Science.gov

Sample records for defoliant thidiazuron gossypium

  1. Disruption of the polar auxin transport system in cotton seedlings following treatment with the defoliant thidiazuron. [Gossypium hirsutum L. cv LG102

    SciTech Connect

    Suttle, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the defoliant thidiazuron (TDZ) on basipetal auxin transport in petiole segments isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv LG102) seedlings was examined using the donor/receiver agar block technique. Treatment of intact seedlings with TDZ at concentrations of 1 micromolar or greater resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of /sup 14/C-IAA transport in petiole segment isolated 1 or 2 days after treatment. Using 100 micromolar TDZ, the inhibition was detectable 19 hours after treatment and was complete by 27 hours. Both leaves and petiole segments exhibited a marked increase in ethylene production following treatment with TDZ at concentrations of 0.1 micromolar or greater. The involvement of ethylene in this TDA response was evaluated by examining the effects of two inhibitors of ethylene action: silver thiosulfate, 2,5-norbornadiene. One day after treatment, both inhibitors effectively antagonized the TDZ-induced inhibition of auxin transport. Two days after TDZ treatment both inhibitors were ineffective. The decrease in IAA transport in TDZ treated tissues was associated with increased metabolism of IAA. The transport of /sup 14/C-2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was also inhibited by TDZ treatment. This inhibition was not accompanied by increased metabolism. Incorporation of TDZ into the receiver blocks had no effect on auxin transport. The ability of the phytotropin N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid to stimulate IAA uptake from a bathing medium was reduced in TDZ-treated tissues. This reduction is thought to reflect a decline in the auxin efflux system following TDZ treatment.

  2. Involvement of Ethylene in the Action of the Cotton Defoliant Thidiazuron 1

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, Jeffrey C.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of the defoliant thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N′-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea) on endogenous ethylene evolution and the role of endogenous ethylene in thidiazuron-mediated leaf abscission were examined in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Stoneville 519) seedlings. Treatment of 20- to 30-day-old seedlings with thidiazuron at concentrations equal to or greater than 10 micromolar resulted in leaf abscission. At a treatment concentration of 100 micromolar, nearly total abscission of the youngest leaves was observed. Following treatment, abscission of the younger leaves commenced within 48 hours and was complete by 120 hours. A large increase in ethylene evolution from leaf blades and abscission zone explants was readily detectable within 24 hours of treatment and persisted until leaf fall. Ethylene evolution from treated leaf blades was greatest 1 day posttreatment and reached levels in excess of 600 nanoliters per gram fresh weight per hour (26.7 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour). The increase in ethylene evolution occurred in the absence of increased ethane evolution, altered leaf water potential, or decreased chlorophyll levels. Treatment of seedlings with inhibitors of ethylene action (silver thiosulfate, hypobaric pressure) or ethylene synthesis (aminoethoxyvinylglycine) resulted in an inhibition of thidiazuron-induced defoliation. Application of exogenous ethylene or 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid largely restored the thidiazuron response. The results indicate that thidiazuron-induced leaf abscission is mediated, at least in part, by an increase in endogenous ethylene evolution. However, alterations of other phytohormone systems thought to be involved in regulating leaf abscission are not excluded by these studies. PMID:16664229

  3. Involvement of ethylene in the action of the cotton defoliant thidiazuron.

    PubMed

    Suttle, J C

    1985-06-01

    The effect of the defoliant thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N'-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea) on endogenous ethylene evolution and the role of endogenous ethylene in thidiazuron-mediated leaf abscission were examined in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Stoneville 519) seedlings. Treatment of 20- to 30-day-old seedlings with thidiazuron at concentrations equal to or greater than 10 micromolar resulted in leaf abscission. At a treatment concentration of 100 micromolar, nearly total abscission of the youngest leaves was observed. Following treatment, abscission of the younger leaves commenced within 48 hours and was complete by 120 hours. A large increase in ethylene evolution from leaf blades and abscission zone explants was readily detectable within 24 hours of treatment and persisted until leaf fall. Ethylene evolution from treated leaf blades was greatest 1 day posttreatment and reached levels in excess of 600 nanoliters per gram fresh weight per hour (26.7 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour). The increase in ethylene evolution occurred in the absence of increased ethane evolution, altered leaf water potential, or decreased chlorophyll levels. Treatment of seedlings with inhibitors of ethylene action (silver thiosulfate, hypobaric pressure) or ethylene synthesis (aminoethoxyvinylglycine) resulted in an inhibition of thidiazuron-induced defoliation. Application of exogenous ethylene or 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid largely restored the thidiazuron response. The results indicate that thidiazuron-induced leaf abscission is mediated, at least in part, by an increase in endogenous ethylene evolution. However, alterations of other phytohormone systems thought to be involved in regulating leaf abscission are not excluded by these studies. PMID:16664229

  4. Effect of the Defoliant Thidiazuron on Ethylene Evolution from Mung Bean Hypocotyl Segments

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, Jeffrey C.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the defoliant thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N′1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea) on ethylene evolution from etiolated mung bean hypocotyl segments was examined. Treatment of hypocotyl segments with concentrations of thidiazuron equal to or greater than 30 nanomolar stimulated ethylene evolution. Increased rates of ethylene evolution from thidiazuron-treated tissues could be detected within 90 minutes of treatment and persisted up to 30 hours after treatment. Radioactive methionine was readily taken up by thidiazuron-treated tissues and was converted to ethylene, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and an acidic conjugate of ACC. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine, aminooxyacetic acid, cobalt chloride, and α-aminoisobutyric acid reduced ethylene evolution from treated tissues. An increase in the endogenous content of free ACC coincided with the increase in ethylene evolution following thidiazuron treatment. Uptake and conversion of exogenous ACC to ethylene were not affected by thidiazuron treatment. No increases in the extractable activities of ACC synthase were detected following thidiazuron treatment. PMID:16663757

  5. Effect of the defoliant thidiazuron on ethylene evolution from mung bean hypocotyl segments.

    PubMed

    Suttle, J C

    1984-08-01

    The effect of the defoliant thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N'1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea) on ethylene evolution from etiolated mung bean hypocotyl segments was examined. Treatment of hypocotyl segments with concentrations of thidiazuron equal to or greater than 30 nanomolar stimulated ethylene evolution. Increased rates of ethylene evolution from thidiazuron-treated tissues could be detected within 90 minutes of treatment and persisted up to 30 hours after treatment. Radioactive methionine was readily taken up by thidiazuron-treated tissues and was converted to ethylene, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and an acidic conjugate of ACC. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine, aminooxyacetic acid, cobalt chloride, and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid reduced ethylene evolution from treated tissues. An increase in the endogenous content of free ACC coincided with the increase in ethylene evolution following thidiazuron treatment. Uptake and conversion of exogenous ACC to ethylene were not affected by thidiazuron treatment. No increases in the extractable activities of ACC synthase were detected following thidiazuron treatment. PMID:16663757

  6. Disruption of the Polar Auxin Transport System in Cotton Seedlings following Treatment with the Defoliant Thidiazuron.

    PubMed

    Suttle, J C

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the defoliant thidiazuron (TDZ) on basipetal auxin transport in petiole segments isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv LG102) seedlings was examined using the donor/receiver agar block technique. Treatment of intact seedlings with TDZ at concentrations of 1 micromolar or greater resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of (14)C-IAA transport in petiole segments isolated 1 or 2 days after treatment. Using 100 micromolar TDZ, the inhibition was detectable 19 hours after treatment and was complete by 27 hours. Both leaves and petiole segments exhibited a marked increase in ethylene production following treatment with TDZ at concentrations of 0.1 micromolar or greater. The involvement of ethylene in this TDZ response was evaluated by examining the effects of two inhibitors of ethylene action: silver thiosulfate, 2,5-norbornadiene. One day after treatment, both inhibitors effectively antagonized the TDZ-induced inhibition of auxin transport. Two days after TDZ treatment both inhibitors were ineffective. The decrease in IAA transport in TDZ treated tissues was associated with increased metabolism of IAA. The transport of (14)C-2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was also inhibited by TDZ treatment. This inhibition was not accompanied by increased metabolism. Incorporation of TDZ into the receiver blocks had no effect on auxin transport. The ability of the phytotropin N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid to stimulate IAA uptake from a bathing medium was reduced in TDZ-treated tissues. This reduction is thought to reflect a decline in the auxin efflux system following TDZ treatment. PMID:16665874

  7. Microbial degradation of thidiazuron and its photoproduct.

    PubMed

    Benezet, H J; Knowles, C O

    1982-01-01

    Degradation of the cotton defoliant thidiazuron and its photoproduct photothidiazuron by soil and thirteen species of microorganisms was examined. Aspergillus versicolor, Torula rosea, and Flavobacter sp. were most active in degrading thidiazuron. Unknown water-soluble metabolites and phenylurea were the major products. A. versicolor and Penicillium cyclopium were most active in degrading photothidiazuron. 4-Hydroxyphenylphotothidiazuron was the major organosoluble product formed by A. versicolor; phenylurea and an unidentified metabolite constituted the major organosoluble products from P. cyclopium. Both microbes also formed appreciable water-soluble metabolites. Radioactive carbon dioxide was formed from thidiazuron-aniline-14C by Oscillatoria sp. but not by Chlorella sp., suggesting that the former algal species utilized the defoliant as an energy source. PMID:7073312

  8. Cotton defoliant runoff as a function of active ingredient and tillage.

    PubMed

    Potter, Thomas L; Truman, Clint C; Bosch, David D; Bednarz, Craig W

    2003-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) defoliant runoff was recently identified as an ecological risk. However, assessments are not supported by field studies. Runoff potential of three defoliant active ingredients, dimethipin (2,3-dihydro-5,6-dimethyl-1,4-dithiin 1,1,4,4-tetraoxide), thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N-1,2,3-thidiazol-5-yl-urea), and tribufos (S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate) was investigated by rainfall simulation on strip (ST) and conventionally tilled (CT) cotton in south central Georgia. Simulated rainfall timing relative to defoliant application (1 h after) represented an extreme worst-case scenario; however, weather records indicate that it was not unrealistic for the region. Thidiazuron and tribufos losses were 12 to 15% of applied. Only 2 to 5% of the more water soluble dimethipin was lost. Although ST erosion rates were less, loss of tribufos, a strongly sorbing compound, was not affected. Higher sediment-water partition coefficients (kd) were measured in ST samples. This likely explains why no tillage related differences in loss rates were observed, but it is unknown whether this result can be generalized. The study was conducted in the first year following establishment of tillage treatments at the study site. As soil conditions stabilize, ST impacts may change. Data provide an estimate of the maximum amount of the defoliants that will run off during a single postapplication storm event. Use of these values in place of the default value in runoff simulation models used in pesticide risk assessments will likely improve risk estimate accuracy and enhance evaluation of comparative risk among these active ingredients. PMID:14674540

  9. The Phytotoxin Coronatine Induces Abscission-Related Gene Expression and Boll Ripening during Defoliation of Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoli; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Tan, Weiming; Xu, Dongyong; Li, Zhaohu

    2014-01-01

    Defoliants can increase machine harvest efficiency of cotton (Gossypium hirusutum L.), prevent lodging and reduce the time from defoliation to harvest. Coronatine (COR) is a chlorosis-inducing non-host-specific phytotoxin that induces leaf and/or fruit abscission in some crops. The present study investigates how COR might induce cotton leaf abscission by modulating genes involved in cell wall hydrolases and ACC (ethylene precursor) in various cotton tissues. The effects of COR on cotton boll ripening, seedcotton yield, and seed development were also studied. After 14 d of treatment with COR, cells within the leaf abscission zone (AZ) showed marked differentiation. Elevated transcripts of GhCEL1, GhPG and GhACS were observed in the AZs treated with COR and Thidiazuron (TDZ). The relative expression of GhCEL1 and GhACS in TDZ treated plants was approximately twice that in plants treated with COR for 12 h. However, only GhACS expression increased in leaf blade and petiole. There was a continuous increase in the activity of hydrolytic enzymes such as cellulase (CEL) and polygalacturonase (PG), and ACC accumulation in AZs following COR and TDZ treatments, but there was greater increase in ACC activity of COR treated boll crust, indicating that COR had greater ripening effect than TDZ. Coronatine significantly enhanced boll opening without affecting boll weight, lint percentage and seed quality. Therefore, COR can be a potential cotton defoliant with different physiological mechanism of action from the currently used TDZ. PMID:24845465

  10. The phytotoxin coronatine induces abscission-related gene expression and boll ripening during defoliation of cotton.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingwei; Li, Yi; Tian, Xiaoli; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Tan, Weiming; Xu, Dongyong; Li, Zhaohu

    2014-01-01

    Defoliants can increase machine harvest efficiency of cotton (Gossypium hirusutum L.), prevent lodging and reduce the time from defoliation to harvest. Coronatine (COR) is a chlorosis-inducing non-host-specific phytotoxin that induces leaf and/or fruit abscission in some crops. The present study investigates how COR might induce cotton leaf abscission by modulating genes involved in cell wall hydrolases and ACC (ethylene precursor) in various cotton tissues. The effects of COR on cotton boll ripening, seedcotton yield, and seed development were also studied. After 14 d of treatment with COR, cells within the leaf abscission zone (AZ) showed marked differentiation. Elevated transcripts of GhCEL1, GhPG and GhACS were observed in the AZs treated with COR and Thidiazuron (TDZ). The relative expression of GhCEL1 and GhACS in TDZ treated plants was approximately twice that in plants treated with COR for 12 h. However, only GhACS expression increased in leaf blade and petiole. There was a continuous increase in the activity of hydrolytic enzymes such as cellulase (CEL) and polygalacturonase (PG), and ACC accumulation in AZs following COR and TDZ treatments, but there was greater increase in ACC activity of COR treated boll crust, indicating that COR had greater ripening effect than TDZ. Coronatine significantly enhanced boll opening without affecting boll weight, lint percentage and seed quality. Therefore, COR can be a potential cotton defoliant with different physiological mechanism of action from the currently used TDZ. PMID:24845465

  11. Thidiazuron uptake, distribution and metabolism in bluegills and channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Knowles, C O; Benezet, H J; Mayer, F L

    1980-01-01

    Bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) exposed to 0.1 ppm of thidiazuron-14C cotton defoliant for 28 days under continuous flow conditions accumulated relatively low levels of radiocarbon. The maximum detected was 5.4 ppm in fillet tissue after 1 day. During a 14 day depuration period, radioactivity declined to 1.0 ppm or less. Fractionation of offal and fillet tissues from bluegills collected at 28 days indicated that most of the radioactive material was water soluble, although appreciable amounts of organosoluble radioactive material also were present. When bluegills were injected intraperitoneally with thidiazuron-14C, metabolism and elimination were relatively rapid. Organosoluble radioactive material isolated from fish tissue included thidiazuron, its 2-hydroxyphenyl derivative, phenylurea, and several unknowns. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) exposed under static conditions to a system containing 0.15 ppm of thidiazuron-14C incorporated into soil also accumulated only low concentrations of radiocarbon. The maximum detected was 2.5 ppb in offal tissue at 7 days. In fillet tissue, radioactivity did not exceed 0.5 ppb. There was no evidence from these studies to indicate that thidiazuron would pose a hazard to the aquatic ecosystem. PMID:7400538

  12. Effects of selected defoliants in combination with insecticides on sweetpotato whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and its parasitoids in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of two defoliants, Def (S, S, Stributylphosphorotrithioate) and Dropp (thidiazuron) alone and in combination with two commonly used insecticides, a pyrethroid, Karate (lambda-cyhalothrin) and an organophosphate, Guthion (azinphosmethyl) on sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Gennadius Bioty...

  13. Cytokinin activity induced by thidiazuron.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J C; Katterman, F R

    1986-06-01

    The diphenylurea derivative thidiazuron induces a variety of cytokinin responses. Levels above 5 x 10(-9) molar and 4 x 10(-7) molar stimulate maximum soybean callus growth and radish cotyledon expansion, respectively. A wider range of dose response related effects follows thidiazuron induced tobacco plant regeneration. Analysis of soybean callus extracts strongly suggests that thidiazuron treatment creates an accumulation and/or synthesis of purine cytokinins, able to induce the growth, expansion and regeneration, mentioned above. PMID:16664878

  14. THERMAL DEFOLIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An apparatus designed to defoliate cotton with hot air was tested in two varieties and two field conditions. Cotton defoliation using hot air was as effective as defoliation using tyical chemicals under some conditions. Aphid populations were eliminated by the thermal treatment, reducing the risk ...

  15. EVALUATION OF COTTON DEFOLIATION STRATEGIES USING AIRBORNE MULTISPECTRAL IMAGERY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visual observations and ground measurements are commonly used to evaluate cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) harvest aids for defoliation, boll opening, and re-growth control. This paper presents a remote sensing-based method for evaluating the effectiveness of different defoliation treatments. Field ...

  16. Thermal defoliation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The negative perception some consumers hold regarding agricultural chemicals has resulted in an increased demand for organic foods and fibers, and in increasing political pressure for the regulation of agricultural production practices. This has revived interest in thermal defoliation of cotton and ...

  17. Employing broadband spectra and cluster analysis to assess thermal defoliation of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growers and field scouts need assistance in surveying cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fields subjected to thermal defoliation to reap the benefits provided by this nonchemical defoliation method. A study was conducted to evaluate broadband spectral data and unsupervised classification as tools for s...

  18. Efficiency of Tank-Mixing Insecticide with Defoliant Against Adult Boll Weevil (Coleoptera:Curculionidae) Populations as Determined by Late-Season Field Disturbance Trapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large commercial field plots were used to assess the effect of tank-mixing cyfluthrin with a defoliant applied in preparation for cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., harvest on adult boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman, populations in south Texas during 2002 and 2003. The defoliant-insectici...

  19. SURVEYING THERMALLY-DEFOLIATED COTTON PLOTS WITH COLOR-INFRARED AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producers can use heated air (thermal defoliation) as a nonchemical alternative for terminating cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) growth and for preparing it for harvest, making this technique ideal for cotton grown in sustainable systems. For large cotton fields, growers need assistance in examining ...

  20. 40 CFR 180.403 - Thidiazuron; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Thidiazuron; tolerances for residues. 180.403 Section 180.403 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.403 Thidiazuron; tolerances for residues....

  1. Cotton thermal defoliation economics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton harvest-aid chemical and application expenses are justified by increased quantity and value of harvested fiber, and decreased harvest costs. Chemical use may be restricted in certain production situations. Harvest preparation costs and producer returns were compared for thermal defoliation ...

  2. FUTURE RISK OF GYPSY MOTH DEFOLIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from the suitable habitit combined with forest density, and adjusted by prefered species basal area and the predicited geographic pattern of defoliation can be used to predict future potential for gypsy moth defoliation.

  3. HISTORICAL GYPSY MOTH DEFOLIATION FREQUENCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gypsy moth populations may exist for many years at low densities such that it may be difficult to find any life stages. Then, for reasons that are not completely understood, populations may rise to very high densities and substantial defoliation of the canopy may occur. These da...

  4. A Ve homologous gene from Gossypium barbadense, Gbvdr3, enhances the defense response against Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianzi; Kan, Jialiang; Yang, Yuwen; Ling, Xitie; Chang, Youhong; Zhang, Baolong

    2016-01-01

    The tomato Ve1 gene and several Ve1 homologues are involved in the resistance to Verticillium dahliae. Here, we report on another Ve homologous gene, Gbvdr3, from a Verticillium wilt-resistant cotton cultivar, Gossypium barbadense Hai7124, which has a 3207-bp region that encodes a predicted receptor-like protein. Transient expression analyses indicated that Gbvdr3 is localized in the plasma membrane, and virus-induced gene silencing of Gbvdr3 compromised the resistance of Hai7124 cotton to a defoliating strain of V. dahliae, V991, but not to a non-defoliating strain, BP2. This resistance pattern was further confirmed by over-expression of Gbvdr3 in transgenic Arabidopsis, which significantly elevated the expression of the ethylene-regulated gene GST2, the ethylene- and jasmonic acid-regulated defense-related genes PR3 and PDF1.2, and the salicylic acid-regulated genes PR1 and PR5, but not the PR2 gene. It also triggered the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and callose at early time points during infection by the V991 defoliating strain. In contrast, elevated accumulation of hydrogen peroxide or callose in Gbvdr3-expressed Arabidopsis leaves was not apparent under infection by the non-defoliating strain, BP2. These results suggested that Gbvdr3 is involved in the resistance to a unique spectrum of defoliating V. dahliae strains. PMID:26686282

  5. Growth Regulator Changes in Cotton Associated with Defoliation Caused by Verticillium albo-atrum.

    PubMed

    Wiese, M V; Devay, J E

    1970-03-01

    Cotton plants, variety Acala 4-42 family 77 (Gossypium hirsutum L.,), were stem puncture-inoculated with either a defoliating isolate (T9) or a nondefoliating isolate (SS4) of Verticillium albo-atrum (Reinke and Berth.). As symptoms developed, growth regulators were assayed in diseased plants to discern their importance in the disease syndrome.An Avena coleoptile straight growth bioassay demonstrated the presence of several growth-regulatory compounds in cotton tissue extracts. Indoleacetic acid was among the compounds whose effects on coleoptile growth were influenced by disease development. Coleoptile growth due to indoleacetic acid was greater in extracts of diseased stems and leaves than in extracts of comparable healthy tissues. During the defoliation period the T9 and SS4 isolates appeared equally effective in increasing indoleacetic acid and reducing indoleacetic acid decarboxylation. Preceding defoliation, however, in plants showing equivalent symptoms the degradation of auxin was reduced more by infection with T9, the defoliating isolate. The reduced auxin degradation appeared to be releated to concomitant increases in caffeic acid and other indoleacetic acid-oxidase inhibitors in the affected tissues.Abscisic acid in tissue extracts strongly inhibited coleoptile growth. During the defoliation period gas-liquid chromatographic and ultraviolet absorption measurements revealed that abscisic acid levels were approximately doubled in T9-infected leaves but were relatively unaffected in leaves infected with the nondefoliating isolate and in stems infected with either isolate.The onset of epinasty and especially defoliation was also accompanied by increased ethylene production in diseased plants. Ethylene in gas samples taken from jars confining plants infected with SS4 or T9, respectively, was increased 2- and 5-fold over uninoculated controls. Ethylene supplied exogenously to healthy plants in concentrations as low as 0.2 microliter per liter induced both the

  6. Growth Regulator Changes in Cotton Associated with Defoliation Caused by Verticillium albo-atrum1

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, M. V.; Devay, J. E.

    1970-01-01

    Cotton plants, variety Acala 4-42 family 77 (Gossypium hirsutum L.,), were stem puncture-inoculated with either a defoliating isolate (T9) or a nondefoliating isolate (SS4) of Verticillium albo-atrum (Reinke and Berth.). As symptoms developed, growth regulators were assayed in diseased plants to discern their importance in the disease syndrome. An Avena coleoptile straight growth bioassay demonstrated the presence of several growth-regulatory compounds in cotton tissue extracts. Indoleacetic acid was among the compounds whose effects on coleoptile growth were influenced by disease development. Coleoptile growth due to indoleacetic acid was greater in extracts of diseased stems and leaves than in extracts of comparable healthy tissues. During the defoliation period the T9 and SS4 isolates appeared equally effective in increasing indoleacetic acid and reducing indoleacetic acid decarboxylation. Preceding defoliation, however, in plants showing equivalent symptoms the degradation of auxin was reduced more by infection with T9, the defoliating isolate. The reduced auxin degradation appeared to be releated to concomitant increases in caffeic acid and other indoleacetic acid-oxidase inhibitors in the affected tissues. Abscisic acid in tissue extracts strongly inhibited coleoptile growth. During the defoliation period gas-liquid chromatographic and ultraviolet absorption measurements revealed that abscisic acid levels were approximately doubled in T9-infected leaves but were relatively unaffected in leaves infected with the nondefoliating isolate and in stems infected with either isolate. The onset of epinasty and especially defoliation was also accompanied by increased ethylene production in diseased plants. Ethylene in gas samples taken from jars confining plants infected with SS4 or T9, respectively, was increased 2- and 5-fold over uninoculated controls. Ethylene supplied exogenously to healthy plants in concentrations as low as 0.2 microliter per liter induced both

  7. Multiresidue analysis of cotton defoliant, herbicide, and insecticide residues in water by solid-phase extraction and GC-NPD, GC-MS, and HPLC-diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Potter, T L; Marti, L; Belflower, S; Truman, C C

    2000-09-01

    A multiresidue procedure was developed for analysis of cotton pesticide and harvest-aid chemicals in water using solid-phase extraction and analysis by GC-NPD, GC-MS, and HPLC-DAD. Target compounds included the defoliants tribufos, dimethipin, thidiazuron; the herbicide diuron; and the insecticide methyl parathion. Three solid-phase extraction (SPE) media, octadecylsilyl (ODS), graphitized carbon black (GCB), and a divinylbenzene-N-vinyl pyrollidine copolymer (DVBVP), were evaluated. On GCB and ODS, recoveries varied depending on compound type. Recoveries were quantitative for all compounds on DVBVP, ranging from 87 to 115% in spiked deionized water and surface runoff. The method detection limit was less than 0.1 microg L(-)(1). SPE with DVBVP was applied to post-defoliation samples of surface runoff and tile drainage from a cotton research plot and surface runoff from a commercial field. The research plot was defoliated with a tank mixture of dimethipin and thidiazuron, and the commercial field, with tribufos. Dimethipin was detected (1.9-9.6 microg L(-)(1)) in all research plot samples. In the commercial field samples, tribufos concentration ranged from 0.1 to 135 microg L(-)(1). An exponentially decreasing concentration trend was observed with each successive storm event. PMID:10995322

  8. SOYBEAN.DEFOLIATION.1.SD.2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various chewing insects feed upon soybean plants, and their infestations may be economically significant in some years in the north-central United States. Soybean lines that are resistant to defoliation may be useful for management of chewing insect pests. Levels of defoliation from chewing insec...

  9. SOYBEAN.DEFOLIATION.2.SD.2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several types of chewing insects feed upon soybean plants, and their infestations may be economically significant in some years in the north-central United States. Soybean lines that are resistant to defoliation may be useful in the management of chewing insect pests. Levels of defoliation from c...

  10. The Pennsylvania defoliation application pilot test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, R. G.; Zobrist, A. L.; Bryant, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite imagery for the State of Pennsylvania was digitally mosaicked to provide the seed data base for monitoring defoliation of hardwood trees by the gypsy moth. Two separate mosaics for the state were prepared, one before defoliation and one after defoliation, to determine the extent, direction, and impact of gypsy moth activity in the state. The digital mosaic technology used to construct the data base was transferred to Pennsylvania State University to permit periodic updates to the data base and to assist in planning and abatement activities. Participating agencies or institutions included Goddard Space Flight Center and the Pennsylvania State University Office for Remote Sensing of Earth Resources.

  11. [Determination of eight defoliant residues in cotton by accelerated solvent extraction coupled with ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Dong, Suozhuai; Pan, Lulu; Zhao, Shanhong; Wang, Lijun; Guo, Fanglong; Li, Dan

    2013-07-01

    A novel method has been developed for the rapid extraction and determination of eight defoliants including thidiazuron, butiphos, methabenzthiazuron, abscisic acid, carfentra-zone-ethyl, diuron, paraquat, and pyrithiobac-sodium in cotton by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) coupled with ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The defoliants in cotton were extracted by ASE and the extracts were dried by a rotavapor, then redissolved in the solvents of acetonitrile and water (1:9, v/v). The chromatographic analysis was performed on an Acquity UPLC HSS T3 column (50 mmx 2. 1 mm, 1. 8 microm) by a gradient elution employing of acetonitrile and 0.05% (v/v) formic acid as mobile phases. The analytes were detected by electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in positive ion mode. Good linearities (r >0.99) were observed between 0. 01 and 0. 3 mg/L for all the compounds. The recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) were obtained by spiking untreated samples with the eight defoliants at 0. 1, 0. 5 and 1.0 mg/kg. The average recoveries of the eight defoliants were from (84. 18 +/- 8.04)% to (95.99 +/- 6.76)%. The precision values expressed as RSDs were from 7. 04% to 10. 60% (n = 6). The limits of detection were 0. 8 - 29 microg/kg and the limits of quantification were 2.5 - 96 1/4g/kg for the analytes. The results ahowed that the method is simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate, and is suitable for the quantitative determination and confirmation of the eight defoliants in cotton. PMID:24164041

  12. Genetic diversity in Gossypium genus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overall objectives of this paper are to report on cotton germplasm resources, morphobiological and agronomic diversity of Gossypium genus and review efforts on molecular genetic diversity of cotton gene pools as well as on the challenges and perspectives of exploiting genetic diversity in cotton...

  13. TREATMENT WITH THIDIAZURON IMPROVES OPENING AND VASE LIFE OF IRIS FLOWERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The marketability of Dutch iris (Iris × hollandica) cut flowers is limited by their short display life and frequent failure to open fully. We tested the ability of thidiazuron (TDZ), a phenyl urea compound with cytokinin-like activity, to improve iris flower opening and longevity. A postharvest pu...

  14. Thidiazuron, a non-metablized cytokinin, shows promise in extending the life of potted plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of low concentrations of thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N’-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-yl urea, TDZ) has been shown to be a very effective means of delaying leaf yellowing in cut flowers such as alstroemeria, stock, lilies and tulips. We examined the possible use of this compound for delaying leaf yellow...

