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Sample records for deformation energy released

  1. Correcting deformity in total knee arthroplasty: Techniques to avoid the release of collateral ligaments in severely deformed knees.

    PubMed

    Mullaji, A B; Shetty, G M

    2016-01-01

    Collateral ligament release is advocated in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to deal with significant coronal plane deformities, but is also associated with significant disadvantages. We describe steps to avoid release of the collateral (superficial medial and lateral collateral) ligaments during TKA in severely deformed knees, while correcting deformity and balancing the knee. PMID:26733653

  2. Effect of plastic deformation on deuterium retention and release in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyev, D.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.; Zayachuk, Y.; Lambrinou, K.; Minov, B.; Dubinko, A.; Bystrov, K.; Van Oost, G.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of severe plastic deformation on the deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high-flux low-energy plasma (flux ˜ 1024 D/m2/s, energy ˜ 50 eV, and fluence up to 3 × 1026 D/m2) at the plasma generator Pilot-PSI was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The desorption spectra in both reference and plastically deformed samples were deconvolved into three contributions attributed to the detrapping from dislocations, deuterium-vacancy clusters, and pores, respectively. The plastically induced deformation, resulting in high dislocation density, does not change the positions of the three peaks, but alters their amplitudes as compared to the reference material. The appearance of blisters detected by scanning electron microscopy and the desorption peak attributed to the release from pores (i.e., deuterium bubbles) were suppressed in the plastically deformed samples but only up to a certain fluence. Beyond 5 × 1025 D/m2, the release from the bubbles in the deformed material is essentially higher than in the reference material. Based on the presented results, we suggest that a dense dislocation network increases the incubation dose needed for the appearance of blisters, associated with deuterium bubbles, by offering numerous nucleation sites for deuterium clusters eventually transforming into deuterium-vacancy clusters by punching out jogs on dislocation lines.

  3. Effect of plastic deformation on deuterium retention and release in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Terentyev, D. Lambrinou, K.; Minov, B.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.; Zayachuk, Y.; Bystrov, K.; Dubinko, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2015-02-28

    The effect of severe plastic deformation on the deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high-flux low-energy plasma (flux ∼ 10{sup 24 }D/m{sup 2}/s, energy ∼ 50 eV, and fluence up to 3 × 10{sup 26 }D/m{sup 2}) at the plasma generator Pilot-PSI was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The desorption spectra in both reference and plastically deformed samples were deconvolved into three contributions attributed to the detrapping from dislocations, deuterium-vacancy clusters, and pores, respectively. The plastically induced deformation, resulting in high dislocation density, does not change the positions of the three peaks, but alters their amplitudes as compared to the reference material. The appearance of blisters detected by scanning electron microscopy and the desorption peak attributed to the release from pores (i.e., deuterium bubbles) were suppressed in the plastically deformed samples but only up to a certain fluence. Beyond 5 × 10{sup 25 }D/m{sup 2}, the release from the bubbles in the deformed material is essentially higher than in the reference material. Based on the presented results, we suggest that a dense dislocation network increases the incubation dose needed for the appearance of blisters, associated with deuterium bubbles, by offering numerous nucleation sites for deuterium clusters eventually transforming into deuterium-vacancy clusters by punching out jogs on dislocation lines.

  4. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  5. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  6. Surface layer effect on nuclear deformation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomietz, V. M.; Sanzhur, A. I.; Reznychenko, B. V.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we apply the direct variational method to derive the nuclear deformation energy. The extended Thomas-Fermi approximation (ETFA) for the energy functional with Skyrme forces is used. We study the influence of the finite surface layer of the nuclear density profile function on the formation of the fission barrier and the scission configuration. Comparison of the variational approach with the traditional liquid drop model (LDM) is presented. We show the sensitivity of the numerical results to the surface diffuseness parameter.

  7. Moment release in the Lower Rhine Embayment, Germany: seismological perspective of the deformation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmedes, J.; Hainzl, S.; Reamer, S.-K.; Scherbaum, F.; Hinzen, K.-G.

    2005-03-01

    An important task of seismic hazard assessment consists of estimating the rate of seismic moment release which is correlated to the rate of tectonic deformation and the seismic coupling. However, the estimations of deformation depend on the type of information utilized (e.g. geodetic, geological, seismic) and include large uncertainties. We therefore estimate the deformation rate in the Lower Rhine Embayment (LRE), Germany, using an integrated approach where the uncertainties have been systematically incorporated. On the basis of a new homogeneous earthquake catalogue we initially determine the frequency-magnitude distribution by statistical methods. In particular, we focus on an adequate estimation of the upper bound of the Gutenberg-Richter relation and demonstrate the importance of additional palaeoseismological information. The integration of seismological and geological information yields a probability distribution of the upper bound magnitude. Using this distribution together with the distribution of Gutenberg-Richter a and b values, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to derive the seismic moment release as a function of the observation time. The seismic moment release estimated from synthetic earthquake catalogues with short catalogue length is found to systematically underestimate the long-term moment rate which can be analytically determined. The moment release recorded in the LRE over the last 250 yr is found to be in good agreement with the probability distribution resulting from the Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, the long-term distribution is within its uncertainties consistent with the moment rate derived by geological measurements, indicating an almost complete seismic coupling in this region. By means of Kostrov's formula, we additionally calculate the full deformation rate tensor using the distribution of known focal mechanisms in LRE. Finally, we use the same approach to calculate the seismic moment and the deformation rate for two subsets

  8. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 deg ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  9. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  10. Seismic energy release of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goins, N. R.; Dainty, A. M.; Toksoz, M. N.

    1981-01-01

    Lunar seismicity is investigated by calculating various source parameters for a number of shallow and deep-focus moonquakes. The seismic moment, seismic energy release, annual seismic energy release, stress drop, and body-wave magnitude are determined for the largest shallow moonquakes and for large deep-focus events. It is found that the shallow events dominate the lunar seismic energy release, that tidal dissipation may account for the energy release by the deep-focus events, and that the stress drops for the deep-focus events are comparable to or smaller than the calculated tidal stresses. A comparison of the results with terrestrial data indicates that the seismic characteristics of a planet are controlled more by tectonic style and state than by the relative magnitude of the driving forces.

  11. Impact of methane flow through deformable lake sediments on atmospheric release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, B.; Juanes, R.

    2010-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is generated geothermally and biologically in lake and ocean sediments. Free gas bubbles may escape oxidative traps and contribute more to the atmospheric source than dissolved methane, but the details of the methane release depend on the interactions between the multiple fluid phases and the deformable porous medium. We present a model and supporting laboratory experiments of methane release through “breathing” dynamic flow conduits that open in response to drops in the hydrostatic load on lake sediments, which has been validated against a high-resolution record of free gas flux and hydrostatic pressure in Upper Mystic Lake, MA. In contrast to previous linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis of gassy sediments, the evolution of gas transport in a deformable compliant sediment is presented within the framework of multiphase poroplasticity. Experiments address how strongly the mode and rate of gas flow, captured by our model, impacts the size of bubbles released into the water column. A bubble's size in turn determines how efficiently it transports methane to the atmosphere, and integrating this effect will be critical to improving estimates of the atmospheric methane source from lakes. Cross-sectional schematic of lake sediments showing two venting sites: one open at left and one closed at right. The vertical release of gas bubbles (red) at the open venting site creates a local pressure drop, which drives both bubble formation from the methane-rich pore water (higher concentrations shaded darker red) and lateral advection of dissolved methane (purple arrows). Even as bubbles in the open site escape, those at the closed site remain trapped.

  12. Concise relation of substitution energy to macroscopic deformation in a deformed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Wei-Lu; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.; Huang, Qun-Ying; Wu, Yi-Can

    2011-12-01

    An ab initio study of the effect of macroscopic deformation on energetics of twelve alloying elements in bcc Fe has been performed under three specially designed strain modes. A concise relation of the macroscopic deformation effect on the substitution energy of alloying elements with linear dependences on defect formation volume and relative volume change was found. Based on this concise relationship, the following behaviors can be predicted by comparing defect formation volumes: the strain-induced solubility change of alloying atoms and then the degree or possibility of redistribution and segregation of alloying atoms, the stability transition between monovacancy and divacancy, and self-interstitial atom reorientation under heavy loading.

  13. Stored energy release behaviour of disordered carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, K.; Barat, P.; Sarkar, A.; Mukherjee, P.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    2007-06-01

    The use of graphite as a moderator in a low temperature thermal nuclear reactor is restricted due to accumulation of energy caused by displacement of atoms by neutrons and high energetic particles. Thermal transients may lead to a release of stored energy that may raise the temperature of the fuel clad above the design limit. Disordered carbon is thought to be an alternative choice for this purpose. Two types of disordered carbon composites, namely, CB (made up of 15 wt. % carbon black dispersed in carbonized phenolic resin) and PAN (made up of 20 vol. % chopped polyacrylonitrile carbon fibre dispersed in carbonized phenolic resin matrix) have been irradiated with 145 MeV Ne6+ ions at three fluence levels of 1.0×1013, 5.0×1013 and 1.5×1014 Ne6+/cm2, respectively. The XRD patterns revealed that both the samples remained disordered even after irradiation. The maximum release of stored energy for CB was 212 J/g and that of PAN was 906 J/g. For CB, the release of stored energy was a first order reaction with activation energy of 2.79 eV and a frequency factor of 3.72×1028 per second. 13% of the defects got annealed by heating up to 700 °C. PAN showed a third-order release rate with activation energy of 1.69 eV and a frequency factor of 1.77×1014 per second. 56% of the total defects got annealed by heating it up to 700 °C. CB seems to be the better choice than PAN as it showed less energy release with a slower rate.

  14. Quantifying the energy dissipation of overriding plate deformation in three-dimensional subduction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, João. C.

    2015-01-01

    In a subduction system the force and the energy required to deform the overriding plate are generally thought to come from the negative buoyancy of the subducted slab and its potential energy, respectively. Such deformation might involve extension and back-arc basin formation or shortening and mountain building. How much of the slab's potential energy is consumed during overriding plate deformation remains unknown. In this work, we present dynamic three-dimensional laboratory experiments of progressive subduction with an overriding plate to quantify the force (FOPD) that drives overriding plate deformation and the associated energy dissipation rate (ΦOPD), and we compare them with the negative buoyancy (FBU) of the subducted slab and its total potential energy release rate (ΦBU), respectively. We varied the viscosity ratio between the plates and the sublithospheric upper mantle with ηSP/ηUM = 157-560 and the thickness of the overriding plate with TOP = 0.5-2.5 cm (scaling to 25-125 km in nature). The results show that FOPD/FBU has average values of 0.5-2.0%, with a maximum of 5.3%, and ΦOPD/ΦBU has average values of 0.05-0.30%, with a maximum of 0.41%. The results indicate that only a small portion of the negative buoyancy of the slab and its potential energy are used to deform the overriding plate. Our models also suggest that the force required to deform the overriding plate is of comparable magnitude as the ridge push force. Furthermore, we show that in subduction models with an overriding plate bending dissipation at the subduction zone hinge remains low (3-15% during steady state subduction).

  15. Energy-release rate associated with diffusional crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, T.

    1982-12-01

    A general expression for the energy release rates (G) that arise during steady state crack propagation by diffusion is derived from the standpoint of irreversible thermodynamics. Three contributing components of G are identified: (1) the Griffith energy (G/sub Gr/); (2) heat generated in the process of surface diffusion; and (3) grain-boundary diffusion. Further, the total G is shown to be directly related to the well-known J-integral if formulated in the framework of finite deformation elasticity. This expression for G is valid in general even if the response of the material is not linear and the mass transport kinetics does not follow Fick's law. Quantitative evaluations of each component are made for the linear case where field solutions are available. The results show that component (2) is approximately equal to G/sub Gr/ and is independent of the crack velocity (nu) whereas component (3) is a monotonically increasing function with G starting from 0.85 G/sub Gr/ when nu is at threshold value; and that strain energy contributions can be neglected leading to G = J = (1-..nu../sup 2/)K/sup 2//E. This means that G is not primarily associated with the release of the strain energy; rather, it stems mostly from the negative work done by the normal stresses on the thickening of the grain boundary due to nonuniform deposition of matter along it.

  16. Self-energies on deformed spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, R.; Ilakovac, A.; Trampetić, J.; You, J.

    2013-11-01

    We study one-loop photon (Π) and neutrino (Σ) self-energies in a U(1) covariant gauge-theory on d-dimensional noncommutative spaces determined by a antisymmetric-constant tensor θ μν . For the general fermion-photon ( S f ) and photon self-interaction ( S g ) the closed form results reveal self-energies besetting with all kind of pathological terms: the UV divergence, the quadratic UV/IR mixing terms as well as a logarithmic IR divergent term of the type ln( μ 2( θp)2). In addition, the photon-loop produces new tensor structures satisfying transversality condition by themselves. We show that the photon self-energy in four-dimensional Euclidean space-time can be reduced to two finite terms by imposing a specific full rank of θ μν and setting parameters ( κ f , κ g ) = (0 , 3). In this case the neutrino two-point function vanishes. Thus for a specific point (0 , 3) in the parameter-space ( κ f , κ g ), a covariant θ-exact approach is able to produce a divergence-free result for one-loop quantum corrections, having also well-defined both the commutative limit as well as the pointlike limit of an extended object. While in two-dimensional space the photon self-energy is finite for arbitrary ( κ f , κ g ) combinations, the neutrino self-energy still contains an superficial IR divergence.

  17. Inelastic stress analyses at finite deformation through complementary energy approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.; Reed, K. W.

    1983-01-01

    A new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm, suitable for analyses of large, quasistatic, inelastic deformations, is presented. The algorithm is based upon a generalization of de Veubeke's (1972) complementary energy principle. The principal variables in the formulation are the nominal stress rate and spin, and the resulting finite element equations are discrete versions of the equations of compatibility and angular momentum balance. The algorithm produces true rates, time derivatives, as opposed to 'increments'. There results a boundary value problem (for stress rate and velocity) and an initial value problem (for total stress and deformation). A discussion of the numerical treatment of the boundary value problem is followed by a detailed examination of the numerical treatment of the initial value problem, covering the topics of efficiency, stability, and objectivity. The paper is closed with a set of examples, finite homogeneous deformation problems, which serve to bring out important aspects of the algorithm.

  18. Shock wave compression and release of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Inelastic deformation of c-axis magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J. M.; Renganathan, P.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2015-03-01

    To understand inelastic deformation mechanisms for shocked hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) metals, shock compression and release wave profiles, previously unavailable for hcp single crystals, were measured for c-axis magnesium crystals. The results show that the elastic-inelastic loading response is strongly time-dependent. Measured release wave profiles showed distinct peaked features, which are unusual for inelastic deformation during unloading of shocked metals. Numerical simulations show that pyramidal slip provides a reasonably good description of the inelastic loading response. However, { 10 1 ¯ 2 } twinning is needed to explain the unloading response. The results and analysis presented here provide insight into the relative roles of dislocation slip and deformation twinning in the response of shocked hcp metals.

  19. Capsizing icebergs release earthquake-sized energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-03-01

    A large iceberg can carry a tremendous amount of gravitational potential energy. While all icebergs float with the bulk of their mass submerged beneath the water's surface, some drift around in precarious orientations—they are temporarily stable, but an outside push would send them tumbling over. Large icebergs, like those that split from the Jakobshavn Isbræ glacier in Greenland, can release the energy equivalent to a magnitude 6 or 7 earthquake when they capsize. A 1995 event demonstrated the potential for destruction, as a tsunami spawned from a capsizing iceberg devastated a coastal Greenland community. Measuring how energy is dispersed during capsizing is crucial to understanding the risk associated with these events but is also key to determining their larger role in surface ocean dynamics

  20. An atomistic methodology of energy release rate for graphene at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhen; Lee, James D.; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-03-21

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb architecture, serving as a fundamental building block for electric devices. Understanding the fracture mechanism of graphene under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of graphene-based devices at atomic scale. Although most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable in molecular dynamics simulation, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at nanoscale. This work introduces an atomistic simulation methodology, based on the energy release rate, as a tool to unveil the fracture mechanism of graphene at nanoscale. This methodology can be easily extended to any atomistic material system. We have investigated both opening mode and mixed mode at different temperatures. Simulation results show that the critical energy release rate of graphene is independent of initial crack length at low temperature. Graphene with inclined pre-crack possesses higher fracture strength and fracture deformation but smaller critical energy release rate compared with the graphene with vertical pre-crack. Owing to its anisotropy, graphene with armchair chirality always has greater critical energy release rate than graphene with zigzag chirality. The increase of temperature leads to the reduction of fracture strength, fracture deformation, and the critical energy release rate of graphene. Also, higher temperature brings higher randomness of energy release rate of graphene under a variety of predefined crack lengths. The energy release rate is independent of the strain rate as long as the strain rate is small enough.

  1. Deformation energy of a toroidal nucleus and plane fragmentation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchard, C.; Royer, G.

    1996-02-01

    The path leading to pumpkin-like configurations and toroidal shapes is investigated using a one-parameter shape sequence. The deformation energy is determined within the analytical expressions obtained for the various shape-dependent functions and the generalized rotating liquid drop model taking into account the proximity energy and the temperature. With increasing mass and angular momentum, a potential well appears in the toroidal shape path. For the heaviest systems, the pocket is large and locally favourable with respect to the plane fragmentation barriers which might allow the formation of evanescent toroidal systems which would rapidly decay in several fragments to minimize the surface tension.

  2. A Novel Medial Soft Tissue Release Method for Varus Deformity during Total Knee Arthroplasty: Femoral Origin Release of the Medial Collateral Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Yong-In

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Numerous methods of medial soft tissue release for severe varus deformity during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) have been reported. These include tibial stripping of the superficial medial collateral ligament (MCL), pie-crusting technique, and medial epicondylar osteotomy. However, there are inherent disadvantages in these techniques. Authors hereby present a novel quantitative method: femoral origin release of the medial collateral ligament (FORM). Surgical Technique For medial tightness remaining even after the release of the deep MCL and semimembranosus, the FORM is initiated with identification of the femoral insertion area of the MCL with the knee in flexion. Starting from the most posterior part of the femoral insertion, one third of the MCL femoral insertion is released from its attachment. If necessary, further sequential medial release is performed. Materials and Methods Seventeen knees that underwent the FORM were evaluated for radiological and clinical outcomes. Results Regardless of the extent of the FORM, no knees showed residual valgus instability at 24 weeks after surgery. Conclusions As the FORM is performed in a stepwise manner, fine adjustment during medial release might be beneficial to prevent inadvertent over-release of the medial structures of the knee. PMID:27274473

  3. Boudinage and folding as an energy instability in ductile deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Herwegh, Marco; Paesold, Martin K.; Poulet, Thomas; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Veveakis, Manolis

    2016-05-01

    We present a theory for the onset of localization in layered rate- and temperature-sensitive rocks, in which energy-related mechanical bifurcations lead to localized dissipation patterns in the transient deformation regime. The implementation of the coupled thermomechanical 2-D finite element model comprises an elastic and rate-dependent von Mises plastic rheology. The underlying system of equations is solved in a three-layer pure shear box, for constant velocity and isothermal boundary conditions. To examine the transition from stable to localized creep, we study how material instabilities are related to energy bifurcations, which arise independently of the sign of the stress conditions imposed on opposite boundaries, whether in compression or extension. The onset of localization is controlled by a critical amount of dissipation, termed Gruntfest number, when dissipative work by temperature-sensitive creep translated into heat overcomes the diffusive capacity of the layer. Through an additional mathematical bifurcation analysis using constant stress boundary conditions, we verify that boudinage and folding develop at the same critical Gruntfest number. Since the critical material parameters and boundary conditions for both structures to develop are found to coincide, the initiation of localized deformation in strong layered media within a weaker matrix can be captured by a unified theory for localization in ductile materials. In this energy framework, neither intrinsic nor extrinsic material weaknesses are required, because the nucleation process of strain localization arises out of steady state conditions. This finding allows us to describe boudinage and folding structures as the same energy attractor of ductile deformation.

  4. Early Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Release for Correction of Sagittal Imbalance in Patients with Adult Spinal Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Armen R.; Dakwar, Elias; Ahmadian, Amir; Smith, Donald A.; Uribe, Juan S.

    2012-01-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate a novel surgical technique in the treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis and present our early experience with the minimally invasive lateral approach for anterior longitudinal ligament release to provide lumbar lordosis and examine its impact on sagittal balance. Methods. All patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) treated with the minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas interbody fusion (MIS LIF) for release of the anterior longitudinal ligament were examined. Patient demographics, clinical data, spinopelvic parameters, and outcome measures were recorded. Results. Seven patients underwent release of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALR) to improve sagittal imbalance. All cases were split into anterior and posterior stages, with mean estimated blood loss of 125 cc and 530 cc, respectively. Average hospital stay was 8.3 days, and mean follow-up time was 9.1 months. Comparing pre- and postoperative 36′′ standing X-rays, the authors discovered a mean increase in global lumbar lordosis of 24 degrees, increase in segmental lumbar lordosis of 17 degrees per level of ALL released, decrease in pelvic tilt of 7 degrees, and decrease in sagittal vertical axis of 4.9 cm. At the last followup, there was a mean improvement in VAS and ODI scores of 26.2% and 18.3%. Conclusions. In the authors' early experience, release of the anterior longitudinal ligament using the minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach may be a feasible alternative in correcting sagittal deformity. PMID:23304089

  5. Building an Efficient Model for Afterburn Energy Release

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, S; Kuhl, A; Najjar, F; Tringe, J; McMichael, L; Glascoe, L

    2012-02-03

    Many explosives will release additional energy after detonation as the detonation products mix with the ambient environment. This additional energy release, referred to as afterburn, is due to combustion of undetonated fuel with ambient oxygen. While the detonation energy release occurs on a time scale of microseconds, the afterburn energy release occurs on a time scale of milliseconds with a potentially varying energy release rate depending upon the local temperature and pressure. This afterburn energy release is not accounted for in typical equations of state, such as the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) model, used for modeling the detonation of explosives. Here we construct a straightforward and efficient approach, based on experiments and theory, to account for this additional energy release in a way that is tractable for large finite element fluid-structure problems. Barometric calorimeter experiments have been executed in both nitrogen and air environments to investigate the characteristics of afterburn for C-4 and other materials. These tests, which provide pressure time histories, along with theoretical and analytical solutions provide an engineering basis for modeling afterburn with numerical hydrocodes. It is toward this end that we have constructed a modified JWL equation of state to account for afterburn effects on the response of structures to blast. The modified equation of state includes a two phase afterburn energy release to represent variations in the energy release rate and an afterburn energy cutoff to account for partial reaction of the undetonated fuel.

