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Sample records for define distinct roles

  1. Axon degeneration: context defines distinct pathways.

    PubMed

    Geden, Matthew J; Deshmukh, Mohanish

    2016-08-01

    Axon degeneration is an essential part of development, plasticity, and injury response and has been primarily studied in mammalian models in three contexts: 1) Axotomy-induced Wallerian degeneration, 2) Apoptosis-induced axon degeneration (axon apoptosis), and 3) Axon pruning. These three contexts dictate engagement of distinct pathways for axon degeneration. Recent advances have identified the importance of SARM1, NMNATs, NAD+ depletion, and MAPK signaling in axotomy-induced Wallerian degeneration. Interestingly, apoptosis-induced axon degeneration and axon pruning have many shared mechanisms both in signaling (e.g. DLK, JNKs, GSK3α/β) and execution (e.g. Puma, Bax, caspase-9, caspase-3). However, the specific mechanisms by which caspases are activated during apoptosis versus pruning appear distinct, with apoptosis requiring Apaf-1 but not caspase-6 while pruning requires caspase-6 but not Apaf-1. PMID:27197022

  2. Distinct Oral Neutrophil Subsets Define Health and Periodontal Disease States.

    PubMed

    Fine, N; Hassanpour, S; Borenstein, A; Sima, C; Oveisi, M; Scholey, J; Cherney, D; Glogauer, M

    2016-07-01

    Neutrophils exit the vasculature and swarm to sites of inflammation and infection. However, these cells are abundant in the healthy, inflammation-free human oral environment, suggesting a unique immune surveillance role within the periodontium. We hypothesize that neutrophils in the healthy oral cavity occur in an intermediary parainflammatory state that allows them to interact with and contain the oral microflora without eliciting a marked inflammatory response. Based on a high-throughput screen of neutrophil CD (cluster of differentiation) marker expression and a thorough literature review, we developed multicolor flow cytometry panels to determine the surface marker signatures of oral neutrophil subsets in periodontal health and disease. We define here 3 distinct neutrophil subsets: resting/naive circulatory neutrophils, parainflammatory neutrophils found in the healthy oral cavity, and proinflammatory neutrophils found in the oral cavity during chronic periodontal disease. Furthermore, parainflammatory neutrophils manifest as 2 distinct subpopulations-based on size, granularity, and expression of specific CD markers-and exhibit intermediate levels of activation as compared with the proinflammatory oral neutrophils. These intermediately activated parainflammatory populations occur in equal proportions in the healthy oral cavity, with a shift to one highly activated proinflammatory neutrophil population in chronic periodontal disease. This work is the first to identify and characterize oral parainflammatory neutrophils that interact with commensal biofilms without inducing an inflammatory response, thereby demonstrating that not all neutrophils trafficking through periodontal tissues are fully activated. In addition to establishing possible diagnostic and treatment monitoring biomarkers, this oral neutrophil phenotype model builds on existing literature suggesting that the healthy periodontium may be in a parainflammatory state. PMID:27270666

  3. Proteolytic activation defines distinct lymphangiogenic mechanisms for VEGFC and VEGFD

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Hung M.; Enis, David; Robciuc, Marius R.; Nurmi, Harri J.; Cohen, Jennifer; Chen, Mei; Yang, Yiqing; Dhillon, Veerpal; Johnson, Kathy; Zhang, Hong; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Traxler, Elizabeth; Alitalo, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangiogenesis is supported by 2 homologous VEGFR3 ligands, VEGFC and VEGFD. VEGFC is required for lymphatic development, while VEGFD is not. VEGFC and VEGFD are proteolytically cleaved after cell secretion in vitro, and recent studies have implicated the protease a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 3 (ADAMTS3) and the secreted factor collagen and calcium binding EGF domains 1 (CCBE1) in this process. It is not well understood how ligand proteolysis is controlled at the molecular level or how this process regulates lymphangiogenesis, because these complex molecular interactions have been difficult to follow ex vivo and test in vivo. Here, we have developed and used biochemical and cellular tools to demonstrate that an ADAMTS3-CCBE1 complex can form independently of VEGFR3 and is required to convert VEGFC, but not VEGFD, into an active ligand. Consistent with these ex vivo findings, mouse genetic studies revealed that ADAMTS3 is required for lymphatic development in a manner that is identical to the requirement of VEGFC and CCBE1 for lymphatic development. Moreover, CCBE1 was required for in vivo lymphangiogenesis stimulated by VEGFC but not VEGFD. Together, these studies reveal that lymphangiogenesis is regulated by two distinct proteolytic mechanisms of ligand activation: one in which VEGFC activation by ADAMTS3 and CCBE1 spatially and temporally patterns developing lymphatics, and one in which VEGFD activation by a distinct proteolytic mechanism may be stimulated during inflammatory lymphatic growth. PMID:27159393

  4. Ionic currents of morphologically distinct peptidergic neurons in defined culture.

    PubMed

    Meyers, D E; Graf, R A; Cooke, I M

    1992-05-01

    1. The X-organ sinus gland is a major peptidergic neurosecretory system in Crustacea, analogous to the vertebrate hypothalamoneurohypophyseal system. Neuronal somata isolated from the crab (Cardisoma carnifex) X-organ and maintained in primary culture in unconditioned, fully defined medium show immediate regenerative outgrowth. Outgrowth occurring as broad lamellipodia ("veiled") distinguishes neurons consistently showing crustacean hyperglycemic hormone immunoreactivity. Neurons that are immunoreactive against molt-inhibiting hormone and red pigment concentrating hormone antisera give rise to branched neurites ("branched"). 2. The whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique was used to study the electrophysiology of these two cell types 24-48 h after plating. Under current clamp, only veiled neurons fired overshooting action potentials either spontaneously or in response to depolarization. 3. Under voltage clamp, net current was predominantly outward. When solutions that suppressed outward current were used, only veiled neurons showed significant inward current. These included a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na current and a slow (time to peak 6-10 ms at 0 mV) Cd-sensitive Ca current (ICa) that was activated at potentials less than -30 mV, was maximal at 0 to +20 mV, and did not reverse at potentials up to +60 mV. 4. In TTX, the form of the Ca current I(V) curve was unchanged by changes of holding potential between -40 and -80 mV, and 75-100% of ICa was available from -40 mV. 5. ICa inactivated slowly and incompletely. Analysis with two-pulse regimes suggested that both inactivation and facilitation mechanisms were present. 6. Outward current was examined in the presence and absence of 0.5 mM Cd2+ (1 microM TTX was always present in the external medium). Cd2+ ions slightly reduced the peak outward current, usually by less than 10% (Vc = -10 to +20 mV; Vh = -80 mV). All additional observations were in the presence of TTX and Cd2+. 7. Both cell types expressed

  5. Role of histone modifications in defining chromatin structure and function.

    PubMed

    Gelato, Kathy A; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Chromosomes in eukaryotic cell nuclei are not uniformly organized, but rather contain distinct chromatin elements, with each state having a defined biochemical structure and biological function. These are recognizable by their distinct architectures and molecular components, which can change in response to cellular stimuli or metabolic requirements. Chromatin elements are characterized by the fundamental histone and DNA components, as well as other associated non-histone proteins and factors. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins in particular often correlate with a specific chromatin structure and function. Patterns of histone modifications are implicated as having a role in directing the level of chromatin compaction, as well as playing roles in multiple functional pathways directing the readout of distinct regions of the genome. We review the properties of various chromatin elements and the apparent links of histone modifications with chromatin organization and functional output. PMID:18225984

  6. VgrG and PAAR Proteins Define Distinct Versions of a Functional Type VI Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Cianfanelli, Francesca R; Alcoforado Diniz, Juliana; Guo, Manman; De Cesare, Virginia; Trost, Matthias; Coulthurst, Sarah J

    2016-06-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread among bacterial pathogens and acts as an effective weapon against competitor bacteria and eukaryotic hosts by delivering toxic effector proteins directly into target cells. The T6SS utilises a bacteriophage-like contractile machinery to expel a puncturing device based on a tube of Hcp topped with a VgrG spike, which can be extended by a final tip from a PAAR domain-containing protein. Effector proteins are believed to be delivered by specifically associating with particular Hcp, VgrG or PAAR proteins, either covalently ('specialised') or non-covalently ('cargo' effectors). Here we used the T6SS of the opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens, together with integratecd genetic, proteomic and biochemical approaches, to elucidate the role of specific VgrG and PAAR homologues in T6SS function and effector specificity, revealing new aspects and unexpected subtleties in effector delivery by the T6SS. We identified effectors, both cargo and specialised, absolutely dependent on a particular VgrG for delivery to target cells, and discovered that other cargo effectors can show a preference for a particular VgrG. The presence of at least one PAAR protein was found to be essential for T6SS function, consistent with designation as a 'core' T6SS component. We showed that specific VgrG-PAAR combinations are required to assemble a functional T6SS and that the three distinct VgrG-PAAR assemblies in S. marcescens exhibit distinct effector specificity and efficiency. Unexpectedly, we discovered that two different PAAR-containing Rhs proteins can functionally pair with the same VgrG protein. Showing that accessory EagR proteins are involved in these interactions, native VgrG-Rhs-EagR complexes were isolated and specific interactions between EagR and cognate Rhs proteins identified. This study defines an essential yet flexible role for PAAR proteins in the T6SS and highlights the existence of distinct versions of the machinery with

  7. VgrG and PAAR Proteins Define Distinct Versions of a Functional Type VI Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Cianfanelli, Francesca R.; Alcoforado Diniz, Juliana; Guo, Manman; De Cesare, Virginia; Trost, Matthias; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread among bacterial pathogens and acts as an effective weapon against competitor bacteria and eukaryotic hosts by delivering toxic effector proteins directly into target cells. The T6SS utilises a bacteriophage-like contractile machinery to expel a puncturing device based on a tube of Hcp topped with a VgrG spike, which can be extended by a final tip from a PAAR domain-containing protein. Effector proteins are believed to be delivered by specifically associating with particular Hcp, VgrG or PAAR proteins, either covalently (‘specialised’) or non-covalently (‘cargo’ effectors). Here we used the T6SS of the opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens, together with integratecd genetic, proteomic and biochemical approaches, to elucidate the role of specific VgrG and PAAR homologues in T6SS function and effector specificity, revealing new aspects and unexpected subtleties in effector delivery by the T6SS. We identified effectors, both cargo and specialised, absolutely dependent on a particular VgrG for delivery to target cells, and discovered that other cargo effectors can show a preference for a particular VgrG. The presence of at least one PAAR protein was found to be essential for T6SS function, consistent with designation as a ‘core’ T6SS component. We showed that specific VgrG-PAAR combinations are required to assemble a functional T6SS and that the three distinct VgrG-PAAR assemblies in S. marcescens exhibit distinct effector specificity and efficiency. Unexpectedly, we discovered that two different PAAR-containing Rhs proteins can functionally pair with the same VgrG protein. Showing that accessory EagR proteins are involved in these interactions, native VgrG-Rhs-EagR complexes were isolated and specific interactions between EagR and cognate Rhs proteins identified. This study defines an essential yet flexible role for PAAR proteins in the T6SS and highlights the existence of distinct versions of the

  8. Distinct neurohumoral biomarker profiles in children with hemodynamically defined orthostatic intolerance may predict treatment options.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Ashley L; Shaltout, Hossam A; Fortunato, John E; Diz, Debra I

    2016-02-01

    Studies of adults with orthostatic intolerance (OI) have revealed altered neurohumoral responses to orthostasis, which provide mechanistic insights into the dysregulation of blood pressure control. Similar studies in children with OI providing a thorough neurohumoral profile are lacking. The objective of the present study was to determine the cardiovascular and neurohumoral profile in adolescent subjects presenting with OI. Subjects at 10-18 yr of age were prospectively recruited if they exhibited two or more traditional OI symptoms and were referred for head-up tilt (HUT) testing. Circulating catecholamines, vasopressin, aldosterone, renin, and angiotensins were measured in the supine position and after 15 min of 70° tilt. Heart rate and blood pressure were continuously measured. Of the 48 patients, 30 patients had an abnormal tilt. Subjects with an abnormal tilt had lower systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures during tilt, significantly higher levels of vasopressin during HUT, and relatively higher catecholamines and ANG II during HUT than subjects with a normal tilt. Distinct neurohumoral profiles were observed when OI subjects were placed into the following groups defined by the hemodynamic response: postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), orthostatic hypotension (OH), syncope, and POTS/syncope. Key characteristics included higher HUT-induced norepinephrine in POTS subjects, higher vasopressin in OH and syncope subjects, and higher supine and HUT aldosterone in OH subjects. In conclusion, children with OI and an abnormal response to tilt exhibit distinct neurohumoral profiles associated with the type of the hemodynamic response during orthostatic challenge. Elevated arginine vasopressin levels in syncope and OH groups are likely an exaggerated response to decreased blood flow not compensated by higher norepinephrine levels, as observed in POTS subjects. These different compensatory mechanisms support the role of measuring neurohumoral

  9. Analysis of Gpr126 function defines distinct mechanisms controlling the initiation and maturation of myelin

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Thomas D.; Talbot, William S.

    2013-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, Schwann cells form the myelin sheath, which allows the efficient propagation of action potentials along axons. The transcription factor Krox20 regulates the initiation of myelination in Schwann cells and is also required to maintain mature myelin. The adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Gpr126 is essential for Schwann cells to initiate myelination, but previous studies have not addressed the role of Gpr126 signaling in myelin maturation and maintenance. Through analysis of Gpr126 in zebrafish, we define two distinct mechanisms controlling the initiation and maturation of myelin. We show that gpr126 mutant Schwann cells elaborate mature myelin sheaths and maintain krox20 expression for months, provided that the early signaling defect is bypassed by transient elevation of cAMP. At the onset of myelination, Gpr126 and protein kinase A (PKA) function as a switch that allows Schwann cells to initiate krox20 expression and myelination. After myelination is initiated, krox20 expression is maintained and myelin maturation proceeds independently of Gpr126 signaling. Transgenic analysis indicates that the Krox20 cis-regulatory myelinating Schwann cell element (MSE) becomes active at the onset of myelination and that this activity is dependent on Gpr126 signaling. Activity of the MSE declines after initiation, suggesting that other elements are responsible for maintaining krox20 expression in mature nerves. We also show that elevated cAMP does not initiate myelination in the absence of functional Neuregulin 1 (Nrg1) signaling. These results indicate that the mechanisms regulating the initiation of myelination are distinct from those mediating the maturation and maintenance of myelin. PMID:23804499

  10. Defining the Role of Academics in Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Khawas, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The policy debate on accountability in higher education has been vigorous in many countries, but it has focused primarily on broad objectives or approaches. Limited attention has been paid to the mechanisms by which universities would implement accountability objectives and to the critical role of academics in developing ways to assess learning…

  11. Defining Role in the New Classroom Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Interviews with four teachers, one parent, one assistant, and two ancillary helpers found that classroom teams possess little structure with minimal role definition. Participants erect defenses against the lack of definition and use a process termed "fraternity" to get along with one another and camouflage uncertainties and tensions. (SK)

  12. DNA Methylome of Familial Breast Cancer Identifies Distinct Profiles Defined by Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, James M.; Cocciardi, Sibylle; Waddell, Nic; Johnstone, Cameron N.; Marsh, Anna; Henderson, Stephen; Simpson, Peter; da Silva, Leonard; Khanna, Kumkum; Lakhani, Sunil; Boshoff, Chris; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2010-01-01

    It is now understood that epigenetic alterations occur frequently in sporadic breast carcinogenesis, but little is known about the epigenetic alterations associated with familial breast tumors. We performed genome-wide DNA-methylation profiling on familial breast cancers (n = 33) to identify patterns of methylation specific to the different mutation groups (BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAx) or intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer (basal, luminal A, luminal B, HER2-amplified, and normal-like). We used methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) on Affymetrix promoter chips to interrogate methylation profiles across 25,500 distinct transcripts. Using a support vector machine classification algorithm, we demonstrated that genome-wide methylation profiles predicted tumor mutation status with estimated error rates of 19% (BRCA1), 31% (BRCA2), and 36% (BRCAx) but did not accurately predict the intrinsic subtypes defined by gene expression. Furthermore, using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, we identified a distinct subgroup of BRCAx tumors defined by methylation profiles. We validated these findings in the 33 tumors in the test set, as well as in an independent validation set of 47 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded familial breast tumors, by pyrosequencing and Epityper. Finally, gene-expression profiling and SNP CGH array previously performed on the same samples allowed full integration of methylation, gene-expression, and copy-number data sets, revealing frequent hypermethylation of genes that also displayed loss of heterozygosity, as well as of genes that show copy-number gains, providing a potential mechanism for expression dosage compensation. Together, these data show that methylation profiles for familial breast cancers are defined by the mutation status and are distinct from the intrinsic subtypes. PMID:20206335

  13. Distinct germline progenitor subsets defined through Tsc2–mTORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robin M; La, Hue M; Mäkelä, Juho-Antti; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Noda, Tetsuo; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Adult tissue maintenance is often dependent on resident stem cells; however, the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity existing within this self-renewing population is poorly understood. Here, we define distinct subsets of undifferentiated spermatogonia (spermatogonial progenitor cells; SPCs) by differential response to hyperactivation of mTORC1, a key growth-promoting pathway. We find that conditional deletion of the mTORC1 inhibitor Tsc2 throughout the SPC pool using Vasa-Cre promotes differentiation at the expense of self-renewal and leads to germline degeneration. Surprisingly, Tsc2 ablation within a subset of SPCs using Stra8-Cre did not compromise SPC function. SPC activity also appeared unaffected by Amh-Cre-mediated Tsc2 deletion within somatic cells of the niche. Importantly, we find that differentiation-prone SPCs have elevated mTORC1 activity when compared to SPCs with high self-renewal potential. Moreover, SPCs insensitive to Tsc2 deletion are preferentially associated with mTORC1-active committed progenitor fractions. We therefore delineate SPC subsets based on differential mTORC1 activity and correlated sensitivity to Tsc2 deletion. We propose that mTORC1 is a key regulator of SPC fate and defines phenotypically distinct SPC subpopulations with varying propensities for self-renewal and differentiation. PMID:25700280

  14. Distinct mechanisms define murine B cell lineage immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Chunlin; Yang, Qunying; Kantor, Aaron B; Chu, Hiutung; Ghosn, Eliver EB; Qin, Guang; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Han, Jian; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-01-01

    Processes that define immunoglobulin repertoires are commonly presumed to be the same for all murine B cells. However, studies here that couple high-dimensional FACS sorting with large-scale quantitative IgH deep-sequencing demonstrate that B-1a IgH repertoire differs dramatically from the follicular and marginal zone B cells repertoires and is defined by distinct mechanisms. We track B-1a cells from their early appearance in neonatal spleen to their long-term residence in adult peritoneum and spleen. We show that de novo B-1a IgH rearrangement mainly occurs during the first few weeks of life, after which their repertoire continues to evolve profoundly, including convergent selection of certain V(D)J rearrangements encoding specific CDR3 peptides in all adults and progressive introduction of hypermutation and class-switching as animals age. This V(D)J selection and AID-mediated diversification operate comparably in germ-free and conventional mice, indicating these unique B-1a repertoire-defining mechanisms are driven by antigens that are not derived from microbiota. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09083.001 PMID:26422511

  15. Genes expressed in the brain define three distinct neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nef, P; Oneyser, C; Alliod, C; Couturier, S; Ballivet, M

    1988-01-01

    Four genes encode the related protein subunits that assemble to form the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) at the motor endplate of vertebrates. We have isolated from the chicken genome four additional members of the same gene family whose protein products, termed alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 4 and n alpha (non-alpha) probably define three distinct neuronal nAChR subtypes. The neuronal nAChR genes have identical structures consisting of six protein-coding exons and specify proteins that are best aligned with the chicken endplate alpha subunit, whose gene we have also characterized. mRNA transcripts encoding alpha 4 and n alpha are abundant in embryonic and in adult avian brain, whereas alpha 2 and alpha 3 transcripts are much scarcer. The same set of neuronal genes probably exists in all vertebrates since their counterparts have also been identified in the rat genome. Images PMID:3267226

  16. Metabolomic Approaches to Defining the Role(s) of GABAρ Receptors in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Rae, Caroline; Nasrallah, Fatima A; Balcar, Vladimir J; Rowlands, Benjamin D; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane R

    2015-09-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) acts through various types of receptors in the central nervous system. GABAρ receptors, defined by their characteristic pharmacology and presence of ρ subunits in the channel structure, are poorly understood and their role in the cortex is ill-defined. Here, we used a targeted pharmacological, NMR-based functional metabolomic approach in Guinea pig brain cortical tissue slices to identify a distinct role for these receptors. We compared metabolic fingerprints generated by a range of ligands active at GABAρ and included these in a principal components analysis with a library of other metabolic fingerprints obtained using ligands active at GABAA and GABAB, with inhibitors of GABA uptake and with compounds acting to inhibit enzymes active in the GABAergic system. This enabled us to generate a metabolic "footprint" of the GABAergic system which revealed classes of metabolic activity associated with GABAρ which are distinct from other GABA receptors. Antagonised GABAρ produce large metabolic effects at extrasynaptic sites suggesting they may be involved in tonic inhibition. PMID:25577264

  17. Distinct Mammalian Precursors Are Committed to Generate Neurons with Defined Dendritic Projection Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kelsch, Wolfgang; Mosley, Colleen P; Lin, Chia-Wei; Lois, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate how dendrites target different neurons to establish connections with specific cell types remain largely unknown. In particular, the formation of cell-type–specific connectivity during postnatal neurogenesis could be either determined by the local environment of the mature neuronal circuit or by cell-autonomous properties of the immature neurons, already determined by their precursors. Using retroviral fate mapping, we studied the lamina-specific dendritic targeting of one neuronal type as defined by its morphology and intrinsic somatic electrical properties in neonatal and adult neurogenesis. Fate mapping revealed the existence of two separate populations of neuronal precursors that gave rise to the same neuronal type with two distinct patterns of dendritic targeting—innervating either a deep or superficial lamina, where they connect to different types of principal neurons. Furthermore, heterochronic and heterotopic transplantation demonstrated that these precursors were largely restricted to generate neurons with a predetermined pattern of dendritic targeting that was independent of the host environment. Our results demonstrate that, at least in the neonatal and adult mammalian brain, the pattern of dendritic targeting of a given neuron is a cell-autonomous property of their precursors. PMID:18001150

  18. GC skew defines distinct RNA polymerase pause sites in CpG island promoters.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Wendy A; Bell, Joshua S K; Vertino, Paula M

    2015-11-01

    CpG islands (CGIs) are associated with over half of human gene promoters and are characterized by a unique chromatin environment and high levels of bidirectional transcriptional activity relative to surrounding genomic regions, suggesting that RNA polymerase (Pol II) progression past the CGI boundaries is restricted. Here we describe a novel transcriptional regulatory step wherein Pol II encounters an additional barrier to elongation distinct from the promoter-proximal pause and occurring at the downstream boundary of the CGI domain. For most CGI-associated promoters, Pol II exhibits a dominant pause at either the promoter-proximal or this distal site that correlates, both in position and in intensity, with local regions of high GC skew, a sequence feature known to form unique secondary structures. Upon signal-induced gene activation, long-range enhancer contacts at the dominant pause site are selectively enhanced, suggesting a new role for enhancers at the downstream pause. These data point to an additional level of control over transcriptional output at a subset of CGI-associated genes that is linked to DNA sequence and the integrity of the CGI domain. PMID:26275623

  19. GC skew defines distinct RNA polymerase pause sites in CpG island promoters

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Wendy A.; Bell, Joshua S.K.; Vertino, Paula M.

    2015-01-01

    CpG islands (CGIs) are associated with over half of human gene promoters and are characterized by a unique chromatin environment and high levels of bidirectional transcriptional activity relative to surrounding genomic regions, suggesting that RNA polymerase (Pol II) progression past the CGI boundaries is restricted. Here we describe a novel transcriptional regulatory step wherein Pol II encounters an additional barrier to elongation distinct from the promoter-proximal pause and occurring at the downstream boundary of the CGI domain. For most CGI-associated promoters, Pol II exhibits a dominant pause at either the promoter-proximal or this distal site that correlates, both in position and in intensity, with local regions of high GC skew, a sequence feature known to form unique secondary structures. Upon signal-induced gene activation, long-range enhancer contacts at the dominant pause site are selectively enhanced, suggesting a new role for enhancers at the downstream pause. These data point to an additional level of control over transcriptional output at a subset of CGI-associated genes that is linked to DNA sequence and the integrity of the CGI domain. PMID:26275623

  20. Human colonic goblet cells. Demonstration of distinct subpopulations defined by mucin-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Podolsky, D K; Fournier, D A; Lynch, K E

    1986-01-01

    We studied glycoprotein content of human colonic goblet cells, using a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against purified human colonic mucin (HCM). Using indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), we found that 17 of 23 anti-HCM MAbs stained some or all goblet cells of normal human colonic mucosa. We observed a variety of cellular staining patterns, including (a) diffuse (homogeneous) staining of intracellular mucin, (b) speckled (inhomogeneous) staining of mucin droplets, (c) peripheral staining of intracellular droplets, (d) cytoplasmic staining of goblet cells, and (e) apical (luminal) surface staining. Staining patterns were not associated with particular HCM species. In addition to variable patterns of IIF within individual cells, anti-HCM MAbs varied in the proportion of goblet cells stained. Some MAbs stained all goblet cells, while others stained a limited number of goblet cells. Although each goblet cell contained more than one type mucin, HCM species III, and IV and V appeared to exist in mutually exclusive goblet cell populations and it was possible to define at least seven subpopulations of goblet cells in colonic mucosa by their content of various combinations of HCM species. Anti-HCM MAbs stained goblet cells from other sites within the gastrointestinal tract to a varying extent. Anti-HCM MAbs also showed extensive cross-reactivity with rodent, rabbit, and monkey colonic mucosa. However, several anti-HCM MAbs stained only human colonic mucosa. These data show that human colonic mucosa contains discrete subpopulations of goblet cells that produce distinctive combinations of specific mucin glycoprotein species. Images PMID:2420829

  1. Distinct prion strains are defined by amyloid core structure and chaperone binding site dynamics.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Kendra K; Debelouchina, Galia T; Kayatekin, Can; Dorminy, Tea; Jacavone, Angela C; Griffin, Robert G; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-02-20

    Yeast prions are self-templating protein-based mechanisms of inheritance whose conformational changes lead to the acquisition of diverse new phenotypes. The best studied of these is the prion domain (NM) of Sup35, which forms an amyloid that can adopt several distinct conformations (strains) that produce distinct phenotypes. Using magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we provide a detailed look at the dynamic properties of these forms over a broad range of timescales. We establish that different prion strains have distinct amyloid structures, with many side chains in different chemical environments. Surprisingly, the prion strain with a larger fraction of rigid residues also has a larger fraction of highly mobile residues. Differences in mobility correlate with differences in interaction with the prion-partitioning factor Hsp104 in vivo, perhaps explaining strain-specific differences in inheritance. PMID:24485763

  2. Defining the role of laminin-332 in carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Cherise M.; Quaranta, Vito

    2010-01-01

    The deadly feature of cancer, metastasis, requires invasion of cells through basement membranes (BM), which normally act as barriers between tissue compartments. In the case of many epithelially-derived cancers (carcinomas), laminin-332 (Ln-332) is a key component of the BM barrier. This review provides a historical examination of Ln-332 from its discovery through identification of its functions in BM and possible role in carcinomas. Current understanding points to distinct roles for the three Ln-332 subunits (α3, β3, γ2) in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix stability, and cell signaling processes in cancer. Given the large number of studies linking Ln-332 γ2 subunit with cancer prognosis, particular attention is given to the crucial role of this subunit in cancer invasion and to the unanswered questions in this area. PMID:19686849

  3. Reliability, Dimensionality, and Internal Consistency as Defined by Cronbach: Distinct Albeit Related Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Ernest C.; Davison, Mark L.; Liou, Pey-Yan; Love, Quintin U.

    2015-01-01

    This article uses definitions provided by Cronbach in his seminal paper for coefficient a to show the concepts of reliability, dimensionality, and internal consistency are distinct but interrelated. The article begins with a critique of the definition of reliability and then explores mathematical properties of Cronbach's a. Internal consistency…

  4. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Kei E; Slusher, Nicole A; Cabana, Michael D; Lynch, Susan V

    2010-01-01

    The human superorganism is a conglomerate of mammalian and microbial cells, with the latter estimated to outnumber the former by ten to one and the microbial genetic repertoire (microbiome) to be approximately 100-times greater than that of the human host. Given the ability of the immune response to rapidly counter infectious agents, it is striking that such a large density of microbes can exist in a state of synergy within the human host. This is particularly true of the distal gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which houses up to 1000 distinct bacterial species and an estimated excess of 1 × 1014 microorganisms. An ever-increasing body of evidence implicates the GI microbiota in defining states of health and disease. Here, we review the literature in adult and pediatric GI microbiome studies, the emerging links between microbial community structure, function, infection and disease, and the approaches to manipulate this crucial ecosystem to improve host health. PMID:20377338

  5. Distinct T cell signatures define subsets of patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mark C.; Pierson, Emily R.; Spieker, Andrew J.; Nielsen, A. Scott; Posso, Sylvia; Kita, Mariko; Buckner, Jane H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated T cell responses to myelin proteins in the blood of healthy controls and 2 groups of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who exhibited lesions either predominantly in the brain or predominantly in the spinal cord in order to assess whether distinct neuroinflammatory patterns were associated with different myelin protein–specific T cell effector function profiles and whether these profiles differed from healthy controls. Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from patients with brain-predominant RRMS, patients with spinal cord–predominant RRMS, and age-matched healthy controls and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assays to quantify interferon gamma–secreting (Th1) and interleukin 17–secreting (Th17) cells responding directly ex vivo to myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Results: Although MBP and MOG elicited different responses, patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who had spinal cord–predominant lesions exhibited significantly higher Th17:Th1 ratios in response to both MBP and MOG compared to patients with brain-predominant MS. Incorporating the cytokine responses to both antigens into logistic regression models showed that these cytokine responses were able to provide good discrimination between patients with distinct neuroinflammatory patterns. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the localization of lesions within the brain vs the spinal cord in patients with MS is associated with different effector T cell responses to myelin proteins. Further investigation of the relationship between T cell effector function, antigen specificities, and lesion sites may reveal features of pathogenic pathways that are distinct to patients with different neuroinflammatory patterns. PMID:27606354

  6. Adult mouse basal forebrain harbors two distinct cholinergic populations defined by their electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Cagri T.; Golowasch, Jorge P.; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    We performed whole-cell recordings from basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons in transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the control of the choline acetyltransferase promoter. BF cholinergic neurons can be differentiated into two electrophysiologically identifiable subtypes: early and late firing neurons. Early firing neurons (∼70%) are more excitable, show prominent spike frequency adaptation and are more susceptible to depolarization blockade, a phenomenon characterized by complete silencing of the neuron following initial action potentials. Late firing neurons (∼30%), albeit being less excitable, could maintain a tonic discharge at low frequencies. In voltage clamp analysis, we have shown that early firing neurons have a higher density of low voltage activated (LVA) calcium currents. These two cholinergic cell populations might be involved in distinct functions: the early firing group being more suitable for phasic changes in cortical acetylcholine release associated with attention while the late firing neurons could support general arousal by maintaining tonic acetylcholine levels. PMID:22586380

  7. Synthetic lipids and their role in defining macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Parrill, Abby L

    2015-10-01

    Lipids have a variety of physiological roles, ranging from structural and biophysical contributions to membrane functions to signaling contributions in normal and abnormal physiology. This review highlights some of the contributions made by Robert Bittman to our understanding of lipid assemblies through the production of synthetic lipid analogs in the sterol, sphingolipid, and glycolipid classes. His contributions have included the development of a fluorescent cholesterol analog that shows strong functional analogies to cholesterol that has allowed live imaging of cholesterol distribution in living systems, to stereospecific synthetic approaches to both sphingolipid and glycolipid analogs crucial in defining the structure-activity relationships of lipid biological targets. PMID:26248325

  8. Further Defining the Role of the Laboratory Genetic Counselor.

    PubMed

    Waltman, Lindsey; Runke, Cassandra; Balcom, Jessica; Riley, Jacquelyn D; Lilley, Margaret; Christian, Susan; Zetzsche, Lindsay; Goodenberger, McKinsey L

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory genetic counseling is becoming increasingly common as a result of increased laboratory services and genetic testing menus, as well as growing job responsibilities. Christian et al. (2012) provided the first quantitative data regarding the roles of the laboratory-based genetic counselor (LBGC) finding that two of the most prevalent roles are as customer liaisons and communicators of test results. The goal of the present study was to further delineate the role of the LBGC by addressing specific tasks that LBGCs are involved with on a day-to-day basis. A survey was designed to expand upon themes identified in the Christian et al. (2012) study by querying specific tasks performed in several categories of potential LBGC job duties. An invitation for LBGCs to participate was distributed via email to the membership of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) and the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors (CAGC). We identified 121 genetic counselors who primarily work in the laboratory setting or whose job role includes a laboratory component. Almost all respondents performed customer liaison/case coordination (95 %), and interpretation and result reporting (88 %). The most frequently performed tasks within these categories involved addressing questions from clients, making phone calls with genetic testing results, obtaining clinical or family history information for results interpretation, and composing case-specific interpretations for unique results and/or obtaining literature references to support interpretations. The study results also point to trends of expanding roles in sales and marketing, variant interpretation and management responsibilities. Results of this study may be useful to further define the full scope of practice of LBGCs, aid in the development of new LBGC positions and expand current positions to include roles related to test development, research, and student supervision. It may also aid in curriculum updates for training

  9. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary “myopathic” changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions. PMID:26999347

  10. New DNA polymorphisms define ethnically distinct haplotypes in the human transferrin receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Van Landeghem, G F; Beckman, L E; Sikström, C; Saha, N; Kucinskas, V; Beckman, L

    1998-01-01

    In a study of transferrin receptor (TFR) polymorphism in different ethnic groups using PCR and restriction cleavage we found a new Hin6I polymorphism in intron 7 and confirmed a tentative BanI polymorphism in exon 4 reported by Evans and Kemp [Gene 1997;199:123-131]. In all ethnic groups there was a complete and highly significant (p < 10(-10)) linkage disequilibrium where all BanI 1 alleles were linked to Hin6I 1 alleles. Furthermore in the European populations, but not in the Chinese, there was a close correlation between the three BanI-Hin6I haplotypes and the alleles of a previously described three-allelic RsaI polymorphism in the TFR gene studied by Southern blotting. There were distinct ethnic differences in TFR allele and haplotype frequencies. Thus the Saamis were significantly different from the other European ethnic groups, and the Lithuanians had a significantly increased frequency of the BanI 2-Hin6I 1 haplotype, suggesting that this marker may be informative in tracing prehistoric migrations and admixture by Baltic peoples. The new TFR polymorphisms and haplotypes may also be useful markers in studies of interactions with the transferrin and hemochromatosis genes, the genetic influence on body iron stores and disease associations. PMID:9748693

  11. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Gerard W; Loges, Niki T; Klinkenbusch, Judith A; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd; Omran, Heymut

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-left-right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP-left-right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography. PMID:26909801

  12. Defining Essential Stem Cell Characteristics in Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Extracted from Distinct Anatomical Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Patrick C.; Francis, Michael P.; Zhao, Min; Brumelle, Jenni; Rao, Raj R.; Elmore, Lynne W.; Holt, Shawn E.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) has created many opportunities for the development of patient-specific cell-based replacement therapies. We have isolated multiple cell strains of ASCs from various anatomical sites (abdomen, arms/legs, breast, buttocks), indicating wide-spread distribution of ASCs throughout the body. Unfortunately, there exists a general lack of agreement in the literature as to their “stem cell” characteristics. We find that telomerase activity and expression of its catalytic subunit in ASCs are both below the levels of detection, independent of age and culturing conditions. ASCs also undergo telomere attrition and eventually senesce, while maintaining a stable karyotype without the development of spontaneous tumor-associated abnormalities. Using a set of cell surface markers that have been promoted to identify ASCs, we find that they failed to distinguish ASCs from normal fibroblasts, as both are positive for CD29, CD73, and CD105 and negative for CD14, CD31, and CD45. All of the ASC isolates are multipotent, capable of differentiating into osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, while fibroblasts show no differentiation potential. Our ASC strains also show elevated expression of genes associated with pluripotent cells, Oct-4, SOX2, and NANOG when compared to fibroblasts and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), although the levels were lower than induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). Together, our data suggest that while the cell surface profile of ASCs does not distinguish them from normal fibroblasts, their differentiation capacity and the expression of genes closely linked to pluripotency clearly define ASCs as multipotent stem cells, regardless of tissue isolation location. PMID:22628159

  13. Comparison of Diagnostic Tests in Distinct Well-Defined Conditions Related to Dry Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Monica; Reinach, Peter Sol; Paula, Jayter Silva; Vellasco e Cruz, Antonio Augusto; Bachette, Leticia; Faustino, Jacqueline; Aranha, Francisco Penteado; Vigorito, Afonso; de Souza, Carmino Antonio; Rocha, Eduardo Melani

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study compares signs, symptoms and predictive tools used to diagnose dry eye disease (DED) and ocular surface disorders in six systemic well-defined and non-overlapping diseases. It is well known that these tests are problematic because of a lack of agreement between them in identifying these conditions. Accordingly, we provide here a comparative clinical profile analysis of these different diseases. Methods A spontaneous and continuous sample of patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) (n = 27), graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) (n = 28), Graves orbitopathy (n = 28), facial palsy (n = 8), diabetes mellitus without proliferative retinopathy (n = 14) and glaucoma who chronically received topical drugs preserved with benzalkonium chloride (n = 20) were enrolled. Evaluation consisted of a comprehensive protocol encompassing: (1) structured questionnaire - Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI); (2) tear osmolarity (TearLab Osmolarity System - Ocusense); (3) tear film break-up time (TBUT); (4) fluorescein and lissamine green staining; (5) Schirmer test and (6) severity grading. Results One hundred and twenty five patients (aged 48.8 years-old±14.1, male:female ratio = 0.4) were enrolled in the study, along with 24 age and gender matched controls. Higher scores on DED tests were obtained in Sjögren Syndrome (P<0.05), except for tear film osmolarity that was higher in diabetics (P<0.001) and fluorescein staining, that was higher in facial palsy (P<0.001). TFBUT and OSDI correlated better with other tests. The best combination of diagnostic tests for DED was OSDI, TBUT and Schirmer test (sensitivity 100%, specificity 95% and accuracy 99.3%). Conclusions DED diagnostic test results present a broad range of variability among different conditions. Vital stainings and TBUT correlated best with one another whereas the best test combination to detect DED was: OSDI/TBUT/Schirmer. PMID:24848115

  14. Histone H3 Acetylation and H3 K4 Methylation Define Distinct Chromatin Regions Permissive for Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunhong; Boyd, Douglas D.

    2006-01-01

    Histone modifications are associated with distinct transcription states and serve as heritable epigenetic markers for chromatin structure and function. While H3 K9 methylation defines condensed heterochromatin that is able to silence a nearby gene, how gene silencing within euchromatin regions is achieved remains elusive. We report here that histone H3 K4 methylation or K9/K14 acetylation defines distinct chromatin regions permissive or nonpermissive for transgene expression. A permissive chromatin region is enriched in H3 K4 methylation and H3 acetylation, while a nonpermissive region is poor in or depleted of these two histone modifications. The histone modification states of the permissive chromatin can spread to transgenic promoters. However, de novo histone H3 acetylation and H3 K4 methylation at a transgenic promoter in a nonpermissive chromatin region are stochastic, leading to variegated transgene expression. Moreover, nonpermissive chromatin progressively silences a transgene, an event that is accompanied by the reduction of H3 K4 methylation and H3 acetylation levels at the transgenic promoter. These repressive effects of nonpermissive chromatin cannot be completely countered by strong transcription activators, indicating the dominance of the chromatin effects. We therefore propose a model in which histone H3 acetylation and H3 K4 methylation localized to discrete sites in the mammalian genome mark distinct chromatin functions that dictate transgene expression or silencing. PMID:16914722

  15. Defined DNA sequences promote the assembly of a bacterial protein into distinct amyloid nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    RepA, the replication initiator protein of Pseudomonas pPS10 plasmid, is made of two winged-helix (WH) domains. RepA dimers undergo a structural transformation upon binding to origin DNA sequences (iterons), resulting in monomerization and α-helix into β-strand conversion. This affects the N-terminal domain (WH1) and generates a metastable intermediate. Here it is shown that the interaction of short dsDNA oligonucleotides, including iteron or operator RepA targets, with the isolated WH1 domain promotes the assembly of different nanostructures. These range from irregular aggregates to amyloid spheroids and fibers. Their intrinsic order inversely correlates with the extent of the transformation induced by each DNA sequence on RepA. However, DNA is not a constituent of the assembled fibers, in agreement with the protein-only principle for amyloid structure. Thus, the RepA-WH1 domain on DNA binding mimics the behavior of the mammalian prion protein. The stretch of amino acids responsible for WH1 aggregation has been identified, leading to the design of mutants with enhanced or reduced amyloidogenicity and the synthesis of a peptide that assembles into a cross-β structure. RepA amyloid assemblies could have a role in the negative regulation of plasmid replication. This article underlines the potential of specific nucleic acid sequences in promoting protein amyloidogenesis at nearly physiological conditions. PMID:17959784

  16. Cladribine and Fludarabine Nucleotides Induce Distinct Hexamers Defining a Common Mode of Reversible RNR Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wisitpitthaya, Somsinee; Zhao, Yi; Long, Marcus J C; Li, Minxing; Fletcher, Elaine A; Blessing, William A; Weiss, Robert S; Aye, Yimon

    2016-07-15

    The enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a major target of anticancer drugs. Until recently, suicide inactivation in which synthetic substrate analogs (nucleoside diphosphates) irreversibly inactivate the RNR-α2β2 heterodimeric complex was the only clinically proven inhibition pathway. For instance, this mechanism is deployed by the multifactorial anticancer agent gemcitabine diphosphate. Recently reversible targeting of RNR-α-alone coupled with ligand-induced RNR-α-persistent hexamerization has emerged to be of clinical significance. To date, clofarabine nucleotides are the only known example of this mechanism. Herein, chemoenzymatic syntheses of the active forms of two other drugs, phosphorylated cladribine (ClA) and fludarabine (FlU), allow us to establish that reversible inhibition is common to numerous drugs in clinical use. Enzyme inhibition and fluorescence anisotropy assays show that the di- and triphosphates of the two nucleosides function as reversible (i.e., nonmechanism-based) inhibitors of RNR and interact with the catalytic (C site) and the allosteric activity (A site) sites of RNR-α, respectively. Gel filtration, protease digestion, and FRET assays demonstrate that inhibition is coupled with formation of conformationally diverse hexamers. Studies in 293T cells capable of selectively inducing either wild-type or oligomerization-defective mutant RNR-α overexpression delineate the central role of RNR-α oligomerization in drug activity, and highlight a potential resistance mechanism to these drugs. These data set the stage for new interventions targeting RNR oligomeric regulation. PMID:27159113

  17. deep-orange and carnation define distinct stages in late endosomal biogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sriram, V; Krishnan, K S; Mayor, Satyajit

    2003-05-12

    Endosomal degradation is severely impaired in primary hemocytes from larvae of eye color mutants of Drosophila. Using high resolution imaging and immunofluorescence microscopy in these cells, products of eye color genes, deep-orange (dor) and carnation (car), are localized to large multivesicular Rab7-positive late endosomes containing Golgi-derived enzymes. These structures mature into small sized Dor-negative, Car-positive structures, which subsequently fuse to form tubular lysosomes. Defective endosomal degradation in mutant alleles of dor results from a failure of Golgi-derived vesicles to fuse with morphologically arrested Rab7-positive large sized endosomes, which are, however, normally acidified and mature with wild-type kinetics. This locates the site of Dor function to fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles with the large Rab7-positive endocytic compartments. In contrast, endosomal degradation is not considerably affected in car1 mutant; fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles and maturation of large sized endosomes is normal. However, removal of Dor from small sized Car-positive endosomes is slowed, and subsequent fusion with tubular lysosomes is abolished. Overexpression of Dor in car1 mutant aggravates this defect, implicating Car in the removal of Dor from endosomes. This suggests that, in addition to an independent role in fusion with tubular lysosomes, the Sec1p homologue, Car, regulates Dor function. PMID:12743107

  18. Doublecortin May Play a Role in Defining Chondrocyte Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; Zhang, Qing-Song; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Reiser, Brendan; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Braun, Stephen E.; O’Brien, Michael J.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic development of articular cartilage has not been well understood and the role of doublecortin (DCX) in determination of chondrocyte phenotype is unknown. Here, we use a DCX promoter-driven eGFP reporter mouse model to study the dynamic gene expression profiles in mouse embryonic handplates at E12.5 to E13.5 when the condensed mesenchymal cells differentiate into either endochondral chondrocytes or joint interzone cells. Illumina microarray analysis identified a variety of genes that were expressed differentially in the different regions of mouse handplate. The unique expression patterns of many genes were revealed. Cytl1 and 3110032G18RIK were highly expressed in the proximal region of E12.5 handplate and the carpal region of E13.5 handplate, whereas Olfr538, Kctd15, and Cited1 were highly expressed in the distal region of E12.5 and the metacarpal region of E13.5 handplates. There was an increasing gradient of Hrc expression in the proximal to distal direction in E13.5 handplate. Furthermore, when human DCX protein was expressed in human adipose stem cells, collagen II was decreased while aggrecan, matrilin 2, and GDF5 were increased during the 14-day pellet culture. These findings suggest that DCX may play a role in defining chondrocyte phenotype. PMID:24758934

  19. Sexual and social competition: broadening perspectives by defining female roles.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2012-08-19

    Males figured more prominently than females in Darwin's view of sexual selection. He considered female choice of secondary importance to male-male competition as a mechanism to explain the evolution of male ornaments and armaments. Fisher later demonstrated the importance of female choice in driving male trait evolution, but his ideas were largely ignored for decades. As sexual selection came to embrace the notions of parent-offspring and sexual conflict, and experimental tests of female choice showed promise, females began to feature more prominently in the framework of sexual selection theory. Recent debate over this theory has centred around the role of females, not only over the question of choice, but also over female-female competition. Whereas some have called for expanding the sexual selection framework to encompass all forms of female-female competition, others have called for subsuming sexual selection within a broader framework of social selection, or replacing it altogether. Still others have argued for linking sexual selection more clearly to other evolutionary theories such as kin selection. Rather than simply debating terminology, we must take a broader view of the general processes that lead to trait evolution in both sexes by clearly defining the roles that females play in the process, and by focusing on intra- and inter-sexual interactions in males and females. PMID:22777013

  20. Distinct roles of doublecortin modulating the microtubule cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Moores, Carolyn A; Perderiset, Mylène; Kappeler, Caroline; Kain, Susan; Drummond, Douglas; Perkins, Stephen J; Chelly, Jamel; Cross, Rob; Houdusse, Anne; Francis, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    Doublecortin is a neuronal microtubule-stabilising protein, mutations of which cause mental retardation and epilepsy in humans. How doublecortin influences microtubule dynamics, and thereby brain development, is unclear. We show here by video microscopy that purified doublecortin has no effect on the growth rate of microtubules. However, it is a potent anti-catastrophe factor that stabilises microtubules by linking adjacent protofilaments and counteracting their outward bending in depolymerising microtubules. We show that doublecortin-stabilised microtubules are substrates for kinesin translocase motors and for depolymerase kinesins. In addition, doublecortin does not itself oligomerise and does not bind to tubulin heterodimers but does nucleate microtubules. In cells, doublecortin is enriched at the distal ends of neuronal processes and our data raise the possibility that the function of doublecortin in neurons is to drive assembly and stabilisation of non-centrosomal microtubules in these doublecortin-enriched distal zones. These distinct properties combine to give doublecortin a unique function in microtubule regulation, a role that cannot be compensated for by other microtubule-stabilising proteins and nucleating factors. PMID:16957770

  1. Defining a role for laquinimod in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory disease affecting the central nervous system, is considered to exhibit an important neurodegenerative component as well. Laquinimod is an orally administered quinoline-3-carboxamide under development for the treatment of MS. In vitro and animal studies have revealed various mechanisms by which laquinimod may exert its effects on the immune and nervous systems. These include effects on the innate immune system that promote the differentiation of anti-inflammatory/regulatory T cells, the activation of microglia cells, an increase in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, as well as the prevention of inflammation-induced excitotoxicity. Two phase III studies revealed the clinical benefits of laquinimod in patients with relapsing–remitting MS and exhibited a benign safety profile for this drug. Ongoing clinical trials will help to define the optimal dose and indication for laquinimod in MS. This article reviews current experimental and clinical evidence on the role of laquinimod in patients with this disabling disease. PMID:25002907

  2. Progesterone receptor action: defining a role in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Andrea R; Hagan, Christy R; Lange, Carol A

    2011-05-01

    The ovarian steroid hormones, estradiol and progesterone, and their nuclear receptors (estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PR]), are involved in breast cancer development. As ER-positive/PR-positive tumors progress, they are likely to become steroid hormone-resistant/independent, yet often retain expression of their steroid receptors. Notably, up to 40% of women with steroid receptor-positive tumors exhibit de novo resistance or eventually fail on estrogen- or ERα-blocking therapies (acquired resistance). Indeed, most of the research on this topic has centered on mechanisms of ER 'escape' from endocrine therapy and the design of better ER-blocking strategies; signaling pathways that mediate endocrine (i.e., anti-estrogen) resistance are also excellent therapeutic targets. However, serious consideration of PR isoforms as important drivers of early breast cancer progression and ER modulators is timely and significant. Indeed, progress has been hindered by ER-centric experimental approaches. This article will focus on defining a role for PR in breast cancer with hopes of providing a refreshing PR-focused perspective. PMID:21857868

  3. Defining a role for laquinimod in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kieseier, Bernd C

    2014-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory disease affecting the central nervous system, is considered to exhibit an important neurodegenerative component as well. Laquinimod is an orally administered quinoline-3-carboxamide under development for the treatment of MS. In vitro and animal studies have revealed various mechanisms by which laquinimod may exert its effects on the immune and nervous systems. These include effects on the innate immune system that promote the differentiation of anti-inflammatory/regulatory T cells, the activation of microglia cells, an increase in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, as well as the prevention of inflammation-induced excitotoxicity. Two phase III studies revealed the clinical benefits of laquinimod in patients with relapsing-remitting MS and exhibited a benign safety profile for this drug. Ongoing clinical trials will help to define the optimal dose and indication for laquinimod in MS. This article reviews current experimental and clinical evidence on the role of laquinimod in patients with this disabling disease. PMID:25002907

  4. Dynamic melody recognition: distinctiveness and the role of musical expertise.

    PubMed

    Bailes, Freya

    2010-07-01

    The hypothesis that melodies are recognized at moments when they exhibit a distinctive musical pattern was tested. In a melody recognition experiment, point-of-recognition (POR) data were gathered from 32 listeners (16 musicians and 16 nonmusicians) judging 120 melodies. A series of models of melody recognition were developed, resulting from a stepwise multiple regression of two classes of information relating to melodic familiarity and melodic distinctiveness. Melodic distinctiveness measures were assembled through statistical analyses of over 15,000 Western themes and melodies. A significant model, explaining 85% of the variance, entered measures primarily of timing distinctiveness and pitch distinctiveness, but excluding familiarity, as predictors of POR. Differences between nonmusician and musician models suggest a processing shift from momentary to accumulated information with increased exposure to music. Supplemental materials for this article may be downloaded from http://mc.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental. PMID:20551343

  5. Monitoring vaccination coverage: Defining the role of surveys.

    PubMed

    Cutts, Felicity T; Claquin, Pierre; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Rhoda, Dale A

    2016-07-29

    Vaccination coverage is a widely used indicator of programme performance, measured by registries, routine administrative reports or household surveys. Because the population denominator and the reported number of vaccinations used in administrative estimates are often inaccurate, survey data are often considered to be more reliable. Many countries obtain survey data on vaccination coverage every 3-5years from large-scale multi-purpose survey programs. Additional surveys may be needed to evaluate coverage in Supplemental Immunization Activities such as measles or polio campaigns, or after major changes have occurred in the vaccination programme or its context. When a coverage survey is undertaken, rigorous statistical principles and field protocols should be followed to avoid selection bias and information bias. This requires substantial time, expertise and resources hence the role of vaccination coverage surveys in programme monitoring needs to be carefully defined. At times, programmatic monitoring may be more appropriate and provides data to guide program improvement. Practical field methods such as health facility-based assessments can evaluate multiple aspects of service provision, costs, coverage (among clinic attendees) and data quality. Similarly, purposeful sampling or censuses of specific populations can help local health workers evaluate their own performance and understand community attitudes, without trying to claim that the results are representative of the entire population. Administrative reports enable programme managers to do real-time monitoring, investigate potential problems and take timely remedial action, thus improvement of administrative estimates is of high priority. Most importantly, investment in collecting data needs to be complemented by investment in acting on results to improve performance. PMID:27349841

  6. New Mecyclothorax spp. (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Moriomorphini) define Mont Mauru, eastern Tahiti Nui, as a distinct area of endemism

    PubMed Central

    Liebherr, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Seven species of Mecyclothorax Sharp precinctive to Mont Mauru, Tahiti, Society Islands are newly described: Mecyclothorax tutei sp. n., Mecyclothorax tihotii sp. n., Mecyclothorax putaputa sp. n., Mecyclothorax toretore sp. n., Mecyclothorax anaana sp. n., Mecyclothorax pirihao sp. n., and Mecyclothorax poro sp. n. These seven constitute the first representative Mecyclothorax species recorded from Mauru, and their geographic restriction to this isolated massif defines it as a distinct area of endemism along the highly dissected eastern versant of the Tahiti Nui volcano. Each of the new species has a closest relative on another massif of Tahiti Nui, supporting speciation associated with vicariance caused by extensive erosional valley formation, especially the development of Papenoo Valley. Comparison of the known elevational distributions of the new discoveries on Mont Mauru to the elevational diversity profile of the comparatively well-sampled Mont Marau, northwest Tahiti Nui, suggests that numerous Mecyclothorax species remain to be discovered in higher-elevation habitats of Mont Mauru. PMID:23166465

  7. Distinct physiological roles for the two L-asparaginase isozymes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Atack, John M; Beacham, Ifor R; Jennings, Michael P

    2013-07-01

    Escherichia coli expresses two L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1) isozymes: L-asparaginse I, which is a low affinity, cytoplasmic enzyme that is expressed constitutively, and L-asparaginase II, a high affinity periplasmic enzyme that is under complex co-transcriptional regulation by both Fnr and Crp. The distinct localisation and regulation of these enzymes suggest different roles. To define these roles, a set of isogenic mutants was constructed that lacked either or both enzymes. Evidence is provided that L-asparaginase II, in contrast to L-asparaginase I, can be used in the provision of an anaerobic electron acceptor when using a non-fermentable carbon source in the presence of excess nitrogen. PMID:23726917

  8. Distinct physiological roles for the two L-asparaginase isozymes of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Atack, John M.; Beacham, Ifor R.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Escherichia coli contains two L-asparaginase isozymes with distinct localization, kinetics and regulation. •Mutant strains were used to examine the roles of these enzymes in L-asparagine utilization. •We report that L-asparaginase II permits growth on asparagine and glycerol under anaerobic conditions. •We propose that this enzyme is the first step in a co-regulated pathway leading to fumarate. •The pathway is regulated by anaerobiosis and cAMP and provides a terminal elector acceptor. -- Abstract: Escherichia coli expresses two L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1) isozymes: L-asparaginse I, which is a low affinity, cytoplasmic enzyme that is expressed constitutively, and L-asparaginase II, a high affinity periplasmic enzyme that is under complex co-transcriptional regulation by both Fnr and Crp. The distinct localisation and regulation of these enzymes suggest different roles. To define these roles, a set of isogenic mutants was constructed that lacked either or both enzymes. Evidence is provided that L-asparaginase II, in contrast to L-asparaginase I, can be used in the provision of an anaerobic electron acceptor when using a non-fermentable carbon source in the presence of excess nitrogen.

  9. The Process of Defining a Role in an Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Malcolm S.

    1973-01-01

    Positions in organizations serve as organizational frameworks for the performance of roles. The views of a role vary. Conflicting views leave the position-holder with seven options, only one of which is viable. That one, an open problem-solving confrontation, may require some inservice education in interpersonal relations. (AG)

  10. Co-Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and c-MET Defines a Distinct Subset of Lung Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Sachiko, Oguni; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Niki, Toshiro

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and MET are molecular targets for lung cancer treatment. The relationships between expression, activation, and gene abnormalities of these two targets are currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a panel of 40 lung cancer cell lines could be classified into two groups. Group I was characterized by (1) high phosphorylations of MET and EGFR, (2) frequent mutation or amplification of EGFR, MET, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), (3) high expressions of bronchial epithelial markers (thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), MUC1, and Cytokeratin 7 (CK7)); and (4) high expressions of MET, human epidermal growth factor receptor-3, E-cadherin, cyclooxygenase-2, and laminin gamma2. In contrast, Group II exhibited little or no phosphorylation of MET and EGFR; no mutation or amplification of EGFR, MET, and HER2; were triple-negative for TTF-1, MUC1, and CK7; and showed high expressions of vimentin, fibroblast growth factor receptor-1, and transcription factor 8. Importantly, Group I was more sensitive to gefitinib and more resistant to cisplatin and paclitaxel than Group II. The clinical relevance was confirmed in publicly available data on 442 primary lung adenocarcinoma patients; survival benefits by postoperative chemotherapy were seen in only patients with tumors corresponding to Group II. Overall, co-activation of EGFR and MET defines a distinct subgroup of lung carcinoma with characteristic genetic abnormalities, gene expression pattern, and response to chemotherapeutic reagents. PMID:20934974

  11. Case study: factors in defining the nurse informatics specialist role.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare organizations, consultant groups, vendor companies, and academic institutions feel the challenge to enhance user experiences with information systems. To meet this challenge, organizations and companies are looking to better understand and utilize a variety of informatics roles to further marketing, business, or healthcare goals. Nursing is one practice area that can support the successful integration of information systems development, implementation, support, and user experience. However, the definition and development of such a role or position has met with mixed success. This article explores some of the issues and influences related to the role's development. The issues, impacts, and influences have been identified based on healthcare business assessment, job description analysis, employment and project evaluations, and professional standards set by the American Nurses Association. PMID:16669586

  12. Rab11-family interacting proteins define spatially and temporally distinct regions within the dynamic Rab11a-dependent recycling system

    PubMed Central

    Baetz, Nicholas W.; Goldenring, James R.

    2013-01-01

    The Rab11-family interacting proteins (Rab11-FIPs) facilitate Rab11-dependent vesicle recycling. We hypothesized that Rab11-FIPs define discrete subdomains and carry out temporally distinct roles within the recycling system. We used live-cell deconvolution microscopy of HeLa cells expressing chimeric fluorescent Rab11-FIPs to examine Rab11-FIP localization, transferrin passage through Rab11-FIP–containing compartments, and overlap among Rab11-FIPs within the recycling system. FIP1A, FIP2, and FIP5 occupy widely distributed mobile tubules and vesicles, whereas FIP1B, FIP1C, and FIP3 localize to perinuclear tubules. Internalized transferrin entered Rab11-FIP–containing compartments within 5 min, reaching maximum colocalization with FIP1B and FIP2 early in the time course, whereas localization with FIP1A, FIP1C, FIP3, and FIP5 was delayed until 10 min or later. Whereas direct interactions with FIP1A were only observed for FIP1B and FIP1C, FIP1A also associated with membranes containing FIP3. Live-cell dual-expression studies of Rab11-FIPs revealed the tubular dynamics of Rab11-FIP–containing compartments and demonstrated a series of selective associations among Rab11-FIPs in real time. These findings suggest that Rab11-FIP1 proteins participate in spatially and temporally distinct steps of the recycling process along a complex and dynamic tubular network in which Rab11-FIPs occupy discrete domains. PMID:23283983

  13. Defining the roles for Vpr in HIV-1-associated neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    James, Tony; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Wigdahl, Brian; Krebs, Fred C

    2016-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) has a unique role in neuropathogenesis. Its ability to induce G2/M arrest coupled with its capacity to increase viral gene transcription gives it a unique role in sustaining viral replication and aiding in the establishment and maintenance of a systemic infection. The requirement of Vpr for HIV-1 infection and replication in cells of monocytic origin (a key lineage of cells involved in HIV-1 neuroinvasion) suggests an important role in establishing and sustaining infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Contributions of Vpr to neuropathogenesis can be expanded further through (i) naturally occurring HIV-1 sequence variation that results in functionally divergent Vpr variants; (ii) the dual activities of Vpr as a intracellular protein delivered and expressed during HIV-1 infection and as an extracellular protein that can act on neighboring, uninfected cells; (iii) cell type-dependent consequences of Vpr expression and exposure, including cell cycle arrest, metabolic dysregulation, and cytotoxicity; and (iv) the effects of Vpr on exosome-based intercellular communication in the CNS. Revealing that the effects of this pleiotropic viral protein is an essential part of a greater understanding of HIV-1-associated pathogenesis and potential approaches to treating and preventing disease caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:27056720

  14. Defining New Roles for Scientific Professional Organizations in Society?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.; Byrne, J.

    2007-12-01

    The obfuscation of authentic science information in North America has reached epidemic proportions. The global warming debate is a classic example - there are a virtual unanimity and overwhelming evidence from scientific community that the Earth is warming rapidly and humans are an important cause, but there is confusion in the media and the public, partly as a result of disinformation campaigns by greenhouse gas polluters. Should the role of scientists in informing the public change in response to this? What should be the role of scientific societies, such as the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society, or the American Association for the Advancement of Science? Should we continue doing what we are doing, or be more proactive in using new technology to educate the public on important scientific issues? Should we devote resources to television advertisements? Should we support ads in the print media? This talk will discuss the pros and cons of individual and group actions in making the case in public for science, and suggest some new directions.

  15. Distinct roles of PTCH2 splice variants in Hedgehog signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Rahnama, Fahimeh; Toftgård, Rune; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2004-01-01

    The human PTCH2 gene is highly similar to PTCH1, a tumour suppressor gene frequently mutated in basal cell carcinoma and several other tumour types. PTCH1 is a transmembrane protein believed to inhibit another transmembrane protein SMO (Smoothened), which mediates HH (Hedgehog) signalling. In this study, we analysed the biological properties of several PTCH2 splice variants. An mRNA form that lacked the last exon was abundantly expressed in all tissues examined, in contrast with the one that included it. Moreover, a transcript lacking exon 9, which is a part of a conserved sterol-sensing domain, was identified in intestine, prostate and cerebellum. In ovary, spleen, testis, cerebellum and skin, an mRNA lacking both exons 9 and 10 could also be observed. The different PTCH2 isoforms localized in the cytoplasm were capable of internalizing the N-terminal fragment of Sonic HH (Shh-N). Additionally, the PTCH2 gene was found to be a target of HH signalling. PTCH2 promoter regulation assays demonstrated that only one of the PTCH2 variants could inhibit the activity of SHH-N, whereas none was capable of inhibiting the activated form of SMO (SMO-M2) and this contrasts with PTCH1. Despite the fact that the PTCH2 isoforms lacked the ability to inhibit SMO-M2 activity, all PTCH2 variants as well as PTCH1, on co-transfection with Smo, were able to change Smo localization from being largely dispersed in the cytoplasm to the juxtanuclear region. Furthermore, the PTCH2 isoforms and PTCH1 co-localized in doubly transfected cells and an interaction between them was confirmed using immunoprecipitation assays. Using Ptch1-/- mouse cells, it was shown that the PTCH2 variants and PTCH1 differentially act to reconstitute not only the SHH but also the Desert HH-dependent transcriptional response. We conclude that in spite of their structural similarities, the PTCH2 isoforms have distinct functional properties when compared with PTCH1. PMID:14613484

  16. K27M mutation in histone H3.3 defines clinically and biologically distinct subgroups of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Liu, Xiao-Yang; Fontebasso, Adam M; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Albrecht, Steffen; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Letourneau, Louis; Bourgey, Mathieu; Bourque, Guillaume; Montpetit, Alexandre; Bourret, Genevieve; Lepage, Pierre; Fleming, Adam; Lichter, Peter; Kool, Marcel; von Deimling, Andreas; Sturm, Dominik; Korshunov, Andrey; Faury, Damien; Jones, David T; Majewski, Jacek; Pfister, Stefan M; Jabado, Nada; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2012-09-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas (GBM) including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) are devastating brain tumors with no effective therapy. Here, we investigated clinical and biological impacts of histone H3.3 mutations. Forty-two DIPGs were tested for H3.3 mutations. Wild-type versus mutated (K27M-H3.3) subgroups were compared for HIST1H3B, IDH, ATRX and TP53 mutations, copy number alterations and clinical outcome. K27M-H3.3 occurred in 71 %, TP53 mutations in 77 % and ATRX mutations in 9 % of DIPGs. ATRX mutations were more frequent in older children (p < 0.0001). No G34V/R-H3.3, IDH1/2 or H3.1 mutations were identified. K27M-H3.3 DIPGs showed specific copy number changes, including all gains/amplifications of PDGFRA and MYC/PVT1 loci. Notably, all long-term survivors were H3.3 wild type and this group of patients had better overall survival. K27M-H3.3 mutation defines clinically and biologically distinct subgroups and is prevalent in DIPG, which will impact future therapeutic trial design. K27M- and G34V-H3.3 have location-based incidence (brainstem/cortex) and potentially play distinct roles in pediatric GBM pathogenesis. K27M-H3.3 is universally associated with short survival in DIPG, while patients wild-type for H3.3 show improved survival. Based on prognostic and therapeutic implications, our findings argue for H3.3-mutation testing at diagnosis, which should be rapidly integrated into the clinical decision-making algorithm, particularly in atypical DIPG. PMID:22661320

  17. Distinct Roles for Intracellular and Extracellular Lipids in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Sowmya; Nieh, Albert H.; Kenwood, Brandon M.; Davis, Christine A.; Tosello-Trampont, Annie-Carole; Elich, Tedd D.; Breazeale, Steven D.; Ward, Eric; Anderson, Richard J.; Caldwell, Stephen H.; Hoehn, Kyle L.; Hahn, Young S.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a chronic liver disease that contributes to progressive metabolic dysfunction. Infection of hepatocytes by hepatitis C virus (HCV) results in reprogramming of hepatic and serum lipids. However, the specific contribution of these distinct pools of lipids to HCV infection remains ill defined. In this study, we investigated the role of hepatic lipogenesis in HCV infection by targeting the rate-limiting step in this pathway, which is catalyzed by the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) enzymes. Using two structurally unrelated ACC inhibitors, we determined that blockade of lipogenesis resulted in reduced viral replication, assembly, and release. Supplementing exogenous lipids to cells treated with ACC inhibitors rescued HCV assembly with no effect on viral replication and release. Intriguingly, loss of viral RNA was not recapitulated at the protein level and addition of 2-bromopalmitate, a competitive inhibitor of protein palmitoylation, mirrored the effects of ACC inhibitors on reduced viral RNA without a concurrent loss in protein expression. These correlative results suggest that newly synthesized lipids may have a role in protein palmitoylation during HCV infection. PMID:27280294

  18. The striatal balancing act in drug addiction: distinct roles of direct and indirect pathway medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Mary Kay; Nestler, Eric J

    2011-01-01

    The striatum plays a key role in mediating the acute and chronic effects of addictive drugs, with drugs of abuse causing long-lasting molecular and cellular alterations in both dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens (ventral striatum). Despite the wealth of research on the biological actions of abused drugs in striatum, until recently, the distinct roles of the striatum's two major subtypes of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in drug addiction remained elusive. Recent advances in cell-type-specific technologies, including fluorescent reporter mice, transgenic, or knockout mice, and viral-mediated gene transfer, have advanced the field toward a more comprehensive understanding of the two MSN subtypes in the long-term actions of drugs of abuse. Here we review progress in defining the distinct molecular and functional contributions of the two MSN subtypes in mediating addiction. PMID:21811439

  19. The Striatal Balancing Act in Drug Addiction: Distinct Roles of Direct and Indirect Pathway Medium Spiny Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Mary Kay; Nestler, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    The striatum plays a key role in mediating the acute and chronic effects of addictive drugs, with drugs of abuse causing long-lasting molecular and cellular alterations in both dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens (ventral striatum). Despite the wealth of research on the biological actions of abused drugs in striatum, until recently, the distinct roles of the striatum’s two major subtypes of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in drug addiction remained elusive. Recent advances in cell-type-specific technologies, including fluorescent reporter mice, transgenic, or knockout mice, and viral-mediated gene transfer, have advanced the field toward a more comprehensive understanding of the two MSN subtypes in the long-term actions of drugs of abuse. Here we review progress in defining the distinct molecular and functional contributions of the two MSN subtypes in mediating addiction. PMID:21811439

  20. Distinct roles for histone chaperones in the deposition of Htz1 in chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongde; Zhu, Min; Mu, Yawen; Liu, Lingjie; Li, Guanghui; Wan, Yakun

    2014-01-01

    Histone variant Htz1 substitution for H2A plays important roles in diverse DNA transactions. Histone chaperones Chz1 and Nap1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) are important for the deposition Htz1 into nucleosomes. In literatures, it was suggested that Chz1 is a Htz1–H2B-specific chaperone, and it is relatively unstructured in solution but it becomes structured in complex with the Htz1–H2B histone dimer. Nap1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) can bind (H3–H4)2 tetramers, H2A–H2B dimers and Htz1–H2B dimers. Nap1 can bind H2A–H2B dimer in the cytoplasm and shuttles the dimer into the nucleus. Moreover, Nap1 functions in nucleosome assembly by competitively interacting with non-nucleosomal histone–DNA. However, the exact roles of these chaperones in assembling Htz1-containing nucleosome remain largely unknown. In this paper, we revealed that Chz1 does not show a physical interaction with chromatin. In contrast, Nap1 binds exactly at the genomic DNA that contains Htz1. Nap1 and Htz1 show a preferential interaction with AG-rich DNA sequences. Deletion of chz1 results in a significantly decreased binding of Htz1 in chromatin, whereas deletion of nap1 dramatically increases the association of Htz1 with chromatin. Furthermore, genome-wide nucleosome-mapping analysis revealed that nucleosome occupancy for Htz1p-bound genes decreases upon deleting htz1 or chz1, suggesting that Htz1 is required for nucleosome structure at the specific genome loci. All together, these results define the distinct roles for histone chaperones Chz1 and Nap1 to regulate Htz1 incorporation into chromatin. PMID:25338502

  1. Expression Profiling of Macrophages Reveals Multiple Populations with Distinct Biological Roles in an Immunocompetent Orthotopic Model of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Poczobutt, Joanna M; De, Subhajyoti; Yadav, Vinod K; Nguyen, Teresa T; Li, Howard; Sippel, Trisha R; Weiser-Evans, Mary C M; Nemenoff, Raphael A

    2016-03-15

    Macrophages represent an important component of the tumor microenvironment and play a complex role in cancer progression. These cells are characterized by a high degree of plasticity, and they alter their phenotype in response to local environmental cues. Whereas the M1/M2 classification of macrophages has been widely used, the complexity of macrophage phenotypes has not been well studied, particularly in lung cancer. In this study we employed an orthotopic immunocompetent model of lung adenocarcinoma in which murine lung cancer cells are directly implanted into the left lobe of syngeneic mice. Using multimarker flow cytometry, we defined and recovered several distinct populations of monocytes/macrophages from tumors at different stages of progression. We used RNA-seq transcriptional profiling to define distinct features of each population and determine how they change during tumor progression. We defined an alveolar resident macrophage population that does not change in number and expresses multiple genes related to lipid metabolism and lipid signaling. We also defined a population of tumor-associated macrophages that increase dramatically with tumor and selectively expresses a panel of chemokine genes. A third population, which resembles tumor-associated monocytes, expresses a large number of genes involved in matrix remodeling. By correlating transcriptional profiles with clinically prognostic genes, we show that specific monocyte/macrophage populations are enriched in genes that predict outcomes in lung adenocarcinoma, implicating these subpopulations as critical determinants of patient survival. Our data underscore the complexity of monocytes/macrophages in the tumor microenvironment, and they suggest that distinct populations play specific roles in tumor progression. PMID:26873985

  2. Distinct roles for IT and IH in controlling the frequency and timing of rebound spike responses

    PubMed Central

    Engbers, Jordan D T; Anderson, Dustin; Tadayonnejad, Reza; Mehaffey, W Hamish; Molineux, Michael L; Turner, Ray W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The ability for neurons to generate rebound bursts following inhibitory synaptic input relies on ion channels that respond in a unique fashion to hyperpolarization. Inward currents provided by T-type calcium channels (IT) and hyperpolarization-activated HCN channels (IH) increase in availability upon hyperpolarization, allowing for a rebound depolarization after a period of inhibition. Although rebound responses have long been recognized in deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) neurons, the actual extent to which IT and IH contribute to rebound spike output following physiological levels of membrane hyperpolarization has not been clearly established. The current study used recordings and simulations of large diameter cells of the in vitro rat DCN slice preparation to define the roles for IT and IH in a rebound response. We find that physiological levels of hyperpolarization make only small proportions of the total IT and IH available, but that these are sufficient to make substantial contributions to a rebound response. At least 50% of the early phase of the rebound spike frequency increase is generated by an IT-mediated depolarization. An additional frequency increase is provided by IH in reducing the time constant and thus the extent of IT inactivation as the membrane returns from a hyperpolarized state to the resting level. An IH-mediated depolarization creates an inverse voltage-first spike latency relationship and produces a 35% increase in the precision of the first spike latency of a rebound. IT and IH can thus be activated by physiologically relevant stimuli and have distinct roles in the frequency, timing and precision of rebound responses. PMID:21969455

  3. Mre11 Nuclease Activity has Essential Roles in DNA Repair and Genomic Stability Distinct from ATM Activation

    PubMed Central

    Buis, Jeffrey; Wu, Yipin; Deng, Yibin; Leddon, Jennifer; Westfield, Gerwin; Eckersdorff, Mark; Sekiguchi, JoAnn M.; Chang, Sandy; Ferguson, David O.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The Mre11/Rad50/NBS1 complex (MRN) maintains genomic stability by bridging DNA ends and initiating DNA damage signaling through activation of the ATM kinase. Mre11 possesses DNA nuclease activities that are highly conserved in evolution, but play unknown roles in mammals. To define functions of Mre11 we engineered targeted mouse alleles which either abrogate nuclease activities or inactivate the entire MRN complex. Mre11 nuclease deficiency causes a striking array of phenotypes indistinguishable from absence of MRN, including early embryonic lethality and dramatic genomic instability. We identify a crucial role for the nuclease activities in homology directed double strand break repair, and a contributing role in activating the ATR kinase. However, nuclease activities are not required to activate ATM after DNA damage or telomere deprotection. Therefore, nucleolytic processing by Mre11 is an essential function of fundamental importance in DNA repair distinct from MRN control of ATM signaling. PMID:18854157

  4. BRAF Mutation and CDKN2A Deletion Define a Clinically Distinct Subgroup of Childhood Secondary High-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Matthew; Zhukova, Nataliya; Merico, Daniele; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Krishnatry, Rahul; Shago, Mary; Stavropoulos, James; Alon, Noa; Pole, Jason D.; Ray, Peter N.; Navickiene, Vilma; Mangerel, Joshua; Remke, Marc; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Guerreiro Stucklin, Ana; Li, Martin; Young, Edwin J.; Zhang, Cindy; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Bakry, Doua; Laughlin, Suzanne; Shlien, Adam; Chan, Jennifer; Ligon, Keith L.; Rutka, James T.; Dirks, Peter B.; Taylor, Michael D.; Greenberg, Mark; Malkin, David; Huang, Annie; Bouffet, Eric; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Tabori, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To uncover the genetic events leading to transformation of pediatric low-grade glioma (PLGG) to secondary high-grade glioma (sHGG). Patients and Methods We retrospectively identified patients with sHGG from a population-based cohort of 886 patients with PLGG with long clinical follow-up. Exome sequencing and array CGH were performed on available samples followed by detailed genetic analysis of the entire sHGG cohort. Clinical and outcome data of genetically distinct subgroups were obtained. Results sHGG was observed in 2.9% of PLGGs (26 of 886 patients). Patients with sHGG had a high frequency of nonsilent somatic mutations compared with patients with primary pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG; median, 25 mutations per exome; P = .0042). Alterations in chromatin-modifying genes and telomere-maintenance pathways were commonly observed, whereas no sHGG harbored the BRAF-KIAA1549 fusion. The most recurrent alterations were BRAF V600E and CDKN2A deletion in 39% and 57% of sHGGs, respectively. Importantly, all BRAF V600E and 80% of CDKN2A alterations could be traced back to their PLGG counterparts. BRAF V600E distinguished sHGG from primary HGG (P = .0023), whereas BRAF and CDKN2A alterations were less commonly observed in PLGG that did not transform (P < .001 and P < .001 respectively). PLGGs with BRAF mutations had longer latency to transformation than wild-type PLGG (median, 6.65 years [range, 3.5 to 20.3 years] v 1.59 years [range, 0.32 to 15.9 years], respectively; P = .0389). Furthermore, 5-year overall survival was 75% ± 15% and 29% ± 12% for children with BRAF mutant and wild-type tumors, respectively (P = .024). Conclusion BRAF V600E mutations and CDKN2A deletions constitute a clinically distinct subtype of sHGG. The prolonged course to transformation for BRAF V600E PLGGs provides an opportunity for surgical interventions, surveillance, and targeted therapies to mitigate the outcome of sHGG. PMID:25667294

  5. Genetic Profiling by Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Array Analysis Defines Three Distinct Subtypes of Orbital Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Cheng-Ying; Mosier, Stacy; Safneck, Janice; Salomao, Diva R.; Miller, Neil R.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Gocke, Christopher D.; Batista, Denise A. S.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital meningiomas can be classified as primary optic nerve sheath (ON) meningiomas, primary intraorbital ectopic (Ob) meningiomas and spheno-orbital (Sph-Ob) meningiomas based on anatomic site. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based array analysis with the Illumina 300K platform was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 19 orbital meningiomas (5 ON, 4 Ob and 10 Sph-Ob meningiomas). Tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) grade I except for two grade II meningiomas, and one was NF2-associated. We found genomic alterations in 68% (13 of 19) of orbital meningiomas. Sph-Ob tumors frequently exhibited monosomy 22/22q loss (70%; 7/10) and deletion of chromosome 1p, 6q and 19p (50% each; 5/10). Among genetic alterations, loss of chromosome 1p and 6q were more frequent in clinically progressive tumors. Chromosome 22q loss also was detected in the majority of Ob meningiomas (75%; 3/4) but was infrequent in ON meningiomas (20%; 1/5). In general, Ob tumors had fewer chromosome alterations than Sph-Ob and ON tumors. Unlike Sph-Ob meningiomas, most of the Ob and ON meningiomas did not progress even after incomplete excision, although follow-up was limited in some cases. Our study suggests that ON, Ob and Sph-Ob meningiomas are three molecularly distinct entities. Our results also suggest that molecular subclassification may have prognostic implications. PMID:24773246

  6. fMRI resting state networks define distinct modes of long-distance interactions in the human brain.

