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Sample records for deficient strontium cobaltate

  1. 40 CFR 721.10600 - Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10600 Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide. (a... calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272; CAS No. 1262279-30-0) is subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10600 - Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10600 Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide. (a... calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272; CAS No. 1262279-30-0) is subject...

  3. Photorefractive properties of cobalt-doped strontium barium niobate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bogodaev, N V; Ivleva, Lyudmila I; Lykov, P A; Polozkov, N M; Osiko, Vyacheslav V

    1999-05-31

    The two-wave interaction (at {lambda} = 488 nm) in strontium barium niobate crystals doped with cobalt ions (Co:SBN) was studied. The experimental dependences of the gain coefficient on the grating period and of the grating response time on the writing beam intensity were used to calculate the Debye screening length, the diffusion length, the dark conductivity, and the effective concentration of carrier traps for a series of Co:SBN crystals with different dopant concentrations. The crystals were shown to have high coupling coefficients ({Gamma} = 33 cm{sup -1}) and short optical response times ({tau} = 140 ms for I = 1 W cm{sup -2} ). This, in combination with a high photorefractive sensitivity (S = 39 cm{sup 2} J{sup -1} ), determines the efficiency of their use in the storage of optical information and in laser phase conjugation. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  4. Equilibrium sorption of cobalt, cesium, and strontium on Bandelier Tuff: analysis of alternative mathematical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.; Essington, E.H.; Roensch, F.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption isotherms are derived from batch equilibrium data for cobalt, cesium and strontium on Bandelier Tuff. Experiments were conducted at an average temperature of 23/sup 0/C and equilibrium was defined at 48 hours. The solute concentrations ranged from 0 to 500 mg/L. The radioactive isotopes /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 85/Sr were used to trace the sorption of the stable solutes. The Linear, Langmuir, Freundlich and a Modified Freundlich isotherm equations are evaluated. The Modified Freundlich isotherm equation is validated as a preferred general mathematical tool for representing the sorption of the three solutes. The empirical constants derived from the Modified Freundlich isotherm equation indicate that under dynamic flow conditions strontium will move most rapidly and cobalt least rapidly. On the other hand, chemical dispersion will be greatest for cesium and least for strontium. Hill Plots of the sorption data suggest that in the region of low saturation sorption of all three solutes is impeded by interactions among sorption sites; cobalt exhibits the greatest effect of interactions and strontium shows only a minimal effect. In the saturation region of 50% or more, sorption of cobalt is enhanced slightly by interactions among sorption sites whereas sorption of cesium and strontium appears to be independent of site interactions. 9 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Water hyacinths and alligator weeds for removal of silver, cobalt, and strontium from polluted waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Mcdonald, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Water hyacinths and alligator weeds demonstrated the ability to rapidly remove heavy metals from an aqueous system by root absorption and concentration. Water hyacinths demonstrated the ability to remove 0.439 mg of silver, 0.568 mg of cobalt, and 0.544 mg of strontium in an ionized form per gram of dry plant material in a 24-hour period. Alligator weeds removed a maximum of 0.439 mg of silver, 0.130 mg of cobalt, and 0.161 mg of strontium per gram of dry plant material per day.

  6. Relaxation behavior of oxygen deficient strontium manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Namita Thakur, Awalendra Kumar

    2014-04-24

    Conduction behavior of nanocrystalline oxygen deficient ceramic-SrMnO{sub 3–δ}(δ∼0.14) has been studied. The structural analysis of nano-SrMnO{sub 2.86} follows hexagonal unit cell structure with P6{sub 3}/mmc (194) space group belonging to 6/mmm point group with 4H – layered type hexagonal-cubic layers. The system have lattice parameters; a = 5.437(92) Å, c = 9.072(92) Å, c/a∼1.66 (85) with α =90° γ= 120° and cell volume, V= 232.35(18). The relaxation times estimated from complex impedance and modulus relaxation spectrum, show the thermally activated system with corresponding activation energies as 0.66 eV and 0.51 eV The stretching factor ‘β’ from the scaled modulus spectrum shows the poly-dispersive non-Debye nature of the system. The hopping number ‘n’ shows the influence of ionic charge carriers which controls the conduction mechanism of nano-SrMnO{sub 2.86}.

  7. Structure and magnetism in rare earth strontium-doped cobaltates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Michael; Morales, Liliana; Wallwork, Kia; Avdeev, Maxim; Withers, Ray; Goossens, Darren

    2006-11-01

    Substantial interest has recently been generated by rare earth cobaltate compounds as cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells. We have synthesised a wide range of single-phase perovskite-based rare earth cobaltates (Ln 1-xSr xCoO 3-δ) (Ln=La 3+-Yb 3+). A combination of electron and X-ray diffraction of these phases reveals a complex family of tetragonal and orthorhombic superstructures. The nature of structural and magnetic ordering relies on both cation and oxygen vacancy distribution. Phase boundaries exists between compounds containing large, medium and small rare earths (between Nd 3+ and Sm 3+, and also between Gd 3+ and Dy 3+) and also at different Sr-doping levels. Powder neutron diffraction has been used in conjunction with the other techniques to reveal cation and oxygen vacancy ordering within these materials. These phases show mixed valence (3+/4+) cobalt oxidation states that increases with Sr content. A range of magnetic behaviours has been observed, including ordered antiferromagnetism at elevated temperatures (>300 K) in Ho 0.2Sr 0.8CoO 2.75.

  8. Cobalt dicarbollide containing polymer resins for cesium and strontium uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Duke, J.R. Jr.; Jorgensen, B.S.

    1994-04-01

    Cobalt(III) dicarbollide [(C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 11}){sub 2}Co]{sup {minus}} (CB{sub 2}) is being investigated for Cs and Sr extraction from nuclear waste. Because organic solvents should be avoided, bonding of CB{sub 2} to resins were investigated. CB{sub 2} was successfully covalently bonded to polystyrene and polybenzimidazole resins. Tetrahydrofuran was the most efficient solvent for grafting. Analysis is being performed, and separation coefficients are also being determined. 3 figs, 8 refs.

  9. Persistent Optically Induced Magnetism in Oxygen-Deficient Strontium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, W. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Crooker, S. A.; Bombeck, M.; Ambwani, P.; Leighton, C.

    2014-03-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is a foundational material in the emerging field of complex oxide electronics. While its electronic, optical, and lattice properties have been studied for decades, SrTiO3 has recently become a renewed focus of materials research owing to the discovery of magnetism and superconductivity at interfaces between SrTiO3 and other oxides. The formation and distribution of oxygen vacancies may play an essential but as-yet-incompletely understood role. Here we observe an optically induced and persistent magnetization in slightly oxygen-deficient bulk SrTiO3-δ crystals using magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. The optically induced magnetization appears below ~18 K, persists for hours below 10 K, and is tunable via the polarization and wavelength of sub-bandgap (400-500 nm) light. These effects, which only occur in oxygen-deficient samples, reveal a detailed interplay between defects, magnetism, and light in oxide materials. W. D. Rice et al. submitted. See article on arXiv.

  10. Deposition of Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite (LSCF) Using Suspension Plasma Spraying for Oxygen Transport Membrane Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, E. S. C.; Kesler, O.

    2015-08-01

    Suspension plasma spray deposition was utilized to fabricate dense lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite oxygen separation membranes (OSMs) on porous metal substrates for mechanical support. The as-sprayed membranes had negligible and/or reversible material decomposition. At the longer stand-off distance (80 mm), smooth and dense membranes could be manufactured using a plasma with power below approximately 81 kW. Moreover, a membrane of 55 μm was observed to have very low gas leakage rates desirable for OSM applications. This thickness could potentially be decreased further to improve oxygen diffusion by using metal substrates with finer surface pores.

  11. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of strontium are reviewed. Consumption for the year is estimated to have been about 35 kt for strontium contained in celestite, strontium carbonate, and strontium nitrate. Exports of strontium totaled only about 1.1 kt for the year. U.S. strontium imports and consumption increased about 30 percent in 1994 due to increased domestic production of color television picture tube glass. The average customs value of celestite coming into the U.S. was about $75/t, strontium carbonate was valued at $661/t, and strontium nitrate was valued at about $1,069/t.

  12. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. In 1995, U.S. strontium imports and consumption increased nearly 30 percent due to increased domestic production of color television picture tube glass. However, strontium compound exports fell during 1995. Strontium is also used in the production of permanent ceramic ferrite magnets. Strontium nitrate, strontium chromate, and strontium chloride are also commonly used materials. Although the development of an affordable flatscreen display could eliminate the need for strontium in television production, this technology is not expected to be perfected in the immediate future.

  13. Chemical and electronic characterization of cobalt in a lanthanum perovskite. Effects of strontium substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Hueso, Jose L.; Holgado, Juan P.; Pereniguez, Rosa; Mun, Simon; Salmeron, Miquel; Caballero, Alfonso

    2010-01-15

    Two different cobaltites, LaCoO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3-{delta}}, have been prepared and characterized by means of high energy Co K-edge and low energy O K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Even though half of the La(III) is substituted by Sr(II), little or no changes can be detected in the formal oxidation state of cobalt atoms. The presence of strontium cations induces two main effects in the chemical and electronic state of the perovskite. The charge balance with Sr(II) species is reached by the formation of oxygen vacancies throughout the network, which explains the well-known increase in the reactivity of this substituted perovskite. O K-edge XAS experiments show that the Sr(II) species induce the transitions of d electrons of cobalt cations from low to high spin configuration. We propose that this change in spin multiplicity is induced by two cooperative effects: the oxygen vacancies, creating five coordinated cobalt atoms, and the bigger size of Sr(II) cations, aligning the Co-O-Co atoms, and favoring the overlapping of pi-symmetry cobalt and oxygen orbitals, reducing the splitting energy of e{sub g} and t{sub 2g} levels. - Graphical abstract: Change in spin multiplicity induced by the bigger size of Sr(II) cations, aligning the Co-O-Co atoms, and favoring the overlapping of pi-symmetry cobalt and oxygen orbitals.

  14. Chemical and electronic characterization of cobalt in Lanthanumperovskites. Effects of Strontium substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Hueso, Jose L.; Holgado, Juan P.; Pereniguez, Rosa; Mun, Simon; Salmeron, Miquel; Caballero, Alfonso

    2009-02-06

    Two different cobaltites, LaCoO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3-{delta}}, have been prepared and characterized by means of high energy Co K-edge and low energy O K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The partial substitution of La(III) by Sr(II) species induces important changes in the reactivity and electronic state of the perovskite, while little or no changes can be detected in the formal oxidation state of cobalt atoms. The presence of strontium cations induces two main effects in the chemical and electronic behavior of the perovskite. The charge balance with Sr(II) species is reached by the formation of oxygen vacancies throughout the network, which increases the reactivity of the perovskite, now more reducible than the original LaCoO{sub 3} perovskite. O K-edge XAS experiments indicate that the Sr(II) species cause d electrons of cobalt cations to change from low to high spin configuration. Our data allow us to propose that this change in spin multiplicity is induced by the bigger size of Sr(II) cations, which aligns the Co-O-Co atoms, and favors the overlapping of {pi}-symmetry cobalt and oxygen orbitals, reducing the splitting energy of e{sub g} and t{sub 2g} levels.

  15. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Mexico is the leading producer of celestite, the most common strontium ore. Chemical Products is the only major US maker of strontium compounds. It produces all of its strontium carbonate from imported Mexican celestite. Mexico is also a large producer of strontium carbonate, as are China, Germany, Japan and the Republic of Korea. There has been no celestite production in the United States since 1959.

  16. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    China, Mexico, Spain and Turkey are the world's leading producers of celestite (strontium sulphate). These countries accounted for 98% of the total world production in 2005. For the same period, US apparent consumption of strontium decreased to 12.3 kt. Imports were 21.2 kt, of which 84% came from Mexico. Imports of celestite and strontium carbonate decreased 71% and 24% respectively.

  17. Microstructural, dielectric and magnetic properties of multiferroic composite system barium strontium titanate – nickel cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Pahuja, Poonam Tandon, R. P.

    2015-05-15

    Multiferroic composites (1-x) Ba{sub 0.95}Sr{sub 0.05}TiO{sub 3} + (x) Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (where x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) has been prepared by solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction analysis of the composite samples confirmed the presence of both barium strontium titanate (BST) and nickel cobalt ferrite (NCF) phases. FESEM images indicated the well dispersion of NCF grains among BST grains. Dielectric constant and loss of the composite samples decreases with increase in frequency following Maxwell-Wagner relaxation mechanism. Composite sample with highest ferrite content possesses highest values of remanent and saturation magnetization.

  18. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Production figures are not published for stronium carbonate because there is only one company producing strontium carbonate domestically. Strontium carbonate is produced in the U.S. from imported celestite. Consumption can be estimated from trade data published by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Consumption is estimated at approximately 24.5 kt of strontium. The largest end-use of strontium carbonate is in the production of faceplate glass for color television picturetubes. Other applications and markets for strontium are discussed.

  19. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, U.S. apparent consumption of strontium (contained in celestite and manufactured strontium compounds) decreased to 16.7 kt (18,400 st) from 17.3 kt (19,100 st) in 2011. Gross weight of imports was 34.3 kt (37,800 st), 86 percent of which originated in Mexico.

  20. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angulo, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, U.S. apparent consumption of strontium (contained in celestite and manufactured strontium compounds) decreased by 11 percent to 10.4 kt (11,460 st) from 11.8 kt (13,000 st) in 2009. Gross weight of imports totaled 20.9 kt (23,000 st), of which 65 percent originated from Mexico.

  1. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, U.S. apparent consumption of strontium (contained in celestite and manufactured strontium compounds) increased markedly to 18.4 kt (20,300 st) from 10.4 kt (11,500 st) in 2010. Gross weight of imports was 34.4 kt (38,000 st), of which 76 percent originated from Mexico.

  2. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angulo, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, U.S. apparent consumption of strontium (contained in celestite and manufactured strontium compounds) increased to 16 kt (17,600 st) from 10.6 kt (11,700 st) in 2008, an increase of 52 percent. This increase was attributed primarily to an increase in imported celestite. Gross weight of imports totaled 25.3 kt (27,900 st), of which 91 percent came from Mexico. Imports in 2009 were 18 percent more than in 2008. Exports of strontium compounds in 2009 decreased 15 percent to 9.3 kt (10,250 st) from 10.9 kt (12,000 st) in 2008. In 2009, the U.S. Customs value of imported strontium carbonate was 65 cents/kg (29 cents/lb); for strontium nitrate, the unit value was $ 1/kg (45 cents/lb). The unit value of imported celestite, all of which was from Mexico, was about $47/t ($43/st).

  3. Boron-Doped Strontium-Stabilized Bismuth Cobalt Oxide Thermoelectric Nanocrystalline Ceramic Powders Synthesized via Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koçyiğit, Serhat; Aytimur, Arda; Çınar, Emre; Uslu, İbrahim; Akdemir, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Boron-doped strontium-stabilized bismuth cobalt oxide thermoelectric nanocrystalline ceramic powders were produced by using a polymeric precursor technique. The powders were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and physical properties measurement system (PPMS) techniques. The XRD results showed that these patterns have a two-phase mixture. The phases are face-centered cubic (fcc) and body-centered cubic (bcc). Values of the crystallite size, dislocation density, and microstrain were calculated by using the Scherrer equation. The lattice parameters were calculated for fcc and bcc phases. The SEM results showed that needle-like grains are formed in boron-undoped composite materials, but the needle-like grains changed to the plate-like grains with the addition of boron. The distribution of the nanofiber diameters was calculated and the average diameter of the boron-doped sample is smaller than the boron-undoped one. PPMS values showed that the electrical resistivity values decreased, but the thermal conductivity values, the Seebeck coefficients, and figure of merit ( ZT) increased with increasing temperature for the two samples.

  4. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section reviewing the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Imports of celestite (strontium ore) reached nearly 45 kt, which represents an increase of 35 percent over 1991. Mexico supplied almost all of the celestite. Nearly 70 percent of the strontium consumed in the U.S. is used in television picture tube faceplate glass to block X-ray emissions.

  5. Preparation and use of tetra-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents

    DOEpatents

    Miller, R.L.; Pinkerton, A.B.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1997-02-11

    Preparation and use of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents. Tetra-C-alkyl derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide, Co(C{sub 2}R{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 9}){sub 2}{sup {minus}}(CoB{sub 2}R{sub 4}{sup {minus}}; R=CH{sub 3} and C{sub 6}H{sub 13}) are demonstrated to be significant cesium and strontium extractants from acidic and alkaline solutions into non-toxic organic solvent systems. Extractions using mesitylene and diethylbenzene are compared to those with nitrobenzene as the organic phase. CoB{sub 2}-hexyl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in diethylbenzene shows improved selectivity (10{sup 4}) for Cs over Na in acidic solution. In dilute alkaline solution, CoB{sub 2}-hexyl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} extracts Cs less efficiently, but more effectively removes Sr from higher base concentrations. A general synthesis of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollides is described. 6 figs.

  6. Preparation and use of tetra-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Rebecca L.; Pinkerton, Anthony B.; Abney, Kent D.; Kinkead, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    Preparation and use of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents. Tetra-C-alkyl derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide, Co(C.sub.2 R.sub.2 B.sub.9 H.sub.9).sub.2.sup.- (CoB.sub.2 R.sub.4.sup.- ; R=CH.sub.3 and C.sub.6 H.sub.13) are demonstrated to be significant cesium and strontium extractants from acidic and alkaline solutions into non-toxic organic solvent systems. Extractions using mesitylene and diethylbenzene are compared to those with nitrobenzene as the organic phase. CoB.sub.2 -hexyl.sub.4.sup.- in diethylbenzene shows improved selectivity (10.sup.4) for Cs over Na in acidic solution. In dilute alkaline solution, CoB.sub.2 -hexyl.sub.4.sup.- extracts Cs less efficiently, but more effectively removes Sr from higher base concentrations. A general synthesis of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollides is described.

  7. An oxygen-deficiency modulated multiferroic: Cobalt-substituted perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, Juan Manuel

    In this work, we use density functional theory to model recently demonstrated room temperature ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity in polycrystalline and single crystal Cobalt-substituted SrTiO3 thin films (SrTi0.70Co0.30O3-d), deposited at different oxygen pressures to change their oxygen vacancy concentration. The modeling indicates an origin for both magnetism and electric polarization in the interactions between oxygen vacancies and the B-site cations. The magnetization saturation increases with the oxygen deficiency as a result of valence spin states changes, which depend on whether the oxygen octahedral of the respective local B-site cations are complete or not. On the other hand, a finite electric polarization appears as a result of a non-centrosymmetric distribution of different resulting local charges and such a polarization increases when the oxygen vacancies increase. Increasing of both order parameters, magnetic and ferroelectric, are analyzed respect to all possible Co-sites and O-vacancies distributions, showing that these results suggest a class of multiferroic materials with properties controlled by their oxygen stoichiometry. Agreement and discrepancies between experiments and modeling are discussed. 1J M Florez and P Vargas thank Fondecyt 1130950 and 11130128, all authors thank the MISTI MIT-Chile, and CAR thanks the (S3TEC) and DoE under DE-SC0001299.

  8. Decontamination of cesium, strontium, and cobalt from aqueous solutions by bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M.A.; Khan, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Sorption studies of cesium, strontium, and cobalt (Cs, Sr, and Co) on bentonite under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, pH, sorbent and sorbate concentration, and temperature, have been performed. The sorption data for all these metals have been interpreted in terms of Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations. Thermodynamics parameters, such as heat of sorption {Delta}H{degrees}, free energy change {Delta}G{degrees}, and entropy change {Delta}S{degrees}, for the sorption of these metals on bentonite have been calculated. The value of {Delta}H{degrees} shows that the sorption of Cs was exothermic, while the sorption of Sr and Co on bentonite were endothermic in nature. The value of {Delta}G{degrees} for their sorption was negative, showing the spontaneity of the process. The maximum loading capacity of Cs, Sr, and Co were 75.5, 22, and 27.5 meq, respectively, for 100 g of bentonite. The mean free energy E of Cs, Sr, and Co sorption on bentonite was 14.5, 9, and 7.7 kJ/mol, respectively. The value of E indicates that ion exchange may be the predominant mode of sorption for these radionuclides. The desorption studies with 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} and groundwater at low-metal loading on bentonite showed that about 95% of Cs, 85-90% of Sr, and 97% of Co were irreversibly sorbed. Bentonite could be effectively used for the decontamination of wastewater effluent containing low concentrations of radioactive nuclides of Cs, Sr, and Co. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Mexico and Spain are the leading producers of celestite, the most common strontium ore. Those countries produced nearly 80 percent of the estimated 360 kt (397,000 st) of celestite produced worldwide during 2002. China and Turkey are other significant celestite producers.

  10. Strontium

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Strontium ; CASRN 7440 - 24 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  11. STRONTIUM PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    McKenzie, T.R.

    1960-09-13

    A process is given for improving the precipitation of strontium from an aqueous phosphoric-acid-containing solution with nickel or cobalt ferrocyanide by simultaneously precipitating strontium or calcium phosphate. This is accomplished by adding to the ferrocyanide-containing solution calcium or strontium nitrate in a quantity to yield a concentration of from 0.004 to 0.03 and adjusting the pH of the solution to a value of above 8.

  12. Cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    Cobalt is typical a by- or co-product with copper or nickel. The average crustal abundance of cobalt is 23 pans per million. Cobalt-containing minerals include cobaltite, skutterudite, and linnaeite. Due to the diversity of cobalt deposits, several techniques are used to extract the ore. The copper/cobalt-bearing ores of Zaire are extracted by open pit and underground methods. In Zambia, similar deposits are mined using modified sublevel, and cut-and-fill underground stoping methods. The sulfide and oxide ore concentrates mined in Zaire are roasted and leached in sulfuric acid. Copper is subsequently recovered by electrolysis, and cobalt is precipitated in the form of a hydrate. Finally, the hydrate is dissolved in acid and cobalt is recovered by electrolysis.

  13. Micronutrients and kelp cultures: Evidence for cobalt and manganese deficiency in Southern California deep seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that naturally occurring copper and zinc concentrations in deep seawater are toxic to marine organisms when the free ion forms are overabundant. The effects of micronutrients on the growth of gametophytes of the ecologically and commercially significant giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) were studied in defined media. The results indicate that toxic copper and zinc ion concentrations as well as cobalt and manganese deficiencies may be among the factors controlling the growth of marine organisms in nature. Copyright ?? 1982 AAAS.

  14. Evaluation of Cuprimine® and Syprine® for Decorporation of Radioisotopes of Cesium, Cobalt, Iridium, and Strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Curry, Terry L.; Luders, Teresa; Peterson, James M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Levinson, Barry

    2011-08-01

    Cuprimine and Syprine are therapeutics approved by FDA to treat copper overload in Wilson Disease (a genetic defect in copper transport) by chelation and accelerated excretion of internally deposited copper. These oral therapeutics are based on respective active ingredients D-penicillamine (DPA) and N,N'-bis (2-aminoethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine dihydrochloride (Trien). Cuprimine is considered the primary treatment, although physicians increasingly are turning to Syprine as first-line therapy. Both drugs exhibit oral systemic activity and low toxicity; their biological effects and safety are established. The literature reports that these agents exhibit high affinity for a range of transition and f-metals and metalloids in vitro. Our previous in vivo studies using a rodent animal model established the decorporation potential of Cuprimine and Syprine for cobalt-60 and polonium-210 (Levitskaia et al 2010a). Currently we are expanding these studies to evaluate in vivo decorporation efficacy of these drugs for several additional radionuclides. In this paper, we discuss results of this investigation using gamma-emitting radionuclides including cesium-137 (137Cs), cobalt-60 (60Co), iridium-192 (192Ir), and strontium-85 (85Sr). Short-term 48 hr pilot studies were undertaken to evaluate DPA and Trien for their in vivo decorporation potency using male Wistar-Han rats. In these studies, radionuclide solution was administered to animals by IV injection, followed by a single IV dose of either DPA or Trien. Control animals received the radionuclide alone. Results show highly effective decorporation of 60Co by DPA. DPA and Trien were modestly effective in decorporation 137Cs and 85Sr, respectively. Based on these promising findings, further studies to evaluate the dose-response pharmacokinetic profiles for decorporation are warranted.

  15. Fabrication of lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathodes for high performance solid oxide fuel cells using a low price commercial inkjet printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Gwon Deok; Neoh, Ke Chean; Bae, Kiho; Choi, Hyung Jong; Park, Suk Won; Son, Ji-Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigate a method to fabricate high quality lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) using a commercial low price inkjet printer. The ink source is synthesized by dissolving the LSCF nanopowder in a water-based solvent with a proper amount of surfactants. Microstructures of the LSCF layer, including porosity and thickness per printing scan cycle, are adjusted by grayscale in the printing image. It is successfully demonstrated that anode-supported SOFCs with optimally printed LSCF cathodes can produce decent power output, i.e., a maximum peak power density of 377 mW cm-2 at 600 °C, in our experiment. We expect that this approach can support the quick and easy prototyping and evaluating of a variety of cathode materials in SOFC research.

  16. Growth of epitaxial films of iron oxide, nickel oxide, cobalt oxide, strontium hexagonal ferrite, and yttrium iron garnet by laser ablation (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.J.

    1996-04-01

    Thin films of iron oxide, nickel oxide, cobalt oxide, strontium hexagonal ferrite, and yttrium iron garnet have been grown by laser ablation. With the exception of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} deposited on LaAlO{sub 3}, the first three materials deposited on [100] LaAlO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and MgO result in high quality {ital c} axis [100] growth. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} deposited on LaAlO{sub 3} produces highly oriented but random in-plane growth. Similar highly oriented but random in-plane growth occurs for all three materials deposited on glass. The same three materials deposited on cubic zirconia grow [111] oriented and twinned. Strontium hexagonal ferrite and yttrium iron garnet have been deposited on [111] large lattice constant garnet. Epitaxial [0001] films are obtained for the former while the latter gives [111]-oriented films. For yttrium iron garnet the closeness of lattice match to the substrate necessitates that the mosaicity (rocking curves) obtained from area maps be compared to the growth temperatures and pressures to determine the optimum growth conditions for epitaxiality. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Predicted risk of cobalt deficiency in grazing sheep from a geochemical survey; communicating uncertainty with the IPCC verbal scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lark, R. M.; Ander, E. L.; Cave, M. R.; Knights, K. V.; Glennon, M. M.; Scanlon, R. P.

    2014-05-01

    Deficiency or excess of certain trace elements in the soil causes problems for agriculture, including disorders of grazing ruminants. Farmers and their advisors in Ireland use index values for the concentration of total soil cobalt and manganese to identify where grazing sheep are at risk of cobalt deficiency. We used cokriging with topsoil data from a regional geochemical survey across six counties of Ireland to form local cokriging predictions of cobalt and manganese concentrations with an attendant distribution which reflects the joint uncertainty of these predictions. From this distribution we then computed conditional probabilities for different combinations of cobalt and manganese index values, and so for the corresponding inferred risk to sheep of cobalt deficiency and the appropriateness of different management interventions. The challenge is to communicate these results effectively to an audience comprising, inter alia, farmers, agronomists and veterinarians. Numerical probabilities are not generally well-understood by non-specialists. For this reason we presented our results as maps using a verbal scale to communicate the probability that a deficiency is indicated by local soil conditions, or that a particular intervention is indicated. In the light of recent research on the effectiveness of the verbal scale used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to communicate probabilistic information we reported the geostatistical predictions as follows. First, we use the basic IPCC scale with intensifiers, but we also indicate the corresponding probabilities (as percentages) as recommended by Budescu et al. (2009). Second, we make it clear that the source of uncertainty in these predictions is the spatial variability of soil Co and Mn. The outcome under consideration is therefore that a particular soil management scenario would be indicated if the soil properties were known without error, possible uncertainty about the implications of particular soil

  18. Colossal positive magnetoresistance in surface-passivated oxygen-deficient strontium titanite

    PubMed Central

    David, Adrian; Tian, Yufeng; Yang, Ping; Gao, Xingyu; Lin, Weinan; Shah, Amish B.; Zuo, Jian-Min; Prellier, Wilfrid; Wu, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of resistance by an external magnetic field, i.e. magnetoresistance effect, has been a long-lived theme of research due to both fundamental science and device applications. Here we report colossal positive magnetoresistance (CPMR) (>30,000% at a temperature of 2 K and a magnetic field of 9 T) discovered in degenerate semiconducting strontium titanite (SrTiO3) single crystals capped with ultrathin SrTiO3/LaAlO3 bilayers. The low-pressure high-temperature homoepitaxial growth of several unit cells of SrTiO3 introduces oxygen vacancies and high-mobility carriers in the bulk SrTiO3, and the three-unit-cell LaAlO3 capping layer passivates the surface and improves carrier mobility by suppressing surface-defect-related scattering. The coexistence of multiple types of carriers and inhomogeneous transport lead to the emergence of CPMR. This unit-cell-level surface engineering approach is promising to be generalized to others oxides, and to realize devices with high-mobility carriers and interesting magnetoelectronic properties. PMID:25975606

  19. Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetic characteristics, and reflection loss analysis of nickel-strontium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, Ali; Paesano, Andrea; Cerqueira Machado, Carla Fabiana; Shirsath, Sagar E.; Liu, Xiaoxi; Morisako, Akimitsu

    2014-05-07

    In current research work, Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x/2}Sr{sub x/2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0–1 in a step of 0.2) ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a sol-gel method. According to the evolution in the subspectral areas obtained from Mössbauer spectroscopy, it was found that the relaxing iron belongs mostly to the site B, since the Mössbauer fraction of site A does not vary appreciably. With an increase in Ni-Sr substitution contents in cobalt ferrite, the coercivity and saturation of magnetization decrease. Variation of reflection loss versus frequency in microwave X-band demonstrates that the reflection peak shifts to lower frequency by adding substituted cations and the synthesized nanoparticles can be considered for application in electromagnetic wave absorber technology.

  20. Metabonomic profiling in studying anti-osteoporosis effects of strontium fructose 1,6-diphosphate on estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis in rats by GC/TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bo; Li, Xiaotian; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Di; Wang, Guangji; A, Jiye; Sun, Jianguo; Li, Jing; Liu, Yinhui; Wang, Yonglu; Ying, Hanjie

    2013-10-15

    A novel strontium salt compound strontium fructose 1, 6-diphosphate (FDP-Sr) has been proved to have highly effective for bone loss via dual effects of stimulating bone formation and suppressing bone absorption. In the present study, metabolomic approach was used to identify and study potential biomarkers associated with the effect and safety of FDP-Sr. The metabolomic profiles of bone loss induced by estrogen deficiency in a rat model was described to attain a system-level map of the shift on the metabolic response in plasma using GC/TOF-MS, after FDP-Sr was orally administered at the dose of 110 mg/kg/day for the prevention and 220 mg/kg/day for the treatment. Meanwhile, bone turnover biomarkers and bone mineral density were investigated to identify the specific changes of potential anti-osteoporosis effects of FDP-Sr. The differences in metabolic profiles between osteoporosis rats and FDP-Sr treated rats were well observed by the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to the MS spectra. Some metabolites including homocysteine, arachidonic acid, alanine, and hydroxyproline, which significantly changed during osteoporosis progression could be effectively reversed after FDP-Sr therapy. Of course some metabolites such as uric acid, glyceric acid, octadecadienoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, oleic acid, and hexadecanoic acid were not found to reverse significantly after FDP-Sr administration. These results delineated the FDP-Sr effects-related metabolic alterations in the bone loss rats, suggesting that metabonomic analysis could provide helpful information on the new potential biomarkers relating to the mechanism of anti-osteoporosis action and side effects of FDP-Sr against estrogen deficiency induced bone loss. PMID:23872379

  1. Process for strontium-82 separation

    DOEpatents

    Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

    1992-12-01

    A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. 1 fig.

  2. Process for strontium-82 separation

    DOEpatents

    Heaton, Richard C.; Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.

    1992-01-01

    A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10598 - Lead strontium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; CAS No. 61461-40-3); Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-271; CAS No. 1262279-31-1); Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272; CAS No. 1262279-30-0); Lanthanum...

  4. Surface redox properties of lanthanum chromium nickel oxide, lanthanum strontium cobalt oxide, and silver explored via in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, Gregory

    The surface redox properties of LaCr0.6Ni0.4O 3 (powder), La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 (thin film) and silver (powder) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to control the oxidation state of a sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions, it was incorporated as the working electrode in a solid state electrochemical cell with the following configuration: (sample|YSZ|Pd:PdO)), where YSZ is 8 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia, an oxide ion conducting electrolyte and Pd:PdO is a palladium-palladium oxide powder mixture serving as the reference electrode and an oxygen reservoir. Reduction/oxidation of the sample was initiated by applying an external bias voltage to the sample. It was found that the surface of LaCr0.6Ni0.4O 3 and LaNiO3 powders could be reversibly reduced and oxidized electrochemically to changes involving La, Cr, Ni, and to a lesser extent, O surface atoms. Binding energy shifts (with respect to the La 3d5/2 peak) were seen for the Cr 2p, Ni 3p, and O 1s peaks. The La 3d peaks did not shift noticeably upon reduction, but did exhibit La 3d5/2 parent:satellite ratio changes. The reduced surfaces of LaCr0.6Ni 0.4O3 and LaNiO3 were found to be active in adsorbing CO2, an indication of the increased Lewis basicity of these surfaces upon electrochemical reduction. La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 thin films displayed similar La 3d5/2 parent:satellite ratio changes as to those seen on LaCr0.6Ni0.4O3 and LaNiO3. The electronic behavior of the B-cation, Co, showed localized electronic changes. Furthermore, the surface stoichiometry of La0.5Sr0.5CoO 3 was rich in La and Sr and displayed irreversible binding energy changes in the Sr 3d and O 1s XPS signals. Two different species of oxygen and strontium were always present on the La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 surface. Ag showed reversible changes to O 1s XPS binding energy shifts and amounts. Although this behavior is in agreement with previous reports, the results were complicated by the reversible movement of sodium arising

  5. Oxides of LANTHANUM(1-X) Strontium(x) COBALT(1 - Iron(y) OXYGEN(3) for Oxygen and Electrical Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Lone-Wen Frank

    Perovskite-type compounds in the system La_{1-x}Sr_{x}Co _{1-y}Fe_{y}O_ {3-delta have been considered as potential cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the structural, electrical, thermochemical properties of these compositions. The first and second papers of this dissertation dealt with the material synthesis, crystal structure, thermal expansion, thermogravimetry, electrical conductivity, and thermoelectricity of La_{0.8 }Sr_{0.2}Co_{1-y}Fe _{y}O_3 (y = 0-1) and La_{1-x}Sr_{x}Co _{0.2}Fe_{0.8}O_3 (x = 0-1) in air, respectively. Electrical conductivities and thermal expansion coefficients for these compositions were found to increase with Sr and Co contents. The unique temperature and composition dependence of the electrical conductivity observed in both systems were semi-empirically modeled by incorporating several mechanisms which include the hopping conduction of small polarons, a thermally activated charge disproportionation of Co^{3+ }, the ionic compensation by oxygen vacancy, and a preferential electronic compensation of acceptor by forming Fe^{4+} over Co^{4+}.. Phase stability, oxygen content, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient of La_ {1-x}Sr_{x}Co_{0.2 }Fe_{0.8}O_{3-delta } (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4) as function of temperature and oxygen activity were reported in the third paper. Both the oxygen deficiency and phase stability of compositions with y = 0.8 were found considerably high. It has been demonstrated that the degree of oxygen deficiency in these compositions significantly influences their structural and electrical properties, especially in the high temperature region.

  6. [Distribution iodine deficiency diseases in coastal areas depending on geochemical conditions].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Andryukov, B G

    2014-01-01

    In the Primorsky Krai there was performed a population ecological and hygienic analysis of the relationship between the content of chemical elements in the soil and thyroid morbidity in the population of the region. The assessment of the prevalence of iodine deficiency and iodine deficiency diseases was carried out on the basis of the impact of the priority environmental toxic (strontium, nickel, cadmium, lead, arsenic, tin) and essential (nickel, iron, germanium, molybdenum, zinc, selenium) trace elements on the level of iodine deficiency diseases. The level of thyroid pathology in the territory of Primorye was established to be the highest one in areas characterized by the severe iodine deficiency (Northwest geochemical zones), where the structure of thyroid diseases is presented mainly by diffuse nontoxic goiter. Thyroid diseases associated with iodine deficiency in the population of different age groups are the result of multiple and combined imbalance of trace elements, which causes a relative (secondary) iodine deficiency. Thyroid disease in Primorye are environmentally caused diseases of technogenic origin, they are a consequence of the relative iodine deficiency, when on the background of normal iodine supply an imbalance of zinc, iron, cobalt, manganese with excess of such toxic trace elements as lead, strontium, nickel and chromium takes place. Thyroid pathology associated with iodine deficiency, along with other environmentally dependent diseases can be considered as a marker of ecological environment trouble. PMID:25831939

  7. Handbook of stable strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Skoryna, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: chemistry of strontium; biogeochemistry of strontium; uptake of stable strontium by plants and effects on plant growth; divalent cation-dependent deposits in paramecium; effects of strontium ion on the hydrolysis of ATP; stronium ions and membranes - screening versus binding at charged surfaces; mitochondrial granules in the liver of rats kept on stable strontium supplementation; divalent cations and regulation of cyclic nucleotides in nervous systems; strontium as the substitute for calcium in the excitation-contraction coupling of crayfish muscle fibers; hemodynamic effects of strontium in the dog; some mechanical characteristics of strontium-mediated contractions in heart muscle; effects of calcium, magnesium, and strontium on drug-receptor interactions; strontium and histamine secretion; and effects of strontium in human dental enamel.

  8. Cobalt(III) Protoporphyrin Activates the DGCR8 Protein and Can Compensate microRNA Processing Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Barr, Ian; Weitz, Sara H; Atkin, Talia; Hsu, PeiKen; Karayiorgou, Maria; Gogos, Joseph A; Weiss, Shimon; Guo, Feng

    2015-06-18

    Processing of microRNA primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs) is highly regulated and defects in the processing machinery play a key role in many human diseases. In 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), heterozygous deletion of DiGeorge critical region gene 8 (DGCR8) causes a processing deficiency, which contributes to abnormal brain development. The DGCR8 protein is the RNA-binding partner of Drosha RNase, both essential for processing canonical pri-miRNAs. To identify an agent that can compensate reduced DGCR8 expression, we screened for metalloporphyrins that can mimic the natural DGCR8 heme cofactor. We found that Co(III) protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) stably binds DGCR8 and activates it for pri-miRNA processing in vitro and in HeLa cells. Importantly, treating cultured Dgcr8(+/-) mouse neurons with Co(III)PPIX can compensate the pri-miRNA processing defects. Co(III)PPIX is effective at concentrations as low as 0.2 μM and is not degraded by heme degradation enzymes, making it useful as a research tool and a potential therapeutic. PMID:26091172

  9. Cobalt poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... and pigments (Cobalt Blue) Magnets Some metal-on-metal hip implants Tires Cobalt was once used as a stabilizer in beer foam. It caused a condition called "beer-drinker's heart," which resulted in heart muscle weakness. This list may not be all-inclusive.

  10. Cobalt poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wear and tear of some cobalt/chromium metal-on-metal hip implants. This type of implant is an ... hip socket that is created by fitting a metal ball into a metal cup. Sometimes, metal particles ( ...

  11. Orthorhombic superstructures within the rare earth strontium-doped cobaltate perovskites: Ln1-xSr xCoO 3-δ ( Ln=Y 3+, Dy 3+-Yb 3+; 0.750⩽ x⩽0.875)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Michael; Avdeev, Maxim; Barnes, Paris; Morales, Liliana; Wallwork, Kia; Withers, Ray

    2007-08-01

    A combination of electron, synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction reveals a new orthorhombic structure type within the Sr-doped rare earth perovskite cobaltates Ln1-xSr xCoO 3-δ ( Ln=Y 3+, Dy 3+, Ho 3+, Er 3+, Tm 3+and Yb 3+). Electron diffraction shows a C-centred cell based on a 2√2 ap×4 ap×4√2 ap superstructure of the basic perovskite unit. Not all of these very weak satellite reflections are evident in the synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data and the average structure of each member of this series could only be refined based on Cmma symmetry and a 2√2 ap×4 ap×2√2 ap cell. The nature of structural and magnetic ordering in these phases relies on both oxygen vacancy and cation distribution. A small range of solid solution exists where this orthorhombic structure type is observed, centred roughly around the compositions Ln0.2Sr 0.8CoO 3-δ. In the case of Yb 3+ the pure orthorhombic phase was only observed for 0.850⩽ x⩽0.875. Tetragonal ( I4 /mmm; 2 ap×2 ap×4 ap) superstructures were observed for compositions having higher or lower Sr-doping levels, or for compounds with rare earth ions larger than Dy 3+. These orthorhombic phases show mixed valence (3+/4+) cobalt oxidation states between 3.2+ and 3.3+. DC magnetic susceptibility measurements show an additional magnetic transition for these orthorhombic phases compared to the associated tetragonal compounds with critical temperatures > 330 K.

  12. Effect of cobalt on the primary productivity of Spirulina platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.M.; Panigrahi, S.; Azeez, P.A.

    1987-10-01

    Cobalt, a micronutrient for biological organisms, is a metal of wide use. Main sources of Co to the environment are combustion of fossil fuels, smelters, cobalt processing facilities, sewage and industrial wastes. Atomic power plants and nuclear weapon detonations form an important source of radioisotopes of this metal to the environment. Cobalt has been included in the 14 toxic trace elements of critical importance from the point of view of environmental pollution and health hazards. Cobalt deficiency leads to diseases like stunted growth. At toxic level, Co inhibits heme biosynthesis and enzyme activities. The present study reports the effect of cobalt on biomass productivity of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis.

  13. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.Strontium-89 chloride is in a class of drugs known as radioisotopes. It delivers radiation to cancer sites and ultimately decreases bone pain. The length of treatment depends on the ...

  14. Recovery of strontium activity from a strontium-82/rubidium-82 generator

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Phillips, Dennis R.; Sosnowski, Kenneth M.

    1999-10-12

    Strontium-82 is recovered from spent strontium-82/rubidium-82 generators to provide a source of strontium-82 for additional strontium-82/rubidium-82 generators. The process involves stripping of the strontium-82 from used strontium-82/rubidium-82 generators followed by purification of the strontium-82 material to remove additional metal contaminants to desired levels.