  6. Cell deformation at the air-liquid interface induces Ca2+-dependent ATP release from lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsingh, Ronaldo; Grygorczyk, Alexandra; Solecki, Anna; Cherkaoui, Lalla Siham; Berthiaume, Yves; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2011-04-01

    Extracellular nucleotides regulate mucociliary clearance in the airways and surfactant secretion in alveoli. Their release is exquisitely mechanosensitive and may be induced by stretch as well as airflow shear stress acting on lung epithelia. We hypothesized that, in addition, tension forces at the air-liquid interface (ALI) may contribute to mechanosensitive ATP release in the lungs. Local depletion of airway surface liquid, mucins, and surfactants, which normally protect epithelial surfaces, facilitate such release and trigger compensatory mucin and fluid secretion processes. In this study, human bronchial epithelial 16HBE14o(-) and alveolar A549 cells were subjected to tension forces at the ALI by passing an air bubble over the cell monolayer in a flow-through chamber, or by air exposure while tilting the cell culture dish. Such stimulation induced significant ATP release not involving cell lysis, as verified by ethidium bromide staining. Confocal fluorescence microscopy disclosed reversible cell deformation in the monolayer part in contact with the ALI. Fura 2 fluorescence imaging revealed transient intracellular Ca(2+) elevation evoked by the ALI, which did not entail nonspecific Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space. ATP release was reduced by ∼40 to ∼90% from cells loaded with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM and was completely abolished by N-ethylmalemide (1 mM). These experiments demonstrate that in close proximity to the ALI, surface tension forces are transmitted directly on cells, causing their mechanical deformation and Ca(2+)-dependent exocytotic ATP release. Such a signaling mechanism may contribute to the detection of local deficiency of airway surface liquid and surfactants on the lung surface. PMID:21239538

  7. Radio Observations of Explosive Energy Releases on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Mukul R.; White, S. M.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter is devoted to a discussion of the radio observations of explosive energy releases (normal flares and small-scale energy releases) on the Sun. Radio imaging observations of solar flares and coronal transients and the relationship of radio phenomena with those observed in hard and soft X-rays and underlying physics are discussed.

  8. Plastic deformation enabled energy dissipation in a bionanowire structured armor.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoze; Yue, Yonghai; Han, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaodong

    2014-05-14

    It has been challenging to simultaneously achieve high strength and toughness in engineered materials because of the trade-off relation between the two distinct properties. Nature, however, has elegantly solved this problem. Seashells, commonly referred to as nature's armors, exhibit an unusual resilience against predatory attacks. In this letter, we report an unexpected phenomenon in a bionanowire structured armor-conch shell where the shell's basic building blocks, i.e., the third-order lamellae, exhibit an exceptional plasticity with a maximum strain of 0.7% upon mechanical loading. We attribute such a plastic deformation behavior to the lamella's unique nanoparticle-biopolymer architecture, in which the biopolymer mediates the rotation of aragonite nanoparticles in response to external attacks. We also found that electron beam irradiation facilitates the lamella's plasticity. These findings advance our understanding of seashell's energy dissipating strategy and provide new design guidelines for developing high performance bioinspired materials and sensors. PMID:24745628

  9. Energy monitoring and analysis during deformation of bedded-sandstone: use of acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Wasantha, P L P; Ranjith, P G; Shao, S S

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the mechanical behaviour and energy releasing characteristics of bedded-sandstone with bedding layers in different orientations, under uniaxial compression. Cylindrical sandstone specimens (54 mm diameter and 108 mm height) with bedding layers inclined at angles of 10°, 20°, 35°, 55°, and 83° to the minor principal stress direction, were produced to perform a series of Uniaxial Compressive Strength (UCS) tests. One of the two identical sample sets was fully-saturated with water before testing and the other set was tested under dry conditions. An acoustic emission system was employed in all the testing to monitor the acoustic energy release during the whole deformation process of specimens. From the test results, the critical joint orientation was observed as 55° for both dry and saturated samples and the peak-strength losses due to water were 15.56%, 20.06%, 13.5%, 13.2%, and 13.52% for the bedding orientations 10°, 20°, 35°, 55°, and 83°, respectively. The failure mechanisms for the specimens with bedding layers in 10°, 20° orientations showed splitting type failure, while the specimens with bedding layers in 55°, 83° orientations were failed by sliding along a weaker bedding layer. The failure mechanism for the specimens with bedding layers in 35° orientation showed a mixed failure mode of both splitting and sliding types. Analysis of the acoustic energy, captured from the acoustic emission detection system, revealed that the acoustic energy release is considerably higher in dry specimens than that of the saturated specimens at any bedding orientation. In addition, higher energy release was observed for specimens with bedding layers oriented in shallow angles (which were undergoing splitting type failures), whereas specimens with steeply oriented bedding layers (which were undergoing sliding type failures) showed a comparatively less energy release under both dry and saturated conditions. Moreover, a considerable amount of

  10. Defect initiation/growth and energy dissipation induced by deformation and fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Based on our capabilities to (1) detect and characterize particle release from surfaces on fast time scales, (2) to measure rapid electrical transients, and (3) to obtain high resolution topographical information utilizing scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy, we present new results on the time sequence of events leading up to defect initiation and growth which ultimately leads to fracture. We employ dynamic methods as well as post-fracture examination in polymers, ceramics, metals, and interfaces. We emphasize mechanisms, with interpretation and connections between these results and the creation and evolution of defects in materials under mechanical stress. In many cases, the information we are acquiring has important implications concerning dissipation of energy (e.g., plastic deformation, microcracking, crack branching, and crack deflection) which play critical roles in controlling the strength and toughness of materials.

  11. Energy Information Administration new releases. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This publication of the National Energy Information Center contains news items and information sources related primarily to electricity generation. News items reported on in this issue include utility compliance costs for the Clean Air Act, 1995 profits for major energy companies, and competition issues in the electric power and natural gas industries. A summary report on crude oil prices is also presented. Other information provided includes a listing of 1996 publications from the center, electronic information services, and energy data information contacts.

  12. Rate of energy release and crack initiation directions for laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Debasish

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the mechanical behavior of composite materials and structures under monotonic and dynamic loads for damage is a vast and complex area of research. The modeling of the physical phenomena of different characteristic behavior of a composite material during deformation plays an important role in the structural design. Our study aims to analyze numerically the energy release rate G of a composite laminated plate glass/epoxy cross [+α, α] in the presence of a crack between two circular notches in effect several parameters such as fiber orientation α, the orientation of the crack orientation β, γ considered two circular notches and the effects of several parameters.

  13. Elastic energy release in great earthquakes and eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2014-05-01

    The sizes of earthquakes are measured using well-defined, measurable quantities such as seismic moment and released (transformed) elastic energy. No similar measures exist for the sizes of volcanic eruptions, making it difficult to compare the energies released in earthquakes and eruptions. Here I provide a new measure of the elastic energy (the potential mechanical energy) associated with magma chamber rupture and contraction (shrinkage) during an eruption. For earthquakes and eruptions, elastic energy derives from two sources: (1) the strain energy stored in the volcano/fault zone before rupture, and (2) the external applied load (force, pressure, stress, displacement) on the volcano/fault zone. From thermodynamic considerations it follows that the elastic energy released or transformed (dU) during an eruption is directly proportional to the excess pressure (pe) in the magma chamber at the time of rupture multiplied by the volume decrease (-dVc) of the chamber, so that . This formula can be used as a basis for a new eruption magnitude scale, based on elastic energy released, which can be related to the moment-magnitude scale for earthquakes. For very large eruptions (>100 km3), the volume of the feeder-dike is negligible, so that the decrease in chamber volume during an eruption corresponds roughly to the associated volume of erupted materials , so that the elastic energy is . Using a typical excess pressures of 5 MPa, it is shown that the largest known eruptions on Earth, such as the explosive La Garita Caldera eruption (27-28 million years ago) and largest single (effusive) Colombia River basalt lava flows (15-16 million years ago), both of which have estimated volumes of about 5000 km3, released elastic energy of the order of 10EJ. For comparison, the seismic moment of the largest earthquake ever recorded, the M9.5 1960 Chile earthquake, is estimated at 100 ZJ and the associated elastic energy release at 10EJ.

  14. TES (Thermal Energy Storage) Video News Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    TES is an in-space technology experiment that flew on STS-62. Its intent is to investigate the behavior of two different thermal energy storage materials as they undergo repeated melting and freezing in the microgravity environment.

  15. Biaxial deformation of a polymer under shear: NMR test of the Doi-Edwards model with convected constraint release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Ryan J.; Kilfoil, Maria L.; Callaghan, Paul T.

    2001-11-01

    2H NMR quadrupole interaction spectroscopy has been used to measure the deformation of a 670 kD poly(dimethylsiloxane) melt under shear in a Couette cell. The signals were acquired from a per deuterated benzene probe molecule which provides a motionally averaged sampling of the entire segmental ensemble. We have measured the dependence on shear rate of the SXX (velocity), SYY (velocity gradient), SZZ (vorticity), and SXY (shear) elements of the segmental alignment tensor, as well as the angular dependence of the deuterium quadrupole splitting at fixed shear rate. We show that the data agree quite well with the Doi-Edwards theory but significantly better when convected constraint release effects are included. These fits return a value for the tube disengagement time of 100 ms.

  16. Deformation luminescence produced during application and release of pressure on to gamma-irradiated CaF2:RE crystals.

    PubMed

    Kher, R S; Brahme, N; Banerjee, M; Dhoble, S J; Khokhar, M S K

    2006-01-01

    Calcium fluoride CaF2 is an interesting host lattice for rare earth (RE) activators. CaF2 crystals doped with different concentrations of Dy, Ce, Er and Gd have been grown by the Bridgman technique and their deformation luminescence (DL) induced by room temperature gamma irradiation has been recorded. When a uniaxial pressure is applied on to gamma-irradiated CaF2:RE crystals, initially the DL intensity increases with time, attains a maximum value and then it decreases with time. Although the DL intensity produced during the release of pressure is less, its rise and decay behaviours are similar to that obtained during the application of pressure. The DL intensity depends on dopant, concentration of dopant, irradiation doses and mass of the load or applied pressure. It is suggested that the moving dislocation produced during deformation of crystals capture holes from hole trapped centres (like perturbed Vk centre) and the subsequent radiative recombination of the dislocation holes with electrons give rise to DL. PMID:16698970

  17. Regional analysis of earthquake occurrence and seismic energy release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The historic temporal variation in earthquake occurrence and seismic energy release on a regional basis throughtout the world were studied. The regionalization scheme employed divided the world into large areas based either on seismic and tectonic considerations (Flinn-Engdahl Scheme) or geographic (longitude and latitude) criteria. The data set is the wide earthquake catalog of the National Geophysical Solar-Terrestrial Data Center. An apparent relationship exists between the maximum energy released in a limited time within a seismic region and the average or background energy per year averaged over a long time period. In terms of average or peak energy release, the most seismic regions of the world during the 50 to 81 year period ending in 1977 were Japanese, Andean South American, and the Alaska-Aleutian Arc regions. The year to year fluctuations in regional seismic energy release are greater, by orders of magnitude, than the corresponding variations in the world-wide seismic energy release. The b values of seismic regions range from 0.7 to 1.4 where earthquake magnitude is in the range 6.0 to 7.5.

  18. Energy Information Administration New Releases, July--August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobus, P.; Springer, I.

    1990-09-01

    New Releases'' is Energy Information Administration's news letter, which reports its activities, publications, and machine-readable data files and modeling programs. For each publication or report, an abstract, subscription price, availability, and other bibliographical information are included. It covers crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves, coal, electricity, nuclear fuel, renewable energy and conservation, and petroleum. Order forms are also provided.

  19. Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Green, H.J. ); Guenther, P.R. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Strain energy release rate distributions for double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A 24-ply composite double cantilever-beam specimen under mode I (opening) loading has been analyzed by a 3D FEM code that calculated along a straight delamination starter for several different specimen materials. An isotropic specimen was found to have a strain-energy release rate distribution which varied along its delamination front due to the boundary-layer effect and another effect associated with the anticlastic curvature of the bent specimen arms. A 0-deg graphite-reinforced epoxy specimen had a nearly-uniform strain-energy release rate distribution which dropped only near the edge, due to the boundary-layer effect, and a +/- 45-deg graphite/epoxy specimen exhibited a pronounced strain-energy release rate variation across the specimen width.

  1. Energy released at Teide Volcano,Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, D. L.; Perez, N. M.; Marrero, R.

    2003-12-01

    Teide volcano (3715 m high) is located at the northern scarp of the Las Ca¤adas caldera, a large depression at the center of Tenerife Island. Las Ca¤adas has been produced by multiple episodes of caldera collapse and giant landslides. The basanite-phonolite magmatic system associated with Teide volcano is emitting gases that reach the summit producing weak fumaroles. The chemical composition of these fumaroles and the flux of diffuse soil CO2 degassing at the summit cone (0.5 km2) has been used to determine the energy released as passive degassing in this volcano. Previous investigations show that Teide's summit is emitting 400 tons m2 day-1 of CO2 to the atmosphere. The composition of CH4, CO2, CO, and H2O indicate a chemical equilibrium temperature of 234° C and 75% condensation of water vapor within the volcanic edifice (Chiodini and Marini, 1998). The composition of the gases before condensation was restored and assumed to represent the composition at the equilibrium zone. The energy stored by the gases at the equilibration zone is assumed to be released as the gases move towards the discharge zone. The following processes are considered: change in pressure and temperature for water from the equilibration zone to the zone of condensation, latent heat released during the water condensation process, cooling of the condensed water from the condensation temperature to ambient temperature, and change of pressure and temperature for CO2 from the equilibrium to the discharge zone. Thermodynamic calculations of the energy released in each one of these processes indicate that 144 MW are released at Teide. Energy flux is 288 MW m-2. Most of this energy is released during the condensation process. This energy output compares with other hydrothermal systems of the world. These results show that during periods of passive degassing, fumarolic activity is limited by the geometry and elevation of the volcanic structure and the internal thermodynamic conditions.

  2. Triggered energy releases in solid hydrogen hosts containing unpaired atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.W.; Fearon, E.M.; Maienschein, J.L.; Mapoles, E.R.; Tsugawa, R.T.; Souers, P.C. ); Gaines, J.R. )

    1990-07-23

    We have observed both triggered and spontaneous energy releases in tritiated solid hydrogens at temperatures above 1.2 K in several different experiments. These energy releases, which can be triggered by a temperature increase, were observed by monitoring the temperature excursion ( heat spike'') versus time, the atom spin density, and nuclear-magnetic-resonance signal heights. The heat spikes correlate with a disappearance of free-atom spin density so that fast atomic recombination is the probable cause. The spontaneous heat spikes may be suppressed by improved heat extraction.

  3. Fragmentation of water by ion impact: Kinetic energy release spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput, Jyoti; Safvan, C. P.

    2011-11-15

    The fragmentation of isolated water molecules on collision with 450-keV Ar{sup 9+} has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry employing multihit detection. The kinetic energy release spectrum for the dissociation of [H{sub 2}O]{sup 2+ White-Star} into (H{sup White-Star },H{sup +},O{sup +}) fragments has been measured where H{sup White-Star} is a neutral Rydberg hydrogen atom. Ab initio calculations are carried out for the lowest states of [H{sub 2}O]{sup q+} with q=2 and 3 to help interpret the kinetic energy release spectra.

  4. Fracture patterns and the energy release rate of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-03-01

    Phosphorene, also known as monolayer black phosphorus, has been enjoying popularity in electronic devices due to its superior electrical properties. However, it's relatively low Young's modulus, low fracture strength and susceptibility to structural failure have limited its application in mechanical devices. Therefore, in order to design more mechanically reliable devices that utilize phosphorene, it is necessary to explore the fracture patterns and energy release rate of phosphorene. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate phosphorene's fracture mechanism. The results indicate that fracture under uniaxial tension along the armchair direction is attributed to a break in the interlayer bond angles, while failure in the zigzag direction is triggered by the break in both intra-layer angles and bonds. Furthermore, we developed a modified Griffith criterion to analyze the energy release rate of phosphorene and its dependence on the strain rates and orientations of cracks. Simulation results indicate that phosphorene's energy release rate remains almost unchanged in the armchair direction while it fluctuates intensively in the zigzag direction. Additionally, the strain rate was found to play a negligible role in the energy release rate. The geometrical factor α in the Griffith's criterion is almost constant when the crack orientation is smaller than 45 degree, regardless of the crack orientation and loading direction. Overall, these findings provide helpful insights into the mechanical properties and failure behavior of phosphorene. PMID:26902970

  5. Energy Information Administration (EIA) new releases, January--February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-03-01

    This report is the Jan-Feb 1994 issue of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) New Releases publication. Highlighted articles include: efficiency gains slow growth in U.S. energy demand, dependency on oil imports continues to climb; new EIA report details status of U.S. coal industry; EIA assesses residential vehicle fuel consumption in the U.S.; EIA plans new survey on alternative-fuel vehicles.

  6. Madelung Deformity.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2015-10-01

    Madelung deformity of the wrist is more common in females and is often associated with Leri Weill dyschondrosteosis, a mesomelic form of dwarfism. Patients with Madelung deformity often report wrist deformity resulting from the prominence of the relatively long ulna. The typical Madelung deformity is associated with a Vickers ligament that creates a tether across the volar-ulnar radial physis that restricts growth across this segment. The distal radius deforms in the coronal (increasing radial inclination) and the sagittal (increasing volar tilt) planes. There is lunate subsidence and the proximal carpal row adapts to the deformity by forming an upside-down pyramid shape or triangle. Treatment depends on the age at presentation, degree of deformity, and magnitude of symptoms. Mild asymptomatic deformity warrants a period of nonsurgical management with serial x-ray examinations because the natural history is unpredictable. Many patients never require surgical intervention. Progressive deformity in the young child with considerable growth potential remaining requires release of Vickers ligament and radial physiolysis to prevent ongoing deterioration Concomitant ulnar epiphysiodesis may be necessary. Advanced asymptomatic deformity in older children with an unacceptable-appearing wrist or symptomatic deformity are indications for surgery. A dome osteotomy of the radius allows 3-dimensional correction of the deformity. Positive radiographic and clinical results after dome osteotomy have been reported. PMID:26341718

  7. An experimental investigation of energy absorption in TRIP steel under impact three-point bending deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is nowadays in widespread use in the automobile industry because of their favorable mechanical properties such as high strength, excellent formability and toughness because of strain-induced martensitic transformation. Moreover, when TRIP steel is applied to the components of the vehicles, it is expected that huge amount of kinetic energy will be absorbed into both plastic deformation and martensitic transformation during the collision. Basically, bending deformation due to buckling is one of the major crash deformation modes of automobile structures. Thus, an investigation of energy absorption during bending deformation at high impact velocity for TRIP steel is indispensable. Although TRIP steel have particularly attracted the recent interest of the scientific community, just few studies can be found on the energy absorption characteristic of TRIP steel, especially at impact loading condition. In present study, experimental investigations of bending deformation behaviors of TRIP steel are conducted in the three-point bending tests for both smooth and pre-cracked specimen. Then, energy absorption characteristic during plastic deformation and fracture process at high impact velocity in TRIP steel will be discussed.

  8. Coronal Energy Release via Explosive Three-Dimensional Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2003-05-01

    It is widely believed that most coronal phenomena involve the release of magnetic free energy that is stored within stressed magnetic field configurations. The availability of sufficient free energy to explain everything from coronal heating to flares and coronal mass ejections is well established, but how this energy is released remains a major puzzle. Observations reveal that an important property of the energy release mechanism is its ``switch on" character. The mechanism must remain dormant for long periods of time to allow the magnetic stresses build, then it must operate very vigorously once it finally turns on. We discuss a mechanism called the ``secondary instability" which exhibits this behavior. It is essentially the ideal kinking of thin twisted magnetic flux tubes that form from the resistive instability of current sheets. We relate the mechanism to the coronal heating idea of Parker in which the coronal magnetic field becomes tangled by random motions of the photospheric footpoints. Global energy balance considerations imply that magnetic energy dissipation occurs at a particular angle in the field, and the secondary instability offers the first quantitative explanation for why this should be. It thus places Parker's popular idea on a much firmer physical footing. This research was funded by NASA.

  9. Magnetic energy release and topology in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Janvier, Miho

    2016-07-01

    The energy released in a wide range of atmospheric events in the Sun is contained in current-carrying magnetic fields that have emerged after traversing the convection zone. Once the magnetic flux reaches the solar atmosphere, it may be further stressed via motions at the photosphere. Magnetic field reconnection is thought to be the mechanism through which the stored magnetic energy is transformed into kinetic energy of accelerated particles, mass flows, and radiative energy along the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Though this mechanism is efficient only at very small spatial scales, it implies a large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field inferred from the analysis of observations, models of the coronal magnetic field and numerical simulations, combined with the computation of the magnetic field topology. The consequences of energy release include phenomena that range from nano-flares and the slow solar wind to powerful flares that may be accompanied by the ejection of large amounts of plasma into the interplanetary medium. We will discuss how the computation and analysis of the magnetic field topology, applied to a wide variety of observed and modeled magnetic configurations, can be used to identify the energy release locations and their physical characteristics.