    PubMed

    De Luca, M; Beckmann, C F; De Stefano, N; Matthews, P M; Smith, S M

    2006-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of the human brain have suggested that low-frequency fluctuations in resting fMRI data collected using blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast correspond to functionally relevant resting state networks (RSNs). Whether the fluctuations of resting fMRI signal in RSNs are a direct consequence of neocortical neuronal activity or are low-frequency artifacts due to other physiological processes (e.g., autonomically driven fluctuations in cerebral blood flow) is uncertain. In order to investigate further these fluctuations, we have characterized their spatial and temporal properties using probabilistic independent component analysis (PICA), a robust approach to RSN identification. Here, we provide evidence that: i. RSNs are not caused by signal artifacts due to low sampling rate (aliasing); ii. they are localized primarily to the cerebral cortex; iii. similar RSNs also can be identified in perfusion fMRI data; and iv. at least 5 distinct RSN patterns are reproducible across different subjects. The RSNs appear to reflect "default" interactions related to functional networks related to those recruited by specific types of cognitive processes. RSNs are a major source of non-modeled signal in BOLD fMRI data, so a full understanding of their dynamics will improve the interpretation of functional brain imaging studies more generally. Because RSNs reflect interactions in cognitively relevant functional networks, they offer a new approach to the characterization of state changes with pathology and the effects of drugs. PMID:16260155

  7. Communication Patterns that Define the Role of the University-Level Tutor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans

    2011-01-01

    This study considers how communication patterns shape the university tutor role. A combination of ethnographic observations and interviews were used to determine the communication behaviors of university tutors and tutees, which help to define what is, otherwise, an ambiguous role. Specifically, the communicative behaviors engaged in by tutors are…

  8. Mutations in IDH1, IDH2, and in the TERT promoter define clinically distinct subgroups of adult malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Patrick; Reitman, Zachary J.; Lipp, Eric; Rasheed, B. Ahmed; Yang, Rui; Diplas, Bill H.; Wang, Zhaohui; Greer, Paula K.; Zhu, Huishan; Wang, Catherine Y.; Carpenter, Austin B.; Friedman, Henry; Friedman, Allan H.; Keir, Stephen T.; He, Jie; He, Yiping; McLendon, Roger E.; Herndon II, James E.; Yan, Hai; Bigner, Darell D.

    2014-01-01

    Frequent mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) and the promoter of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) represent two significant discoveries in glioma genomics. Understanding the degree to which these two mutations co-occur or occur exclusively of one another in glioma subtypes presents a unique opportunity to guide glioma classification and prognosis. We analyzed the relationship between overall survival (OS) and the presence of IDH1/2 and TERT promoter mutations in a panel of 473 adult gliomas. We hypothesized and show that genetic signatures capable of distinguishing among several types of gliomas could be established providing clinically relevant information that can serve as an adjunct to histopathological diagnosis. We found that mutations in the TERT promoter occurred in 74.2% of glioblastomas (GBM), but occurred in a minority of Grade II-III astrocytomas (18.2%). In contrast, IDH1/2 mutations were observed in 78.4% of Grade II-III astrocytomas, but were uncommon in primary GBM. In oligodendrogliomas, TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations co-occurred in 79% of cases. Patients whose Grade III-IV gliomas exhibit TERT promoter mutations alone predominately have primary GBMs associated with poor median OS (11.5 months). Patients whose Grade III-IV gliomas exhibit IDH1/2 mutations alone predominately have astrocytic morphologies and exhibit a median OS of 57 months while patients whose tumors exhibit both TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations predominately exhibit oligodendroglial morphologies and exhibit median OS of 125 months. Analyzing gliomas based on their genetic signatures allows for the stratification of these patients into distinct cohorts, with unique prognosis and survival. PMID:24722048

  9. BRAF-V600E expression in precursor versus differentiated dendritic cells defines clinically distinct LCH risk groups

    PubMed Central

    Berres, Marie-Luise; Lim, Karen Phaik Har; Peters, Tricia; Price, Jeremy; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Salmon, Hélène; Idoyaga, Juliana; Ruzo, Albert; Lupo, Philip J.; Hicks, M. John; Shih, Albert; Simko, Stephen J.; Abhyankar, Harshal; Chakraborty, Rikhia; Leboeuf, Marylene; Beltrão, Monique; Lira, Sérgio A.; Heym, Kenneth M.; Clausen, Björn E.; Bigley, Venetia; Collin, Matthew; Manz, Markus G.; McClain, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal disorder with elusive etiology, characterized by the accumulation of CD207+ dendritic cells (DCs) in inflammatory lesions. Recurrent BRAF-V600E mutations have been reported in LCH. In this study, lesions from 100 patients were genotyped, and 64% carried the BRAF-V600E mutation within infiltrating CD207+ DCs. BRAF-V600E expression in tissue DCs did not define specific clinical risk groups but was associated with increased risk of recurrence. Strikingly, we found that patients with active, high-risk LCH also carried BRAF-V600E in circulating CD11c+ and CD14+ fractions and in bone marrow (BM) CD34+ hematopoietic cell progenitors, whereas the mutation was restricted to lesional CD207+ DC in low-risk LCH patients. Importantly, BRAF-V600E expression in DCs was sufficient to drive LCH-like disease in mice. Consistent with our findings in humans, expression of BRAF-V600E in BM DC progenitors recapitulated many features of the human high-risk LCH, whereas BRAF-V600E expression in differentiated DCs more closely resembled low-risk LCH. We therefore propose classification of LCH as a myeloid neoplasia and hypothesize that high-risk LCH arises from somatic mutation of a hematopoietic progenitor, whereas low-risk disease arises from somatic mutation of tissue-restricted precursor DCs. PMID:24638167

  10. Use of HCA in Subproteome-immunization and Screening of Hybridoma Supernatants to Define Distinct Antibody Binding Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Szafran, Adam T.; Mancini, Maureen G.; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.; Edwards, Dean P.; Mancini, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the properties and functions of complex biological systems depends upon knowing the proteins present and the interactions between them. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have given us greater insights into the participating proteomes, however, monoclonal antibodies remain key to understanding the structures, functions, locations and macromolecular interactions of the involved proteins. The traditional single immunogen method to produce monoclonal antibodies using hybridoma technology are time, resource and cost intensive, limiting the number of reagents that are available. Using a high content analysis screening approach, we have developed a method in which a complex mixture of proteins (e.g., subproteome) is used to generate a panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to a subproteome located in a defined subcellular compartment such as the nucleus. The immunofluorescent images in the primary hybridoma screen are analyzed using an automated processing approach and classified using a recursive partitioning forest classification model derived from images obtained from the Human Protein Atlas. Using an ammonium sulfate purified nuclear matrix fraction as an example of reverse proteomics, we identified 866 hybridoma supernatants with a positive immunofluorescent signal. Of those, 402 produced a nuclear signal from which patterns similar to known nuclear matrix associated proteins were identified. Detailed here is our method, the analysis techniques, and a discussion of the application to further in vivo antibody production. PMID:26521976

  11. B lymphocyte reconstitution after human bone marrow transplantation. Leu-1 antigen defines a distinct population of B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Antin, J H; Ault, K A; Rappeport, J M; Smith, B R

    1987-01-01

    Differences in the expression of Leu-1 (CD5) define two populations of recovering B cells after human marrow transplantation, Leu-1+ and Leu-1- B cells. The Leu-1+ B cells were polyclonal, of donor origin, and did not express detectable interleukin 2 receptor. Leu-1+ B cells generally appeared 2-4 wk after marrow grafting and often preceded the recovery of Leu-1- B cells. Acute and chronic graft vs. host disease (GvHD) resulted in the recovery of significantly fewer Leu-1+ B cells, whereas Leu-1- B cells were only decreased in acute GvHD. Multivariate analysis showed no significant effect of age, disease, prednisone or azathioprine, or ex vivo treatment of the marrow with anti-Leu-1 and complement on recovery of Leu-1+ and Leu-1- B cells, independent of the effects of GvHD. Leu-1+ B cells are a major lymphocyte population posttransplant. They may reflect a stage of differentiation of normal B cells or a separate B cell lineage. PMID:3112184

  12. HER2, MET and FGFR2 oncogenic driver alterations define distinct molecular segments for targeted therapies in gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y J; Shen, D; Yin, X; Gavine, P; Zhang, T; Su, X; Zhan, P; Xu, Y; Lv, J; Qian, J; Liu, C; Sun, Y; Qian, Z; Zhang, J; Gu, Y; Ni, X

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gastric cancer (GC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Since the approval of trastuzumab, targeted therapies are emerging as promising treatment options for the disease. This study aimed to explore the molecular segmentation of several known therapeutics targets, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), MET and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), within GC using clinically approved or investigational kits and scoring criteria. Knowledge of how these markers are segmented in the same cohort of GC patients could improve future clinical trial designs. Methods: Using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and FISH methods, overexpression and amplification of HER2, FGFR2 and MET were profiled in a cohort of Chinese GC samples. The correlations between anti-tumour sensitivity and the molecular segments of HER2, MET and FGFR2 alterations were further tested in a panel of GC cell lines and the patient-derived GC xenograft (PDGCX) model using the targeted inhibitors. Results: Of 172 GC patients, positivity for HER2, MET and FGFR2 alternations was found in 23 (13.4%), 21 (12.2%) and 9 (5.2%) patients, respectively. Positivity for MET was found in 3 of 23 HER2-positive GC patients. Co-positivity for FGFR2 and MET was found in 1 GC patient, and amplification of the two genes was found in different tumour cells. Our study in a panel of GC cell lines showed that in most cell lines, amplification or high expression of a particular molecular marker was mutually exclusive and in vitro sensitivity to the targeted agents lapatinib, PD173074 and crizotinib was only observed in cell lines with the corresponding high expression of the drugs' target protein. SGC031, an MET-positive PDGCX mouse model, responded to crizotinib but not to lapatinib or PD173074. Conclusions: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, MET and FGFR2 oncogenic driver alterations (gene amplification and overexpression) occur in three largely distinct molecular segments in GC. A

  13. Epigenetic Marks Define the Lineage and Differentiation Potential of Two Distinct Neural Crest-Derived Intermediate Odontogenic Progenitor Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Gokul; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modifications, play an active role in the differentiation and lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells. In the present study, epigenetic states and differentiation profiles of two odontogenic neural crest-derived intermediate progenitor populations were compared: dental pulp (DP) and dental follicle (DF). ChIP on chip assays revealed substantial H3K27me3-mediated repression of odontoblast lineage genes DSPP and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) in DF cells, but not in DP cells. Mineralization inductive conditions caused steep increases of mineralization and patterning gene expression levels in DP cells when compared to DF cells. In contrast, mineralization induction resulted in a highly dynamic histone modification response in DF cells, while there was only a subdued effect in DP cells. Both DF and DP progenitors featured H3K4me3-active marks on the promoters of early mineralization genes RUNX2, MSX2, and DLX5, while OSX, IBSP, and BGLAP promoters were enriched for H3K9me3 or H3K27me3. Compared to DF cells, DP cells expressed higher levels of three pluripotency-associated genes, OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2. Finally, gene ontology comparison of bivalent marks unique for DP and DF cells highlighted cell–cell attachment genes in DP cells and neurogenesis genes in DF cells. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the DF intermediate odontogenic neural crest lineage is distinguished from its DP counterpart by epigenetic repression of DSPP and DMP1 genes and through dynamic histone enrichment responses to mineralization induction. Findings presented here highlight the crucial role of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in the terminal differentiation of odontogenic neural crest lineages. PMID:23379639

  14. An Old Story Retold: Loss of G1 Control Defines A Distinct Genomic Subtype of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiyan; Bai, Jian; Abliz, Amir; Liu, Ying; Gong, Kenan; Li, Jingjing; Shi, Wenjie; Pan, Yaqi; Liu, Fangfang; Lai, Shujuan; Yang, Haijun; Lu, Changdong; Zhang, Lixin; Chen, Wei; Xu, Ruiping; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang; Zeng, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has a high mortality rate. To determine the molecular basis of ESCC development, this study sought to identify characteristic genome-wide alterations in ESCC, including exonic mutations and structural alterations. The clinical implications of these genetic alterations were also analyzed. Exome sequencing and verification were performed for nine pairs of ESCC and the matched blood samples, followed by validation with additional samples using Sanger sequencing. Whole-genome SNP arrays were employed to detect copy number alteration (CNA) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 55 cases, including the nine ESCC samples subjected to exome sequencing. A total of 108 non-synonymous somatic mutations (NSSMs) in 102 genes were verified in nine patients. The chromatin modification process was found to be enriched in our gene ontology (GO) analysis. Tumor genomes with TP53 mutations were significantly more unstable than those without TP53 mutations. In terms of the landscape of genomic alterations, deletion of 9p21.3 covering CDKN2A/2B (30.9%), amplification of 11q13.3 covering CCND1 (30.9%), and TP53 point mutation (50.9%) occurred in two-thirds of the cases. These results suggest that the deregulation of the G1 phase during the cell cycle is a key event in ESCC. Furthermore, six minimal common regions were found to be significantly altered in ESCC samples and three of them, 9p21.3, 7p11.2, and 3p12.1, were associated with lymph node metastasis. With the high correlation of TP53 mutation and genomic instability in ESCC, the amplification of CCND1, the deletion of CDKN2A/2B, and the somatic mutation of TP53 appear to play pivotal roles via G1 deregulation and therefore helps to classify this cancer into different genomic subtypes. These findings provide clinical significance that could be useful in future molecular diagnoses and therapeutic targeting. PMID:26386145

  15. Genome-Wide Identification of Binding Sites Defines Distinct Functions for Caenorhabditis elegans PHA-4/FOXA in Development and Environmental Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Mei; Niu, Wei; Lu, Zhi John; Sarov, Mihail; Murray, John I.; Janette, Judith; Raha, Debasish; Sheaffer, Karyn L.; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Preston, Elicia; Slightham, Cindie; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Brock, Trisha; Agarwal, Ashish; Auerbach, Raymond; Hyman, Anthony A.; Gerstein, Mark; Mango, Susan E.; Kim, Stuart K.; Waterston, Robert H.; Reinke, Valerie; Snyder, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors are key components of regulatory networks that control development, as well as the response to environmental stimuli. We have established an experimental pipeline in Caenorhabditis elegans that permits global identification of the binding sites for transcription factors using chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing. We describe and validate this strategy, and apply it to the transcription factor PHA-4, which plays critical roles in organ development and other cellular processes. We identified thousands of binding sites for PHA-4 during formation of the embryonic pharynx, and also found a role for this factor during the starvation response. Many binding sites were found to shift dramatically between embryos and starved larvae, from developmentally regulated genes to genes involved in metabolism. These results indicate distinct roles for this regulator in two different biological processes and demonstrate the versatility of transcription factors in mediating diverse biological roles. PMID:20174564

  16. Genome-wide identification of binding sites defines distinct functions for Caenorhabditis elegans PHA-4/FOXA in development and environmental response.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Mei; Niu, Wei; Lu, Zhi John; Sarov, Mihail; Murray, John I; Janette, Judith; Raha, Debasish; Sheaffer, Karyn L; Lam, Hugo Y K; Preston, Elicia; Slightham, Cindie; Hillier, LaDeana W; Brock, Trisha; Agarwal, Ashish; Auerbach, Raymond; Hyman, Anthony A; Gerstein, Mark; Mango, Susan E; Kim, Stuart K; Waterston, Robert H; Reinke, Valerie; Snyder, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Transcription factors are key components of regulatory networks that control development, as well as the response to environmental stimuli. We have established an experimental pipeline in Caenorhabditis elegans that permits global identification of the binding sites for transcription factors using chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing. We describe and validate this strategy, and apply it to the transcription factor PHA-4, which plays critical roles in organ development and other cellular processes. We identified thousands of binding sites for PHA-4 during formation of the embryonic pharynx, and also found a role for this factor during the starvation response. Many binding sites were found to shift dramatically between embryos and starved larvae, from developmentally regulated genes to genes involved in metabolism. These results indicate distinct roles for this regulator in two different biological processes and demonstrate the versatility of transcription factors in mediating diverse biological roles. PMID:20174564

  17. The roles of shared vs. distinctive conceptual features in lexical access

    PubMed Central

    Vieth, Harrison E.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary models of spoken word production assume conceptual feature sharing determines the speed with which objects are named in categorically-related contexts. However, statistical models of concept representation have also identified a role for feature distinctiveness, i.e., features that identify a single concept and serve to distinguish it quickly from other similar concepts. In three experiments we investigated whether distinctive features might explain reports of counter-intuitive semantic facilitation effects in the picture word interference (PWI) paradigm. In Experiment 1, categorically-related distractors matched in terms of semantic similarity ratings (e.g., zebra and pony) and manipulated with respect to feature distinctiveness (e.g., a zebra has stripes unlike other equine species) elicited interference effects of comparable magnitude. Experiments 2 and 3 investigated the role of feature distinctiveness with respect to reports of facilitated naming with part-whole distractor-target relations (e.g., a hump is a distinguishing part of a CAMEL, whereas knee is not, vs. an unrelated part such as plug). Related part distractors did not influence target picture naming latencies significantly when the part denoted by the related distractor was not visible in the target picture (whether distinctive or not; Experiment 2). When the part denoted by the related distractor was visible in the target picture, non-distinctive part distractors slowed target naming significantly at SOA of −150 ms (Experiment 3). Thus, our results show that semantic interference does occur for part-whole distractor-target relations in PWI, but only when distractors denote features shared with the target and other category exemplars. We discuss the implications of these results for some recently developed, novel accounts of lexical access in spoken word production. PMID:25278914

  18. Leading Charters: How Charter School Administrators Define Their Roles and Their Ability to Lead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Dick Michael, II; Peak, Charity

    2013-01-01

    Charter schools have been studied from numerous perspectives. One topic that remains under-researched, however, is charter school leadership. Therefore, we examine how charter administrators define their leadership roles and their ability to lead. Results indicate that charter principals see three primary functions in their leadership--building…

  19. Phytochrome-Interacting Factors Have Both Shared and Distinct Biological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jinkil; Choi, Giltsu

    2013-01-01

    Phytochromes are plant photoreceptors that perceive red and far-red light. Upon the perception of light in Arabidopsis, light-activated phytochromes enter the nucleus and act on a set of interacting proteins, modulating their activities and thereby altering the expression levels of ∼10% of the organism’s entire gene complement. Phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) belonging to Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) subgroup 15 are key interacting proteins that play negative roles in light responses. Their activities are post-translationally countered by light-activated phytochromes, which promote the degradation of PIFs and directly or indirectly inhibit their binding to DNA. The PIFs share a high degree of similarity, but examinations of pif single and multiple mutants have indicated that they have shared and distinct functions in various developmental and physiological processes. These are believed to stem from differences in both intrinsic protein properties and their gene expression patterns. In an effort to clarify the basis of these shared and distinct functions, we compared recently published genome-wide ChIP data, developmental gene expression maps, and responses to various stimuli for the various PIFs. Based on our observations, we propose that the biological roles of PIFs stem from their shared and distinct DNA binding targets and specific gene expression patterns. PMID:23708772

  20. Distinct Roles of Central and Peripheral Prostaglandin E2 and EP Subtypes in Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianxin; Du, Yaomin

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a major prostanoid with a wide variety of biological activities. PGE2 can influence blood pressure (BP) both positively and negatively. In particular, centrally administered PGE2 induces hypertension whereas systemic administration of PGE2 produces a hypotensive effect. These physiologically opposing effects are generated by the existence of multiple EP receptors, namely EP1–4, which are G protein-coupled receptors with distinct signaling properties. This review highlights the distinct roles of PGE2 in BP regulation and the involvement of specific EP receptor subtypes. American Journal of Hypertension, advance online publication 14 June 2012; doi:10.1038/ajh.2012.67 PMID:22695507

  1. STRUCTURALLY DISTINCT UBIQUITIN- AND SUMO-MODIFIED PCNA: IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR DISTINCT ROLES IN THE DNA DAMAGE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Weinacht, Christopher P.; Freudenthal, Bret D.; Yang, Kun; Zhuang, Zhihao; Washington, M. Todd; Tainer, John A.; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a pivotal replication protein, which also controls cellular responses to DNA damage. Posttranslational modification of PCNA by SUMO and ubiquitin modulate these responses. How the modifiers alter PCNA-dependent DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways is largely unknown. We used hybrid methods to identify atomic models of PCNAK107-Ub and PCNAK164-SUMO consistent with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data of these complexes in solution. We show that SUMO and ubiquitin have distinct modes of association to PCNA. Ubiquitin adopts discrete docked binding positions. By contrast, SUMO associates by simple tethering and adopts extended flexible conformations. These structural differences are the result of the opposite electrostatic potentials of SUMO and Ub. The unexpected contrast in conformational behavior of Ub-PCNA and SUMO-PCNA has implications for interactions with partner proteins, interacting surfaces accessibility, and access points for pathway regulation. PMID:25773143

  2. Two distinct roles of the yorkie/yap gene during homeostasis in the planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byulnim; An, Yang; Agata, Kiyokazu; Umesono, Yoshihiko

    2015-04-01

    Adult planarians possess somatic pluripotent stem cells called neoblasts that give rise to all missing cell types during regeneration and homeostasis. Recent studies revealed that the Yorkie (Yki)/Yes-associated protein (YAP) transcriptional coactivator family plays an important role in the regulation of tissue growth during development and regeneration, and therefore we investigated the role of a planarian yki-related gene (termed Djyki) during regeneration and homeostasis of the freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica. We found that knockdown of the function of Djyki by RNA interference (RNAi) downregulated neoblast proliferation and caused regeneration defects after amputation. In addition, Djyki RNAi caused edema during homeostasis. These seemingly distinct defects induced by Djyki RNAi were rescued by simultaneous RNAi of a planarian mats-related gene (termed Djmats), suggesting an important role of Djmats in the negative regulation of Djyki, in accordance with the conservation of the functional relationship of these two genes during the course of evolution. Interestingly, Djyki RNAi did not prevent normal protonephridial structure, suggesting that Djyki RNAi induced the edema phenotype without affecting the excretory system. Further analyses revealed that increased expression of the D. japonica gene DjaquaporinA (DjaqpA), which belongs to a large gene family that encodes a water channel protein for the regulation of transcellular water flow, promoted the induction of edema, but not defects in neoblast dynamics, in Djyki(RNAi) animals. Thus, we conclude that Djyki plays two distinct roles in the regulation of active proliferation of stem cells and in osmotic water transport across the body surface in D. japonica. PMID:25708270

  3. Role of distinct CD4(+) T helper subset in pathogenesis of oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Dunfang; Han, Qi; Zhao, Xin; Zeng, Xin; Xu, Yi; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Qianming

    2016-07-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is one of the most common chronic inflammatory oral mucosal diseases with T-cell-mediated immune pathogenesis. In subepithelial and lamina propria of OLP local lesions, the presence of CD4(+) T helper (CD4(+) Th) cells appeared as the major lymphocytes. These CD4(+) T lymphocytes can differentiate into distinct Th cell types such as Th1, Th2, Treg, Th17, Th22, Th9, and Tfh within the context of certain cytokines environment. Growing evidence indicated that Th1/Th2 imbalance may greatly participate into the cytokine network of OLP immunopathology. In addition, Th1/Th2 imbalance can be regulated by the Treg subset and also greatly influenced by the emerging novel CD4(+) Th subset Th17. Furthermore, the presence of novel subsets Th22, Th9 and Tfh in OLP patients is yet to be clarified. All these Th subsets and their specific cytokines may play a critical role in determining the character, extent and duration of immune responses in OLP pathogenesis. Therefore, we review the roles of distinct CD4(+) Th subsets and their signature cytokines in determining disease severity and susceptibility of OLP and also reveal the novel therapeutic strategies based on T lymphocytes subsets in OLP treatment. PMID:26693958

  4. The role of CYP26 enzymes in defining appropriate retinoic acid exposure during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pennimpede, Tracie; Cameron, Don A; MacLean, Glenn A; Li, Hui; Abu-Abed, Suzan; Petkovich, Martin

    2010-10-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a pleiotropic derivative of vitamin A, or retinol, which is responsible for all of the bioactivity associated with this vitamin. The teratogenic influences of vitamin A deficiency and excess RA in rodents were first observed more than 50 years ago. Efforts over the last 15-20 years have refined these observations by defining the molecular mechanisms that control RA availability and signaling during murine embryonic development. This review will discuss our current understanding of the role of RA in teratogenesis, with specific emphasis on the essential function of the RA catabolic CYP26 enzymes in preventing teratogenic consequences caused by uncontrolled distribution of RA. Particular focus will be paid to the RA-sensitive tissues of the caudal and cranial regions, the limb, and the testis, and how genetic mutation of factors controlling RA distribution have revealed important roles for RA during embryogenesis. PMID:20842651

  5. The role of substrate specificity and metal binding in defining the activity and structure of an intracellular subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Michael; Künze, Georg; Brancale, Andrea; Wilson, Keith S; Jones, D Dafydd

    2012-01-01

    The dimeric intracellular subtilisin proteases (ISPs) found throughout Gram-positive bacteria are a structurally distinct class of the subtilase family. Unlike the vast majority of subtilisin-like proteases, the ISPs function exclusively within the cell, contributing the majority of observed cellular proteolytic activity. Given that they are active within the cell, little is known about substrate specificity and the role of stress signals such as divalent metal ions in modulating ISP function. We demonstrate that both play roles in defining the proteolytic activity of Bacillus clausii ISP and propose the molecular basis of their effects. Enzyme kinetics reveal that one particular synthetic tetrapeptide substrate, Phe-Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA, is hydrolysed with a catalytic efficiency ∼100-fold higher than any other tested. Heat-denatured whole proteins were found to be better substrates for ISP than the native forms. Substrate binding simulations suggest that the S1, S2 and S4 sites form defined binding pockets. The deep S1 cavity and wide S4 site are fully occupied by the hydrophobic aromatic side-chains of Phe. Divalent metal ions, probably Ca(2+), are proposed to be important for ISP activity through structural changes. The presence of >0.01 mM EDTA inactivates ISP, with CD and SEC suggesting that the protein becomes less structured and potentially monomeric. Removal of Ca(2+) at sites close to the dimer interface and the S1 pocket are thought to be responsible for the effect. These studies provide a new insight into the potential physiological function of ISPs, by reconciling substrate specificity and divalent metal binding to associate ISP with the unfolded protein response under stress conditions. PMID:23650602

  6. Quantifying the relative roles of selective and neutral processes in defining eukaryotic microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Morrison-Whittle, Peter; Goddard, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    We have a limited understanding of the relative contributions of different processes that regulate microbial communities, which are crucial components of both natural and agricultural ecosystems. The contributions of selective and neutral processes in defining community composition are often confounded in field studies because as one moves through space, environments also change. Managed ecosystems provide an excellent opportunity to control for this and evaluate the relative strength of these processes by minimising differences between comparable niches separated at different geographic scales. We use next-generation sequencing to characterize the variance in fungal communities inhabiting adjacent fruit, soil and bark in comparable vineyards across 1000 kms in New Zealand. By compartmentalizing community variation, we reveal that niche explains at least four times more community variance than geographic location. We go beyond merely demonstrating that different communities are found in both different niches and locations by quantifying the forces that define these patterns. Overall, selection unsurprisingly predominantly shapes these microbial communities, but we show the balance of neutral processes also have a significant role in defining community assemblage in eukaryotic microbes. PMID:25756681

  7. Quantifying the relative roles of selective and neutral processes in defining eukaryotic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Morrison-Whittle, Peter; Goddard, Matthew R

    2015-09-01

    We have a limited understanding of the relative contributions of different processes that regulate microbial communities, which are crucial components of both natural and agricultural ecosystems. The contributions of selective and neutral processes in defining community composition are often confounded in field studies because as one moves through space, environments also change. Managed ecosystems provide an excellent opportunity to control for this and evaluate the relative strength of these processes by minimising differences between comparable niches separated at different geographic scales. We use next-generation sequencing to characterize the variance in fungal communities inhabiting adjacent fruit, soil and bark in comparable vineyards across 1000 kms in New Zealand. By compartmentalizing community variation, we reveal that niche explains at least four times more community variance than geographic location. We go beyond merely demonstrating that different communities are found in both different niches and locations by quantifying the forces that define these patterns. Overall, selection unsurprisingly predominantly shapes these microbial communities, but we show the balance of neutral processes also have a significant role in defining community assemblage in eukaryotic microbes. PMID:25756681

  8. Distinct spatiotemporal roles of hedgehog signalling during chick and mouse cranial base and axial skeleton development

    PubMed Central

    Balczerski, B.; Zakaria, S.; Tucker, A. S.; Borycki, A.G.; Koyama, E.; Pacifici, M.; Francis-West, P.

    2012-01-01

    The cranial base exerts a supportive role for the brain and includes the occipital, sphenoid and ethmoid bones that arise from cartilaginous precursors in the early embryo. As the occipital bone and the posterior part of the sphenoid are mesoderm derivatives that arise in close proximity to the notochord and floor plate, it has been assumed that their development, like the axial skeleton, is dependent on Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and modulation of bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signalling. Here we examined the development of the cranial base in chick and mouse embryos to compare the molecular signals that are required for chondrogenic induction in the trunk and head. We found that Shh signalling is required but the molecular network controlling cranial base development is distinct from that in the trunk. In the absence of Shh, the presumptive cranial base did not undergo chondrogenic commitment as determined by the loss of Sox9 expression and there was a decrease in cell survival. In contrast, induction of the otic capsule occurred normally demonstrating that induction of the cranial base is uncoupled from formation of the sensory capsules. Lastly, we found that the early cranial mesoderm is refractory to Shh signalling, likely accounting for why development of the cranial base occurs after the axial skeleton. Our data reveal that cranial and axial skeletal induction is controlled by conserved, yet spatiotemporally distinct mechanisms that co-ordinate development of the cranial base with that of the cranial musculature and the pharyngeal arches. PMID:23009899

  9. The Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase Biosynthetic Enzyme Has Distinct Catalytic and Metabolic Roles

    PubMed Central

    Frej, Anna D.; Clark, Jonathan; Le Roy, Caroline I.; Lilla, Sergio; Thomason, Peter A.; Otto, Grant P.; Churchill, Grant; Insall, Robert H.; Claus, Sandrine P.; Hawkins, Phillip; Stephens, Len

    2016-01-01

    Inositol levels, maintained by the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase (Ino1), are altered in a range of disorders, including bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. To date, most inositol studies have focused on the molecular and cellular effects of inositol depletion without considering Ino1 levels. Here we employ a simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, to demonstrate distinct effects of loss of Ino1 and inositol depletion. We show that loss of Ino1 results in an inositol auxotrophy that can be rescued only partially by exogenous inositol. Removal of inositol supplementation from the ino1− mutant resulted in a rapid 56% reduction in inositol levels, triggering the induction of autophagy, reduced cytokinesis, and substrate adhesion. Inositol depletion also caused a dramatic generalized decrease in phosphoinositide levels that was rescued by inositol supplementation. However, loss of Ino1 triggered broad metabolic changes consistent with the induction of a catabolic state that was not rescued by inositol supplementation. These data suggest a metabolic role for Ino1 that is independent of inositol biosynthesis. To characterize this role, an Ino1 binding partner containing SEL1L1 domains (Q54IX5) and having homology to mammalian macromolecular complex adaptor proteins was identified. Our findings therefore identify a new role for Ino1, independent of inositol biosynthesis, with broad effects on cell metabolism. PMID:26951199

  10. The Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase Biosynthetic Enzyme Has Distinct Catalytic and Metabolic Roles.

    PubMed

    Frej, Anna D; Clark, Jonathan; Le Roy, Caroline I; Lilla, Sergio; Thomason, Peter A; Otto, Grant P; Churchill, Grant; Insall, Robert H; Claus, Sandrine P; Hawkins, Phillip; Stephens, Len; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-05-15

    Inositol levels, maintained by the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase (Ino1), are altered in a range of disorders, including bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. To date, most inositol studies have focused on the molecular and cellular effects of inositol depletion without considering Ino1 levels. Here we employ a simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, to demonstrate distinct effects of loss of Ino1 and inositol depletion. We show that loss of Ino1 results in an inositol auxotrophy that can be rescued only partially by exogenous inositol. Removal of inositol supplementation from the ino1(-) mutant resulted in a rapid 56% reduction in inositol levels, triggering the induction of autophagy, reduced cytokinesis, and substrate adhesion. Inositol depletion also caused a dramatic generalized decrease in phosphoinositide levels that was rescued by inositol supplementation. However, loss of Ino1 triggered broad metabolic changes consistent with the induction of a catabolic state that was not rescued by inositol supplementation. These data suggest a metabolic role for Ino1 that is independent of inositol biosynthesis. To characterize this role, an Ino1 binding partner containing SEL1L1 domains (Q54IX5) and having homology to mammalian macromolecular complex adaptor proteins was identified. Our findings therefore identify a new role for Ino1, independent of inositol biosynthesis, with broad effects on cell metabolism. PMID:26951199

  11. Distinct roles of neuropilin 1 signaling for radial and tangential extension of callosal axons.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Fujisawa, Hajime; Murakami, Fujio; Masu, Masayuki

    2009-05-20

    Cortical excitatory neurons migrate from their origin in the ventricular zone (VZ) toward the pial surface. During migration, these neurons exhibit a stellate shape in the intermediate zone (IZ), transform into bipolar cells, and then initiate radial migration, extending a trailing process, which may lead to an axon. Here we examined the role of neuropilin 1 (NRP1) in these developmental events. Both NRP1 mRNA and protein were highly expressed in the IZ, where stellate-shaped cells were located. DiI labeling experiments showed that neuronal migration occurred normally in Nrp1 mutant mice up to embryonic day (E) 14.5, the latest day to which the mutant survives, with only subtle axonal defasciculation. However, interference with Nrp1 signaling at a later stage caused pathfinding errors: when a dominant negative form of Nrp1 was electroporated into the cortical VZ cells at E12.5 or E15.5 and examined perinatally, guidance errors were found in tangential axonal extension toward the midline. In contrast, no significant effect was noted on the migration of cortical excitatory neurons. These findings indicate that NRP1 plays an important role in the guidance of callosal axons originating from cortical excitatory neurons but does not support a role in their migration. Moreover, insofar as radial axonal extension within the cortical plate was unaffected, the present findings imply that molecular mechanisms for the axonal extension of excitatory neurons within the cortical plate are distinct from those in the white matter. PMID:19296474

  12. Distinctive Role of Symbolic Number Sense in Mediating the Mathematical Abilities of Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Hiniker, Alexis; Rosenberg-Lee, Miriam; Menon, Vinod

    2016-04-01

    Despite reports of mathematical talent in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), little is known about basic number processing abilities in affected children. We investigated number sense, the ability to rapidly assess quantity information, in 36 children with ASD and 61 typically developing controls. Numerical acuity was assessed using symbolic (Arabic numerals) as well as non-symbolic (dot array) formats. We found significant impairments in non-symbolic acuity in children with ASD, but symbolic acuity was intact. Symbolic acuity mediated the relationship between non-symbolic acuity and mathematical abilities only in children with ASD, indicating a distinctive role for symbolic number sense in the acquisition of mathematical proficiency in this group. Our findings suggest that symbolic systems may help children with ASD organize imprecise information. PMID:26659551

  13. Crystal Structures of the Viral Protease Npro Imply Distinct Roles for the Catalytic Water in Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Zögg, Thomas; Sponring, Michael; Schindler, Sabrina; Koll, Maria; Schneider, Rainer; Brandstetter, Hans; Auer, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Summary Npro is a key effector protein of pestiviruses such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and abolishes host cell antiviral defense mechanisms. Synthesized as the N-terminal part of the viral polyprotein, Npro releases itself via an autoproteolytic cleavage, triggering its immunological functions. However, the mechanisms of its proteolytic action and its immune escape were unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of Npro to 1.25 Å resolution. Structures of pre- and postcleavage intermediates identify three catalytically relevant elements. The trapping of the putative catalytic water reveals its distinct roles as a base, acid, and nucleophile. The presentation of the substrate further explains the enigmatic latency of the protease, ensuring a single in cis cleavage. Additionally, we identified a zinc-free, disulfide-linked conformation of the TRASH motif, an interaction hub of immune factors. The structure opens additional opportunities in utilizing Npro as an autocleaving fusion protein and as a pharmaceutical target. PMID:23643950

  14. Two Distinct Roles of Atlantic SSTs in ENSO Variability: North Tropical Atlantic SST and Atlantic Nino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Yoo-Geun; Kug, Jong-Seong; Park, Jong-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Two distinct roles of the Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), namely, the North Tropical Atlantic (NTA) SST and the Atlantic Nino, on the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability are investigated using the observational data from 1980 to 2010 and coupled model experiments. It appears that the NTA SST and the Atlantic Nino can be used as two independent predictors for predicting the development of ENSO events in the following season. Furthermore, they are likely to be linked to different types of El Nino events. Specifically, the NTA SST cooling during February, March, and April contributes to the central Pacific warming at the subsequent winter season, while the negative Atlantic Nino event during June, July, and August contributes to enhancing the eastern Pacific warming. The coupled model experiments support these results. With the aid of a lagged inverse relationship, the statistical forecast using two Atlantic indices can successfully predict various ENSO indices.

  15. Optogenetic activation reveals distinct roles of PIP3 and Akt in adipocyte insulin action.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingke; Nan, Di; Fan, Jiannan; Bogan, Jonathan S; Toomre, Derek

    2016-05-15

    Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4; also known as SLC2A4) resides on intracellular vesicles in muscle and adipose cells, and translocates to the plasma membrane in response to insulin. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway plays a major role in GLUT4 translocation; however, a challenge has been to unravel the potentially distinct contributions of PI3K and Akt (of which there are three isoforms, Akt1-Akt3) to overall insulin action. Here, we describe new optogenetic tools based on CRY2 and the N-terminus of CIB1 (CIBN). We used these 'Opto' modules to activate PI3K and Akt selectively in time and space in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We validated these tools using biochemical assays and performed live-cell kinetic analyses of IRAP-pHluorin translocation (IRAP is also known as LNPEP and acts as a surrogate marker for GLUT4 here). Strikingly, Opto-PIP3 largely mimicked the maximal effects of insulin stimulation, whereas Opto-Akt only partially triggered translocation. Conversely, drug-mediated inhibition of Akt only partially dampened the translocation response of Opto-PIP3 In spatial optogenetic studies, focal targeting of Akt to a region of the cell marked the sites where IRAP-pHluorin vesicles fused, supporting the idea that local Akt-mediated signaling regulates exocytosis. Taken together, these results indicate that PI3K and Akt play distinct roles, and that PI3K stimulates Akt-independent pathways that are important for GLUT4 translocation. PMID:27076519

  16. Distinct roles for protein kinase C isoforms in regulating platelet purinergic receptor function.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Jones, Matthew L; Hardy, Adam R; Barton, Johanna F; Beaucourt, Stephanie M; Conley, Pamela B; Poole, Alastair W

    2006-09-01

    ADP is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), P2Y1 and P2Y12. We have shown previously that the receptors are functionally desensitized, in a homologous manner, by distinct kinase-dependent mechanisms in which P2Y1 is regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and P2Y12 by G protein-coupled receptor kinases. In this study, we addressed whether different PKC isoforms play different roles in regulating the trafficking and activity of these two GPCRs. Expression of PKCalpha and PKCdelta dominant-negative mutants in 1321N1 cells revealed that both isoforms regulated P2Y1 receptor signaling and trafficking, although only PKCdelta was capable of regulating P2Y12, in experiments in which PKC was directly activated by the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). These results were paralleled in human platelets, in which PMA reduced subsequent ADP-induced P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptor signaling. PKC isoform-selective inhibitors revealed that novel, but not conventional, isoforms of PKC regulate P2Y12 function, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 activity. It is also noteworthy that we studied receptor internalization in platelets by a radioligand binding approach showing that both receptors internalize rapidly in these cells. ADP-induced P2Y1 receptor internalization is attenuated by PKC inhibitors, whereas that of the P2Y12 receptor is unaffected. Both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors can also undergo PMA-stimulated internalization, and here again, novel but not classic PKCs regulate P2Y12, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 internalization. This study therefore is the first to reveal distinct roles for PKC isoforms in the regulation of platelet P2Y receptor function and trafficking. PMID:16804093

  17. Distinct roles of class IA PI3K isoforms in primary and immortalised macrophages.

    PubMed

    Papakonstanti, Evangelia A; Zwaenepoel, Olivier; Bilancio, Antonio; Burns, Emily; Nock, Gemma E; Houseman, Benjamin; Shokat, Kevan; Ridley, Anne J; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart

    2008-12-15

    The class IA isoforms of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (p110alpha, p110beta and p110delta) often have non-redundant functions in a given cell type. However, for reasons that are unclear, the role of a specific PI3K isoform can vary between cell types. Here, we compare the relative contributions of PI3K isoforms in primary and immortalised macrophages. In primary macrophages stimulated with the tyrosine kinase ligand colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), all class IA PI3K isoforms participate in the regulation of Rac1, whereas p110delta selectively controls the activities of Akt, RhoA and PTEN, in addition to controlling proliferation and chemotaxis. The prominent role of p110delta in these cells correlates with it being the main PI3K isoform that is recruited to the activated CSF1 receptor (CSF1R). In immortalised BAC1.2F5 macrophages, however, the CSF1R also engages p110alpha, which takes up a more prominent role in CSF1R signalling, in processes including Akt phosphorylation and regulation of DNA synthesis. Cell migration, however, remains dependent mainly on p110delta. In other immortalised macrophage cell lines, such as IC-21 and J774.2, p110alpha also becomes more prominently involved in CSF1-induced Akt phosphorylation, at the expense of p110delta.These data show that PI3K isoforms can be differentially regulated in distinct cellular contexts, with the dominant role of the p110delta isoform in Akt phosphorylation and proliferation being lost upon cell immortalisation. These findings suggest that p110delta-selective PI3K inhibitors may be more effective in inflammation than in cancer. PMID:19033389

  18. Systems-Based Practice Defined: Taxonomy Development and Role Identification for Competency Assessment of Residents

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Mark J.; Naqvi, Zoon; Encandela, John; Harding, Kelli J.; Chatterji, Madhabi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate a methodology for coding and taxonomy development and to operationally define residents' competence in systems-based practice (SBP) in terms of observable roles, actions, and behaviors. Methods The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME's) full-text definition of SBP and the 6 discrete expectations it contains were content analyzed. Structured interviews of 88 health care professionals using a variant of focus group interviews called nominal group processes were conducted and qualitatively analyzed to identify the key attributes of SBP. Themes obtained from these 2 procedures were conceptually matched and organized to create a taxonomy of observable SPB behaviors and the SBP domain. Results Six general resident roles emerged, under which 35 specific behavioral attributes were subsumed. From the SBP domain specified. Sample SBP items categorized by roles were derived that reflected “in-context” representations of ACGME SBP expectations. Conclusion Our comprehensive analysis created an operational representation of the SBP competency. The taxonomy development model provides a framework for constructing assessment instrument(s) that could be applied to the other ACGME competencies or complex concepts in medical education. PMID:21975707

  19. Role of the observer in the scientific process in astrobiology and in defining life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.

    2010-09-01

    The role of the observer in the scientific process has been studied in various contexts, including philosophical. It is notorious that the experiments are theory-loaded, that the observers pick and choose what they consider important based on their scientific and cultural backgrounds, and that the same phenomenon may be studied by different observers from different angles. In this paper we critically review various authors' views of the role of the observer in the scientific process, as they apply to astrobiology. Astrobiology is especially vulnerable to the role of the observer, since it is an interdisciplinary science. Thus, the backgrounds of the observers in the astrobiology field are even more heterogeneous than in the other sciences. The definition of life is also heavily influenced by the observer of life who injects his/her own prejudices in the process of observing and defining life. Such prejudices are often dictated by the state of science, instrumentation, and the science politics at the time, as well as the educational, scientific, cultural and other background of the observer.

  20. Two Distinct Binding Modes Define the Interaction of Brox with the C-Terminal Tails of CHMP5 and CHMP4B

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Ruiling; Dussupt, Vincent; Jiang, Jiansheng; Sette, Paola; Rudd, Victoria; Chuenchor, Watchalee; Bello, Nana F.; Bouamr, Fadila; Xiao, Tsan Sam

    2012-05-21

    Interactions of the CHMP protein carboxyl terminal tails with effector proteins play important roles in retroviral budding, cytokinesis, and multivesicular body biogenesis. Here we demonstrate that hydrophobic residues at the CHMP4B C-terminal amphipathic {alpha} helix bind a concave surface of Brox, a mammalian paralog of Alix. Unexpectedly, CHMP5 was also found to bind Brox and specifically recruit endogenous Brox to detergent-resistant membrane fractions through its C-terminal 20 residues. Instead of an {alpha} helix, the CHMP5 C-terminal tail adopts a tandem {beta}-hairpin structure that binds Brox at the same site as CHMP4B. Additional Brox:CHMP5 interface is furnished by a unique CHMP5 hydrophobic pocket engaging the Brox residue Y348 that is not conserved among the Bro1 domains. Our studies thus unveil a {beta}-hairpin conformation of the CHMP5 protein C-terminal tail, and provide insights into the overlapping but distinct binding profiles of ESCRT-III and the Bro1 domain proteins.

  1. The Splice Isoforms of the Drosophila Ecdysis Triggering Hormone Receptor Have Developmentally Distinct Roles.

    PubMed

    Diao, Feici; Mena, Wilson; Shi, Jonathan; Park, Dongkook; Diao, Fengqiu; Taghert, Paul; Ewer, John; White, Benjamin H

    2016-01-01

    To grow, insects must periodically shed their exoskeletons. This process, called ecdysis, is initiated by the endocrine release of Ecdysis Trigger Hormone (ETH) and has been extensively studied as a model for understanding the hormonal control of behavior. Understanding how ETH regulates ecdysis behavior, however, has been impeded by limited knowledge of the hormone's neuronal targets. An alternatively spliced gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (ETHR) that is activated by ETH has been identified, and several lines of evidence support a role in ecdysis for its A-isoform. The function of a second ETHR isoform (ETHRB) remains unknown. Here we use the recently introduced "Trojan exon" technique to simultaneously mutate the ETHR gene and gain genetic access to the neurons that express its two isoforms. We show that ETHRA and ETHRB are expressed in largely distinct subsets of neurons and that ETHRA- but not ETHRB-expressing neurons are required for ecdysis at all developmental stages. However, both genetic and neuronal manipulations indicate an essential role for ETHRB at pupal and adult, but not larval, ecdysis. We also identify several functionally important subsets of ETHR-expressing neurons including one that coexpresses the peptide Leucokinin and regulates fluid balance to facilitate ecdysis at the pupal stage. The general strategy presented here of using a receptor gene as an entry point for genetic and neuronal manipulations should be useful in establishing patterns of functional connectivity in other hormonally regulated networks. PMID:26534952

  2. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region

    PubMed Central

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A βcatenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (βcatenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis. PMID:26556349

  3. Separate and distinctive roles for Wnt5a in tongue, lingual tissue and taste papilla development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Grosse, Ann S.; Iwatsuki, Ken; Mishina, Yuji; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Mistretta, Charlotte M.

    2012-01-01

    Although canonical Wnt signaling is known to regulate taste papilla induction and numbers, roles for noncanonical Wnt pathways in tongue and taste papilla development have not been explored. With mutant mice and whole tongue organ cultures we demonstrate that Wnt5a protein and message are within anterior tongue mesenchyme across embryo stages from the initiation of tongue formation, through papilla placode appearance and taste papilla development. The Wnt5a mutant tongue is severely shortened, with an ankyloglossia, and lingual mesenchyme is disorganized. However, fungiform papilla morphology, number and innervation are preserved, as is expression of the papilla marker, Shh. These data demonstrate that the genetic regulation for tongue size and shape can be separated from that directing lingual papilla development. Preserved number of papillae in a shortened tongue results in an increased density of fungiform papillae in the mutant tongues. In tongue organ cultures, exogenous Wnt5a profoundly suppresses papilla formation and simultaneously decreases canonical Wnt signaling as measured by the TOPGAL reporter. These findings suggest that Wnt5a antagonizes canonical Wnt signaling to dictate papilla number and spacing. In all, distinctive roles for Wnt5a in tongue size, fungiform papilla patterning and development are shown and a necessary balance between non-canonical and canonical Wnt paths in regulating tongue growth and fungiform papillae is proposed in a model, through the Ror2 receptor. PMID:22024319

  4. Two distinct DNA binding modes guide dual roles Of a CRISPR-Cas protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Westra, Edze R.; Vlot, Marnix; Künne, Tim; Sobota, Małgorzata; Dekker, Cees; Brouns, Stan J.J.; Joo, Chirlmin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Small RNA-guided protein complexes play an essential role in CRISPR-mediated immunity in prokaryotes. While these complexes initiate interference by flagging cognate invader DNA for destruction, recent evidence has implicated their involvement in new CRISPR memory formation, called priming, against mutated invader sequences. The mechanism by which the target recognition complex mediates these disparate responses—interference and priming—remains poorly understood. Using single-molecule FRET, we visualize how bona fide and mutated targets are differentially probed by E. coli Cascade. We observe that the recognition of bona fide targets is an ordered process that is tightly controlled for high fidelity. Mutated targets are recognized with low fidelity, which is featured by short-lived and PAM- and seed-independent binding by any segment of the crRNA. These dual roles of Cascade in immunity with distinct fidelities underpin CRISPR-Cas robustness, allowing for efficient degradation of bona fide targets and priming of mutated DNA targets. PMID:25752578

  5. Distinct Roles of Muscle and Motoneuron LRP4 in Neuromuscular Junction Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haitao; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Patel, Neil; Gan, Lin; Xiong, Wen C.; Mei, Lin

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation requires precise interaction between motoneurons and muscle fibers. LRP4 is a receptor of agrin that is thought to act incis to stimulate MuSK in muscle fibers for postsynaptic differentiation. Here we dissected the roles of LRP4 in muscle fibers and motoneurons in NMJ formation by cell-specific mutation. Studies of muscle-specific mutants suggest that LRP4 is involved in deciding where to form AChR clusters in muscle fibers, postsynaptic differentiation, and axon terminal development. LRP4 in HEK293 cells increased synapsin or SV2 puncta in contacting axons of co-cultured neurons, suggesting a synaptogenic function. Analysis of LRP4 muscle and motoneuron double mutants and mechanistic studies suggest that NMJ formation may also be regulated by LRP4 in motoneurons, which could serve as agrin’s receptor in trans to induce AChR clusters. These observations uncovered distinct roles of LRP4 in motoneurons and muscles in NMJ development. PMID:22794264

  6. Distinct roles of muscle and motoneuron LRP4 in neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haitao; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Patel, Neil; Gan, Lin; Xiong, Wen C; Mei, Lin

    2012-07-12

    Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation requires precise interaction between motoneurons and muscle fibers. LRP4 is a receptor of agrin that is thought to act in cis to stimulate MuSK in muscle fibers for postsynaptic differentiation. Here we dissected the roles of LRP4 in muscle fibers and motoneurons in NMJ formation by cell-specific mutation. Studies of muscle-specific mutants suggest that LRP4 is involved in deciding where to form AChR clusters in muscle fibers, postsynaptic differentiation, and axon terminal development. LRP4 in HEK293 cells increased synapsin or SV2 puncta in contacting axons of cocultured neurons, suggesting a synaptogenic function. Analysis of LRP4 muscle and motoneuron double mutants and mechanistic studies suggest that NMJ formation may also be regulated by LRP4 in motoneurons, which could serve as agrin's receptor in trans to induce AChR clusters. These observations uncovered distinct roles of LRP4 in motoneurons and muscles in NMJ development. PMID:22794264

  7. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region.

    PubMed

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A βcatenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (βcatenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis. PMID:26556349

  8. Two novel regulators of N-acetyl-galactosamine utilization pathway and distinct roles in bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Fengyu; Gong, Xiufang; Hao, Lina; Cao, Min; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Wang, Changjun; Feng, Youjun

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial pathogens can exploit metabolic pathways to facilitate their successful infection cycles, but little is known about roles of d-galactosamine (GalN)/N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (GalNAc) catabolism pathway in bacterial pathogenesis. Here, we report the genomic reconstruction of GalN/GalNAc utilization pathway in Streptococci and the diversified aga regulons. We delineated two new paralogous AgaR regulators for the GalN/GalNAc catabolism pathway. The electrophoretic mobility shift assays experiment demonstrated that AgaR2 (AgaR1) binds the predicted palindromes, and the combined in vivo data from reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and RNA-seq suggested that AgaR2 (not AgaR1) can effectively repress the transcription of the target genes. Removal of agaR2 (not agaR1) from Streptococcus suis 05ZYH33 augments significantly the abilities of both adherence to Hep-2 cells and anti-phagocytosis against RAW264.7 macrophage. As anticipated, the dysfunction in AgaR2-mediated regulation of S. suis impairs its pathogenicity in experimental models of both mice and piglets. Our finding discovered two novel regulators specific for GalN/GalNAc catabolism and assigned them distinct roles into bacterial infections. To the best of our knowledge, it might represent a first paradigm that links the GalN/GalNAc catabolism pathway to bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:26540018

  9. Psychosis and behavioural symptoms of dementia: defining the role of neuroleptic interventions.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, B; Bhriain, S N

    2001-12-01

    Neuroleptics have a definite role in dementia but the treatment targets need to be more narrowly defined. Symptom clusters that are neuroleptic-responsive (e.g., aggression, psychomotor agitation and psychosis) appear to be emerging but need clearer definition and measurement. A number of these symptom clusters are relatively persistent over time and associated with increased risk of institutionalization, underscoring the need for treatment. The frequency, severity and persistence of the symptom or behaviour, the context in which it occurs and its impact on the carer must be considered before prescribing a neuroleptic. Given the modest effect size for neuroleptic interventions, the safety and tolerability of the agent is also a key factor in determining drug choice. Novel neuroleptics are safer and better tolerated and therefore should be used in preference to conventional agents when neuroleptic treatment is indicated for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. PMID:11748783

  10. Defining the role of the CGGBP1 protein in FMR1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Goracci, Martina; Lanni, Stella; Mancano, Giorgia; Palumbo, Federica; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Neri, Giovanni; Tabolacci, Elisabetta

    2016-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common heritable form of intellectual disability and is caused by the expansion over 200 repeats and subsequent methylation of the CGG triplets at the 5' UTR of the FMR1 gene, leading to its silencing. The epigenetic and molecular mechanisms responsible for FMR1 gene silencing are not fully clarified. To identify structure-specific proteins that could recruit components of the silencing machinery we investigated the role of CGGBP1 in FMR1 gene transcription. CGGBP1 is a highly conserved protein that binds specifically to unmethylated CGG tracts. Its role on FMR1 transcription is yet to be defined. Sequencing analysis and expression studies through quantitative PCR of CGGBP1 were performed in cell lines with different allele expansions: wild type, premutation, methylated full mutation and unmethylated full mutation, demonstrating no differences between them. ChIP assays clearly demonstrated that CGGBP1 binds to unmethylated CGG triplets of the FMR1 gene, but not to methylated CGGs. We also observed that CGGBP1 binding to the FMR1 locus was restored after pharmacological demethylation, with 5-azadC, of alleles, carriers of methylated full mutation, suggesting a possible role for CGGBP1 in FMR1 expression. CGGBP1 silencing with shRNAs (reaching ~98% of CGGBP1-mRNA depletion) did not affect FMR1 transcription and CGG expansion stability in expanded alleles. Although the strong binding to the CGG tract could suggest a relevant role of CGGBP1 on FMR1 gene expression, our results demonstrate that CGGBP1 has no direct effect on FMR1 transcription and CGG repeat stability. PMID:26306647

  11. Defining the role of NMDA receptors in anesthesia: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Andrey B; Yamakura, Tomohiro; Sakimura, Kenji; Baba, Hiroshi

    2014-01-15

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are important in mediating excitatory neurotransmission in the nervous system. They are preferentially inhibited by some general anesthetics and have, therefore, been implied in the mediation of their effects. This review summarizes the main research findings available related to NMDA receptors and their role in anesthesia. The contribution of NMDA receptors to the anesthetized state is discussed separately for each of its components: amnesia, analgesia, unconsciousness and immobility. Anesthetic-induced unconsciousness and immobility have received the most attention in the research community and are the main focus of this review. In the overall perspective, however, studies using pharmacological or electrophysiological approaches have failed to reach definitive conclusions regarding the contribution of NMDA receptors to these anesthetic endpoints. None of the studies have specifically addressed the role of NMDA receptors in the amnestic effect of general anesthetics, and the few available data are (at best) only indirect. NMDA receptor antagonism by general anesthetics may have a preventive anti-hyperalgesic effect. The only and most extensively used genetic tool to examine the role of NMDA receptors in anesthesia is global knockout of the GluN2A subunit of the NMDA receptor. These animals are resistant to many intravenous and inhalational anesthetics, but the interpretation of their phenotype is hindered by the secondary changes occurring in these animals after GluN2A knockout, which are themselves capable of altering anesthetic sensitivity. Generation of more sophisticated conditional knockout models targeting NMDA receptors is required to finally define their role in the mechanisms of anesthesia. PMID:24333550

  12. Perspective: Defining and quantifying the role of dynamics in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Warshel, Arieh; Bora, Ram Prasad

    2016-05-14

    Enzymes control chemical reactions that are key to life processes, and allow them to take place on the time scale needed for synchronization between the relevant reaction cycles. In addition to general interest in their biological roles, these proteins present a fundamental scientific puzzle, since the origin of their tremendous catalytic power is still unclear. While many different hypotheses have been put forward to rationalize this, one of the proposals that has become particularly popular in recent years is the idea that dynamical effects contribute to catalysis. Here, we present a critical review of the dynamical idea, considering all reasonable definitions of what does and does not qualify as a dynamical effect. We demonstrate that no dynamical effect (according to these definitions) has ever been experimentally shown to contribute to catalysis. Furthermore, the existence of non-negligible dynamical contributions to catalysis is not supported by consistent theoretical studies. Our review is aimed, in part, at readers with a background in chemical physics and biophysics, and illustrates that despite a substantial body of experimental effort, there has not yet been any study that consistently established a connection between an enzyme's conformational dynamics and a significant increase in the catalytic contribution of the chemical step. We also make the point that the dynamical proposal is not a semantic issue but a well-defined scientific hypothesis with well-defined conclusions. PMID:27179464

  13. Possible role of ceramide in defining structure and function of membrane glycolipids.

    PubMed Central

    Kannagi, R; Nudelman, E; Hakomori, S

    1982-01-01

    A possible role of ceramide in defining the carbohydrate structure of glycolipids and the expression of glycolipid function has been proposed, on the basis of our finding that the ceramide composition of "lacto-series" glycosphingolipid isolated from human erythrocytes shows a remarkable correlation with the terminal carbohydrate structure: (i) The ceramides of three glycosphingolipids with Lex (or x) determinant [Gal beta 1 leads to 4(Fuc alpha 1 leads to 3) GlcNAc] had almost exclusively 16:0 fatty acid; in contrast, the ceramide of its positional isomer H determinant had mainly 20--24:0 fatty acids. (ii) The ceramide of two glycosphingolipids with NeuAc alpha 2 leads to 6GAL structure was predominantly of 16:0 fatty acid, in contrast to that of its positional isomer NeuAc alpha 2 leads to 3Gal residue, in which the ceramide had 20--24:0 fatty acids. These results, together with our previous observation that ceramide composition of mouse lymphoma and myelocytic leukemia MI cells affects their antigenicity, suggest that ceramide structure may define the organization of glycosyltransferase for synthesis of the carbohydrate determinants and may affect the organization and orientation of the carbohydrate chain in membranes, eliciting or suppressing the reactivity to its ligand. Because these glycolipids with Lex and NeuAc alpha 2 leads to 6Gal structures are developmentally regulated and are highly expressed in certain tumors, ceramide composition may affect development, differentiation, and oncogenesis. Images PMID:6954491

  14. RE-DEFINING THE ROLES OF SENSORS IN OBJECTIVE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY MONITORING

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kong Y.; Janz, Kathleen F.; Zhu, Weimo; Brychta, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background As physical activity researchers are increasingly using objective portable devices, this review describes current state of the technology to assess physical activity, with a focus on specific sensors and sensor properties currently used in monitors and their strengths and weakness. Additional sensors and sensor properties desirable for activity measurement and best practices for users and developers also are discussed. Best Practices We grouped current sensors into three broad categories for objectively measuring physical activity: associated body movement, physiology, and context. Desirable sensor properties for measuring physical activity and the importance of these properties in relationship to specific applications are addressed, and the specific roles of transducers and data acquisition systems within the monitoring devices are defined. Technical advancements in sensors, microcomputer processors, memory storage, batteries, wireless communication, and digital filters have made monitors more usable for subjects (smaller, more stable, and longer running time) and for researchers (less costly, higher time resolution and memory storage, shorter download time, and user-defined data features). Future Directions Users and developers of physical activity monitors should learn about the basic properties of their sensors, such as range, accuracy, precision, while considering the data acquisition/filtering steps that may be critical to data quality and may influence the desirable measurement outcome(s). PMID:22157770

  15. Perspective: Defining and quantifying the role of dynamics in enzyme catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Warshel, Arieh; Bora, Ram Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes control chemical reactions that are key to life processes, and allow them to take place on the time scale needed for synchronization between the relevant reaction cycles. In addition to general interest in their biological roles, these proteins present a fundamental scientific puzzle, since the origin of their tremendous catalytic power is still unclear. While many different hypotheses have been put forward to rationalize this, one of the proposals that has become particularly popular in recent years is the idea that dynamical effects contribute to catalysis. Here, we present a critical review of the dynamical idea, considering all reasonable definitions of what does and does not qualify as a dynamical effect. We demonstrate that no dynamical effect (according to these definitions) has ever been experimentally shown to contribute to catalysis. Furthermore, the existence of non-negligible dynamical contributions to catalysis is not supported by consistent theoretical studies. Our review is aimed, in part, at readers with a background in chemical physics and biophysics, and illustrates that despite a substantial body of experimental effort, there has not yet been any study that consistently established a connection between an enzyme’s conformational dynamics and a significant increase in the catalytic contribution of the chemical step. We also make the point that the dynamical proposal is not a semantic issue but a well-defined scientific hypothesis with well-defined conclusions. PMID:27179464

  16. Perspective: Defining and quantifying the role of dynamics in enzyme catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warshel, Arieh; Bora, Ram Prasad

    2016-05-01

    Enzymes control chemical reactions that are key to life processes, and allow them to take place on the time scale needed for synchronization between the relevant reaction cycles. In addition to general interest in their biological roles, these proteins present a fundamental scientific puzzle, since the origin of their tremendous catalytic power is still unclear. While many different hypotheses have been put forward to rationalize this, one of the proposals that has become particularly popular in recent years is the idea that dynamical effects contribute to catalysis. Here, we present a critical review of the dynamical idea, considering all reasonable definitions of what does and does not qualify as a dynamical effect. We demonstrate that no dynamical effect (according to these definitions) has ever been experimentally shown to contribute to catalysis. Furthermore, the existence of non-negligible dynamical contributions to catalysis is not supported by consistent theoretical studies. Our review is aimed, in part, at readers with a background in chemical physics and biophysics, and illustrates that despite a substantial body of experimental effort, there has not yet been any study that consistently established a connection between an enzyme's conformational dynamics and a significant increase in the catalytic contribution of the chemical step. We also make the point that the dynamical proposal is not a semantic issue but a well-defined scientific hypothesis with well-defined conclusions.