  15. Oxygen vacancy ordering in strontium doped rare earth cobaltate perovskites Ln{sub 1-x}Sr {sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (Ln = La, Pr and Nd; x > 0.60)

    SciTech Connect

    James, M. . E-mail: mja@ansto.gov.au; Tedesco, T.; Cassidy, D.J.; Withers, R.L.

    2005-06-15

    A family of Sr-doped perovskite compounds Ln{sub 1-x}Sr {sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (Ln = La{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}; x > 0.60), were prepared by sol-gel chemistry and reaction at 1100 deg. C under 1 atm of oxygen. This structural family has been shown to be present only for rare earth ions larger than Sm{sup 3+} and an upper limit of Sr{sup 2+} solubility in these phases was found to exist between x = 0.90 and 0.95. X-ray diffraction shows oxygen-deficient, simple cubic (Pm-3m) perovskite crystal structures. The combination of electron and powder neutron diffraction reveals that oxygen vacancy ordering occurs, leading to a tetragonal (P4/mmm) superstructure and a doubling of the basic perovskite unit along the crystallographic c-axis. No additional Ln{sup 3+}/Sr{sup 2+} cation ordering was observed.

  16. Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for separation of cesium and strontium

    DOEpatents

    Abney, Kent D.; Kinkead, Scott A.; Mason, Caroline F. V.; Rais, Jiri

    1997-01-01

    Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for extraction of cesium and strontium. The use of polymeric materials containing plasticizers which are solvents for hydrophobic anions such as derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide or tetraphenylborate which are capable of extracting cesium and strontium ions from aqueous solutions in contact with the polymeric materials, is described. The polymeric material may also include a synergistic agent for a given ion like polyethylene glycol or a crown ether, for removal of radioactive isotopes of cesium and strontium from solutions of diverse composition and, in particular, for solutions containing large excess of sodium nitrate.

  17. Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for separation of cesium and strontium

    DOEpatents

    Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.; Mason, C.F.V.; Rais, J.

    1997-09-09

    Preparation and use is described for polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for extraction of cesium and strontium. The use of polymeric materials containing plasticizers which are solvents for hydrophobic anions such as derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide or tetraphenylborate which are capable of extracting cesium and strontium ions from aqueous solutions in contact with the polymeric materials, is described. The polymeric material may also include a synergistic agent for a given ion like polyethylene glycol or a crown ether, for removal of radioactive isotopes of cesium and strontium from solutions of diverse composition and, in particular, for solutions containing large excess of sodium nitrate.

  18. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had bone marrow disease, blood disorders, or kidney disease.you should know that strontium-89 chloride may interfere with the normal menstrual cycle (period) in women and may stop sperm production in men. However, ...

  19. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS SEPARATION OF CESIUM AND STRONTIUM FROM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd; R. Scott Herbst; David H. Meikrantz; Dean R. Peterman; Catherine L. Riddle; Richard D. Tillotson

    2005-02-01

    Two new solvent extraction technologies have been recently developed to simultaneously separate cesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel, following dissolution in nitric acid. The first process utilizes a solvent consisting of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide and polyethylene glycol extractants in a phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone diluent. Recent improvements to the process include development of a new, non-nitroaromatic diluent and development of new stripping reagents, including a regenerable strip reagent that can be recovered and recycled. This new strip reagent reduces product volume by a factor of 20, over the baseline process. Countercurrent flowsheet tests on simulated spent nuclear fuel feed streams have been performed with both cesium and strontium removal efficiencies of greater than 99 %. The second process developed to simultaneously separate cesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel is based on two highly-specific extractants: 4',4',(5')-Di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and Calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. A solvent composition has been developed that enables both elements to be removed together and, in fact, a synergistic effect was observed with strontium distributions in the combined solvent that are much higher that in the strontium extraction (SREX) process. Initial laboratory test results of the new combined cesium and strontium extraction process indicate good extraction and stripping performance.

  20. Accumulation of bone strontium measured by in vivo XRF in rats supplemented with strontium citrate and strontium ranelate.

    PubMed

    Wohl, Gregory R; Chettle, David R; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Druchok, Cheryl; Webber, Colin E; Adachi, Jonathan D; Beattie, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Strontium ranelate is an approved pharmacotherapy for osteoporosis in Europe and Australia, but not in Canada or the United States. Strontium citrate, an alternative strontium salt, however, is available for purchase over-the-counter as a nutritional supplement. The effects of strontium citrate on bone are largely unknown. The study's objectives were 1) to quantify bone strontium accumulation in female Sprague Dawley rats administered strontium citrate (N=7) and compare these levels to rats administered strontium ranelate (N=6) and vehicle (N=6) over 8 weeks, and 2) to verify an in vivo X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) system for measurement of bone strontium in the rat. Daily doses of strontium citrate and strontium ranelate were determined with the intention to achieve equivalent amounts of elemental strontium. However, post-hoc analyses of each strontium compound conducted using energy dispersive spectrometry microanalysis revealed a higher elemental strontium concentration in strontium citrate than strontium ranelate. Bone strontium levels were measured at baseline and 8 weeks follow-up using a unique in vivo XRF technique previously used in humans. XRF measurements were validated against ex vivo measurements of bone strontium using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Weight gain in rats in all three groups was equivalent over the study duration. A two-way ANOVA was conducted to compare bone strontium levels amongst the three groups. Bone strontium levels in rats administered strontium citrate were significantly greater (p<0.05) than rats administered strontium ranelate and vehicle. ANCOVA analyses were performed with Sr dose as a covariate to account for differences in strontium dosing. The ANCOVA revealed differences in bone strontium levels between the strontium groups were not significant, but that bone strontium levels were still very significantly greater than vehicle. PMID:22995463

  1. Cobalt free maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Floreen, S.

    1984-04-17

    The subject invention is directed to ferrous-base alloys, particularly to a cobalt-free maraging steel of novel chemistry characterized by a desired combination of strength and toughness, notwithstanding that cobalt is non-essential.

  2. Magnetic properties of cobalt-strontium-borate oxide glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ardelean, I.; Ilonca, G.; Simon, S.; Filip, S.; Jurcut, T.

    1997-02-01

    The results of the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility on xCoO{center_dot}(1 {minus} x)[2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}SrO] glasses with 0 < x {le} 50 mol% are reported. The effective magnetic moment values suggest that the Co{sup 2+} ions are predominantly octahedral coordinated in low CoO content glasses, whereas in higher CoO content glasses the Co{sup 2+} ions are located in tetrahedral sites. Also {theta}{sub p} values indicate that the Co{sup 2+} ions participate at the negative superexchange interaction for x {ge} 20 mol%.

  3. Interferometry with Strontium Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Lambert, Enoch; Otterstrom, Nils; Jones, Tyler; Durfee, Dallin

    2014-05-01

    We describe progress on a cold ion matter-wave interferometer. Cold Strontium atoms are extracted from an LVIS. The atoms will be photo-ionized with a two-photon transition to an auto-ionizing state in the continuum. The ions will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions from a pair of diode lasers injection locked to two beams from a master laser which have been shifted up and down by half the hyperfine splitting. We are developing laser instrumentation for this project including a method to prevent mode-hopping by analyzing laser frequency noise, and an inexpensive, robust wavelength meter. Supported by NSF Award No. 1205736.

  4. The characteristic of strontium-site deficient perovskites SrxFe1.5Mo0.5O6-δ (x = 1.9-2.0) as intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guoquan; Feng, Jie; Sun, Wang; Dai, Ningning; Hou, Mingyue; Hao, Xiaoming; Qiao, Jinshuo; Sun, Kening

    2014-12-01

    As the cathodes for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs), A-site deficient SrxFe1.5Mo0.5O6-δ (x = 1.9-2.0) (SxFM) materials have been successfully synthesized using the sol-gel combustion method. In the perovskite structure of these oxides, the unit cell varies from pseudocubic to cubic with increasing deficiency. Thermal expansion coefficient of SxFM has also been measured and compared with that of Scandium-stabilized zirconium (ScSZ) electrolyte. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicate that the Sr-deficiency has changed the proportion of Fe2+/Fe3+ and Mo6+/Mo5+ ratios, which directly influences the conductivity of SxFM materials. S1.950FM possesses the largest electrical conductivity and the lowest polarization resistance (Rp) among all the samples. The maximum power densities of a single cell with the S1.950FM cathode reaches 1083 mW cm-2, and the area specific resistance value is 0.17 Ω cm2 at 800 °C. These results indicate that the A-site deficiency could promote the electrochemical performance of SFM materials as cathodes for IT-SOFCs.

  5. Bench-scale treatability studies for simulated incinerator scrubber blowdown containing radioactive cesium and strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Coroneos, A.C.; Taylor, P.A.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bostick, D.A.; Perona, J.J.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of bench-scale testing completed to remove {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr from the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator blowdown at the K-25 Site Central Neutralization Facility, a wastewater treatment facility designed to remove heavy metals and uranium from various wastewaters. The report presents results of bench-scale testing using chabazite and clinoptilolite zeolites to remove cesium and strontium; using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide (KCCF) to remove cesium; and using strontium chloride coprecipitation, sodium phosphate coprecipitation, and calcium sulfate coprecipitation to remove strontium. Low-range, average-range, and high-range concentration blowdown surrogates were used to complete the bench-scale testing.

  6. Strontium-90 fluoride data sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a compilation of available data and appropriate literature references on the properties of strontium-90 fluoride and nonradioactive strontium fluoride. The objective of the document is to compile in a single source pertinent data to assist potential users in the development, licensing, and use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/-fueled radioisotope heat sources for terrestrial power conversion and thermal applications. The report is an update of the Strontium-90 Fluoride Data Sheet (BNWL-2284) originally issued in April 1977.

  7. Solubility of cobalt in cement.

    PubMed

    Fregert, S; Gruvberger, B

    1978-02-01

    Unlike chromate, cobalt occurring as cobalt oxides in cement is not water-soluble in a detectable amount. Cobalt oxides are to some extent soluble in the presence of amino acids with which cobalt forms complexes. Such complexes can elicit patch test reactions. It is postulated that cobalt is more readily dissolved by forming complexes in eczematous skin than in normal skin. This may explain why cobalt sensitization in cement eczemas is secondary to chromate sensitivity. PMID:657784

  8. A Cold Strontium Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Blaser, Kelvin; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-03-01

    We present a cold ion source for strontium 87. The source is based off of a standard Low-Velocity-Intense-Source (LVIS) for strontium using permanent magnets in place of anti-Helmholtz coils. Atoms from the LVIS are then ionized in a two photon process as they pass a 20kV anode plate. The result is a mono-energetic beam of ions whose velocity is tunable. Applications for the ions include spectroscopy and ion interferometry.

  9. Marine cobalt resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Ferromanganese oxides in the open oceans are more enriched in cobalt than any other widely distributed sediments or rocks. Concentrations of cobalt exceed 1 percent in ferromanganese crusts on seamounts, ocean ridges, and other raised areas of the ocean. The cobalt-rich crusts may be the slowest growing of any earth material, accumulating one molecular layer every 1 to 3 months. Attention has been drawn to crusts as potential resources because they contain cobalt, manganese, and platinum, three of the four priority strategic metals for the United States. Moreover, unlike abyssal nodules, whose recovery is complicated by their dominant location in international waters, some of the most cobalt-rich crusts occur within the exclusive economic zone of the United States and other nations. Environmental impact statements for crust exploitation are under current development by the Department of the Interior.

  10. 10 CFR 35.2204 - Records of molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... elution of rubidium-82, the ratio of the measures expressed as kilobecquerel of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium), kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  11. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.02 microcurie of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium-82 chloride); or more than 0.2 kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.2 microcurie of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  12. 10 CFR 35.2204 - Records of molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... elution of rubidium-82, the ratio of the measures expressed as kilobecquerel of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium), kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  13. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.02 microcurie of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium-82 chloride); or more than 0.2 kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.2 microcurie of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  14. 10 CFR 35.2204 - Records of molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... elution of rubidium-82, the ratio of the measures expressed as kilobecquerel of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium), kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  15. 10 CFR 35.2204 - Records of molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... elution of rubidium-82, the ratio of the measures expressed as kilobecquerel of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium), kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  16. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.02 microcurie of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium-82 chloride); or more than 0.2 kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.2 microcurie of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  17. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.02 microcurie of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium-82 chloride); or more than 0.2 kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.2 microcurie of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  18. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.02 microcurie of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium-82 chloride); or more than 0.2 kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 chloride injection (0.2 microcurie of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  19. 10 CFR 35.2204 - Records of molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... elution of rubidium-82, the ratio of the measures expressed as kilobecquerel of strontium-82 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-82 per millicurie of rubidium), kilobecquerel of strontium-85 per megabecquerel of rubidium-82 (or microcuries of strontium-85 per millicurie of...

  20. The Use of Strontium-87/Strontium-86 Ratios to Measure Atmospheric Transport into Forested Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graustein, William C.; Armstrong, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Strontium-87/strontium-86 ratios indicate the sources of strontium in samples of natural waters, vegetation, and soil material taken from watersheds in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of New Mexico. More than 75 percent of the strontium in the vegetation is ultimately derived from atmospheric transport and less than 25 percent from the weathering of the underlying rock. Much of the airborne strontium enters the watersheds by impacting on coniferous foliage, but deciduous foliage apparently traps little, if any, strontium-bearing aerosol. The strontium and presumably other nutrients are continuously recycled in a nearly closed system consisting of upper soil horizons, forest litter, and the standing crop of vegetation.

  1. The use of strontium-87/strontium-86 ratios to measure atmospheric transport into forested watersheds.

    PubMed

    Graustein, W C; Armstrong, R L

    1983-01-21

    Strontium-87/strontium-86 ratios indicate the sources of strontium in samples of natural waters, vegetation, and soil material taken from watersheds in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of New Mexico. More than 75 percent of the strontium in the vegetation is ultimately derived from atmospheric transport and less than 25 percent from the weathering of the underlying rock. Much of the airborne strontium enters the watersheds by impacting on coniferous foliage, but deciduous foliage apparently traps little, if any, strontium-bearing aerosol. The strontium and presumably other nutrients are continuously recycled in a nearly closed system consisting of upper soil horizons, forest litter, and the standing crop of vegetation. PMID:17798277

  2. Samarium/Cobalt Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, D.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R.; Chang, C.

    1985-01-01

    Intrinsic magnetic coercivities of samarium cobalt magnets made to approach theoretical limit of 350 kA/m by carefully eliminating oxygen from finished magnet by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). HIP process viable alternative to currently used sintering process.

  3. Exploring strontium titanate as a reforming catalyst for dodecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hbaieb, K.

    2016-08-01

    Yttrium-doped strontium titanate (YST)-based perovskite has been explored as catalyst for reforming dodecane. Active metal elements such as ruthenium, nickel and cobalt were doped on the B-site of the perovskite to boost the catalyst activity. Commercial Ni-alumina catalyst has been used for benchmarking. Both steam and autothermal reforming schemes have been used at 800 and 850 °C. Irrespective of the doping elements, all catalysts performed well and had comparable activity and conversion as the commercial catalyst with slight advantage for ruthenium followed by nickel-based catalysts. Hydrogen and syngas yields fall into the range of 65-75 and 83-91 %, respectively. Conversion was consistently between 84 and 90 %. As such, the YST-based perovskite is a promising catalyst for reforming of heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel.

  4. Sorption of strontium on bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Khan, S.; Riaz-ur-Rehman; Ali Khan, M.

    1995-12-31

    Sorption of Sr on bentonite was studied using the batch technique. Distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) were determined as a function of contact time, pH, sorbent and sorbate concentration and temperature. The data were interpreted in terms of Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. Thermodynamic parameters for the sorption system were determined at three different temperatures. The positive value of the heat of sorption, {Delta}H{degree} = 30.62 kJ/mol at 295 K, shows that the sorption of strontium on bentonite is endothermic. The negative value of the free energy of sorption, {Delta}G{degree} = {minus}10.69 kJ/mol at 298 K, shows the spontaneity of the reaction. {Delta}G{degree} becomes more negative with increasing temperature, which shows that the sorption process is more favorable at higher temperatures. The mean free energy for sorption, E {approximately} 9 kJ/mol, suggests that ion exchange is the predominant mode of sorption in the Sr concentration range studies, i.e., 0.01--0.3 mol/dm{sup 3}. The presence of complementary cations depresses the sorption of strontium on bentonite in the order Ca{sup 2+}>Mg{sup 2+}>K{sup +}>Na{sup +}. Some organic complexing agents and natural ligands also affect the sorption of strontium. The desorption studies with ground water at low strontium loads on bentonite show that about 90% of Sr is irreversibly sorbed on the bentonite.

  5. Development of Technologies for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Spent Nuclear Fuel as Part of an Advanced Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; R. Scott HErbst; David H. Meikrantz; Dean R. Peterman; Catherine L. Riddle; Richard D. Tillotson; Terry A. Todd

    2005-04-01

    As part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, two solvent extraction technologies are being developed to simultaneously separate cesium and strontium from dissolved spent nuclear fuel. The first process utilizes a solvent consisting of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide and polyethylene glycol extractants in a phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone diluent. Recent improvements to the process include development of a new, non-nitroaromatic diluent and development of new stripping reagents, including a regenerable strip reagent that can be recovered and recycled. Countercurrent flowsheets have been designed and tested on simulated and actual spent nuclear fuel feed streams with both cesium and strontium removal efficiencies of greater than 99 %. The second process developed to simultaneously separate cesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel is based on two highly-specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-Di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and Calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. A solvent composition has been developed that enables both elements to be removed together and, in fact, a synergistic effect was observed with strontium distributions in the combined solvent that are much higher that in the strontium extraction (SREX) process. Initial laboratory test results of the new combined cesium and strontium extraction process indicate good extraction and stripping performance. A flowsheet for treatment of spent nuclear fuel is currently being developed.

  6. Wrought cobalt- base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klarstrom, D. L.

    1993-08-01

    Wrought cobalt-base superalloys are used extensively in gas turbine engines because of their excellent high-temperature creep and fatigue strengths and resistance to hot corrosion attack. In addition, the unique character of the oxide scales that form on some of the alloys provides outstanding resistance to high-temperature sliding wear. This article provides a review of the evolutionary development of wrought cobalt-base alloys in terms of alloy design and physical metallurgy. The topics include solid-so-lution strengthening, carbide precipitation characteristics, and attempts to introduce age hardening. The use of PHACOMP to enhance thermal stability characteristics and the incorporation of rare-earth ele-ments to improve oxidation resistance is also reviewed and discussed. The further development of cobalt-base superalloys has been severely hampered by past political events, which have accentuated the strategic vulnerability of cobalt as a base or as an alloying element. Consequently, alternative alloys have been developed that use little or no cobalt. One such alternative, Haynes® 230TMalloy, is discussed briefly.

  7. Strontium Substitution for Calcium in Lithogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Blaschko, Sarah D.; Chi, Thomas; Miller, Joe; Flechner, Lawrence; Fakra, Sirine; Kapahi, Pankaj; Kahn, Arnold; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Strontium has chemical similarity to calcium, which enables the replacement of calcium by strontium in biomineralization processes. Incorporating strontium into human bone and teeth has been studied extensively but little research has been performed of the incorporation of strontium into urinary calculi. We used synchrotron based x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption techniques to examine the presence of strontium in different types of human kidney stones. Materials and Methods Multiple unique human stone samples were obtained via consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomies/ureteroscopies. A portion of each stone was sent for standard laboratory analysis and a portion was retained for x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption measurements. X-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption measurements determined the presence, spatial distribution and speciation of strontium in each stone sample. Results Traditional kidney stone analyses identified calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, uric acid and cystine stones. X-ray fluorescence measurements identified strontium in all stone types except pure cystine. X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping of the samples revealed co-localization of calcium and strontium. X-ray absorption measurements of the calcium phosphate stone showed strontium predominately present as strontium apatite. Conclusions Advanced x-ray fluorescence imaging identified strontium in all calcium based stones, present as strontium apatite. This finding may be critical since apatite is thought to be the initial nidus for calcium stone formation. Strontium is not identified by standard laboratory stone analyses. Its substitution for calcium can be reliably identified in stones from multiple calcium based stone formers, which may offer opportunities to gain insight into early events in lithogenesis. PMID:23260568

  8. Assessment of strontium oxide functionalized graphene nanoflakes for enhanced photocatalytic activity: A density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, A.; Mathavan, T.; Asath, R. Mohamed; Archana, J.; Hayakawa, Y.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    A series of strontium oxide functionalized graphene nanoflakes were designed and their optoelectronic properties were studied for enhanced photocatalytic activity. The efficiency of designed molecules was studied using various parameters such as HOMO-LUMO energy gap, light harvesting efficiency and exciton binding energy. The computed results show that by increasing the degree of functionalization of strontium oxide leads to lowering the band gap of hydrogen terminated graphene nanoflakes. Furthermore, the study explores the role of strontium oxide functionalization in Frontier Molecular Orbitals, ionization potential, electron affinity, exciton binding energy and light harvesting efficiency of designed molecules. The infrared and Raman spectra were simulated for pure and SrO functionalized graphene nanoflakes. The electron rich and electron deficient regions which are favorable for electrophilic and nucleophilic attacks respectively were analyzed using molecular electrostatic potential surface analysis.

  9. Strontium: Part II. Chemistry, Biological Aspects and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, G. C.; Johnson, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews basic information on the Chemistry of strontium and its compounds. Explains biological aspects of strontium and its pharmaceutical applications. Highlights industrial application of strontium and its components. (ML)

  10. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

  11. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-12-08

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal. 3 figs.

  12. Sorption of strontium on clinoptilolite and heulandite

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyavskaya, N.B.

    1986-05-01

    The author investigates the sorption of strontium on the isostructural zeolites clinoptilolite and heulandite. In the Sr/Na/zeolite/H/sub 2/O system, clinoptilolite manifests selectivity for strontium, and heulandite for sodium. The role of the nature of the exchange ions is discussed. Modification of the clinoptilolite with acid, subsequently obtaining the Na, NH/sub 4/, or N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ form, increases the capacity for strontium by a factor of 2-4.

  13. Setting properties and in vitro bioactivity of strontium-enriched gelatin-calcium phosphate bone cements.

    PubMed

    Panzavolta, S; Torricelli, P; Sturba, L; Bracci, B; Giardino, R; Bigi, A

    2008-03-15

    Strontium is known to reduce bone resorption and stimulate bone formation. We have investigated the effect of strontium on the setting properties and in vitro bioactivity of a biomimetic gelatin-calcium phosphate bone cement. Gelatin-alpha-TCP powders, with a gelatin content of 15 wt %, were prepared by grinding and sieving the solid compounds obtained by casting gelatin aqueous solutions containing alpha-TCP. 5 wt % of CaHPO(4).2H(2)O were added to the cement powders before mixing with the liquid phase, with a L/P ratio of 0.3 mL/g. Strontium was added as SrCl(2).6H(2)O in different amounts up to 5 atom %. X-ray diffraction analysis, mechanical tests, and SEM investigations were carried out on the cements after different times of soaking in physiological solution. The presence of strontium affects both the initial and the final setting times of the cements, which increase with the ion content. The microstructural modifications observed in the SEM micrographs of the fractured surfaces are in agreement with the increase of the total porosity, and with the slight reduction of the compressive strength of the aged cements, on increasing strontium content. The rate of transformation of alpha-TCP into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite increases on increasing strontium content. SEM reveals that MG63 osteoblasts grown on the cements show a normal morphology and biological tests demonstrate very good rate of proliferation and viability in every experimental time. In particular, strontium stimulates Alkaline Phosphatase activity, Collagen type I, osteocalcin, and osteoprotegerin expression. PMID:17647240

  14. METHOD OF REMOVING STRONTIUM IONS

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, D.W.; McHenry, J.R.; Ames, L.L. Jr.

    1962-05-01

    A method is given for removing trace amounts of Sr/sup 90/ from solutions. Phosphate ion is added to the solution and it is then brought into contact with a solid salt such as calcium carbonate which will react methathetically with the phosphate ion to form a salt such as calcium phosphate. During this reaction, strontium will be absorbed to a high degree within the newly formed lattice. (AEC)

  15. Mechanical properties of nanocrystalline cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimpoor, Amir A.; Erb, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    Due to their excellent wear and corrosion properties, nanocrystalline cobalt and several cobalt alloys made by electrodeposition are currently being developed as environmentally benign replacement coatings for hard chromium electrodeposits. The focus of this study is on the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline cobalt, which are currently not well understood. A comparison is presented for hardness, tensile properties, Charpy impact properties and fracture surface analysis of both nanocrystalline (grain size: 12 nm) and conventional polycrystalline (grain size: 4.8 m) cobalt. It is shown that the hardness and tensile strength of nanocrystalline cobalt is 2-3 times higher than for polycrystalline cobalt. However, in contrast to other nanocrystalline materials tested previously, nanocrystalline cobalt retains considerable ductility with elongation to fracture values up to 7%.

  16. Separation of strontium from fecal matter

    DOEpatents

    Kester, Dianne K.

    1995-01-01

    A method of separating strontium from a sample of biomass potentially contaminated with various radionuclides. After the sample is reduced, dissociated, and carried on a first precipitate of actinides, the first precipitate is removed to leave a supernate. Next, oxalic acid is added to the supernate to cause a second precipitate of strontium and calcium. Then, after separating the second precipitate, nitric acid is added to the second precipitate to cause a third precipitate of strontium. The calcium remains in solution and is discarded to leave essentially the precipitate of strontium.

  17. Separation of strontium from fecal matter

    DOEpatents

    Kester, D.K.

    1995-01-03

    A method is presented of separating strontium from a sample of biomass potentially contaminated with various radionuclides. After the sample is reduced, dissociated, and carried on a first precipitate of actinides, the first precipitate is removed to leave a supernate. Next, oxalic acid is added to the supernate to cause a second precipitate of strontium and calcium. Then, after separating the second precipitate, nitric acid is added to the second precipitate to cause a third precipitate of strontium. The calcium remains in solution and is discarded to leave essentially the precipitate of strontium.

  18. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOEpatents

    Hurlburt, Paul K.; Abney, Kent D.; Kinkead, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

  19. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOEpatents

    Hurlburt, P.K.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1997-05-20

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10{prime} positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron. 1 fig.

  20. Coordination Complexes of Cobalt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gregory M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment involving the synthesis and spectral studies of cobalt complexes that not only give general chemistry students an introduction to inorganic synthesis but allows them to conduct a systematic study on the effect of different ligands on absorption spectra. Background information, procedures, and experimental results are…

  1. Strontium mineralization of shark vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Raoult, Vincent; Peddemors, Victor M; Zahra, David; Howell, Nicholas; Howard, Daryl L; de Jonge, Martin D; Williamson, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    Determining the age of sharks using vertebral banding is a vital component of management, but the causes of banding are not fully understood. Traditional shark ageing is based on fish otolith ageing methods where growth bands are assumed to result from varied seasonal calcification rates. Here we investigate these assumptions by mapping elemental distribution within the growth bands of vertebrae from six species of sharks representing four different taxonomic orders using scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy. Traditional visual growth bands, determined with light microscopy, were more closely correlated to strontium than calcium in all species tested. Elemental distributions suggest that vertebral strontium bands may be related to environmental variations in salinity. These results highlight the requirement for a better understanding of shark movements, and their influence on vertebral development, if confidence in age estimates is to be improved. Analysis of shark vertebrae using similar strontium-focused elemental techniques, once validated for a given species, may allow more successful estimations of age on individuals with few or no visible vertebral bands. PMID:27424768

  2. Strontium mineralization of shark vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Raoult, Vincent; Peddemors, Victor M.; Zahra, David; Howell, Nicholas; Howard, Daryl L.; de Jonge, Martin D.; Williamson, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the age of sharks using vertebral banding is a vital component of management, but the causes of banding are not fully understood. Traditional shark ageing is based on fish otolith ageing methods where growth bands are assumed to result from varied seasonal calcification rates. Here we investigate these assumptions by mapping elemental distribution within the growth bands of vertebrae from six species of sharks representing four different taxonomic orders using scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy. Traditional visual growth bands, determined with light microscopy, were more closely correlated to strontium than calcium in all species tested. Elemental distributions suggest that vertebral strontium bands may be related to environmental variations in salinity. These results highlight the requirement for a better understanding of shark movements, and their influence on vertebral development, if confidence in age estimates is to be improved. Analysis of shark vertebrae using similar strontium-focused elemental techniques, once validated for a given species, may allow more successful estimations of age on individuals with few or no visible vertebral bands. PMID:27424768

  3. Chalcogenide Cobalt telluride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Bishnu; Dulal, Rajendra; Pegg, Ian L.; Philip, John

    Cobalt telluride nanotubes are grown using wet chemical and hydrothermal syntheses. Wet chemical synthesized nanotubes display nearly 1: 1 Co to Te ratio. On the other hand, CoTe nanotubes synthesized using hydrothermal method show excess Co content leading to the compound Co58Te42. Both CoTe and Co58Te42 display magnetic properties, but with totally different characteristics. The Curie temperature of CoTe is higher than 400 K. However, the Tc of Co58Te42 is below 50 K. Transport properties of cobalt telluride (CoTe) nanotube devices show that they exhibit p-type semiconducting behavior. The magnetoresistance measured at 10 K show a magnetoresistance of 54%. . National Science Foundation under ECCS-0845501 and NSF-MRI, DMR-0922997.

  4. Substitution mechanism of alkali metals for strontium in strontium hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Naddari, Thouraya; Hamdi, Besma; Savariault, Jean Michel; El Feki, Hafed; Ben Salah, Abdelhamid

    2003-01-25

    Strontium hydroxyapatites substituted by alkali metals are synthesized by double decomposition method in basic medium. Structures of Sr{sub 9.50}Na{sub 0.30}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 1.30} (SrNaHAp) and Sr{sub 9.81}K{sub 0.12}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 1.74} (SrKHAp) are determined by X-ray powder diffraction. Both compounds are isotypic and crystallize in hexagonal system (space group P63/m) with the following cells: a=9.751(3) A and c=7.279(3) A for SrNaHAp and a=9.755(4) A and c=7.284(3) A for SrKHAp. Results are compared to those of Sr{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}. According to the site occupancy factors, in SrNaHAp sodium is localized in site (I) and in SrKHAp potassium in site (II). Both structures contain vacancies in hydroxyl and metal sites. The mechanism of alkali metals substitution for strontium proposed explains the vacancies formation.

  5. Cobalt ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Varying concentrations of an organometallic cobalt complex were added to an epoxy system currently used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin. Methods for combining cobalt (III) acetylacetonate with a tetraglycidyl 4,4 prime - diaminodiphenylmethane-based epoxy were investigated. The effects of increasing cobalt ion concentration on the epoxy cure were demonstrated by epoxy gel times and differential scanning calorimetry cure exotherms. Analysis on cured cobalt-containing epoxy castings included determination of glass transition temperatures by thermomechanical analysis, thermooxidative stabilities by thermogravimetric analysis, and densities in a density gradient column. Flexural strength and stiffness were also measured on the neat resin castings.

  6. Blood doping by cobalt. Should we measure cobalt in athletes?

    PubMed Central

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Background Blood doping is commonplace in competitive athletes who seek to enhance their aerobic performances through illicit techniques. Presentation of the hypothesis Cobalt, a naturally-occurring element with properties similar to those of iron and nickel, induces a marked and stable polycythemic response through a more efficient transcription of the erythropoietin gene. Testing the hypothesis Although little information is available so far on cobalt metabolism, reference value ranges or supplementation in athletes, there is emerging evidence that cobalt is used as a supplement and increased serum concentrations are occasionally observed in athletes. Therefore, given the athlete's connatural inclination to experiment with innovative, unfair and potentially unhealthy doping techniques, cobalt administration might soon become the most suited complement or surrogate for erythropoiesis-stimulating substances. Nevertheless, cobalt administration is not free from unsafe consequences, which involve toxic effects on heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and cancer promotion. Implications of the hypothesis Cobalt is easily purchasable, inexpensive and not currently comprehended within the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Moreover, available techniques for measuring whole blood, serum, plasma or urinary cobalt involve analytic approaches which are currently not practical for antidoping laboratories. Thus more research on cobalt metabolism in athletes is compelling, along with implementation of effective strategies to unmask this potentially deleterious doping practice PMID:16863591

  7. Thermoelectric Power Generation from Lanthanum Strontium Titanium Oxide at Room Temperature through the Addition of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yue; Norman, Colin; Srivastava, Deepanshu; Azough, Feridoon; Wang, Li; Robbins, Mark; Simpson, Kevin; Freer, Robert; Kinloch, Ian A

    2015-07-29

    The applications of strontium titanium oxide based thermoelectric materials are currently limited by their high operating temperatures of >700 °C. Herein, we show that the thermal operating window of lanthanum strontium titanium oxide (LSTO) can be reduced to room temperature by the addition of a small amount of graphene. This increase in operating performance will enable future applications such as generators in vehicles and other sectors. The LSTO composites incorporated one percent or less of graphene and were sintered under an argon/hydrogen atmosphere. The resultant materials were reduced and possessed a multiphase structure with nanosized grains. The thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites decreased upon the addition of graphene, whereas the electrical conductivity and power factor both increased significantly. These factors, together with a moderate Seebeck coefficient, meant that a high power factor of ∼2500 μWm(-1)K(-2) was reached at room temperature at a loading of 0.6 wt % graphene. The highest thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) was achieved when 0.6 wt % graphene was added (ZT = 0.42 at room temperature and 0.36 at 750 °C), with >280% enhancement compared to that of pure LSTO. A preliminary 7-couple device was produced using bismuth strontium cobalt oxide/graphene-LSTO pucks. This device had a Seebeck coefficient of ∼1500 μV/K and an open voltage of 600 mV at a mean temperature of 219 °C. PMID:26095083

  8. Occurrence of strontium in natural water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skougstad, M.W.; Horr, C. Albert

    1960-01-01

    The regions where the stable strontium content of surface waters is relatively low (less than 0.50 ppm) include the Pacific Northwest, Northeastern United States, and the Central Lowlands, Particularly the Lower Mississippi basin and the Western Gulf Coast area. Moderate concentrations of strontium (0.50 to 1.5 ppm) are found in streams of Southeastern United States, most of the Great Plains Region, the Western Mountain and Plateau Regions, and California. Relatively high concentrations of strontium occur in the surface waters of an area that includes Northern and Western Texas and Southern New Mexico and Arizona. Exceptions to the above distribution are due to local geologic conditions.

  9. Strontium Ions Substitution in Brushite Crystals: The Role of Strontium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad H.; Rueda, Carmen; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2011-01-01

    The incorporation of strontium chloride to brushite cement was successful to introduce strontium ions within the lattice of brushite crystals. The effect of strontium ions on brushite cement properties was concentration dependent; such that, the addition of 5% and 10% (w/w) SrCl2 significantly increased the cement FST and the addition of 10% SrCl2 decreased the cement tensile strength. Further, cement weight loss was shown to be increased by cement modification with SrCl2. The combination of ionic substitution and the degradability of brushite cements would constitute a system for the local delivery of strontium ions in the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:24956162

  10. Cobalt source calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Rizvi, H.M.

    1999-12-03

    The data obtained from these tests determine the dose rate of the two cobalt sources in SRTC. Building 774-A houses one of these sources while the other resides in room C-067 of Building 773-A. The data from this experiment shows the following: (1) The dose rate of the No.2 cobalt source in Building 774-A measured 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 17, 1999). The dose rate of the Shepherd Model 109 Gamma cobalt source in Building 773-A measured 9.27 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 25, 1999). These rates come from placing the graduated cylinder containing the dosimeter solution in the center of the irradiation chamber. (2) Two calibration tests in the 774-A source placed the graduated cylinder with the dosimeter solution approximately 1.5 inches off center in the axial direction. This movement of the sample reduced the measured dose rate 0.92% from 1.083 x 10{sup 5} rad/h to 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h. and (3) A similar test in the cobalt source in 773-A placed the graduated cylinder approximately 2.0 inches off center in the axial direction. This change in position reduced the measured dose rate by 10.34% from 1.036 x 10{sup 6} to 9.27 x 10{sup 5}. This testing used chemical dosimetry to measure the dose rate of a radioactive source. In this method, one determines the dose by the chemical change that takes place in the dosimeter. For this calibration experiment, the author used a Fricke (ferrous ammonium sulfate) dosimeter. This solution works well for dose rates to 10{sup 7} rad/h. During irradiation of the Fricke dosimeter solution the Fe{sup 2+} ions ionize to Fe{sup 3+}. When this occurs, the solution acquires a slightly darker tint (not visible to the human eye). To determine the magnitude of the change in Fe ions, one places the solution in an UV-VIS Spectrophotometer. The UV-VIS Spectrophotometer measures the absorbency of the solution. Dividing the absorbency by the total time (in minutes) of exposure yields the dose rate.

  11. A Strontium87 Ion Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Archibald, James L., II; Jackson, Jarom; Anderson, Dean; Hermansen, Michael; Cunningham, Mark; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2011-05-01

    We describe a matter-wave interferometer based on Sr87+. The ions are generated from a laser-cooled strontium beam that is photo-ionized using a two-photon transition to an auto- ionizing state in the continuum. The ionization occurs between two electrodes, allowing us to accelerate the ions to any desired energy from a few meV to 20 keV. Each ion's quantum wave is split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions between the hyperfine ground states of Sr87+. The two required optical frequencies for this transition are created by frequency-shifting a master laser in opposite directions by half of the 5 GHz ground-state hyperfine splitting. We can then determine the interferometer phase from the fluorescence of one of the ground states. We will discuss the theory of operation, experimental methods, and potential applications of the device. NSF, NIST

  12. Matter Wave Interferometery with Strontium 87 Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher; Lyon, Mary; Archibald, James; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-10-01

    We present progress on a strontium ion interferometer for use as an electromagnetic field sensor with unprecedented sensitivity. Applications include measurements of fringing fields, studies of image charge scattering in superconductors, and ultra-precise tests of electromagnetism.

  13. Strontium in the bone-implant interface.

    PubMed

    Vestermark, Marianne Toft

    2011-05-01

    Total hip replacement surgery is being performed on an increasingly large part of the population and at increasingly younger age. Because we live and stay physically active longer, and since hip replacement surgery has become quite successful, the treatment is being offered to progressively more patients. Unfortunately, about 17% of hip replacement surgeries currently involve revisions. Consequently, the longevity of both the primary and revision implant is an issue and warrants further investigation. Implants undergoing early instability or even subsidence correlate with an increased risk of aseptic loosening, subsequently requiring revision. Thus, the goal is early fixation by osseointegration of the implant. For revision implants, this is an even greater challenge since an allograft is often needed during surgery to obtain immediate stability of the implant. Bone grafts are rapidly resorbed. Thus, instability of the prosthesis may develop before new bone formation is well established and can mechanically secure the prosthesis. Strontium is a dual action drug; being both bone anabolic and anti-catabolic. In the form of strontiumranelate, it is used in the treatment of osteoporosis. Strontium may potentially improve the early osseointegration and fixation of implants. This dissertation consists of three studies investigating the effect of strontium at the bone-implant interface. The questions were firstly, what is the optimal delivery method for strontium to the interface, and secondly, can strontium exercise its dual action at the interface? The studies were performed in a cementless, experimental gap model in canine. The effects of strontium were evaluated by histomorphometrical analysis of the osseointegration and mechanical push-out test of implant fixation. Different stereological methods were used for the histomorphometrical analysis of each study. The methods used were reviewed critically and found valid. Study I compared a 5% strontium

  14. Investigation of modified strontium titanate photoanodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisyan, A.G.; Arutyunyan, V.M.; Melikyan, V.V.; Putnyn', E.V.

    1986-04-01

    This paper studies semiconducting phases on the basis of single-crystal and polycrystalline strontium titanate. An attempt is made to correlate the photoelectrochemical behavior of SrTiO/sub 3/ photoanodes with their electrophysical properties. It is shown that the photoelectrochemical properties of the photoanodes studied largely depend on the electrophysical parameters of the semiconducting strontium titanate. Ceramic electrodes doped with lanthanum display high photosensitivity.

  15. Mineral resource of the month: strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2008-01-01

    Last month as Americans sat transfixed watching fireworks on July 4, they were probably unaware that strontium was responsible for the beautiful reds in the display. Strontium, a soft silver-white or yellowish metallic element that turns yellow when exposed to air (and red when it burns), is prized for its brilliant red flame. Because it reacts with air and water, the metal is only present naturally in compounds, such as celestite and strontianite.

  16. Cesium and strontium ion specific exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.

    1996-10-01

    This work is one of two parallel projects that are part of an ESP task to develop high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. In this subtask, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with AlliedSignal, Inc. (Des Plaines, Illinois) to develop inorganic ion exchangers that are selective for strontium and cesium from alkaline high-level waste and groundwater streams.

  17. Separation of strontium from fecal matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kester, D.K.

    1994-12-31

    The present invention relates to a method of separating strontium, and, more particularly, to a method of separating strontium from a sample of biomass potentially contaminated with various radionuclides. Radioactive strontium is a radionuclide which represents a hazard to man because of its long half-life and, if ingested, its tendency to be retained in the human body. In the event that radionuclides such as strontium or various actinides are ingested, it is desirable to monitor the discharge or release of these radionuclides from the human body through analysis of fecal matter. In laboratories and other facilities where potential for radionuclide contamination exists, fecal analysis for strontium is routinely conducted for individuals who are terminating from their position or are suspected of having been contaminated with radionuclides. Methods for separating and analyzing radioactive actinides from a biomass sample are well known and have been extensively developed for the US Department of Energy. These methods, described in the Department`s internal procedure, USDOE, RESL/ID, A-16, 1981, as well as in US Patent 5,190,881, involve the use of an iron phosphate precipitation step to separate actinides from a solution, or supernate. However, there are no established procedures for the separation of strontium from a biomass sample wherein an iron phosphate precipitation step is involved.