  15. Simulated impacts of insect defoliation on forest carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvigy, D.; Clark, K. L.; Skowronski, N. S.; Schäfer, K. V. R.

    2012-12-01

    Many temperate and boreal forests are subject to insect epidemics. In the eastern US, over 41 million meters squared of tree basal area are thought to be at risk of gypsy moth defoliation. However, the decadal-to-century scale implications of defoliation events for ecosystem carbon dynamics are not well understood. In this study, the effects of defoliation intensity, periodicity and spatial pattern on the carbon cycle are investigated in a set of idealized model simulations. A mechanistic terrestrial biosphere model, ecosystem demography model 2, is driven with observations from a xeric oak-pine forest located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Simulations indicate that net ecosystem productivity (equal to photosynthesis minus respiration) decreases linearly with increasing defoliation intensity. However, because of interactions between defoliation and drought effects, aboveground biomass exhibits a nonlinear decrease with increasing defoliation intensity. The ecosystem responds strongly with both reduced productivity and biomass loss when defoliation periodicity varies from 5 to 15 yr, but exhibits a relatively weak response when defoliation periodicity varies from 15 to 60 yr. Simulations of spatially heterogeneous defoliation resulted in markedly smaller carbon stocks than simulations with spatially homogeneous defoliation. These results show that gypsy moth defoliation has a large effect on oak-pine forest biomass dynamics, functioning and its capacity to act as a carbon sink.

  16. Defoliation effects on pasture photosynthesis and respiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecosystem C gain or loss from managed grasslands can depend on the type and intensity of management practices that are employed. However, limited information is available at the field scale on how the type of defoliation, specifically grazing vs. cutting, affects gross primary productivity (GPP) an...

  17. Differentiating pollen from four species of Gossypium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton, Gossypium (Malvaceae) has been spun, woven, and dyed since prehistoric times. Four cotton species are economically important, Gossypium arboreum (tree cotton), G. barbadense (American pima cotton), G. herbaceum (levant cotton), and G. hirsutum (American upland cotton). Some research has be...

  18. Aerial Photography: Use in Detecting Simulated Insect Defoliation in Corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, H. C.; Latham, R.; Meyer, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial defoliation in corn was used to explore the usefulness of aerial photography in detecting crop insect infestations. Defoliation on the top of plants was easily detected, while that on the base was less so. Aero infrared film with Wratten 89B filter gave the best results, and morning flights at the scale of 1:15840 are recommended. Row direction, plant growth stage, and time elapse since defoliation were not important factors.

  19. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: DEFOLIATION OF COTTON, STATE-OF-THE ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a study of air pollutants emitted during the defoliation or desiccation of cotton prior to harvest. (Defoliation is the process by which leaves are abscissed from the plant by the action of topically applied chemical agents. Desiccation by chemicals is the dr...

  20. Non-defoliating and defoliating strains from cotton correlate with races 1 and 2 of Verticillium dahliae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt caused by Verticillium dahliae is an important disease of cotton worldwide. Isolates of V. dahliae can be characterized as race 1 or race 2 based on the responses of differential cultivars of tomato and lettuce or as defoliating or non-defoliating based on symptom expression in cot...

  1. Collinearity analysis of allotetraploid Gossypium tomentosum and Gossypium darwinii.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Zhou, Z L; Wang, C Y; Wang, Y H; Cai, X Y; Wang, X X; Wang, K B; Zhang, Z S

    2016-01-01

    Gossypium tomentosum and G. darwinii are wild allotetraploid cotton species, characterized by many excellent traits, including fiber fineness, drought tolerance, and Fusarium and Verticillium wilt resistance. Based on the construction of F2 linkage groups of G. hirsutum x G. tomentosum and G. hirsutum x G. darwinii, two genetic linkage maps were compared. As a result, we found a total of seven inverted fragments on chr02, chr05, chr08, chr12, chr14, chr16, and chr25, and three translocated fragments on chr05, chr14, and chr26. In addition, comparison of the inverted and translocated fragments revealed that the orientation of four of seven markers in G. tomentosum were consistent with G. hirsutum or G. raimondii. The orientation of one of seven inverted markers of G. darwinii was consistent with G. hirsutum, and the orientation of one of three translocated markers of G. tomentosum was consistent with G. raimondii. These results indicate that, in comparison to G. darwinii, G. tomentosum has a closer genetic relationship to G. hirsutum. These findings will be important for our understanding on the genome structure of G. tomentosum and G. darwinii, and set the scene for further in-depth genome research such as fine mapping, tagging genes of interest from wild relatives, and evolutionary study. PMID:27525913

  2. Monitoring Tamarisk Defoliation and Scaling Evapotranspiration Using Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, P. E.; Hultine, K. R.; Nagler, P. L.; Miura, T.; Glenn, E. P.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Non-native tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) has invaded riparian ecosystems throughout the Western United States. Another non-native species, the saltcedar leaf beetle (Diorhabda elongata), has been released in an attempt to control tamarisk infestations. Most efforts directed towards monitoring tamarisk defoliation by Diorhabda have focused on changes in leaf area or sap flux, but these measurements only give a local view of defoliation impacts. We are assessing the ability of remote sensing data for monitoring tamarisk defoliation and measuring resulting changes in evapotranspiration over space and time. Tamarisk defoliation by Diorhabda has taken place during the past two summers along the Colorado River and its tributaries near Moab, Utah. We are using 15 meter spatial resolution Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and 250 meter spatial resolution Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data to monitor tamarisk defoliation. An ASTER normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) time series has revealed large drops in index values associated with loss of leaf area due to defoliation. MODIS data have superior temporal monitoring abilities, but at the sacrifice of much lower spatial resolution. A MODIS enhanced vegetation index time series has revealed that for pixels where the percentage of riparian cover is moderate or high, defoliation is detectable even at 250 meter spatial resolution. We are comparing MODIS vegetation index time series to site measurements of leaf area and sap flux. We are also using an evapotranspiration model to scale potential water savings resulting from the biocontrol of tamarisk.

  3. Ethylene: a factor in defoliation induced by auxins.

    PubMed

    Hallaway, M; Osborne, D J

    1969-03-01

    Aerial sprays of synthetic auxins defoliate many species of tropical trees. Treatment of Euonymus japonica leaves with the n-butyl ester of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid causes premature senescence and leaf fall and stimulates ethylene production by the blade 5-to 25-fold. Exposure to ethylene alone similarly accelerates senescence and leaf fall. Evidence indicates that the defoliant action of auxin is mediated through the enhanced amounts of ethylene in the blade. PMID:5764868

  4. Gossypium Germplasm Resources for Cotton Improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Only a very small fraction of the genetic diversity residing in the Gossypium genus is represented in improved, elite cotton germplasm. Although genetic diversity in elite germplasm is reported to be narrow, diversity on the farm is narrower, due to preferential planting of successful cultivars, an...

  5. Assessing MODIS-based Products and Techniques for Detecting Gypsy Moth Defoliation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Hargrove, William; Smoot, James C.; Prados, Don; McKellip, Rodney; Sader, Steven A.; Gasser, Jerry; May, George

    2008-01-01

    The project showed potential of MODIS and VIIRS time series data for contributing defoliation detection products to the USFS forest threat early warning system. This study yielded the first satellite-based wall-to-wall 2001 gypsy moth defoliation map for the study area. Initial results led to follow-on work to map 2007 gypsy moth defoliation over the eastern United States (in progress). MODIS-based defoliation maps offer promise for aiding aerial sketch maps either in planning surveys and/or adjusting acreage estimates of annual defoliation. More work still needs to be done to assess potential of technology for "now casts"of defoliation.

  6. Growth and mortality of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) in response to artificial defoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulinier, Julien; Lorenzetti, François; Bergeron, Yves

    2014-02-01

    To simulate the effects of forest tent caterpillar (FTC) defoliation on trembling aspen growth and mortality, an artificial defoliation experiment was performed over three years in young aspen stands of northwestern Quebec. Defoliation plots of 15 × 15 m were established on three sites, together with associated control stands of pure trembling aspen. In 2007, root collar diameters were measured and positions of all trees were mapped prior defoliation. Severe FTC defoliation was simulated for three successive years (2007-2009) by manually removing all leaves from all but 7-10% of the trees present in the defoliation plots. Yearly surveys of growth and mortality were conducted until 2010 to evaluate defoliation effects on defoliated as well as surrounding undefoliated trees. In absence of other factors, growth and mortality of trembling aspen decreased and increased, respectively, after defoliation. Our study further revealed that small diameter trees died after one year of artificial defoliation, while larger-diameter trees died after repeated defoliations. Distributions of tree mortality tended to be aggregated at small scales (<5 m), corroborating gap patterns observed in mature stands following FTC outbreaks. This experiment revealed that trembling aspen mortality can be directly attributed solely to defoliation. Repeated defoliations during FTC outbreaks have the potential to profoundly modify stand productivity and structure by reducing tree growth and increasing tree mortality in the absence of predisposing factors.

  7. An Experimental Comparison of Two Methods on Photosynthesis Driving Soil Respiration: Girdling and Defoliation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yanli; Guan, Dexin; Wu, Jiabing; Wang, Anzhi; Jin, Changjie; Yuan, Fenghui

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies with different experimental methods have demonstrated that photosynthesis significantly influences soil respiration (RS). To compare the experimental results of different methods, RS after girdling and defoliation was measured in five-year-old seedlings of Fraxinus mandshurica from June to September. Girdling and defoliation significantly reduced RS by 33% and 25% within 4 days, and 40% and 32% within the entire treatment period, respectively. The differential response of RS to girdling and defoliation was a result of the over-compensation for RS after girdling and redistribution of stored carbon after defoliation. No significant effect on RS was observed between girdling and defoliation treatment, while the soluble sugar content in fine roots was higher in defoliation than in girdling treatment, indicating that defoliation had less compensation effect for RS after interrupting photosynthates supply. We confirm the close coupling of RS with photosynthesis and recommend defoliation for further studies to estimate the effect of photosynthesis on RS. PMID:26177498

  8. Defining the temporal window for monitoring forest canopy defoliation using Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of Landsat imagery of forested areas near Williamsport, Pennsylvania shows that the effects of defoliation by insects can be assessed over a two month period beginning in early June. Within this window heavily defoliated forest can be successfully delineated from moderately defoliated and healthy forest. Consequently, the effects of insect damage can be assessed at times other than peak defoliation, doubling the probability that useful satellite data can be acquired in the Williamsport area.

  9. Crested Wheatgrass Defoliation Intensity and Season of Use on Medusahead Invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of crested wheatgrass defoliation intensity and timing on medusahead density and biomass. Eighteen treatments (six defoliation levels, three seasons of defoliation) were applied to 21.5-ft2 plots on two sites with varying clay content. Plant...

  10. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Gossypium thurberi in Response to Verticillium dahliae Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Weiping; Xie, Deyi; Zhu, Heqin; Li, Wu; Xu, Zhenzhen; Yang, Lirong; Li, Zhifang; Sun, Li; Wang, Jinxia; Nie, Lihong; Tang, Zhongjie; Lv, Shuping; Zhao, Fu’an; Sun, Yao; Zhao, Yuanming; Hou, Jianan; Yang, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Verticillium wilt is threatening cotton productivity globally. This disease is caused by soil-borne Verticillium dahliae which directly infects cotton roots, and exclusively colonizes and occludes xylem vessels, finally resulting in necrosis, defoliation, and most severely, plant death. For the first time, iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) was applied to screen the differentially expressed proteins of Gossypium thurberi inoculated with V. dahliae. A total of 6533 proteins were identified from the roots of G. thurberi after inoculation with V. dahliae, and 396 showed up- and 279 down-regulated in comparison to a mock-inoculated roots. Of these identified proteins, the main functional groups were those involved in cell wall organization and reinforcement, disease-resistant chemicals of secondary metabolism, phytohormone signaling, pathogenesis-related proteins, and disease-resistant proteins. Physiological and biochemical analysis showed that peroxidase activity, which promotes the biosynthesis and accumulation of lignin, was induced early in the hypocotyl after inoculation with V. dahliae. Similarly, salicylic acid also accumulated significantly in hypocotyl of the seedlings after inoculation. These findings provide an important knowledge of the molecular events and regulatory networks occurring during G. thurberi-V. dahliae interaction, which may provide a foundation for breeding disease-resistance in cotton. PMID:26506344

  11. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Gossypium thurberi in Response to Verticillium dahliae Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Weiping; Xie, Deyi; Zhu, Heqin; Li, Wu; Xu, Zhenzhen; Yang, Lirong; Li, Zhifang; Sun, Li; Wang, Jinxia; Nie, Lihong; Tang, Zhongjie; Lv, Shuping; Zhao, Fu'an; Sun, Yao; Zhao, Yuanming; Hou, Jianan; Yang, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Verticillium wilt is threatening cotton productivity globally. This disease is caused by soil-borne Verticillium dahliae which directly infects cotton roots, and exclusively colonizes and occludes xylem vessels, finally resulting in necrosis, defoliation, and most severely, plant death. For the first time, iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) was applied to screen the differentially expressed proteins of Gossypium thurberi inoculated with V. dahliae. A total of 6533 proteins were identified from the roots of G. thurberi after inoculation with V. dahliae, and 396 showed up- and 279 down-regulated in comparison to a mock-inoculated roots. Of these identified proteins, the main functional groups were those involved in cell wall organization and reinforcement, disease-resistant chemicals of secondary metabolism, phytohormone signaling, pathogenesis-related proteins, and disease-resistant proteins. Physiological and biochemical analysis showed that peroxidase activity, which promotes the biosynthesis and accumulation of lignin, was induced early in the hypocotyl after inoculation with V. dahliae. Similarly, salicylic acid also accumulated significantly in hypocotyl of the seedlings after inoculation. These findings provide an important knowledge of the molecular events and regulatory networks occurring during G. thurberi-V. dahliae interaction, which may provide a foundation for breeding disease-resistance in cotton. PMID:26506344

  12. Comparative phenotypic analysis of Gossypium raimondii with Upland cotton.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gossypium raimondii Ulbr., a wild species with a diploid genome, has been sequenced due to its small genome size and sequence similarity with the polyploidy cultivated Gossypium species. Accessibility of the G. raimondii genome has made the species a reference used extensively in cotton genomic and...

  13. Gossypolhemiquinone, a dimeric sesquiterpenoid identified in cotton (Gossypium)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The report that the cotton leaf perforator, Bucculatrix thurberiella, is one of the few insect herbivores to attack Gossypium thurberi prompted an investigation of the terpenoids present in the leaves of this wild species of cotton. Members of Gossypium produce subepidermal pigment glands in their ...

  14. Gypsy moth defoliation assessment: Forest defoliation in detectable from satellite imagery. [New England, New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J. (Principal Investigator); Rohde, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery obtained over eastern Pennsylvania during July 1973, indicates that forest defoliation is detectable from satellite imagery and correlates well with aerial visual survey data. It now appears that two damage classes (heavy and moderate-light) and areas of no visible defoliation can be detected and mapped from properly prepared false composite imagery. In areas where maple is the dominant species or in areas of small woodlots interspersed with agricultural areas, detection and subsequent mapping is more difficult.

  15. Linkage mapping of Gossypium longicalyx resistance to reniform nematode during introgression into cotton Gossypium hirsutum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford and Oliveira) poses significant problems for US cultivated Upland cottons (Gossypium hirsutum L., 2n=52), all of which lack high resistance. The African species G. longicalyx (Hutch. and Lee), however, is extremely resistant. We used three pr...

  16. Effects of Invasive Winter Moth Defoliation on Tree Radial Growth in Eastern Massachusetts, USA

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Michael J.; Lee, Thomas D.; Ducey, Mark J.; Elkinton, Joseph S.; Boettner, George H.; Dodds, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Winter moth, Operophtera brumata L. (Lepidoptera: Geometridae), has been defoliating hardwood trees in eastern Massachusetts since the 1990s. Native to Europe, winter moth has also been detected in Rhode Island, Connecticut, eastern Long Island (NY), New Hampshire, and Maine. Individual tree impacts of winter moth defoliation in New England are currently unknown. Using dendroecological techniques, this study related annual radial growth of individual host (Quercus spp. and Acer spp.) trees to detailed defoliation estimates. Winter moth defoliation was associated with up to a 47% reduction in annual radial growth of Quercus trees. Latewood production of Quercus was reduced by up to 67% in the same year as defoliation, while earlywood production was reduced by up to 24% in the year following defoliation. Winter moth defoliation was not a strong predictor of radial growth in Acer species. This study is the first to document impacts of novel invasions of winter moth into New England. PMID:26462685

  17. Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) suppession by sudangrass interference and defoliation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canada thistle is difficult to manage in farming systems with reduced reliance on herbicides, including organic and low-external input systems. Previous field studies found that defoliation or sudangrass interference suppressed Canada thistle. Our objective was to understand the factors causing supp...

  18. Artificial defoliation effect on Populus growth, biomass production, and total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbacker, R.R.; Hart, E.R.; Schultz, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    The impact of artificial defoliation on Populus growth, biomass production, and total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration was examined. Four Populus clones were field planted and artificially defoliated. Assigned defoliation levels (0, 25, 50, or 75%) were applied to leaves of leaf plastochron index 0 through 8 during a 6-d period in a 3-step incremental manner to simulate cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta F., larval feeding patterns. Artificial defoliations were timed to coincide with the outbreaks of natural beetle populations in adjacent areas. After 2 growing seasons, trees were measured for height, diameter, and biomass accumulation. Root samples were collected from 0 and 75% defoliation treatments for each clone. Biomass was reduced an average of 33% as defoliation level increased from 0 to 75%. As defoliation level increased from 0 to 75%, a consistent allocation ratio of biomass to 2/3 above and 1/3 below ground components continued in all clones. An overcompensation response occurred in above ground biomass when a defoliation level of 25% was applied. Between 25 and 75% a strong linear trend of decreasing biomass as defoliation increased was indicated. Vitality of the tree, as indicated by total nonstructural carbohydrate content, was affected only slightly by increasing defoliation. 26 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  19. Photosynthetic responses of field-grown Pinus radiata trees to artificial and aphid-induced defoliation.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Smith, David; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Smith, Ian; Corkrey, Ross; Elms, Stephen; Beadle, Chris; Mohammed, Caroline

    2011-06-01

    The phloem-feeding aphid Essigella californica represents a potential threat to the productivity of Pinus radiata plantations in south-eastern Australia. Five- and nine-year-old field trials were used to characterize the effects of artificial and natural aphid-induced (E. californica) defoliation, respectively, on shoot photosynthesis and growth. Photosynthetic capacity (A(max)) was significantly greater following a 25% (D25) (13.8 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) and a 50% (D50) (15.9 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) single-event upper-crown artificial defoliation, 3 weeks after defoliation than in undefoliated control trees (12.9 µmol m(-2) s(-1)). This response was consistently observed for up to 11 weeks after the defoliation event; by Week 16, there was no difference in A(max) between control and defoliated trees. In the D50 treatment, this increased A(max) was not sufficient to fully compensate for the foliage loss as evidenced by the reduced diameter increment (by 15%) in defoliated trees 36 weeks after defoliation. In contrast, diameter increment of trees in the D25 treatment was unaffected by defoliation. The A(max) of trees experiencing upper-crown defoliation by natural and repeated E. californica infestations varied, depending on host genotype. Despite clear differences in defoliation levels between resistant and susceptible genotypes (17 vs. 35% of tree crown defoliated, respectively), growth of susceptible genotypes was not significantly different from that of resistant genotypes. The observed increases in A(max) in the lower crown of the canopy following attack suggested that susceptible genotypes were able to partly compensate for the loss of foliage by compensatory photosynthesis. The capacity of P. radiata to regulate photosynthesis in response to natural aphid-induced defoliation provides evidence that the impact of E. californica attack on stem growth will be less than expected, at least for up to 35% defoliation. PMID:21697147

  20. Biochemical characterization of embryogenic calli of Vanilla planifolia in response to two years of thidiazuron treatment.

    PubMed

    Kodja, Hippolyte; Noirot, Michel; Khoyratty, Shahnoo S; Limbada, Hafsah; Verpoorte, Robert; Palama, Tony Lionel

    2015-11-01

    Vanilla planifolia embryogenic calli were cultured for two years on a medium containing thidiazuron (TDZ). Due to the presence of TDZ, these calli were under permanent chemical treatment and the differentiation of adventitious shoots from protocorm-like-bodies (PLBs) was blocked. When embryogenic calli were transferred onto a medium without TDZ, shoot organogenesis and plantlet regeneration occurred. To gain better knowledge about the biochemical and molecular processes involved in the morphoregulatory role of TDZ, hormonal and metabolomic analyses were performed. Our results indicate that in the presence of TDZ, embryogenic calli contained a high amount of abscisic acid (ABA) essentially metabolized into abscisic acid glucosyl ester (ABAGE) and phaseic acid (PA), which was the most abundant. When transferred onto a medium without TDZ, shoot regeneration and development take place in four stages that include: embryogenic calli growth, differentiation of PLBs from meristmatic cells zones (MCZ), shoot organogenesis from PLBs and the elongation of well-formed shoots. From a hormonal perspective, the significant reduction in ABA metabolism and its readjustment in the ABAGE pathway triggered PLBs formation. However, this first morphogenesis was stimulated by a strong reduction in IAA metabolism. The organogenesis of PLBs into shoots is associated with an increase in ABA catabolism and a gradual shift in cellular metabolism towards shoot differentiation. Thus, the initiation of the elongation process in shoots is correlated with an alteration in metabolite composition, including an increase in energy reserves (sucrose/starch) and a rapid decrease in alanine content. Our data highlighted the relationship between endogenous hormone signalling, carbohydrate metabolism and shoot organogenesis in Orchid plants. PMID:26351150

  1. Polyploidy and the petal transcriptome of Gossypium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genes duplicated by polyploidy (homoeologs) may be differentially expressed in plant tissues. Recent research using DNA microarrays and RNAseq data have described a cacophony of complex expression patterns during development of cotton fibers, petals, and leaves. Because of its highly canalized development, petal tissue has been used as a model tissue for gene expression in cotton. Recent advances in cotton genome annotation and assembly now permit an enhanced analysis of duplicate gene deployment in petals from allopolyploid cotton. Results Homoeologous gene expression levels were quantified in diploid and tetraploid flower petals of Gossypium using the Gossypium raimondii genome sequence as a reference. In the polyploid, most homoeologous genes were expressed at equal levels, though a subset had an expression bias of AT and DT copies. The direction of gene expression bias was conserved in natural and recent polyploids of cotton. Conservation of direction of bias and additional comparisons between the diploids and tetraploids suggested different regulation mechanisms of gene expression. We described three phases in the evolution of cotton genomes that contribute to gene expression in the polyploid nucleus. Conclusions Compared to previous studies, a surprising level of expression homeostasis was observed in the expression patterns of polyploid genomes. Conserved expression bias in polyploid petals may have resulted from cis-acting modifications that occurred prior to polyploidization. Some duplicated genes were intriguing exceptions to general trends. Mechanisms of gene regulation for these and other genes in the cotton genome warrants further investigation. PMID:24393201

  2. Future impacts of nitrogen deposition and climate change scenarios on forest crown defoliation.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Alessandra; Proietti, Chiara; Cionni, Irene; Fischer, Richard; Screpanti, Augusto; Vitale, Marcello

    2014-11-01

    Defoliation is an indicator for forest health in response to several stressors including air pollutants, and one of the most important parameters monitored in the International Cooperative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (ICP Forests). The study aims to estimate crown defoliation in 2030, under three climate and one nitrogen deposition scenarios, based on evaluation of the most important factors (meteorological, nitrogen deposition and chemical soil parameters) affecting defoliation of twelve European tree species. The combination of favourable climate and nitrogen fertilization in the more adaptive species induces a generalized decrease of defoliation. On the other hand, severe climate change and drought are main causes of increase in defoliation in Quercus ilex and Fagus sylvatica, especially in Mediterranean area. Our results provide information on regional distribution of future defoliation, an important knowledge for identifying policies to counteract negative impacts of climate change and air pollution. PMID:25118942

  3. Effects of Artificial Defoliation on Growth and Biomass Accumulation in Short-Rotation Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Jetton, Robert M.; Robison, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Sweetgum, Liquidambar styraciflua L. (Hamamelidales: Hamamelidaceae), is a species of interest for short-rotation plantation forestry in the southeastern United States. Despite its high levels of resistance to many native insects and pathogens, the species is susceptible to generalist defoliators during outbreak epidemics. The objective of this field study was to evaluate the potential impact of defoliation on sweetgum growth and productivity within the context of an operational plantation. Over three growing seasons, trees were subjected to artificial defoliation treatments of various intensity (control = 0% defoliation; low intensity = 33% defoliation; moderate intensity = 67% defoliation; high intensity = 99% defoliation) and frequency (not defoliated; defoliated once in April of the first growing season; defoliated twice, once in April of the first growing season and again in April of the second growing season). The responses of stem height, stem diameter, stem volume, crown volume, total biomass accumulation, and branch growth were measured in November of each growing season. At the end of the first growing season, when trees had received single defoliations, significant reductions in all growth traits followed the most severe (99%) defoliation treatment only. After the second and third growing seasons, when trees had received one or two defoliations of varying intensity, stem diameter and volume and total tree biomass were reduced significantly by 67 and 99% defoliation, while reductions in stem height and crown volume followed the 99% treatment only. All growth traits other than crown volume were reduced significantly by two defoliations but not one defoliation. Results indicate that sweetgum is highly resilient to single defoliations of low, moderate, and high intensity. However, during the three-year period of the study, repeated high-intensity defoliation caused significant reductions in growth and productivity that could have lasting impacts on yield

  4. Condensed tannins increase nitrogen recovery by trees following insect defoliation.

    PubMed

    Madritch, Michael D; Lindroth, Richard L

    2015-10-01

    While the importance of plant secondary metabolites to belowground functioning is gaining recognition, the perception remains that secondary metabolites are produced for herbivore defense, whereas their belowground impacts are ecological by-products, or 'afterlife' effects. However, plants invest a significant amount of resources into production of secondary metabolites that have minimal effects on herbivore resistance (e.g. condensed tannins and insect herbivores). We show that genetically mediated variation in condensed tannin concentration is correlated with plant nitrogen recovery following a severe defoliation event. We used single-tree mesocosms labeled with (15) N to track nitrogen through both the frass and litter cycling pathways. High concentrations of leaf tannins in Populus tremuloides were correlated with (15) N recovery from frass within the same growing season and in the following growing season. Likewise, leaf tannin concentrations were also correlated with (15) N recovery from the litter of defoliated trees in the growing season following the defoliation event. Conversely, tannins were not well correlated with nitrogen uptake under conditions of nominal herbivory. Our results suggest that tannins may confer benefits in response to herbivore pressure through conserved belowground nitrogen cycling, rather than via defensive properties. Consequently, tannins may be considered as chemical mediators of tolerance rather than resistance. PMID:25952793

  5. Defoliation reduces soil biota - and modifies stimulating effects of elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Dam, Marie; Christensen, Søren

    2015-11-01

    To understand the responses to external disturbance such as defoliation and possible feedback mechanisms at global change in terrestrial ecosystems, it is necessary to examine the extent and nature of effects on aboveground-belowground interactions. We studied a temperate heathland system subjected to experimental climate and atmospheric factors based on prognoses for year 2075 and further exposed to defoliation. By defoliating plants, we were able to study how global change modifies the interactions of the plant-soil system. Shoot production, root biomass, microbial biomass, and nematode abundance were assessed in the rhizosphere of manually defoliated patches of Deschampsia flexuosa in June in a full-factorial FACE experiment with the treatments: increased atmospheric CO 2, increased nighttime temperatures, summer droughts, and all of their combinations. We found a negative effect of defoliation on microbial biomass that was not apparently affected by global change. The negative effect of defoliation cascades through to soil nematodes as dependent on CO 2 and drought. At ambient CO 2, drought and defoliation each reduced nematodes. In contrast, at elevated CO 2, a combination of drought and defoliation was needed to reduce nematodes. We found positive effects of CO 2 on root density and microbial biomass. Defoliation affected soil biota negatively, whereas elevated CO 2 stimulated the plant-soil system. This effect seen in June is contrasted by the effects seen in September at the same site. Late season defoliation increased activity and biomass of soil biota and more so at elevated CO 2. Based on soil biota responses, plants defoliated in active growth therefore conserve resources, whereas defoliation after termination of growth results in release of resources. This result challenges the idea that plants via exudation of organic carbon stimulate their rhizosphere biota when in apparent need of nutrients for growth. PMID:26640664

  6. Analysis of forchlorfenuron and thidiazuron in fruits and vegetables by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy after selective solid-phase extraction with modified β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoman; Yan, Kuanglin; Xiao, Xiaohua; Li, Gongke

    2016-06-01

    β-Cyclodextrin and its derivatives can selectively bind to various organic molecules in its cavity and provide good applications in sample preparation. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is a sensitive technique and has received increasing attention in the last decade. Herein, 3,5-dimethyl phenyl carbamoylated β-cyclodextrin bonded silica gel was used as a ssorbent in solid-phase extraction to selectively enrich forchlorfenuron and thidiazuron followed by determination with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. It showed excellent selectivity for forchlorfenuron and thidiazuron and the adsorption capacities were 40.0 and 30.0 μg/g, respectively. A rapid and sensitive method based on the modified β-cyclodextrin solid-phase extraction coupled with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy was developed. The linear ranges were 30.0-300.0 μg/L for forchlorfenuron and thidiazuron at 1005 and 640 cm(-1) , respectively. Both of the limits of detection were 15.0 μg/L, which were significantly lower than the maximum permitted by the National Standard. The recoveries of forchlorfenuron and thidiazuron were 78.9-87.9% for the spiked grape, kiwi, cucumber and tomato, with relative standard deviations of 8.1-13.2%. The results show that this method is sensitive, selective, and relatively time saving, and has great potential in the analysis of trace amounts of plant growth regulators in fruits and vegetables. PMID:27120042

  7. Monitoring the defoliation of hardwood forests in Pennsylvania using LANDSAT. [gypsy moth surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dottavio, C. L.; Nelson, R. F.; Williams, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    An automated system for conducting annual gypsy moth defoliation surveys using LANDSAT MSS data and digital processing techniques is described. A two-step preprocessing procedure was developed that uses multitemporal data sets representing forest canopy conditions before and after defoliation to create a digital image in which all nonforest cover types are eliminated or masked out of a LANDSAT image that exhibits insect defoliation. A temporal window for defoliation assessment was identified and a statewide data base was established. A data management system to interface image analysis software with the statewide data base was developed and a cost benefit analysis of this operational system was conducted.