  17. Distinct Roles of Apolipoproteins A1 and E in the Modulation of High-Density Lipoprotein Composition and Function.

    PubMed

    Filou, Serafoula; Lhomme, Marie; Karavia, Eleni A; Kalogeropoulou, Christina; Theodoropoulos, Vassilis; Zvintzou, Evangelia; Sakellaropoulos, George C; Petropoulou, Peristera-Ioanna; Constantinou, Caterina; Kontush, Anatol; Kypreos, Kyriakos E

    2016-07-12

    In addition to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, HDL quality also appears to be very important for atheroprotection. Analysis of various clinical paradigms suggests that the lipid and apolipoprotein composition of HDL defines its size, shape, and functions and may determine its beneficial effects on human health. Previously, we reported that like apolipoprotein A-I (Apoa1), apolipoprotein E (Apoe) is also capable of promoting the de novo biogenesis of HDL with the participation of ATP binding cassette A lipid transporter member 1 (Abca1) and plasma enzyme lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (Lcat), in a manner independent of a functional Apoa1. Here, we performed a comparative analysis of the functions of these HDL subpopulations. Specifically, Apoe and Apoa1 double-deficient (Apoe(-/-) × Apoa1(-/-)) mice were infected with APOA1- or APOE3-expressing adenoviruses, and APOA1-containing HDL (APOA1-HDL) and APOE3-containing HDL (APOE3-HDL), respectively, were isolated and analyzed by biochemical and physicochemical methods. Western blot and lipidomic analyses indicated significant differences in the apolipoprotein and lipid composition of the two HDL species. Moreover APOE3-HDL presented a markedly reduced antioxidant potential and Abcg1-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity. Surprisingly, APOE3-HDL but not APOA1-HDL attenuated LPS-induced production of TNFα in RAW264.7 cells, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of APOA1 are dependent on APOE expression. Taken together, our data indicate that APOA1 and APOE3 recruit different apolipoproteins and lipids on the HDL particle, leading to structurally and functionally distinct HDL subpopulations. The distinct role of these two apolipoproteins in the modulation of HDL functionality may pave the way toward the development of novel pharmaceuticals that aim to improve HDL functionality. PMID:27332083

  18. Distinct roles for mammalian target of rapamycin complexes in the fibroblast response to transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Rod A; Andrianifahanana, Mahefatiana; Wilkes, Mark C; Edens, Maryanne; Kottom, Theodore J; Blenis, John; Leof, Edward B

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) promotes a multitude of diverse biological processes, including growth arrest of epithelial cells and proliferation of fibroblasts. Although the TGF-beta signaling pathways that promote inhibition of epithelial cell growth are well characterized, less is known about the mechanisms mediating the positive response to this growth factor. Given that TGF-beta has been shown to promote fibrotic diseases and desmoplasia, identifying the fibroblast-specific TGF-beta signaling pathways is critical. Here, we investigate the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a known effector of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and promoter of cell growth, in the fibroblast response to TGF-beta. We show that TGF-beta activates mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in fibroblasts but not epithelial cells via a PI3K-Akt-TSC2-dependent pathway. Rapamycin, the pharmacologic inhibitor of mTOR, prevents TGF-beta-mediated anchorage-independent growth without affecting TGF-beta transcriptional responses or extracellular matrix protein induction. In addition to mTORC1, we also examined the role of mTORC2 in TGF-beta action. mTORC2 promotes TGF-beta-induced morphologic transformation and is required for TGF-beta-induced Akt S473 phosphorylation but not mTORC1 activation. Interestingly, both mTOR complexes are necessary for TGF-beta-mediated growth in soft agar. These results define distinct and overlapping roles for mTORC1 and mTORC2 in the fibroblast response to TGF-beta and suggest that inhibitors of mTOR signaling may be useful in treating fibrotic processes, such as desmoplasia. PMID:19117990

  19. Defining the role of tyrosine and rational tuning of oxidase activity by genetic incorporation of unnatural tyrosine analogs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Lv, Xiaoxuan; Li, Jiasong; Zhou, Qing; Cui, Chang; Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Mukherjee, Arnab; Nilges, Mark J; Wang, Jiangyun; Lu, Yi

    2015-04-15

    While a conserved tyrosine (Tyr) is found in oxidases, the roles of phenol ring pKa and reduction potential in O2 reduction have not been defined despite many years of research on numerous oxidases and their models. These issues represent major challenges in our understanding of O2 reduction mechanism in bioenergetics. Through genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acid analogs of Tyr, with progressively decreasing pKa of the phenol ring and increasing reduction potential, in the active site of a functional model of oxidase in myoglobin, a linear dependence of both the O2 reduction activity and the fraction of H2O formation with the pKa of the phenol ring has been established. By using these unnatural amino acids as spectroscopic probe, we have provided conclusive evidence for the location of a Tyr radical generated during reaction with H2O2, by the distinctive hyperfine splitting patterns of the halogenated tyrosines and one of its deuterated derivatives incorporated at the 33 position of the protein. These results demonstrate for the first time that enhancing the proton donation ability of the Tyr enhances the oxidase activity, allowing the Tyr analogs to augment enzymatic activity beyond that of natural Tyr. PMID:25672571

  20. Picking sides: Distinct roles for CYP76M6 and -8 in rice oryzalexin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yisheng; Wang, Qiang; Hillwig, Matthew L.; Peters, Reuben J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural products biosynthesis often requires the action of multiple cytochromes P450 (CYPs), whose ability to introduce oxygen, increasing solubility, is critical for imparting biological activity. In previous investigations of rice diterpenoid biosynthesis, we have characterized CYPs that catalyze alternative hydroxylation of ent-sandaracopimaradiene, the precursor to the rice oryzalexin antibiotic phytoalexins. In particular, CYP76M5, -6 and -8 were all shown to carry out C7β-hydroxylation, while CYP701A8 catalyzes C3α-hydroxylation, with oxy groups found at both positions in oryzalexins A–D, suggesting that these may act consecutively in oryzalexin biosynthesis. Here we report that, although CYP701A8 only poorly reacts with 7β-hydroxy-ent-sandaracopimaradiene, CYP76M6 and -8 readily react with 3α-hydroxy-ent-sandaracopimaradiene. Notably, their activity yields distinct products, resulting from hydroxylation at C9β by CYP76M6 or C7β by CYP76M8, on different sides of the core tricyclic ring structure. Thus, CYP76M6 and -8 have distinct, non-redundant roles in orzyalexin biosynthesis. Moreover, the resulting 3α,7β- and 3α,9β- diols correspond to oryzalexins D and E, respectively. Accordingly, our results complete the functional identification of the biosynthetic pathway underlying the production of these bioactive phytoalexins. In addition, the altered regiochemistry catalyzed by CYP76M6 following C3α-hydroxylation has some implications for its active site configuration, offering further molecular insight. PMID:23795884

  1. Distinct roles of T-cell lymphopenia and the microbial flora for gastrointestinal and CNS autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Henrike J; Witte, Ann-Kathrin; Walter, Lutz; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; van den Brandt, Jens; Reichardt, Holger M

    2016-05-01

    T-cell lymphopenia is a major risk factor for autoimmunity. Here we describe congenic Lewis (LEW) rats with a loss-of-function mutation in the Gimap5 gene, leading to a 92% reduction in peripheral T-cell numbers. Gimap5-deficient LEW rats developed eosinophilic autoimmune gastroenteritis accompanied by a 40-fold increase in IgE serum levels. This phenotype was ameliorated by antibiotic treatment, indicating a critical role of the microbial flora in the development of inflammatory bowel disease. Interestingly, Gimap5-deficient LEW rats showed strongly aggravated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) after immunization with guinea pig myelin basic protein. This phenotype, however, persisted after antibiosis, confirming that the enhanced CNS autoimmune response in T-cell lymphopenic Gimap5-deficient LEW rats was unrelated to the composition of the microbial flora. Rather, it seems that it was caused by the 7-fold increase in the percentage of activated T cells producing IL-17 and IFN-γ, and the skewed T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire, both of which were the result of T-cell lymphopenia and not affected by antibiosis. This notion was supported by the observation that adoptive T-cell transfer corrected the TCR repertoire and improved EAE. Collectively, our findings confirm a critical albeit differential role of T-cell lymphopenia in the susceptibility to organ-specific autoimmune responses.-Fischer, H. J., Witte, A.-K., Walter, L., Gröne, H.-J., van den Brandt, J., Reichardt, H. M. Distinct roles of T-cell lymphopenia and the microbial flora for gastrointestinal and CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26740263

  2. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunits perform distinct functional roles in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joon-Hee; Kim, Jung-Eun; Malapi-Wight, Martha; Choi, Yoon-E; Shaw, Brian D; Shim, Won-Bo

    2013-06-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of maize causing ear rot and stalk rot. The fungus also produces fumonisins, a group of mycotoxins linked to disorders in animals and humans. A cluster of genes, designated FUM genes, plays a key role in the synthesis of fumonisins. However, our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of fumonisin biosynthesis is still incomplete. We have demonstrated previously that Cpp1, a protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit, negatively regulates fumonisin production and is involved in cell shape maintenance. In general, three PP2A subunits, structural A, regulatory B and catalytic C, make up a heterotrimer complex to perform regulatory functions. Significantly, we identified two PP2A regulatory subunits in the F. verticillioides genome, Ppr1 and Ppr2, which are homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc55 and Rts1, respectively. In this study, we hypothesized that Ppr1 and Ppr2 are involved in the regulation of fumonisin biosynthesis and/or cell development in F. verticillioides, and generated a series of mutants to determine the functional role of Ppr1 and Ppr2. The PPR1 deletion strain (Δppr1) resulted in drastic growth defects, but increased microconidia production. The PPR2 deletion mutant strain (Δppr2) showed elevated fumonisin production, similar to the Δcpp1 strain. Germinating Δppr1 conidia formed abnormally swollen cells with a central septation site, whereas Δppr2 showed early hyphal branching during conidia germination. A kernel rot assay showed that the mutants were slow to colonize kernels, but this is probably a result of growth defects rather than a virulence defect. Results from this study suggest that two PP2A regulatory subunits in F. verticillioides carry out distinct roles in the regulation of fumonisin biosynthesis and fungal development. PMID:23452277

  3. The distinctiveness effect in forenames: the role of subjective experiences and recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Karen R; Gardiner, John M; Macrae, C Neil

    2006-05-01

    We describe two experiments that tested the prediction that distinctive forenames would be better recognized than typical forenames and which investigated whether this distinctiveness effect, if obtained, occurred in subjective experiences of the recollective or familiarity components of recognition memory. To that end, the remember-know paradigm was used to measure people's experiences of recollection or familiarity. The results revealed that distinctive forenames were more memorable than typical forenames and that that this distinctiveness effect was present only in the subjective experience of remembering. Additionally, the present research showed that these distinctiveness effects were present after retention intervals of both 1 and 7 days. These results replicate and extend past research on distinctiveness effects and also provide support for Rajaram's (1996) distinctiveness-fluency account of the 2 states of subjective awareness. PMID:16613653

  4. The role of self-other distinction in understanding others' mental and emotional states: neurocognitive mechanisms in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Steinbeis, Nikolaus

    2016-01-19

    Social interactions come with the fundamental problem of trying to understand others' mental and affective states while under the overpowering influence of one's own concurrent thoughts and feelings. The ability to distinguish between simultaneous representations of others' current experiences as well as our own is crucial to navigate our complex social environments successfully. The developmental building blocks of this ability and how this is given rise to by functional and structural brain development remains poorly understood. In this review, I outline some of the key findings on the role of self-other distinction in understanding others' mental as well as emotional states in children and adults. I will begin by clarifying the crucial role for self-other distinction in avoiding egocentric attributions of one's own cognitive as well as affective states to others in adults and outline the underlying neural circuitry in overcoming such egocentricity. This will provide the basis for a discussion of the emergence of self-other distinction in early childhood as well as developmental changes therein throughout childhood and into adulthood. I will demonstrate that self-other distinction of cognitive and emotional states is already dissociable early in development. Concomitantly, I will show that processes of self-other distinction in cognitive and affective domains rely on adjacent but distinct neural circuitry each with unique connectivity profiles, presumably related to the nature of the distinction that needs to be made. PMID:26644593

  5. Components of the Engulfment Machinery Have Distinct Roles in Corpse Processing

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, Tracy L.; Joudi, Tony F.; Timmons, Allison K.; Taylor, Jeffrey D.; Habib, Corey S.; Peterson, Jeanne S.; Emmanuel, Shanan; Franc, Nathalie C.; McCall, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Billions of cells die in our bodies on a daily basis and are engulfed by phagocytes. Engulfment, or phagocytosis, can be broken down into five basic steps: attraction of the phagocyte, recognition of the dying cell, internalization, phagosome maturation, and acidification. In this study, we focus on the last two steps, which can collectively be considered corpse processing, in which the engulfed material is degraded. We use the Drosophila ovarian follicle cells as a model for engulfment of apoptotic cells by epithelial cells. We show that engulfed material is processed using the canonical corpse processing pathway involving the small GTPases Rab5 and Rab7. The phagocytic receptor Draper is present on the phagocytic cup and on nascent, phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P)- and Rab7-positive phagosomes, whereas integrins are maintained on the cell surface during engulfment. Due to the difference in subcellular localization, we investigated the role of Draper, integrins, and downstream signaling components in corpse processing. We found that some proteins were required for internalization only, while others had defects in corpse processing as well. This suggests that several of the core engulfment proteins are required for distinct steps of engulfment. We also performed double mutant analysis and found that combined loss of draper and αPS3 still resulted in a small number of engulfed vesicles. Therefore, we investigated another known engulfment receptor, Crq. We found that loss of all three receptors did not inhibit engulfment any further, suggesting that Crq does not play a role in engulfment by the follicle cells. A more complete understanding of how the engulfment and corpse processing machinery interact may enable better understanding and treatment of diseases associated with defects in engulfment by epithelial cells. PMID:27347682

  6. [Distinct roles of the direct and indirect pathways in the basal ganglia circuit mechanism].

    PubMed

    Morita, Makiko; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2015-11-01

    The basal ganglia are key neural substrates that control not only motor balance but also emotion, motivation, cognition, learning, and decision-making. Dysfunction of the basal ganglia leads to neurodegenerative diseases (e.g. Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease) and psychiatric disorders (e.g. drug addiction, schizophrenia, and depression). In the basal ganglia circuit, there are two important pathways: the direct and indirect striatal pathways. Recently, new molecular techniques that activate or inactive selectively the direct or indirect pathway neurons have revealed the function of each pathway. Here we review the distinct roles of the direct and indirect striatal pathways in brain function and drug addiction. We have developed a reversible neurotransmission blocking technique, in which transmission of each pathway is selectively blocked by specific expression of transmission-blocking tetanus toxin, and revealed that the activation of D1 receptors in the direct pathway is critical for reward learning/cocaine addiction, and that the inactivation of D2 receptors is critical for aversive learning/learning flexibility. We propose a new circuit mechanism by which the dopaminergic input from the ventral tegmental area can switch the direct and indirect pathways in the nucleus accumbens. These basal ganglia circuit mechanisms will give us insights into the pathophysiology of mental diseases. PMID:26785520

  7. Distinct roles for paxillin and Hic-5 in regulating breast cancer cell morphology, invasion, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Nicholas O.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2011-01-01

    Individual metastatic tumor cells exhibit two interconvertible modes of cell motility during tissue invasion that are classified as either mesenchymal or amoeboid. The molecular mechanisms by which invasive breast cancer cells regulate this migratory plasticity have yet to be fully elucidated. Herein we show that the focal adhesion adaptor protein, paxillin, and the closely related Hic-5 have distinct and unique roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell lung metastasis by modulating cell morphology and cell invasion through three-dimensional extracellular matrices (3D ECMs). Cells depleted of paxillin by RNA interference displayed a highly elongated mesenchymal morphology, whereas Hic-5 knockdown induced an amoeboid phenotype with both cell populations exhibiting reduced plasticity, migration persistence, and velocity through 3D ECM environments. In evaluating associated signaling pathways, we determined that Rac1 activity was increased in cells devoid of paxillin whereas Hic-5 silencing resulted in elevated RhoA activity and associated Rho kinase–induced nonmuscle myosin II activity. Hic-5 was essential for adhesion formation in 3D ECMs, and analysis of adhesion dynamics and lifetime identified paxillin as a key regulator of 3D adhesion assembly, stabilization, and disassembly. PMID:21148292

  8. Distinct roles for secreted semaphorin signaling in spinal motor axon guidance.

    PubMed

    Huber, Andrea B; Kania, Artur; Tran, Tracy S; Gu, Chenghua; De Marco Garcia, Natalia; Lieberam, Ivo; Johnson, Dontais; Jessell, Thomas M; Ginty, David D; Kolodkin, Alex L

    2005-12-22

    Neuropilins, secreted semaphorin coreceptors, are expressed in discrete populations of spinal motor neurons, suggesting they provide critical guidance information for the establishment of functional motor circuitry. We show here that motor axon growth and guidance are impaired in the absence of Sema3A-Npn-1 signaling. Motor axons enter the limb precociously, showing that Sema3A controls the timing of motor axon in-growth to the limb. Lateral motor column (LMC) motor axons within spinal nerves are defasciculated as they grow toward the limb and converge in the plexus region. Medial and lateral LMC motor axons show dorso-ventral guidance defects in the forelimb. In contrast, Sema3F-Npn-2 signaling guides the axons of a medial subset of LMC neurons to the ventral limb, but plays no major role in regulating their fasciculation. Thus, Sema3A-Npn-1 and Sema3F-Npn-2 signaling control distinct steps of motor axon growth and guidance during the formation of spinal motor connections. PMID:16364899

  9. Distinctive roles of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in hyperlipidemic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Chang, Ming-Chu; Tung, Chien-Chih; Wei, Shu-Chen; Wong, Jau-Min

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate how the saturated and unsaturated fatty acid composition influences the susceptibility of developing acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Primary pancreatic acinar cells were treated with low and high concentrations of different saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and changes in the cytosolic Ca2+ signal and the expression of protein kinase C (PKC) were measured after treatment. RESULTS: Unsaturated fatty acids at high concentrations, including oleic acid, linoleic acid, palmitoleic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and arachidonic acid, induced a persistent rise in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations in acinar cells. Unsaturated fatty acids at low concentrations and saturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, stearic acid, and triglycerides, at low and high concentrations were unable to induce a rise in Ca2+ concentrations in acinar cells. Unsaturated fatty acids at high concentrations but not saturated fatty acids induced intra-acinar cell trypsin activation and cell damage and increased PKC expression. CONCLUSION: At sufficiently high concentrations, unsaturated fatty acids were able to induce acinar cells injury and promote the development of pancreatitis. Unsaturated fatty acids may play a distinctive role in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis through the activation of PKC family members. PMID:26327761

  10. Distinct roles of the DmNav and DSC1 channels in the action of DDT and pyrethroids.

    PubMed

    Rinkevich, Frank D; Du, Yuzhe; Tolinski, Josh; Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2015-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav channels) are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system and are the primary targets of the insecticides DDT and pyrethroids. In Drosophila melanogaster, besides the canonical Nav channel, Para (also called DmNav), there is a sodium channel-like cation channel called DSC1 (Drosophila sodium channel 1). Temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations in DmNav (para(ts)) confer resistance to DDT and pyrethroids, whereas DSC1 knockout flies exhibit enhanced sensitivity to pyrethroids. To further define the roles and interaction of DmNav and DSC1 channels in DDT and pyrethroid neurotoxicology, we generated a DmNav/DSC1 double mutant line by introducing a para(ts1) allele (carrying the I265N mutation) into a DSC1 knockout line. We confirmed that the I265N mutation reduced the sensitivity to two pyrethroids, permethrin and deltamethrin of a DmNav variant expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Computer modeling predicts that the I265N mutation confers pyrethroid resistance by allosterically altering the second pyrethroid receptor site on the DmNav channel. Furthermore, we found that I265N-mediated pyrethroid resistance in para(ts1) mutant flies was almost completely abolished in para(ts1);DSC1(-/-) double mutant flies. Unexpectedly, however, the DSC1 knockout flies were less sensitive to DDT, compared to the control flies (w(1118A)), and the para(ts1);DSC1(-/-) double mutant flies were even more resistant to DDT compared to the DSC1 knockout or para(ts1) mutant. Our findings revealed distinct roles of the DmNav and DSC1 channels in the neurotoxicology of DDT vs. pyrethroids and implicate the exciting possibility of using DSC1 channel blockers or modifiers in the management of pyrethroid resistance. PMID:25687544

  11. Defining potential roles of Pb(2+) in neurotoxicity from a calciomics approach.

    PubMed

    Gorkhali, Rakshya; Huang, Kenneth; Kirberger, Michael; Yang, Jenny J

    2016-06-01

    Metal ions play crucial roles in numerous biological processes, facilitating biochemical reactions by binding to various proteins. An increasing body of evidence suggests that neurotoxicity associated with exposure to nonessential metals (e.g., Pb(2+)) involves disruption of synaptic activity, and these observed effects are associated with the ability of Pb(2+) to interfere with Zn(2+) and Ca(2+)-dependent functions. However, the molecular mechanism behind Pb(2+) toxicity remains a topic of debate. In this review, we first discuss potential neuronal Ca(2+) binding protein (CaBP) targets for Pb(2+) such as calmodulin (CaM), synaptotagmin, neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1), N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and family C of G-protein coupled receptors (cGPCRs), and their involvement in Ca(2+)-signalling pathways. We then compare metal binding properties between Ca(2+) and Pb(2+) to understand the structural implications of Pb(2+) binding to CaBPs. Statistical and biophysical studies (e.g., NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy) of Pb(2+) binding are discussed to investigate the molecular mechanism behind Pb(2+) toxicity. These studies identify an opportunistic, allosteric binding of Pb(2+) to CaM, which is distinct from ionic displacement. Together, these data suggest three potential modes of Pb(2+) activity related to molecular and/or neural toxicity: (i) Pb(2+) can occupy Ca(2+)-binding sites, inhibiting the activity of the protein by structural modulation, (ii) Pb(2+) can mimic Ca(2+) in the binding sites, falsely activating the protein and perturbing downstream activities, or (iii) Pb(2+) can bind outside of the Ca(2+)-binding sites, resulting in the allosteric modulation of the protein activity. Moreover, the data further suggest that even low concentrations of Pb(2+) can interfere at multiple points within the neuronal Ca(2+) signalling pathways to cause neurotoxicity. PMID:27108875

  12. Defining roles for HOX and MEIS1 genes in induction of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Thorsteinsdottir, U; Kroon, E; Jerome, L; Blasi, F; Sauvageau, G

    2001-01-01

    Complex genetic and biochemical interactions between HOX proteins and members of the TALE (i.e., PBX and MEIS) family have been identified in embryonic development, and some of these interactions also appear to be important for leukemic transformation. We have previously shown that HOXA9 collaborates with MEIS1 in the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this report, we demonstrate that HOXB3, which is highly divergent from HOXA9, also genetically interacts with MEIS1, but not with PBX1, in generating AML. In addition, we show that the HOXA9 and HOXB3 genes play key roles in establishing all the main characteristics of the leukemias, while MEIS1 functions only to accelerate the onset of the leukemic transformation. Contrasting the reported functional similarities between PREP1 and MEIS1, such as PBX nuclear retention, we also show that PREP1 overexpression is incapable of accelerating the HOXA9-induced AML, suggesting that MEIS1 function in transformation must entail more than PBX nuclear localization. Collectively, these data demonstrate that MEIS1 is a common leukemic collaborator with two structurally and functionally divergent HOX genes and that, in this collaboration, the HOX gene defines the identity of the leukemia. PMID:11113197

  13. Defining Roles for HOX and MEIS1 Genes in Induction of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Kroon, Evert; Jerome, Lori; Blasi, Francesco; Sauvageau, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Complex genetic and biochemical interactions between HOX proteins and members of the TALE (i.e., PBX and MEIS) family have been identified in embryonic development, and some of these interactions also appear to be important for leukemic transformation. We have previously shown that HOXA9 collaborates with MEIS1 in the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this report, we demonstrate that HOXB3, which is highly divergent from HOXA9, also genetically interacts with MEIS1, but not with PBX1, in generating AML. In addition, we show that the HOXA9 and HOXB3 genes play key roles in establishing all the main characteristics of the leukemias, while MEIS1 functions only to accelerate the onset of the leukemic transformation. Contrasting the reported functional similarities between PREP1 and MEIS1, such as PBX nuclear retention, we also show that PREP1 overexpression is incapable of accelerating the HOXA9-induced AML, suggesting that MEIS1 function in transformation must entail more than PBX nuclear localization. Collectively, these data demonstrate that MEIS1 is a common leukemic collaborator with two structurally and functionally divergent HOX genes and that, in this collaboration, the HOX gene defines the identity of the leukemia. PMID:11113197

  14. The C. elegans Connectome Consists of Homogenous Circuits with Defined Functional Roles.

    PubMed

    Azulay, Aharon; Itskovits, Eyal; Zaslaver, Alon

    2016-09-01

    A major goal of systems neuroscience is to decipher the structure-function relationship in neural networks. Here we study network functionality in light of the common-neighbor-rule (CNR) in which a pair of neurons is more likely to be connected the more common neighbors it shares. Focusing on the fully-mapped neural network of C. elegans worms, we establish that the CNR is an emerging property in this connectome. Moreover, sets of common neighbors form homogenous structures that appear in defined layers of the network. Simulations of signal propagation reveal their potential functional roles: signal amplification and short-term memory at the sensory/inter-neuron layer, and synchronized activity at the motoneuron layer supporting coordinated movement. A coarse-grained view of the neural network based on homogenous connected sets alone reveals a simple modular network architecture that is intuitive to understand. These findings provide a novel framework for analyzing larger, more complex, connectomes once these become available. PMID:27606684

  15. Assembly of RecA-like recombinases: Distinct roles for mediator proteins in mitosis and meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gasior, Stephen L.; Olivares, Heidi; Ear, Uy; Hari, Danielle M.; Weichselbaum, Ralph; Bishop, Douglas K.

    2001-01-01

    Members of the RecA family of recombinases from bacteriophage T4, Escherichia coli, yeast, and higher eukaryotes function in recombination as higher-order oligomers assembled on tracts of single-strand DNA (ssDNA). Biochemical studies have shown that assembly of recombinase involves accessory factors. These studies have identified a class of proteins, called recombination mediator proteins, that act by promoting assembly of recombinase on ssDNA tracts that are bound by ssDNA-binding protein (ssb). In the absence of mediators, ssb inhibits recombination reactions by competing with recombinase for DNA-binding sites. Here we briefly review mediated recombinase assembly and present results of new in vivo experiments. Immuno-double-staining experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggest that Rad51, the eukaryotic recombinase, can assemble at or near sites containing ssb (replication protein A, RPA) during the response to DNA damage, consistent with a need for mediator activity. Correspondingly, mediator gene mutants display defects in Rad51 assembly after DNA damage and during meiosis, although the requirements for assembly are distinct in the two cases. In meiosis, both Rad52 and Rad55/57 are required, whereas either Rad52 or Rad55/57 is sufficient to promote assembly of Rad51 in irradiated mitotic cells. Rad52 promotes normal amounts of Rad51 assembly in the absence of Rad55 at 30°C but not 20°C, accounting for the cold sensitivity of rad55 null mutants. Finally, we show that assembly of Rad51 is induced by radiation during S phase but not during G1, consistent with the role of Rad51 in repairing the spontaneous damage that occurs during DNA replication. PMID:11459983

  16. The phosphoglycerate kinase isoenzymes have distinct roles in the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Barros-Álvarez, Ximena; Cáceres, Ana J; Michels, Paul A M; Concepción, Juan Luis; Quiñones, Wilfredo

    2014-08-01

    The glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) is present in Trypanosoma cruzi as three isoenzymes, two of them located inside glycosomes (PGKA and PGKC) and another one in the cytosol (PGKB). The three isoenzymes are expressed at all stages of the life cycle of the parasite. A heterologous expression system for PGKA (rPGKA) was developed and the substrate affinities of the natural and recombinant PGKA isoenzyme were determined. Km values measured for 3-phosphoglycerate (3PGA) were 174 and 850 μM, and for ATP 217 and 236 μM, for the natural and recombinant enzyme, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two forms of the enzyme. The rPGKA was inhibited by Suramin with Ki values of 10.08 μM and 12.11 μM for ATP and 3PGA, respectively, and the natural enzyme was inhibited at similar values. A site-directed mutant was created in which the 80 amino acids PGKA sequence, present as a distinctive insertion in the N-terminal domain, was deleted. This internally truncated PGKA showed the same Km values and specific activity as the full-length rPGKA. The natural PGKC isoenzyme was purified from epimastigotes and separated from PGKA through molecular exclusion chromatography and its kinetic characteristics were determined. The Km value obtained for 3PGA was 192 μM, and 10 μM for ATP. Contrary to PGKA, the activity of PGKC is tightly regulated by ATP (substrate inhibition) with a Ki of 270 μM, suggesting a role for this isoenzyme in regulating metabolic fluxes inside the glycosomes. PMID:24858924

  17. Distinct Roles for CdtA and CdtC during Intoxication by Cytolethal Distending Toxins.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Shandee D; Huynh, Melanie M; Tamilselvam, Batcha; Spiegelman, Lindsey M; Son, Sophia B; Eshraghi, Aria; Blanke, Steven R; Bradley, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs) are heterotrimeric protein exotoxins produced by a diverse array of Gram-negative pathogens. The enzymatic subunit, CdtB, possesses DNase and phosphatidylinositol 3-4-5 trisphosphate phosphatase activities that induce host cell cycle arrest, cellular distension and apoptosis. To exert cyclomodulatory and cytotoxic effects CDTs must be taken up from the host cell surface and transported intracellularly in a manner that ultimately results in localization of CdtB to the nucleus. However, the molecular details and mechanism by which CDTs bind to host cells and exploit existing uptake and transport pathways to gain access to the nucleus are poorly understood. Here, we report that CdtA and CdtC subunits of CDTs derived from Haemophilus ducreyi (Hd-CDT) and enteropathogenic E. coli (Ec-CDT) are independently sufficient to support intoxication by their respective CdtB subunits. CdtA supported CdtB-mediated killing of T-cells and epithelial cells that was nearly as efficient as that observed with holotoxin. In contrast, the efficiency by which CdtC supported intoxication was dependent on the source of the toxin as well as the target cell type. Further, CdtC was found to alter the subcellular trafficking of Ec-CDT as determined by sensitivity to EGA, an inhibitor of endosomal trafficking, colocalization with markers of early and late endosomes, and the kinetics of DNA damage response. Finally, host cellular cholesterol was found to influence sensitivity to intoxication mediated by Ec-CdtA, revealing a role for cholesterol or cholesterol-rich membrane domains in intoxication mediated by this subunit. In summary, data presented here support a model in which CdtA and CdtC each bind distinct receptors on host cell surfaces that direct alternate intracellular uptake and/or trafficking pathways. PMID:26618479

  18. Learning of Syllable-Object Relations by Preverbal Infants: The Role of Temporal Synchrony and Syllable Distinctiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogate, Lakshmi J.

    2010-01-01

    The role of temporal synchrony and syllable distinctiveness in preverbal infants' learning of word-object relations was investigated. In Experiment 1, 7- and 8-month-olds (N=64) were habituated under conditions where two "similar-sounding" syllables, /tah/ and /gah/, were spoken simultaneously with the motions of one of two sets of objects…

  19. The role of lithological contrasts in the formation of sinkholes: a Distinct Element Method modelling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Holohan, Eoghan P.; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    Sinkhole formation is a geological phenomenon resulting from dissolution and subrosion of rocks or sediments at depth, where large secondary pore space and cavities may develop, and from the eventual subsidence of the overburden. Although sinkholes may develop slowly as a natural process, their formation is often intensified by human activities. For instance, sinkhole hazard has intensified at the Dead Sea shoreline in the Middle East since the beginning of the recession of the Dead Sea level. Another example concerns sinkhole formation induced by solution mining of salt rock in the Lorraine district, France. Signs of precursors to collapse sinkholes have sometimes been indicated by monitoring studies, but are not well understood in terms of quantitative models. Here we report on a general, simplified approach to simulating sinkhole formation by using 2D Distinct Element Method (PFC2D) models comprising elastically bonded particles. The presence of bonds leads to elastic rock deformation under loading conditions and bond breakage may result in spontaneous formation of faults and cracks. Using different rheological parameters like Young's modulus, density, cohesion and friction coefficients, this method is able to simulate realistic rock layering contrasts. The dissolution or subrosion process leading to the formation of underground cavities is simulated via simple incremental particle deletion, whereby an arbitrary dissolution rate can be determined. Model structures preceding a sinkhole collapse, as well as precursory changes in density or porosity, are explicitly simulated and may be linked to measured geophysical parameters such as microseismicity, seismic velocity and electric conductivity. As well as examining precursory phenomena, we study the effect of lithological contrasts on (1) the geometry of sinkholes (diameter to depth ratio) and (2) the onset of collapse. Beside the formulation of general relations, we compare our simulations to well documented case

  20. Distinct roles of dopamine and subthalamic nucleus in learning and probabilistic decision making

    PubMed Central

    Bogacz, Rafal; Javed, Shazia; Mooney, Lucy K.; Murphy, Gillian; Keeley, Sophie; Whone, Alan L.

    2012-01-01

    plan, a pattern of behaviour that mirrors the impulsivity described clinically in some patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Thus, we demonstrate distinct mechanisms for two important facets of human decision making: first, a role for dopamine in memory consolidation, and second, the critical importance of the subthalamic nucleus in successful decision making when multiple pieces of information must be combined. PMID:23114368

  1. Tricho- and atrichoblast cell files show distinct PIN2 auxin efflux carrier exploitations and are jointly required for defined auxin-dependent root organ growth.

    PubMed

    Löfke, Christian; Scheuring, David; Dünser, Kai; Schöller, Maria; Luschnig, Christian; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    The phytohormone auxin is a vital growth regulator in plants. In the root epidermis auxin steers root organ growth. However, the mechanisms that allow adjacent tissues to integrate growth are largely unknown. Here, the focus is on neighbouring epidermal root tissues to assess the integration of auxin-related growth responses. The pharmacologic, genetic, and live-cell imaging approaches reveal that PIN2 auxin efflux carriers are differentially controlled in tricho- and atrichoblast cells. PIN2 proteins show lower abundance at the plasma membrane of trichoblast cells, despite showing higher rates of intracellular trafficking in these cells. The data suggest that PIN2 proteins display distinct cell-type-dependent trafficking rates to the lytic vacuole for degradation. Based on this insight, it is hypothesized that auxin-dependent processes are distinct in tricho- and atrichoblast cells. Moreover, genetic interference with epidermal patterning supports this assumption and suggests that tricho- and atrichoblasts have distinct importance for auxin-sensitive root growth and gravitropic responses. PMID:26041320

  2. Defining and Identifying Hard-to-Staff Schools: The Role of School Demographics and Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opfer, Darleen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study makes a distinction between a school having high attrition and one having difficulties in hiring. It does so by exploring the relationship between definitions of hard-to-staff schools, school demographics, and school conditions that are often associated with a school being hard-to-staff. Research Design: The study relies on a…

  3. Distinct Signaling Roles of Ceramide Species in Yeast Revealed Through Systematic Perturbation and Systems Biology Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, David J.; Chen, Lujia; Matmati, Nabil; Lu, Songjian; Newcomb, Benjamin; Cooper, Gregory F.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Lu, Xinghua

    2014-01-01

    Ceramide, the central molecule of sphingolipid metabolism, is an important bioactive molecule participating in cellular regulatory events and having implications for disease. A challenge in deciphering ceramide signaling emanates from the myriad of ceramide species that exist and the possibility that many of them may have distinct functions. Here, we applied systems biology and molecular approaches to perturb ceramide metabolism in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and inferred causal relationships between ceramide species and their potential targets by combining lipidomic, genomic, and transcriptomic analyses. We find that during heat stress distinct metabolic mechanisms control the abundance of different groups of ceramide species. Additionally, distinct groups of ceramide species regulated different sets of functionally related genes, indicating that specific sub-groups of lipids participated in different regulatory pathways. These results indicate a previously unrecognized complexity and versatility of lipid-mediated cell regulation. PMID:24170935

  4. Sex-Role Stereotyping and Male-Female Character Distribution in Popular, Prestigious, and Sex-Role Defining Children's Literature from 1959 to 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraad, Harriet

    This dissertation explored the extent and kind of sex-role stereotyping in popular, prestigious, and sex-role defining children's picture books printed between 1959 and 1972. The sample consisted of two categories of popular children's picture books, best-selling golden books and "New York Times" children's best-sellers, one category of Caldecott…

  5. Role of Importance and Distinctiveness of Semantic Features in People with Aphasia: A Replication Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason-Baughman, Mary Beth; Wallace, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that people with aphasia have incomplete lexical-semantic representations with decreased low-importance distinctive (LID) feature knowledge. In addition, decreased LID feature knowledge correlates with ability to discriminate among semantically related words. The current study seeks to replicate and extend previous…

  6. The structure of the exocyst subunit Sec6p defines a conserved architecture with diverse roles.

    PubMed

    Sivaram, Mylavarapu V S; Furgason, Melonnie L M; Brewer, Daniel N; Munson, Mary

    2006-06-01

    The exocyst is a conserved protein complex essential for trafficking secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane. The structure of the C-terminal domain of the exocyst subunit Sec6p reveals multiple helical bundles, which are structurally and topologically similar to Exo70p and the C-terminal domains of Exo84p and Sec15, despite <10% sequence identity. The helical bundles appear to be evolutionarily related molecular scaffolds that have diverged to create functionally distinct exocyst proteins. PMID:16699513

  7. Distinct roles of RalA and RalB in the progression of cytokinesis are supported by distinct RalGEFs.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Ilaria; Selimoglu, Rasim; Ozdemir, Cafer; Del Nery, Elaine; Yeaman, Charles; White, Michael; Camonis, Jacques

    2008-09-17

    The Ras family G-proteins RalA and RalB make critical non-overlapping contributions to the generation of a tumorigenic regulatory network, supporting bypass of the normal restraints on both cell proliferation and survival. The Sec6/8 complex, or exocyst, has emerged as a principal direct effector complex for Ral GTPases. Here, we show that RalA and RalB support mitotic progression through mobilization of the exocyst for two spatially and kinetically distinct steps of cytokinesis. RalA is required to tether the exocyst to the cytokinetic furrow in early cytokinesis. RalB is then required for recruitment of the exocyst to the midbody of this bridge to drive abscission and completion of cytokinesis. The collaborative action of RalA and RalB is specified by discrete subcellular compartmentalization and unique pairs of RalGEF proteins that provide inputs from both Ras-family protein-dependent and protein-independent regulatory cues. This suggests that Ral GTPases integrate diverse upstream signals to choreograph multiple roles for the exocyst in mitotic progression. PMID:18756269

  8. How Do Students Define Their Roles and Responsibilities in Online Learning Group Projects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Karen C.; Morgan, Kari; Cameron, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the processes of group role formation in online class settings. Qualitative analysis was used to code chat logs and discussion threads in six undergraduate Family and Consumer Sciences online courses that required online group projects. Four themes related to the process of group role formation emerged:…

  9. Building Turnaround Capacity for Urban School Improvement: The Role of Adaptive Leadership and Defined Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Jill K.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the levels of and relationships between technical leadership, adaptive leadership, and defined autonomy among Denver school leaders along with their combined effects on school growth gains over time. Thirty principals provided complete responses to an online survey that included existing scales for technical leadership,…

  10. Defining a Successful Leadership Pathway: Women in Academia and the Role of Institutional Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sheila A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies in the literature have demonstrated underrepresentation of women in higher education leadership. Nonetheless, women leaders have achieved success when they received strong institutional support. However, even with supportive institutional policies like family leave, there was a need for mapping a more defined career pathway for aspiring…

  11. Exploring the Role of Space-Defining Objects in Constructing and Maintaining Imagined Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullally, Sinead L.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been observed that certain objects, when viewed or imagined in isolation, evoke a strong sense of three-dimensional local space surrounding them (space-defining (SD) objects), while others do not (space-ambiguous (SA) objects), and this is associated with engagement of the parahippocampal cortex (PHC). But activation of the PHC is…

  12. RMP Plays Distinct Roles in the Proliferation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells and Normal Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sijun; Wang, Hongmin; Guo, Yunlan; Chen, Shaomu; Zhang, Mei-Yin; Shen, Jian; Yu, Huijun; Miao, Jingcheng; Wang, Hui-Yun; Wei, Wenxiang

    2013-01-01

    RMP has been shown to function in the transcription regulation through association with RNA polymerase (RNAP) II subunit RPB5. It also has been shown to be required for the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells with an antiapoptotic property. In this article, we further demonstrate that RMP displays distinct features in HCC cells compared with normal hepatic cells. RMP expression is remarkably increased in various cancer cell lines including HCC cells when compared with normal cells. Depletion of RMP could inhibit the proliferation of HCC cells, but not the normal hepatic cells. RMP significantly prevented apoptosis of HCC cells in SMMC-7721 and HepG2, but had little effect on apoptosis in the normal hepatic cells. The mechanisms of RMP's distinct features rely on different responsive expressions of apoptosis factors induced by RMP in HCC and hepatic cells. Either overexpression or depletion of RMP significantly affected the expression of apoptosis factors in HCC cells. However, normal hepatic cells showed a tendency to resist RMP for the regulation of apoptosis. In the clinical samples, the increased expression of RMP in HCCs was also observed when compared with the matched non-tumor tissues from 30 HCC patients. The different expression levels of and distinct responses to RMP between HCC and hepatic cells suggest that RMP might serve as not only a biomarker for the diagnosis of HCC, but also a potential target for the HCC therapy. PMID:23847445

  13. The role of neurocranial shape in defining the boundaries of an expanded Homo erectus hypodigm.

    PubMed

    Baab, Karen L

    2016-03-01

    The main goals of this study were to evaluate the distinctiveness of Homo erectus neurocranial shape relative to other closely related species, and assess the likelihood that particular fossils were correctly attributed to H. erectus given how shape variation related to geography, time and brain size. This was accomplished through analyses of several sets of landmarks designed to maximize the fossil sample, including 24 putative H. erectus fossils. The question of taxonomic differentiation was initially assessed for the type specimen (Trinil II) and morphologically similar Sangiran fossils and subsequently for increasingly inclusive definitions of H. erectus. Results indicated that H. erectus fossils from China, Indonesia, Georgia and East Africa shared a neurocranial shape that was distinct from that of other Plio-Pleistocene Homo taxa, a pattern only partially accounted for by brain size. Early Indonesian H. erectus formed a morphological "bridge" between earlier and later populations assigned to H. erectus from Africa and Asia, respectively. These results were combined with discrete characters to create a more complete species definition for H. erectus. There were two notable exceptions to the general pattern of H. erectus uniqueness. The 0.8-1.0 Ma (millions of years ago) Daka calvaria from Ethiopia consistently grouped with mid-Pleistocene Homo, including Bodo and Kabwe, rather than African or Asian H. erectus. In addition, Daka also exhibited several traits derived for mid-Pleistocene Homo, and its scaling pattern mirrored mid-Pleistocene Homo rather than H. erectus. Daka may have belonged to an "advanced" H. erectus population close to the root of Homo heidelbergensis sensu lato (s.l.), or to an early population of H. heidelbergensis s.l.. The 1.5 Ma KNM-ER 42700 specimen from Kenya exhibited a unique calvarial shape distinct from H. erectus despite the exclusion of problematic landmarks from the frontal bone. These unique aspects of shape were not present

  14. Distinctive Roles for Amygdalar CREB in Reconsolidation and Extinction of Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tronson, Natalie C.; Wiseman, Shari L.; Neve, Rachael L.; Nestler, Eric J.; Olausson, Peter; Taylor, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays a critical role in fear memory formation. Here we determined the role of CREB selectively within the amygdala in reconsolidation and extinction of auditory fear. Viral overexpression of the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) or the dominant-negative mCREB, specifically within the lateral…

  15. Sex and Sex-Role Identification: An Important Distinction for Organizational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gary N.; Butterfield, R. Anthony

    Studies which have investigated males' and females' attitudes and behavior in organizations have yielded apparently contradictory results. In some studies, individuals have followed traditional sex-role stereotypes; in others, they have not. A proposed explanation for these inconsistencies is that sex-role identification is a more important…

  16. Observational distinction between black holes and naked singularities: the role of the redshift function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Néstor; Sarbach, Olivier; Zannias, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    We suggest that the redshift of photons traveling from past to future null infinity through a collapsing object could provide an observational signature capable of differentiating between the formation of a globally naked singularity and the formation of an event horizon. Supporting evidence for this idea is drawn from the analysis of photons with zero angular momentum through the center of a collapsing spherical dust cloud. We show that the frequency shift as a function of proper time with respect to stationary observers has distinct features depending on whether the object collapses to a black hole or a naked singularity.

  17. Co-occurring genomic alterations define major subsets of KRAS - mutant lung adenocarcinoma with distinct biology, immune profiles, and therapeutic vulnerabilities

    PubMed Central

    Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Byers, Lauren A.; Diao, Lixia; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A.; Tong, Pan; Izzo, Julie; Behrens, Carmen; Kadara, Humam; Parra, Edwin R.; Canales, Jaime Rodriguez; Zhang, Jianjun; Giri, Uma; Gudikote, Jayanthi; Cortez, Maria A.; Yang, Chao; Fan, You Hong; Peyton, Michael; Girard, Luc; Coombes, Kevin R.; Toniatti, Carlo; Heffernan, Timothy P.; Choi, Murim; Frampton, Garrett M.; Miller, Vincent; Weinstein, John N.; Herbst, Roy S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Zhang, Jianhua; Sharma, Padmanee; Mills, Gordon B.; Hong, Waun K.; Minna, John D.; Allison, James P.; Futreal, Andrew; Wang, Jing; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Heymach, John V.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular underpinnings that drive the heterogeneity of KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma (LUAC) are poorly characterized. We performed an integrative analysis of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data from early-stage and chemo-refractory LUAC and identified three robust subsets of KRAS-mutant LUAC dominated, respectively, by co-occurring genetic events in STK11/LKB1 (the KL subgroup), TP53 (KP) and CDKN2A/B inactivation coupled with low expression of the NKX2-1 (TTF1) transcription factor (KC). We further reveal biologically and therapeutically relevant differences between the subgroups. KC tumors frequently exhibited mucinous histology and suppressed mTORC1 signaling. KL tumors had high rates of KEAP1 mutational inactivation and expressed lower levels of immune markers, including PD-L1. KP tumors demonstrated higher levels of somatic mutations, inflammatory markers, immune checkpoint effector molecules and improved relapse-free survival. Differences in drug sensitivity patterns were also observed; notably, KL cells showed increased vulnerability to HSP90-inhibitor therapy. This work provides evidence that co-occurring genomic alterations identify subgroups of KRAS-mutant LUAC with distinct biology and therapeutic vulnerabilities. PMID:26069186

  18. Distinct Temporal Regulation of RET Isoform Internalization: Roles of Clathrin and AP2.

    PubMed

    Crupi, Mathieu J F; Yoganathan, Piriya; Bone, Leslie N; Lian, Eric; Fetz, Andrew; Antonescu, Costin N; Mulligan, Lois M

    2015-11-01

    The RET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) contributes to kidney and nervous system development, and is implicated in a number of human cancers. RET is expressed as two protein isoforms, RET9 and RET51, with distinct interactions and signaling properties that contribute to these processes. RET isoforms are internalized from the cell surface into endosomal compartments in response to glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) ligand stimulation but the specific mechanisms of RET trafficking remain to be elucidated. Here, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to demonstrate that RET internalization occurs primarily through clathrin coated pits (CCPs). Activated RET receptors colocalize with clathrin, but not caveolin. The RET51 isoform is rapidly and robustly recruited to CCPs upon GDNF stimulation, while RET9 recruitment occurs more slowly and is less pronounced. We showed that the clathrin-associated adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) interacts directly with each RET isoform through its AP2 μ subunit, and is important for RET internalization. Our data establish that interactions with the AP2 complex promote RET receptor internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis but that RET9 and RET51 have distinct internalization kinetics that may contribute to differences in their biological functions. PMID:26304132

  19. Distinct Roles of Frontal and Rear Cell-Substrate Adhesions in Fibroblast MigrationV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Munevar, Steven; Wang, Yu-li; Dembo, Micah

    2001-01-01

    Cell migration involves complex physical and chemical interactions with the substrate. To probe the mechanical interactions under different regions of migrating 3T3 fibroblasts, we have disrupted cell-substrate adhesions by local application of the GRGDTP peptide, while imaging stress distribution on the substrate with traction force microscopy. Both spontaneous and GRGDTP-induced detachment of the trailing edge caused extensive cell shortening, without changing the overall level of traction forces or the direction of migration. In contrast, disruption of frontal adhesions caused dramatic, global loss of traction forces before any significant shortening of the cell. Although traction forces and cell migration recovered within 10–20 min of transient frontal treatment, persistent treatment with GRGDTP caused the cell to develop traction forces elsewhere and reorient toward a new direction. We conclude that contractile forces of a fibroblast are transmitted to the substrate through two distinct types of adhesions. Leading edge adhesions are unique in their ability to transmit active propulsive forces. Their functions cannot be transferred directly to existing adhesions upon detachment. Trailing end adhesions create passive resistance during cell migration and readily redistribute their loads upon detachment. Our results indicate the distinct nature of mechanical interactions at the leading versus trailing edges, which together generate the mechanical interactions for fibroblast migration. PMID:11739792

  20. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: roles for distinctTIN2-containing complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sahn-Ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Campisi, Judith

    2006-11-07

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA binding proteins, TRF1, TRF2 and POT1, and several associated factors. One factor, TIN2, binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. These and two other proteins form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere-maintenance complex. It is not clear whether subcomplexes exist or function in vivo. Here, we provide evidence for two TIN2 subcomplexes with distinct functions in human cells. TIN2 ablation by RNA interference caused telomere uncapping and p53-independent cell death in all cells tested. However, we isolated two TIN2 complexes from cell lysates, each selectively sensitive to a TIN2 mutant (TIN2-13, TIN2-15C). In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN215C more than TIN2-13 caused genomic instability and cell death. Thus, TIN2 subcomplexes likely have distinct functions in telomere maintenance, and may provide selective targets for eliminating cells with mutant p53.

  1. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: Roles for distinct TIN2-containing complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sahn-ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Zou, Ying; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Yannone, Steven M.; Campisi, Judith

    2007-10-02

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA binding proteins (TRF1, TRF2 and POT1), and several associated factors. One factor, TIN2, binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. Along with two other proteins, TPP1 and hRap1, these form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere maintenance complex. It is not clear whether sub-complexes also exist in vivo. We provide evidence for two TIN2 sub-complexes with distinct functions in human cells. We isolated these two TIN2 sub-complexes from nuclear lysates of unperturbed cells and cells expressing TIN2 mutants TIN2-13, TIN2-15C, which cannot bind TRF2 or TRF1, respectively. In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere dysfunction and cell death. Our findings suggest that distinct TIN2 complexes exist, and that TIN2-15C-sensitive subcomplexes are particularly important for cell survival in the absence of functional p53.

  2. Simulators in training: defining the optimal role for various simulation models in the training environment.

    PubMed

    Sedlack, Robert E

    2006-07-01

    Clearly, the potential applications for simulation training in endoscopy are vast. Endoscopy models may serve as a platform to introduce new skills, to maintain proficiency, or even to assess competency. As these applications are explored fully, the strengths and weaknesses of specific devices will dictate their roles. Educators must ensure that these roles are founded on reliable research but remain mindful that simulators are only tools to augment clinical training, with the goal of benefiting both student and patient, and are not a replacement for patient-based experience. PMID:16876725

  3. Novel homodimeric and heterodimeric rat gamma-hydroxybutyrate synthases that associate with the Golgi apparatus define a distinct subclass of aldo-keto reductase 7 family proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Vincent P; Sherratt, Philip J; Crouch, Dorothy H; Hayes, John D

    2002-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 7 family is composed of the dimeric aflatoxin B(1) aldehyde reductase (AFAR) isoenzymes. In the rat, two AFAR subunits exist, designated rAFAR1 and rAFAR2. Herein, we report the molecular cloning of rAFAR2, showing that it shares 76% sequence identity with rAFAR1. By contrast with rAFAR1, which comprises 327 amino acids, rAFAR2 contains 367 amino acids. The 40 extra residues in rAFAR2 are located at the N-terminus of the polypeptide as an Arg-rich domain that may form an amphipathic alpha-helical structure. Protein purification and Western blotting have shown that the two AFAR subunits are found in rat liver extracts as both homodimers and as a heterodimer. Reductase activity in rat liver towards 2-carboxybenzaldehyde (CBA) was resolved by anion-exchange chromatography into three peaks containing rAFAR1-1, rAFAR1-2 and rAFAR2-2 dimers. These isoenzymes are functionally distinct; with NADPH as cofactor, rAFAR1-1 has a low K(m) and high activity with CBA, whereas rAFAR2-2 exhibits a low K(m) and high activity towards succinic semialdehyde. These data suggest that rAFAR1-1 is a detoxication enzyme, while rAFAR2-2 serves to synthesize the endogenous neuromodulator gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Subcellular fractionation of liver extracts showed that rAFAR1-1 was recovered in the cytosol whereas rAFAR2-2 was associated with the Golgi apparatus. The distinct subcellular localization of the rAFAR1 and rAFAR2 subunits was confirmed by immunocytochemistry in H4IIE cells. Association of rAFAR2-2 with the Golgi apparatus presumably facilitates secretion of GHB, and the novel N-terminal domain may either determine the targeting of the enzyme to the Golgi or regulate the secretory process. A murine AKR protein of 367 residues has been identified in expressed sequence tag databases that shares 91% sequence identity with rAFAR2 and contains the Arg-rich extended N-terminus of 40 amino acids. Further bioinformatic evidence is presented that full

  4. Kelp Fly Virus: a Novel Group of Insect Picorna-Like Viruses as Defined by Genome Sequence Analysis and a Distinctive Virion Structure

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, C. J.; Greenwood, D. R.; Gilbert, R. J. C.; Masoumi, A.; Gordon, K. H. J.; Hanzlik, T. N.; Fry, E. E.; Stuart, D. I.; Scotti, P. D.

    2005-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of kelp fly virus (KFV), originally isolated from the kelp fly, Chaetocoelopa sydneyensis, has been determined. Analyses of its genomic and structural organization and phylogeny show that it belongs to a hitherto undescribed group within the picorna-like virus superfamily. The single-stranded genomic RNA of KFV is 11,035 nucleotides in length and contains a single large open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 3,436 amino acids with 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of 384 and 343 nucleotides, respectively. The predicted amino acid sequence of the polypeptide shows that it has three regions. The N-terminal region contains sequences homologous to the baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat domain, an inhibitor of apoptosis commonly found in animals and in viruses with double-stranded DNA genomes. The second region contains at least two capsid proteins. The third region has three sequence motifs characteristic of replicase proteins of many plant and animal viruses, including a helicase, a 3C chymotrypsin-like protease, and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Phylogenetic analysis of the replicase motifs shows that KFV forms a distinct and distant taxon within the picorna-like virus superfamily. Cryoelectron microscopy and image reconstruction of KFV to a resolution of 15 Å reveals an icosahedral structure, with each of its 12 fivefold vertices forming a turret from the otherwise smooth surface of the 20-Å-thick capsid. The architecture of the KFV capsid is unique among the members of the picornavirus superfamily for which structures have previously been determined. PMID:16227260

  5. Defining and Activating the Role of Department Chair as Instructional Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Carolyn; Salisbury, Jason

    2013-01-01

    With strong connection to schoolwide policy and vision and to the realities of the daily life of teachers and students, the department chair is uniquely positioned to play an important role in advancing instructional effectiveness (Printy, 2008; Weller, 2001). This article provides an in-depth look at the efforts of three urban comprehensive high…

  6. Defining Peace Psychology and the Role of Peace Psychologists: A Survey of Division 48 Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Naomi S.

    This study was undertaken in an attempt to clarify and delineate the definition of peace psychology and the role of peace psychologists. Members of Division 48 of the American Psychological Association were asked to respond to three questions: (1) What is the definition of peace psychology? (2) How is peace psychology a psychology? and (3) What…

  7. Developing Curriculum for the Bilingual Classroom: Toward Defining the Role of the Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Sonia

    It is proposed that the role of teachers in bilingual education curriculum development is essential. The assumption is that pre-packaged curricula, programs, and materials cannot be effective because student and community needs differ from one situation to the other. Therefore, those persons involved in each situation should be the ones to develop…

  8. Sequential and Distinct Roles of the Cadherin Domain-containing Protein Axl2p in Cell Polarization in Yeast Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang-Dong; Sperber, Lauren M.; Kane, Steven A.; Tong, Zongtian; Tong, Amy Hin Yan; Boone, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Polarization of cell growth along a defined axis is essential for the generation of cell and tissue polarity. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Axl2p plays an essential role in polarity-axis determination, or more specifically, axial budding in MATa or α cells. Axl2p is a type I membrane glycoprotein containing four cadherin-like motifs in its extracellular domain. However, it is not known when and how Axl2p functions together with other components of the axial landmark, such as Bud3p and Bud4p, to direct axial budding. Here, we show that the recruitment of Axl2p to the bud neck after S/G2 phase of the cell cycle depends on Bud3p and Bud4p. This recruitment is mediated via an interaction between Bud4p and the central region of the Axl2p cytoplasmic tail. This region of Axl2p, together with its N-terminal region and its transmembrane domain, is sufficient for axial budding. In addition, our work demonstrates a previously unappreciated role for Axl2p. Axl2p interacts with Cdc42p and other polarity-establishment proteins, and it regulates septin organization in late G1 independently of its role in polarity-axis determination. Together, these results suggest that Axl2p plays sequential and distinct roles in the regulation of cellular morphogenesis in yeast cell cycle. PMID:17460121

  9. The pleasures and pains of distinct self-construals: the role of interdependence in regulatory focus.

    PubMed

    Lee, A Y; Aaker, J L; Gardner, W L

    2000-06-01

    Regulatory focus theory distinguishes between self-regulatory processes that focus on promotion and prevention strategies for goal pursuit. Five studies provide support for the hypothesis that these strategies differ for individuals with distinct self-construals. Specifically, individuals with a dominant independent self-construal were predicted to place more emphasis on promotion-focused information, and those with a dominant interdependent self-construal on prevention-focused information. Support for this hypothesis was obtained for participants who scored high versus low on the Self-Construal Scale, participants who were presented with an independent versus interdependent situation, and participants from a Western versus Eastern culture. The influence of interdependence on regulatory focus was observed in both importance ratings of information and affective responses consistent with promotion or prevention focus. PMID:10870913

  10. Mitofusin 1 and 2 play distinct roles in mitochondrial fusion reactions via GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Naotada; Eura, Yuka; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2004-12-15

    The mammalian homologues of yeast and Drosophila Fzo, mitofusin (Mfn) 1 and 2, are both essential for mitochondrial fusion and maintenance of mitochondrial morphology. Though the GTPase domain is required for Mfn protein function, the molecular mechanisms of the GTPase-dependent reaction as well as the functional division of the two Mfn proteins are unknown. To examine the function of Mfn proteins, tethering of mitochondrial membranes was measured in vitro by fluorescence microscopy using green fluorescence protein- or red fluorescent protein-tagged and Mfn1-expressing mitochondria, or by immunoprecipitation using mitochondria harboring HA- or FLAG-tagged Mfn proteins. These experiments revealed that Mfn1-harboring mitochondria were efficiently tethered in a GTP-dependent manner, whereas Mfn2-harboring mitochondria were tethered with only low efficiency. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation followed by co-immunoprecipitation revealed that Mfn1 produced oligomerized approximately 250 kDa and approximately 450 kDa complexes in a GTP-dependent manner. The approximately 450 kDa complex contained oligomerized Mfn1 from distinct apposing membranes (docking complex), whereas the approximately 250 kDa complex was composed of Mfn1 present on the same membrane or in the membrane-solubilized state (cis complex). These results were also confirmed using blue-native PAGE. Mfn1 exhibited higher activity for this reaction than Mfn2. Purified recombinant Mfn1 exhibited approximately eightfold higher GTPase activity than Mfn2. These findings indicate that the two Mfn proteins have distinct activities, and suggest that Mfn1 is mainly responsible for GTP-dependent membrane tethering. PMID:15572413

  11. Peer review, basic research, and engineering: Defining a role for QA professionals in basic research environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1989-02-01

    Within the context of doing basic research, this paper seeks to answer four major questions: (1) What is the authority structure of science. (2) What is peer review. (3) Where is the interface between basic physics research and standard engineering. and (4) Given the conclusions to the first three questions, what is the role of the QA professional in a basic research environment like Fermilab. 23 refs.

  12. New measures for new roles: defining and measuring the current practices of health sciences librarians

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Carol S.; Jacobson, Susan

    2002-01-01

    The roles of academic health sciences librarians are continually evolving as librarians initiate new programs and services in response to developments in computer technology and user demands. However, statistics currently collected by libraries do not accurately reflect or measure these new roles. It is essential for librarians to document, measure, and evaluate these new activities to continue to meet the needs of users and to ensure the viability of their professional role. To determine what new measures should be compiled, the authors examined current statistics, user demands, professional literature, and current activities of librarians as reported in abstracts of poster sessions at Medical Library Association annual meetings. Three new categories of services to be measured are proposed. The first, consultation, groups activities such as quality filtering and individual point-of-need instruction. The second, outreach, includes activities such as working as liaisons, participating in grand rounds or morning report, and providing continuing education. The third area, Web authoring, encompasses activities such as designing Web pages, creating online tutorials, and developing new products. Adding these three measures to those already being collected will provide a more accurate and complete depiction of the services offered by academic health sciences librarians. PMID:11999174

  13. New measures for new roles: defining and measuring the current practices of health sciences librarians.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Carol S; Jacobson, Susan

    2002-04-01

    The roles of academic health sciences librarians are continually evolving as librarians initiate new programs and services in response to developments in computer technology and user demands. However, statistics currently collected by libraries do not accurately reflect or measure these new roles. It is essential for librarians to document, measure, and evaluate these new activities to continue to meet the needs of users and to ensure the viability of their professional role. To determine what new measures should be compiled, the authors examined current statistics, user demands, professional literature, and current activities of librarians as reported in abstracts of poster sessions at Medical Library Association annual meetings. Three new categories of services to be measured are proposed. The first, consultation, groups activities such as quality filtering and individual point-of-need instruction. The second, outreach, includes activities such as working as liaisons, participating in grand rounds or morning report, and providing continuing education. The third area, Web authoring, encompasses activities such as designing Web pages, creating online tutorials, and developing new products. Adding these three measures to those already being collected will provide a more accurate and complete depiction of the services offered by academic health sciences librarians. PMID:11999174

  14. Defining the Role of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treating Chronic Low Back Pain: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Hanscom, David A; Brox, Jens Ivar; Bunnage, Ray

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Narrative review of the literature. Objectives Determine if the term cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is useful in clinical care and research. What literature supports these variables being relevant to the experience of chronic pain? What effects of CBT in treating these factors have been documented? What methods and platforms are available to administer CBT? Methods Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a complex neurologic disorder with many components. CBT refers to a broad family of therapies that address both maladaptive thoughts and behaviors. There are several ways to deliver it. CLBP was broken into five categories that affect the perception of pain, and the literature was reviewed to see the effects of CBT on these variables. Results The term cognitive behavioral therapy has little use in future research because it covers such a wide range of therapies. CBT should always be defined by the problem it is intended to solve. The format and method of delivery should be defined because they have implications for outcomes. They are readily available even at the primary care level. The effectiveness of CBT is unquestioned regarding its effectiveness in treating each of the variables that affect CLBP. It is unclear why it is not more widely implemented. Conclusions CBT represents a family of therapies that are effective for a wide range of problems, many of which coexist with and influence CLBP. Each of the variables can be improved with focused CBT. Early, widespread adoption of CBT in treating and preventing CLBP is recommended. Future research and clinical care should focus on strategies to operationalize these well-documented treatments utilizing a public health approach. PMID:26682100

  15. Defining the Role of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treating Chronic Low Back Pain: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Hanscom, David A.; Brox, Jens Ivar; Bunnage, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review of the literature. Objectives Determine if the term cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is useful in clinical care and research. What literature supports these variables being relevant to the experience of chronic pain? What effects of CBT in treating these factors have been documented? What methods and platforms are available to administer CBT? Methods Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a complex neurologic disorder with many components. CBT refers to a broad family of therapies that address both maladaptive thoughts and behaviors. There are several ways to deliver it. CLBP was broken into five categories that affect the perception of pain, and the literature was reviewed to see the effects of CBT on these variables. Results The term cognitive behavioral therapy has little use in future research because it covers such a wide range of therapies. CBT should always be defined by the problem it is intended to solve. The format and method of delivery should be defined because they have implications for outcomes. They are readily available even at the primary care level. The effectiveness of CBT is unquestioned regarding its effectiveness in treating each of the variables that affect CLBP. It is unclear why it is not more widely implemented. Conclusions CBT represents a family of therapies that are effective for a wide range of problems, many of which coexist with and influence CLBP. Each of the variables can be improved with focused CBT. Early, widespread adoption of CBT in treating and preventing CLBP is recommended. Future research and clinical care should focus on strategies to operationalize these well-documented treatments utilizing a public health approach. PMID:26682100

  16. Distinct roles for two purified factors in transcription of Xenopus mitochondrial DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Antoshechkin, I.; Bogenhagen, D.F.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates transcription of mitochondrial DNA in Xenopus laevis (xl-mtDNA) by mitochondrial RNA polymerases. Details regarding the characterization of xl-mtDNA and its role in transcription in the presence of mtRNA polymerase are provided. 40 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Distinct noise-controlling roles of multiple negative feedback mechanisms in a prokaryotic operon system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L K; Kulasiri, D

    2011-03-01

    Molecular fluctuations are known to affect dynamics of cellular systems in important ways. Studies aimed at understanding how molecular systems of certain regulatory architectures control noise therefore become essential. The interplay between feedback regulation and noise has been previously explored for cellular networks governed by a single negative feedback loop. However, similar issues within networks consisting of more complex regulatory structures remain elusive. The authors investigate how negative feedback loops manage noise within a biochemical cascade concurrently governed by multiple negative feedback loops, using the prokaryotic tryptophan (trp) operon system in Escherechia coli as the model system. To the authors knowledge, this is the first study of noise in the trp operon system. They show that the loops in the trp operon system possess distinct, even opposing, noise-controlling effects despite their seemingly analogous feedback structures. The enzyme inhibition loop, although controlling the last reaction of the cascade, was found to suppress noise not only for the tryptophan output but also for other upstream components. In contrast, the Repression (Rep) loop enhances noise for all systems components. Attenuation (Att) poses intermediate effects by attenuating noise for the upstream components but promoting noise for components downstream of its target. Regarding noise at the output tryptophan, Rep and Att can be categorised as noise-enhancing loops whereas Enzyme Inhibition as a noise-reducing loop. These findings suggest novel implications in how cellular systems with multiple feedback mechanisms control noise. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:21405203

  18. Boundaries, gaps, and overlaps: defining roles in a multidisciplinary nephrology clinic

    PubMed Central

    Stenfors-Hayes, Terese; Kang, Helen H

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore how health care professionals in a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinic interact with one another, patients, families, and caregivers to expand understanding of how this increasingly common form of chronic disease management functions in situ. Nonparticipatory observations were conducted of 64 consultations between patients and health care professionals and end-of-day rounds at a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinic. Key themes in our findings revolved around the question of boundaries between the health professions that were expected to work cooperatively within the clinic, between medical specialties in the management of complex patients, and between caregivers and patients. Understanding the importance of various professional roles and how they are allocated, either formally as part of care design or organically as a clinical routine, may help us understand how multidisciplinary care teams function in real life and help us identify gaps in practice. This study highlights two areas for further study and reflection: the effect of discrepancies in health information and the role of caregivers in patient care. PMID:25336966

  19. Defining the roles of inflammatory and anabolic cytokines in cartilage metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, M B; Otero, M; Tsuchimochi, K; Ijiri, K; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    In osteoarthritis (OA), adult articular chondrocytes undergo phenotypic modulation in response to alterations in the environment owing to mechanical injury and inflammation. These processes not only stimulate the production of enzymes that degrade the cartilage matrix but also inhibit repair. With the use of in vitro and in vivo models, new genes, not known previously to act in cartilage, have been identified and their roles in chondrocyte differentiation during development and in dysregulated chondrocyte function in OA have been examined. These new genes include growth arrest and DNA damage (GADD)45β and the epithelial-specific ETS (ESE)-1 transcription factor, induced by bone morpho-genetic protein (BMP)-2 and inflammatory cytokines, respectively. Both genes are induced by NF-κB, suppress COL2A1 and upregulate matrix meatalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) expression. These genes have also been examined in mouse models of OA, in which discoidin domain receptor 2 is associated with MMP-13-mediated remodelling, in order to understand their roles in physiological cartilage homoeostasis and joint disease. PMID:19022820

  20. Unmasking alternative splicing inside protein-coding exons defines exitrons and their role in proteome plasticity.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Yamile; Höpfler, Markus; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and is widely recognized as a key mechanism for regulating gene expression. Previously, in an analysis of intron retention events in Arabidopsis, we found unusual AS events inside annotated protein-coding exons. Here, we also identify such AS events in human and use these two sets to analyse their features, regulation, functional impact, and evolutionary origin. As these events involve introns with features of both introns and protein-coding exons, we name them exitrons (exonic introns). Though exitrons were detected as a subset of retained introns, they are clearly distinguishable, and their splicing results in transcripts with different fates. About half of the 1002 Arabidopsis and 923 human exitrons have sizes of multiples of 3 nucleotides (nt). Splicing of these exitrons results in internally deleted proteins and affects protein domains, disordered regions, and various post-translational modification sites, thus broadly impacting protein function. Exitron splicing is regulated across tissues, in response to stress and in carcinogenesis. Intriguingly, annotated intronless genes can be also alternatively spliced via exitron usage. We demonstrate that at least some exitrons originate from ancestral coding exons. Based on our findings, we propose a "splicing memory" hypothesis whereby upon intron loss imprints of former exon borders defined by vestigial splicing regulatory elements could drive the evolution of exitron splicing. Altogether, our studies show that exitron splicing is a conserved strategy for increasing proteome plasticity in plants and animals, complementing the repertoire of AS events. PMID:25934563

  1. The Race against Protease Activation Defines the Role of ESCRTs in HIV Budding

    PubMed Central

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2016-01-01

    HIV virions assemble on the plasma membrane and bud out of infected cells using interactions with endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). HIV protease activation is essential for maturation and infectivity of progeny virions, however, the precise timing of protease activation and its relationship to budding has not been well defined. We show that compromised interactions with ESCRTs result in delayed budding of virions from host cells. Specifically, we show that Gag mutants with compromised interactions with ALIX and Tsg101, two early ESCRT factors, have an average budding delay of ~75 minutes and ~10 hours, respectively. Virions with inactive proteases incorporated the full Gag-Pol and had ~60 minutes delay in budding. We demonstrate that during budding delay, activated proteases release critical HIV enzymes back to host cytosol leading to production of non-infectious progeny virions. To explain the molecular mechanism of the observed budding delay, we modulated the Pol size artificially and show that virion release delays are size-dependent and also show size-dependency in requirements for Tsg101 and ALIX. We highlight the sensitivity of HIV to budding “on-time” and suggest that budding delay is a potent mechanism for inhibition of infectious retroviral release. PMID:27280284

  2. Unmasking alternative splicing inside protein-coding exons defines exitrons and their role in proteome plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Yamile; Höpfler, Markus; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and is widely recognized as a key mechanism for regulating gene expression. Previously, in an analysis of intron retention events in Arabidopsis, we found unusual AS events inside annotated protein-coding exons. Here, we also identify such AS events in human and use these two sets to analyse their features, regulation, functional impact, and evolutionary origin. As these events involve introns with features of both introns and protein-coding exons, we name them exitrons (exonic introns). Though exitrons were detected as a subset of retained introns, they are clearly distinguishable, and their splicing results in transcripts with different fates. About half of the 1002 Arabidopsis and 923 human exitrons have sizes of multiples of 3 nucleotides (nt). Splicing of these exitrons results in internally deleted proteins and affects protein domains, disordered regions, and various post-translational modification sites, thus broadly impacting protein function. Exitron splicing is regulated across tissues, in response to stress and in carcinogenesis. Intriguingly, annotated intronless genes can be also alternatively spliced via exitron usage. We demonstrate that at least some exitrons originate from ancestral coding exons. Based on our findings, we propose a “splicing memory” hypothesis whereby upon intron loss imprints of former exon borders defined by vestigial splicing regulatory elements could drive the evolution of exitron splicing. Altogether, our studies show that exitron splicing is a conserved strategy for increasing proteome plasticity in plants and animals, complementing the repertoire of AS events. PMID:25934563

  3. Microfluidic Investigation Reveals Distinct Roles for Actin Cytoskeleton and Myosin II Activity in Capillary Leukocyte Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Sylvain; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Bongrand, Pierre; Théodoly, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Circulating leukocyte sequestration in pulmonary capillaries is arguably the initiating event of lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome. We present a microfluidic investigation of the roles of actin organization and myosin II activity during the different stages of leukocyte trafficking through narrow capillaries (entry, transit and shape relaxation) using specific drugs (latrunculin A, jasplakinolide, and blebbistatin). The deformation rate during entry reveals that cell stiffness depends strongly on F-actin organization and hardly on myosin II activity, supporting a microfilament role in leukocyte sequestration. In the transit stage, cell friction is influenced by stiffness, demonstrating that the actin network is not completely broken after a forced entry into a capillary. Conversely, membrane unfolding was independent of leukocyte stiffness. The surface area of sequestered leukocytes increased by up to 160% in the absence of myosin II activity, showing the major role of molecular motors in microvilli wrinkling and zipping. Finally, cell shape relaxation was largely independent of both actin organization and myosin II activity, whereas a deformed state was required for normal trafficking through capillary segments. PMID:19450501

  4. NFAT isoforms play distinct roles in TNFα-induced retinal leukostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bretz, Colin A.; Savage, Sara R.; Capozzi, Megan E.; Suarez, Sandra; Penn, John S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of individual NFAT isoforms in TNFα-induced retinal leukostasis. To this end, human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMEC) transfected with siRNA targeting individual NFAT isoforms were treated with TNFα, and qRT-PCR was used to examine the contribution of each isoform to the TNFα-induced upregulation of leukocyte adhesion proteins. This showed that NFATc1 siRNA increased ICAM1 expression, NFATc2 siRNA reduced CX3CL1, VCAM1, SELE, and ICAM1 expression, NFATc3 siRNA increased CX3CL1 and SELE expression, and NFATc4 siRNA reduced SELE expression. Transfected HRMEC monolayers were also treated with TNFα and assayed using a parallel plate flow chamber, and both NFATc2 and NFATc4 knockdown reduced TNFα-induced cell adhesion. The effect of isoform-specific knockdown on TNFα-induced cytokine production was also measured using protein ELISAs and conditioned cell culture medium, and showed that NFATc4 siRNA reduced CXCL10, CXCL11, and MCP-1 protein levels. Lastly, the CN/NFAT-signaling inhibitor INCA-6 was shown to reduce TNFα-induced retinal leukostasis in vivo. Together, these studies show a clear role for NFAT-signaling in TNFα-induced retinal leukostasis, and identify NFATc2 and NFATc4 as potentially valuable therapeutic targets for treating retinopathies in which TNFα plays a pathogenic role. PMID:26527057

  5. Distinct roles of the RasGAP family proteins in C. elegans associative learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkó, M. Dávid; Csermely, Péter; Sőti, Csaba; Steták, Attila

    2015-01-01

    The Ras GTPase activating proteins (RasGAPs) are regulators of the conserved Ras/MAPK pathway. Various roles of some of the RasGAPs in learning and memory have been reported in different model systems, yet, there is no comprehensive study to characterize all gap genes in any organism. Here, using reverse genetics and neurobehavioural tests, we studied the role of all known genes of the rasgap family in C. elegans in associative learning and memory. We demonstrated that their proteins are implicated in different parts of the learning and memory processes. We show that gap-1 contribute redundantly with gap-3 to the chemosensation of volatile compounds, gap-1 plays a major role in associative learning, while gap-2 and gap-3 are predominantly required for short- and long-term associative memory. Our results also suggest that the C. elegans Ras orthologue let-60 is involved in multiple processes during learning and memory. Thus, we show that the different classes of RasGAP proteins are all involved in cognitive function and their complex interplay ensures the proper formation and storage of novel information in C. elegans. PMID:26469632

  6. Dual transcriptional activities of SIX proteins define their roles in normal and ectopic eye development.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Abigail M; Weasner, Bonnie M; Weasner, Brandon P; Kumar, Justin P

    2012-03-01

    The SIX family of homeodomain-containing DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in both Drosophila and vertebrate retinal specification. In flies, three such family members exist, but only two, Sine oculis (So) and Optix, are expressed and function within the eye. In vertebrates, the homologs of Optix (Six3 and Six6) and probably So (Six1 and Six2) are also required for proper eye formation. Depending upon the individual SIX protein and the specific developmental context, transcription of target genes can either be activated or repressed. These activities are thought to occur through physical interactions with the Eyes absent (Eya) co-activator and the Groucho (Gro) co-repressor, but the relative contribution that each complex makes to overall eye development is not well understood. Here, we attempt to address this issue by investigating the role that each complex plays in the induction of ectopic eyes in Drosophila. We fused the VP16 activation and Engrailed repressor domains to both So and Optix, and attempted to generate ectopic eyes with these chimeric proteins. Surprisingly, we find that So and Optix must initially function as transcriptional repressors to trigger the formation of ectopic eyes. Both factors appear to be required to repress the expression of non-retinal selector genes. We propose that during early phases of eye development, SIX proteins function, in part, to repress the transcription of non-retinal selector genes, thereby allowing induction of the retina to proceed. This model of repression-mediated induction of developmental programs could have implications beyond the eye and might be applicable to other systems. PMID:22318629

  7. Cardiomyocytes hypertrophic status after myocardial infarction determines distinct types of arrhythmia: role of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Fauconnier, Jérémy; Pasquié, Jean-Luc; Bideaux, Patrice; Lacampagne, Alain; Richard, Sylvain

    2010-09-01

    The mechanisms responsible for sudden cardiac death in heart failure (HF) are unclear. We investigated early and delayed afterdepolarizations (EADs, DADs) in HF. Cardiomyocytes were enzymatically isolated from the right ventricle (RV) and the septum of rats 8 weeks after myocardial infarction (MI) and sham-operated animals. Membrane capacitance, action potentials (AP) and ionic currents were measured by whole-cell patch-clamp. The [Ca(2+)](i) transients and Ca(2+) sparks were recorded with Fluo-4 during fluorescence measurements. Arrhythmia was triggered in 40% of MI cells (not in sham) using trains of 5 stimulations at 2.0 Hz. EADs and DADs occurred in distinct cell populations both in the RV and the septum. EADs occurred in normal-sized PMI cells (<230 pF), whereas DADs occurred in hypertrophic PMI cells (>230 pF). All cells exhibited prolonged APs due to reduced I(to) current. However, additional modifications in Ca(2+)-dependent ionic currents occurred in hypertrophic cells: a decrease in the inward rectifier K(+) current I(K1), and a slowing of L-type Ca(2+) current inactivation which was responsible for the lack of adaptation of APs to abrupt changes in the pacing rate. The occurrence of spontaneous Ca(2+) sparks, reflecting ryanodine receptor (RyR2) diastolic activity, increased with hypertrophy. The [Ca(2+)](i) transient amplitude, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load and Ca(2+) sparks amplitude were all inversely correlated with cell size. We conclude that the trophic status of cardiomyocytes determines the type of cellular arrhythmia in MI rats, based on differential electrophysiological remodeling which may reflect early-mild and late-severe or differential modifications in the RyR2 function. PMID:20109482

  8. Distinct roles of NR2A and NR2B cytoplasmic tails in long term potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Kelly A.; McLaughlin, Nathan; Edbauer, Dieter; Phillips, Marnie; Bolton, Andrew; Constantine-Paton, Martha; Sheng, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are critical mediators of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, but the differential roles of NR2A- versus NR2B-containing NMDARs have been controversial. Here, we investigate the roles of NR2A and NR2B in LTP in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures using RNAi and overexpression, to complement pharmacological approaches. In young slices, when NR2B is the predominant subunit expressed, LTP is blocked by the NR2B-selective antagonist Ro25-6981. As slices mature, and NR2A expression rises, activation of NR2B receptors became no longer necessary for LTP induction. LTP was blocked, however, by RNAi knockdown of NR2B, and this was rescued by coexpression of an RNAi-resistant NR2B (NR2B*) cDNA. Interestingly, a chimeric NR2B subunit in which the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail was replaced by that of NR2A failed to rescue LTP while the reverse chimera, NR2A channel with NR2B tail, was able to restore LTP. Thus expression of NR2B with its intact cytoplasmic tail is required for LTP induction, at an age when channel activity of NR2B-NMDARs is not required for LTP. Overexpression of wildtype NR2A failed to rescue LTP in neurons transfected with NR2B-RNAi construct, despite restoring NMDA-EPSC amplitude to a similar level as NR2B*. Surprisingly, an NR2A construct lacking its entire C-terminal cytoplasmic tail regained its ability to restore LTP. Together these data suggest that the NR2B subunit plays a critical role for LTP, presumably by recruiting relevant molecules important for LTP via its cytoplasmic tail. By contrast, NR2A is not essential for LTP and its cytoplasmic tail seems to carry inhibitory factors for LTP. PMID:20164351

  9. slc7a6os Gene Plays a Critical Role in Defined Areas of the Developing CNS in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Benini, Anna; Cignarella, Francesca; Calvarini, Laura; Mantovanelli, Silvia; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Zizioli, Daniela; Borsani, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to shed light on the functional role of slc7a6os, a gene highly conserved in vertebrates. The Danio rerio slc7a6os gene encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with 46% identity to human SLC7A6OS and 14% to Saccharomyces cerevisiae polypeptide Iwr1. Yeast Iwr1 specifically binds RNA pol II, interacts with the basal transcription machinery and regulates the transcription of specific genes. In this study we investigated for the first time the biological role of SLC7A6OS in vertebrates. Zebrafish slc7a6os is a maternal gene that is expressed throughout development, with a prevalent localization in the developing central nervous system (CNS). The gene is also expressed, although at different levels, in various tissues of the adult fish. To determine the functional role of slc7a6os during zebrafish development, we knocked-down the gene by injecting a splice-blocking morpholino. At 24 hpf morphants show morphological defects in the CNS, particularly the interface between hindbrain and midbrain is not well-defined. At 28 hpf the morpholino injected embryos present an altered somite morphology and appear partially or completely immotile. At this stage the midbrain, hindbrain and cerebellum are compromised and not well defined compared with control embryos. The observed alterations persist at later developmental stages. Consistently, the expression pattern of two markers specifically expressed in the developing CNS, pax2a and neurod, is significantly altered in morphants. The co-injection of embryos with synthetic slc7a6os mRNA, rescues the morphant phenotype and restores the wild type expression pattern of pax2a and neurod. Our data suggest that slc7a6os might play a critical role in defined areas of the developing CNS in vertebrates, probably by regulating the expression of key genes. PMID:25803583

  10. Distinct Roles of SOM and VIP Interneurons during Cortical Up States

    PubMed Central

    Neske, Garrett T.; Connors, Barry W.