  18. Splitting water with cobalt.

    PubMed

    Artero, Vincent; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Fontecave, Marc

    2011-08-01

    The future of energy supply depends on innovative breakthroughs regarding the design of cheap, sustainable, and efficient systems for the conversion and storage of renewable energy sources, such as solar energy. The production of hydrogen, a fuel with remarkable properties, through sunlight-driven water splitting appears to be a promising and appealing solution. While the active sites of enzymes involved in the overall water-splitting process in natural systems, namely hydrogenases and photosystem II, use iron, nickel, and manganese ions, cobalt has emerged in the past five years as the most versatile non-noble metal for the development of synthetic H(2)- and O(2)-evolving catalysts. Such catalysts can be further coupled with photosensitizers to generate photocatalytic systems for light-induced hydrogen evolution from water. PMID:21748828

  19. Cobalt: for strength and color

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  20. Strontium hydroxyapatite and strontium carbonate as templates for the precipitation of calcium-phosphates in the absence and presence of fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternitzke, Vanessa; Janousch, Markus; Heeb, Michèle B.; Hering, Janet G.; Johnson, C. Annette

    2014-06-01

    The heterogeneous precipitation of calcium-phosphates on calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 or HAP) in the presence and absence of fluoride is important in the formation of bone and teeth, protection against tooth decay, dental and skeletal fluorosis and defluoridation of drinking water. Strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr10(PO4)6(OH)2 or SrHAP) and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) were used as calcium-free seed templates in precipitation experiments conducted with varying initial calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) or calcium-to-phosphate-to-fluoride (Ca/P/F) ratios. Suspensions of SrHAP or SrCO3 seed templates (which were calcium-limited for both templates and phosphate-limited in the case of SrCO3) were reacted at pH 7.3 (25 °C) over 3 days. The resulting solids were examined with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Calcium apatite was the predominant phase identified by all techniques independent of the added Ca/P ratios and of the presence of fluoride. It was not possible to make an unambiguous distinction between HAP and fluorapatite (Ca10(PO4)6F2, FAP). The apatite was calcium-deficient and probably contained some strontium.

  1. Iron, lead, and cobalt absorption: similarities and dissimilarities

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.C.; Conrad, M.E.; Holland, R.

    1981-01-01

    Using isolated intestinal segments in rats, the absorption of iron, lead, and cobalt was increased in iron deficiency and decreased in iron loading. Similarly, the absorption of these metals was decreased in transfusional erythocytosis, after intravenous iron injection and after parenteral endotoxin injection. Acute bleeding or abbreviated intervals of dietary iron deprivation resulted in increased iron absorption from isolated intestinal segments and in intact animals, while the absorption of lead and cobalt was unaffected. These results suggest that the specificity of the mucosal metal absorptive mechanism is either selectively enhanced for iron absorption by phlebotomy or brief periods of dietary iron deprivation, or that two or more mucosal pathways for iron absorption may exist.

  2. Strontium-89 and Strontium-90 Levels in Breast Milk and in Mineral-Supplement Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Anita A.; Brown, John R.; Tiefenbach, Bella

    1963-01-01

    Strontium-90, strontium-89 and S.U. values were determined in human milk before and after the resumption of atmospheric nuclear testings in 1961, and the levels were compared to cows' milk values reported during the same time. S.U.90 levels in human milk were approximately one-fifth of those found in cows' milk. Assuming an average dietary intake of 11-13 S.U.90 during the period tested, the mean strontium/calcium ratio of 1.78 found in human milk represents an Observed Ratio milk-diet of approximately 0.14-0.16. Although strontium-89 was present in cows' milk already in September 1961, it did not appear in human milk until November 1961. It seems, therefore, that there was a two-month lag period between the appearance of fresh fallout in cows' milk and human milk. Calcium-supplement mineral preparations used by pregnant and lactating women were tested to find their strontium-89, strontium-90 and S.U. levels, because strontium isotopes, if present in these products, will be transferred to the fetus and to breast-fed infants. The compounds tested had S.U.90 levels of 0.13-2.62; in none of the preparations was Sr89 present. PMID:14041888

  3. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world. PMID:1745900

  4. Thermodynamic restrictions on mechanosynthesis of strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, J.F.; Ferreira, A.A.L.; Antunes, I.; Fagg, D.P.; Frade, J.R.

    2012-01-15

    Chemical potential phase stability diagrams were calculated from relevant thermodynamic properties and used to predict the thermodynamic driving force under prospective conditions of room temperature mechanosynthesis. One analysed the dependence of chemical potential diagrams on temperature and partial pressure of evolving gases such as oxygen or carbon dioxide, as expected on using strontium peroxide or strontium carbonate as precursor reactants for the alkali earth component. Thermodynamic calculations were also obtained for changes in titania precursor reactants, including thermodynamic predictions for reactivity of strontium carbonate with amorphous titania. Experimental evidence showed that strontium titanate can be obtained by mechanosynthesis of strontium carbonate+anatase mixtures, due to previous amorphization under high energy milling. Ability to perform mechanosynthesis with less energetic milling depends on the suitable choice of alternative precursor reactants, which meet the thermodynamic requirements without previous amorphization; this was demonstrated by mechanosynthesis from anatase+strontium peroxide mixtures. - Graphical abstract: X-Ray diffractograms of the starting TiO{sub 2} (anatase)+SrCO{sub 3} mixture and after mechanical activation at 650 rpm, for 1, 2, and 7 h. Different symbols are used to identify reflections ascribed to anatase (diamonds), SrCO{sub 3} (squares) and SrTiO{sub 3} (triangles). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prediction of thermodynamic driving force for room temperature mechanosynthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dependence of chemical potential diagrams on temperature and partial pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic calculations for changes in titania precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental support for thermodynamic predictions.

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of an anisotropic M-type LaCo-substituted strontium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrman, Muriel; Pasko, Alexandre; De La Barrière, Olivier; Mazaleyrat, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth-free permanent magnets returned to the forefront of scientific and technological concerns about the environmental and economical issues. The emergence of new markets, control of costs and availability of raw materials encourage to look for alternative materials containing much less, or no, rare earth elements selected from the most common and most available. The hexaferrite doped with lanthanum and cobalt present interesting properties to succeed the rare-earth magnets. The structural and magnetic properties of a strontium hexaferrite are presented in this paper, and two models are developed in order to correlate structural and magnetic properties. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2014)", edited by Adel Razek

  6. First principles investigation of substituted strontium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Vivek

    This dissertation investigates how the magnetic properties of strontium hexaferrite change upon the substitution of foreign atoms at the Fe sites. Strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12O19, is a commonly used hard magnetic material and is produced in large quantities (around 500,000 tons per year). For different applications of strontium hexaferrite, its magnetic properties can be tuned by a proper substitution of the foreign atoms. Experimental screening for a proper substitution is a cost-intensive and time-consuming process, whereas computationally it can be done more efficiently. We used the 'density functional theory' a first principles based method to study substituted strontium hexaferrite. The site occupancies of the substituted atoms were estimated by calculating the substitution energies of different configurations. The formation probabilities of configurations were used to calculate the magnetic properties of substituted strontium hexaferrite. In the first study, Al-substituted strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12-x AlxO19 with x=0.5 and x=1.0 were investigated. It was found that at the annealing temperature the non-magnetic Al +3 ions preferentially replace Fe+3 ions from the 12 k and 2a sites. We found that the magnetization decreases and the magnetic anisotropy field increases as the fraction, x of the Al atoms increases. In the second study, SrFe12-xGaxO19 and SrFe12-xInxO19 with x=0.5 and x=1.0 were investigated. In the case of SrFe12-xGaxO19, the sites where Ga+3 ions prefer to enter are: 12 k, 2a, and 4f1. For SrFe12-xInxO19, In+3 ions most likely to occupy the 12k, 4f1 , and 4f2 sites. In both cases the magnetization was found to decrease slightly as the fraction of substituted atom increases. The magnetic anisotropy field increased for SrFe12-xGaxO 19, and decreased for SrFe12-xInxO19 as the concentration of substituted atoms increased. In the third study, 23 elements (M) were screened for their possible substitution in strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12-xMxO 19

  7. Morphology Tuning of Strontium Tungstate Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, S.; George, T.; George, K. C.; Sunny, A. T.; Mathew, S.

    2007-08-22

    Strontium tungstate nanocrystals in two different morphologies are successfully synthesized by controlled precipitation in aqueous and in poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) medium. Structural characterizations are carried out by XRD and SEM. The average particle size calculated for the SrWO4 prepared in the two different solvents ranges 20-24 nm. The SEM pictures show that the surface morphologies of the SrWO4 nanoparticles in aqueous medium resemble mushroom and the SrWO4 nanoparticles in PVA medium resemble cauliflower. Investigations on the room temperature luminescent properties of the strontium tungstate nanoparticles prepared in aqueous and PVA medium shows strong emissions around 425 nm.

  8. Cobalt excretion test for the assessment of body iron stores.

    PubMed

    Sorbie, J; Olatunbosun, D; Corbett, W E; Valberg, L S

    1971-05-01

    Iron absorption is under delicate control and the level of absorption is adjusted to comply with the body's need for iron. To measure the intestinal setting for iron absorption, and thereby indirectly assess body iron requirements, cobaltous chloride labelled with (57)Co or (60)Co was given by mouth and the percentage of the test dose excreted in the urine in 24 hours was measured in a gamma counter. Seventeen control subjects with normal iron stores excreted 18% (9-23%) of the dose. Increased excretion, 31% (23-42%), was found in 10 patients with iron deficiency anemia and in 15 patients with depleted iron stores in the absence of anemia. In contrast, 12 patients with anemia due to causes other than iron deficiency excreted amounts of radiocobalt within the normal control range. In patients with iron deficiency, replenishment of iron stores by either oral or parenteral iron caused the previously high results to return to normal.Excretion of the test dose was normal in portal cirrhosis with normal iron stores but it was markedly increased in patients with cirrhosis complicated by either iron deficiency or endogenous iron overload. It was also raised in primary hemochromatosis. Excretion of the dose was reduced in gluten-sensitive enteropathy. Gastrointestinal surgery and inflammatory disease of the lower small intestine had no effect on the results except that some patients with steatorrhea had diminished excretion.The cobalt excretion test provides the clinician with a tool for the assessment of iron absorption, the detection of a reduction in body iron stores below the level that is normal for the subject in question, the differentiation of iron deficiency anemia from anemia due to other causes, and the investigation of patients with iron-loading disorders. PMID:5578125

  9. Wrought cobalt-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Klarstrom, D.L. )

    1993-08-01

    Wrought cobalt-base superalloys are used extensively in gas turbine engines because of their excellent high-temperature creep and fatigue strength and resistance to hot corrosion attach. In addition, the unique character of the oxide scales that form on some of the alloys provides outstanding resistance to high-temperature sliding wear. This article provides a review of the evolutionary development of wrought cobalt-base alloys in terms of alloy design and physical metallurgy. The topics include solid-solution strengthening, carbide precipitation characteristics, and attempts to introduce age hardening. The use of PHACOMP to enhance thermal stability characteristics and the incorporation of rare-earth elements to improve oxidation resistance is also reviewed and discussed. The further development of cobalt-base superalloys has been severely hampered by past political events, which have accentuated the strategic vulnerability of cobalt as a base or as an alloying element. Consequently, alternative alloys have been developed that use little or no cobalt. One such alternative, Haynes 230 alloy, is discussed briefly.

  10. Thermochemistry of perovskites in the lanthanum-strontium-manganese-iron oxide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinescu, Cornelia; Vradman, Leonid; Tanasescu, Speranta; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-10-01

    The enthalpies of formation from binary oxides of perovskites (ABO3) based on lanthanum strontium manganite La(Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and lanthanum strontium ferrite La(Sr)FeO3 (LSF) and mixed lanthanum strontium manganite ferrite La(Sr)Mn(Fe)O3 (LSMF) were measured by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. Using iodometric titration, the oxygen content was derived. The perovskites with A-site cation deficiency have greater oxygen deficiency than the corresponding A-site stoichiometric series. Stability of LSMF decreases with increasing iron content. Increasing oxygen deficiency clearly destabilizes the perovskites. The results suggest an enthalpy of oxygen incorporation that is approximately independent of composition. 0.35La2O3 (xl, 25 °C)+Mn2O3 (xl, 25 °C)+0.3SrO (xl, 25 °C)+Fe2O3 (xl, 25 °C)+O2 (g, 25 °C)→La0.7Sr0.3Mn1-yFeyO3-δ (xl, 25 °C). (b) ∆ Hf,ox* (La0.7Sr0.3Mn1-yFeyO3-δ) .0.35 La2O3 (xl, 25 ººC) + (0.7-y+ 2δ)/2 Mn2O3 (xl, 25 ºC) + 0.3 SrO (xl, 25 ºC) + y/2Fe2O3 (xl, 25 ºC) + (0.3-2δ) MnO2 (xl, 25 ºC)→La0.7Sr0.3Mn1-yFeyO3-δ (xl, 25 ºC).

  11. Controls over the strontium isotope composition of river water

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M.R. ); Edmond, J.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Strontium concentrations and isotope ratios have been measured in river and ground waters from the Granges, Orinoco, and Amazon river basins. When compared with major element concentrations, the data set has allowed a detailed examination of the controls over the strontium isotope systematics of riverine input to the oceans in the following environments: (1) typical drainage basins containing limestones, evaporites, shales, and alumino-silicate metamorphic and igneous rocks; (2) shield terrains containing no chemical or biogenic sediments; and (3) the flood plains that constitute the largest areas of many large rivers. The strontium concentration and isotope compositions of river waters are largely defined by mixing of strontium derived from limestones and evaporites with strontium derived from silicate rocks. The strontium isotope composition of the limestone end member generally lies within the Phanerozoic seawater range, which buffers the [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios of major rivers. A major exception is provided by the rivers draining the Himalayas, where widescale regional metamorphism appears to have led to an enrichment in limestones of radiogenic strontium derived from coexisting silicate rocks. The strontium isotope systematics of rivers draining shield areas are controlled by the intense, transport-limited, nature of the weathering reactions, and thereby limits variations in the strontium flux from these terrains. Flood plains are only a minor source of dissolved strontium to river waters, and precipitation of soil salts in some flood plains can reduce the riverine flux of dissolved strontium to the oceans.

  12. Solubility of strontium-substituted apatite by solid titration.

    PubMed

    Pan, H B; Li, Z Y; Lam, W M; Wong, J C; Darvell, B W; Luk, K D K; Lu, W W

    2009-06-01

    Solid titration was used to explore the solubility isotherms of partially (Srx-HAp, x=1, 5, 10, 40, 60 mol.%) and fully substituted strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr-HAp). Solubility increased with increasing strontium content. No phase other than strontium-substituted HAp, corresponding to the original titrant, was detected in the solid present at equilibrium; in particular, dicalcium hydrogen phosphate was not detected at low pH. The increase in solubility with strontium content is interpreted as a destabilization of the crystal structure by the larger strontium ion. Carbonated HAp was formed in simulated body fluid containing carbonate on seeding with Sr10-HAp, but the precipitate was strontium-substituted on seeding with Sr-HAp. Strontium-substituted HAp might be usable as a template for the growth of new bone, since nucleation appears to be facilitated. PMID:19135423

  13. Cesium and Strontium Separation Technologies Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    T. A. Todd; T. A. Todd; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst

    2004-03-01

    Integral to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program’s proposed closed nuclear fuel cycle, the fission products cesium and strontium in the dissolved spent nuclear fuel stream are to be separated and managed separately. A comprehensive literature survey is presented to identify cesium and strontium separation technologies that have the highest potential and to focus research and development efforts on these technologies. Removal of these high-heat-emitting fission products reduces the radiation fields in subsequent fuel cycle reprocessing streams and provides a significant short-term (100 yr) heat source reduction in the repository. This, along with separation of actinides, may provide a substantial future improvement in the amount of fuel that could be stored in a geologic repository. The survey and review of the candidate cesium and strontium separation technologies are presented herein. Because the AFCI program intends to manage cesium and strontium together, technologies that simultaneously separate both elements are of the greatest interest, relative to technologies that separate only one of the two elements.

  14. Cobalt Alums. A Demonstration Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Claus E.; Steenberg, Paul

    2002-08-01

    The demonstration experiment describes the isolation of [Co(H2O)6]3+ both as the pure blue crystalline cesium cobalt alum, CsCo(SO4)2·12H2O, and as a light greenish-blue solid solution of ammonium cobalt alum in (NH4)Al(SO4)2·12H2O. The hexaaquacobalt(III) ion is prepared chemically by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide, taking advantage of the stabilization of CoIII relative to CoII by complexation with the carbonate ligand. A brief description of alum structure and a characterization of alum subclasses are included.

  15. Controlling the misuse of cobalt in horses.

    PubMed

    Ho, Emmie N M; Chan, George H M; Wan, Terence S M; Curl, Peter; Riggs, Christopher M; Hurley, Michael J; Sykes, David

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is a well-established inducer of hypoxia-like responses, which can cause gene modulation at the hypoxia inducible factor pathway to induce erythropoietin transcription. Cobalt salts are orally active, inexpensive, and easily accessible. It is an attractive blood doping agent for enhancing aerobic performance. Indeed, recent intelligence and investigations have confirmed cobalt was being abused in equine sports. In this paper, population surveys of total cobalt in raceday samples were conducted using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Urinary threshold of 75 ng/mL and plasma threshold of 2 ng/mL could be proposed for the control of cobalt misuse in raceday or in-competition samples. Results from administration trials with cobalt-containing supplements showed that common supplements could elevate urinary and plasma cobalt levels above the proposed thresholds within 24 h of administration. It would therefore be necessary to ban the use of cobalt-containing supplements on raceday as well as on the day before racing in order to implement and enforce the proposed thresholds. Since the abuse with huge quantities of cobalt salts can be done during training while the use of legitimate cobalt-containing supplements are also allowed, different urinary and plasma cobalt thresholds would be required to control cobalt abuse in non-raceday or out-of-competition samples. This could be achieved by setting the thresholds above the maximum urinary and plasma cobalt concentrations observed or anticipated from the normal use of legitimate cobalt-containing supplements. Urinary threshold of 2000 ng/mL and plasma threshold of 10 ng/mL were thus proposed for the control of cobalt abuse in non-raceday or out-of-competition samples. PMID:25256240

  16. Cobalt(II) and Cobalt(III) Coordination Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Nicholas C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment which illustrates the formation of tris(phenanthroline)cobalt complexes in the 2+ and 3+ oxidation states, the effect of coordination on reactions of the ligand, and the use of a ligand displacement reaction in recovering the transformed ligand. Uses IR, UV-VIS, conductivity, and NMR. (MVL)

  17. Effects of calcium and magnesium on strontium distribution coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunde, R.L.; Rosentreter, J.J.; Liszewski, M.J.; Hemming, C.H.; Welhan, J.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of calcium and magnesium on the distribution of strontium between a surficial sediment and simulated wastewater solutions were measured as part of an investigation to determine strontium transport properties of surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. The investigation was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho State University, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine strontium linear sorption isotherms and distribution coefficients (K(d)'s) using simulated wastewater solutions prepared at pH 8.0??0.1 with variable concentrations of calcium and magnesium. Strontium linear sorption isotherm K(d)'s ranged from 12??1 to 85??3 ml/g, increasing as the concentration of calcium and magnesium decreased. The concentration of sorbed strontium and the percentage of strontium retained by the sediment were correlated to aqueous concentrations of strontium, calcium, and magnesium. The effect of these cation concentrations on strontium sorption was quantified using multivariate least-squares regression techniques. Analysis of data from these experiments indicates that increased concentrations of calcium and magnesium in wastewater discharged to waste disposal ponds at the INEL increases the availability of strontium for transport beneath the ponds by decreasing strontium sorption to the surficial sediment.

  18. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  19. NMR Study of Strontium Binding by a Micaceous Mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4. Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 °C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a 1H-87Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by 87Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct 87Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  20. Topotactic synthesis of strontium cobalt oxyhydride thin film with perovskite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tsukasa; Chikamatsu, Akira Kamisaka, Hideyuki; Yokoyama, Yuichi; Hirata, Yasuyuki; Wadati, Hiroki; Fukumura, Tomoteru; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    The substitution of hydride anions (H{sup −}) into transition metal oxides has recently become possible through topotactic reactions or high-pressure synthesis methods. However, the fabrication of oxyhydrides is still difficult because of their inherently less-stable frameworks. In this study, we successfully fabricated perovskite SrCoO{sub x}H{sub y} thin films via the topotactic hydride doping of brownmillerite SrCoO{sub 2.5} epitaxial thin films with CaH{sub 2}. The perovskite-type cation framework was maintained during the topotactic treatment owing to epitaxial stabilization. Structural and chemical analyses accompanied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements revealed that the doped hydride ions form a two-dimensional network of Co-H{sup −}-Co bonds, in contrast to other reported perovskite oxyhydrides, SrMO{sub 3−x}H{sub x} (M = Cr, Ti, V). The SrCoO{sub x}H{sub y} thin film exhibited insulating behavior and had a direct band gap of 2.1 eV. Thus, topotactic hydride doping of transition-metal-oxide thin films on suitable substrates is a promising method for the synthesis of new transition metal oxyhydrides.

  1. Observed variations in the strontium concentration of sea water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angino, E.E.; Billings, G.K.; Andersen, N.

    1966-01-01

    On samples obtained from five widely separated areas of the North Atlantic Ocean 91 determinations of strontium were made. These include surface and deep-water samples from both the cold North Atlantic area and the warm subtropical Caribbean area. The results differ from many of the previously reported values for strontium in sea water. It appears that the more correct value for soluble strontium in sea water is less than the commonly accepted figure of 8.0-8.2 mg/l and most likely lies between 7.2 and 7.8 mg/l. The use of an "average" figure for strontium in sea water should be discouraged as it is clear that the soluble strontium content in sea water does vary considerably; consequently the assumption of a "constant" strontium/chlorinity ratio in the ocean is in error. ?? 1966.

  2. Controls over the strontium isotope composition of river water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, M. R.; Edmond, J. M.

    1992-05-01

    Strontium concentrations and isotope ratios have been measured in river and ground waters from the Ganges, Orinoco, and Amazon river basins. When compared with major element concentrations, the data set has allowed a detailed examination of the controls over the strontium isotope systematics of riverine input to the oceans in the following environments: (1) "typical" drainage basins containing limestones, evaporites, shales, and alumino-silicate metamorphic and igneous rocks; (2) shield terrains containing no chemical or biogenic sediments; and (3) the floodplains that constitute the largest areas of many large rivers. The strontium concentration and isotope composition of river waters are largely defined by mixing of strontium derived from limestones and evaporites with strontium derived from silicate rocks. The strontium isotope composition of the limestone endmember generally lies within the Phanerozoic seawater range, which buffers the 87Sr /86Sr ratios of major rivers. A major exception is provided by the rivers draining the Himalayas, where widescale regional metamorphism appears to have led to an enrichment in limestones of radiogenic strontium derived from coexisting silicate rocks. The strontium isotope systematics of rivers draining shield areas are controlled by the intense, transportlimited, nature of the weathering reactions, and thereby limits variations in the strontium flux from these terrains. Floodplains are only a minor source of dissolved strontium to river waters, and precipitation of soil salts in some floodplains can reduce the riverine flux of dissolved strontium to the oceans. The most effective mechanisms for altering the isotope ratio and flux of riverine strontium to the oceans are increased glaciation and large-scale regional metamorphism of the type produced during continental collision. Both mechanisms provide a means for increasing the 87Sr /86Sr ratio of the global riverine flux.

  3. Strontium metabolism in the rebuilding of skeletal tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between calcium and strontium in bone metabolism is described. Whole body comparisons in the form of balance studies, plasma kinetics, and biochemical bone differences are briefly reviewed. The value of strontium as a qualitative calcium mimetic is established. A procedure of strontium deposition in the bones is presented as a means to study postflight bone rebuilding and to locate areas of inflight demineralization.

  4. Strain control of oxygen vacancies in epitaxial strontium cobaltite films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jeen, Hyoung Jeen; Choi, Woo Seok; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Freeland, John W.; Eres, Gyula; Lee, Ho Nyung; Petrie, Jonathan R.; Mitra, Chandrima; Meyer, Tricia L.

    2016-01-25

    In this study, the ability to manipulate oxygen anion defects rather than metal cations in complex oxides can facilitate creating new functionalities critical for emerging energy and device technologies. However, the difficulty in activating oxygen at reduced temperatures hinders the deliberate control of important defects, oxygen vacancies. Here, strontium cobaltite (SrCoOx) is used to demonstrate that epitaxial strain is a powerful tool for manipulating the oxygen vacancy concentration even under highly oxidizing environments and at annealing temperatures as low as 300 °C. By applying a small biaxial tensile strain (2%), the oxygen activation energy barrier decreases by ≈30%, resulting inmore » a tunable oxygen deficient steady-state under conditions that would normally fully oxidize unstrained cobaltite. These strain-induced changes in oxygen stoichiometry drive the cobaltite from a ferromagnetic metal towards an antiferromagnetic insulator. The ability to decouple the oxygen vacancy concentration from its typical dependence on the operational environment is useful for effectively designing oxides materials with a specific oxygen stoichiometry.« less

  5. Cobalt, manganese, and iron near the Hawaiian Islands: A potential concentrating mechanism for cobalt within a cyclonic eddy and implications for the hybrid-type trace metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Abigail E.; Saito, Mak A.; Maiti, Kanchan; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.

    2008-05-01

    The vertical distributions of cobalt, iron, and manganese in the water column were studied during the E-Flux Program (E-Flux II and III), which focused on the biogeochemistry of cold-core cyclonic eddies that form in the lee of the Hawaiian Islands. During E-Flux II (January 2005) and E-Flux III (March 2005), 17 stations were sampled for cobalt ( n=147), all of which demonstrated nutrient-like depletion in surface waters. During E-Flux III, two depth profiles collected from within a mesoscale cold-core eddy, Cyclone Opal, revealed small distinct maxima in cobalt at ˜100 m depth and a larger inventory of cobalt within the eddy. We hypothesize that this was due to a cobalt concentrating effect within the eddy, where upwelled cobalt was subsequently associated with sinking particulate organic carbon (POC) via biological activity and was released at a depth coincident with nearly complete POC remineralization [Benitez-Nelson, C., Bidigare, R.R., Dickey, T.D., Landry, M.R., Leonard, C.L., Brown, S.L., Nencioli, F., Rii, Y.M., Maiti, K., Becker, J.W., Bibby, T.S., Black, W., Cai, W.J., Carlson, C.A., Chen, F., Kuwahara, V.S., Mahaffey, C., McAndrew, P.M., Quay, P.D., Rappe, M.S., Selph, K.E., Simmons, M.P., Yang, E.J., 2007. Mesoscale eddies drive increased silica export in the subtropical Pacific Ocean. Science 316, 1017-1020]. There is also evidence for the formation of a correlation between cobalt and soluble reactive phosphorus during E-Flux III relative to the E-Flux II cruise that we suggest is due to increased productivity, implying a minimum threshold of primary production below which cobalt-phosphate coupling does not occur. Dissolved iron was measured in E-Flux II and found in somewhat elevated concentrations (˜0.5 nM) in surface waters relative to the iron depleted waters of the surrounding Pacific [Fitzwater, S.E., Coale, K.H., Gordon, M.R., Johnson, K.S., Ondrusek, M.E., 1996. Iron deficiency and phytoplankton growth in the equatorial Pacific. Deep

  6. Strontium doping of bone graft extender

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Allografts are often used during revision hip replacement surgery for stabilization of the implant. Resorption of the allograft may exceed new bone formation, and instability of the prosthesis can develop. We investigated whether strontium could regulate the imbalance of fast resorption of allograft and slower formation of new bone, because it is both an anabolic and an anticatabolic agent. Method Strontium was added to the implant interface environment by doping a hydroxyapatite bone graft extender. 10 dogs each received 2 experimental titanium implants. The implants were inserted within a 2.7-mm concentric gap in cancellous bone. The gap was filled with 50% (v/v) allograft mixed with 50% bone graft extender. The extender either had 5% strontium doping (SrHA) or was undoped (HA). After 4 weeks, osseointegration and mechanical fixation were evaluated by histomorphometry and by push-out test. Results SrHA bone graft extender induced a 1.2-fold increase in volume of new bone, a 1.2-fold increase in allograft remaining in the gap, and a 1.4-fold increase in surface area of the bone graft extender material in contact with new bone compared to HA bone graft extender. All these increases were statistically significant. SrHA bone graft extender did not significantly improve ongrowth of bone onto the implants or improve any of the mechanical push-out parameters compared to HA bone graft extender. Interpretation Doping of the HA bone graft extender with 5% strontium increased gap healing, preserved more of the allograft in the gap, and increased the ongrowth of bone onto the bone graft extender material, but did not improve mechanical fixation. PMID:21895497

  7. Reversibility of strontium sorption on fracture fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, D.; Eriksen, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    Granite has been chosen by several countries as a major candidate for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste. The authors have carried out a comparative study of sorption and desorption of strontium in groundwater on separated size and magnetic fractions of fracture fillings from deep granite. Complete reversibility of the sorption process was demonstrated by identical Freundlich isotherms, isotopic exchangeability and pH dependence of the distribution coefficient R{sub d}.

  8. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  9. Cosine (Cobalt Silicide Growth Through Nitrogen-Induced Epitaxy) Process For Epitaxial Cobalt Silicide Formation For High Performance Sha

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Chong Wee; Shin, Chan Soo; Gall, Daniel; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2004-09-28

    A method for forming an epitaxial cobalt silicide layer on a MOS device includes sputter depositing cobalt in an ambient to form a first layer of cobalt suicide on a gate and source/drain regions of the MOS device. Subsequently, cobalt is sputter deposited again in an ambient of argon to increase the thickness of the cobalt silicide layer to a second thickness.

  10. Selected aspects of the action of cobalt ions in the human body.

    PubMed

    Czarnek, Katarzyna; Terpiłowska, Sylwia; Siwicki, Andrzej K

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is widespread in the natural environment and can be formed as an effect of anthropogenic activity. This element is used in numerous industrial applications and nuclear power plants. Cobalt is an essential trace element for the human body and can occur in organic and inorganic forms. The organic form is a necessary component of vitamin B12 and plays a very important role in forming amino acids and some proteins in nerve cells, and in creating neurotransmitters that are indispensable for correct functioning of the organism. Its excess or deficiency will influence it unfavourably. Salts of cobalt have been applied in medicine in the treatment of anaemia, as well as in sport as an attractive alternative to traditional blood doping. Inorganic forms of cobalt present in ion form, are toxic to the human body, and the longer they are stored in the body, the more changes they cause in cells. Cobalt gets into the body in several ways: firstly, with food; secondly by the respiratory system; thirdly, by the skin; and finally, as a component of biomaterials. Cobalt and its alloys are fundamental components in orthopaedic implants and have been used for about 40 years. The corrosion of metal is the main problem in the construction of implants. These released metal ions may cause type IV inflammatory and hypersensitivity reactions, and alternations in bone modelling that lead to aseptic loosening and implant failure. The ions of cobalt released from the surface of the implant are absorbed by present macrophages, which are involved in many of the processes associated with phagocytose orthopaedic biomaterials particles and release pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and prostaglandin. PMID:26557039

  11. Selected aspects of the action of cobalt ions in the human body

    PubMed Central

    Terpiłowska, Sylwia; Siwicki, Andrzej K.

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is widespread in the natural environment and can be formed as an effect of anthropogenic activity. This element is used in numerous industrial applications and nuclear power plants. Cobalt is an essential trace element for the human body and can occur in organic and inorganic forms. The organic form is a necessary component of vitamin B12 and plays a very important role in forming amino acids and some proteins in nerve cells, and in creating neurotransmitters that are indispensable for correct functioning of the organism. Its excess or deficiency will influence it unfavourably. Salts of cobalt have been applied in medicine in the treatment of anaemia, as well as in sport as an attractive alternative to traditional blood doping. Inorganic forms of cobalt present in ion form, are toxic to the human body, and the longer they are stored in the body, the more changes they cause in cells. Cobalt gets into the body in several ways: firstly, with food; secondly by the respiratory system; thirdly, by the skin; and finally, as a component of biomaterials. Cobalt and its alloys are fundamental components in orthopaedic implants and have been used for about 40 years. The corrosion of metal is the main problem in the construction of implants. These released metal ions may cause type IV inflammatory and hypersensitivity reactions, and alternations in bone modelling that lead to aseptic loosening and implant failure. The ions of cobalt released from the surface of the implant are absorbed by present macrophages, which are involved in many of the processes associated with phagocytose orthopaedic biomaterials particles and release pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and prostaglandin. PMID:26557039

  12. Polytypic transformations during the thermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2010-06-15

    The isothermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature leads to the formation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The phase evolution during the decomposition process was monitored using powder X-ray diffraction. The transformation of cobalt hydroxide to cobalt oxide occurs via three phase mixture while cobalt hydroxynitrate to cobalt oxide occurs through a two phase mixture. The nature of the sample and its preparation method controls the decomposition mechanism. The comparison of topotactical relationship between the precursors to the decomposed product has been reported in relation to polytypism. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal thermal decomposition studies of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature show the metastable phase formed prior to Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase.

  13. PGK deficiency.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) deficiency is one of the relatively uncommon causes of hereditary non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia (HNSHA). The gene encoding the erythrocyte enzyme PGK1, is X-linked. Mutations of this gene may cause chronic haemolysis with or without mental retardation and they may cause myopathies, often with episodes of myoglobinuria, or a combination of these clinical manifestations. Twenty-six families have been described and in 20 of these the mutations are known. The reason for different clinical manifestations of mutations of the same gene remains unknown. PMID:17222195

  14. The respiratory effects of cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Cugell, D.W.; Morgan, W.K.; Perkins, D.G.; Rubin, A. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied seven subjects with certain manifestations of cobalt-induced lung disease. All worked with cobalt and were involved in either the production or use of hard metal. The mode of presentation varied from an acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis that cleared completely when exposure ceased to progressive severe interstitial fibrosis of the lungs. In one subject reexposure was followed by a recurrence of the symptoms. All subjects showed restrictive ventilatory impairment and a reduction of their diffusing capacity. The radiologic appearances varied greatly. While two subjects had clear roentgenograms with small lung volumes, others had a micronodular pattern or small blotchy nodular infiltrates, and one had diffuse reticulonodulation as is seen in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. The pathologic appearances varied between desquamative interstitial pneumonia and overt mural fibrosis of the alveoli. Six of the seven patients had multinucleated giant cells in their biopsy specimens or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

  15. Cobalt single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, En-Che; Hendrickson, David N.; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Nakano, Motohiro; Zakharov, Lev N.; Sommer, Roger D.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Ledezma-Gairaud, Marisol; Christou, George

    2002-05-01

    A cobalt molecule that functions as a single-molecule magnet, [Co4(hmp)4(MeOH)4Cl4], where hmp- is the anion of hydroxymethylpyridine, is reported. The core of the molecule consists of four Co(II) cations and four hmp- oxygen atom ions at the corners of a cube. Variable-field and variable-temperature magnetization data have been analyzed to establish that the molecule has a S=6 ground state with considerable negative magnetoanisotropy. Single-ion zero-field interactions (DSz2) at each cobalt ion are the origin of the negative magnetoanisotropy. A single crystal of the compound was studied by means of a micro-superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer in the range of 0.040-1.0 K. Hysteresis was found in the magnetization versus magnetic field response of this single crystal.

  16. Technical and business considerations of cobalt hydrometallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peek, Edgar; Åkre, Torjus; Asselin, Edouard

    2009-10-01

    Approximately 55,000 tonnes of cobalt are produced annually worldwide, which represents an estimated 1-3 billion in annual sales depending on cobalt price changes. Cobalt is a common impurity in both non-ferrous mineral sulfide and oxide processing. In this paper some business and technical considerations are presented to facilitate the decision-making process required to produce either an intermediate or a finished cobalt product via a hydrometallurgical route. Methods currently available and practiced for the recovery of cobalt are considered, and process requirements up- and down-stream associated with each chosen method are discussed. In particular, some environmental, energy, or other sustainable development implications of each process are mentioned. An outlook on the future of the cobalt industry and anticipated future trends is included.

  17. Magnetic dipolar interaction induced cobalt nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gong, Maogang; Dai, Qilin; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-02-19

    The dipolar interaction of magnetic nanoparticles is of intense interest to engineer material self-assembly for anisotropic functional nanostructures. Here we report the solution synthesis of cobalt nanowires, where the one-dimensional nanowire formation is ultimately dependent on the magnetic dipolar interaction to realize in situ assembly of cobalt nanoparticles. The morphology transition of cobalt nanostructures is well controlled via the ligand-free synthesis and thermal decomposition of zero-valent cobalt precursor. This study provides a self-assembly approach to the development of anisotropic cobalt nanostructures and a better understanding of nucleation parameters, which are demonstrated to correlate strongly with the size and morphology of final cobalt nanowires. This approach may be extended to other magnetic materials for the control of their nanostructure and magnetic performance. PMID:26783195

  18. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D level does not reflect intestinal calcium absorption: an assay using strontium as a surrogate marker.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Marília Brasilio Rodrigues; Vilaça, Tatiane; Hayashi, Lilian Fukusima; Rocha, Olguita G Ferreira; Lazaretti-Castro, Marise

    2015-05-01

    There is conflicting evidence as to the optimal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration for intestinal calcium absorption (Abs-Ca). Our purpose was to assess the relationship between vitamin D status and Abs-Ca in postmenopausal women. Fifty volunteers with low bone mass were grouped according to their serum 25(OH)D concentration as follows: mild deficient, <50 nmol/L (DEF) and sufficient, ≥75 nmol/L (SUF). The subjects were submitted to an oral strontium overload test to assess their Abs-Ca. Fasting blood samples were obtained to perform the relevant hormonal and biochemical tests. After the subjects received the test solution, blood samples were drawn at 30, 60, 120, and 240 min to determine the strontium concentrations. Abs-Ca was indirectly expressed as the area under the serum strontium concentration curve (AUC). A repeated measures ANOVA was performed to determine the differences among the groups. Pearson's correlation and multiple linear regression analysis were used to study the associations between the variables. The mean 25(OH)D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] concentrations differed between the groups (SUF vs. DEF) as follows: 98.7 ± 18.2 vs. 38.4 ± 8.5 nmol/L (p < 0.001) and 36.2 ± 10.2 vs. 24.9 ± 4.6 pg/mL (p < 0.001), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups for parathyroid hormone and AUC. Only 1,25(OH)2D influenced the strontium absorption in the last 2 h of the test. In the studied population, no correlation between levels of 25(OH)D and Abs-Ca was found. Only 1,25(OH)2D influenced Abs-Ca as measured by a strontium absorption test. PMID:24858975

  19. Relative transition probabilities of cobalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roig, R. A.; Miller, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results of determinations of neutral-cobalt transition probabilities measured relative to Co I 4150.43 A and Co II 4145.15 A, using a gas-driven shock tube as the spectroscopic light source. Results are presented for 139 Co I lines in the range from 3940 to 6640 A and 11 Co II lines in the range from 3840 to 4730 A, which are estimated to have reliabilities ranging from 8 to 50%.

  20. Mineral resource of the month: cobalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt is a metal used in numerous commercial, industrial and military applications. On a global basis, the leading use of cobalt is in rechargeable lithium-ion, nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride battery electrodes. Cobalt use has grown rapidly since the early 1990s, with the development of new battery technologies and an increase in demand for portable electronics such as cell phones, laptop computers and cordless power tools.

  1. Cobalt silica magnetic nanoparticles with functional surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadala, Michael L.; Zalich, Michael A.; Fulks, David B.; St. Pierre, Tim G.; Dailey, James P.; Riffle, Judy S.

    2005-05-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles encased in polysiloxane block copolymers have been heated at 600-700 °C to form protective shells around the particles, which contain crosslinked Si-O structures, and to anneal the cobalt. Methods to functionalize and modify the surfaces of the pyrolyzed/annealed silica-cobalt complexes with amines, isocyanates, poly(ethylene oxide), poly( L-lactide) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are presented.

  2. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  3. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  4. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2015-03-01

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitation for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on 90Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr-AGe model). The Sr-AGe model has similar structure as the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly reevaluated: gastro-intestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr-AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (0–80 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr-AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general population exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes.

  5. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans.

    PubMed

    Shagina, N B; Tolstykh, E I; Degteva, M O; Anspaugh, L R; Napier, B A

    2015-03-01

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitations for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on (90)Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr-AGe model). The Sr-AGe model has a similar structure to the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly re-evaluated: gastrointestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr-AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (0-80 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr-AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general populations exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes. PMID:25574605

  6. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  7. STRONTIUM AS AN EFFICIENT PROMOTER FOR SUPPORTED PALLADIUM HYDROGENATION CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of strontium promotion is studied for a series of supported palladium catalysts such as Pd/zeolite-β, Pd/Al2O3, Pd/SiO2, Pd/hydrotalcite and Pd/MgO. Strontium is found to be an effective promoter for enhancing the metal area, perce...

  8. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  9. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  14. Rainfall and Deposition of Strontium-90 in Clallam County, Washington.

    PubMed

    Hardy, E; Alexander, L T

    1962-06-01

    A linear relationship between cumulative strontium-90 deposition and rainfall has been observed from measurements made at five sites on the Olympic Peninsula. When an estimated contribution from dry deposition is subtracted from the measured total, the strontium-90 concentration in precipitation is seen to be independent of the amount of precipitation. PMID:17754183

  15. 40 CFR 721.10598 - Lead strontium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lead strontium titanium zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10598 Lead strontium titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... titanium zirconium oxide (PMN P-11-270; CAS No. 61461-40-3) is subject to reporting under this section...