  8. Consequences of resource limitation for recovery from repeated defoliation in Eucalyptus globulus Labilladière.

    PubMed

    Barry, Karen M; Quentin, Audrey; Eyles, Alieta; Pinkard, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Recovery following defoliation can be modified by co-occurring site resource limitations. The growth response of young Eucalyptus globulus saplings to two defoliation events was examined in an experimental plantation with combinations of low (-) or high (+) water (W) and nitrogen (N) resources. Artificial defoliation was applied at 3 and 9 months of age to remove ~40 and 55% of leaf area in the upper crown, respectively. At 18 months of age, height, stem diameter and leaf area were not significantly different between control and defoliated saplings, across all resource treatments. However, stem volume, bark volume and branch number were significantly increased in defoliated saplings, including a significant interaction with resource treatment. Total above-ground biomass of saplings in response to defoliation was significantly higher (almost double) than controls for the low water (N + W-) treatment only. Significantly increased foliar starch content (and a trend for increased soluble sugars) in the upper crown zone was found in the defoliated saplings of the N + W- treatment compared with the upper zone of control saplings. Foliar total non-structural carbohydrates were significantly correlated to stem biomass regardless of resource treatment or defoliation, and we suggest that foliar resources are most important for stem growth in E. globulus rather than stored carbon (C) from other tissues. After repeated defoliation and several months recovery, E. globulus saplings were generally not C limited in this study. PMID:22174093

  9. Differential Effects of Thidiazuron on Production of Anticancer Phenolic Compounds in Callus Cultures of Fagonia indica.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tariq; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Khan, Mubarak Ali; Shinwari, Zabta Khan

    2016-04-01

    Fagonia indica, a very important anticancer plant, has been less explored for its in vitro potential. This is the first report on thidiazuron (TDZ)-mediated callogenesis and elicitation of commercially important phenolic compounds. Among the five different plant growth regulators tested, TDZ induced comparatively higher fresh biomass, 51.0 g/100 mL and 40.50 g/100 mL for stem and leaf explants, respectively, after 6 weeks of culture time. Maximum total phenolic content (202.8 μg gallic acid equivalent [GAE]/mL for stem-derived callus and 161.3 μg GAE/mL for leaf-derived callus) and total flavonoid content (191.03 μg quercetin equivalent [QE]/mL for stem-derived callus and 164.83 μg QE/mL for leaf-derived callus) were observed in the optimized callus cultures. The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) data indicated higher amounts of commercially important anticancer secondary metabolites such as gallic acid (125.10 ± 5.01 μg/mL), myricetin (32.5 ± 2.05 μg/mL), caffeic acid (12.5 ± 0.52 μg/mL), catechin (9.4 ± 1.2 μg/mL), and apigenin (3.8 ± 0.45 μg/mL). Owing to the greater phenolic content, a better 2-2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity (69.45 % for stem explant and 63.68 % for leaf explant) was observed in optimized calluses. The unusually higher biomass and the enhanced amount of phenolic compounds as a result of lower amounts of TDZ highlight the importance of this multipotent hormone as elicitor in callus cultures of F. indica. PMID:26758711

  10. Thidiazuron Triggers Morphogenesis in Rosa canina L. Protocorm-Like Bodies by Changing Incipient Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Kou, Yaping; Yuan, Cunquan; Zhao, Qingcui; Liu, Guoqin; Nie, Jing; Ma, Zhimin; Cheng, Chenxia; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Zhao, Liangjun

    2016-01-01

    Thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N'-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea; TDZ) is an artificial plant growth regulator that is widely used in plant tissue culture. Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) induced by TDZ serve as an efficient and rapid in vitro regeneration system in Rosa species. Despite this, the mechanism of PLB induction remains relatively unclear. TDZ, which can affect the level of endogenous auxins and cytokinins, converts the cell fate of rhizoid tips and triggers PLB formation and plantlet regeneration in Rosa canina L. In callus-rhizoids, which are rhizoids that co-develop from callus, auxin and a Z-type cytokinin accumulated after applying TDZ, and transcription of the auxin transporter gene RcPIN1 was repressed. The expression of RcARF4, RcRR1, RcCKX2, RcCKX3, and RcLOG1 increased in callus-rhizoids and rhizoid tips while the transcription of an auxin response factor (RcARF1) and auxin transport proteins (RcPIN2, RcPIN3) decreased in callus-rhizoids but increased in rhizoid tips. In situ hybridization of rhizoids showed that RcWUS and RcSERK1 were highly expressed in columella cells and root stem cells resulting in the conversion of cell fate into shoot apical meristems or embryogenic callus. In addition, transgenic XVE::RcWUS lines showed repressed RcWUS overexpression while RcWUS had no effect on PLB morphogenesis. Furthermore, higher expression of the root stem cell marker RcWOX5 and root stem cell maintenance regulator genes RcPLT1 and RcPLT2 indicated the presence of a dedifferentiation developmental pathway in the stem cell niche of rhizoids. Viewed together, our results indicate that different cells in rhizoid tips acquired regeneration competence after induction by TDZ. A novel developmental pathway containing different cell types during PLB formation was identified by analyzing the endogenous auxin and cytokinin content. This study also provides a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying in vitro regeneration in Rosa. PMID:27200031

  11. Thidiazuron Triggers Morphogenesis in Rosa canina L. Protocorm-Like Bodies by Changing Incipient Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yaping; Yuan, Cunquan; Zhao, Qingcui; Liu, Guoqin; Nie, Jing; Ma, Zhimin; Cheng, Chenxia; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A.; Zhao, Liangjun

    2016-01-01

    Thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N′-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea; TDZ) is an artificial plant growth regulator that is widely used in plant tissue culture. Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) induced by TDZ serve as an efficient and rapid in vitro regeneration system in Rosa species. Despite this, the mechanism of PLB induction remains relatively unclear. TDZ, which can affect the level of endogenous auxins and cytokinins, converts the cell fate of rhizoid tips and triggers PLB formation and plantlet regeneration in Rosa canina L. In callus-rhizoids, which are rhizoids that co-develop from callus, auxin and a Z-type cytokinin accumulated after applying TDZ, and transcription of the auxin transporter gene RcPIN1 was repressed. The expression of RcARF4, RcRR1, RcCKX2, RcCKX3, and RcLOG1 increased in callus-rhizoids and rhizoid tips while the transcription of an auxin response factor (RcARF1) and auxin transport proteins (RcPIN2, RcPIN3) decreased in callus-rhizoids but increased in rhizoid tips. In situ hybridization of rhizoids showed that RcWUS and RcSERK1 were highly expressed in columella cells and root stem cells resulting in the conversion of cell fate into shoot apical meristems or embryogenic callus. In addition, transgenic XVE::RcWUS lines showed repressed RcWUS overexpression while RcWUS had no effect on PLB morphogenesis. Furthermore, higher expression of the root stem cell marker RcWOX5 and root stem cell maintenance regulator genes RcPLT1 and RcPLT2 indicated the presence of a dedifferentiation developmental pathway in the stem cell niche of rhizoids. Viewed together, our results indicate that different cells in rhizoid tips acquired regeneration competence after induction by TDZ. A novel developmental pathway containing different cell types during PLB formation was identified by analyzing the endogenous auxin and cytokinin content. This study also provides a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying in vitro regeneration in Rosa. PMID:27200031

  12. Responses of Medicago sativa and M. falcata type alfalfas to different defoliation times and grass competition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incorporating alfalfa into rangelands can enhance the quantity and quality of forage production. We evaluated the impact of defoliation timing and selective defoliation on two grazing- (Anik and SCMF 3713) and one hay-type alfalfas (Vernal) near Mandan, North Dakota, USA. Entries were space-plante...

  13. Defoliation effects on Bromus tectorum seed production: Implications for grazing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hempy-Mayer, K.; Pyke, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) is an invasive annual grass that creates near-homogenous stands in areas throughout the Intermountain sagebrush steppe and challenges successful native plant restoration in these areas. A clipping experiment carried out at two cheatgrass-dominated sites in eastern Oregon (Lincoln Bench and Succor Creek) evaluated defoliation as a potential control method for cheatgrass and a seeding preparation method for native plant reseeding projects. Treatments involved clipping plants at two heights (tall = 7.6 cm, and short = 2.5 cm), two phenological stages (boot and purple), and two frequencies (once and twice), although purple-stage treatments were clipped only once. Treatments at each site were replicated in a randomized complete block design that included a control with no defoliation. End-of-season seed density (seeds??m-2) was estimated by sampling viable seeds from plants, litter, and soil of each treatment. Undipped control plants produced an average of approximately 13 000 and 20 000 seeds??m-2 at Lincoln Bench and Succor Creek, respectively. Plants clipped short at the boot stage and again 2 wk later had among the lowest mean seed densities at both sites, and were considered the most successful treatments (Lincoln Bench: F 6,45 = 47.07, P < 0.0001; Succor Creek: F6,40 = 19.60, P < 0.0001). The 95% confidence intervals for seed densities were 123-324 seeds??m-2 from the Lincoln Bench treatment, and 769-2256 seeds??m-2 from the Succor Creek treatment. Literature suggests a maximum acceptable cheatgrass seed density of approximately 330 seeds??m-2 for successful native plant restoration through reseeding. Thus, although this study helped pinpoint optimal defoliation parameters for cheatgrass control, it also called into question the potential for livestock grazing to be an effective seed-bed preparation technique in native plant reseeding projects in cheatgrass-dominated areas.

  14. Topolins and Hydroxylated Thidiazuron Derivatives Are Substrates of Cytokinin O-Glucosyltransferase with Position Specificity Related to Receptor Recognition1

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Machteld C.; Martin, Ruth C.; Dobrev, Petre I.; Vanková, Radomira; Ho, P. Shing; Yonekura-Sakakibara, Keiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Mok, David W.S.

    2005-01-01

    Glucosides of trans-zeatin occur widely in plant tissues, formed either by O-glucosylation of the hydroxylated side chain or N-glucosylation of the purine ring structure. O-Glucosylation is stereo-specific: the O-glucosyltransferase encoded by the Phaseolus lunatus ZOG1 gene has high affinity for trans-zeatin as the substrate, whereas the enzyme encoded by the maize (Zea mays) cisZOG1 gene prefers cis-zeatin. Here we show that hydroxylated derivatives of benzyladenine (topolins) are also substrates of ZOG1 and cisZOG1. The m-OH and o-OH derivatives are the preferred substrate of ZOG1 and cisZOG1, respectively. Among the hydroxylated derivatives of thidiazuron tested, the only enzyme/substrate combination resulting in conversion was cisZOG1/(o-OH) thidiazuron. The abilities of these cytokinins to serve as substrates to the glucosyltransferases were in a large part correlated with their biological activities in the P. lunatus callus bioassay, indicating that there may be similarities between cytokinin-binding sites on the enzymes and cytokinin receptors. Further support for this interpretation is provided by cytokinin recognition studies involving the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CRE1/WOL/AHK4 and maize ZmHK1 receptors. The AHK4 receptor responded to trans-zeatin and m-topolin, while the ZmHK1 receptor responded also to cis-zeatin and o-topolin. Three-dimensional molecular models of the substrates were applied to explain the results. PMID:15728338

  15. Carbon allocation during defoliation: testing a defense-growth trade-off in balsam fir

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Annie; Caron, Laurie; Rossi, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    During repetitive defoliation events, carbon can become limiting for trees. To maintain growth and survival, the resources have to be shared more efficiently, which could result in a trade-off between the different physiological processes of a plant. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of defoliation in carbon allocation of balsam fir [Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.] to test the presence of a trade-off between allocation to growth, carbon storage, and defense. Three defoliation intensities [control (C-trees, 0% defoliation), moderately (M-trees, 41–60%), and heavily (H-trees, 61–80%) defoliated] were selected in order to monitor several variables related to stem growth (wood formation in xylem), carbon storage in stem and needle (non-structural soluble sugars and starch), and defense components in needles (terpenoids compound) from May to October 2011. The concentration of starch was drastically reduced in both wood and leaves of H-trees with a quasi-absence of carbon partitioning to storage in early summer. Fewer kinds of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were formed with an increasing level of defoliation indicating a lower carbon allocation for the production of defense. The carbon allocation to wood formation gradually reduced at increasing defoliation intensities, with a lower growth rate and fewer tracheids resulting in a reduced carbon sequestration in cell walls. The hypothesis of a trade-off between the allocations to defense components and to non-structural (NCS) and structural (growth) carbon was rejected as most of the measured variables decreased with increasing defoliation. The starch amount was highly indicative of the tree carbon status at different defoliation intensity and future research should focus on the mechanism of starch utilization for survival and growth following an outbreak. PMID:26029235

  16. Nutrients and defoliation increase soil carbon inputs in grassland.

    PubMed

    Ziter, Carly; MacDougall, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    Given the regulatory impact of resources and consumers on plant production, decomposition, and soil carbon sequestration, anthropogenic changes to nutrient inputs and grazing have likely transformed how grasslands process atmospheric CO2. The direction and magnitude of these changes, however, remain unclear in this system, whose soils contain -20% of the world's carbon pool. Nutrients stimulate production but can also increase tissue palatability and decomposition. Grazing variously affects tissue quality and quantity, decreasing, standing biomass, but potentially increasing leaf nutrient concentrations, root production, or investment in tissue defenses that slow litter decay. Here, we quantified individual and interactive impacts of nutrient addition and simulated grazing (mowing) on above- and belowground production, tissue quality, and soil carbon inputs in a western North American grassland with globally distributed agronomic species. Given that nutrients and grazing are often connected with increased root production and higher foliar tissue quality, we hypothesized that these treatments would combine to reduce inputs of recalcitrant-rich litter critical for C storage. This hypothesis was unsupported. Nutrients and defoliation combined to significantly increase belowground production but did not affect root tissue quality. There were no significant interactions between nutrients and defoliation for any measured response. Three years of nutrient addition increased root and shoot biomass by 37% and 23%, respectively, and had no impact on decomposition, resulting in a -15% increase in soil organic matter and soil carbon. Defoliation triggered a significant burst of short-lived lignin-rich roots, presumably a compensatory response to foliar loss, which increased root litter inputs by 33%. The majority of root and shoot responses were positively correlated, with aboveground biomass a reasonable proxy for whole plant responses. The exceptions were decomposition, with

  17. Enhancement and diversity of primitive cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., is an important cultivated crop that is grown throughout the world. Improvements in agronomic performance and fiber quality are needed to ensure its economic viability. Primitive accessions of cotton offer a wealth of genetic variability; however, since most of these...

  18. Localization of Allotetraploid Gossypium SNPs Using Physical Mapping Resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent efforts in Gossypium SNP development have produced thousands of putative SNPs for G. barbadense, G. mustelinum, and G. tomentosum relative to G. hirsutum. Here we report on current efforts to localize putative SNPs using physical mapping resources. Recent advances in physical mapping resour...

  19. Variability in four diverse cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) germplasm populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A broad range of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) germplasm resources exist with characteristics useful for improving modern cotton cultivars. However, much of this germplasm is not well utilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate agronomic and fiber traits of four germplasm populations to...

  20. Molecular confirmation of Gossypium hirsutum chromosome substitution lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary gene pool for tetraploid cotton species includes G. hirsutum L., as well as the other four 2n=52 species of Gossypium (G. barbadense, G. mustellinum, G. tomentosum and G. darwinii). To help overcome barriers to effective introgression, we have developed a number of alien chromosome subst...

  1. The Impact of Drought on Cotton (Gossypium Hirsutum) Fiber Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inadequate moisture during the growing season has been shown to reduce cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) lint yields. Little is known, however, as to how in-season growing conditions alter cotton fiber quality. Here, we show the impact of irrigation on cotton fiber quality. Cotton was grown in large repli...

  2. Sequencing of the cultivated tetraploid cotton genome - Gossypium hirsutum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is an important cash crop in the world and it plays an irreplaceable role in China’s national economy. Cultivated upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) represents 95% of world cotton production but it has a complex allotetraploid genome that contains at least 30,000 genes in 2,500 Mb DNA. S...

  3. Molecular Diversity of Gossypium herbaceum L. and G. arboreum L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diploid Asiatic cotton species (Gossypium herbaceum L. and G. arboreum L.) are a valuable source of genetic variation in modern cotton improvement. In this study, the genetic diversity of selected G. herbaceum and G. arboreum accessions collected from different regions all around the world accor...

  4. The draft genome of a diploid cotton Gossypium raimondii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have sequenced and assembled the draft genome of Gossypium raimondii, whose progenitor is considered the contributor of the D-subgenome to the economically important natural textile fiber producer, G. hirsutum. Next-generation Illumina pair-end (PE) sequencing strategies were employed to obtain ...

  5. Portable DNA markers tailored for systematic characterization of Gossypium germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many small-scale ad-hoc studies on characterization of Gossypium germplasm have been conducted that use different sets of markers. Coordination with the cotton community is needed to reach a consensus on the appropriate initial set of DNA markers. In consultation with the cotton community, a set o...

  6. Genome-Wide Gossypium SNP development and validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts toward development of cotton SNPs have been few and mostly small-scale. Novel cotton fiber ESTs were developed from normalized non-clonal cDNA libraries of Gossypium species that were sequenced using complementary 454 and Illumina technologies. A hybrid de novo assembly of G. hirsutum cv. ...

  7. Genome-wide SNP development and validation for allotetraploid Gossypium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts toward development of cotton SNPs have been few and mostly small-scale. Novel cotton fiber ESTs were developed from normalized non-clonal cDNA libraries of Gossypium species that were sequenced using complementary 454 and Illumina technologies. A hybrid de novo assembly of G. hirsutum cv. ...

  8. Extreme defoliation reduces tree growth but not C and N storage in a winter-deciduous species

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Frida I.; Gundale, Michael J.; Fajardo, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims There is a growing concern about how forests will respond to increased herbivory associated with climate change. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) limitation are hypothesized to cause decreasing growth after defoliation, and eventually mortality. This study examines the effects of a natural and massive defoliation by an insect on mature trees’ C and N storage, which have rarely been studied together, particularly in winter-deciduous species. Methods Survival, growth rate, carbon [C, as non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentration] and nitrogen (N) storage, defences (tannins and total polyphenols), and re-foliation traits were examined in naturally defoliated and non-defoliated adult trees of the winter-deciduous temperate species Nothofagus pumilio 1 and 2 years after a massive and complete defoliation caused by the caterpillar of Ormiscodes amphimone (Saturniidae) during summer 2009 in Patagonia. Key Results Defoliated trees did not die but grew significantly less than non-defoliated trees for at least 2 years after defoliation. One year after defoliation, defoliated trees had similar NSC and N concentrations in woody tissues, higher polyphenol concentrations and lower re-foliation than non-defoliated trees. In the second year, however, NSC concentrations in branches were significantly higher in defoliated trees while differences in polyphenols and re-foliation disappeared and decreased, respectively. Conclusions The significant reduction in growth following defoliation was not caused by insufficient C or N availability, as frequently assumed; instead, it was probably due to growth limitations due to factors other than C or N, or to preventative C allocation to storage. This study shows an integrative approach to evaluating plant growth limitations in response to disturbance, by examining major resources other than C (e.g. N), and other C sinks besides storage and growth (e.g. defences and re-foliation). PMID:25851136

  9. Fire, defoliation, and competing species alter Aristida purpurea biomass, tiller, and axillary bud production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aristida purpurea (threeawn) is a competitive native perennial grass with monoculturistic tendencies and poor palatability. We examined effects of fire, defoliation, and interspecific/intraspecific planting for 1) threeawn responses in the presence of threeawn, Bouteloua gracilis, or Pascopyrum smi...

  10. cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid: A New Cotton Defoliant and Crop Desiccant.

    PubMed

    Herrett, R A; Kurtz, A N

    1963-09-20

    cis-3-Chloroacrylic acid is a potent cotton defoliant and a crop desiccant. Relationships between structure and activity indicate a relatively high degree of specificity, since minor modifications in structure result in loss of activity. PMID:17751800

  11. The Virgin River Tamarisk Defoliation by Diorhabda carinulata: It's Effects on Evapotranspiration Rates and Groundwater Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueki, S.; Healey, J. M.; Acharya, K.

    2013-12-01

    Saltcedar (tamarisk; Tamarix spp) has become the most widespread invasive plant species in the western United States. Waterways and their corridors have evolved into mono-species stands of saltcedar. Chemical and mechanical methods of tamarisk eradication have been partially effective and prove to be expensive and cause irrepressible damage to natural resources. In the late 1960s, biological control program began in order to reduce the risk of damaging native plants. In 2001, Diorhabda elongate (leaf beetles) was released for open field tests followed by other releases in several locations in the western United States. One of the successful releases occurred in St. George, UT along the Virgin River in 2006. The last few years has seen establishment of large scale populations in the lower Virgin River. Eddy covariance (EC) tower including groundwater monitoring well was set up along the Virgin River near Mesquite, NV in 2010 to monitor effects of tamarisk defoliation on evapotranspiration (ET). Initial 2010 data (pre-beetle) established a baseline for characterization of tamarisk ET and groundwater consumption prior to defoliation of tamarisk. The beetles arrived at the site in late 2010 and established a healthy population at the growing season of 2011. 2010 data compared to the episodic herbivore events, observed at the site in 2011 and 2012, clearly show the direct impact of tamarisk defoliation. The results show that the post-defoliation ET values along with magnitude of diurnal fluctuations, found in the water level record, decreased compared to the pre-defoliation values. However, magnitude of the effects of defoliation seemed to be dependent on growth stage of tamarisk at the time of defoliation. Also, the defoliation periods are short lived as tamarisk quickly recovered and establish new growth. In 2012, the defoliation occurred twice since tamarisk re-foliated quickly after the first defoliation by late summer before beetles started overwintering

  12. Resource allocation in an annual herb: Effects of light, mycorrhizal fungi, and defoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Chama, Ana; Guevara, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Concurrent interactions and the availability of resources (e.g., light) affect the cost/benefit balance during mutualistic and antagonistic interactions, as well as plant resource allocation patterns. Mycorrhizal interactions and herbivory concur in most plants, where mycorrhizae can enhance the uptake of soil nutrients by plants as well as consuming a large fraction of the plant's carbon, and defoliation usually reduces light interception and photosynthesis, thereby causing direct losses to the hosts of mycorrhizal fungi. Both types of interactions affect the carbon budget of their host plants and thus we predict that the relative costs of herbivory and mycorrhizal colonization will increase when photosynthesis is reduced, for instance in light limited environments. We conducted a greenhouse experiment using Datura stramonium to investigate the effects of defoliation and mycorrhizal inoculation on the resource allocation patterns in two different light environments. Defoliated plants overcompensated in terms of leaf mass in both light environments, but total seed mass per fruit was negatively affected by defoliation in both light environments. Mycorrhizal inoculation had a positive effect on vegetative growth and the leaf nitrogen content, but defoliation negates the benefit of mycorrhizal interactions in terms of the leaf nitrogen content. In general, D. stramonium compensated for the relative costs of concurrent mycorrhizal interactions and defoliation; plants that lacked both interactions exhibited the same performance as plants with both types of interactions.

  13. Impact of defoliation intensities on plant biomass, nutrient uptake and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus tenuis growing in a saline-sodic soil.

    PubMed

    García, I; Mendoza, R

    2012-11-01

    The impact of different defoliation intensities on the ability of Lotus tenuis plants to regrowth, mobilise nutrients and to associate with native AM fungi and Rhizobium in a saline-sodic soil was investigated. After 70 days, plants were subjected to 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% defoliation and shoot regrowth was assessed at the end of subsequent 35 days. Compared to non-defoliated plants, low or moderate defoliation up to 75% did not affect shoot regrowth. However, 100% treatment affected shoot regrowth and the clipped plants were not able to compensate the growth attained by non-defoliated plants. Root growth was more affected by defoliation than shoot growth. P and N concentrations in shoots and roots increased with increasing defoliation while Na(+) concentration in shoots of non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants was similar. Non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants prevented increases of Na(+) concentration in shoots through both reducing Na(+) uptake and Na(+) transport to shoots by accumulating Na(+) in roots. At high defoliation, the salinity tolerance mechanism is altered and Na(+) concentration in shoots was higher than in roots. Reduction in the photosynthetic capacity induced by defoliation neither changed the root length colonised by AM fungi nor arbuscular colonisation but decreased the vesicular colonisation. Spore density did not change, but hyphal density and Rhizobium nodules increased with defoliation. The strategy of the AM symbiont consists in investing most of the C resources to preferentially retain arbuscular colonisation as well as inoculum density in the soil. PMID:22512871

  14. High-Frequency Regeneration of the Drought-Tolerant Tree Melia volkensii Gurke Using Low-Cost Agrochemical Thidiazuron

    PubMed Central

    Mulanda, Eliud Sagwa; Adero, Mark Ochieng; Amugune, Nelson Onzere; Akunda, Elijah; Kinyamario, Jenesio I.

    2012-01-01

    Melia volkensii Gurke is a drought-tolerant tree native to East Africa's arid and semiarid lands (ASALs), with vast but underutilized potential for agroforestry and sustainable livelihoods in the ASALs. Its cultivation is limited by difficulties in propagation via conventional means. Full exploitation of the ability of thidiazuron (TDZ) to elicit regeneration in plant tissue cultures, as sole plant growth regulator (PGR), is hampered by high costs. This study tested the effectiveness of a low-cost agrochemical TDZ for in vitro propagation of M. volkensii. Zygotic embryos from mature seeds were cultured on Gamborg's B5 medium containing 0 to 4 mg/L of agrochemical TDZ from Kingtai Chemicals Co.,Ltd., China. Callus induction frequency was 96.67 to 100%. Significantly large callus fresh mass was produced at 0.05 mg/L TDZ concentration (ANOVA, P < 0.001). The effect of TDZ on embryogenicity was significant over certain ranges of concentrations (Anova, P < 0.001). Multiple somatic embryos developed within 14 days of subculture to hormone-free B5 medium. Somatic embryos developed into microshoots which elongated when transferred to 1/2 MS medium supplemented with 0.1 mg/L 6-benzylaminopurine plus 10% coconut water. The Kingtai-TDZ showed a high potency and suitability for use in M. volkensii tissue culture. PMID:23227344

  15. Defoliation by pastoralists affects savanna tree seedling dynamics by limiting the facilitative role of canopy cover.

    PubMed

    Bufford, Jennifer L; Gaoue, Orou G

    2015-07-01

    Recurrent tree defoliation by pastoralists, akin to herbivory, can negatively affect plant reproduction and population dynamics. However, our understanding of the indirect role of defoliation in seedling recruitment and tree-grass dynamics in tropical savanna is limited. In West African savanna, Fulani pastoralists frequently defoliate several fodder tree species to feed livestock in the dry season. We investigated the direct and indirect effects of recurrent defoliation of African mahogany (Khaya senegalensis) by Fulani people on seedling (< 2 cm basal diameter) and sapling dynamics in West Africa using four years of demographic data on seedling and sapling density, growth, and survival, coupled with fruit production and microhabitat data over the same time period. Tree canopy cover facilitated seedlings but had negative effects on sapling growth possibly via intraspecific competition with adult plants. Interspecific competition with grasses strongly reduced seedling survival but had a weak effect on sapling growth. Fire reduced seedling survival and weakly reduced growth of seedlings and saplings, but did not affect sapling survival. These results indicate that the effect of fire on seedlings and saplings is distinct, a mechanism suitable for an episodic recruitment of seedlings into the sapling stage and consistent with predictions from the demographic bottleneck model. Defoliation affected seedling density and sapling growth through changes in canopy cover, but had no effect on seedling growth and sapling survival. In the moist region, sapling density was higher in sites with low-intensity defoliation, indicating that defoliation may strengthen the tree recruitment bottleneck. Our study suggests that large-scale defoliation can alter the facilitative role of nurse trees on seedling dynamics and tree-sapling competition. Given that tree defoliation by local people is a widespread activity throughout savanna-forest systems in West Africa, it has the potential to

  16. Is growth reduction in defoliated trees a consequence of prioritized carbon allocation to reserves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, Guenter; Schmid, Sandra; Palacio, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Tissue concentrations of carbon reserve compounds are frequently used as proxies for the carbon balance of trees, but the mechanisms regulating the formation of carbon reserves are still under debate. It is often assumed that carbon storage in trees is largely a consequence of surplus carbon supply (reserve accumulation). In contrast, carbon storage might also occur against prevailing carbon demand from other sink activities, like growth (reserve formation), in which case carbon reserve pools might increase even at carbon limitation, and thus, cannot be used as indicators for a tree's carbon supply status. Such a situation might be severe defoliation by herbivores. Especially in evergreen tree species, it has been shown that natural and experimental defoliation leads to a reduction of growth that is proportional to the lost leaf area. Compared to this strong effect on growth, carbon reserve pools (i.e. sugars, starch and storage lipids) of defoliated trees often exert only a temporary decrease immediately after defoliation, while tissue concentrations of carbon reserves return to those of undefoliated trees by the end of the growing season. Within a recent experiment, we investigated, if the growth decline in trees following early season defoliation is the consequence of prioritized carbon allocation to carbon reserves over growth. To test this hypothesis we grew seedlings of evergreen Quecus ilex and deciduous Quercus petraea trees under low (140 ppm), medium (280 ppm) and high (560 ppm) CO2 concentrations and completely defoliated half of the seedlings in each CO2 treatment at the beginning of the growing season. In undefoliated control trees, CO2 had a significant positive effect on the seasonal growth in both species. Defoliation had a strong negative impact on growth in the evergreen Q. illex, but less in the deciduous Q. petraea. In both species, the growth reduction after defoliation relative to undefoliated controls was very similar at all three CO2

  17. Spraying Hydrangea Leaves with Chemical Defoliants, Urea, and GA in the Autumn Alters Defoliation Efficiency and Growth and Flowering Performance of Hydrangea during Forcing.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In two separate experiments, Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Merritt’s Supreme’ plants were used to study the effects of foliar sprays of Def-6 (Def, 2500, 5000, 7500 and 10000ppm), giberellic acid, (GA, 50ppm), copper-EDTA (CuEDTA, 0.5% and 1.0%), Florel (F, 2000ppm) and urea (U, 3%) on defoliation in the a...