    2016-01-01

    During cortical network activity, recurrent synaptic excitation among pyramidal neurons is approximately balanced by synaptic inhibition, which is provided by a vast diversity of inhibitory interneurons. The relative contributions of different interneuron subtypes to inhibitory tone during cortical network activity is not well-understood. We previously showed that many of the major interneuron subtypes in mouse barrel cortex are highly active during Up states (Neske et al., 2015); while fast-spiking (FS), parvalbumin (PV)-positive cells were the most active interneuron subtype, many non-fast-spiking (NFS), PV-negative interneurons were as active or more active than neighboring pyramidal cells. This suggests that the NFS cells could play a role in maintaining or modulating Up states. Here, using optogenetic techniques, we further dissected the functional roles during Up states of two major NFS, PV-negative interneuron subtypes: somatostatin (SOM)-positive cells and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-positive cells. We found that while pyramidal cell excitability during Up states significantly increased when SOM cells were optogenetically silenced, VIP cells did not influence pyramidal cell excitability either upon optogenetic silencing or activation. VIP cells failed to contribute to Up states despite their ability to inhibit SOM cells strongly. We suggest that the contribution of VIP cells to the excitability of pyramidal cells may vary with cortical state. PMID:27507936

  11. Distinct roles of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in spatial and object recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kana; Nishizawa, Kayo; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Sakata, Shogo; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    Recognition memory requires processing of various types of information such as objects and locations. Impairment in recognition memory is a prominent feature of amnesia and a symptom of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons contain two major groups, one localized in the medial septum (MS)/vertical diagonal band of Broca (vDB), and the other in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM). The roles of these cell groups in recognition memory have been debated, and it remains unclear how they contribute to it. We use a genetic cell targeting technique to selectively eliminate cholinergic cell groups and then test spatial and object recognition memory through different behavioural tasks. Eliminating MS/vDB neurons impairs spatial but not object recognition memory in the reference and working memory tasks, whereas NBM elimination undermines only object recognition memory in the working memory task. These impairments are restored by treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, anti-dementia drugs for AD. Our results highlight that MS/vDB and NBM cholinergic neurons are not only implicated in recognition memory but also have essential roles in different types of recognition memory. PMID:26246157

  12. Role of different hematologic variables in defining the risk of malignant transformation in monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Baldini, L; Guffanti, A; Cesana, B M; Colombi, M; Chiorboli, O; Damilano, I; Maiolo, A T

    1996-02-01

    The presenting clinico-hematologic features of 386 patients with nonmyelomatous monoclonal gammopathy (MG) were correlated with the frequency of malignant transformation to evaluate the most important variables conditioning its evolution into multiple myeloma (MM) or Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). Most of the patients (335) had monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS: 39 IgA, 242 IgG, 54 IgM): the remaining 51 patients (12 IgA, 39 IgG) fulfilled all of the MGUS diagnostic criteria (according to Durie) except that bone marrow plasma cell (BMPC) content was 10% to 30%, and so they were defined as having monoclonal gammopathy of borderline significance (MGBS). There were no significant differences between the MGUS and MGBS groups in terms of age, sex, or median follow-up. After a median follow-up of 70 and 53 months, respectively, 23 of 335 MGUS and 19 of 51 MGBS patients had undergone a malignant evolution. Univariate analysis of the IgA and IgG patients showed that the cumulative probability of the disease evolving into MM correlated with diagnostic definition (MGBS v MGUS), BMPC content (> or = 10% v < 5% and < or = 5% v > 5%) and reduced serum polyclonal Ig. In the IgG cases, there was also a significant correlation with detectable Bence Jones proteinuria, serum monoclonal component (MC) levels and age at diagnosis (> 70 v < = or 55 years). In the IgG cases as a whole, the same variables remained in the Cox model where the BMPC percentage was considered after natural logarithmic transformation and the monoclonal component as g/dL value. The relative risks of developing MM are the following: 2.4 for each 1 g/dL increase of IgG, serum MC, 3.5 for detectable light chain proteinuria, 4.4 for the increase of 1 unit in log. BMPC percentage, 6.1 for age > 70, 3.6 and 13.1 for a reduction in one or two polyclonal Ig. In conclusion, our study allows the identification of a particular subset of MGUS patients (MC < = or 1.5 g/dL, BMPC < 5%, no

  13. Defining the Role of Dexmedetomidine in the Prevention of Delirium in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, S.; Muzyk, A. J.; Bucklin, M. H.; Brudney, S.; Gagliardi, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective α2 agonist used as a sedative agent. It also provides anxiolysis and sympatholysis without significant respiratory compromise or delirium. We conducted a systematic review to examine whether sedation of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) with dexmedetomidine was associated with a lower incidence of delirium as compared to other nondexmedetomidine sedation strategies. A search of PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews yielded only three trials from 1966 through April 2015 that met our predefined inclusion criteria and assessed dexmedetomidine and outcomes of delirium as their primary endpoint. The studies varied in regard to population, comparator sedation regimen, delirium outcome measure, and dexmedetomidine dosing. All trials are limited by design issues that limit our ability definitively to conclude that dexmedetomidine prevents delirium. Evidence does suggest that dexmedetomidine may allow for avoidance of deep sedation and use of benzodiazepines, factors both observed to increase the risk for developing delirium. Our assessment of currently published literature highlights the need for ongoing research to better delineate the role of dexmedetomidine for delirium prevention. PMID:26576429

  14. Defining the role of intramedullary nailing for fractures of the distal radius: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jordan, R W; Saithna, A

    2015-10-01

    This article is a systematic review of the published literature about the biomechanics, functional outcome and complications of intramedullary nailing of fractures of the distal radius. We searched the Medline and EMBASE databases and included all studies which reported the outcome of intramedullary (IM) nailing of fractures of the distal radius. Data about functional outcome, range of movement (ROM), strength and complications, were extracted. The studies included were appraised independently by both authors using a validated quality assessment scale for non-controlled studies and the CONSORT statement for randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The search strategy revealed 785 studies, of which 16 were included for full paper review. These included three biomechanical studies, eight case series and five randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The biomechanical studies concluded that IM nails were at least as strong as locking plates. The clinical studies reported that IM nailing gave a comparable ROM, functional outcome and grip strength to other fixation techniques. However, the mean complication rate of intramedullary nailing was 17.6% (0% to 50%). This is higher than the rates reported in contemporary studies for volar plating. It raises concerns about the role of intramedullary nailing, particularly when comparative studies have failed to show that it has any major advantage over other techniques. Further adequately powered RCTs comparing the technique to both volar plating and percutaneous wire fixation are needed. PMID:26430012

  15. Defining the Role of PCSK9 Inhibitors in the Treatment of Hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2016-04-01

    Statins remain the mainstay of medical cardiovascular risk reduction because of their effectiveness in decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as well as some other potentially beneficial effects. The latest US 2013 lipid guidelines essentially recommend only the prescription of a high-dose statin for the high-risk patient. However, both quite old and quite new outcomes evidence, such as reported for ezetimibe, emphasize that LDL-C lowering is, in and of itself, quite important for cardiovascular risk reduction. It appears that the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors represent a major new contribution to this effort, especially for patients with severe familial hypercholesterolemia, proven clinical cardiovascular disease, statin intolerance, or failure to attain an acceptably low LDL-C goal despite maximum available medical management. Very recent clinical trials have proven overwhelmingly the effectiveness and safety of PCSK9 inhibitors for lowering LDL-C. Both alirocumab and evolocumab have now been approved by the US FDA and there are some initial favorable outcomes data. This review is intended to summarize available evidence and emphasize the possible clinical role of these inhibitors following the approval of alirocumab and evolocumab. Understanding the negative receptor feedback of PCSK9 and the mechanism and beneficial effect of PCSK9 inhibitors for cardiovascular risk reduction is essential for the up-to-date practitioner of cardiovascular medicine. There is every reasonable hope for significant cardiovascular benefit from these new additions to our medical cardiovascular armamentarium. PMID:26596726

  16. Defining the Role of the Monoamine Oxidase-B Inhibitors for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Robakis, Daphne; Fahn, Stanley

    2015-06-01

    Inhibitors of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) occupy an important place in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Selegiline was the first MAO-B to be used therapeutically, while rasagiline is a second-generation drug with higher potency and selectivity. Safinamide is an investigational MAO-B inhibitor with non-dopaminergic properties that may provide advantages over its predecessors. As a class, MAO-B inhibitors are safe and well tolerated and provide symptomatic benefit both as monotherapy and in combination with other antiparkinsonian medications from early to late stages of disease. In combination with levodopa, MAO-B inhibitors may improve motor fluctuations and allow for lower total doses of levodopa. Patient characteristics and preferences can be important factors in deciding between agents. As a class, MAO-B inhibitors have shown promise as disease-modifying agents, but the clinical trial evidence to date has not been strong enough to afford them such a label. Future research may help further elucidate their relative merits and clarify their role in altering disease progression. PMID:26164425

  17. Two distinct roles of the yorkie/yap gene during homeostasis in the planarian Dugesia japonica

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Byulnim; An, Yang; Agata, Kiyokazu; Umesono, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Adult planarians possess somatic pluripotent stem cells called neoblasts that give rise to all missing cell types during regeneration and homeostasis. Recent studies revealed that the Yorkie (Yki)/Yes-associated protein (YAP) transcriptional coactivator family plays an important role in the regulation of tissue growth during development and regeneration, and therefore we investigated the role of a planarian yki-related gene (termed Djyki) during regeneration and homeostasis of the freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica. We found that knockdown of the function of Djyki by RNA interference (RNAi) downregulated neoblast proliferation and caused regeneration defects after amputation. In addition, Djyki RNAi caused edema during homeostasis. These seemingly distinct defects induced by Djyki RNAi were rescued by simultaneous RNAi of a planarian mats-related gene (termed Djmats), suggesting an important role of Djmats in the negative regulation of Djyki, in accordance with the conservation of the functional relationship of these two genes during the course of evolution. Interestingly, Djyki RNAi did not prevent normal protonephridial structure, suggesting that Djyki RNAi induced the edema phenotype without affecting the excretory system. Further analyses revealed that increased expression of the D. japonica gene DjaquaporinA (DjaqpA), which belongs to a large gene family that encodes a water channel protein for the regulation of transcellular water flow, promoted the induction of edema, but not defects in neoblast dynamics, in Djyki(RNAi) animals. Thus, we conclude that Djyki plays two distinct roles in the regulation of active proliferation of stem cells and in osmotic water transport across the body surface in D. japonica. PMID:25708270

  18. Distinct Roles of the Prefrontal and Posterior Parietal Cortices in Response Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Qi, Xue-Lian; Constantinidis, Christos

    2016-03-29

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex have been implicated in the planning of movements and inhibition of inappropriate responses, though their precise roles in these functions are not known. To address this question, we trained monkeys to perform memory-guided saccade and anti-saccade tasks and compared neural responses in the same animals. A population of neurons with no motor responses was also activated by a stimulus appearing out of the receptive field and could therefore mediate vector inversion. These neurons were found almost exclusively in the prefrontal cortex. Prefrontal cortical activity better predicted the level of performance in the task. Representation of the saccade goal also peaked in the prefrontal cortex at a time that was predictive of reaction time. These results suggest that the prefrontal cortex is the primary site of vector inversion in the cerebral cortex and explain the importance of this area in response inhibition. PMID:26997283

  19. Distinct Roles of the Prefrontal and Posterior Parietal Cortices in Response Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Qi, Xue-Lian; Constantinidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The dorsolateral prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex have been implicated in planning of movements and inhibition of inappropriate responses, though their precise roles in these functions are not known. To address this question we trained monkeys to perform memory guided saccade and anti-saccade tasks and compared neural responses in the same animals. A population of neurons with no motor responses was also activated by a stimulus appearing out of the receptive field and could therefore mediate vector inversion. These neurons were found almost exclusively in the prefrontal cortex. Prefrontal cortical activity better predicted the level of performance in the task. Representation of the saccade goal also peaked in the prefrontal cortex at a time that was predictive of reaction time. These results suggest that prefrontal cortex is the primary site of vector inversion in the cerebral cortex and explain the importance of this area in response inhibition. PMID:26997283

  20. Actin cap associated focal adhesions and their distinct role in cellular mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Khatau, Shyam B.; Feng, Yunfeng; Walcott, Sam; Sun, Sean X.; Longmore, Gregory D.; Wirtz, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The ability for cells to sense and adapt to different physical microenvironments plays a critical role in development, immune responses, and cancer metastasis. Here we identify a small subset of focal adhesions that terminate fibers in the actin cap, a highly ordered filamentous actin structure that is anchored to the top of the nucleus by the LINC complexes; these differ from conventional focal adhesions in morphology, subcellular organization, movements, turnover dynamics, and response to biochemical stimuli. Actin cap associated focal adhesions (ACAFAs) dominate cell mechanosensing over a wide range of matrix stiffness, an ACAFA-specific function regulated by actomyosin contractility in the actin cap, while conventional focal adhesions are restrictively involved in mechanosensing for extremely soft substrates. These results establish the perinuclear actin cap and associated ACAFAs as major mediators of cellular mechanosensing and a critical element of the physical pathway that transduce mechanical cues all the way to the nucleus. PMID:22870384

  1. A Distinct Role of the Queen in Coordinated Workload and Soil Distribution in Eusocial Naked Mole-Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kutsukake, Nobuyuki; Inada, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Shinsuke H.; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how group members achieve collective decision-making, by considering individual intrinsic behavioural rules and behavioural mechanisms for maintaining social integration. Using a simulated burrow environment, we investigated the behavioural rules of coordinated workload for soil distribution in a eusocial mammal, the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber). We tested two predictions regarding a distinct role of the queen, a socially dominant individual in the caste system: the presence of a queen would increase the workload of other caste individuals, and the cues by a queen would affect the soil distribution. In experiment 1, we placed four individuals of various castes from the same colony into an experimental burrow. Workers exhibited the highest frequency of workload compared to other castes. The presence of a queen activated the workload by other individuals. Individuals showed a consistent workload in a particular direction so as to bias the soil distribution. These results suggest that individuals have a consensus on soil distribution and that the queen plays a distinct role. In experiment 2, we placed the odour of a queen in one of four cells and observed its effect on other individuals’ workload and soil distribution. Relative to other cells, individuals frequently dug in the queen cell so the amount of soil in the queen cell decreased. These results suggest that queen odour is an important cue in coordinated workload and soil distribution in this species. PMID:22957085

  2. Distinct Roles of Mic12 and Mic27 in the Mitochondrial Contact Site and Cristae Organizing System.

    PubMed

    Zerbes, Ralf M; Höß, Philipp; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria

    2016-04-24

    The mitochondrial inner membrane consists of two morphologically distinct domains, the inner boundary membrane and large invaginations termed cristae. Narrow membrane structures, the crista junctions, link these two domains. Maintenance of this elaborate architecture depends on the evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS), a multisubunit inner membrane protein complex. MICOS consists of two functional modules, a Mic60-Mic19 subcomplex that forms Mic60-mediated contact sites with the outer mitochondrial membrane and a Mic10-Mic12-Mic26-Mic27 membrane-sculpting subcomplex that contains large Mic10 oligomers. Deletion of MIC10 or MIC60 results in the loss of most crista junctions. Distinct views have been discussed about how the MICOS modules cooperate with each other. We searched for components required for the structural organization of MICOS and identified Mic12 and Mic27 as crucial factors with specific roles in MICOS complex formation. Mic27 promotes the stability of the Mic10 oligomers in the membrane-sculpting subcomplex, whereas Mic12 is required for the coupling of the two MICOS subcomplexes. We conclude that in addition to the MICOS core components Mic10 and Mic60, Mic12 and Mic27 play specific roles in the organization of the MICOS complex. PMID:26968360

  3. Insights into the distinct roles of MMP-11 in tumor biology and future therapeutics (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Huang, Shuai; Guo, Junchao; Zhou, Li; You, Lei; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-05-01

    The biological processes of cancer cells such as tumorigenesis, proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis and invasion are greatly influenced by the surrounding microenvironment. The ability of solid malignant tumors to alter the microenvironment represents an important characteristic through which tumor cells are able to acquire specific functions necessary for their malignant biological behaviors. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases with the capacity of remodeling extracellular matrix (ECM) by degrading almost all ECM proteins, which plays essential roles during the invasion and metastasis process of solid malignant tumors, including allowing tumor cells to modify the ECM components and release cytokines, ultimately facilitating protease-dependent tumor progression. MMP-11, also named stromelysin-3, is a member of the stromelysin subgroup belonging to MMPs superfamily, which has been detected in cancer cells, stromal cells and adjacent microenvironment. Differently, MMP-11 exerts a dual effect on tumors. On the one hand MMP-11 promotes cancer development by inhibiting apoptosis as well as enhancing migration and invasion of cancer cells, on the other hand MMP-11 plays a negative role against cancer development via suppressing metastasis in animal models. Overexpression of MMP-11 was discovered in sera of cancer patients compared with normal control group as well as in multiple tumor tissue specimens, such as gastric cancer, breast cancer, and pancreatic cancer. At present, some evidence supports that MMP-11 may work as a significant tumor biomarker for early detection of cancer, tumor staging, prognostic analysis, monitoring recurrence during follow-up and also a potential target for immunotherapy against cancer. In view of the importance of MMP-11 in modifying tumor microenvironment and potent antitumoral effects on solid tumors, there is an urgent need for a deeper understanding of how MMP-11 modulates tumor progression

  4. Distinct Roles of Myosins in Aspergillus fumigatus Hyphal Growth and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Hilary; Vargas-Muñiz, José M; Richards, Amber D; Asfaw, Yohannes G; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Steinbach, William J

    2016-05-01

    Myosins are a family of actin-based motor proteins found in many organisms and are categorized into classes based on their structures. Class II and V myosins are known to be important for critical cellular processes, including cytokinesis, endocytosis, exocytosis, and organelle trafficking, in the model fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans However, the roles of myosins in the growth and virulence of the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are unknown. We constructed single- and double-deletion strains of the class II and class V myosins in A. fumigatus and found that while the class II myosin (myoB) is dispensable for growth, the class V myosin (myoE) is required for proper hyphal extension; deletion of myoE resulted in hyperbranching and loss of hyphal polarity. Both myoB and myoE are necessary for proper septation, conidiation, and conidial germination, but only myoB is required for conidial viability. Infection with the ΔmyoE strain in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella model and also in a persistently immunosuppressed murine model of invasive aspergillosis resulted in hypovirulence, while analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release and cellular infiltration were similar compared to those of the wild-type strain. The ΔmyoE strain showed fungal growth in the murine lung, while the ΔmyoB strain exhibited little fungal burden, most likely due to the reduced conidial viability. These results show, for the first time, the important role these cytoskeletal components play in the growth of and disease caused by a known pathogen, prompting future studies to understand their regulation and potential targeting for novel antifungal therapies. PMID:26953327

  5. Distinct roles of prostaglandin D2 receptors in chronic skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Yuki; Satoh, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masataka; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2011-10-01

    Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) is a prostanoid implicated in allergic inflammation. However, the roles of PGD2 in immune and allergic responses remain controversial. PGD2 exerts its effect through the CRTH2 and DP receptors. To elucidate functional differences of PGD2 and its receptors in chronic skin inflammation, chronic contact hypersensitivity (chronic CHS) and IgE-mediated chronic allergic skin inflammation (IgE-CAI) were induced in mice deficient in the CRTH2 and/or DP genes. DP (-/-) mice and CRTH2 (-/-)/DP (-/-) mice showed exacerbated chronic CHS, and conversely, CRTH2 (-/-) mice exhibited diminished skin responses. Skin responses correlated with local levels of IL-13, CCL11, and CCL22. These phenotypic changes in chronic CHS of mutant mice were similar to those in acute CHS despite the differences in the cytokine milieus; chronic CHS and acute CHS were mediated by Th2 and Th1/Th17 immunity, respectively. However, in IgE-CAI, DP (-/-) mice showed comparable skin responses to wild-type mice. Alleviation of IgE-CAI was observed in CRTH2 (-/-) mice, and as a consequence, CRTH2 (-/-)/DP (-/-) mice exhibited diminished IgE-CAI compared with wild-type mice. IgE-CAI in mutant mice correlated with local IL-4 and CCL22 production. Consistent with these results, a CRTH2-specific antagonist exerted inhibitory effects in both chronic CHS and IgE-CAI. The present study demonstrates that functional roles of PGD2 and its receptors appear to depend on the nature of the inflammation. Nevertheless, tools targeted against PGD2-CRTH2 signals could offer therapeutic potential for both types of chronic skin inflammation. PMID:21943706

  6. Managing bipolar disorder in the elderly: defining the role of the newer agents.

    PubMed

    Sajatovic, Martha; Madhusoodanan, Subramoniam; Coconcea, Nicoleta

    2005-01-01

    Clinical research in geriatric psychopharmacology has been a relatively neglected focus compared with the wealth of information on younger populations, and there is a dearth of published, controlled trials. Similarly, these are limited data in the area of geriatric bipolar disorder. Although there is an absence of rigorous, evidence-based information, preliminary data on older adults with bipolar disorder suggest some promising treatment options and important differences in older versus younger patients with bipolar illness. Lithium, while widely utilised in younger populations, is often poorly tolerated in the elderly. Clinical evidence regarding use of antiepileptic compounds in late-life bipolar disorder is generally compiled from bipolar disorder studies in mixed populations, studies in older adults with seizure disorders, and studies on dementia and psychotic conditions other than bipolar disorder. Valproate semisodium and carbamazepine are widely prescribed compounds in older adults with bipolar disorder. However, the popularity of these compounds has occurred in context of an absence of evidence-based data. The atypical antipsychotics have expanded the treatment armamentarium for bipolar disorder in mixed populations and may offer particular promise in management of bipolar illness in older populations as well. Olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, ziprasidone and aripiprazole are atypical antipsychotics that have been approved by the US FDA for the treatment of bipolar disorder; however, there are no published, controlled trials with atypical antipsychotics specific to mania in geriatric patients. Preliminary reports on the use of clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine suggest a role for the use of these agents in late-life bipolar disorder. Information with ziprasidone and aripiprazole specific to geriatric bipolar disorder is still lacking. PMID:15663348

  7. Defining the role of omics in assessing ecosystem health: Perspectives from the Canadian environmental monitoring program.

    PubMed

    Bahamonde, Paulina A; Feswick, April; Isaacs, Meghan A; Munkittrick, Kelly R; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Scientific reviews and studies continue to describe omics technologies as the next generation of tools for environmental monitoring, while cautioning that there are limitations and obstacles to overcome. However, omics has not yet transitioned into national environmental monitoring programs designed to assess ecosystem health. Using the example of the Canadian Environmental Effects Monitoring (EEM) program, the authors describe the steps that would be required for omics technologies to be included in such an established program. These steps include baseline collection of omics endpoints across different species and sites to generate a range of what is biologically normal within a particular ecosystem. Natural individual variability in the omes is not adequately characterized and is often not measured in the field, but is a key component to an environmental monitoring program, to determine the critical effect size or action threshold for management. Omics endpoints must develop a level of standardization, consistency, and rigor that will allow interpretation of the relevance of changes across broader scales. To date, population-level consequences of routinely measured endpoints such as reduced gonad size or intersex in fish is not entirely clear, and the significance of genome-wide molecular, proteome, or metabolic changes on organism or population health is further removed from the levels of ecological change traditionally managed. The present review is not intended to dismiss the idea that omics will play a future role in large-scale environmental monitoring studies, but rather outlines the necessary actions for its inclusion in regulatory monitoring programs focused on assessing ecosystem health. PMID:26771350

  8. An (Anti)-Inflammatory Microbiota: Defining the Role in Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

    PubMed

    Burman, S; Hoedt, E C; Pottenger, S; Mohd-Najman, N-S; Ó Cuív, P; Morrison, Mark

    2016-01-01

    While it is now accepted that the gut microbiota contribute to the genotype-environment-lifestyle interactions triggering inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) episodes, efforts to identify the pathogen(s) that cause these diseases have met with limited success. The advent of culture-independent techniques for characterizing the structure and/or function of microbial communities (hereafter referred to as metagenomics) has provided new insights into the events associated with the onset, remission and recurrence of IBD. A large number of observational and/or case-control studies of IBD patients have confirmed substantive changes in gut bacterial profiles (dysbiosis) associated with disease. These types of studies have been augmented by new profiling approaches that support the identification of more 'colitogenic' bacteria from numerically predominant taxa. Evidence of alterations in lesser abundant taxa such as the methanogenic archaea, to favor types that are more immunogenic, has also been forthcoming. Several recent longitudinal studies of patients with Crohn's disease have produced additional insights, including evidence for the role of 'anti-inflammatory' microbiota in providing a protective effect and/or promoting remission. In summation, the implications of dysbiosis and restoration of a 'healthy microbiota' in IBD patients requires definition beyond a taxonomic assessment of the changes in the gut microbiota during disease course. The available evidence does suggest that specific members of the gut microbiota can contribute either pro- or anti-inflammatory effects, and their ecological fitness in the large bowel affects the onset and recurrence of IBD. While metagenomics and related approaches offer the potential to provide novel and important insights into these microbiota and thereby the pathophysiology of IBD, we also need to better understand factors affecting the ecological fitness of these microbes, if new treatment of IBD patients are to be delivered. PMID

  9. An insect lipoprotein hybrid helps to define the role of apolipophorin III.

    PubMed

    Van der Horst, D J; Ryan, R O; Van Heusden, M C; Schulz, T K; Van Doorn, J M; Law, J H; Beenakkers, A M

    1988-02-01

    Insects transport lipid for flight in the form of diacylglycerol-rich low density lipoproteins (low density lipophorin (LDLp)). A hybrid LDLp has been produced in vitro by using Locusta migratoria fat body, locust high density lipophorin, locust adipokinetic hormone, and Manduca sexta apolipophorin III (apoLp-III). The hybrid is similar in size and density to locust LDLp, contains several molecules of M. sexta apoLp-III, and lacks locust apoLp-III, as shown by immunochemical methods. Under the same conditions an apoLp-III from Thasus acutangulus is poorly incorporated into the locust lipoprotein. The role of apoLp-III as a recognition signal/activator of flight muscle lipoprotein lipase was assayed with labeled hybrid LDLp produced in vitro using M. sexta apoLp-III radiolabeled with 35S. In addition, hydrolysis of diacylglycerol was determined with lipid-labeled hybrid LDLp produced in vitro using [U-14C]glycerol incorporated into the diacylglycerol moiety. In vitro incubations of the labeled hybrid LDLp with L. migratoria flight muscles show that the lipase efficiently utilizes hybrid LDLp as a substrate and demonstrate that the carbohydrate moiety of locust apoLp-III (which is lacking in the M. sexta protein) is not required for interaction with the lipase. It also suggests that specific antigenic determinants of L. migratoria apoLp-III are not required for lipase activation since M. sexta apoLp-III lacks immunological cross-reactivity with L. migratoria apoLp-III. PMID:2448303

  10. Synaptonemal Complex Proteins of Budding Yeast Define Reciprocal Roles in MutSγ-Mediated Crossover Formation.

    PubMed

    Voelkel-Meiman, Karen; Cheng, Shun-Yun; Morehouse, Savannah J; MacQueen, Amy J

    2016-07-01

    During meiosis, crossover recombination creates attachments between homologous chromosomes that are essential for a precise reduction in chromosome ploidy. Many of the events that ultimately process DNA repair intermediates into crossovers during meiosis occur within the context of homologous chromosomes that are tightly aligned via a conserved structure called the synaptonemal complex (SC), but the functional relationship between SC and crossover recombination remains obscure. There exists a widespread correlation across organisms between the presence of SC proteins and successful crossing over, indicating that the SC or its building block components are procrossover factors . For example, budding yeast mutants missing the SC transverse filament component, Zip1, and mutant cells missing the Zip4 protein, which is required for the elaboration of SC, fail to form MutSγ-mediated crossovers. Here we report the reciprocal phenotype-an increase in MutSγ-mediated crossovers during meiosis-in budding yeast mutants devoid of the SC central element components Ecm11 or Gmc2, and in mutants expressing a version of Zip1 missing most of its N terminus. This novel phenotypic class of SC-deficient mutants demonstrates unequivocally that the tripartite SC structure is dispensable for MutSγ-mediated crossover recombination in budding yeast. The excess crossovers observed in SC central element-deficient mutants are Msh4, Zip1, and Zip4 dependent, clearly indicating the existence of two classes of SC proteins-a class with procrossover function(s) that are also necessary for SC assembly and a class that is not required for crossover formation but essential for SC assembly. The latter class directly or indirectly limits MutSγ-mediated crossovers along meiotic chromosomes. Our findings illustrate how reciprocal roles in crossover recombination can be simultaneously linked to the SC structure. PMID:27184389

  11. The Roles and Interactions of Symbiont, Host and Environment in Defining Coral Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Mieog, Jos C.; Olsen, Jeanine L.; Berkelmans, Ray; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia A.; Willis, Bette L.; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Reef-building corals live in symbiosis with a diverse range of dinoflagellate algae (genus Symbiodinium) that differentially influence the fitness of the coral holobiont. The comparative role of symbiont type in holobiont fitness in relation to host genotype or the environment, however, is largely unknown. We addressed this knowledge gap by manipulating host-symbiont combinations and comparing growth, survival and thermal tolerance among the resultant holobionts in different environments. Methodology/Principal Findings Offspring of the coral, Acropora millepora, from two thermally contrasting locations, were experimentally infected with one of six Symbiodinium types, which spanned three phylogenetic clades (A, C and D), and then outplanted to the two parental field locations (central and southern inshore Great Barrier Reef, Australia). Growth and survival of juvenile corals were monitored for 31–35 weeks, after which their thermo-tolerance was experimentally assessed. Our results showed that: (1) Symbiodinium type was the most important predictor of holobiont fitness, as measured by growth, survival, and thermo-tolerance; (2) growth and survival, but not heat-tolerance, were also affected by local environmental conditions; and (3) host population had little to no effect on holobiont fitness. Furthermore, coral-algal associations were established with symbiont types belonging to clades A, C and D, but three out of four symbiont types belonging to clade C failed to establish a symbiosis. Associations with clade A had the lowest fitness and were unstable in the field. Lastly, Symbiodinium types C1 and D were found to be relatively thermo-tolerant, with type D conferring the highest tolerance in A. millepora. Conclusions/Significance These results highlight the complex interactions that occur between the coral host, the algal symbiont, and the environment to shape the fitness of the coral holobiont. An improved understanding of the factors affecting coral

  12. Distinct roles of visual, parietal, and frontal motor cortices in memory-guided sensorimotor decisions.

    PubMed

    Goard, Michael J; Pho, Gerald N; Woodson, Jonathan; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Mapping specific sensory features to future motor actions is a crucial capability of mammalian nervous systems. We investigated the role of visual (V1), posterior parietal (PPC), and frontal motor (fMC) cortices for sensorimotor mapping in mice during performance of a memory-guided visual discrimination task. Large-scale calcium imaging revealed that V1, PPC, and fMC neurons exhibited heterogeneous responses spanning all task epochs (stimulus, delay, response). Population analyses demonstrated unique encoding of stimulus identity and behavioral choice information across regions, with V1 encoding stimulus, fMC encoding choice even early in the trial, and PPC multiplexing the two variables. Optogenetic inhibition during behavior revealed that all regions were necessary during the stimulus epoch, but only fMC was required during the delay and response epochs. Stimulus identity can thus be rapidly transformed into behavioral choice, requiring V1, PPC, and fMC during the transformation period, but only fMC for maintaining the choice in memory prior to execution. PMID:27490481

  13. Comprehensive RNA Polymerase II Interactomes Reveal Distinct and Varied Roles for Each Phospho-CTD Residue.

    PubMed

    Harlen, Kevin M; Trotta, Kristine L; Smith, Erin E; Mosaheb, Mohammad M; Fuchs, Stephen M; Churchman, L Stirling

    2016-06-01

    Transcription controls splicing and other gene regulatory processes, yet mechanisms remain obscure due to our fragmented knowledge of the molecular connections between the dynamically phosphorylated RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) and regulatory factors. By systematically isolating phosphorylation states of the CTD heptapeptide repeat (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7), we identify hundreds of protein factors that are differentially enriched, revealing unappreciated connections between the Pol II CTD and co-transcriptional processes. These data uncover a role for threonine-4 in 3' end processing through control of the transition between cleavage and termination. Furthermore, serine-5 phosphorylation seeds spliceosomal assembly immediately downstream of 3' splice sites through a direct interaction with spliceosomal subcomplex U1. Strikingly, threonine-4 phosphorylation also impacts splicing by serving as a mark of co-transcriptional spliceosome release and ensuring efficient post-transcriptional splicing genome-wide. Thus, comprehensive Pol II interactomes identify the complex and functional connections between transcription machinery and other gene regulatory complexes. PMID:27239037

  14. Distinct Roles of Histone H3 and H2A Tails in Nucleosome Stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhai; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome breathing potentially increases the DNA exposure, which in turn recruits DNA-binding protein and regulates gene transcription. Numerous studies have shown the critical roles of N-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 in gene expression; however, few studies have focused on the H2A C-terminal tail. Here we present thorough computational studies on a single nucleosome particle showing the linker DNA closing and opening, which is thought to be nucleosome breathing. With our simulation, the H2A C-terminal and H3 N-terminal tails were found to modulate the nucleosome conformation differently. The H2A C-terminal tail regulates nucleosome conformation by binding to linker DNA at different locations, whereas the H3 N-terminal tail regulates linker DNA by binding to it in different patterns. Further MD simulation on tail truncated structures corroborates this analysis. These findings replenish our understanding of the histone tail regulation mechanism on atomic level. PMID:27527579

  15. Distinct Roles of Histone H3 and H2A Tails in Nucleosome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhai; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome breathing potentially increases the DNA exposure, which in turn recruits DNA-binding protein and regulates gene transcription. Numerous studies have shown the critical roles of N-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 in gene expression; however, few studies have focused on the H2A C-terminal tail. Here we present thorough computational studies on a single nucleosome particle showing the linker DNA closing and opening, which is thought to be nucleosome breathing. With our simulation, the H2A C-terminal and H3 N-terminal tails were found to modulate the nucleosome conformation differently. The H2A C-terminal tail regulates nucleosome conformation by binding to linker DNA at different locations, whereas the H3 N-terminal tail regulates linker DNA by binding to it in different patterns. Further MD simulation on tail truncated structures corroborates this analysis. These findings replenish our understanding of the histone tail regulation mechanism on atomic level. PMID:27527579

  16. Distinct Roles of Cytoskeletal Components in Immunological Synapse Formation and Directed Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Hironori; Zhou, Jie; Xie, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of CD4+ T cell activation and immunological synapse (IS) formation is the migration of the microtubule organization center and associated organelles toward the APCs. In this study, we found that when murine CD4+ T cells were treated with a microtubule-destabilizing agent (vinblastine) after the formation of IS, the microtubule organization center dispersed and all of the major cellular organelles moved away from the IS. Cytokines were no longer directed toward the synapse but were randomly secreted in quantities similar to those seen in synaptic secretion. However, if the actin cytoskeleton was disrupted at the same time with cytochalasin D, the organelles did not shift away from the IS. These findings suggest that there is a complex interplay between the microtubules and actin cytoskeleton, where microtubules are important for directing particular cytokines into the synapse, but they are not involved in the amount of cytokines that are produced for at least 1 h after IS formation. In addition, we found that they play a critical role in mobilizing organelles to reorient toward the synapse during T cell activation and in stabilizing organelles against the force that is generated through actin polymerization so that they move toward the APCs. These findings show that there is a complex interplay between these major cytoskeletal components during synapse formation and maintenance. PMID:26392461

  17. Distinct roles of visual, parietal, and frontal motor cortices in memory-guided sensorimotor decisions

    PubMed Central

    Goard, Michael J; Pho, Gerald N; Woodson, Jonathan; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Mapping specific sensory features to future motor actions is a crucial capability of mammalian nervous systems. We investigated the role of visual (V1), posterior parietal (PPC), and frontal motor (fMC) cortices for sensorimotor mapping in mice during performance of a memory-guided visual discrimination task. Large-scale calcium imaging revealed that V1, PPC, and fMC neurons exhibited heterogeneous responses spanning all task epochs (stimulus, delay, response). Population analyses demonstrated unique encoding of stimulus identity and behavioral choice information across regions, with V1 encoding stimulus, fMC encoding choice even early in the trial, and PPC multiplexing the two variables. Optogenetic inhibition during behavior revealed that all regions were necessary during the stimulus epoch, but only fMC was required during the delay and response epochs. Stimulus identity can thus be rapidly transformed into behavioral choice, requiring V1, PPC, and fMC during the transformation period, but only fMC for maintaining the choice in memory prior to execution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13764.001 PMID:27490481

  18. The distinct role of performing euthanasia on depression and suicide in veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lily; Crane, Monique F; Phillips, Jacqueline K

    2014-04-01

    Veterinarians are more likely to experience mood disorders and suicide than other occupational groups (Fritschi, Morrison, Shirangi & Day, 2009; Platt, Hawton, Simkin, & Mellanby, 2010). The performance of euthanasia has been implicated as contributing determinately to the prevalence of suicide risk and psychological distress in veterinarians (Bartram & Baldwin, 2008, 2010). In contrast, the application of psychological approaches would suggest a possible protective role for euthanasia administration. This paper is the first to investigate the association between euthanasia-administration frequency and depressed mood and suicide risk. A cross-sectional survey sampled 540 Australia-registered veterinarians (63.8% women), ranging in age from 23 to 74. Results revealed that the administration of objectionable euthanasia (i.e., euthanasia that the veterinarian disagreed with) was not related to our mental health variables. In contrast, overall euthanasia frequency had a weak positive linear relationship with depression. Moreover, overall euthanasia frequency moderated the impact of depression on suicide risk. The nature of this moderation suggested that average frequency per week of performing euthanasia attenuated the relationship between depressed mood and suicide risk. The implications of these findings and directions for further research are discussed. PMID:24635739

  19. Liver X Receptors (LXRs) Alpha and Beta Play Distinct Roles in the Mouse Epididymis.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Marjorie; Ouvrier, Aurélia; Cadet, Rémi; Damon-Soubeyrand, Christelle; Guiton, Rachel; Janny, Laurent; Kocer, Ayhan; Marceau, Geoffroy; Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Trousson, Amalia; Drevet, Joël R; Saez, Fabrice

    2016-03-01

    After its production in the testis, a spermatozoon has to undergo posttesticular maturation steps to become fully motile and fertile. The first step is epididymal maturation, during which immature spermatozoa are transformed into biochemically mature cells ready to proceed to the next step, capacitation, a physiological process occurring in the female genital tract. The biochemical transformations include modification of sperm lipid composition during epididymal transit, with significant changes in fatty acids, phospholipids, and sterols between the caput and the cauda epididymal spermatozoa. Although quantitative aspects of these changes are well documented for several mammalian species, molecular mechanisms governing these steps are poorly understood. Transgenic male mice invalidated for the two liver X receptors (LXRalpha and LXRbeta, nuclear oxysterol receptors regulating cholesterol and lipid metabolism) become sterile when aging, showing an epididymal phenotype. We used single-knockout-model mice to characterize the role of each LXR isoform during sperm maturation in the epididymis. We show here that although a certain redundancy exists in the functions of the two LXR isoforms, some physiological processes are more under the influence of only one of them. In both cases, aging males showed slight subfertility, associated with dyslipidemia, emphasizing the importance of lipid metabolism in relation with male fertility. PMID:26792941

  20. Distinct roles of cytochrome P450 reductase in mitomycin c redox cycling and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Mitomycin c (MMC), a quinone-containing anticancer drug, is known to redox cycle and generate reactive oxygen species. A key enzyme mediating MMC redox cycling is cytochrome P450 reductase, a microsomal NADPH-dependent flavoenzyme. In the present studies, CHO cells overexpressing this enzyme (CHO-OR cells) and corresponding control cells (CHO-WT cells) were used to investigate the role of cytochrome P450 reductase in the actions of MMC. In lysates from both cell types, MMC was found to redox cycle and generate H2O2; this activity was greater in CHO-OR cells (Vmax = 1.2 ± 0.1 nmol H2O2/min/mg protein in CHO-WT cells vs. 32.4 ± 3.9 nmol H2O2/min/mg protein in CHO-OR cells). MMC was also more effective in generating superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals in CHO-OR cells, relative to CHO-WT cells. Despite these differences in MMC redox cycling, MMC-induced cytotoxicity, as measured by growth inhibition, was similar in the two cell types (IC50 = 72 ± 20 nM for CHO-WT and 75 ± 23 nM for CHO-OR cells), as was its ability to induce G2/M and S phase arrest. Additionally, in 9 different tumor cell lines, although a strong correlation was observed between MMC-induced H2O2 generation and cytochrome P450 reductase activity, there was no relationship between redox cycling and cytotoxicity. Hypoxia, which stabilizes MMC radicals generated by redox cycling, also had no effect on the sensitivity of tumor cells to MMC-induced cytotoxicity. These data indicate that NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase-mediated MMC redox cycling is not involved in cytotoxicity of this chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:20501808

  1. Distinct functional roles of cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations revealed by a 3D simulation model.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Asuka; Okada, Jun-Ichi; Washio, Takumi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2015-06-01

    Experimental characterization of two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations, namely, subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM), has been hampered by technical difficulties, and an alternative approach is eagerly awaited. We previously developed a three-dimensional computational cardiomyocyte model that integrates electrophysiology, metabolism, and mechanics with subcellular structure. In this study, we further developed our model to include intracellular oxygen diffusion, and determined whether mitochondrial localization or intrinsic properties cause functional variations. For this purpose, we created two models: one with equal SSM and IFM properties and one with IFM having higher activity levels. Using these two models to compare the SSM and IFM responses of [Ca(2+)], tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, [NADH], and mitochondrial inner membrane potential to abrupt changes in pacing frequency (0.25-2 Hz), we found that the reported functional differences between these subpopulations appear to be mostly related to local [Ca(2+)] heterogeneity, and variations in intrinsic properties only serve to augment these differences. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on mitochondrial function. Under normoxic conditions, intracellular oxygen is much higher throughout the cell than the half-saturation concentration for oxidative phosphorylation. However, under limited oxygen supply, oxygen is mostly exhausted in SSM, leaving the core region in an anoxic condition. Reflecting this heterogeneous oxygen environment, the inner membrane potential continues to decrease in IFM, whereas it is maintained to nearly normal levels in SSM, thereby ensuring ATP supply to this region. Our simulation results provide clues to understanding the origin of functional variations in two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations and their differential roles in maintaining cardiomyocyte function as a whole. PMID:26039174

  2. Distinct Functional Roles of Cardiac Mitochondrial Subpopulations Revealed by a 3D Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Asuka; Okada, Jun-ichi; Washio, Takumi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2015-01-01

    Experimental characterization of two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations, namely, subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM), has been hampered by technical difficulties, and an alternative approach is eagerly awaited. We previously developed a three-dimensional computational cardiomyocyte model that integrates electrophysiology, metabolism, and mechanics with subcellular structure. In this study, we further developed our model to include intracellular oxygen diffusion, and determined whether mitochondrial localization or intrinsic properties cause functional variations. For this purpose, we created two models: one with equal SSM and IFM properties and one with IFM having higher activity levels. Using these two models to compare the SSM and IFM responses of [Ca2+], tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, [NADH], and mitochondrial inner membrane potential to abrupt changes in pacing frequency (0.25–2 Hz), we found that the reported functional differences between these subpopulations appear to be mostly related to local [Ca2+] heterogeneity, and variations in intrinsic properties only serve to augment these differences. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on mitochondrial function. Under normoxic conditions, intracellular oxygen is much higher throughout the cell than the half-saturation concentration for oxidative phosphorylation. However, under limited oxygen supply, oxygen is mostly exhausted in SSM, leaving the core region in an anoxic condition. Reflecting this heterogeneous oxygen environment, the inner membrane potential continues to decrease in IFM, whereas it is maintained to nearly normal levels in SSM, thereby ensuring ATP supply to this region. Our simulation results provide clues to understanding the origin of functional variations in two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations and their differential roles in maintaining cardiomyocyte function as a whole. PMID:26039174

  3. Mitochondrial thiol oxidase Erv1: both shuttle cysteine residues are required for its function with distinct roles.

    PubMed

    Ang, Swee Kim; Zhang, Mengqi; Lodi, Tiziana; Lu, Hui

    2014-06-01

    Erv1 (essential for respiration and viability 1), is an essential component of the MIA (mitochondrial import and assembly) pathway, playing an important role in the oxidative folding of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins. In the MIA pathway, Mia40, a thiol oxidoreductase with a CPC motif at its active site, oxidizes newly imported substrate proteins. Erv1 a FAD-dependent thiol oxidase, in turn reoxidizes Mia40 via its N-terminal Cys30-Cys33 shuttle disulfide. However, it is unclear how the two shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 relay electrons from the Mia40 CPC motif to the Erv1 active-site Cys130-Cys133 disulfide. In the present study, using yeast genetic approaches we showed that both shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 are required for cell growth. In organelle and in vitro studies confirmed that both shuttle cysteine residues were indeed required for import of MIA pathway substrates and Erv1 enzyme function to oxidize Mia40. Furthermore, our results revealed that the two shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 are functionally distinct. Although Cys33 is essential for forming the intermediate disulfide Cys33-Cys130' and transferring electrons to the redox active-site directly, Cys30 plays two important roles: (i) dominantly interacts and receives electrons from the Mia40 CPC motif; and (ii) resolves the Erv1 Cys33-Cys130 intermediate disulfide. Taken together, we conclude that both shuttle cysteine residues are required for Erv1 function, and play complementary, but distinct, roles to ensure rapid turnover of active Erv1. PMID:24625320

  4. Distinct roles for the complement regulators factor H and Crry in protection of the kidney from injury.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Jennifer; Renner, Brandon; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Panzer, Sarah; Hannan, Jonathan P; Ljubanovic, Danica; Ruseva, Marieta M; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Antonioli, Alexandra H; Pickering, Matthew C; Holers, V Michael; Thurman, Joshua M

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the complement regulatory proteins are associated with several different diseases. Although these mutations cause dysregulated alternative pathway activation throughout the body, the kidneys are the most common site of injury. The susceptibility of the kidney to alternative pathway-mediated injury may be due to limited expression of complement regulatory proteins on several tissue surfaces within the kidney. To examine the roles of the complement regulatory proteins factor H and Crry in protecting distinct renal surfaces from alternative pathway mediated injury, we generated mice with targeted deletions of the genes for both proteins. Surprisingly, mice with combined genetic deletions of factor H and Crry developed significantly milder renal injury than mice deficient in only factor H. Deficiency of both factor H and Crry was associated with C3 deposition at multiple locations within the kidney, but glomerular C3 deposition was lower than that in factor H alone deficient mice. Thus, factor H and Crry are critical for regulating complement activation at distinct anatomic sites within the kidney. However, widespread activation of the alternative pathway reduces injury by depleting the pool of C3 available at any 1 location. PMID:27165610

  5. Mycobacterial secretion systems ESX-1 and ESX-5 play distinct roles in host cell death and inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Abdallah M; Bestebroer, Jovanka; Savage, Nigel D L; de Punder, Karin; van Zon, Maaike; Wilson, Louis; Korbee, Cees J; van der Sar, Astrid M; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; van der Wel, Nicole N; Bitter, Wilbert; Peters, Peter J

    2011-11-01

    During infection of humans and animals, pathogenic mycobacteria manipulate the host cell causing severe diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy. To understand the basis of mycobacterial pathogenicity, it is crucial to identify the molecular virulence mechanisms. In this study, we address the contribution of ESX-1 and ESX-5--two homologous type VII secretion systems of mycobacteria that secrete distinct sets of immune modulators--during the macrophage infection cycle. Using wild-type, ESX-1- and ESX-5-deficient mycobacterial strains, we demonstrate that these secretion systems differentially affect subcellular localization and macrophage cell responses. We show that in contrast to ESX-1, the effector proteins secreted by ESX-5 are not required for the translocation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium marinum to the cytosol of host cells. However, the M. marinum ESX-5 mutant does not induce inflammasome activation and IL-1β activation. The ESX-5 system also induces a caspase-independent cell death after translocation has taken place. Importantly, by means of inhibitory agents and small interfering RNA experiments, we reveal that cathepsin B is involved in both the induction of cell death and inflammasome activation upon infection with wild-type mycobacteria. These results reveal distinct roles for two different type VII secretion systems during infection and shed light on how virulent mycobacteria manipulate the host cell in various ways to replicate and spread. PMID:21957139

  6. Distinct roles of residual xylan and lignin in limiting enzymatic hydrolysis of organosolv pretreated loblolly pine and sweetgum.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Tu, Maobing; Cao, Dongxu; Bass, Patrick; Adhikari, Sushil

    2013-01-23

    The interactions between xylan/lignin and cellulase enzymes play a key role in the effective hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Organosolv pretreated loblolly pine (OPLP) and sweetgum (OPSG) were used to quantitatively elucidate the distinct roles of residual xylan and lignin on enzymatic hydrolysis, based on the initial hydrolysis rates and the final hydrolysis yields. The initial hydrolysis rates of OPLP and OPSG were 1.45 (glucose) and 1.19 g/L/h (glucose), respectively, under the enzyme loading of 20 FPU/g glucan. The final glucan hydrolysis yields of OPLP and OPSG at 72 h were 76.4 and 98.9%, respectively. By correlating the amount of residual lignin and xylan to the initial hydrolysis rate and the final hydrolysis yield in OPLP and OPSG, a more accurate fundamental understanding of the roles of xylan and lignin in limiting the enzymatic hydrolysis has been developed. The higher amount of residual xylan (9.7%) in OPSG resulted in lower initial hydrolysis rate (1.19 g/L/h). The higher amount of residual lignin in OPLP (18.6%) resulted in lower final hydrolysis yield of glucan (76.4%). In addition, we observed in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) that ethyl xyloside was produced by the enzymatic catalysis of xylose/xylan and ethanol. PMID:23270516

  7. The indirect role of fibroblast growth factor-8 in defining neurogenic niches of the olfactory/GnRH systems.

    PubMed

    Forni, Paolo Emanuele; Bharti, Kapil; Flannery, Ellen M; Shimogori, Tomomi; Wray, Susan

    2013-12-11

    Bone morphogenic protein-4 (BMP4) and fibroblast growth factor-8 (FGF8) are thought to have opposite roles in defining epithelial versus neurogenic fate in the developing olfactory/vomeronasal system. In particular, FGF8 has been implicated in specification of olfactory and gonadotropin releasing hormone-1 (GnRH) neurons, as well as in controlling olfactory stem cell survival. Using different knock-in mouse lines and Cre-lox-mediated lineage tracing, Fgf8 expression and cell lineage was analyzed in the developing nose in relation to the expression of Bmp4 and its antagonist Noggin (Nog). FGF8 is expressed by cells that acquire an epidermal, respiratory cell fate and not by stem cells that acquire neuronal olfactory or vomeronasal cell fate. Ectodermal and mesenchymal sources of BMP4 control the expression of BMP/TGFβ antagonist Nog, whereas mesenchymal sources of Nog define the neurogenic borders of the olfactory pit. Fgf8 hypomorph mouse models, Fgf8(neo/neo) and Fgf8(neo/null), displayed severe craniofacial defects together with overlapping defects in the olfactory pit including (1) lack of neuronal formation ventrally, where GnRH neurons normally form, and (2) altered expression of Bmp4 and Nog, with Nog ectopically expressed in the nasal mesenchyme and no longer defining the GnRH and vomeronasal neurogenic border. Together our data show that (1) FGF8 is not sufficient to induce ectodermal progenitors of the olfactory pit to acquire neural fate and (2) altered neurogenesis and lack of GnRH neuron specification after chronically reduced Fgf8 expression reflected dysgenesis of the nasal region and loss of a specific neurogenic permissive milieu that was defined by mesenchymal signals. PMID:24336726

  8. The vexing problem of defining the meaning, role and measurement of values in treatment decision-making.

    PubMed

    Charles, Cathy; Gafni, Amiram

    2014-03-01

    Two international movements, evidence-based medicine (EBM) and shared decision-making (SDM) have grappled for some time with issues related to defining the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in their respective models of treatment decision-making. In this article, we identify and describe unresolved problems in the way that each movement addresses these issues. The starting point for this discussion is that at least two essential ingredients are needed for treatment decision-making: research information about treatment options and their potential benefits and risks; and the values/preferences of participants in the decision-making process. Both the EBM and SDM movements have encountered difficulties in defining the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in treatment decision-making. In the EBM model of practice, there is no clear and consistent definition of patient values/preferences and no guidance is provided on how to integrate these into an EBM model of practice. Methods advocated to measure patient values are also problematic. Within the SDM movement, patient values/preferences tend to be defined and measured in a restrictive and reductionist way as patient preferences for treatment options or attributes of options, while broader underlying value structures are ignored. In both models of practice, the meaning and expected role of physician values in decision-making are unclear. Values clarification exercises embedded in patient decision aids are suggested by SDM advocates to identify and communicate patient values/preferences for different treatment outcomes. Such exercises have the potential to impose a particular decision-making theory and/or process onto patients, which can change the way they think about and process information, potentially impeding them from making decisions that are consistent with their true values. The tasks of clarifying the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in treatment decision

  9. Four Isoforms of Arabidopsis 4-Coumarate:CoA Ligase Have Overlapping yet Distinct Roles in Phenylpropanoid Metabolism1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Im

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of lignin, flavonoids, and hydroxycinnamoyl esters share the first three enzymatic steps of the phenylpropanoid pathway. The last shared step is catalyzed by 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), which generates p-coumaroyl CoA and caffeoyl CoA from their respective acids. Four isoforms of 4CL have been identified in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Phylogenetic analysis reveals that 4CL1, 4CL2, and 4CL4 are more closely related to each other than to 4CL3, suggesting that the two groups may serve different biological functions. Promoter-GUS analysis shows that 4CL1 and 4CL2 are expressed in lignifying cells. In contrast, 4CL3 is expressed in a broad range of cell types, and 4CL3 has acquired a distinct role in flavonoid metabolism. Sinapoylmalate, the major hydroxycinnamoyl ester found in Arabidopsis, is greatly reduced in the 4cl1 4cl3 mutant, showing that 4CL1 and 4CL3 function redundantly in its biosynthesis. 4CL1 accounts for the majority of the total 4CL activity, and loss of 4CL1 leads to reduction in lignin content but no growth defect. The 4cl1 4cl2 and 4cl1 4cl2 4cl3 mutants are both dwarf but do not have further reduced lignin than the 4cl1 mutant, indicating that either 4CL1 or 4CL2 is required for normal plant growth. Although 4CL4 has a limited expression profile, it does make a modest contribution to lignin biosynthesis. Together, these data show that the four isoforms of 4CL in Arabidopsis have overlapping yet distinct roles in phenylpropanoid metabolism. PMID:26491147

  10. Oxylipin Signaling: A Distinct Role for the Jasmonic Acid Precursor cis-(+)-12-Oxo-Phytodienoic Acid (cis-OPDA)

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Anuja; Graham, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxylipins are lipid-derived compounds, many of which act as signals in the plant response to biotic and abiotic stress. They include the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) and related jasmonate metabolites cis-(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), methyl jasmonate, and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile). Besides the defense response, jasmonates are involved in plant growth and development and regulate a range of processes including glandular trichome development, reproduction, root growth, and senescence. cis-OPDA is known to possess a signaling role distinct from JA-Ile. The non-enzymatically derived phytoprostanes are structurally similar to cis-OPDA and induce a common set of genes that are not responsive to JA in Arabidopsis thaliana. A novel role for cis-OPDA in seed germination regulation has recently been uncovered based on evidence from double mutants and feeding experiments showing that cis-OPDA interacts with abscisic acid (ABA), inhibits seed germination, and increases ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5) protein abundance. Large amounts of cis-OPDA are esterified to galactolipids in A. thaliana and the resulting compounds, known as Arabidopsides, are thought to act as a rapidly available source of cis-OPDA. PMID:22645585

  11. Distinct roles for two Galpha-Gbeta interfaces in cell polarity control by a yeast heterotrimeric G protein.

    PubMed

    Strickfaden, Shelly C; Pryciak, Peter M

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromones trigger dissociation of a heterotrimeric G protein (Galphabetagamma) into Galpha-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and Gbetagamma. The Gbetagamma dimer regulates both mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade signaling and cell polarization. Here, by independently activating the MAP kinase pathway, we studied the polarity role of Gbetagamma in isolation from its signaling role. MAP kinase signaling alone could induce cell asymmetry but not directional growth. Surprisingly, active Gbetagamma, either alone or with Galpha-GTP, could not organize a persistent polarization axis. Instead, following pheromone gradients (chemotropism) or directional growth without pheromone gradients (de novo polarization) required an intact receptor-Galphabetagamma module and GTP hydrolysis by Galpha. Our results indicate that chemoattractant-induced cell polarization requires continuous receptor-Galphabetagamma communication but not modulation of MAP kinase signaling. To explore regulation of Gbetagamma by Galpha, we mutated Gbeta residues in two structurally distinct Galpha-Gbeta binding interfaces. Polarity control was disrupted only by mutations in the N-terminal interface, and not the Switch interface. Incorporation of these mutations into a Gbeta-Galpha fusion protein, which enforces subunit proximity, revealed that Switch interface dissociation regulates signaling, whereas the N-terminal interface may govern receptor-Galphabetagamma coupling. These findings raise the possibility that the Galphabetagamma heterotrimer can function in a partially dissociated state, tethered by the N-terminal interface. PMID:17978098

  12. Distinct Roles for Two Gα–Gβ Interfaces in Cell Polarity Control by a Yeast Heterotrimeric G Protein

    PubMed Central

    Strickfaden, Shelly C.

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromones trigger dissociation of a heterotrimeric G protein (Gαβγ) into Gα-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and Gβγ. The Gβγ dimer regulates both mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade signaling and cell polarization. Here, by independently activating the MAP kinase pathway, we studied the polarity role of Gβγ in isolation from its signaling role. MAP kinase signaling alone could induce cell asymmetry but not directional growth. Surprisingly, active Gβγ, either alone or with Gα-GTP, could not organize a persistent polarization axis. Instead, following pheromone gradients (chemotropism) or directional growth without pheromone gradients (de novo polarization) required an intact receptor–Gαβγ module and GTP hydrolysis by Gα. Our results indicate that chemoattractant-induced cell polarization requires continuous receptor–Gαβγ communication but not modulation of MAP kinase signaling. To explore regulation of Gβγ by Gα, we mutated Gβ residues in two structurally distinct Gα–Gβ binding interfaces. Polarity control was disrupted only by mutations in the N-terminal interface, and not the Switch interface. Incorporation of these mutations into a Gβ–Gα fusion protein, which enforces subunit proximity, revealed that Switch interface dissociation regulates signaling, whereas the N-terminal interface may govern receptor–Gαβγ coupling. These findings raise the possibility that the Gαβγ heterotrimer can function in a partially dissociated state, tethered by the N-terminal interface. PMID:17978098

  13. Distinct roles for lymphotoxin-alpha and tumor necrosis factor in the control of Leishmania donovani infection.

    PubMed

    Engwerda, Christian R; Ato, Manabu; Stäger, Simona; Alexander, Clare E; Stanley, Amanda C; Kaye, Paul M

    2004-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for the control of visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani. However, the role of the related cytokine lymphotoxin (LT) alpha in this infection is unknown. Here we report that C57BL/6 mice deficient in TNF (B6.TNF(-/-)) or LT alpha (B6.LT alpha(-/-)) have increased susceptibility to hepatic L. donovani infection. Furthermore, the outcome of infection in bone marrow chimeric mice is dependent on donor hematopoietic cells, indicating that developmental defects in lymphoid organs were not responsible for increased susceptibility to L. donovani. Although both LT alpha and TNF regulated the migration of leukocytes into the sinusoidal area of the infected liver, their roles were distinct. LT alpha was essential for migration of leukocytes from periportal areas, an event consistent with LT alpha-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1 on liver sinusoid lining cells, whereas TNF was essential for leukocyte recruitment to the liver. During visceral leishmaniasis, both cytokines were produced by radio-resistant cells and by CD4(+) T cells. LT alpha and TNF production by the former was required for granuloma assembly, while production of these cytokines by CD4(+) T cells was necessary to control parasite growth. The production of inducible nitric oxide synthase was also found to be deficient in TNF- and LT alpha-deficient infected mice. These results demonstrate that both LT alpha and TNF are required for control of L. donovani infection in noncompensatory ways. PMID:15579454

  14. Haemophilus ducreyi RpoE and CpxRA Appear To Play Distinct yet Complementary Roles in Regulation of Envelope-Related Functions

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R.; Liu, Yunlong; Munson, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid and a chronic limb ulceration syndrome in children. In humans, H. ducreyi is found in an abscess and overcomes a hostile environment to establish infection. To sense and respond to membrane stress, bacteria utilize two-component systems (TCSs) and extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. We previously showed that activation of CpxRA, the only intact TCS in H. ducreyi, does not regulate homologues of envelope protein folding factors but does downregulate genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, including many virulence determinants. H. ducreyi also harbors a homologue of RpoE, which is the only ECF sigma factor in the organism. To potentially understand how H. ducreyi responds to membrane stress, here we defined RpoE-dependent genes using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 180 RpoE-dependent genes, of which 98% were upregulated; a major set of these genes encodes homologues of envelope maintenance and repair factors. We also identified and validated a putative RpoE promoter consensus sequence, which was enriched in the majority of RpoE-dependent targets. Comparison of RpoE-dependent genes to those controlled by CpxR showed that each transcription factor regulated a distinct set of genes. Given that RpoE activated a large number of genes encoding envelope maintenance and repair factors and that CpxRA represses genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, these data suggest that RpoE and CpxRA appear to play distinct yet complementary roles in regulating envelope homeostasis in H. ducreyi. PMID:25201944

  15. P. aeruginosa SGNH Hydrolase-Like Proteins AlgJ and AlgX Have Similar Topology but Separate and Distinct Roles in Alginate Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Moynihan, Patrick J.; Kitova, Elena N.; Walvoort, Marthe T. C.; Little, Dustin J.; Whitney, John C.; Dawson, Karen; Weadge, Joel T.; Robinson, Howard; Ohman, Dennis E.; Codée, Jeroen D. C.; Klassen, John S.; Clarke, Anthony J.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2014-01-01

    The O-acetylation of polysaccharides is a common modification used by pathogenic organisms to protect against external forces. Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the anionic, O-acetylated exopolysaccharide alginate during chronic infection in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients to form the major constituent of a protective biofilm matrix. Four proteins have been implicated in the O-acetylation of alginate, AlgIJF and AlgX. To probe the biological function of AlgJ, we determined its structure to 1.83 Å resolution. AlgJ is a SGNH hydrolase-like protein, which while structurally similar to the N-terminal domain of AlgX exhibits a distinctly different electrostatic surface potential. Consistent with other SGNH hydrolases, we identified a conserved catalytic triad composed of D190, H192 and S288 and demonstrated that AlgJ exhibits acetylesterase activity in vitro. Residues in the AlgJ signature motifs were found to form an extensive network of interactions that are critical for O-acetylation of alginate in vivo. Using two different electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) assays we compared the abilities of AlgJ and AlgX to bind and acetylate alginate. Binding studies using defined length polymannuronic acid revealed that AlgJ exhibits either weak or no detectable polymer binding while AlgX binds polymannuronic acid specifically in a length-dependent manner. Additionally, AlgX was capable of utilizing the surrogate acetyl-donor 4-nitrophenyl acetate to catalyze the O-acetylation of polymannuronic acid. Our results, combined with previously published in vivo data, suggest that the annotated O-acetyltransferases AlgJ and AlgX have separate and distinct roles in O-acetylation. Our refined model for alginate acetylation places AlgX as the terminal acetlytransferase and provides a rationale for the variability in the number of proteins required for polysaccharide O-acetylation. PMID:25165982

  16. Picking sides: distinct roles for CYP76M6 and CYP76M8 in rice oryzalexin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yisheng; Wang, Qiang; Hillwig, Matthew L; Peters, Reuben J

    2013-09-01

    Natural products biosynthesis often requires the action of multiple CYPs (cytochromes P450), whose ability to introduce oxygen, increasing solubility, is critical for imparting biological activity. In previous investigations of rice diterpenoid biosynthesis, we characterized CYPs that catalyse alternative hydroxylation of ent-sandaracopimaradiene, the precursor to the rice oryzalexin antibiotic phytoalexins. In particular, CYP76M5, CYP76M6 and CYP76M8 were all shown to carry out C-7β hydroxylation, whereas CYP701A8 catalyses C-3α hydroxylation, with oxy groups found at both positions in oryzalexins A-D, suggesting that these may act consecutively in oryzalexin biosynthesis. In the present paper, we report that, although CYP701A8 only poorly reacts with 7β-hydroxy-ent-sandaracopimaradiene, CYP76M6 and CYP76M8 readily react with 3α-hydroxy-ent-sandaracopimaradiene. Notably, their activity yields distinct products, resulting from hydroxylation at C-9β by CYP76M6 or C-7β by CYP76M8, on different sides of the core tricyclic ring structure. Thus CYP76M6 and CYP76M8 have distinct non-redundant roles in orzyalexin biosynthesis. Moreover, the resulting 3α,7β- and 3α,9β-diols correspond to oryzalexins D and E respectively. Accordingly, the results of the present study complete the functional identification of the biosynthetic pathway underlying the production of these bioactive phytoalexins. In addition, the altered regiochemistry catalysed by CYP76M6 following C-3α hydroxylation has some implications for its active-site configuration, offering further molecular insight. PMID:23795884

  17. The spatiotemporal segregation of GAD forms defines distinct GABA signaling functions in the developing mouse olfactory system and provides novel insights into the origin and migration of GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Vastagh, Csaba; Schwirtlich, Marija; Kwakowsky, Andrea; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Margolis, Frank L; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Katarova, Zoya; Szabó, Gábor

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has a dual role as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system (CNS) and as a signaling molecule exerting largely excitatory actions during development. The rate-limiting step of GABA synthesis is catalyzed by two glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms GAD65 and GAD67 coexpressed in the GABAergic neurons of the CNS. Here we report that the two GADs show virtually nonoverlapping expression patterns consistent with distinct roles in the developing peripheral olfactory system. GAD65 is expressed exclusively in undifferentiated neuronal progenitors confined to the proliferative zones of the sensory vomeronasal and olfactory epithelia In contrast GAD67 is expressed in a subregion of the nonsensory epithelium/vomeronasal organ epithelium containing the putative Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) progenitors and GnRH neurons migrating from this region through the frontonasal mesenchyme into the basal forebrain. Only GAD67+, but not GAD65+ cells accumulate detectable GABA. We further demonstrate that GAD67 and its embryonic splice variant embryonic GAD (EGAD) concomitant with GnRH are dynamically regulated during GnRH neuronal migration in vivo and in two immortalized cell lines representing migratory (GN11) and postmigratory (GT1-7) stage GnRH neurons, respectively. Analysis of GAD65/67 single and double knock-out embryos revealed that the two GADs play complementary (inhibitory) roles in GnRH migration ultimately modulating the speed and/or direction of GnRH migration. Our results also suggest that GAD65 and GAD67/EGAD characterized by distinct subcellular localization and kinetics have disparate functions during olfactory system development mediating proliferative and migratory responses putatively through specific subcellular GABA pools. PMID:25125027

  18. The Distinct Roles of Two GPCRs, MrgprC11 and PAR2, in Itch and Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Weng, Hao-Jui; Patel, Kush N.; Tang, Zongxiang; Bai, Haihua; Steinhoff, Martin; Dong, Xinzhong

    2011-01-01

    Itch has been defined as an unpleasant skin sensation that triggers the urge to scratch. Primary sensory dorsal root ganglia neurons detect itch stimuli through peripheral axons in the skin, playing an important role in generating itch. Itch is broadly categorized as histaminergic (sensitive to antihistamines) or nonhistaminergic. The peptide Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Arg-Leu (SLIGRL) is an itch-inducing agent widely used to study histamine-independent itch. Here, we show that Mrgprs (Mas-related G protein–coupled receptors), particularly MrgprC11, rather than PAR2 (protease-activated receptor 2) as previously thought, mediate this type of itch. A shorter peptide, SLIGR, which specifically activates PAR2 but not MrgprC11, induced thermal pain hypersensitivity in mice but not a scratch response. Therefore, although both Mrgpr and PAR2 are SLIGRL-responsive G protein–coupled receptors present in dorsal root ganglia, each plays a specific role in mediating itch and pain. PMID:21775281

  19. The two ATP binding sites of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) play distinct roles in gating kinetics and energetics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xiaohui; Liu, Hao-Yang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2006-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family, is a chloride channel whose activity is controlled by protein kinase-dependent phosphorylation. Opening and closing (gating) of the phosphorylated CFTR is coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis at CFTR's two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies present evidence that the open channel conformation reflects a head-to-tail dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs as seen in the NBDs of other ABC transporters (Vergani et al., 2005). Whether these two ATP binding sites play an equivalent role in the dynamics of NBD dimerization, and thus in gating CFTR channels, remains unsettled. Based on the crystal structures of NBDs, sequence alignment, and homology modeling, we have identified two critical aromatic amino acids (W401 in NBD1 and Y1219 in NBD2) that coordinate the adenine ring of the bound ATP. Conversion of the W401 residue to glycine (W401G) has little effect on the sensitivity of the opening rate to [ATP], but the same mutation at the Y1219 residue dramatically lowers the apparent affinity for ATP by >50-fold, suggesting distinct roles of these two ATP binding sites in channel opening. The W401G mutation, however, shortens the open time constant. Energetic analysis of our data suggests that the free energy of ATP binding at NBD1, but not at NBD2, contributes significantly to the energetics of the open state. This kinetic and energetic asymmetry of CFTR's two NBDs suggests an asymmetric motion of the NBDs during channel gating. Opening of the channel is initiated by ATP binding at the NBD2 site, whereas separation of the NBD dimer at the NBD1 site constitutes the rate-limiting step in channel closing. PMID:16966475

  20. The Two ATP Binding Sites of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Play Distinct Roles in Gating Kinetics and Energetics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xiaohui; Liu, Hao-Yang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2006-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family, is a chloride channel whose activity is controlled by protein kinase–dependent phosphorylation. Opening and closing (gating) of the phosphorylated CFTR is coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis at CFTR's two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies present evidence that the open channel conformation reflects a head-to-tail dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs as seen in the NBDs of other ABC transporters (Vergani et al., 2005). Whether these two ATP binding sites play an equivalent role in the dynamics of NBD dimerization, and thus in gating CFTR channels, remains unsettled. Based on the crystal structures of NBDs, sequence alignment, and homology modeling, we have identified two critical aromatic amino acids (W401 in NBD1 and Y1219 in NBD2) that coordinate the adenine ring of the bound ATP. Conversion of the W401 residue to glycine (W401G) has little effect on the sensitivity of the opening rate to [ATP], but the same mutation at the Y1219 residue dramatically lowers the apparent affinity for ATP by >50-fold, suggesting distinct roles of these two ATP binding sites in channel opening. The W401G mutation, however, shortens the open time constant. Energetic analysis of our data suggests that the free energy of ATP binding at NBD1, but not at NBD2, contributes significantly to the energetics of the open state. This kinetic and energetic asymmetry of CFTR's two NBDs suggests an asymmetric motion of the NBDs during channel gating. Opening of the channel is initiated by ATP binding at the NBD2 site, whereas separation of the NBD dimer at the NBD1 site constitutes the rate-limiting step in channel closing. PMID:16966475

  1. Cucumber SUPERMAN has conserved function in stamen and fruit development and a distinct role in floral patterning.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianyu; Liu, Meiling; Jiang, Li; Ding, Lian; Yan, Shuang Shuang; Zhang, Juan; Dong, Zhaobin; Ren, Huazhong; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene encodes a C2H2 type zinc finger protein that is required for maintaining the boundaries between stamens and carpels, and for regulating development of ovule outer integument. Orthologs of SUP have been characterized in bisexual flowers as well as dioecious species, but it remains elusive in monoecious plants with unisexual flowers on the same individual. Here we isolate the SUP ortholog in Cucumis sativus L (CsSUP), a monoecious vegetable. CsSUP is predominantly expressed in female specific organs: the female flower buds and ovules. Ectopic expression of CsSUP in Arabidopsis can partially complement the fruit development in sup-5 mutant, and its over-expression in wide-type leads to reduced silique length, suppressed stamen development and distorted petal patterning. Our data suggest that CsSUP plays conserved as well as distinct roles during flower and fruit development, and it may function in the boundaries and ovules to balance petal patterning, stamen and ovule development in Arabidopsis. PMID:24465952

  2. RNase P: role of distinct protein cofactors in tRNA substrate recognition and RNA-based catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Sharin, Ela; Schein, Aleks; Mann, Hagit; Ben-Asouli, Yitzhak; Jarrous, Nayef

    2005-01-01

    The Escherichia coli ribonuclease P (RNase P) has a protein component, termed C5, which acts as a cofactor for the catalytic M1 RNA subunit that processes the 5′ leader sequence of precursor tRNA. Rpp29, a conserved protein subunit of human RNase P, can substitute for C5 protein in reconstitution assays of M1 RNA activity. To better understand the role of the former protein, we compare the mode of action of Rpp29 to that of the C5 protein in activation of M1 RNA. Enzyme kinetic analyses reveal that complexes of M1 RNA–Rpp29 and M1 RNA–C5 exhibit comparable binding affinities to precursor tRNA but different catalytic efficiencies. High concentrations of substrate impede the activity of the former complex. Rpp29 itself exhibits high affinity in substrate binding, which seems to reduce the catalytic efficiency of the reconstituted ribonucleoprotein. Rpp29 has a conserved C-terminal domain with an Sm-like fold that mediates interaction with M1 RNA and precursor tRNA and can activate M1 RNA. The results suggest that distinct protein folds in two unrelated protein cofactors can facilitate transition from RNA- to ribonucleoprotein-based catalysis by RNase P. PMID:16155184

  3. Distinct roles for SWR1 and INO80 chromatin remodeling complexes at chromosomal double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    van Attikum, Haico; Fritsch, Olivier; Gasser, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    INO80 and SWR1 are two closely related ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes that share several subunits. Ino80 was reported to be recruited to the HO endonuclease-induced double-strand break (DSB) at the budding yeast mating-type locus, MAT. We find Swr1 similarly recruited in a manner dependent on the phosphorylation of H2A (γH2AX). This is not unique to cleavage at MAT; both Swr1 and Ino80 bind near an induced DSB on chromosome XV. Whereas Swr1 incorporates the histone variant H2A.Z into chromatin at promoters, H2A.Z levels do not increase at DSBs. Instead, H2A.Z, γH2AX and core histones are coordinately removed near the break in an INO80-dependent, but SWR1-independent, manner. Mutations in INO80-specific subunits Arp8 or Nhp10 impair the binding of Mre11 nuclease, yKu80 and ATR-related Mec1 kinase at the DSB, resulting in defective end-processing and checkpoint activation. In contrast, Mre11 binding, end-resection and checkpoint activation were normal in the swr1 strain, but yKu80 loading and error-free end-joining were impaired. Thus, these two related chromatin remodelers have distinct roles in DSB repair and checkpoint activation. PMID:17762868

  4. The Chang'E-1 orbiter plays a distinctive role in China's first successful selenodetic lunar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinsong; Su, Xiaoli; Huang, Qian; Yan, Jianguo

    2011-12-01

    The first Chinese lunar orbiter Chang'E-1 is a successful mission with many fruitful results obtained in various disciplines. The scientific data acquired by the Chang'E-1 payloads can benefit studies of the lunar origin and evolution, as well as other relevant research areas, after careful validation of the data. Among the new results, the Chang'E-1 selenodetic products are continually uncovering characteristics of the lunar surface, undersurface and inner structure. Successful lunar orbiters such as the Clementine, Lunar Prospector, KAGUYA/SELENE, Chang'E-1, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and GRAIL have been revealing, with increasing clarity, global selenodetic characteristics with state-of-the-art fine resolution and high precision. In particular, the Chang'E-1 plays an important distinctive role in selenodetic exploration through enhancing lunar topography and gravity models. The gravity model has been successfully improved with a factor of two after applying the Chang'E-1 long-wavelength tracking data. Using the new models, some medium-scale lunar surface characteristics such as basins and volcanoes have been identified. Furthermore, the old mascon basins of Bouguer, gravity anomaly and craters have been discovered with the Chang'E-1 selenodetic data.