  16. Calcium versus strontium handling by the heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Hendrych, Michal; Olejnickova, Veronika; Novakova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in numerous processes in living systems, from both intracellular and intercellular signalling to blood clotting. Calcium can be replaced by strontium in various intracellular processes due to high level of their similarity and strontium thus may serve as a valuable tool for different experimental studies. On the other hand, strontium is also used in clinical medicine and is commonly taken to the human body with food and water. The negative cardiac side effects of strontium therapy of osteoporosis and bone metastases are well known, but still not fully explained. This fact explains enhanced interest in this element and its impact on human body. This article reviews effects of calcium and strontium on several biochemical and physiological processes, with special emphasis on cardiac muscle. PMID:26612918

  17. Strontium promotes cementoblasts differentiation through inhibiting sclerostin expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xingfu; Liu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yi; Cui, Yue; Yao, Jindan; Hu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Cementogenesis, performed by cementoblasts, is important for the repair of root resorption caused by orthodontic treatment. Based on recent studies, strontium has been applied for osteoporosis treatment due to its positive effect on osteoblasts. Although promising, the effect of strontium on cementoblasts is still unclear. So the aim of this research was to clarify and investigate the effect of strontium on cementogenesis via employing cementoblasts as model. A series of experiments including MTT, alkaline phosphatase activity, gene analysis, alizarin red staining, and western blot were carried out to evaluate the proliferation and differentiation of cementoblasts. In addition, expression of sclerostin was checked to analyze the possible mechanism. Our results show that strontium inhibits the proliferation of cementoblasts with a dose dependent manner; however, it can promote the differentiation of cementoblasts via downregulating sclerostin expression. Taking together, strontium may facilitate cementogenesis and benefit the treatment of root resorption at a low dose. PMID:25003114

  18. Strontium Promotes Cementoblasts Differentiation through Inhibiting Sclerostin Expression In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xingfu; Liu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yi; Cui, Yue; Yao, Jindan

    2014-01-01

    Cementogenesis, performed by cementoblasts, is important for the repair of root resorption caused by orthodontic treatment. Based on recent studies, strontium has been applied for osteoporosis treatment due to its positive effect on osteoblasts. Although promising, the effect of strontium on cementoblasts is still unclear. So the aim of this research was to clarify and investigate the effect of strontium on cementogenesis via employing cementoblasts as model. A series of experiments including MTT, alkaline phosphatase activity, gene analysis, alizarin red staining, and western blot were carried out to evaluate the proliferation and differentiation of cementoblasts. In addition, expression of sclerostin was checked to analyze the possible mechanism. Our results show that strontium inhibits the proliferation of cementoblasts with a dose dependent manner; however, it can promote the differentiation of cementoblasts via downregulating sclerostin expression. Taking together, strontium may facilitate cementogenesis and benefit the treatment of root resorption at a low dose. PMID:25003114

  19. Nondestructive measurement of environmental radioactive strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiba, Shuntaro; Okamiya, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Saki; Tanuma, Ryosuke; Totsuka, Yumi; Murata, Jiro

    2014-03-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. The main radioactivity concerns after the accident are I-131 (half-life: 8.0 days), Cs-134 (2.1 years), Cs-137 (30 years), Sr-89 (51 days), and Sr-90 (29 years). We are aiming to establish a new nondestructive measurement and detection technique that will enable us to realize a quantitative evaluation of strontium radioactivity without chemical separation processing. This technique is needed to detect radiation contained in foods, environmental water, and soil, to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to radiation.

  20. Crystalline silicotitanates for cesium/strontium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.; Miller, J.; Sherman, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CST) has been developed that exhibits very high selectivity for cesium and strontium in the highly alkaline radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site and other DOE sites. Tests have also shown that CSTs have high selectivity for cesium in acidic and neutral solutions. The ESP is supporting an effort at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A & M University to further develop and characterize the important chemical and physical properties that will determine the applicability of CST to radioactive waste treatment at Hanford and other DOE facilities.

  1. Bose-Einstein Condensation of Strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Stellmer, Simon; Huang Bo; Grimm, Rudolf; Tey, Meng Khoon; Schreck, Florian

    2009-11-13

    We report on the attainment of Bose-Einstein condensation with ultracold strontium atoms. We use the {sup 84}Sr isotope, which has a low natural abundance but offers excellent scattering properties for evaporative cooling. Accumulation in a metastable state using a magnetic-trap, narrowline cooling, and straightforward evaporative cooling in an optical trap lead to pure condensates containing 1.5x10{sup 5} atoms. This puts {sup 84}Sr in a prime position for future experiments on quantum-degenerate gases involving atomic two-electron systems.

  2. Electrocaloric properties of epitaxial strontium titanate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Misirlioglu, I. B.; Alpay, S. P.; Rossetti, G. A.

    2012-05-01

    The electrocaloric (EC) response of strontium titanate thin films is computed as a function of misfit strain, temperature, electric field strength, and electrode configuration using a nonlinear thermodynamic theory. For films in a capacitor configuration on compressive substrates, the transition between paraelectric and strain-induced ferroelectric tetragonal phases produces a large adiabatic temperature change, ΔT = 5 K, at room temperature for electric field changes ΔE = 1200 kV/cm. For films on tensile substrates, the transition between the paraelectric and strain-induced ferroelectric orthorhombic phases can also be accessed using inter-digitated electrodes (IDEs). The maximum EC response occurs for IDEs with a [110] orientation.

  3. Strontium-90 and promethium-147 recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hoisington, J.E.; McDonell, W.R.

    1982-08-30

    Strontium-90 and promethium-147 are fission product radionuclides with potential for use as heat source materials in high reliability, non-interruptible power supplies. Interest has recently been expressed in their utilization for Department of Defense (DOD) applications. This memorandum summarizes the current inventories, the annual production rates, and the possible recovery of Sr-90 and Pm-147 from nuclear materials production operations at Hanford and Savannah River. Recovery of these isotopes from LWR spend fuel utilizing the Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant (BNFP) is also considered. Unit recovery costs at each site are provided.

  4. Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Zaitsev, Boris N.; Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M.; Lazarev, Leonard N.; Dzekun, Evgeniy G.; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.; Herbst, Ronald S.; Law, Jack D.

    2001-01-01

    Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

  5. Cobalt Reduction Guidelines, Revision 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This report, which updates and supersedes an earlier report (EPRI NP-6737) on the same subject, describes methods for establishing a program to identify nuclear power plant valves with high-cobalt hardfacing that are potential significant contributors to the cobalt inventory that is irradiated in the reactor core. The resulting radioactive cobalt isotope, cobalt-60, is a major contributor to plant radiation levels and therefore occupational doses received by plant operational and maintenance personnel. A methodology to determine whether hardfacing is actually required on specific valves is also described as is the physical, mechanical and wear properties of high-cobalt and potential replacement cobalt-free hardfacing and trim alloys. Discussions are presented of the general and specific design requirements for valve hardfacing in nuclear service. Current world-wide nuclear utility experience with cobalt-free hardfacing alloys is described. The regulatory and industry code issues related to replacing and/or changing valve hardfacing materials are discussed. The actions and responsibilities of utility management in implementing an effective cobalt-reduction program are also delineated.

  6. Cobalt and nickel content of Asian cements.

    PubMed

    Goh, C L; Kwok, S F; Gan, S L

    1986-09-01

    The total cobalt and nickel concentration of 11 brands of Asian cement ranged from 8.1 to 14.2 micrograms/g and 14.9 to 28.5 micrograms/g, respectively. These metals exist mainly as insoluble salts; the water-soluble concentration of cobalt and nickel in the cements ranged from 0.39 to 0.65 micrograms/g and from 0-1.2 micrograms/g, respectively. 1.5% (4/272) of construction workers in a prefabrication construction factory had cobalt sensitivity. All had allergic contact dermatitis from chromate in cement. No worker had isolated cobalt sensitivity and cement dermatitis. It appeared that sensitization to cobalt in cement occurs only secondarily to an existing cement dermatitis. 1.8% (5/272) workers had nickel sensitivity: 2 with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel in their watches, 2 were asymptomatic and 1 had allergic contact dermatitis to chromate and cobalt in cement. The low prevalence of cobalt and nickel sensitivity from cement was probably related to the low concentration of soluble cobalt and nickel salts in the cement. However, these insoluble salts can form soluble complexes with body fluids on eczematous skin and sensitize the skin. PMID:2946537

  7. Inhalation cancer risk assessment of cobalt metal.

    PubMed

    Suh, Mina; Thompson, Chad M; Brorby, Gregory P; Mittal, Liz; Proctor, Deborah M

    2016-08-01

    Cobalt compounds (metal, salts, hard metals, oxides, and alloys) are used widely in various industrial, medical and military applications. Chronic inhalation exposure to cobalt metal and cobalt sulfate has caused lung cancer in rats and mice, as well as systemic tumors in rats. Cobalt compounds are listed as probable or possible human carcinogens by some agencies, and there is a need for quantitative cancer toxicity criteria. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has derived a provisional inhalation unit risk (IUR) of 0.009 per μg/m(3) based on a chronic inhalation study of soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate; however, a recent 2-year cancer bioassay affords the opportunity to derive IURs specifically for cobalt metal. The mechanistic data support that the carcinogenic mode of action (MOA) is likely to involve oxidative stress, and thus, non-linear/threshold mechanisms. However, the lack of a detailed MOA and use of high, toxic exposure concentrations in the bioassay (≥1.25 mg/m(3)) preclude derivation of a reference concentration (RfC) protective of cancer. Several analyses resulted in an IUR of 0.003 per μg/m(3) for cobalt metal, which is ∼3-fold less potent than the provisional IUR. Future research should focus on establishing the exposure-response for key precursor events to improve cobalt metal risk assessment. PMID:27177823

  8. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eddie L.; Simmers, Christa; Knight, D. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In addition to reviewing the cobalt complexes containing polydentate donor ligands, we also focus on the antimicrobial activity of the homoleptic [Co(NH3)6]3+ ion.

  9. Cobalt and possible oxidant-mediated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nemery, B; Lewis, C P; Demedts, M

    1994-06-30

    The occurrence of interstitial lung disease similar to hard metal lung disease in diamond polishers who had been exposed to cobalt (in the absence of tungsten carbide) through the use of polishing disks containing microdiamonds sintered with cobalt, led us to experimentally test the hypothesis that cobalt has pro-oxidant activity in lung tissue. Several experiments were carried out in which we measured indices of oxidant stress, mainly changes in the oxidation state of glutathione and in the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway, upon exposure of hamster pulmonary tissue to CoCl2 in vivo by intratracheal instillation, or in vitro by incubating lung slices. These experiments indicated that cobalt ions are capable of causing thiol oxidation in lung tissue as an early manifestation of oxidant stress, but more studies are needed to establish the relevance of this mechanism in the causation of lung disease in subjects exposed to cobalt-containing dusts. PMID:7939609

  10. Immunization against strontium-90 induction of bone tumors with inactivated FBJ virus and irradiated syngeneic strontium-90-induced tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.; Triest, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    Three hundred six C57BL/6J female mice were subdivided into a control group left untreated and an experimental group treated intraperitoneally with 1.0 ..mu..Ci strontium-90/g of body weight at an age of 66 days. Treatments for the groups were as follows: none, 6 injections of formalin-inactivated FBJ viral preparation, 6 injections of active FBJ viral preparation, and 2 injections of 10,000 rad irradiated transplantable osteosarcoma previously induced in C57BL/6J mice by strontium-90. In addition to the above groups, two other groups were treated with respectively 0.032 and 0.10 ..mu..Ci strontium-90/g body weight in order to obtain information on the dose-response relationship between the injection of strontium-90 and the yield of bone tumors. In the groups not treated with strontium-90, only 1 bone tumor developed; this occurred in the group injected with FBJ virus. The incidence of bone tumors in the groups treated with 1.0 ..mu..Ci strontium-90 was significantly lower (18.5% or 18.2%) in the two groups that had received injections of inactivated FBJ virus or irradiated isogenic osteosarcoma when compared to the group left uninjected, which developed 43.5% tumors. In contrast, the strontium-90-treated group that also received injections of active FBJ virus developed 63.0% tumors. Only a single bone tumor developed in the groups treated solely with intermediate doses of strontium-90. The results indicate that immunization with inactivated FBJ virus or with irradiated syngeneic strontium-90-induced tumor cells can significantly decrease the development of strontium-90-induced tumors.

  11. Development of Cesium and Strontium Separation and Immobilization Technologies in Support of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Troy G. Garn; R. Scott Herbst; David H. Meikrantz; Dean R. Peterman; Catherine L. Riddle; Terry A. Todd; Julie L. Tripp

    2006-02-01

    As part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, two solvent extraction technologies are being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory to simultaneously separate cesium and strontium from dissolved spent nuclear fuel. The chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide/polyethylene glycol (CCD/PEG) process utilizes a solvent consisting of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide for the extraction of Cs and polyethylene glycol for the synergistic extraction of Sr in a phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone diluent. Countercurrent flowsheets have been designed and tested on simulated and actual spent nuclear fuel feed streams with both cesium and strontium removal efficiencies of greater than 99%. The Fission Product Extraction (FPEX) process is based on two highly-specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-Di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) for the extraction of Sr and Calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) for the extraction of Cs. Laboratory test results of the FPEX process, using simulated feed solution spiked with radiotracers, indicate good Cs and Sr extraction and stripping performance. A preliminary solvent extraction flowsheet for the treatment of spent nuclear fuel with the FPEX process has been developed, and testing of the flowsheet with simulated spent nuclear fuel solutions is planned in the near future. Steam reforming is currently being developed for stabilization of the Cs/Sr product stream because it can produce a solid waste form while retaining the Cs and Sr in the solid, destroy the nitrates and organics present in these aqueous solutions, and convert the Cs and Sr into leach resistant aluminosilicate minerals. A bench-scale steam reforming pilot plant has been operated with several potential feed compositions and steam reformed product has been generated and analyzed.

  12. Investigation of strontium accumulation on ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rat tibia by micro-PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Li, Y.; Jin, W.; Zheng, Y.; Rong, C.; Lyu, H.; Shen, H.

    2014-08-01

    Strontium ranelate is a newly developed drug effective in osteoporosis treatment by depressing bone resorption and maintaining bone formation. Strontium accumulation and distribution are determined in bones of rat after strontium ranelate administration by using micro-PIXE. The investigated rats are divided into four groups: (A) control, (B) ovariectomized, (C) ovariectomized followed with strontium chloride, (D) ovariectomized followed with strontium ranelate. It was found that strontium ranelate would result in increasing trabecular volume and decreasing bone resorption to treat osteoporosis. There are similar contours of calcium and strontium in two-dimensional images, while the strontium is not evenly distributed in the bone. It supports the conclusion that strontium has an affinity for bone and it is capable of replacing calcium atoms as a part of the strontium mechanism in the osteoporosis treatment. The results related to biochemistry are also discussed.

  13. The effect of strontium non-stoichiometry on the physical properties of double perovskite Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Harnagea, L. Berthet, P.

    2015-02-15

    We present a detailed study on the effect of strontium non-stoichiometry on the properties of double perovskite Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} (SFMO). A citrate route has been used to prepare high quality polycrystalline samples with (2−x)Sr:Fe:Mo (x=0, 0.02, 0.04) and (2+x)Sr:Fe:Mo (x=0.02, 0.04, 0.10) cationic ratios. The strontium deficient samples exhibit a significant decrease in their values of saturation magnetization (Ms), Curie temperature (Tc) and magnetoresistance (MR) compared to the stoichiometric SFMO. On the other hand, the samples prepared with an excess of strontium, respectively those with x=0.02 and 0.04, show remarkably superior magneto–transport characteristics, despite of their increased level of Fe/Mo disorder and somewhat diminished magnetic properties compared to the stoichiometric SFMO. We also show that these samples exhibit superior MR values under low magnetic field and persisting up to temperatures as high as 400 K. - Graphical abstract: Evolution of the magnetization versus temperature under an applied magnetic field of 1000 Oe (left panel) and magnetoresistance versus applied magnetic field at 300 K (right panel) for strontium off-stoichiometric Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} samples. - Highlights: • Strontium nonstoichiometric samples of Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} are prepared by a citrate route. • The nonstoichiometric samples exhibit an increased Fe/Mo disorder in the structure. • We observed important changes in their magnetic and magnetoresistive properties. • Improved magnetoresistive properties for samples prepared with strontium excess.

  14. Lithium cobalt oxide thin film and its electrochromism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guang; Haas, Terry E.; Goldner, Ronald B.

    1989-06-01

    Thin films of lithium cobalt oxide have been prepared by RF-sputtering from powdered LiCoO2. These films permit reversible electrolytic removal of lithium ions upon application of an anodic voltage in a propylene carbonate-lithium perchlorate electrolyte, the films changing in color from a pale amber transparent state to a dark brown. A polycrystalline columnar film structure was revealed with SEM and TEM. X ray examination of the films suggests that the layered rhombohedral LiCoO2 structure is the major crystalline phase present. Oxidation-reduction titration and atomic absorption were used for the determination of the film stoichiometry. The results show that the as deposited-films on glass slides are lithium deficient (relative to the starting material) and show a high average cobalt oxidation state near +3.5. The measurements of dc conductivity suggest a band to band conduction at high temperature (300 to 430 K) and hopping conduction in localized states at low temperature (4 to 270 K). The thermoelectric power data show that the films behave as p-type semiconductors. Transmission and reflectance measurements from 400 nm to 2500 nm show significant near-IR reflectivity.

  15. Phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilovol, V.; Martínez-García, R.

    2015-11-01

    The phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite (SrFe12O19) to magnetite (Fe3O4) as main phase and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) as secondary phase is reported here. SrFe12O19 powder was obtained by a heat treatment at 250 °C under controlled oxygen flow. It was observed that the phase transformation occurred when the SrFe12O19 ferrite was heated up to 625 °C in confinement conditions. This transformation took place by a combination of three factors: the presence of stresses in the crystal lattice of SrFe12O19 due to a low synthesis temperature, the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ during the heating up to 625 °C, and the similarity of the coordination spheres of the iron atoms present in the S-block of SrFe12O19 and Fe3O4. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the existence of strain and crystal deformation in SrFe12O19 and the absence of them in the material after the phase transformation. Dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Fe57 Mössbauer spectroscopy provided evidences of the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ in the SrFe12O19 crystal.

  16. Lead-strontium-chalcogenide diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, D.L.

    1988-01-26

    A large optical cavity quantum well double heterojunction semiconductor infrared diode laser is described having an active region layer sandwiched between two contiguous layers of monocrystalline semiconductive material. The laser exhibits current carrier and optical confinement for its active region layer but also exhibits increased operating temperature due to close lattice matching of face centered cubic monocrystalline layers forming the double heterojunctions. The laser comprises a monocrystalline buffer layer of a given conductivity type lead salt semiconductor containing strontium, selenium that has an energy band gap greater than, an index of refraction lesser than, and a lattice constant substantially equal to predetermined values of the active region layer, a monocrystalline active region layer on the buffer layer of a lead salt semiconductor containing a pn junction that has the predetermined energy and gap, index of refraction and lattice constant, and a confinement layer on the active region layer an opposite conductivity type lead salt semiconductor containing lesser amounts and smaller proportions of strontium and selenium that has an energy band gap greater than, an index of refraction smaller than, and a lattice constant substantially equal to the predetermined values.

  17. Exposure to cobalt in the production of cobalt and cobalt compounds and its effect on the heart

    PubMed Central

    Linna, A; Oksa, P; Groundstroem, K; Halkosaari, M; Palmroos, P; Huikko, S; Uitti, J

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether exposure to cobalt in cobalt plants has any measurable effect on the cardiovascular system. Methods: Occupational, cross sectional study, using a self administered questionnaire, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiography, and laboratory tests in which 203 male workers with at least one year of exposure to cobalt and 94 unexposed controls participated. Echocardiography was performed on a subset of 122 most highly exposed cobalt workers, of which 109 were analysed, and on 60 controls, of which 57 were analysed. Analysis of covariance and a multiple regression analysis were used to evaluate the data. Results: Two of the echocardiography parameters measured were associated with cobalt exposure. In the higher exposure group the left ventricular isovolumic relaxation time (mean 53.3, 49.1, and 49.7 ms in the high exposure, low exposure, and control groups respectively) and the deceleration time of the velocity of the early rapid filling wave (mean 194.3, 180.5, and 171.7 ms for those in the high exposure, low exposure, and control groups respectively) were prolonged, indicating altered left ventricular relaxation and early filling. Conclusion: Cumulative exposure to cobalt was found to be associated with the results of Doppler echocardiography measurements, indicating altered diastole. This finding supports the hypothesis that cobalt accumulation in the myocardium could affect myocardial function. Whether this finding has clinical implications remains to be evaluated. PMID:15477280

  18. Macro- and microscopic properties of strontium doped indium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaenko, Y. M.; Kuzovlev, Y. E.; Medvedev, Y. V.; Mezin, N. I.; Fasel, C.; Gurlo, A.; Schlicker, L.; Bayer, T. J. M.; Genenko, Y. A.

    2014-07-28

    Solid state synthesis and physical mechanisms of electrical conductivity variation in polycrystalline, strontium doped indium oxide In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:(SrO){sub x} were investigated for materials with different doping levels at different temperatures (T = 20–300 °C) and ambient atmosphere content including humidity and low pressure. Gas sensing ability of these compounds as well as the sample resistance appeared to increase by 4 and 8 orders of the magnitude, respectively, with the doping level increase from zero up to x = 10%. The conductance variation due to doping is explained by two mechanisms: acceptor-like electrical activity of Sr as a point defect and appearance of an additional phase of SrIn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. An unusual property of high level (x = 10%) doped samples is a possibility of extraordinarily large and fast oxygen exchange with ambient atmosphere at not very high temperatures (100–200 °C). This peculiarity is explained by friable structure of crystallite surface. Friable structure provides relatively fast transition of samples from high to low resistive state at the expense of high conductance of the near surface layer of the grains. Microscopic study of the electro-diffusion process at the surface of oxygen deficient samples allowed estimation of the diffusion coefficient of oxygen vacancies in the friable surface layer at room temperature as 3 × 10{sup −13} cm{sup 2}/s, which is by one order of the magnitude smaller than that known for amorphous indium oxide films.

  19. Electronic transitions of cobalt monoboride.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y W; Pang, H F; Cheung, A S-C

    2011-11-28

    Electronic transition spectrum of cobalt monoboride (CoB) in the visible region between 495 and 560 nm has been observed and analyzed using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. CoB molecule was produced by the reaction of laser-ablated cobalt atom and diborane (B(2)H(6)) seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded, which included transitions of both Co(10)B and Co(11)B isotopic species. Our analysis showed that the observed transition bands are ΔΩ = 0 transitions with Ω" = 2 and Ω" = 3 lower states. Four transition systems have been assigned, namely, the [18.1](3)Π(2)-X(3)Δ(2), the [18.3](3)Φ(3)-X(3)Δ(3), the [18.6]3- X(3)Δ(3), and the [19.0]2-X(3)Δ(2) systems. The bond length, r(o), of the X(3)Δ(3) state of CoB is determined to be 1.705 Å. The observed rotational lines showed unresolved hyperfine structure arising from the nuclei, which conforms to the Hund's case (a(β)) coupling scheme. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the CoB spectrum. PMID:22128936

  20. Loss of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2 Alpha in the Lung Alveolar Epithelium of Mice Leads to Enhanced Eosinophilic Inflammation in Cobalt-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Proper, Steven P.; Saini, Yogesh; LaPres, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Hard metal lung disease (HMLD) is an occupational lung disease specific to inhalation of cobalt-containing particles whose mechanism is largely unknown. Cobalt is a known hypoxia mimic and stabilizer of the alpha subunits of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Previous work revealed that though HIF1α contrib utes to cobalt toxicity in vitro, loss of HIF1α in the alveolar epithelial cells does not provide in vivo protection from cobalt-induced lung inflammation. HIF1α and HIF2α show unique tissue expression profiles, and HIF2α is known to be the predominant HIF mRNA isoform in the adult lung. Thus, if HIF2α activation by cobalt contributes to pathophysiology of HMLD, we hypothesized that loss of HIF2α in lung epithelium would provide protection from cobalt-induced inflammation. Mice with HIF2α-deficiency in Club and alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATIIs) (HIF2αΔ/Δ) were exposed to cobalt (60 µg/day) or saline using a subacute occupational exposure model. Bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity, cytokines, qRT-PCR, and histopathology were analyzed. Results show that loss of HIF2α leads to enhanced eosinophilic inflammation and increased goblet cell metaplasia. Additionally, control mice demonstrated a mild recovery from cobalt-induced lung injury compared with HIF2αΔ/Δ mice, suggesting a role for epithelial HIF2α in repair mechanisms. The expression of important cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10, displayed significant differences following cobalt exposure when HIF2αΔ/Δ and control mice were compared. In summary, our data suggest that although loss of HIF2α does not afford protection from cobalt-induced lung inflammation, epithelial HIF2α signaling does play an important role in modulating the inflammatory and repair response in the lung. PMID:24218148

  1. Loss of hypoxia-inducible factor 2 alpha in the lung alveolar epithelium of mice leads to enhanced eosinophilic inflammation in cobalt-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Proper, Steven P; Saini, Yogesh; Greenwood, Krista K; Bramble, Lori A; Downing, Nathaniel J; Harkema, Jack R; Lapres, John J

    2014-02-01

    Hard metal lung disease (HMLD) is an occupational lung disease specific to inhalation of cobalt-containing particles whose mechanism is largely unknown. Cobalt is a known hypoxia mimic and stabilizer of the alpha subunits of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Previous work revealed that though HIF1α contrib utes to cobalt toxicity in vitro, loss of HIF1α in the alveolar epithelial cells does not provide in vivo protection from cobalt-induced lung inflammation. HIF1α and HIF2α show unique tissue expression profiles, and HIF2α is known to be the predominant HIF mRNA isoform in the adult lung. Thus, if HIF2α activation by cobalt contributes to pathophysiology of HMLD, we hypothesized that loss of HIF2α in lung epithelium would provide protection from cobalt-induced inflammation. Mice with HIF2α-deficiency in Club and alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATIIs) (HIF2α(Δ/Δ)) were exposed to cobalt (60 µg/day) or saline using a subacute occupational exposure model. Bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity, cytokines, qRT-PCR, and histopathology were analyzed. Results show that loss of HIF2α leads to enhanced eosinophilic inflammation and increased goblet cell metaplasia. Additionally, control mice demonstrated a mild recovery from cobalt-induced lung injury compared with HIF2α(Δ/Δ) mice, suggesting a role for epithelial HIF2α in repair mechanisms. The expression of important cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10, displayed significant differences following cobalt exposure when HIF2α(Δ/Δ) and control mice were compared. In summary, our data suggest that although loss of HIF2α does not afford protection from cobalt-induced lung inflammation, epithelial HIF2α signaling does play an important role in modulating the inflammatory and repair response in the lung. PMID:24218148

  2. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the... and to prevent “gushing.” (b) Food containing any added cobaltous salts is deemed to be adulterated...

  3. Metallurgical Properties and Phase Transformations of Barium-Strontium Modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, M. A.; Sulimova, I. S.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Dmitrienko, V. I.; Horoshun, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Metallurgical properties and phase transformations of barium-strontium modifier were tested in laboratory conditions resembling steel processing in furnace and ladle. When heating barium-strontium modifier start of melting, kinetics of decomposition, phase and structure transformation were studied. The concentrate under consideration has been revealed to be a complex mineral compound containing barytocalcite, calcite, calciostrontianite, dolomite and siderite. The reaction kinetics of decomposing mineral components of barium-strontium modifier to oxides does not considerably affect slag formation in conditions of out-of-furnace steel processing.

  4. Potassium, rubidium, strontium, thorium, uranium, and the ratio of strontium-87 to strontium-86 in oceanic tholeiitic basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.; Hedge, C.E.; Engel, A.E.J.

    1965-01-01

    The average concentrations of potassium, rubidium, strontium, thorium, and uranium in oceanic tholeiitic basalt are (in parts per million) K, 1400; Rb, 1.2; Sr, 120; Th, 0.2; and U, 0.1. The ratio Sr87 to Sr86 is about 0.702, that of K to U is 1.4 ?? 104, and of Th to U is 1.8. These amounts of K, Th, U, and radiogenic Sr87 are less than in other common igneous rocks. The ratios of Th to U and Sr87 to Sr 86 suggest that the source region of the oceanic tholeiites was differentiated from the original mantle material some time in the geologic past.

  5. Growth and micro structural studies on Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) buffer layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, S.; Pinto, R.; Pai, S. P.; Dsousa, D. P.; Apte, P. R.; Kumar, D.; Purandare, S. C.; Bhatnagar, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    Microstructure of Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) of radio frequency magnetron sputtered buffer layers was studied at various sputtering conditions on Si (100), Sapphire and LaAlO3 (100) substrates. The effect of substrate temperatures up to 800 C and sputtering gas pressures in the range of 50 mTorr. of growth conditions was studied. The buffer layers of YSZ and STO showed a strong tendency for columnar growth was observed above 15 mTorr sputtering gas pressure and at high substrate temperatures. Post annealing of these films in oxygen atmosphere reduced the oxygen deficiency and strain generated during growth of the films. Strong c-axis oriented superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin films were obtained on these buffer layers using pulsed laser ablation technique. YBCO films deposited on multilayers of YSZ and STO were shown to have better superconducting properties.

  6. Skin reactivity to metallic cobalt in patients with a positive patch test to cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    de Fine Olivarius, F; Menné, T

    1992-10-01

    458 consecutive patients were patch tested with a metallic cobalt disc as a supplement to the standard series. 23 patients had a positive reaction to CoCl2 1% pet. Of these, 19 were tested with the cobalt disc. 11 had a positive reaction and 5 a questionable reaction. There were no positive reactions to the cobalt disc in patients with a negative patch test to CoCl2 1% pet. Patch testing with CoCl2 1% pet. diagnoses all patients with allergy to metallic cobalt, but the test method is limited by a high number of irritant and questionable reactions. PMID:1451489

  7. Cesium and strontium in Black Sea macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Nonova, Tzvetana; Tosheva, Zornitza

    2014-03-01

    The trace level of metals and particularly radioactive ones should be monitored to evaluate the transfer along the trophic chain, assess the risk for biota and can be used for global changes assessment. Plants respond rapidly to all changes in the ecosystem conditions and are widely used as indicators and predictors for changes in hydrology and geology. In this work we represent our successful development and applications of a methodology for monitoring of stable and radioactive strontium and cesium in marine biota (Black Sea algae's). In case of radioactive release they are of high interest. We use ED-XRF, gamma spectrometers and LSC instrumentation and only 0.25 g sample. Obtained results are compared with those of other authors in same regions. The novelty is the connection between the radioactive isotopes and their stable elements in algae in time and space scale. All our samples were collected from Bulgarian Black Sea coast. PMID:24368267

  8. Polar state in freestanding strontium titanate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, Trevor A. E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov Yu, Tian; Croft, Mark; Scofield, Megan E.; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel; Wong, Stanislaus S. E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov

    2014-09-01

    Monodispersed strontium titanate nanoparticles were prepared and studied in detail. It is found that ∼10 nm as-prepared stoichiometric nanoparticles are in a polar structural state (possibly with ferroelectric properties) over a broad temperature range. A tetragonal structure, with possible reduction of the electronic hybridization, is found as the particle size is reduced. In the 10 nm particles, no change in the local Ti-off centering is seen between 20 and 300 K. The results indicate that nanoscale motifs of SrTiO{sub 3} may be utilized in data storage as assembled nano-particle arrays in applications where chemical stability, temperature stability, and low toxicity are critical issues.

  9. Secondary laser cooling of strontium-88 atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Strelkin, S. A.; Khabarova, K. Yu. Galyshev, A. A.; Berdasov, O. I.; Gribov, A. Yu.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Slyusarev, S. N.

    2015-07-15

    The secondary laser cooling of a cloud of strontium-88 atoms on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (689 nm) intercombination transition captured into a magneto-optical trap has been demonstrated. We describe in detail the recapture of atoms from the primary trap operating on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 1}P{sub 1} (461 nm) transition and determine the recapture coefficient κ, the number of atoms, and their temperature in the secondary trap as a function of experimental parameters. A temperature of 2 µK has been reached in the secondary trap at the recapture coefficient κ = 6%, which confirms the secondary cooling efficiency and is sufficient to perform metrological measurements of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (698 nm) clock transition in an optical lattice.

  10. Worldwide deposition of strontium-90 through 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Monetti, M.A.

    1996-03-01

    Strontium-90 results from the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s (EML) Global Fallout Program (GFP) are presented for the years 1987 through 1990. Quarterly {sup 90}Sr deposition results for the 66 sampling locations of EML`s GFP were generally low, indicating that there was no significant release of fission products into the atmosphere during this period. The global {sup 90}Sr deposition during these 4 years was lower than it has been for any similar period since this program began in 1958. Since there was no major atmospheric source of {sup 90}Sr during this period, the global cumulative deposit of {sup 90}Sr continued to decrease by radioactive decay to a 27 year low of 311.4 Pbq.

  11. Biofortification of soy (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) with strontium ions.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Ireneusz; Wójciak-Kosior, Magdalena; Strzemski, Maciej; Dresler, Sławomir; Szwerc, Wojciech; Blicharski, Tomasz; Szymczak, Grażyna; Kocjan, Ryszard

    2014-06-11

    Soy (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is an annual plant cultivated worldwide mostly for food. Moreover, due to its pharmacological properties it is widely used in pharmacy for alleviating the symptoms of osteoporosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the biofortification of soy treated with various concentrations of strontium. Soy was found to have a strong capacity to absorb Sr(2+) (bioconcentration factor higher than 1). A positive linear correlation (R(2) > 0.98) between the amount of strontium in the growth medium and its content in the plant was also observed. Moreover, at a concentration of 1.5 mM, strontium appeared to be nontoxic and even stimulated plant growth by approximately 19.4% and 22.6% of fresh weight for shoots and roots, respectively. Our research may be useful to obtain vegetable products or herbal preparations containing both phytoestrogens and strontium to prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:24835388

  12. DRESS syndrome with autoimmune hepatitis from strontium ranelate.

    PubMed

    di Meo, Nicola; Gubertini, Nicoletta; Crocè, Lory; Tiribelli, Claudio; Trevisan, Giusto

    2016-05-01

    Strontium ranelate, which is used for postmenopausal osteoporosis, has been associated with drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, a severe, acute, potentially fatal, multisystem adverse drug reaction characterized by skin rash, fever, hematological abnormalities, and lymphadenopathy with involvement of several internal organs. We report the case of a woman who developed DRESS syndrome with a generalized maculopapular rash, eosinophilia, dyspnea, bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy, and reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with liver damage 3 weeks after administration of strontium ranelate for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Approximately 6 months after total remission of cutaneous symptoms, the patient developed autoimmune hepatitis. This case confirms that strontium ranelate should be considered as a possible factor in the etiopathology of DRESS syndrome as well as in the subsequent development of autoimmune hepatitis. The possibility of developing autoimmune hepatitis as a part of DRESS syndrome related to strontium ranelate use can occur months after the acute episode. PMID:27274555

  13. A combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Jensen, M.P.

    1996-03-01

    A new solvent extraction process for the simultaneous extraction of cesium and strontium from acidic nitrate media is described. This process uses a solvent formulation comprised of 0.05 M di-t-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6), 0.1 M Crown 100{prime} (a proprietary, cesium-selective derivative of dibenzo-18-crown-6), 1.2 M tributyl phosphate (TBP), and 5% (v/v) lauryl nitrile in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. Distribution ratios for cesium and strontium from 4 M nitric acid are 4.13 and 3.46, respectively. A benchtop batch countercurrent extraction experiment indicates that >98% of the cesium and strontium initially present in the feed solution can be removed in only four extraction stages. Through proper choice of extraction and strip conditions, extracted cesium and strontium can be recovered either together or individually.

  14. Porous allograft bone scaffolds: doping with strontium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28 ± 0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60 ± 0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes. PMID:23922703

  15. Porous Allograft Bone Scaffolds: Doping with Strontium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28±0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60±0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes. PMID:23922703

  16. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  17. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-03-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

  18. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1990-12-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  19. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  20. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Byrne, J M; Coker, V S; Moise, S; Wincott, P L; Vaughan, D J; Tuna, F; Arenholz, E; van der Laan, G; Pattrick, R A D; Lloyd, J R; Telling, N D

    2013-06-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 -xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt-iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe(2+) site with Co(2+), with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  1. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and wild type'' strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V[sub m] = 376 mg dm[sup [minus]3] h[sup [minus]1] and K 1.27 m[sup 2] g[sup [minus]1].

  2. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and ``wild type`` strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V{sub m} = 376 mg dm{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1} and K 1.27 m{sup 2} g{sup {minus}1}.

  3. Nanocrystalline cobalt oxides for carbon nanotube growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kun; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2007-09-01

    Thin Films of nanocrystalline cobalt oxide were formed by sol-gel method. Structure, optical properties and surface properties of these films were investigated by numerous characterization techniques. These films were successfully fabricated on glass substrates below 500°C. . Micropatterns of cobalt oxide thin films were also fabricated on glass and silicon substrates by employing a lift-off method. Crystal size of these nanocrystalline cobalt films could be successfully controllable by varying the amount of cobalt precursors and number of layers. These films were used as the seeding layers for carbon nanotube growth in a CVD process By changing the concentration of monomer precursors in the solgel coating solutions, different size nanoclusters hence different size carbon nanotubes could be synthesized in CVD process. This method can be used for controlled growth of carbon nanotubes for many different applications. In this paper, detail of these experimental results will be presented.

  4. Verification timer for AECL 780 Cobalt unit.

    PubMed

    Smathers, J B; Holly, F E

    1984-05-01

    To obtain verification of the proper time setting of the motorized run down timer for a AECL 780 Cobalt Unit, a digital timer is described, which can be added to the system for under $300. PMID:6735762

  5. Infiltrated lanthanum strontium chromite anodes for solid oxide fuel cells: Structural and catalytic aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae-Sik; Yu, Anthony S.; Adijanto, Lawrence; Gorte, Raymond J.; Vohs, John M.

    2014-09-01

    Infiltration is a widely used fabrication method for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) composite electrodes. Here we report a study of the structure and electrocatalytic properties of SOFC anodes composed of a layer of lanthanum, strontium chromite (La0.8Sr0.2CrO3, LSCr), both with and without added transition metal dopants, infiltrated into a porous yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix. The structural evolution of the electrode upon reduction and under typical SOFC operating conditions is compared to that reported previously for La0.8Sr0.2Cr0.5Mn0.5O3-YSZ composite anodes. For the transition metal doped materials, a portion of the metal dopants were found to be exsolved from the LSCr lattice upon reduction and to be effective in promoting electro-oxidation of hydrogen. Exsolved cobalt particles were also found to be relatively stable when exposed to hydrocarbon fuels with low activity for the formation of carbon deposits.

  6. Use of PVC plasticized membranes for uptake of radioactive cesium and strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Rais, J.; Mason, C.V.; Abney, K.D.

    1997-03-01

    A new type of sorbent for the selective uptake of elements based on the use of PVC plasticized membranes, commonly used in electrochemistry as ion selective (ISE) membranes, is described. It is theoretically derived that the material acting as a selective ion sensor of ISE must be also effective as a sorbent. In experimental verification of the hypothesis, the cobalt dicarbollide and sodium tetraphenylborate with the addition of a synergist of the polyethyleneglycol type were dissolved in several solvents mixed with a tetrahydrofurane solution of 5% PVC and evaporated to produce a membrane used for the sorption experiments. It was found that PVC, besides functioning as a solid support, does not influence significantly the behavior of the prepared materials; however, the kinetics are slower than for the analogous solvent extraction techniques. Practical applications of such membranes for the isolation of radioactive cesium and strontium from acidic and alkaline solutions with a high of Na{sup +} ions content are shown, with emphasis on nontoxic solvents as substitutes for the toxic nitrobenzene. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Role of cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R.; Barefoot, J.; Tien, J.; Sanchez, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt or substituting for cobalt on the mechanical properties of nickel-based superalloys is discussed. Waspaloy, UDIMET 700, and NIMONIC 115, which are representative of Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Ti-Mo superalloys having different gamma prime contents which are strengthened by a heavily alloyed matrix, coherent gamma prime precipitates, and carbides at the grain boundaries. Microstructure and in situ and extracted phase STEM micro-analysis were used to evaluate the three alloys.

  8. [Are the cobalt hip prosthesis dangerous?].

    PubMed

    Mistretta, Virginie; Kurth, William; Charlier, Corinne

    The placement of a hip prosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures. Some implants contain metal and are therefore capable of releasing metal particles like cobalt in patients who wear metal prostheses. Cobalt can be responsible of local toxicity (including metallosis, hypersensitivity reaction, and benign tumor) or systemic toxicity (including cardiomyopathy, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, and neurological disorders). To monitor potential toxicity of metal hip prostheses, an annual monitoring of patients implanted is recommended and includes clinical examination, radiological examination and blood cobalt determination. The cobalt concentration in blood allows to estimate the risk of toxicity and to evaluate the performance of the implant. The currently recommended threshold value is equal to 7 µg of cobalt per liter of blood. Our study, conducted on 251 patients over a period of 4 years, has shown that the cobalt concentration average was 2.51 µg/l in blood, with 51 patients having a cobaltemia higher than the threshold of 7 µg/l. PMID:27615181

  9. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  10. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  11. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  12. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  13. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  14. Strontium-90 at the Hanford Site and its ecological implications

    SciTech Connect

    RE Peterson; TM Poston

    2000-05-22

    Strontium-90, a radioactive contaminant from historical operations at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, enters the Columbia River at several locations associated with former plutonium production reactors at the Site. Strontium-90 is of concern to humans and the environment because of its moderately long half-life (29.1 years), its potential for concentrating in bone tissue, and its relatively high energy of beta decay. Although strontium-90 in the environment is not a new issue for the Hanford Site, recent studies of near-river vegetation along the shoreline near the 100 Areas raised public concern about the possibility of strontium-90-contaminated groundwater reaching the riverbed and fall chinook salmon redds. To address these concerns, DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to prepare this report on strontium-90, its distribution in groundwater, how and where it enters the river, and its potential ecological impacts, particularly with respect to fall chinook salmon. The purpose of the report is to characterize groundwater contaminants in the near-shore environment and to assess the potential for ecological impact using salmon embryos, one of the most sensitive ecological indicators for aquatic organisms. Section 2.0 of the report provides background information on strontium-90 at the Hanford Site related to historical operations. Public access to information on strontium-90 also is described. Section 3.0 focuses on key issues associated with strontium-90 contamination in groundwater that discharges in the Hanford Reach. The occurrence and distribution of fall chinook salmon redds in the Hanford Reach and characteristics of salmon spawning are described in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 describes the regulatory standards and criteria used to set action levels for strontium-90. Recommendations for initiating additional monitoring and remedial action associated with strontium-90 contamination at the Hanford Site are presented in Section 6

  15. Self-organized single crystal mixed magnetite/cobalt ferrite films grown by infrared pulsed-laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Figuera, Juan; Quesada, Adrián; Martín-García, Laura; Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Prieto, Pilar; Muñoz-Martín, Ángel; Aballe, Lucía; Marco, José F.

    2015-12-01

    We have grown mixed magnetite/cobalt ferrite epitaxial films on SrTiO3 by infrared pulsed-laser deposition. Diffraction experiments indicate epitaxial growth with a relaxed lattice spacing. The films are flat with two distinct island types: nanometric rectangular mounds in two perpendicular orientations, and larger square islands, attributed to the two main components of the film as determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The origin of the segregation is suggested to be the oxygen-deficiency during growth.