  10. DEM code-based modeling of energy accumulation and release in structurally heterogeneous rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrikov, S. V.; Revuzhenko, A. F.

    2015-10-01

    Based on discrete element method, the authors model loading of a physical specimen to describe its capacity to accumulate and release elastic energy. The specimen is modeled as a packing of particles with viscoelastic coupling and friction. The external elastic boundary of the packing is represented by particles connected by elastic springs. The latter means introduction of an additional special potential of interaction between the boundary particles, that exercises effect even when there is no direct contact between the particles. On the whole, the model specimen represents an element of a medium capable of accumulation of deformation energy in the form of internal stresses. The data of the numerical modeling of the physical specimen compression and the laboratory testing results show good qualitative consistency.

  11. Magnetic Reconnection Onset and Energy Release at Current Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2015-04-01

    Reconnection and energy release at current sheets are important at the Sun (coronal heating, coronal mass ejections, flares, and jets) and at the Earth (magnetopause flux transfer events and magnetotail substorms) and other magnetized planets, and occur also at the interface between the Heliosphere and the interstellar medium, the heliopause. The consequences range from relatively quiescent heating of the ambient plasma to highly explosive releases of energy and accelerated particles. We use the Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver (ARMS) model to investigate the self-consistent formation and reconnection of current sheets in an initially potential 2D magnetic field containing a magnetic null point. Unequal stresses applied to the four quadrants bounded by the X-line separatrix distort the potential null into a double-Y-type current sheet. We find that this distortion eventually leads to onset of fast magnetic reconnection across the sheet, with copious production, merging, and ejection of magnetic islands due to plasmoid instability. In the absence of a mechanism for ideal instability or loss of equilibrium of the global structure, however, this reconnection leads to minimal energy release. Essentially, the current sheet oscillates about its force-free equilibrium configuration. When the structure is susceptible to a large-scale rearrangement of the magnetic field, on the other hand, the energy release becomes explosive. We identify the conditions required for reconnection to transform rapidly a large fraction of the magnetic free energy into kinetic and other forms of plasma energy, and to restructure the current sheet and its surrounding magnetic field dramatically. We discuss the implications of our results for understanding heliophysical activity, particularly eruptions, flares, and jets in the corona.Our research was supported by NASA’s Heliophysics Supporting Research and Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology programs.

  12. Cosmic ray spectral deformation caused by energy determination errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Per; Wannemark, Conny

    2005-08-01

    Using simulation methods, distortion effects on energy spectra caused by errors in the energy determination have been investigated. For cosmic ray proton spectra falling steeply with kinetic energy E as E-2.7, significant effects appear. When magnetic spectrometers are used to determine the energy, the relative error increases linearly with the energy and distortions with a sinusoidal form appear starting at an energy that depends significantly on the error distribution but at an energy lower than that corresponding to the maximum detectable rigidity of the spectrometer. The effect should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different experiments, often having different error distributions.

  13. Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Early Release: Summary of Two Cases

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration provides a long-term outlook for energy supply, demand, and prices in its Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). This outlook is centered on the Reference case, which is not a prediction of what will happen, but rather a modeled projection of what might happen given certain assumptions and methodologies. Today, EIA released an annotated summary of the AEO2016 Reference Case—which includes the Clean Power Plan—and a side case without the Clean Power Plan.

  14. The Role of Compressibility in Energy Release by Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Borovosky, J. E.; Hesse, M.

    2012-01-01

    Using resistive compressible magnetohydrodynamics, we investigate the energy release and transfer by magnetic reconnection in finite (closed or periodic) systems. The emphasis is on the magnitude of energy released and transferred to plasma heating in configurations that range from highly compressible to incompressible, based on the magnitude of the background beta (ratio of plasma pressure over magnetic pressure) and of a guide field in two-dimensional reconnection. As expected, the system becomes more incompressible, and the role of compressional heating diminishes, with increasing beta or increasing guide field. Nevertheless, compressional heating may dominate over Joule heating for values of the guide field of 2 or 3 (in relation to the reconnecting magnetic field component) and beta of 5-10. This result stems from the strong localization of the dissipation near the reconnection site, which is modeled based on particle simulation results. Imposing uniform resistivity, corresponding to a Lundquist number of 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4), leads to significantly larger Ohmic heating. Increasing incompressibility greatly reduces the magnetic flux transfer and the amount of energy released, from approx. 10% of the energy associated with the reconnecting field component, for zero guide field and low beta, to approx. 0.2%-0.4% for large values of the guide field B(sub y0) > 5 or large beta. The results demonstrate the importance of taking into account plasma compressibility and localization of dissipation in investigations of heating by turbulent reconnection, possibly relevant for solar wind or coronal heating.

  15. CMB spectral distortions and energy release in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the spectral deviation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the blackbody spectrum has become a focus of attention as a probe of the thermal history of the Universe. It has been more than 20 years since COBE/FIRAS's measurement, which showed excellent agreement between the CMB spectrum and a perfect blackbody spectrum. Significant developments in the technology since then have allowed us to improve the sensitivity of the absolute spectrum measurement by a factor of {˜ }10^4. Therefore, the physics related to the generation of CMB spectral distortions should now be investigated in greater detail. To probe the physics in the early universe and to open an observational window for new physics, various energy release mechanisms both in and beyond standard cosmology need to be studied. In this paper, we provide a review of the physics of CMB distortions and the energy release that creates CMB distortions in the early universe.

  16. Fracture patterns and the energy release rate of phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-03-01

    Phosphorene, also known as monolayer black phosphorus, has been enjoying popularity in electronic devices due to its superior electrical properties. However, it's relatively low Young's modulus, low fracture strength and susceptibility to structural failure have limited its application in mechanical devices. Therefore, in order to design more mechanically reliable devices that utilize phosphorene, it is necessary to explore the fracture patterns and energy release rate of phosphorene. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate phosphorene's fracture mechanism. The results indicate that fracture under uniaxial tension along the armchair direction is attributed to a break in the interlayer bond angles, while failure in the zigzag direction is triggered by the break in both intra-layer angles and bonds. Furthermore, we developed a modified Griffith criterion to analyze the energy release rate of phosphorene and its dependence on the strain rates and orientations of cracks. Simulation results indicate that phosphorene's energy release rate remains almost unchanged in the armchair direction while it fluctuates intensively in the zigzag direction. Additionally, the strain rate was found to play a negligible role in the energy release rate. The geometrical factor α in the Griffith's criterion is almost constant when the crack orientation is smaller than 45 degree, regardless of the crack orientation and loading direction. Overall, these findings provide helpful insights into the mechanical properties and failure behavior of phosphorene.Phosphorene, also known as monolayer black phosphorus, has been enjoying popularity in electronic devices due to its superior electrical properties. However, it's relatively low Young's modulus, low fracture strength and susceptibility to structural failure have limited its application in mechanical devices. Therefore, in order to design more mechanically reliable devices that utilize phosphorene, it is

  17. Partitioning of Initial Energy Release in a Tunnel Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felts, Joshua; Lee, Richard; Mychajlonka, Kyle; Davis, Andy

    2015-06-01

    After the detonation of an explosive charge in the closed end of a tunnel, the products and excess fuels mix and partially combust with the available air before expanding down the tunnel. Both the energy of the detonation and from the combustion of the products and excess fuels drive the blast wave. The energy of the blast wave was calculated for several explosives in a small-scale tunnel. The calculations were performed using the methodology of Hutchens, which is an adaptation of the classical approach of Taylor and Sedov. For similarly sized explosives, the detonation energy was measured using a detonation calorimeter. The difference in the initial energy release of the tunnel with that of the calorimeter is the energy from the initial partial combustion of the detonation products and excess fuels in the explosive formulation. This difference is related to the explosive formulations and can be interpolated for new formulations. This relationship can guide new formulation development for use in a tunnel environment. Knowledge of the initial energy release partitioning can lead to better computer models for fuel-rich explosives.

  18. Effect of deformations on the binding energy of centrally depressed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; Ellithi, A. Y.; Adel, A.; Abdulghany, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    The energy density formalism is implemented to study the binding energy of some heavy, superheavy and hyperheavy nuclei. The macroscopic contribution of binding energy is derived in the presence of a depression parameter in the nuclear density distribution, and the total energy is obtained by adding the shell and pairing correction to the macroscopic part. Total energy is studied with the variation of quadrupole {{β }2} and hexadecapole {{β }4} deformation parameters using different values of depression parameter. The addition of the shell and pairing corrections affects the behavior of the total energy especially the minimum position at specific deformation parameters, a second minimum in some cases are close to the first one, suggesting the possible existence of shape isomers. We minimized the total energy with respect to deformation and density depression parameters and obtained the binding energy of 208Pb, 238U, 252Cf, 280Cn, 285-289Fl, 298Fl, 306120, 320126, 339136, 500174 and 700226. The binding energies obtained are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The difference between the binding energies obtained by this simple method and experimental ones is less than 0.13%.

  19. Energy released by the interaction of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Comparisons between coronal spectroheliograms and photospheric magnetograms are presented to support the idea that as coronal magnetic fields interact, a process of field-line reconnection usually takes place as a natural way of preventing magnetic stresses from building up in the lower corona. This suggests that the energy which would have been stored in stressed fields is continuously released as kinetic energy of material being driven aside to make way for the reconnecting fields. However, this kinetic energy is negligible compared with the thermal energy of the coronal plasma. Therefore, it appears that these slow adjustments of coronal magnetic fields cannot account for even the normal heating of the corona, much less the energetic events associated with solar flares.

  20. Energy and the Confused Student V: The Energy/Momentum Approach to Problems Involving Rotating and Deformable Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, John W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Energy is a critical concept in physics problem-solving, but is often a major source of confusion for students if the presentation is not carefully crafted by the instructor or the textbook. A common approach to problems involving deformable or rotating systems that has been discussed in the literature is to employ the work-kinetic energy theorem…

  1. Effect of surface energy on size-dependent deformation twinning of defect-free Au nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byungil; Kang, Mijeong; Lee, Subin; Weinberger, Christopher R; Loya, Phillip; Lou, Jun; Oh, Sang Ho; Kim, Bongsoo; Han, Seung Min

    2015-10-14

    In this study, we report the size-dependent transition of deformation twinning studied using in situ SEM/TEM tensile testing of defect-free [110] Au nanowires/ribbons with controlled geometry. The critical dimension below which the ordinary plasticity transits to deformation twinning is experimentally determined to be ∼170 nm for Au nanowires with equilateral cross-sections. Nanoribbons with a fixed thickness but increased width-to-thickness ratios (9 : 1) were also studied to show that an increase in the surface energy due to the crystal re-orientation suppresses the deformation twinning. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that the transition from partial dislocation mediated plasticity to perfect dislocation plasticity with increase in the width-to-thickness ratio is due to the effect of the surface energy. PMID:26350050

  2. Global calculations of microscopic energies and nuclear deformations: Isospin dependence of the spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhe-Ying; Qi, Chong; Wyss, Ramon; Liu, Hong-Liang

    2015-08-01

    Background: The deviation between different model calculations that may occur when one goes toward regions where the masses are unknown is getting increased attention. This is related to the uncertainties of the different models which may have not been fully understood. Purpose: To explore in detail the effect of the isospin dependence of the spin-orbital force in the Woods-Saxon potential on global binding energy and deformation calculations. Method: The microscopic energies and nuclear deformations of about 1850 even-even nuclei are calculated systematically within the macroscopic-microscopic framework using three Woods-Saxon parametrizations, with different isospin dependencies, which were constructed mainly for nuclear spectroscopy calculations. Calculations are performed in the deformation space (β2,γ ,β4) . Both the monopole and doubly stretched quadrupole interactions are considered for the pairing channel. Results: The ground-state deformations obtained by the three calculations are quite similar to each other. Large differences are seen mainly in neutron-rich nuclei and in superheavy nuclei. Systematic calculations on the shape-coexisting second minima are also presented. As for the microscopic energies of the ground states, the results are also very close to each other. Only in a few cases the difference is larger than 2 MeV. The total binding energy is estimated by adding the macroscopic energy provided by the usual liquid drop model with its parameters fitted through the least square root and minimax criteria. Calculations are also compared with the results of other macroscopic-microscopic mass models. Conclusions: All the three calculations give similar values for the deformations, microscopic energies, and binding energies of most nuclei. One may expect to have a better understanding of the isospin dependence of the spin-orbital force with more data on proton- and neutron-rich nuclei.

  3. Effect of surface energy on size-dependent deformation twinning of defect-free Au nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Byungil; Kang, Mijeong; Lee, Subin; Weinberger, Christopher R.; Loya, Phillip; Lou, Jun; Oh, Sang Ho; Kim, Bongsoo; Han, Seung Min

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we report the size-dependent transition of deformation twinning studied using in situ SEM/TEM tensile testing of defect-free [110] Au nanowires/ribbons with controlled geometry. The critical dimension below which the ordinary plasticity transits to deformation twinning is experimentally determined to be ~170 nm for Au nanowires with equilateral cross-sections. Nanoribbons with a fixed thickness but increased width-to-thickness ratios (9 : 1) were also studied to show that an increase in the surface energy due to the crystal re-orientation suppresses the deformation twinning. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that the transition from partial dislocation mediated plasticity to perfect dislocation plasticity with increase in the width-to-thickness ratio is due to the effect of the surface energy.In this study, we report the size-dependent transition of deformation twinning studied using in situ SEM/TEM tensile testing of defect-free [110] Au nanowires/ribbons with controlled geometry. The critical dimension below which the ordinary plasticity transits to deformation twinning is experimentally determined to be ~170 nm for Au nanowires with equilateral cross-sections. Nanoribbons with a fixed thickness but increased width-to-thickness ratios (9 : 1) were also studied to show that an increase in the surface energy due to the crystal re-orientation suppresses the deformation twinning. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that the transition from partial dislocation mediated plasticity to perfect dislocation plasticity with increase in the width-to-thickness ratio is due to the effect of the surface energy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03902a

  4. Explosive Products EOS: Adjustment for detonation speed and energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-05

    Propagating detonation waves exhibit a curvature effect in which the detonation speed decreases with increasing front curvature. The curvature effect is due to the width of the wave profile. Numerically, the wave profile depends on resolution. With coarse resolution, the wave width is too large and results in a curvature effect that is too large. Consequently, the detonation speed decreases as the cell size is increased. We propose a modification to the products equation of state (EOS) to compensate for the effect of numerical resolution; i.e., to increase the CJ pressure in order that a simulation propagates a detonation wave with a speed that is on average correct. The EOS modification also adjusts the release isentrope to correct the energy release.

  5. Roles of deformation and orientation in heavy-ion collisions induced by light deformed nuclei at intermediate energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, X. G.; Zhang, G. Q.; Cai, X. Z.; Ma, Y. G.; Guo, W.; Chen, J. G.; Tian, W. D.; Fang, D. Q.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-06-15

    The reaction dynamics of axisymmetric deformed {sup 24}Mg+{sup 24}Mg collisions has been investigated systematically by an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. It is found that different deformations and orientations result in apparently different properties of reaction dynamics. We reveal that some observables such as nuclear stopping power (R), multiplicity of fragments, and elliptic flow are very sensitive to the initial deformations and orientations. There exists an eccentricity scaling of elliptic flow in central body-body collisions with different deformations. In addition, the tip-tip and body-body configurations turn out to be two extreme cases in central reaction dynamical process.

  6. Trans-reflection thermal driven deformable mirror with flexible bonding in high energy laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xingkun; Huang, Lei; Gong, Mali; Xue, Qiao

    2014-09-01

    Deformable mirrors used in high energy laser system suffer from problems like the stress from adhesive solidification or the relatively expensive unit price of piezoceramic actuator. The thermal driven deformable mirror (TDDM) investigated here provided a promising prospect to solve these problems. Four scenarios of TDDM were studied and compared. Results showed that the trans-reflection TDDM with flexible bonding best met the requirement in practical use. The flexible bonding excluded the stress problem in the solidification of adhesives, trans-reflection brought about enough correction range, and the choice of thermo-electric cooler as actuator could greatly bring down the cost of adaptive optics apparatus as well.

  7. Nuclear-deformation energies according to a liquid-drop model with a sharp surface

    SciTech Connect

    Blocki, J.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1982-05-01

    We present an atlas of 665 deformation-energy maps and 150 maps of other properties of interest, relevant for nuclear systems idealized as uniformly charged drops endowed with a surface tension. The nuclear shapes are parametrized in terms of two spheres modified by a smoothly fitted quadratic surface of revolution and are specified by three variables: asymmetry, sphere separation, and a neck variable (that goes over into a fragment-deformation variable after scission). The maps and related tables should be useful for the study of macroscopic aspects of nuclear fission and of collisions between any two nuclei in the periodic table.

  8. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF WEAK ENERGY RELEASES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Barve, Indrajit V.; Beeharry, G. K.; Rajasekara, G. N.

    2010-08-10

    We report observations of weak, circularly polarized, structureless type III bursts from the solar corona in the absence of H{alpha}/X-ray flares and other related activity, during the minimum between the sunspot cycles 23 and 24. The spectral information about the event obtained with the CALLISTO spectrograph at Mauritius revealed that the drift rate of the burst is {approx}-30 MHz s{sup -1} is in the range 50-120 MHz. Two-dimensional imaging observations of the burst at 77 MHz obtained with the Gauribidanur radioheliograph indicate that the emission region was located at a radial distance of {approx}1.5 R{sub sun} in the solar atmosphere. The estimated peak brightness temperature of the burst at 77 MHz is {approx}10{sup 8} K. We derived the average magnetic field at the aforementioned location of the burst using the one-dimensional (east-west) Gauribidanur radio polarimeter at 77 MHz, and the value is {approx}2.5 {+-} 0.2 G. We also estimated the total energy of the non-thermal electrons responsible for the observed burst as {approx}1.1 x 10{sup 24} erg. This is low compared to the energy of the weakest hard X-ray microflares reported in the literature, which is about {approx}10{sup 26} erg. The present result shows that non-thermal energy releases that correspond to the nanoflare category (energy {approx}10{sup 24} erg) are taking place in the solar corona, and the nature of such small-scale energy releases has not yet been explored.

  9. Energy release and transfer in guide field reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2010-01-01

    Properties of energy release and transfer by magnetic reconnection in the presence of a guide field are investigated on the basis of 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Two initial configurations are considered: a plane current sheet with a uniform guide field of 80% of the reconnecting magnetic field component and a force-free current sheet in which the magnetic field strength is constant but the field direction rotates by 180° through the current sheet. The onset of reconnection is stimulated by localized, temporally limited compression. Both MHD and PIC simulations consistently show that the outgoing energy fluxes are dominated by (redirected) Poynting flux and enthalpy flux, whereas bulk kinetic energy flux and heat flux (in the PIC simulation) are small. The Poynting flux is mainly associated with the magnetic energy of the guide field which is carried from inflow to outflow without much alteration. The conversion of annihilated magnetic energy to enthalpy flux (that is, thermal energy) stems mainly from the fact that the outflow occurs into a closed field region governed by approximate force balance between Lorentz and pressure gradient forces. Therefore, the energy converted from magnetic to kinetic energy by Lorentz force acceleration becomes immediately transferred to thermal energy by the work done by the pressure gradient force. Strong similarities between late stages of MHD and PIC simulations result from the fact that conservation of mass and entropy content and footpoint displacement of magnetic flux tubes, imposed in MHD, are also approximately satisfied in the PIC simulations.

  10. Equilibrium deformations and excitation energies of single-quasiproton band heads of rare-earth nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarewicz, W.; Riley, M. A.; Garrett, J. D.

    1990-05-01

    Noncollective single-proton states in odd- Z (Eu, Tb, Ho, Tm, Lu, Ta, Ir and Au) rare-earth nuclei have been calculated using the shell correction method with an average Woods-Saxon potential and a monopole pairing residual interaction. Calculated equilibrium deformations of the lowest single-proton states are presented, and calculated band head excitation energies are compared with experimental proton band heads for odd- Z rare-earth nuclei. Good agreement is found between the experimental and calculated band heads. We find that strong polarisation effects due to the odd proton explain many of the systematic trends of known band heads. Different deformation driving forces of the odd-proton orbitals can also partly explain deviations seen in high-spin data. Shape co-existence effects in Ir and Au isotopes are discussed. In addition, equilibrium deformations of even-even rare-earth nuclei are computed and compared with experimental values.

  11. Method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy

    DOEpatents

    Brueckner, Keith A.

    1986-01-01

    A method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy by illuminating a minute, solid density, hollow shell of a mixture of material such as deuterium and tritium with a high intensity, uniformly converging laser wave to effect an extremely rapid build-up of energy in inwardly traveling shock waves to implode the shell creating thermonuclear conditions causing a reaction of deuterons and tritons and a resultant high energy thermonuclear burn. Utilizing the resulting energy as a thermal source and to breed tritium or plutonium. The invention also contemplates a laser source wherein the flux level is increased with time to reduce the initial shock heating of fuel and provide maximum compression after implosion; and, in addition, computations and an equation are provided to enable the selection of a design having a high degree of stability and a dependable fusion performance by establishing a proper relationship between the laser energy input and the size and character of the selected material for the fusion capsule.