  5. Transcripts of two ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase genes differentially localize in rice plants according to their distinct biological roles

    PubMed Central

    Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Usui, Masami; Sugawara, Chizu; Kanno, Yuri; Sakai, Arisa; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakazono, Mikio; Kuroda, Masaharu; Miyamoto, Koji; Morimoto, Yu; Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Okada, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Yamane, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are diterpenoid phytohormones that regulate various aspects of plant growth. Tetracyclic hydrocarbon ent-kaurene is a biosynthetic intermediate of GAs, and is converted from geranylgeranyl diphosphate, a common precursor of diterpenoids, via ent-copalyl diphosphate (ent-CDP) through successive cyclization reactions catalysed by two distinct diterpene synthases, ent-CDP synthase and ent-kaurene synthase. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) has two ent-CDP synthase genes, OsCPS1 and OsCPS2. It has been thought that OsCPS1 participates in GA biosynthesis, while OsCPS2 participates in the biosynthesis of phytoalexins, phytocassanes A–E, and oryzalexins A–F. It has been shown previously that loss-of-function OsCPS1 mutants display a severe dwarf phenotype caused by GA deficiency despite possessing another ent-CDP synthase gene, OsCPS2. Here, experiments were performed to account for the non-redundant biological function of OsCPS1 and OsCPS2. Quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) analysis showed that OsCPS2 transcript levels were drastically lower than those of OsCPS1 in the basal parts, including the meristem of the second-leaf sheaths of rice seedlings. qRT–PCR results using tissue samples prepared by laser microdissection suggested that OsCPS1 transcripts mainly localized in vascular bundle tissues, similar to Arabidopsis CPS, which is responsible for GA biosynthesis, whereas OsCPS2 transcripts mainly localized in epidermal cells that address environmental stressors such as pathogen attack. Furthermore, the OsCPS2 transgene under regulation of the OsCPS1 promoter complemented the dwarf phenotype of an OsCPS1 mutant, oscps1-1. The results indicate that transcripts of the two ent-CDP synthase genes differentially localize in rice plants according to their distinct biological roles, OsCPS1 for growth and OsCPS2 for defence. PMID:25336684

  6. The Distinct Role of the Amygdala, Superior Colliculus and Pulvinar in Processing of Central and Peripheral Snakes

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Inês; Soares, Sandra C.; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    pulvinar. Conclusion These results show that subcortical structures containing foveal representations such as the amygdala, pulvinar and superior colliculus play distinct roles in the central and peripheral processing of snake shapes. Our findings suggest multiple phylogenetic fingerprints in the responses of subcortical structures to fear-relevant stimuli. PMID:26075614

  7. NF-κB p50 Plays Distinct Roles in the Establishment and Control of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Latency ▿

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Laurie T.; Collins, Christopher M.; Gargano, Lisa M.; Speck, Samuel H.

    2009-01-01

    NF-κB signaling is critical to the survival and transformation of cells infected by the human gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Here we have examined how elimination of the NF-κB transcription factor p50 from mice affects the life cycle of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68). Notably, mice lacking p50 in every cell type were unable to establish a sufficiently robust immune response to control MHV68 infection, leading to high levels of latently infected B cells detected in the spleen and persistent virus replication in the lungs. The latter correlated with very low levels of virus-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the infected p50−/− mice at day 48 postinfection. Because the confounding impact of the loss of p50 on the host response to MHV68 infection prevented a direct analysis of the role of this NF-κB family member on MHV68 latency in B cells, we generated and infected mixed p50+/+/p50−/− bone marrow chimeric mice. We show that the chimeric mice were able to control acute virus replication and exhibited normal levels of virus-specific IgG at 3 months postinfection, indicating the induction of a normal host immune response to MHV68 infection. However, in p50+/+/p50−/− chimeric mice the p50−/− B cells exhibited a significant defect compared to p50+/+ B cells in supporting MHV68 latency. In addition to identifying a role for p50 in the establishment of latency, we determined that the absence of p50 in a subset of the hematopoietic compartment led to persistent virus replication in the lungs of the chimeric mice, providing evidence that p50 is required for controlling virus reactivation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that p50 is required for immune control by the host and has distinct tissue-dependent roles in the regulation of murine gammaherpesvirus latency during chronic infection. PMID:19264770

  8. Two related trypanosomatid eIF4G homologues have functional differences compatible with distinct roles during translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Moura, Danielle M N; Reis, Christian R S; Xavier, Camila C; da Costa Lima, Tamara D; Lima, Rodrigo P; Carrington, Mark; de Melo Neto, Osvaldo P

    2015-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, eIF4A, eIF4E and eIF4G homologues interact to enable mRNA recruitment to the ribosome. eIF4G acts as a scaffold for these interactions and also interacts with other proteins of the translational machinery. Trypanosomatid protozoa have multiple homologues of eIF4E and eIF4G and the precise function of each remains unclear. Here, 2 previously described eIF4G homologues, EIF4G3 and EIF4G4, were further investigated. In vitro, both homologues bound EIF4AI, but with different interaction properties. Binding to distinct eIF4Es was also confirmed; EIF4G3 bound EIF4E4 while EIF4G4 bound EIF4E3, both these interactions required similar binding motifs. EIF4G3, but not EIF4G4, interacted with PABP1, a poly-A binding protein homolog. Work in vivo with Trypanosoma brucei showed that both EIF4G3 and EIF4G4 are cytoplasmic and essential for viability. Depletion of EIF4G3 caused a rapid reduction in total translation while EIF4G4 depletion led to changes in morphology but no substantial inhibition of translation. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to disrupt interactions of the eIF4Gs with either eIF4E or eIF4A, causing different levels of growth inhibition. Overall the results show that only EIF4G3, with its cap binding partner EIF4E4, plays a major role in translational initiation. PMID:25826663

  9. Antiviral immunity of Anopheles gambiae is highly compartmentalized, with distinct roles for RNA interference and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Carissimo, Guillaume; Pondeville, Emilie; McFarlane, Melanie; Dietrich, Isabelle; Mitri, Christian; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Antoniewski, Christophe; Bourgouin, Catherine; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Kohl, Alain; Vernick, Kenneth D

    2015-01-13

    Arboviruses are transmitted by mosquitoes and other arthropods to humans and animals. The risk associated with these viruses is increasing worldwide, including new emergence in Europe and the Americas. Anopheline mosquitoes are vectors of human malaria but are believed to transmit one known arbovirus, o'nyong-nyong virus, whereas Aedes mosquitoes transmit many. Anopheles interactions with viruses have been little studied, and the initial antiviral response in the midgut has not been examined. Here, we determine the antiviral immune pathways of the Anopheles gambiae midgut, the initial site of viral infection after an infective blood meal. We compare them with the responses of the post-midgut systemic compartment, which is the site of the subsequent disseminated viral infection. Normal viral infection of the midgut requires bacterial flora and is inhibited by the activities of immune deficiency (Imd), JAK/STAT, and Leu-rich repeat immune factors. We show that the exogenous siRNA pathway, thought of as the canonical mosquito antiviral pathway, plays no detectable role in antiviral defense in the midgut but only protects later in the systemic compartment. These results alter the prevailing antiviral paradigm by describing distinct protective mechanisms in different body compartments and infection stages. Importantly, the presence of the midgut bacterial flora is required for full viral infectivity to Anopheles, in contrast to malaria infection, where the presence of the midgut bacterial flora is required for protection against infection. Thus, the enteric flora controls a reciprocal protection tradeoff in the vector for resistance to different human pathogens. PMID:25548172

  10. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and 4-kinase have distinct roles in intracellular trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Masaru; Suda, Yasuyuki; Vernhettes, Samantha; Nakano, Akihiko; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The oriented deposition of cellulose microfibrils in the plant cell wall plays a crucial role in various plant functions such as cell growth, organ formation and defense responses. Cellulose is synthesized by cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs) embedded in the plasma membrane (PM), which comprise the cellulose synthases (CESAs). The abundance and localization of CSCs at the PM should be strictly controlled for precise regulation of cellulose deposition, which strongly depends on the membrane trafficking system. However, the mechanism of the intracellular transport of CSCs is still poorly understood. In this study, we explored requirements for phosphoinositides (PIs) in CESA trafficking by analyzing the effects of inhibitors of PI synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged CESA3 (GFP-CESA3). We found that a shift to a sucrose-free condition accelerated re-localization of PM-localized GFP-CESA3 into the periphery of the Golgi apparatus via the clathrin-enriched trans-Golgi network (TGN). Treatment with wortmannin (Wm), an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3- (PI3K) and 4- (PI4K) kinases, and phenylarsine oxide (PAO), a more specific inhibitor for PI4K, inhibited internalization of GFP-CESA3 from the PM. In contrast, treatment with LY294002, which impairs the PI3K activity, did not exert such an inhibitory effect on the sequestration of GFP-CESA3, but caused a predominant accumulation of GFP-CESA3 at the ring-shaped periphery of the Golgi apparatus, resulting in the removal of GFP-CESA3 from the PM. These results indicate that PIs are essential elements for localization and intracellular transport of CESA3 and that PI4K and PI3K are required for distinct steps in secretory and/or endocytic trafficking of CESA3. PMID:25516570

  11. Orexin/Hypocretin and Histamine: Distinct Roles in the Control of Wakefulness Demonstrated Using Knock-Out Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Anaclet, Christelle; Parmentier, Régis; Ouk, Koliane; Guidon, Gérard; Buda, Colette; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Akaoka, Hidéo; Sergeeva, Olga A.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Franco, Patricia; Haas, Helmut L.; Lin, Jian Sheng

    2009-01-01

    To determine the respective role played by orexin/hypocretin and histamine (HA) neurons in maintaining wakefulness (W), we characterized the behavioral and sleep-wake phenotypes of orexin(Ox) knockout(−/−) mice and compared them with those of histidine-decarboxylase(HDC, HA-synthesizing enzyme)−/−mice. While both mouse strains displayed sleep fragmentation and increased paradoxical sleep(PS), they presented a number of marked differences: 1) The PS-increase in HDC−/−mice was seen during lightness, whereas that in Ox−/−mice occurred during darkness; 2) Contrary to HDC−/−, Ox−/−mice had no W deficiency around lights-off, nor an abnormal EEG and responded to a new environment with increased W; 3) Only Ox−/−, but not HDC−/−mice, displayed narcolepsy and deficient W when faced with motor challenge. Thus, when placed on a wheel, WT, but not littermate Ox−/−mice, voluntarily spent their time in turning it and as a result, remained highly awake; this was accompanied by dense c-fos expression in many areas of their brains, including Ox-neurons in the dorsolateral hypothalamus. The W and motor deficiency of Ox−/−mice was due to the absence of Ox because intraventricular dosing of Ox-A restored their W amount and motor performance whereas SB-334867 (Ox1-receptor antagonist, i.p.) impaired W and locomotion of WT mice during the test. These data indicate that Ox, but not HA, promotes W through enhanced locomotion and suggest that HA and Ox neurons exert a distinct, but complementary and synergistic control of W: the neuropeptide being more involved in its behavioral aspects, whereas the amine is mainly responsible for its qualitative cognitive aspects and cortical-EEG activation. PMID:19923277

  12. Two related trypanosomatid eIF4G homologues have functional differences compatible with distinct roles during translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Danielle MN; Reis, Christian RS; Xavier, Camila C; da Costa Lima, Tamara D; Lima, Rodrigo P; Carrington, Mark; de Melo Neto, Osvaldo P

    2015-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, eIF4A, eIF4E and eIF4G homologues interact to enable mRNA recruitment to the ribosome. eIF4G acts as a scaffold for these interactions and also interacts with other proteins of the translational machinery. Trypanosomatid protozoa have multiple homologues of eIF4E and eIF4G and the precise function of each remains unclear. Here, 2 previously described eIF4G homologues, EIF4G3 and EIF4G4, were further investigated. In vitro, both homologues bound EIF4AI, but with different interaction properties. Binding to distinct eIF4Es was also confirmed; EIF4G3 bound EIF4E4 while EIF4G4 bound EIF4E3, both these interactions required similar binding motifs. EIF4G3, but not EIF4G4, interacted with PABP1, a poly-A binding protein homolog. Work in vivo with Trypanosoma brucei showed that both EIF4G3 and EIF4G4 are cytoplasmic and essential for viability. Depletion of EIF4G3 caused a rapid reduction in total translation while EIF4G4 depletion led to changes in morphology but no substantial inhibition of translation. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to disrupt interactions of the eIF4Gs with either eIF4E or eIF4A, causing different levels of growth inhibition. Overall the results show that only EIF4G3, with its cap binding partner EIF4E4, plays a major role in translational initiation. PMID:25826663

  13. Distinct roles of cell wall biogenesis in yeast morphogenesis as revealed by multivariate analysis of high-dimensional morphometric data

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hiroki; Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Roncero, Cesar; Konopka, James B.; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of budding yeast is a rigid structure composed of multiple components. To thoroughly understand its involvement in morphogenesis, we used the image analysis software CalMorph to quantitatively analyze cell morphology after treatment with drugs that inhibit different processes during cell wall synthesis. Cells treated with cell wall–affecting drugs exhibited broader necks and increased morphological variation. Tunicamycin, which inhibits the initial step of N-glycosylation of cell wall mannoproteins, induced morphologies similar to those of strains defective in α-mannosylation. The chitin synthase inhibitor nikkomycin Z induced morphological changes similar to those of mutants defective in chitin transglycosylase, possibly due to the critical role of chitin in anchoring the β-glucan network. To define the mode of action of echinocandin B, a 1,3-β-glucan synthase inhibitor, we compared the morphology it induced with mutants of Fks1 that contains the catalytic domain for 1,3-β-glucan synthesis. Echinocandin B exerted morphological effects similar to those observed in some fks1 mutants, with defects in cell polarity and reduced glucan synthesis activity, suggesting that echinocandin B affects not only 1,3-β-glucan synthesis, but also another functional domain. Thus our multivariate analyses reveal discrete functions of cell wall components and increase our understanding of the pharmacology of antifungal drugs. PMID:24258022

  14. Defining roles of PARKIN and ubiquitin phosphorylation by PINK1 in mitochondrial quality control using a ubiquitin replacement strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ordureau, Alban; Heo, Jin-Mi; Duda, David M.; Paulo, Joao A.; Olszewski, Jennifer L.; Yanishevski, David; Rinehart, Jesse; Schulman, Brenda A.; Harper, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    The PTEN-induced putative kinase protein 1 (PINK1) and ubiquitin (UB) ligase PARKIN direct damaged mitochondria for mitophagy. PINK1 promotes PARKIN recruitment to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) for ubiquitylation of MOM proteins with canonical and noncanonical UB chains. PINK1 phosphorylates both Ser65 (S65) in the UB-like domain of PARKIN and the conserved Ser in UB itself, but the temporal sequence and relative importance of these events during PARKIN activation and mitochondria quality control remain poorly understood. Using “UBS65A-replacement,” we find that PARKIN phosphorylation and activation, and ubiquitylation of Lys residues on a cohort of MOM proteins, occur similarly irrespective of the ability of the UB-replacement to be phosphorylated on S65. In contrast, polyubiquitin (poly-UB) chain synthesis, PARKIN retention on the MOM, and mitophagy are reduced in UBS65A-replacement cells. Analogous experiments examining roles of individual UB chain linkage types revealed the importance of K6 and K63 chain linkages in mitophagy, but phosphorylation of K63 chains by PINK1 did not enhance binding to candidate mitophagy receptors optineurin (OPTN), sequestosome-1 (p62), and nuclear dot protein 52 (NDP52) in vitro. Parallel reaction monitoring proteomics of total mitochondria revealed the absence of p-S65-UB when PARKIN cannot build UB chains, and <0.16% of the monomeric UB pool underwent S65 phosphorylation upon mitochondrial damage. Combining p-S65-UB and p-S65-PARKIN in vitro showed accelerated transfer of nonphosphorylated UB to PARKIN itself, its substrate mitochondrial Rho GTPase (MIRO), and UB. Our data further define a feed-forward mitochondrial ubiquitylation pathway involving PARKIN activation upon phosphorylation, UB chain synthesis on the MOM, UB chain phosphorylation, and further PARKIN recruitment and enzymatic amplification via binding to phosphorylated UB chains. PMID:25969509

  15. Compartment-specific roles of ABC transporters define differential topotecan distribution in brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jun; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Hubbard, K. Elaine; Tagen, Michael; Wynn, Henry G.; Panetta, John C.; Waters, Christopher M.; Elmeliegy, Mohamed A.; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2009-01-01

    Topotecan is a substrate of the ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp/MDR1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). To define the role of these transporters in topotecan penetration into the ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (vCSF) and brain parenchymal extracellular fluid (ECF) compartments we performed intracerebral microdialysis on transporter-deficient mice after an intravenous dose of topotecan (4 mg/kg). vCSF penetration of unbound topotecan lactone was measured as the ratio of vCSF-to-plasma area under the concentration-time curves (AUCs). The mean (±SD) ratios for wild-type, Mdr1a/b−/−, Bcrp1−/− and Mdr1a/b−/−Bcrp1−/− mice were 3.07±0.09, 2.57±0.17, 1.63±0.12 and 0.86±0.05, respectively. In contrast, the ECF-to-plasma ratios for wild-type, Bcrp1−/− and Mdr1a/b−/−Bcrp1−/− mice were 0.36±0.06, 0.42±0.06 and 0.88±0.07. Topotecan lactone was below detectable limits in the ECF of Mdr1a/b−/−mice. When gefitinib (200 mg/kg) was pre-administered to inhibit Bcrp1 and P-gp, the vCSF-to-plasma ratio decreased to 1.29±0.09 in wild-type mice and increased to 1.13±0.13 in Mdr1a/b−/−Bcrp1−/− mice, whereas the ECF-to-plasma ratio increased to 0.74±0.14 in wild-type and 1.07±0.03 in Mdr1a/b−/−Bcrp1−/− mice. Preferential active transport of topotecan lactone over topotecan carboxylate was shown in vivo by vCSF lactone-to-carboxylate AUC ratios for wild-type, Mdr1a/b−/−, Bcrp1−/− and Mdr1a/b−/−Bcrp1−/− mice of 5.69±0.83, 3.85±0.64, 3.61±0.46 and 0.78±0.19. Our results suggest that Bcrp1 and P-gp transport topotecan into vCSF and out of brain parenchyma through the blood-brain barrier. These findings may help to improve pharmacological strategies to treat brain tumors. PMID:19567673

  16. The Distinct Roles of Sociometric and Perceived Popularity in Friendship: Implications for Adolescent Depressive Affect and Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwack, Scott D.; Aikins, Julie Wargo; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.

    2012-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to examine the similarities and distinctions between two types of popularity, sociometric and perceived, in their associations with friendship characteristics and how they in turn are related to depressive affect and self-esteem. Among 245 eighth graders, sociometric popularity was associated with a greater…

  17. Exploring the effects of icon characteristics on user performance: the role of icon concreteness, complexity, and distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    McDougall, S J; de Bruijn, O; Curry, M B

    2000-12-01

    Because icons, signs, and symbols are now widely used to communicate information, it is essential for system designers to know what makes them easy to use and interpret. The authors report a series of studies that examine characteristics considered central to icon usability. After quantifying the properties of icon concreteness, complexity, and discriminability, the authors assessed each property's effects on user performance when user experience, task demands, and presentation context were systematically varied. Findings indicated that the effects of icon concreteness were primarily associated with the initial grasp of meaning, whereas complexity effects were found to persist longer and to be associated with search efficacy. The effects of icon distinctiveness were complex, but distinctiveness was enhanced by using both semantic and visual contrasts. The implications of these findings for interface design are discussed. PMID:11218339

  18. Focal Uncaging of GABA Reveals a Temporally Defined Role for GABAergic Inhibition during Appetitive Associative Olfactory Conditioning in Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raccuglia, Davide; Mueller, Uli

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, the inhibitory neurotransmitter ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a key modulator of physiological processes including learning. With respect to associative learning, the exact time in which GABA interferes with the molecular events of learning has not yet been clearly defined. To address this issue, we used two…

  19. Culex torrentium Mosquito Role as Major Enzootic Vector Defined by Rate of Sindbis Virus Infection, Sweden, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Verner-Carlsson, Jenny; Larsson, Anders; Ahmed, Raija; Lundkvist, Åke; Lundström, Jan O.

    2015-01-01

    We isolated Sindbis virus (SINV) from the enzootic mosquito vectors Culex torrentium, Cx. pipiens, and Culiseta morsitans collected in an area of Sweden where SINV disease is endemic. The infection rate in Cx. torrentium mosquitoes was exceptionally high (36 infections/1,000 mosquitoes), defining Cx. torrentium as the main enzootic vector of SINV in Scandinavia. PMID:25898013

  20. Systemwide Reform in Districts under Pressure: The Role of Social Networks in Defining, Acquiring, Using, and Diffusing Research Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnigan, Kara S.; Daly, Alan J.; Che, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the way in which low-performing schools and their district define, acquire, use, and diffuse research-based evidence. Design/methodology/approach: The mixed methods case study builds upon the prior research on research evidence and social networks, drawing on social network analyses, survey data and…

  1. The role of well-defined nanotopography of titanium implants on osseointegration: cellular and molecular events in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Karazisis, Dimitrios; Ballo, Ahmed M; Petronis, Sarunas; Agheli, Hossein; Emanuelsson, Lena; Thomsen, Peter; Omar, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mechanisms governing the cellular interactions with well-defined nanotopography are not well described in vivo. This is partly due to the difficulty in isolating a particular effect of nanotopography from other surface properties. This study employed colloidal lithography for nanofabrication on titanium implants in combination with an in vivo sampling procedure and different analytical techniques. The aim was to elucidate the effect of well-defined nanotopography on the molecular, cellular, and structural events of osseointegration. Materials and methods Titanium implants were nanopatterned (Nano) with semispherical protrusions using colloidal lithography. Implants, with and without nanotopography, were implanted in rat tibia and retrieved after 3, 6, and 28 days. Retrieved implants were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, histology, immunohistochemistry, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Results Surface characterization showed that the nanotopography was well defined in terms of shape (semispherical), size (79±6 nm), and distribution (31±2 particles/µm2). EDS showed similar levels of titanium, oxygen, and carbon for test and control implants, confirming similar chemistry. The molecular analysis of the retrieved implants revealed that the expression levels of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, and the osteoclastic marker, CatK, were reduced in cells adherent to the Nano implants. This was consistent with the observation of less CD163-positive macrophages in the tissue surrounding the Nano implant. Furthermore, periostin immunostaining was frequently detected around the Nano implant, indicating higher osteogenic activity. This was supported by the EDS analysis of the retrieved implants showing higher content of calcium and phosphate on the Nano implants. Conclusion The results show that Nano implants elicit less periimplant macrophage infiltration and downregulate the early expression of inflammatory (TNF-α) and

  2. Computational identification and analysis of signaling subnetworks with distinct functional roles in the regulation of TNF production.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Kottke, Melissa; Matheny, Ronald W; Reifman, Jaques; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation is a complex process driven by the coordinated action of a vast number of pro- and anti-inflammatory molecular mediators. While experimental studies have provided an abundance of information about the properties and mechanisms of action of individual mediators, essential system-level regulatory patterns that determine the time-course of inflammation are not sufficiently understood. In particular, it is not known how the contributions from distinct signaling pathways involved in cytokine regulation combine to shape the overall inflammatory response over different time scales. We investigated the kinetics of the intra- and extracellular signaling network controlling the production of the essential pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and its anti-inflammatory counterpart, interleukin 10 (IL-10), in a macrophage culture. To tackle the intrinsic complexity of the network, we employed a computational modeling approach using the available literature data about specific molecular interactions. Our computational model successfully captured experimentally observed short- and long-term kinetics of key inflammatory mediators. Subsequent model analysis showed that distinct subnetworks regulate IL-10 production by impacting different temporal phases of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. Moreover, the model revealed that functionally similar inhibitory control circuits regulate the early and late activation phases of nuclear factor κB and CREB. Finally, we identified and investigated distinct signaling subnetworks that independently control the peak height and tail height of the TNF temporal trajectories. The knowledge of such subnetwork-specific regulatory effects may facilitate therapeutic interventions aimed at precise modulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:26751842

  3. Distinct Roles of Type I and Type III Interferons in Intestinal Immunity to Homologous and Heterologous Rotavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Murugabaskar; Tseng, Hsiang-Chi; McElrath, Constance; Smirnov, Sergey V.; Peng, Jianya; Yasukawa, Linda L.; Durbin, Russell K.; Durbin, Joan E.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Kotenko, Sergei V.

    2016-01-01

    Type I (IFN-α/β) and type III (IFN-λ) interferons (IFNs) exert shared antiviral activities through distinct receptors. However, their relative importance for antiviral protection of different organ systems against specific viruses remains to be fully explored. We used mouse strains deficient in type-specific IFN signaling, STAT1 and Rag2 to dissect distinct and overlapping contributions of type I and type III IFNs to protection against homologous murine (EW-RV strain) and heterologous (non-murine) simian (RRV strain) rotavirus infections in suckling mice. Experiments demonstrated that murine EW-RV is insensitive to the action of both types of IFNs, and that timely viral clearance depends upon adaptive immune responses. In contrast, both type I and type III IFNs can control replication of the heterologous simian RRV in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and they cooperate to limit extra-intestinal simian RRV replication. Surprisingly, intestinal epithelial cells were sensitive to both IFN types in neonatal mice, although their responsiveness to type I, but not type III IFNs, diminished in adult mice, revealing an unexpected age-dependent change in specific contribution of type I versus type III IFNs to antiviral defenses in the GI tract. Transcriptional analysis revealed that intestinal antiviral responses to RV are triggered through either type of IFN receptor, and are greatly diminished when receptors for both IFN types are lacking. These results also demonstrate a murine host-specific resistance to IFN-mediated antiviral effects by murine EW-RV, but the retention of host efficacy through the cooperative action by type I and type III IFNs in restricting heterologous simian RRV growth and systemic replication in suckling mice. Collectively, our findings revealed a well-orchestrated spatial and temporal tuning of innate antiviral responses in the intestinal tract where two types of IFNs through distinct patterns of their expression and distinct but overlapping sets

  4. Are you upset? Distinct roles for orbitofrontal and lateral prefrontal cortex in detecting and distinguishing facial expressions of emotion.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Ami; Fellows, Lesley K

    2012-12-01

    Navigating our complex social world requires effective processing of subtle emotional signals, such as those conveyed by facial expressions. Failure to do so may underlie some of the disabling social-emotional deficits common in a range of neuropsychiatric and neurological conditions. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) has long been implicated in these processes, but the particular contributions of subregions within PFC remain unclear. We used a sensitive facial emotion rating task in patients with focal lesions to different regions within PFC to identify distinct contributions of 2 prefrontal regions to recognizing emotions from facial expressions. A combination of region-of-interest and voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping established that damage to ventromedial PFC impaired the detection of subtle facial expressions of emotion. Such patients had difficulty distinguishing emotional from neutral expressions. In contrast, patients with left ventrolateral PFC were able to detect the presence of emotional signals but had difficulty discriminating between specific emotions. These effects were regionally specific: Dorsomedial prefrontal damage had no effect on either aspect of emotion recognition. These findings suggest that separable processes relying critically on distinct regions within PFC responsible, on the one hand, for detecting emotional signals from facial expressions and, on the other, for correctly classifying such signals. PMID:22223852

  5. Criteria to Define a Pair-Ion Plasma and the Role of Electrons in its Nonlinear Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, Hamid

    2008-10-15

    Criteria to define a pure pair-ion (PI) plasma are presented. It is suggested that the lighter elements (like H and He) are suitable to produce PI plasmas. The observation of ion acoustic wave (IAW) in recent experiments with fullerene plasmas clearly indicates the presence of electrons in the system. A set of two coupled nonlinear differential equations are obtained for PI plasma dynamics. In moving frame, it can be reduced to a form similar to Hasegawa-Mima equation but it does not support drift waves.

  6. Defining Staff Roles and Responsibilities with Integration: A Model for Effective Utilization of Special Education Staff in the Regular Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Vicky A.

    This practicum report addressed the problem of role ambiguity in regard to effective utilization of special education staff within the regular fourth grade classroom and the need for support for the regular teacher working with special education students. The researcher, a special educator, conducted the following activities: (1) presented an…

  7. Cellular dynamics of regeneration reveals role of two distinct Pax7 stem cell populations in larval zebrafish muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    Pipalia, Tapan G.; Koth, Jana; Roy, Shukolpa D.; Hammond, Christina L.; Kawakami, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterogeneity of stem cells or their niches is likely to influence tissue regeneration. Here we reveal stem/precursor cell diversity during wound repair in larval zebrafish somitic body muscle using time-lapse 3D confocal microscopy on reporter lines. Skeletal muscle with incision wounds rapidly regenerates both slow and fast muscle fibre types. A swift immune response is followed by an increase in cells at the wound site, many of which express the muscle stem cell marker Pax7. Pax7+ cells proliferate and then undergo terminal differentiation involving Myogenin accumulation and subsequent loss of Pax7 followed by elongation and fusion to repair fast muscle fibres. Analysis of pax7a and pax7b transgenic reporter fish reveals that cells expressing each of the duplicated pax7 genes are distinctly localised in uninjured larvae. Cells marked by pax7a only or by both pax7a and pax7b enter the wound rapidly and contribute to muscle wound repair, but each behaves differently. Low numbers of pax7a-only cells form nascent fibres. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that the more numerous pax7b-marked cells frequently fuse to pre-existing fibres, contributing more strongly than pax7a-only cells to repair of damaged fibres. pax7b-marked cells are more often present in rows of aligned cells that are observed to fuse into a single fibre, but more rarely contribute to nascent regenerated fibres. Ablation of a substantial portion of nitroreductase-expressing pax7b cells with metronidazole prior to wounding triggered rapid pax7a-only cell accumulation, but this neither inhibited nor augmented pax7a-only cell-derived myogenesis and thus altered the cellular repair dynamics during wound healing. Moreover, pax7a-only cells did not regenerate pax7b cells, suggesting a lineage distinction. We propose a modified founder cell and fusion-competent cell model in which pax7a-only cells initiate fibre formation and pax7b cells contribute to fibre growth. This newly discovered cellular

  8. Differential protein-protein interactions of LRRK1 and LRRK2 indicate roles in distinct cellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Reyniers, Lauran; Del Giudice, Maria Grazia; Civiero, Laura; Belluzzi, Elisa; Lobbestael, Evy; Beilina, Alexandra; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Li, Yan; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro; Cookson, Mark R.; Baekelandt, Veerle; Greggio, Elisa; Taymans, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies show that LRRK2, and not its closest paralogue LRRK1, is linked to Parkinson’s disease. To gain insight into the molecular and cellular basis of this discrepancy, we searched for LRRK1- and LRRK2-specific cellular processes by identifying their distinct interacting proteins. A protein microarray-based interaction screen was performed with recombinant 3xFlag-LRRK1 and 3xFlag-LRRK2 and, in parallel, co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry was performed from SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell lines stably expressing 3xFlag-LRRK1 or 3xFlag-LRRK2. We identified a set of LRRK1- and LRRK2-specific as well as common interactors. One of our most prominent findings was that both screens pointed to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) as a LRRK1-specific interactor, while 14-3-3 proteins were LRRK2-specific. This is consistent with phosphosite mapping of LRRK1, revealing phosphosites outside of 14-3-3 consensus binding motifs. To assess the functional relevance of these interactions, SH-SY5Y-LRRK1 and -LRRK2 cell lines were treated with LRRK2 kinase inhibitors that disrupt 14-3-3 binding, or with EGF, an EGF-R agonist. Redistribution of LRRK2, not LRRK1, from diffuse cytoplasmic to filamentous aggregates was observed after inhibitor treatment. Similarly, EGF induced translocation of LRRK1, but not of LRRK2, to endosomes. Our study confirms that LRRK1 and LRRK2 can carry out distinct functions by interacting with different cellular proteins. PMID:24947832

  9. Onset polarity and illness course in bipolar I and II disorders: The predictive role of broadly defined mixed states.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Antonio; Musetti, Laura; Benedetti, Alessandra; Berti, Benedetta; Massimetti, Gabriele; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2015-11-01

    Several studies investigating bipolar disorders have shown that polarity of onset can predict differences in symptomatology, course, and prognosis. Frequently, however, research on the topic has examined only bipolar I inpatients and has not included patients with mixed onset. The aim of the present naturalistic study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and illness course of a consecutive sample (407 outpatients, 58.7% with bipolar I (BD-I) and 41.3% with bipolar II (BD-II) disorder) according to polarity of onset: depressive (DP-o); manic/hypomanic (HM-o); or mixed--broadly defined to include agitated depression for BD-II--onset (MX-o). As compared with patients in the other two groups: a) DP-o patients (67.3%) were more frequently affected by BD-II and had lower ratings for psychotic symptoms; b) HM-o patients (17%) had a higher rate of family history for psychosis and a lower rate of suicide attempts; and c) patients in the MX-o group (15.7%) more frequently showed substance abuse and had a higher number of mixed recurrences per year. In the BD-II group, MX-o patients more frequently attempted suicide. The present study's main limitations are those of retrospective assessment of onset polarity and lack of treatment-impact evaluations over illness course. In conclusion, we confirm clinical expression differences in bipolar disorder in function of polarity of onset and underscore the importance of carefully considering broadly defined mixed state when examining polarity of onset. Further investigations are required to confirm the present study's results. PMID:26555487

  10. Transnational Geographies of Academic Distinction: The Role of Social Capital in the Recognition and Evaluation of "Overseas" Credentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Johanna L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the role of specific and place-based social capital in the recognition and evaluation of international credentials. Whilst research on labour market segmentation has contributed towards an understanding of the spatial variability of the value of human capital, very little attention has been paid to the ways in which the…

  11. Histone H3 K79 methylation states play distinct roles in UV-induced sister chromatid exchange and cell cycle checkpoint arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rossodivita, Alyssa A.; Boudoures, Anna L.; Mecoli, Jonathan P.; Steenkiste, Elizabeth M.; Karl, Andrea L.; Vines, Eudora M.; Cole, Arron M.; Ansbro, Megan R.; Thompson, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications have been shown to contribute to DNA damage repair. Prior studies have suggested that specific H3K79 methylation states play distinct roles in the response to UV-induced DNA damage. To evaluate these observations, we examined the effect of altered H3K79 methylation patterns on UV-induced G1/S checkpoint response and sister chromatid exchange (SCE). We found that the di- and trimethylated states both contribute to activation of the G1/S checkpoint to varying degrees, depending on the synchronization method, although methylation is not required for checkpoint in response to high levels of UV damage. In contrast, UV-induced SCE is largely a product of the trimethylated state, which influences the usage of gene conversion versus popout mechanisms. Regulation of H3K79 methylation by H2BK123 ubiquitylation is important for both checkpoint function and SCE. H3K79 methylation is not required for the repair of double-stranded breaks caused by transient HO endonuclease expression, but does play a modest role in survival from continuous exposure. The overall results provide evidence for the participation of H3K79 methylation in UV-induced recombination repair and checkpoint activation, and further indicate that the di- and trimethylation states play distinct roles in these DNA damage response pathways. PMID:24748660

  12. Distinct role of Arabidopsis mitochondrial P-type pentatricopeptide repeat protein-modulating editing protein, PPME, in nad1 RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Kuan-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Huei-Jing; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mitochondrion is an important power generator in most eukaryotic cells. To preserve its function, many essential nuclear-encoded factors play specific roles in mitochondrial RNA metabolic processes, including RNA editing. RNA editing consists of post-transcriptional deamination, which alters specific nucleotides in transcripts to mediate gene expression. In plant cells, many pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs) participate in diverse organellar RNA metabolic processes, but only PLS-type PPRs are involved in RNA editing. Here, we report a P-type PPR protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, P-type PPR-Modulating Editing (PPME), which has a distinct role in mitochondrial nad1 RNA editing via RNA binding activity. In the homozygous ppme mutant, cytosine (C)-to-uracil (U) conversions at both the nad1-898 and 937 sites were abolished, disrupting Arg300-to-Trp300 and Pro313-to-Ser313 amino acid changes in the mitochondrial NAD1 protein. NAD1 is a critical component of mitochondrial respiration complex I; its activity is severely reduced in the homozygous ppme mutant, resulting in significantly altered growth and development. Both abolished RNA editing and defective complex I activity were completely rescued by CaMV 35S promoter- and PPME native promoter-driven PPME genomic fragments tagged with GFP in a homozygous ppme background. Our experimental results demonstrate a distinct role of a P-type PPR protein, PPME, in RNA editing in plant organelles. PMID:27149614

  13. Distinct role of Arabidopsis mitochondrial P-type pentatricopeptide repeat protein-modulating editing protein, PPME, in nad1 RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Leu, Kuan-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Huei-Jing; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondrion is an important power generator in most eukaryotic cells. To preserve its function, many essential nuclear-encoded factors play specific roles in mitochondrial RNA metabolic processes, including RNA editing. RNA editing consists of post-transcriptional deamination, which alters specific nucleotides in transcripts to mediate gene expression. In plant cells, many pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs) participate in diverse organellar RNA metabolic processes, but only PLS-type PPRs are involved in RNA editing. Here, we report a P-type PPR protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, P-type PPR-Modulating Editing (PPME), which has a distinct role in mitochondrial nad1 RNA editing via RNA binding activity. In the homozygous ppme mutant, cytosine (C)-to-uracil (U) conversions at both the nad1-898 and 937 sites were abolished, disrupting Arg(300)-to-Trp(300) and Pro(313)-to-Ser(313) amino acid changes in the mitochondrial NAD1 protein. NAD1 is a critical component of mitochondrial respiration complex I; its activity is severely reduced in the homozygous ppme mutant, resulting in significantly altered growth and development. Both abolished RNA editing and defective complex I activity were completely rescued by CaMV 35S promoter- and PPME native promoter-driven PPME genomic fragments tagged with GFP in a homozygous ppme background. Our experimental results demonstrate a distinct role of a P-type PPR protein, PPME, in RNA editing in plant organelles. PMID:27149614

  14. Vacuolar Nicotianamine Has Critical and Distinct Roles under Iron Deficiency and for Zinc Sequestration in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Haydon, Michael J.; Kawachi, Miki; Wirtz, Markus; Hillmer, Stefan; Hell, Rüdiger; Krämer, Ute

    2012-01-01

    The essential micronutrients Fe and Zn often limit plant growth but are toxic in excess. Arabidopsis thaliana ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR1 (ZIF1) is a vacuolar membrane major facilitator superfamily protein required for basal Zn tolerance. Here, we show that overexpression of ZIF1 enhances the partitioning into vacuoles of the low molecular mass metal chelator nicotianamine and leads to pronounced nicotianamine accumulation in roots, accompanied by vacuolar buildup of Zn. Heterologous ZIF1 protein localizes to vacuolar membranes and enhances nicotianamine contents of yeast cells engineered to synthesize nicotianamine, without complementing a Zn-hypersensitive mutant that additionally lacks vacuolar membrane Zn2+/H+ antiport activity. Retention in roots of Zn, but not of Fe, is enhanced in ZIF1 overexpressors at the expense of the shoots. Furthermore, these lines exhibit impaired intercellular Fe movement in leaves and constitutive Fe deficiency symptoms, thus phenocopying nicotianamine biosynthesis mutants. Hence, perturbing the subcellular distribution of the chelator nicotianamine has profound, yet distinct, effects on Zn and Fe with respect to their subcellular and interorgan partitioning. The zif1 mutant is also hypersensitive to Fe deficiency, even in media lacking added Zn. Therefore, accurate levels of ZIF1 expression are critical for both Zn and Fe homeostasis. This will help to advance the biofortification of crops. PMID:22374397

  15. Pivotal and distinct role for Plasmodium actin capping protein alpha during blood infection of the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Ganter, Markus; Rizopoulos, Zaira; Schüler, Herwig; Matuschewski, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Accurate regulation of microfilament dynamics is central to cell growth, motility and response to environmental stimuli. Stabilizing and depolymerizing proteins control the steady-state levels of filamentous (F-) actin. Capping protein (CP) binds to free barbed ends, thereby arresting microfilament growth and restraining elongation to remaining free barbed ends. In all CPs characterized to date, alpha and beta subunits form the active heterodimer. Here, we show in a eukaryotic parasitic cell that the two CP subunits can be functionally separated. Unlike the beta subunit, the CP alpha subunit of the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium is refractory to targeted gene deletion during blood infection in the mammalian host. Combinatorial complementation of Plasmodium berghei CP genes with the orthologs from Plasmodium falciparum verified distinct activities of CP alpha and CP alpha/beta during parasite life cycle progression. Recombinant Plasmodium CP alpha could be produced in Escherichia coli in the absence of the beta subunit and the protein displayed F-actin capping activity. Thus, the functional separation of two CP subunits in a parasitic eukaryotic cell and the F-actin capping activity of CP alpha expand the repertoire of microfilament regulatory mechanisms assigned to CPs. PMID:25565321

  16. Distinct effects of TRAIL on the mitochondrial network in human cancer cells and normal cells: role of plasma membrane depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Saito, Kosuke; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Ochiai, Toyoko; Soma, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Apo2 ligand/tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (Apo2L/TRAIL) is a promising anticancer drug due to its tumor-selective cytotoxicity. Here we report that TRAIL exhibits distinct effects on the mitochondrial networks in malignant cells and normal cells. Live-cell imaging revealed that multiple human cancer cell lines and normal cells exhibited two different modes of mitochondrial responses in response to TRAIL and death receptor agonists. Mitochondria within tumor cells became fragmented into punctate and clustered in response to toxic stimuli. The mitochondrial fragmentation was observed at 4 h, then became more pronounced over time, and associated with apoptotic cell death. In contrast, mitochondria within normal cells such as melanocytes and fibroblasts became only modestly truncated, even when they were treated with toxic stimuli. Although TRAIL activated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1)-dependent mitochondrial fission, inhibition of this process by Drp1 knockdown or with the Drp1 inhibitor mdivi-1, potentiated TRAIL-induced apoptosis, mitochondrial fragmentation, and clustering. Moreover, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated depolarization accelerated mitochondrial network abnormalities in tumor cells, but not in normal cells, and TRAIL caused higher levels of mitochondrial ROS accumulation and depolarization in malignant cells than in normal cells. Our findings suggest that tumor cells are more prone than normal cells to oxidative stress and depolarization, thereby being more vulnerable to mitochondrial network abnormalities and that this vulnerability may be relevant to the tumor-targeting killing by TRAIL. PMID:26057632

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factors have distinct and stage-specific roles during reprogramming of human cells to pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Julie; Zhou, Wenyu; Xing, Yalan; Sperber, Henrik; Ferreccio, Amy; Agoston, Zsuzsa; Kuppusamy, Kavitha T; Moon, Randall T; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2014-05-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have distinct metabolic requirements, and reprogramming cells to pluripotency requires a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism. Here, we show that this shift occurs early during reprogramming of human cells and requires hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in a stage-specific manner. HIF1α and HIF2α are both necessary to initiate this metabolic switch and for the acquisition of pluripotency, and the stabilization of either protein during early phases of reprogramming is sufficient to induce the switch to glycolytic metabolism. In contrast, stabilization of HIF2α during later stages represses reprogramming, partly because of the upregulation of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). TRAIL inhibits induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) generation by repressing apoptotic caspase 3 activity specifically in cells undergoing reprogramming but not human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and inhibiting TRAIL activity enhances human iPSC generation. These results shed light on the mechanisms underlying the metabolic shifts associated with the acquisition of a pluripotent identity during reprogramming. PMID:24656769

  18. Drp2 and Periaxin form Cajal Bands with Dystroglycan but have Distinct Roles in Schwann Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Diane L.; Wu, Lai Man N.; Grove, Matthew; Gillespie, C. Stewart; Brophy, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Cajal bands are cytoplasmic channels flanked by appositions where the abaxonal surface of Schwann cell myelin apposes and adheres to the overlying plasma membrane. These appositions contain a dystroglycan complex that includes periaxin and dystrophin-related protein 2 (Drp2). Loss of periaxin disrupts appositions and Cajal bands in Schwann cells and causes a severe demyelinating neuropathy in mouse and man. Here we have investigated the role of mouse Drp2 in apposition assembly and Cajal band function and compared it to periaxin. We show that Periaxin and Drp2 are not only both required to form appositions, but they must also interact. Periaxin-Drp2 interaction is also required for Drp2 phosphorylation but phosphorylation is not required for the assembly of appositions. Drp2 loss causes corresponding increases in Dystrophin family members, utrophin and dystrophin Dp116 though dystroglycan remains unchanged. We also show that all dystroglycan complexes in Schwann cells utilise the uncleaved form of β-dystroglycan. Drp2-null Schwann cells have disrupted appositions and Cajal bands, and they undergoe focal hypermyelination and concomitant demyelination. Nevertheless, they do not have the short internodal lengths and associated reduced nerve conduction velocity seen in the absence of periaxin, showing that periaxin regulates Schwann cell elongation independent of its role in the dystroglycan complex. We conclude that the primary role of the dystroglycan complex in appositions is to stabilize and limit the radial growth of myelin. PMID:22764250

  19. Distinct roles of Rho1, Cdc42, and Cyk3 in septum formation and abscission during yeast cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Ko, Nolan; Nishihama, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    In yeast and animal cytokinesis, the small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rho1/RhoA has an established role in formation of the contractile actomyosin ring, but its role, if any, during cleavage-furrow ingression and abscission is poorly understood. Through genetic screens in yeast, we found that either activation of Rho1 or inactivation of another small GTPase, Cdc42, promoted secondary septum (SS) formation, which appeared to be responsible for abscission. Consistent with this hypothesis, a dominant-negative Rho1 inhibited SS formation but not cleavage-furrow ingression or the concomitant actomyosin ring constriction. Moreover, Rho1 is temporarily inactivated during cleavage-furrow ingression; this inactivation requires the protein Cyk3, which binds Rho1-guanosine diphosphate via its catalytically inactive transglutaminase-like domain. Thus, unlike the active transglutaminases that activate RhoA, the multidomain protein Cyk3 appears to inhibit activation of Rho1 (and thus SS formation), while simultaneously promoting cleavage-furrow ingression through primary septum formation. This work suggests a general role for the catalytically inactive transglutaminases of fungi and animals, some of which have previously been implicated in cytokinesis. PMID:23878277

  20. Hha has a defined regulatory role that is not dependent upon H-NS or StpA

    PubMed Central

    Solórzano, Carla; Srikumar, Shabarinath; Canals, Rocío; Juárez, Antonio; Paytubi, Sonia; Madrid, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The Hha family of proteins is involved in the regulation of gene expression in enterobacteria by forming complexes with H-NS-like proteins. Whereas several amino acid residues of both proteins participate in the interaction, some of them play a key role. Residue D48 of Hha protein is essential for the interaction with H-NS, thus the D48N substitution in Hha protein abrogates H-NS/Hha interaction. Despite being a paralog of H-NS protein, StpA interacts with HhaD48N with higher affinity than with the wild type Hha protein. To analyze whether Hha is capable of acting independently of H-NS and StpA, we conducted transcriptomic analysis on the hha and stpA deletion strains and the hhaD48N substitution strain of Salmonella Typhimurium using a custom microarray. The results obtained allowed the identification of 120 genes regulated by Hha in an H-NS/StpA-independent manner, 38% of which are horizontally acquired genes. A significant number of the identified genes are involved in functions related to cell motility, iron uptake, and pathogenicity. Thus, motility assays, siderophore detection and intra-macrophage replication assays were performed to confirm the transcriptomic data. Our findings point out the importance of Hha protein as an independent regulator in S. Typhimurium, highlighting a regulatory role on virulence. PMID:26284052

  1. Defining "Development".

    PubMed

    Pradeu, Thomas; Laplane, Lucie; Prévot, Karine; Hoquet, Thierry; Reynaud, Valentine; Fusco, Giuseppe; Minelli, Alessandro; Orgogozo, Virginie; Vervoort, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Is it possible, and in the first place is it even desirable, to define what "development" means and to determine the scope of the field called "developmental biology"? Though these questions appeared crucial for the founders of "developmental biology" in the 1950s, there seems to be no consensus today about the need to address them. Here, in a combined biological, philosophical, and historical approach, we ask whether it is possible and useful to define biological development, and, if such a definition is indeed possible and useful, which definition(s) can be considered as the most satisfactory. PMID:26969977

  2. Defining the Role of the NADH-Cytochrome-b5 Reductase 3 in the Mitochondrial Amidoxime Reducing Component Enzyme System.

    PubMed

    Plitzko, Birte; Havemeyer, Antje; Bork, Bettina; Bittner, Florian; Mendel, Ralf; Clement, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The importance of the mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component (mARC)-containing enzyme system in N-reductive metabolism has been studied extensively. It catalyzes the reduction of various N-hydroxylated compounds and therefore acts as the counterpart of cytochrome P450- and flavin-containing monooxygenase-catalyzed oxidations at nitrogen centers. This enzyme system was found to be responsible for the activation of amidoxime and N-hydroxyguanidine prodrugs in drug metabolism. The synergy of three components (mARC, cytochrome b5, and the appropriate reductase) is crucial to exert the N-reductive catalytic effect. Previous studies have demonstrated the involvement of the specific isoforms of the molybdoenzyme mARC and the electron transport protein cytochrome b5 in N-reductive metabolism. To date, the corresponding reductase involved in N-reductive metabolism has yet to be defined because previous investigations have presented ambiguous results. Using small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown in human cells and assessing the stoichiometry of the enzyme system reconstituted in vitro, we provide evidence that NADH-cytochrome-b5 reductase 3 is the principal reductase involved in the mARC enzyme system and is an essential component of N-reductive metabolism in human cells. In addition, only minimal levels of cytochrome-b5 reductase 3 protein are sufficient for catalysis, which impeded previous attempts to identify the reductase. PMID:27469001

  3. Role of inhalation studies with animals in defining human health risks for vehicle and power plant emissions.

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, R O

    1983-01-01

    Automotive vehicles and power plants using fossil fuels emit a complex array of gases and particulate material. The physical and chemical characteristics of these emissions vary markedly between sources and comprise only a portion of the contributors to air pollution exposure of people. Further, it is well recognized that a single form of self-inflicted air pollution, cigarette smoking, is the dominant cause of air pollution-induced disease. These factors minimize our potential for developing an adequate understanding of the health effects of vehicle and power plant emissions by studying only people. The alternative is to use the human data to the extent feasible and complement it with information gained in studies with macromolecules, organelles, cells, tissues and whole animals. Within this context, this paper reviews the use of inhalation studies with animals for defining human health risks of airborne materials, especially particulate materials. The major areas covered are: the fate of inhaled materials, the pathogenesis of disease induced by inhaled materials and long-term animal studies to identify late-occurring effects. Emphasis is placed on the utility of studies in whole animals as integrative models in which the multiple processes such as xenobiotic metabolism, cell injury, repair, transformation and promotion under the influence of many host factors interact in a manner that may not be directly observed in isolated cells or tissues. PMID:6186479

  4. Role of inhalation studies with animals in defining human health risks for vehicle and power plant emissions

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    Automotive vehicles and power plants using fossil fuels emit a complex array of gases and particulate material. The physical and chemical characteristics of these emissions vary markedly between sources and comprise only a portion of the contributors to air pollution exposure of people. Further, it is well recognized that a single form of self-inflicted air pollution, cigarette smoking, is the dominant cause of air pollution-induced disease. These factors minimize our potential for developing an adequate understanding of the health effects of vehicle and power plant emissions by studying only people. The alternative is to use the human data to the extent feasible and complement it with information gained in studies with macromolecules, organelles, cells, tissues and whole animals. Within this context, this paper reviews the use of inhalation studies with animals for defining human health risks of airborne materials, especially particulate materials. The major areas covered are: the fate of inhaled materials, the pathogenesis of disease induced by inhaled materials and long-term animal studies to identify late-occurring effects. Emphasis is placed on the utility of studies in whole animals as integrative models in which the multiple processes such as xenobiotic metabolism, cell injury, repair, transformation and promotion under the influence of many host factors interact in a manner that may not be directly observed in isolated cells or tissues. 60 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  5. The role of the boundary plasma in defining the viability of a magnetic fusion reactor: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    The boundary of magnetic confinement devices, from the pedestal through to the surrounding surfaces, encompasses an enormous range of plasma and material physics, and their integrated coupling. It is becoming clear that due to fundamental limits of plasma stability and material response the boundary will largely define the viability of an MFE reactor. However we face an enormous knowledge deficit in stepping from present devices and ITER towards a demonstration power plant. We review the boundary and plasma-material interaction (PMI) research required to address this deficit as well as related theoretical/scaling methods for extending present results to future devices. The research activities and gaps are reviewed and organized to three major axes of challenges: power density, plasma duration, and material temperature. The boundary can also be considered a multi-scale system of coupled plasma and material science regulated through the non-linear interface of the sheath. Measurement, theory and modeling across these scales are reviewed. Dimensionless parameters, often used to organized core plasma transport on similarity arguments, can be extended to the boundary plasma, plasma-surface interactions and material response. The scaling methodology suggests intriguing ways forward to prescribe and understand the boundary issues of an eventual reactor in intermediate size devices. Finally, proposed technology and science innovations towards solving the extreme PMI/boundary challenges of magnetic fusion energy will be reviewed.

  6. IRE1/bZIP60-Mediated Unfolded Protein Response Plays Distinct Roles in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Francisca; Boatwright, Jon Lucas; Moreno, Ignacio; Jordan, Melissa R.; Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated protein secretion and quality control have been shown to play an important role in immune responses in both animals and plants. In mammals, the ER membrane-located IRE1 kinase/endoribonuclease, a key regulator of unfolded protein response (UPR), is required for plasma cell development to accommodate massive secretion of immunoglobulins. Plant cells can secrete the so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins with antimicrobial activities upon pathogen challenge. However, whether IRE1 plays any role in plant immunity is not known. Arabidopsis thaliana has two copies of IRE1, IRE1a and IRE1b. Here, we show that both IRE1a and IRE1b are transcriptionally induced during chemically-induced ER stress, bacterial pathogen infection and treatment with the immune signal salicylic acid (SA). However, we found that IRE1a plays a predominant role in the secretion of PR proteins upon SA treatment. Consequently, the ire1a mutant plants show enhanced susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen and are deficient in establishing systemic acquired resistance (SAR), whereas ire1b is unaffected in these responses. We further demonstrate that the immune deficiency in ire1a is due to a defect in SA- and pathogen-triggered, IRE1-mediated cytoplasmic splicing of the bZIP60 mRNA, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the expression of UPR-responsive genes. Consistently, IRE1a is preferentially required for bZIP60 splicing upon pathogen infection, while IRE1b plays a major role in bZIP60 processing upon Tunicamycin (Tm)-induced stress. We also show that SA-dependent induction of UPR-responsive genes is altered in the bzip60 mutant resulting in a moderate susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen. These results indicate that the IRE1/bZIP60 branch of UPR is a part of the plant response to pathogens for which the two Arabidopsis IRE1 isoforms play only partially overlapping roles and that IRE1 has both bZIP60-dependent and bZIP60-independent functions in

  7. Defining reality: the potential role of pharmacists in assessing the impact of progesterone receptor modulators and misoprostol in reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Donna J; Mitroka, James G

    2011-01-01

    Medical abortion is increasingly heralded as an ideal method for decreasing maternal mortality in health-care resource-deprived areas and as an answer to the shrinking pool of physicians willing to perform abortions. The advent of progesterone receptor modulators (PRMs) and the recent approval by the Food and Drug Administration of ella (ulipristal) as an emergency contraceptive put pharmacists in the center of abortion controversy. Pharmacists, worldwide, need to be aware of the controversy surrounding the introduction of PRMs, particularly with regard to the effect on health policy, their mechanism of action, associated adverse events, and common off-label uses. Once understood, genuine opportunity exists for pharmacists to serve a fundamental role in positively shaping public health policy. PMID:21177418

  8. Two alternatively spliced isoforms of the Arabidopsis SR45 protein have distinct roles during normal plant development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Mount, Stephen M

    2009-07-01

    The serine-arginine-rich (SR) proteins constitute a conserved family of pre-mRNA splicing factors. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), they are encoded by 19 genes, most of which are themselves alternatively spliced. In the case of SR45, the use of alternative 3' splice sites 21 nucleotides apart generates two alternatively spliced isoforms. Isoform 1 (SR45.1) has an insertion relative to isoform 2 (SR45.2) that replaces a single arginine with eight amino acids (TSPQRKTG). The biological implications of SR45 alternative splicing have been unclear. A previously described loss-of-function mutant affecting both isoforms, sr45-1, shows several developmental defects, including defects in petal development and root growth. We found that the SR45 promoter is highly active in regions with actively growing and dividing cells. We also tested the ability of each SR45 isoform to complement the sr45-1 mutant by overexpression of isoform-specific green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins. As expected, transgenic plants overexpressing either isoform displayed both nuclear speckles and GFP fluorescence throughout the nucleoplasm. We found that SR45.1-GFP complements the flower petal phenotype, but not the root growth phenotype. Conversely, SR45.2-GFP complements root growth but not floral morphology. Mutation of a predicted phosphorylation site within the alternatively spliced segment, SR45.1-S219A-GFP, does not affect complementation. However, a double mutation affecting both serine-219 and the adjacent threonine-218 (SR45.1-T218A + S219A-GFP) behaves like isoform 2, complementing the root but not the floral phenotype. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that the two alternatively spliced isoforms of SR45 have distinct biological functions. PMID:19403727

  9. Defining Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Defining infertility What is infertility? Infertility is “the inability to conceive after 12 months ... to conceive after 6 months is generally considered infertility. How common is it? Infertility affects 10%-15% ...

  10. Defining Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tholkes, Ben F.

    1998-01-01

    Defines camping risks and lists types and examples: (1) objective risk beyond control; (2) calculated risk based on personal choice; (3) perceived risk; and (4) reckless risk. Describes campers to watch ("immortals" and abdicators), and several "treatments" of risk: avoidance, safety procedures and well-trained staff, adequate insurance, and a…

  11. Distinctive anabolic roles of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and parathyroid hormone in teeth and mandible versus long bones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Guo, Jian; Wang, Lin; Chen, Ning; Karaplis, Andrew; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2009-11-01

    To assess the roles of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) in hard tissue formation in oro-facial tissues, we examined the effect of either 1,25(OH)(2)D or PTH deficiency on dentin and dental alveolar bone formation and mineralization in the mandibles, and osteoblastic bone formation in long bones of 1alpha-hydroxylase knockout (1alpha(OH)ase(-/-)) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, the mineral density was decreased in the teeth and mandibles, and unmineralized dentin (predentin and biglycan immunopositive dentin) and unmineralized bone matrix in the dental alveolar bone were increased in 1alpha(OH)ase(-/-) mice. The dental volume, reparative dentin volume, and dentin sialoprotein immunopositive areas were reduced in 1alpha(OH)ase(-/-) mice. The cortical thickness, dental alveolar bone volume, and osteoblast number were all decreased significantly in the mandibles; in contrast, the osteoblast number and surface were increased in the trabecular bone of the tibiae in 1alpha(OH)ase(-/-) mice consistent with their secondary hyperparathyroidism. The expression of PTH receptor and IGF1 was reduced slightly in mandibles, but enhanced significantly in the long bones in the 1alpha(OH)ase(-/-) mice. To control for the role of secondary hyperparathyroidism, we also examined teeth and mandibles in 6-week-old PTH(-/-) mice. In these animals, dental and bone volumes in mandibles were not altered when compared with their wild-type littermates. These results suggest that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) plays an anabolic role in both dentin and dental alveolar bone as it does in long bones, whereas PTH acts predominantly in long bones rather than mandibular bone. PMID:19713218

  12. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr1 in the Proximal and Distal Tubule Identifies Distinct Roles in Phosphate and Calcium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaobin; Yang, Jiancheng; Li, Linqiang; Huang, Jinsong; King, Gwendalyn; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2016-01-01

    A postnatal role of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) in the kidney is suggested by its binding to α-Klotho to form an obligate receptor for the hormone fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). FGFR1 is expressed in both the proximal and distal renal tubular segments, but its tubular specific functions are unclear. In this study, we crossed Fgfr1flox/flox mice with either gamma-glutamyltransferase-Cre (γGT-Cre) or kidney specific-Cre (Ksp-Cre) mice to selectively create proximal tubule (PT) and distal tubule (DT) Fgfr1 conditional knockout mice (designated Fgfr1PT-cKO and Fgfr1DT-cKO, respectively). Fgfr1PT-cKO mice exhibited an increase in sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter expression, hyperphosphatemia, and refractoriness to the phosphaturic actions of FGF-23, consistent with a direct role of FGFR1 in mediating the proximal tubular phosphate responses to FGF-23. In contrast, Fgfr1DT-cKO mice unexpectedly developed hypercalciuria, secondary elevations of parathyroid hormone (PTH), hypophosphatemia and enhanced urinary phosphate excretion. Fgfr1PT-cKO mice also developed a curly tail/spina bifida-like skeletal phenotype, whereas Fgfr1DT-cKO mice developed renal tubular micro-calcifications and reductions in cortical bone thickness. Thus, FGFR1 has dual functions to directly regulate proximal and distal tubule phosphate and calcium reabsorption, indicating a physiological role of FGFR1 signaling in both phosphate and calcium homeostasis. PMID:26839958

  13. Distinct roles of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in social behavior and emotionality at different developmental ages in rats.

    PubMed

    Manduca, Antonia; Morena, Maria; Campolongo, Patrizia; Servadio, Michela; Palmery, Maura; Trabace, Luigia; Hill, Matthew N; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Trezza, Viviana

    2015-08-01

    To date, our understanding of the relative contribution and potential overlapping roles of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the regulation of brain function and behavior is still limited. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of systemic administration of JZL195, that simultaneously increases AEA and 2-AG signaling by inhibiting their hydrolysis, in the regulation of socio-emotional behavior in adolescent and adult rats. JZL195, administered at the dose of 0.01mg/kg, increased social play behavior, that is the most characteristic social activity displayed by adolescent rats, and increased social interaction in adult animals. At both ages, these behavioral effects were antagonized by the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A and were associated with increased brain levels of 2-AG, but not AEA. Conversely, at the dose of 1mg/kg, JZL195 decreased general social exploration in adolescent rats without affecting social play behavior, and induced anxiogenic-like effects in the elevated plus-maze test both in adolescent and adult animals. These effects, mediated by activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors, were paralleled by simultaneous increase in AEA and 2-AG levels in adolescent rats, and by an increase of only 2-AG levels in adult animals. These findings provide the first evidence for a role of 2-AG in social behavior, highlight the different contributions of AEA and 2-AG in the modulation of emotionality at different developmental ages and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of AEA and 2-AG hydrolysis is a useful approach to investigate the role of these endocannabinoids in neurobehavioral processes. PMID:25914159

  14. Distinctive roles of PLD signaling elicited by oxidative stress in synaptic endings from adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Melina V; Giusto, Norma M; Salvador, Gabriela A

    2012-12-01

    The role of iron in oxidative injury in the nervous system has been extensively described. However, little is known about the role of lipid signal transduction in neurodegeneration processes triggered by iron overload. The purpose of this work was to characterize the regulation and the crosstalk between phosphatidylcholine (PC)-derived diacylglycerol (DAG) and cannonical signaling pathways during iron-induced oxidative stress in cerebral cortex synaptic endings (Syn) obtained from adult (4 months old) and aged (28 months old) rats. DAG production was increased in Syn exposed to iron. This rise in DAG formation was due to phospholipase D1 (PLD1) and PLD2 activations. In adult rats, PKD1, ERK1/2 and PKCα/βII activations were PLD1 and PLD2 dependent. In contrast, in senile rats, DAG formation catalyzed by PLDs did not participate in PKD1, ERK1/2 and PKCα/βII regulations, but it was dependent on ERK and PKC activities. Iron-induced oxidative stress promoted an increased localization of PLD1 in membrane rafts, whereas PLD2 was excluded from these domains and appeared to be involved in glutamate transporter function. Our results show a differential regulation and synaptic function of DAG generated by PLDs during iron-induced oxidative stress as a consequence of aging. PMID:23010583

  15. Perforin and Granzyme B Have Separate and Distinct Roles during Atherosclerotic Plaque Development in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hiebert, Paul R.; Boivin, Wendy A.; Zhao, Hongyan; McManus, Bruce M.; Granville, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The granzyme B/perforincytotoxic pathway is a well established mechanism of initiating target cell apoptosis. Previous studies have suggested a role for the granzyme B/perforin cytotoxic pathway in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque formation. In the present study, granzyme B deficiency resulted in reduced atherosclerotic plaque development in the descending aortas of apolipoprotein E knockout mice fed a high fat diet for 30 weeks while perforindeficiency resulted in greater reduction in plaque development with significantly less plaque area than granzyme Bdeficient mice. In contrast to the descending aorta, no significant change in plaque size was observed in aortic roots from either granzyme Bdeficient or perforindeficient apolipoprotein E knockout mice. However, atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic roots did exhibit significantly more collagen in granzyme B, but not perforin deficient mice. Together these results suggest significant, yet separate roles for granzyme B and perforin in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis that go beyond the traditional apoptotic pathway with additional implications in plaque development, stability and remodelling of extracellular matrix. PMID:24205352

  16. The Role of Noble Gases in Defining the Mean Residence Times of Fluids within Precambrian Crustal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, O.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Fellowes, J.; Sutcliffe, C. N.; McDermott, J. M.; Holland, G.; Mabry, J.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Brines rich in N2, H2, CH4 and He hosted within Precambrian crustal rocks are known to sustain microbial life [1]. The geological systems containing these brines have the potential to isolate organisms over planetary timescales and so can provide unique insight into the diversity and evolution of terrestrial life [1-3]. Long considered geological outliers, the prevalence of systems containing these ancient, deep fracture waters is only now being revealed. Recent studies demonstrate the Precambrian crust which accounts for ~70% of total crustal surface area has a global hydrogen production comparable to marine systems [2]. In addition to H2-producing reactions (e.g. radiolysis and serpentinization), a diversity of CH4-producing reactions also occur in these systems through both microbial and water-rock interactions [1, 2]. However, the role these Precambrian systems have in global hydrogen and carbon cycles is poorly understood. For this we need good constraints on the origins, residence times and degree of microbial activity of the fluids within these systems as well as the degree of interaction with external systems. Fortunately, noble gases are ideal for this role [1,3]. Previous noble gas analysis of N2, H2, CH4 and He-rich fluid samples collected at 2.4 km depth from a Cu-Zn mine in Timmins, Ontario, identified isolated fracture fluids with the oldest residence times ever observed (>1.1 Ga) [3]. This study has been significantly expanded now to fluids from an even greater depth (3 km) at Timmins, and from two new mines in the Sudbury Basin. Preliminary data from the deeper Timmins level indicate a new closed system with 136Xe/130Xe ratios 93% above modern air values (20% at 2.4 km) and an early atmosphere 124Xe/130Xe signal approaching the age of the host rock (~2.7 Ga) [4]. In comparison, the Sudbury system indicates exchange with an external source, being highly enriched in helium (30% gas volume) but with a low fissiogenic 136Xe/130Xe excess (10-38% above

  17. Disease of distinction.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephan A

    2006-01-01

    Gout is one of the rare diseases that defines its sufferers by class and culture. It is also one of the first chronic diseases to be clinically described. The Egyptians had identified gout as a distinct disorder by 2640 bce. This paper traces the history of gout from its earliest recorded period down to modern times, with a particular emphasis on the cultural, political, geopolitical, and social aspects. Included is a discussion of its role in the American Revolution. Today, gout is a well-understood clinically managed arthritic disease that excites little comment. This is an entirely modern perspective. For most of human history, gout was a disease of distinction that dominated much of medicine, playing the same role in Rome's third century bce aristocracy it would later play in the aristocracies of 17th and 18th century France and England, when each of these countries dominated the world. Because it was considered a disease of lifestyle until modern times, when genetics began to be understood, gout was associated with rich, high status Caucasian men and their excessive consumption of drink and rich foods. It was virtually unknown in Asia, until Western dietary practices became widespread there. From earliest history, gout has been linked with high IQ and sexual promiscuity, which made it grist for artists and writers, and their social commentary up to the time of Dickens; this is discussed, with examples. Because of its association with the rich, gout also developed a powerful moralistic aspect, particularly during the Christian era when the concept of sin was a cultural fundamental. The loose living and indulgence of the rich and the gout it produced made the disease a parable of Christian ethics. The Italian poet Francesco Petrarch (1304-1374) was one of the first to establish this nuance, and it influenced how gout was seen for centuries. Part of what gave gout its special character was that while it tortured, it rarely killed. Indeed, when death was a

  18. Defining key roles for auxiliary proteins in an ABC transporter that maintains bacterial outer membrane lipid asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Thong, Shuhua; Ercan, Bilge; Torta, Federico; Fong, Zhen Yang; Wong, Hui Yi Alvina; Wenk, Markus R; Chng, Shu-Sin

    2016-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipid asymmetry is critical for the function of the outer membrane (OM) as a selective permeability barrier, but how it is established and maintained is poorly understood. Here, we characterize a non-canonical ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter in Escherichia coli that provides energy for maintaining OM lipid asymmetry via the transport of aberrantly localized phospholipids (PLs) from the OM to the inner membrane (IM). We establish that the transporter comprises canonical components, MlaF and MlaE, and auxiliary proteins, MlaD and MlaB, of previously unknown functions. We further demonstrate that MlaD forms extremely stable hexamers within the complex, functions in substrate binding with strong affinity for PLs, and modulates ATP hydrolytic activity. In addition, MlaB plays critical roles in both the assembly and activity of the transporter. Our work provides mechanistic insights into how the MlaFEDB complex participates in ensuring active retrograde PL transport to maintain OM lipid asymmetry. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19042.001 PMID:27529189

  19. A single domain antibody fragment that recognizes the adaptor ASC defines the role of ASC domains in inflammasome assembly.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Florian I; Lu, Alvin; Chen, Jeff W; Ruan, Jianbin; Tang, Catherine; Wu, Hao; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2016-05-01

    Myeloid cells assemble inflammasomes in response to infection or cell damage; cytosolic sensors activate pro-caspase-1, indirectly for the most part, via the adaptors ASC and NLRC4. This leads to secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and pyroptosis. To explore complex formation under physiological conditions, we generated an alpaca single domain antibody, VHHASC, which specifically recognizes the CARD of human ASC via its type II interface. VHHASC not only impairs ASC(CARD) interactions in vitro, but also inhibits inflammasome activation in response to NLRP3, AIM2, and NAIP triggers when expressed in living cells, highlighting a role of ASC in all three types of inflammasomes. VHHASC leaves the Pyrin domain of ASC functional and stabilizes a filamentous intermediate of inflammasome activation. Incorporation of VHHASC-EGFP into these structures allowed the visualization of endogenous ASC(PYD) filaments for the first time. These data revealed that cross-linking of ASC(PYD) filaments via ASC(CARD) mediates the assembly of ASC foci. PMID:27069117

  20. Mutant huntingtin causes defective actin remodeling during stress: defining a new role for transglutaminase 2 in neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Munsie, Lise; Caron, Nicholas; Atwal, Randy Singh; Marsden, Ian; Wild, Edward J.; Bamburg, James R.; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Truant, Ray

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG tract in the Interesting transcript 15 (IT15) gene encoding the 350 kDa huntingtin protein. Cellular stresses can trigger the release of huntingtin from the endoplasmic reticulum, allowing huntingtin nuclear entry. Here, we show that endogenous, full-length huntingtin localizes to nuclear cofilin–actin rods during stress and is required for the proper stress response involving actin remodeling. Mutant huntingtin induces a dominant, persistent nuclear rod phenotype similar to that described in Alzheimer's disease for cytoplasmic cofilin–actin rods. Using live cell temporal studies, we show that this stress response is similarly impaired when mutant huntingtin is present, or when normal huntingtin levels are reduced. In clinical lymphocyte samples from HD patients, we have quantitatively detected cross-linked complexes of actin and cofilin with complex formation varying in correlation with disease progression. By live cell fluorescence lifetime imaging measurement–Förster resonant energy transfer studies and western blot assays, we quantitatively observed that stress-activated tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is responsible for the actin–cofilin covalent cross-linking observed in HD. These data support a direct role for huntingtin in nuclear actin re-organization, and describe a new pathogenic mechanism for aberrant TG2 enzymatic hyperactivity in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21355047

  1. The role of N-methylaspartate receptors in mediating responses of rat and cat spinal neurones to defined sensory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Headley, P M; Parsons, C G; West, D C

    1987-04-01

    1. Single-cell recordings were made from neurones in various spinal laminae in anaesthetized or decerebrated, spinalized or intact rats and cats. Cells were activated by controlled peripheral sensory stimuli which mimicked natural conditions and with some cells also by micro-electrophoretically administered excitatory amino acid analogues. Such responses were tested with amino acid antagonists administered both micro-electrophoretically and intravenously. 2. With cells in the dorsal horn, the dissociative anaesthetic ketamine, administered either micro-electrophoretically or intravenously at doses which selectively reduce responses to N-methylaspartate, had no consistent effect on any of the sensory responses examined. 3. The non-selective amino acid antagonist cis-2,3-piperidine dicarboxylate was somewhat more effective at reducing sensory responses. 4. With motoneurones, intravenous N-methylaspartate-blocking doses of ketamine consistently reduced nociceptive responses. Non-nociceptive responses were less affected. 5. With ventral horn interneurones, intravenous but not micro-electrophoretic ketamine reduced nociceptive responses on about half the cells tested. 6. These results are interpreted in terms of the physiological role of the N-methylaspartate class of excitatory amino acid receptor in mediating responses in the ventral but not dorsal horn of the spinal cord to peripheral somatic stimuli. PMID:2821241

  2. Opinion: uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) plays distinct and non-canonical roles in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Ashraf S.; Stanlie, Andre; Begum, Nasim A.