  16. Synergetic interactions improve cobalt leaching from lithium cobalt oxide in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Li, Tianchi; Liu, Chuan; Quan, Xie; Chen, Lijie; Wang, Aijie; Chen, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt leaching from lithium cobalt oxide is a promising reduction process for recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries, but suffers from consumption of large amount of reductants and energy, and generation of excess secondary polluted sludge. Thus, effective and environmental friendly processes are needed to improve the existing process limitations. Here we reported microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to effectively reduce Co(III) in lithium cobalt oxide with concomitant energy generation. There was a synergetic interaction in MFCs, leading to a more rapid Co(III) leaching at a rate 3.4 times the sum of rates by conventional chemical processes and no-acid controls. External resistor, solid/liquid ratio, solution conductivity, pH and temperature affected system performance. This study provides a new process for recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries with concomitant energy generation from MFCs. PMID:23211478

  17. Decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 by cobalt. Evidence for a role of cobalt protoporphyrin.

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, J F; Sinclair, P R; Healey, J F; Smith, E L; Bonkowsky, H L

    1982-01-01

    Exposure of cultured chick-embryo hepatocytes to increasing concentrations of CoCl2 in the presence of allylisopropylacetamide results in formation of cobalt protoporphyrin, with a reciprocal decrease in haem and cytochrome P-450. Treatment of rats with CoCl2 (84 mumol/kg) and 5-aminolaevulinate (0.2 mmol/kg) also results in formation of cobalt protoporphyrin and a decrease in cytochrome P-450 in the liver. Hepatic microsomal fractions from rats treated with phenobarbital, CoCl2 and 5-aminolaevulinate were analysed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Cobalt protoporphyrin was associated mainly with proteins of 50000-53000 mol.wt. The results suggest that the formation of cobalt protoporphyrin occurred at the expense of the synthesis of haem, leading to a decrease in cytochrome P-450. Furthermore, the cobalt protoporphyrin that was formed may itself have been incorporated into apocytochrome P-450. Images Fig. 2. PMID:7115319

  18. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  19. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  20. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    SciTech Connect

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  1. DOCK8 Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System ​​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned ... Scientists Identify Genetic Cause of Previously Undefined Primary Immune Deficiency Disease Signs and Symptoms DOCK8 deficiency causes persistent skin ...

  2. The imidazole role in strontium beta-diketonate complexes formation.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Pettinari, Riccardo; Cingolani, Augusto; Gobetto, Roberto; Chierotti, Michele R; Drozdov, Andrei; Troyanov, Sergey I

    2006-04-01

    A selection of new strontium beta-diketonate derivatives (imH2)2[Sr2(beta-dike)6] [where imH = imidazole and beta-dike = tfac (tfacH = 1,1,1-trifluoro-2,4-pentanedione), tfbz (tfbzH = 1,1,1-trifluoro-4-phenyl-2,4-butanedione), or hfac (hfacH = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedione)], [Sr2(tfac)4(Meim)2(H2O)2], (MeimH)2[Sr(beta-dike)4] (where Meim = 1-methylimidazole and beta-dike = tfbz or hfac), [Sr2(thd)4(imH)2(EtOH)], and [Sr2(thd)4(Meim)2(EtOH)] (where thdH = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedione) have been synthesized and fully characterized. (imH2)2[Sr2(beta-dike)6] and (MeimH)2[Sr(beta-dike)4] are di- and mononuclear Sr anionic complexes, respectively, while [Sr2(tfac)4(Meim)2(H2O)2], [Sr2(thd)4(imH)2(EtOH)], and [Sr2(thd)4(Meim)2(EtOH)] are neutral dinuclear molecular derivatives. The derivative (imH2)2[Sr2(hfac)6] slowly decomposes in solution under aerobic conditions, giving (imH2)2[Sr(H2O)2(tfa)3](tfa) (tfaH = trifluoroacetic acid), which is an ionic compound containing polynuclear anionic chains composed of Sr(H2O)2(tfa)3 units. When a deficiency of imH is employed, the thdH proligand forms not only the dinuclear derivative [Sr2(thd)4(imH)2(EtOH)] but also an additional product with the formula [Sr(thd)2(H2O)2(EtOH)], in which the Sr atom is seven-coordinated. A complete solid-state characterization has been accomplished by comparing X-ray and solid-state 13C NMR data. Elucidation of the H-bond interaction between the heterocyclic rings and metal complexes by cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning 15N NMR is also reported. PMID:16562964

  3. Binding of Dissolved Strontium by Micrococcus luteus

    PubMed Central

    Faison, Brendlyn D.; Cancel, Carmen A.; Lewis, Susan N.; Adler, Howard I.

    1990-01-01

    Resting cells of Micrococcus luteus have been shown to remove strontium (Sr) from dilute aqueous solutions of SrCl2 at pH 7. Loadings of 25 mg of Sr per g of cell dry weight were achieved by cells exposed to a solution containing 50 ppm (mg/liter) of Sr. Sr binding occurred in the absence of nutrients and did not require metabolic activity. Initial binding was quite rapid (<0.5 h), although a slow, spontaneous release of Sr was observed over time. Sr binding was inhibited in the presence of polyvalent cations but not monovalent cations. Ca and Sr were bound preferentially over all other cations tested. Sr-binding activity was localized on the cell envelope and was sensitive to various chemical and physical pretreatments. Bound Sr was displaced by divalent ions or by H+. Other monovalent ions were less effective. Bound Sr was also removed by various chelating agents. It was concluded that Sr binding by M. luteus is a reversible equilibrium process. Both ion exchange mediated by acidic cell surface components and intracellular uptake may be involved in this activity. PMID:16348370

  4. Binding of dissolved strontium by Micrococcus luteus

    SciTech Connect

    Faison, B.D.; Cancel, C.A.; Lewis, S.N.; Adler, H.I. )

    1990-12-01

    Resting cells of Micrococcus luteus have been shown to remove strontium (Sr) from dilute aqueous solutions of SrCl{sub 2} at pH 7. Loadings of 25 mg of Sr per g of cell dry weight were achieved by cells exposed to a solution containing 50 ppm (mg/liter) of Sr. Sr binding occurred in the absence of nutrients and did not require metabolic activity. Initial binding was quite rapid (<0.5 h), although a slow, spontaneous release of Sr was observed over time. Sr binding was inhibited in the presence of polyvalent cations but not monovalent cations. Ca and Sr were bound preferentially over all other cations tested. Sr-binding activity was localized on the cell envelope and was sensitive to various chemical and physical pretreatments. Bound Sr was displaced by divalent ions or by H{sup +}. Other monovalent ions were less effective. Bound Sr was also removed by various chelating agents. It was concluded that Sr binding by M. luteus is a reversible equilibrium process. Both ion exchange mediated by acidic cell surface components and intracellular uptake may be involved in this activity.

  5. Coating of metal implant materials with strontium.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias J; Walter, Martin S; Tiainen, Hanna; Rubert, Marina; Monjo, Marta; Lyngstadaas, S Petter; Haugen, Håvard J

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to show that cathodic polarization can be used for coating commercial implant surfaces with an immobilized but functional and bioavailable surface layer of strontium (Sr). Moreover, this study assessed the effect of fluorine on Sr-attachment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that addition of fluorine (F) to the buffer during coating increased surface Sr-amounts but also changed the chemical surface composition by adding SrF2 alongside of SrO whereas pre-treatment of the surface by pickling in hydrofluoric acid appeared to hinder Sr-attachment. Assessment of the bio-availability hinted at a positive effect of Sr on cell differentiation given that the surface reactivity of the original surface remained unchanged. Additional SrF2 on the surface appeared to reduce undesired surface contamination while maintaining the surface micro-topography and micro-morphology. Anyhow, this surface modification revealed to create nano-nodules on the surface. PMID:23888353

  6. STRONTIUM-90 LIQUID CONCENTRATION SOLUBILITY CORRELATION IN THE HANFORD TANK WASTE OPERATIONS SIMULATOR

    SciTech Connect

    HOHL, T.; PLACE, D.; WITTMAN, R.

    2004-08-05

    A new correlation was developed to estimate the concentration of strontium-90 in a waste solution based on total organic carbon. This correlation replaces the strontium-90 wash factors, and when applied in the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator, significantly reduced the estimated quantity of strontium-90 in the delivered low-activity waste feed. This is thought to be a more realistic estimate of strontium-90 than using the wash-factor method.

  7. Cobalt: A vital element in the aircraft engine industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Recent trends in the United States consumption of cobalt indicate that superalloys for aircraft engine manufacture require increasing amounts of this strategic element. Superalloys consume a lion's share of total U.S. cobalt usage which was about 16 million pounds in 1980. In excess of 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country was imported, principally from the African countries of Zaire and Zambia. Early studies on the roles of cobalt as an alloying element in high temperature alloys concentrated on the simple Ni-Cr and Nimonic alloy series. The role of cobalt in current complex nickel base superalloys is not well defined and indeed, the need for the high concentration of cobalt in widely used nickel base superalloys is not firmly established. The current cobalt situation is reviewed as it applies to superalloys and the opportunities for research to reduce the consumption of cobalt in the aircraft engine industry are described.

  8. Detecting infiltration and impacts of introduced water using strontium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Brinck, Elizabeth L; Frost, Carol D

    2007-01-01

    Water introduced to surface drainages, such as agricultural and roadway runoff, mine drainage, or coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced water, potentially can be of environmental concern. In order to mitigate potential environmental effects, it may be important to be able to trace water discharged to the surface as it infiltrates and interacts with near-surface aquifers. We have chosen to study water withdrawn during CBNG production for isotope tracing in the hyporheic zone because it poses a variety of economic, environmental, and policy issues in the Rocky Mountain states. Ground water quality must be protected as CBNG water is added to semiarid ecosystems. Strontium (Sr) isotopes are effective fingerprints of the aquifer from which water originates. In this study, CBNG water was found to have a higher (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio than the local alluvial aquifer water. This measurable difference allows the strontium isotope ratio and concentration to be used as tracers of CBNG water following its discharge to the surface. The dissolution and mobilization of salts from soil are an important contributor to ground water quality degradation. In the Powder River basin of Wyoming, the soils are calcium carbonate-buffered systems. The chemical similarity of strontium to calcium allows it to substitute into calcium minerals and enabled us to use strontium isotopes to identify calcium salts mobilized from the soil. Strontium isotopes are an effective monitor of the source of ions and the volume and direction of introduced water flow in the hyporheic zone. PMID:17760582

  9. Strontium oral load test in children with idiopathic hypercalciuria.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Porfirio; Santos, Fernando; Sotorrío, Pilar; Mayordomo, Juan; Ferrero, Luis

    2007-09-01

    Increased intestinal calcium absorption may play an important role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic hypercalciuria in children. Calcium absorption was assessed by an oral strontium load test in 22 prepubertal children (13 male) with idiopathic hypercalciuria, urinary calcium excretion 6.48 +/- 0.60 mg/kg per day (range 4.12-13.40 mg/kg per day), and ten healthy, young, normocalciuric controls (six male). After administration of 2.65 mg/kg of strontium chloride (SrCl(2)), the serum concentrations of strontium at 30 min, 60 min, 120 min, 240 min, and the fraction of the absorbed dose (FAD%) at 30 min, 60 min and 240 min, were similar in both groups. FAD% at 120 min was lower (P < 0.05) in hypercalciuric children than in controls (11.84 +/- 0.96% vs 15.87 +/- 1.77%). Values of the area under the curve were not different between both groups. In children with idiopathic hypercalciuria, serum basal intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) (r = -0.59, P = 0.004) and the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/PTH ratio (r = 0.65; P = 0.001) were correlated with the serum concentration of strontium at 60 min. The study reported here provides, for the first time, the results of a strontium oral load test in children with idiopathic hypercalciuria. With this method no major alterations of intestinal calcium absorption were found in this disorder. PMID:17541793

  10. A process for the development of strontium hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, N.; Fayyaz, M.; Iqbal, W.; Irfan, M.; Alam, S.

    2014-06-01

    A procedure for the preparation of Strontium Hydroxyapatite is adapted to produce high purity and better homogeneity ceramic with good Crystallinity. The strontium substituted bone cement has potential for use in orthopedic surgeries. Ionic Strontium (Sr) in humans shares the same physiological pathway as calcium and can be deposited in the mineral structure of the bone. In the present study, a novel concept of preparing Sr-contained Hydroxyapatite bone cement by using a precipitation method is proposed to get an ideal biomaterial that possesses potential degradability and more excellent pharmacological effect. Chemical analysis, Fourier Transform Infra Red analysis and Thermogravimetric/ Differential Scanning Calorimetric studies were conducted on prepared Strontium Hydroxyapatite sample to characterize the incorporation of 15% Sr2+ into the crystal lattice of Hydroxyapatite. Strontium was quantitatively incorporated into Hydroxyapatite where its substitution for calcium provoked a linear shift of the infrared absorption bands of the hydroxyl and phosphate groups. Thus, the formation of Sr-HAp was confirmed by Chemical Analysis, FT-IR and TGA/DSC results.

  11. The position of strontium ranelate in today's management of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Reginster, J-Y; Brandi, M-L; Cannata-Andía, J; Cooper, C; Cortet, B; Feron, J-M; Genant, H; Palacios, S; Ringe, J D; Rizzoli, R

    2015-06-01

    Osteoporosis accounts for about 3 % of total European health-care spending. The low proportion of costs for the pharmacological prevention of osteoporotic fracture means that it is highly cost saving, especially in patient with severe osteoporosis or patients who cannot take certain osteoporosis medications due to issues of contraindications or tolerability. Following recent regulatory changes, strontium ranelate is now indicated in patients with severe osteoporosis for whom treatment with other osteoporosis treatments is not possible, and without contraindications including uncontrolled hypertension, established, current or past history of ischaemic heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, and/or cerebrovascular disease. We review here today's evidence for the safety and efficacy of strontium ranelate. The efficacy of strontium ranelate in patients complying with the new prescribing information (i.e. severe osteoporosis without contraindications) has been explored in a multivariate analysis of clinical trial data, which concluded that the antifracture efficacy of strontium ranelate is maintained in patients with severe osteoporosis without contraindications and also demonstrated how the new target population mitigates risk. Strontium ranelate is therefore an important alternative in today's management of osteoporosis, with a positive benefit-risk balance, provided that the revised indication and contraindications are followed and cardiovascular risk is monitored. The bone community should be reassured that there remain viable alternatives in patients in whom treatment with other agents is not possible and protection against the debilitating effects of fracture is still feasible in patients with severe osteoporosis. PMID:25868510

  12. Investigation of Varied Strontium-Transuranic Precipitation Chemistries for Crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A.

    2000-07-27

    Precipitation chemistries for strontium and transuranic (TRU) removal have been tested for crossflow filterability and lanthanide removal with simulants of Hanford tank 241-AN-107 supernate. This is the initial work indicating the usefulness of a strontium and permanganate precipitation process as applied to the Hanford River Protection Project. Precipitations with both ferric and ferrous iron were shown to be at least two orders of magnitude less filterable than a 0.1 gpm/ft target average flux that was desired at the time. A precipitate from a strontium nitrate strike alone was found to filter easily and to make the desired average flux. Other chemistries tested included precipitant of lanthanum(III), nickel (II), calcium (II), and a redox chemistry using sodium permanganate. Of these chemistries a strontium and permanganate strike including calcium provided the highest filter flux compared to the other chemistries. It showed the most promise in lanthanide removal as well. This work provides a promising direction for further work to achieve both acceptable filterability and decontamination for Envelope C wastes to be treated by the Hanford River Protection Project. The work reported here was originally intended to satisfy needs for crossflow filter testing of a strontium and ferric precipitation method for treating Envelope C using a 241-AN-107 simulant.

  13. Surface functionalization with strontium-containing nanocomposite coatings via EPD.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kena; Huang, Dan; Cai, Jing; Cai, Xinjie; Gong, Lingling; Huang, Pin; Wang, Yining; Jiang, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Metal orthopedic implants still face challenges in some compromised conditions, partly due to bio-inertness. The present study aimed to functionalize metallic implants with organic-inorganic nanocomposite (strontium-containing chitosan/gelatin) coatings through a simple single-step electrophoretic deposition under mild conditions. The surface characterization and in vitro cellular response were studied and compared with chitosan/gelatin (CS/G) coatings. SEM images suggested the inorganic nanoparticles may be encapsulated within or mixed with organic polymers. The XRD patterns showed that strontium carbonate was generated in the coatings. The TEM images revealed strontium-containing nanoparticles were released from the coatings in PBS. The continuous release after the initial burst release ensured the enduring effects of the functionalized surface. The tensile bond strength of the coatings to the substrates increased after the addition of strontium. In vitro cellular study confirmed that strontium-containing coatings supported the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells and exhibited excellent ability to enhance the differentiation of such pre-osteoblasts. Therefore, such organic-inorganic nanocomposite coatings are a promising candidate to functionalize orthopedic implant surfaces. PMID:27262259

  14. Detecting infiltration and impacts of introduced water using strontium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Brinck, E.L.; Frost, C.D.

    2007-09-15

    Water introduced to surface drainages, such as agricultural and roadway runoff, mine drainage, or coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced water, potentially can be of environmental concern. In order to mitigate potential environmental effects, it may be important to be able to trace water discharged to the surface as it infiltrates and interacts with near-surface aquifers. We have chosen to study water withdrawn during CBNG production for isotope tracing in the hyporheic zone because it poses a variety of economic, environmental, and policy issues in the Rocky Mountain states. Ground water quality must be protected as CBNG water is added to semiarid ecosystems. Strontium (Sr) isotopes are effective fingerprints of the aquifer from which water originates. In this study, CBNG water was found to have a higher Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio than the local alluvial aquifer water. This measurable difference allows the strontium isotope ratio and concentration to be used as tracers of CBNG water following its discharge to the surface. The dissolution and mobilization of salts from soil are an important contributor to ground water quality degradation. In the Powder River basin of Wyoming, the soils are calcium carbonate-buffered systems. The chemical similarity of strontium to calcium allows it to substitute into calcium minerals and enabled us to use strontium isotopes to identify calcium salts mobilized from the soil. Strontium isotopes are an effective monitor of the source of ions and the volume and direction of introduced water flow in the hyporheic zone.

  15. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, Anouk; Jacquemyn, Yves; Kinget, Kristof; Eyskens, François

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations. PMID:26113999

  16. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Anouk; Jacquemyn, Yves; Kinget, Kristof; Eyskens, François

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations. PMID:26113999

  17. Equilibrium phase boundary between hcp-cobalt and fcc-cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cynn, Hyunchae; Lipp, Magnus J.; Evans, William J.; Baer, Bruce J.

    In 2000 (Yoo et al., PRL), fcc-cobalt was reported as a new high pressure phase transforming from ambient hcp-cobalt starting at around 105 GPa and 300 K. Both cobalts coexist up to 150 GPa and thereafter only fcc-cobalt was found to be the only stable phase to 200 GPa. Our recent synchrotron x-ray diffraction data on cobalt are at odds with the previous interpretation. We will present our new finding and elaborate on our understanding in terms of the equilibrium phase boundary of cobalt. We will also compare our previous work on xenon (Cynn et al., 2001, PRL) with our new results on cobalt. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Portions of this work were performed at HPCAT (Sector 16), APS, Argonne National Laboratory. HPCAT operations are supported by DOE-NNSA under Award No. DENA0001974 and DOE-BES under Award No. DE-FG02-99ER45775. The Advanced Photon Source is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  20. 10 CFR 35.433 - Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments... Brachytherapy § 35.433 Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments. (a) Only an authorized medical physicist shall calculate the activity of each strontium-90 source that is used to determine the...

  1. 10 CFR 35.2433 - Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic... Records § 35.2433 Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the activity of a strontium-90 source required by § 35.433 for the life of the...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  3. 10 CFR 35.433 - Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments... Brachytherapy § 35.433 Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments. (a) Only an authorized medical physicist shall calculate the activity of each strontium-90 source that is used to determine the...

  4. 10 CFR 35.433 - Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments... Brachytherapy § 35.433 Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments. (a) Only an authorized medical physicist shall calculate the activity of each strontium-90 source that is used to determine the...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  6. 10 CFR 35.433 - Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments... Brachytherapy § 35.433 Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments. (a) Only an authorized medical physicist shall calculate the activity of each strontium-90 source that is used to determine the...

  7. 10 CFR 35.2433 - Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic... Records § 35.2433 Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the activity of a strontium-90 source required by § 35.433 for the life of the...

  8. 10 CFR 35.2433 - Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic... Records § 35.2433 Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the activity of a strontium-90 source required by § 35.433 for the life of the...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  10. 10 CFR 35.433 - Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments... Brachytherapy § 35.433 Decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments. (a) Only an authorized medical physicist shall calculate the activity of each strontium-90 source that is used to determine the...

  11. 10 CFR 35.2433 - Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic... Records § 35.2433 Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the activity of a strontium-90 source required by § 35.433 for the life of the...

  12. 10 CFR 35.2433 - Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic... Records § 35.2433 Records of decay of strontium-90 sources for ophthalmic treatments. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the activity of a strontium-90 source required by § 35.433 for the life of the...

  13. 10 CFR 31.10 - General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices... MATERIAL § 31.10 General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices. (a) A general license is hereby issued to own, receive, acquire, possess, use, and transfer strontium 90 contained in ice...

  14. 10 CFR 31.10 - General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices... MATERIAL § 31.10 General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices. (a) A general license is hereby issued to own, receive, acquire, possess, use, and transfer strontium 90 contained in ice...

  15. 10 CFR 31.10 - General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices... MATERIAL § 31.10 General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices. (a) A general license is hereby issued to own, receive, acquire, possess, use, and transfer strontium 90 contained in ice...

  16. 10 CFR 31.10 - General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices... MATERIAL § 31.10 General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices. (a) A general license is hereby issued to own, receive, acquire, possess, use, and transfer strontium 90 contained in ice...

  17. 10 CFR 31.10 - General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices... MATERIAL § 31.10 General license for strontium 90 in ice detection devices. (a) A general license is hereby issued to own, receive, acquire, possess, use, and transfer strontium 90 contained in ice...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  2. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  3. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  4. Palladium-cobalt particles as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Huang, Tao

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates to palladium-cobalt particles useful as oxygen-reducing electrocatalysts. The invention also relates to oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells containing these palladium-cobalt particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for the production of electrical energy by using the palladium-cobalt particles of the invention.

  5. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  7. Cobalt and marine redox evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Saito, Mak A.; Kappler, Andreas; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2014-03-01

    Cobalt (Co) is a bio-essential trace element and limiting nutrient in some regions of the modern oceans. It has been proposed that Co was more abundant in poorly ventilated Precambrian oceans based on the greater utilization of Co by anaerobic microbes relative to plants and animals. However, there are few empirical or theoretical constraints on the history of seawater Co concentrations. Herein, we present a survey of authigenic Co in marine sediments (iron formations, authigenic pyrite and bulk euxinic shales) with the goal of tracking changes in the marine Co reservoir throughout Earth's history. We further provide an overview of the modern marine Co cycle, which we use as a platform to evaluate how changes in the redox state of Earth's surface were likely to have affected marine Co concentrations. Based on sedimentary Co contents and our understanding of marine Co sources and sinks, we propose that from ca. 2.8 to 1.8 Ga the large volume of hydrothermal fluids circulating through abundant submarine ultramafic rocks along with a predominantly anoxic ocean with a low capacity for Co burial resulted in a large dissolved marine Co reservoir. We tentatively propose that there was a decrease in marine Co concentrations after ca. 1.8 Ga resulting from waning hydrothermal Co sources and the expansion of sulfide Co burial flux. Changes in the Co reservoir due to deep-water ventilation in the Neoproterozoic, if they occurred, are not resolvable with the current dataset. Rather, Co enrichments in Phanerozoic euxinic shales deposited during ocean anoxic events (OAE) indicate Co mobilization from expanded anoxic sediments and enhanced hydrothermal sources. A new record of marine Co concentrations provides a platform from which we can reevaluate the role that environmental Co concentrations played in shaping biological Co utilization throughout Earth's history.

  8. Nickel cobalt phosphorous low stress electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An electrolytic plating process is provided for electrodepositing a nickel or nickel cobalt alloy which contains at least about 2% to 25% by atomic volume of phosphorous. The process solutions contains nickel and optionally cobalt sulfate, hypophosphorous acid or a salt thereof, boric acid or a salt thereof, a monodentate organic acid or a salt thereof, and a multidentate organic acid or a salt thereof. The pH of the plating bath is from about 3.0 to about 4.5. An electroplating process is also provided which includes electroplating from the bath a nickel or nickel cobalt phosphorous alloy. This process can achieve a deposit with high microyield of at least about 84 kg/mm.sup.2 (120 ksi) and a density lower than pure nickel of about 8.0 gm/cc. This process can be used to plate a deposit of essentially zero stress at plating temperatures from ambient to 70.degree. C.

  9. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavel, T.; Raj, S. Gokul; Rajarajan, G.; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  10. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J. M.; Coker, V. S.; Moise, S.; Wincott, P. L.; Vaughan, D. J.; Tuna, F.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Lloyd, J. R.; Telling, N. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 −xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt–iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe2+ site with Co2+, with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  11. Cold atom quantum emulation with ultracold lithium and strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Shankari; Senaratne, Ruwan; Geiger, Zachary; Fujiwara, Kurt; Singh, Kevin; Weld, David

    2016-05-01

    We discuss progress towards cold atom quantum emulation of nonequilibrium dynamics in optical lattices, focusing on quasiperiodic and strongly-driven systems using lithium and strontium. Tunable interactions in lithium Grant access to an added dimension of parameter space to explore in such systems, which could uncover rich physics. The high nuclear spin of fermionic strontium presents opportunities to study interactions in spin-dependent lattices and develop novel cooling techniques. We also describe construction of a single-site resolution imaging chamber for strontium, including a novel bio-inspired imaging scheme that makes use of a dark metastable state. We acknowledge support from the AFOSR, the ONR, the ARO and the PECASE and DURIP programs, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the NSF GRFP, and the University of California Office of the President.

  12. Metabolism of radioactive and stable strontium in man

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, H.; Kramer, L.; Michaud, M.; Sontag, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    Although strontium and calcium are chemically similar and both are bone seekers, the metabolism of these minerals differs greatly in humans. Radioactive strontium is preferentially excreted in urine and the intestinal absorption is considerably lower than of calcium. These two processes lead to decreased retention of radioactive strontium. Since the urinary radiostrontium excretion varies with the urinary calcium excretion, several compounds which increase the urinary calcium excretion were used in order to increase the urinary and radiostrontium excretion. This procedure can be used for decontamination and for decreasing the radiostrontium body burden. Aluminum phosphate gel, an antacid, is highly effective in inhibiting the intestinal absorption or radiostrontium while compounds containing either aluminum only or phosphate alone were also effective but to a considerably lesser extent. 23 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  13. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; cobalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crockett, R.N.; Chapman, G.R.; Forrest, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Major world resources of cobalt are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI}. ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of cobalt on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  14. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  15. Cobalt plaque therapy of posterior uveal melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, J.A.; Augsburger, J.J.; Brady, L.W.; Day, J.L.

    1982-10-01

    One hundred patients with choroidal melanomas who were treated by the authors with cobalt plaque radiotherapy were analyzed with regard to tumor regression, visual results, complications, and mortality rate. The follow-up period at the time of this writing ranged from one to five years. These preliminary observations indicate that cobalt plaque radiotherapy induces tumor regression in 96% of cases, preserves useful vision in many cases and has fewer complications during the one- to five-year follow-up period than previously believed.

  16. Bone strontium in pregnant and lactating females from archaeological samples.

    PubMed

    Blakely, R L

    1989-10-01

    Because plants and animals consume or absorb different amounts of strontium and calcium, anthropologists are able to use strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) ratios from archaeologically recovered human bone to estimate the relative contributions of meat and plants to paleodiets. Often females exhibit higher Sr/Ca ratios than males, a fact usually attributed to lower meat intake among women. However, in vivo and in vitro experiments with laboratory animals show that pregnancy and lactation elevate maternal bone strontium and depress maternal bone calcium because 1) strontium is discriminated against in favor of calcium in the transport of ions to the placenta and mammary glands and 2) pregnancy and lactation facilitate absorption of alkaline earth metals from the gut. In this study, bone Sr/Ca ratios and strontium concentrations were compared between reproductive-age females, postmenopausal females, and adult males from two late prehistoric Native American sites in Georgia: the King site (N = 43) and the Etowah site (N = 51). At the King site, the mean Sr/Ca ratio of females was over 14% greater than that of males. At Etowah, the mean strontium level of reproductive-age females exceeded that of postmenopausal females by almost 25%. Most of the difference, it is argued, is due to pregnancy and lactation. A dietary preference among pregnant and lactating women for foods high in alkaline earths, particularly nuts and corn, may also be partially responsible. Until we assess the influence variables other than nutrition exert on trace element concentrations, our reconstructions of paleodiets will be suspect. PMID:2801910

  17. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2-Al2O3-Y2O3-SrO-Na2O-K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O-P2O5-F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F - pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F - Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite - pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). These

  18. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2–Al2O3–Y2O3–SrO–Na2O–K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O–P2O5–F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F – pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  19. Crystal structure of strontium dinickel iron orthophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ouaatta, Said; Assani, Abderrazzak; Saadi, Mohamed; El Ammari, Lahcen

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, SrNi2Fe(PO4)3, synthesized by solid-state reaction, crystallizes in an ordered variant of the α-CrPO4 structure. In the asymmetric unit, two O atoms are in general positions, whereas all others atoms are in special positions of the space group Imma: the Sr cation and one P atom occupy the Wyckoff position 4e (mm2), Fe is on 4b (2/m), Ni and the other P atom are on 8g (2), one O atom is on 8h (m) and the other on 8i (m). The three-dimensional framework of the crystal structure is built up by [PO4] tetra­hedra, [FeO6] octa­hedra and [Ni2O10] dimers of edge-sharing octa­hedra, linked through common corners or edges. This structure comprises two types of layers stacked alternately along the [100] direction. The first layer is formed by edge-sharing octa­hedra ([Ni2O10] dimer) linked to [PO4] tetra­hedra via common edges while the second layer is built up from a strontium row followed by infinite chains of alternating [PO4] tetra­hedra and FeO6 octa­hedra sharing apices. The layers are held together through vertices of [PO4] tetra­hedra and [FeO6] octa­hedra, leading to the appearance of two types of tunnels parallel to the a- and b-axis directions in which the Sr cations are located. Each Sr cation is surrounded by eight O atoms. PMID:26594419

  20. Low temperature transport measurements on atomically smooth metallic and oxygen deficient strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barquist, C. S.; Kwak, I. H.; Bauer, J.; Edmonds, T.; Biswas, A.; Lee, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Atomically smooth, TiO2 terminated SrTiO3 (STO) substrates were prepared using a combination of chemical and thermal annealing treatments. The TiO2 terminated surface was obtained by etching with aqua regia solution and thermal annealing at 1000 °C for 30 min. The subsequent vacuum annealing at 830 °C for 10 min generated an atomically smooth and metallic surface of STO. In this paper, we report low temperature transport measurements down to 50 mK on these samples which clearly exhibit a metallic temperature dependence in the resistance. The samples show no sign of superconductivity down to the lowest temperatures.The Rsquare(T) data provide information on the physical origin of metallic behavior in STO, which might also be relevant to the current research interest in oxide interfaces.

  1. Proposed strontium radiosotope thermoelectric generator fuel encapsulation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, H.E. )

    1993-01-10

    The proposed Fuel Encapsulation Facility is a fully equipped facility for processing and encapsulating strontium Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) fuel from presently available Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) capsules. The facility location is on the second building level below ground of the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), Cells 142, 143, and 145. Capsules containing strontium fluoride (SrF[sub 2]) would be received from the WESF in Cell 145 and transferred to the three adjacent cells for processing and encapsulation into the final RTG fuel configuration.

  2. Control of magnetization reversal in oriented strontium ferrite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Debangsu Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2014-02-21

    Oriented Strontium Ferrite films with the c axis orientation were deposited with varying oxygen partial pressure on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. The angle dependent magnetic hysteresis, remanent coercivity, and temperature dependent coercivity had been employed to understand the magnetization reversal of these films. It was found that the Strontium Ferrite thin film grown at lower (higher) oxygen partial pressure shows Stoner-Wohlfarth type (Kondorsky like) reversal. The relative importance of pinning and nucleation processes during magnetization reversal is used to explain the type of the magnetization reversal with different oxygen partial pressure during growth.

  3. All-alkoxide synthesis of strontium-containing metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    A method for making strontium-containing metal-oxide ceramic thin films from a precursor liquid by mixing a strontium neo-pentoxide dissolved in an amine solvent and at least one metal alkoxide dissolved in a solvent, said at least one metal alkoxide selected from the group consisting of alkoxides of calcium, barium, bismuth, cadmium, lead, titanium, tantalum, hafnium, tungsten, niobium, zirconium, yttrium, lanthanum, antimony, chromium and thallium, depositing a thin film of the precursor liquid on a substrate, and heating the thin film in the presence of oxygen at between 550 and 700.degree. C.

  4. Creatine deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Andreas

    2003-02-01

    Since the first description of a creatine deficiency syndrome, the guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency, in 1994, the two further suspected creatine deficiency syndromes--the creatine transporter (CrT1) defect and the arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency were disclosed. GAMT and AGAT deficiency have autosomal-recessive traits, whereas the CrT1 defect is a X-linked disorder. All patients reveal developmental delay/regression, mental retardation, and severe disturbance of their expressive and cognitive speech. The common feature of all creatine deficiency syndromes is the severe depletion of creatine/phosphocreatine in the brain. Only the GAMT deficiency is in addition characterized by accumulation of guanidinoacetic acid in brain and body fluids. Guanidinoacetic acid seems to be responsible for intractable seizures and the movement disorder, both exclusively found in GAMT deficiency. Treatment with oral creatine supplementation is in part successful in GAMT and AGAT deficiency, whereas in CrT1 defect it is not able to replenish creatine in the brain. Treatment of combined arginine restriction and ornithine substitution in GAMT deficiency is capable to decrease guanidinoacetic acid permanently and improves the clinical outcome. The lack of the creatine/phosphocreatine signal in the patient's brain by means of in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is the common finding and the diagnostic clue in all three diseases. In AGAT deficiency guanidinoacetic acid is decreased, whereas creatine in blood was found to be normal. On the other hand the CrT1 defect is characterized by an increased concentration of creatine in blood and urine whereas guanidinoacetic acid concentration is normal. The increasing number of patients detected very recently suffering from a creatine deficiency syndrome and the unfavorable outcome highlights the need of further attempts in early recognition of affected individuals and in optimizing its treatment

  5. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} in modulating cobalt-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saini, Yogesh; Kim, Kyung Y; Lewandowski, Ryan; Bramble, Lori A; Harkema, Jack R; Lapres, John J

    2010-02-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in development, cellular homeostasis, and pathological conditions, such as cancer and stroke. There is also growing evidence that hypoxia is an important modulator of the inflammatory process. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of proteins that regulate the cellular response to oxygen deficit, and loss of HIFs impairs inflammatory cell function. There is little known, however, about the role of epithelial-derived HIF signaling in modulating inflammation. Cobalt is capable of eliciting an allergic response and promoting HIF signaling. To characterize the inflammatory function of epithelial-derived HIF in response to inhaled cobalt, a conditional lung-specific HIF1alpha, the most ubiquitously expressed HIF, deletion mouse, was created. Control mice showed classic signs of metal-induced injury following cobalt exposure, including fibrosis and neutrophil infiltration. In contrast, HIF1alpha-deficient mice displayed a Th2 response that resembled asthma, including increased eosinophilic infiltration, mucus cell metaplasia, and chitinase-like protein expression. The results suggest that epithelial-derived HIF signaling has a critical role in establishing a tissue's inflammatory response, and compromised HIF1alpha signaling biases the tissue towards a Th2-mediated reaction. PMID:19915160

  6. Tracing the Geographical Origin of Onions by Strontium Isotope Ratio and Strontium Content.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Hisaaki; Morita, Sakie; Izawa, Atsunobu; Aoyama, Keisuke; Shin, Ki-Cheol; Nakano, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    The strontium (Sr) isotope ratio ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) and Sr content were used to trace the geographical origin of onions from Japan and other countries, including China, the United States of America, New Zealand, Australia, and Thailand. The mean (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio and Sr content (dry weight basis) for onions from Japan were 0.70751 and 4.6 mg kg(-1), respectively, and the values for onions from the other countries were 0.71199 and 12.4 mg kg(-1), respectively. Linear discriminant analysis was performed to classify onions produced in Japan from those produced in the other countries based on the Sr data. The discriminant equation derived from linear discriminant analysis was evaluated by 10-fold cross validation. As a result, the origins of 92% of onions were correctly classified between Japan and the other countries. PMID:27396661

  7. A novel method for local administration of strontium from implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Forsgren, Johan; Engqvist, Håkan

    2010-05-01

    This study proves that a film of Strontianite (SrCO(3)) successfully can be formed on a bioactive surface of sodium titanate when exposed to a strontium acetate solution. This Strontianite film is believed to enable local release of strontium ions from implant surfaces and thus stimulate bone formation in vivo. Depending on the method, different types of films were achieved with different release rates of strontium ions, and the results points at the possibility to tailor the rate and amount of strontium that is to be released from the surface. Strontium has earlier been shown to be highly involved in the formation of new bone as it stimulates the replication of osteoblasts and decreases the activity of osteoclasts. The benefit of strontium has for example been proved in studies where the number of vertebral compression fractures in osteoporotic persons was drastically reduced in patients receiving therapeutical doses of strontium. Therefore, it is here suggested that the bone healing process around an implant may be improved if strontium is administered locally at the site of the implant. The films described in this paper were produced by a simple immersion process where alkali treated titanium was exposed to an aqueous solution containing strontium acetate. By heating the samples at different times during the process, different release rates of strontium ions were achieved when the samples were exposed to simulated body fluid. The strontium containing films also promoted precipitation of bone like apatite when exposed to a simulated body fluid. PMID:20162327

  8. Microwave-assisted fabrication of strontium doped apatite coating on Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Kong, Shiqin; Pan, Yan; Zhang, Zhiguo; Deng, Linhong

    2015-11-01

    Strontium has been shown to be a beneficial dopant to calcium phosphates when incorporated at nontoxic level. In the present work we studied the possibility of solution derived doping strontium into calcium phosphate coatings on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V based implants by a recently reported microwave-assisted method. By using this method strontium doped calcium phosphate nuclei were deposited to pretreated titanium alloy surface dot by dot to compose a crack-free coating layer. The presence of strontium in solution led to reduced roughness of the coating and finer nucleus size formed. In vitro study found that proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast cells seeded on the coating were influenced by strontium content in coatings, showing an increasing followed by a decreasing behavior with increasing substitution of calcium by strontium. It is suggested that this new microwave-assisted strontium doped calcium phosphate coatings may have great potential in implant modification. PMID:26249578

  9. α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Umur; Stoller, James K

    2016-09-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an autosomal codominant condition that predisposes to emphysema and cirrhosis. The condition is common but grossly under-recognized. Identifying patients' α1-antitrypsin deficiency has important management implications (ie, smoking cessation, genetic and occupational counseling, and specific treatment with the infusion of pooled human plasma α1-antitrypsin). The weight of evidence suggests that augmentation therapy slows the progression of emphysema in individuals with severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:27514595

  10. Magnetization dynamics of cobalt grown on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, A. J.; White, S. P.; Adur, R.; Pu, Y.; Hammel, P. C.; Amamou, W.; Kawakami, R. K.

    2014-05-07

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on chemical vapor deposition graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidth—an often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1 nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone.

  11. Cobalt processing - flask positioner location sensing system

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors offer unique opportunities for economical production of /sup 60/Co in the adjuster rods used for xenon override and maximization of core output. Cobalt is effectively a by-product in CANDU reactors with the standards stainless steel adjuster rods replaced with cobalt adjuster rods. The Flask Positioner unit is a part of the cobalt adjuster element processing system (CAEPS) equipment which is used for removing irradiated cobalt adjuster elements from the reactor and safely transporting them to the irradiated fuel bay, where they are dismantled and prepared for shipment. The flask positioner equipment is similar to a crane, carries the CAEPS flask and locates it in an accurate position concentric with any adjuster site centerline. This enables the required operations for safe transfer of the irradiated adjuster element into the flask. The positioner is located above the reactivity mechanism deck. The CAEPS system has been made operational on several CANDU reactors. The location sensing system has been demonstrated to work very satisfactorily on all installations.

  12. Localized comedo formation after cobalt irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Myskowski, P.L.; Safai, B.

    1981-10-01

    Following Cobalt-60 irradiation for a left frontotemporal tumor, a 61-year-old woman developed comedones on the forehead. These changes responded to conventional acne therapy with retinoic acid. Multiple acneigenic factors were implicated in the pathogenesis of her lesions.

  13. Sintered diamond compacts using metallic cobalt binders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libby, W. F.; Katzman, H.

    1972-01-01

    Method is developed for sintering diamond powder which uses metallic cobalt as binder. Present samples show maximum microhardness of over 3000 kg/sq mm on Knoop scale. Material may be used as hard surface coating or may compete with cubic boron nitride as abrasive grain.

  14. Magnetization dynamics of cobalt grown on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A. J.; Amamou, W.; White, S. P.; Adur, R.; Pu, Y.; Kawakami, R. K.; Hammel, P. C.

    2014-05-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on chemical vapor deposition graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidth—an often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1 nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone.

  15. Water splitting: Taking cobalt in isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aiqin; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The sustainable production of hydrogen is key to the delivery of clean energy in a hydrogen economy; however, lower-cost alternatives to platinum electrocatalysts are needed. Now, isolated, earth-abundant cobalt atoms dispersed over nitrogen-doped graphene are shown to efficiently electrolyse water to generate hydrogen.

