisotropic tissue conductivities. We exemplify the capabilities of these simulations with real-world tDCS electrode configurations and treatment parameters and compare the model's predictions to those attained from medical research studies. The model is implemented using efficient numerical strategies and solution techniques to allow the use of fine computational grids needed by the medical community. PMID:25404950

  10. High-resolution magnetics reveal the deep structure of a volcanic-arc-related basalt-hosted hydrothermal site (Palinuro, Tyrrhenian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szitkar, Florent; Petersen, Sven; Caratori Tontini, Fabio; Cocchi, Luca

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution magnetic surveys have been acquired over the partially sedimented Palinuro massive sulfide deposits in the Aeolian volcanic arc, Tyrrhenian Sea. Surveys flown close to the seafloor using an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) show that the volcanic-arc-related basalt-hosted hydrothermal site is associated with zones of lower magnetization. This observation reflects the alteration of basalt affected by hydrothermal circulation and/or the progressive accumulation of a nonmagnetic deposit made of hydrothermal and volcaniclastic material and/or a thermal demagnetization of titanomagnetite due to the upwelling of hot fluids. To discriminate among these inferences, estimate the shape of the nonmagnetic deposit and the characteristics of the underlying altered area—the stockwork—we use high-resolution vector magnetic data acquired by the AUV Abyss (GEOMAR) above a crater-shaped depression hosting a weakly active hydrothermal site. Our study unveils a relatively small nonmagnetic deposit accumulated at the bottom of the depression and locked between the surrounding volcanic cones. Thermal demagnetization is unlikely but the stockwork extends beyond the limits of the nonmagnetic deposit, forming lobe-shaped zones believed to be a consequence of older volcanic episodes having contributed in generating the cones.

  11. Transcranial infrared laser stimulation produces beneficial cognitive and emotional effects in humans.

    PubMed

    Barrett, D W; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2013-01-29

    This is the first controlled study demonstrating the beneficial effects of transcranial laser stimulation on cognitive and emotional functions in humans. Photobiomodulation with red to near-infrared light is a novel intervention shown to regulate neuronal function in cell cultures, animal models, and clinical conditions. Light that intersects with the absorption spectrum of cytochrome oxidase was applied to the forehead of healthy volunteers using the laser diode CG-5000, which maximizes tissue penetration and has been used in humans for other indications. We tested whether low-level laser stimulation produces beneficial effects on frontal cortex measures of attention, memory and mood. Reaction time in a sustained-attention psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) was significantly improved in the treated (n=20) vs. placebo control (n=20) groups, especially in high novelty-seeking subjects. Performance in a delayed match-to-sample (DMS) memory task showed also a significant improvement in treated vs. control groups as measured by memory retrieval latency and number of correct trials. The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS-X), which tracks self-reported positive and negative affective (emotional) states over time, was administered immediately before treatment and 2 weeks after treatment. The PANAS showed that while participants generally reported more positive affective states than negative, overall affect improved significantly in the treated group due to more sustained positive emotional states as compared to the placebo control group. These data imply that transcranial laser stimulation could be used as a non-invasive and efficacious approach to increase brain functions such as those related to cognitive and emotional dimensions. Transcranial infrared laser stimulation has also been proven to be safe and successful at improving neurological outcome in humans in controlled clinical trials of stroke. This innovative approach could lead to the development of non-invasive, performance-enhancing interventions in healthy humans and in those in need of neuropsychological rehabilitation. PMID:23200785

  12. Transcranial functional ultrasound imaging of the brain using microbubble-enhanced ultrasensitive Doppler.

    PubMed

    Errico, Claudia; Osmanski, Bruno-Félix; Pezet, Sophie; Couture, Olivier; Lenkei, Zsolt; Tanter, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    Functional ultrasound (fUS) is a novel neuroimaging technique, based on high-sensitivity ultrafast Doppler imaging of cerebral blood volume, capable of measuring brain activation and connectivity in rodents with high spatiotemporal resolution (100?m, 1ms). However, the skull attenuates acoustic waves, so fUS in rats currently requires craniotomy or a thinned-skull window. Here we propose a non-invasive approach by enhancing the fUS signal with a contrast agent, inert gas microbubbles. Plane-wave illumination of the brain at high frame rate (500Hz compounded sequence with three tilted plane waves, PRF=1500Hz with a 128 element 15MHz linear transducer), yields highly-resolved neurovascular maps. We compared fUS imaging performance through the intact skull bone (transcranial fUS) versus a thinned-skull window in the same animal. First, we show that the vascular network of the adult rat brain can be imaged transcranially only after a bolus intravenous injection of microbubbles, which leads to a 9dB gain in the contrast-to-tissue ratio. Next, we demonstrate that functional increase in the blood volume of the primary sensory cortex after targeted electrical-evoked stimulations of the sciatic nerve is observable transcranially in presence of contrast agents, with high reproducibility (Pearson's coefficient ?=0.7±0.1, p=0.85). Our work demonstrates that the combination of ultrafast Doppler imaging and injection of contrast agent allows non-invasive functional brain imaging through the intact skull bone in rats. These results should ease non-invasive longitudinal studies in rodents and open a promising perspective for the adoption of highly resolved fUS approaches for the adult human brain. PMID:26416649

  13. The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation: a role for cortical excitation/inhibition balance?

    PubMed

    Krause, Beatrix; Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising tool for cognitive enhancement and neurorehabilitation in clinical disorders in both cognitive and clinical domains (e.g., chronic pain, tinnitus). Here we suggest the potential role of tDCS in modulating cortical excitation/inhibition (E/I) balance and thereby inducing improvements. We suggest that part of the mechanism of action of tDCS can be explained by non-invasive modulations of the E/I balance. PMID:24068995

  14. All-optical osteotomy to create windows for transcranial imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Diana C; Tsai, Philbert S; Kleinfeld, David

    2013-10-01

    Surgical procedures as a prelude to optical imaging are a rate-limiting step in experimental neuroscience. Towards automation of these procedures, we describe the use of nonlinear optical techniques to create a thinned skull window for transcranial imaging. Metrology by second harmonic generation was used to map the surfaces of the skull and define a cutting path. Plasma-mediated laser ablation was utilized to cut bone. Mice prepared with these techniques were used to image subsurface cortical vasculature and blood flow. The viability of the brain tissue was confirmed via histological analysis and supports the utility of solely optical techniques for osteotomy and potentially other surgical procedures. PMID:24104230

  15. Efficacy of transcranial magnetotherapy in the complex treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Staroverov, A T; Zhukov, O B; Raigorodskii, Yu M

    2009-11-01

    A total of 54 patients with alcoholism were studied during abstinence. Of these, 29 patients in the experimental group received basal therapy supplemented with physical treatment consisting of transcranial dynamic magnetotherapy (TcDMT), while the control group of 25 patients received only basal therapy. Comparison of the status of patients in the experimental and control groups during treatment demonstrated advantages of TcDMT in relation to improving the functional state of the CNS, memory, and attention, the autonomic nervous system, and the psychoemotional status of the patients (with decreases in the severity of anxiety and depression). PMID:19830574

  16. Aberration correction for transcranial photoacoustic tomography of primates employing adjunct image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; Nie, Liming; Schoonover, Robert W.; Guo, Zijian; Schirra, Carsten O.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-06-01

    A challenge in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) brain imaging is to compensate for aberrations in the measured photoacoustic data due to their propagation through the skull. By use of information regarding the skull morphology and composition obtained from adjunct x-ray computed tomography image data, we developed a subject-specific imaging model that accounts for such aberrations. A time-reversal-based reconstruction algorithm was employed with this model for image reconstruction. The image reconstruction methodology was evaluated in experimental studies involving phantoms and monkey heads. The results establish that our reconstruction methodology can effectively compensate for skull-induced acoustic aberrations and improve image fidelity in transcranial PAT.