  12. Surface deformation associated with the 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan earthquake: Geologic slip rates may significantly underestimate strain release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Ryan; Reitman, Nadine; Briggs, Richard; Barnhart, William; Hayes, Gavin

    2015-04-01

    The 24 September 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake ruptured a ~200 km-long stretch of the 60° ± 15° northwest-dipping Hoshab fault in southern Pakistan. The earthquake is notable because it produced the second-largest lateral surface displacement observed for a continental strike-slip earthquake. Surface displacements and geodetic and teleseismic inversions indicate that peak slip occurred within the upper 0-3 km of the crust. To explore along-strike and fault-perpendicular surface deformation patterns, we remotely mapped the surface trace of the rupture and measured its surface deformation using high-resolution (0.5 m) pre- and post-event satellite imagery. Post-event images were collected 7-114 days following the earthquake, so our analysis captures the sum of both the coseismic and post-seismic (e.g., after slip) deformation. We document peak left-lateral offset of ~15 m using 289 near-field (±10 m from fault) laterally offset piercing points, such as streams, terrace risers, and roads. We characterize off-fault deformation by measuring the medium- (±200 m from fault) and far-field (±10 km from fault) displacement using manual (242 measurements) and automated image cross-correlation methods. Off-fault peak lateral displacement values (medium- and far-field) are ~16 m and commonly exceed the on-fault displacement magnitudes. Our observations suggest that coseismic surface displacement typically increases with distance away from the surface trace of the fault; however, the majority of surface displacement is within 100 m of the primary fault trace and is most localized on sections of the rupture exhibiting narrow (<5 m) zones of observable surface deformation. Furthermore, the near-field displacement measurements account for, on average, only 73% of the total coseismic displacement field and the pattern is highly heterogeneous. This analysis highlights the importance of identifying paleoseismic field study sites (e.g. trenches) that span fault

  13. Novel characteristics of energy spectrum for 3D Dirac oscillator analyzed via Lorentz covariant deformed algebra

    PubMed Central

    Betrouche, Malika; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the Lorentz-covariant deformed algebra for Dirac oscillator problem, which is a generalization of Kempf deformed algebra in 3 + 1 dimension of space-time, where Lorentz symmetry are preserved. The energy spectrum of the system is analyzed by taking advantage of the corresponding wave functions with explicit spin state. We obtained entirely new results from our development based on Kempf algebra in comparison to the studies carried out with the non-Lorentz-covariant deformed one. A novel result of this research is that the quantized relativistic energy of the system in the presence of minimal length cannot grow indefinitely as quantum number n increases, but converges to a finite value, where c is the speed of light and β is a parameter that determines the scale of noncommutativity in space. If we consider the fact that the energy levels of ordinary oscillator is equally spaced, which leads to monotonic growth of quantized energy with the increment of n, this result is very interesting. The physical meaning of this consequence is discussed in detail. PMID:24225900

  14. Dynamics of galloping detonations: inert hydrodynamics with pulsed energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2015-11-01

    Previous models for galloping and cellular detonations of Ulyanitski, Vasil'ev and Higgins assume that the unit shock decay or cell can be modeled by Taylor-Sedov blast waves. We revisit this concept for galloping detonations, which we model as purely inert hydrodynamics with periodically pulsed energy deposition. At periodic time intervals, the chemical energy of the non-reacted gas accumulating between the lead shock and the contact surface separating reacted and non reacted gas is released nearly instantaneously. In between these pulses, the gas evolves as an inert medium. The resulting response of the gas to the periodic forcing is a sudden gain in pressure followed by mechanical relaxation accompanied by strong shock waves driven both forward and backwards. It is shown that the decay of the lead shock in-between pulses follows an exponential decay, whose time constant is controlled by the frequency of the energy deposition. More-over, the average speed of the lead shock is found to agree within 2 percent to the ideal Chapman-Jouguet value, while the large scale dynamics of the wave follows closely the ideal wave form of a CJ wave trailed by a Taylor expansion. When friction and heat losses are accounted for, velocity deficits are predicted, consistent with experiment. Work performed while MIR was on sabbatical at Caltech.

  15. Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov calculation for spherical and deformed hot nuclei: Temperature dependence of the pairing energy and gaps, nuclear deformation, nuclear radii, excitation energy, and entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, R.; Malheiro, M.; Carlson, B. V.

    2016-02-01

    Background: Unbound single-particle states become important in determining the properties of a hot nucleus as its temperature increases. We present relativistic mean field (RMF) for hot nuclei considering not only the self-consistent temperature and density dependence of the self-consistent relativistic mean fields but also the vapor phase that takes into account the unbound nucleon states. Purpose: The temperature dependence of the pairing gaps, nuclear deformation, radii, binding energies, entropy, and caloric curves of spherical and deformed nuclei are obtained in self-consistent RMF calculations up to the limit of existence of the nucleus. Method: We perform Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov (DHB) calculations for hot nuclei using a zero-range approximation to the relativistic pairing interaction to calculate proton-proton and neutron-neutron pairing energies and gaps. A vapor subtraction procedure is used to account for unbound states and to remove long range Coulomb repulsion between the hot nucleus and the gas as well as the contribution of the external nucleon gas. Results: We show that p -p and n -n pairing gaps in the S10 channel vanish for low critical temperatures in the range Tcp≈0.6 -1.1 MeV for spherical nuclei such as 90Zr, 124Sn, and 140Ce and for both deformed nuclei 150Sm and 168Er. We found that superconducting phase transition occurs at Tcp=1.03 Δp p(0 ) for 90Zr, Tcp=1.16 Δp p(0 ) for 140Ce, Tcp=0.92 Δp p(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=0.97 Δp p(0 ) for 168Er. The superfluidity phase transition occurs at Tcp=0.72 Δn n(0 ) for 124Sn, Tcp=1.22 Δn n(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=1.13 Δn n(0 ) for 168Er. Thus, the nuclear superfluidity phase—at least for this channel—can only survive at very low nuclear temperatures and this phase transition (when the neutron gap vanishes) always occurs before the superconducting one, where the proton gap is zero. For deformed nuclei the nuclear deformation disappear at temperatures of about Tcs=2.0 -4.0 MeV , well above the

  16. Tire tread deformation sensor and energy harvester development for smart-tire applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kee S.; Liang, Hong; Yi, Jingang; Mika, Bartek

    2007-04-01

    Pneumatic tires are critical components in mobile systems that are widely used in our lives for passenger and goods transportation. Wheel/ground interactions in these systems play an extremely important role for not only system design and efficiency but also safe operation. However, fully understanding wheel/ground interactions is challenging because of high complexity of such interactions and the lack of in situ sensors. In this paper, we present the development of a tire tread deformation sensor and energy harvester for real-time tire monitoring and control. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) based micro-sensor is designed and fabricated to embed inside the tire tread and to measure the tread deformation. We also present a cantilever array based energy harvester that takes advantages of the mechanical bandpass filter concept. The harvester design is able to have a natural frequency band that can be used to harvest energy from varying-frequency vibrational sources. The energy harvester is also built using with new single crystal relaxor ferroelectric material (1 - \\Vkgr)Pb(Mg 1/3Nb 2/3)O 3-\\Vkgr PbTiO 3 (PMN-PT) and interdigited (IDT) electrodes that can perform the energy conversion more efficiently. Some preliminary experiment results show that the performance of the sensor and the energy harvester is promising.

  17. Adhesive-Bonded Composite Joint Analysis with Delaminated Surface Ply Using Strain-Energy Release Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadegani, Alireza; Yang, Chihdar; Smeltzer, Stanley S. III

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to determine the strain energy release rate due to an interlaminar crack of the surface ply in adhesively bonded composite joints subjected to axial tension. Single-lap shear-joint standard test specimen geometry with thick bondline is followed for model development. The field equations are formulated by using the first-order shear-deformation theory in laminated plates together with kinematics relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. The system of second-order differential equations is solved to using the symbolic computation tool Maple 9.52 to provide displacements fields. The equivalent forces at the tip of the prescribed interlaminar crack are obtained based on interlaminar stress distributions. The strain energy release rate of the crack is then determined by using the crack closure method. Finite element analyses using the J integral as well as the crack closure method are performed to verify the developed analytical model. It has been shown that the results using the analytical method correlate well with the results from the finite element analyses. An attempt is made to predict the failure loads of the joints based on limited test data from the literature. The effectiveness of the inclusion of bondline thickness is justified when compared with the results obtained from the previous model in which a thin bondline and uniform adhesive stresses through the bondline thickness are assumed.

  18. Measurement of microscopic surface deformation due to low energy ion bombardment on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piercy, Peter

    2014-03-01

    A low energy electron diffraction spot profile analysis of the Si(111) surface, after argon ion bombardment at an elevated temperature, finds a continuous, low amplitude distribution of surface height, in addition to the atomic-step-and-terrace structure. With an amplitude of tenths of an Angstrom or less in height, correlated laterally over tens of Angstroms, this microscopic surface deformation is measured versus ion dose and for various sample temperatures during bombardment and annealing. For 230 eV argon ion doses increasing in the range of 1015 - 1016 cm- 2 with the sample held at 580 K and 800 K, the amplitude of surface deformation, measured as the standard deviation wz of the continuous height distribution, increases steadily in the range 0.06 - 0.10 Å. For higher ion doses in the range of 3 × 1016 - 1 × 1017 cm- 2, saturation-like behavior with wz ≈ 0.14 - 0.15 Å is measured at 800 K. After an ion dose of 1017 cm- 2, the surface deformation shows a lateral correlation length of 20 Å, implying an average lateral feature size of ≈ 40 Å, slightly less than the average terrace width of ≈ 60 Å. On the other hand, after the same ion dose at 300 K followed by annealing at 800 K, the surface deformation has a similar correlation length but a much smaller height amplitude of wz = 0.06 Å. It is notable that wz depends quite differently on sample preparation conditions overall, compared to the average terrace width and to the degree of (7 × 7) order indicated by diffraction intensities, both of which are found to evolve much more slowly with ion dose in conditions for which the height amplitude increased in the range of 0.06 - 0.14 Å. The surface height deformation due to strain around buried, subsurface defects is estimated as a function of defect concentration using a simple, order-of-magnitude theoretical model, in which a distribution of subsurface defects is modeled as small inclusions in a continuous elastic medium. This approximate model is

  19. Revisiting Bangham's law of adsorption-induced deformation: changes of surface energy and surface stress.

    PubMed

    Gor, Gennady Y; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-04-14

    When fluids are adsorbed on a solid surface they induce noticeable stresses, which cause the deformation of the solid. D. H. Bangham and co-authors performed a series of experimental measurements of adsorption-induced strains, and concluded that physisorption causes expansion, which is proportional to the lowering of the surface energy Δγ. This statement is referred to as the Bangham effect or Bangham's law. However, it is known that the quantity that controls the deformation is actually the change in surface stress Δf rather than surface energy Δγ, but this difference has not been considered in the context of adsorption-induced deformation of mesoporous materials. We use the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) theory to derive both values and show the difference between them. We find the condition when the difference between the two vanishes, and Bangham's law is applicable; it is likely that this condition is satisfied in most cases, and prediction of strain based on Δγ is a good approximation. We show that this is the case for adsorption of argon and water on Vycor glass. Finally, we show that the difference between Δγ and Δf can explain some of the experimental data that contradicts Bangham's law. PMID:27001041

  20. Role of neutron transfer and deformation effect in capture process at sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.; Zhang, H. Q.

    2012-12-01

    The roles of nuclear deformation and neutron transfer in sub-barrier capture process are studied within the quantum diffusion approach. The change of the deformations of colliding nuclei with neutron exchange can crucially influence the sub-barrier fusion. The sub-barrier capture reactions following the neutron pair transfer are used for the indirect study of neutron-neutron correlation in the surface region of nucleus. The strong surface enhancement of the neutron pairing in nuclei 48Ca, 64Ni, and 116,124,132Sn is demonstrated. Comparing the capture cross sections calculated without the breakup effect and experimental complete fusion cross sections, the breakup was analyzed in reactions with weakly bound projectiles 6,7,9Li and 9Be. A trend of a systematic behavior for the complete fusion suppression as a function of the target charge and bombarding energy is not achieved.

  1. The surface-forming energy release rate based fracture criterion for elastic-plastic crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Si; Wang, He-Ling; Liu, Bin; Hwang, Keh-Chih

    2015-11-01

    The J-integral based criterion is widely used in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. However, it is not rigorously applicable when plastic unloading appears during crack propagation. One difficulty is that the energy density with plastic unloading in the J-integral cannot be defined unambiguously. In this paper, we alternatively start from the analysis on the power balance, and propose a surface-forming energy release rate (ERR), which represents the energy available for separating the crack surfaces during the crack propagation and excludes the loading-mode-dependent plastic dissipation. Therefore the surface-forming ERR based fracture criterion has wider applicability, including elastic-plastic crack propagation problems. Several formulae are derived for calculating the surface-forming ERR. From the most concise formula, it is interesting to note that the surface-forming ERR can be computed using only the stress and deformation of the current moment, and the definition of the energy density or work density is avoided. When an infinitesimal contour is chosen, the expression can be further simplified. For any fracture behaviors, the surface-forming ERR is proven to be path-independent, and the path-independence of its constituent term, so-called Js-integral, is also investigated. The physical meanings and applicability of the proposed surface-forming ERR, traditional ERR, Js-integral and J-integral are compared and discussed. Besides, we give an interpretation of Rice paradox by comparing the cohesive fracture model and the surface-forming ERR based fracture criterion.

  2. A Computational Investigation on Bending Deformation Behavior at Various Deflection Rates for Enhancement of Absorbable Energy in TRIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hang Thi; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2016-05-01

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel might have a high energy-absorption characteristic because it could possibly consume impact energy by not only plastic deformation but also strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during deformation. Therefore, TRIP steel is considered to be suitable for automotive structures from the viewpoint of safety. Bending deformation due to buckling is one of the major collapse modes of automotive structures. Thus, an investigation on the bending deformation behavior and energy-absorption characteristic in TRIP steel at high deformation rate is indispensable to clarify the mechanism of better performance. Some past studies have focused on the improvement of mechanical properties by means of SIMT; however, the mechanism through which the energy-absorption characteristic in steel can be improved is still unclear. In this study, the three-point bending deformation behavior of a beam specimen made of type-304 austenitic stainless steel, a kind of TRIP steel, is investigated at various deflection rates by experiments and finite-element simulations based on a constitutive model proposed by one of the authors. After confirming the validity of the computation, the rate-sensitivity of energy absorption from the viewpoint of hardening behavior is examined and the improvement of the energy-absorption characteristic in TRIP steel including its mechanism is discussed.

  3. A Computational Investigation on Bending Deformation Behavior at Various Deflection Rates for Enhancement of Absorbable Energy in TRIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hang Thi; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel might have a high energy-absorption characteristic because it could possibly consume impact energy by not only plastic deformation but also strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during deformation. Therefore, TRIP steel is considered to be suitable for automotive structures from the viewpoint of safety. Bending deformation due to buckling is one of the major collapse modes of automotive structures. Thus, an investigation on the bending deformation behavior and energy-absorption characteristic in TRIP steel at high deformation rate is indispensable to clarify the mechanism of better performance. Some past studies have focused on the improvement of mechanical properties by means of SIMT; however, the mechanism through which the energy-absorption characteristic in steel can be improved is still unclear. In this study, the three-point bending deformation behavior of a beam specimen made of type-304 austenitic stainless steel, a kind of TRIP steel, is investigated at various deflection rates by experiments and finite-element simulations based on a constitutive model proposed by one of the authors. After confirming the validity of the computation, the rate-sensitivity of energy absorption from the viewpoint of hardening behavior is examined and the improvement of the energy-absorption characteristic in TRIP steel including its mechanism is discussed.

  4. Computation of strain energy release rates for skin-stiffener debonds modeled with plate elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. T.; Raju, I. S.; Davila, C. G.; Sleight, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient method for predicting the strength of debonded composite skin-stiffener configurations is presented. This method, which is based on fracture mechanics, models the skin and the stiffener with two-dimensional (2D) plate elements instead of three-dimensional (3D) solid elements. The skin and stiffener flange nodes are tied together by two modeling techniques. In one technique, the corresponding flange and skin nodes are required to have identical translational and rotational degrees-of-freedom. In the other technique, the corresponding flange and skin nodes are only required to have identical translational degrees-of-freedom. Strain energy release rate formulas are proposed for both modeling techniques. These formulas are used for skin-stiffener debond cases with and without cylindrical bending deformations. The cylindrical bending results are compared with plane-strain finite element results. Excellent agreement between the two sets of results is obtained when the second technique is used. Thus, from these limited studies, a preferable modeling technique for skin-stiffener debond analysis using plate elements is established.

  5. On the maximum energy release in flux-rope models of eruptive flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.; Priest, E. R.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    We determine the photospheric boundary conditions which maximize the magnetic energy released by a loss of ideal-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium in two-dimensional flux-rope models. In these models a loss of equilibrium causes a transition of the flux rope to a lower magnetic energy state at a higher altitude. During the transition a vertical current sheet forms below the flux rope, and reconnection in this current sheet releases additional energy. Here we compute how much energy is released by the loss of equilibrium relative to the total energy release. When the flux-rope radius is small compared to its height, it is possible to obtain general solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation for a wide range of boundary conditions. Variational principles can then be used to find the particular boundary condition which maximizes the magnetic energy released for a given class of conditions. We apply this procedure to a class of models known as cusp-type catastrophes, and we find that the maximum energy released by the loss of equilibrium is 20.8% of the total energy release for any model in this class. If the additional restriction is imposed that the photospheric magnetic field forms a simple arcade in the absence of coronal currents, then the maximum energy release reduces to 8.6%

  6. Simulation of the dissipated and stored energy under deformation and failure of metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostina, Anastasiia; Plekhov, Oleg

    2015-10-01

    This work is devoted to the development of the statistical model of the structural defect evolution which was developed at the Institute of continuous media mechanics UB RAS. This model takes into account stochastic properties of the defect evolution process, nonlinear interaction of defects, and connection between microplasticity and damage accumulation. The obtained constitutive equations allow us to propose a model of the energy storage and dissipation in the process of plastic deformation and failure of metallic materials. The obtained relations were adapted for standard finite-element package. Applicability of this model was demonstrated in three-dimensional simulation of the strain localization and crack propagation in metals.

  7. Simulation of the dissipated and stored energy under deformation and failure of metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kostina, Anastasiia Plekhov, Oleg

    2015-10-27

    This work is devoted to the development of the statistical model of the structural defect evolution which was developed at the Institute of continuous media mechanics UB RAS. This model takes into account stochastic properties of the defect evolution process, nonlinear interaction of defects, and connection between microplasticity and damage accumulation. The obtained constitutive equations allow us to propose a model of the energy storage and dissipation in the process of plastic deformation and failure of metallic materials. The obtained relations were adapted for standard finite-element package. Applicability of this model was demonstrated in three-dimensional simulation of the strain localization and crack propagation in metals.

  8. On the energy conservation during the active deformation in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhong, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we examined the energy conservation for the current schemes of applying active deformation in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Specifically, two methods are examined. One is scaling the dimension of the simulation box and the atom positions via an affine transformation, suitable for the periodic system. The other is moving the rigid walls that interact with the atoms in the system, suitable for the non-periodic system. Based on the calculation of the external work and the internal energy change, we present that the atom velocities also need to be updated in the first deformation method; otherwise the energy conservation cannot be satisfied. The classic updating scheme is examined, in which any atom crossing the periodic boundary experiences a velocity delta that is equal to the velocity difference between the opposite boundaries. In addition, a new scheme which scales the velocities of all the atoms according to the strain increment is proposed, which is more efficient and realistic than the classic scheme. It is also demonstrated that the Virial stress instead of its interaction part is the correct stress definition that corresponds to Cauchy stress in the continuum mechanics.

  9. Pervasive nanoscale deformation twinning as a catalyst for efficient energy dissipation in a bioceramic armour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Ortiz, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Hierarchical composite materials design in biological exoskeletons achieves penetration resistance through a variety of energy-dissipating mechanisms while simultaneously balancing the need for damage localization to avoid compromising the mechanical integrity of the entire structure and to maintain multi-hit capability. Here, we show that the shell of the bivalve Placuna placenta (~99 wt% calcite), which possesses the unique optical property of ~80% total transmission of visible light, simultaneously achieves penetration resistance and deformation localization via increasing energy dissipation density (0.290 ± 0.072 nJ μm-3) by approximately an order of magnitude relative to single-crystal geological calcite (0.034 ± 0.013 nJ μm-3). P. placenta, which is composed of a layered assembly of elongated diamond-shaped calcite crystals, undergoes pervasive nanoscale deformation twinning (width ~50 nm) surrounding the penetration zone, which catalyses a series of additional inelastic energy dissipating mechanisms such as interfacial and intracrystalline nanocracking, viscoplastic stretching of interfacial organic material, and nanograin formation and reorientation.