  16. Controlled cobalt doping of magnetosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Staniland, Sarah; Williams, Wyn; Telling, Neil; Van Der Laan, Gerrit; Harrison, Andrew; Ward, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize iron into magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles that are surrounded by lipid vesicles. These 'magnetosomes' have considerable potential for use in bio- and nanotechnological applications because of their narrow size and shape distribution and inherent biocompatibility. The ability to tailor the magnetic properties of magnetosomes by chemical doping would greatly expand these applications; however, the controlled doping of magnetosomes has so far not been achieved. Here, we report controlled in vivo cobalt doping of magnetosomes in three strains of the bacterium Magnetospirillum. The presence of cobalt increases the coercive field of the magnetosomes--that is, the field necessary to reverse their magnetization--by 36-45%, depending on the strain and the cobalt content. With elemental analysis, X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism, we estimate the cobalt content to be between 0.2 and 1.4%. These findings provide an important advance in designing biologically synthesized nanoparticles with useful highly tuned magnetic properties. PMID:18654488

  17. An hydrothermal experimental study of the cobalt-cobalt oxide redox buffer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemke, K.H.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Bischoff, J.L.; Bird, D.K.

    2008-01-01

    Equilibrium aqueous hydrogen concentration and corresponding energies of reaction, ??Grxno(T, P), for the reaction Co(s) + H2O(l) = CoO(s) + H2(aq) have been determined at temperatures between 256 and 355 ??C and at 400 bar. Steady-state concentrations of hydrogen were approached in experiments under conditions of both H2 excess and deficiency containing the solids Co, CoO and liquid water. All experiments were carried out in flexible gold and titanium reactors with the capability of on-line fluid sampling. Measured equilibrium molal concentrations of H2(aq) at 256, 274, 300, 324 and 355 ??C are 0.81(?? 0.01) ?? 10- 3 1.11(?? 0.01) ?? 10- 3, 1.92(?? 0.01) ?? 10- 3, 3.71(?? 0.06) ?? 10- 3, 7.54(?? 0.12) ?? 10- 3, respectively, and corresponding values of ??Grxno(T, P) in units kJ ?? mol- 1 are 31.4(?? 0.1), 31.0(?? 0.1), 29.8(?? 0.1), 27.7(?? 0.5) and 25.5(?? 0.9), respectively. Using published heat capacity data for Co(s) and CoO(s) and - 79.6 J ?? mol- 1 ?? K- 1 for the entropy of formation of CoO we calculated for this study a value for ??GCoO,Tr,Pro = - 214.5(?? 0.9) kJ ?? mol- 1 and ??HCoO,Tr,Pro = - 238.3(?? 0.9) kJ ?? mol- 1 at 25 ??C and 1 bar. The value of ??HCoO,Tr,Pro determined in this study compares well with the reported calorimetric value of - 238.9(?? 1.2) kJ ?? mol- 1 [Boyle, B.J., King, E.G., Conway, K.C., 1954. Heats of formation of nickel and cobalt oxides (NiO and CoO) by combustion calorimetry. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 76, 3835-3837]. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cobalt Biogeochemistry in the South Atlantic: A Full-Depth Zonal Ocean Section of Total Dissolved Cobalt, and Development of a High Throughput Cobalt ICP-MS Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, A. E.; Saito, M. A.; Goepfert, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    This study presents the first high-resolution full-depth zonal section of total dissolved cobalt from a recent cruise transecting the South Atlantic Ocean along approximately 11S. This section demonstrates that current electrochemical analytical techniques are capable of producing the high precision and high resolution datasets for total dissolved cobalt expected to be generated as a part of the international GEOTRACES Program. The micronutritive role of cobalt may affect community structure in different regions of the oceans, a compelling reason to include cobalt in the trace element analyses planned for the GEOTRACES Program. This cobalt section reveals an advective source of cobalt from the African coast near Namibia, which we propose to be due to the Benguela Current interacting with reducing shelf sediments. These high concentrations of cobalt were also observed within the oxygen minimum zone that extends across much of the South Atlantic basin in this section, and are likely indicative of redox cycling of cobalt in the water column. Nutrient-like vertical structure of cobalt was observed in the surface waters across the majority of the basin due to biological utilization, and the expected hybrid-type trend is observed at depth, with scavenging of cobalt below the nutricline. Deepwater concentrations of cobalt were around 50pM across the basin below 3000m. Analysis of the shelf-life of refrigerated filtered samples stored without acidification for electrochemical cobalt analysis demonstrated that those samples which were collected specifically within oxygen minimum zones may underestimate cobalt if not analyzed within a few weeks of collection. These results motivate our on-going development of a method to measure cobalt in acidified samples via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The benefit of this technique would be twofold: acidification would extend the shelf-life of the samples significantly, and samples would be preserved identically

  19. Constructing a Neoproterozoic Seawater Strontium Isotope Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Shields-Zhou, G. A.; Manning, C. J.; Thirlwall, M.; Thurow, J. W.; Zhu, M.; Ling, H.

    2014-12-01

    The strontium isotopic composition of seawater has varied throughout Earth history in response to the balance between Sr isotopic exchange with ocean crust and input of riverine Sr derived from continental weathering. Because of this, seawater 87Sr/86Sr highs are interpreted to reflect erosion events, related to mountain building, while 87Sr/86Sr lows are considered to result from low weathering rates or increased seafloor spreading. Seawater 87Sr/86Sr also responds to changes in the isotopic composition of material undergoing weathering. The largest ever increase in seawater 87Sr/86Sr took place sometime from approximately 900 Ma to 500 Ma, and was associated with a permanent step shift in baseline 87Sr/86Sr composition. The unprecedented size of this increase, its timing and causation remains unconstrained. This study attempts firstly to reconstruct global seawater 87Sr/86Sr trends through this increase, using well-preserved carbonate rock samples from the North China craton, calibrated against additional 87Sr/86Sr and δ13C data from Neoproterozoic samples collected from other sections around the world. Sample preparation techniques for bulk carbonate Sr isotope stratigraphy are being honed during the course of this study. Other stable isotope systems (δ13C and δ18O) and trace elements, including REE have been investigated on the same samples to identify pristine samples for Sr isotope analysis and help in interpretation. The newly obtained data from this study (mainly Huaibei group of Huaibei area), using the excellently preserved early marine calcite cements and some bulk rock samples, confirm that the carbonate strata across the Jiao-Liao-Xu-Huai stratigraphic realm of the North China Craton exhibit the moderately positive δ13C values and low 87Sr/86Sr values that are characteristic of the early Neoproterozoic (Tonian).The results help to recreate the global curve by linking negative excursions in the Shijia (Xuzhou) (Xiao et al., 2014, Precambr. Res., 246

  20. Strontium-90 and cesium-137 distribution in Baltic Sea waters

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarev, L.N.; Gedeonov, L.I.; Ivanova, L.M.; Stepanov, A.V.

    1988-09-01

    The strontium-90 and cesium-137 concentrations determined in 1983 in the Baltic Sea proper and the Gulf of Finland and in the Soviet Baltic rivers are furnished. The cesium-137 content has been found to be directly proportional to the salinity of the water. Significant influx of technogenic radioactive contaminants from the North to the Baltic Sea was noted in 1983.

  1. Membrane-based separation technologies for cesium, strontium, and technetium

    SciTech Connect

    Kafka, T.

    1996-10-01

    This work is one of two parallel projects that are part of an ESP task to develop high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. In this subtask, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota, working in cooperation with IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah.

  2. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    PubMed

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium. PMID:16527534

  3. Strontium Batch Distribution Coefficients with Envelope C (AN-107) Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.

    2001-03-16

    The pretreatment process for the Hanford River Protection Project is to treat Hanford underground storage tank waste and provide decontaminated salt solution and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low and high activity waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium.

  4. Discovery of rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, and rhodium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, A.M.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-07-15

    Currently, 31 rubidium, 35 strontium, 35 molybdenum, and 38 rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  5. Influence of pH, competing ions, and salinity on the sorption of strontium and cobalt onto biogenic hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Handley-Sidhu, Stephanie; Mullan, Thomas K.; Grail, Quentin; Albadarneh, Malek; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Macaskie, Lynne E.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides contaminate a range of environments as a result of nuclear activities, for example, leakage from waste storage tanks/ponds (e.g. Hanford, USA or Sellafield sites, UK) or as a result of large scale nuclear accidents (e.g. Chernobyl, Ukraine or Fukushima, Japan). One of the most widely applied remediation techniques for contaminated waters is the use of sorbent materials (e.g. zeolites and apatites). However, a key problem at nuclear contaminated sites is the remediation of radionuclides from complex chemical environments. In this study, biogenic hydroxyapatite (BHAP) produced by Serratia sp. bacteria was investigated for its potential to remediate surrogate radionuclides (Sr2+ and Co2+) from environmentally relevant waters by varying pH, salinity and the type and concentration of cations present. The sorption capacity of the BHAP for both Sr2+ and Co2+ was higher than for a synthetically produced hydroxyapatite (HAP) in the solutions tested. BHAP also compared favorably against a natural zeolite (as used in industrial decontamination) for Sr2+ and Co2+ uptake from saline waters. Results confirm that hydroxyapatite minerals of high surface area and amorphous calcium phosphate content, typical for biogenic sources, are suitable restoration or reactive barrier materials for the remediation of complex contaminated environments or wastewaters. PMID:26988070

  6. Influence of pH, competing ions, and salinity on the sorption of strontium and cobalt onto biogenic hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Handley-Sidhu, Stephanie; Mullan, Thomas K; Grail, Quentin; Albadarneh, Malek; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides contaminate a range of environments as a result of nuclear activities, for example, leakage from waste storage tanks/ponds (e.g. Hanford, USA or Sellafield sites, UK) or as a result of large scale nuclear accidents (e.g. Chernobyl, Ukraine or Fukushima, Japan). One of the most widely applied remediation techniques for contaminated waters is the use of sorbent materials (e.g. zeolites and apatites). However, a key problem at nuclear contaminated sites is the remediation of radionuclides from complex chemical environments. In this study, biogenic hydroxyapatite (BHAP) produced by Serratia sp. bacteria was investigated for its potential to remediate surrogate radionuclides (Sr(2+) and Co(2+)) from environmentally relevant waters by varying pH, salinity and the type and concentration of cations present. The sorption capacity of the BHAP for both Sr(2+) and Co(2+) was higher than for a synthetically produced hydroxyapatite (HAP) in the solutions tested. BHAP also compared favorably against a natural zeolite (as used in industrial decontamination) for Sr(2+) and Co(2+) uptake from saline waters. Results confirm that hydroxyapatite minerals of high surface area and amorphous calcium phosphate content, typical for biogenic sources, are suitable restoration or reactive barrier materials for the remediation of complex contaminated environments or wastewaters. PMID:26988070

  7. Influence of pH, competing ions, and salinity on the sorption of strontium and cobalt onto biogenic hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley-Sidhu, Stephanie; Mullan, Thomas K.; Grail, Quentin; Albadarneh, Malek; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Macaskie, Lynne E.

    2016-03-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides contaminate a range of environments as a result of nuclear activities, for example, leakage from waste storage tanks/ponds (e.g. Hanford, USA or Sellafield sites, UK) or as a result of large scale nuclear accidents (e.g. Chernobyl, Ukraine or Fukushima, Japan). One of the most widely applied remediation techniques for contaminated waters is the use of sorbent materials (e.g. zeolites and apatites). However, a key problem at nuclear contaminated sites is the remediation of radionuclides from complex chemical environments. In this study, biogenic hydroxyapatite (BHAP) produced by Serratia sp. bacteria was investigated for its potential to remediate surrogate radionuclides (Sr2+ and Co2+) from environmentally relevant waters by varying pH, salinity and the type and concentration of cations present. The sorption capacity of the BHAP for both Sr2+ and Co2+ was higher than for a synthetically produced hydroxyapatite (HAP) in the solutions tested. BHAP also compared favorably against a natural zeolite (as used in industrial decontamination) for Sr2+ and Co2+ uptake from saline waters. Results confirm that hydroxyapatite minerals of high surface area and amorphous calcium phosphate content, typical for biogenic sources, are suitable restoration or reactive barrier materials for the remediation of complex contaminated environments or wastewaters.

  8. VOLATILITY AND EXTRACTABILITY OF STRONTIUM-85, CESIUM-134, COBALT-57, AND URANIUM AFTER HEATING HARDENED PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this preliminary investigation is to determine the effect of heating hardened Portland cement paste (the cementitious component of concrete) in aiding the removal of common radionuclide contaminants including 137Cs, 90Sr, 60Co, and U. Direct volatilization of ra...

  9. Iodine-deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Jooste, Pieter L; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2008-10-01

    2 billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficiency disorders. Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. Assessment methods include urinary iodine concentration, goitre, newborn thyroid-stimulating hormone, and blood thyroglobulin. In nearly all countries, the best strategy to control iodine deficiency is iodisation of salt, which is one of the most cost-effective ways to contribute to economic and social development. When iodisation of salt is not possible, iodine supplements can be given to susceptible groups. Introduction of iodised salt to regions of chronic iodine-deficiency disorders might transiently increase the proportion of thyroid disorders, but overall the small risks of iodine excess are far outweighed by the substantial risks of iodine deficiency. International efforts to control iodine-deficiency disorders are slowing, and reaching the third of the worldwide population that remains deficient poses major challenges. PMID:18676011

  10. Vitamin deficiencies and excesses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamins are essential nutrients that must be supplied exogenously either as part of a well balanced diet or as supplements. Deficiency states are uncommon in developed countries except, perhaps, among some food insecure families. In contrast, deficiency states are quite common in many developing ...

  11. Testosterone deficiency myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, R W; Woodrow, D F; Barrett, M C; Press, M; Dick, D J; Rowe, R C; Lane, R J

    1995-01-01

    Testosterone is recognized to have a positive effect on nitrogen balance and muscle development in hypogonadal men, but significantly myopathy secondary to testosterone deficiency has been reported only rarely. We describe a patient who presented with a myopathy associated with testosterone deficiency, and who demonstrated a significant functional and myometric response to treatment. PMID:7562829

  12. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  13. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  14. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  15. Factor X deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Factor X (ten) deficiency is a disorder caused by a lack of a protein called factor X in the blood. It leads to problems with ... or are not functioning like they should. Factor X is one such coagulation factor. Factor X deficiency ...

  16. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  17. G6PD Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  18. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leah J.; Holmes, Amie L.; Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity. - Highlights: • Particulate and soluble cobalt are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung cells. • Soluble cobalt induces more cytotoxicity compared to particulate cobalt. • Soluble and particulate cobalt induce similar levels of genotoxicity. • Particle-cell contact is required for particulate cobalt-induced toxicity.

  19. Effects of cobalt precursor on pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole as electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A series of non-precious metal electrocatalysts, namely pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole, Co-PPy-TsOH/C, are synthesized with various cobalt precursors, including cobalt acetate, cobalt nitrate, cobalt oxalate, and cobalt chloride. The catalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is comparatively investigated with electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltammogram, rotating disk electrode and rotating ring-disk electrode. The results are analyzed and discussed employing physiochemical techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, elemental analysis, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It shows that the cobalt precursor plays an essential role on the synthesis process as well as microstructure and performance of the Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts towards ORR. Among the studied Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts, that prepared with cobalt acetate exhibits the best ORR performance. The crystallite/particle size of cobalt and its distribution as well as the graphitization degree of carbon in the catalyst greatly affects the catalytic performance of Co-PPy-TsOH/C towards ORR. Metallic cobalt is the main component in the active site in Co-PPy-TsOH/C for catalyzing ORR, but some other elements such as nitrogen are probably involved, too. PMID:24229351

  20. Effects of cobalt precursor on pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole as electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xianxia; Hu, Xin-Xin; Ding, Xin-Long; Kong, Hai-Chuan; Sha, Hao-Dong; Lin, He; Wen, Wen; Shen, Guangxia; Guo, Zhi; Ma, Zi-Feng; Yang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    A series of non-precious metal electrocatalysts, namely pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole, Co-PPy-TsOH/C, are synthesized with various cobalt precursors, including cobalt acetate, cobalt nitrate, cobalt oxalate, and cobalt chloride. The catalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is comparatively investigated with electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltammogram, rotating disk electrode and rotating ring-disk electrode. The results are analyzed and discussed employing physiochemical techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, elemental analysis, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It shows that the cobalt precursor plays an essential role on the synthesis process as well as microstructure and performance of the Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts towards ORR. Among the studied Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts, that prepared with cobalt acetate exhibits the best ORR performance. The crystallite/particle size of cobalt and its distribution as well as the graphitization degree of carbon in the catalyst greatly affects the catalytic performance of Co-PPy-TsOH/C towards ORR. Metallic cobalt is the main component in the active site in Co-PPy-TsOH/C for catalyzing ORR, but some other elements such as nitrogen are probably involved, too. PMID:24229351

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G-6-PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Churchill Livingston; 2008:chap 45. Golan DER. Hemolytic anemias: red cell membrane and metabolic defects. In: Goldman ...

  2. Betaine deficiency in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Lerma, C. ); Rich, P.J.; Ju, G.C.; Yang, Wenju; Rhodes, D. ); Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency. This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline {r arrow} betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde.

  3. Low-cobalt single crystal Rene 150

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of cobalt content on a single crystal version of the advanced, high gamma prime content turbine airfoil alloy Rene 150 were investigated. Cobalt contents under investigation include 12 wt.% (composition level of Rene 150), 6 wt.%, and 0 wt.%. Preliminary test results are presented and compared with the properties of standard DS Rene 150. DTA results indicate that the liquidus goes through a maximum of about 1435 C near 6 wt.% Co. The solidus remains essentially constant at 1390 C with decreasing Co content. The gamma prime solvus appears to go through a minimum of about 1235 C near 6 wt.% Co content. Preliminary as-cast tensile and stress rupture results are presented along with heat treat schedules and future test plans.

  4. Creep-fatigue of low cobalt superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Testing for the low cycle fatigue and creep fatigue resistance of superalloys containing reduced amounts of cobalt is described. The test matrix employed involves a single high temperature appropriate for each alloy. A single total strain range, again appropriate to each alloy, is used in conducting strain controlled, low cycle, creep fatigue tests. The total strain range is based upon the level of straining that results in about 10,000 cycles to failure in a high frequency (0.5 Hz) continuous strain-cycling fatigue test. No creep is expected to occur in such a test. To bracket the influence of creep on the cyclic strain resistance, strain hold time tests with ore minute hold periods are introduced. One test per composition is conducted with the hold period in tension only, one in compression only, and one in both tension and compression. The test temperatures, alloys, and their cobalt compositions that are under study are given.

  5. Are cobaltates conventional? An ARPES viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.Z. . E-mail: mzhasan@Princeton.edu; Qian, D.; Foo, M.L.; Cava, R.J.

    2006-07-15

    Recently discovered class of cobaltate superconductors (Na{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) is a novel realization of interacting quantum electron system in a triangular network with low-energy degrees of freedom. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle parameters in the parent superconductors. Results reveal a large hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy quasiparticles. The measured quasiparticle parameters collectively suggest two orders of magnitude departure from the conventional weak coupling (such as Al) Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron dynamics paradigm and unveils cobaltates as a rather hidden class of relatively high temperature superconductors. These parameters also form the basis for a microscopic Hamiltonian of the system.

  6. Hard Machinable Machining of Cobalt Super Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čep, Robert; Janásek, Adam; Petrů, Jana; Čepová, Lenka; Sadílek, Marek; Kratochvíl, Jiří

    2012-12-01

    The article deals with difficult-to-machine cobalt super alloys. The main aim is to test the basic properties of cobalt super alloys and propose suitable cutting materials and machining parameters under the designation 188 when machining. Although the development of technology in chipless machining such as moulding, precision casting and other manufacturing methods continues to advance, machining is still the leading choice for piece production, typical for energy and chemical engineering. Nowadays, super alloys are commonly used in turbine engines in regions that are subject to high temperatures, which require high strength, high temperature resistance, phase stability, as well as corrosion or oxidation resistance.

  7. Influence of cobalt on fermentative methylation.

    PubMed

    Claridge, C A; Rossomano, V Z; Buono, N S; Gourevitch, A; Lein, J

    1966-03-01

    Streptomyces rishiriensis produces at least five closely related antibiotics. Strain selection yielded a culture producing only the most active component, coumermycin A. Hydrolysis of this antibiotic by barium hydroxide yielded both 5-methyl-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid and pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, which could be separated by paper chromatography. Coumermycin A was thus shown to be two fractions, designated A(1) and A(2) depending upon the nature of the pyrrole carboxylic acid portion. The addition of cobalt to the fermentation medium at a level as low as 0.01 mug/ml shifted the fermentation exclusively to the production of coumermycin A(1). Other ions were ineffective, except nickel, whose activity could be explained by the presence of contaminating cobalt. PMID:5959861

  8. Cobalt recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2002-01-01

    This report is one of a series of reports on metals recycling. It defines and quantifies the 1998 flow of cobalt-bearing materials in the United States, from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of cobalt?s many and diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 1998, an estimated 32 percent of U.S. cobalt supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of cobalt consumed from new scrap to that from old scrap was estimated to be 50:50. Of all the cobalt in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 68 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of different nanostructures of cobalt phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Badsar, M.; Edrissi, M.

    2010-09-15

    In this research, different nanostructures of cobalt phosphate were successfully prepared. Flowerlike cobalt phosphate and platelike ammonium cobalt phosphate were made by coprecipitation method without any use of surfactant or capping agent as structure directors. Reverse micelle route in water/CTAB/n-hexanol microemulsion system was used to synthesize cobalt phosphate nanoparticles. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), chemical analysis, and BET. The SEM images showed that the flowerlike nanostructure is an arrangement of cobalt phosphate plates. TEM images revealed that the nanoparticles are spherical with the diameter of 30-50 nm. The purity of cobalt phosphate nanoparticles was confirmed by chemical analysis. Finally, the possible mechanisms which can describe the formation of these nanostructures were discussed.

  10. Interfacial Structure Dependent Spin Mixing Conductance in Cobalt Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Tokaç, M; Bunyaev, S A; Kakazei, G N; Schmool, D S; Atkinson, D; Hindmarch, A T

    2015-07-31

    Enhancement of Gilbert damping in polycrystalline cobalt thin-film multilayers of various thicknesses, overlayered with copper or iridium, was studied in order to understand the role of local interface structure in spin pumping. X-ray diffraction indicates that cobalt films less than 6 nm thick have strong fcc(111) texture while thicker films are dominated by hcp(0001) structure. The intrinsic damping for cobalt thicknesses above 6 nm is weakly dependent on cobalt thickness for both overlayer materials, and below 6 nm the iridium overlayers show higher damping enhancement compared to copper overlayers, as expected due to spin pumping. The interfacial spin mixing conductance is significantly enhanced in structures where both cobalt and iridium have fcc(111) structure in comparison to those where the cobalt layer has subtly different hcp(0001) texture at the interface. PMID:26274431

  11. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  12. Atomically flat ultrathin cobalt ferrite islands.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Laura; Quesada, Adrián; Munuera, Carmen; Fernández, Jose F; García-Hernández, Mar; Foerster, Michael; Aballe, Lucía; de la Figuera, Juan

    2015-10-21

    A route for fabricating structurally perfect cobalt ferrite magnetic nanostructures is demonstrated. Ultrathin islands of up to 100 μm(2) with atomically flat surfaces and free from antiphase boundaries are developed. The extremely low defect concentration leads to a robust magnetic order, even for thicknesses below 1 nm, and exceptionally large magnetic domains. This approach allows the evaluation of the influence of specific extrinsic effects on domain wall pinning. PMID:26306027

  13. Congenital limb deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, William R; Coulter, Colleen P; Schmitz, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Congenital limb deficiency disorders (LDDs) are birth defects characterized by the aplasia or hypoplasia of bones of the limbs. Limb deficiencies are classified as transverse, those due to intrauterine disruptions of previously normal limbs, or longitudinal, those that are isolated or associated with certain syndromes as well as chromosomal anomalies. Consultation with a medical geneticist is advisable. Long-term care should occur in a specialized limb deficiency center with expertise in orthopedics, prosthetics, and occupational and physical therapy and provide emotional support and contact with other families. With appropriate care, most children with LDDs can lead productive lives. PMID:26042905

  14. Iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of diagnostic testing and therapeutic recommendations for dogs and cats with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:22942439

  15. Thiamine deficiency and delirium.

    PubMed

    Osiezagha, Kenneth; Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C; Barker, Narviar C; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K

    2013-04-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  16. Cobalt(II) Complex of a Diazoalkane Radical Anion.

    PubMed

    Bonyhady, Simon J; Goldberg, Jonathan M; Wedgwood, Nicole; Dugan, Thomas R; Eklund, Andrew G; Brennessel, William W; Holland, Patrick L

    2015-06-01

    β-Diketiminate cobalt(I) precursors react with diphenyldiazomethane to give a compound that is shown by computational studies to be a diazoalkane radical anion antiferromagnetically coupled to a high-spin cobalt(II) ion. Thermolysis of this complex results in formal N-N cleavage to give a cobalt(II) ketimide complex. Experimental evaluation of the potential steps in the mechanism suggests that free azine is a likely intermediate in this reaction. PMID:25986783

  17. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  18. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  19. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  20. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  1. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of metallic cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jinhee; Saly, Mark; Kanjolia, Ravi; Chabal, Yves; University of Texas at Dallas Collaboration; SAFC Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    Metallic cobalt has rich catalytic, electronic and magnetic properties, which makes it critical to have a better control of Co thin film deposition for various applications. This work focuses on the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of cobalt using (tertiarybutylallyl)cobalttricarbonyl (t BuAllyl)Co(CO)3 and dimethylhydrazine (DMHy) on H-terminated Si to uncover the growth mechanisms. The first pulse of (t BuAllyl)Co(CO)3 reacts with surface H--Si bonds completely, forming one monolayer of metallic silicide. In situ infrared absorption spectra show that further deposition of Co is made possible only after linear carbonyl groups which remain after the first (t BuAllyl)Co(CO)3 pulse as the surface ligand are removed by subsequent ALD cycles. Further ALD cycles give rise to metallic Co growth through ligand exchange after a nucleation period of 8--10 cycles. The derived growth rate of cobalt is 0.6 +/- 0.1 Å/cycle. The resultant Co film shows low concentration of carbon and nitrogen impurities in the bulk according to X-ray photoemission spectroscopy.

  3. Development toxicity of cobalt in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Paternain, J.L.; Domingo, J.L.; Corbella, J.

    1988-01-01

    To determine the potential developmental toxicity of cobalt, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given by gavage a daily dose of 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg cobalt(II) chloride on d 6-15 of gestation. Females were sacrificed on d 20. Maternal effects included significant reductions in weight gain and food consumption, particularly at 100 mk/kg x d. Hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and reticulocytes were increased significantly in the 100-mg/kg x d group. No treatment-related changes were recorded in the number of corpora lutea, total implants, resorptions, the number of live and dead fetuses, fetal size parameters, or fetal sex distribution data. Increased incidence of stunted fetuses per litter was the only adverse finding at 50 and 100 mg/kg x d group. However, this increase was not statistically significant. Examination of fetuses for gross external abnormalities, skeletal malformation, or ossification variations revealed that cobalt did not produce teratogenicity or significant fetotoxicity in the rat at doses as high as 100 mg/kg x d.

  4. Kinetics of cobalt cementation on zinc powder

    SciTech Connect

    Polcaro, A.M.; Palmas, S.; Dernini, S.

    1995-09-01

    The cementation process may be considered an interesting method to treat dilute solutions containing metal ions. The aim of the process may be either the removal of pollutant metals or the recovery of economically valuable metals such as Ag from spent photographic liquors. The kinetics of cobalt cementation on Zn powder from zinc sulfate concentrated solutions in the presence of copper and antimony ions was investigated in stirred tank reactors. The composition of the solutions was in the range usually utilized in industrial zinc electrowinning plants. The results showed that the reaction occurs by means of the formation of crystallization nuclei of noble metals on the zinc powder, followed by the cementation of cobalt ions on these newly-formed nuclei. Mass transfer to the reaction surface is shown to be the controlling step in copper and antimony reduction, and an equation correlating mass transfer coefficients has been determined. A kinetic equation, which interprets the influence of stirring speed and solution composition on cobalt cementation, has also been proposed.

  5. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  6. Compact magnetooptical isolator with cobalt ferrite on silicon photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanaga, Megumi; Shoji, Yuya; Takamura, Yota; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Mizumoto, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    In the telecom wavelength range, the magnetooptical effect of cobalt ferrites is approximately 10 times larger than that of conventional magnetooptical materials such as yttrium iron garnets. In this study, we focus on an application of cobalt ferrite to a magnetooptical isolator that is to be miniaturized and made suitable for integration. First, we prepare polycrystalline cobalt ferrite films deposited on a silicon substrate using a MgO buffer layer. Next, we fabricate a waveguide optical isolator of silicon waveguides by the partial deposition of the cobalt ferrite films. An optical isolation ratio of 5.5 dB is demonstrated.

  7. Application of XRF to measure strontium in human bone in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Vartsky, D.; Yasumura, S.; Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    As a basis for better understanding the role that Sr fulfills in human body, it is desirable to measure directly the main Sr store in human body. Although strontium is omnipresent in human tissues, 99% is stored inthe mineral portion of the bone. In the present study x-ray fluorescence (XRF) was applied to measure the strontium content of the tibial shaft in vivo. The feasibility studies showed that normal levels of stable strontium in the bone can be measured successfully.

  8. Porosity occurring in modification of hypoeutectic silumins with strontium and zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsenok, N.L.; Ganiev, I.N.; Yanchuk, V.N.

    1987-07-01

    The authors investigate modifications in castability, temperature effects, porosity, and fracture properties in silicon-aluminium alloys after being alloyed with strontium and zirconium. The porosity observed in alloys containing strontium was found to have a microshrinkage character. Alloying with zirconium was found to reduce somewhat the tendency of the alloy toward the formation of microshrinkage porosity but did not compensate for the influence of strontium.

  9. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and white-colored blood vessels in the retinas Pancreatitis that keeps returning Yellowing of the eyes and ... discuss your diet needs with a registered dietitian. Pancreatitis that is related to lipoprotein lipase deficiency responds ...

  10. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  11. Vitamin D Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency can lead to a loss of bone density (size and strength), broken bones (fractures), muscle weakness, ... get too much calcium in their blood or urine. Careful monitoring of blood vitamin D levels will ...

  12. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... as many as 20 different proteins in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor ... You will be given fresh blood plasma or fresh frozen plasma infusions ... These treatments will correct the deficiency temporarily.

  13. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  14. Corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of strontium and fluorine co-doped electrodeposited hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Ding, Qiongqiong; Pang, Xiaofeng; Han, Shuguang; Yan, Yajing

    2013-10-01

    To improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of biomedical titanium, strontium (Sr) and fluorine (F) were simultaneously incorporated in hydroxyapatite (HAp) to form SrFHAp coating on titanium (Ti) via electrodeposition. The microstructure, phase composition, corrosion resistance, and cytocompatibility of the films were studied. Results revealed that by incorporating F- and Sr2+ ions in HAp, the density of the coating markedly increased, i.e., a lower porosity than common HAp coating. The SrFHAp layer was dense and uniform, with nano-needle-like crystals of apatite, which aligned vertically to the substrate. The SrFHAp crystals were calcium-deficient apatite, and Sr2+ ions and F- ions were homogeneously distributed in the coating. The SrFHAp coating showed lower dissolution rate than HA coating. Potentiodynamic polarization test manifested that the SrFHAp-coated titanium exhibited superior corrosion resistance than HAp single-coated sample. In addition, osteoblasts cellular tests revealed that the SrFHAp coating was more effective to improve the in vitro biocompatibility of Ti compared with HAp coating.

  15. Growth and micro structural studies on Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, S.; Bhatnagar, A.K.; Pinto, R.

    1994-12-31

    Microstructure of Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) of radio frequency magnetron sputtered buffer layers was studied at various sputtering conditions on Si<100>, Sapphire and LaAlO{sub 3} <100> substrates. The effect of substrate temperatures upto 800 C and sputtering gas pressures in the range of 50 mTorr. of growth conditions was studied. The buffer layers of YSZ and STO showed a strong tendency for columnar structure with variation growth conditions. The buffer layers of YSZ and STO showed orientation. The tendency for columnar growth was observed above 15 mTorr sputtering gas pressure and at high substrate temperatures. Post annealing of these films in oxygen atmosphere reduced the oxygen deficiency and strain generated during growth of the films. Strong c-axis oriented superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 9}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) thin films were obtained on these buffer layers using pulsed laser ablation technique. YBCO films deposited on multilayers of YSZ and STO were shown to have better superconducting properties.

  16. Layered metal sulfides: Exceptionally selective agents for radioactive strontium removal

    PubMed Central

    Manos, Manolis J.; Ding, Nan; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we report the family of robust layered sulfides K2xMnxSn3-xS6 (x = 0.5–0.95) (KMS-1). These materials feature hexagonal [MnxSn3-xS6]2x− slabs of the CdI2 type and contain highly mobile K+ ions in their interlayer space that are easily exchangeable with other cations and particularly strontium. KMS-1 display outstanding preference for strontium ions in highly alkaline solutions containing extremely large excess of sodium cations as well as in acidic environment where most alternative adsorbents with oxygen ligands are nearly inactive. The implication of these results is that simple layered sulfides should be considered for the efficient remediation of certain nuclear wastes. PMID:18316731

  17. Physical Character and Morphology of Platinum Nanocrystals on Strontium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gild, Joshua; Pierce, Michael; Komanicky, Vladimir; Barbour, Andi; You, Hoydoo

    2015-03-01

    The physical characteristics of platinum nanocrystals on single crystal strontium titanate, SrTiO3 , can effect the chemical properties of this important model catalyst. The morphology, epitaxy, distribution, and size of the Pt nano-crystals can all be controlled through different growth and processing mechanisms. Nanometer scale platinum thin films are deposited on strontium titanate at ambient temperatures then annealed at range of temperatures and in various oxidizing environments. The process of how these conditions influence the formation of uniformly epitaxial platinum crystals on the sample surface has been investigated using basic materials characterization techniques. Single crystal x-ray diffraction is the primary tool for these experiments, coupled with atomic force microscopy for morphology and x-ray and electron spectroscopy to determine chemical bonding between the particles and gases introduced into the system. These substrate supported nanoparticle samples will then be utilized in experiments to test their catalytic activity compared to an amorphous platinum film.

  18. Isotopic composition of strontium in sea water throughout Phanerozoic time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Z.E.; Hedge, C.E.; Tourtelot, H.A.

    1970-01-01

    Isotopic analyses of strontium in primary fossil carbonate reveal significant variations in Sr87 Sr86 of sea water during the Phanerozoic. The strontium isotopic composition may have been uniform from the Ordovician through the Mississippian, with an average Sr87 Sr86 of 0.7078. A subsequent decrease in this value into the Mesozoic is interrupted by two provisionally documented positive pulses in Sr87 Sr86-one in the Early Pennsylvanian and one in the Early Triassic. The lowest observed value (0.7068) occurred in Late Jurassic time, and this was followed by a gradual increase to 0.7075 in the Late Cretaceous and a more rapid increase through the Tertiary to 0.7090 for modern sea water. These variations are thought to be the result of a complex interplay of periods of intense volcanism and epeirogenic movements of the continents on a worldwide scale. ?? 1970.

  19. Clock Laser System for a Strontium Lattice Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legero, T.; Lisdat, Ch.; Vellore Winfred, J. S. R.; Schnatz, H.; Grosche, G.; Riehle, F.; Sterr, U.

    2009-04-01

    We describe the setup and the characterization of a 698 nm master-slave diode laser system to probe the 1S0-3P0 clock transition of strontium atoms confined in a 1D optical lattice. The frequency noise and the linewidth of the laser system have been measured with respect to an ultrastable 657 nm diode laser with 1 Hz linewidth. The large frequency difference of more than 25 THz was bridged using a femtosecond fiber comb as transfer oscillator. In a second step the virtual beat was used to establish a phase lock between the narrow line 657 nm laser and the strontium clock laser. This technique allowed to transfer the stability from the 657 nm to the 698 nm laser.

  20. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  1. P-type conductivity in annealed strontium titanate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poole, Violet M.; Corolewski, Caleb D.; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2015-12-17

    In this study, Hall-effect measurements indicate p-type conductivity in bulk, single-crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO3, or STO) samples that were annealed at 1200°C. Room temperature mobilities above 100 cm2/Vs were measured, an order of magnitude higher than those for electrons (5-10 cm2/Vs). Average hole densities were in the 109-1010 cm-3 range, consistent with a deep acceptor.

  2. Strontium stable isotopes fractionate in the soil environments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halicz, Ludwik; Segal, Irina; Fruchter, Noa; Stein, Mordechai; Lazar, Boaz

    2008-07-01

    This study shows that the stable isotopic composition of strontium (the 88Sr/ 86Sr ratio expressed as δ 88/86Sr value relative to the NBS987 standard) varies significantly in sedimentary terrestrial environments. The abundances of 86Sr, 88Sr isotopes were analyzed by MC-ICP-MS "Nu Plasma". All studied rocks and waters show δ 88/86Sr values that are distinctly different from the measured NBS987 standard (yielding 0.01 ± 0.05‰, all errors are reported as 2 σ). Modern corals from the northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea yielded significantly different value than seawater (δ 88/86Sr = 0.22 ± 0.07‰, compared to 0.35 ± 0.06‰, respectively), in an excellent correlation with the δ 88/86Sr analyses reported by Fietzke and Eisenhauer [Fietzke, J., Eisenhauer, A., 2006. Determination of temperature-dependent stable strontium isotopes ( 88Sr/ 86Sr) fractionation via bracketing standard MC-ICP-MS. Geochm. Geophys. Geosyst. 7 (no. 8)] on other coral samples. All carbonate samples that originated in the marine environment: corals ( porites and acropora from the northern Gulf of Aqaba); Cretaceous limestone and runoff from the Judea Mountains as well as lacustrine evaporitic aragonite (Dead Sea); and Red Sea and Atlantic seawater yield an average δ 88/86Sr value of 0.26 ± 0.1‰. On the other hand, secondary materials (products of chemical weathering) from the terrestrial environment of the Judea Mountain such as terra rossa soil and speleothem calcite (that derives its Sr from the above-lying soil) yielded significantly lower δ 88/86Sr value of - 0.17 ± 0.06‰. This indicates that strontium isotopes fractionate in the soil environment calling for a possible development of strontium isotopes as a tracer for processes of chemical weathering and pedogenesis.

  3. Laser Cooled Strontium Source for an Ion Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Mary; Archibald, James; Erickson, Christopher; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-10-01

    We present a Strontium-87 magneto-optical trap (MOT) in a Low-Velocity-Intense-Source (LVIS) as the source of cooled, collimated atoms for an ion interferometer. Laser cooling and trapping is accomplished with a 461 nm frequency doubled laser and a pair of permanent magnets. A beam of cooled atoms is produced by passing the atoms through a hole drilled in one of the retroreflecting optics. The atoms are then photo-ionized in a two photon process.

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sr-71 (Strontium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sr-71 (Strontium, atomic number Z = 38, mass number A = 71).

  5. Extraction of cesium and strontium from nuclear waste

    DOEpatents

    Davis, M.W. Jr.; Bowers, C.B. Jr.

    1988-06-07

    Cesium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4[prime](5) [1-hydroxy-2-ethylhexyl]benzo 18-crown-6 compound and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution. Strontium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4[prime](5[prime]) [1-hydroxyheptyl]cyclohexo 18-crown-6 compound, and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution. 3 figs.

  6. Extraction of cesium and strontium from nuclear waste

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Milton W.; Bowers, Jr., Charles B.

    1988-01-01

    Cesium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4'(5) [1-hydroxy-2-ethylhexyl]benzo 18-crown-6 compound and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution. Strontium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4'(5') [1-hydroxyheptyl]cyclohexo 18-crown-6 compound, and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution.

  7. Towards quantum simulation and quantum sensing with strontium and lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senaratne, Ruwan; Rajagopal, Shankari; Geiger, Zachary; Lebedev, Vyacheslav; Weld, David

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we describe progress towards the construction of two ultracold atomic physics experiments, based on bosonic and fermionic strontium and lithium. Applications of the experiments will include quantum simulation of quasicrystals, the development of novel cooling techniques, and force sensing on small length scales. We discuss hardware design, experimental features, and scientific goals. Work supported in part by AFOSR via a YIP award.

  8. Seawater strontium isotopes, acid rain, and the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdougall, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    A large bolide impact at the end of the Cretaceous would have produced significant amounts of nitrogen oxides by shock heating of the atmosphere. The resulting acid precipitation would have increased continental weathering greatly and could be an explanation for the observed high ratio of strontium-87 to strontium-86 in seawater at about this time, due to the dissolution of large amounts of strontium from the continental crust. Spikes to high values in the seawater strontium isotope record at other times may reflect similar episodes.

  9. Strontium eluting graphene hybrid nanoparticles augment osteogenesis in a 3D tissue scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to prepare hybrid nanoparticles of graphene sheets decorated with strontium metallic nanoparticles and demonstrate their advantages in bone tissue engineering. Strontium-decorated reduced graphene oxide (RGO_Sr) hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized by the facile reduction of graphene oxide and strontium nitrate. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy revealed that the hybrid particles were composed of RGO sheets decorated with 200-300 nm metallic strontium particles. Thermal gravimetric analysis further confirmed the composition of the hybrid particles as 22 wt% of strontium. Macroporous tissue scaffolds were prepared by incorporating RGO_Sr particles in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL). The PCL/RGO_Sr scaffolds were found to elute strontium ions in aqueous medium. Osteoblast proliferation and differentiation was significantly higher in the PCL scaffolds containing the RGO_Sr particles in contrast to neat PCL and PCL/RGO scaffolds. The increased biological activity can be attributed to the release of strontium ions from the hybrid nanoparticles. This study demonstrates that composites prepared using hybrid nanoparticles that elute strontium ions can be used to prepare multifunctional scaffolds with good mechanical and osteoinductive properties. These findings have important implications for designing the next generation of biomaterials for use in tissue regeneration.The objective of this work was to prepare hybrid nanoparticles of graphene sheets decorated with strontium metallic nanoparticles and demonstrate their advantages in bone tissue engineering. Strontium-decorated reduced graphene oxide (RGO_Sr) hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized by the facile reduction of graphene oxide and strontium nitrate. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy revealed that the hybrid particles were composed of RGO sheets decorated with 200-300 nm metallic strontium

  10. Enhancing Perovskite Electrocatalysis through Strain Tuning of the Oxygen Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Jonathan R; Jeen, Hyoungjeen; Barron, Sara C; Meyer, Tricia L; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-06-15

    Oxygen vacancies in transition-metal oxides facilitate catalysis critical for energy storage and generation. However, promoting vacancies at the lower temperatures required for operation in devices such as metal-air batteries and portable fuel cells has proven elusive. Here we used thin films of perovskite-based strontium cobaltite (SrCoOx) to show that epitaxial strain is a powerful tool for manipulating the oxygen content under conditions consistent with the oxygen evolution reaction, yielding increasingly oxygen-deficient states in an environment where the cobaltite would normally be fully oxidized. The additional oxygen vacancies created through tensile strain enhance the cobaltite's catalytic activity toward this important reaction by over an order of magnitude, equaling that of precious-metal catalysts, including IrO2. Our findings demonstrate that strain in these oxides can dictate the oxygen stoichiometry independent of ambient conditions, allowing unprecedented control over oxygen vacancies essential in catalysis near room temperature. PMID:27232374

  11. Strontium borate glass: potential biomaterial for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pan, H. B.; Zhao, X. L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, K. B.; Li, L. C.; Li, Z. Y.; Lam, W. M.; Lu, W. W.; Wang, D. P.; Huang, W. H.; Lin, K. L.; Chang, J.