  17. Assessment of hemodynamic disturbances in aphasic patients by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Pendefunda, L

    1989-01-01

    The author presents a study of Doppler cerebrovascular ultrasonography carried out in 38 aphasie patients (forms ranging from transient speech disturbances to severe, persistent disturbances of motor, sensory or mixed aphasia) after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. In these cases, the clinical symptoms were dominated by speech impairment and neurological deficits (mainly pyramidal), of low intensity or transient. The angiographic study revealed stenotic or occlusive disturbances at various levels of the cerebral arterial trunks. The prevalence of some clinical aspects of aphasia correlated with Doppler velocimetric images is discussed and the use of transcranial Doppler method in idiopathic aphasia, possible consequence of a transient ischemic attack, is suggested. PMID:2479971

  18. Aberration correction for transcranial photoacoustic tomography of primates employing adjunct image data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Schoonover, Robert W.; Guo, Zijian; Schirra, Carsten O.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. A challenge in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) brain imaging is to compensate for aberrations in the measured photoacoustic data due to their propagation through the skull. By use of information regarding the skull morphology and composition obtained from adjunct x-ray computed tomography image data, we developed a subject-specific imaging model that accounts for such aberrations. A time-reversal-based reconstruction algorithm was employed with this model for image reconstruction. The image reconstruction methodology was evaluated in experimental studies involving phantoms and monkey heads. The results establish that our reconstruction methodology can effectively compensate for skull-induced acoustic aberrations and improve image fidelity in transcranial PAT. PMID:22734772

  19. Numerical investigation of the effects of shear waves in transcranial photoacoustic tomography with a planar geometry

    PubMed Central

    Schoonover, Robert W.; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Using a recently developed reconstruction method for photoacoustic tomography (PAT) valid for a planar measurement geometry parallel to a layered medium, we investigate the effects of shear wave propagation in the solid layer upon the ability to estimate Fourier components of the object. We examine this ability as a function of the thickness of the layer supporting shear waves as well as of the incidence angle of the field in the planewave representation. Examples are used to demonstrate the importance of accounting for shear waves in transcranial PAT. Error measures are introduced to quantify the error found when omitting shear waves from the forward model in PAT. PMID:22734745

  20. All-optical osteotomy to create windows for transcranial imaging in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Diana C.; Tsai, Philbert S.; Kleinfeld, David

    2013-01-01

    Surgical procedures as a prelude to optical imaging are a rate-limiting step in experimental neuroscience. Towards automation of these procedures, we describe the use of nonlinear optical techniques to create a thinned skull window for transcranial imaging. Metrology by second harmonic generation was used to map the surfaces of the skull and define a cutting path. Plasma-mediated laser ablation was utilized to cut bone. Mice prepared with these techniques were used to image subsurface cortical vasculature and blood flow. The viability of the brain tissue was confirmed via histological analysis and supports the utility of solely optical techniques for osteotomy and potentially other surgical procedures. PMID:24104230

  1. Single-layer skull approximations perform well in transcranial direct current stimulation modeling.

    PubMed

    Rampersad, Sumientra M; Stegeman, Dick F; Oostendorp, Thom F

    2013-05-01

    In modeling the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation, the representation of the skull is an important factor. In a spherical model, we compared a realistic skull modeling approach, in which the skull consisted of three isotropic layers, to anisotropic and isotropic single-layer approximations. We simulated direct current stimulation for a range of conductivity values and investigated differences in the resulting current densities. Our results demonstrate that both approximation methods perform well, provided that the optimal conductivity values are used. We found that for both the anisotropic and the isotropic approximations the optimal conductivity values are largely dictated by the equivalent radial conductivity of the three-layered skull. PMID:22855232

  2. Deep pockets for deep seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Peter Auster, a fisheries ecologist with the National Undersea Research Center in Connecticut, plans to assess degradation of the deep-shelf seafloor from bottom trawling. Magnus Ngoile, an official with Tanzania's National Environmental Management Council, will work on building capacity of poor villagers to protect their coastline. And Alison Rieser, a lawyer with the University of Maine School of Law, will produce a textbook to educate scientists on how to apply the law for marine conservation.These individuals are among 11 recipients of the Pew Charitable Trust's 10th annual marine conservation fellowships, announced on July 12. With each recipient receiving an award of $150,000, the program is the world's largest award for marine conservationists. Other 1999 recipients will be involved with areas including investigating marine pollution in the Arctic region, examining economic incentives for conservation in Baja, Mexico, and establishing a marine conservation biology training program for minority students.

  3. Magnetic field-dependent molecular and chemical processes in biochemistry, genetics and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular concept (paradigm) in magnetobiology seems to be most substantiated and significant for explaining the biomedical effects of electromagnetic fields, for the new medical technology of transcranial magnetic stimulation of cognitive activity, for the nuclear magnetic control of biochemical processes and for the search of new magnetic effects in biology and medicine. The key structural element of the concept is a radical ion pair as the receiver of magnetic fields and the source of magnetic effects. The existence of such pairs was recently detected in the two life-supporting processes of paramount importance — in enzymatic ATP and DNA syntheses. The bibliography includes 80 references.

  4. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis? Español Deep vein thrombosis (throm-BO-sis), or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Blood clots occur when blood ...

  5. Deep breathing after surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... way to do so is by doing deep breathing exercises. Deep breathing keeps your lungs well-inflated and ... your or nurse told you. Do these deep-breathing exercises as directed by your doctor or nurse.

  6. Deep Research Submarine

    E-print Network

    Woertz, Jeff

    2002-02-01

    The Deep Sea Research Submarine (Figure 1) is a modified VIRGINIA Class Submarine that incorporates a permanently installed Deep Sea Operations Compartment (Figure 2). Table 1 summarizes the characteristics of the Deep ...

  7. Safety of Microbubbles and Transcranial Ultrasound in Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culp, William C.; Brown, Aliza T.; Hennings, Leah; Lowery, John; Culp, Benjamin C.; Erdem, Eren; Roberson, Paula; Matsunaga, Terry O.