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair complex, is required for CSR. The role of UNG in CSR and SHM is extremely controversial. AID deficiency in mice abolishes both CSR and SHM, while UNG-deficient mice have drastically reduced CSR but augmented SHM raising a possibility of differential functions of UNG in CSR and SHM. Interestingly, UNG has been associated with a CSR-specific repair adapter protein Brd4, which interacts with acetyl histone 4, γH2AX and 53BP1 to promote non-homologous end joining during CSR. A non-canonical scaffold function of UNG, but not the catalytic activity, can be attributed to the recruitment of essential repair proteins associated with the error-free repair during SHM, and the end joining during CSR. PMID:24994819

  3. Opinion: uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) plays distinct and non-canonical roles in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Ashraf S; Stanlie, Andre; Begum, Nasim A; Honjo, Tasuku

    2014-10-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair complex, is required for CSR. The role of UNG in CSR and SHM is extremely controversial. AID deficiency in mice abolishes both CSR and SHM, while UNG-deficient mice have drastically reduced CSR but augmented SHM raising a possibility of differential functions of UNG in CSR and SHM. Interestingly, UNG has been associated with a CSR-specific repair adapter protein Brd4, which interacts with acetyl histone 4, γH2AX and 53BP1 to promote non-homologous end joining during CSR. A non-canonical scaffold function of UNG, but not the catalytic activity, can be attributed to the recruitment of essential repair proteins associated with the error-free repair during SHM, and the end joining during CSR. PMID:24994819

  4. Distinct Roles of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Encoded Viral Interferon Regulatory Factors in Inflammatory Response and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baresova, Petra; Pitha, Paula M.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). Similar to other herpesviruses, KSHV has two life cycles, latency and lytic replication. In latency, the KSHV genome persists as a circular episome in the nucleus of the host cell and only a few viral genes are expressed. In this review, we focus on oncogenic, antiapoptotic, and immunomodulating properties of KSHV-encoded homologues of cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs)—viral IRF1 (vIRF1) to vIRF4—and their possible role in the KSHV-mediated antiviral response, apoptosis, and oncogenicity. PMID:23785197

  5. Bone marrow ablation demonstrates that excess endogenous parathyroid hormone plays distinct roles in trabecular and cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Sun, Weiwei; Zhang, Jing; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2012-07-01

    Mice null for Cyp27b1, which encodes the 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase [1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice], lack 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D] and have hypocalcemia and high parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. Intermittent, exogenous PTH is anabolic for bone. To determine the effect of the chronic excess endogenous PTH on osteogenesis and bone turnover, bone marrow ablations (BMX) were performed in tibiae and femurs of 6-week-old 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice and in wild-type (WT) controls. Newly formed bone tissue was analyzed at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after BMX. BMX did not alter the higher levels of PTH in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice. In the marrow cavity, trabecular volume, osteoblast number, alkaline phosphatase-positive areas, type I collagen-positive areas, bone formation-related genes, and protein expression levels all increased significantly after BMX in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, compared with WT. Osteoclast numbers and surface and ratio of RANKL/OPG-relative mRNA levels decreased significantly after BMX in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, compared with WT. In the cortex, alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts and osteoclast numbers increased significantly after BMX in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, compared with WT. These results demonstrate that chronic excess endogenous PTH exerts an anabolic role in trabecular bone by stimulating osteogenic cells and reducing bone resorption, but plays a catabolic role in cortical bone by enhancing bone turnover with an increase in resorption. PMID:22640808

  6. ROS, MAPK/ERK and PKC play distinct roles in EGF-stimulated human corneal cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Huo, Y-N; Chen, W; Zheng, X-X

    2015-01-01

    Cornea is at the outermost surface of eye globe, and it easily receives damage from ultraviolet light exposure, physiology wounding, and infections. It is essential to understand the mechanisms controlling human corneal epithelial (HCE) cell proliferation and wound healing. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) could stimulate cell proliferation and migration in various cell types. Therefore, we investigated the roles and mechanisms of EGF on HCE cell proliferation and migration. CCK-8 kit and wound healing experiment were used to investigate HCE cell proliferation and cell migration, respectively. ROS activity was quantified by DCFDA and flow cytometry. Western blot and Q-PCR were performed to examine protein and RNA levels. EGF could promote HCE cell proliferation and migration in both physiology status and UV irradiation conditions, which is used to mimic the disease condition in human corneal epithelial cells. Interestingly, the promotion effect of EGF on HCE cell proliferation is mainly mediated by activated ROS signaling under disease condition. However, the EGF function is mediated by ROS and MAPK/ERK pathway in EGF-treated corneal epithelial cells in physiology status, in which ROS and MAPK/ERK pathway have no mutual influence on the other signaling pathway in EGF-stimulated corneal epithelial cells. We also revealed that MAPK/ERK pathway instead of ROS mediates EGF-stimulated HCE cell migration. Interestingly, we found that PKC proteins were downregulated by EGF in HCE cells that is partially mediated by ROS signaling, while PKC pathway was not involved in EGF-stimulated corneal cell proliferation and migration. EGF promotes human corneal cell proliferation and migration both in physiology and disease conditions, and ROS, MAPK/ERK and PKC pathways play different roles in these processes. PMID:26567598

  7. Chelating agents exert distinct effects on biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus depending on strain background: role for clumping factor B

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nabil M.; Lamlertthon, Supaporn; Fowler, Vance G.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of catheter infections, and biofilm formation plays a key role in the pathogenesis. Metal ion chelators inhibit bacterial biofilm formation and viability, making them attractive candidates as components in catheter lock solutions. The goal of this study was to characterize further the effect of chelators on biofilm formation. The effect of the calcium chelators ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and trisodium citrate (TSC) on biofilm formation by 30 S. aureus strains was tested. The response to subinhibitory doses of EGTA and TSC varied dramatically depending on strain variation. In some strains, the chelators prevented biofilm formation, in others they had no effect, and they actually enhanced biofilm formation in others. The molecular basis for this phenotypic variability was investigated using two related strains: Newman, in which biofilm formation was inhibited by chelators, and 10833, which formed strong biofilms in the presence of chelators. It was found that deletion of the gene encoding the surface adhesin clumping factor B (clfB) completely eliminated chelator-induced biofilm formation in strain 10833. The role of ClfB in biofilm formation activity in chelators was confirmed in additional strains. It was concluded that biofilm-forming ability varies strikingly depending on strain background, and that ClfB is involved in biofilm formation in the presence EGTA and citrate. These results suggest that subinhibitory doses of chelating agents in catheter lock solutions may actually augment biofilm formation in certain strains of S. aureus, and emphasize the importance of using these agents appropriately so that inhibitory doses are achieved consistently. PMID:22516131

  8. Defining cure.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Paul; Robinson, Dudley

    2011-06-01

    This paper is a summary of the presentations made as Proposal 2-"Defining cure" to the 2nd Annual meeting of the ICI-Research Society, in Bristol, 16th June 2010. It reviews definitions of 'cure' and 'outcome', and considers the impact that varying definition may have on prevalence studies and cure rates. The difference between subjective and objective outcomes is considered, and the significance that these different outcomes may have for different stakeholders (e.g. clinicians, patients, carers, industry etc.) is discussed. The development of patient reported outcome measures and patient defined goals is reviewed, and consideration given to the use of composite end-points. A series of proposals are made by authors and discussants as to how currently validated outcomes should be applied, and where our future research activity in this area might be directed. PMID:21661023

  9. Defining the Roles of IFN-γ and IL-17A in Inflammation and Protection against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sjökvist Ottsjö, Louise; Flach, Carl-Fredrik; Nilsson, Staffan; de Waal Malefyt, Rene; Walduck, Anna K.; Raghavan, Sukanya

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells have been shown to be essential for vaccine-induced protection against Helicobacter pylori infection. However, the effector mechanisms leading to reductions in the gastric bacterial loads of vaccinated mice remain unclear. We have investigated the function of IFN-γ and IL-17A for vaccine-induced protection and inflammation (gastritis) using IFN-γ-gene-knockout (IFN-γ-/-) mice, after sublingual or intragastric immunization with H. pylori lysate antigens and cholera toxin. Bacteria were enumerated in the stomachs of mice and related to the gastritis score and cellular immune responses. We report that sublingually and intragastrically immunized IFN-γ-/- mice had significantly reduced bacterial loads similar to immunized wild-type mice compared to respective unimmunized infection controls. The reduction in bacterial loads in sublingually and intragastrically immunized IFN-γ-/- mice was associated with significantly higher levels of IL-17A in stomach extracts and lower gastritis scores compared with immunized wild-type mice. To study the role of IL-17A for vaccine-induced protection in sublingually immunized IFN-γ-/- mice, IL-17A was neutralized in vivo at the time of infection. Remarkably, the neutralization of IL-17A in sublingually immunized IFN-γ-/- mice completely abolished protection against H. pylori infection and the mild gastritis. In summary, our results suggest that IFN-γ responses in the stomach of sublingually immunized mice promote vaccine-induced gastritis, after infection with H. pylori but that IL-17A primarily functions to reduce the bacterial load. PMID:26168305

  10. Defining the Role of Gut Bacteria in the Metabolism of Deleobuvir: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Michelle; Sane, Rucha S; Keith-Luzzi, Monica; Xu, Jun; King, Illeaniz; Whitcher-Johnstone, Andrea; Johnstone, Nicholas; Tweedie, Donald J; Li, Yongmei

    2015-10-01

    Deleobuvir is a potent inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B polymerase. In humans, deleobuvir underwent extensive reduction to form CD 6168. This metabolite was not formed in vitro in aerobic incubations with human liver microsomes or cytosol. Anaerobic incubations of deleobuvir with rat and human fecal homogenates produced CD 6168. Using these in vitro formation rates, a retrospective analysis was conducted to assess whether the fecal formation of CD 6168 could account for the in vivo levels of this metabolite. The formation of CD 6168 was also investigated using a pseudo-germ free (pGF) rat model, in which gut microbiota were largely eradicated by antibiotic treatment. Plasma exposure (area under the curve from 0 to ∞) of CD 6168 was approximately 9-fold lower in pGF rats (146 ± 64 ng·h/ml) compared with control rats (1,312 ± 649 ng·h/ml). Similarly, in pGF rats, lower levels of CD 6168 (1.5% of the deleobuvir dose) were excreted in feces compared with control rats (42% of the deleobuvir dose). In agreement with these findings, in pGF rats, approximately all of the deleobuvir dose was excreted as deleobuvir into feces (105% of dose), whereas only 26% of the deleobuvir dose was excreted as deleobuvir in control rats. These differences in plasma and excretion profiles between pGF and control rats confirm the role of gut bacteria in the formation of CD 6168. These results underline the importance of evaluating metabolism by gut bacteria and highlight experimental approaches for nonclinical assessment of bacterial metabolism in drug development. PMID:26068924

  11. Analytic Hierarchy Process to Define the Most Important Factors and Related Technologies for Empowering Elderly People in Taking an Active Role in their Health.

    PubMed

    Fico, G; Gaeta, E; Arredondo, M T; Pecchia, L

    2015-09-01

    Successful management of health conditions in older population is determined by strategic involvement of a professional team of careers and by empowering patients and their caregivers to take over a central role and responsibility in the daily management of condition. Identifying, structuring and ranking the most important needs related to these aspects could pave the way for improved strategies in designing systems and technological solutions supporting user empowerment. This paper presents the preliminary results of a study aiming to elicit these needs. Healthcare professionals, working together in the European and Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP-AHA) initiative, have defined a set of needs and factors that have been organized in two hierarchies around the concepts of patient activation and proactive and prepared care team, defined in the Chronic Care Model. The two hierarchies have been mapped, by a team of experts in computer science, with technologies and solutions that could facilitate the achievement of the identified needs. PMID:26254254

  12. Frequency-Dependent Evaluation of the Role of Definity in Producing Sonoporation of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Monica M.; Steinberg, Ryan L.; O'Brien, William D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Sonoporation uses ultrasound (US) and ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) to enhance cell permeabilization, thereby allowing delivery of therapeutic compounds non-invasively into specific target cells. The objective of this study was to elucidate the biophysical mechanism of sonoporation, specifically the role of UCAs as well as exposure frequency. The inertial cavitation (IC) thresholds of the lipid-shelled octafluoropropane UCA were directly compared to the levels of generated sonoporation to determine the involvement of UCAs in producing sonoporation. Methods Chinese hamster ovary cells were exposed as a monolayer in a solution of the UCA, 500,000-Da fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, and phosphate-buffered saline to 30 seconds of pulsed US (pulse duration, 5 cycles; pulse repetition frequency, 10 Hz) at 3 frequencies (0.92, 3.2, and 5.6 MHz). The peak rarefactional pressure (Pr) was varied over a range from 4 kPa to 4.1 MPa, and 5 to 7 independent replicates were performed at each pressure. Results The experimental observations demonstrated that IC was likely not the physical mechanism for sonoporation. Sonoporation activity was observed at pressure levels below the threshold for IC of the UCA (1.27 ± 0.32 MPa at 0.92 MHz, 0.84 ± 0.19 MPa at 3.2 MHz, and 2.57 ± 0.26 MPa at 5.6 MHz) for all 3 frequencies examined. The Pr values at which the peak sonoporation activity occurred were 1.4 MPa at 0.92 MHz, 0.25 MPa at 3.2 MHz, and 2.3 MPa at 5.6 MHz. The UCA collapse thresholds followed a similar trend. A 1-way analysis of variance test confirmed that sonoporation activity differed among the 3 frequencies examined (P = 10−8). Conclusions These results thus suggest that sonoporation is related to linear and/or nonlinear oscillation of the UCA occurring at pressure levels below the IC threshold. PMID:21193706

  13. Distinct roles of N-acetyl and 5-methoxy groups in the antiproliferative and neuroprotective effects of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Letra-Vilela, Ricardo; Sánchez-Sánchez, Ana María; Rocha, Ana Maia; Martin, Vanesa; Branco-Santos, Joana; Puente-Moncada, Noelia; Santa-Marta, Mariana; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Antolín, Isaac; Rodriguez, Carmen; Herrera, Federico

    2016-10-15

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a highly pleiotropic hormone with antioxidant, antiproliferative, oncolytic and neuroprotective properties. Here, we present evidence that the N-acetyl side chain plays a key role in melatonin's antiproliferative effect in HT22 and sw-1353 cells, but it does so at the expense of antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. Removal of the N-acetyl group enhances the antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of the indole, but it can lead to toxic methamphetamine-like effects in several cell lines. Inhibition of NFkB mimicked melatonin's antiproliferative and antioxidant effects, but not neuroprotection. Our results strongly suggest that neuroprotective and antiproliferative effects of melatonin rely on different parts of the molecule and are likely mediated by different mechanisms. We also predict that melatonin metabolism by target cells could determine whether melatonin inhibits cell proliferation, prevents toxicity or induces cell death (e.g. apoptosis or autophagy). These observations could have important implications for the rational use of melatonin in personalized medicine. PMID:27402602

  14. Distinct roles for inhibition in spatial and temporal tuning of local edge detectors in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Venkataramani, Sowmya; Van Wyk, Michiel; Buldyrev, Ilya; Sivyer, Benjamin; Vaney, David I; Taylor, W Rowland

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the role of inhibition in generating the receptive-field properties of local edge detector (LED) ganglion cells in the rabbit retina. We confirm that the feed-forward inhibition is largely glycinergic but, contrary to a recent report, our data demonstrate that the glycinergic inhibition contributes to temporal tuning for the OFF and ON inputs to the LEDs by delaying the onset of spiking; this delay was more pronounced for the ON inputs (∼ 340 ms) than the OFF inputs (∼ 12 ms). Blocking glycinergic transmission reduced the delay to spike onset and increased the responses to flickering stimuli at high frequencies. Analysis of the synaptic conductances indicates that glycinergic amacrine cells affect temporal tuning through both postsynaptic inhibition of the LEDs and presynaptic modulation of the bipolar cells that drive the LEDs. The results also confirm that presynaptic GABAergic transmission contributes significantly to the concentric surround antagonism in LEDs; however, unlike presumed LEDs in the mouse retina, the surround is only partly generated by spiking amacrine cells. PMID:24586343

  15. The intrinsically disordered tails of PTEN and PTEN-L have distinct roles in regulating substrate specificity and membrane activity.

    PubMed

    Masson, Glenn R; Perisic, Olga; Burke, John E; Williams, Roger L

    2016-01-15

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a lipid and protein phosphatase, and both activities are necessary for its role as a tumour suppressor. PTEN activity is controlled by phosphorylation of its intrinsically disordered C-terminal tail. A recently discovered variant of PTEN, PTEN-long (PTEN-L), has a 173-residue N-terminal extension that causes PTEN-L to exhibit unique behaviour, such as movement from one cell to another. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and biophysical assays, we show that both the N-terminal extension of PTEN-L and C-terminal tail of PTEN affect the phosphatase activity using unique mechanisms. Phosphorylation of six residues in the C-terminal tail of PTEN results in auto-inhibitory interactions with the phosphatase and C2 domains, effectively blocking both the active site and the membrane-binding interface of PTEN. Partially dephosphorylating PTEN on pThr(366)/pSer(370) results in sufficient exposure of the active site to allow a selective activation for soluble substrates. Using HDX-MS, we identified a membrane-binding element in the N-terminal extension of PTEN-L, termed the membrane-binding helix (MBH). The MBH radically alters the membrane binding mechanism of PTEN-L compared with PTEN, switching PTEN-L to a 'scooting' mode of catalysis from the 'hopping' mode that is characteristic of PTEN. PMID:26527737

  16. Nitrate isotopes unveil distinct seasonal N-sources and the critical role of crop residues in groundwater contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Martine M.; Somers, George; Smirnoff, Anna; Paradis, Daniel; van Bochove, Eric; Liao, Shawna

    2010-02-01

    SummaryGlobally, fertilizers are identified as principle sources of nitrate in waters of intensely cultivated areas. Here this general concept is appraised on a seasonal basis over a two year period, under temperate climatic conditions. Water ( δ2H and δ18O) and nitrate ( δ15N and δ18O) isotopes in surface water and groundwater suggest that freshwater is acting as a transport vector conducting nitrate from agricultural soils to groundwater and ultimately to surface water. Measured nitrate isotopes of organic and inorganic fertilizers and of nitrate in groundwater are used to constrain a conceptual apportionment model quantifying the relative seasonal N contributions in an area of intense potato production. Source inputs differ strongly between the growing (summer and fall) and non-growing (winter and spring) periods. Chemical fertilizers and soil organic matter equally dominate and contribute to the growing period load, whereas soil organic matter dominates the non-growing period load, and accounts for over half of the overall annual nitrogen charge. These findings reveal the magnitude of nitrogen cycling by soil organic matter, and point to the benefits of controlling the timing of its nitrate release from this organic material. We conclude that strategies to attenuate contamination by nitrate in waters of temperate climate row-cropping regions must consider nitrogen cycling by soil organic matter, including the crucial role of crop residues throughout both the growing and non-growing seasons.

  17. Distinct roles of STAT3 and STAT5 in the pathogenesis and targeted therapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Frank, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors STAT3 and STAT5 play important roles in the regulation of mammary gland function during pregnancy, lactation, and involution. Given that STAT3 and STAT5 regulate genes involved in proliferation and survival, it is not surprising that inappropriate activation of STAT3 and STAT5 occurs commonly in breast cancer. Although these proteins are structurally similar, they have divergent and opposing effects on gene expression and cellular phenotype. Notably, when STAT5 and STAT3 are activated simultaneously, STAT5 has a dominant effect, and leads to decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to cell death. Similarly, in breast cancer, activation of both STAT5 and STAT3 is associated with longer patient survival than activation of STAT3 alone. Pharmacological inhibitors of STAT3 and STAT5 are being developed for cancer therapy, though understanding the activation state and functional interaction of STAT3 and STAT5 in a patient's tumor may be critical for the optimal use of this strategy. PMID:23531638

  18. Postsynaptic TrkB signaling has distinct roles in spine maintenance in adult visual cortex and hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Sridhara; Saiepour, M. Hadi; Bence, Matthew; Perry, Sean; Hartman, Robin; Couey, Jonathan J.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Levelt, Christiaan N.

    2006-01-01

    In adult primary visual cortex (V1), dendritic spines are more persistent than during development. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increases synaptic strength, and its levels rise during cortical development. We therefore asked whether postsynaptic BDNF signaling through its receptor TrkB regulates spine persistence in adult V1. This question has been difficult to address because most methods used to alter TrkB signaling in vivo affect cortical development or cannot distinguish between pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. We circumvented these problems by employing transgenic mice expressing a dominant negative TrkB–EGFP fusion protein in sparse pyramidal neurons of the adult neocortex and hippocampus, producing a Golgi-staining-like pattern. In adult V1, expression of dominant negative TrkB-EGFP resulted in reduced mushroom spine maintenance and synaptic efficacy, accompanied by an increase in long and thin spines and filopodia. In contrast, mushroom spine maintenance was unaffected in CA1, indicating that TrkB plays fundamentally different roles in structural plasticity in these brain areas. PMID:16418274

  19. PI3-Kinase-γ Has a Distinct and Essential Role in Lung-Specific Dendritic Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Nobs, Samuel Philip; Schneider, Christoph; Dietrich, Maren Gil; Brocker, Thomas; Rolink, Antonius; Hirsch, Emilio; Kopf, Manfred

    2015-10-20

    Development of dendritic cells (DCs) commences in the bone marrow, from where pre-DCs migrate to peripheral organs to differentiate into mature DCs in situ. However, the factors that regulate organ-specific differentiation to give rise to tissue-specific DC subsets remain unclear. Here we show that the Ras-PI3Kγ-Akt-mTOR signaling axis acted downstream of FLT3L signaling and was required for development of lung CD103(+) DCs and, to a smaller extent, for lung CD11b(+) DCs, but not related DC populations in other non-lymphoid organs. Furthermore, we show that in lymphoid organs such as the spleen, DCs depended on a similar signaling network to respond to FLT3 ligand with overlapping and partially redundant roles for kinases PI3Kγ and PI3Kδ. Thus we identified PI3Kγ as an essential organ-specific regulator of lung DC development and discovered a signaling network regulating tissue-specific DC development mediated by FLT3. PMID:26453378

  20. Adjacent proline residues in the inhibitory domain of the Oct-2 transcription factor play distinct functional roles.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y Z; Lee, I K; Locke, I; Dawson, S J; Latchman, D S

    1998-01-01

    A 40 amino acid region of Oct-2 from amino acids 142 to 181 functions as an active repressor domain capable of inhibiting both basal activity and activation of promoters containing a TATA box, but not of those that contain an initiator element. Based on our observation that the equivalent region of the closely related Oct-1 factor does not act as an inhibitory domain, we have mutated specific residues in the Oct-2 domain in an attempt to probe their importance in repressor domain function. Although mutations of several residues have no or minimal effect, mutation of proline 175 to arginine abolishes the ability to inhibit both basal and activated transcription. In contrast, mutation of proline 174 to arginine confers upon the domain the ability to repress activation of an initiator-containing promoter by acidic activation domains, and also suppresses the effect of the proline 175 mutation. Hence, adjacent proline residues play key roles in the functioning of the inhibitory domain and in limiting its specificity to TATA-box-containing promoters. PMID:9580701

  1. Two distinct domains of Flo8 activator mediates its role in transcriptional activation and the physical interaction with Mss11.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Sung Bae; Kang, Hyen Sam; Oh, Goo Taeg; Kim, TaeSoo

    2014-06-27

    Flo8 is a transcriptional activator essential for the inducible expression of a set of target genes such as STA1, FLO11, and FLO1 encoding an extracellular glucoamylase and two cell surface proteins, respectively. However, the molecular mechanism of Flo8-mediated transcriptional activation remains largely elusive. By generating serial deletion constructs, we revealed here that a novel transcriptional activation domain on its extreme C-terminal region plays a crucial role in activating transcription. On the other hand, the N-terminal LisH motif of Flo8 appears to be required for its physical interaction with another transcriptional activator, Mss11, for their cooperative transcriptional regulation of the shared targets. Additionally, GST pull-down experiments uncovered that Flo8 and Mss11 can directly form either a heterodimer or a homodimer capable of binding to DNA, and we also showed that this formed complex of two activators interacts functionally and physically with the Swi/Snf complex. Collectively, our findings provide valuable clues for understanding the molecular mechanism of Flo8-mediated transcriptional control of multiple targets. PMID:24813990

  2. Distinct but Concerted Roles of ATR, DNA-PK, and Chk1 in Countering Replication Stress during S Phase.

    PubMed

    Buisson, Rémi; Boisvert, Jessica L; Benes, Cyril H; Zou, Lee

    2015-09-17

    The ATR-Chk1 pathway is critical for DNA damage responses and cell-cycle progression. Chk1 inhibition is more deleterious to cycling cells than ATR inhibition, raising questions about ATR and Chk1 functions in the absence of extrinsic replication stress. Here we show that a key role of ATR in S phase is to coordinate RRM2 accumulation and origin firing. ATR inhibitor (ATRi) induces massive ssDNA accumulation and replication catastrophe in a fraction of early S-phase cells. In other S-phase cells, however, ATRi induces moderate ssDNA and triggers a DNA-PK and Chk1-mediated backup pathway to suppress origin firing. The backup pathway creates a threshold such that ATRi selectively kills cells under high replication stress, whereas Chk1 inhibitor induces cell death at a lower threshold. The levels of ATRi-induced ssDNA correlate with ATRi sensitivity in a panel of cell lines, suggesting that ATRi-induced ssDNA could be predictive of ATRi sensitivity in cancer cells. PMID:26365377

  3. Secreted Phospholipases A2 Are Intestinal Stem Cell Niche Factors with Distinct Roles in Homeostasis, Inflammation, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schewe, Matthias; Franken, Patrick F; Sacchetti, Andrea; Schmitt, Mark; Joosten, Rosalie; Böttcher, René; van Royen, Martin E; Jeammet, Louise; Payré, Christine; Scott, Patricia M; Webb, Nancy R; Gelb, Michael; Cormier, Robert T; Lambeau, Gérard; Fodde, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    The intestinal stem cell niche provides cues that actively maintain gut homeostasis. Dysregulation of these cues may compromise intestinal regeneration upon tissue insult and/or promote tumor growth. Here, we identify secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) as stem cell niche factors with context-dependent functions in the digestive tract. We show that group IIA sPLA2, a known genetic modifier of mouse intestinal tumorigenesis, is expressed by Paneth cells in the small intestine, while group X sPLA2 is expressed by Paneth/goblet-like cells in the colon. During homeostasis, group IIA/X sPLA2s inhibit Wnt signaling through intracellular activation of Yap1. However, upon inflammation they are secreted into the intestinal lumen, where they promote prostaglandin synthesis and Wnt signaling. Genetic ablation of both sPLA2s improves recovery from inflammation but increases colon cancer susceptibility due to release of their homeostatic Wnt-inhibitory role. This "trade-off" effect suggests sPLA2s have important functions as genetic modifiers of inflammation and colon cancer. PMID:27292189

  4. Distinct roles of apolipoprotein components within the trypanosome lytic factor complex revealed in a novel transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Molina-Portela, Maria Pilar; Samanovic, Marie; Raper, Jayne

    2008-08-01

    Humans express a unique subset of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) called trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs) that kill many Trypanosoma parasite species. The proteins apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, apoL-I, and haptoglobin-related protein, which are involved in TLF structure and function, were expressed through the introduction of transgenes in mice to explore their physiological roles in vivo. Transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein L-I alone conferred trypanolytic activity in vivo. Coexpression of human apolipoprotein A-I and haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr) had an effect on the integration of apolipoprotein L-I into HDL, and both proteins were required to increase the specific activity of TLF, which was measurable in vitro. Unexpectedly, truncated apolipoprotein L-I devoid of the serum resistance gene interacting domain, which was previously shown to kill human infective trypanosomes, was not trypanolytic in transgenic mice despite being coexpressed with human apolipoprotein A-I and Hpr and incorporated into HDLs. We conclude that all three human apolipoproteins act cooperatively to achieve maximal killing capacity and that truncated apolipoprotein L-I does not function in transgenic animals. PMID:18606856

  5. The intrinsically disordered tails of PTEN and PTEN-L have distinct roles in regulating substrate specificity and membrane activity

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Glenn R.; Perisic, Olga; Burke, John E.; Williams, Roger L.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a lipid and protein phosphatase, and both activities are necessary for its role as a tumour suppressor. PTEN activity is controlled by phosphorylation of its intrinsically disordered C-terminal tail. A recently discovered variant of PTEN, PTEN-long (PTEN-L), has a 173-residue N-terminal extension that causes PTEN-L to exhibit unique behaviour, such as movement from one cell to another. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX–MS) and biophysical assays, we show that both the N-terminal extension of PTEN-L and C-terminal tail of PTEN affect the phosphatase activity using unique mechanisms. Phosphorylation of six residues in the C-terminal tail of PTEN results in auto-inhibitory interactions with the phosphatase and C2 domains, effectively blocking both the active site and the membrane-binding interface of PTEN. Partially dephosphorylating PTEN on pThr366/pSer370 results in sufficient exposure of the active site to allow a selective activation for soluble substrates. Using HDX–MS, we identified a membrane-binding element in the N-terminal extension of PTEN-L, termed the membrane-binding helix (MBH). The MBH radically alters the membrane binding mechanism of PTEN-L compared with PTEN, switching PTEN-L to a ‘scooting’ mode of catalysis from the ‘hopping’ mode that is characteristic of PTEN. PMID:26527737

  6. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö.; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27605249

  7. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain.

    PubMed

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27605249

  8. Distinct Roles for Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the Regulation of Murine Intestinal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gonneaud, Alexis; Turgeon, Naomie; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie; Rivard, Nathalie; Asselin, Claude

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium responds to and transmits signals from the microbiota and the mucosal immune system to insure intestinal homeostasis. These interactions are in part conveyed by epigenetic modifications, which respond to environmental changes. Protein acetylation is an epigenetic signal regulated by histone deacetylases, including Hdac1 and Hdac2. We have previously shown that villin-Cre-inducible intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions disturb intestinal homeostasis. To determine the role of Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the regulation of IEC function and the establishment of the dual knockout phenotype, we have generated villin-Cre murine models expressing one Hdac1 allele without Hdac2, or one Hdac2 allele without Hdac1. We have also investigated the effect of short-term deletion of both genes in naphtoflavone-inducible Ah-Cre and tamoxifen-inducible villin-Cre(ER) mice. Mice with one Hdac1 allele displayed normal tissue architecture, but increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In contrast, mice with one Hdac2 allele displayed intestinal architecture defects, increased proliferation, decreased goblet cell numbers as opposed to Paneth cells, increased immune cell infiltration associated with fibrosis, and increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In comparison to dual knockout mice, intermediary activation of Notch, mTOR, and Stat3 signaling pathways was observed. While villin-Cre(ER) Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions led to an impaired epithelium and differentiation defects, Ah-Cre-mediated deletion resulted in blunted proliferation associated with the induction of a DNA damage response. Our results suggest that IEC determination and intestinal homeostasis are highly dependent on Hdac1 and Hdac2 activity levels, and that changes in the IEC acetylome may alter the mucosal environment. PMID:26174178

  9. Distinct roles for the p53-like transcription factor XprG and autophagy genes in the response to starvation.

    PubMed

    Katz, Margaret E; Buckland, Rebecca; Hunter, Cameron C; Todd, Richard B

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy and autolysis are two cannibalistic pathways which allow filamentous fungi to obtain nutrients once environmental nutrient sources are exhausted. In Aspergillus nidulans, the effects of mutations in two key autophagy genes, atgA, the ATG1 ortholog, and atgH, the ATG8 ortholog, were compared with mutations in xprG, which encodes a transcriptional activator that plays a key role in autolysis. The anti-fungal drug rapamycin induces autophagy in a range of organisms. Mutations in atgA and atgH did not alter sensitivity to rapamycin, which inhibits growth and asexual spore production (conidiation), indicating that autophagy is not required for rapamycin sensitivity in A. nidulans. In contrast, inhibition of conidiation by rapamcyin was partially suppressed by the xprG1 gain-of-function mutation, indicating that XprG acts in the pathway(s) affected by rapamycin. It was anticipated that the absence of an intact autophagy pathway would accelerate the response to starvation. However, extracellular and intracellular protease production in response to carbon or nitrogen starvation was not increased in the atgAΔ and atgHΔ mutants, and the onset of autolysis was not accelerated. Compared to wild-type strains and the xprGΔ and xprG1 mutants, conidiation of the autophagy mutants was reduced in carbon- or nitrogen-limiting conditions but not during growth on nutrient-sufficient medium. Nuclear localization of the global nitrogen regulator AreA in response to nitrogen starvation was blocked in the xprG2 loss-of-function mutant, but not in the atgHΔ mutant. Conversely, the atgAΔ mutation but not the xprGΔ mutation prevented vacuolar accumulation of GFP-AtgH, a hallmark of autophagy. These results indicate that in A. nidulans there is little interaction between autophagy and autolysis and the two pathways are activated in parallel during starvation. PMID:26296599

  10. Predominant Expression of Hybrid N-Glycans Has Distinct Cellular Roles Relative to Complex and Oligomannose N-Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A.; Zhu, Yong; Dayal, Sahil; Whitman, Austin A.; Schwalbe, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation modulates growth, maintenance, and stress signaling processes. Consequently, altered N-glycosylation is associated with reduced fitness and disease. Therefore, expanding our understanding of N-glycans in altering biological processes is of utmost interest. Herein, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/caspase9 (CRISPR/Cas9) technology was employed to engineer a glycosylation mutant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line, K16, which expresses predominantly hybrid type N-glycans. This newly engineered cell line enabled us to compare N-glycan effects on cellular properties of hybrid type N-glycans, to the well-established Pro−5 and Lec1 cell lines, which express complex and oligomannose types of N-glycans, respectively. Lectin binding studies revealed the predominant N-glycan expressed in K16 is hybrid type. Cell dissociation and migration assays demonstrated the greatest strength of cell–cell adhesion and fastest migratory rates for oligomannose N-glycans, and these properties decreased as oligomannose type were converted to hybrid type, and further decreased upon conversion to complex type. Next, we examined the roles of three general types of N-glycans on ectopic expression of E-cadherin, a cell–cell adhesion protein. Microscopy revealed more functional E-cadherin at the cell–cell border when N-glycans were oligomannose and these levels decreased as the oligomannose N-glycans were processed to hybrid and then to complex. Thus, we provide evidence that all three general types of N-glycans impact plasma membrane architecture and cellular properties. PMID:27304954

  11. Distinct roles of GPVI and integrin α2β1 in platelet shape change and aggregation induced by different collagens

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Gavin E; Atkinson, Ben T; Snell, Daniel C; Watson, Steve P

    2002-01-01

    Various platelet membrane glycoproteins have been proposed as receptors for collagen, in some cases as receptors for specific collagen types. In this study we have compared the ability of a range of collagen types to activate platelets. Bovine collagen types I–V, native equine tendon collagen fibrils and collagen-related peptide (CRP) all induced platelet aggregation and shape change. Responses were abolished in FcRγ chain-deficient platelets, which also lack GPVI, indicating a critical dependence on the GPVI/FcRγ chain complex. Responses to all collagens were unaffected in CD36-deficient platelets. A monoclonal antibody (6F1) which binds to the α2 integrin subunit of human platelets had a minimal effect on the rate and extent of aggregation induced by the collagens; however, it delayed the onset of aggregation following addition of all collagens. For shape change, 6F1 abolished the response induced by collagen types I and IV, substantially attenuated that to collagen types II, III and V, but only partially inhibited Horm collagen. Simultaneous blockade of the P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, and inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase demonstrated that CRP can activate platelets independently of ADP and TxA2; however, responses to the collagens were dependent on these mediators. This study confirms the importance of the GPVI/FcRγ chain complex in platelet responses induced by a range of collagen agonists, while providing no evidence for collagen type-specific receptors. It also provides evidence for a modulatory role of α2β1, the significance of which depends on the collagen preparation. PMID:12183336

  12. Predominant Expression of Hybrid N-Glycans Has Distinct Cellular Roles Relative to Complex and Oligomannose N-Glycans.

    PubMed

    Hall, M Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A; Zhu, Yong; Dayal, Sahil; Whitman, Austin A; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation modulates growth, maintenance, and stress signaling processes. Consequently, altered N-glycosylation is associated with reduced fitness and disease. Therefore, expanding our understanding of N-glycans in altering biological processes is of utmost interest. Herein, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/caspase9 (CRISPR/Cas9) technology was employed to engineer a glycosylation mutant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line, K16, which expresses predominantly hybrid type N-glycans. This newly engineered cell line enabled us to compare N-glycan effects on cellular properties of hybrid type N-glycans, to the well-established Pro(-)5 and Lec1 cell lines, which express complex and oligomannose types of N-glycans, respectively. Lectin binding studies revealed the predominant N-glycan expressed in K16 is hybrid type. Cell dissociation and migration assays demonstrated the greatest strength of cell-cell adhesion and fastest migratory rates for oligomannose N-glycans, and these properties decreased as oligomannose type were converted to hybrid type, and further decreased upon conversion to complex type. Next, we examined the roles of three general types of N-glycans on ectopic expression of E-cadherin, a cell-cell adhesion protein. Microscopy revealed more functional E-cadherin at the cell-cell border when N-glycans were oligomannose and these levels decreased as the oligomannose N-glycans were processed to hybrid and then to complex. Thus, we provide evidence that all three general types of N-glycans impact plasma membrane architecture and cellular properties. PMID:27304954

  13. Estrogen and progesterone receptors have distinct roles in the establishment of the hyperplastic phenotype in PR-A transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Simian, Marina; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Shyamala, Gopalan

    2009-05-11

    Expression of the A and B forms of progesterone receptor (PR) in an appropriate ratio is critical for mammary development. Mammary glands of PR-A transgenic mice, carrying an additional A form of PR as a transgene, exhibit morphological features associated with the development of mammary tumors. Our objective was to determine the roles of estrogen (E) and progesterone (P) in the genesis of mammary hyperplasias/preneoplasias in PR-A transgenics. We subjected PR-A mice to hormonal treatments and analyzed mammary glands for the presence of hyperplasias and used BrdU incorporation to measure proliferation. Quantitative image analysis was carried out to compare levels of latency-associated peptide and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF{beta}1) between PR-A and PR-B transgenics. Basement membrane disruption was examined by immunofluorescence and proteolytic activity by zymography. The hyperplastic phenotype of PR-A transgenics is inhibited by ovariectomy, and is reversed by treatment with E + P. Studies using the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 or antiprogestins RU486 or ZK 98,299 show that the increase in proliferation requires signaling through E/estrogen receptor alpha but is not sufficient to give rise to hyperplasias, whereas signaling through P/PR has little impact on proliferation but is essential for the manifestation of hyperplasias. Increased proliferation is correlated with decreased TGF{beta}1 activation in the PR-A transgenics. Analysis of basement membrane integrity showed loss of laminin-5, collagen III and collagen IV in mammary glands of PR-A mice, which is restored by ovariectomy. Examination of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) showed that total levels of MMP-2 correlate with the steady-state levels of PR, and that areas of laminin-5 loss coincide with those of activation of MMP-2 in PR-A transgenics. Activation of MMP-2 is dependent on treatment with E and P in ovariectomized wild-type mice, but is achieved only by treatment with P in PR-A mice. These data

  14. Defining chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Brian R.; Ott, Edward

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we propose, discuss, and illustrate a computationally feasible definition of chaos which can be applied very generally to situations that are commonly encountered, including attractors, repellers, and non-periodically forced systems. This definition is based on an entropy-like quantity, which we call “expansion entropy,” and we define chaos as occurring when this quantity is positive. We relate and compare expansion entropy to the well-known concept of topological entropy to which it is equivalent under appropriate conditions. We also present example illustrations, discuss computational implementations, and point out issues arising from attempts at giving definitions of chaos that are not entropy-based.

  15. Increasing the complexity of chromatin: functionally distinct roles for replication-dependent histone H2A isoforms in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajbir; Mortazavi, Amir; Telu, Kelly H.; Nagarajan, Prabakaran; Lucas, David M.; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Clinton, Steven K.; Byrd, John C.; Freitas, Michael A.; Parthun, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Replication-dependent histones are encoded by multigene families found in several large clusters in the human genome and are thought to be functionally redundant. However, the abundance of specific replication-dependent isoforms of histone H2A is altered in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Similar changes in the abundance of H2A isoforms are also associated with the proliferation and tumorigenicity of bladder cancer cells. To determine whether these H2A isoforms can perform distinct functions, expression of several H2A isoforms was reduced by siRNA knockdown. Reduced expression of the HIST1H2AC locus leads to increased rates of cell proliferation and tumorigenicity. We also observe that regulation of replication-dependent histone H2A expression can occur on a gene-specific level. Specific replication-dependent histone H2A genes are either up- or downregulated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia tumor tissue samples. In addition, discreet elements are identified in the 5′ untranslated region of the HIST1H2AC locus that confer translational repression. Taken together, these results indicate that replication-dependent histone isoforms can possess distinct cellular functions and that regulation of these isoforms may play a role in carcinogenesis. PMID:23956221

  16. The MDM2 RING domain and central acidic domain play distinct roles in MDM2 protein homodimerization and MDM2-MDMX protein heterodimerization.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Patrick L; Ke, Hengming; Zhang, Yanping

    2015-05-15

    The oncoprotein murine double minute 2 (MDM2) is an E3 ligase that plays a prominent role in p53 suppression by promoting its polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In its active form, MDM2 forms homodimers as well as heterodimers with the homologous protein murine double minute 4 (MDMX), both of which are thought to occur through their respective C-terminal RING (really interesting new gene) domains. In this study, using multiple MDM2 mutants, we show evidence suggesting that MDM2 homo- and heterodimerization occur through distinct mechanisms because MDM2 RING domain mutations that inhibit MDM2 interaction with MDMX do not affect MDM2 interaction with WT MDM2. Intriguingly, deletion of a portion of the MDM2 central acidic domain selectively inhibits interaction with MDM2 while leaving intact the ability of MDM2 to interact with MDMX and to ubiquitinate p53. Further analysis of an MDM2 C-terminal deletion mutant reveals that the C-terminal residues of MDM2 are required for both MDM2 and MDMX interaction. Collectively, our results suggest a model in which MDM2-MDMX heterodimerization requires the extreme C terminus and proper RING domain structure of MDM2, whereas MDM2 homodimerization requires the extreme C terminus and the central acidic domain of MDM2, suggesting that MDM2 homo- and heterodimers utilize distinct MDM2 domains. Our study is the first to report mutations capable of separating MDM2 homo- and heterodimerization. PMID:25809483

  17. Presence or absence of a known DKA precipitant defines distinct syndromes of “A-β+” Ketosis-Prone Diabetes (KPD) based on long-term beta cell function, HLA class II alleles, and gender predilection

    PubMed Central

    Nalini, Ramaswami; Ozer, Kerem; Maldonado, Mario; Patel, Sanjeet G.; Hampe, Christiane S.; Guthikonda, Anu; Villanueva, Jesus; Smith, E. O'Brian; Gaur, Lakshmi K.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    Objective Ketosis prone diabetes (KPD) is heterogeneous. Longitudinal follow-up revealed that patients with “A-β+” KPD (absent autoantibodies and preserved beta cell function) segregated into two subgroups with distinct evolution of beta cell function and glycemic control. Generalized linear analysis demonstrated that the variable that most significantly differentiated them was presence of a clinically evident precipitating event for the index DKA. Hence we performed a comprehensive analysis of A-β+ KPD patients presenting with “provoked” compared to “unprovoked” DKA. Methods Clinical, biochemical and beta cell functional characteristics were compared between provoked and unprovoked A-β+ KPD patients followed prospectively for 1-8 years. HLA class II allele frequencies were compared between these two groups and population controls. Results Unprovoked A-β+ KPD patients (n=83) had greater BMI, male preponderance, higher frequency of women with oligo/anovulation, more frequent African-American ethnicity and less frequent family history of diabetes than provoked A-β+ KPD patients (n=64). The provoked group had higher frequencies of the HLA class II type 1 diabetes susceptibility alleles DQB1*0302 (than the unprovoked group or population controls), and DRB1*04 (than the unprovoked group), while the unprovoked group had a higher frequency of the protective allele DQB1*0602. Beta cell secretory reserve and glycemic control improved progressively in the unprovoked group, but declined in the provoked group. The differences persisted in comparisons restricted to patients with new-onset diabetes. Conclusions “Unprovoked” A-β+ KPD is a distinct syndrome characterized by reversible beta cell dysfunction with male predominance and increased frequency of DQB1*0602, while “provoked” A-β+ KPD is characterized by progressive loss of beta cell reserve and increased frequency of DQB1*0302 and DRB1*04. Unprovoked DKA predicts long-term beta cell functional

  18. Structural and functional analysis of the Crb2–BRCT2 domain reveals distinct roles in checkpoint signaling and DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Kilkenny, Mairi L.; Doré, Andrew S.; Roe, S. Mark; Nestoras, Konstantinos; Ho, Jenny C.Y.; Watts, Felicity Z.; Pearl, Laurence H.

    2008-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Crb2 is a checkpoint mediator required for the cellular response to DNA damage. Like human 53BP1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad9 it contains Tudor2 and BRCT2 domains. Crb2-Tudor2 domain interacts with methylated H4K20 and is required for recruitment to DNA dsDNA breaks. The BRCT2 domain is required for dimerization, but its precise role in DNA damage repair and checkpoint signaling is unclear. The crystal structure of the Crb2–BRCT2 domain, alone and in complex with a phosphorylated H2A.1 peptide, reveals the structural basis for dimerization and direct interaction with γ-H2A.1 in ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF). Mutational analysis in vitro confirms the functional role of key residues and allows the generation of mutants in which dimerization and phosphopeptide binding are separately disrupted. Phenotypic analysis of these in vivo reveals distinct roles in the DNA damage response. Dimerization mutants are genotoxin sensitive and defective in checkpoint signaling, Chk1 phosphorylation, and Crb2 IRIF formation, while phosphopeptide-binding mutants are only slightly sensitive to IR, have extended checkpoint delays, phosphorylate Chk1, and form Crb2 IRIF. However, disrupting phosphopeptide binding slows formation of ssDNA-binding protein (Rpa1/Rad11) foci and reduces levels of Rad22(Rad52) recombination foci, indicating a DNA repair defect. PMID:18676809

  19. The two SAMP repeats and their phosphorylation state in Drosophila Adenomatous polyposis coli-2 play mechanistically distinct roles in negatively regulating Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; Von Kleeck, Ryan A; Greaves, Bradford D; Vinson, David; Roberts, David M; McCartney, Brooke M

    2015-12-01

    The tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) plays a key role in regulating the canonical Wnt signaling pathway as an essential component of the β-catenin destruction complex. C-terminal truncations of APC are strongly implicated in both sporadic and familial forms of colorectal cancer. However, many questions remain as to how these mutations interfere with APC's tumor suppressor activity. One set of motifs frequently lost in these cancer-associated truncations is the SAMP repeats that mediate interactions between APC and Axin. APC proteins in both vertebrates and Drosophila contain multiple SAMP repeats that lack high sequence conservation outside of the Axin-binding motif. In this study, we tested the functional redundancy between different SAMPs and how these domains are regulated, using Drosophila APC2 and its two SAMP repeats as our model. Consistent with sequence conservation-based predictions, we show that SAMP2 has stronger binding activity to Axin in vitro, but SAMP1 also plays an essential role in the Wnt destruction complex in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that the phosphorylation of SAMP repeats is a potential mechanism to regulate their activity. Overall our findings support a model in which each SAMP repeat plays a mechanistically distinct role but they cooperate for maximal destruction complex function. PMID:26446838

  20. The two SAMP repeats and their phosphorylation state in Drosophila Adenomatous polyposis coli-2 play mechanistically distinct roles in negatively regulating Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; Von Kleeck, Ryan A.; Greaves, Bradford D.; Vinson, David; Roberts, David M.; McCartney, Brooke M.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) plays a key role in regulating the canonical Wnt signaling pathway as an essential component of the β-catenin destruction complex. C-terminal truncations of APC are strongly implicated in both sporadic and familial forms of colorectal cancer. However, many questions remain as to how these mutations interfere with APC’s tumor suppressor activity. One set of motifs frequently lost in these cancer-associated truncations is the SAMP repeats that mediate interactions between APC and Axin. APC proteins in both vertebrates and Drosophila contain multiple SAMP repeats that lack high sequence conservation outside of the Axin-binding motif. In this study, we tested the functional redundancy between different SAMPs and how these domains are regulated, using Drosophila APC2 and its two SAMP repeats as our model. Consistent with sequence conservation–based predictions, we show that SAMP2 has stronger binding activity to Axin in vitro, but SAMP1 also plays an essential role in the Wnt destruction complex in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that the phosphorylation of SAMP repeats is a potential mechanism to regulate their activity. Overall our findings support a model in which each SAMP repeat plays a mechanistically distinct role but they cooperate for maximal destruction complex function. PMID:26446838

  1. Two-step model of leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction in inflammation: distinct roles for LECAM-1 and the leukocyte beta 2 integrins in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    von Andrian, U H; Chambers, J D; McEvoy, L M; Bargatze, R F; Arfors, K E; Butcher, E C

    1991-01-01

    The lectin homing receptor LECAM-1 (LAM-1, Leu8) and the beta 2 integrins, particularly Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18), participate in leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in inflammation. LECAM-1 is rapidly shed while Mac-1 expression is dramatically increased upon neutrophil activation, suggesting functionally distinct roles for these molecules. Using intravital video microscopy, we have compared the effect of antibodies against LECAM-1 and CD18 on leukocyte interactions with rabbit mesenteric venules. Anti-LECAM-1 monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragments inhibited initial reversible leukocyte rolling along the vascular wall. Anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody had no effect on rolling but prevented subsequent firm attachment of leukocytes to venular endothelium. These results support a two-step model of leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions: reversible rolling mediated in part by LECAM-1 facilitates leukocyte recruitment by the local microenvironment and precedes activation-dependent firm attachment involving beta 2 integrins. Images PMID:1715568

  2. Defining GERD.

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    "It is not the death of GERD that I seek, but that it turns from its evil ways and follows the path of righteousness." The reflux world is fully aware of what GERD is and what GERD does. What the world does not know, however, is the answer to the most important yet least asked question surrounding GERD's raison-d'etre: Why is GERD here and why do we have it? What GERD is: abnormal gastric reflux into the esophagus that causes any type of mischief. What GERD does: causes discomfort and/or pain with or without destroying the mucosa; causes stricture or stenosis, preventing food from being swallowed; sets the stage for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; invades the surrounding lands to harass the peaceful oropharyngeal, laryngeal and broncho-pulmonary territories; reminds us that we are not only human, but that we are dust and ashes. Why GERD is here: We propose three separate and distinct etiologies of GERD, and we offer the following three hypotheses to explain why, after 1.5 million years of standing erect, we have evolved into a species (specifically Homosapiens sapiens) that is destined to live with the scourge of GERD. Hypothesis 1: congenital. The antireflux barrier, comprising the smooth-muscled lower esophageal sphincter, the skeletal-muscled right crural diaphragm and the phreno-esophageal ligament does not completely develop due to a developmental anomaly or incomplete gestation. Hypothesis 2: acute trauma: The antireflux barrier in adults suffering acute traumatic injury to the abdomen or chest is permanently disrupted by unexpected forces, such as motor vehicle accidents (with steering wheel crush impact), blows to the abdomen (from activities such as boxing, etc.), heavy lifting or moving (e.g., pianos, refrigerators) or stress positions (e.g., hand stands on parallel gym bars). The trauma creates a hiatal hernia that renders the antireflux mechanism useless and incapable of preventing GERD. Hypothesis 3: chronic trauma: The antireflux barrier

  3. The Plasmodium serine-type SERA proteases display distinct expression patterns and non-essential in vivo roles during life cycle progression of the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Putrianti, Elyzana D; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Arnold, Iris; Heussler, Volker T; Matuschewski, Kai; Silvie, Olivier

    2010-06-01

    Parasite proteases play key roles in several fundamental steps of the Plasmodium life cycle, including haemoglobin degradation, host cell invasion and parasite egress. Plasmodium exit from infected host cells appears to be mediated by a class of papain-like cysteine proteases called 'serine repeat antigens' (SERAs). A SERA subfamily, represented by Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, contains an atypical active site serine residue instead of a catalytic cysteine. Members of this SERAser subfamily are abundantly expressed in asexual blood stages, rendering them attractive drug and vaccine targets. In this study, we show by antibody localization and in vivo fluorescent tagging with the red fluorescent protein mCherry that the two P. berghei serine-type family members, PbSERA1 and PbSERA2, display differential expression towards the final stages of merozoite formation. Via targeted gene replacement, we generated single and double gene knockouts of the P. berghei SERAser genes. These loss-of-function lines progressed normally through the parasite life cycle, suggesting a specialized, non-vital role for serine-type SERAs in vivo. Parasites lacking PbSERAser showed increased expression of the cysteine-type PbSERA3. Compensatory mechanisms between distinct SERA subfamilies may thus explain the absence of phenotypical defect in SERAser disruptants, and challenge the suitability to develop potent antimalarial drugs based on specific inhibitors of Plasmodium serine-type SERAs. PMID:20039882

  4. Distinct Roles of PKCι/λ and PKMζ in the Initiation and Maintenance of Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation and Memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoli; Sheng, Tao; Ren, Siqiang; Tian, Tian; Lu, Wei

    2016-08-16

    PKMζ has been proposed to be essential for maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term memory (LTM). However, recent data from PKMζ-knockout mice has called this role into question. Instead, the other atypical isoform, protein kinase C iota/lambda (PKCι/λ), has emerged as a potential alternative player. Therefore, the nature of the "memory molecule" maintaining learned information remains uncertain. Here, we report knockdown (KD) of PKCι/λ and PKMζ in the dorsal hippocampus and find deficits in early expression and late maintenance, respectively, during both LTP and hippocampus-dependent LTM. Sequential increases in the active form of PKCι/λ and PKMζ are detected during LTP or fear conditioning. Importantly, PKMζ, but not PKCι/λ, KD disrupts previously established LTM. Thus, PKCι/λ and PKMζ have distinct functions in LTP and memory, with PKMζ playing a specific role in memory maintenance. This relaying pattern may represent a precise molecular mechanism by which atypical PKCs regulate the different stages of memory. PMID:27498875

  5. Unexpected Distinct Roles of the Related Histone H3 Lysine 9 Methyltransferases G9a and G9a-Like Protein in Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Valentine; Pontis, Julien; Boyarchuk, Ekaterina; Fritsch, Lauriane; Robin, Philippe; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Joliot, Véronique

    2016-06-01

    Lysine methyltransferases G9a and GLP (G9a-like protein) are highly homologous and form functional heterodimeric complexes that establish mono- and dimethylation on histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me1, H3K9me2) in euchromatin. Here, we describe unexpected distinct roles for G9a and GLP in skeletal muscle terminal differentiation. Indeed, gain- or loss-of-function assays in myoblasts showed, in agreement with previous reports, that G9a inhibits terminal differentiation. While GLP plays a more intricate role in muscle differentiation,in one hand, both GLP gain and loss of function inhibit late steps of differentiation; on the other hand, in contrast to G9a, GLP overexpression promotes abnormal precocious expression of muscle differentiation-specific genes already in proliferating myoblasts. In agreement, transcriptomic analysis indicates that G9a and GLP regulate different sets of genes. Thus, GLP, but not G9a, inhibits proteasome subunit-encoding genes expression, resulting in an inhibition of the proteasome activities. Subsequently, GLP, but not G9a, overexpression stabilizes MyoD that is likely to be responsible for muscle markers expression in proliferating myoblasts. PMID:27056598

  6. Distinct roles of isoforms of the heme-liganded nuclear receptor E75, an insect orthologue of the vertebrate Rev-Erb, in mosquito reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Josefa; Mane-Padros, Daniel; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    Mosquitoes are adapted to using vertebrate blood as a nutrient source to promote egg development and as a consequence serve as disease vectors. Blood-meal activated reproductive events in female mosquitoes are hormonally and nutritionally controlled with an insect steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) playing a central role. The nuclear receptor E75 is an essential factor in the 20E genetic hierarchy, however functions of its three isoforms - E75A, E75B, and E75C – in mosquito reproduction are unclear. By means of specific RNA interference depletion of E75 isoforms, we identified their distinct roles in regulating the level and timing of expression of key genes involved in vitellogenesis in the fat body (an insect analogue of vertebrate liver and adipose tissue) of the mosquito Aedes aegypti. Heme is required in a high level of expression of 20E-controlled genes in the fat body, and this heme action depends on E75. Thus, in mosquitoes, heme is an important signaling molecule, serving as a sensor of the availability of a protein meal for egg development. Disruption of this signaling pathway could be explored in the design of mosquito control approaches. PMID:22115961

  7. Distinctive Roles of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine in Anterior Agranular Insular and Basolateral Amygdala in Reconsolidation of Aversive Memory Associated with Morphine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, JianJun; Li, Ming; Sui, Nan

    2016-01-01

    5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza), an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), has been implicated in aversive memory and the function of brain region involved in processing emotion. However, little is known about the role of 5-aza in the reconsolidation of opiate withdrawal memory. In the present study, using the morphine-naloxone induced conditioned place aversion (CPA) model in rats, we injected 5-aza into agranular insular (AI), granular insular (GI), basolateral amygdala (BLA) and central amygdala (CeA) immediately after the memory retrieval and tested the behavioral consequences at 24 h, 7 and 14 days after retrieval test. We found that 5-aza injection into AI disrupted the reconsolidation of morphine-associated withdrawal memory, but 5-aza injection into GI had no impact on the reconsolidation. Meanwhile, 5-aza injection into BLA but not CeA attenuated the withdrawal memory trace 14 days later. However, 5-aza administration to rats, in the absence of memory reactivation, had no effect on morphine-associated withdrawal memory. These findings suggest that 5-aza interferes with the reconsolidation of opiate withdrawal memory, and the roles of insular and amygdala in reconsolidation are distinctive. PMID:27014010

  8. Differential Loss of Prolyl Isomerase or Chaperone Activity of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Unveils Distinct Physiological Roles of Its Cyclophilin Domain in Proteostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung-in; Patil, Hemangi; Senda, Eugene; Wang, Jessica; Yi, Haiqing; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Yu, Minzhong; Orry, Andrew; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    The immunophilins, cyclophilins, catalyze peptidyl cis-trans prolyl-isomerization (PPIase), a rate-limiting step in protein folding and a conformational switch in protein function. Cyclophilins are also chaperones. Noncatalytic mutations affecting the only cyclophilins with known but distinct physiological substrates, the Drosophila NinaA and its mammalian homolog, cyclophilin-B, impair opsin biogenesis and cause osteogenesis imperfecta, respectively. However, the physiological roles and substrates of most cyclophilins remain unknown. It is also unclear if PPIase and chaperone activities reflect distinct cyclophilin properties. To elucidate the physiological idiosyncrasy stemming from potential cyclophilin functions, we generated mice lacking endogenous Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2) and expressing bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 with impaired C-terminal chaperone and with (Tg-Ranbp2WT-HA) or without PPIase activities (Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA). The transgenic lines exhibit unique effects in proteostasis. Either line presents selective deficits in M-opsin biogenesis with its accumulation and aggregation in cone photoreceptors but without proteostatic impairment of two novel Ranbp2 cyclophilin partners, the cytokine-responsive effectors, STAT3/STAT5. Stress-induced STAT3 activation is also unaffected in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. Conversely, proteomic analyses found that the multisystem proteinopathy/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, are down-regulated post-transcriptionally only in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. This is accompanied by the age- and tissue-dependent reductions of diubiquitin and ubiquitylated proteins, increased deubiquitylation activity, and accumulation of the 26 S proteasome subunits S1 and S5b. These manifestations are absent in another line, Tg-Ranbp2CLDm-HA::Ranbp2−/−, harboring SUMO-1 and S1-binding mutations in the Ranbp2 cyclophilin-like domain. These results unveil

  9. Is Face Distinctiveness Gender Based?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Gallay, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study the role of gender category in evaluations of face distinctiveness. In Experiment 1, participants had to evaluate the distinctiveness and the femininity-masculinity of real or artificial composite faces. The composite faces were created by blending either faces of the same gender (sexed composite faces,…

  10. P130Cas Src-Binding and Substrate Domains Have Distinct Roles in Sustaining Focal Adhesion Disassembly and Promoting Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Meenderink, Leslie M.; Ryzhova, Larisa M.; Donato, Dominique M.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Kaverina, Irina; Hanks, Steven K.

    2010-01-01

    The docking protein p130Cas is a prominent Src substrate found in focal adhesions (FAs) and is implicated in regulating critical aspects of cell motility including FA disassembly and protrusion of the leading edge plasma membrane. To better understand how p130Cas acts to promote these events we examined requirements for established p130Cas signaling motifs including the SH3-binding site of the Src binding domain (SBD) and the tyrosine phosphorylation sites within the substrate domain (SD). Expression of wild type p130Cas in Cas −/− mouse embryo fibroblasts resulted in enhanced cell migration associated with increased leading-edge actin flux, increased rates of FA assembly/disassembly, and uninterrupted FA turnover. Variants lacking either the SD phosphorylation sites or the SBD SH3-binding motif were able to partially restore the migration response, while only a variant lacking both signaling functions was fully defective. Notably, the migration defects associated with p130Cas signaling-deficient variants correlated with longer FA lifetimes resulting from aborted FA disassembly attempts. However the SD mutational variant was fully defective in increasing actin assembly at the protruding leading edge and FA assembly/disassembly rates, indicating that SD phosphorylation is the sole p130Cas signaling function in regulating these processes. Our results provide the first quantitative evidence supporting roles for p130Cas SD tyrosine phosphorylation in promoting both leading edge actin flux and FA turnover during cell migration, while further revealing that the p130Cas SBD has a function in cell migration and sustained FA disassembly that is distinct from its known role of promoting SD tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:20976150

  11. Genome-Wide Occupancy of SREBP1 and Its Partners NFY and SP1 Reveals Novel Functional Roles and Combinatorial Regulation of Distinct Classes of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Brian D.; Charos, Alexandra E.; Szekely, Anna M.; Weissman, Sherman M.; Snyder, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family member SREBP1 is a critical transcriptional regulator of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism and has been implicated in insulin resistance, diabetes, and other diet-related diseases. We globally identified the promoters occupied by SREBP1 and its binding partners NFY and SP1 in a human hepatocyte cell line using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with genome tiling arrays (ChIP-chip). We find that SREBP1 occupies the promoters of 1,141 target genes involved in diverse biological pathways, including novel targets with roles in lipid metabolism and insulin signaling. We also identify a conserved SREBP1 DNA-binding motif in SREBP1 target promoters, and we demonstrate that many SREBP1 target genes are transcriptionally activated by treatment with insulin and glucose using gene expression microarrays. Finally, we show that SREBP1 cooperates extensively with NFY and SP1 throughout the genome and that unique combinations of these factors target distinct functional pathways. Our results provide insight into the regulatory circuitry in which SREBP1 and its network partners coordinate a complex transcriptional response in the liver with cues from the diet. PMID:18654640

  12. Expression patterns suggest that despite considerable functional redundancy, galectin-4 and -6 play distinct roles in normal and damaged mouse digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Houzelstein, Denis; Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Maurer, Marie; Netter, Pierre; Higuet, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    The galectin-4 protein is mostly expressed in the digestive tract and is associated with lipid raft stabilization, protein apical trafficking, wound healing, and inflammation. While most mammalian species, including humans, have a single Lgals4 gene, some mice have two paralogues: Lgals4 and Lgals6. So far, their significant similarities have hindered the analysis of their respective expression and function. We took advantage of two antibodies that discriminate between the galectin-4 and galectin-6 proteins to document their patterns of expression in the normal and the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-damaged digestive tract in the mouse. In the normal digestive tract, their pattern of expression from tongue to colon is quite similar, which suggests functional redundancy. However, the presence of galectin-4, but not galectin-6, in the lamina propria of the DSS-damaged colon, its association with luminal colonic bacteria, and differences in subcellular localization of these proteins suggest that they also have distinct roles in the normal and the damaged mouse digestive tract. Our results provide a rare example of ancestral and derived functions evolving after tandem gene duplication. PMID:23360694

  13. Structural and Functional Modularity of the Orange Carotenoid Protein: Distinct Roles for the N- and C-Terminal Domains in Cyanobacterial Photoprotection[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, Ryan L.; Jallet, Denis; Li, Ming-De; Mathies, Richard A.; Kirilovsky, Diana; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    The orange carotenoid protein (OCP) serves as a sensor of light intensity and an effector of phycobilisome (PB)–associated photoprotection in cyanobacteria. Structurally, the OCP is composed of two distinct domains spanned by a single carotenoid chromophore. Functionally, in response to high light, the OCP converts from a dark-stable orange form, OCPO, to an active red form, OCPR. The C-terminal domain of the OCP has been implicated in the dynamic response to light intensity and plays a role in switching off the OCP’s photoprotective response through its interaction with the fluorescence recovery protein. The function of the N-terminal domain, which is uniquely found in cyanobacteria, is unclear. To investigate its function, we isolated the N-terminal domain in vitro using limited proteolysis of native OCP. The N-terminal domain retains the carotenoid chromophore; this red carotenoid protein (RCP) has constitutive PB fluorescence quenching activity comparable in magnitude to that of active, full-length OCPR. A comparison of the spectroscopic properties of the RCP with OCPR indicates that critical protein–chromophore interactions within the C-terminal domain are weakened in the OCPR form. These results suggest that the C-terminal domain dynamically regulates the photoprotective activity of an otherwise constitutively active carotenoid binding N-terminal domain. PMID:24399299

  14. Comparative analysis of kdp and ktr mutants reveals distinct roles of the potassium transporters in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Nanatani, Kei; Shijuku, Toshiaki; Takano, Yousuke; Zulkifli, Lalu; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Tominaga, Akira; Souma, Satoshi; Onai, Kiyoshi; Morishita, Megumi; Ishiura, Masahiro; Hagemann, Martin; Suzuki, Iwane; Maruyama, Hisataka; Arai, Fumihito; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2015-02-15

    Photoautotrophic bacteria have developed mechanisms to maintain K(+) homeostasis under conditions of changing ionic concentrations in the environment. Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 contains genes encoding a well-characterized Ktr-type K(+) uptake transporter (Ktr) and a putative ATP-dependent transporter specific for K(+) (Kdp). The contributions of each of these K(+) transport systems to cellular K(+) homeostasis have not yet been defined conclusively. To verify the functionality of Kdp, kdp genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, where Kdp conferred K(+) uptake, albeit with lower rates than were conferred by Ktr. An on-chip microfluidic device enabled monitoring of the biphasic initial volume recovery of single Synechocystis cells after hyperosmotic shock. Here, Ktr functioned as the primary K(+) uptake system during the first recovery phase, whereas Kdp did not contribute significantly. The expression of the kdp operon in Synechocystis was induced by extracellular K(+) depletion. Correspondingly, Kdp-mediated K(+) uptake supported Synechocystis cell growth with trace amounts of external potassium. This induction of kdp expression depended on two adjacent genes, hik20 and rre19, encoding a putative two-component system. The circadian expression of kdp and ktr peaked at subjective dawn, which may support the acquisition of K(+) required for the regular diurnal photosynthetic metabolism. These results indicate that Kdp contributes to the maintenance of a basal intracellular K(+) concentration under conditions of limited K(+) in natural environments, whereas Ktr mediates fast potassium movements in the presence of greater K(+) availability. Through their distinct activities, both Ktr and Kdp coordinate the responses of Synechocystis to changes in K(+) levels under fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:25313394

  15. Comparative Analysis of kdp and ktr Mutants Reveals Distinct Roles of the Potassium Transporters in the Model Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Nanatani, Kei; Shijuku, Toshiaki; Takano, Yousuke; Zulkifli, Lalu; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Tominaga, Akira; Souma, Satoshi; Onai, Kiyoshi; Morishita, Megumi; Ishiura, Masahiro; Hagemann, Martin; Suzuki, Iwane; Maruyama, Hisataka; Arai, Fumihito

    2014-01-01

    Photoautotrophic bacteria have developed mechanisms to maintain K+ homeostasis under conditions of changing ionic concentrations in the environment. Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 contains genes encoding a well-characterized Ktr-type K+ uptake transporter (Ktr) and a putative ATP-dependent transporter specific for K+ (Kdp). The contributions of each of these K+ transport systems to cellular K+ homeostasis have not yet been defined conclusively. To verify the functionality of Kdp, kdp genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, where Kdp conferred K+ uptake, albeit with lower rates than were conferred by Ktr. An on-chip microfluidic device enabled monitoring of the biphasic initial volume recovery of single Synechocystis cells after hyperosmotic shock. Here, Ktr functioned as the primary K+ uptake system during the first recovery phase, whereas Kdp did not contribute significantly. The expression of the kdp operon in Synechocystis was induced by extracellular K+ depletion. Correspondingly, Kdp-mediated K+ uptake supported Synechocystis cell growth with trace amounts of external potassium. This induction of kdp expression depended on two adjacent genes, hik20 and rre19, encoding a putative two-component system. The circadian expression of kdp and ktr peaked at subjective dawn, which may support the acquisition of K+ required for the regular diurnal photosynthetic metabolism. These results indicate that Kdp contributes to the maintenance of a basal intracellular K+ concentration under conditions of limited K+ in natural environments, whereas Ktr mediates fast potassium movements in the presence of greater K+ availability. Through their distinct activities, both Ktr and Kdp coordinate the responses of Synechocystis to changes in K+ levels under fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:25313394

  16. Role of miR-155 at early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis induced by choline-deficient and amino acid defined diet in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Majumder, Sarmila; Nuovo, Gerard; Kutay, Huban; Volinia, Stefano; Patel, Tushar; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Croce, Carlo; Ghoshal, Kalpana; Jacob, Samson T.