  18. Dissipation of the defoliant tribufos in cotton-producing soils.

    PubMed

    Potter, Thomas L; Reddy, Krishna N; Millhollen, Eddie P; Bednarz, Craig W; Bosch, David D; Truman, Clint C; Strickland, Timothy

    2002-06-19

    Soil dissipation of the cotton defoliant tribufos was measured in laboratory incubations and on 0.2-ha research plots. Computed 50% dissipation time (DT(50)) using nonlinear and linear kinetic models ranged from 1 to 19 days. Data indicated that exchangeable soil aluminum inhibited tribufos-degrading soil organisms. Nevertheless, measured DT(50) values were 40 to 700 times less than the aerobic soil half-life (t(1/2)) values used in recent tribufos risk assessments. DT(50) values suggest that risk estimates were overstated. However, edge-of-field runoff concentrations measured on research plots exceeded invertebrate LOECs, thus some aquatic risk is indicated. Field data also suggested that volatilization may be a significant soil dissipation pathway. From this result, we conclude that volatilization should be included in simulation models used for pesticide registration. This will likely improve the accuracy of model outputs for products such as tribufos. Potential volatilization losses indicate a need to evaluate the atmospheric behavior of tribufos. PMID:12059162

  19. Canopy Defoliation has More Impact on Carbohydrate Availability than on Hydraulic Function in Declining Scots Pine Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyatos, R.; Aguadé, D.; Gómez, M.; Mencuccini, M.; Martínez-Vilalta, J.

    2013-12-01

    Drought-induced defoliation has recently been associated with depletion of carbohydrate reserves and increased mortality risk in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) at its dry limit. Are defoliated pines hydraulically impaired compared to non-defoliated pines? Moreover, how do defoliated pines cope with potentially lethal droughts, as compared to non-defoliated pines in the same population? In order to address these questions, we measured the seasonal dynamics of sap flow and needle water potentials (2010-2012), hydraulic function and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) (2012) in healthy and defoliated pines in the Prades mountains (NE Spain). The summer drought was mild in 2010, intense in 2012 and extremely long in 2011. Defoliated Scots pines showed higher sap flow per unit leaf area during spring, but they were more sensitive to summer drought (Figure 1). This pattern was associated with a steeper decline in soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance, which could not be explained by differences in branch vulnerability to embolism across defoliation classes. Accordingly, the native loss of xylem conductivity in branches, measured in 2012, remained similar across defoliation classes and reached >65% at the peak of the drought. However, a steeper vulnerability curve was observed for root xylem of defoliated pines. Xylem diameter variations (2011-2012) will be used to further investigate possible differences in the aboveground/belowground partitioning of hydraulic resistance across defoliation classes. NSC levels varied across tree organs (leaves>branches>roots>trunk) and strongly declined with drought. Defoliated pines displayed reduced NSC levels throughout the study period, despite enhanced water transport capacity and increased gas exchange rates during spring. Overall, the defoliated vs. healthy status seems to be more associated to differences in carbohydrate storage and dynamics than to hydraulic differences per se. However, starch conversion to soluble sugars during

  20. Interactive effects of water supply and defoliation on photosynthesis, plant water status and growth of Eucalyptus globulus Labill.

    PubMed

    Quentin, A G; O'Grady, A P; Beadle, C L; Mohammed, C; Pinkard, E A

    2012-08-01

    Increased climatic variability, including extended periods of drought stress, may compromise on the health of forest ecosystems. The effects of defoliating pests on plantations may also impact on forest productivity. Interactions between climate signals and pest activity are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the combined effects of reduced water availability and defoliation on maximum photosynthetic rate (A(sat)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), plant water status and growth of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. Field-grown plants were subjected to two water-availability regimes, rain-fed (W-) and irrigated (W+). In the summer of the second year of growth, leaves from 75% of crown length removed from trees in both watering treatments and physiological responses within the canopies were examined. We hypothesized that defoliation would result in improved plant water status providing a mechanistic insight into leaf- and canopy-scale gas-exchange responses. Defoliated trees in the W+ treatment exhibited higher A(sat) and g(s) compared with non-defoliated trees, but these responses were not observed in the W- treatment. In contrast, at the whole-plant scale, maximum rates of transpiration (E(max)) and canopy conductance (G(Cmax)) and soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance (K(P)) increased in both treatments following defoliation. As a result, plant water status was unaffected by defoliation and trees in the defoliated treatments exhibited homeostasis in this respect. Whole-plant soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance was strongly correlated with leaf scale g(s) and A(sat) following the defoliation, providing a mechanistic insight into compensatory up-regulation of photosynthesis. Above-ground height and diameter growth were unaffected by defoliation in both water availability treatments, suggesting that plants use a range of responses to compensate for the impacts of defoliation. PMID:22874831

  1. Limited Growth Recovery after Drought-Induced Forest Dieback in Very Defoliated Trees of Two Pine Species.

    PubMed

    Guada, Guillermo; Camarero, J Julio; Sánchez-Salguero, Raúl; Cerrillo, Rafael M Navarro

    2016-01-01

    Mediterranean pine forests display high resilience after extreme climatic events such as severe droughts. However, recent dry spells causing growth decline and triggering forest dieback challenge the capacity of some forests to recover following major disturbances. To describe how resilient the responses of forests to drought can be, we quantified growth dynamics in plantations of two pine species (Scots pine, black pine) located in south-eastern Spain and showing drought-triggered dieback. Radial growth was characterized at inter- (tree-ring width) and intra-annual (xylogenesis) scales in three defoliation levels. It was assumed that the higher defoliation the more negative the impact of drought on tree growth. Tree-ring width chronologies were built and xylogenesis was characterized 3 years after the last severe drought occurred. Annual growth data and the number of tracheids produced in different stages of xylem formation were related to climate data at several time scales. Drought negatively impacted growth of the most defoliated trees in both pine species. In Scots pine, xylem formation started earlier in the non-defoliated than in the most defoliated trees. Defoliated trees presented the shortest duration of the radial-enlargement phase in both species. On average the most defoliated trees formed 60% of the number of mature tracheids formed by the non-defoliated trees in both species. Since radial enlargement is the xylogenesis phase most tightly related to final growth, this explains why the most defoliated trees grew the least due to their altered xylogenesis phases. Our findings indicate a very limited resilience capacity of drought-defoliated Scots and black pines. Moreover, droughts produce legacy effects on xylogenesis of highly defoliated trees which could not recover previous growth rates and are thus more prone to die. PMID:27066053

  2. Limited Growth Recovery after Drought-Induced Forest Dieback in Very Defoliated Trees of Two Pine Species

    PubMed Central

    Guada, Guillermo; Camarero, J. Julio; Sánchez-Salguero, Raúl; Cerrillo, Rafael M. Navarro

    2016-01-01

    Mediterranean pine forests display high resilience after extreme climatic events such as severe droughts. However, recent dry spells causing growth decline and triggering forest dieback challenge the capacity of some forests to recover following major disturbances. To describe how resilient the responses of forests to drought can be, we quantified growth dynamics in plantations of two pine species (Scots pine, black pine) located in south-eastern Spain and showing drought-triggered dieback. Radial growth was characterized at inter- (tree-ring width) and intra-annual (xylogenesis) scales in three defoliation levels. It was assumed that the higher defoliation the more negative the impact of drought on tree growth. Tree-ring width chronologies were built and xylogenesis was characterized 3 years after the last severe drought occurred. Annual growth data and the number of tracheids produced in different stages of xylem formation were related to climate data at several time scales. Drought negatively impacted growth of the most defoliated trees in both pine species. In Scots pine, xylem formation started earlier in the non-defoliated than in the most defoliated trees. Defoliated trees presented the shortest duration of the radial-enlargement phase in both species. On average the most defoliated trees formed 60% of the number of mature tracheids formed by the non-defoliated trees in both species. Since radial enlargement is the xylogenesis phase most tightly related to final growth, this explains why the most defoliated trees grew the least due to their altered xylogenesis phases. Our findings indicate a very limited resilience capacity of drought-defoliated Scots and black pines. Moreover, droughts produce legacy effects on xylogenesis of highly defoliated trees which could not recover previous growth rates and are thus more prone to die. PMID:27066053

  3. A Detailed RFLP Map of Cotton, Gossypium Hirsutum X Gossypium Barbadense: Chromosome Organization and Evolution in a Disomic Polyploid Genome

    PubMed Central

    Reinisch, A. J.; Dong, J. M.; Brubaker, C. L.; Stelly, D. M.; Wendel, J. F.; Paterson, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    We employ a detailed restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) map to investigate chromosome organization and evolution in cotton, a disomic polyploid. About 46.2% of nuclear DNA probes detect RFLPs distinguishing Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense; and 705 RFLP loci are assembled into 41 linkage groups and 4675 cM. The subgenomic origin (A vs. D) of most, and chromosomal identity of 14 (of 26), linkage groups is shown. The A and D subgenomes show similar recombinational length, suggesting that repetitive DNA in the physically larger A subgenome is recombinationally inert. RFLPs are somewhat more abundant in the D subgenome. Linkage among duplicated RFLPs reveals 11 pairs of homoeologous chromosomal regions-two appear homosequential, most differ by inversions, and at least one differs by a translocation. Most homoeologies involve chromosomes from different subgenomes, putatively reflecting the n = 13 to n = 26 polyploidization event of 1.1-1.9 million years ago. Several observations suggest that another, earlier, polyploidization event spawned n = 13 cottons, at least 25 million years ago. The cotton genome contains about 400-kb DNA per cM, hence map-based gene cloning is feasible. The cotton map affords new opportunities to study chromosome evolution, and to exploit Gossypium genetic resources for improvement of the world's leading natural fiber. PMID:7851778

  4. Mortality following cotton defoliation: San Joaquin Valley, California, 1970-1990.

    PubMed

    Ames, R G; Gregson, J

    1995-07-01

    A proportional mortality study comparing the cotton-growing areas of the San Joaquin Valley with the rest of the State of California was performed by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a continuation of earlier studies related to mercaptan-releasing pesticides. This mortality study found a pattern of increased proportion of "respiratory causes" mortality (ICD codes 460-519), statistically significant at less than the .05 probability level, for 15 of 21 years between 1970 and 1990, for the time period during and immediately following cotton defoliation. Defoliants which have the potential to produce acute symptoms include DEF and Folex, both of which release odorous butyl mercaptan gas as a degradation product. This paper tests the hypothesis that exposure to cotton defoliant breakdown products may be associated with a disproportionate increase in mortality. Prediction of the mortality proportions by pounds of DEF and Folex used was not statistically significant in the unadjusted models or in models adjusted for air pollution variables. One air pollution adjustment factor, total suspended particulates, was a statistically significant independent mortality proportion predictor. This finding suggests that total suspended particulates, not defoliants, may be related to mortality differentials during defoliation season. Possible confounding by demographic variation of the counties was not controlled in the analysis. PMID:7552465

  5. Genetic diversity and population structure in the US Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elite plant breeding programs could likely benefit from the unexploited standing genetic variation of obsolete cultivars without the yield drag typically associated with wild accessions. A set of 381 accessions comprising 378 Upland (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and 3 Gossypium barbadense L. accessions of...

  6. Gossypolone and Gossypolhemiquinone: Biological activity of terpenoids found in cotton (Gossypium)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wild cotton plant, Gossypium thurberi grows in the Sonoran Desert in northern Mexico and southern Arizona, and is attacked by few herbivorous insects (Korban, 1999). In general, members of Gossypium produce a rich assortment of sesquiterpenoid and sesterterpenoids in the subepidermal pigment gl...

  7. The tolerance of grain amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus L.) to defoliation during vegetative growth is compromised during flowering.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ortiz, Erandi; Délano-Frier, John Paul; Tiessen, Axel

    2015-06-01

    The biochemical processes underlying variations of tolerance are often accompanied by source-sink transitions affecting carbon (C) metabolism. We investigated the tolerance of Amaranthus cruentus L. to total mechanical defoliation through development and in different growing seasons. Defoliated A. cruentus recovered ∼80% of their above-ground biomass and ∼100% of grain yield compared to intact plants if defoliation occurred early during ontogeny, but could not compensate when defoliation occurred during flowering. Tolerance index was higher in the summer season (-0.3) than in the winter season (-0.7). Overall, defoliation tolerance was closely related to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity in leaves and the subsequent accumulation of starch (∼500 μmol/gDW) and sucrose (∼140 μmol/gDW) in stems and roots. Thus, A. cruentus accumulated sufficient C in roots and stem to allow branching and shoot re-growth after defoliation, but it only possessed sufficient C reserves to maintain <19% seed yield in the absence of new vegetative tissue. Seed size was larger during the warm season but it was not affected by foliar damage. Seed chemical composition was altered by defoliation at flowering. We conclude that A. cruentus defoliation tolerance depends on both, the re-allocation of starch from stem and roots, and the activation of dormant meristems before flowering to generate new photosynthetic capacity to sustain seed filling. PMID:25863889

  8. Effect of defoliation prior to a frost on postharvest respiration rate, extractable sucrose, and invert sugar concentration of sugarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effect of defoliation prior to a frost on postharvest storage properties of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.). Roots of plants with canopies intact until harvest were compared to roots of plants that had been defoliated prior to a frost on multiple harvest dates following a da...

  9. Consequences of Repeated Defoliation on Belowground Bud Banks of Carex brevicuspis (Cyperaceae) in the Dongting Lake Wetlands, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin-Sheng; Deng, Zheng-Miao; Xie, Yong-Hong; Li, Feng; Hou, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Despite the predominant role of bud banks in the regeneration of clonal macrophyte populations, few studies have examined the way in which clonal macrophytes adjust the demographic features of bud banks to regulate population dynamics in response to defoliation in wetlands. We investigated the density and composition of bud banks under repeated defoliation in the wetland sedge Carex brevicuspis C. B. Clarke in the Dongting Lake wetlands, China. The density and biomass of rhizome buds and shoots did not decrease significantly in response to repeated defoliation over two consecutive years. The composition of bud banks, which consisted of long and short rhizome buds, also did not change significantly in response to repeated defoliation. Nevertheless, the ramet height and the shoot, root, and rhizome mass of C. brevicuspis declined significantly under repeated defoliation. Our findings suggest that bud banks are a conservative reproductive strategy that enables C. brevicuspis to tolerate a certain amount of defoliation. The maintenance of large bud banks after repeated defoliation may enable C. brevicuspis populations to regenerate and persist in disturbed habitats. However, bud bank density of C. brevicuspis might decline in the long term because the amount of carbon stored in rhizome buds and plants is reduced by frequent defoliation. PMID:27524993

  10. Multiple-level defoliation assessment with hyperspectral data: integration of continuum-removed absorptions and red edges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral data were collected from 40 canopies of saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima), 10 healthy canopies and 30 canopies defoliated by an introduced biological control agent, the saltcedar leaf beetle (Diorhabda elongata). These data were assessed to detect categories of defoliation in response to...

  11. Consequences of Repeated Defoliation on Belowground Bud Banks of Carex brevicuspis (Cyperaceae) in the Dongting Lake Wetlands, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin-Sheng; Deng, Zheng-Miao; Xie, Yong-Hong; Li, Feng; Hou, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Despite the predominant role of bud banks in the regeneration of clonal macrophyte populations, few studies have examined the way in which clonal macrophytes adjust the demographic features of bud banks to regulate population dynamics in response to defoliation in wetlands. We investigated the density and composition of bud banks under repeated defoliation in the wetland sedge Carex brevicuspis C. B. Clarke in the Dongting Lake wetlands, China. The density and biomass of rhizome buds and shoots did not decrease significantly in response to repeated defoliation over two consecutive years. The composition of bud banks, which consisted of long and short rhizome buds, also did not change significantly in response to repeated defoliation. Nevertheless, the ramet height and the shoot, root, and rhizome mass of C. brevicuspis declined significantly under repeated defoliation. Our findings suggest that bud banks are a conservative reproductive strategy that enables C. brevicuspis to tolerate a certain amount of defoliation. The maintenance of large bud banks after repeated defoliation may enable C. brevicuspis populations to regenerate and persist in disturbed habitats. However, bud bank density of C. brevicuspis might decline in the long term because the amount of carbon stored in rhizome buds and plants is reduced by frequent defoliation. PMID:27524993

  12. Tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) water fluxes before, during and after episodic defoliation by the saltcedar leaf beetle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hultine, K.R.; Nagler, P.L.; Dennison, P.E.; Bush, S.E.; Ehleringer, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Tamarisk (Tamarix) species are among the most successful and economically costly plant invaders in the western United States, in part due to its potential to remove large amounts of water from shallow aquifers. Accordingly, local, state and federal agencies have released a new biological control - the saltcedar leaf beetle (Diorhabda elongata) along many watersheds in the western United States to reduce the spread of tamarisk. The beetle defoliates tamarisk for much of the growing season resulting in potentially large seasonal declines in productivity, fitness, and water loss from tamarisk stands. We measured sap flux density (Js) using heat dissipation sensors to investigate water use patterns of tamarisk before, during and after a single, six week beetle-induced defoliation event in southeastern, Utah, USA. Granier-style probes were installed on 20 dominant trees from May through September 2008, a period that covers almost the entire growing season. As the beetle emerged from dormancy in mid-June, daytime and nighttime Js measurably increased for approximately two weeks before declining to less than 20% of predicted values (predicted by modeling Js with atmospheric vapor pressure deficit in May and June before defoliation). Tamarisk trees in mid-August produced new leaves and Js returned to pre-defoliation levels. Total Js, summed over the duration of the study was 13% lower than predicted values. These data suggest that defoliation results in only small changes in seasonal water loss from tamarisk stands. Current research is focusing on long-term ecohydrological impacts of tamarisk defoliation over multiple growing seasons.

  13. Mapping Historic Gypsy Moth Defoliation with MODIS Satellite Data: Implications for Forest Threat Early Warning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurce, Joseph P.; Hargrove, William; Ryan, Robert E.; Smooth, James C.; Prados, Don; McKellip, Rodney; Sader, Steven A.; Gasser, Jerry; May, George

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews a project, the goal of which is to study the potential of MODIS data for monitoring historic gypsy moth defoliation. A NASA/USDA Forest Service (USFS) partnership was formed to perform the study. NASA is helping USFS to implement satellite data products into its emerging Forest Threat Early Warning System. The latter system is being developed by the USFS Eastern and Western Forest Threat Assessment Centers. The USFS Forest Threat Centers want to use MODIS time series data for regional monitoring of forest damage (e.g., defoliation) preferably in near real time. The study's methodology is described, and the results of the study are shown.

  14. The effects of defoliation on carbon allocation: can carbon limitation reduce growth in favour of storage?

    PubMed

    Wiley, Erin; Huepenbecker, Sarah; Casper, Brenda B; Helliker, Brent R

    2013-11-01

    There is no consensus about how stresses such as low water availability and temperature limit tree growth. Sink limitation to growth and survival is often inferred if a given stress does not cause non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations or levels to decline along with growth. However, trees may actively maintain or increase NSC levels under moderate carbon stress, making the pattern of reduced growth and increased NSCs compatible with carbon limitation. To test this possibility, we used full and half defoliation to impose severe and moderate carbon limitation on 2-year-old Quercus velutina Lam. saplings grown in a common garden. Saplings were harvested at either 3 weeks or 4 months after treatments were applied, representing short- and longer-term effects on woody growth and NSC levels. Both defoliation treatments maintained a lower total leaf area than controls throughout the experiment with no evidence of photosynthetic up-regulation, and resulted in a similar total biomass reduction. While fully defoliated saplings had lower starch levels than controls in the short term, half defoliated saplings maintained control starch levels in both the short and longer term. In the longer term, fully defoliated saplings had the greatest starch concentration increment, allowing them to recover to near-control starch levels. Furthermore, between the two harvest dates, fully and half defoliated saplings allocated a greater proportion of new biomass to starch than did controls. The maintenance of control starch levels in half defoliated saplings indicates that these trees actively store a substantial amount of carbon before growth is carbon saturated. In addition, the allocation shift favouring storage in defoliated saplings is consistent with the hypothesis that, as an adaptation to increasing carbon stress, trees can prioritize carbon reserve formation at the expense of growth. Our results suggest that as carbon limitation increases, reduced growth is not necessarily

  15. Adventitious bud regeneration from leaf expiants of the shrubby ornamental honeysuckle, Lonicera nitida Wils. cv. 'Maigrün': effects of thidiazuron and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Cambecèdes, J; Duron, M; Decourtye, L

    1991-11-01

    Different combinations of auxins and cytokinins were employed to assess the regeneration capacity from in vitro leaf explants of Lonicera nitida Wils. cv 'Maïgrün'. A high frequency of rhizogenesis was noticed, with 2.3 μM thidiazuron plus 2.9 μM indole-3-acetic acid as the only hormonal combination to support caulogenic responses. Increasing thidiazuron concentration and/or suppressing auxin did not improve caulogenesis. Combining thidiazuron with 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid produced a dramatic increase in the percentage of caulogenic explants. A maximum of 74% of adventitious bud forming explants was obtained with 2.3 μM thidiazuron plus 20 μM 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid. Buds were often in a rosette form and were vitreous, so that shoot elongation was difficult to obtain. The effect of the duration of the 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid treatment on shoot elongation was investigated. PMID:24221854

  16. Natural hybridization between Gossypium mustelinum and exotic allotetraploid cotton species.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, I P P; da Silva, J O; Malafaia, G; Silveira, R D D; Barroso, P A V

    2015-01-01

    Cotton has been collected in Brazil for decades for its conservation, evaluation, and the use of its genetic resources. Gossypium mustelinum is an allotetraploid cotton species that only occurs in Brazil, and little is known about its genetic potential for improvement. However, the species is threatened by habitat fragmentation and interspecific hybridization with exotic species of cotton. In this study, we investigated the rate of natural hybridization in two populations of G. mustelinum in Bahia, Brazil, with G. hirsutum and G. barbadense using a set of microsatellite markers. PMID:26535735

  17. EFFECT OF DEFOLIATION AND ROOT-FEEDING ON MAMEY SAPOTE YIELD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mamey sapote, Pouteria sapota (Sapotaceae), is a valuable fruit crop that grows well in Puerto Rico. Unfortunately it is a preferred host of Phyllophaga vandinei (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). The adults of this beetle can defoliate trees and the larvae feed on the roots, in some cases resulting in the...

  18. Defoliation Management of Bahiagrass Germplasm Affects Dry Matter Yeild and Herbage Nutritive Value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flügge) cultivars are daylength-sensitive and have minimal cool-season production. A new genotype is less daylength sensitive and more cold tolerant, but its dry matter (DM) yield and nutritive value responses to defoliation treatments are unknown. A 3-yr field experimen...

  19. Remote sensing for assessing cotton defoliation, regrowth control and root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton defoliation and post-harvest destruction are important cultural practices for cotton production. Cotton root rot is a serious and destructive disease that affects cotton yield and lint quality. This paper presents exemplary applications of remote sensing technology for evaluating cotton def...

  20. Interaction of Insect Defoliation, Wildfires and Climate Change on Carbon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hom, J.; van Tuyl, S.; Scheller, R.; Pan, Y.; Clark, K.; Cole, J.; Foster, J.; Patterson, M.; Gallagher, M.

    2009-05-01

    We assess and predict the interactive effects of gypsy moth defoliation, fire management, and climate change on carbon uptake, forest productivity, species composition, and tree mortality in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. This effort will combine carbon flux measurements, a forest landscape disturbance model, and field monitoring data. We will determine how interactions among these disturbances affect current management and potential carbon management goals. The LANDIS-II forest landscape simulation model in this study uses three model extensions or modules: the Dynamic Fire System (DFS) extension, the Biomass Succession extension, and an insect defoliation extension. Parameterization of the DFS and the Biomass Succession extension uses new and existing data sources for the study area. This includes flux tower data from three upland forest types, for annual net ecosystem exchange of carbon taken before and after defoliation as well as during prescribed burns. An intensified grid of FIA-type plots around each tower (up to 24 plots per tower) provides additional biometric information. The study conducted a field mortality survey and canopy foliar analysis to understand the process of forest decline with insect defoliation. This project provides a predictive framework for working through landscape to regional management scenarios in areas with multiple, interacting management priorities that can be applied across the US, especially in areas where both insect and fire disturbances occur.

  1. The Use of Internal Nitrogen Stores in the Rhizomatous Grass Calamagrostis epigejos During Regrowth After Defoliation

    PubMed Central

    KAVANOVÁ, MONIKA; GLOSER, VÍT

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims The regrowth dynamics after defoliation of the invasive grass Calamagrostis epigejos were studied. As nitrogen (N) reserves have been shown to play an important role during plant regrowth, the identity, location and relative importance for regrowth of N stores were determined in this rhizomatous grass. • Methods Plant growth, nitrate uptake and root respiration were followed during recovery from defoliation. Water soluble carbohydrates, nitrate, free amino acids and soluble proteins were analysed in the remaining organs. • Key Results Nitrate uptake and root respiration were severely reduced during the first days of regrowth. Roots were the main net source of mobilized N. The quantitatively dominant N storage compounds were free amino acids. Free amino acids and soluble proteins in the roots decreased by 55 and 50 %, respectively, and a substantial (∼38 %) decrease in stubble protein was also observed. Although the relative abundance of several soluble proteins in roots decreased during the initial recovery from defoliation, no evidence was found for vegetative storage protein (VSP). Furthermore, rhizomes did not act as a N storage compartment. • Conclusions Production of new leaf area was entirely reliant, during the first week after defoliation, on N stores present in the plant. Mobilized N originated mainly from free amino acids and soluble proteins located in roots, and less so from proteins in stubble. Presence of VSP in the roots was not confirmed. The data suggest that rhizomes played an important role in N transport but not in N storage. PMID:15598700

  2. Evaluating the impact of red-edge band from Rapideye image for classifying insect defoliation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelabu, Samuel; Mutanga, Onisimo; Adam, Elhadi

    2014-09-01

    The prospect of regular assessments of insect defoliation using remote sensing technologies has increased in recent years through advances in the understanding of the spectral reflectance properties of vegetation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the red edge channel of Rapideye imagery to discriminate different levels of insect defoliation in an African savanna by comparing the results of obtained from two classifiers. Random Forest and Support vector machine classification algorithms were applied using different sets of spectral analysis involving the red edge band. Results show that the integration of information from red edge increases classification accuracy of insect defoliation levels in all analysis performed in the study. For instance, when all the 5 bands of Rapideye imagery were used for classification, the overall accuracies increases about 19% and 21% for SVM and RF, respectively, as opposed to when the red edge channel was excluded. We also found out that the normalized difference red-edge index yielded a better accuracy result than normalized difference vegetation index. We conclude that the red-edge channel of relatively affordable and readily available high-resolution multispectral satellite data such as Rapideye has the potential to considerably improve insect defoliation classification especially in sub-Saharan Africa where data availability is limited.