    2007-05-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the safety of large doses of microbubbles and ultrasound administered to the head of rabbits as if they were receiving acute stroke therapy of a similar nature. Materials and Methods: Female New Zealand White rabbits were used, N=24, in three groups 1] n=4 control (no treatment), 2] n=10 bubble control (ultrasound plus aspirin), and 3] n=10 target group (ultrasound plus aspirin plus MRX-815 microbubbles). Group 3 was infused with IV bubbles over 1 hour at 0.16cc/kg. Ultrasound was delivered to the dehaired side of the head during bubble infusion and for 1 additional hour at 0.8 W/cm2 20% pulsed wave. Rabbits survived for 22 to 24 hours, were imaged with computerized tomography and 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging including contrast studies, and sacrificed. Tetrazolium (TTC) and Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) sections were made for pathological examination. Results: All 24 animals showed absence of bleeding, endothelial damage, EKG abnormalities, stroke, blood-brain-barrier breakdown, or other acute abnormalities. CT and MRI showed no bleeding or signs of stroke, but two animals had mild hydrocephalus. The EKGs showed normal variation in QTc. Rabbit behavior was normal in all. Minimal chronic inflammation unrelated to the study was seen in 5. Two animals were excluded because of protocol violations and replaced during the study. Conclusion: The administered dose of microbubbles and ultrasound demonstrated no detrimental effects on the healthy rabbit animal model.

  8. Magnetic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bath, G.D.; Jahren, C.E.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Baldwin, M.J.

    1983-12-31

    Air and ground magnetic anomalies in the Climax stock area of the NTS help define the gross configuration of the stock and detailed configuration of magnetized rocks at the Boundary and Tippinip faults that border the stock. Magnetizations of geologic units were evaluated by measurements of magnetic properties of drill core, minimum estimates of magnetizations from ground magnetic anomalies for near surface rocks, and comparisons of measured anomalies with anomalies computed by a three-dimensional forward program. Alluvial deposits and most sedimentary rocks are nonmagnetic, but drill core measurements reveal large and irregular changes in magnetization for some quartzites and marbles. The magnetizations of quartz monzonite and granodiorite near the stock surface are weak, about 0.15 A/m, and increase at a rate of 0.00196 A/m/m to 1.55 A/m, at depths greater than 700 m (2300 ft). The volcanic rocks of the area are weakly magnetized. Aeromagnetic anomalies 850 m (2800 ft) above the stock are explained by a model consisting of five vertical prisms. Prisms 1, 2, and 3 represent the near surface outline of the stock, prism 4 is one of the models developed by Whitehill (1973), and prism 5 is modified from the model developed by Allingham and Zietz (1962). Most of the anomaly comes from unsampled and strongly-magnetized deep sources that could be either granite or metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. 48 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Image-guided transcranial focused ultrasound stimulates human primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyungmin; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2015-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has recently been investigated as a new mode of non-invasive brain stimulation, which offers exquisite spatial resolution and depth control. We report on the elicitation of explicit somatosensory sensations as well as accompanying evoked electroencephalographic (EEG) potentials induced by FUS stimulation of the human somatosensory cortex. As guided by individual-specific neuroimage data, FUS was transcranially delivered to the hand somatosensory cortex among healthy volunteers. The sonication elicited transient tactile sensations on the hand area contralateral to the sonicated hemisphere, with anatomical specificity of up to a finger, while EEG recordings revealed the elicitation of sonication-specific evoked potentials. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic propagation through the skull showed that a threshold of acoustic intensity may exist for successful cortical stimulation. The neurological and neuroradiological assessment before and after the sonication, along with strict safety considerations through the individual-specific estimation of effective acoustic intensity in situ and thermal effects, showed promising initial safety profile; however, equal/more rigorous precautionary procedures are advised for future studies. The transient and localized stimulation of the brain using image-guided transcranial FUS may serve as a novel tool for the non-invasive assessment and modification of region-specific brain function. PMID:25735418

  10. Monte Carlo analysis of the enhanced transcranial penetration using distributed near-infrared emitter array.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lan; Humayun, Mark S

    2015-08-01

    Transcranial near-infrared (NIR) treatment of neurological diseases has gained recent momentum. However, the low NIR dose available to the brain, which shows severe scattering and absorption of the photons by human tissues, largely limits its effectiveness in clinical use. Hereby, we propose to take advantage of the strong scattering effect of the cranial tissues by applying an evenly distributed multiunit emitter array on the scalp to enhance the cerebral photon density while maintaining each single emitter operating under the safe thermal limit. By employing the Monte Carlo method, we simulated the transcranial propagation of the array emitted light and demonstrated markedly enhanced intracranial photon flux as well as improved uniformity of the photon distribution. These enhancements are correlated with the source location, density, and wavelength of light. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first systematic analysis of the intracranial light field established by the scalp-applied multisource array and reveal a strategy for the optimization of the therapeutic effects of the NIR radiation. PMID:26252627

  11. Image-Guided Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Stimulates Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyungmin; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2015-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has recently been investigated as a new mode of non-invasive brain stimulation, which offers exquisite spatial resolution and depth control. We report on the elicitation of explicit somatosensory sensations as well as accompanying evoked electroencephalographic (EEG) potentials induced by FUS stimulation of the human somatosensory cortex. As guided by individual-specific neuroimage data, FUS was transcranially delivered to the hand somatosensory cortex among healthy volunteers. The sonication elicited transient tactile sensations on the hand area contralateral to the sonicated hemisphere, with anatomical specificity of up to a finger, while EEG recordings revealed the elicitation of sonication-specific evoked potentials. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic propagation through the skull showed that a threshold of acoustic intensity may exist for successful cortical stimulation. The neurological and neuroradiological assessment before and after the sonication, along with strict safety considerations through the individual-specific estimation of effective acoustic intensity in situ and thermal effects, showed promising initial safety profile; however, equal/more rigorous precautionary procedures are advised for future studies. The transient and localized stimulation of the brain using image-guided transcranial FUS may serve as a novel tool for the non-invasive assessment and modification of region-specific brain function. PMID:25735418

  12. Image-Guided Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Stimulates Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyungmin; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2015-03-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has recently been investigated as a new mode of non-invasive brain stimulation, which offers exquisite spatial resolution and depth control. We report on the elicitation of explicit somatosensory sensations as well as accompanying evoked electroencephalographic (EEG) potentials induced by FUS stimulation of the human somatosensory cortex. As guided by individual-specific neuroimage data, FUS was transcranially delivered to the hand somatosensory cortex among healthy volunteers. The sonication elicited transient tactile sensations on the hand area contralateral to the sonicated hemisphere, with anatomical specificity of up to a finger, while EEG recordings revealed the elicitation of sonication-specific evoked potentials. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic propagation through the skull showed that a threshold of acoustic intensity may exist for successful cortical stimulation. The neurological and neuroradiological assessment before and after the sonication, along with strict safety considerations through the individual-specific estimation of effective acoustic intensity in situ and thermal effects, showed promising initial safety profile; however, equal/more rigorous precautionary procedures are advised for future studies. The transient and localized stimulation of the brain using image-guided transcranial FUS may serve as a novel tool for the non-invasive assessment and modification of region-specific brain function.