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs are conserved, small (20–25 nucleotide) noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate expression of mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. Aberrant expression of certain microRNAs plays a causal role in tumorigenesis. Here, we report identification of hepatic microRNAs that are dysregulated at early stages of feeding C57BL/6 mice choline deficient and amino acid defined (CDAA) diet that is known to promote nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis after 84 weeks. Microarray analysis identified 30 hepatic microRNAs that are significantly (P≤0.01) altered in mice fed CDAA diet for 6, 18, 32 and 65 weeks compared to those fed choline sufficient and amino acid defined diet. Real-time RT-PCR analysis demonstrated upregulation of oncogenic miR-155, miR-221/222 and miR-21 and downregulation of the most abundant liver specific miR-122 at early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis. Western blot analysis showed reduced expression of hepatic PTEN and C/EBPβ respective targets of miR-21 and miR-155, in these mice at early stages. DNA binding activity of NF-kB that transactivates miR-155 gene was significantly (P=0.002) elevated in the liver nuclear extract of mice fed CDAA diet. Further, the expression of miR-155, as measured by in situ hybridization and real-time RT-PCR, correlated with diet-induced histopathological changes in the liver. Ectopic expression of miR-155 promoted growth of HCC cells whereas its depletion inhibited cell growth. Notably, miR-155 was significantly (P=0.0004) upregulated in primary human HCCs with concomitant decrease (P=0.02) in C/EBPβ level compared to matching liver tissues. Conclusion Temporal changes in microRNA profile occur at early stages of CDAA diet-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Reciprocal regulation of specific oncomirs and their tumor suppressor targets implicate their role in NASH-induced hepatocarcinogenesis and suggest their use in the diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of liver cancer. PMID:19711427

  17. Distinct Roles of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium CyaY and YggX Proteins in the Biosynthesis and Repair of Iron-Sulfur Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, Jyoti; Karlinsey, Joyce E.; Frawley, Elaine R.; Becker, Lynne A.; Nartea, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Labile [4Fe-4S]2+ clusters found at the active sites of many dehydratases are susceptible to damage by univalent oxidants that convert the clusters to an inactive [3Fe-4S]1+ form. Bacteria repair damaged clusters in a process that does not require de novo protein synthesis or the Isc and Suf cluster assembly pathways. The current study investigates the participation of the bacterial frataxin ortholog CyaY and the YggX protein, which are proposed to play roles in iron trafficking and iron-sulfur cluster repair. Previous reports found that individual mutations in cyaY or yggX were not associated with phenotypic changes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, suggesting that CyaY and YggX might have functionally redundant roles. However, we have found that individual mutations in cyaY or yggX confer enhanced susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, inactivation of the stm3944 open reading frame, which is located immediately upstream of cyaY and which encodes a putative inner membrane protein, dramatically enhances the hydrogen peroxide sensitivity of a cyaY mutant. Overexpression of STM3944 reduces the elevated intracellular free iron levels observed in an S. Typhimurium fur mutant and also reduces the total cellular iron content under conditions of iron overload, suggesting that the stm3944-encoded protein may mediate iron efflux. Mutations in cyaY and yggX have different effects on the activities of the iron-sulfur cluster-containing aconitase, serine deaminase, and NADH dehydrogenase I enzymes of S. Typhimurium under basal conditions or following recovery from oxidative stress. In addition, cyaY and yggX mutations have additive effects on 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase-dependent growth during nitrosative stress, and a cyaY mutation reduces Salmonella virulence in mice. Collectively, these results indicate that CyaY and YggX play distinct supporting roles in iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis

  18. Optimal Distinctiveness Signals Membership Trust.

    PubMed

    Leonardelli, Geoffrey J; Loyd, Denise Lewin

    2016-07-01

    According to optimal distinctiveness theory, sufficiently small minority groups are associated with greater membership trust, even among members otherwise unknown, because the groups are seen as optimally distinctive. This article elaborates on the prediction's motivational and cognitive processes and tests whether sufficiently small minorities (defined by relative size; for example, 20%) are associated with greater membership trust relative to mere minorities (45%), and whether such trust is a function of optimal distinctiveness. Two experiments, examining observers' perceptions of minority and majority groups and using minimal groups and (in Experiment 2) a trust game, revealed greater membership trust in minorities than majorities. In Experiment 2, participants also preferred joining minorities over more powerful majorities. Both effects occurred only when minorities were 20% rather than 45%. In both studies, perceptions of optimal distinctiveness mediated effects. Discussion focuses on the value of relative size and optimal distinctiveness, and when membership trust manifests. PMID:27140657

  19. The Atypical Occurrence of Two Biotin Protein Ligases in Francisella novicida Is Due to Distinct Roles in Virulence and Biotin Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Chin, Chui-Yoke; Chakravartty, Vandana; Gao, Rongsui; Crispell, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The physiological function of biotin requires biotin protein ligase activity in order to attach the coenzyme to its cognate proteins, which are enzymes involved in central metabolism. The model intracellular pathogen Francisella novicida is unusual in that it encodes two putative biotin protein ligases rather than the usual single enzyme. F. novicida BirA has a ligase domain as well as an N-terminal DNA-binding regulatory domain, similar to the prototypical BirA protein in E. coli. However, the second ligase, which we name BplA, lacks the N-terminal DNA binding motif. It has been unclear why a bacterium would encode these two disparate biotin protein ligases, since F. novicida contains only a single biotinylated protein. In vivo complementation and enzyme assays demonstrated that BirA and BplA are both functional biotin protein ligases, but BplA is a much more efficient enzyme. BirA, but not BplA, regulated transcription of the biotin synthetic operon. Expression of bplA (but not birA) increased significantly during F. novicida infection of macrophages. BplA (but not BirA) was required for bacterial replication within macrophages as well as in mice. These data demonstrate that F. novicida has evolved two distinct enzymes with specific roles; BplA possesses the major ligase activity, whereas BirA acts to regulate and thereby likely prevent wasteful synthesis of biotin. During infection BplA seems primarily employed to maximize the efficiency of biotin utilization without limiting the expression of biotin biosynthetic genes, representing a novel adaptation strategy that may also be used by other intracellular pathogens. PMID:26060274

  20. A study of the role of wetlands in defining spatial patterns of near-surface (top 1 m) soil carbon in the Northern Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, E. M.; Oliver, R.; Gedney, N.

    2014-12-01

    A study of two observation-based maps (the Harmonised World Soil Database, HWSD and the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database, NCSCD) of the surface (1 m) soil carbon in the Northern Latitudes (containing the Arctic and Boreal regions) reveal that, although the amounts of carbon estimated to be present in this region are very uncertain, the patterns are robust: both maps have soil carbon maxima that coincide with the major wetlands in the region, as described in the Global Lakes and Wetlands Database, GLWD. In fact, the relationship between near-surface soil carbon and the presence of wetlands is stronger than the relationship with soil temperature and vegetation productivity. These relationships are explored using the land surface model of the UK Hadley Centre GCM: JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator). The model is run to represent conditions at the end of the 20th century. Observed vegetation and phenology are used to define the vegetation, the physical properties of organic soils are represented, the fine-scale topography of the region is included in the parameterisation of the hydrology and as a result the GPP and location of the wetlands of the region are reasonably well simulated using JULES. Despite this, the soil carbon simulated by the model does not reveal the same patterns or the correlation with the wetland regions that are present in the data. This suggests that the model does not represent sufficiently strongly the suppression of heterotrophic respiration in saturated conditions. A simple adjustment to the JULES model was made whereby the heterotrophic respiration was reduced by the fraction of the grid that is modelled to be saturated. In effect, for the saturated areas the respiration was zero. This adjustment represents a simple experiment to establish the role of wetlands in defining the spatial patterns of near-surface soil carbon. The results were an improved predicted spatial pattern of soil carbon, with an increase in the

  1. A study of the role of wetlands in defining spatial patterns of near-surface (top 1m) soil carbon in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosby, B. J., Jr.; Blyth, E.; Oliver, R.; Gedney, N.

    2014-12-01

    A study of two observation-based maps (the Harmonised World Soil Database, HWSD and the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database, NCSCD) of the surface 1m of soil carbon in the Arctic reveal that, although the amounts of carbon estimated to be present in this region are very uncertain, the patterns are robust: both maps have soil carbon maxima that coincide with the major wetlands in the region, as described in the Global Lakes and Wetlands Database, the GLWD. In fact, the relationship between near-surface soil carbon and the presence of wetlands is stronger than the relationship with soil temperature and vegetation productivity. These relationships are explored using the land surface model of the UK Hadley Centre GCM: JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator). The model is run to represent conditions at the end of the 20thcentury. Observed vegetation and phenology are used to define the vegetation, the physical properties of organic soils are represented, the fine-scale topography of the region is included in the parameterisation of the hydrology and as a result the GPP and wetlands of the region are reasonably well simulated using JULES. Despite this, the soil carbon simulated by the model does not reveal the same patterns and correlation with the wetland regions that are present in the data. This suggests that the model does not represent sufficiently strongly the suppression of heterotrophic respiration by saturated conditions. A simple adjustment to the JULES model was made whereby the heterotrophic respiration was reduced by the fraction of the grid that is modelled to be saturated. In effect, for the saturated areas the respiration was zero. This adjustment represents a simple experiment to establish the role of wetlands in defining the spatial patterns of near-surface soil carbon. The results were an improved predicted spatial pattern of soil carbon, with an increase in the correlation between soil carbon and wetlands although not as strong as suggested

  2. Use of adhesion-defective mutants of Staphylococcus aureus to define the role of specific plasma proteins in promoting bacterial adhesion to canine arteriovenous shunts.

    PubMed Central

    Vaudaux, P E; François, P; Proctor, R A; McDevitt, D; Foster, T J; Albrecht, R M; Lew, D P; Wabers, H; Cooper, S L

    1995-01-01

    We used an ex vivo canine arteriovenous shunt model, previously developed to study plasma protein adsorption and thrombogenesis on polymeric biomaterials, to define the role of host proteins in promoting adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus. Either polyethylene or polyvinyl chloride tubings were exposed to canine blood for 5, 15, or 60 min at a flow rate of 300 ml/min and then were flushed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), cut into 1.5-cm segments, and stored at -70 degrees C. After thawing, each segment was preincubated in 0.5% albumin in PBS to prevent nonspecific staphylococcal attachment to surfaces that were not exposed to blood. Each segment was then incubated with 4 x 10(6) CFU of [3H]thymidine-labelled S. aureus per ml for 60 min at 37 degrees C in an in vitro adhesion assay. Two site-specific mutants of S. aureus were tested: one specifically defective in adhesion to surface-bound fibronectin (FnAd-def) and the other defective in adhesion to fibrinogen (FgAD-def) [corrected]. Compared with their respective parental strains, the FgAd-def, but not the FnAd-def, mutant of S. aureus showed a strong (> 80%) decrease in attachment to ex vivo tubings. The adhesion of each strain of S. aureus onto polyethylene was consistently more than twofold higher than the adhesion onto polyvinyl chloride segments exposed to flowing blood for 5 or 15 min, but adhesion became similar to that on polyvinyl chloride after 60 min of exposure. In conclusion, the specific adhesion-defective mutants of S. aureus suggested that fibrinogen was the most active adhesion-promoting protein in a short-term blood-material interaction. The experimental approach described in this study should prove useful for screening materials thought to be resistant to protein-mediated staphylococcal adhesion and colonization. PMID:7822026

  3. Tobacco bZIP transcription factor TGA2.2 and related factor TGA2.1 have distinct roles in plant defense responses and plant development.

    PubMed

    Thurow, Corinna; Schiermeyer, Andreas; Krawczyk, Stefanie; Butterbrodt, Thomas; Nickolov, Kaloian; Gatz, Christiane

    2005-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a crucial internal signaling molecule needed for the induction of plant defense responses upon attack of a variety of pathogens. Basic leucine zipper transcription factors of the TGA family bind to activating sequence-1 (as-1)-like elements which are SA-responsive cis elements found in promoters of 'immediate early' and 'late' SA-inducible genes. TGA2.2 constitutes the main component of tobacco as-1-binding factor-1 (ASF-1). TGA2.1, which differs from TGA2.2 by being able to activate transcription in yeast, constitutes a minor fraction of the complex. Both proteins interact with NPR1, a protein essential for SA inducibility of 'late' genes. Here we demonstrate using dsRNAi mediated gene silencing that reducing the amount of TGA2.2 and TGA2.1 correlates with a significant decrease in ASF-1 activity and with a decreased inducibility of both 'immediate early' and 'late' genes. In contrast, reducing the amount of TGA2.1 alone had no effect on the expression of these target genes suggesting that TGA2.1 is dispensable for SA-inducible gene expression from the as-1 element. Expression of a TGA2.2 mutant unable to form heterodimers with the endogenous pool of TGA factors led to reduced SA-inducibility of 'immediate early' gene Nt103, indicating that the native leucine zipper is important for the protein to act positively on transcription. Plants with reduced amounts of TGA2.1 developed petal like stamens indicating a regulatory role of TGA2.1 in defining organ identity in tobacco flowers. A model is suggested that unifies conflicting results on the function of tobacco TGA factors with respect to activation of the 'late' PR-1a promoter. PMID:16167899

  4. The role of pinning-points, marine ice and subglacial channeling in defining the buttressing strength of the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Reinhard; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Berger, Sophie; Callens, Denis; Favier, Lionel; Pattyn, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Within the coastal belt of Dronning Maud Land, many ice shelves, which are freely floating otherwise, reattach to localized highs in the bathymetry on the ice-shelf front. These localized pinning-points exert a buttressing force, which typically slows down the ice shelves farther upstream. Our interest is to quantify this buttressing effect, and to determine as to whether or not, the comparatively small pinning-points can play a decisive role in defining the mass balance of tributary glaciers. We consider the Roi Baudouin ice shelf, which is laterally confined by two large ice rises, and pinned on the ice-shelf front by a small ice rumple. It buttresses the western Ragnhild glacier. On the ice-shelf surface, satellite imagery reveals a number of elongated surface depressions, which are aligned along-flow and which correspond to a sub-ice shelf channeling system. We present the results of two consecutive field seasons which were geared at unraveling the combined effect of ice rumple and subice-shelf channels on the ice shelf's buttressing strength. Around 130 km of multi-frequency radar profiles map the channeling as well as the basal interface of the pinning-point. We observe strongly dipping internal layers within the surface depressions and a firmly grounded ice rumple. Data from a 20 x 25 km wide GNSS strain net is extended spatially on a 50 m grid with the help of satellite derived surface velocities. Six wide-angle radar surveys within the research grid show that the depth-averaged density varies spatially on scales that are smaller than the grid size in commonly applied Antarctic-wide firn densification models. The density variations are significant, and need to be taken into account when comparing the hydrostatically inverted GPS thickness with the measured radar thickness. Notwithstanding the ice-rumple's small extent (1-2 km), the combined strain rates show a shear zone which extends all the way back to the grounding line and emphasizes the importance of

  5. Defining the paramedic process.

    PubMed

    Carter, Holly; Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    The use of a 'process of care' is well established in several health professions, most evidently within the field of nursing. Now ingrained within methods of care delivery, it offers a logical approach to problem solving and ensures an appropriate delivery of interventions that are specifically suited to the individual patient. Paramedicine is a rapidly advancing profession despite a wide acknowledgement of limited research provisions. This frequently results in the borrowing of evidence from other disciplines. While this has often been useful, there are many concerns relating to the acceptable limit of evidence transcription between professions. To date, there is no formally recognised 'process of care'-defining activity within the pre-hospital arena. With much current focus on the professional classification of paramedic work, it is considered timely to formally define a formula that underpins other professional roles such as nursing. It is hypothesised that defined processes of care, particularly the nursing process, may have features that would readily translate to pre-hospital practice. The literature analysed was obtained through systematic searches of a range of databases, including Ovid MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health. The results demonstrated that the defined process of care provides nursing with more than just a structure for practice, but also has implications for education, clinical governance and professional standing. The current nursing process does not directly articulate to the complex and often unstructured role of the paramedic; however, it has many principles that offer value to the paramedic in their practice. Expanding the nursing process model to include the stages of Dispatch Considerations, Scene Assessment, First Impressions, Patient History, Physical Examination, Clinical Decision-Making, Interventions, Re-evaluation, Transport Decisions, Handover and Reflection would provide an appropriate model for pre

  6. Speciation without Pre-Defined Fitness Functions

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Robin; Golestani, Abbas; Hendry, Andrew P.; Cristescu, Melania E.

    2015-01-01

    The forces promoting and constraining speciation are often studied in theoretical models because the process is hard to observe, replicate, and manipulate in real organisms. Most models analyzed to date include pre-defined functions influencing fitness, leaving open the question of how speciation might proceed without these built-in determinants. To consider the process of speciation without pre-defined functions, we employ the individual-based ecosystem simulation platform EcoSim. The environment is initially uniform across space, and an evolving behavioural model then determines how prey consume resources and how predators consume prey. Simulations including natural selection (i.e., an evolving behavioural model that influences survival and reproduction) frequently led to strong and distinct phenotypic/genotypic clusters between which hybridization was low. This speciation was the result of divergence between spatially-localized clusters in the behavioural model, an emergent property of evolving ecological interactions. By contrast, simulations without natural selection (i.e., behavioural model turned off) but with spatial isolation (i.e., limited dispersal) produced weaker and overlapping clusters. Simulations without natural selection or spatial isolation (i.e., behaviour model turned off and high dispersal) did not generate clusters. These results confirm the role of natural selection in speciation by showing its importance even in the absence of pre-defined fitness functions. PMID:26372462

  7. China English: Its Distinctive Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Wei-dong; Dai, Wei-ping

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to expound that China English boasting its own distinctive features on the levels of phonology, words, sentences and discourse has been playing an irreplaceable role in intercultural activities, though still in its infancy and in the process of developing and perfecting itself, and it now makes every effort to move towards…

  8. The Managerial Roles of Community College Chief Academic Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Philip Wayne

    This study utilized Mintzberg's taxonomy of managerial roles to examine the roles performed by community college chief academic officers (CAOs). Mintzberg's taxonomy defines managerial roles as a set of behaviors and identifies 10 distinct roles: (1) figurehead; (2) leader; (3) liaison; (4) monitor; (5) disseminator; (6) spokesperson; (7)…

  9. The Role of Parieto-Occipital Junction in the Interaction between Dorsal and Ventral Streams in Disparity-Defined Near and Far Space Processing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychological and functional MRI data suggest that two functionally and anatomically dissociable streams of visual processing exist: a ventral perception-related stream and a dorsal action-related stream. However, relatively little is known about how the two streams interact in the intact brain during the production of adaptive behavior. Using functional MRI and a virtual three-dimensional paradigm, we aimed at examining whether the parieto-occipital junction (POJ) acts as an interface for the integration and processing of information between the dorsal and ventral streams in the near and far space processing. Virtual reality three-dimensional near and far space was defined by manipulating binocular disparity, with -68.76 arcmin crossed disparity for near space and +68.76 arcmin uncrossed disparity for near space. Our results showed that the POJ and bilateral superior occipital gyrus (SOG) showed relative increased activity when responded to targets presented in the near space than in the far space, which was independent of the retinotopic and perceived sizes of target. Furthermore, the POJ showed the enhanced functional connectivity with both the dorsal and ventral streams during the far space processing irrespective of target sizes, supporting that the POJ acts as an interface between the dorsal and ventral streams in disparity-defined near and far space processing. In contrast, the bilateral SOG showed the enhanced functional connectivity only with the ventral stream if retinotopic sizes of targets in the near and far spaces were matched, which suggested there was a functional dissociation between the POJ and bilateral SOG. PMID:26999674

  10. The Role of Parieto-Occipital Junction in the Interaction between Dorsal and Ventral Streams in Disparity-Defined Near and Far Space Processing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijun; Li, You; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychological and functional MRI data suggest that two functionally and anatomically dissociable streams of visual processing exist: a ventral perception-related stream and a dorsal action-related stream. However, relatively little is known about how the two streams interact in the intact brain during the production of adaptive behavior. Using functional MRI and a virtual three-dimensional paradigm, we aimed at examining whether the parieto-occipital junction (POJ) acts as an interface for the integration and processing of information between the dorsal and ventral streams in the near and far space processing. Virtual reality three-dimensional near and far space was defined by manipulating binocular disparity, with -68.76 arcmin crossed disparity for near space and +68.76 arcmin uncrossed disparity for near space. Our results showed that the POJ and bilateral superior occipital gyrus (SOG) showed relative increased activity when responded to targets presented in the near space than in the far space, which was independent of the retinotopic and perceived sizes of target. Furthermore, the POJ showed the enhanced functional connectivity with both the dorsal and ventral streams during the far space processing irrespective of target sizes, supporting that the POJ acts as an interface between the dorsal and ventral streams in disparity-defined near and far space processing. In contrast, the bilateral SOG showed the enhanced functional connectivity only with the ventral stream if retinotopic sizes of targets in the near and far spaces were matched, which suggested there was a functional dissociation between the POJ and bilateral SOG. PMID:26999674

  11. Functional characterization of a higher plant sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase: defining the role of sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Louise V; Zäuner, Simone; Markham, Jonathan E; Haslam, Richard P; Desikan, Radhika; Mugford, Sarah; Albrecht, Sandra; Warnecke, Dirk; Sperling, Petra; Heinz, E; Napier, Johnathan A

    2009-01-01

    The role of Delta4-unsaturated sphingolipid long-chain bases such as sphingosine was investigated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Identification and functional characterization of the sole Arabidopsis ortholog of the sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase was achieved by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. A P. pastoris mutant disrupted in the endogenous sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase gene was unable to synthesize glucosylceramides. Synthesis of glucosylceramides was restored by the expression of Arabidopsis gene At4g04930, and these sphingolipids were shown to contain Delta4-unsaturated long-chain bases, confirming that this open reading frame encodes the sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase. At4g04930 has a very restricted expression pattern, transcripts only being detected in pollen and floral tissues. Arabidopsis insertion mutants disrupted in the sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase At4g04930 were isolated and found to be phenotypically normal. Sphingolipidomic profiling of a T-DNA insertion mutant indicated the absence of Delta4-unsaturated sphingolipids in floral tissue, also resulting in the reduced accumulation of glucosylceramides. No difference in the response to drought or water loss was observed between wild-type plants and insertion mutants disrupted in the sphingolipid Delta4-desaturase At4g04930, nor was any difference observed in stomatal closure after treatment with abscisic acid. No differences in pollen viability between wild-type plants and insertion mutants were detected. Based on these observations, it seems unlikely that Delta4-unsaturated sphingolipids and their metabolites such as sphingosine-1-phosphate play a significant role in Arabidopsis growth and development. However, Delta4-unsaturated ceramides may play a previously unrecognized role in the channeling of substrates for the synthesis of glucosylceramides. PMID:18978071

  12. Functional Characterization of a Higher Plant Sphingolipid Δ4-Desaturase: Defining the Role of Sphingosine and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, Louise V.; Zäuner, Simone; Markham, Jonathan E.; Haslam, Richard P.; Desikan, Radhika; Mugford, Sarah; Albrecht, Sandra; Warnecke, Dirk; Sperling, Petra; Heinz, E.; Napier, Johnathan A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of Δ4-unsaturated sphingolipid long-chain bases such as sphingosine was investigated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Identification and functional characterization of the sole Arabidopsis ortholog of the sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase was achieved by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. A P. pastoris mutant disrupted in the endogenous sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase gene was unable to synthesize glucosylceramides. Synthesis of glucosylceramides was restored by the expression of Arabidopsis gene At4g04930, and these sphingolipids were shown to contain Δ4-unsaturated long-chain bases, confirming that this open reading frame encodes the sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase. At4g04930 has a very restricted expression pattern, transcripts only being detected in pollen and floral tissues. Arabidopsis insertion mutants disrupted in the sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase At4g04930 were isolated and found to be phenotypically normal. Sphingolipidomic profiling of a T-DNA insertion mutant indicated the absence of Δ4-unsaturated sphingolipids in floral tissue, also resulting in the reduced accumulation of glucosylceramides. No difference in the response to drought or water loss was observed between wild-type plants and insertion mutants disrupted in the sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase At4g04930, nor was any difference observed in stomatal closure after treatment with abscisic acid. No differences in pollen viability between wild-type plants and insertion mutants were detected. Based on these observations, it seems unlikely that Δ4-unsaturated sphingolipids and their metabolites such as sphingosine-1-phosphate play a significant role in Arabidopsis growth and development. However, Δ4-unsaturated ceramides may play a previously unrecognized role in the channeling of substrates for the synthesis of glucosylceramides. PMID:18978071

  13. TIMELESS Forms a Complex with PARP1 Distinct from Its Complex with TIPIN and Plays a Role in the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Young, Lauren M; Marzio, Antonio; Perez-Duran, Pablo; Reid, Dylan A; Meredith, Daniel N; Roberti, Domenico; Star, Ayelet; Rothenberg, Eli; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Pagano, Michele

    2015-10-20

    PARP1 is the main sensor of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA and, in building chains of poly(ADP-ribose), promotes the recruitment of many downstream signaling and effector proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR). We show a robust physical interaction between PARP1 and the replication fork protein TIMELESS, distinct from the known TIMELESS-TIPIN complex, which activates the intra-S phase checkpoint. TIMELESS recruitment to laser-induced sites of DNA damage is dependent on its binding to PARP1, but not PARP1 activity. We also find that the PARP1-TIMELESS complex contains a number of established PARP1 substrates, and TIMELESS mutants unable to bind PARP1 are impaired in their ability to bind PARP1 substrates. Further, PARP1 binding to certain substrates and their recruitment to DNA damage lesions is impaired by TIMELESS knockdown, and TIMELESS silencing significantly impairs DNA double-strand break repair. We hypothesize that TIMELESS cooperates in the PARP1-mediated DDR. PMID:26456830

  14. ALL2, a Homologue of ALL1, Has a Distinct Role in Regulating pH Homeostasis in the Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neena; Bouklas, Tejas; Gupta, Anjali; Varshney, Avanish K.; Orner, Erika P.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular fungal pathogen that has a polysaccharide capsule and causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Its capsule, as well as its ability to survive in the acidic environment of the phagolysosome, contributes to the pathogen's resilience in the host environment. Previously, we reported that downregulation of allergen 1 (ALL1) results in the secretion of a shorter, more viscous exopolysaccharide with less branching and structural complexity, as well as altered iron homeostasis. Now, we report on a homologous coregulated gene, allergen 2 (ALL2). ALL2's function was characterized by generating null mutants in C. neoformans. In contrast to ALL1, loss of ALL2 attenuated virulence in the pulmonary infection model. The all2Δ mutant shed a less viscous exopolysaccharide and exhibited higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide than the wild type, and as a result, the all2Δ mutant was more resistant to macrophage-mediated killing. Transcriptome analysis further supported the distinct function of these two genes. Unlike ALL1's involvement in iron homeostasis, we now present data on ALL2's unique function in maintaining intracellular pH in low-pH conditions. Thus, our data highlight that C. neoformans, a human-pathogenic basidiomycete, has evolved a unique set of virulence-associated genes that contributes to its resilience in the human niche. PMID:26597983

  15. The role of personality in social identity: effects of field-dependence and context on reactions to threat to group distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Yonat; Nadler, Arie

    2007-10-01

    This article examines the role of personality dispositions as determinants of people's reactions to threats to social identity. It is argued that since individuals characterized as high field-dependents have a greater tendency to anchor their identity in the social group than low field-dependents, they will be more affected by threats to social identity, especially when the context is framed as an intergroup context. Threat to social identity was manipulated by inducing intergroup similarity, and intergroup differentiation was measured. The first experiment assessed the hypothesis with minimal groups. The second experiment assessed it with real groups (two rival schools). Findings provided support for the hypotheses. The discussion centers on the role of personality dispositions in the social identity perspective. PMID:17760852

  16. On the road to value co-creation in health care: the role of consumers in defining the destination, planning the journey and sharing the drive.

    PubMed

    Janamian, Tina; Crossland, Lisa; Wells, Leanne

    2016-04-18

    The role of consumers is now extending beyond being passive health care recipients and even active participants in their own care to involvement in innovation and value co-creation in health care - from being "users and choosers" to becoming "makers and shapers" of services. For active dialogue to occur in co-creation, consumers must become equal partners with health care organisations and providers, with the focus on areas of interest to all parties. The use of value co-creation in health care involves embedding the approach across the whole health care system - from the microsystem level to the mesosystem and the entire macrosystem. PMID:27078786

  17. Membership of Defined Responses in Stimulus Classes

    PubMed Central

    Lionello-DeNolf, Karen M.; Braga-Kenyon, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Sidman (2000) has suggested that in addition to conditional and discriminative stimuli, class-consistent defined responses can also become part of an equivalence class. In the current study, this assertion was tested using a mixed-schedule procedure that allowed defined response patterns to be “presented” as samples in the absence of different occasioning stimuli. Four typically developing adults were first trained to make distinct response topographies to two visual color stimuli, and then were taught to match those color stimuli to two different form-sample stimuli in a matching task. Three separate tests were given in order to determine whether training had established two classes each comprised of a response, a color, and a form: a form-response test in which the forms were presented to test if the participants would make differential responses to them; and two response-matching tests to test if the participants would match visual stimulus comparisons to response-pattern samples. Three of the four participants showed class-consistent responding in the tests, although some participants needed additional training prior to passing the tests. In general, the data indicated that the different response patterns had entered into a class with the visual stimuli. These results add to a growing literature on the role of class-consistent responding in stimulus class formation, and provide support for the notion that differential responses themselves can become a part of an equivalence class. PMID:24778458

  18. Co-immunoprecipitation with Tau Isoform-specific Antibodies Reveals Distinct Protein Interactions and Highlights a Putative Role for 2N Tau in Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Song, Xiaomin; Nisbet, Rebecca; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Alternative splicing generates multiple isoforms of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, but little is known about their specific function. In the adult mouse brain, three Tau isoforms are expressed that contain either 0, 1, or 2 N-terminal inserts (0N, 1N, and 2N). We generated Tau isoform-specific antibodies and performed co-immunoprecipitations followed by tandem mass tag multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified novel Tau-interacting proteins of which one-half comprised membrane-bound proteins, localized to the plasma membrane, mitochondria, and other organelles. Tau was also found to interact with proteins involved in presynaptic signal transduction. MetaCore analysis revealed one major Tau interaction cluster that contained 33 Tau pulldown proteins. To explore the pathways in which these proteins are involved, we conducted an ingenuity pathway analysis that revealed two significant overlapping pathways, "cell-to-cell signaling and interaction" and "neurological disease." The functional enrichment tool DAVID showed that in particular the 2N Tau-interacting proteins were specifically associated with neurological disease. Finally, for a subset of Tau interactions (apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apoE, mitochondrial creatine kinase U-type, β-synuclein, synaptogyrin-3, synaptophysin, syntaxin 1B, synaptotagmin, and synapsin 1), we performed reverse co-immunoprecipitations, confirming the preferential interaction of specific isoforms. For example, apoA1 displayed a 5-fold preference for the interaction with 2N, whereas β-synuclein showed preference for 0N. Remarkably, a reverse immunoprecipitation with apoA1 detected only the 2N isoform. This highlights distinct protein interactions of the different Tau isoforms, suggesting that they execute different functions in brain tissue. PMID:26861879

  19. Roles of VP4 and NSP1 in determining the distinctive replication capacities of simian rotavirus RRV and bovine rotavirus UK in the mouse biliary tract.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ningguo; Sen, Adrish; Wolf, Marie; Vo, Phuoc; Hoshino, Yasutaka; Greenberg, Harry B

    2011-03-01

    Rotavirus replication and virulence are strongly influenced by virus strain and host species. The rotavirus proteins VP3, VP4, VP7, NSP1, and NSP4 have all been implicated in strain and species restriction of replication; however, the mechanisms have not been fully determined. Simian (RRV) and bovine (UK) rotaviruses have distinctive replication capacities in mouse extraintestinal organs such as the biliary tract. Using reassortants between UK and RRV, we previously demonstrated that the differential replication of these viruses in mouse embryonic fibroblasts is determined by the respective NSP1 proteins, which differ substantially in their abilities to degrade interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and suppress the type I IFN response. In this study, we used an in vivo model of rotavirus infection of mouse gallbladder with UK × RRV reassortants to study the genetic and mechanistic basis of systemic rotavirus replication. We found that the low-replication phenotype of UK in biliary tissues was conferred by UK VP4 and that the high-replication phenotype of RRV was conferred by RRV VP4 and NSP1. Viruses with RRV VP4 entered cultured mouse cholangiocytes more efficiently than did those with UK VP4. Reassortants with RRV VP4 and UK NSP1 genes induced high levels of expression of IRF3-dependent p54 in biliary tissues, and their replication was increased 3-fold in IFN-α/β and -γ receptor or STAT1 knockout (KO) mice compared to wild-type mice. Our data indicate that systemic rotavirus strain-specific replication in the murine biliary tract is determined by both viral entry mediated by VP4 and viral antagonism of the host innate immune response mediated by NSP1. PMID:21191030

  20. Co-immunoprecipitation with Tau Isoform-specific Antibodies Reveals Distinct Protein Interactions and Highlights a Putative Role for 2N Tau in Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Song, Xiaomin; Nisbet, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates multiple isoforms of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, but little is known about their specific function. In the adult mouse brain, three Tau isoforms are expressed that contain either 0, 1, or 2 N-terminal inserts (0N, 1N, and 2N). We generated Tau isoform-specific antibodies and performed co-immunoprecipitations followed by tandem mass tag multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified novel Tau-interacting proteins of which one-half comprised membrane-bound proteins, localized to the plasma membrane, mitochondria, and other organelles. Tau was also found to interact with proteins involved in presynaptic signal transduction. MetaCore analysis revealed one major Tau interaction cluster that contained 33 Tau pulldown proteins. To explore the pathways in which these proteins are involved, we conducted an ingenuity pathway analysis that revealed two significant overlapping pathways, “cell-to-cell signaling and interaction” and “neurological disease.” The functional enrichment tool DAVID showed that in particular the 2N Tau-interacting proteins were specifically associated with neurological disease. Finally, for a subset of Tau interactions (apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apoE, mitochondrial creatine kinase U-type, β-synuclein, synaptogyrin-3, synaptophysin, syntaxin 1B, synaptotagmin, and synapsin 1), we performed reverse co-immunoprecipitations, confirming the preferential interaction of specific isoforms. For example, apoA1 displayed a 5-fold preference for the interaction with 2N, whereas β-synuclein showed preference for 0N. Remarkably, a reverse immunoprecipitation with apoA1 detected only the 2N isoform. This highlights distinct protein interactions of the different Tau isoforms, suggesting that they execute different functions in brain tissue. PMID:26861879

  1. Distinct Roles for the α, β and γ1 isoforms of Protein Phosphatase 1 in the Outside-in αIIbβ3 Integrin Signaling Dependent Functions

    PubMed Central

    Alrehani, Nawaf; Pradhan, Subhashree; Khatlani, Tanvir; Kailasam, Lavanya; Vijayan, K. Vinod

    2013-01-01

    Although protein kinases and phosphatases participate in integrin αIIbβ3 signaling, whether integrin functions are regulated by the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) isoforms are unclear. We show that siRNA mediated knockdown of all PP1c isoforms (α, β and γ1) in 293 αIIbβ3 cells decreased adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen and fibrin clot retraction. Selective knockdown of only PP1cγ1 did not alter adhesion or clot retraction, while depletion of PP1cβ decreased both functions. Unexpectedly, knockdown of PP1cα enhanced αIIbβ3 adhesion to fibrinogen and clot retraction. Protein interaction studies revealed that all PP1c isoforms can interact with the integrin αIIb subunit. Phosphoprofiling studies revealed an enhanced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 in the PP1cα depleted cells. Enhanced adhesive phenotype displayed by the PP1cα depleted 293 αIIbβ3 cells was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of p38. Conversely, the decreased adhesion of PP1cα overexpressing cells was rescued by the expression of constitutively active p38α or p38γ. Thus, PP1c isoforms have distinct contribution to the outside-in αIIbβ3 signaling-dependent functions in 293 αIIbβ3 cells. Moreover, PP1cα negatively regulates integrin function by suppressing the p38 pathway. PMID:23197154

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Possesses Two Putative Type I Signal Peptidases, LepB and PA1303, Each with Distinct Roles in Physiology and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Ruth S.; Rangarajan, Minnie; Aduse-Opoku, Joseph; Hashim, Ahmed; Curtis, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Type I signal peptidases (SPases) cleave signal peptides from proteins during translocation across biological membranes and hence play a vital role in cellular physiology. SPase activity is also of fundamental importance to the pathogenesis of infection for many bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which utilizes a variety of secreted virulence factors, such as proteases and toxins. P. aeruginosa possesses two noncontiguous SPase homologues, LepB (PA0768) and PA1303, which share 43% amino acid identity. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR showed that both proteases were expressed, while a FRET-based assay using a peptide based on the signal sequence cleavage region of the secreted LasB elastase showed that recombinant LepB and PA1303 enzymes were both active. LepB is positioned within a genetic locus that resembles the locus containing the extensively characterized SPase of E. coli and is of similar size and topology. It was also shown to be essential for viability and to have high sequence identity with SPases from other pseudomonads (≥78%). In contrast, PA1303, which is small for a Gram-negative SPase (20 kDa), was found to be dispensable. Mutation of PA1303 resulted in an altered protein secretion profile and increased N-butanoyl homoserine lactone production and influenced several quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypic traits, including swarming motility and the production of rhamnolipid and elastinolytic activity. The data indicate different cellular roles for these P. aeruginosa SPase paralogues; the role of PA1303 is integrated with the quorum-sensing cascade and includes the suppression of virulence factor secretion and virulence-associated phenotypes, while LepB is the primary SPase. PMID:22730125

  3. A task-based approach to defining the role of the nurse practitioner: the views of UK acute and primary sector nurses.

    PubMed

    Hicks, C; Hennessy, D

    1999-03-01

    There exists within the United Kingdom considerable confusion relating to the definition and occupational boundaries of the nurse practitioner (NP). In consequence, the clinical practice and training of the NP remain unregulated, unstandardized and heavily dependent on local forces. Such a situation is regrettable, particularly in view of the potential value the nurse practitioner has for health care provision and also for influencing national policy decisions. It is conceivable that one reason for the current failure to reach agreement over the role definition of the nurse practitioner relates to the fact that their essential job functions depend upon the context in which the nurse practitioner operates, with primary-based practice differing from acute sector service delivery in sufficient critical ways as to make a generic, inclusive definition impossible. To investigate the veracity of this view, two cohorts of United Kingdom nurses were sampled, one of which worked within the acute sector (n = 49) and the other in the community (n = 420). These groups were surveyed using a unique training needs analysis instrument that had been developed along formal psychometric principles. Both groups perceived advanced clinical activities, including examination and diagnosis, and a range of research activities to be central to the role of the nurse practitioner. The primary sample, however, reported business and management activities as essential tasks, while the acute sector nurses regarded high levels of communication skills, autonomy and risk management to be more important. The implications of the similarities and differences between the two data sets are discussed with reference to different clinical domains. PMID:10210464

  4. Distinct roles of NF-{kappa}B p50 in the regulation of acetaminophen-induced inflammatory mediator production and hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dambach, Donna M.; Durham, Stephen K.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L. . E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu

    2006-03-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. In addition to inducing direct cellular damage, oxidants can activate transcription factors including NF-{kappa}B, which regulate the production of inflammatory mediators implicated in hepatotoxicity. Here, we investigated the role of APAP-induced oxidative stress and NF-{kappa}B in inflammatory mediator production. Treatment of mice with APAP (300 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increased serum aminotransferase levels. This was correlated with depletion of hepatic glutathione and CuZn superoxide dismutase (SOD). APAP administration also increased expression of the proinflammatory mediators, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}), macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and KC/gro, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10). Pretreatment of mice with the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevented APAP-induced depletion of glutathione and CuZnSOD, as well as hepatotoxicity. NAC also abrogated APAP-induced increases in TNF{alpha}, KC/gro, and IL-10, but augmented expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) and transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF{beta}). No effects were observed on IL-1{beta} or MCP-1 expression. To determine if NF-{kappa}B plays a role in regulating mediator production, we used transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the gene for NF-{kappa}B p50. As observed with NAC pretreatment, the loss of NF-{kappa}B p50 was associated with decreased ability of APAP to upregulate TNF{alpha}, KC/gro, and IL-10 expression and increased expression of IL-4 and TGF{beta}. However, in contrast to NAC pretreatment, the loss of p50 had no effect on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. These data demonstrate that APAP-induced cytokine expression in the liver is influenced by oxidative stress and that this is dependent, in part, on NF-{kappa}B. However, NF-{kappa}B p50

  5. Impact of Iymph node metastases identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer: potential role of BRAFV600E mutation in defining CND

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Ali S; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-01-01

    The impact of metastasized cervical lymph nodes (CLN) identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence/persistence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and the extent of CND needed to reduce recurrence/persistence have not been firmly established. To assess the impact of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation on the recurrence/persistence of PTC and the potential of BRAF mutation in assisting CND, we analysed data of 379 consecutive patients with PTC who underwent thyroidectomy with (n=243) or without CND (n=136) at a tertiary-care academic hospital during the period 2001–2010 for their clinicopathological outcomes and BRAF mutation status. Increasingly aggressive tumor characteristics were found as the extent of CND was advanced following conventional risk criteria from non-CND to limited CND to formal CND. Disease recurrence/persistence rate also sharply rose from 4.7% to 15.7% and 40.5% in these CND settings respectively (P<0.0001). CLN metastasis rate rose from 18.0 to 77.3% from limited CND to formal CND (P<0.0001). An increasing rate of BRAF mutation was also found from less to more extensive CND. A strong association of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation with disease recurrence/persistence was revealed on Kaplan– Meier analysis and BRAF mutation strongly predicted CLN metastasis. CLN metastases found on CND are closely associated with disease recurrence/persistence of PTC, which are both strongly predicted by BRAF mutation. Current selection of PTC patients for CND is appropriate but higher extent of the procedure, once selected, is needed to reduce disease recurrence, which may be defined by combination use of preoperative BRAF mutation testing and conventional risk factors of PTC. PMID:23132792

  6. Distinct roles of L- and T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in regulation of lymphatic vessel contractile activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stewart; Roizes, Simon; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Lymph drainage maintains tissue fluid homeostasis and facilitates immune response. It is promoted by phasic contractions of collecting lymphatic vessels through which lymph is propelled back into the blood circulation. This rhythmic contractile activity (i.e. lymphatic pumping) increases in rate with increase in luminal pressure and relies on activation of nifedipine-sensitive voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs). Despite their importance, these channels have not been characterized in lymphatic vessels. We used pressure- and wire-myography as well as intracellular microelectrode electrophysiology to characterize the pharmacological and electrophysiological properties of L-type and T-type VDCCs in rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels and evaluated their particular role in the regulation of lymphatic pumping by stretch. We complemented our study with PCR and confocal immunofluorescence imaging to investigate the expression and localization of these channels in lymphatic vessels. Our data suggest a delineating role of VDCCs in stretch-induced lymphatic vessel contractions, as the stretch-induced increase in force of lymphatic vessel contractions was significantly attenuated in the presence of L-type VDCC blockers nifedipine and diltiazem, while the stretch-induced increase in contraction frequency was significantly decreased by the T-type VDCC blockers mibefradil and nickel. The latter effect was correlated with a hyperpolarization. We propose that activation of T-type VDCCs depolarizes membrane potential, regulating the frequency of lymphatic contractions via opening of L-type VDCCs, which drive the strength of contractions. PMID:25326448

  7. Role of hypoxia and HIF2α in development of the sympathoadrenal cell lineage and chromaffin cell tumours with distinct catecholamine phenotypic features

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Susan; Qin, Nan; Pacak, Karel; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia has wide-ranging impact in normal physiology and disease processes. This stimulus evokes changes in gene expression mediated by transcription factors termed hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) that affect numerous processes: angiogenesis, cell survival, cellular metabolism, stem cell self- renewal and multipotency, migration, invasiveness and metastatic progression in tumour cells. Over the past decade increasing numbers of reports have emerged documenting differential roles of HIF1α and HIF2α in these processes. In cells of the sympathoadrenal lineage both HIFs differentially mediate influences of hypoxia on catecholamine synthesis and secretion, but HIF2α signalling has particularly prominent functions in regulating developmental processes of growth and differentiation. This article discusses the role of HIF2α and HIF1α in the context of the development, phenotypic features and functions of chromaffin cells. Moreover, current knowledge about tumour formation in cells of the sympathoadrenal lineage, leading to catecholamine producing pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas, is analysed in the light of the HIF2α signalling network. PMID:24054150

  8. The differential characterization of GPR55 receptor in human peripheral blood reveals a distinctive expression in monocytes and NK cells and a proinflammatory role in these innate cells.

    PubMed

    Chiurchiù, Valerio; Lanuti, Mirko; De Bardi, Marco; Battistini, Luca; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-03-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is activated by endogenous, plant-derived and synthetic cannabinoids. Recent studies reported a broad tissue distribution for GPR55 and found prominent roles for this receptor in inflammatory pain, gut and bone physiology, as well as cancer. However, little is known about the expression and function of GPR55 in immune cells. To address this question, we performed a detailed characterization of GPR55 in different human innate and adaptive immune populations using polychromatic flow cytometry and we found that monocytes and NK cells expressed remarkable levels of this receptor compared to several cells of adaptive immunity. GPR55 activation by the specific agonist O-1602 boosted IL-12 and TNF-α production, and decreased endocytic activity, in LPS-activated monocytes. In addition, it increased CD69 activation marker expression, granzyme B and CD107a-dependent cytotoxicity and IFN-γ and TNF-α production in NK cells activated by both IL-2 and IL-12. These over-stimulatory effects of GPR55 were antagonized by its selective antagonist cannabidiol. Altogether, our data thus unveil a proinflammatory role for GPR55 in innate immunity that may be important for the design of new immune therapeutic strategies. PMID:25344934

  9. Critical and Distinct Roles of p16 and Telomerase in Regulating the Proliferative Life Span of Normal Human Prostate Epithelial Progenitor Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Bobby; Jiang, Ming; Suraneni, Mahipal; Patrawala, Lubna; Badeaux, Mark; Schneider-Broussard, Robin; Multani, Asha S.; Jeter, Collene R.; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Hu, Limei; Hu, Jianhua; Tsavachidis, Spiridon; Zhang, Wei; Chang, Sandy; Hayward, Simon W.; Tang, Dean G.

    2008-01-01

    Normal human prostate (NHP) epithelial cells undergo senescence in vitro and in vivo, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that the senescence of primary NHP cells, which are immunophenotyped as intermediate basal-like cells expressing progenitor cell markers CD44, α2β1, p63, hTERT, and CK5/CK18, involves loss of telomerase expression, up-regulation of p16, and activation of p53. Using genetically defined manipulations of these three signaling pathways, we show that p16 is the primary determinant of the NHP cell proliferative capacity and that hTERT is required for unlimited proliferative life span. Hence, suppression of p16 significantly extends NHP cell life span, but both p16 inhibition and hTERT are required to immortalize NHP cells. Importantly, immortalized NHP cells retain expression of most progenitor markers, demonstrate gene expression profiles characteristic of proliferating progenitor cells, and possess multilineage differentiation potential generating functional prostatic glands. Our studies shed important light on the molecular mechanisms regulating the proliferative life span of NHP progenitor cells. PMID:18662989

  10. Defining the role of a FYVE domain in the localization and activity of a cAMP phosphodiesterase implicated in osmoregulation in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Schoijet, Alejandra C; Miranda, Kildare; Medeiros, Lia Carolina Soares; de Souza, Wanderley; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Torres, Héctor N; Pignataro, Omar P; Docampo, Roberto; Alonso, Guillermo D

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotide second messengers are regulated predominantly by a large superfamily of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, encodes four different PDE families. One of these PDEs, T. cruzi PDE C2 (TcrPDEC2) has been characterized as a FYVE domain containing protein. Here, we report a novel role for TcrPDEC2 in osmoregulation in T. cruzi and reveal the relevance of its FYVE domain. Our data show that treatment of epimastigotes with TcrPDEC2 inhibitors improves their regulatory volume decrease, whereas cells overexpressing this enzyme are unaffected by the same inhibitors. Consistent with these results, TcrPDEC2 localizes to the contractile vacuole complex, showing strong labelling in the region corresponding to the spongiome. Furthermore, transgenic parasites overexpressing a truncated version of TcrPDEC2 without the FYVE domain show a failure in its targeting to the contractile vacuole complex and a marked decrease in PDE activity, supporting the importance of this domain to the localization and activity of TcrPDEC2. Taking together, the results here presented are consistent with the importance of the cyclic AMP signalling pathway in regulatory volume decrease and implicate TcrPDEC2 as a specifically localized PDE involved in osmoregulation in T. cruzi. PMID:21166893

  11. The role of genes and environment in shaping co-occurrence of DSM-IV defined anxiety dimensions among Italian twins aged 8-17.

    PubMed

    Ogliari, Anna; Spatola, Chiara A; Pesenti-Gritti, Paola; Medda, Emanuela; Penna, Luana; Stazi, Maria Antonietta; Battaglia, Marco; Fagnani, Corrado

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated the ultimate causes of co-variation between symptoms of four common DSM-IV anxiety dimensions - Generalized Anxiety, Panic, Social Phobia and Separation Anxiety disorder - assessed with the Italian version of the Screen for Child Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorders questionnaire in a sample of 378 twin pairs aged 8-17 from the population-based Italian Twin Register. Genetic and environmental proportions of covariance between the targeted anxiety dimensions were estimated by multivariate twin analyses. Genetic influences (explaining from 58% to 99% of covariance) and unique environmental factors were the sole sources of co-variation for all phenotypes under study. Genetic influences associated with different anxiety dimensions coincide remarkably, as indicated by genetic correlations ranging from 0.40 to 0.61, while unique environmental overlap is less substantial. Thus, while additive genetic effects are important in explaining why children report symptoms from multiple anxiety disorders, environmental idiosyncratic factors seem to play a marginal role in shaping the co-occurrence of different anxiety dimensions in childhood. PMID:20223633

  12. Role of glass structure in defining the chemical dissolution behavior, bioactivity and antioxidant properties of zinc and strontium co-doped alkali-free phosphosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Saurabh; Goel, Ashutosh; Tilocca, Antonio; Dhuna, Vikram; Bhatia, Gaurav; Dhuna, Kshitija; Ferreira, José M F

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the structure-property relationships in a series of alkali-free phosphosilicate glass compositions co-doped with Zn(2+) and Sr(2+). The emphasis was laid on understanding the structural role of Sr(2+) and Zn(2+) co-doping on the chemical dissolution behavior of glasses and its impact on their in vitro bioactivity. The structure of glasses was studied using molecular dynamics simulations in combination with solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The relevant structural properties are then linked to the observed degradation behavior, in vitro bioactivity, osteoblast proliferation and oxidative stress levels. The apatite-forming ability of glasses has been investigated by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy after immersion of glass powders/bulk in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1h and 14 days, while their chemical degradation has been studied in Tris-HCl in accordance with ISO 10993-14. All the glasses exhibit hydroxyapatite formation on their surface within 1-3h of their immersion in SBF. The cellular responses were observed in vitro on bulk glass samples using human osteosarcoma MG63 cell line. The dose-dependent cytoprotective effect of glasses with respect to the concentration of zinc and strontium released from the glasses is also discussed. PMID:24709542

  13. WW domains of Rsp5p define different functions: determination of roles in fluid phase and uracil permease endocytosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, B; Kamińska, J; Jesionowska, A; Martin, N C; Hopper, A K; Zoładek, T

    2001-01-01

    Rsp5p, ubiquitin-protein ligase, an enzyme of the ubiquitination pathway, contains three WW domains that mediate protein-protein interactions. To determine if these domains adapt Rsp5p to a subset of substrates involved in numerous cellular processes, we generated mutations in individual or combinations of the WW domains. The rsp5-w1, rsp5-w2, and rsp5-w3 mutant alleles complement RSP5 deletions at 30 degrees. Thus, individual WW domains are not essential. Each rsp5-w mutation caused temperature-sensitive growth. Among variants with mutations in multiple WW domains, only rsp5-w1w2 complemented the deletion. Thus, the WW3 domain is sufficient for Rsp5p essential functions. To determine whether rsp5-w mutations affect endocytosis, fluid phase and uracil permease (Fur4p) endocytosis was examined. The WW3 domain is important for both processes. WW2 appears not to be important for fluid phase endocytosis whereas it is important for Fur4p endocytosis. In contrast, the WW1 domain affects fluid phase endocytosis, but it does not appear to function in Fur4p endocytosis. Thus, various WW domains play different roles in the endocytosis of these two substrates. Rsp5p is located in the cytoplasm in a punctate pattern that does not change during the cell cycle. Altering WW domains does not change the location of Rsp5p. PMID:11139494

  14. Common and distinct roles for the binding partners Rabenosyn-5 and Vps45 in the regulation of endocytic trafficking in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Rahajeng, Juliati; Caplan, Steve; Naslavsky, Naava

    2010-01-01

    In several invertebrate organisms, the Sec1p/Munc18-like protein Vps45 interacts with the divalent Rab4/Rab5 effector, Rabenosyn-5 and carries out multiple functions in the endocytic/secretory pathways. In mammalian cells, Vps45 and Rabenosyn-5 also interact, but the molecular characterization of this binding, and the functional relationship between these two proteins has not been well defined. Here we identify a novel sequence within Rabenosyn-5 required for its interaction with Vps45. We demonstrate that hVps45-depletion decreases expression of Rabenosyn-5, likely resulting from Rabenosyn-5 degradation through the proteasomal pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that similar to Rabenosyn-5-depletion, hVps45-depletion causes impaired recycling of β1 integrins, and a subsequent delay in human fibroblast cell migration on fibronectin-coated plates. Moreover, β1 integrin recycling could be rescued by reintroduction of siRNA-resistant wild-type Rabenosyn-5, but not a mutant deficient in Vps45 binding. However, unlike Rabenosyn-5-depletion, which induces Golgi fragmentation and decreased recruitment of sorting nexin retromer subunits to the Golgi, hVps45-depletion induces Golgi condensation and accumulation of retromer subunits in the vicinity of the Golgi. In part, these phenomena could be attributed to reduced Syntaxin16 expression and altered localization of both Syntaxin16 and Syntaxin6 upon Vps45-depletion. Overall, these findings implicate hVps45 and Rabenosyn-5 in post early endosome transport, and we propose that their interaction serves as a nexus to promote bidirectional transport along the endosome-to-recycling compartment and endosome-to-Golgi axes. PMID:19931244

  15. Defining the Metabolic Functions and Roles in Virulence of the rpoN1 and rpoN2 Genes in Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Benjamin R; Connolly, Morgan P; Choudhary, Pratibha; Brookins-Little, Tiffany S; Chatterjee, Snigdha; Raina, Ramesh; Nomura, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN is a unique regulator found among bacteria. It controls numerous processes that range from basic metabolism to more complex functions such as motility and nitrogen fixation. Our current understanding of RpoN function is largely derived from studies on prototypical bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. Although the extent and necessity of RpoN-dependent functions differ radically between these model organisms, each bacterium depends on a single chromosomal rpoN gene to meet the cellular demands of RpoN regulation. The bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is often recognized for being the causative agent of wilt disease in crops, including banana, peanut and potato. However, this plant pathogen is also one of the few bacterial species whose genome possesses dual rpoN genes. To determine if the rpoN genes in this bacterium are genetically redundant and interchangeable, we constructed and characterized ΔrpoN1, ΔrpoN2 and ΔrpoN1 ΔrpoN2 mutants of R. solanacearum GMI1000. It was found that growth on a small range of metabolites, including dicarboxylates, ethanol, nitrate, ornithine, proline and xanthine, were dependent on only the rpoN1 gene. Furthermore, the rpoN1 gene was required for wilt disease on tomato whereas rpoN2 had no observable role in virulence or metabolism in R. solanacearum GMI1000. Interestingly, plasmid-based expression of rpoN2 did not fully rescue the metabolic deficiencies of the ΔrpoN1 mutants; full recovery was specific to rpoN1. In comparison, only rpoN2 was able to genetically complement a ΔrpoN E. coli mutant. These results demonstrate that the RpoN1 and RpoN2 proteins are not functionally equivalent or interchangeable in R. solanacearum GMI1000. PMID:26659655

  16. Defining the Metabolic Functions and Roles in Virulence of the rpoN1 and rpoN2 Genes in Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Benjamin R.; Connolly, Morgan P.; Choudhary, Pratibha; Brookins-Little, Tiffany S.; Chatterjee, Snigdha; Raina, Ramesh; Nomura, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN is a unique regulator found among bacteria. It controls numerous processes that range from basic metabolism to more complex functions such as motility and nitrogen fixation. Our current understanding of RpoN function is largely derived from studies on prototypical bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. Although the extent and necessity of RpoN-dependent functions differ radically between these model organisms, each bacterium depends on a single chromosomal rpoN gene to meet the cellular demands of RpoN regulation. The bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is often recognized for being the causative agent of wilt disease in crops, including banana, peanut and potato. However, this plant pathogen is also one of the few bacterial species whose genome possesses dual rpoN genes. To determine if the rpoN genes in this bacterium are genetically redundant and interchangeable, we constructed and characterized ΔrpoN1, ΔrpoN2 and ΔrpoN1 ΔrpoN2 mutants of R. solanacearum GMI1000. It was found that growth on a small range of metabolites, including dicarboxylates, ethanol, nitrate, ornithine, proline and xanthine, were dependent on only the rpoN1 gene. Furthermore, the rpoN1 gene was required for wilt disease on tomato whereas rpoN2 had no observable role in virulence or metabolism in R. solanacearum GMI1000. Interestingly, plasmid-based expression of rpoN2 did not fully rescue the metabolic deficiencies of the ΔrpoN1 mutants; full recovery was specific to rpoN1. In comparison, only rpoN2 was able to genetically complement a ΔrpoN E. coli mutant. These results demonstrate that the RpoN1 and RpoN2 proteins are not functionally equivalent or interchangeable in R. solanacearum GMI1000. PMID:26659655

  17. Novel Antibodies Reactive with Sialyl Lewis X in Both Humans and Mice Define Its Critical Role in Leukocyte Trafficking and Contact Hypersensitivity Responses*

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Ryuji; Hirakawa, Jotaro; Sato, Kaori; Ikeda, Toshiaki; Nagai, Motoe; Fukuda, Minoru; Imai, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    Sialyl Lewis X (sLex) antigen functions as a common carbohydrate determinant recognized by all three members of the selectin family. However, its expression and function in mice remain undefined due to the poor reactivity of conventional anti-sLex monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with mouse tissues. Here, we developed novel anti-sLex mAbs, termed F1 and F2, which react well with both human and mouse sLex, by immunizing fucosyltransferase (FucT)-IV and FucT-VII doubly deficient mice with 6-sulfo-sLex-expressing cells transiently transfected with an expression vector encoding CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase. F1 and F2 specifically bound both the N-acetyl and the N-glycolyl forms of sLex as well as 6-sulfo-sLex, a major ligand for L-selectin expressed in high endothelial venules, and efficiently blocked physiological lymphocyte homing to lymph nodes in mice. Importantly, both of the mAbs inhibited contact hypersensitivity responses not only when administered in the L-selectin-dependent sensitization phase but also when administered in the elicitation phase in mice. When administered in the latter phase, F1 and F2 efficiently blocked rolling of mouse leukocytes along blood vessels expressing P- and E-selectin in the auricular skin in vivo. Consistent with these findings, the mAbs blocked P- and E-selectin-dependent leukocyte rolling in a flow chamber assay. Taken together, these results indicate that novel anti-sLex mAbs reactive with both human and mouse tissues, with the blocking ability against leukocyte trafficking mediated by all three selectins, have been established. These mAbs should be useful in determining the role of sLex antigen under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25944902

  18. Superoxide dismutases, SOD1 and SOD2, play a distinct role in the fat body during pupation in silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Yosui; Ito, Katsuhiko; Ono, Hiromasa; Nakazato, Takeru; Bono, Hidemasa; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Sato, Ryoichi; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Satoh, Jun-ichi; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Fugo, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    One way that aerobic biological systems counteract the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is with superoxide dismutase proteins SOD1 and SOD2 that metabolize superoxide radicals to molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide or scavenge oxygen radicals produced by the extensive oxidation-reduction and electron-transport reactions that occur in mitochondria. We characterized SOD1 and SOD2 of Bombyx mori isolated from the fat body of larvae. Immunological analysis demonstrated the presence of BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 in the silk gland, midgut, fat body, Malpighian tubules, testis and ovary from larvae to adults. We found that BmSOD2 had a unique expression pattern in the fat body through the fifth instar larval developmental stage. The anti-oxidative functions of BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 were assessed by exposing larvae to insecticide rotenone or vasodilator isosorbide dinitrate, which is an ROS generator in BmN4 cells; however, exposure to these compounds had no effect on the expression levels of either BmSOD protein. Next, we investigated the physiological role of BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 under environmental oxidative stress, applied through whole-body UV irradiation and assayed using quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting and microarray analysis. The mRNA expression level of both BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 was markedly increased but protein expression level was increased only slightly. To examine the differences in mRNA and protein level due to UV irradiation intensity, we performed microarray analysis. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that genes in the insulin signaling pathway and PPAR signaling pathway were significantly up-regulated after 6 and 12 hours of UV irradiation. Taken together, the activities of BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 may be related to the response to UV irradiation stress in B. mori. These results suggest that BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 modulate environmental oxidative stress in the cell and have a specific role in fat body of B. mori during pupation. PMID:25714339

  19. Role of TAPP1 and TAPP2 adaptor binding to PtdIns(3,4)P2 in regulating insulin sensitivity defined by knock-in analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wullschleger, Stephan; Wasserman, David H.; Gray, Alex; Sakamoto, Kei; Alessi, Dario R.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin sensitivity is critically dependent on the activity of PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and generation of the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 second messenger. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 can be broken down to PtdIns(3,4)P2 through the action of the SHIPs (Src-homology-2-domain-containing inositol phosphatases). As PtdIns(3,4)P2 levels peak after those of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, it has been proposed that PtdIns(3,4)P2 controls a negative-feedback loop that down-regulates the insulin and PI3K network. Previously, we identified two related adaptor proteins termed TAPP [tandem PH (pleckstrin homology)-domain-containing protein] 1 and TAPP2 that specifically bind to PtdIns(3,4)P2 through their C-terminal PH domain. To determine whether TAPP1 and TAPP2 play a role in regulating insulin sensitivity, we generated knock-in mice that express normal endogenous levels of mutant TAPP1 and TAPP2 that are incapable of binding PtdIns(3,4)P2. These homozygous TAPP1R211L/R211LTAPP2R218L/R218L double knock-in mice are viable and exhibit significantly enhanced activation of Akt, a key downstream mediator of insulin signalling. Consistent with increased PI3K and Akt activity, the double knock-in mice display enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity and disposal of glucose uptake into muscle tissues. We also generated wild-type and double TAPP1R211L/R211LTAPP2R218L/R218L knock-in embryonic fibroblasts and found that insulin triggered enhanced production of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and Akt activity in the double knock-in fibroblasts. These observations provide the first genetic evidence to support the notion that binding of TAPP1 and TAPP2 adaptors to PtdIns(3,4)P2 function as negative regulators of the insulin and PI3K signalling pathways. PMID:21204784

  20. A ChIP-seq-defined genome-wide map of MEF2C binding reveals inflammatory pathways associated with its role in bone density determination.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew E; Deliard, Sandra; Zhu, Fengchang; Xia, Qianghua; Wells, Andrew D; Hankenson, Kurt D; Grant, Struan F A

    2014-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have demonstrated that genetic variation at the MADS box transcription enhancer factor 2, polypeptide C (MEF2C) locus is robustly associated with bone mineral density, primarily at the femoral neck. MEF2C is a transcription factor known to operate via the Wnt signaling pathway. Our hypothesis was that MEF2C regulates the expression of a set of molecular pathways critical to skeletal function. Drawing on our laboratory and bioinformatic experience with ChIP-seq, we analyzed ChIP-seq data for MEF2C available via the ENCODE project to gain insight in to its global genomic binding pattern. We aligned the ChIP-seq data generated for GM12878 (an established lymphoblastoid cell line) and, using the analysis package HOMER, a total of 17,611 binding sites corresponding to 8,118 known genes were observed. We then performed a pathway analysis of the gene list using Ingenuity. At 5 kb, the gene list yielded 'EIF2 Signaling' as the most significant annotation, with a P value of 5.01 × 10(-26). Moving further out, this category remained the top pathway at 50 and 100 kb, then dropped to just second place at 500 kb and beyond by 'Molecular Mechanisms of Cancer'. In addition, at 50 kb and beyond 'RANK Signaling in Osteoclasts' was a consistent feature and resonates with the main general finding from GWAS of bone density. We also observed that MEF2C binding sites were significantly enriched primarily near inflammation associated genes identified from GWAS; indeed, a similar enrichment for inflammation genes has been reported previously using a similar approach for the vitamin D receptor, an established key regulator of bone turnover. Our analyses point to known connective tissue and skeletal processes but also provide novel insights in to networks involved in skeletal regulation. The fact that a specific GWAS category is enriched points to a possible role of inflammation through which it impacts bone mineral density. PMID:24337390

  1. The genetic and structural basis of two distinct terminal side branch residues in stewartan and amylovoran exopolysaccharides and their potential role in host adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Yang, Fan; von Bodman, Susanne B

    2012-01-01

    Stewartan and amylovoran exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by the plant pathogenic bacteria Pantoea stewartii and Erwinia amylovora are virulence factors in the cause of Stewart's vascular wilt and fire blight. The biosynthesis of amylovoran and stewartan is encoded by a set of homologous operons that have been partially characterized, although some annotations are solely on the basis of sequence homology. The major distinguishing features of these two EPS forms are the presence of a terminal pyruvate in amylovoran and glucose in stewartan, even though the gene systems to account for both are conserved and present in each bacterium. This study explores the genetic, structural and functional differences of amylovoran and stewartan, and their potential role in host adaptation. We report that the pyruvyl transferase gene in P. stewartii is non-functional, while the terminal glucosyl transferase is catalytically active. Conversely, in E. amylovora, the homologous glucosyl transferase activity appears to be relatively ineffective, while the pyruvyl transferase function predominates. We also show that the terminally pyruvylated versus glucosylated EPS require specific repeating unit translocases (Wzx). We discuss the evolutionary, functional and biological implications of the terminally pyruvylated and glucosylated polymers and their potential contribution to plant and insect host adaptation. PMID:22111898

  2. Distinct roles of Fgf8, Foxi1, Dlx3b and Pax8/2 during otic vesicle induction and maintenance in medaka.

    PubMed

    Aghaallaei, Narges; Bajoghli, Baubak; Czerny, Thomas

    2007-07-15

    The development of the vertebrate inner ear is a complex process that has been investigated in several model organisms. In this work, we examined genetic interactions regulating early development of otic structures in medaka. We demonstrate that misexpression of Fgf8, Dlx3b and Foxi1 during early gastrulation is sufficient to produce ectopic otic vesicles. Combined misexpression strongly increases the appearance of this phenotype. By using a heat-inducible promoter we were furthermore able to separate the regulatory interactions among Fgf8, Foxi1, Dlx3b, Pax8 and Pax2 genes, which are active during different stages of early otic development. In the preplacodal stage we suggest a central position of Foxi1 within a regulatory network of early patterning genes including Dlx3b and Pax8. Different pathways are active after the placodal stage with Dlx3b playing a central role. There Dlx3b regulates members of the Pax-Six-Eya-Dach network and also strongly affects the early dorsoventral marker genes Otx1 and Gbx2. PMID:17555740

  3. The Plexin PLX-2 and the Ephrin EFN-4 Have Distinct Roles in MAB-20/Semaphorin 2A Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Fumi; Hudson, Martin L.; Suzuki, Motoshi; Peckler, Zachary; Kurokawa, Rie; Liu, Zhicen; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Nukazuka, Akira; Fujii, Takashi; Suto, Fumikazu; Shibata, Yukimasa; Shioi, Go; Fujisawa, Hajime; Mitani, Shohei; Chisholm, Andrew D.; Takagi, Shin

    2007-01-01

    Semaphorins are extracellular proteins that regulate axon guidance and morphogenesis by interacting with a variety of cell surface receptors. Most semaphorins interact with plexin-containing receptor complexes, although some interact with non-plexin receptors. Class 2 semaphorins are secreted molecules that control axon guidance and epidermal morphogenesis in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that the C. elegans class 2 semaphorin MAB-20 binds the plexin PLX-2. plx-2 mutations enhance the phenotypes of hypomorphic mab-20 alleles but not those of mab-20 null alleles, indicating that plx-2 and mab-20 act in a common pathway. Both mab-20 and plx-2 mutations affect epidermal morphogenesis during embryonic and in postembryonic development. In both contexts, plx-2 null mutant phenotypes are much less severe than mab-20 null phenotypes, indicating that PLX-2 is not essential for MAB-20 signaling. Mutations in the ephrin efn-4 do not synergize with mab-20, indicating that EFN-4 may act in MAB-20 signaling. EFN-4 and PLX-2 are coexpressed in the late embryonic epidermis where they play redundant roles in MAB-20-dependent cell sorting. PMID:17507686

  4. Overlapping and Distinct Roles of Aspergillus fumigatus UDP-glucose 4-Epimerases in Galactose Metabolism and the Synthesis of Galactose-containing Cell Wall Polysaccharides*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mark J.; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Cerone, Robert P.; Baptista, Stefanie D.; Campoli, Paolo V.; Choe, Se-In; Kravtsov, Ilia; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Creuzenet, Carole; Liu, Hong; Berghuis, Albert M.; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Filler, Scott G.; Fontaine, Thierry; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Aspergillus fumigatus contains two galactose-containing polysaccharides, galactomannan and galactosaminogalactan, whose biosynthetic pathways are not well understood. The A. fumigatus genome contains three genes encoding putative UDP-glucose 4-epimerases, uge3, uge4, and uge5. We undertook this study to elucidate the function of these epimerases. We found that uge4 is minimally expressed and is not required for the synthesis of galactose-containing exopolysaccharides or galactose metabolism. Uge5 is the dominant UDP-glucose 4-epimerase in A. fumigatus and is essential for normal growth in galactose-based medium. Uge5 is required for synthesis of the galactofuranose (Galf) component of galactomannan and contributes galactose to the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan. Uge3 can mediate production of both UDP-galactose and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and is required for the production of galactosaminogalactan but not galactomannan. In the absence of Uge5, Uge3 activity is sufficient for growth on galactose and the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan containing lower levels of galactose but not the synthesis of Galf. A double deletion of uge5 and uge3 blocked growth on galactose and synthesis of both Galf and galactosaminogalactan. This study is the first survey of glucose epimerases in A. fumigatus and contributes to our understanding of the role of these enzymes in metabolism and cell wall synthesis. PMID:24257745

  5. The Membrane-Anchored BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE1 Plays Distinct Roles in Arabidopsis Resistance to Necrotrophic and Biotrophic PathogensW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Veronese, Paola; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Bluhm, Burton; AbuQamar, Synan; Chen, Xi; Salmeron, John; Dietrich, Robert A.; Hirt, Heribert; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2006-01-01

    Plant resistance to disease is controlled by the combination of defense response pathways that are activated depending on the nature of the pathogen. We identified the Arabidopsis thaliana BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE1 (BIK1) gene that is transcriptionally regulated by Botrytis cinerea infection. Inactivation of BIK1 causes severe susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens but enhances resistance to a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato. The response to an avirulent bacterial strain is unchanged, limiting the role of BIK1 to basal defense rather than race-specific resistance. The jasmonate- and ethylene-regulated defense response, generally associated with resistance to necrotrophic fungi, is attenuated in the bik1 mutant based on the expression of the plant defensin PDF1.2 gene. bik1 mutants show altered root growth, producing more and longer root hairs, demonstrating that BIK1 is also required for normal plant growth and development. Whereas the pathogen responses of bik1 are mostly dependent on salicylic acid (SA) levels, the nondefense responses are independent of SA. BIK1 is membrane-localized, suggesting possible involvement in early stages of the recognition or transduction of pathogen response. Our data suggest that BIK1 modulates the signaling of cellular factors required for defense responses to pathogen infection and normal root hair growth, linking defense response regulation with that of growth and development. PMID:16339855

  6. EFO1 and EFO2, encoding putative WD-domain proteins, have overlapping and distinct roles in the regulation of vegetative development and flowering of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyi; Yang, Dennis; Feldmann, Kenneth A

    2011-01-01

    From screening a population of Arabidopsis overexpression lines, two Arabidopsis genes were identified, EFO1 (early flowering by overexpression 1) and EFO2, that confer early flowering when overexpressed. The two genes encode putative WD-domain proteins which share high sequence similarity and constitute a small subfamily. Interestingly, the efo2-1 loss-of-function mutant also flowered earlier in short days and slightly earlier in long days than the wild type, while no flowering-time or morphological differences were observed in efo1-1 relative to the wild type. In addition, the efo2-1 mutation perturbed hypocotyl elongation, leaf expansion and formation, and stem elongation. EFO1 and EFO2 are both regulated by the circadian clock. Expression and genetic analyses revealed that EFO2 suppresses flowering largely through the action of CONSTANS (CO) and flowering locus T (FT), suggesting that EFO2 is a negative regulator of photoperiodic flowering. The growth defects in efo2-1 were augmented in efo1 efo2, but the induction of FT in the double mutant was comparable to that in efo2-1. Thus, while EFO2 acts as a floral repressor, EFO1 may not be directly involved in flowering, but the two genes do have overlapping roles in regulating other developmental processes. EFO1 and EFO2 may function collectively to serve as one of the converging points where the signals of growth and flowering intersect. PMID:21242318

  7. A group IIA-secreted phospholipase A2 from snake venom induces lipid body formation in macrophages: the roles of intracellular phospholipases A2 and distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Leiguez, Elbio; Zuliani, Juliana Pavan; Cianciarullo, Aurora Marques; Fernandes, Cristina Maria; Gutiérrez, José Maria; Teixeira, Catarina

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the ability of the sPLA(2), known as MT-III, isolated from the viperid snake Bothrops asper, to induce LB formation in macrophages and the major cellular signaling pathways involved in this process. The effects of MT-III on ADRP localization and expression and macrophage ultrastructure were assessed. Our results showed that this sPLA(2) induced a marked increase in LB numbers in macrophages, induced the recruitment of ADRP in macrophages, and up-regulated ADRP expression. Ultrastructural analysis showed the presence of weakly and strongly osmiophilic LBs in sPLA(2)-stimulated cells. Enlargement of the ER and Golgi cisterns was also observed. Pretreatment of cells with H7 or staurosporine (PKC inhibitors), LY294002 or wortmannin (PI3K inhibitors), SB202190 or PD98059 (p38(MAPK) and ERK1/2 inhibitors, respectively), or Pyr-2 or Bel (cPLA(2) and iPLA(2) inhibitors, respectively) significantly reduced sPLA(2)-induced LB formation. Herbimycin (a PTK inhibitor) and indomethacin or etoricoxib (COX inhibitors) failed to alter sPLA(2)-induced effects. In conclusion, our results show for the first time the ability of a venom sPLA(2) to induce the formation of LBs and the expression of ADRP in macrophages. Venom PLA(2)-induced LB formation is dependent on PKC, PI3K, p38(MAPK), ERK1/2, cPLA(2), and iPLA(2) signaling pathways but not on PTK, COX-1, or COX-2 pathways. Activation of the ER and Golgi complex may play an important role in the formation of LBs induced by this sPLA(2) in macrophages. PMID:21478270