    2010-01-01

    Boron plays important roles in many life processes including embryogenesis, bone growth and maintenance, immune function and psychomotor skills. Thus, the delivery of boron by the degradation of borate glass is of special interest in biomedical applications. However, the cytotoxicity of borate glass which arises with the rapid release of boron has to be carefully considered. In this study, it was found that the incorporation of strontium into borate glass can not only moderate the rapid release of boron, but also induce the adhesion of osteoblast-like cells, SaOS-2, thus significantly increasing the cyto-compatibility of borate glass. The formation of multilayers of apatite with porous structure indicates that complete degradation is optimistic, and the spread of SaOS-2 covered by apatite to form a sandwich structure may induce bone-like tissue formation at earlier stages. Therefore, such novel strontium-incorporated borosilicate may act as a new generation of biomaterial for bone regeneration, which not only renders boron as a nutritious element for bone health, but also delivers strontium to stimulate formation of new bones. PMID:20031984

  12. TRPV3 channels mediate strontium-induced mouse egg activation

    PubMed Central

    Carvacho, Ingrid; Lee, Hoi Chang; Fissore, Rafael A.; Clapham, David E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In mammals, calcium influx is required for oocyte maturation and egg activation. The molecular identities of the calcium-permeant channels that underlie the initiation of embryonic development are not established. Here, we describe a Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channel current activated by TRP agonists that is absent in TrpV3−/− eggs. TRPV3 current is differentially expressed during oocyte maturation, reaching a peak of maximum density and activity at metaphase of meiosis II (MII), the stage of fertilization. Selective activation of TRPV3 channels provokes egg activation by mediating massive calcium entry. Widely used to activate eggs, strontium application is known to yield normal offspring in combination with somatic cell nuclear transfer. We show that TRPV3 is required for strontium influx, as TrpV3−/− eggs failed to permeate Sr2+ or undergo strontium-induced activation. We propose that TRPV3 is the major mediator of calcium influx in mouse eggs and is a putative target for artificial egg activation. PMID:24316078

  13. Synthesis, Structures, and Multiferroic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Guolong; Chen, Xiuna

    2013-05-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of large ferroelectricity and strong ferromagnetism has been observed in strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) ceramics. Strontium hexaferrite powders with hexagonal crystal structures have been successfully synthesized through the co-precipitation precursor method using strontium nitrate and ferric nitrate as starting materials. The powders were pressed into pellets and then sintered into ceramics at a temperature range of at 1000°C to 1100°C for 1 h. The structure and morphology of the ceramics were determined using x-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy techniques. Clear ferroelectric hysteresis loops demonstrated large spontaneous polarization in the SrFe12O19 ceramics at room temperature. The maximum remnant polarization of the SrFe12O19 ceramic was estimated to be approximately 15 μC/cm2. The FeO6 octahedron in its perovskite-like hexagonal unit cell and the displacement of Fe3+ off the center of the octahedron are proposed to be the origin of electric polarization in SrFe12O19. In our experimental observations, the SrFe12O19 ceramic also revealed strong ferromagnetism at room temperature.

  14. Assessment of strontium in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Strom, R.N.

    1992-12-31

    This document on strontium is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the sixth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of SRS (Savannah River Site) operations. Strontium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Strontium has been produced at SRS during the operation of 5 production reactors. About 300 curies of radiostrontium were released into streams in the late 50s and 60s, primarily from leaking fuel elements in reactor storage basins. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 400 Ci were released to seepage basins. A much smaller quantity, about 2 Ci, was released to the atmosphere. The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 6.2 mrem (atmospheric) and 1.4 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Radiostrontium releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

  15. The diffusion of cesium, strontium, and europium in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwaraknath, S. S.; Was, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    A novel multi-layer diffusion couple was used to isolate the diffusion of strontium, europium and cesium in SiC without introducing radiation damage to SiC and at concentrations below the solubility limit for the fission products in SiC. Diffusion occurred by both bulk and grain boundary pathways for all three fission products between 900∘ C and 1 ,300∘ C. Cesium was the fastest diffuser below 1 ,100∘ C and the slowest above this temperature. Strontium and europium diffusion tracked very closely as a function of temperature for both bulk and grain boundary diffusion. Migration energies ranged from 1.0 eV to 5.7 eV for bulk diffusion and between 2.2 eV and 4.7 eV for grain boundary diffusion. These constitute the first measurements of diffusion of cesium, europium, and strontium in silicon carbide, and the magnitude of the cesium diffusion coefficient supports the premise that high quality TRISO fuel should have minimal cesium release.

  16. Strontium isotope ratios and the origin of anorthosites

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradov, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    Anorthosites are rocks consisting almost completely of calcic plagioclase, usually from andesine to labradorite. They are not widespread, and until recently were of no economic interest. However, with the advance of the new global tectonics, which has excited considerable interest in the structure and composition of upper-mantle rocks, interest in the anorthosites has grown. This has particularly been the case since the discovery of anorthosites on the moon, where they appear to be more widespread than on the earth. Data have recently been obtained on the strontium isotope compositions of anorthosite intrusions in the Dzhugdzhur-Stanovoy zone and in the rocks surrounding them, which have revealed some unexpected features. The paper describes the geological features of anorthosites, initial concepts on strontium isotope geochemistry, strontium isotope compositions of this region, and discusses some genetic consequences from the isotope data. Although the data of this study are insufficient to determine the origin of anorthosites, the data indicate several points which should be considered in following studies. 11 references, 1 figure.

  17. Lifetimes of ultra-long-range strontium Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, F.; Whalen, J. D.; Ding, R.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdorfer, J.; Dunning, F. B.; Killian, T. C.

    2016-05-01

    The lifetimes of the lower-lying vibrational states of ultralong-range strontium Rydberg molecules comprising one ground-state 5s2 1S0 atom and one Rydberg atom in the 5s 38s3S1 state are reported. The molecules are created in an ultracold gas held in an optical dipole trap and their numbers determined using field ionization, the product electrons being detected by a microchannel plate. The measurements show that, in marked contrast to earlier measurements involving rubidium Rydberg molecules, the lifetimes of the low-lying molecular vibrational states are very similar to those of the parent Rydberg atoms. This results because the strong p-wave resonance in low-energy electron-rubidium scattering, which strongly influences the rubidium molecular lifetimes, is not present for strontium. The absence of this resonance offers advantages for experiments involving strontium Rydberg atoms as impurities in quantum gases and for testing theories of molecular formation and decay. This research was supported by the AFOSR, NSF, the Robert A. Welch Foundation, the FWF (Austria), FWF-SFB049 NextLite. H.R.S. was supported by a Grant to ITAMP from the NSF.

  18. VERMILION-DEFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    Bridges, C B

    1919-07-20

    In May, 1916, a culture of Drosophila melanogaster showed that a new sex-linked lethal had arisen. The linkage relations indicated that the position of the lethal was in the neighborhood of the sex-linked recessive "vermilion," whose locus in the X chromosome is at 33.0. When females heterozygous for the lethal were outcrossed to vermilion males, all the daughters that received the lethal-bearing chromosome showed vermilion eye-color, though, from the pedigree, vermilion was known to be absent from the ancestry of the mother. The lethal action and the unexpected appearance of vermilion both suggested that this was another instance of the phenomenon called "deficiency;" that is, the loss or "inactivation" of the genes of a section of the X chromosome. The lethal action would then be due to the deficient region including one or more genes necessary for the life of the individual. The appearance of vermilion in females carrying only one vermilion gene would be explainable on the ground that the deficient-bearing females are virtually haploid for the region including the vermilion locus. Linkage tests showed that the amount of crossing over in the neighborhood of the deficiency was cut down by about five units. Part of this may be attributed to the actual length of the "deficient" region, within which it is probable that no crossing over occurs, and part (probably most) to an alteration in the synaptic relations in the regions immediately adjacent. In more remote regions there was no disturbance or perhaps a slight rise in the frequency of crossing over. Both the local fall and the possible rise in more distant regions would seem to argue that a "pucker" at synapsis had been caused by an actual shortening of the deficient chromosome. That the deficient region extends to the left of the locus of vermilion was indicated by a test in which it was observed that the presence of an extra piece of chromosome including the loci for vermilion and sable ("vermilion

  19. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  20. Solvent extraction of cobalt from laterite-ammoniacal leach liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, D.N.; Siemens, R.E.; Rhoads, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines is developing a method to recover Ni, Co, and Cu from laterites containing less than 1.2% Ni and 0.25% Co. The method consists of the following basic unit operations: (1) reduction roasting, (2) leaching, (3) solvent extraction, and (4) electrowinning. The method reflects three Bureau of Mines objectives: (1) recovery of critical minerals that are domestically in short supply from low-grade domestic laterites, (2) lower processing energy requirements, and (3) solution recycling. This report deals with the extraction of cobalt and the preparation of a suitable cobalt electrolyte by solvent extraction from liquor produced by this method. Nickel and copper are coextracted with LIX64N from an ammoniacal ammonium sulfate leach liquor containing about 1.00 g/1 Ni, 0.30 g/1 Co, 0.03 g/1 Cu, and 0.02 g/1 Zn. Cobalt (III) in the nickel-copper barren raffinate is reduced to cobalt (II) with cobalt metal. Reduction of cobalt (III) to cobalt (II) greatly aids subsequent extraction. Commercially available XI-51 extracts about 94% of the cobalt from the treated raffinate in one stage in a laboratory mixer-settler continuous circuit. Ammonia loaded on the solvent is removed in two washing steps. About 94% of the cobalt then is stripped from the XI-51 in one stage with spent cobalt electrolyte containing about 77 g/1 Co and 18 g/1 sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). Electrolytes containing less H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ also may be used. Preliminary data indicate that coextracted zinc may be removed from pregnant cobalt electrolyte containing 3 g/1 or less H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ with di-(2 ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA).

  1. An evaluation of strontium chloride, Rappaport and strontium selenite enrichment for the isolation of salmonellas from man, animals, meat products and abattoir effluents.

    PubMed

    Iveson, J B; Mackay-Scollay, E M

    1972-06-01

    Strontium chloride enrichment broth was found to be comparable to Rappaport broth for the recovery of a wide range of Salmonella serotypes from man, animals, meat products and effluents. With the exception of cloacal samples from reptiles, both procedures were superior to selenite F.The performance of strontium chloride Mand selenite F enrichment was improved when effluent samples were incubated at 43 degrees C.Strontium chloride M and Rappaport enrichment were superior to selenite F for the isolation of Arizona species from reptiles.Strontium chloride B, strontium selenite and Rappaport broths were found suitable for the isolation of multiple Salmonella serotypes from sea water contaminated with abattoir effluents. The strontium chloride B and strontium selenite enrichment media were superior to Rappaport broth when samples were incubated at 43 degrees C.Modified bismuth sulphite agar was found superior to Salmonella-Shigella agar as a solid subculture medium.The investigation of a food poisoning outbreak due to Salmonella typhimurium phage type 21 is reported.The significance of the choice of sampling and isolation techniques in salmonellosis in man and animals is discussed. PMID:4503874

  2. Monitoring bone strontium levels of an osteoporotic subject due to self-administration of strontium citrate with a novel diagnostic tool, in vivo XRF: a case study.

    PubMed

    Moise, H; Adachi, J D; Chettle, D R; Pejović-Milić, A

    2012-07-01

    A previously developed in vivo X-ray fluorescence (IVXRF) I-125 based system was used to measure bone strontium levels non-invasively in an osteoporotic female volunteer. The volunteer was recruited in December 2008, as part of the Ryerson and McMaster University Strontium in Bone Research Study and measured at twice weekly, weekly and monthly intervals. Thirty minute measurements were taken at the finger and ankle bone sites, representing primarily cortical and trabecular bone, respectively and the strontium K-alpha X-ray peak at 14.16 keV was used in the analysis. Since the volunteer had no prior history of strontium based medications or supplementation, baseline natural strontium levels were obtained followed by a 24h measurement of first intake of strontium citrate supplements (680 mg Sr/day). While the baseline levels of 0.38 ± 0.05 and 0.39 ± 0.10 for the finger and ankle, respectively, were on par with those previously reported in Caucasians among twenty-two healthy non-supplementing strontium individuals by our group, an increase began to be seen after 24 hrs of 0.62 ± 0.14 and 0.45 ± 0.12 for the finger and ankle, respectively. By 120 h, the increase was statistically significant at 0.68 ± 0.07 and 0.93 ± 0.05, respectively. Further increases occurred within an interval of 90-180 days, with the most recent, after 800 days, at the finger and ankle being 7 and 15 times higher than the initial baseline reading. The intriguing results show bone strontium incorporation and retention follow a pattern, suggesting strontium levels, at least in the ankle, do not plateau within two to three years and will continue to increase over time, as an individual takes strontium supplements. The ability of this IVXRF system to monitor and measure bone strontium levels over time provides a useful diagnostic tool to help gain insight into strontium bone kinetics. PMID:22549020

  3. The role of cobalt on the creep of Waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Chin, L.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Cobalt was systematically replaced with nickel in Waspaloy (which normally contains 13% Co) to determine the effects of cobalt on the creep behavior of this alloy. Effects of cobalt were found to be minimal on tensile strengths and microstructure. The creep resistance and the stress rupture resistance determined in the range from 704 to 760 C (1300 to 1400 C) were found to decrease as cobalt was removed from the standard alloy at all stresses and temperatures. Roughly a ten-fold drop in rupture life and a corresponding increase in minimum creep rate were found under all test conditions. Both the apparent creep activation energy and the matrix contribution to creep resistance were found to increase with cobalt. These creep effects are attributed to cobalt lowering the stacking fault energy of the alloy matrix. The creep resistance loss due to the removal of cobalt is shown to be restored by slightly increasing the gamma' volume fraction. Results are compared to a previous study on Udimet 700, a higher strength, higher gamma' volume fraction alloy with similar phase chemistry, in which cobalt did not affect creep resistance. An explanation for this difference in behavior based on interparticle spacing and cross-slip is presented.

  4. Microwave Mapping Demonstration Using the Thermochromic Cobalt Chloride Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Vu D.; Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    An update to the thermochromic cobalt(II) chloride equilibrium demonstration is described. Filter paper that has been saturated with aqueous cobalt(II) chloride is heated for seconds in a microwave oven, producing a color change. The resulting pink and blue map is used to colorfully demonstrate Le Châtelier's principle and to illuminate the…

  5. [The cobalt lung in diamond cutters: a new disease].

    PubMed

    Demedts, M; Gyselen, A

    1989-01-01

    Although for forty years already broncho-pulmonary pathology has been described in workers exposed to hard-metal (i.e. alloys of tungsten carbide and cobalt) and although cobalt is considered the offending agent of this hazard, these abnormalities have almost not been found after exposure to cobalt alone except in animal experiments. Recently we detected clearcut broncho-pulmonary pathology in 48 diamond polishers (i.e. nearly 1% of those exposed) attributable to the ultrafine cobalt dust from the cutting surface of polishing disks, in which it was used as a cementing matrix for microdiamonds without any tungsten carbide. Nineteen of these patients presented with a fibrosing alveolitis documented in 6 by lung biopsy and in 12 by broncho-alveolar lavage, both of which revealed characteristic multinucleated giant cells. Thirteen suffered from asthma of occupational origin, in 9 proven by cobalt-inhalation tests, and in 5 by peak flow measurements at the workplace. Sixteen had mixed bronchial and alveolar pathology or were incompletely documented. A cross-sectional study in about 200 diamond polishers showed a significant correlation between exposure to cobalt and decrease in lung function. The strikingly harmful effects of cobalt can be explained by the chronic exposure to very small particles with markedly increased solubility. The pathogenesis of the broncho-pulmonary pathology may be attributed to the cytotoxic as well as to the sensitising (i.e. allergic and/or idiosyncratic) actions of cobalt. PMID:2561412

  6. Effect of cobalt on Escherichia coli metabolism and metalloporphyrin formation

    PubMed Central

    Majtan, Tomas; Frerman, Frank E.

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity in Escherichia coli resulting from high concentrations of cobalt has been explained by competition of cobalt with iron in various metabolic processes including Fe–S cluster assembly, sulfur assimilation, production of free radicals and reduction of free thiol pool. Here we present another aspect of increased cobalt concentrations in the culture medium resulting in the production of cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX), which was incorporated into heme proteins including membrane-bound cytochromes and an expressed human cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS). The presence of CoPPIX in cytochromes inhibited their electron transport capacity and resulted in a substantially decreased respiration. Bacterial cells adapted to the increased cobalt concentration by inducing a modified mixed acid fermentative pathway under aerobiosis. We capitalized on the ability of E. coli to insert cobalt into PPIX to carry out an expression of CoPPIX-substituted heme proteins. The level of CoPPIX-substitution increased with the number of passages of cells in a cobalt-containing medium. This approach is an inexpensive method to prepare cobalt-substituted heme proteins compared to in vitro enzyme reconstitution or in vivo replacement using metalloporphyrin heme analogs and seems to be especially suitable for complex heme proteins with an additional coenzyme, such as human CBS. PMID:21184140

  7. Potential for cobalt recovery from lateritic ores in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrington, R.

    2012-04-01

    Cobalt is one of the 'critical metals' identified under the EU Raw Materials Initiative. Annually the global mine production of cobalt is around 55,000 tonnes,with Europe's industries consuming around 30% of that figure. Currently Europe produces around 27 tonnes of cobalt from mines in Finland although new capacity is planned. Co-bearing nickel laterite ores being mined in Greece, Macedonia and Kosovo where the cobalt is currently not being recovered (ores have typical analyses of 0.055% Co and >1% Ni,). These ores are currently treated directly in pyrometallurgical plants to recover the contained nickel and this process means there is no separate cobalt product produced. Hydrometallurgical treatment of mineralogically suitable laterite ores can recover the cobalt; for example Cuba recovers 3,500 tonnes of cobalt from its laterite mining operations, which are of a similar scale to the current European operations. Implementation of hydrometallurgical techniques is in its infancy in Europe with one deposit in Turkey planning to use atmospheric heap leaching to recover nickel and copper from oxide-dominated ores. More widespread implementation of these methods to mineralogically suitable ore types could unlock the highly significant undeveloped resources (with metal contents >0.04% Co and >1% Ni), which have been defined throughout the Balkans eastwards into Turkey. At a conservative estimate, this region has the potential to supply up to 30% of the EU cobalt requirements.

  8. Experimental evaluation of cobalt behavior on BWR fuel rod surface

    SciTech Connect

    Karasawa, H.; Asakura, Y.; Sakagami, M.; Uchida, S. )

    1988-06-01

    Cobalt behavior on the boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rod surface was experimentally evaluated at 285 C and with various pH values. Adsorption of cobalt ions on hematite particles proceeded via the exchange reaction of cobalt ion with the surface hydroxyl of the hematite. The equilibrium constant for the adsorption at 285 C was found to be -- 570 times as large as that at 20 C. The adsorbate formed cobalt ferrite at the rate of 3.4 x 10/sup -2/ g-Co/g-Co adsorbed/h. The dissolution rates of cobalt ferrite and cobalt oxide particles were found to depend on (H/sup -/)/sup 1.1/ and (H/sup -/)/sup 1.2/, respectively, where (H/sup -/) means the H/sup -/ concentration. Cobalt ions were released from these oxides when O/sup 2-/ ions in them combined with two aqueous protons to form water at the oxide-water interface. Cobalt behavior on the fuel rod surface under BWR conditions was discussed using the experimental results.

  9. Comparative toxicity and carcinogenicity of soluble and insoluble cobalt compounds.

    PubMed

    Behl, Mamta; Stout, Matthew D; Herbert, Ronald A; Dill, Jeffrey A; Baker, Gregory L; Hayden, Barry K; Roycroft, Joseph H; Bucher, John R; Hooth, Michelle J

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposure to cobalt is of widespread concern due to its use in a variety of industrial processes and the occurrence of occupational disease. Due to the lack of toxicity and carcinogenicity data following exposure to cobalt, and questions regarding bioavailability following exposure to different forms of cobalt, the NTP conducted two chronic inhalation exposure studies in rats and mice, one on soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate, and a more recent study on insoluble cobalt metal. Herein, we compare and contrast the toxicity profiles following whole-body inhalation exposures to these two forms of cobalt. In general, both forms were genotoxic in the Salmonella T98 strain in the absence of effects on micronuclei. The major sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity in both chronic inhalation studies were the respiratory tract in rats and mice, and the adrenal gland in rats. In addition, there were distinct sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity noted following exposure to cobalt metal. In rats, carcinogenicity was observed in the blood, and pancreas, and toxicity was observed in the testes of rats and mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that both forms of cobalt, soluble and insoluble, appear to be multi-site rodent carcinogens following inhalation exposure. PMID:25896363

  10. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment. PMID:26314490

  11. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  12. Unconventional magnetisation texture in graphene/cobalt hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, A. D.; Coraux, J.; Chen, G.; N’Diaye, A. T.; Schmid, A. K.; Rougemaille, N.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic domain structure and spin-dependent reflectivity measurements on cobalt thin films intercalated at the graphene/Ir(111) interface are investigated using spin-polarised low-energy electron microscopy. We find that graphene-covered cobalt films have surprising magnetic properties. Vectorial imaging of magnetic domains reveals an unusually gradual thickness-dependent spin reorientation transition, in which magnetisation rotates from out-of-the-film plane to the in-plane direction by less than 10° per cobalt monolayer. During this transition, cobalt films have a meandering spin texture, characterised by a complex, three-dimensional, wavy magnetisation pattern. In addition, spectroscopy measurements suggest that the electronic band structure of the unoccupied states is essentially spin-independent already a few electron-Volts above the vacuum level. These properties strikingly differ from those of pristine cobalt films and could open new prospects in surface magnetism.

  13. Effects of cobalt in lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagshaw, N. B.

    The effects of cobalt additions (0.1-1 g/1) to the electrolyte have been studied by anodic corrosion tests on sheets of various alloys, and by continuous charge, cycling and charge retention tests on thick plate automotive-type of batteries. Positive grid corrosion decreases with increase in cobalt concentration but the effect is less marked for alloys with high intrinsic corrosion resistance. Cobalt oxidizes some types of separator even at a relatively low concentration. The top-of-charge voltage is reduced by the presence of cobalt, the effect occurring mainly at the positive plate. Cobalt causes increased open-circuit losses but the effect is fairly small at low concentrations (0.1-0.15 g/1).

  14. Unconventional magnetisation texture in graphene/cobalt hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Vu, A. D.; Coraux, J.; Chen, G.; N’Diaye, A. T.; Schmid, A. K.; Rougemaille, N.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic domain structure and spin-dependent reflectivity measurements on cobalt thin films intercalated at the graphene/Ir(111) interface are investigated using spin-polarised low-energy electron microscopy. We find that graphene-covered cobalt films have surprising magnetic properties. Vectorial imaging of magnetic domains reveals an unusually gradual thickness-dependent spin reorientation transition, in which magnetisation rotates from out-of-the-film plane to the in-plane direction by less than 10° per cobalt monolayer. During this transition, cobalt films have a meandering spin texture, characterised by a complex, three-dimensional, wavy magnetisation pattern. In addition, spectroscopy measurements suggest that the electronic band structure of the unoccupied states is essentially spin-independent already a few electron-Volts above the vacuum level. These properties strikingly differ from those of pristine cobalt films and could open new prospects in surface magnetism. PMID:27114039

  15. Unconventional magnetisation texture in graphene/cobalt hybrids.

    PubMed

    Vu, A D; Coraux, J; Chen, G; N'Diaye, A T; Schmid, A K; Rougemaille, N

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic domain structure and spin-dependent reflectivity measurements on cobalt thin films intercalated at the graphene/Ir(111) interface are investigated using spin-polarised low-energy electron microscopy. We find that graphene-covered cobalt films have surprising magnetic properties. Vectorial imaging of magnetic domains reveals an unusually gradual thickness-dependent spin reorientation transition, in which magnetisation rotates from out-of-the-film plane to the in-plane direction by less than 10° per cobalt monolayer. During this transition, cobalt films have a meandering spin texture, characterised by a complex, three-dimensional, wavy magnetisation pattern. In addition, spectroscopy measurements suggest that the electronic band structure of the unoccupied states is essentially spin-independent already a few electron-Volts above the vacuum level. These properties strikingly differ from those of pristine cobalt films and could open new prospects in surface magnetism. PMID:27114039

  16. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    DOEpatents

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  17. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  18. HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, Linda S.; Perkins, Patrick; Vollhardt, K.Peter C.

    1980-10-01

    In this report we detail the synthesis catalytic chemistry of polystyrene supported {eta}{sup 5} ~cyclopentadienyl- dicarbonyl cobalt, CpCo(CO){sub 2}. This material is active in the hydrogenation of CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain its "homogeneous", mononuclear character during the course of its catalysis, During ·the course of our work 18% and 20% crosslinked analogs of polystyrene supported CpCo(CO){sub 2} were shown to exhibit limited catalytic activity and no CO activation.

  19. Cold-Sprayed Nanostructured Pure Cobalt Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cold-sprayed pure cobalt coatings were deposited on carbon-steel substrate. Submicrometer particles for spraying were produced via cryomilling. Deposits were produced using different processing conditions (gas temperature and pressure, nozzle-to-substrate distance) to evaluate the resulting variations in grain size dimension, microhardness, adhesion strength, and porosity. The coating mechanical properties improved greatly with higher temperature and carrying-gas pressure. The coating microstructure was analyzed as a function of spraying condition by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, revealing many different microstructural features for coatings experiencing low or high strain rates during deposition.

  20. Fischer-Tropsch cobalt catalyst development

    SciTech Connect

    Oukaci, R.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.; Marcelin, G.; Singleton, A.

    1994-12-31

    Based on the information provided in patents assigned to Gulf, Shell, Exxon, and Statoil, a series of catalysts has been prepared consisting of 12-20 wt% cobalt, a second metal promoter (Ru or Re), and an oxide promoter such as lanthana, zirconia, or alkali oxide, the support being alumina, silica, or titania. All catalysts have been extensively characterized by different methods. The catalysts have been evaluated in terms of their activity, selectivity both in a fixed bed reactor and in a slurry bubble column reactor, and the results correlated with their physico-chemical properties.

  1. Electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended inliquid

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongjian; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Yadong; Augustsson, Andreas; Dong, Chungli; Nordgren, Joseph; Chang, Chinglin; Alivisatos, Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Ogletree, D. Frank; Requejo, Felix G.; de Groot, Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-07-16

    The electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended in liquid as a function of size has been investigated using in-situ x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. A sharp absorption peak associated with the ligand molecules is found that increases in intensity upon reducing the nanocrystal size. X-ray Raman features due to d-d and to charge-transfer excitations of ligand molecules are identified. The study reveals the local symmetry of the surface of {var_epsilon}-Co phase nanocrystals, which originates from a dynamic interaction between Co nanocrystals and surfactant + solvent molecules.

  2. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left. PMID:25759629

  3. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  4. Natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer, and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of individuals who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically-defined congenital immunodeficiency of which there are over forty presently known to impair NK cells. The abnormality of NK cells, however, in certain cases represents the majority immunological defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in three different genes that can cause NK cell deficiency as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation. PMID:23993353

  5. Thiamine Deficiency and Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C.; Barker, Narviar C.; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K.

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke’s encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  6. Complete cobalt recovery from lithium cobalt oxide in self-driven microbial fuel cell - Microbial electrolysis cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liping; Yao, Binglin; Wu, Dan; Quan, Xie

    2014-08-01

    Complete cobalt recovery from lithium cobalt oxide requires to firstly leach cobalt from particles LiCoO2 and then recover cobalt from aqueous Co(II). A self-driven microbial fuel cell (MFC)-microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) system can completely carry out these two processes, in which Co(II) is firstly released from particles LiCoO2 on the cathodes of MFCs and then reduced on the cathodes of MECs which are powered by the cobalt leaching MFCs. A cobalt leaching rate of 46 ± 2 mg L-1 h-1 with yield of 1.5 ± 0.1 g Co g-1 COD (MFCs) and a Co(II) reduction rate of 7 ± 0 mg L-1 h-1 with yield of 0.8 ± 0.0 g Co g-1 COD (MECs), as well as a overall system cobalt yield of 0.15 ± 0.01 g Co g-1 Co can be achieved in this self-driven MFC-MEC system. Coulombic efficiencies reach 41 ± 1% (anodic MFCs), 75 ± 0% (anodic MECs), 100 ± 2% (cathodic MFCs), and 29 ± 1% (cathodic MECs) whereas overall system efficiency averages 34 ± 1%. These results provide a new process of linking MFCs to MECs for complete recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries with no external energy consumption.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10202 - Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- [(substituted)azo]-, strontium salt (1:1) (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10202 Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium salt (1:1... identified generically as benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium salt (1:1) (PMN P-08-701) is subject...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5253 - 2-Naphthalenecarboxylic acid, 4,4′-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt. 721.5253 Section 721.5253 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...′-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting...-, strontium salt (PMN P-99-1341; CAS No. 235083-90-6) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5253 - 2-Naphthalenecarboxylic acid, 4,4′-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt. 721.5253 Section 721.5253 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...′-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting...-, strontium salt (PMN P-99-1341; CAS No. 235083-90-6) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5253 - 2-Naphthalenecarboxylic acid, 4,4′-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt. 721.5253 Section 721.5253 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...′-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting...-, strontium salt (PMN P-99-1341; CAS No. 235083-90-6) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10202 - Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- [(substituted)azo]-, strontium salt (1:1) (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10202 Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium salt (1:1... identified generically as benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium salt (1:1) (PMN P-08-701) is subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5253 - 2-Naphthalenecarboxylic acid, 4,4′-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt. 721.5253 Section 721.5253 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...′-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting...-, strontium salt (PMN P-99-1341; CAS No. 235083-90-6) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10202 - Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- [(substituted)azo]-, strontium salt (1:1) (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10202 Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium salt (1:1... identified generically as benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium salt (1:1) (PMN P-08-701) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5253 - 2-Naphthalenecarboxylic acid, 4,4′-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt. 721.5253 Section 721.5253 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...′-methylenebis [3-hydroxy-, strontium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting...-, strontium salt (PMN P-99-1341; CAS No. 235083-90-6) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10202 - Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- [(substituted)azo]-, strontium salt (1:1) (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10202 Benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium salt (1:1... identified generically as benzoic acid, 4-chloro-2- -, strontium salt (1:1) (PMN P-08-701) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10423 - Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... earth doped (generic). 721.10423 Section 721.10423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10423 Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped... substances identified generically as complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (PMNs P-12-22, P-12-23,...

  17. Strontium localization in bone tissue studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Raffalt, Anders Christer; Stahl, Kenny

    2014-02-01

    Strontium has recently been introduced as a pharmacological agent for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. We determined the localization of strontium incorporated into bone matrix from dogs treated with Sr malonate by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A new approach for analyzing the X-ray absorption spectra resulted in a compositional model and allowed the relative distribution of strontium in the different bone components to be estimated. Approximately 35-45% of the strontium present is incorporated into calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA) by substitution of some of the calcium ions occupying highly ordered sites, and at least 30% is located at less ordered sites where only the first solvation shell is resolved, suggesting that strontium is surrounded by only oxygen atoms similar to Sr(2+) in solution. Strontium was furthermore shown to be absorbed in collagen in which it obtains a higher structural order than when present in serum but less order than when it is incorporated into CaHA. The total amount of strontium in the samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the amount of Sr was found to increase with increasing dose levels and treatment periods, whereas the relative distribution of strontium among the different components appears to be independent of treatment period and dose level. PMID:24101232

  18. Determination of variables in the prediction of strontium distribution coefficients for selected sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pace, M.N.; Rosentreter, J.J.; Bartholomay, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    Idaho State University and the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, conducted a study to determine and evaluate strontium distribution coefficients (Kds) of subsurface materials at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Kds were determined to aid in assessing the variability of strontium Kds and their effects on chemical transport of strontium-90 in the Snake River Plain aquifer system. Data from batch experiments done to determine strontium Kds of five sediment-infill samples and six standard reference material samples were analyzed by using multiple linear regression analysis and the stepwise variable-selection method in the statistical program, Statistical Product and Service Solutions, to derive an equation of variables that can be used to predict strontium Kds of sediment-infill samples. The sediment-infill samples were from basalt vesicles and fractures from a selected core at the INEEL; strontium Kds ranged from ???201 to 356 ml g-1. The standard material samples consisted of clay minerals and calcite. The statistical analyses of the batch-experiment results showed that the amount of strontium in the initial solution, the amount of manganese oxide in the sample material, and the amount of potassium in the initial solution are the most important variables in predicting strontium Kds of sediment-infill samples.

  19. Full-Scale and Bench-Scale Studies on the Removal of Strontium from Water (abstract)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Strontium (Sr) is a natural and commonly occurring alkaline earth metal which has an oxidation state of +2 under normal environmental conditions. Stable strontium is suspended in water and is dissolved after water runs through rocks and soil. It behaves very similar to calcium. G...

  20. 10 CFR 35.491 - Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90. 35.491 Section 35.491 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.491 Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require the authorized user of...

  1. 10 CFR 35.491 - Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90. 35.491 Section 35.491 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.491 Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require the authorized user of...

  2. 10 CFR 35.491 - Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90. 35.491 Section 35.491 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.491 Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require the authorized user of...

  3. 10 CFR 35.491 - Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90. 35.491 Section 35.491 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.491 Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require the authorized user of...

  4. 10 CFR 35.491 - Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90. 35.491 Section 35.491 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.491 Training for ophthalmic use of strontium-90. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require the authorized user of...

  5. Strontium isotope signals in cremated petrous portions as indicator for childhood origin.

    PubMed

    Harvig, Lise; Frei, Karin Margarita; Price, T Douglas; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Dental enamel is currently of high informative value in studies concerning childhood origin and human mobility because the strontium isotope ratio in human dental enamel is indicative of geographical origin. However, many prehistoric burials involve cremation and although strontium retains its original biological isotopic composition, even when exposed to very high temperatures, intact dental enamel is rarely preserved in cremated or burned human remains. When preserved, fragments of dental enamel may be difficult to recognize and identify. Finding a substitute material for strontium isotope analysis of burned human remains, reflecting childhood values, is hence of high priority. This is the first study comparing strontium isotope ratios from cremated and non-cremated petrous portions with enamel as indicator for childhood origin. We show how strontium isotope ratios in the otic capsule of the petrous portion of the inner ear are highly correlated with strontium isotope ratios in dental enamel from the same individual, whether inhumed or cremated. This implies that strontium isotope ratios in the petrous bone, which practically always survives cremation, are indicative of childhood origin for human skeletal remains. Hence, the petrous bone is ideal as a substitute material for strontium isotope analysis of burned human remains. PMID:25010496

  6. Strontium Isotope Signals in Cremated Petrous Portions as Indicator for Childhood Origin

    PubMed Central

    Harvig, Lise; Frei, Karin Margarita; Price, T. Douglas; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Dental enamel is currently of high informative value in studies concerning childhood origin and human mobility because the strontium isotope ratio in human dental enamel is indicative of geographical origin. However, many prehistoric burials involve cremation and although strontium retains its original biological isotopic composition, even when exposed to very high temperatures, intact dental enamel is rarely preserved in cremated or burned human remains. When preserved, fragments of dental enamel may be difficult to recognize and identify. Finding a substitute material for strontium isotope analysis of burned human remains, reflecting childhood values, is hence of high priority. This is the first study comparing strontium isotope ratios from cremated and non-cremated petrous portions with enamel as indicator for childhood origin. We show how strontium isotope ratios in the otic capsule of the petrous portion of the inner ear are highly correlated with strontium isotope ratios in dental enamel from the same individual, whether inhumed or cremated. This implies that strontium isotope ratios in the petrous bone, which practically always survives cremation, are indicative of childhood origin for human skeletal remains. Hence, the petrous bone is ideal as a substitute material for strontium isotope analysis of burned human remains. PMID:25010496

  7. Preferential occupancy of strontium in the hydroxyapatite lattice in biphasic mixtures formed from non-stoichiometric calcium apatites.

    PubMed

    Nandha Kumar, P; Mishra, Sandeep K; Udhay Kiran, R; Kannan, S

    2015-05-01

    The present study reports the variations in phase content of biphasic mixtures and structural changes induced by different levels of strontium addition in calcium-deficient apatite (Ca/P = 1.60) powders during heat treatment. The synthesis was attempted by an in situ aqueous precipitation technique and X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Rietveld refinement of the powder X-ray diffraction data were employed for comprehensive analysis. The results confirm the preferential occupancy of Sr(2+) at two different Ca(2+) sites of the hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAP] lattice, with the Ca(2+) (2) site accommodating more Sr(2+) than the Ca(2+) (1) site. Increasing Sr(2+) addition in calcium-deficient apatite has led to a decline in the phase content of β-tricalcium phosphate [β-Ca3(PO4)2, β-TCP] in biphasic mixtures of HAP and β-TCP. Sr(2+) addition exceeding the critical limit of a (Ca + Sr)/P > 1.75 molar ratio has resulted in the formation of CaO as an additional phase, and this justifies the lack of enough PO4(3-) ions to promote any kind of calcium phosphate precipitation. Sr(2+) accommodation in the lattice sites of HAP has induced an increase in the lattice parameters and has also led to the significant distortion of the PO4 tetrahedron and OH groups, confirmed by Raman and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. PMID:25851342

  8. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Irshad, M. I. Mohamed, N. M.; Ahmad, F. Abdullah, M. Z.

    2014-10-24

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl{sub 2}Ðœ‡6H2O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and acidified by dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications.

  9. Cobalt distribution during copper matte smelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, T. S.; Swinbourne, D. R.; Lehner, T.

    2006-04-01

    Many smelter operators subscribe to the “precautionary principle” and wish to understand the behavior of the metals and impurities during smelting, especially how they distribute between product and waste phases and whether these phases lead to environmental, health, or safety issues. In copper smelting, copper and other elements are partitioned between copper matte, iron silicate slag, and possibly the waste gas. Many copper concentrates contain small amounts of cobalt, a metal of considerable value but also of some environmental interest. In this work, the matte/slag distribution ratio (weight percent) of cobalt between copper matte (55 wt pct) and iron silicate slag was thermodynamically modeled and predicted to be approximately 5. Experiments were performed using synthetic matte and slag at 1250 °C under a low oxygen partial pressure and the distribution ratio was found to be 4.3, while between industrial matte and slag, the ratio was found to be 1.8. Both values are acceptably close to each other and to the predicted value, given the errors inherent in such measurements. The implications of these results for increasingly sustainable copper production are discussed.

  10. Cataractogenesis after Cobalt-60 eye plaque radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kleineidam, M.; Augsburger, J.J. ); Hernandez, C.; Glennon, P.; Brady, L.W. )

    1993-07-15

    This study was designed to estimate the actuarial incidence of typical postirradiation cataracts and to identify prognostic factors related to their development in melanoma-containing eyes treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. A special interest was the impact of calculated radiation dose and dose-rate to the lens. The authors evaluated the actuarial occurrence of post-irradiation cataract in 365 patients with primary posterior uveal melanoma treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy between 1976 and 1986. Only 22% (S.E. = 4.6%) of the patients who received a total dose of 6 to 20 Gy at the center of the lens developed a visually significant cataract attributable to the radiation within 5 years after treatment. Using multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, the authors identified thickness of the tumor, location of the tumor's anterior margin relative to the equatorward and the ora serrata, and diameter of the eye plaque used as the best combination of covariables for predicting length of time until development of cataract. Surprisingly, the dose of radiation delivered to the lens, which was strongly correlated to all of these covariables, was not a significant predictive factor in multivariate analysis. The results suggest that success of efforts to decrease the occurrence rate of post-irradiation cataracts by better treatment planning might be limited in patients with posterior uveal melanoma. 21 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Elevated granulocyte strontium in inflammatory arthritides is related to the inflammatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haellgren, R.; Svensson, K.; Johansson, E.; Lindh, U.

    1984-12-01

    Total cellular strontium and calcium were measured by the nuclear microprobe technique. Increased mass fraction of both elements was found in granulocytes isolated from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and other kinds of inflammatory arthritides. Increased granulocyte calcium but only marginally elevated granulocyte strontium was demonstrated in patients with scleroderma. The granulocyte accumulation of strontium and calcium seems to be linked to the degree of inflammatory activity, because the granulocyte content of both elements was positively correlated to the plasma concentration of acute-phase proteins. Corticosteroid therapy induced a marked reduction of granulocyte strontium but a more modest decrease of granulocyte calcium. The serum levels of strontium and calcium were within the normal ranges in all patients and were not significantly altered by corticosteroids. 21 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Effects of strontium-induced stress on marine microalgae Platymonas subcordiformis (Chlorophyta: Volvocales)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; Xie, Xitao; Xue, Renhao; Liu, Zhili

    2006-06-01

    Strontium-induced stress in growth and chlorophyll contents of Platymonas subcordiformis was investigated under laboratory condition. The results showed that strontium exposure had little influences in general on growth and chlorophyll contents of the algae except for very high Sr concentrations. The maximum biosorption capacity of strontium ranged from 69.62 to 269.18 mg Sr2+/g dry weight. The algal biomass exhibited high uptake capacity of strontium. Total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and the content of lipid peroxidation products malondialdehyde (MDA) were significantly different in different treatments. SOD activity reached the highest level at 0.09 mmol/L that was about 55.8% higher than that in the control. The MDA content increased significantly at 0.36 mmol/L, which was 2.15 times higher than that in the control, indicating a state of oxidative stress. With the increase of strontium concentration, the amount of fatty acids decreased.