  13. Experimental and biological variation of three-dimensional transcranial Doppler measurements.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L L; Iversen, H K

    1993-12-01

    A new transcranial Doppler system (3-D Transscan, Eden Medizinische Elektronik) was evaluated in relation to sex, age, intersubject, interobserver, side-to-side, and day-to-day variation. Fifty-eight healthy volunteers participated (aged 18-80 yr). Mean velocity was higher in females than in males and decreased with age. The coefficient of variation in the middle cerebral artery was 26% between subjects, 20% between sides, 16% between days, 13% between observers, and 7% during 5 min. The coefficient of variation was higher in the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries. Bruits were heard in 35 subjects, 24 females and 11 males (P = 0.002). When middle cerebral artery velocity was monitored, high- and low-frequency oscillations were found, with a mean frequency of 5 and 1.6/min, respectively. These variations underline the necessity of standardized conditions and very carefully matched control groups in studies using transcranial Doppler. This is especially important when expected changes are small and easy to overlook, as in studies of normal physiological responses and migraine. PMID:7907324

  14. Friends, not foes: Magnetoencephalography as a tool to uncover brain dynamics during transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Neuling, Toralf; Ruhnau, Philipp; Fuscà, Marco; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Herrmann, Christoph S; Weisz, Nathan

    2015-09-01

    Brain oscillations are supposedly crucial for normal cognitive functioning and alterations are associated with cognitive dysfunctions. To demonstrate their causal role on behavior, entrainment approaches in particular aim at driving endogenous oscillations via rhythmic stimulation. Within this context, transcranial electrical stimulation, especially transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), has received renewed attention. This is likely due to the possibility of defining oscillatory stimulation properties precisely. Also, measurements comparing pre-tACS with post-tACS electroencephalography (EEG) have shown impressive modulations. However, the period during tACS has remained a blackbox until now, due to the enormous stimulation artifact. By means of application of beamforming to magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we successfully recovered modulations of the amplitude of brain oscillations during weak and strong tACS. Additionally, we demonstrate that also evoked responses to visual and auditory stimuli can be recovered during tACS. The main contribution of the present study is to provide critical evidence that during ongoing tACS, subtle modulations of oscillatory brain activity can be reconstructed even at the stimulation frequency. Future tACS experiments will be able to deliver direct physiological insights in order to further the understanding of the contribution of brain oscillations to cognition and behavior. PMID:26080310

  15. High-resolution Modeling Assisted Design of Customized and Individualized Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Bikson, Marom; Rahman, Asif; Datta, Abhishek; Fregni, Felipe; Merabet, Lotfi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that delivers low-intensity currents facilitating or inhibiting spontaneous neuronal activity. tDCS is attractive since dose is readily adjustable by simply changing electrode number, position, size, shape, and current. In the recent past, computational models have been developed with increased precision with the goal to help customize tDCS dose. The aim of this review is to discuss the incorporation of high-resolution patient-specific computer modeling to guide and optimize tDCS. Methods In this review, we discuss the following topics: (i) The clinical motivation and rationale for models of transcranial stimulation is considered pivotal in order to leverage the flexibility of neuromodulation; (ii) The protocols and the workflow for developing high-resolution models; (iii) The technical challenges and limitations of interpreting modeling predictions, and (iv) Real cases merging modeling and clinical data illustrating the impact of computational models on the rational design of rehabilitative electrotherapy. Conclusions Though modeling for non-invasive brain stimulation is still in its development phase, it is predicted that with increased validation, dissemination, simplification and democratization of modeling tools, computational forward models of neuromodulation will become useful tools to guide the optimization of clinical electrotherapy. PMID:22780230

  16. On the possible role of stimulation duration for after-effects of transcranial alternating current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Strüber, Daniel; Rach, Stefan; Neuling, Toralf; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation is a novel method that allows application of sinusoidal currents to modulate brain oscillations and cognitive processes. Studies in humans have demonstrated transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) after-effects following stimulation durations in the range of minutes. However, such after-effects are absent in animal studies using much shorter stimulation protocols in the range of seconds. Thus, stimulation duration might be a critical parameter for after-effects to occur. To test this hypothesis, we repeated a recent human tACS experiment with a short duration. We applied alpha tACS intermittently for 1 s duration while keeping other parameters identical. The results demonstrate that this very short intermittent protocol did not produce after-effects on amplitude or phase of the electroencephalogram. Since synaptic plasticity has been suggested as a possible mechanism for after-effects, our results indicate that a stimulation duration of 1 s is too short to induce synaptic plasticity. Future studies in animals are required that use extended stimulation durations to reveal the neuronal underpinnings. A better understanding of the mechanisms of tACS after-effects is crucial for potential clinical applications. PMID:26321912

  17. High-Frequency Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation Enhances Perception of Facial Identity.

    PubMed

    Romanska, Aleksandra; Rezlescu, Constantin; Susilo, Tirta; Duchaine, Bradley; Banissy, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of transcranial current stimulation as a tool to facilitate a variety of cognitive and perceptual abilities. Few studies, though, have examined the utility of this approach for the processing of social information. Here, we conducted 2 experiments to explore whether a single session of high-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) targeted at lateral occipitotemporal cortices would enhance facial identity perception. In Experiment 1, participants received 20 min of active high-frequency tRNS or sham stimulation prior to completing the tasks examining facial identity perception or trustworthiness perception. Active high-frequency tRNS facilitated facial identity perception, but not trustworthiness perception. Experiment 2 assessed the spatial specificity of this effect by delivering 20 min of active high-frequency tRNS to lateral occipitotemporal cortices or sensorimotor cortices prior to participants completing the same facial identity perception task used in Experiment 1. High-frequency tRNS targeted at lateral occipitotemporal cortices enhanced performance relative to motor cortex stimulation. These findings show that high-frequency tRNS to lateral occipitotemporal cortices produces task-specific and site-specific enhancements in face perception. PMID:25662714

  18. Neuroimmunomodulatory effects of transcranial laser therapy combined with intravenous tPA administration for acute cerebral ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Peplow, Philip V.

    2015-01-01

    At present, the only FDA approved treatment for ischemic strokes is intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator within 4.5 hours of stroke onset. Owing to this brief window only a small percentage of patients receive tissue plasminogen activator. Transcranial laser therapy has been shown to be effective in animal models of acute ischemic stroke, resulting in significant improvement in neurological score and function. NEST-1 and NEST-2 clinical trials in human patients have demonstrated the safety and positive trends in efficacy of transcranial laser therapy for the treatment of ischemic stroke when initiated close to the time of stroke onset. Combining intravenous tissue plasminogen activator treatment with transcranial laser therapy may provide better functional outcomes. Statins given within 4 weeks of stroke onset improve stroke outcomes at 90 days compared to patients not given statins, and giving statins following transcranial laser therapy may provide an effective treatment for patients not able to be given tissue plasminogen activator due to time constraints. PMID:26487831

  19. Feasibility of Transcranial, Localized Drug-delivery in the Brain of Alzheimers-model Mice Using Focused Ultrasound

    E-print Network

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    Feasibility of Transcranial, Localized Drug-delivery in the Brain of Alzheimers-model Mice Using the BBB is the rate-limiting factor in brain drug delivery development [3]. The BBB is a specialized actively transported. A successful drug delivery system requires transient, localized, and non

  20. Medical treatment of horses with deep digital flexor tendon injuries diagnosed with high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging: 118 cases (2000-2010).