  10. Pervasive nanoscale deformation twinning as a catalyst for efficient energy dissipation in a bioceramic armour.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Ortiz, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Hierarchical composite materials design in biological exoskeletons achieves penetration resistance through a variety of energy-dissipating mechanisms while simultaneously balancing the need for damage localization to avoid compromising the mechanical integrity of the entire structure and to maintain multi-hit capability. Here, we show that the shell of the bivalve Placuna placenta (~99 wt% calcite), which possesses the unique optical property of ~80% total transmission of visible light, simultaneously achieves penetration resistance and deformation localization via increasing energy dissipation density (0.290 ± 0.072 nJ μm(-3)) by approximately an order of magnitude relative to single-crystal geological calcite (0.034 ± 0.013 nJ μm(-3)). P. placenta, which is composed of a layered assembly of elongated diamond-shaped calcite crystals, undergoes pervasive nanoscale deformation twinning (width ~50 nm) surrounding the penetration zone, which catalyses a series of additional inelastic energy dissipating mechanisms such as interfacial and intracrystalline nanocracking, viscoplastic stretching of interfacial organic material, and nanograin formation and reorientation. PMID:24681646

  11. A deformation energy-based model for predicting nucleosome dyads and occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoqing; Xing, Yongqiang; Zhao, Hongyu; Wang, Jianying; Shang, Yu; Cai, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome plays an essential role in various cellular processes, such as DNA replication, recombination, and transcription. Hence, it is important to decode the mechanism of nucleosome positioning and identify nucleosome positions in the genome. In this paper, we present a model for predicting nucleosome positioning based on DNA deformation, in which both bending and shearing of the nucleosomal DNA are considered. The model successfully predicted the dyad positions of nucleosomes assembled in vitro and the in vitro map of nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Applying the model to Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, we achieved satisfactory results. Our data also show that shearing energy of nucleosomal DNA outperforms bending energy in nucleosome occupancy prediction and the ability to predict nucleosome dyad positions is attributed to bending energy that is associated with rotational positioning of nucleosomes. PMID:27053067

  12. Energy Release, Acceleration, and Escape of Solar Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nolfo, G. A.; Ireland, J.; Ryan, J. M.; Young, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Solar flares are prodigious producers of energetic particles, and thus a rich laboratory for studying particle acceleration. The acceleration occurs through the release of magnetic energy, a significant fraction of which can go into the acceleration of particles. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) certainly produce shocks that both accelerate particles and provide a mechanism for escape into the interplanetary medium (IP). What is less well understood is whether accelerated particles produced from the flare reconnection process escape, and if so, how these same particles are related to solar energetic particles (SEPs) detected in-situ. Energetic electron SEPs have been shown to be correlated with Type III radio bursts, hard X-ray emission, and EUV jets, making a very strong case for the connection between acceleration at the flare and escape along open magnetic field lines. Because there has not been a clear signature of ion escape, as is the case with the Type III radio emission for electrons, sorting out the avenues of escape for accelerated flare ions and the possible origin of the impulsive SEPs continues to be a major challenge. The key to building a clear picture of particle escape relies on the ability to map signatures of escape such as EUV jets at the Sun and to follow the progression of these escape signatures as they evolve in time. Furthermore, nuclear γ-ray emissions provide critical context relating ion acceleration to that of escape. With the advent observations from Fermi as well as RHESSI and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the challenge of ion escape from the Sun can now be addressed. We present a preliminary study of the relationship of EUV jets with nuclear γ-ray emission and Type III radio observations and discuss the implications for possible magnetic topologies that allow for ion escape from deep inside the corona to the interplanetary medium.

  13. Spatio-temporal modeling and optimization of a deformable-grating compressor for short high-energy laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Qiao, J; Papa, J; Liu, X

    2015-10-01

    Monolithic large-scale diffraction gratings are desired to improve the performance of high-energy laser systems and scale them to higher energy, but the surface deformation of these diffraction gratings induce spatio-temporal coupling that is detrimental to the focusability and compressibility of the output pulse. A new deformable-grating-based pulse compressor architecture with optimized actuator positions has been designed to correct the spatial and temporal aberrations induced by grating wavefront errors. An integrated optical model has been built to analyze the effect of grating wavefront errors on the spatio-temporal performance of a compressor based on four deformable gratings. A 1.5-meter deformable grating has been optimized using an integrated finite-element-analysis and genetic-optimization model, leading to spatio-temporal performance similar to the baseline design with ideal gratings. PMID:26480107

  14. Black hole monster in a spin releases energy!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    the black hole itself is rotating. According to the team, one model fits the XMM-Newton data well. It corresponds to a theory proposed over 25 years ago by two Cambridge University astronomers. Roger Blandford and Roman Znajek had suggested that rotational energy could escape from a black hole when it is in a strong magnetic field which exerts a braking effect. This theory fits the physical laws of thermodynamics which state that energy released should be absorbed by the surrounding gas. "We have probably seen this electric dynamo effect for the very first time. Energy is being extracted from the black hole's spin and is conveyed into the innermost parts of the accretion disc, making it hotter and brighter in X-rays," says Jörn Wilms. Co-investigator Dr. Christopher Reynolds at the University of Maryland and other American members of the team contributed greatly to the theoretical interpretation of the data. "Never before have we seen energy extracted from black holes. We always see energy going in, not out," says Reynolds, who performed much of the analysis whilst at the University of Colorado. Other scientists involved in this work are James Reeves of Leicester University, United Kingdom, and Silvano Molendi of the Instituto di Fisica Cosmica "G. Occhialini", Milan, Italy. The team's conclusion that a magnetodynamic process is involved is already provoking intense debate. "We recognise that more observations are required to confirm our work," says Jörn Wilms. "But there is no disputing the presence of this exceptionally strong iron line in the spectrum of MCG-6-30-15. It is extremely puzzling and an explanation must be found." One thing is sure: only a couple of years ago, before operations with the European X-ray observatory began, no one would have dared propose such interpretations. Sufficiently detailed spectra of the kind today provided by XMM-Newton were just not available. REFERENCE "XMM-EPIC observation of MCG-6-30-15: Direct evidence for the extraction of

  15. Octupole deformation properties of the Barcelona-Catania-Paris energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, L. M.; Baldo, M.; Schuck, P.; Vinas, X.

    2010-03-15

    We discuss the octupole deformation properties of the recently proposed Barcelona-Catania-Paris (BCP) energy density functionals for two sets of isotopes, those of radium and barium, in which it is believed that octupole deformation plays a role in the description of the ground state. The analysis is carried out in the mean field framework (Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation) by using the axially symmetric octupole moment as a constraint. The main ingredients entering the octupole collective Hamiltonian are evaluated and the lowest-lying octupole eigenstates are obtained. In this way we restore, in an approximate way, the parity symmetry spontaneously broken by the mean field and also incorporate octupole fluctuations around the ground-state solution. For each isotope the energy of the lowest lying 1{sup -} state and the B(E1) and B(E3) transition probabilities have been computed and compared to both the experimental data and the results obtained in the same framework with the Gogny D1S interaction, which are used here as a well-established benchmark. Finally, the octupolarity of the configurations involved in the way down to fission of {sup 240}Pu, which is strongly connected to the asymmetric fragment mass distribution, is studied. We confirm with this thorough study the suitability of the BCP functionals to describe octupole-related phenomena.

  16. Anomalous energy cascades in dense granular materials yielding under simple shear deformations.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Mizuno, Hideyuki

    2016-02-01

    By using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of dense granular particles in two dimensions, we study turbulent-like structures of their non-affine velocities under simple shear deformations. We find that the spectrum of non-affine velocities, introduced as an analog of the energy spectrum for turbulent flows, exhibits the power-law decay if the system is yielding in a quasi-static regime, where large-scale collective motions and inelastic interactions of granular particles are crucial for the anomalous cascade of kinetic energy. Based on hydrodynamic equations of dense granular materials, which include both kinetic and contact contributions in constitutive relations, we derive a theoretical expression for the spectrum, where a good agreement between the result of MD simulations and theoretical prediction is established over a wide range of length scales. PMID:26701740

  17. Strain Rate Dependency of Coarse Crystal Marble Under Uniaxial Compression: Strength, Deformation and Strain Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanrong; Huang, Da; Li, Xi'an

    2014-07-01

    Strain rate during testing, uniaxial or triaxial, has important influence on the measured mechanical properties of rocks. Uniaxial compression tests were performed at nine pre-specified static-to-quasistatic strain rates (ranging from 1 × 10-5 to 1 × 10-1 s-1) on coarse crystal marble. The aim is to gain deep insight into the influence of strain rate on characteristic stresses, deformation properties and conversion of strain energy of such rock. It is found that the strain rate of 5 × 10-3 s-1 is the threshold to delineate the failure modes the tested coarse marble behaves in. At a strain rate less than this threshold, single-plane shear and conjugate X-shaped shear are the main failure modes, while beyond this threshold, extensile and splitting failures are dominant. The stress for crack initiation, the critical stress for dilation, the peak stress, and Young's modulus are all found to increase with strain rate, with an exception that the above stresses and modulus appear relatively low compared to the strain rate in the range of between 1 × 10-4 and 5 × 10-3 s-1. The pre-peak absorbed strain energy, damage strain energy and elastic strain energy are found to increase with strain rate. In addition, the elastic strain energy stored before peak point favors brittle failure of the specimen, as the more stored elastic energy in the specimen, the stronger the fragmenting.

  18. Analysis of the Petatlan aftershocks: Numbers, energy release, and asperities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ValdéS, Carlos; Meyer, Robert P.; ZuñIga, Ramón; Havskov, Jens; Singh, Shri K.

    1982-10-01

    The Petatlan earthquake of March 14, 1979 (Ms = 7.6), occurred between the Middle America trench and the Mexican coast, 15 km southwest of Petatlan, Guerrero, Mexico. From seismograms recorded on smoked paper, FM, and digital tapes, we have identified 255 aftershocks with coda lengths greater than 60 s that occurred 11 hours to 36 days after the main shock. Based on these events, the aftershock epicentral area defined during the period between 11 and 60 hours was about 2000 km2; between 11 hours and 6 days it was about 2400 km2. Although the area grew to 6060 km2 in 36 days, most of the activity was still confined within the area defined after 6 days. This suggests that the smaller aftershock area might represent an asperity. The distribution of events and energy release per unit area confirm the existence of heterogeneity in the aftershock area. Thus our data support the concept of an inhomogeneous rupture area that includes an asperity, as suggested by Chael and Stewart (1982) to account for the differences they computed for the body and surface wave moments from WWSSN data. However, the combination of the moments Reichle et al. (1982) report for body and surface waves from IDA data and the rupture areas reported in this paper results in a solution that is most physically realizable in terms of stress drop and slip. We calculate stress drops of 5 and 15 bars, the former for the average over the entire area, the latter for the asperity, and an average slip of 60 cm for the entire area and 120 cm for the asperity. These values for slip are 30% and 60%, respectively, of the convergence of the Cocos plate relative to the North America plate during the 36-year period between the last two major earthquakes in the Petatlan area. Hypocenters of the aftershocks define a zone about 25 km thick, dipping 15° with an azimuth of N20°E, which is perpendicular to the Middle America trench. Most aftershocks are below the main shock. The b value estimated for aftershocks in the

  19. A method for calculating strain energy release rate based on beam theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Pandey, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    The Timoshenko beam theory was used to model cracked beams and to calculate the total strain energy release rate. The root rotation of the beam segments at the crack tip were estimated based on an approximate 2D elasticity solution. By including the strain energy released due to the root rotations of the beams during crack extension, the strain energy release rate obtained using beam theory agrees very well with the 2D finite element solution. Numerical examples were given for various beam geometries and loading conditions. Comparisons with existing beam models were also given.

  20. Magnetic calorimeter with a SQUID for detecting weak radiations and recording the ultralow energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, Aleksander I; Zherikhina, L N; Kuleshova, G V; Tskhovrebov, A M; Izmailov, G N

    2006-12-31

    The scheme of a magnetic calorimeter for recording extremely low energy releases is developed. The calorimeter is activated by the method of adiabatic demagnetisation and its response to the energy release is measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The estimate of the ultimate sensitivity of the calorimeter with the SQUID demonstrates the possibilities of its application for detecting ultralow radiation intensity, recording single X-ray quanta in the proportional regime and other events with ultralow energy releases. The scheme of the calorimeter with the SQUID on matter waves in superfluid {sup 4}He is proposed. (radiation detectors)

  1. Energy Dissipation and Release During Coal Failure Under Conventional Triaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ruidong; Ju, Yang; Wang, J. G.; Xie, Heping; Gao, Feng; Mao, Lingtao

    2015-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies have revealed that energy dissipation and release play an important role in the deformation and failure of coal rocks. To determine the relationship between energy transformation and coal failure, the mechanical behaviors of coal specimens taken from a 600-m deep mine were investigated by conventional triaxial compression tests using five different confining pressures. Each coal specimen was scanned by microfocus computed tomography before and after testing to examine the crack patterns. Sieve analysis was used to measure the post-failure coal fragments, and a fractal model was developed for describing the size distribution of the fragments. Based on the test results, a damage evolution model of the rigidity degeneration of coal before the peak strength was also developed and used to determine the initial damage and critical damage variables. It was found that the peak strength increased with increasing confining pressure, but the critical damage variable was almost invariant. More new cracks were initiated in the coal specimens when there was no confining pressure or the pressure was too high. The parameters of failure energy ratio β and stress drop coefficient α are further proposed to describe the failure mode of coal under different confining pressures. The test results revealed that β was approximately linearly related to the fractal dimension of the coal fragments and that a higher failure energy ratio corresponded to a larger fractal dimension and more severe failure. The stress drop coefficient α decreased approximately exponentially with increasing confining pressure, and could be used to appropriately describe the evolution of the coal failure mode from brittle to ductile with increasing confining pressure. A large β and small α under a high confining pressure were noticed during the tests, which implied that the failure of the coal was a kind of pseudo-ductile failure. Brittle failure occurred when the confining

  2. High Shear Deformation to Produce High Strength and Energy Absorption in Mg Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Vineet V.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Li, Dongsheng; Garmestani, Hamid; Nyberg, Eric A.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2014-02-01

    Magnesium alloys have the potential to reduce the mass of transportation systems however to fully realize the benefits it must be usable in more applications including those that require higher strength and ductility. It has been known that fine grain size in Mg alloys leads to high strength and ductility. However, the challenge is how to achieve this optimal microstructure in a cost effective way. This work has shown that by using optimized high shear deformation and second phase particles of Mg2Si and MgxZnZry the energy absorption of the extrusions can exceed that of AA6061. The extrusion process under development described in this presentation appears to be scalable and cost effective. In addition to process development a novel modeling approach to understand the roles of strain and state-of-strain on particle fracture and grain size control has been developed

  3. A Method for Calculating Strain Energy Release Rates in Preliminary Design of Composite Skin/Stringer Debonding Under Multi-Axial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Three simple procedures were developed to determine strain energy release rates, G, in composite skin/stringer specimens for various combinations of unaxial and biaxial (in-plane/out-of-plane) loading conditions. These procedures may be used for parametric design studies in such a way that only a few finite element computations will be necessary for a study of many load combinations. The results were compared with mixed mode strain energy release rates calculated directly from nonlinear two-dimensional plane-strain finite element analyses using the virtual crack closure technique. The first procedure involved solving three unknown parameters needed to determine the energy release rates. Good agreement was obtained when the external loads were used in the expression derived. This superposition technique was only applicable if the structure exhibits a linear load/deflection behavior. Consequently, a second technique was derived which was applicable in the case of nonlinear load/deformation behavior. The technique involved calculating six unknown parameters from a set of six simultaneous linear equations with data from six nonlinear analyses to determine the energy release rates. This procedure was not time efficient, and hence, less appealing. A third procedure was developed to calculate mixed mode energy release rates as a function of delamination lengths. This procedure required only one nonlinear finite element analysis of the specimen with a single delamination length to obtain a reference solution for the energy release rates and the scale factors. The delamination was extended in three separate linear models of the local area in the vicinity of the delamination subjected to unit loads to obtain the distribution of G with delamination lengths. This set of sub-problems was Although additional modeling effort is required to create the sub- models, this local technique is efficient for parametric studies.

  4. Release of brain amino acids during hyposmolar stress and energy deprivation.

    PubMed

    Haugstad, T S; Langmoen, I A

    1996-04-01

    The release of 10 amino acids from rat hippocampal slices during exposure to hyposmotic stress or energy deprivation was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Exposing the slices to hyposmotic stress by lowering extracellular NaCl caused a 10-fold release of taurine (p < 0.01) and over a twofold increase of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (p < 0.01). These changes were reversed by mannitol. Exposure to combined glucose and oxygen deprivation (energy deprivation) caused a 50-fold increase in the release of GABA, a 40-fold increase in glutamate release (p < 0.01), and a twofold to sixfold increase in taurine, aspartate, glycine, asparagine, serine, and alanine release (p < 0.05) but no change in glutamine. Energy deprivation increased the water content by 21%. Mannitol blocked this increase and further enhanced the release of glutamate and aspartate (p < 0.01) but not of GABA. The permissivity of the amino acids was plotted against the pI (pH at isoelectric point) and hydropathy indexes. Energy deprivation increased the permissivity in the following order: acidic > neutral > basic. Among neutral amino acids, permissivity increased with increasing hydrophobicity. These results indicate that the mechanisms of amino acid release are different during cerebral ischemia and hyposmotic stress. PMID:8829565

  5. Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network releases search widget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-11-01

    The Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) has launched a widget that can be embedded in any Web site to search the network's catalog of online resources relating to climate and energy topics for students in grades 6-12 and for general audiences. The catalog includes more than 300 high-quality existing digital resources, including learning activities, videos, visualizations, and short investigations that have been reviewed and annotated for scientific accuracy and pedagogical potential. The widget allows users to search keywords and then access the full catalog record of resources from the search. The CLEAN Web site includes a section on teaching climate and energy topics.

  6. Permeation of low-Z atoms through carbon sheets: Density functional theory study on energy barriers and deformation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Stefan E. E-mail: Michael.probst@uibk.ac.at; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael E-mail: Michael.probst@uibk.ac.at

    2013-12-15

    Energetic and geometric aspects of the permeation of the atoms hydrogen to neon neutral atoms through graphene sheets are investigated by investigating the associated energy barriers and sheet deformations. Density functional theory calculations on cluster models, where graphene is modeled by planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), provide the energies and geometries. Particularities of our systems, such as convergence of both energy barriers and deformation curves with increasing size of the PAHs, are discussed. Three different interaction regimes, adiabatic, planar and vertical, are investigated by enforcing different geometrical constraints. The adiabatic energy barriers range from 5 eV for hydrogen to 20 eV for neon. We find that the permeation of oxygen and carbon into graphene is facilitated by temporary chemical bonding while for other, in principle reactive atoms, it is not. We discuss implications of our results for modeling chemical sputtering of graphite.

  7. Computational Study of Deflagration to Detonation Transition in a Straight Duct: Effect of Energy Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Hu, Zongmin; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    Numerical simulation based on the Euler equation and one-step reaction model is carried out to investigate the process of deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) occurring in a straight duct. The numerical method used includes a high resolution fifth-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory scheme for spatial discretization, coupled with a third order total variation diminishing Runge-Kutta time stepping method. In particular, effect of energy release on the DDT process is studied. The model parameters used are the heat release at q=50, 30, 25, 20, 15, 10 and 5, the specific heat ratio at 1.2, and the activation temperature at Ti=15, respectively. For all the cases, the initial energy in the spark is about the same compared to the detonation energy at the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state. It is found from the simulation that the DDT occurrence strongly depends on the magnitude of the energy release. The run-up distance of DDT occurrence decreases with the increase of the energy release for q=50 20, and increases with the increase of the energy release for q=50 20. It is concluded from the simulations that the interaction of the shock wave and the flame front is the main reason for leading to DDT.

  8. Energy Released During the H-L Back Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldon, D.; Kolemen, E.; Gohil, P.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Schmitz, L.

    2015-11-01

    Prompt energy loss (ΔW) at the H-L transition, as a fraction of total stored energy before the transition, is about 30 % and is insensitive to density in ITER-similar DIII-D plasmas. Occasionally, some ELMs will appear before the transition and reduce total energy, thus reducing ΔW across the following transition. Other results (not in the ITER-similar shape) have shown that ELMs can be triggered in low powered H-modes, prior to H-L transitions, when the plasma is stable to ideal P-B modes (these are not typical type-I ELMs, despite superficial similarities) and E × B shear is strong. These are indeed ELMs occurring in H-mode and not part of a dithering transition. Finally, ELM ΔW is sensitive to edge toroidal rotation and becomes smaller than uncertainty (< 5 kJ) at low rotation (ωtor < 5 krad/s). These results point to a strategy where ΔW for the H-L transition may be reduced by the presence of (not type-I) ELMs before the transition, and ΔW for the ELMs may be reduced by controlling rotation. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  9. Determination of earthquake energy release in the Eastern Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstetter, A.; Shapira, A.

    2000-12-01

    Seismic energy radiated by earthquakes in the Eastern Mediterranean region is estimated using the short-period (50 samples per second) seismic recordings made by the Israel Seismic Network during 1990-1997. Our data set is the whole S-wave window (from Sn until Lg falls to less than twice the noise level) from 133 earthquakes with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We obtained the attenuation function (1.850+/-0.005)logR+(0.00460+0.00005)Rloge+0.05, where the distance range is 50<=R<=1500km. We tested the dependence of the attenuation function on the azimuth and the distance. Despite the different propagation paths of the waves travelling through the continental crust of the Arabian Shield to the east or the intermediate crust of the Mediterranean Sea to the west, we show that from a statistical point of view the attenuation functions are similar. The energy estimation involves time-domain integration of the squared ground-motion velocity, assuming that the attenuation is known, following the method of Kanamori et al. (1993). For the magnitude range 3.0<=mB<=6.2 (magnitude determined by the National Earthquake Information Service, NEIS), we obtained the magnitude-energy relationship logE0=(2.09+/-0.10)mB+ (8.86+/-0.42). Comparison of the seismic energy and the seismic moment suggests that E~M00.19 and that Orowan's stress drop increases as M00.19. A refinement of the results is expected with the application of the method of Mayeda & Walter (1996) for energy estimation from coda envelopes using a large data set of broad-band observations.

  10. A Microelectromechanical High-Density Energy Storage/Rapid Release System

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Allen, Jim J.; Meeks, Kent D.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Sam L.

    1999-07-21

    One highly desirable characteristic of electrostatically driven microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is that they consume very little power. The corresponding drawback is that the force they produce may be inadequate for many applications. It has previously been demonstrated that gear reduction units or microtransmissions can substantially increase the torque generated by microengines. Operating speed, however, is also reduced by the transmission gear ratio. Some applications require both high speed and high force. If this output is only required for a limited period of time, then energy could be stored in a mechanical system and rapidly released upon demand. We have designed, fabricated, and demonstrated a high-density energy storage/rapid release system that accomplishes this task. Built using a 5-level surface micromachining technology, the assembly closely resembles a medieval crossbow. Energy releases on the order of tens of nanojoules have already been demonstrated, and significantly higher energy systems are under development.

  11. System for monitoring of energy release in the core of a boiling-water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Leshchenko, Yu.I.; Sadulin, V.P.; Semidotskii, I.I.