  3. Responses of African Grasses in the Genus Sporobolus to Defoliation and Sodium Stress: Tradeoffs, Cross-Tolerance, or Independent Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Daniel M.; Anderson, T. Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the Serengeti ecosystem of East Africa, grazing ungulates prefer areas with elevated grass Na, suggesting that some grasses tolerate both high soil Na and defoliation. We performed a factorial Na-by-defoliation greenhouse study with five abundant Sporobolus congeners to explore whether Serengeti grasses possess traits which: (i) confer tolerance to both Na and defoliation (cross-tolerance); (ii) display a tradeoff; or (iii) act independently in their tolerances. Our expectation was that related grasses would exhibit cross-tolerance when simultaneously subjected to Na and defoliation. Instead, we found that physiological tolerances and growth responses to Na and defoliation did not correlate but instead acted independently: species characterized by intense grazing in the field showed no growth or photosynthetic compensation for combined Na and defoliation. Additionally, in all but the highest Na dosage, mortality was higher when species were exposed to both Na and defoliation together. Across species, mortality rates were greater in short-statured species which occur on sodic soils in heavily grazed areas. Mortality among species was positively correlated with specific leaf area, specific root length, and relative growth rate, suggesting that rapidly growing species which invest in low cost tissues have higher rates of mortality when exposed to multiple stressors. We speculate that the prevalence of these species in areas of high Na and disturbance is explained by alternative strategies, such as high fecundity, a wide range of germination conditions, or further dispersal, to compensate for the lack of additional tolerance mechanisms. PMID:27137400

  4. Experimental defoliation affects male but not female reproductive performance of the tropical monoecious plant Croton suberosus (Euphorbiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Narbona, Eduardo; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Monoecious plants have the capacity to allocate resources separately to male and female functions more easily than hermaphrodites. This can be advantageous against environmental stresses such as leaf herbivory. However, studies showing effects of herbivory on male and female functions and on the interaction with the plant's pollinators are limited, particularly in tropical plants. Here, the effects of experimental defoliation were examined in the monoecious shrub Croton suberosus (Euphorbiaceae), a wasp-pollinated species from a Mexican tropical dry forest. Methods Three defoliation treatments were applied: 0 % (control), 25 % (low) or 75 % (high) of plant leaf area removed. Vegetative (production of new leaves) and reproductive (pistillate and staminate flower production, pollen viability, nectar production, fruit set, and seed set) performance variables, and the abundance and activity of floral visitors were examined. Key Results Defoliated plants overcompensated for tissue loss by producing more new leaves than control plants. Production of staminate flowers gradually decreased with increasing defoliation and the floral sex ratio (staminate : pistillate flowers) was drastically reduced in high-defoliation plants. In contrast, female reproductive performance (pistillate flower production, fruit set and seed set) and pollinator visitation and abundance were not impacted by defoliation. Conclusions The asymmetrical effects of defoliation on male and female traits of C. suberosus may be due to the temporal and spatial flexibility in the allocation of resources deployed by monoecious plants. We posit that this helps to maintain the plant's pollination success in the face of leaf herbivory stress. PMID:20519239

  5. Detection of tamarisk defoliation by the northern tamarisk beetle based on multitemporal Landsat 5 thematic mapper imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meng, Ran; Dennison, Philip E.; Jamison, Levi R.; van Riper, Charles, III; Nager, Pamela; Hultine, Kevin R.; Bean, Dan W.; Dudley, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The spread of tamarisk (Tamarix spp., also known as saltcedar) is a significant ecological disturbance in western North America and has long been targeted for control, leading to the importation of the northern tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) as a biological control agent. Following its initial release along the Colorado River near Moab, Utah in 2004, the beetle has successfully established and defoliated tamarisk across much of the upper Colorado River Basin. However, the spatial distribution and seasonal timing of defoliation are complex and difficult to quantify over large areas. To address this challenge, we tested and compared two remote sensing approaches to mapping tamarisk defoliation: Disturbance Index (DI) and a decision tree method called Random Forest (RF). Based on multitemporal Landsat 5 TM imagery for 2006-2010, changes in DI and defoliation probability from RF were calculated to detect tamarisk defoliation along the banks of Green, Colorado, Dolores and San Juan rivers within the Colorado Plateau area. Defoliation mapping accuracy was assessed based on field surveys partitioned into 10 km sections of river and on regions of interest created for continuous riparian vegetation. The DI method detected 3711 ha of defoliated area in 2007, 7350 ha in 2008, 10,457 ha in 2009 and 5898 ha in 2010. The RF method detected much smaller areas of defoliation but proved to have higher accuracy, as demonstrated by accuracy assessment and sensitivity analysis, with 784 ha in 2007, 960 ha in 2008, 934 ha in 2009, and 1008 ha in 2010. Results indicate that remote sensing approaches are likely to be useful for studying spatiotemporal patterns of tamarisk defoliation as the tamarisk leaf beetle spreads throughout the western United States.

  6. Thidiazuron induces shoot organogenesis at low concentrations and somatic embryogenesis at high concentrations on leaf and petiole explants of African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl).

    PubMed

    Mithila, J; Hall, J C; Victor, J M R; Saxena, P K

    2003-01-01

    Regeneration via shoot organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis was observed from thidiazuron (TDZ)-treated leaf and petiole explants of greenhouse- and in vitro-grown African violet plants. The response of cultures to other growth regulators over a range of 0.5 microM to 10 microM was 50% less than that observed with TDZ. A comparative study among several cultivars of African violet indicated that "Benjamin" and "William" had the highest regeneration potential. In "Benjamin", higher frequencies of shoot organogenesis (twofold) and somatic embryogenesis (a 50% increase) were observed from in vitro- and greenhouse-grown plants, respectively. At concentrations lower than 2.5 microM, TDZ induced shoot organogenesis, whereas at higher doses (5-10 microM) somatic embryos were formed. These findings provide the first report of simultaneous shoot organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis of African violet explants in response to TDZ. PMID:12789442

  7. Gossypium accessions resistant to Rotylenchulus reniformis vary in sensitivity to the herbicide fluometuron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) resistance is being transferred to Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) from its distant relatives. Anecdotal observations of fluometuron damage to LONREN lines with resistance from G. longicalyx raised concerns about introducing herbicide sensitivity from ...

  8. Thidiazuron-enhanced biosynthesis and antimicrobial efficacy of silver nanoparticles via improving phytochemical reducing potential in callus culture of Linum usitatissimum L.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Sumaira; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2016-01-01

    Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by using plants is an emerging class of nanobiotechnology. It revolutionizes all domains of medical sciences by synthesizing chemical-free AgNPs for various biomedical applications. In this report, AgNPs were successfully synthesized by using whole plant extract (WPE) and thidiazuron-induced callus extract (CE) of Linum usitatissimum. The phytochemical analysis revealed that the total phenolic and flavonoid contents were higher in CE than that in WPE. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy of synthesized AgNPs showed a characteristic surface plasmon band in the range of 410-426 nm. Bioreduction of CE-mediated AgNPs was completed in a shorter time than that of WPE-mediated AgNPs. Scanning electron microscopy showed that both types of synthesized AgNPs were spherical in shape, but CE-mediated AgNPs were smaller in size (19-24 nm) and more scattered in distribution than that of WPE-mediated AgNPs (49-54 nm). X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed crystalline nature (face-centered cubic) of both types of AgNPs. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that the polyphenols and flavonoids were mainly responsible for reduction and capping of synthesized AgNPs. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further confirmed the successful synthesis of AgNPs. Moreover, the synthesized AgNPs were found to be stable over months with no change in the surface plasmon bands. More importantly, CE-mediated AgNPs displayed significantly higher bactericidal activity against multiple drug-resistant human pathogens than WPE-mediated AgNPs. The present work highlighted the potent role of thidiazuron in in vitro-derived cultures for enhanced biosynthesis of chemical-free AgNPs, which can be used as nanomedicines in many biomedical applications. PMID:26955271

  9. Thidiazuron-enhanced biosynthesis and antimicrobial efficacy of silver nanoparticles via improving phytochemical reducing potential in callus culture of Linum usitatissimum L.

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Sumaira; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2016-01-01

    Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by using plants is an emerging class of nanobiotechnology. It revolutionizes all domains of medical sciences by synthesizing chemical-free AgNPs for various biomedical applications. In this report, AgNPs were successfully synthesized by using whole plant extract (WPE) and thidiazuron-induced callus extract (CE) of Linum usitatissimum. The phytochemical analysis revealed that the total phenolic and flavonoid contents were higher in CE than that in WPE. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy of synthesized AgNPs showed a characteristic surface plasmon band in the range of 410–426 nm. Bioreduction of CE-mediated AgNPs was completed in a shorter time than that of WPE-mediated AgNPs. Scanning electron microscopy showed that both types of synthesized AgNPs were spherical in shape, but CE-mediated AgNPs were smaller in size (19–24 nm) and more scattered in distribution than that of WPE-mediated AgNPs (49–54 nm). X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed crystalline nature (face-centered cubic) of both types of AgNPs. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that the polyphenols and flavonoids were mainly responsible for reduction and capping of synthesized AgNPs. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further confirmed the successful synthesis of AgNPs. Moreover, the synthesized AgNPs were found to be stable over months with no change in the surface plasmon bands. More importantly, CE-mediated AgNPs displayed significantly higher bactericidal activity against multiple drug-resistant human pathogens than WPE-mediated AgNPs. The present work highlighted the potent role of thidiazuron in in vitro-derived cultures for enhanced biosynthesis of chemical-free AgNPs, which can be used as nanomedicines in many biomedical applications. PMID:26955271

  10. Exudation of alcohol and aldehyde sugars from roots of defoliated Lolium perenne L. grown under sterile conditions.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Stephen J; Read, Derek B; Murray, Philip J; Gregory, Peter J

    2008-11-01

    Root exudates were collected over a 27 day period from defoliated and non-defoliated Lolium perenne L. plants grown under sterile conditions in microlysimeters. Eleven individual sugars, including both aldehyde and alcohol sugars, were identified and quantified with a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). There was no change in the number of sugars present between 7 and 27 days, but the exudation of alcohol sugars decreased rapidly at about day 12. Xylose and glucose were present in the largest amounts. Defoliation initially increased the total amount of sugars in the exudates, but continuous defoliation reduced total sugar exudation by 16% and induced changes in the exudation patterns of individual sugars. Defoliation enhanced exudation of erythritol, threitol, and xylitol, reduced exudation of glucose and arabitol, but had little effect on the amounts of other sugars exuded. The more complex 6 C, 5 OH aldehyde sugars, especially glucose, showed changes earlier and to a greater extent (17 days), than the 5 C, 4 OH (xylose and ribose) and 6 C 4 OH (fucose) aldehyde groups. These findings confirm the general finding that repeated defoliation reduces the quantity of total sugars exuded, but the pattern of release of individual sugars is complex and variable. PMID:18815840

  11. Feast and famine: previous defoliation limiting survival of pine processionary caterpillar Thaumetopoea pityocampa in Scots pine Pinus sylvestris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hódar, José A.; Zamora, Regino; Castro, Jorge; Baraza, Elena

    2004-12-01

    This study analyses the consequences of previous defoliation on the survival of the larvae of the pine processionary moth Thaumetopoea pityocampa (Denis and Schiffermüller) feeding on relict Scots pine Pinus sylvestris (L.) ssp. nevadensis Christ in the Sierra Nevada mountains (SE Spain). Egg batches of the pine processionary moth were placed on four groups of Scots pines that underwent different periods of herbivory. The larval survival was related to the nitrogen content, fibre, phenolics and terpenes in the needles. Larval survival was higher in undefoliated pines, lower in pines defoliated two consecutive years, and intermediate in pines defoliated only one year, suggesting a direct relationship between previous defoliation and larval survival. In contrast, none of the characteristics of the needles showed a clear relationship with larval survival. The resulting reduction in larval number also affects the capacity of the larvae to develop during winter, because it hampered nest warming. Thus, previous defoliation limits, although it does not impede, the possibility of repeated defoliation on Scots pine.

  12. Gibberellin stimulates regrowth after defoliation of sheepgrass (Leymus chinensis) by regulating expression of fructan-related genes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yueyue; Shao, Linhui; Li, Xiuqing; Liu, Gongshe; Chen, Shuangyan

    2016-09-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) affect forage growth and development; however, it is largely unknown how GAs regulate the metabolism of fructan (an important polysaccharide reserve in many cereals) and the regrowth of forage plants after defoliation. To explore the mechanism of the responses of defoliated sheepgrass [Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Tzvel] to GA, we sprayed defoliated sheepgrass with GA3 and/or paclobutrazol (PAC; an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis) and analyzed the growth characteristics, carbohydrate contents, and transcript levels of genes related to GA metabolism, GA signal transduction, and fructan metabolism. The results showed that spraying exogenous GA3 onto defoliated sheepgrass promoted leaf and internode elongation, while spraying with PAC inhibited leaf and internode elongation, compared with the control. Spraying GA3 onto defoliated sheepgrass also altered the fructan content by extending the period of fructan utilization. At the transcriptional level, exogenous GA3 increased the transcript levels of genes related to GA metabolism in the sheath. Taken together, our results suggest that exogenous GA3 stimulates the regrowth of defoliated sheepgrass regrowth by regulating GA and fructan-related genes, and by promoting endogenous GA synthesis, fructan metabolism, and signaling. PMID:27216422

  13. [Effects of Litchi chinensis Defoliation on Growth and Photosynthesis of Microcystis aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-xiong; Jiang, Chen-chun; Li, Jin-weiz; Wang, Xiao-ju

    2015-05-01

    The growth and physiology of bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa were determined by the pulse amplitude modulated fluorimetry when exposed to different concentrations of Litchi chinensis defoliation extract for 15 d. The growth, maximal efficiency (Fv/Fm), effective quantum yield (YII) of PSII photochemistry, photosynthesis efficiency (α) , maximum electron transport rate (rETRmax) and light saturation coefficient (Ik) were used to evaluate the growth and photosynthesis in M. aeruginosa. It was found that the extract of L. chinensis defoliation stored for 5 days significantly inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa in a concentration-dependent way. After a long time of exposure, stimulation effect disappeared gradually. Fv/Fm fluorescence parameters, YII and alpha changed from negative correlation to positive correlation or kept positive correlation with the extract of L. chinensis defoliation, which might affect the photosynthesis of M. aeruginosa at early time or help the cyanobacterium to survive in the stress environment by improving the efficiency of light energy. Ik, rETRmax and the content of algal chlorophyll-a changed from negative to significant negative correlation with the extract. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that the peak intensities of tryptophan and tyrosine fluorescence were only about one third in 2.0 g · L(-1) extract treatment when compared to the 1.2 g · L(-1) extract treatment on day 15. At the same time, the peak intensity of humic acid fluorescence was weaker than that on day 1. Further study showed that the EC50 of algal growth was smaller than that of the traditional crops straw, which might achieve good effect to control the growth of algae with lower concentration of L. chinensis defoliation extract due to its strong allelopathy. PMID:26314111

  14. Temporal patterns of nitrogen leakage from mid-Appalachian forested watersheds: Role of insect defoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshleman, Keith N.; Morgan, Raymond P.; Webb, James R.; Deviney, Frank A.; Galloway, James N.

    1998-08-01

    Fluxes of dissolved nitrogen (N) as nitrate from forested watersheds in the mid-Appalachian region have important water quality ramifications for small acid-sensitive streams and for downstream receiving waters such as the Chesapeake Bay. Previous studies of N leakage have suggested that annual dissolved N fluxes from small watersheds can vary by several orders of magnitude and may be increasing as second-growth forests gradually become N saturated from the accrual of atmospheric N loadings. In this study, we examined the temporal (intra-annual and interannual) variability in dissolved nitrate fluxes from five small (area < 15 km2) forested watersheds in the mid-Appalachian region from 1988 to 1995. At all sites, nitrate concentrations were observed to increase dramatically during storm flow events, with nitric acid contributing significantly to depressions in pH and acid-neutralizing capacity; annual nitrate fluxes were dominated by high-discharge periods. Interannually, the fluxes at each site varied by 1-2 orders of magnitude, but the patterns of N leakage displayed considerable synchrony with outbreaks of gypsy moth caterpillar defoliation that began in the late 1980s and early 1990s in this region. N leakage from forested watersheds apparently lagged the initial defoliation by several months to perhaps a year or more. Defoliation outbreaks by the gypsy moth caterpillar (or other herbivorous pests) thus provide an alternative explanation of N leakage from forest ecosystems. Poorly documented insect defoliations, rather than premature N saturation of intact forest ecosystems, need to be considered as a possible explanation of N leakage from forested watersheds in the mid-Appalachian region and elsewhere.

  15. Effect of defoliant (butiphose) on morpho-physiological properties and enzyme systems of natural membranes.

    PubMed

    Mirakhmedov, A K; Ochilov, K R; Sagatova, G A; Khan, M Z; Khole, V

    1989-03-01

    Butiphose (Tributyltritiophosphate, (C4H9S)3PO) a commonly used defoliant in cotton growing regions of USSR, caused extensive alterations in morphological features of erythrocyte and nuclear membranes and affected the permeability properties of rat liver mitochondrial membrane. It disrupted Ca2+ transport system and other energy dependent processes in mitochondria. A reduction in the activity of cytochrome-c-oxidase and NAD.H-oxidase was also observed. PMID:2606532

  16. Cotton Fiber Cell Walls of Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense Have Differences Related to Loosely-Bound Xyloglucan

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Utku; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Singh, Bir; Brown, Virginia L.; Hahn, Michael G.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2013-01-01

    Cotton fiber is an important natural textile fiber due to its exceptional length and thickness. These properties arise largely through primary and secondary cell wall synthesis. The cotton fiber of commerce is a cellulosic secondary wall surrounded by a thin cuticulated primary wall, but there were only sparse details available about the polysaccharides in the fiber cell wall of any cotton species. In addition, Gossypium hirsutum (Gh) fiber was known to have an adhesive cotton fiber middle lamella (CFML) that joins adjacent fibers into tissue-like bundles, but it was unknown whether a CFML existed in other commercially important cotton fibers. We compared the cell wall chemistry over the time course of fiber development in Gh and Gossypium barbadense (Gb), the two most important commercial cotton species, when plants were grown in parallel in a highly controlled greenhouse. Under these growing conditions, the rate of early fiber elongation and the time of onset of secondary wall deposition were similar in fibers of the two species, but as expected the Gb fiber had a prolonged elongation period and developed higher quality compared to Gh fiber. The Gb fibers had a CFML, but it was not directly required for fiber elongation because Gb fiber continued to elongate rapidly after CFML hydrolysis. For both species, fiber at seven ages was extracted with four increasingly strong solvents, followed by analysis of cell wall matrix polysaccharide epitopes using antibody-based Glycome Profiling. Together with immunohistochemistry of fiber cross-sections, the data show that the CFML of Gb fiber contained lower levels of xyloglucan compared to Gh fiber. Xyloglucan endo-hydrolase activity was also higher in Gb fiber. In general, the data provide a rich picture of the similarities and differences in the cell wall structure of the two most important commercial cotton species. PMID:23457548

  17. Activation of sucrose transport in defoliated Lolium perenne L.: an example of apoplastic phloem loading plasticity.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Alexandre; Desclos, Marie; Amiard, Véronique; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Adams, William W; Turgeon, Robert; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Noiraud-Romy, Nathalie

    2009-07-01

    The pathway of carbon phloem loading was examined in leaf tissues of the forage grass Lolium perenne. The effect of defoliation (leaf blade removal) on sucrose transport capacity was assessed in leaf sheaths as the major carbon source for regrowth. The pathway of carbon transport was assessed via a combination of electron microscopy, plasmolysis experiments and plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) purified by aqueous two-phase partitioning from the microsomal fraction. Results support an apoplastic phloem loading mechanism. Imposition of an artificial proton-motive force to PMVs from leaf sheaths energized an active, transient and saturable uptake of sucrose (Suc). The affinity of Suc carriers for Suc was 580 microM in leaf sheaths of undefoliated plants. Defoliation induced a decrease of K(m) followed by an increase of V(max). A transporter was isolated from stubble (including leaf sheaths) cDNA libraries and functionally expressed in yeast. The level of L.perenne SUcrose Transporter 1 (LpSUT1) expression increased in leaf sheaths in response to defoliation. Taken together, the results indicate that Suc transport capacity increased in leaf sheaths of L. perenne in response to leaf blade removal. This increase might imply de novo synthesis of Suc transporters, including LpSUT1, and may represent one of the mechanisms contributing to rapid refoliation. PMID:19520670

  18. Potential of VIIRS Data for Regional Monitoring of Gypsy Moth Defoliation: Implications for Forest Threat Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruce, J. P.; Ryan, R. E.; Smoot, J. C.; Prados, D. L.; McKellip, R. D.; Sader, S. A.; Gasser, G.; May, G.; Hargrove, W.

    2007-12-01

    A NASA RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) experiment was conducted to assess the potential of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) data for monitoring non-native gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) defoliation of forests. This experiment compares defoliation detection products computed from simulated VIIRS and from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) time series products as potential inputs to a forest threat EWS (Early Warning System) being developed for the USFS (USDA Forest Service). Gypsy moth causes extensive defoliation of broadleaved forests in the United States and is specifically identified in the Healthy Forest Restoration Act (HFRA) of 2003. The HFRA mandates development of a national forest threat EWS. This system is being built by the USFS, and NASA is aiding integration of needed satellite data products into this system, including MODIS products. This RPC experiment enabled the MODIS follow-on, VIIRS, to be evaluated as a data source for EWS forest monitoring products. The experiment included 1) assessment of MODIS-simulated VIIRS NDVI products, and 2) evaluation of gypsy moth defoliation mapping products from MODIS-simulated VIIRS and from MODIS NDVI time series data. This experiment employed MODIS data collected over the approx. 15 million acre mid-Appalachian Highlands during the annual peak defoliation time frame (June 10 through July 27) during 2000-2006. NASA Stennis Application Research Toolbox software was used to produce MODIS-simulated VIIRS data and NASA Stennis Time Series Product Tool software was employed to process MODIS and MODIS-simulated VIIRS time series data scaled to planetary reflectance. MODIS-simulated VIIRS data was assessed through comparison to Hyperion-simulated VIIRS data using data collected during gypsy moth defoliation. Hyperion- simulated MODIS data showed a high correlation with actual MODIS data. MODIS-simulated VIIRS data for the same date showed moderately high correlation with Hyperion

  19. Comparative analysis of genome-wide divergence, domestication footprints and genome-wide association study of root traits for Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of 10,129 singleton SNPs of known genomic location in tetraploid cotton provided unique opportunities to characterize genome-wide diversity among 440 Gossypium hirsutum and 219 G. barbadense cultivars and landrace accessions of widespread origin. Using genome-wide distributed SNPs, we examined ...

  20. The role of defoliation and root rot pathogen infection in driving the mode of drought-related physiological decline in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Aguadé, D; Poyatos, R; Gómez, M; Oliva, J; Martínez-Vilalta, J

    2015-03-01

    Drought-related tree die-off episodes have been observed in all vegetated continents. Despite much research effort, however, the multiple interactions between carbon starvation, hydraulic failure and biotic agents in driving tree mortality under field conditions are still not well understood. We analysed the seasonal variability of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in four organs (leaves, branches, trunk and roots), the vulnerability to embolism in roots and branches, native embolism (percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC)) in branches and the presence of root rot pathogens in defoliated and non-defoliated individuals in a declining Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) population in the NE Iberian Peninsula in 2012, which included a particularly dry and warm summer. No differences were observed between defoliated and non-defoliated pines in hydraulic parameters, except for a higher vulnerability to embolism at pressures below -2 MPa in roots of defoliated pines. No differences were found between defoliation classes in branch PLC. Total NSC (TNSC, soluble sugars plus starch) values decreased during drought, particularly in leaves. Defoliation reduced TNSC levels across tree organs, especially just before (June) and during (August) drought. Root rot infection by the fungal pathogen Onnia P. Karst spp. was detected but it did not appear to be associated to tree defoliation. However, Onnia infection was associated with reduced leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity and sapwood depth, and thus contributed to hydraulic impairment, especially in defoliated pines. Infection was also associated with virtually depleted root starch reserves during and after drought in defoliated pines. Moreover, defoliated and infected trees tended to show lower basal area increment. Overall, our results show the intertwined nature of physiological mechanisms leading to drought-induced mortality and the inherent difficulty of isolating their contribution under field conditions. PMID

  1. Consequences of enriched atmospheric CO{sub 2} and defoliation for foliar chemistry and gypsy moth performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroth, R.L.; Kinney, K.K.

    1998-10-01

    Elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} are likely to interact with other factors affecting plant physiology to alter plant chemical profiles and plant-herbivore interactions. The authors evaluated the independent and interactive effects of enriched CO{sub 2} and artificial defoliation on foliar chemistry of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) and sugar maple (Acer saccharum), and the consequences of such changes for short-term performance of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar). They grew aspen and maple seedlings in ambient and enriched CO{sub 2} environments at the University of wisconsin Biotron. Seven weeks after budbreak, trees in half of the rooms were subjected to 50% defoliation. Afterwards, foliage was collected for chemical analyses, and feeding trials were conducted with fourth-stadium gypsy moths. Enriched CO{sub 2} altered foliar levels of water, nitrogen, carbohydrates, and phenolics, and responses generally differed between the two tree species. Defoliation induced chemical changes only in aspen. They found no significant interactions between CO{sub 2} and defoliation for levels of carbon-based defenses (phenolic glycosides and tannins). CO{sub 2} treatment altered the performance of larvae fed aspen, but not maple, whereas defoliation had little effect on performance on insects. In general, results from this experimental system do not support the hypothesis that induction of carbon-based chemical defenses, and attendant effects on insects, will be stronger in a CO{sub 2}-enriched world.

  2. Effect of alpha-naphthalene acetic acid and thidiazuron on seedling of economic crops grown in endosulfan sulfate-spiked sand.

    PubMed

    Somtrakoon, Khanitta; Kruatrachue, Maleeya

    2014-11-01

    The effect of two plant growth regulators, alpha-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and thidiazuron (TDZ) on the growth of sweet corn (Zea mays), cowpea (Vigna sinensis) and cucumber (Cucurmis sativus) seedling planted in 1-100 mg kg(-1) of endosulfan sulfate spiked sand was investigated. Endosulfan sulfate had no apparent toxicity as seedlings of these crop plants grew normally in endosulfan sulfate spiked sand. Concentration of endosulfan sulfate in sand affected the response of seedling induction by NAA or TDZ. Induction of crop seeds by NAA or TDZ did not promote growth of sweet corn, cowpea and cucumber to an appreciable extent. Both plant regulators at concentration of 10 mg l(-1) seemed to exert adverse effect on crop seedling. TDZ decreased shoot length, root length and chlorophyll contents in leaves of sweet corn and cowpea growing in endosulfan sulfate spiked sand. In contrast, NAA was not toxic and promoted growth of sweet corn and cowpea seedling. However, cucumber was affected by NAA and TDZ more than other plants. TDZ significantly decreased biomass and root length of cucumber. Also, NAA significantly decreased cucumber root length and tended to increase cucumber root dried weight when grown in 100 mg kg(-1) of endosulfan sulfate spiked sand. PMID:25522501

  3. Peroxidase and catalase activities are involved in direct adventitious shoot formation induced by thidiazuron in eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) zygotic embryos.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Newton, Ronald J

    2005-08-01

    We reported establishment of an efficient plant regeneration procedure through direct adventitious shoot (DAS) formation from cotyledons and hypocotyls of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) mature embryos in this investigation. Multiple DASs were initiated from cotyledons of embryos on PS medium containing N6-benzyladenine (BA), thidiazuron (TDZ), or kinetin (KIN). Among different concentrations of casein enzymatic hydrosylate (CH) and glutamine used in this study, 500 mg l(-1) CH or 600 mg l(-1) glutamine induced the highest frequency of DAS formation. Rooting of regenerated shoots was obtained on PS medium supplemented with 0.01-0.1 microM indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) with the highest frequency on medium containing 0.01 muM IAA. No DASs were obtained on medium without TDZ. Measurement of peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) activity during direct shoot induction and differentiation demonstrated that the lowest POD activity appeared in the 5-6th week of culture and lowest CAT activity occurred in the 7-8th week of culture on medium with TDZ. No such a change in POD and CAT activities was observed on medium without TDZ. These results demonstrated that POD and CAT activities were involved in DAS formation induced by TDZ in eastern white pine. PMID:16129608

  4. Elevated CO2, not defoliation, enhances N cycling and increases short-term soil N immobilization regardless of N addition in a semiarid grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated CO2 and defoliation effects on nitrogen (N) cycling in rangeland soils remain poorly understood. Here we tested whether effects of elevated CO2 and defoliation (clipping to 2.5 cm height) on N cycling depended on soil N availability (addition of 1 vs. 11 g N/m2) in intact mesocosms extracte...

  5. Long-term shifts in the cyclicity of outbreaks of a forest-defoliating insect.

    PubMed

    Allstadt, Andrew J; Haynes, Kyle J; Liebhold, Andrew M; Johnson, Derek M

    2013-05-01

    Recent collapses of population cycles in several species highlight the mutable nature of population behavior as well as the potential role of human-induced environmental change in causing population dynamics to shift. We investigate changes in the cyclicity of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) outbreaks by applying wavelet analysis to an 86-year time series of forest defoliation in the northeastern United States. Gypsy moth population dynamics shifted on at least four occasions during the study period (1924-2009); strongly cyclical outbreaks were observed between ca. 1943-1965 and ca. 1978-1996, with noncyclical dynamics in the intervening years. During intervals of cyclical dynamics, harmonic oscillations at cycle lengths of 4-5 and 8-10 years co-occurred. Cross-correlation analyses indicated that the intensity of suppression efforts (area treated by insecticide application) did not significantly reduce the total area of defoliation across the region in subsequent years, and no relationship was found between insecticide use and the cyclicity of outbreaks. A gypsy moth population model incorporating empirically based trophic interactions produced shifting population dynamics similar to that observed in the defoliation data. Gypsy moth cycles were the result of a high-density limit cycle driven by a specialist pathogen. Though a generalist predator did not produce an alternative stable equilibrium, cyclical fluctuations in predator density did generate extended intervals of noncyclical behavior in the gypsy moth population. These results suggest that changes in gypsy moth population behavior are driven by trophic interactions, rather than by changes in climatic conditions frequently implicated in other systems. PMID:23073635

  6. Monitoring gypsy moth defoliation by applying change detection techniques to Landsat imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. L.; Stauffer, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    The overall objective of a research effort at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is to develop and evaluate digital image processing techniques that will facilitate the assessment of the intensity and spatial distribution of forest insect damage in Northeastern U.S. forests using remotely sensed data from Landsats 1, 2 and C. Automated change detection techniques are presently being investigated as a method of isolating the areas of change in the forest canopy resulting from pest outbreaks. In order to follow the change detection approach, Landsat scene correction and overlay capabilities are utilized to provide multispectral/multitemporal image files of 'defoliation' and 'nondefoliation' forest stand conditions.