    PubMed

    Lutter, John D; Schneider, Robert K; Sampson, Sarah N; Cary, Julie A; Roberts, Greg D; Vahl, Christopher I

    2015-12-01

    Objective-To describe the location and severity of deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) lesions diagnosed by means of high-field-strength MRI in horses and to identify variables associated with return to activity following medical treatment. Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-118 horses. Procedures-Medical records of horses with DDFT injury diagnosed with MRI over a 10-year period (2000-2010) and treated medically (intrasynovial administration of corticosteroids and sodium hyaluronan, rest and rehabilitation, or both) were reviewed. History, signalment, use, results of lameness examination and diagnostic local anesthesia, MRI findings, and treatment details were recorded. Outcome was obtained by telephone interview or follow-up examination. Horses were grouped by predictor variables and analyzed with logistic regression to identify significant effects. Results-Overall, of 97 horses available for follow-up (median time to follow-up, 5 years; range, 1 to 12 years), 59 (61%) returned to activity for a mean duration of 22.6 months (median, 18 months; range, 3 to 72 months), with 25 (26%) still sound at follow-up. Of horses with mild, moderate, and severe injury, 21 of 29 (72%), 20 of 36 (56%), and 18 of 32 (56%), respectively, returned to use. Horses treated with intrasynovial corticosteroid injection and 6 months of rest and rehabilitation returned to use for a significantly longer duration than did horses treated without rest. Western performance horses returned to use for a significantly longer duration than did English performance horses. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results of the present study suggested that outcome for horses with DDFT injuries treated medically depended on injury severity, presence of concurrent injury to other structures in the foot, type of activity, and owner compliance with specific treatment recommendations. Although some horses successfully returned to prior activity, additional treatment options are needed to improve outcome in horses with severe injuries and to improve long-term prognosis. PMID:26594815

  1. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ174 WOMEN’S HEALTH Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis • What is deep vein thrombosis ( DVT) ? • How does a clot form ... diagnosed? • How is DVT treated? • Glossary What is deep vein thrombosis (DVT)? Deep vein thrombosis is a ...

  2. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during sleep has a sleep-stabilizing effect in chronic insomnia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Saebipour, Mohammad R; Joghataei, Mohammad T; Yoonessi, Ali; Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Khalighinejad, Nima; Khademi, Soroush

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that lack of slow-wave activity may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of insomnia. Pharmacological approaches and brain stimulation techniques have recently offered solutions for increasing slow-wave activity during sleep. We used slow (0.75 Hz) oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation during stage 2 of non-rapid eye movement sleeping insomnia patients for resonating their brain waves to the frequency of sleep slow-wave. Six patients diagnosed with either sleep maintenance or non-restorative sleep insomnia entered the study. After 1 night of adaptation and 1 night of baseline polysomnography, patients randomly received sham or real stimulation on the third and fourth night of the experiment. Our preliminary results show that after termination of stimulations (sham or real), slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation increased the duration of stage 3 of non-rapid eye movement sleep by 33 ± 26 min (P = 0.026), and decreased stage 1 of non-rapid eye movement sleep duration by 22 ± 17.7 min (P = 0.028), compared with sham. Slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation decreased stage 1 of non-rapid eye movement sleep and wake time after sleep-onset durations, together, by 55.4 ± 51 min (P = 0.045). Slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation also increased sleep efficiency by 9 ± 7% (P = 0.026), and probability of transition from stage 2 to stage 3 of non-rapid eye movement sleep by 20 ± 17.8% (P = 0.04). Meanwhile, slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation decreased transitions from stage 2 of non-rapid eye movement sleep to wake by 12 ± 6.7% (P = 0.007). Our preliminary results suggest a sleep-stabilizing role for the intervention, which may mimic the effect of sleep slow-wave-enhancing drugs. PMID:26014344

  3. Learning Deep Generative Ruslan Salakhutdinov

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    Learning Deep Generative Models Ruslan Salakhutdinov Departments of Computer Science reserved Keywords deep learning, deep belief networks, deep Boltzmann machines, graphical models Abstract suggest that building such systems requires models with deep architectures that involve many layers

  4. Microscopic magnetic stimulation of neural tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bonmassar, Giorgio; Lee, Seung Woo; Freeman, Daniel K.; Polasek, Miloslav; Fried, Shelley I.; Gale, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently used to treat a wide range of cardiovascular, sensory and neurological diseases. Despite its success, there are significant limitations to its application, including incompatibility with magnetic resonance imaging, limited control of electric fields and decreased performance associated with tissue inflammation. Magnetic stimulation overcomes these limitations but existing devices (that is, transcranial magnetic stimulation) are large, reducing their translation to chronic applications. In addition, existing devices are not effective for deeper, sub-cortical targets. Here we demonstrate that sub-millimeter coils can activate neuronal tissue. Interestingly, the results of both modelling and physiological experiments suggest that different spatial orientations of the coils relative to the neuronal tissue can be used to generate specific neural responses. These results raise the possibility that micro-magnetic stimulation coils, small enough to be implanted within the brain parenchyma, may prove to be an effective alternative to existing stimulation devices. PMID:22735449

  5. In vivo targeted magnetic resonance imaging and visualized photodynamic therapy in deep-tissue cancers using folic acid-functionalized superparamagnetic-upconversion nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Leyong; Luo, Lijia; Pan, Yuanwei; Luo, Song; Lu, Guangming; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-05-01

    Multifunctional nanoprobes used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) also have potential applications in diagnosis and visualized therapy of cancers, and hence it is important to investigate the active-targeting ability and in vivo reliability of these nanoprobes. In this work, folic acid (FA)-targeted, photosensitizer (PS)-loaded Fe3O4@NaYF4:Yb/Er (FA-NPs-PS) nanocomposites were synthesized for in vivo T2-weighted MRI and visualized PDT of cancers by modeling MCF-7 tumor-bearing nude mice. By measuring the upconversion luminescence (UCL) and fluorescence emission spectra, the as-prepared FA-NPs-PS nanocomposites showed near-infrared (NIR)-triggered PDT performance due to the production of a singlet oxygen species. Moreover, by tracing PS fluorescence in MCF-7, HeLa cells and in MCF-7 tumors, the FA-targeted nanocomposites demonstrated good targeting ability both in vitro and in vivo. Under the irradiation of a 980 nm laser, the viabilities of MCF-7 and HeLa cells incubated with FA-NPs-PS nanocomposites could decrease to about 18.4% and 30.7%, respectively, and the inhibition of MCF-7 tumors could reach about 94.9%. The transverse MR relaxivity of 63.79 mM-1 s-1 (r2 value) and in vivo MR imaging of MCF-7 tumors indicated an excellent T2-weighted MR performance. This work demonstrated that FA-targeted MRI/PDT nanoprobes are effective for in vivo diagnosis and visualized therapy of breast cancers.Multifunctional nanoprobes used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) also have potential applications in diagnosis and visualized therapy of cancers, and hence it is important to investigate the active-targeting ability and in vivo reliability of these nanoprobes. In this work, folic acid (FA)-targeted, photosensitizer (PS)-loaded Fe3O4@NaYF4:Yb/Er (FA-NPs-PS) nanocomposites were synthesized for in vivo T2-weighted MRI and visualized PDT of cancers by modeling MCF-7 tumor-bearing nude mice. By measuring the upconversion luminescence (UCL) and fluorescence emission spectra, the as-prepared FA-NPs-PS nanocomposites showed near-infrared (NIR)-triggered PDT performance due to the production of a singlet oxygen species. Moreover, by tracing PS fluorescence in MCF-7, HeLa cells and in MCF-7 tumors, the FA-targeted nanocomposites demonstrated good targeting ability both in vitro and in vivo. Under the irradiation of a 980 nm laser, the viabilities of MCF-7 and HeLa cells incubated with FA-NPs-PS nanocomposites could decrease to about 18.4% and 30.7%, respectively, and the inhibition of MCF-7 tumors could reach about 94.9%. The transverse MR relaxivity of 63.79 mM-1 s-1 (r2 value) and in vivo MR imaging of MCF-7 tumors indicated an excellent T2-weighted MR performance. This work demonstrated that FA-targeted MRI/PDT nanoprobes are effective for in vivo diagnosis and visualized therapy of breast cancers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01932j