    1988-06-01

    Results are discussed from an investigation into a system for the physical monitoring of energy release in the core of the VK-50 boiling water reactor. Movable self-powered detectors are used in this system as energy-release neutron detectors. Rhodium serves as the emitter in these detectors. A number of parameters for these detectors were experimentally measured; they include the ratio of the instantaneous current to the activation current, the coefficients of relative sensitivity of the detectors to neutrons, and the effective cross sections for the interaction of /sup 103/Rh with thermal and epithermal neutrons. Computer simulation of the system and detectors is discussed. The system can monitor absolute energy distribution in the fuel assemblies under reactor conditions. The system is independent of thermotechnical measurements with an instrument to determine energy release in the reactor core.

  12. Innovative methodologies and technologies for thermal energy release measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotta, Enrica; Peluso, Rosario; Avino, Rosario; Belviso, Pasquale; Caliro, Stefano; Carandente, Antonio; Chiodini, Giovanni; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Petrillo, Zaccaria; Sansivero, Fabio; Vilardo, Giuseppe; Marfe, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Volcanoes exchange heat, gases and other fluids between the interrior of the Earth and its atmosphere influencing processes both at the surface and above it. This work is devoted to improve the knowledge on the parameters that control the anomalies in heat flux and chemical species emissions associated with the diffuse degassing processes of volcanic and hydrothermal zones. We are studying and developing innovative medium range remote sensing technologies to measure the variations through time of heat flux and chemical emissions in order to boost the definition of the activity state of a volcano and allowing a better assessment of the related hazard and risk mitigation. The current methodologies used to measure heat flux (i.e. CO2 flux or temperature gradient) are either poorly efficient or effective, and are unable to detect short to medium time (days to months) variation trends in the heat flux. Remote sensing of these parameters will allow for measurements faster than already accredited methods therefore it will be both more effective and efficient in case of emergency and it will be used to make quick routine monitoring. We are currently developing a method based on drone-born IR cameras to measure the ground surface temperature that, in a purely conductive regime, is directly correlated to the shallow temperature gradient. The use of flying drones will allow to quickly obtain a mapping of areas with thermal anomalies and a measure of their temperature at distance in the order of hundreds of meters. Further development of remote sensing will be done through the use, on flying drones, of multispectral and/or iperspectral sensors, UV scanners in order to be able to detect the amount of chemical species released in the athmosphere.

  13. Influence of Finite Element Software on Energy Release Rates Computed Using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Goetze, Dirk; Ransom, Jonathon (Technical Monitor)

    2006-01-01

    Strain energy release rates were computed along straight delamination fronts of Double Cantilever Beam, End-Notched Flexure and Single Leg Bending specimens using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). Th e results were based on finite element analyses using ABAQUS# and ANSYS# and were calculated from the finite element results using the same post-processing routine to assure a consistent procedure. Mixed-mode strain energy release rates obtained from post-processing finite elem ent results were in good agreement for all element types used and all specimens modeled. Compared to previous studies, the models made of s olid twenty-node hexahedral elements and solid eight-node incompatible mode elements yielded excellent results. For both codes, models made of standard brick elements and elements with reduced integration did not correctly capture the distribution of the energy release rate acr oss the width of the specimens for the models chosen. The results suggested that element types with similar formulation yield matching results independent of the finite element software used. For comparison, m ixed-mode strain energy release rates were also calculated within ABAQUS#/Standard using the VCCT for ABAQUS# add on. For all specimens mod eled, mixed-mode strain energy release rates obtained from ABAQUS# finite element results using post-processing were almost identical to re sults calculated using the VCCT for ABAQUS# add on.

  14. Mapping the deformation in the "island of inversion": Inelastic scattering of 30Ne and 36Mg at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornenbal, P.; Scheit, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Aoi, N.; Li, K.; Matsushita, M.; Steppenbeck, D.; Wang, H.; Baba, H.; Ideguchi, E.; Kobayashi, N.; Kondo, Y.; Lee, J.; Michimasa, S.; Motobayashi, T.; Poves, A.; Sakurai, H.; Takechi, M.; Togano, Y.; Yoneda, K.

    2016-04-01

    The transition strengths of the first-excited 2+ states and deformation lengths of the nuclei 30Ne and 36Mg were determined via Coulomb- and nuclear-force-dominated inelastic scattering at intermediate energies. Beams of these exotic nuclei were produced at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory and were incident on lead and carbon targets at energies above 200 MeV/u . Absolute excitation cross sections on the lead target yielded reduced transition probabilities of 0.0277(79) and 0.0528(121) e2b2 , while the measurements with the carbon target revealed nuclear deformation lengths of δN=1.98 (11) and 1.93(11) fm for 30Ne and 36Mg, respectively. Corresponding quadrupole deformation parameters of β2˜0.5 from the two probes were found comparable in magnitude, showing no indication for a reduction in deformation along isotopic and isotonic chains from 32Mg towards the neutron drip-line. Comparisons to shell-model calculations illustrate the importance of neutron excitations across the N =20 shell for 30Ne and suggest that shallow maximums of collectivity may occur around N =22 and 24 along the neon and magnesium isotopic chains, respectively.

  15. Translational and extensional energy release rates (the J- and M-integrals) for a crack layer in thermoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Gommerstadt, B.

    1985-01-01

    A number of papers have been presented on the evaluation of energy release rate for thermoelasticity and corresponding J integral. Two main approaches were developed to treat energy release rate in elasticity. The first is based on direct calculation of the potential energy rate with respect to crack length. The second makes use of Lagrangian formalism. The translational and expansional energy release rates in thermoelasticity are studied by employing the formalism of irreversible thermodynamics and the Crack Layer Approach.

  16. Effect of finite width on deflection and energy release rate of an orthotropic double cantilever specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schapery, R. A.; Davidson, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of an orthotropic cantilevered plate subjected to a uniformly distributed end load is solved by the Rayleigh-Ritz energy method. The result is applied to laminated composite, double cantilevered specimens to estimate the effect of crack tip constraint on the transverse curvature, deflection and energy release rate. The solution is also utilized to determined finite width correction factors for fracture energy characterization tests in which neither plane stress nor plane strain conditions apply.

  17. Theoretical energy release of thermites, intermetallics, and combustible metals

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.H.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1998-06-01

    Thermite (metal oxide) mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels have long been used in pyrotechnic applications. Advantages of these systems typically include high energy density, impact insensitivity, high combustion temperature, and a wide range of gas production. They generally exhibit high temperature stability, and possess insensitive ignition properties. In this paper, the authors review the applications, benefits, and characteristics of thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels. Calculated values for reactant density, heat of reaction (per unit mass and per unit volume), and reaction temperature (without and with consideration of phase changes and the variation of specific heat values) are tabulated. These data are ranked in several ways, according to density, heat of reaction, reaction temperature, and gas production.

  18. Nuclear data processing for energy release and deposition calculations in the MC21 Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Trumbull, T. H.

    2013-07-01

    With the recent emphasis in performing multiphysics calculations using Monte Carlo transport codes such as MC21, the need for accurate estimates of the energy deposition-and the subsequent heating - has increased. However, the availability and quality of data necessary to enable accurate neutron and photon energy deposition calculations can be an issue. A comprehensive method for handling the nuclear data required for energy deposition calculations in MC21 has been developed using the NDEX nuclear data processing system and leveraging the capabilities of NJOY. The method provides a collection of data to the MC21 Monte Carlo code supporting the computation of a wide variety of energy release and deposition tallies while also allowing calculations with different levels of fidelity to be performed. Detailed discussions on the usage of the various components of the energy release data are provided to demonstrate novel methods in borrowing photon production data, correcting for negative energy release quantities, and adjusting Q values when necessary to preserve energy balance. Since energy deposition within a reactor is a result of both neutron and photon interactions with materials, a discussion on the photon energy deposition data processing is also provided. (authors)

  19. The relationship between critical strain energy release rate and fracture mode in multidirectional carbon-fiber/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Trakas, K.; Kortschot, M.T.

    1997-12-31

    It is proposed that the fracture surface of delaminated specimens, and hence the critical strain energy release rate, is dependent on both the mode of fracture and the orientation of the plies on either side of the delamination with respect to the propagation direction. Recent fractographs of Mode 3 delamination surfaces obtained by the authors have reinforced the idea that the properties, G{sub 11c} and G{sub 111c}, are structural rather than material properties for composite laminates. In this study, the relationship between the mode of fracture, the ply orientation, and the apparent interlaminar toughness has been explored. Standard double-cantilever-beam and end-notched flexure tests have been used, as has the newly developed Mode 3 modified split-cantilever beam test. Delaminations between plies of various orientations have been constrained to the desired plane using Teflon inserts running along the entire length of the specimen. As well, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fractography has been extensively used so that measured energies can be correlated to the surface deformation. While fractographs show that Modes 2 and 3 share common fractographic features, corresponding values of G, do not correlate, and it is shown that the large plastic zone of fractured Mode 2 specimens eliminates any comparison between the two. In contrast, Mode 1 delamination is found to be independent of the orientation of the delaminating plies.

  20. Theoretical Energy Release of Thermites, Intermetallics, and Combustible Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.H.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1999-05-14

    Thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels have long been used in pyrotechnic applications. Advantages of these systems typically include high energy density, high combustion temperature, and a wide range of gas production. They generally exhibit high temperature stability and possess insensitive ignition properties. For the specific applications of humanitarian demining and disposal of unexploded ordnance, these pyrotechnic formulations offer additional benefits. The combination of high thermal input with low brisance can be used to neutralize the energetic materials in mines and other ordnance without the "explosive" high-blast-pressure events that can cause extensive collateral damage to personnel, facilities, and the environment. In this paper, we review the applications, benefits, and characteristics of thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels. Calculated values for reactant density, heat of reaction (per unit mass and per unit volume), and reaction temperature (without and with consideration of phase changes and the variation of specific heat values) are tabulated. These data are ranked in several ways, according to density, heat of reaction, reaction temperature, and gas production.

  1. Intermittent Coronal Loop Oscillations by Random Energy Releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Briceño, César A.; Erdélyi, Robert

    2006-09-01

    High-resolution observations by the SOHO and TRACE spacecraft have confirmed the existence of coronal loop oscillations and waves. In a recent work, Mendoza-Briceño et al. studied the heating response of coronal plasma to energy pulses randomly distributed in time and space along coronal loops. In this paper we focus on the oscillatory patterns and other features, such as cool gas blobs traveling along the loop, during the evolution of spatiotemporal randomly heated flux tubes in the corona. The nature of these oscillatory patterns is investigated using wavelet analysis. Periodic features, such as wave packets, with periods of 150-220, 500-600, and 800-1000 s are found. It is also found that the periods increase with the loop length and decrease with the length of the loop segments along which the pulses are injected. On the other hand, the randomly driven intermittent cool plasma blobs that propagate from one footpoint to the other are analyzed. Although plenty of coronal loop oscillations are detected by the cohort of the current high-resolution satellites, there are more controversial observational evidences about the predicted cold plasma blobs.

  2. Experimental study of spontaneous release of accumulated energy in irradiated ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, E.; Kulagin, E.; Kulikov, S.; Melikhov, V.

    2003-06-01

    A phenomenon of spontaneous release of energy accumulated in some hydrogenous materials under fast neutron irradiation at low temperature was studied at a cryogenic irradiation facility of the IBR-2 reactor in Dubna for the purpose of cold neutron moderator development. Spontaneous release of energy occurred in water ice after 5-11 h of fast neutron irradiation at temperature <34 K and at absorbed dose rate 0.4 MGy/h. In contrast with previous data, no spontaneous burp was observed in solid methane.

  3. Energy release and transfer in solar flares: simulations of three-dimensional reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, Joachim; Fletches, L; Hesse, M; Neukirch, T

    2008-01-01

    Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations we investigate energy release and transfer in a three-dimensional extension of the standard two-ribbon flare picture. In this scenario reconnection is initiated in a thin current sheet (suggested to form below a departing coronal mass ejection) above a bipolar magnetic field. Two cases are contrasted: an initially force-free current sheet (low beta) and a finite-pressure current sheet (high beta). The energy conversion process from reconnect ion consists of incoming Poynting flux (from the release of magnetic energy) turned into up-and downgoing Poynting flux, enthalpy flux and bulk kinetic energy flux. In the low-beta case, the outgoing Poynting flux is the dominant contribution, whereas the outgoing enthalpy flux dominates in the high-beta case. The bulk kinetic energy flux is only a minor contribution, particularly in the downward direction. The dominance of the downgoing Poynting flux in the low-beta case is consistent with an alternative to the thick target electron beam model for solar flare energy transport, suggested recently by Fletcher and Hudson. For plausible characteristic parameters of the reconnecting field configuration, we obtain energy release time scales and and energy output rates that compare favorably with those inferred from observations for the impulsive phase of flares.

  4. [Releases of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus from sewage sludge at different microwave energy inputs].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong; Cheng, Zhen-min; Wang, Ya-wei; Xiao, Ben-yi; Wei, Yuan-song; Liu, Jun-xin

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the releases of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus from sludge treated by microwave irradiation were investigated by batch experiments at two microwave energy inputs (MEIs), 54 kJ and 108 kJ. The final temperatures of the treated samples at these two MEIs were about 56 degrees C and 90 degrees C, respectively. Results showed that the higher MEI was more helpful to release TC, TOC, TN and TP from sludge treated by microwave. The release rates of TC, TN and TP were doubled at the MEI of 108 kJ than that of 54 kJ, and their highest rates were 5.26%, 22.06% and 33.15%, respectively. The MLSS significantly affected releases of TOC, TC, TN, NH4+ -N, TP and ortho-PO4(3-). However, the microwave power (MWP) had no significant effect on these releases except IC. The normalization of these parameters, representing the energy efficiencies of treating sludge, clearly showed that the P (TP) was the highest and the P(IC) was the lowest. However, the average values of P(IC), P(NH4+ -N) and P(ortho-PO4(3-)) decreased at the same MISS concentration, respectively, about 67%, 73% and 56% when the MEI doubled from 54 kJ to 108 kJ. PMID:20187400

  5. Anaerobic energy release in working muscle during 30 s to 3 min of exhausting bicycling.

    PubMed

    Medbø, J I; Tabata, I

    1993-10-01

    To examine the anaerobic energy release during intense exercise, 16 healthy young men cycled as long as possible at constant powers chosen to exhaust the subjects in approximately 30 s, 1 min, or 2-3 min. Muscle biopsies were taken before and approximately 10 s after exercise and analyzed for lactate, phosphocreatine (PCr), and other metabolites. O2 uptake was measured for determination of the accumulated O2 deficit (a whole body measure of the anaerobic energy release), and this indirect measure of the anaerobic energy release was compared with a direct value obtained from measured muscle metabolites. Muscle lactate concentration rose by 30.0 +/- 1.2 mmol/kg and muscle PCr concentration fell by 12.4 +/- 0.9 mmol/kg during the 2-3 min of exhausting exercise. The anaerobic ATP production was consequently 58 +/- 2 mmol/kg wet muscle mass, which may be the maximum anaerobic energy release for human muscle during bicycling. Because the anaerobic ATP production was 6 and 32% less for 1 min and 30 s of exercise, respectively, than for 2 min of exercise (P < 0.03), 2 min of exhausting exercise may be required for maximal use of anaerobic sources. Lactate production provided three times more ATP than PCr breakdown for all three exercise durations. There was a close linear relationship between the rates of anaerobic ATP production in muscle and the value estimated for the whole body by the O2 deficit (r = 0.94). This suggests that the accumulated O2 deficit is a valid measure of the anaerobic energy release during bicycling. PMID:8282617

  6. Constraints on energy release in solar flares from RHESSI and GOES X-ray observations. II. Energetics and energy partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, A.; Mann, G.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We derive constraints on energy release, transport and conversion processes in solar flares based on a detailed characterization of the physical parameters of both the thermal plasma and the accelerated nonthermal electrons based on X-ray observations. In particular, we address the questions of whether the energy required to heat the thermal plasma can be supplied by nonthermal particles, and how the energetics derived from X-rays compare to the total bolometric radiated energy. Methods: Time series of spectral fits and images for 24 flares ranging from GOES class C3.4 to X17.2 were obtained using RHESSI hard X-ray observations. This has been supplemented by GOES soft X-ray fluxes. In our companion Paper I, we have used this data set to obtain the basic physical parameters for the thermal plasma (using the isothermal approximation) and the injected energetic electrons (assuming the thick-target model). Here, we used this data set to derive the flare energetics, including thermal energy, radiative and conductive energy loss, gravitational and flow energy of the plasma, and kinetic energy of the injected electrons. We studied how the thermal energies compare to the energy in nonthermal electrons, and how the various energetics and energy partition depend on flare importance. Results: All flare energetics show a good to excellent correlation with the peak GOES flux. The gravitational energy of the evaporated plasma and the kinetic energy of plasma flows can be neglected in the discussion of flare energetics. The radiative energy losses are comparable to the maximum thermal energy, while the conductive losses are considerably higher than the maximum thermal energy, especially in weaker flares. The total heating requirement of the hot plasma amounts to ≈50% of the total bolometric energy loss, with the conductive losses as a major contribution. The nonthermal energy input by energetic electrons is not sufficient to account for the total heating requirements of

  7. Structural Analysis of Shipping Casks, Vol. 9. Energy Absorption Capabilities of Plastically Deformed Struts Under Specified Impact Loading Conditions (Thesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.C.

    2001-02-19

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the energy absorption characteristics of plastically deformed inclined struts under impact loading. This information is needed to provide a usable method by which designers and analysts of shipping casks for radioactive or fissile materials can determine the energy absorption capabilities of external longitudinal fins on cylindrical casks under specified impact conditions. A survey of technical literature related to experimental determination of the dynamic plastic behavior of struts revealed no information directly applicable to the immediate problem, especially in the impact velocity ranges desired, and an experimental program was conducted to obtain the needed data. Mild-steel struts with rectangular cross sections were impacted by free-falling weights dropped from known heights. These struts or fin specimens were inclined at five different angles to simulate different angles of impact that fins on a shipping cask could experience under certain accident conditions. The resisting force of the deforming strut was measured and recorded as a function of time by using load cells instrumented with resistance strain gage bridges, signal conditioning equipment, an oscilloscope, and a Polaroid camera. The acceleration of the impacting weight was measured and recorded as a function of time during the latter portion of the testing program by using an accelerometer attached to the drop hammer, appropriate signal conditioning equipment, the oscilloscope, and the camera. A digital computer program was prepared to numerically integrate the force-time and acceleration-time data recorded during the tests to obtain deformation-time data. The force-displacement relationships were then integrated to obtain values of absorbed energy with respect to deformation or time. The results for various fin specimen geometries and impact angles are presented graphically, and these curves may be used to compute the energy absorption capacity of

  8. LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF PICOFLARE CATEGORY ENERGY RELEASES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, R.; Sasikumar Raja, K.; Kathiravan, C.; Satya Narayanan, A.

    2013-01-10

    We report low-frequency (80 MHz) radio observations of circularly polarized non-thermal type I radio bursts ({sup n}oise storms{sup )} in the solar corona whose estimated energy is {approx}10{sup 21} erg. These are the weakest energy release events reported to date in the solar atmosphere. The plot of the distribution of the number of bursts (dN) versus their corresponding peak flux density in the range S to S+dS shows a power-law behavior, i.e., dN {proportional_to} S {sup {gamma}} dS. The power-law index {gamma} is in the range -2.2 to -2.7 for the events reported in the present work. The present results provide independent observational evidence for the existence of picoflare category energy releases in the solar atmosphere which are yet to be explored.

  9. Numerical modeling of the energy storage and release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Weng, F. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on investigation of the photospheric magnetic field-line footpoint motion (usually referred to as shear motion) and magnetic flux emerging from below the surface in relation to energy storage in a solar flare. These causality relationships are demonstrated by using numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations. From these results, one may conclude that the energy stored in solar flares is in the form of currents. The dynamic process through which these currents reach a critical value is discussed as well as how these currents lead to energy release, such as the explosive events of solar flares.

  10. Transient solution for megajoule energy release in a lumped-parameter series RLC circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.; Dannenberg, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    A method is developed for optimizing the energy release from a megajoule capacitive discharge in a series RLC circuit with an RL load. Both the resistance and inductance of the load are represented by effective values that characterize their behavior during the discharge. Using Kirchhoff's laws, equations utilizing the load impedance and the external circuit impedance are derived for determining the instantaneous load voltage and energy characteristics. A program (ERES) computes and displays the load characteristics and the circuit current. Use of the ERES program allows a designer to perturbate values of the circuit elements in order to produce the desired time distribution for the load energy input.

  11. The energy release in earthquakes, and subduction zone seismicity and stress in slabs. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliou, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Energy release in earthquakes is discussed. Dynamic energy from source time function, a simplified procedure for modeling deep focus events, static energy estimates, near source energy studies, and energy and magnitude are addressed. Subduction zone seismicity and stress in slabs are also discussed.

  12. Kinetic-energy release in CO dissociation caused by fast F4+ impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Ginther, S. G.; Krishnamurthi, Vidhya; Carnes, K. D.

    1995-01-01

    The dissociation of CO caused by 1-MeV/amu F4+ impact has been studied using the coincidence time-of-flight technique. The kinetic energy released during the dissociation of COQ+ into ion pairs Cq1+ and Oq+2 was determined from the measured difference in the times of flight of the two charged fragments. The kinetic-energy distributions of CO2+ dissociating into C+ and O+ as a result of different impinging projectiles have been compared. These distributions shift towards higher kinetic-energy release values with increasing strength of interaction. A single Gaussian kinetic-energy distribution is in good agreement with the highly charged CO dissociation, while for doubly and triply charged CO, additional Gaussians are needed. While the Coulomb-explosion model approximately predicts the most likely value of a measured distribution, the widths of all distributions are grossly underestimated by the model. The measured widths of the distributions can be explained only by invoking the existence of potential-energy curves of the multiply charged ions that have steeper and shallower slopes as compared to the Coulombic curve. The reflection method was used to calculate the kinetic-energy release for F4++CO-->CO2+* transitions to all known CO2+ states. The final kinetic-energy distribution was then fitted to the data in order to evaluate the weights of the different transitions. The calculated fit is in fair agreement with the measured one, although the high-energy tail of the measured distribution could not be accounted for, indicating that contributions from highly excited dissociating states or from curve crossings need to be included.