  7. Population dynamics of the Teak defoliator (Hyblaea puera Cramer) in Nilambur teak plantations using Randomly Amplified Gene Encoding Primers (RAGEP)

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, N; Sajeev, TV; Sudheendrakumar, VV; Banerjee, Moinak

    2005-01-01

    Background The Teak defoliator (Hyblaea puera) is a pest moth of teak woodlands in India and other tropical regions (e.g. Thailand) and is of major economic significance. This pest is of major concern as it is involved in complete defoliation of trees during the early part of the growing season. Defoliation does not kill teak trees, but it results in huge amount of timber loss. Teak defoliator outbreaks are a regular annual feature in most teak plantations in India and it is extremely difficult to predict the exact time and place of occurrence of these outbreaks. Evidence from the study of the population dynamics of H. puera indicated habitual, short range movements of emerging moth populations, suggesting that these populations have spread to larger areas, generation after generation, affecting the entire teak plantations. We were therefore interested in investigating the temporal and spatial relationship among various population groups in Nilambur, Kerala (India) and address the cause of outbreak at the landscape level. Results The populations were classified into 'endemic', 'epicenter' and 'epidemic' populations based on the time of occurrence and size of infestation. We devised a novel method of screening nuclear and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms using Randomly Amplified Gene Encoding Primers (RAGEP). We have used this method extensively to evaluate the species specificity, reproducibility and to discriminate among the three different characterised populations of teak defoliator. Conclusions This method also allowed us to comment with some certainty that the endemic teak defoliator, H. puera do not play a major role in contributing to large-scale infestations. With respect to the hypotheses put forward regarding the origin of outbreaks of the moth, this study confirms the role of migration in outbreak causation, while negating the belief that endemic populations aggregate to cause an epidemic. PMID:15689236

  8. Optimising the spatial resolution of WorldView-2 pan-sharpened imagery for predicting levels of Gonipterus scutellatus defoliation in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lottering, Romano; Mutanga, Onisimo

    2016-02-01

    Gonipterus scutellatus Gyllenhal is a leaf feeding weevil that is a major defoliator of the genus Eucalyptus. Understanding the relationship between levels of weevil induced vegetation defoliation and the optimal spatial resolution of satellite images is essential for effective management of plantation resources. The objective of this study was to identify appropriate spatial resolutions for predicting levels of weevil induced defoliation. We resampled the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Simple Ratio (SR) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) images computed from a WorldView-2 pan-sharpened image, which is characterised with a 0.5 m spatial resolution and 8 spectral bands. Within each plantation compartment 30 × 30 m plots were established, representing different levels of defoliation. From the centre of each plot, the spatial resolution of the original image was progressively resampled from 1.5 to 8.5 m, with 1 m increments. The minimal variance for each level of defoliation was then established and used as an indicator for quantitatively selecting the optimal spatial resolution. Results indicate that an appropriate spatial resolution was established at 1.25, 1.25, 1.75 and 2.25 m for low, medium, high and severe levels of defoliation, respectively. In addition, an Artificial Neural Network was run to determine the relationship between the appropriate spatial resolution and levels of Gonipterus scutellatus induced defoliation. The model yielded an R2 of 0.80, with an RMSE of 1.28 (2.45% of the mean measured defoliation) based on an independent test dataset. We then compared this model to a model developed using the original 0.5 m image spatial resolution. Our results suggest that optimising the spatial resolution of remotely sensed imagery essentially improves the prediction of vegetation defoliation. In essence, this study provides the foundation for multi-scale defoliation mapping using high spatial resolution imagery.

  9. Novosphingobium gossypii sp. nov., isolated from Gossypium hirsutum.

    PubMed

    Kämpfer, Peter; Martin, Karin; McInroy, John A; Glaeser, Stefanie P

    2015-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium (strain JM-1396(T)) producing a yellow pigment, was isolated from the healthy internal stem tissue of post-harvest cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, cultivar 'DES-119') grown at the Plant Breeding Unit at the E.V. Smith Research Center in Tallassee (Macon county), AL, USA. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of strain JM-1396(T) showed high sequence similarity values to the type strains of Novosphingobium mathurense, Novosphingobium panipatense (both 98.6%) and Novosphingobium barchaimii (98.5%); sequence similarities to all other type strains of species of the genus Novosphingobium were below 98.3%. DNA-DNA pairing experiments of the DNA of strain JM-1396(T) and N. mathurense SM117(T), N. panipatense SM16(T) and N. barchaimii DSM 25411(T) showed low relatedness values of 8% (reciprocal 7%), 24% (reciprocal 26%) and 19% (reciprocal 25%), respectively. Ubiquinone Q-10 was detected as the dominant quinone; the fatty acids C18 : 1ω7c (71.0%) and the typical 2-hydroxy fatty acid, C14 : 0 2-OH (11.7%), were detected as typical components. The polar lipid profile contained the diagnostic lipids diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, sphingoglycolipid and phosphatidylcholine. The polyamine pattern contained the major compound spermidine and only minor amounts of other polyamines. All these data revealed that strain JM-1396(T) represents a novel species of the genus Novosphingobium. For this reason we propose the name Novosphingobium gossypii sp. nov. with the type strain JM-1396(T) ( = LMG 28605(T) = CCM 8569(T) = CIP 110884(T)). PMID:25985829

  10. Purification and biosynthesis of cottonseed (Gossypium hirsutum L.) catalase.

    PubMed Central

    Kunce, C M; Trelease, R N; Turley, R B

    1988-01-01

    As part of our research on peroxisome biogenesis, catalase was purified from cotyledons of dark-grown cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seedlings and monospecific antibodies were raised in rabbits. Purified catalase appeared as three distinct electrophoretic forms in non-denaturing gels and as a single protein band (with a subunit Mr of 57,000) on silver-stained SDS/polyacrylamide gels. Western blots of crude extracts and isolated peroxisomes from cotton revealed one immunoreactive polypeptide with the same Mr (57,000) as the purified enzyme, indicating that catalase did not undergo any detectable change in Mr during purification. Synthesis in vitro, directed by polyadenylated RNA isolated from either maturing seeds or cotyledons of dark-grown cotton seedlings, revealed a predominant immunoreactive translation product with a subunit Mr of 57,000 and an additional minor immunoreactive product with a subunit Mr of 64000. Labelling studies in vivo revealed newly synthesized monomers of both the 64000- and 57,000-Mr proteins present in the cytosol and incorporation of both proteins into the peroxisome without proteolytic processing. Within the peroxisome, the 57,000-Mr catalase was found as an 11S tetramer; whereas the 64,000-Mr protein was found as a relatively long-lived 20S aggregate (native Mr approx. 600,000-800,000). The results strongly indicate that the 64,000-Mr protein (catalase?) is not a precursor to the 57,000-Mr catalase and that cotton catalase is translated on cytosolic ribosomes without a cleavable transit or signal sequence. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:3134010

  11. Potential of VIIRS Data for Regional Monitoring of Gypsy Moth Defoliation: Implications for Forest Threat Early Warning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ryan, Robert E.; Smoot, James C.; Prados, Donald; McKellip, Rodney; Sader. Steven A.; Gasser, Jerry; May, George; Hargrove, William

    2007-01-01

    A NASA RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) experiment was conducted to assess the potential of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) data for monitoring non-native gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) defoliation of forests. This experiment compares defoliation detection products computed from simulated VIIRS and from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) time series products as potential inputs to a forest threat EWS (Early Warning System) being developed for the USFS (USDA Forest Service). Gypsy moth causes extensive defoliation of broadleaved forests in the United States and is specifically identified in the Healthy Forest Restoration Act (HFRA) of 2003. The HFRA mandates development of a national forest threat EWS. This system is being built by the USFS and NASA is aiding integration of needed satellite data products into this system, including MODIS products. This RPC experiment enabled the MODIS follow-on, VIIRS, to be evaluated as a data source for EWS forest monitoring products. The experiment included 1) assessment of MODIS-simulated VIIRS NDVI products, and 2) evaluation of gypsy moth defoliation mapping products from MODIS-simulated VIIRS and from MODIS NDVI time series data. This experiment employed MODIS data collected over the approximately 15 million acre mid-Appalachian Highlands during the annual peak defoliation time frame (approximately June 10 through July 27) during 2000-2006. NASA Stennis Application Research Toolbox software was used to produce MODIS-simulated VIIRS data and NASA Stennis Time Series Product Tool software was employed to process MODIS and MODIS-simulated VIIRS time series data scaled to planetary reflectance. MODIS-simulated VIIRS data was assessed through comparison to Hyperion-simulated VIIRS data using data collected during gypsy moth defoliation. Hyperion-simulated MODIS data showed a high correlation with actual MODIS data (NDVI R2 of 0.877 and RMSE of 0.023). MODIS-simulated VIIRS data for the same

  12. LANDSAT Digital Data Base Preparation for the Pennsylvania Defoliation Application Pilot Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, R. G.; Zobrist, A. L.

    1982-01-01

    A LANDSAT digital mosaic data base for the State of Pennsylvania was prepared for use in the development of an automated system to annually estimate the extent and severity of Gypsy Moth defoliation of hardward forests. The techniques for detecting the defoliation and development of a geographic information system (GIS) to assess damage is being developed jointly by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and Pennsylvania State University using the JPL prepared mosaic base. The JPL processing involved the use of ground control points from the Master Data Processor for planimetric control, resampling of the LANDSAT data to 57 x 57 meter pixels, realignment to north, and reprojection to the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection in UTM zones 17 and 18. The completed mosaic for each UTM zone was subdivided into 1 degree of latitude by 2 degrees of longitude quadrangles for easy data handling. Consideration is given to the issues of mapping standards, sensor and spacecraft platform characteristics, and their implication to geographic information systems operation. Methods for obtaining measures of accuracy for LANDSAT mosaics are reviewed.

  13. Plant-herbivore-carnivore interactions in cotton, Gossypium hirsutum: Linking belowground and aboveground

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most studies on plant-herbivore interactions focus on either root or shoot herbivory in isolation, but above- and belowground herbivores may interact on a shared host plant. Cotton (Gossypium spp.) produces a variety of terpenoid aldehydes that exhibit toxicity to a wide range of herbivores and pat...

  14. The diploid D genome cottons (Gossypium spp.) of the new world

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diploid D genome cottons (Gossypium spp.) of the New World are part of a great reservoir of important genes for improving fiber quality, pest and disease resistance, and drought and salt tolerance in the modern cultivated Upland/Acala (G. hirsutum) and Pima [also known as Sea Island or Egyptian ...

  15. Evaluating protective terpenoid aldehyde compounds in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) has epidermal glands containing terpenoid aldehyde (TA) compounds that help protect the cotton plant from pests and diseases. One terpenoid aldehyde called gossypol, is found predominantly in seed and roots and has two forms, plus (+) and minus (-) present in varying a...

  16. Registration of Five Exotic Germplasm Lines of Cotton Derived From Multiple Crosses Among Gossypium Tetraploid Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SP (Species Polycross) germplasm was developed from multiple crosses among Gossypium tetraploid species. SP156, SP177, SP179, SP205, and SP225 were released by Agriculture Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture for their highly desirable combinations of yield, yield components, a...

  17. Comparative Next-Generation Sequencing for Transcriptome Definition and SNP Development in Gossypium hirsutum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current databases for cotton include 269,657 ESTs for Gossypium hirsutum representing 98,420 unigenes with a large proportion representing singletons. However, few lines are sequenced, each at a limited depth. Consequently, mining ESTs for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) results in a high rat...

  18. Genome sequence of cultivated Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum TM-1) provides insights into genome evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and genomic analyses of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) are difficult because it has a complex allotetraploid (AADD; 2n = 4x = 52) genome. Here we sequenced, assembled and analyzed the world's most important cultivated cotton genome with 246.2 gigabase (Gb) clean data obtained using whol...

  19. QTL Analysis of Resistance to Reniform Nematode in Gossypium barbadense L. Accession GB713

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reniform nematode (RN), Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveria, is a major pathogen of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). The identification of molecular markers closely linked to RN resistance gene(s) in the G. barbadense L. accession GB713 would be very useful in cotton breeding prog...

  20. Molecular confirmation of Gossypium hirsutum chromosome substitution lines and interspecific F1 hypoaneuploids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tetraploid Gossypium species G. barbadense, G. tomentosum, and G. mustelinum (2n=52) are useful sources of important genes for pest and disease resistance, and for improved agronomic and fiber traits in Upland cotton (G. hirsutum). Cytological analyses of hybrids and comparative linkage mapping...

  1. Molecular evolution of the clustered MMIC-3 multigene family of Gossypium species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uniqueness, content, localization, and defense-related features of the root-knot nematode resistance-associated MIC-3 supergene cluster in the genus Gossypium are all of interest for molecular evolutionary studies of duplicate supergenes in allopolyploids. Here we report molecular evolutionary rates...

  2. Molecular Evolution of Clustered MIC-3 (Meloidogyne Induced Cotton -3) Multigene Family of Gossypium Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uniqueness, content, localization, and defense-related features of the root-knot nematode resistance-associated MIC-3 multigene cluster in the genus Gossypium are all of interest for molecular evolutionary studies of duplicate genes in allopolyploids. Here we report molecular evolutionary rates of t...

  3. WIDE-CROSS WHOLE-GENOME RADIATION HYBIRD MAPPING OF THE COTTON (GOSSYPIUM BARBADENSE L.) GENOME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole-genome radiation hybrid mapping has been applied extensively to human and certain animal species but little to plants. We recently demonstrated an alternative mapping approach in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) based on segmentation by 5-krad gamma-irradiation and derivation of wild-cross whol...

  4. Breeding implications of boll distribution responses to water stress deficits in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To identify the impact of different water stress deficits on the boll distribution of elite Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars in the Texas High Plains, cultivars which represent the diverse gene-pools of the private sector were subjected to three different water deficit regimes. This s...

  5. Development of a core set of SSR markers for the characterization of Gossypium germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular markers such as simple sequence repeats (SSR) are a useful tool for characterizing genetic diversity of Gossypium germplasm collections. Genetic profiles by DNA fingerprinting of cotton accessions can only be compared among different collections if a common set of molecular markers are us...

  6. Registration of mutant population of MD 15 M4 Gossypium hirsutum L. with enhanced fiber quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutant population of MD 15 M4 (Reg. No. ,PI ) is a unique germplasm population of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). This germplasm was developed by USDA-ARS, Stoneville, MS in 2008 and released in June, 2012. About 5000 seeds of a Mississippi Delta line, MD 15 were chemically mutagenized with 3...

  7. Assessing Genetic Diversity in Gossypium Arboreum L. Cultivars Using Genomic and EST-Derived Microsatellites.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cultivated diploid, Gossypium arboreum L., (A genome) is an invaluable genetic resource for improving modern tetraploid cotton (G. hirsutum L. and G. barbadense L.) cultivars. The objective of this research is to select a set of informative and robust microsatellites for studying genetic relatio...

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF 656 NEW SSR MARKERS DEVELOPED FROM GOSSYPIUM HIRSUTUM SEQUENCES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to contribute valuable marker resources to the cotton research community we are making available the sequences 656 SSR markers captured from Gossypium hirsutum (GH) cultivar TAMCot Sphinx. A total of 4,512 clones, from two independent (GA)n, (AGA)n, and (CA)n microsatellite-enriched li...

  9. Selection of Gossypium hirsutum genotypes for interspecific introgression from G. arboreum using ovule culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovule culture is one of the techniques currently used to introgress desirable traits from Gossypium arboreum germplasm into G. hirsutum cultivars. Twenty-six G. hirsutum breeding lines were used as female parents in crosses with five G. arboreum accessions to determine if the G. hirsutum parent inf...

  10. Genome-wide analysis of the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase gene family in Gossypium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background The majority of commercial cotton varieties planted worldwide are derived from Gossypium hirsutum, which is a naturally occurring allotetraploid produced by interspecific hybridization of A- and D-genome diploid progenitor species. While most cotton species are adapted to warm, semi-arid ...

  11. Genetic diversity of the two commercial tetraploid cotton species in the Gossypium Diversity Reference Set

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A diversity reference set has been constructed for the Gossypium accessions in the U.S. National Cotton Germplasm Collection to facilitate more extensive evaluation and utilization of accessions held in the Collection. A set of 105 mapped simple sequence repeat markers were used to study the alleli...

  12. Measuring diversity in Gossypium hirsutum using the CottonSNP63K Array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A CottonSNP63K array and accompanying cluster file has been developed and includes 45,104 intra-specific SNPs and 17,954 inter-specific SNPs for automated genotyping of cotton (Gossypium spp.) samples. Development of the cluster file included genotyping of 1,156 samples, a subset of which were iden...

  13. Registration of Four Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Genetic Stock Mutants with Tolerance to Imazamox

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few mutants conferring herbicide tolerance in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) have been developed. Imazamox is a broad spectrum imidazolinone herbicide that could give growers a new tool to control many troublesome annual broadleaf and grass weeds. The objective was to identify imazamox tolerance in ...

  14. CURRENT STATUS OF THE COTTON DB, A GENOME DATABASE FOR GOSSYPIUM SPP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cotton genome database, CottonDB, is a publicly available resource for cotton genome research ranging from the collections of Gossypium germplasm, molecular markers, to the functions of cotton genes. Curation of CottonDB is currently maintained in our Research Unit (http://algodon.tamu.edu/cotto...

  15. CURRENT STATUS OF THE COTTONDB, A GENOME DATABASE FOR GOSSYPIUM SPP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cotton genome database, CottonDB, is a publicly available resource for cotton genome research ranging from the collections of Gossypium germplasm, molecular markers, to the functions of cotton genes. Curation of CottonDB is currently maintained in our Research Unit(http://algodon.tamu.edu/cotton...

  16. Analyses of Fusarium wilt race 3 resistance in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Uzbekistan, the most northern cotton country, as well as in many others worldwide, Fusarium wilt [Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum (FOV) Atk. Sny & Hans] represents a serious threat to cotton (Gossypium spp.) production. At least eight genotypes of FOV, called races, have been described. Thes...

  17. Development of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers via Sequence-based Genotyping in Cotton (Gossypium spp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping has become the dominant approach to genomic analysis and genetic manipulation in many crop plants. In cotton (Gossypium spp), however, only a very limited number of loci and a dearth of information have been generated from SNP genotypi...

  18. Percent Artropisomers of Gossypol in Seeds from Accessions of Gossypium barbadense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gossypol occurs naturally in the seed, leaves and roots of the cotton plant (Gossypium) as two atropisomers due to restricted rotation around the binaphthyl bond. The atropisomers differ in their biological activity. (-)-(R)-Gossypol exhibits significantly greater anti-cancer activity than the (+)...

  19. New DNA Markers for the Use in Cotton (Gossypium spp.) Improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SSR markers, also known as DNA microsatellite markers, are proving to be very useful for saturation of the large and complex upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum genetic linkage map. Monsanto Company has invested heavily in development of cotton SSRs and has implemented molecular breeding technologies ...

  20. Water use, yield, and fiber quality differences of diverse cotton (gossypium spp.) genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declining levels of available water for irrigation use in the Ogallala, TX, San Joaquin Valley, CA, and other aquifers has led to the need to identify and develop cotton (Gossypium spp.) cultivars that can more efficiently use available soil water. Elite upland (G. hirsutum L.) commercial cultivars,...

  1. Introgression of Resistance to Nematode Rotylenchulus reniformis into Upland Cotton Gossypium hirsutum from G. longicalyx

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Absence of sources of resistance to the reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, is a major impediment to the production of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) in the United States. In this study, two triple hybrids of G. hirsutum, G. longiclalyx, and either G. armourianum or G. herbaceum were u...

  2. Performance and combining ability in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) populations with diverse parents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving fiber quality properties of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is important for increasing the efficiency of manufacturing textiles, including enhancing yarn quality and spinning performance. This study was conducted to determine if we could identify useful cotton cultivars to use as parents ...

  3. Severed stems of Amaranthus palmeri are capable of regrowth and seed production in Gossypium hirsuium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field studies were conducted to evaluate the capacity of Amaranthus palmeri to grow and reproduce following incomplete physical control in Gossypium hirsutum fields. Amaranthus palmeri plants that emerged simultaneously with a G. hirsutum crop were selected for use. Treatments included severing the ...

  4. RNA Interference for Functional Genomics and Improvement of Cotton (Gossypium species)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi), is a powerful new technology in the discovery of genetic sequence functions, and has become a valuable tool for functional genomics of cotton (Gossypium ssp.). The rapid adoption of RNAi has replaced previous antisense technology. RNAi has aided in the discovery of function ...

  5. Plant-herbivore-carnivore interactions in cotton, Gossypium hirsutum linking below ground and above ground

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most studies on plant-herbivore interactions have focused on either root or shoot herbivory in isolation, but recent studies show how above- and below ground herbivores may interact via a shared host plant. Cotton (Gossypium spp.) produces a variety of terpenoid aldehydes that exhibit toxicity to a...

  6. The World Gene Pool of Gossypium barbadense L. and Its Improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the improved and unimproved gene pools of Gossypium barbadense. Section one discusses the taxonomic and geographic structure of species diversity. Section two describes the origin and development of modern improved germplasm pools, beginning with Sea Island cottons deve...

  7. Sequencing of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. acc. TM-1) provides a resource for fiber improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is the world’s most important natural textile fibre and a significant oilseed crop. Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), an allotetraploid derived from A- and D-genome progenitors, accounts for >95% of world production. Here, we sequenced and assembled 88% of the 2.5-gigabase genome of the ...

  8. Molecular characterization of the Gossypium diversity reference set of the US National Cotton Germplasm Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the genetic diversity of cotton (Gossypium spp.) is essential to develop strategies for collection, conservation, and utilization of these germplasm resources. The US National Cotton Germplasm Collection is one of the largest world collections and includes not only accessions wi...

  9. Repeated polyploidization of Gossypium genomes and the evolution of spinnable cotton fibres

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emergent phenotypes are common in polyploids relative to their diploid progenitors, a phenomenon exemplified by spinnable cotton fibers. Following 15-18 fold paleopolyploidy, allopolyploidy 1-2 million years ago reunited divergent Gossypium genomes, imparting new combinatorial complexity that might ...

  10. Modifying gossypol in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.): a cost effective method for small seed samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) has pigment glands throughout the vegetative and reproductive parts of the plant and these glands contain a polyphenolic compound called gossypol. This compound has been reported to have anti-tumor activity. However, it also acts as an anti-nutritional factor that can ...

  11. New HPLC methods to quantitate terpenoid aldehydes in foliage of cotton (Gossypium)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cotton plant (Gossypium) produces protective terpenoid aldehydes in lysigenous pigment glands. These terpenoids include hemigossypolone, hemigossypolone-6-methyl ether, gossypol, gossypol-6-methyl ether, gossypol-6,6'-dimethyl ether, heliocides H1, H2, H3 and H4, and heliocides B1, B2, B3 and B4...

  12. Defoliation of interior Douglas-fir elicits carbon transfer and stress signalling to ponderosa pine neighbors through ectomycorrhizal networks.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan Yuan; Simard, Suzanne W; Carroll, Allan; Mohn, William W; Zeng, Ren Sen

    2015-01-01

    Extensive regions of interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca, IDF) forests in North America are being damaged by drought and western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis). This damage is resulting from warmer and drier summers associated with climate change. To test whether defoliated IDF can directly transfer resources to ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosae) regenerating nearby, thus aiding in forest recovery, we examined photosynthetic carbon transfer and defense enzyme response. We grew pairs of ectomycorrhizal IDF 'donor' and ponderosa pine 'receiver' seedlings in pots and isolated transfer pathways by comparing 35 μm, 0.5 μm and no mesh treatments; we then stressed IDF donors either through manual defoliation or infestation by the budworm. We found that manual defoliation of IDF donors led to transfer of photosynthetic carbon to neighboring receivers through mycorrhizal networks, but not through soil or root pathways. Both manual and insect defoliation of donors led to increased activity of peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and superoxide dismutase in the ponderosa pine receivers, via a mechanism primarily dependent on the mycorrhizal network. These findings indicate that IDF can transfer resources and stress signals to interspecific neighbors, suggesting ectomycorrhizal networks can serve as agents of interspecific communication facilitating recovery and succession of forests after disturbance. PMID:25683155

  13. Influence of defoliation date and gin-drying temperature on oven moisture and KFT water within cotton cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water measured in lint cotton by Karl Fischer Titration was compared to moisture content measured by standard oven-drying in two cultivars. The cultivars had been defoliated at different times and ginned at two possible temperatures. Ginned lint was further processed to produce mechanically cleaned,...

  14. Defoliation of interior Douglas-fir elicits carbon transfer and stress signalling to ponderosa pine neighbors through ectomycorrhizal networks

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuan Yuan; Simard, Suzanne W.; Carroll, Allan; Mohn, William W.; Zeng, Ren Sen

    2015-01-01

    Extensive regions of interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca, IDF) forests in North America are being damaged by drought and western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis). This damage is resulting from warmer and drier summers associated with climate change. To test whether defoliated IDF can directly transfer resources to ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosae) regenerating nearby, thus aiding in forest recovery, we examined photosynthetic carbon transfer and defense enzyme response. We grew pairs of ectomycorrhizal IDF ‘donor’ and ponderosa pine ‘receiver’ seedlings in pots and isolated transfer pathways by comparing 35 μm, 0.5 μm and no mesh treatments; we then stressed IDF donors either through manual defoliation or infestation by the budworm. We found that manual defoliation of IDF donors led to transfer of photosynthetic carbon to neighboring receivers through mycorrhizal networks, but not through soil or root pathways. Both manual and insect defoliation of donors led to increased activity of peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and superoxide dismutase in the ponderosa pine receivers, via a mechanism primarily dependent on the mycorrhizal network. These findings indicate that IDF can transfer resources and stress signals to interspecific neighbors, suggesting ectomycorrhizal networks can serve as agents of interspecific communication facilitating recovery and succession of forests after disturbance. PMID:25683155

  15. Effects of Defoliating Insect Resistance QTLs and a crylAc Transgene in Soybean Near-Isogenic Lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Additional sources of resistance would be desirable to manage defoliating insect resistance to crystal proteins coded by transgenes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and to sustain the deployment of Bt crops. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects and interactions of three soybean (G...