  6. Impact of brain tissue filtering on neurostimulation fields: A modeling study

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Tim

    Electrical neurostimulation techniques, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are increasingly used in the neurosciences, e.g., for studying brain function, and for neurotherapeutics, ...

  7. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex in waking resting state induces motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Speth, Jana; Speth, Clemens; Harley, Trevor A

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates if anodal and cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of areas above the motor cortex (C3) influences spontaneous motor imagery experienced in the waking resting state. A randomized triple-blinded design was used, combining neurophysiological techniques with tools of quantitative mentation report analysis from cognitive linguistics. The results indicate that while spontaneous motor imagery rarely occurs under sham stimulation, general and athletic motor imagery (classified as athletic disciplines), is induced by anodal tDCS. This insight may have implications beyond basic consciousness research. Motor imagery and corresponding motor cortical activation have been shown to benefit later motor performance. Electrophysiological manipulations of motor imagery could in the long run be used for rehabilitative tDCS protocols benefitting temporarily immobile clinical patients who cannot perform specific motor imagery tasks - such as dementia patients, infants with developmental and motor disorders, and coma patients. PMID:26204566

  8. [Transcranial magneto- and electrostimulation in patients with obesity and erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, G N; Bin'iash, T G; Ra?gorodski?, Iu M; Guliaev, A S; Shul'diakov, V A; Kiriliuk, A M; Vartanova, L Iu

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate therapeutic efficiency of transcranial magnetotherapy (TcMT) and electric stimulation (ES) included in the combined treatment of 143 patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and abdominal obesity. The majority of the patients had waist circumference over 102 cm. An AMO-ATOS complex was used to stimulate the hypothalamic region and other brain structures. Transdermal myostimulation of the abdominal and femoral regions was achieved with a Miovolna device. It was shown that both TcM and ES improved lipid metabolism and erectile function; moreover, they exerted hypotensive and sedative action. Specifically, the testosterone level in the patients increased by a mean of 27% compared with the pre-treatment values while the number of patients complaining of erectile dysfunction decreased by 31%. PMID:19886019

  9. Methodological Dimensions of Transcranial Brain Stimulation with the Electrical Current in Human

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Maryam; Golesorkhi, Mehrshad; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial current stimulation (TCS) is a neuromodulation method in which the patient is exposed to a mild electric current (direct or alternating) at 1-2 mA, resulting in an increase or a decrease in the brain excitability. This modification in neural activities can be used as a method for functional human brain mapping with causal inferences. This method might also facilitate the treatments of many neuropsychiatric disorders based on its inexpensive, simple, safe, noninvasive, painless, semi-focal excitatory and inhibitory effects. Given this, a comparison amongst different brain stimulation modalities has been made to determine the potential advantages of the TCS method. In addition, considerable methodological details on using TCS in basic and clinical neuroscience studies in human subjects have been introduced. Technical characteristics of TCS devices and their related accessories with regard to safety concerns have also been well articulated. Finally, some TCS application opportunities have been emphasized, including its potential use in the near future. PMID:25337348

  10. Effect of the Interindividual Variability on Computational Modeling of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Parazzini, Marta; Fiocchi, Serena; Liorni, Ilaria; Ravazzani, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that delivers low intensity, direct current to cortical areas facilitating or inhibiting spontaneous neuronal activity. This paper investigates how normal variations in anatomy may affect the current flow through the brain. This was done by applying electromagnetic computational methods to human models of different age and gender and by comparing the electric field and current density amplitude distributions within the tissues. Results of this study showed that the general trend of the spatial distributions of the field amplitude shares some gross characteristics among the different human models for the same electrode montages. However, the physical dimension of the subject and his/her morphological and anatomical characteristics somehow influence the detailed field distributions such as the field values. PMID:26265912

  11. Reduced cerebral embolic signals in beating heart coronary surgery detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Watters, M P; Cohen, A M; Monk, C R; Angelini, G D; Ryder, I G

    2000-05-01

    Cerebral emboli detected by transcranial Doppler imaging were recorded in 20 patients undergoing multiple-vessel coronary artery bypass surgery, either with or without cardiopulmonary bypass, in a prospective unblinded comparative study. Emboli were recorded continuously from the time of pericardial incision until 10 min after the last aortic instrumentation. The numbers of coronary grafts and of aortic clampings were also documented. Patients undergoing revascularization with cardiopulmonary bypass had more emboli (median 79, range 38-876) per case compared with patients having off-pump surgery (median 3, range 0-18). No clinically detectable neurological deficits were seen in either group. Beating heart surgery is associated with fewer emboli than coronary surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Further research is necessary to determine whether a smaller number of emboli alters the incidence of neurological deficit after cardiac surgery. PMID:10844840

  12. Consensus Paper: Probing Homeostatic Plasticity of Human Cortex With Non-invasive Transcranial Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Karabanov, Anke; Ziemann, Ulf; Hamada, Masashi; George, Mark S; Quartarone, Angelo; Classen, Joseph; Massimini, Marcello; Rothwell, John; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic plasticity is thought to stabilize neural activity around a set point within a physiologically reasonable dynamic range. Over the last ten years, a wide range of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques have been used to probe homeostatic control of cortical plasticity in the intact human brain. Here, we review different NTBS approaches to study homeostatic plasticity on a systems level and relate the findings to both, physiological evidence from in vitro studies and to a theoretical framework of homeostatic function. We highlight differences between homeostatic and other non-homeostatic forms of plasticity and we examine the contribution of sleep in restoring synaptic homeostasis. Finally, we discuss the growing number of studies showing that abnormal homeostatic plasticity may be associated to a range of neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:26050599

  13. Consensus Paper: Probing Homeostatic Plasticity of Human Cortex With Non-invasive Transcranial Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Karabanov, Anke; Ziemann, Ulf; Hamada, Masashi; George, Mark S; Quartarone, Angelo; Classen, Joseph; Massimini, Marcello; Rothwell, John; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic plasticity is thought to stabilize neural activity around a set point within a physiologically reasonable dynamic range. Over the last ten years, a wide range of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques have been used to probe homeostatic control of cortical plasticity in the intact human brain. Here, we review different NTBS approaches to study homeostatic plasticity on a systems level and relate the findings to both, physiological evidence from in vitro studies and to a theoretical framework of homeostatic function. We highlight differences between homeostatic and other non-homeostatic forms of plasticity and we examine the contribution of sleep in restoring synaptic homeostasis. Finally, we discuss the growing number of studies showing that abnormal homeostatic plasticity may be associated to a range of neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:26598772