  13. Color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannorren, D.

    1982-04-01

    Congenital and acquired color vision defects are described in the context of physiological data. Light sources, photometry, color systems and test methods are described. A list of medicines is also presented. The practical social consequences of color vision deficiencies are discussed.

  14. Arginase-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Baron, Garrett; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Arginase-1 (ARG1) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects the liver-based urea cycle, leading to impaired ureagenesis. This genetic disorder is caused by 40+ mutations found fairly uniformly spread throughout the ARG1 gene, resulting in partial or complete loss of enzyme function, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. ARG1-deficient patients exhibit hyperargininemia with spastic paraparesis, progressive neurological and intellectual impairment, persistent growth retardation, and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, a clinical pattern that differs strikingly from other urea cycle disorders. This review briefly highlights the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of ARG1 deficiency derived from clinical case reports and therapeutic strategies stretching over several decades and reports on several exciting new developments regarding the pathophysiology of the disorder using ARG1 global and inducible knockout mouse models. Gene transfer studies in these mice are revealing potential therapeutic options that can be exploited in the future. However, caution is advised in extrapolating results since the lethal disease phenotype in mice is much more severe than in humans indicating that the mouse models may not precisely recapitulate human disease etiology. Finally, some of the functions and implications of ARG1 in non-urea cycle activities are considered. Lingering questions and future areas to be addressed relating to the clinical manifestations of ARG1 deficiency in liver and brain are also presented. Hopefully, this review will spark invigorated research efforts that lead to treatments with better clinical outcomes. PMID:26467175

  15. Determining landscape use of Holocene mammals using strontium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Feranec, Robert S; Hadly, Elizabeth A; Paytan, Adina

    2007-10-01

    The use of the landscape by animals is predicted to be a function of their body size. However, empirical data relating these two variables from an array of body sizes within a single mammalian community are scarce. We tested this prediction by assessing landscape use of mammals by analyzing strontium (Sr) isotope signatures found in mammalian hard tissues representing a 3,000-year record. We examined: (1) the Sr-determined landscape area of small (approximately 100 g), medium (approximately 1,500 g) and large (approximately 100,000 g) mammals, and; (2) whether the area used by these mammals varied during periods of environmental change. Strontium isotope values were obtained from 46 specimens from the Holocene paleontological deposits of Lamar Cave and Waterfall Locality in Wyoming, USA, as well as from 13 modern ungulate specimens from the same area. Our data indicate that medium- and large-sized species use larger percentages of the landscape than do species of small body size. The isotope values for specimens from each of the paleontological sites are similar across all stratigraphic levels, suggesting no change in home range over the last 3,000 years, even though climate is known to have fluctuated at these sites over this time period. Further, our study verifies that the fossil localities represent the local community. Where bedrock geology is appropriate, the use of strontium isotope analyses provides a valuable tool for discerning landscape use by vertebrate communities, an important though generally difficult aspect of an ancient species niche to identify. PMID:17593400

  16. Development of Nondestructive Measuring Technique of Environmental Radioactive Strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiba, Shuntaro; Okamiya, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Saki; Tanuma, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Tatsuru; Murata, Jiro

    The Fukushima first nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the Japanese big earthquake in 2011. The main radioactivity concerned after the accident are I-131 (half-life 8.0 days), Cs-134 (2.1 years) and 137 (30 years), Sr-89 (51 days) and 90 (29 years). We are aiming to establish a new detection technique which enables us to realize quantitative evaluation of the strontium radioactivity by means of nondestructive measurement without chemical separation processing, which is concerned to be included inside foods, environmental water and soil around us, in order to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to the radiation.

  17. P-type conductivity in annealed strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, Violet M.; Corolewski, Caleb D.; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2015-12-17

    In this study, Hall-effect measurements indicate p-type conductivity in bulk, single-crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO3, or STO) samples that were annealed at 1200°C. Room temperature mobilities above 100 cm2/Vs were measured, an order of magnitude higher than those for electrons (5-10 cm2/Vs). Average hole densities were in the 109-1010 cm-3 range, consistent with a deep acceptor.

  18. P-type conductivity in annealed strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, Violet M.; Corolewski, Caleb D.; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2015-12-15

    Hall-effect measurements indicate p-type conductivity in bulk, single-crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}, or STO) samples that were annealed at 1200°C. Room-temperature mobilities above 100 cm{sup 2}/V s were measured, an order of magnitude higher than those for electrons (5-10 cm{sup 2}/V s). Average hole densities were in the 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} range, consistent with a deep acceptor.

  19. Ion-exchange properties of strontium hydroxyapatite under acidic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Nishioka, Hitoshi; Moriga, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Hiromu; Moffat, J.B.

    1998-09-01

    The ion exchange of strontium hydroxyapatite (SrHAp) with Pb{sup 2+} has been investigated under acidic conditions at 293 K. The addition of various acids to the exchanging solution enhanced the exchange capacity in the order HCl > HBr > HF > HNO{sub 3} > no acid, corresponding to the formation of halogen apatites with the former three acids or hydrogen phosphate with HNO{sub 3}. Since the ion-exchange capacity of SrHAp under nonacidic conditions is higher than that of chlorapatite, the aforementioned observations can be attributed to the participation of the protons introduced by the acids.z

  20. Synthesis and thermal properties of strontium and calcium peroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H.; Kraft, Patricia A.

    1989-01-01

    A practical synthesis and a discussion of some chemical properties of pure strontium peroxide and calcium peroxide are presented. The general synthesis of these peroxides involves precipitation of their octahydrates by addition of H2O2 to aqueous ammoniacal Sr(NO3)2 or CaCl2. The octahydrates are converted to the anhydrous peroxides by various dehydration techniques. A new x-ray diffraction powder pattern for CaO2 x 8H2O is given from which lattice parameters a=6.212830 and c=11.0090 were calculated on the basis of the tetragonal crystal system.

  1. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, Lauren M. Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-07

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d{sub 33} piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m{sup −1}. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  2. Strain engineered barium strontium titanate for tunable thin film resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Khassaf, H.; Khakpash, N.; Sun, F.; Sbrockey, N. M.; Tompa, G. S.; Kalkur, T. S.; Alpay, S. P.

    2014-05-19

    Piezoelectric properties of epitaxial (001) barium strontium titanate (BST) films are computed as functions of composition, misfit strain, and temperature using a non-linear thermodynamic model. Results show that through adjusting in-plane strains, a highly adaptive rhombohedral ferroelectric phase can be stabilized at room temperature with outstanding piezoelectric response exceeding those of lead based piezoceramics. Furthermore, by adjusting the composition and the in-plane misfit, an electrically tunable piezoelectric response can be obtained in the paraelectric state. These findings indicate that strain engineered BST films can be utilized in the development of electrically tunable and switchable surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators.

  3. Strontium vanadate nanoribbons: Synthesis, characterization and detection of dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qing; Shao, Mingwang; Chen, Tao; Xu, Hongyan

    2010-09-15

    Large-scale, high-purity and uniform strontium vanadate (Sr{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}) nanoribbons were easily synthesized via a hydrothermal process without any surfactants. The as-prepared products were up to hundreds of micrometers in length, 200-600 nm in width, and 20 nm in thickness. These nanomaterials were employed to modify glassy carbon electrode, which displayed excellent electrochemical sensitivity in detecting dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid. A linear relationship between the concentrations of dopamine and its oxidation peak currents was obtained. The modified electrode exhibited high reproducibility and stability, which might be found potential application in the biosensors.

  4. Bone formation induced by strontium modified calcium phosphate cement in critical-size metaphyseal fracture defects in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Thormann, Ulrich; Ray, Seemun; Sommer, Ursula; Elkhassawna, Thaqif; Rehling, Tanja; Hundgeburth, Marvin; Henß, Anja; Rohnke, Marcus; Janek, Jürgen; Lips, Katrin S; Heiss, Christian; Schlewitz, Gudrun; Szalay, Gabor; Schumacher, Matthias; Gelinsky, Michael; Schnettler, Reinhard; Alt, Volker

    2013-11-01

    The first objective was to investigate new bone formation in a critical-size metaphyseal defect in the femur of ovariectomized rats filled with a strontium modified calcium phosphate cement (SrCPC) compared to calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and empty defects. Second, detection of strontium release from the materials as well as calcium and collagen mass distribution in the fracture defect should be targeted by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). 45 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three different treatment groups: (1) SrCPC (n = 15), (2) CPC (n = 15), and (3) empty defect (n = 15). Bilateral ovariectomy was performed and three months after multi-deficient diet, the left femur of all animals underwent a 4 mm wedge-shaped metaphyseal osteotomy that was internally fixed with a T-shaped plate. The defect was then either filled with SrCPC or CPC or was left empty. After 6 weeks, histomorphometric analysis showed a statistically significant increase in bone formation of SrCPC compared to CPC (p = 0.005) and the empty defect (p = 0.002) in the former fracture defect zone. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher bone formation at the tissue-implant interface in the SrCPC group compared to the CPC group (p < 0.0001). These data were confirmed by immunohistochemistry revealing an increase in bone-morphogenic protein 2, osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin expression and a statistically significant higher gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen10a1 and osteocalcin in the SrCPC group compared to CPC. TOF-SIMS analysis showed a high release of Sr from the SrCPC into the interface region in this area compared to CPC suggesting that improved bone formation is attributable to the released Sr from the SrCPC. PMID:23906515

  5. High doses of cobalt induce optic and auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona; Zaghini, Anna; Mariotti, Andrea; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Vielmi, Valentina; Semeraro, Francesco; Duse, Sarah; Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Padovani, Alessandro; Rizzetti, Maria Cristina; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-09-01

    The adverse biological effects of continuous exposure to cobalt and chromium have been well defined. In the past, this toxicity was largely an industrial issue concerning workers exposed in occupational setting. Nevertheless, recent reports have described a specific toxicity mediated by the high levels of cobalt and chromium released by metallic prostheses, particularly in patients who had received hip implants. Clinical symptoms, including blindness, deafness and peripheral neuropathy, suggest a specific neurotropism. However, little is known about the neuropathological basis of this process, and experimental evidence is still lacking. We have investigated this issue in an experimental setting using New Zealand White rabbits treated with repeated intravenous injections of cobalt and chromium, alone or in combination. No evident clinical or pathological alterations were associated after chromium administration alone, despite its high levels in blood and tissue while cobalt-chromium and cobalt-treated rabbits showed clinical signs indicative of auditory and optic system toxicity. On histopathological examination, the animals showed severe retinal and cochlear ganglion cell depletion along with optic nerve damage and loss of sensory cochlear hair cells. Interestingly, the severity of the alterations was related to dosages and time of exposure. These data confirmed our previous observation of severe auditory and optic nerve toxicity in patients exposed to an abnormal release of cobalt and chromium from damaged hip prostheses. Moreover, we have identified the major element mediating neurotoxicity to be cobalt, although the molecular mechanisms mediating this toxicity still have to be defined. PMID:23069009

  6. Genetics Home Reference: biotinidase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aydin HI, Sennaroğlu L, Belgin E, Jensen K, Wolf B. Hearing loss in biotinidase deficiency: genotype-phenotype ... corrected to Aydin, Halil Ibrahim]. Citation on PubMed Wolf B. Biotinidase deficiency: "if you have to have ...

  7. Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... takes longer than normal to clot in a test tube. Factor XII deficiency is a rare inherited disorder. Symptoms There are usually no symptoms. Exams and Tests Factor XII deficiency is most often found when ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: pseudocholinesterase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is a condition that results in increased sensitivity to certain muscle relaxant drugs used during general ... People with pseudocholinesterase deficiency may also have increased sensitivity to certain other drugs, including the local anesthetic ...

  9. Strontium ranelate promotes osteoblastic cell replication through at least two different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Caverzasio, Joseph

    2008-06-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in osteoblastic cell replication induced by strontium ranelate are presently under investigation. The calcium-sensing receptor is a suggested target but other potential mechanisms have not been investigated. Signaling pathways involved in strontium ranelate-induced replication were investigated in preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and pluripotent mesenchymal C3H10T1/2 cells. Strontium ranelate effects were compared with those of calcium chloride as Ca(2+). In MC3T3-E1 cells, strontium ranelate but not CaCl(2) dose-dependently increased cell number whereas similar effects were observed for both cations in C3H10T1/2 cells. Immunoblot analysis indicated that activation of ERK, PKC and PKD by strontium ranelate in MC3T3-E1 cells was delayed compared with CaCl(2). Indeed, onset of signaling by strontium ranelate was detected after one or several hours whereas CaCl(2) had a maximal effect already after 5 min exposure. In C3H10T1/2 cells, strontium ranelate induced two types of signaling, a rapid effect and a delayed response. In addition to activation of ERK, PKC and PKD, strontium ranelate and CaCl(2) also transiently activated p38 in C3H10T1/2 cells. Functional analysis with specific inhibitors indicated that cell replication induced by strontium ranelate involves a PKC/PKD pathway in MC3T3-E1 cells and p38 in C3H10T1/2 cells. In both cell types, inhibition of the ERK pathway decreased basal cell replication but not the strontium ranelate response. In conclusion, strontium ranelate increases the replication of cells of the osteoblastic lineage by two distinct cellular mechanisms. Strontium ranelate may directly interact with the CaSR and trigger mitogenic signals such as p38 in C3H10T1/2 cells. The delayed activation of several signaling pathways in both cell lines, however, suggests the release of an autocrine growth factor by strontium ranelate that represents another potential mechanism for inducing osteoblastic cell replication

  10. Reoxidation and deactivation of supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Schanke, D.; Hilmen, A.M.; Bergene, E.

    1995-12-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is an attractive possibility for conversion of natural gas into high quality liquid fuels. Due to its low water-gas shift activity, good activity/selectivity properties and relatively low price, cobalt is the choice of catalytic metal for natural gas conversion via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. In the cobalt-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch reaction, oxygen is mainly rejected as water. In this paper we describe the influence of water on supported cobalt catalysts. The deactivation of supported Co catalysts was studied in a fixed-bed reactor using synthesis gas feeds containing varying concentrations of water vapour.

  11. Magnetoelastic coupling in epitaxial cobalt ferrite/barium titanate heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Joachim; Welke, Martin; Bern, Francis; Ziese, Michael; Denecke, Reinhard

    2013-08-01

    Ultra-thin cobalt ferrite films have been synthesised on ferroelectric barium titanate crystals. The cobalt ferrite films exhibit a magnetic response to strain induced by structural changes in the barium titanate substrate, suggesting a pathway to multiferroic coupling. These structural changes are achieved by heating through the phase transition temperatures of barium titanate. In addition the ferromagnetic signal of the substrate itself is taken into account, addressing the influence of impurities or defects in the substrate. The cobalt ferrite/barium titanate heterostructure is a suitable oxidic platform for future magnetoelectric applications with an established ferroelectric substrate and widely tuneable magnetic properties by changing the transition metal in the ferrite film.

  12. Dissolved strontium in the subterranean estuary - Implications for the marine strontium isotope budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Aaron J.; Charette, Matthew A.; Cochran, J. Kirk; Gonneea, Meagan E.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard

    2013-09-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to the ocean supplies Sr with less radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr than seawater, and thus constitutes an important term in the Sr isotope budget of the modern ocean. However, few data exist for Sr in coastal groundwater or in the geochemically dynamic subterranean estuary (STE). We examined Sr concentrations and isotope ratios from nine globally-distributed coastal sites and characterized the behavior of Sr in the STE. Dissolved Sr generally mixed conservatively in the STE, although large differences were observed in the meteoric groundwater end-member Sr concentrations among sites (0.1-24 μM Sr). Strontium isotope exchange was observed in the STE at five of the sites studied, and invariably favored the meteoric groundwater end-member signature. Most of the observed isotope exchange occurred in the salinity range 5-15, and reached up to 40% exchange at salinity 10. Differences in fresh groundwater Sr concentrations and isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr = 0.707-0.710) reflected aquifer lithology. The SGD end-member 87Sr/86Sr must be lower than modern seawater (i.e., less than 0.70916) in part because groundwater Sr concentrations are orders of magnitude higher in less-radiogenic carbonate and volcanic island aquifers. A simple lithological model and groundwater Sr data compiled from the literature were used to estimate a global average groundwater end-member of 2.9 μM Sr with 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7089. This represents a meteoric-SGD-driven Sr input to the ocean of 0.7-2.8 × 1010 mol Sr y-1. Meteoric SGD therefore accounts for 2-8% of the oceanic Sr isotope budget, comparable to other known source terms, but is insufficient to balance the remainder of the budget. Using reported estimates for brackish SGD, the estimated volume discharge at salinity 10 (7-11 × 1015 L y-1) was used to evaluate the impact of isotope exchange in the STE on the brackish SGD Sr flux. A moderate estimate of 25% isotope exchange in the STE gives an SGD Sr end-member 87Sr/86Sr

  13. Transient partial growth hormone deficiency due to zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Aihara, K; Fujie, A; Kihara, M

    1989-04-01

    We present here a 13-year-old boy with partial growth hormone deficiency due to chronic mild zinc deficiency. When zinc administration was started, his growth rate, growth hormone levels, and plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly. His poor dietary intake resulted in chronic mild zinc deficiency, which in turn could be the cause of a further loss of appetite and growth retardation. There was also a possibility of renal zinc wasting which may have contributed to zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency should be carefully ruled out in patients with growth retardation. PMID:2708733

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G6PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Gallagher PG. Hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Janz ...

  15. Strontium-89 therapy: measurement of absorbed dose to skeletal metastases.

    PubMed

    Blake, G M; Zivanovic, M A; Blaquiere, R M; Fine, D R; McEwan, A J; Ackery, D M

    1988-04-01

    We report measurements of absorbed dose to vertebral metastases in ten patients referred for 89Sr therapy for disseminated prostatic carcinoma. Patients received a tracer dose of 85Sr at the time of 89Sr treatment and metastatic strontium retention was monitored scintigraphically for 6 mo. Metastatic 85Sr activity corrected for tissue attenuation was measured using the conjugate view principle, with special care taken to eliminate errors due to the selection of the metastatic region of interest. Metastatic volume was determined from high resolution CT images, and density inferred from Hounsfield number using the QCT bone mineral calibration of Genant and Cann. The mean absorbed dose was 850 rad/mCi (23 cGy/MBq) with a range from 220-2260 rad/mCi (6 to 61 cGy/MBq). The wide range found was consistent with the variation expected to arise due to differences in strontium renal plasma clearance (range 0.1-11.81/day) and extent of skeletal metastatic disease (varying from two small metastases to a superscan on [99mTc]MDP images) among the patients studied. PMID:3351609

  16. Determination of Strontium-90 in urine by extraction without ashing

    SciTech Connect

    Scasnar, V.

    1984-03-01

    Urine is a complex matrix. Any analytical separation that attempts to isolate an almost insignificant mass of material from urine must be capable of overcoming the high variability of sample composition. The urine is usually ashed to destroy all organic constituents to reduce the complexity of the sample. This step is time- and labor-consuming. In the method proposed no ashing of urine sample is necessary. Accordingly, radiostrontium can be directly extracted from urine after cesium has been extracted, when a proper amount of PEG 300 is added. This paper demonstrates that PEG strongly increases the extraction of microamounts of strontium into nitrobenzene, when the univalent hydrophobic anion of dicarbolide-H/sup +/ was used. The magnitude of the synergistic effect > 10/sup 3/ creates good conditions for the extraction of strontium after previous extraction of cesium. Since both radionuclides are most significant components of fission mixture and the extraction of other fission and activated radionuclides using dicarbolide-H/sup +/ appears to be low, the conditions for a selective and quantitative separation of radiostrontium from contaminated urine were investigated in this work. Dicarbolide-H/sup +/ with high stability constant of its complex anion, fully dissociated and stable also in a high acidic media, together with PEG of mean relative molecular mass 300 was used for this purpose.

  17. Seawater strontium isotopes at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdougall, J. D.; Martin, E.

    1988-01-01

    Anomalously high values of Seawater Sr-87/Sr-86 near the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary have been reported. However, few of the data from the literature are from a single continuous section, and perhaps the most complete study of the boundary region, from a shallow marine limestone sequence in Alabama, showed elevated Sr-87/Sr-86 but no pronounced spike. Thus, in order to investigate the cause of the change in strontium isotopic composition, it is important to determine the exact nature and magnitude of the increase by studying in detail continuous sections through the boundary. If there is indeed a Sr isotope spike at the K-T boundary, it requires the addition of a large amount of radiogenic Sr to the oceans over a short time period, a phenomenon that may be linked to other large-scale environmental disturbances which occurred at that time. In order to address this question, a high-resolution strontium isotope study of foraminifera from three Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores which recovered the K-T boundary section: Site 356 in the South Atlantic, Site 384 in the North Atlantic and Site 577 from the Shatsky Rise in the Pacific was initiated. The isotope measurements are being made on either single or small numbers of forams carefully picked and identified and in most cases examined by SEM before analysis. Because this work is not yet complete, conclusions drawn here must be viewed as tentative. They are briefly discussed.

  18. Strontium isotope evidence for landscape use by early hominins.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Sandi R; Sponheimer, Matt; de Ruiter, Darryl J; Lee-Thorp, Julia A; Codron, Daryl; le Roux, Petrus J; Grimes, Vaughan; Richards, Michael P

    2011-06-01

    Ranging and residence patterns among early hominins have been indirectly inferred from morphology, stone-tool sourcing, referential models and phylogenetic models. However, the highly uncertain nature of such reconstructions limits our understanding of early hominin ecology, biology, social structure and evolution. We investigated landscape use in Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus from the Sterkfontein and Swartkrans cave sites in South Africa using strontium isotope analysis, a method that can help to identify the geological substrate on which an animal lived during tooth mineralization. Here we show that a higher proportion of small hominins than large hominins had non-local strontium isotope compositions. Given the relatively high levels of sexual dimorphism in early hominins, the smaller teeth are likely to represent female individuals, thus indicating that females were more likely than males to disperse from their natal groups. This is similar to the dispersal pattern found in chimpanzees, bonobos and many human groups, but dissimilar from that of most gorillas and other primates. The small proportion of demonstrably non-local large hominin individuals could indicate that male australopiths had relatively small home ranges, or that they preferred dolomitic landscapes. PMID:21637256

  19. Tuning the physical properties in strontium iridate heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, John; Meyer, Tricia; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-03-01

    Strontium iridate (Srn+1IrnO3n+1) has received lots of attention recently for its potential to reveal novel physical phenomena due to strong spin-orbital coupling with an interaction energy comparable to that of the on-site Coulomb interaction and crystal field splitting. The coexistence of fundamental interactions has created an exotic Jeff = 1/2 antiferromagnetic insulating ground state in Sr2IrO4. In particular, it is known that this system can be driven into a metallic state with the simultaneous increase in dimensionality (n) and strain. We have investigated the effects of electron confinement by interfacing strontium iridates with other perovskite oxides. We have synthesized thin film heterostructures, SrIrO3/AMO3 (A = Sr, La; B = Ti, Mn, Rh), layer-by-layer with pulsed laser deposition equipped with reflection high-energy electron diffraction. Based on investigations with x-ray diffraction, dc transport, SQUID magnetometry, and various spectroscopic measurements, we will present that the physical properties of the heterostructures are strongly dependent on spatial confinement and epitaxial strain. *This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division.

  20. Characterization of Filters Loaded With Reactor Strontium Carbonate - 13203

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Walter S.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2013-07-01

    A collection of three highly radioactive filters containing reactor strontium carbonate were being prepared for disposal. All three filters were approximately characterized at the time of manufacture by gravimetric methods. The first filter had been partially emptied, and the quantity of residual activity was uncertain. Dose rate to activity modeling using the Monte-Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code was selected to confirm the gravimetric characterization of the full filters, and to fully characterize the partially emptied filter. Although dose rate to activity modeling using MCNP is a common technique, it is not often used for Bremsstrahlung-dominant materials such as reactor strontium. As a result, different MCNP modeling options were compared to determine the optimum approach. This comparison indicated that the accuracy of the results were heavily dependent on the MCNP modeling details and the location of the dose rate measurement point. The optimum model utilized a photon spectrum generated by the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation and Depletion (ORIGEN) code and dose rates measured at 30 cm. Results from the optimum model agreed with the gravimetric estimates within 15%. It was demonstrated that dose rate to activity modeling can be successful for Bremsstrahlung-dominant radioactive materials. However, the degree of success is heavily dependent on the choice of modeling techniques. (authors)

  1. Sub-monolayer Strontium Phase Diagram on Silicon (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, James; Garrity, Kevin; Walker, Fred; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Ahn, C. H.

    2008-03-01

    Crystalline oxides manifest a number of important phenomena, including magnetism, ferroelectricity, superconductivity, and colossal magnetoresistance. Recently, it has become possible to integrate these materials onto a silicon platform in a fully epitaxial structure. These crystalline oxide-silicon heterostructures bring the promise of integrating the rich functionality present in crystalline oxides with modern silicon device technology. The most successful fully epitaxial oxide-silicon (100) heterostructures have been achieved through a deposition recipe that involves manipulating substrate temperature and oxygen pressure on a layer by layer basis during the deposition of an alkaline earth metal. Motivated by a desire to develop a fundamental understanding of this important transition layer between silicon and oxide, we have mapped out the phase diagram of strontium on silicon as a function of temperature and coverage. In particular, recent work on sub-monolayer strontium deposition on the silicon surface suggests the conventional picture of this structure, upon which the entire crystalline oxides on silicon framework is built, is only a low-temperature phase which plays no role in enabling epitaxial oxide growth. Instead, there is strong evidence that a different high temperature phase is the crucial template for epitaxial oxide growth on silicon.

  2. Strontium leachability of hydrofracture grouts for sludge-slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.T.; McDaniel, E.W.; Moore, J.G.; Devaney, H.E.; Dole, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    A series of experiments to determine the strontium leachability of cement-based sludge-slurry hydrofracture grouts is summarized. The hydrofracture process has been used at ORNL since 1966 for the routine disposal of intermediate-level waste (ILW) solutions. In this process, cement and other additives are mixed with a waste stream to form grout, which is then injected into a shale bed at a pressure sufficient to cause fracturing along the horizontal bedding planes. This injected grout soon hardens, fixing the radionuclides between layers of the massive Conasauga shale formation. Modified IAEA dynamic leach tests on hydrofracture grout specimens showed improved leach resistance (by a factor of 3 to 5) as the curing time increased from 28 d to 91 d. A weak trend toward lower leachability with increased amounts of dry solids was observed. The moving boundary-plus-diffusion leach model fits the dynamic leach data successfully in most cases. An apparent diffusion coefficient of 5 x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 2//s and a moving boundary coefficient of 1 x 10/sup -7/ s/sup -1/ were obtained when one of the best grout compositions was leached in distilled water. Assuming that vertical fractures produce the leachable surfaces in a grout sheet, the release rate of strontium calculated with these coefficients is well below the NRC maximum of 10/sup -5/ fraction per year.

  3. Strontium modified biocements with zero order release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hamdan Alkhraisat, Mohammad; Moseke, Claus; Blanco, Luis; Barralet, Jake E; Lopez-Carbacos, Enrique; Gbureck, Uwe

    2008-12-01

    Strontium-substituted beta-TCP with the general formula Ca((3-x))Sr(x)(PO(4))(2) (0strontium substitution in the setting products but surprisingly it also favoured the formation of monetite (CaHPO(4)) as setting product, whereas Sr-free cements set to brushite (CaHPO(4).2H(2)O). Release experiments under dynamic conditions for up to 15 days revealed the release of Sr(2+) ions at dose ranges of 12-30 ppm with zero order release kinetic. Cement cytocompatibility was investigated by culturing human osteoblast cell line hFOB1.19 on cement surfaces whereas Sr-containing cements were as good as Sr-free cements in providing a template for cell growth and function. PMID:18804862

  4. Multichannel quantum defect theory of strontium bound Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaillant, C. L.; Jones, M. P. A.; Potvliege, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    Using the reactance matrix approach, we systematically develop new multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) models for the singlet and triplet S, P, D and F states of strontium below the first ionization limit, based on improved energy level measurements. The new models reveal additional insights into the character of doubly excited perturber states, and the improved energy level measurements for certain series allow fine structure to be resolved for those series’ perturbers. Comparison between the predictions of the new models and those of previous empirical and ab initio studies reveals good agreement with most series; however, some discrepancies are highlighted. Using the MQDT wave functions derived from our models we calculate other observables such as Landé {{g}J}-factors and radiative lifetimes. The analysis reveals the impact of perturbers on the Rydberg state properties of divalent atoms, highlighting the importance of including two-electron effects in the calculations of these properties. The work enables future investigations of properties such as Stark maps and long-range interactions of Rydberg states of strontium.

  5. Oxygen Evolution Electrocatalysis on Cobalt Oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Norskov, Jens K.; García-Mota, Monica; Bell, Alexis T.

    2012-02-01

    The oxidation of water for hydrogen production using sunlight is of high importance to photo-fuel cell research. The electrochemical approach via heterogeneous catalysis to water splitting is a very promising route. The key challenge of this method lies in reduction of the loses, i.e., over-potential, for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on the anode. In this work, we investigate the dependence of theoretical over-potential of OER on type of anode by applying standard density functional theory (DFT). We attempt to explain recent experimental observation of enhanced activity on gold supported Cobalt Oxide surfaces [1]. We explore variety of possible CoO structures and associated surfaces which could emerge under operating conditions of catalyst. Finally, we also explore the influence of environment and admixtures of CoO with other elements. [4pt] [1] B.S. Yeo, A.T. Bell, AT, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 5587-5593 (2011).

  6. Aqua-bromidobis(dimethyl-glyoximato)cobalt(III).

    PubMed

    Meera, Parthasarathy; Amutha Selvi, Madhavan; Jothi, Pachaimuthu; Dayalan, Arunachalam

    2011-04-01

    In the title complex, [CoBr(C(4)H(7)N(2)O(2))(2)(H(2)O)], a crystallo-graphic mirror plane bis-ects the mol-ecule, perpendicular to the glyoximate ligands. The geometry around the cobalt(III) atom is approximately octa-hedral with the four glyoximate N atoms forming the square base. A bromide ion and the O atom of a water mol-ecule occupy the remaining coordination sites. The N-Co-N bite angles are 82.18 (4) and 80.03 (16)°. The glyoximate moieties form strong intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The coordinated water mol-ecule forms an inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond with a glyoximate O atom, thereby generating supra-molecular chains parallel to [010]. PMID:21753964

  7. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) is a severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism first described in 1978. It is characterized by a neonatal presentation of intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, microcephaly with brain atrophy and coarse facial features. MoCD results in deficiency of the molybdenum cofactor dependent enzymes sulfite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. The resultant accumulation of sulfite, taurine, S-sulfocysteine and thiosulfate contributes to the severe neurological impairment. Recently, initial evidence has demonstrated early treatment with cyclic PMP can turn MoCD type A from a previously neonatal lethal condition with only palliative options, to near normal neurological outcomes in affected patients. We review MoCD and focus on describing the currently published evidence of this exciting new therapeutic option for MoCD type A caused by pathogenic variants in MOCD1. PMID:26653176

  8. Role of Surface Cobalt Silicate in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis from Silica-Supported Cobalt Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Wang, X; Derrouiche, S; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    A silica-supported cobalt catalyst has been developed via incipient wetness impregnation for high-yield synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Co/SiO{sub 2}-impregnated catalysts have not been observed to be efficient for SWNT synthesis. Using an appropriately chosen precursor, we show that effective catalysts can be obtained for SWNT synthesis with yields up to 75 wt %. Detailed characterization indicates that the active sites for SWNT synthesis are small cobalt particles resulting from the reduction of a highly dispersed surface cobalt silicate species. The SWNTs produced by this catalyst are of high quality and easy to purify, and the process is simple and scalable.

  9. Urinary strontium and the risk of breast cancer: A case-control study in Guangzhou, China

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Li-Juan; Tang, Lu-Ying; He, Jian-Rong; Su, Yi; Cen, Yu-Ling; Yu, Dan-Dan; Wu, Bang-Hua; Lin, Ying; Chen, Wei-Qing; Song, Er-Wei; Ren, Ze-Fang

    2012-01-15

    Strontium has been widely used in industries like electronic and pharmacy. It has a carcinogenic potential, however, and no study has been conducted to evaluate its effects on cancer risk. The aim of this study was to explore the possible association between strontium and breast cancer risk in a case-control study including 240 incident invasive breast cancer patients and 246 age-matched controls. We measured the urinary concentrations of strontium by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and conducted face-to-face interviews to obtain information on potential breast cancer risk factors. Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the association. Creatinine-adjusted levels [median (25th, 75th) {mu}g/g] of strontium were 155.59 (99.05, 230.70) in the breast cancer patients and 119.62 (81.97, 163.76) in the controls. Women in the highest tertile of strontium showed 124% increased risk of breast cancer, when compared with those in the lowest tertile after adjustment for the potential risk factors [OR (95% CI): 2.24 (1.42-3.81)]. This association was particularly strong for HER2 positive breast cancer [OR (95% CI): 10.92 (3.53-33.77)], and only occurred among premenopausal women. These results suggest a potential role of strontium in the development of breast cancer and urge further studies on the environmental contamination and the physiological and pathological mechanisms of strontium.

  10. Urinary strontium and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Juan; Tang, Lu-Ying; He, Jian-Rong; Su, Yi; Cen, Yu-Ling; Yu, Dan-Dan; Wu, Bang-Hua; Lin, Ying; Chen, Wei-Qing; Song, Er-Wei; Ren, Ze-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Strontium has been widely used in industries like electronic and pharmacy. It has a carcinogenic potential, however, and no study has been conducted to evaluate its effects on cancer risk. The aim of this study was to explore the possible association between strontium and breast cancer risk in a case-control study including 240 incident invasive breast cancer patients and 246 age-matched controls. We measured the urinary concentrations of strontium by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and conducted face-to-face interviews to obtain information on potential breast cancer risk factors. Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the association. Creatinine-adjusted levels [median (25th, 75th) μg/g] of strontium were 155.59 (99.05, 230.70) in the breast cancer patients and 119.62 (81.97, 163.76) in the controls. Women in the highest tertile of strontium showed 124% increased risk of breast cancer, when compared with those in the lowest tertile after adjustment for the potential risk factors [OR (95% CI): 2.24 (1.42-3.81)]. This association was particularly strong for HER2 positive breast cancer [OR (95% CI): 10.92 (3.53-33.77)], and only occurred among premenopausal women. These results suggest a potential role of strontium in the development of breast cancer and urge further studies on the environmental contamination and the physiological and pathological mechanisms of strontium. PMID:22172139

  11. REVIEW OF ACTINIDE AND STRONTIUM LOADING DATA FOR MST AND MMST

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Hobbs, D.; Fink, S.

    2010-10-20

    SRNL reviewed the relevant data from MST and mMST fissile loading studies to determine if further studies were required. With respect to MST, SRNL found that the published results adequately bound the expected conditions that Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process will operate under. The lack of strontium data does not represent an issue as strontium is not relevant to criticality. There is no threat to criticality safety from the lack of strontium loading data. However, SRNL proposes a single test with MST to ensure that future SCIX operations are conservatively bounded and strontium maximum loading is understood. With respect to attempts to maximally load mMST, SRNL's knowledge on actinide and strontium loading is limited to uranium behavior. mMST has a very weak affinity for uranium, and even extended contact time at high uranium concentration shows minimal loading onto mMST. This leaves questions about the ability to load plutonium, neptunium and strontium. SRNL proposes to perform two tests with mMST to ensure that questions on plutonium, neptunium, and strontium sorption are answered, as well as ensuring that future mMST operations are conservatively bounded.

  12. Hydrologic inferences from strontium isotopes in pore water from the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.D.; Futa, K.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1997-12-31

    Calcite is ubiquitous at Yucca Mountain, occurring in the soils and as fracture and cavity coatings within the volcanic tuff section. Strontium is a trace element in calcite, generally at the tens to hundreds of ppm level. Because calcite contains very little rubidium and the half-life of the {sup 87}Rb parent is billions of years, the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of the calcite record the ratio in the water from which the calcite precipitated. Dissolution and reprecipitation does not alter these compositions so that, in the absence of other sources of strontium, one would expect the strontium ratios along a flow path to preserve variations inherited from strontium in the soil zone. Strontium isotope compositions of calcites from various settings in the Yucca Mountain region have contributed to the understanding of the unsaturated zone (UZ), especially in distinguishing unsaturated zone calcite from saturated zone calcite. Different populations of calcite have been compared, either to group them together or distinguish them from each other in terms of their strontium isotope compositions. Ground water and perched water have also been analyzed; this paper presents strontium isotope data obtained on pore water.

  13. Strontium isotope geochemistry of soil and playa deposits near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.D.; Mahan, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    The isotopic composition of strontium contained in the carbonate fractions of soils provides an excellent tracer which can be used to test models for their origin. This paper reports data on surface coatings and cements, eolian sediments, playas and alluvial fan soils which help to constrain a model for formation of the extensive calcretes and fault infilling in the Yucca Mountain region. The playas contain carbonate with a wide range of strontium compositions; further work will be required to fully understand their possible contributions to the pedogenic carbonate system. Soils from an alluvial fan to the west of Yucca Mountain show that only small amounts of strontium are derived from weathering of silicate detritus. However, calcretes from a fan draining a carbonate terrane have strontium compositions dominated locally by the limestone strontium component. Although much evidence points to an eolian source for at least some of the strontium in the pedogenic carbonates near Yucca Mountain, an additional component or past variation of strontium composition in the eolian source is required to model the pedogenic carbonate system.

  14. Studies on gel-grown pure and strontium-modified lanthanum tartrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdous, A.; Quasim, I.; Ahmad, M. M.; Kotru, P. N.

    2009-07-01

    Crystals of pure and strontium-modified lanthanum tartrate bearing composition (La) 1-x(Sr) xC 4H 4O 6· nH 2O (where x=0, 0.04, 0.10, 0.15; n=5,5,6,8) were obtained using gel method. The materials were studied using CH analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, FTIR, EDAX and thermoanalytical techniques. X-ray powder diffraction results analyzed by using suitable software suggest that while unmodified lanthanum tartrate has a monoclinic structure with the space group P 21, the entry of strontium into its lattice changes the system to orthorhombic with the space group P 2121. The unit cell volume is observed to decrease with increase in the concentration of strontium in lanthanum tartrate. Thermal analysis suggests that pure lanthanum tartrate starts decomposing at 41.31 °C whereas the strontium-modified lanthanum tartrate brings about better thermal stability which increases with an increase in strontium concentration. The percentage weight loss calculations from the thermogram supplemented by EDAX, CH analysis and FTIR spectroscopy suggest that both unmodified and strontium-modified lanthanum tartrate spherulitic crystals contain water of hydration; the amount of water of hydration being different for crystals with different content of strontium.

  15. Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Erin K; Colman, Roberta F; Patterson, David

    2006-01-01

    Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency is a disease of purine metabolism which affects patients both biochemically and behaviorally. The symptoms are variable and include psychomotor retardation, autistic features, hypotonia, and seizures. Patients also accumulate the substrates of ADSL in body fluids. Both the presence of normal levels of ADSL enzyme activities in some patient tissues and the absence of a clear correlation between mutations, biochemistry, and behavior show that the system has unexplored biochemical and/or genetic complexity. It is unclear whether the pathological mechanisms of this disease result from a deficiency of purines, a toxicity of intermediates, or perturbation of another pathway or system. A patient with autistic features and mild psychomotor delay carries two novel mutations in this gene, E80D and D87E. The creation of a mouse model of this disease will be an important step in elucidating the in vivo mechanisms of the disease. Mice carrying mutations that cause ADSL deficiency in humans will be informative as to the effects of these mutations both during embryogenesis and on the brain, possibly leading to therapies for this disease in the future. PMID:16839792

  16. Primary antibody deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wood, P

    2009-03-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are a group of rare disorders characterized by an inability to produce clinically effective immunoglobulin responses. Some of these disorders result from genetic mutations in genes involved in B cell development, whereas others appear to be complex polygenic disorders. They most commonly present with recurrent infections due to encapsulated bacteria, although in the most common antibody deficiency, Common Variable Immunodeficiency, systemic and organ-specific autoimmunity can be a presenting feature. Diagnostic delay in this group of disorders remains a problem, and the laboratory has a vital role in the detection of abnormalities in immunoglobulin concentration and function. It is critical to distinguish this group of disorders from secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinaemia, in particular lymphoid malignancy, and appropriate laboratory investigations are of critical importance. Treatment of primary antibody deficiencies involves immunoglobulin replacement therapy, either via the intravenous or subcutaneous route. Patients remain at risk of a wide variety of complications, not all linked to diagnostic delay and inadequate therapy. In common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) in particular, patients remain at significantly increased risk of lymphoid malignancy, and regular clinical and laboratory monitoring is required. This review aims to give an overview of these conditions for the general reader, covering pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory investigation, therapy and clinical management. PMID:19151170

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  18. Reaction of cobalt in SO2 atmospheric at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Worrell, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction rate of cobalt in SO2 argon environments was measured at 650 C, 700 C, 750 C and 800 C. Product scales consist primarily of an interconnected sulfide phase in an oxide matrix. At 700 C to 800 C a thin sulfide layer adjacent to the metal is also observed. At all temperatures, the rapid diffusion of cobalt outward through the interconnected sulfide appears to be important. At 650 C, the reaction rate slows dramatically after five minutes due to a change in the distribution of these sulfides. At 700 C and 750 C the reaction is primarily diffusion controlled values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from this work show favorable agreement with values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from previous sulfidation work. At 800 C, a surface step becomes rate limiting.

  19. The Study of a Cobalt Complex--A Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehlin, James H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an 8-week project involving the synthesis of cobalt compounds. Once synthesized, compounds are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. Background information, laboratory procedures, and results/discussion are provided for three project experiments. (Author/JN)

  20. Cobalt Oxide Hollow Nanoparticles Derived by Bio-Templating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Choi, Sang H.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; King, Glen C.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    We present here the first fabrication of hollow cobalt oxide nanoparticles produced by a protein-regulated site-specific reconstitution process in aqueous solution and describe the metal growth mechanism in the ferritin interior.