  16. Forest defoliators and climatic change: Potential changes in spatial distribution of outbreaks of western spruce budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.W.; Liebhold, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    Changes in geographical ranges and spatial extent of outbreaks of pest species are likely consequences of climatic change. We investigated potential changes in spatial distribution of outbreaks of western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman, and gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), in Oregon and Pennsylvania, respectively using maps of historial defoliation, climate, and forest type in a geographic information system. Maps of defoliation frequency at a resolution of 2 x 2 km were assembled from historical aerial survey data. Weather maps for mean monthly temperature maxima and minima and precipitation over 30 yr were developed by interpolation. Relationships between defoliation status and environmental variables were estimated using linear discriminant analysis. Five climatic change scenarios were investigated: an increase of 2{degrees}C, a 2{degrees}C increase with a small increase and a small decrease in precipitation, and projections of two general circulation models (GCMs) after 100 yr at doubled carbon dioxide. With an increase in temperature alone, the projected defoliated area decreased relative to ambient conditions for budworm and increased slightly for gypsy moth. With an increase in temperature and precipitation, defoliated area increased for both species. Conversely, defoliated area decreased for both when temperature increased and precipitation decreased. Results for the GCM scenarios contrasted sharply. For one GCM, defoliation by budworm was projected to cover Oregon completely, whereas no defoliation was projected by gypsy moth in Pennsylvania. For the other, defoliation disappeared completely for budworm and slightly exceeded that under ambient conditions for gypsy moth. The results are discussed in terms of current forest composition and its potential changes. 36 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Grain amaranths are defoliation tolerant crop species capable of utilizing stem and root carbohydrate reserves to sustain vegetative and reproductive growth after leaf loss.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ortiz, Erandi; Espitia-Rangel, Eduardo; Tiessen, Axel; Délano-Frier, John Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tolerance to defoliation can be defined as the degree to which productivity is affected by photosynthetic area reduction. This trait was studied in grain amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus and A. hypochondriacus), which are considered to be a highly defoliation-tolerant species. The physiological and biochemical responses to increasing levels of mechanical leaf removal up to total defoliation were quantified. Tolerance appeared to be dependent on various factors: ( i) amount of lost tissue; (ii) mechanics of leaf tissue removal; (iii) environment, and (iv) species tested. Thus, grain amaranth was found to be a highly tolerant species under green-house conditions when leaf tissue loss was performed by gradual perforation. However, tolerance was compromised under similar conditions when defoliation was done by gradual cutting of the leaf. Also tolerance in completely defoliated plants tended to decrease under field conditions, where differences between A. cruentus and A. hypochondriacus were observed. All non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) levels were reduced in stems and roots of totally defoliated amaranths one day after treatment. Such depletion probably provided the carbon (C) resources needed to sustain the early recovery process in the absence of photosynthetic capacity. This was corroborated by shading of intact plants, which produced the same rapid and drastic reduction of NSC levels in these tissues. These results emphasize the role of stored NSCs, particularly starch, in buffering the impact of severe defoliation in amaranth. The fall in sucrose synthase and cell wall invertase activity observed in stems and roots soon after defoliation was consistent with their predicted shift from sink to source tissues. It is concluded that mobilization of C stores in stems and roots, is a physiologically important trait underlying tolerance to defoliation in grain amaranth. PMID:23861825

  18. Grain Amaranths Are Defoliation Tolerant Crop Species Capable of Utilizing Stem and Root Carbohydrate Reserves to Sustain Vegetative and Reproductive Growth after Leaf Loss

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Ortiz, Erandi; Espitia-Rangel, Eduardo; Tiessen, Axel; Délano-Frier, John Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tolerance to defoliation can be defined as the degree to which productivity is affected by photosynthetic area reduction. This trait was studied in grain amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus and A. hypochondriacus), which are considered to be a highly defoliation-tolerant species. The physiological and biochemical responses to increasing levels of mechanical leaf removal up to total defoliation were quantified. Tolerance appeared to be dependent on various factors: ( i) amount of lost tissue; (ii) mechanics of leaf tissue removal; (iii) environment, and (iv) species tested. Thus, grain amaranth was found to be a highly tolerant species under green-house conditions when leaf tissue loss was performed by gradual perforation. However, tolerance was compromised under similar conditions when defoliation was done by gradual cutting of the leaf. Also tolerance in completely defoliated plants tended to decrease under field conditions, where differences between A. cruentus and A. hypochondriacus were observed. All non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) levels were reduced in stems and roots of totally defoliated amaranths one day after treatment. Such depletion probably provided the carbon (C) resources needed to sustain the early recovery process in the absence of photosynthetic capacity. This was corroborated by shading of intact plants, which produced the same rapid and drastic reduction of NSC levels in these tissues. These results emphasize the role of stored NSCs, particularly starch, in buffering the impact of severe defoliation in amaranth. The fall in sucrose synthase and cell wall invertase activity observed in stems and roots soon after defoliation was consistent with their predicted shift from sink to source tissues. It is concluded that mobilization of C stores in stems and roots, is a physiologically important trait underlying tolerance to defoliation in grain amaranth. PMID:23861825

  19. Transgene integration and organization in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) genome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Cai, Lin; Cheng, Jiaqin; Mao, Huizhu; Fan, Xiaoping; Meng, Zhaohong; Chan, Ka Man; Zhang, Huijun; Qi, Jianfei; Ji, Lianghui; Hong, Yan

    2008-04-01

    While genetically modified upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) varieties are ranked among the most successful genetically modified organisms (GMO), there is little knowledge on transgene integration in the cotton genome, partly because of the difficulty in obtaining large numbers of transgenic plants. In this study, we analyzed 139 independently derived T0 transgenic cotton plants transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain AGL1 carrying a binary plasmid pPZP-GFP. It was found by PCR that as many as 31% of the plants had integration of vector backbone sequences. Of the 110 plants with good genomic Southern blot results, 37% had integration of a single T-DNA, 24% had two T-DNA copies and 39% had three or more copies. Multiple copies of the T-DNA existed either as repeats in complex loci or unlinked loci. Our further analysis of two T1 populations showed that segregants with a single T-DNA and no vector sequence could be obtained from T0 plants having multiple T-DNA copies and vector sequence. Out of the 57 T-DNA/T-DNA junctions cloned from complex loci, 27 had canonical T-DNA tandem repeats, the rest (30) had deletions to T-DNAs or had inclusion of vector sequences. Overlapping micro-homology was present for most of the T-DNA/T-DNA junctions (38/57). Right border (RB) ends of the T-DNA were precise while most left border (LB) ends (64%) had truncations to internal border sequences. Sequencing of collinear vector integration outside LB in 33 plants gave evidence that collinear vector sequence was determined in agrobacterium culture. Among the 130 plants with characterized flanking sequences, 12% had the transgene integrated into coding sequences, 12% into repetitive sequences, 7% into rDNAs. Interestingly, 7% had the transgene integrated into chloroplast derived sequences. Nucleotide sequence comparison of target sites in cotton genome before and after T-DNA integration revealed overlapping microhomology between target sites and the T-DNA (8/8), deletions to

  20. Nitrate variability in hydrological flow paths for three mid-Appalachian forested watersheds following a large-scale defoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riscassi, Ami L.; Scanlon, Todd M.

    2009-06-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) leakage from forested watersheds due to disturbance is a well documented but not well understood process that can contribute to the degradation of receiving waters through eutrophication. Several studies have shown that large-scale defoliation and deforestation events in small forested watersheds in the eastern United States cause immediate and dramatic increases in NO3- flux to steams, with large differences in recovery time. Water quality and discharge data collected from 1992 to 2004 following a large-scale gypsy moth defoliation were used to investigate hydrological controls on long-term NO3- leakage from three forested watersheds in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. During storm events, a conventional two-component hydrograph separation in conjunction with an inverse solution technique was employed to determine the concentrations of NO3- in groundwater and soil water. Following defoliation, groundwater NO3- concentrations declined exponentially with a distinct seasonal pattern. A rank-order relationship between the rate constants associated with the exponential declines in groundwater NO3- concentrations and groundwater recession constants indicates a hydrological control on long-term watershed recovery for these defoliated systems. Comparisons to deforested systems in Hubbard Brook, New Hampshire, and Coweeta, North Carolina, indicate hydrological controls are similarly present. Biogeochemical differences, however, need to be considered to account for the more attenuated recovery observed in defoliated systems. No long-term trend was found in the model-derived soil water NO3- concentrations, which suggests the presence of some form of rate limitation on the transformation of the nitrogen pool introduced during the disturbance and/or reduced nutrient uptake due to tree mortality.

  1. The Role of Forest Tent Caterpillar Defoliations and Partial Harvest in the Decline and Death of Sugar Maple

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Henrik; Messier, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Natural and anthropogenic disturbances can act as stresses on tree vigour. According to Manion's conceptual model of tree disease, the initial vigour of trees decreases as a result of predisposing factors that render these trees more vulnerable to severe inciting stresses, stresses that can then cause final vigour decline and subsequent tree death. This tree disease model was tested in sugar maple (Acer saccharum) by assessing the roles of natural and anthropogenic disturbances in tree decline and death. Methods Radial growth data from 377 sugar maple trees that had undergone both defoliations by insects and partial harvest were used to estimate longitudinal survival probabilities as a proxy for tree vigour. Radial growth rates and survival probabilities were compared among trees subjected to different levels of above- and below-ground disturbances, between periods of defoliation and harvest, and between live and dead trees. Key Results Manion's tree disease model correctly accounts for vigour decline and tree death in sugar maple; tree growth and vigour were negatively affected by a first defoliation, predisposing these trees to death later during the study period due to a second insect outbreak that initiated a final vigour decline. This decline was accelerated by the partial harvest disturbance in 1993. Even the most severe anthropogenic disturbances from partial harvest did not cause, unlike insect defoliation, any growth or vigour declines in live sugar maple. Conclusions Natural disturbances acted as predisposing and inciting stresses in tree sugar maple decline and death. Anthropogenic disturbances from a partial harvest at worst accelerated a decline in trees that were already weakened by predisposing and inciting stresses (i.e. repeated insect defoliations). Favourable climatic conditions just before and after the partial harvest may have alleviated possible negative effects on growth resulting from harvesting. PMID:18660493

  2. Whole-plant versus leaf-level regulation of photosynthetic responses after partial defoliation in Eucalyptus globulus saplings.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Davies, Noel W; Corkrey, Ross; Churchill, Keith; O'Grady, Anthony P; Sands, Peter; Mohammed, Caroline

    2013-04-01

    Increases in photosynthetic capacity (A1500) after defoliation have been attributed to changes in leaf-level biochemistry, water, and/or nutrient status. The hypothesis that transient photosynthetic responses to partial defoliation are regulated by whole-plant (e.g. source-sink relationships or changes in hydraulic conductance) rather than leaf-level mechanisms is tested here. Temporal variation in leaf-level gas exchange, chemistry, whole-plant soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance (KP), and aboveground biomass partitioning were determined to evaluate mechanisms responsible for increases in A1500 of Eucalyptus globulus L. potted saplings. A1500 increased in response to debudding (B), partial defoliation (D), and combined B&D treatments by up to 36% at 5 weeks after treatment. Changes in leaf-level factors partly explained increases in A1500 of B and B&D treatments but not for D treatment. By week 5, saplings in B, B&D, and D treatments had similar leaf-specific KP to control trees by maintaining lower midday water potentials and higher transpiration rate per leaf area. Whole-plant source:sink ratios correlated strongly with A1500. Further, unlike KP, temporal changes in source:sink ratios tracked well with those observed for A1500. The results indicate that increases in A1500 after partial defoliation treatments were largely driven by an increased demand for assimilate by developing sinks rather than improvements in whole-plant water relations and changes in leaf-level factors. Three carbohydrates, galactional, stachyose, and, to a lesser extent, raffinose, correlated strongly with photosynthetic capacity, indicating that these sugars may function as signalling molecules in the regulation of longer term defoliation-induced gas exchange responses. PMID:23382548

  3. Employing citizen science to study defoliation impacts on arthropod communities on tamarisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Audrey L.

    The invasive tamarisk tree is widespread across the southwestern landscape of the United States and has been dominant in regulated river reaches, outcompeting native vegetation and impacting trophic webs in riparian ecosystems. The changes in riparian habitat and recreation opportunities along southwestern rivers, like the San Juan River in Utah, led to the implementation of a biocontrol program in the form of the tamarisk leaf beetle (Diorhabda spp.). It is unknown what the long term effects on riparian ecosystems are as a result of the beetles' defoliation of tamarisk each summer. This study sought to identify the current arthropod community composition and abundance over one growing season on the San Juan River between Bluff and Mexican Hat, UT and second, to involve the public in this research through a citizen science component. I found that non-native insects, including the tamarisk leaf beetle, dominated the arboreal arthropod communities within the tamarisk and there are relatively few native arthropods residing in tamarisk throughout the summer season. Foliation levels (the quantity of leaves in the canopy of tamarisk) were inconclusive predictors of arthropod abundances but varied by species and by feeding guild. This may indicate that the defoliation of the tamarisk is not necessarily negatively impacting trophic interactions in tamarisk. I incorporated youth participants on educational river rafting trips to assist in data collection of arthropods from tamarisk trees as a way to educate and bring attention to the issue of invasive species in the Southwest. After completing my own citizen science project and after doing a literature review of other, similar citizen science projects, I found that striving for both rigorous scientific data and quality educational programming is challenging for a small scale project that does not target broad spatial, geographic, or temporal data. Citizen science project developers should clearly identify their objectives

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of Gossypium L. using restriction fragment length polymorphism of repeated sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiping; Rong, Ying; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Zhang, Yang; Stelly, David M; Zhang, Hong-Bin

    2015-10-01

    Cotton is the world's leading textile fiber crop and is also grown as a bioenergy and food crop. Knowledge of the phylogeny of closely related species and the genome origin and evolution of polyploid species is significant for advanced genomics research and breeding. We have reconstructed the phylogeny of the cotton genus, Gossypium L., and deciphered the genome origin and evolution of its five polyploid species by restriction fragment analysis of repeated sequences. Nuclear DNA of 84 accessions representing 35 species and all eight genomes of the genus were analyzed. The phylogenetic tree of the genus was reconstructed using the parsimony method on 1033 polymorphic repeated sequence restriction fragments. The genome origin of its polyploids was determined by calculating the diploid-polyploid restriction fragment correspondence (RFC). The tree is consistent with the morphological classification, genome designation and geographic distribution of the species at subgenus, section and subsection levels. Gossypium lobatum (D7) was unambiguously shown to have the highest RFC with the D-subgenomes of all five polyploids of the genus, while the common ancestor of Gossypium herbaceum (A1) and Gossypium arboreum (A2) likely contributed to the A-subgenomes of the polyploids. These results provide a comprehensive phylogenetic tree of the cotton genus and new insights into the genome origin and evolution of its polyploid species. The results also further demonstrate a simple, rapid and inexpensive method suitable for phylogenetic analysis of closely related species, especially congeneric species, and the inference of genome origin of polyploids that constitute over 70 % of flowering plants. PMID:25877517

  5. Effects of insecticide treatments on subsequent defoliation by western spruce budworm in Oregon and Washington: 1982-92. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    Effects of insecticide treatments conducted in Oregon and Washington from 1982 through 1992 on subsequent defoliation by western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) were evaluated by using aerial sketchmaps and a geographic information system. For each treatment, the extent and severity of defoliation was calculated for the treated areas and a set of four nested rings surrounding the treated area (0-0.5 mile, 0.5.1 mile, 1-2 miles) for up to 8 years: 3 years prior to treatment, the year of treatment, and 4 years following treatment, insecticide treatments applied in 1982 and 1983 coincided with reduced percentages of defoliation by western spruce budworm during the year following treatment. However, the percentage of defoliation usually returned to pretreatment levels by the second year, and defoliation severity in treated and adjacent untreated areas was nearly identical following treatment. For the period from 1985 through 1992, defoliation patterns (including both extent and severity) following treatment were generally similar in treated and adjacent untreated areas.

  6. Ecotypic variation in growth responses to simulated herbivory: trade-off between maximum relative growth rate and tolerance to defoliation in an annual plant

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Iván D.; Tapia-López, Rosalinda; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that slow-growing plants are more likely to maximize above-ground biomass and fitness when defoliated by herbivores than those with an already high relative growth rate (RGR). Some populations of the annual herb Datura stramonium L. can tolerate foliar damage better than others. The physiological basis of this difference is examined here in a comparative study of two ecotypes that differ in tolerance and maximum growth rate, using a growth analytical approach. One hundred and fifty-four plants of each ecotype grown under controlled conditions were suddenly defoliated (35 % of total leaf area removed) and a similar sample size of plants remained undefoliated (control). Ontogenetic plastic changes in RGR and its growth components [net assimilation rate (NAR), specific leaf area and leaf weight ratio (LWR)] after defoliation were measured to determine whether these plastic changes maximize plant growth and fitness. Different ontogenetic phases of the response were discerned and increased RGR of defoliated plants was detected at the end of the experimental period, but brought about by a different growth component (NAR or LWR) in each ecotype. These changes in RGR are putatively related to increases in fitness in defoliated environments. At the intra-specific scale, data showed a trade-off between the ability to grow under benign environmental conditions and the ability to tolerate resource limitation due to defoliation. PMID:25725085

  7. Effects of partial defoliation on carbon and nitrogen partitioning and photosynthetic carbon uptake by two-year-old cork oak (Quercus suber) saplings.

    PubMed

    Cerasoli, S; Scartazza, A; Brugnoli, E; Chaves, M M; Pereira, J S

    2004-01-01

    At the end of the growing season in late July, 20-month-old cork oak (Quercus suber L.) saplings were partially defoliated (63% of leaf area) to evaluate their ability to recover leaf area after defoliation. At 18 and 127 days after defoliation, changes in starch and nitrogen pools were determined in leaves and perennial organs, and variations in photosynthetic carbon uptake were investigated. To determine the role of stored nitrogen in regrowth after defoliation, plant nitrogen was labeled in the previous winter by enriching the nutrient solution with 15N. Plants recovered the lost leaf area in 127 days. Although there was remobilization of starch and nitrogen from leaves and perennial organs, the availability of resources for growth in the following spring was not decreased by defoliation. On the contrary, starch concentration in coarse roots was higher in defoliated saplings than in control saplings, presumably as a result of the higher net CO2 exchange rate in newly developed leaves compared with pre-existing leaves. PMID:14652217

  8. Effect of drought and defoliation on the susceptibility of eucalypts to cankers caused by Endothia gyrosa and Botryosphaeria ribis

    SciTech Connect

    Old, K.M.; Gibbs, R.; Craig, I.; Myers, B.J. ); Yuan, Z.Q. )

    1990-01-01

    Seedlings, saplings and mature eucalypts were susceptible to infection by Endothia gyrosa and Botryosphaeria ribis. Eucalyptus regnans and E. delegatensis were more susceptible than E. grandis and E. saligna. In trees not subjected to stress, cankers were limited in extent and often healed. When trees were defoliated, either manually or by severe insect attack, stem concentrations of both starch and soluble carbohydrates were reduced and canker development in some pathogen/host combinations was increased. Seedlings subjected to water stress were not predisposed to canker formation. The association of E. gyrosa with branch dieback of rural eucalypts suffering from chronic defoliation suggests that canker fungi contribute to the crown dieback syndrome in south-eastern Australia.

  9. Estimation of scots pine defoliation by the common pine sawfly (Diprion pini L.) using multi-temporal radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latva-Kayra, Petri T.

    In 1998-2001 Finland suffered the most severe insect outbreak ever recorded, over 500,000 hectares. The outbreak was caused by the common pine sawfly ( Diprion pini L.). The outbreak has continued in the study area, Palokangas, ever since. To find a good method to monitor this type of outbreaks, the purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of multi-temporal ERS-2 and ENVISAT SAR imagery for estimating Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) defoliation. Three methods were tested: unsupervised k-means clustering, supervised linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and logistic regression. In addition, I assessed if harvested areas could be differentiated from the defoliated forest using the same methods. Two different speckle filters were used to determine the effect of filtering on the SAR imagery and subsequent results. The logistic regression performed best, producing a classification accuracy of 81.6% (kappa 0.62) with two classes (no defoliation, >20% defoliation). LDA accuracy was with two classes at best 77.7% (kappa 0.54) and k-means 72.8 (0.46). In general, the largest speckle filter, 5 x 5 image window, performed best. When additional classes were added the accuracy was usually degraded on a step-by-step basis. The results were good, but because of the restrictions in the study they should be confirmed with independent data, before full conclusions can be made that results are reliable. The restrictions include the small size field data and, thus, the problems with accuracy assessment (no separate testing data) as well as the lack of meteorological data from the imaging dates.

  10. Cloning and Functional Analysis of the Promoter of an Ascorbate Oxidase Gene from Gossypium hirsutum.

    PubMed

    Xin, Shan; Tao, Chengcheng; Li, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Apoplastic ascorbate oxidase (AO) plays significant roles in plant cell growth. However, the mechanism of underlying the transcriptional regulation of AO in Gossypium hirsutum remains unclear. Here, we obtained a 1,920-bp promoter sequence from the Gossypium hirsutum ascorbate oxidase (GhAO1) gene, and this GhAO1 promoter included a number of known cis-elements. Promoter activity analysis in overexpressing pGhAO1::GFP-GUS tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) showed that the GhAO1 promoter exhibited high activity, driving strong reporter gene expression in tobacco trichomes, leaves and roots. Promoter 5'-deletion analysis demonstrated that truncated GhAO1 promoters with serial 5'-end deletions had different GUS activities. A 360-bp fragment was sufficient to activate GUS expression. The P-1040 region had less GUS activity than the P-720 region, suggesting that the 320-bp region from nucleotide -720 to -1040 might include a cis-element acting as a silencer. Interestingly, an auxin-responsive cis-acting element (TGA-element) was uncovered in the promoter. To analyze the function of the TGA-element, tobacco leaves transformed with promoters with different 5' truncations were treated with indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Tobacco leaves transformed with the promoter regions containing the TGA-element showed significantly increased GUS activity after IAA treatment, implying that the fragment spanning nucleotides -1760 to -1600 (which includes the TGA-element) might be a key component for IAA responsiveness. Analyses of the AO promoter region and AO expression pattern in Gossypium arboreum (Ga, diploid cotton with an AA genome), Gossypium raimondii (Gr, diploid cotton with a DD genome) and Gossypium hirsutum (Gh, tetraploid cotton with an AADD genome) indicated that AO promoter activation and AO transcription were detected together only in D genome/sub-genome (Gr and Gh) cotton. Taken together, these results suggest that the 1,920-bp GhAO1 promoter is a functional sequence with a

  11. Abundance and Frequency of the Asiatic Oak Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Defoliation on American, Chinese, and Hybrid Chestnut (Castanea).

    PubMed

    Case, Ashley E; Mayfield, Albert E; Clark, Stacy L; Schlarbaum, Scott E; Reynolds, Barbara C

    2016-01-01

    The Asiatic oak weevil, Cyrtepistomus castaneus Roelofs (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a nonnative defoliator of trees in the Fagaceae family in the United States but has not been studied on Castanea species in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Planted trees of Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh. (Fagales: Fagaceae), Castanea mollissima Blume (Fagales: Fagaceae), and four hybrid breeding generations were evaluated in 2012 for insect defoliation and C. castaneus abundance and frequency. Defoliation was visually assessed throughout the growing season at two sites in the southern Appalachian Mountains (western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee). C. castaneus abundance and frequency were monitored on trees using beat sheets and emergence was recorded from ground traps. Asiatic oak weevils were more abundant and more frequently collected on American chestnut (Ca. dentata) and its most closely related BC3F3 hybrid generation than on the Asian species Ca. mollissima. In most months, C. castaneus colonization of hybrid generations was not significantly different than colonization of parental species. Frequency data for C. castaneus suggested that adults were distributed relatively evenly throughout the study sites rather than in dense clusters. Emergence of C. castaneus was significantly higher under a canopy dominated by Quercus species than under non-Quercus species or open sky. C. castaneus emergence began in May and peaked in late June and early July. These results may be useful for resource managers trying to restore blight-resistant chestnut to the Southern Appalachians while minimizing herbivory by insect pests. PMID:27001964

  12. Abundance and Frequency of the Asiatic Oak Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Defoliation on American, Chinese, and Hybrid Chestnut (Castanea)

    PubMed Central

    Case, Ashley E.; Mayfield, Albert E.; Clark, Stacy L.; Schlarbaum, Scott E.; Reynolds, Barbara C.

    2016-01-01

    The Asiatic oak weevil, Cyrtepistomus castaneus Roelofs (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a nonnative defoliator of trees in the Fagaceae family in the United States but has not been studied on Castanea species in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Planted trees of Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh. (Fagales: Fagaceae), Castanea mollissima Blume (Fagales: Fagaceae), and four hybrid breeding generations were evaluated in 2012 for insect defoliation and C. castaneus abundance and frequency. Defoliation was visually assessed throughout the growing season at two sites in the southern Appalachian Mountains (western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee). C. castaneus abundance and frequency were monitored on trees using beat sheets and emergence was recorded from ground traps. Asiatic oak weevils were more abundant and more frequently collected on American chestnut (Ca. dentata) and its most closely related BC3F3 hybrid generation than on the Asian species Ca. mollissima. In most months, C. castaneus colonization of hybrid generations was not significantly different than colonization of parental species. Frequency data for C. castaneus suggested that adults were distributed relatively evenly throughout the study sites rather than in dense clusters. Emergence of C. castaneus was significantly higher under a canopy dominated by Quercus species than under non-Quercus species or open sky. C. castaneus emergence began in May and peaked in late June and early July. These results may be useful for resource managers trying to restore blight-resistant chestnut to the Southern Appalachians while minimizing herbivory by insect pests. PMID:27001964

  13. Remote sensing of tamarisk biomass, insect herbivory, and defoliation: Novel methods in the Grand Canyon Region, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Temuulen Ts.; Sankey, Joel B.; Horne, Rene; Bedford, Ashton

    2016-01-01

    Tamarisk is an invasive, riparian shrub species in the southwestern USA. The northern tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) has been introduced to several states to control tamarisk. We classified tamarisk distribution in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Arizona using a 0.2 m resolution, airborne multispectral data and estimated tamarisk beetle effects (overall accuracy of 86 percent) leading to leaf defoliation in a 49,408 m2 area. We also estimated individual tamarisk tree biomass and their uncertainties using airbonre liday data (100 points/m2). On average, total above ground tamarisk biomass was 8.67 kg/m2 (SD=17.6). The tamarisk beetle defoliation resulted in a mean leaf biomass loss of 0.52 kg/m2 and an equivalent of 25,692 kg across the entire study area. Our defoliated tamarisk map and biomass estimates can help inform restoration treatments to reduce tamarisk. Continued monitoring of tamarisk and tamarisk beetle effects are recommended to understand the currently-unknown eventual equilibrium between the two species and the cascading effects on ecosystem processes.

  14. Remote sensing of spruce budworm defoliation using EO-1 Hyperion hyperspectral data: an example in Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Each year, the spruce budworm (SBW) causes severe, widespread damage to spruces and fir in east coast Canada. Early estimation of the defoliation can provide crucial support to mitigate the socio-economic impact on vulnerable forests. Remote sensing techniques are suitable to investigate the affected regions that usually consist of large and inaccessible forestry areas. Using satellite images, surface reflectance values at two or more wavelengths are combined to generate vegetation indices (VIs), revealing a relative abundance of features of interest. Forest health analysis based on VIs is considered as one of the primary information sources for monitoring vegetation conditions. Especially the spectral resolution of Hyperion hyperspectral satellite imagery used in this study allows for a detailed examination of the red to near-infrared portion of the spectrum to identify areas of stressed vegetation. Several narrow-band vegetation indices are used to indicate the overall amount and quality of photosynthetic material and moisture content in vegetation. By integrating the information from VIs that focus on different aspects of overall health and vigour in forested areas, the study aims at detecting defoliated condition in a forested region in the Province of Quebec, Canada. In June and August of 2014 two Hyperion images were acquired by NASA's EO-1 satellite for this study. Changes in vegetation health and vigour are observed and quantitatively compared using the multi-temporal remote sensing images. The experimental results suggest that the VI- based forest health analysis is effective in estimating SBW defoliation in the study area.

  15. Predicted effects of gypsy moth defoliation and climate change on forest carbon dynamics in the New Jersey pine barrens.

    PubMed

    Kretchun, Alec M; Scheller, Robert M; Lucash, Melissa S; Clark, Kenneth L; Hom, John; Van Tuyl, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Disturbance regimes within temperate forests can significantly impact carbon cycling. Additionally, projected climate change in combination with multiple, interacting disturbance effects may disrupt the capacity of forests to act as carbon sinks at large spatial and temporal scales. We used a spatially explicit forest succession and disturbance model, LANDIS-II, to model the effects of climate change, gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) defoliation, and wildfire on the C dynamics of the forests of the New Jersey Pine Barrens over the next century. Climate scenarios were simulated using current climate conditions (baseline), as well as a high emissions scenario (HadCM3 A2 emissions scenario). Our results suggest that long-term changes in C cycling will be driven more by climate change than by fire or gypsy moths over the next century. We also found that simulated disturbances will affect species composition more than tree growth or C sequestration rates at the landscape level. Projected changes in tree species biomass indicate a potential increase in oaks with climate change and gypsy moth defoliation over the course of the 100-year simulation, exacerbating current successional trends towards increased oak abundance. Our research suggests that defoliation under climate change may play a critical role in increasing the variability of tree growth rates and in determining landscape species composition over the next 100 years. PMID:25119162

  16. Predicted Effects of Gypsy Moth Defoliation and Climate Change on Forest Carbon Dynamics in the New Jersey Pine Barrens

    PubMed Central

    Kretchun, Alec M.; Scheller, Robert M.; Lucash, Melissa S.; Clark, Kenneth L.; Hom, John; Van Tuyl, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Disturbance regimes within temperate forests can significantly impact carbon cycling. Additionally, projected climate change in combination with multiple, interacting disturbance effects may disrupt the capacity of forests to act as carbon sinks at large spatial and temporal scales. We used a spatially explicit forest succession and disturbance model, LANDIS-II, to model the effects of climate change, gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) defoliation, and wildfire on the C dynamics of the forests of the New Jersey Pine Barrens over the next century. Climate scenarios were simulated using current climate conditions (baseline), as well as a high emissions scenario (HadCM3 A2 emissions scenario). Our results suggest that long-term changes in C cycling will be driven more by climate change than by fire or gypsy moths over the next century. We also found that simulated disturbances will affect species composition more than tree growth or C sequestration rates at the landscape level. Projected changes in tree species biomass indicate a potential increase in oaks with climate change and gypsy moth defoliation over the course of the 100-year simulation, exacerbating current successional trends towards increased oak abundance. Our research suggests that defoliation under climate change may play a critical role in increasing the variability of tree growth rates and in determining landscape species composition over the next 100 years. PMID:25119162

  17. Survey of 42,000 Gossypium hirsutum cv. Maxxa BAC-End Sequences and Frequency, Type, and Annotation of BAC-derived SSRs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quest for more molecular markers is a major initiative in cotton, which lags behind crops such as soybean, maize, and rice in this type of research. In an effort to increase the number of microsatellite markers in Gossypium, BAC-end sequences from a publicly available Gossypium hirsutum cv. Maxx...