  14. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) and Aphasia: The Case of Mr. C

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Leora R.; Babbitt, Edna M.; Hurwitz, Rosalind; Rogers, Lynn M.; Stinear, James; Wang, Xue; Harvey, Richard L.; Parrish, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To illustrate the ethical challenges that arose from investigating a novel treatment procedure, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), in a research participant with aphasia. Method First, we reviewed the current evidence supporting the use of tDCS in aphasia research, highlighting methodological gaps in our knowledge of tDCS. Second, we examined the case of Mr. C, a person with chronic aphasia who participated in a research protocol investigating the impact of tDCS on aphasia treatment. Results We describe the procedures that he underwent and the resulting behavioral and neurophysiological outcomes bed. Finally, we share the steps that were taken to balance beneficence and nonmaleficence, and to ensure Mr. C’s autonomy. Conclusion: Researchers must consider not only the scientific integrity of their studies, but also potential ethical issues and consequences to the research participants. PMID:23340067

  15. Anodal Transcranial Pulsed Current Stimulation: The Effects of Pulse Duration on Corticospinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The aim is to investigate the effects of pulse duration (PD) on the modulatory effects of transcranial pulsed current (tPCS) on corticospinal excitability (CSE). CSE of the dominant primary motor cortex (M1) of right first dorsal interosseous muscle was assessed by motor evoked potentials, before, immediately, 10, 20 and 30 minutes after application of five experimental conditions: 1) anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS), 2) a-tPCS with 125 ms pulse duartion (a-tPCSPD = 125), 3) a-tPCS with 250 ms pulse duration (a-tPCSPD = 250), 4) a-tPCS with 500 ms pulse duration (a-tPCSPD = 500) and 5) sham a-tPCS. The total charges were kept constant in all experimental conditions except sham condition. Post-hoc comparisons indicated that a-tPCSPD = 500 produced larger CSE compared to a-tPCSPD = 125 (P<0.0001), a-tPCSPD = 250 (P = 0.009) and a-tDCS (P = 0.008). Also, there was no significant difference between a-tPCSPD = 250 and a-tDCS on CSE changes (P>0.05). All conditions except a-tPCSPD = 125 showed a significant difference to the sham group (P<0.006). All participants tolerated the applied currents. It could be concluded that a-tPCS with a PD of 500ms induces largest CSE changes, however further studies are required to identify optimal values. PMID:26177541

  16. Transcranial Assessment and Visualization of Acoustic Cavitation: Modeling and Experimental Validation.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Clement, Gregory T; McDannold, Nathan

    2015-06-01

    The interaction of ultrasonically-controlled microbubble oscillations with tissues and biological media has been shown to induce a wide range of bioeffects that may have significant impact on therapy and diagnosis of brain diseases and disorders. However, the inherently non-linear microbubble oscillations combined with the micrometer and microsecond scales involved in these interactions and the limited methods to assess and visualize them transcranially hinder both their optimal use and translation to the clinics. To overcome these challenges, we present a framework that combines numerical simulations with multimodality imaging to assess and visualize the microbubble oscillations transcranially. In the present work, microbubble oscillations were studied with an integrated US and MR imaging guided clinical FUS system. A high-resolution brain CT scan was also co-registered to the US and MR images and the derived acoustic properties were used as inputs to two- and three-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain simulations that matched the experimental conditions and geometry. Synthetic point sources by either a Gaussian function or the output of a microbubble dynamics model were numerically excited and propagated through the skull towards a virtual US imaging array. Using passive acoustic mapping (PAM) that was refined to incorporate variable speed of sound, we were able to correct the aberrations introduced by the skull and substantially improve the PAM resolution. The good agreement between the simulations incorporating microbubble emissions and experimentally-determined PAMs suggest that this integrated approach can provide a clinically-relevant framework and more control over this nonlinear and dynamic process. PMID:25546857

  17. A 1372-element Large Scale Hemispherical Ultrasound Phased Array Transducer for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-14

    Noninvasive transcranial therapy using high intensity focused ultrasound transducers has attracted high interest as a promising new modality for the treatments of brain related diseases. We describe the development of a 1372 element large scale hemispherical ultrasound phased array transducer operating at a resonant frequency of 306 kHz. The hemispherical array has a diameter of 31 cm and a 15.5 cm radius of curvature. It is constructed with piezoelectric (PZT-4) tube elements of a 10 mm in diameter, 6 mm in length and 1.4 mm wall thickness. Each element is quasi-air backed by attaching a cork-rubber membrane on the back of the element. The acoustic efficiency of the element is determined to be approximately 50%. The large number of the elements delivers high power ultrasound and offers better beam steering and focusing capability. Comparisons of sound pressure-squared field measurements with theoretical calculations in water show that the array provides good beam steering and tight focusing capability over an efficient volume of approximately 100x100x80 mm{sup 3} with nominal focal spot size of approximately 2.3 mm in diameter at -6 dB. We also present its beam steering and focusing capability through an ex vivo human skull by measuring pressure-squared amplitude after phase corrections. These measurements show the same efficient volume range and focal spot sizes at -6 dB as the ones in water without the skull present. These results indicate that the array is sufficient for use in noninvasive transcranial ultrasound therapy.

  18. Taoism and Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvan, Richard; Bennett, David

    1988-01-01

    Contrasted are the philosophies of Deep Ecology and ancient Chinese. Discusses the cosmology, morality, lifestyle, views of power, politics, and environmental philosophies of each. Concludes that Deep Ecology could gain much from Taoism. (CW)

  19. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    You were treated for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). This is a condition in which a blood clot forms in a vein that is not on ... especially if it gets worse upon taking a deep breath in You cough up blood

  20. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Action of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Evidence from In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation is a noninvasive technique that has been experimentally tested for a number of psychiatric and neurological conditions. Preliminary observations suggest that this approach can indeed influence a number of cellular and molecular pathways that may be disease relevant. However, the mechanisms of action underlying its beneficial effects are largely unknown and need to be better understood to allow this therapy to be used optimally. In this review, we summarize the physiological responses observed in vitro and in vivo, with a particular emphasis on cellular and molecular cascades associated with inflammation, angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and neuroplasticity recruited by direct current stimulation, a topic that has been largely neglected in the literature. A better understanding of the neural responses to transcranial direct current stimulation is critical if this therapy is to be used in large-scale clinical trials with a view of being routinely offered to patients suffering from various conditions affecting the central nervous system. PMID:25522391

  1. Deep Web video

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2012-03-28

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  2. Deep Space Telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Resch, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing load on NASA's deep Space Network, the new capabilities for deep space missions inherent in a next-generation radio telescope, and the potential of new telescope technology for reducing construction and operation costs suggest a natural marriage between radio astronomy and deep space telecommunications in developing advanced radio telescope concepts.