  13. Influence of the Combustion Energy Release on Surface Accelerations of an HCCI Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, Jeffery A; Eaton, Scott J; Wagner, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Large cyclic variability along with increased combustion noise present in low temperature combustion (LTC) modes of internal combustion engines has driven the need for fast response, robust sensors for diagnostics and feedback control. Accelerometers have been shown as a possible technology for diagnostics and feedback control of advanced LTC operation in internal combustion engines. To make better use of this technology, an improved understanding is necessary of the effect of energy release from the combustion process on engine surface vibrations. This study explores the surface acceleration response for a single-cylinder engine operating with homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. Preliminary investigation of the engine surface accelerations is conducted using a finite element analysis of the engine cylinder jacket along with consideration of cylindrical modes of the engine cylinder. Measured in-cylinder pressure is utilized as a load input to the FE model to provide an initial comparison of the computed and measured surface accelerations. Additionally, the cylindrical cavity resonant modes of the engine geometry are computed and the in-cylinder pressure frequency content is examined to verify this resonant behavior. Experimental correlations between heat release and surface acceleration metrics are then used to identify specific acceleration frequency bands in which characteristics of the combustion heat release process is detected with minimal structural resonant influence. Investigation of a metric capable of indicting combustion phasing is presented. Impact of variations in the combustion energy release process on the surface accelerations is discussed.

  14. {Delta}I = 2 energy staggering in normal deformed dysprosium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.A.; Brown, T.B.; Archer, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Very high spin states (I{ge}50{Dirac_h}) have been observed in {sup 155,156,157}Dy. The long regular band sequences, free from sharp backbending effects, observed in these dysprosium nuclei offer the possibility of investigating the occurence of any {Delta}I = 2 staggering in normal deformed nuclei. Employing the same analysis techniques as used in superdeformed nuclei, certain bands do indeed demonstrate an apparent staggering and this is discussed.

  15. Blast Shock Wave Mitigation Using the Hydraulic Energy Redirection and Release Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Huang, Wei; Constantini, Shlomi

    2012-01-01

    A hydraulic energy redirection and release technology has been developed for mitigating the effects of blast shock waves on protected objects. The technology employs a liquid-filled plastic tubing as a blast overpressure transformer to transfer kinetic energy of blast shock waves into hydraulic energy in the plastic tubings. The hydraulic energy is redirected through the plastic tubings to the openings at the lower ends, and then is quickly released with the liquid flowing out through the openings. The samples of the specifically designed body armor in which the liquid-filled plastic tubings were installed vertically as the outer layer of the body armor were tested. The blast test results demonstrated that blast overpressure behind the body armor samples was remarkably reduced by 97% in 0.2 msec after the liquid flowed out of its appropriate volume through the openings. The results also suggested that a volumetric liquid surge might be created when kinetic energy of blast shock wave was transferred into hydraulic energy to cause a rapid physical movement or displacement of the liquid. The volumetric liquid surge has a strong destructive power, and can cause a noncontact, remote injury in humans (such as blast-induced traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder) if it is created in cardiovascular system. The hydraulic energy redirection and release technology can successfully mitigate blast shock waves from the outer surface of the body armor. It should be further explored as an innovative approach to effectively protect against blast threats to civilian and military personnel. PMID:22745740

  16. Blast shock wave mitigation using the hydraulic energy redirection and release technology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Huang, Wei; Constantini, Shlomi

    2012-01-01

    A hydraulic energy redirection and release technology has been developed for mitigating the effects of blast shock waves on protected objects. The technology employs a liquid-filled plastic tubing as a blast overpressure transformer to transfer kinetic energy of blast shock waves into hydraulic energy in the plastic tubings. The hydraulic energy is redirected through the plastic tubings to the openings at the lower ends, and then is quickly released with the liquid flowing out through the openings. The samples of the specifically designed body armor in which the liquid-filled plastic tubings were installed vertically as the outer layer of the body armor were tested. The blast test results demonstrated that blast overpressure behind the body armor samples was remarkably reduced by 97% in 0.2 msec after the liquid flowed out of its appropriate volume through the openings. The results also suggested that a volumetric liquid surge might be created when kinetic energy of blast shock wave was transferred into hydraulic energy to cause a rapid physical movement or displacement of the liquid. The volumetric liquid surge has a strong destructive power, and can cause a noncontact, remote injury in humans (such as blast-induced traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder) if it is created in cardiovascular system. The hydraulic energy redirection and release technology can successfully mitigate blast shock waves from the outer surface of the body armor. It should be further explored as an innovative approach to effectively protect against blast threats to civilian and military personnel. PMID:22745740

  17. Plasma radiation diagnostics of the primary energy release region in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. F.; Spicer, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility is investigated that the plasma turbulence used in many recent models of the primary energy release and acceleration in solar flares should be detectable by radiation near the fundamental and second harmonic of the plasma frequency. Formulae are derived for fundamental emission due to the combination of ion-acoustic and Langmuir plasma turbulence and for second harmonic emission due to the combination of two Langmuir waves. These results are applied to recent primary energy release and acceleration models which shows that either such radiation should be detectable and possibly distinguishable with suitable microwave interferometers or that its absence places fairly stringent constraints on the possible level of Langmuir or Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in these models.

  18. Magnetic reconnection and energy release in a long-duration stellar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto, G.; Pallavicini, R.; Kopp, R. A.

    A dynamical model of magnetic reconnection in solar two-ribbon flares is applied to Exosat observations of a long-decay flare from the star EQ Peg. It is shown that the model is capable of reproducing correctly the energy release rate and temporal evolution of the decay phase of the observed flare. It is concluded that the flare was the stellar counterpart of solar two-ribbon flares, and the physical parameters of the emitting region are derived.

  19. Convergence of strain energy release rate components for edge-delaminated composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Crews, J. H., Jr.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    Strain energy release rates for edge delaminated composite laminates were obtained using quasi 3 dimensional finite element analysis. The problem of edge delamination at the -35/90 interfaces of an 8-ply composite laminate subjected to uniform axial strain was studied. The individual components of the strain energy release rates did not show convergence as the delamination tip elements were made smaller. In contrast, the total strain energy release rate converged and remained unchanged as the delamination tip elements were made smaller and agreed with that calculated using a classical laminated plate theory. The studies of the near field solutions for a delamination at an interface between two dissimilar isotropic or orthotropic plates showed that the imaginary part of the singularity is the cause of the nonconvergent behavior of the individual components. To evaluate the accuracy of the results, an 8-ply laminate with the delamination modeled in a thin resin layer, that exists between the -35 and 90 plies, was analyzed. Because the delamination exists in a homogeneous isotropic material, the oscillatory component of the singularity vanishes.

  20. Deformation mechanisms, architecture, and petrophysical properties of large normal faults in platform carbonates and their role in the release of carbon dioxide from earth's interior in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, Fabrizio

    2006-04-01

    A challenging theme of research in structural geology is the process of faulting in carbonate rocks: how do the resulting internal architecture and petrophysical properties of faults affect subsurface fluid flow. A better understanding of this process is important to evaluate the potential oil and gas recovery from carbonate reservoirs, and to plan CO 2 containment in the depleted reservoirs. Carbonate rocks may deform with different mechanisms depending primarily on their original sedimentary fabric, diagenetic history, fluid content, and tectonic environment. In this dissertation I investigate the deformation mechanisms, petrophysics, and internal fluid composition of large, seismic, basin-bounding normal faults in low porosity platform carbonates. Based on the nature, orientation, and abutting relationships of the structural elements preserved within the faults and in the surrounding carbonate host rocks, I was able to characterize the mechanisms of fault growth and the fault architecture. Incipient faulting occurred at shallow depths by sequential formation and shearing of pressure solution seams and joints/veins; with ongoing deformation and exhumation, the joint-based mechanism became predominant. The end result is a mature normal fault that juxtaposes basin sedimentary rocks of the hanging wall against deformed carbonates of the footwall. The deformed carbonates of the fault footwalls are composed of rocks with low porosity and permeability and major slip surfaces in the fault core, and fragmented carbonate matrices with high porosity and permeability, and small faults in the damage zone. The degree of fragmentation in the damage zone generally increases towards the fault hanging wall, forming structural domains characterized by different deformation intensity. The rocks of the fault core have sub-spherical pores, those of the damage zone have elongated, crack-like, pores. The permeability structure of the normal fault zones is therefore made up of a fault

  1. Energy Release from Impacting Prominence Material Following the 2011 June 7 Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, H. R.; Inglis, A. R.; Mays, M. L.; Ofman, L.; Thompson, B. J.; Young, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Solar filaments exhibit a range of eruptive-like dynamic activity, ranging from the full or partial eruption of the filament mass and surrounding magnetic structure as a coronal mass ejection to a fully confined or failed eruption. On 2011 June 7, a dramatic partial eruption of a filament was observed by multiple instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory. One of the interesting aspects of this event is the response of the solar atmosphere as non-escaping material falls inward under the influence of gravity. The impact sites show clear evidence of brightening in the observed extreme ultraviolet wavelengths due to energy release. Two plausible physical mechanisms for explaining the brightening are considered: heating of the plasma due to the kinetic energy of impacting material compressing the plasma, or reconnection between the magnetic field of low-lying loops and the field carried by the impacting material. By analyzing the emission of the brightenings in several SDO/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly wavelengths, and comparing the kinetic energy of the impacting material (7.6 × 10(exp 26) - 5.8 × 10(exp 27) erg) to the radiative energy (approx. 1.9 × 10(exp 25) - 2.5 × 10(exp 26) erg), we find the dominant mechanism of energy release involved in the observed brightening is plasma compression.

  2. Radio and X-ray Diagnostics of Energy Release in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin

    2013-07-01

    Solar flares involve catastrophic release of magnetic energy previously stored in the Sun's corona. This dissertation focuses on studies of radio and hard X-ray emissions as diagnostics of energy release in flares. A major part of the dissertation is exploiting spatially resolved dynamic spectroscopy to study coherent radio bursts. The Frequency-Agile Solar Radiotelescope Subsystem Testbed, a three-element radio interferometer, provides the first opportunity of doing such studies on zebra-pattern bursts. The observations allow us to identify the relevant emission mechanism, enabling diagnostics of the plasma parameters in the source. With the help of coronal magnetic field extrapolations, the source is placed into a three-dimensional magnetic field configuration and its relation to the energy release is clarified. The next part of the dissertation discusses the "solar mode" commissioning of the upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). As a general purpose telescope, special provisions should be made for the VLA to enable solar observations. Based on the test results on the VLA's hardware, solar observing and calibration strategies are developed. Now the VLA is capable of observing the Sun with simultaneous imaging and dynamic spectroscopy over a large bandwidth at high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions. The upgraded VLA is used to observe decimetric type III radio bursts, which are the radio signature of propagating fast electron beams produced in flares. The new observing technique allows detailed trajectories of these electron beams to be derived. Combined with multi-wavelength observations, the properties of the energy release site, electron beams, and the surrounding coronal medium are deduced. The dissertation also presents a study on coronal hard X-ray/gamma-ray sources. Rather extreme conditions are needed to account for some observed coronal hard X-ray/gamma-ray sources using the usually-assumed non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission. This

  3. Haglund's Deformity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Haglund’s Deformity? Haglund’s deformity is a bony enlargement on the back of the heel. The soft ... the Achilles tendon becomes irritated when the bony enlargement rubs against shoes. This often leads to painful ...

  4. Linear Free Energy Correlations for Fission Product Release from the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-03-03

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes, et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the source of the radionuclides to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form ln χ = -α (ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)+β were obtained between the deposited concentration and the reduction potential of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn(TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2130 K and 2220 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, 151Sm through atmospheric venting and releases during the first month following the accident were performed, and indicate large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  5. Front propagation in a bistable system: How the energy is released

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. V.; Gendelman, O. V.; Manevitch, L. I.

    2014-05-01

    In this Rapid Communication we consider a front of transition between metastable and stable states in a conservative system. Due to the difference of energies between initial and finite states, such transition front can propagate only while radiating energy. A simulation of such a process in a one-dimensional nonlinear lattice shows an essential imbalance between the energy released in each act of transition, and the density of energy of oscillations behind the front. It means that the stationary front propagation must be accompanied by an essentially nonstationary radiative process. We reveal the origin of this phenomenon and show that the characteristics of the front propagation critically depend on boundary conditions. In the framework of a simple model of a bistable system we propose analytic evaluation of all important features of the transition process, such as front velocity, radiation frequency, and oscillation amplitude. All calculated values are in good agreement with numerical simulation data.

  6. Stretchable and Waterproof Self-Charging Power System for Harvesting Energy from Diverse Deformation and Powering Wearable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fang; Wang, Jie; Wang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Simiao; Li, Shengming; Liao, Qingliang; Xu, Youlong; You, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-07-26

    A soft, stretchable, and fully enclosed self-charging power system is developed by seamlessly combining a stretchable triboelectric nanogenerator with stretchable supercapacitors, which can be subject to and harvest energy from almost all kinds of large-degree deformation due to its fully soft structure. The power system is washable and waterproof owing to its fully enclosed structure and hydrophobic property of its exterior surface. The power system can be worn on the human body to effectively scavenge energy from various kinds of human motion, and it is demonstrated that the wearable power source is able to drive an electronic watch. This work provides a feasible approach to design stretchable, wearable power sources and electronics. PMID:27351212

  7. Enclosure fire hazard analysis using relative energy release criteria. [burning rate and combustion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    A method for predicting the probable course of fire development in an enclosure is presented. This fire modeling approach uses a graphic plot of five fire development constraints, the relative energy release criteria (RERC), to bound the heat release rates in an enclosure as a function of time. The five RERC are flame spread rate, fuel surface area, ventilation, enclosure volume, and total fuel load. They may be calculated versus time based on the specified or empirical conditions describing the specific enclosure, the fuel type and load, and the ventilation. The calculation of these five criteria, using the common basis of energy release rates versus time, provides a unifying framework for the utilization of available experimental data from all phases of fire development. The plot of these criteria reveals the probable fire development envelope and indicates which fire constraint will be controlling during a criteria time period. Examples of RERC application to fire characterization and control and to hazard analysis are presented along with recommendations for the further development of the concept.

  8. Kinetic Modeling of Slow Energy Release in Non-Ideal Carbon Rich Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Fried, L; Glaesemann, K; Souers, C

    2006-06-20

    We present here the first self-consistent kinetic based model for long time-scale energy release in detonation waves in the non-ideal explosive LX-17. Non-ideal, insensitive carbon rich explosives, such as those based on TATB, are believed to have significant late-time slow release in energy. One proposed source of this energy is diffusion-limited growth of carbon clusters. In this paper we consider the late-time energy release problem in detonation waves using the thermochemical code CHEETAH linked to a multidimensional ALE hydrodynamics model. The linked CHEETAH-ALE model dimensional treats slowly reacting chemical species using kinetic rate laws, with chemical equilibrium assumed for species coupled via fast time-scale reactions. In the model presented here we include separate rate equations for the transformation of the un-reacted explosive to product gases and for the growth of a small particulate form of condensed graphite to a large particulate form. The small particulate graphite is assumed to be in chemical equilibrium with the gaseous species allowing for coupling between the instantaneous thermodynamic state and the production of graphite clusters. For the explosive burn rate a pressure dependent rate law was used. Low pressure freezing of the gas species mass fractions was also included to account for regions where the kinetic coupling rates become longer than the hydrodynamic time-scales. The model rate parameters were calibrated using cylinder and rate-stick experimental data. Excellent long time agreement and size effect results were achieved.

  9. A Semi-Analytical Method for Determining the Energy Release Rate of Cracks in Adhesively-Bonded Single-Lap Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Charles; Sun, Wenjun; Tomblin, John S.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2007-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for determining the strain energy release rate due to a prescribed interface crack in an adhesively-bonded, single-lap composite joint subjected to axial tension is presented. The field equations in terms of displacements within the joint are formulated by using first-order shear deformable, laminated plate theory together with kinematic relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. Based on the adhesive stress distributions, the forces at the crack tip are obtained and the strain energy release rate of the crack is determined by using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). Additionally, the test specimen geometry from both the ASTM D3165 and D1002 test standards are utilized during the derivation of the field equations in order to correlate analytical models with future test results. The system of second-order differential field equations is solved to provide the adherend and adhesive stress response using the symbolic computation tool, Maple 9. Finite element analyses using J-integral as well as VCCT were performed to verify the developed analytical model. The finite element analyses were conducted using the commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. The results determined using the analytical method correlated well with the results from the finite element analyses.

  10. Energy harvesting of dielectric elastomer generators concerning inhomogeneous fields and viscoelastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiefeng; Qu, Shaoxing; Yang, Wei

    2012-08-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators convert mechanical work into electrical energy. Previous tests on membrane inflation elastomer generators, however, indicated rather low efficiency on energy harvesting. To characterize this phenomenon, an analytical model for viscoelastic dielectric elastomer generators is presented to maximize the energy conversion. The analysis is intended for inhomogeneous fields. The result indicates that viscoelasticity and instabilities during inflation and deflation degrade the efficiency of energy conversion and the specific electrical energy generated per cycle. Rapid loading and unloading, as well as appropriate pre-stretches, are found to upgrade the performances of the dielectric elastomer generators. The analysis may guide the design of dielectric elastomer generators.

  11. Chemical Energy Release in Several Recently Discovered Detonation and Deflagration Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.

    2010-10-01

    Several recent experiments on complex detonation and deflagration flows are analyzed in terms of the chemical energy release required to sustain these flows. The observed double cellular structures in detonating gaseous nitromethane-oxygen and NO2-fuel (H2, CH4, and C2H6) mixtures are explained by the amplification of two distinct pressure wave frequencies by two exothermic reactions, the faster reaction forming vibrationally excited NO* and the slower reaction forming highly vibrationally excited N2**. The establishment of a Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) deflagration behind a weak shock wave, the C-J detonation established after a head-on collision with a shock front, and the C-J detonation conditions established in reactive supersonic flows are quantitatively calculated using the chemical energy release of a H2 + Cl2 mixture. For these three reactive flows, these calculations illustrate that different fractions of the exothermic chemical energy are used to sustain steady-state propagation. C-J detonation calculations on the various initial states using the CHEETAH chemical equilibrium code are shown to be in good agreement with experimental detonation velocity measurements for the head-on collision and supersonic flow detonations.

  12. Residual thermal and moisture influences on the strain energy release rate analysis of local delaminations from matrix cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis utilizing laminated plate theory is developed to calculate the strain energy release rate associated with local delaminations originating at off-axis, single ply, matrix cracks in laminates subjected to uniaxial loads. The analysis includes the contribution of residual thermal and moisture stresses to the strain energy released. Examples are calculated for the strain energy release rate associated with local delaminations originating at 90 degrees and angle-ply (non-90 degrees) matrix ply cracks in glass epoxy and graphite epoxy laminates. The solution developed may be used to assess the relative contribution of mechanical, residual thermal, and moisture stresses on the strain energy release rate for local delamination for a variety of layups and materials.

  13. Burnup of rhodium SPND in VVER-1000: Method for determination of linear energy release by SPND readings

    SciTech Connect

    Kurchenkov, A. Yu.

    2011-12-15

    A method for determination of linear energy release of a VVER fuel assembly near a rhodium self-powered neutron detector (SPND) is described. The dependence of SPND burnup on the charge passing through it is specified.

  14. Significant release of shear energy of the North Korean nuclear test on February 12, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    On February 12, 2013 the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) carried out an announced nuclear test, which was the third after tests conducted in 2006 and 2009. An important task in discriminating a man-made explosion and a natural tectonic earthquake is the analysis of seismic waveforms. To determine the isotropic and non-isotropic characteristics of the detonation source, I invert long-period seismic data for the full seismic moment tensor to match the observed seismic signals by synthetic waveforms based on a 3D Earth model. Here, I show that the inversion of long-period seismic data of the 2013 test reveals a clear explosive (isotropic) component combined with a significant release of shear energy by the double-couple part of the moment tensor. While the isotropic part of the nuclear test in 2009 was similar to that in 2013, the double-couple part was lower by a factor of 0.55 compared to the explosion in 2013. Moreover, the ratio of the isotropic seismic moments of the 2013 and 2009 nuclear tests is 1.4 ± 0.1 and lower than published estimations of the yield ratio, which indicates the importance of considering the release of shear energy. The determined orientation of the double-couple fault plane is parallel to the dominating geologic fault structures NNE-SSW to NE-SW, but the calculated normal faulting mechanism does not correspond to the general tectonic strike-slip regime. Thus, explanations for the enhanced release of shear energy might be induced dip-slip motion pre-stressed by the previous test or near source damaging effects due to a changed containment of the nuclear explosion.

  15. Variation of the energy release rate as a crack approaches and passes through an elastic inclusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Rongshun; Chudnovsky, A.

    1993-01-01

    The variation of the energy release rate (ERP) at the tip of a crack penetrating an elastic inclusion is analyzed using an approach involving modeling the random array of microcracks or other defects by an elastic inclusion with effective elastic properties. Computations are carried out using a finite element procedure. The eight-noded isoparametric serendipity element with the shift of the midpoint to the quarter-point is used to simulate the singularity at the crack tip, and the crack growth is accommodated by implementing a mesh regeneration technique. The ERP values were calculated for various crack tip positions which simulate the process of the crack approaching and penetrating the inclusion.

  16. Observational clues to the energy release process in impulsive solar bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, David

    1990-01-01

    The nature of the energy release process that produces impulsive bursts of hard X-rays and microwaves during solar flares is discussed, based on new evidence obtained using the method of Crannell et al. (1978). It is shown that the hard X-ray spectral index gamma is negatively correlated with the microwave peak frequency, suggesting a common source for the microwaves and X-rays. The thermal and nonthermal models are compared. It is found that the most straightforward explanations for burst time behavior are shock-wave particle acceleration in the nonthermal model and thermal conduction fronts in the thermal model.