  8. Distinct catalytic activity and in vivo roles of the ExoIII and EndoIV AP endonucleases from Sulfolobus islandicus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhou; Huang, Qihong; Ni, Jinfeng; Shen, Yulong

    2016-09-01

    AP endonuclease cleaves the phosphodiester bond 5'- to the AP (apurinic or apyrimidinic) sites and is one of the major enzymes involved in base excision repair. So far, the properties of several archaeal AP endonuclease homologues have been characterized in vitro, but little is known about their functions in vivo. Herein, we report on the biochemical and genetic analysis of two AP endonucleases, SisExoIII and SisEndoIV, from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A. Both SisExoIII and SisEndoIV exhibit AP endonuclease activity, but neither of them has 3'-5' exonuclease activity. SisExoIII and SisEndoIV have similar K M values on the substrate containing an AP site, but the latter cleaves the AP substrate at a dramatically higher catalytic rate than the former. Unlike other AP endonucleases identified in archaea, SisExoIII and SisEndoIV do not exhibit any cleavage activity on DNA having oxidative damage (8-oxo-dG) or uracil. Genetic analysis revealed that neither gene is essential for cell viability, and the growth of ∆SiRe_2666 (endoIV), ∆SiRe_0100 (exoIII), and ∆SiRe_0100∆SiRe_2666 is not affected under normal growth conditions. However, ∆SiRe_2666 exhibits higher sensitivity to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) than ∆SiRe_0100. Over-expression of SiRe_0100 can partially complement the sensitivity of ∆SiRe_2666 to MMS, suggesting a backup role of SisExoIII in AP site processing in vivo. Intriguingly, over-expression of SisEndoIV renders the strain more sensitive to MMS than the control. Taken together, we conclude that SisEndoIV, but not SisExoIII, is the main AP endonuclease that participates directly in base excision repair in S. islandicus. PMID:27457080

  9. Arabidopsis cytosolic acyl-CoA-binding proteins ACBP4, ACBP5 and ACBP6 have overlapping but distinct roles in seed development

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, An-Shan; Haslam, Richard P.; Michaelson, Louise V.; Liao, Pan; Chen, Qin-Fang; Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Mowbray, Sherry L.; Napier, Johnathan A.; Tanner, Julian A.; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytosolic ACBPs (acyl-CoA-binding proteins) bind acyl-CoA esters and maintain a cytosolic acyl-CoA pool, but the thermodynamics of their protein–lipid interactions and physiological relevance in plants are not well understood. Arabidopsis has three cytosolic ACBPs which have been identified as AtACBP4, AtACBP5 and AtACBP6, and microarray data indicated that all of them are expressed in seeds; AtACBP4 is expressed in early embryogenesis, whereas AtACBP5 is expressed later. ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry) in combination with transgenic Arabidopsis lines were used to investigate the roles of these three ACBPs from Arabidopsis thaliana. The dissociation constants, stoichiometry and enthalpy change of AtACBP interactions with various acyl-CoA esters were determined using ITC. Strong binding of recombinant (r) AtACBP6 with long-chain acyl-CoA (C16- to C18-CoA) esters was observed with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. However, the affinity of rAtACBP4 and rAtACBP5 to these acyl-CoA esters was much weaker (dissociation constants in the micromolar range), suggesting that they interact with acyl-CoA esters differently from rAtACBP6. When transgenic Arabidopsis expressing AtACBP6pro::GUS was generated, strong GUS (β-glucuronidase) expression in cotyledonary-staged embryos and seedlings prompted us to measure the acyl-CoA contents of the acbp6 mutant. This mutant accumulated higher levels of C18:1-CoA and C18:1- and C18:2-CoAs in cotyledonary-staged embryos and seedlings, respectively, in comparison with the wild type. The acbp4acbp5acbp6 mutant showed the lightest seed weight and highest sensitivity to abscisic acid during germination, suggesting their physiological functions in seeds. PMID:25423293

  10. The goya mouse mutant reveals distinct newly identified roles for MAP3K1 in the development and survival of cochlear sensory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew; Cross, Sally H.; Jackson, Ian J.; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel; Morse, Susan; Nicholson, George; Coghill, Emma; Bowl, Michael R.; Brown, Steve D. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAP3K1, plays an important role in a number of cellular processes, including epithelial migration during eye organogenesis. In addition, studies in keratinocytes indicate that MAP3K1 signalling through JNK is important for actin stress fibre formation and cell migration. However, MAP3K1 can also act independently of JNK in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. We have identified a mouse mutant, goya, which exhibits the eyes-open-at-birth and microphthalmia phenotypes. In addition, these mice also have hearing loss. The goya mice carry a splice site mutation in the Map3k1 gene. We show that goya and kinase-deficient Map3k1 homozygotes initially develop supernumerary cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) that subsequently degenerate, and a progressive profound hearing loss is observed by 9 weeks of age. Heterozygote mice also develop supernumerary OHCs, but no cellular degeneration or hearing loss is observed. MAP3K1 is expressed in a number of inner-ear cell types, including outer and inner hair cells, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion. Investigation of targets downstream of MAP3K1 identified an increase in p38 phosphorylation (Thr180/Tyr182) in multiple cochlear tissues. We also show that the extra OHCs do not arise from aberrant control of proliferation via p27KIP1. The identification of the goya mutant reveals a signalling molecule involved with hair-cell development and survival. Mammalian hair cells do not have the ability to regenerate after damage, which can lead to irreversible sensorineural hearing loss. Given the observed goya phenotype, and the many diverse cellular processes that MAP3K1 is known to act upon, further investigation of this model might help to elaborate upon the mechanisms underlying sensory hair cell specification, and pathways important for their survival. In addition, MAP3K1 is revealed as a new candidate gene for human sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26542706

  11. DISTINCT ROLES OF β1 MIDAS, ADMIDAS AND LIMBS CATION-BINDING SITES IN LIGAND RECOGNITION BY INTEGRIN α2β1*

    PubMed Central

    Valdramidou, Dimitra; Humphries, Martin J.; Mould, A. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Integrin-ligand interactions are regulated in a complex manner by divalent cations, and previous studies have identified ligand-competent, stimulatory, and inhibitory cation-binding sites. In collagen-binding integrins, such as α2β1, ligand recognition takes place exclusively at the α subunit I domain. However, activation of the αI domain depends on its interaction with a structurally similar domain in the β subunit known as the I-like or βI domain. The top face of the βI domain contains three cation-binding sites: the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), the ADMIDAS (adjacent to MIDAS) and LIMBS (ligand-associated metal binding site). The role of these sites in controlling ligand binding to the αI domain has yet to be elucidated. Mutation of the MIDAS or LIMBS completely blocked collagen binding to α2β1; in contrast mutation of the ADMIDAS reduced ligand recognition but this effect could be overcome by the activating mAb TS2/16. Hence, the MIDAS and LIMBS appear to be essential for the interaction between αI and βI whereas occupancy of the ADMIDAS has an allosteric effect on the conformation of βI. An activating mutation in the α2 I domain partially restored ligand binding to the MIDAS and LIMBS mutants. Analysis of the effects of Ca2+, Mg2+ and Mn2+ on ligand binding to these mutants showed that the MIDAS is a ligand-competent site through which Mn2+ stimulates ligand binding, whereas the LIMBS is a stimulatory Ca2+-binding site, occupancy of which increases the affinity of Mg2+ for the MIDAS. PMID:18820259

  12. Distinct Roles of the Repeat-Containing Regions and Effector Domains of the Vibrio vulnificus Multifunctional-Autoprocessing Repeats-in-Toxin (MARTX) Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung Sik; Gavin, Hannah E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio vulnificus is a seafood-borne pathogen that destroys the intestinal epithelium, leading to rapid bacterial dissemination and death. The most important virulence factor is the multifunctional-autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin comprised of effector domains in the center region flanked by long repeat-containing regions which are well conserved among MARTX toxins and predicted to translocate effector domains. Here, we examined the role of the repeat-containing regions using a modified V. vulnificus MARTX (MARTXVv) toxin generated by replacing all the internal effector domains with β-lactamase (Bla). Bla activity was detected in secretions from the bacterium and also in the cytosol of intoxicated epithelial cells. The modified MARTXVv toxin without effector domains retained its necrotic activity but lost its cell-rounding activity. Further, deletion of the carboxyl-terminal repeat-containing region blocked toxin secretion from the bacterium. Deletion of the amino-terminal repeat-containing region had no effect on secretion but completely abolished translocation and necrosis. Neither secretion nor translocation was affected by enzymatically inactivating the cysteine protease domain of the toxin. These data demonstrate that the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal repeat-containing regions of the MARTXVv toxin are necessary and sufficient for the delivery of effector domains and epithelial cell lysis in vitro but that effector domains are required for other cytopathic functions. Furthermore, Ca2+-dependent secretion of the modified MARTXVv toxin suggests that nonclassical RTX-like repeats found in the carboxyl-terminal repeat-containing region are functionally similar to classical RTX repeats found in other RTX proteins. PMID:25827415

  13. A role for sorting nexin 2 in epidermal growth factor receptor down-regulation: evidence for distinct functions of sorting nexin 1 and 2 in protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Gullapalli, Anuradha; Garrett, Tiana A; Paing, May M; Griffin, Courtney T; Yang, Yonghua; Trejo, JoAnn

    2004-05-01

    Sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) and SNX2, homologues of the yeast vacuolar protein-sorting (Vps)5p, contain a phospholipid-binding motif termed the phox homology (PX) domain and a carboxyl terminal coiled-coil region. A role for SNX1 in trafficking of cell surface receptors from endosomes to lysosomes has been proposed; however, the function of SNX2 remains unknown. Toward understanding the function of SNX2, we first examined the distribution of endogenous protein in HeLa cells. We show that SNX2 resides primarily in early endosomes, whereas SNX1 is found partially in early endosomes and in tubulovesicular-like structures distributed throughout the cytoplasm. We also demonstrate that SNX1 interacts with the mammalian retromer complex through its amino terminal domain, whereas SNX2 does not. Moreover, activated endogenous epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) colocalizes markedly with SNX2-positive endosomes, but minimally with SNX1-containing vesicles. To assess SNX2 function, we examined the effect of a PX domain-mutated SNX2 that is defective in vesicle localization on EGFR trafficking. Mutant SNX2 markedly inhibited agonist-induced EGFR degradation, whereas internalization remained intact. In contrast, SNX1 PX domain mutants failed to effect EGFR degradation, whereas a SNX1 deletion mutant significantly inhibited receptor down-regulation. Interestingly, knockdown of SNX1 and SNX2 expression by RNA interference failed to alter agonist-induced EGFR down-regulation. Together, these findings suggest that both SNX1 and SNX2 are involved in regulating lysosomal sorting of internalized EGFR, but neither protein is essential for this process. These studies are the first to demonstrate a function for SNX2 in protein trafficking. PMID:14978220

  14. Defining an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future. PMID:26470448

  15. Distinctiveness of management in a university psychiatric hospital as a public health institution.

    PubMed

    Koncina, Miroslav

    2008-06-01

    The distinctiveness of management of a university psychiatric hospital which has the status of a public health institution is manifested in the following ways: * Distinctive features and characteristics of managing service provider organizations compared to those whose operational results involve tangible products; * Distinctive features of management which originate from its role as a regional hospital and a tertiary research and educational institution in the field of psychiatry, with special importance for the Republic of Slovenia as a whole; * Distinctive features of management that are defined by the social and legal framework of operation of public health institutions and their special social mission. This paper therefore discusses the specific theoretical and practical findings regarding management of service provider organizations from the viewpoint of their social mission and significance, as well as their legal organization, internal structure and values. PMID:18587280

  16. Modulation of NADH Levels by Arabidopsis Nudix Hydrolases, AtNUDX6 and 7, and the Respective Proteins Themselves Play Distinct Roles in the Regulation of Various Cellular Responses Involved in Biotic/Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takahisa; Muramoto, Kohei; Takada, Risa; Nakagawa, Shouya; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Yoshimura, Kazuya

    2016-06-01

    Arabidopsis Nudix hydrolases, AtNUDX6 and 7, exhibit pyrophosphohydrolase activities toward NADH and contribute to the modulation of various defense responses, such as the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PAR) reaction and salicylic acid (SA)-induced Nonexpresser of Pathogenesis-Related genes 1 (NPR1)-dependent defense pathway, against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the mechanisms by which these enzymes regulate such cellular responses remain unclear. To clarify the functional role(s) of AtNUDX6 and 7 and NADH metabolism, we examined the effects of the transient expression of the active and inactive forms of AtNUDX6 and 7 under the control of an estrogen (ES)-inducible system on various stress responses. The transient expression of active AtNUDX6 and 7 proteins suppressed NADH levels and induced PAR activity, whereas that of their inactive forms did not, indicating the involvement of NADH metabolism in the regulation of the PAR reaction. A transcriptome analysis using KO-nudx6, KO-nudx7 and double KO-nudx6/7 plants, in which intracellular NADH levels increased, identified genes (NADH-responsive genes, NRGs) whose expression levels positively and negatively correlated with NADH levels. Many NRGs did not overlap with the genes whose expression was reported to be responsive to various types of oxidants and reductants, suggesting a novel role for intracellular NADH levels as a redox signaling cue. The active and inactive AtNUDX6 proteins induced the expression of thioredoxin-h5, the activator of NPR1 and SA-induced NPR1-dependent defense genes, while the active and inactive AtNUDX7 proteins suppressed the accumulation of SA and subsequent gene expression, indicating that AtNUDX6 and 7 proteins themselves play distinct roles in stress responses. PMID:27095738

  17. Defining Overweight and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Defining Adult Overweight and ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  18. Interpolation and Definability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, Dov M.; Maksimova, Larisa L.

    This chapter is on interpolation and definability. This notion is not only central in pure logic, but has significant meaning and applicability in all areas where logic itself is applied, especially in computer science, artificial intelligence, logic programming, philosophy of science and natural language. The notion may sometimes appear to the reader as too technical/mathematical but it does also have a general meaning in terms of expressibility and definability.

  19. Triple positive breast cancer: a distinct subtype?

    PubMed

    Vici, Patrizia; Pizzuti, Laura; Natoli, Clara; Gamucci, Teresa; Di Lauro, Luigi; Barba, Maddalena; Sergi, Domenico; Botti, Claudio; Michelotti, Andrea; Moscetti, Luca; Mariani, Luciano; Izzo, Fiorentino; D'Onofrio, Loretta; Sperduti, Isabella; Conti, Francesca; Rossi, Valentina; Cassano, Alessandra; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Mottolese, Marcella; Marchetti, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and within the HER-2 positive subtype this is highly exemplified by the presence of substantial phenotypical and clinical heterogeneity, mostly related to hormonal receptor (HR) expression. It is well known how HER-2 positivity is commonly associated with a more aggressive tumor phenotype and decreased overall survival and, moreover, with a reduced benefit from endocrine treatment. Preclinical studies corroborate the role played by functional crosstalks between HER-2 and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling in endocrine resistance and, more recently, the activation of ER signaling is emerging as a possible mechanism of resistance to HER-2 blocking agents. Indeed, HER-2 positive breast cancer heterogeneity has been suggested to underlie the variability of response not only to endocrine treatments, but also to HER-2 blocking agents. Among HER-2 positive tumors, HR status probably defines two distinct subtypes, with dissimilar clinical behavior and different sensitivity to anticancer agents. The triple positive subtype, namely, ER/PgR/Her-2 positive tumors, could be considered the subset which most closely resembles the HER-2 negative/HR positive tumors, with substantial differences in biology and clinical outcome. We argue on whether in this subgroup the "standard" treatment may be considered, in selected cases, i.e., small tumors, low tumor burden, high expression of both hormonal receptors, an overtreatment. This article review the existing literature on biologic and clinical data concerning the HER-2/ER/PgR positive tumors, in an attempt to better define the HER-2 subtypes and to optimize the use of HER-2 targeted agents, chemotherapy and endocrine treatments in the various subsets. PMID:25554445

  20. Expression of the T-cell surface molecule CD2 and an epitope-loss CD2 mutant to define the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bierer, B E; Peterson, A; Barbosa, J; Seed, B; Burakoff, S J

    1988-01-01

    To define the role of the CD2-lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) interaction in T-cell activation, we have expressed a cDNA encoding the human CD2 molecule in a murine antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma. Expression of the CD2 molecule greatly enhances T-cell responsiveness to antigen; this enhancement is inhibited by anti-CD2 and anti-LFA-3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). CD2+ hybridomas produce interleukin 2 in response to combinations of anti-CD2 mAbs 9.6 and 9-1 and, in the presence of mAb 9-1, to sheep erythrocytes or to the LFA-3 antigen. Furthermore, hybridomas expressing a mutant CD2 molecule that has lost mAb 9.6 binding do not exhibit the enhanced response to antigen or the ability to respond to LFA-3 plus mAb 9-1, but these hybridomas retain the ability to respond to combinations of anti-CD2 mAbs. The role of the CD2-LFA-3 interaction in T-cell activation and the potential for other physiologic ligands for CD2 are discussed. PMID:2448792

  1. Defining Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  2. Defining Equality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Ronald E.

    1977-01-01

    Defines equality of education in three areas: 1) by the degree of integration of school systems; 2) by a comparison of material resources and assets in education; and 3) by the effects of schooling as measured by the mean scores of groups on standardized tests. Available from: College of Education, 107 Quadrangle, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa…

  3. Defining Supports Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Michelle L.; McManus, George E.; Dickey, Ashley L.; Arb, Maxwell S.

    2012-01-01

    The process of developing definitions is underemphasized in most mathematics instruction. Investing time in constructing meaning is well worth the return in terms of the knowledge it imparts. In this article, the authors present a third approach to "defining," called "constructive." It involves modifying students' previous understanding of a term…

  4. On Defining Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

  5. Defining Faculty Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Peter J.; Diamond, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    A process of planned change is proposed for redefining college faculty work. Legitimate faculty work is defined in broad terms, and information sources and methods for collecting information to support redefinition are identified. The final step in the redefinition process is the development of new mission statements for the institution and its…

  6. Defined by Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arriola, Sonya; Murphy, Katy

    2010-01-01

    Undocumented students are a population defined by limitations. Their lack of legal residency and any supporting paperwork (e.g., Social Security number, government issued identification) renders them essentially invisible to the American and state governments. They cannot legally work. In many states, they cannot legally drive. After the age of…

  7. Defining structural limit zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Method for defining limit loads uses probability distribution of largest load occurring during given time intervals. Method is compatible with both deterministic and probabilistic structural design criteria. It also rationally accounts for fact that longer structure is exposed to random loading environment, greater is possibility that it will experience extreme load.

  8. Defining Airflow Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Eschenbacher, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Airflow obstruction has been defined using spirometric test results when the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) to forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio is below a fixed cutoff (<70%) or lower limits of normal (LLN) from reference equations that are based on values from a normal population. However, similar to other positive or abnormal diagnostic test results that are used to identify the presence of disease, perhaps airflow obstruction should be defined based on the values of FEV1/FVC for a population of individuals with known disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Unfortunately, we do not know such a distribution of values of FEV1/FVC for patients with COPD since there is no gold standard for this syndrome or condition. Yet, we have used this physiologic definition of airflow obstruction based on a normal population to identify patients with COPD. In addition, we have defined airflow obstruction as either being present or absent. Instead, we should use a different approach to define airflow obstruction based on the probability or likelihood that the airflow obstruction is present which in turn would give us the probability or likelihood of a disease state such as COPD. PMID:27239557

  9. Defining Dynamic Route Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelinski, Shannon; Jastrzebski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This poster describes a method for defining route structure from flight tracks. Dynamically generated route structures could be useful in guiding dynamic airspace configuration and helping controllers retain situational awareness under dynamically changing traffic conditions. Individual merge and diverge intersections between pairs of flights are identified, clustered, and grouped into nodes of a route structure network. Links are placed between nodes to represent major traffic flows. A parametric analysis determined the algorithm input parameters producing route structures of current day flight plans that are closest to todays airway structure. These parameters are then used to define and analyze the dynamic route structure over the course of a day for current day flight paths. Route structures are also compared between current day flight paths and more user preferred paths such as great circle and weather avoidance routing.

  10. Analysis of Host Gene Expression Changes Reveals Distinct Roles for the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Epstein-Barr Virus Receptor/CD21 in B-Cell Maturation, Activation, and Initiation of Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arredouani, Mohamed S.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Sage, David R.; Dunn, Laura K.; Gill, Michael B.; Agnani, Deep; Libermann, Towia A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) attachment to human CD21 on the B-cell surface initiates infection. Whether CD21 is a simple tether or conveys vital information to the cell interior for production of host factors that promote infection of primary B cells is controversial, as the cytoplasmic fragment of CD21 is short, though highly conserved. The ubiquity of CD21 on normal B cells, the diversity of this population, and the well-known resistance of primary B cells to gene transfer technologies have all impeded resolution of this question. To uncover the role(s) of the CD21 cytoplasmic domain during infection initiation, the full-length receptor (CD21 = CR), a mutant lacking the entire cytoplasmic tail (CT), and a control vector (NEO) were stably expressed in two pre-B-cell lines that lack endogenous receptor. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis demonstrated that stable CD21 surface expression alone (either CR or CT) produced multiple independent changes in gene expression, though both dramatically decreased class I melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) family RNAs and upregulated genes associated with B-cell differentiation (e.g., C2TA, HLA-II, IL21R, MIC2, CD48, and PTPRCAP/CD45-associated protein). Temporal analysis spanning 72 h revealed that not only CR- but also CT-expressing lines initiated latency. In spite of this, the number and spectrum of transcripts altered in CR- compared with CT-bearing lines at 1 h after infection further diverged. Differential modulation of immediate early cellular transcripts (e.g., c-Jun and multiple histones), both novel and previously linked to CD21-initiated signaling, as well as distinct results from pathway analyses support a separate role for the cytoplasmic domain in initiation of intracellular signals. IMPORTANCE Membrane proteins that mediate virus attachment tether virus particles to the cell surface, initiating infection. In addition, upon virus interaction such proteins may transmit signals to the interior of the cell

  11. Defining functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Calleja, José Luis

    2011-12-01

    Dyspepsia and functional dyspepsia represent a highly significant public health issue. A good definition of dyspepsia is key for helping us to better approach symptoms, decision making, and therapy indications.During the last few years many attempts were made at establishing a definition of dyspepsia. Results were little successful on most occasions, and clear discrepancies arose on whether symptoms should be associated with digestion, which types of symptoms were to be included, which anatomic location should symptoms have, etc.The Rome III Committee defined dyspepsia as "a symptom or set of symptoms that most physicians consider to originate from the gastroduodenal area", including the following: postprandial heaviness, early satiety, and epigastric pain or burning. Two new entities were defined: a) food-induced dyspeptic symptoms (postprandial distress syndrome); and b) epigastric pain (epigastric pain syndrome). These and other definitions have shown both strengths and weaknesses. At times they have been much too complex, at times much too simple; furthermore, they have commonly erred on the side of being inaccurate and impractical. On the other hand, some (the most recent ones) are difficult to translate into the Spanish language. In a meeting of gastroenterologists with a special interest in digestive functional disorders, the various aspects of dyspepsia definition were discussed and put to the vote, and the following conclusions were arrived at: dyspepsia is defined as a set of symptoms, either related or unrelated to food ingestion, localized on the upper half of the abdomen. They include: a) epigastric discomfort (as a category of severity) or pain; b) postprandial heaviness; and c) early satiety. Associated complaints include: nausea, belching, bloating, and epigastric burn (heartburn). All these must be scored according to severity and frequency. Furthermore, psychological factors may be involved in the origin of functional dyspepsia. On the other hand

  12. Collections Define Cataloging's Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    The role of catalogers within academic libraries is evolving to meet new demands and cultivating a broader understanding of cataloging--one that focuses on collections, not the catalog, and applies cataloger expertise across metadata activities. Working collaboratively as never before, catalogers are reinventing their place within the library.

  13. Defining periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the periodontium has relied exclusively on a variety of physical measurements (e.g., attachment level, probing depth, bone loss, mobility, recession, degree of inflammation, etc.) in relation to various case definitions of periodontal disease. Periodontal health was often an afterthought and was simply defined as the absence of the signs and symptoms of a periodontal disease. Accordingly, these strict and sometimes disparate definitions of periodontal disease have resulted in an idealistic requirement of a pristine periodontium for periodontal health, which makes us all diseased in one way or another. Furthermore, the consequence of not having a realistic definition of health has resulted in potentially questionable recommendations. The aim of this manuscript was to assess the biological, environmental, sociological, economic, educational and psychological relationships that are germane to constructing a paradigm that defines periodontal health using a modified wellness model. The paradigm includes four cardinal characteristics, i.e., 1) a functional dentition, 2) the painless function of a dentition, 3) the stability of the periodontal attachment apparatus, and 4) the psychological and social well-being of the individual. Finally, strategies and policies that advocate periodontal health were appraised. I'm not sick but I'm not well, and it's a sin to live so well. Flagpole Sitta, Harvey Danger PMID:26390888

  14. Mechanistic characterization of the 5′-triphosphate-dependent activation of PKR: Lack of 5′-end nucleobase specificity, evidence for a distinct triphosphate binding site, and a critical role for the dsRBD

    PubMed Central

    Toroney, Rebecca; Hull, Chelsea M.; Sokoloski, Joshua E.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase PKR is activated by RNA to phosphorylate eIF-2α, inhibiting translation initiation. Long dsRNA activates PKR via interactions with the dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD). Weakly structured RNA also activates PKR and does so in a 5′-triphosphate (ppp)–dependent fashion, however relatively little is known about this pathway. We used a mutant T7 RNA polymerase to incorporate all four triphosphate-containing nucleotides into the first position of a largely single-stranded RNA and found absence of selectivity, in that all four transcripts activate PKR. Recognition of 5′-triphosphate, but not the nucleobase at the 5′-most position, makes this RNA-mediated innate immune response sensitive to a broad array of viruses. PKR was neither activated in the presence of γ-GTP nor recognized NTPs other than ATP in activation competition and ITC binding assays. This indicates that the binding site for ATP is selective, which contrasts with the site for the 5′ end of ppp-ssRNA. Activation experiments reveal that short dsRNAs compete with 5′-triphosphate RNAs and heparin for activation, and likewise gel-shift assays reveal that activating 5′-triphosphate RNAs and heparin compete with short dsRNAs for binding to PKR's dsRBD. The dsRBD thus plays a critical role in the activation of PKR by ppp-ssRNA and even heparin. At the same time, cross-linking experiments indicate that ppp-ssRNA interacts with PKR outside of the dsRBD as well. Overall, 5′-triphosphate-containing, weakly structured RNAs activate PKR via interactions with both the dsRBD and a distinct triphosphate binding site that lacks 5′-nucleobase specificity, allowing the innate immune response to provide broad-spectrum protection from pathogens. PMID:22912486

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis MtrB Sensor Kinase Interactions with FtsI and Wag31 Proteins Reveal a Role for MtrB Distinct from That Regulating MtrA Activities

    PubMed Central

    Plocinska, Renata; Martinez, Luis; Gorla, Purushotham; Pandeeti, Emmanuel; Sarva, Krishna; Blaszczyk, Ewelina; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    The septal association of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MtrB, the kinase partner of the MtrAB two-component signal transduction system, is necessary for the optimal expression of the MtrA regulon targets, including ripA, fbpB, and ftsI, which are involved in cell division and cell wall synthesis. Here, we show that MtrB, irrespective of its phosphorylation status, interacts with Wag31, whereas only phosphorylation-competent MtrB interacts with FtsI. We provide evidence that FtsI depletion compromises the MtrB septal assembly and MtrA regulon expression; likewise, the absence of MtrB compromises FtsI localization and, possibly, FtsI activity. We conclude from these results that FtsI and MtrB are codependent for their activities and that FtsI functions as a positive modulator of MtrB activation and MtrA regulon expression. In contrast to FtsI, Wag31 depletion does not affect MtrB septal assembly and MtrA regulon expression, whereas the loss of MtrB increased Wag31 localization and the levels of PknA/PknB (PknA/B) serine-threonine protein kinase-mediated Wag31 phosphorylation. Interestingly, we found that FtsI decreased levels of phosphorylated Wag31 (Wag31∼P) and that MtrB interacted with PknA/B. Overall, our results indicate that MtrB interactions with FtsI, Wag31, and PknA/B are required for its optimal localization, MtrA regulon expression, and phosphorylation of Wag31. Our results emphasize a new role for MtrB in cell division and cell wall synthesis distinct from that regulating the MtrA phosphorylation activities. PMID:25225272

  16. Neurobehavioral Perspectives on the Distinction between Fear and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perusini, Jennifer N.; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the usefulness of the distinction between fear and anxiety. The clinical use of the labels is ambiguous, often defining one in terms of the other. We first consider what a useful, objective, and scientifically valid definition would entail and then evaluate several fear/anxiety distinctions that have been made in the…

  17. Touch communicates distinct emotions.

    PubMed

    Hertenstein, Matthew J; Keltner, Dacher; App, Betsy; Bulleit, Brittany A; Jaskolka, Ariane R

    2006-08-01

    The study of emotional signaling has focused almost exclusively on the face and voice. In 2 studies, the authors investigated whether people can identify emotions from the experience of being touched by a stranger on the arm (without seeing the touch). In the 3rd study, they investigated whether observers can identify emotions from watching someone being touched on the arm. Two kinds of evidence suggest that humans can communicate numerous emotions with touch. First, participants in the United States (Study 1) and Spain (Study 2) could decode anger, fear, disgust, love, gratitude, and sympathy via touch at much-better-than-chance levels. Second, fine-grained coding documented specific touch behaviors associated with different emotions. In Study 3, the authors provide evidence that participants can accurately decode distinct emotions by merely watching others communicate via touch. The findings are discussed in terms of their contributions to affective science and the evolution of altruism and cooperation. PMID:16938094

  18. TAPERED DEFINING SLOT

    DOEpatents

    Pressey, F.W.

    1959-09-01

    An improvement is reported in the shape and formation of the slot or opening in the collimating slot member which forms part of an ion source of the type wherein a vapor of the material to be ionized is bombarded by electrons in a magnetic field to strike an arc-producing ionization. The defining slot is formed so as to have a substantial taper away from the cathode, causing the electron bombardment from the cathode to be dispersed over a greater area reducing its temperature and at the same time bringing the principal concentration of heat from the electron bombardment nearer the anode side of the slot, thus reducing deterioration and prolonging the life of the slot member during operation.

  19. Conceptual Distinctions amongst Generics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasada, Sandeep; Khemlani, Sangeet; Leslie, Sarah-Jane; Glucksberg, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Generic sentences (e.g., bare plural sentences such as "dogs have four legs" and "mosquitoes carry malaria") are used to talk about "kinds" of things. Three experiments investigated the conceptual foundations of generics as well as claims within the formal semantic approaches to generics concerning the roles of prevalence, cue validity and…

  20. Paleontological evidence for defining the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnosky, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Paleontological criteria formed the basis for defining most of the geological eras, periods, epochs, and ages that are commonly recognized. By the same token, the Anthropocene can be defined by paleontological distinctiveness in accordance with commonly accepted biostratigraphic and biochronologic practice. Here I focus on the utility of defining the Anthropocene by the distinctive fossils (or potential fossils of the future) that have accumulated and are accumulating in the sedimentary record. I discuss what kinds of biostratrigraphic criteria would be of most use in recognizing the Anthropocene's base and temporal extent, including pros and cons of definitions based on range zones, interval zones, lineage zones, assemblage zones, and abundance zones, as well as implications for potential reference sections. Key paleontological criteria useful in formally defining the Anthropocene as a geological epoch include (1) anthropogenic trace fossils such as buildings, roads, plastics, etc; (2) abundance zones based on remains of domesticated species and humans; and (3) assemblage zones based on species transported around the globe by people. The magnitude of paleontologically-recognizable changes that have occurred since humans became the dominant species on Earth is at least as great as the paleontological differences that distinguish other Cenozoic epochs, and supports recognition of the Anthropocene as a formal stratigraphic unit.

  1. Penoscrotal porokeratosis: A distinct entity

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rajiv; Jadhav, Yatin

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with five months history of redness associated with itching and burning over the scrotum and shaft of the penis with a persistent rash on those sites. There had been no response to topical steroid and antifungal creams. Clinical examination revealed a large well-circumscribed erythematous plaque with a thready raised border with a tiny groove at its summit that involved almost two-thirds of the ventral part of the shaft of the penis. Ill-defined erythema with a granular surface was seen over the anterior scrotal skin. A 4 mm punch biopsy of the plaque on the penile shaft revealed multiple cornoid lamellae located adjacent to one another. The patient was treated with topical emollients. Follow up after four months revealed almost complete resolution of the plaque on the penile shaft. Penoscrotal porokeratosis appears to be a distinct entity in the family of porokeratotic diseases, described only in young males in their twenties with involvement of the penile shaft and anterior scrotum with severe burning and itching and histologically associated with multiple cornoid lamellae. It may represent an unusual epidermal porokeratotic reaction pattern and may be a self-resolving condition. PMID:26500866

  2. Penoscrotal porokeratosis: A distinct entity.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajiv; Jadhav, Yatin

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with five months history of redness associated with itching and burning over the scrotum and shaft of the penis with a persistent rash on those sites. There had been no response to topical steroid and antifungal creams. Clinical examination revealed a large well-circumscribed erythematous plaque with a thready raised border with a tiny groove at its summit that involved almost two-thirds of the ventral part of the shaft of the penis. Ill-defined erythema with a granular surface was seen over the anterior scrotal skin. A 4 mm punch biopsy of the plaque on the penile shaft revealed multiple cornoid lamellae located adjacent to one another. The patient was treated with topical emollients. Follow up after four months revealed almost complete resolution of the plaque on the penile shaft. Penoscrotal porokeratosis appears to be a distinct entity in the family of porokeratotic diseases, described only in young males in their twenties with involvement of the penile shaft and anterior scrotum with severe burning and itching and histologically associated with multiple cornoid lamellae. It may represent an unusual epidermal porokeratotic reaction pattern and may be a self-resolving condition. PMID:26500866

  3. Defining responsibility for screening.

    PubMed

    Sifri, R; Wender, R

    1999-10-01

    Patients commonly receive medical care from multiple providers and confusion as to who is responsible for cancer screening undoubtedly contributes to inadequate recommendations. Effective screening requires successful implementation of a series of steps that begin with the initial discussion of a screening test and proceed through obtaining results and instituting appropriate follow-up. Clear definition of generalist and specialist physician roles are necessary to optimally screen the public. This article explores the differences in how generalists and specialists approach screening, describes models of care that facilitate shared responsibility for screening, and suggests strategies on how to improve communication between physicians to maximize screening performance. PMID:10452930

  4. Defining the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Simon; Maslin, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Should the Anthropocene - the idea that human activity is a force acting upon the Earth system in ways that mean that Earth will be altered for millions of years - be defined as a geological time-unit at the level of an Epoch? Here we appraise the data to assess such claims, first in terms of changes to the Earth system, with particular focus on very long-lived impacts, as Epochs typically last millions of years. Can Earth really be said to be in transition from one state to another? Secondly, we then consider the formal criteria used to define geological time-units and move forward through time examining whether currently available evidence passes typical geological time-unit evidence thresholds. We suggest two time periods likely fit the criteria (1) the aftermath of the interlinking of the Old and New Worlds, which moved species across continents and ocean basins worldwide, a geologically unprecedented and permanent change, which is also the globally synchronous coolest part of the Little Ice Age (in Earth system terms), and the beginning of global trade and a new socio-economic "world system" (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by a temporary drop in atmospheric CO2, centred on 1610 CE; and (2) the aftermath of the Second World War, when many global environmental changes accelerated and novel long-lived materials were increasingly manufactured, known as the Great Acceleration (in Earth system terms) and the beginning of the Cold War (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by the peak in radionuclide fallout in 1964. We finish by noting that the Anthropocene debate is politically loaded, thus transparency in the presentation of evidence is essential if a formal definition of the Anthropocene is to avoid becoming a debate about bias. The

  5. Defining Life: The Virus Viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forterre, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Are viruses alive? Until very recently, answering this question was often negative and viruses were not considered in discussions on the origin and definition of life. This situation is rapidly changing, following several discoveries that have modified our vision of viruses. It has been recognized that viruses have played (and still play) a major innovative role in the evolution of cellular organisms. New definitions of viruses have been proposed and their position in the universal tree of life is actively discussed. Viruses are no more confused with their virions, but can be viewed as complex living entities that transform the infected cell into a novel organism—the virus—producing virions. I suggest here to define life (an historical process) as the mode of existence of ribosome encoding organisms (cells) and capsid encoding organisms (viruses) and their ancestors. I propose to define an organism as an ensemble of integrated organs (molecular or cellular) producing individuals evolving through natural selection. The origin of life on our planet would correspond to the establishment of the first organism corresponding to this definition.

  6. Cytokine-Defined B Cell Responses as Therapeutic Targets in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Healy, Luke M.; Muirhead, Gillian; Prat, Alexandre; Gommerman, Jennifer L.; Bar-Or, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Important antibody-independent pathogenic roles of B cells are emerging in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). The contrasting results of different treatments targeting B cells in patients (in spite of predictions of therapeutic benefits from animal models) call for a better understanding of the multiple roles that distinct human B cell responses likely play in MS. In recent years, both murine and human B cells have been identified with distinct functional properties related to their expression of particular cytokines. These have included regulatory (Breg) B cells (secreting interleukin (IL)-10 or IL-35) and pro-inflammatory B cells (secreting tumor necrosis factor α, LTα, IL-6, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Better understanding of human cytokine-defined B cell responses is necessary in both health and diseases, such as MS. Investigation of their surface phenotype, distinct functions, and the mechanisms of regulation (both cell intrinsic and cell extrinsic) may help develop effective treatments that are more selective and safe. In this review, we focus on mechanisms by which cytokine-defined B cells contribute to the peripheral immune cascades that are thought to underlie MS relapses, and the impact of B cell-directed therapies on these mechanisms. PMID:26779181

  7. Foundations of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltaxe, Christiane A. M.

    This treatise on the theoretical and historical foundations of distinctive feature theory traces the evolution of the distinctive features concept in the context of related notions current in linguistic theory, discusses the evolution of individual distinctive features, and criticizes certain acoustic and perceptual correlates attributed to these…

  8. Endothelial progenitor cells: identity defined?

    PubMed Central

    Timmermans, Frank; Plum, Jean; Yöder, Mervin C; Ingram, David A; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Case, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In the past decade, researchers have gained important insights on the role of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells in adult neovascularization. A subset of BM-derived cells, called endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), has been of particular interest, as these cells were suggested to home to sites of neovascularization and neoendothelialization and differentiate into endothelial cells (ECs) in situ, a process referred to as postnatal vasculogenesis. Therefore, EPCs were proposed as a potential regenerative tool for treating human vascular disease and a possible target to restrict vessel growth in tumour pathology. However, conflicting results have been reported in the field, and the identification, characterization, and exact role of EPCs in vascular biology is still a subject of much discussion. The focus of this review is on the controversial issues in the field of EPCs which are related to the lack of a unique EPC marker, identification challenges related to the paucity of EPCs in the circulation, and the important phenotypical and functional overlap between EPCs, haematopoietic cells and mature ECs. We also discuss our recent findings on the origin of endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs), showing that this in vitro defined EC population does not originate from circulating CD133+ cells or CD45+ haematopoietic cells. PMID:19067770

  9. Defining the nociceptor transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Matthew; Crow, Megan; Richards, Natalie; Davey, Gareth I. J.; Levine, Emma; Kelleher, Jayne H.; Agley, Chibeza C.; Denk, Franziska; Harridge, Stephen D. R.; McMahon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Unbiased “omics” techniques, such as next generation RNA-sequencing, can provide entirely novel insights into biological systems. However, cellular heterogeneity presents a significant barrier to analysis and interpretation of these datasets. The neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are an important model for studies of neuronal injury, regeneration and pain. The majority of investigators utilize a dissociated preparation of whole ganglia when studying cellular and molecular function. We demonstrate that the standard methods for producing these preparations gives a 10%-neuronal mixture of cells, with the remainder of cells constituting satellite glia and other non-neuronal cell types. Using a novel application of magnetic purification, we consistently obtain over 95% pure, viable neurons from adult tissue, significantly enriched for small diameter nociceptors expressing the voltage gated ion channel Nav1.8. Using genome-wide RNA-sequencing we compare the currently used (10% neuronal) and pure (95% nociceptor) preparations and find 920 genes enriched. This gives an unprecedented insight into the molecular composition of small nociceptive neurons in the DRG, potentially altering the interpretation of previous studies performed at the tissue level, and indicating a number of novel markers of this widely-studied population of cells. We anticipate that the ease of use, affordability and speed of this technique will see it become widely adopted, delivering a greatly improved capacity to study the roles of nociceptors in health and disease. PMID:25426020

  10. Categorically distinct types of receptive fields in early visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Vargha; Baker, Curtis L

    2016-05-01

    In the visual cortex, distinct types of neurons have been identified based on cellular morphology, response to injected current, or expression of specific markers, but neurophysiological studies have revealed visual receptive field (RF) properties that appear to be on a continuum, with only two generally recognized classes: simple and complex. Most previous studies have characterized visual responses of neurons using stereotyped stimuli such as bars, gratings, or white noise and simple system identification approaches (e.g., reverse correlation). Here we estimate visual RF models of cortical neurons using visually rich natural image stimuli and regularized regression system identification methods and characterize their spatial tuning, temporal dynamics, spatiotemporal behavior, and spiking properties. We quantitatively demonstrate the existence of three functionally distinct categories of simple cells, distinguished by their degree of orientation selectivity (isotropic or oriented) and the nature of their output nonlinearity (expansive or compressive). In addition, these three types have differing average values of several other properties. Cells with nonoriented RFs tend to have smaller RFs, shorter response durations, no direction selectivity, and high reliability. Orientation-selective neurons with an expansive output nonlinearity have Gabor-like RFs, lower spontaneous activity and responsivity, and spiking responses with higher sparseness. Oriented RFs with a compressive nonlinearity are spatially nondescript and tend to show longer response latency. Our findings indicate multiple physiologically defined types of RFs beyond the simple/complex dichotomy, suggesting that cortical neurons may have more specialized functional roles rather than lying on a multidimensional continuum. PMID:26936978

  11. Defining the cortical visual systems: "what", "where", and "how"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creem, S. H.; Proffitt, D. R.; Kaiser, M. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The visual system historically has been defined as consisting of at least two broad subsystems subserving object and spatial vision. These visual processing streams have been organized both structurally as two distinct pathways in the brain, and functionally for the types of tasks that they mediate. The classic definition by Ungerleider and Mishkin labeled a ventral "what" stream to process object information and a dorsal "where" stream to process spatial information. More recently, Goodale and Milner redefined the two visual systems with a focus on the different ways in which visual information is transformed for different goals. They relabeled the dorsal stream as a "how" system for transforming visual information using an egocentric frame of reference in preparation for direct action. This paper reviews recent research from psychophysics, neurophysiology, neuropsychology and neuroimaging to define the roles of the ventral and dorsal visual processing streams. We discuss a possible solution that allows for both "where" and "how" systems that are functionally and structurally organized within the posterior parietal lobe.

  12. Defining the Orphan Functions of Lysine Acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Long known for their role in histone acetylation, recent studies have demonstrated that lysine acetyltransferases also carry out distinct “orphan” functions. These activities impact a wide range of biological phenomena including metabolism, RNA modification, nuclear morphology, and mitochondrial function. Here, we review the discovery and characterization of orphan lysine acetyltransferase functions. In addition to highlighting the evidence and biological role for these functions in human disease, we discuss the part emerging chemical tools may play in investigating this versatile enzyme superfamily. PMID:25591746

  13. Defining the Stimulus - A Memoir

    PubMed Central

    Terrace, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    The eminent psychophysicist, S. S. Stevens, once remarked that, “the basic problem of psychology was the definition of the stimulus” (Stevens, 1951, p. 46). By expanding the traditional definition of the stimulus, the study of animal learning has metamorphosed into animal cognition. The main impetus for that change was the recognition that it is often necessary to postulate a representation between the traditional S and R of learning theory. Representations allow a subject to re-present a stimulus it learned previously that is currently absent. Thus, in delayed-matching-to-sample, one has to assume that a subject responds to a representation of the sample during test if it responds correctly. Other examples, to name but a few, include concept formation, spatial memory, serial memory, learning a numerical rule, imitation and metacognition. Whereas a representation used to be regarded as a mentalistic phenomenon that was unworthy of scientific inquiry, it can now be operationally defined. To accommodate representations, the traditional discriminative stimulus has to be expanded to allow for the role of representations. The resulting composite can account for a significantly larger portion of the variance of performance measures than the exteroceptive stimulus could by itself. PMID:19969047

  14. Sleep Related Scratching: A Distinct Parasomnia?

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Gaurav; Riaz, Muhammad; Hershner, Shelley D.; Goldstein, Cathy A.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2016-01-01

    Pruritus (itching) during the sleep period can present as a symptom of dermatological or systemic disease, or as a parasomnia. Sleep related scratching as a primary parasomnia, exclusively confined to sleep in the absence of coexisting dermatological disorders, has not been well described. This case series describes three such patients, and discusses potentially relevant pathophysiology that can underlie itching or pain. Such cases of sleep related scratching may merit nosologic classification apart from previously defined parasomnias. Citation: Nigam G, Riaz M, Hershner SD, Goldstein CA, Chervin RD. Sleep related scratching: a distinct parasomnia? J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):139–142. PMID:26285112

  15. Hepatocyte Growth Factor-mediated satellite cells niche perturbation promotes development of distinct sarcoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Morena, Deborah; Maestro, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Forni, Paolo Emanuele; Lingua, Marcello Francesco; Foglizzo, Valentina; Šćepanović, Petar; Miretti, Silvia; Morotti, Alessandro; Shern, Jack F; Khan, Javed; Ala, Ugo; Provero, Paolo; Sala, Valentina; Crepaldi, Tiziana; Gasparini, Patrizia; Casanova, Michela; Ferrari, Andrea; Sozzi, Gabriella; Chiarle, Roberto; Ponzetto, Carola; Taulli, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) and Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma (UPS) are distinct sarcoma subtypes. Here we investigate the relevance of the satellite cell (SC) niche in sarcoma development by using Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) to perturb the niche microenvironment. In a Pax7 wild type background, HGF stimulation mainly causes ERMS that originate from satellite cells following a process of multistep progression. Conversely, in a Pax7 null genotype ERMS incidence drops, while UPS becomes the most frequent subtype. Murine EfRMS display genetic heterogeneity similar to their human counterpart. Altogether, our data demonstrate that selective perturbation of the SC niche results in distinct sarcoma subtypes in a Pax7 lineage-dependent manner, and define a critical role for the Met axis in sarcoma initiation. Finally, our results provide a rationale for the use of combination therapy, tailored on specific amplifications and activated signaling pathways, to minimize resistance emerging from sarcomas heterogeneity. PMID:26987019

  16. Synthesis of Well-Defined Copper "N"-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes and Their Use as Catalysts for a "Click Reaction": A Multistep Experiment that Emphasizes the Role of Catalysis in Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ison, Elon A.; Ison, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A multistep experiment for an advanced synthesis lab course that incorporates topics in organic-inorganic synthesis and catalysis and highlights green chemistry principles was developed. Students synthesized two "N"-heterocyclic carbene ligands, used them to prepare two well-defined copper(I) complexes and subsequently utilized the complexes as…

  17. CD161 defines a transcriptional and functional phenotype across distinct human T cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Fergusson, Joannah R.; Smith, Kira E.; Fleming, Vicki M.; Rajoriya, Neil; Newell, Evan W.; Simmons, Ruth; Marchi, Emanuele; Björkander, Sophia; Kang, Yu-Hoi; Swadling, Leo; Kurioka, Ayako; Sahgal, Natasha; Lockstone, Helen; Baban, Dilair; Freeman, Gordon J.; Sverremark-Ekström, Eva; Davis, Mark M.; Davenport, Miles P.; Venturi, Vanessa; Ussher, James E.; Willberg, Christian B.; Klenerman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The C-type lectin CD161 is expressed by a large proportion of human T lymphocytes of all lineages, including a novel population known as Mucosal Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells. To understand whether different T cell subsets expressing CD161 have similar properties, we examined these populations in parallel using mass cytometry and mRNA microarray approaches. The analysis identified a conserved CD161++/MAIT cell transcriptional signature enriched in CD161+CD8+ T cells, that can be extended to CD161+ CD4+ and CD161+TCRγδ+ T cells. Further, this led to the identification of a shared innate-like, TCR-independent response to interleukin (IL)-12 plus IL-18 by different CD161 expressing T cell populations. This response was independent of regulation by CD161, which acted as a costimulatory molecule in the context of T cell receptor stimulation. Expression of CD161 hence identifies a transcriptional and functional phenotype, shared across human T lymphocytes and independent of both TCR expression and cell lineage. PMID:25437561

  18. Microsatellite instability and ploidy status define three categories with distinctive prognostic impact in endometrioid endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao-Sieyro, Cristina; Ramírez-Moreno, Raquel; Rodríguez-González, Germán; Falcón, Orlando; León, Laureano; Torres, Santiago; Fernández, Leandro; Alonso, Sergio; Díaz-Chico, Nicolás; Perucho, Manuel; Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) and aneuploidy are inversely related phenomena. We tested whether ploidy status influences the clinical impact of MSI in endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC). We analyzed 167 EECs for MSI and ploidy. Tumors were classified in three categories according to MSI and ploidy status. Associations with clinicopathological and molecular variables, survival, and treatment response were assessed. All MSI tumors (23%) were scored as diploid, and 14% of microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors presented aneuploidy. MSI tumors associated with older age at diagnosis, non-obesity, high histological grade, and advanced surgical stage. MSS-aneuploid tumors also associated with higher grade and advanced stage. In multivariate survival analysis MSI did not influence disease-free survival (DFS) or cancer-specific survival (CSS). However, when just diploid tumors were considered for the analysis, MSI significantly contributed to worse DFS and CSS, and the same was observed for aneuploidy when MSS tumors were analyzed alone. In diploid tumors, a differential response to postoperative radiotherapy (RT) was observed according to MSI, since it predicted poor DFS and CSS in the multivariate analysis. We conclude that ploidy status influences the clinical impact of MSI in EEC. Among diploid tumors those with MSI have poor clinical outcome and respond worse to RT. PMID:25026289

  19. Defining Distinct Negative Beliefs about Uncertainty: Validating the Factor Structure of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Kathryn A.; Dugas, Michel J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the English version of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS; French version: M. H. Freeston, J. Rheaume, H. Letarte, M. J. Dugas, & R. Ladouceur, 1994; English version: K. Buhr & M. J. Dugas, 2002) using a substantially larger sample than has been used in previous studies. Nonclinical undergraduate…

  20. Competition of two distinct actin networks for actin defines a bistable switch for cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lomakin, Alexis J.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J.; Bui, D A.; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype upon relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin-II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. At low contractility regimes epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner due to emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin-II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally “locks” actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient. PMID:26414403

  1. Assessment with Distinctly Defined Criteria: A Research Study of a National Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopfenbeck, Therese N.; Throndsen, Inger; Lie, Svein; Dale, Erling Lars

    2012-01-01

    This article explores changes in teachers' beliefs and practice concerning assessment after participating in a project for improving assessment practices in Norwegian schools. The project was initiated by the Norwegian Directorate for Education and Training in 2008, and included a total of 77 schools, more than 600 teachers and a sample of their…

  2. A Novel Algorithm for the Generation of Distinct Kinematic Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medapati, Sreenivasa Reddy; Kuchibhotla, Mallikarjuna Rao; Annambhotla, Balaji Srinivasa Rao

    2016-07-01

    Generation of distinct kinematic chains is an important topic in the design of mechanisms for various industrial applications i.e., robotic manipulator, tractor, crane etc. Many researchers have intently focused on this area and explained various processes of generating distinct kinematic chains which are laborious and complex. It is desirable to enumerate the kinematic chains systematically to know the inherent characteristics of a chain related to its structure so that all the distinct chains can be analyzed in depth, prior to the selection of a chain for a purpose. This paper proposes a novel and simple method with set of rules defined to eliminate isomorphic kinematic chains generating distinct kinematic chains. Also, this method simplifies the process of generating distinct kinematic chains even at higher levels i.e., 10-link, 11-link with single and multiple degree of freedom.

  3. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation Mediated by Biochemically Distinct SWI/SNF Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Jesse R.; Resnick, Samuel; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Multiple positions within the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex can be filled by mutually exclusive subunits. Inclusion or exclusion of these proteins defines many unique forms of SWI/SNF and has profound functional consequences. Often this complex is studied as a single entity within a particular cell type and we understand little about the functional relationship between these biochemically distinct forms of the remodeling complex. Here we examine the functional relationships among three complex-specific ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain) subunits using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, transcriptome analysis, and transcription factor binding maps. We find widespread overlap in transcriptional regulation and the genomic binding of distinct SWI/SNF complexes. ARID1B and ARID2 participate in wide-spread cooperation to repress hundreds of genes. Additionally, we find numerous examples of competition between ARID1A and another ARID, and validate that gene expression changes following loss of one ARID are dependent on the function of an alternative ARID. These distinct regulatory modalities are correlated with differential occupancy by transcription factors. Together, these data suggest that distinct SWI/SNF complexes dictate gene-specific transcription through functional interactions between the different forms of the SWI/SNF complex and associated co-factors. Most genes regulated by SWI/SNF are controlled by multiple biochemically distinct forms of the complex, and the overall expression of a gene is the product of the interaction between these different SWI/SNF complexes. The three mutually exclusive ARID family members are among the most frequently mutated chromatin regulators in cancer, and understanding the functional interactions and their role in transcriptional regulation provides an important foundation to understand their role in cancer. PMID:26716708

  4. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation Mediated by Biochemically Distinct SWI/SNF Complexes.

    PubMed

    Raab, Jesse R; Resnick, Samuel; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-12-01

    Multiple positions within the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex can be filled by mutually exclusive subunits. Inclusion or exclusion of these proteins defines many unique forms of SWI/SNF and has profound functional consequences. Often this complex is studied as a single entity within a particular cell type and we understand little about the functional relationship between these biochemically distinct forms of the remodeling complex. Here we examine the functional relationships among three complex-specific ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain) subunits using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, transcriptome analysis, and transcription factor binding maps. We find widespread overlap in transcriptional regulation and the genomic binding of distinct SWI/SNF complexes. ARID1B and ARID2 participate in wide-spread cooperation to repress hundreds of genes. Additionally, we find numerous examples of competition between ARID1A and another ARID, and validate that gene expression changes following loss of one ARID are dependent on the function of an alternative ARID. These distinct regulatory modalities are correlated with differential occupancy by transcription factors. Together, these data suggest that distinct SWI/SNF complexes dictate gene-specific transcription through functional interactions between the different forms of the SWI/SNF complex and associated co-factors. Most genes regulated by SWI/SNF are controlled by multiple biochemically distinct forms of the complex, and the overall expression of a gene is the product of the interaction between these different SWI/SNF complexes. The three mutually exclusive ARID family members are among the most frequently mutated chromatin regulators in cancer, and understanding the functional interactions and their role in transcriptional regulation provides an important foundation to understand their role in cancer. PMID:26716708

  5. Clarifying and Defining Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shubert, Joseph F., Ed.; Josey, E. J., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This issue presents articles which, in some way, help to clarify and define library services. It is hoped that this clarification in library service will serve to secure the resources libraries need to serve the people of New York. The following articles are presented: (1) Introduction: "Clarifying and Defining Library Services" (Joseph F.…

  6. Crack-Defined Electronic Nanogaps.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Valentin; Niklaus, Frank; Stemme, Göran

    2016-03-01

    Achieving near-atomic-scale electronic nanogaps in a reliable and scalable manner will facilitate fundamental advances in molecular detection, plasmonics, and nanoelectronics. Here, a method is shown for realizing crack-defined nanogaps separating TiN electrodes, allowing parallel and scalable fabrication of arrays of sub-10 nm electronic nanogaps featuring individually defined gap widths. PMID:26784270

  7. A Vocabulary of Motives: Understanding How Parents Define Quality Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Karrie Ann

    2007-01-01

    Although discussions of parenting refer to quality time, parents' views of quality time have not been explored. Using the Sloan 500 Family Study, this article examines how 220 parents from 110 dual-parent families define the spending quality time with their families and finds 3 distinct views: Structured-planning parents saw it as planned family…

  8. Neurobehavioral perspectives on the distinction between fear and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Perusini, Jennifer N; Fanselow, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    In this review, we discuss the usefulness of the distinction between fear and anxiety. The clinical use of the labels is ambiguous, often defining one in terms of the other. We first consider what a useful, objective, and scientifically valid definition would entail and then evaluate several fear/anxiety distinctions that have been made in the neurobiological literature. A strong distinction should specify the difference in conditions that lead to fear versus anxiety. Additionally, fear and anxiety should generate distinct sets of behaviors. Ideally, the two states should be supported by distinguishable neuroanatomical circuits. Such a conceptualization would be consistent with the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria (RDoc). The majority of neurobiological approaches to the fear versus anxiety distinction fail to differentiate the two states in terms of behavior, often using the exact same behavioral measures as indicators. Of the two that do, only Predatory Imminence Theory provides a distinction both in terms of cause and effect. Indeed, that approach provides a ready distinction of anxiety, fear, and panic in terms of both antecedent conditions and response selection rules. Additionally, it appeals to distinct neural circuits to generate these modes of action. PMID:26286652

  9. Co-localised Raman and force spectroscopy reveal the roles of hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions in defining the mechanical properties of diphenylalanine nano- and micro-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinjab, Faris; Bondakov, Georgi; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-06-01

    An integrated atomic force and polarized Raman microscope were used to measure the elastic properties of individual diphenylalanine (FF) nano- and micro-tubes and to obtain quantitative information regarding the inter-molecular interactions that define their mechanical properties. For individual tubes, co-localised force spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements allowed the calculation of the Young's and shear moduli (25 ± 5 GPa and 0.28 ± 0.05 GPa, respectively) and the contribution of hydrogen bonding network to the Young's modulus (˜17.6 GPa). The π-π interactions between the phenyl rings, dominated by T-type arrangements, were estimated based on previously published X-ray data to only 0.20 GPa. These results provide experimental evidence obtained from individual FF tubes that the network of H-bonds dominates the elastic properties of the FF tubes.

  10. Co-localised Raman and force spectroscopy reveal the roles of hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions in defining the mechanical properties of diphenylalanine nano- and micro-tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sinjab, Faris; Bondakov, Georgi; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-06-23

    An integrated atomic force and polarized Raman microscope were used to measure the elastic properties of individual diphenylalanine (FF) nano- and micro-tubes and to obtain quantitative information regarding the inter-molecular interactions that define their mechanical properties. For individual tubes, co-localised force spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements allowed the calculation of the Young's and shear moduli (25 ± 5 GPa and 0.28 ± 0.05 GPa, respectively) and the contribution of hydrogen bonding network to the Young's modulus (∼17.6 GPa). The π-π interactions between the phenyl rings, dominated by T-type arrangements, were estimated based on previously published X-ray data to only 0.20 GPa. These results provide experimental evidence obtained from individual FF tubes that the network of H-bonds dominates the elastic properties of the FF tubes.

  11. The Problem of Defining Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubar, David

    1981-01-01

    The major philosophical issues surrounding the concept of intelligence are reviewed with respect to the problems surrounding the process of defining and developing artificial intelligence (AI) in computers. Various current definitions and problems with these definitions are presented. (MP)

  12. Unsupervised Definition of Chemically Distinct Provinces at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasnault, O.

    2006-03-01

    A multivariate analysis of the Martian maps of H, Si, Fe, Cl, Th, and K shows that seven large provinces chemically distinct can be defined. The dimensionality of the problem can be reduced to 5, or even to 3, through a principal component analysis.

  13. Distinct Translational Control in CD4+ T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Yurchenko, Ekaterina; Zheng, Lei; Gandin, Valentina; Topisirovic, Ivan; Li, Shui; Wagner, Carston R.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 play indispensable roles for the induction and maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. Genome-wide mRNA expression studies have defined canonical signatures of T cell subsets. Changes in steady-state mRNA levels, however, often do not reflect those of corresponding proteins due to post-transcriptional mechanisms including mRNA translation. Here, we unveil a unique translational signature, contrasting CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (TFoxp3+) and CD4+Foxp3− non-regulatory T (TFoxp3−) cells, which imprints subset-specific protein expression. We further show that translation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is induced during T cell activation and, in turn, regulates translation of cell cycle related mRNAs and proliferation in both TFoxp3− and TFoxp3+ cells. Unexpectedly, eIF4E also affects Foxp3 expression and thereby lineage identity. Thus, mRNA–specific translational control directs both common and distinct cellular processes in CD4+ T cell subsets. PMID:23658533

  14. Distinctive Characteristics of Educational Donors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Russell N., III.

    2008-01-01

    Examining the charitable behavior of 56,663 US households, this paper evaluates the distinctive characteristics of educational donors as compared with donors to noneducational charitable organizations and with nondonors. In general, educational donors had significantly greater income, wealth, and education than other donors. Educational donors…

  15. Distinctiveness Maps for Image Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, Roberto; Tomasi, Carlo

    2000-01-01

    Stereo correspondence is hard because different image features can look alike. We propose a measure for the ambiguity of image points that allows matching distinctive points first and breaks down the matching task into smaller and separate subproblems. Experiments with an algorithm based on this measure demonstrate the ensuing efficiency and low likelihood of incorrect matches.

  16. Educational Psychology: The Distinctive Contribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper, written in the twenty-first anniversary year of the journal "Educational Psychology in Practice", attempts to uncover those distinctive aspects of the discipline and the practice of applied psychology in general and educational psychology in particular. After considering some of the reasons for attempting this task at this point in…

  17. Integrated transducer for color distinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hisao; Kojima, Masahiko; Yoshida, Akira

    1983-06-01

    A method for fabricating the improved version of an integrated transducer for color distinction is proposed. It consists of three SnO2(n)-Si(n) photodiodes on a Si wafer and a trichromatic filter prepared by arranging filters of the three primary colors (Eastman Kodak gelatin filters; Nos. 47B, 58, and 25) on an infrared glass filter (Hoya Glass; B-460). Its photoelectric characteristics and dependence of error of color distinction on the dimension of the transducer are reported. The photodiodes employed in this conversion assembly are produced by the simple spray method and are most suitable for detecting the low illumination. Since this transducer adapts the trichromatic color resolution method, highly accurate color distinction is possible. With this type of transducer, three photodiodes sensitive to the primary colors, red, green, and blue, respectively, are arranged on a plane. An error in color distinction can occur due to the differences in the strength of the light incident upon the respective photodiodes. This problem is reduced by making the transducer more compact. Finally, 11 kinds of colors are discerned in this experiment as an application of the transducer.

  18. Distinctive Qualities of Expert Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsui, Amy B. M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to identify the distinctive qualities of successful veteran teachers, referred to as "expert teachers", which separates them not only from novice teachers but more importantly from experienced non-expert teachers. Based on earlier case studies, this paper maintains that the critical differences between expert and non-expert…

  19. A Distinct Structure inside the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Baba, Daisuke; Haba, Yasuaki; Kadowaki, Ryota; Kato, Daisuke; Kurita, Mikio; Nagashima, Chie; Nagayama, Takahiro; Murai, Yuka; Nakajima, Yasushi; Tamura, Motohide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Sugitani, Koji; Naoi, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Sato, Shuji

    2005-03-01

    We present the result of a near-infrared (JHKs) survey along the Galactic plane, -10.5d<=l<=10.5d and b=+1deg, with the IRSF 1.4 m telescope and the SIRIUS camera. Ks versus H-Ks color-magnitude diagrams reveal a well-defined population of red clump stars whose apparent magnitude peak changes continuously along the Galactic plane, from Ks=13.4 at l=-10deg to Ks=12.2 at l=10deg after dereddening. This variation can be explained by the barlike structure found in previous studies, but we find an additional inner structure at |l|<~4deg, where the longitude-apparent magnitude relation is distinct from the outer bar and where the apparent magnitude peak changes by only ~0.1 mag over the central 8°. The exact nature of this inner structure is as yet uncertain.

  20. Mapping Between Distinct Reed-Solomon Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, Marvin

    1994-01-01

    One-to-one mapping between two Reed-Solomon (RS) codes devised to enable decoder designed for one of codes to operate on other one also. Codes in question must have same N and K parameters (defined below) but otherwise be two distinct RS codes. Mapping intended to enable same ground-based decoder to decode telemetry signals from two spacecraft in two different RS codes of (N,K) = (255,223). Also useful in purely terrestrial data communications and in optical and magnetic recording and playback of digitized audio and video signals. Implemented in interface circuitry and/or software to enable communication between coding systems of different manufacturers using different RS codes within same (N,K) family.

  1. Defining attitude for science educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrigley, Robert L.; Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.; Simpson, Ronald D.

    A distinct and complex definition of attitude is evolving within the literature. A mental readiness to respond and a correlational consistency between attitude and behavior - although controversial and in need of further study and analysis - remain viable subcomponents within the definition. Most agree that evaluation is the heartbeat of attitude. The impact of social influence on attitudes is becoming increasingly important. Attitudes are learned and not inherited.

  2. The clathrin adaptor proteins ARH, Dab2, and numb play distinct roles in Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 versus low density lipoprotein receptor-mediated cholesterol uptake.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jian; Fu, Zhen-Yan; Li, Pei-Shan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Li, Bo-Liang; Ma, Yi-Tong; Song, Bao-Liang

    2014-11-28

    The uptake of circulating low density lipoproteins (LDL) is mediated by LDL receptor (LDLR) through clathrin-dependent endocytosis. At the early stage of this process, adaptor proteins ARH and Dab2 specifically bind the endocytic signal motif in LDLR and recruit clathrin/AP2 to initiate internalization. On the other hand, intestinal cholesterol is absorbed by Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) through clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Another adaptor protein, Numb recognizes the endocytic motif in NPC1L1 C terminus and couples NPC1L1 to endocytic machinery. The ARH, Dab2, and Numb proteins contain a homogeneous phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain that directly binds endocytic motifs. Because ARH, Dab2, and Numb are all PTB domain family members, the emerging mystery is whether these adaptors act complementally in LDLR and NPC1L1 endocytosis. Here, we found that ARH and Dab2 did not bind NPC1L1 and were not required for NPC1L1 internalization. Similarly, Numb lacked the ability to interact with the LDLR C terminus and was dispensable for LDL uptake. Only the Numb isoforms with shorter PTB domain could facilitate NPC1L1 endocytosis. Besides the reported function in intestinal cholesterol absorption, Numb also mediated cholesterol reabsorption from bile in liver. We further identified a Numb variant with G595D substitution in humans of low blood LDL-cholesterol. The G595D substitution impaired NPC1L1 internalization and cholesterol reabsorption, due to attenuating affinity of Numb to clathrin/AP2. These results demonstrate that Numb specifically regulates NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol absorption both in human intestine and liver, distinct from ARH and Dab2, which selectively participate in LDLR-mediated LDL uptake. PMID:25331956

  3. Defining the genetic blueprint of kidney development.

    PubMed

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W; Patterson, Larry T

    2011-09-01

    Thousands of genes show differential expression patterns during kidney development, suggesting that the genetic program driving this process is complex. While great progress has been made in defining the outline of the genetic basis of nephrogenesis, it is clear that much remains to be learned. A global atlas of the gene expression profiles of the multiple elements of the developing kidney would allow the identification of novel growth factor-receptor interactions, identify additional molecular markers of distinct components, facilitate the generation of compartment specific GFP-CRE transgenic mouse tools, lend insights into the genetic regulatory circuits governing nephron formation, and fully characterize the waves of gene expression that impel nephrogenesis. Both microarrays and next generation deep sequencing of cDNA libraries can be used to define comprehensive, sensitive, and quantitative gene expression profiles. In addition, laser capture microdissection and transgenic GFP mice can be used to isolate specific compartments and pure cell types from the developing kidney. Advancing technologies are even allowing robust gene expression profiling of single cells. The final goal is the production of an exquisitely detailed atlas of the gene expression program that drives kidney development. PMID:21336810

  4. Critical role of bevacizumab scheduling in combination with pre-surgical chemo-radiotherapy in MRI-defined high-risk locally advanced rectal cancer: results of the branch trial

    PubMed Central

    Avallone, Antonio; Pecori, Biagio; Bianco, Franco; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Romano, Carmela; Granata, Vincenza; Marone, Pietro; Leone, Alessandra; Botti, Gerardo; Petrillo, Antonella; Caracò, Corradina; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo R.; Muto, Paolo; Romano, Giovanni; Comella, Pasquale; Budillon, Alfredo; Delrio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that an intensified preoperative regimen including oxaliplatin plus raltitrexed and 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (OXATOM/FUFA) during preoperative pelvic radiotherapy produced promising results in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Preclinical evidence suggests that the scheduling of bevacizumab may be crucial to optimize its combination with chemo-radiotherapy. Patients and methods This non-randomized, non-comparative, phase II study was conducted in MRI-defined high-risk LARC. Patients received three biweekly cycles of OXATOM/FUFA during RT. Bevacizumab was given 2 weeks before the start of chemo-radiotherapy, and on the same day of chemotherapy for 3 cycles (concomitant-schedule A) or 4 days prior to the first and second cycle of chemotherapy (sequential-schedule B). Primary end point was pathological complete tumor regression (TRG1) rate. Results The accrual for the concomitant-schedule was early terminated because the number of TRG1 (2 out of 16 patients) was statistically inconsistent with the hypothesis of activity (30%) to be tested. Conversely, the endpoint was reached with the sequential-schedule and the final TRG1 rate among 46 enrolled patients was 50% (95% CI 35%–65%). Neutropenia was the most common grade ≥3 toxicity with both schedules, but it was less pronounced with the sequential than concomitant-schedule (30% vs. 44%). Postoperative complications occurred in 8/15 (53%) and 13/46 (28%) patients in schedule A and B, respectively. At 5 year follow-up the probability of PFS and OS was 80% (95%CI, 66%–89%) and 85% (95%CI, 69%–93%), respectively, for the sequential-schedule. Conclusions These results highlights the relevance of bevacizumab scheduling to optimize its combination with preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in the management of LARC. PMID:26320185

  5. Impaired intracellular trafficking defines early Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hunn, Benjamin H.M.; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Bolam, J. Paul; Spillantini, Maria-Grazia; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an insidious and incurable neurodegenerative disease, and represents a significant cost to individuals, carers, and ageing societies. It is defined at post-mortem by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra together with the presence of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. We examine here the role of α-synuclein and other cellular transport proteins implicated in PD and how their aberrant activity may be compounded by the unique anatomy of the dopaminergic neuron. This review uses multiple lines of evidence from genetic studies, human tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells, and refined animal models to argue that prodromal PD can be defined as a disease of impaired intracellular trafficking. Dysfunction of the dopaminergic synapse heralds trafficking impairment. PMID:25639775

  6. Defining "Folklore" in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falke, Anne

    Folklore, a body of traditional beliefs of a people conveyed orally or by means of custom, is very much alive, involves all people, and is not the study of popular culture. In studying folklore, the principal tasks of the folklorist have been defined as determining definition, classification, source (the folk), origin (who composed folklore),…

  7. Defined by Word and Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole D.

    2010-01-01

    In the author's art class, she found that many of her students in an intro art class have some technical skill, but lack the ability to think conceptually. Her goal was to create an innovative project that combined design, painting, and sculpture into a compact unit that asked students how they define themselves. In the process of answering this…

  8. Both Loss-of-Function and Gain-of-Function Mutations in Snf Define a Role for Snrnp Proteins in Regulating Sex-Lethal Pre-mRNA Splicing in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Salz, H. K.; Flickinger, T. W.

    1996-01-01

    The Drosophila snf gene encodes a protein with functional homology to the mammalian U1A and U2B" snRNP proteins. Studies, based on the analysis of three viable alleles, have suggested a role for snf in establishing the female-specific splicing pattern of the sex determination switch gene, Sex-lethal. Here, we show that the non-sex-specific lethal null allele is required for female sex determination, arguing against the formal possibility that the viable alleles disrupt a function unrelated to snf's wild-type function. Moreover, we find snf is required for normal cell growth and/or survival, as expected for a protein involved in a cell-vital process such as RNA splicing. We also show that of the three viable alleles only one, snf(JA2), is a partial loss-of-function mutation. The other two viable alleles, snf(1621) and snf(e8H), encode antimorphic proteins. We find the antimorphic proteins are mislocalized and correlate their mislocalization with their molecular lesions and mutant phenotypes. Finally, we provide genetic evidence that the antimorphic alleles interfere with the autoregulatory splicing function of the Sex-lethal protein. Based on these studies we suggest a model in which the snRNP protein, Snf, functions with Sex-lethal to block recognition of the regulated male-specific exon. PMID:8878676

  9. Rescue of Wild-type Mumps Virus from a Strain Associated with Recent Outbreaks Helps to Define the Role of the SH ORF in the Pathogenesis of Mumps Virus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pei; Li, Zhuo; Sun, Dengyun; Lin, Yuan; Wu, Jianguo; Rota, Paul A.; He, Biao

    2011-01-01

    Mumps virus (MuV) causes acute infections in humans. In recent years, MuV has caused epidemics among highly vaccinated populations. The largest outbreak in the U.S. in the past 20 years occurred in 2005–2006 with over reported 5,000 cases which the majority of the cases was in vaccinated young adults. We sequenced the complete genome of a representative strain from the epidemic (MuV-IA). MuV-IA is a member of genotype G, the same genotype of MuV that was associated with the outbreak in the UK in 2004–2005. We constructed a reverse genetics system for MuV-IA (rMuV-IA), and rescued a virus lacking the open reading frame (ORF) of the SH gene (rMuVΔSH). rMuVΔSH infection in L929 cells induced increased NF-κB activation, TNF-α production and apoptosis compared to rMuV-IA. rMuVΔSH was attenuated in an animal model. These results indicated that the SH ORF of MuV plays a significant role in interfering with TNF-α signaling and viral pathogenesis during virus infection. PMID:21676427

  10. Defining the role of University of Kentucky HealthCare in its medical market--how strategic planning creates the intersection of good public policy and good business practices.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Michael; Lofgren, Richard; Bricker, Timothy;