  3. Deep space optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, Martin M.; Lesh, James R.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary concepts and designs of a deep space optical link for planetary and deep space science are described. As a mission application, attention is given to a spacecraft optical transceiver package (OPTRANSDAC) attached to a Mars rover vehicle. Also considered are a preliminary concept for a 1000-AU mission, and to a tentative long-range plan for NASA's deep space optical communications program.

  4. Deep Lambertian Networks Introduction

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    Deep Lambertian Networks Introduction Learns distributions over 3D object shapes from sets of 2D-shot recognition possible Uses multiplicative interactions to approximate the Lambertian reflectance model Deep 30 50 Experiments Deep Lambertian Networks Inference Samples from albedo DBN Face Relighting Simple

  5. Deep Web video

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2009-06-01

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  6. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337–43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring technique currently exists. PMID:23807573

  7. Non-invasive transcranial ultrasound therapy based on a 3D CT scan: protocol validation and in vitro results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, F.; Pernot, M.; Aubry, J.-F.; Montaldo, G.; Marsac, L.; Tanter, M.; Fink, M.

    2009-05-01

    A non-invasive protocol for transcranial brain tissue ablation with ultrasound is studied and validated in vitro. The skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and in amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Adaptive corrections of the distortions induced by the skull bone are performed using a previous 3D computational tomography scan acquisition (CT) of the skull bone structure. These CT scan data are used as entry parameters in a FDTD (finite differences time domain) simulation of the full wave propagation equation. A numerical computation is used to deduce the impulse response relating the targeted location and the ultrasound therapeutic array, thus providing a virtual time-reversal mirror. This impulse response is then time-reversed and transmitted experimentally by a therapeutic array positioned exactly in the same referential frame as the one used during CT scan acquisitions. In vitro experiments are conducted on monkey and human skull specimens using an array of 300 transmit elements working at a central frequency of 1 MHz. These experiments show a precise refocusing of the ultrasonic beam at the targeted location with a positioning error lower than 0.7 mm. The complete validation of this transcranial adaptive focusing procedure paves the way to in vivo animal and human transcranial HIFU investigations.

  8. Comparison between Trans-Cranial Electromagnetic Stimulation and Low-Level Laser on Modulation of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Seada, Yasser Ibrahim; Nofel, Reda; Sayed, Hayam Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine which of the transcranial electromagnetic stimulation or low level laser therapy is more effective in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia of multiple sclerosis patients. [Methods] Thirty multiple sclerosis patients of both sexes participated in this study. The age of the subjects ranged from 40 to 60?years and their mean age was (56.4–6.6). Participants were randomly selected from Dental and Neurology Outpatient Clinics at King Khalid Hospital, Najran University, Saudi Arabia. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups of 15. The Laser group received a low level laser therapy, 830?nm wavelength, 10?Hz and 15?min duration, while the Electromagnetic group received repetitive transcranial electromagnetic stimulation at a frequency of 10?Hz, intensity of 50 mA and duration of 20 minutes. Patients were assessed pre and post treatment for degree of pain using a numerical rating scale, maximal oral mouth opening using a digital calibrated caliper, masseter muscle tension using a tensiometer and a compound action potentials of masseter and temporalis muscles. [Results] There were significant improvements after treatment in both groups, with a significant difference between the Electromagnetic and Laser groups, in favor of the Electromagnetic group. [Conclusion] Repetitive transcranial electromagnetic stimulation at 10?Hz, 50 mA, and 20 minutes duration is more effective than low level laser therapy at reducing trigeminal pain, increasing maximum oral mouth opening, masseter and temporalis muscle tension in multiple sclerosis patients. PMID:24259883

  9. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan M.; O'Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-07-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337-43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring techniques currently exist.

  10. The effects of theta transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on fluid intelligence.

    PubMed

    Pahor, Anja; Jaušovec, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to explore the influence of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on resting brain activity and on measures of fluid intelligence. Theta tACS was applied to the left parietal and left frontal brain areas of healthy participants after which resting electroencephalogram (EEG) data was recorded. Following sham/active stimulation, the participants solved two tests of fluid intelligence while their EEG was recorded. The results showed that active theta tACS affected spectral power in theta and alpha frequency bands. In addition, active theta tACS improved performance on tests of fluid intelligence. This influence was more pronounced in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left parietal area than in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left frontal area. Left parietal tACS increased performance on the difficult test items of both tests (RAPM and PF&C) whereas left frontal tACS increased performance only on the easy test items of one test (RAPM). The observed behavioral tACS influences were also accompanied by changes in neuroelectric activity. The behavioral and neuroelectric data tentatively support the P-FIT neurobiological model of intelligence. PMID:24998643

  11. From amusic to musical?--Improving pitch memory in congenital amusia with transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Nora K; Pfeifer, Jasmin; Krause, Vanessa; Pollok, Bettina

    2015-11-01

    Brain imaging studies highlighted structural differences in congenital amusia, a life-long perceptual disorder that is associated with pitch perception and pitch memory deficits. A functional anomaly characterized by decreased low gamma oscillations (30-40 Hz range) in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during pitch memory has been revealed recently. Thus, the present study investigates whether applying transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) at 35 Hz to the right DLPFC would improve pitch memory. Nine amusics took part in two tACS sessions (either 35 Hz or 90 Hz) and completed a pitch and visual memory task before and during stimulation. 35 Hz stimulation facilitated pitch memory significantly. No modulation effects were found with 90 Hz stimulation or on the visual task. While amusics showed a selective impairment of pitch memory before stimulation, the performance during 35 Hz stimulation was not significantly different to healthy controls anymore. Taken together, the study shows that modulating the right DLPFC with 35 Hz tACS in congenital amusia selectively improves pitch memory performance supporting the hypothesis that decreased gamma oscillations within the DLPFC are causally involved in disturbed pitch memory and highlight the potential use of tACS to interact with cognitive processes. PMID:26254878

  12. Task-Specific Facilitation of Cognition by Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Pope, Paul A; Brenton, Jonathan W; Miall, R Chris

    2015-11-01

    We previously speculated that depression of cerebellar excitability using cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) might release extra cognitive resources via the disinhibition of activity in prefrontal cortex. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether anodal tDCS over the prefrontal cortex could similarly improve performance when cognitive demands are high. Sixty-three right-handed participants in 3 separate groups performed the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT) and the more difficult Paced Auditory Serial Subtraction Task (PASST), before and after 20 min of anodal, cathodal, or sham stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Performance was assessed in terms of the accuracy, latency, and variability of correct verbal responses. All behavioral measures significantly improved for the PASST after anodal DLPFC stimulation, but not the PASAT. There were smaller practice effects after cathodal and sham stimulation. Subjective ratings of attention and mental fatigue were unchanged by tDCS over time. We conclude that anodal stimulation over the left DLPFC can selectively improve performance on a difficult cognitive task involving arithmetic processing, verbal working memory, and attention. This result might be achieved by focally improving executive functions and/or cognitive capacity when tasks are difficult, rather than by improving levels of arousal/alertness. PMID:25979089

  13. Effects of T