  18. Clonal Expansion and Migration of a Highly Virulent, Defoliating Lineage of Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Milgroom, Michael G; Del Mar Jiménez-Gasco, María; Olivares-García, Concepción; Jiménez-Díaz, Rafael M

    2016-09-01

    We used a population genomics approach to test the hypothesis of clonal expansion of a highly fit genotype in populations of Verticillium dahliae. This fungal pathogen has a broad host range and can be dispersed in contaminated seed or other plant material. It has a highly clonal population structure, with several lineages having nearly worldwide distributions in agricultural crops. Isolates in lineage 1A are highly virulent and cause defoliation in cotton, okra, and olive (denoted 1A/D), whereas those in other lineages cause wilting but not defoliation (ND). We tested whether the highly virulent lineage 1A/D could have spread from the southwestern United States to the Mediterranean basin, as predicted from historical records. We found 187 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), determined by genotyping by sequencing, among 91 isolates of lineage 1A/D and 5 isolates in the closely related lineage 1B/ND. Neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood analyses on the 187 SNPs showed a clear divergence between 1A/D and 1B/ND haplotypes. Data for only 77 SNPs were obtained for all 96 isolates (no missing data); lineages 1A/D and 1B/ND differed by 27 of these 77 SNPs, confirming a clear divergence between the two lineages. No evidence of recombination was detected within or between these two lineages. Phylogenetic and genealogical analyses resulted in five distinct subclades of 1A/D isolates that correlated closely with geographic origins in the Mediterranean basin, consistent with the hypothesis that the D pathotype was introduced at least five times in independent founder events into this region from a relatively diverse source population. The inferred ancestral haplotype was found in two isolates sampled before 1983 from the southwestern United States, which is consistent with historical records that 1A/D originated in North America. The five subclades coalesce with the ancestral haplotype at the same time, consistent with a hypothesis of rapid population expansion in the

  19. Nitrate Variability in Hydrological Flowpaths for a Mid-Appalachian Forested Catchment Following a Large-Scale Defoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riscassi, A. L.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) leakage from forested watersheds due to disturbance is a well-documented, but not well understood process that contributes to the degradation of receiving waters through eutrophication. Several studies have shown that large scale defoliation events in small forested watersheds in the Eastern U.S. cause immediate and dramatic increases in N flux to streams. Recovery times can differ dramatically depending upon location. Reasons for these differences are not well understood, however, because N transport and transformation processes are difficult to track over these long recovery timescales. This research focuses on a large-scale gypsy moth defoliation event that impacted Shenandoah National Park (SNP) in the late 1980s to early 1990s. Water chemistry and discharge have been monitored at a number of catchments within SNP over the timeframe since the defoliation. Recovery of these systems to pre-defoliation N levels has been observed to be unusually slow, lasting over a decade. Availability of high-frequency (i.e. hourly) stream chemistry and discharge data during storm events throughout the period of recovery allows us to investigate short- and long-term mechanisms for N "leaks" from forested watersheds. Through geochemical hydrograph separation techniques, we can determine how nitrate concentrations vary between event, soil, and groundwater during and in the years following a disturbance. Analyses focus on Paine Run, a 12.4 km2 catchment where over 50 storms have been characterized since the 1990-1992 defoliation. Standard geochemical hydrograph separation is performed using conservative tracers to determine the relative flow contributions from the three flow components for each measurement time step. Computed discharge components, along with measured steam nitrate concentrations (NO3 -) at each time-step, were used to solve for the relative concentration of NO3 - in each of the hydrologic zones for storms by solving the over-determined set of mixing

  20. Tamarisk Water Flux Patterns Before, During and After Episodic Defoliation by the Salt Cedar Leaf Beetle on the Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultine, K. R.; Nagler, P. L.; Dennison, P. E.

    2008-12-01

    Tamarisk (Tamarix) species are among the most successful plant invaders in the western United States, and has had significant impacts on watershed hydrology and water resources. Accordingly, local, state and federal agencies have undertaken considerable efforts to eradicate tamarisk and restore riparian habitats to pre-invasion status. A biological control - the saltcedar leaf beetle (Diorhabda elongata) - was released in the summer of 2004 at several locations in eastern Utah, USA to control the spread and impact of tamarisk within the Colorado River watershed. Beginning in April of 2008, sap flux techniques were used to monitor changes in transpiration fluxes in response to canopy defoliation by the beetle. Specifically we installed modified (10 mm length) heat dissipation probes into the main stem of 20 mature tamarisk trees within a single stand on the Colorado Plateau. In July, the saltcedar leaf beetle reduced the total leaf area to near 0% of pre-beetle invasion status. Consequently, sap flux declined by up to 80% compared to pre-beetle invasion fluxes. By mid-August, refoliation of the canopy occurred, and sap flux rates returned to pre- defoliation status. Sap flux rates prior to defoliation were modeled against atmospheric vapor pressure deficit in order to predict the amount of water salvage from defoliation. Sap flux from June 1 through September 1 was on average 36% lower than predicted values. Combined with scaling techniques, the heat dissipation approach shows a high potential for monitoring changes in watershed hydrology in response to tamarisk defoliation by the saltcedar leaf beetle. Nevertheless, tamarisk sap flux studies with heat dissipation probes presents several challenges, including, narrow sapwood depth, low flux rates in response to defoliation, and large thermal gradients that are inevitable in warm climates (particularly after defoliation removes canopy shading). We will present results from ongoing research to address these potential

  1. Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Wyatt I.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Gaskin, John F.; Norton, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has contributed to the successful invasion of exotic plant species in their introduced ranges, but how evolution affects particular control strategies is still under evaluation. For instance, classical biological control, a common strategy involving the utilization of highly specific natural enemies to control exotic pests, may be negatively affected by host hybridization because of shifts in plant traits, such as root allocation or chemical constituents. We investigated introgression between two parent species of the invasive shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States, and how differences in plant traits affect interactions with a biological control agent. Introgression varied strongly with latitude of origin and was highly correlated with plant performance. Increased levels of T. ramosissima introgression resulted in both higher investment in roots and tolerance to defoliation and less resistance to insect attack. Because tamarisk hybridization occurs predictably on the western U.S. landscape, managers may be able to exploit this information to maximize control efforts. Genetic differentiation in plant traits in this system underpins the importance of plant hybridization and may explain why some biological control releases are more successful than others.

  2. Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Wyatt I; Friedman, Jonathan M; Gaskin, John F; Norton, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has contributed to the successful invasion of exotic plant species in their introduced ranges, but how evolution affects particular control strategies is still under evaluation. For instance, classical biological control, a common strategy involving the utilization of highly specific natural enemies to control exotic pests, may be negatively affected by host hybridization because of shifts in plant traits, such as root allocation or chemical constituents. We investigated introgression between two parent species of the invasive shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States, and how differences in plant traits affect interactions with a biological control agent. Introgression varied strongly with latitude of origin and was highly correlated with plant performance. Increased levels of T. ramosissima introgression resulted in both higher investment in roots and tolerance to defoliation and less resistance to insect attack. Because tamarisk hybridization occurs predictably on the western U.S. landscape, managers may be able to exploit this information to maximize control efforts. Genetic differentiation in plant traits in this system underpins the importance of plant hybridization and may explain why some biological control releases are more successful than others. PMID:24665340

  3. Framework for video-based monitoring of forest insect defoliation and discoloration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Feifei; Wang, Yafei; Qiao, Yanyou

    2015-01-01

    Pest damage is a general problem that disturbs the growth of forests, influencing carbon sequestration and causing economic losses. In the past decades, many studies have been conducted to monitor and detect forest insect damage using satellite remote sensing technology. Satellite remote sensing has a satellite or aerial vision allowing the monitoring of extensive forest areas, but it usually requires constant time periods and is prone to cloud interference. To enable more efficient and effective monitoring of forest pest damage, a video-based monitoring framework is presented. This framework comprises three key parts: (1) video positioning of forest insect damage based on digital elevation model (DEM) and the parameters obtained from the pan-tilt-zoom camera, (2) integration of two-dimensional/three-dimensional geographic information system and video surveillance to provide more intuitionistic monitoring and assistance for positioning, (3) on-site verification conducted by ground surveys and guided through global positioning system (GPS) integrated in the embedded devices. The experiment was carried out over two forest areas to validate the proposed method. Results showed that the framework bears a sound positioning accuracy and high detection ratio, which could be effectively used in detecting and monitoring forest insect defoliation and discoloration.

  4. Molecular data and phylogeny of Nosema infecting lepidopteran forest defoliators in the genera Choristoneura and Malacosoma.

    PubMed

    Kyei-Poku, George; Gauthier, Debbie; van Frankenhuyzen, Kees

    2008-01-01

    Nosema isolates from five lepidopteran forest defoliators, Nosema fumiferanae from spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana; a Nosema sp. from jack pine budworm, Choristoneura pinus pinus and western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis (Nosema sp. CPP and Nosema sp. CO, respectively); Nosema thomsoni from large aspen tortrix, Choristoneura conflictana; and Nosema disstriae, from the forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria were compared based on their small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences. Four of the species sequenced, N. fumiferanae, Nosema sp. CPP, Nosema sp. CO, and N. disstriae have a high SSU rDNA sequence identity (0.6%-1.5%) and are members of the "true Nosema" clade. They all showed the reverse arrangement of the (large subunit [LSU]-internal transcribed spacer [ITS]-SSU) of the rRNA gene. The fifth species, N. thomsoni has the usual (SSU-ITS-LSU) arrangement and is not a member of this clade showing only an 82% sequence similarity. We speculate, therefore, that a genetic reversal may have occurred in the common ancestor to the "true Nosema" clade. Although, the mechanism for rearrangement of the rRNA gene subunits is not known we provide a possible explanation for the localization. N. fumiferanae, Nosema sp. CPP, and Nosema sp. CO clustered together on the inferred phylogenetic tree. The high sequence similarities, the reverse arrangement in the rRNA gene subunits, and the phylogenetic clustering suggest that these three species are closely related but separate species. PMID:18251803

  5. Effects of defoliation and shading on the physiological cost of reproduction in silky locoweed Oxytropis sericea

    PubMed Central

    Ida, Takashi Y.; Harder, Lawrence D.; Kudo, Gaku

    2012-01-01

    Background The production of flowers, fruits and seeds demands considerable energy and nutrients, which can limit the allocation of these resources to other plant functions and, thereby, influence survival and future reproduction. The magnitude of the physiological costs of reproduction depends on both the factors limiting seed production (pollen, ovules or resources) and the capacity of plants to compensate for high resource demand. Methods To assess the magnitude and consequences of reproductive costs, we used shading and defoliation to reduce photosynthate production by fully pollinated plants of a perennial legume, Oxytropis sericea (Fabaceae), and examined the resulting impact on photosynthate allocation, and nectar, fruit and seed production. Key Results Although these leaf manipulations reduced photosynthesis and nectar production, they did not alter photosynthate allocation, as revealed by 13C tracing, or fruit or seed production. That photosynthate allocation to reproductive organs increased >190 % and taproot mass declined by 29 % between flowering and fruiting indicates that reproduction was physiologically costly. Conclusions The insensitivity of fruit and seed production to leaf manipulation is consistent with either compensatory mobilization of stored resources or ovule limitation. Seed production differed considerably between the two years of the study in association with contrasting precipitation prior to flowering, perhaps reflecting contrasting limits on reproductive performance. PMID:22021817

  6. Effects of Dracontomelon duperreanum defoliation extract on Microcystis aeruginosa: physiological and morphological aspects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxiong; Jiang, Chenchun; Szeto, Yim-Tong; Li, Ho-Kin; Yam, Kwei-Lam; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-05-01

    Harmful cyanobacteria bloom contributes to economic loss as well as the threat to human health. Agricultural waste products, particularly straw, have been used to control bloom while arbor plant is the potential candidate for limiting antialgal activity. This study investigated the use of Dracontomelon duperreanum defoliation extract (DDDE) to inhibit the activity of Microcystis aeruginosa. The primary goal of the research was to explore the solution to control cyanobacterial bloom. The photosynthetic activity, cell morphology, membrane integrity, and esterase activity of M. aeruginosa were determined using phytoplankton analyzer pulse amplitude modulation (Phyto-PAM) and flow cytometry before and after exposure to DDDE. The inhibitory rate of M. aeruginosa was about 99.6 % on day 15 when exposed to 2.0 g L(-1). A reduction of chlorophyll a (Chl-a) activity and changes in cell membrane suggested the algistatic property of DDDE. Inhibition of photosynthetic activity was reflected by changing mean Chl-a fluorescence intensity (MFI) which was about 52.5 % on day 15 when exposed to 2.0 g L(-1) DDDE as well as relative electron transport rates (rETRs) of algal cell. These changes might contribute to the suppression of M. aeruginosa. Algal cell exposed to DDDE may lead to cell volume reduction or slow growth. This resulted in a decreased proportion of normal or swollen granular cells after DDDE treatment. PMID:26803752

  7. Potential of VIIRS Time Series Data for Aiding the USDA Forest Service Early Warning System for Forest Health Threats: A Gypsy Moth Defoliation Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ryan, Robert E.; Smoot, James; Kuper, Phillip; Prados, Donald; Russell, Jeffrey; Ross, Kenton; Gasser, Gerald; Sader, Steven; McKellip, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    This report details one of three experiments performed during FY 2007 for the NASA RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) at Stennis Space Center. This RPC experiment assesses the potential of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data for detecting and monitoring forest defoliation from the non-native Eurasian gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar). The intent of the RPC experiment was to assess the degree to which VIIRS data can provide forest disturbance monitoring information as an input to a forest threat EWS (Early Warning System) as compared to the level of information that can be obtained from MODIS data. The USDA Forest Service (USFS) plans to use MODIS products for generating broad-scaled, regional monitoring products as input to an EWS for forest health threat assessment. NASA SSC is helping the USFS to evaluate and integrate currently available satellite remote sensing technologies and data products for the EWS, including the use of MODIS products for regional monitoring of forest disturbance. Gypsy moth defoliation of the mid-Appalachian highland region was selected as a case study. Gypsy moth is one of eight major forest insect threats listed in the Healthy Forest Restoration Act (HFRA) of 2003; the gypsy moth threatens eastern U.S. hardwood forests, which are also a concern highlighted in the HFRA of 2003. This region was selected for the project because extensive gypsy moth defoliation occurred there over multiple years during the MODIS operational period. This RPC experiment is relevant to several nationally important mapping applications, including agricultural efficiency, coastal management, ecological forecasting, disaster management, and carbon management. In this experiment, MODIS data and VIIRS data simulated from MODIS were assessed for their ability to contribute broad, regional geospatial information on gypsy moth defoliation. Landsat and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission

  8. Genome-wide comparison of AP2/ERF superfamily genes between Gossypium arboreum and G. raimondii.

    PubMed

    Lei, Z P; He, D H; Xing, H Y; Tang, B S; Lu, B X

    2016-01-01

    The APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor superfamily is known to regulate diverse processes of plant development and stress responses. We conducted a genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF gene in Gossypium arboreum and G. raimondii. Using RPSBLAST and HMMsearch, a total of 271 and 269 AP2/ERF genes were identified in the G. arboreum and G. raimondii genomes, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis classified diploid Gossypium spp AP2/ERF genes into 4 families and 16 subfamilies. Orthologous genes predominated the terminal branch of the phylogenetic tree. Physical mapping showed at least 30% of AP2/ERF genes clustered together. A high level of intra- and inter-species collinearity involving AP2/ERF genes was observed, indicating common (before species divergence) or parallel (after species divergence) segmental duplications, along with tandem duplications, resulting in the species-specific expansion of AP2/ERF genes in diploid Gossypium species. Motif analyses of the AP2/ERF proteins revealed that motif arrangements were highly diverse among subfamilies, but shared by orthologous gene pairs. An examination of nucleotide divergence of AP2/ERF coding regions identified small and non-significant sequence differences among orthologs. Expression profiling of AP2/ERF orthologous gene pairs showed similar abundance levels of orthologous copies between G. arboreum and G. raimondii. Thus, cotton species possess abundant and diverse AP2/ERF genes, resulting from tandem and segmental duplications. Protein and nucleotide sequence and mRNA expression analyses revealed symmetrical evolution, indicating that most AP2/ ERF genes may not have undergone significant biochemical and morphological divergence between sister species. Our study provides detailed insights into the evolutionary characteristics and functional importance of AP2/ERF genes, and could aid in the genetic improvement of agriculturally significant crops in this genus. PMID:27525884

  9. The cell-wall phosphatase of cotton (Gossypium) is inhibited by kelthane.

    PubMed Central

    Daley, L S; Carroll, P; Mussell, H

    1979-01-01

    Kelthane [4,4'-dichloro-alpha-(trichloromethyl)benzhydrol] was previously shown to decrease the limited tolerance of susceptible varieties of cotton (Gossypium) to Verticillium wilt. Kelthane was shown in the present study to inhibit the cell-wall p-nitrophenyl phosphatase of cotton. In view of information already establishing the cell wall as a primary site of action of Verticillium wilt, the data are interpreted as suggesting an as yet undefined interaction between Kelthane, cell-wall phosphatase and verticillium-resistance mechanisms of the cell wall. PMID:224864

  10. Using remote sensing to assess stand loss and defoliation in maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Bruce Joel

    Accurate assessment of hail and wind damage to crops has long been a difficult task. Yield effects of stand loss and defoliation at various crop stages are well known, but getting accurate damage information across a field has been problematic. A quick and accurate method of determining losses such as using remote sensing techniques could lead to more efficient crop management and more accurate insurance claims adjustment. New satellites with spatial and temporal resolution capable of assessing crop damage could provide data for producing maps of field damage. Field plots of maize, Zea mays L. were established in Indiana and Nebraska in 1997, 1998, and 1999 and were subjected to various levels of stand loss and leaf loss during vegetative and early reproductive growth stages. Remote sensing data were collected using a variety of imaging spectroradiometers mounted in airplanes and field spectrometers mounted on boom trucks. Radiometric data compiled by wavelength to produce spectral response curves showed light reflectance level directly related to damage level across a broad range of wavelengths. Using feature selection, a function of the image processing software MultiSpec, the red and near infrared (NIR) wavelength bands provided the most distinction among levels of damage. Classification of images by damage level was accomplished using a combination of red and near infrared bands and using Discriminate Analysis Feature Extraction (DAFE) to utilize the contribution of all sensor bands and attempt high accuracy. Classification accuracies achievable for discriminating four levels of damage inflicted on a particular date ranged from 72% to 100%, with accuracy depending on the band combination used and level of damage. In a field after a storm, remote sensing images could be used to extrapolate information collected by insurance adjusters, and produce damage maps of a field. Fewer ground checks would be needed to get an accurate damage estimate.

  11. [Ecological and biological features of soils in the forests defoliated by the siberian moth in the southern taiga of middle Siberia].

    PubMed

    Krasnoshchekov, Iu N; Vishniakova, Z V; Perevoznikova, V D; Baranchikov, Iu N

    2003-01-01

    Experimental data are analyzed that concern the effect of zoogenic debris on the properties of soddy deep podzolic soils and raw-humus brown soils characteristic of southern taiga forests in the Yenisei region of Siberia. It is shown that the influence of excrements of Siberian moth larvae on the soil microflora lasts for two or, at most, three growing seasons. Zoogenic plant debris falling on the ground surface during tree stand defoliation is a short-acting but powerful stimulant of biological activity in the litter; hence, it has a considerable effect on soil properties. This effect is enhanced by changes in ecological conditions that occur upon defoliation. The influence of the cenotic factor on biogenic soil properties is manifested more strongly in the organogenic horizons. The communities of microorganisms involved in the nitrogen and carbon cycles are dominated by prototrophic forms in the normal fir forest and by pedotrophic forms in the forest defoliated by pests. PMID:14735796

  12. Metabolic and enzymatic changes associated with carbon mobilization, utilization and replenishment triggered in grain amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) in response to partial defoliation by mechanical injury or insect herbivory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Amaranthus cruentus and A. hypochondriacus are crop plants grown for grain production in subtropical countries. Recently, the generation of large-scale transcriptomic data opened the possibility to study representative genes of primary metabolism to gain a better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying tolerance to defoliation in these species. A multi-level approach was followed involving gene expression analysis, enzyme activity and metabolite measurements. Results Defoliation by insect herbivory (HD) or mechanical damage (MD) led to a rapid and transient reduction of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in all tissues examined. This correlated with a short-term induction of foliar sucrolytic activity, differential gene expression of a vacuolar invertase and its inhibitor, and induction of a sucrose transporter gene. Leaf starch in defoliated plants correlated negatively with amylolytic activity and expression of a β-amylase-1 gene and positively with a soluble starch synthase gene. Fatty-acid accumulation in roots coincided with a high expression of a phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate transporter gene. In all tissues there was a long-term replenishment of most metabolite pools, which allowed damaged plants to maintain unaltered growth and grain yield. Promoter analysis of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and vacuolar invertase genes indicated the presence of cis-regulatory elements that supported their responsiveness to defoliation. HD and MD had differential effects on transcripts, enzyme activities and metabolites. However, the correlation between transcript abundance and enzymatic activities was very limited. A better correlation was found between enzymes, metabolite levels and growth and reproductive parameters. Conclusions It is concluded that a rapid reduction of NSC reserves in leaves, stems and roots followed by their long-term recovery underlies tolerance to defoliation in grain amaranth. This requires the coordinate action of genes

  13. Phosphorus and Defoliation Interact and Improve the Growth and Composition of the Plant Community and Soil Properties in an Alpine Pasture of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

    PubMed

    Qi, Juan; Nie, Zhongnan; Jiao, Ting; Zhang, Degang

    2015-01-01

    Pasture degradation caused by overgrazing and inappropriate fertiliser management is a major production and environmental threat in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Previous research has focused on the effects of mixed nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertiliser and reduced grazing pressure on the plant community of the grassland; however, the role of P and how it interacts with various defoliation (the process of the complete or partial removal of the above-ground parts of plants by grazing or cutting) intensities on the plant and soil of the grassland ecosystem have not been quantified. A field experiment was conducted to quantify how P application in combination of defoliation pressure could impact the dynamic change of the plant and soil in a native alpine grassland ecosystem of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China, from May 2012 to September 2014. A split-plot design with 4 replicates and repeated measures was used to determine the growth and composition of plant community and soil physical and chemical properties under various levels of P fertiliser and defoliation intensity. The results showed that applying 20 kg P/ha increased the herbage yield of Melissitus ruthenica by 68% and total pasture yield by 25%. Close defoliation favoured the growth and plant frequency of the shorter species, whereas lax defoliation favoured that of the taller plant species. Medium P rate and cutting to 3 cm above ground gave an overall best outcome in pasture yield, quality and frequency and soil moisture and nutrient concentration. Application of P fertiliser with a moderate defoliation pressure to promote legume growth and N fixation has the potential to achieve multiple benefits in increasing pasture and livestock production and improving environmental sustainability in the alpine pasture of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, a fragile and P-deficient ecosystem zone in China and its western neighbouring countries. PMID:26513363

  14. Phosphorus and Defoliation Interact and Improve the Growth and Composition of the Plant Community and Soil Properties in an Alpine Pasture of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Juan; Nie, Zhongnan; Jiao, Ting; Zhang, Degang

    2015-01-01

    Pasture degradation caused by overgrazing and inappropriate fertiliser management is a major production and environmental threat in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Previous research has focused on the effects of mixed nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertiliser and reduced grazing pressure on the plant community of the grassland; however, the role of P and how it interacts with various defoliation (the process of the complete or partial removal of the above-ground parts of plants by grazing or cutting) intensities on the plant and soil of the grassland ecosystem have not been quantified. A field experiment was conducted to quantify how P application in combination of defoliation pressure could impact the dynamic change of the plant and soil in a native alpine grassland ecosystem of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China, from May 2012 to September 2014. A split-plot design with 4 replicates and repeated measures was used to determine the growth and composition of plant community and soil physical and chemical properties under various levels of P fertiliser and defoliation intensity. The results showed that applying 20 kg P/ha increased the herbage yield of Melissitus ruthenica by 68% and total pasture yield by 25%. Close defoliation favoured the growth and plant frequency of the shorter species, whereas lax defoliation favoured that of the taller plant species. Medium P rate and cutting to 3 cm above ground gave an overall best outcome in pasture yield, quality and frequency and soil moisture and nutrient concentration. Application of P fertiliser with a moderate defoliation pressure to promote legume growth and N fixation has the potential to achieve multiple benefits in increasing pasture and livestock production and improving environmental sustainability in the alpine pasture of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, a fragile and P-deficient ecosystem zone in China and its western neighbouring countries. PMID:26513363

  15. Identification of the unsaturated heptadecyl fatty acids in the seed oils of Thespesia populnea and Gossypium hirsutum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fatty acid composition of the seed oils of Thespesia populnea and cotton variety SG-747 (Gossypium hirsutum) were studied to identity their 17-carbon fatty acids. With a combination of chemical derivatization, gas chromatography, and mass spectrometry, 8-heptadecenoic acid, 9-heptadecenoic acid...

  16. Diurnal pollen tube growth is exceptionally sensitive to high temperature in field-grown Gossypium hirsutum pistils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For Gossypium hirsutum L. pollination, germination, and pollen tube growth must occur in a highly concerted fashion on the day of flowering for fertilization to occur. Because reproductive success is influenced by photosynthetic activity of major source leaves, we hypothesized that high temperatures...

  17. Identification of QTL Regions and SSR Markers Associated with Resistance to Reniform Nematode in Gossypium barbadense L. accession GB713

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The identification of molecular markers, closely linked to gene(s)in Gossypium barbadense L., accession GB713 that confer a high level of resistance to reniform nematode (RN), Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveria, would be very useful in cotton breeding programs. Our objectives were to determ...

  18. A Transgressive Segregation Factor (RKN2) in Gossypium barbadense for Nematode Resistance Clusters with Gene rkn1 in G. hirsutum.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host plant resistance is an important strategy for managing root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in cotton (Gossypium L.). Here we report evidence for enhanced resistance in interspecific crosses resulting from transgressive segregation of clustered gene loci. Recently, a major gene, rkn1, on ...

  19. Transmission of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) seed and boll rotting bacteria by southern green stink bugs (Nezara viridula L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study is to determine the ability of the southern green stink bug (Nezara viridula L.) to transmit an opportunistic Pantoea agglomerans strain into unopened, green cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) bolls. Southern green stink bug (SGSB) colonies were reared on fresh green beans in the labo...

  20. Year One Results for Tolerance Screening of Selected Gossypium hirsutum Varieties to Rotylenchulus Reniformis in the Mississippi Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirteen varieties of Gossypium hirsutum were screened for tolerance to the reniform nematode in 2006 at the Delta Research and Extension Center, Stoneville, MS. The trials were arranged in a split plot design, with four rows of untreated and four rows of Temik 15G, 7 lb/acre for each variety. This ...

  1. Population structure and genetic diversity of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), on Gossypium in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis, has been identified as one of the most devastating pests in U.S. history, its origin and activity in Mexico, both on wild and cultivated cotton hosts (genus Gossypium), is poorly understood. Three forms (geographical or host-associated races) of A. grandis ...

  2. SSR markers for marker assisted selection of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) resistant plants in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L) cultivars highly resistant to the southern root-knot nematode (RKN) [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood] are not available. Recently, molecular markers on chromosomes 11 and 14 have been associated with RKN resistance, thus opening the way for marker assis...

  3. Reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) resistance locus from Gossypium aridum identified and introgressed into upland cotton (G. hirsutum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SSR markers associated with reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) resistance were identified and mapped using progeny from a cross between a tri-species hybrid [Gossypium arboreum × (G 371 - G. hirsutum × G. aridum -)] and G. hirsutum MD51ne. The 50 most resistant and 26 most susceptible prog...

  4. Registration of RMBUP-C4, a random mated population with Gossypium hirsutum L. alleles, introgresssed into Upland cotton germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RMBUP-C4 (Random Mated Barbadense Upland Population Cycle 4) (Reg. No. GP_____: PI______) is a unique random mated germplasm population of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) which has introgression of G. barbadense L. alleles. This population involved five cycles of random mating beginning ...

  5. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) boll rotting bacteria vectored by the brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Say) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidea)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determine the capacity of the brown stink bug (Euschistus servus) to transmit an infective Pantoea agglomerans into cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, L.) bolls. A laboratory colony of the brown stink bug (BSB) was maintained on fresh green beans. The P. agglomerans mutant strain Sc 1-R that holds rifamp...

  6. The Li2 mutation results in reduced subgenome expression bias in elongating fibers of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) technology was used to evaluate the effects of the Ligon lintless-2 (Li2) short fiber mutation on transcriptomes of both subgenomes of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) as compared to its near-isogenic wild type. Sequencing was performed on 4 librari...

  7. Next Generation Genetic Mapping of the Ligon-lintless-2 (Li2) Locus in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing offers new ways to identify the genetic mechanisms that underlie mutant phenotypes. The release of a reference diploid Gossypium raimondii (D5) genome and bioinformatics tools to sort tetraploid reads into subgenomes has brought cotton genetic mapping into the genomics er...

  8. Warm Root Temperature Mitigates the Effect of Chilling in the Dark on Photosynthesis in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Productivity of warm season crops such as cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) can be reduced by untimely episodes of chilling temperature that often occur during the first weeks after planting. We examined the impact of chilling stress on cotton seedlings two weeks after planting by chilling both shoots...

  9. Detection, validation and application of genotyping-by-sequencing based single nucleotide polymorphisms in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of two closely related sub-genomes in the allotetraploid Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) combined with a narrow genetic base of the cultivated varieties has hindered the identification of polymorphic genetic markers and their utilization in improving this important crop. Genotypi...

  10. Genetic changes in plant growth and their associations with chromosomes from Gossypium hirsutum L. in G. hirsutum L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., plant growth is an important time-specific agronomic character that supports the development of squares, flower production, boll retention, and yield. With the use of a mixed linear model approach, we investigated 14 cotton chromosome substitution lines and their chrom...