  17. Spatiotemporal Organization of Energy Release Events in the Quiet Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvenic interactions.

  18. Spatiotemporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-11-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvénic interactions.

  19. New RHESSI Results on Particle Acceleration and Energy Release in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    2003-01-01

    The primary scientific objective of NASA RHESSI mission (launched February 2002) is to investigate the physics of particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares, through imaging and spectroscopy of X-ray gamma-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines emitted by accelerated electrons and ions, respectively. Here I summarize the new solar observations, including the first hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy, the first high resolution spectroscopy of solar gamma ray lines, the first imaging of solar gamma ray lines and continuum, and the highest sensitivity hard X-ray observations of microflares and type III solar radio bursts.

  20. Linear free energy correlations for fission product release from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M

    2015-03-01

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the initial source of the radionuclides to the environment to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form In χ = −α ((ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)) + β were obtained between the deposited concentrations, and the reduction potentials of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn (TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2015 and 2060 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, and 151Sm through atmospheric venting during the first month following the accident were obtained, indicating that large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores. PMID:25675358

  1. Comparison between diffraction contrast tomography and high-energy diffraction microscopy on a slightly deformed aluminium alloy.

    PubMed

    Renversade, Loïc; Quey, Romain; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Menasche, David; Maddali, Siddharth; Suter, Robert M; Borbély, András

    2016-01-01

    The grain structure of an Al-0.3 wt%Mn alloy deformed to 1% strain was reconstructed using diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) and high-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM). 14 equally spaced HEDM layers were acquired and their exact location within the DCT volume was determined using a generic algorithm minimizing a function of the local disorientations between the two data sets. The microstructures were then compared in terms of the mean crystal orientations and shapes of the grains. The comparison shows that DCT can detect subgrain boundaries with disorientations as low as 1° and that HEDM and DCT grain boundaries are on average 4 µm apart from each other. The results are important for studies targeting the determination of grain volume. For the case of a polycrystal with an average grain size of about 100 µm, a relative deviation of about ≤10% was found between the two techniques. PMID:26870379

  2. Total and partial capture cross sections in reactions with deformed nuclei at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzyakin, R. A. Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2013-06-15

    Within the quantum diffusion approach, the capture of a projectile nucleus by a target nucleus is studied at bombarding energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The effects of deformation of interacting nuclei and neutron transfer between them on the total and partial capture cross sections and the mean angular momentum of the captured system are studied. The results obtained for the {sup 16}O + {sup 112}Cd, {sup 152}Sm, and {sup 184}W; {sup 19}F +{sup 175}Lu; {sup 28}Si +{sup 94,100}Mo and {sup 154}Sm; {sup 40}Ca +{sup 96}Zr; {sup 48}Ca+ {sup 90}Zr; and {sup 64}Ni +{sup 58,64}Ni, {sup 92,96}Zr, and {sup 100}Mo reactions are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  3. Comparison between diffraction contrast tomography and high-energy diffraction microscopy on a slightly deformed aluminium alloy

    PubMed Central

    Renversade, Loïc; Quey, Romain; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Menasche, David; Maddali, Siddharth; Suter, Robert M.; Borbély, András

    2016-01-01

    The grain structure of an Al–0.3 wt%Mn alloy deformed to 1% strain was reconstructed using diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) and high-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM). 14 equally spaced HEDM layers were acquired and their exact location within the DCT volume was determined using a generic algorithm minimizing a function of the local disorientations between the two data sets. The microstructures were then compared in terms of the mean crystal orientations and shapes of the grains. The comparison shows that DCT can detect subgrain boundaries with disorientations as low as 1° and that HEDM and DCT grain boundaries are on average 4 µm apart from each other. The results are important for studies targeting the determination of grain volume. For the case of a polycrystal with an average grain size of about 100 µm, a relative deviation of about ≤10% was found between the two techniques. PMID:26870379

  4. Total and partial capture cross sections in reactions with deformed nuclei at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakin, R. A.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2013-06-01

    Within the quantum diffusion approach, the capture of a projectile nucleus by a target nucleus is studied at bombarding energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The effects of deformation of interacting nuclei and neutron transfer between them on the total and partial capture cross sections and the mean angular momentum of the captured system are studied. The results obtained for the 16O + 112Cd, 152Sm, and 184W; 19F +175Lu; 28Si +94,100Mo and 154Sm; 40Ca +96Zr; 48Ca+ 90Zr; and 64Ni +58,64Ni, 92,96Zr, and 100Mo reactions are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  5. A model for a constrained, finitely deforming, elastic solid with rotation gradient dependent strain energy, and its specialization to von Kármán plates and beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa, A. R.; Reddy, J. N.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop the governing equations for a fully constrained finitely deforming hyperelastic Cosserat continuum where the directors are constrained to rotate with the body rotation. This is the generalization of small deformation couple stress theories and would be useful for developing mathematical models for an elastic material with embedded stiff short fibers or inclusions (e.g., materials with carbon nanotubes or nematic elastomers, cellular materials with oriented hard phases, open cell foams, and other similar materials), that account for certain longer range interactions. The theory is developed as a limiting case of a regular Cosserat elastic material where the directors are allowed to rotate freely by considering the case of a high "rotational mismatch energy". The theory is developed using the formalism of Lagrangian mechanics, with the static case being based on Castigliano's first theorem. By considering the stretch U and the rotation R as additional independent variables and using the polar decomposition theorem as an additional constraint equation, we obtain the governing and as well as the boundary conditions for finite deformations. The resulting equations are further specialized for plane strain and axisymmetric finite deformations, deformations of beams and plates with small strain and moderate rotation, and for small deformation theories. We also show that the boundary conditions for this theory involve "surface tension" like terms due to the higher gradients in the strain energy function. For beams and plates, the rotational gradient dependent strain energy does not require additional variables (unlike Cosserat theories) and additional differential equations; nor do they raise the order of the differential equations, thus allowing us to include a material length scale dependent response at no extra "computational cost" even for finite deformation beam/plate theories

  6. Strain energy release rate analysis of delamination in a tapered laminate subjected to tension load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Raju, I. S.; Obrien, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    A tapered composite laminate subjected to tension load was analyzed using the finite-element method. The glass/epoxy laminate has a (+ or - 45)sub 3 group of plies dropped in three distinct steps, each 20 ply-thicknesses apart, thus forming a taper angle of 5.71 degrees. Steep gradients of interlaminar normal and shear stress on a potential delamination interface suggest the existence of stress singularities at the points of material and geometric discontinuities created by the internal plydrops. The delamination was assumed to initiate at the thin end of the taper on a -45/+45 interface and the delamination growth was simulated in both directions, i.e., along the taper and into the thin region. The strain-energy-release rate for a delamination growing into the thin laminate consisted predominantly of mode I (opening) component. For a delamination growing along the tapered region, the strain-energy-release rate was initially all mode I, but the proportion of mode I decreased with increase in delamination size until eventually total G was all mode II. The total G for both delamination tips increased with increase in delamination size, indicating that a delamination initiating at the end of the taper will grow unstably along the taper and into the thin laminate simultaneously.

  7. Application of the relative energy release criteria to enclosure fire testing. [aircraft compartments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roschke, E. J.; Coulbert, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    The five relative energy release criteria (RERC) which are a first step towards formulating a unified concept that can be applied to the development of fires in enclosures, place upper bounds on the rate and amount of energy released during a fire. They are independent, calculated readily, and may be applied generally to any enclosure regardless of size. They are useful in pretest planning and for interpreting experimental data. Data from several specific fire test programs were examined to evaluate the potential use of RERC to provide test planning guidelines. The RERC were compared with experimental data obtained in full-scale enclosures. These results confirm that in general the RERC do identify the proper limiting constraints on enclosure fire development and determine the bounds of the fire development envelope. Plotting actual fire data against the RERC reveals new valid insights into fire behavior and reveals the controlling constraints in fire development. The RERC were calculated and plotted for several descrpitions of full-scale fires in various aircraft compartments.

  8. New evidence of EIBS & IINF model on energy release in solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Run Bao

    I developed a model named electron-ion bound state and its introducing nuclear fusion EIBS IINF in 1994 It met thoroughly and widely doubt The EIBS IINF model give the idea for solar flare energy release as following these are two independent processes of emission in solar flare p-e-p sim 12 5keV soft X-ray and p-e-A sim 25keV are source of soft X-ray sim 12 5keV or 25keV mainly d -e-d sim 25keV and d d fusion and secondary reactions producing gamma -ray are source of hard X-ray sim 13keV Widely accepted Neupert effect model or evaporation model or thick target model is contradiction to observations New observations by BATSE SPEC and LAD especially by RHESSI provide firmly evidences indicating that the EIBS IINF model is suitable to explain the mechanism of energy release in solar flare Reference 1 R P Lin P T Fetter and R A Schwartz APJ557 L125-L128 2001 2 S Krucker and R P Lin Solar Phys 210 229-243 2002 3 A O Benz and P C Grigis Solar Physics 210 431-444 2002

  9. Possible two-step solar energy release mechanism due to turbulent magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Quanlin; Feng Xueshang; Xiang Changqing

    2005-05-15

    In this paper, a possible two-step solar magnetic energy release process attributed to turbulent magnetic reconnection is investigated by magnetohydrodynamic simulation for the purpose of accounting for the closely associated observational features including canceling magnetic features and different kinds of small-scale activities such as ultraviolet explosive events in the lower solar atmosphere. Numerical results based on realistic transition region physical parameters show that magnetic reconnections in a vertical turbulent current sheet consist of two stages, i.e., a first slow Sweet-Parker-like reconnection and a later rapid Petschek-like reconnection, where the latter fast reconnection phase seems a direct consequence of the initial slow reconnection phase when a critical state is reached. The formation of coherent plasmoid of various sizes and their coalescence play a central role in this complex nonlinear evolution. The 'observed' values of the rate of cancellation flux as well as the approaching velocity of magnetic fragments of inverse polarity in present simulation are well consistent with the corresponding measurements in the latest observations. The difference between our turbulent magnetic reconnection two-step energy release model and other schematic two-step models is discussed and then possible application of present outcome to solar explosives is described.

  10. Effect of stacking fault energy on mechanism of plastic deformation in nanotwinned FCC metals

    SciTech Connect

    Borovikov, Valery; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; King, Alexander H.; LeSar, Richard

    2015-05-15

    Starting from a semi-empirical potential designed for Cu, we have developed a series of potentials that provide essentially constant values of all significant (calculated) materials properties except for the intrinsic stacking fault energy, which varies over a range that encompasses the lowest and highest values observed in nature. In addition, these potentials were employed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate how stacking fault energy affects the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned face-centered cubic (FCC) materials. The results indicate that properties such as yield strength and microstructural stability do not vary systematically with stacking fault energy, but rather fall into two distinct regimes corresponding to 'low' and 'high' stacking fault energies.

  11. Effect of stacking fault energy on mechanism of plastic deformation in nanotwinned FCC metals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borovikov, Valery; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; King, Alexander H.; LeSar, Richard

    2015-05-15

    Starting from a semi-empirical potential designed for Cu, we have developed a series of potentials that provide essentially constant values of all significant (calculated) materials properties except for the intrinsic stacking fault energy, which varies over a range that encompasses the lowest and highest values observed in nature. In addition, these potentials were employed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate how stacking fault energy affects the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned face-centered cubic (FCC) materials. The results indicate that properties such as yield strength and microstructural stability do not vary systematically with stacking fault energy, but rather fall into twomore » distinct regimes corresponding to 'low' and 'high' stacking fault energies.« less

  12. Soft computing analysis of the possible correlation between temporal and energy release patterns in seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantaras, Anthony; Katsifarakis, Emmanouil; Artzouxaltzis, Xristos; Makris, John; Vallianatos, Filippos; Varley, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary investigation of the possible correlation of temporal and energy release patterns of seismic activity involving the preparation processes of consecutive sizeable seismic events [1,2]. The background idea is that during periods of low-level seismic activity, stress processes in the crust accumulate energy at the seismogenic area whilst larger seismic events act as a decongesting mechanism releasing considerable energy [3,4]. A dynamic algorithm is being developed aiming to identify and cluster pre- and post- seismic events to the main earthquake following on research carried out by Zubkov [5] and Dobrovolsky [6,7]. This clustering technique along with energy release equations dependent on Richter's scale [8,9] allow for an estimate to be drawn regarding the amount of the energy being released by the seismic sequence. The above approach is being implemented as a monitoring tool to investigate the behaviour of the underlying energy management system by introducing this information to various neural [10,11] and soft computing models [1,12,13,14]. The incorporation of intelligent systems aims towards the detection and simulation of the possible relationship between energy release patterns and time-intervals among consecutive sizeable earthquakes [1,15]. Anticipated successful training of the imported intelligent systems may result in a real-time, on-line processing methodology [1,16] capable to dynamically approximate the time-interval between the latest and the next forthcoming sizeable seismic event by monitoring the energy release process in a specific seismogenic area. Indexing terms: pattern recognition, long-term earthquake precursors, neural networks, soft computing, earthquake occurrence intervals References [1] Konstantaras A., Vallianatos F., Varley M.R. and Makris J. P.: ‘Soft computing modelling of seismicity in the southern Hellenic arc', IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 5 (3), pp. 323-327, 2008 [2] Eneva M. and

  13. Soft computing analysis of the possible correlation between temporal and energy release patterns in seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantaras, Anthony; Katsifarakis, Emmanouil; Artzouxaltzis, Xristos; Makris, John; Vallianatos, Filippos; Varley, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary investigation of the possible correlation of temporal and energy release patterns of seismic activity involving the preparation processes of consecutive sizeable seismic events [1,2]. The background idea is that during periods of low-level seismic activity, stress processes in the crust accumulate energy at the seismogenic area whilst larger seismic events act as a decongesting mechanism releasing considerable energy [3,4]. A dynamic algorithm is being developed aiming to identify and cluster pre- and post- seismic events to the main earthquake following on research carried out by Zubkov [5] and Dobrovolsky [6,7]. This clustering technique along with energy release equations dependent on Richter's scale [8,9] allow for an estimate to be drawn regarding the amount of the energy being released by the seismic sequence. The above approach is being implemented as a monitoring tool to investigate the behaviour of the underlying energy management system by introducing this information to various neural [10,11] and soft computing models [1,12,13,14]. The incorporation of intelligent systems aims towards the detection and simulation of the possible relationship between energy release patterns and time-intervals among consecutive sizeable earthquakes [1,15]. Anticipated successful training of the imported intelligent systems may result in a real-time, on-line processing methodology [1,16] capable to dynamically approximate the time-interval between the latest and the next forthcoming sizeable seismic event by monitoring the energy release process in a specific seismogenic area. Indexing terms: pattern recognition, long-term earthquake precursors, neural networks, soft computing, earthquake occurrence intervals References [1] Konstantaras A., Vallianatos F., Varley M.R. and Makris J. P.: ‘Soft computing modelling of seismicity in the southern Hellenic arc', IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 5 (3), pp. 323-327, 2008 [2] Eneva M. and

  14. Crustal deformation and earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The manner in which the Earth's surface deforms during the cycle of stress accumulation and release along major faults is investigated. In an investigation of the crustal deformation associated with a thin channel asthenosphere displacements are reduced from those computed for a half space asthenosphere. A previous finding by other workers that displacements are enhanced when flow is confined to a thin channel is based on several invalid approximations. The major predictions of the finite element model are that the near field postseismic displacements and strain rates are less than those for a half space asthenosphere and that the postseismic strain rates at intermediate distances are greater (in magnitude). The finite width of the asthenosphere ceases to have a significant impact on the crustal deformation pattern when its magnitude exceeds about three lithosphere thicknesses.

  15. Using Sdo's AIA to Investigate Energy Transport from a Flare's Energy Release Site to the Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Holman, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated observations of a GOES B4.8 microflare with SDOs Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the RamatyHigh Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on 2010 July 31 show that emission in all seven of AIAs EUV channels brightened simultaneously nearly 6 min before RHESSI or GOES detected emission from plasma at temperatures around 10 MK. Aims. To help interpret these and AIA flare observations in general, we characterized the expected temporal responses of AIAs 94, 131, 171, 193, 211, and 335 channels to solar flare brightenings by combining (1) AIAs nominal temperature response functions available through SSWIDL with (2) EUV spectral line data observed in a flare loop Coordinated observations of a GOES B4.8 microflare with SDOs Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the RamatyHigh Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on 2010 July 31 show that emission in all seven of AIAs EUV channels brightenedsimultaneously nearly 6 min before RHESSI or GOES detected emission from plasma at temperatures around 10 MK.Aims. To help interpret these and AIA flare observations in general, we characterized the expected temporal responses of AIAs 94,131, 171, 193, 211, and 335 channels to solar flare brightenings by combining (1) AIAs nominal temperature response functionsavailable through SSWIDL with (2) EUV spectral line data observed in a flare loop

  16. Strain-energy release rate analysis of cyclic delamination growth in compressively loaded laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates was studied analytically and experimentally. The configuration used was a laminate with an across-the-width delamination. An approximate super-position stress analysis was developed to quantify the effects of various geometric, material, and load parameters on mode 1 and mode 2 strain energy release rates G sub 1 and G sub 2, respectively. Calculated values of G sub 1 and G sub 2 were then compared with measured cyclic delamination growth rates to determine the relative importance of G sub 1 and G sub 2. High growth rates were observed only when G sub 1 was large. However, slow growth was observed even when G sub 1 was negligibly small. This growth was apparently due to a large value of G sub 2.

  17. Strain energy release rate analysis of cyclic delamination growth in compressively loaded laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates was studied analytically and experimentally. The configuration used was a laminate with an across-the-width delamination. An approximate super-position stress analysis was developed to quantify the effects of various geometric, material, and load parameters on mode 2 and mode 2 strain energy release rates G sub/1 and G sub 2, respectively. Calculated values of G sub 1 and G sub 2 were then compared with measured cyclic delamination growth rates to determine the relative importance of G sub 1 and G sub 2. High growth rates were observed only when G sub 1 was large. However, slow growth was observed even when G sub 1 was negligibly small. This growth apparently was due to a large value of G sub 2.

  18. Strain-energy release rate analysis of a laminate with a postbuckled delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1987-01-01

    Delamination growth due to local buckling of a delamination was studied. Delamination growth was assumed to be related to the total strain-energy release rate, G. In order to calculate the distribution of G along the delamination front, a new virtual crack closure technique was developed which is suitable for use with plate analysis. A check of the technique indicated that it is accurate. For square and rectangular delaminations, there is a large variation of G along the delamination front. Hence, self-similar growth is not expected. Whether a delamination grows in the load direction or perpendicular to the load direction was found to depend on the current delamination aspect ratio, the strain level, and the absolute size of the delamination.

  19. Strain energy release rate analysis of delamination in a tapered laminate subjected to tension load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Raju, I. S.; O'Brien, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Finite element method was used to analyze a tapered glass/epoxy composite laminate subjected to a tension load, in order to determine the interlaminar stress distributions the strain-energy release rate for the delamination growth that may occur due to ply drops. In a laminate having a typical configuration of a helicopter hub, the (+/- 45)3 plies were dropped in three distinct steps, each 20-ply thickness apart, with the resulting taper angle of 5.71 deg. Delaminations were assumed to initiate at the bottom of the taper on the -45/+45 interface, and the delamination growth was simulated along the taper and into the thin region. The results of the analysis indicated that a delamination initiating at the end of the taper will grow unstably along the taper and the thin laminate simultaneously.

  20. Effect of slow energy releasing on divergent detonation of Insensitive High Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaomian; Pan, Hao; Huang, Yong; Wu, Zihui

    2014-03-01

    There exists a slow energy releasing (SER) process in the slow reaction zone located behind the detonation wave due to the carbon cluster in the detonation products of Insensitive High Explosives (IHEs), and the process will affect the divergent detonation wave's propagation and the driving process of the explosives. To study the potential effect, a new artificial burn model including the SER process based on the programmed burn model is proposed in the paper. Quasi-steady analysis of the new model indicates that the nonlinearity of the detonation speed as a function of front curvature owes to the significant change of the reaction rate and the reaction zone length at the sonic state. What's more, in simulating the detonation of IHE JB-9014, the new model including the slow reaction can predict a slower jump-off velocity, in good agreement with the result of the test.

  1. Energy loss in vehicle collisions from permanent deformation: an extension of the `Triangle Method'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangi, Dario; Begani, Filippo

    2013-06-01

    The paper presents an extension of the 'Triangle Method', to evaluate the energy loss in road accidents. The improvement of the method allows to evaluate the energy loss by both the colliding vehicles in car to car impacts, considering the main possible configurations of accident. The limits of applicability of the method are those of the Campbell's method [K.E. Campbell, Energy basis for collision severity, SAE paper 740565, Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc., Warrendale, Pennsylvania, 1974; A.G. Fonda, Principles of crush energy determination, SAE 1999-01-0106, Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc., Warrendale, Pennsylvania, 1999; N.S. Tumbas and R.A. Smith, Measurement protocol for quantifying vehicle damage from an energy basis point of view, SAE paper 880072, Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc., Warrendale, Pennsylvania, 1988; G.A. Nystrom, G. Kost, and S.M. Werner, Stiffness parameters for vehicle collision analysis, SAE paper 910119, Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc., Warrendale, Pennsylvania, 1991; J.A. Neptune, G.Y. Blair, and J.E. Flynn, A method for quantifying vehicle crush stiffness coefficients, SAE paper 920607, Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc., Warrendale, Pennsylvania, 1992]. The advantage over the usual methods are that the method does not require the knowledge of the stiffness of the vehicles and only two parameters are needed to define the damage geometry. The latter can be easily evaluated by visual inspection on a suitable photographical documentation of the damages, without the need to perform any direct measurement on the vehicles. Furthermore, the method can be used also in the very frequent cases in which some of the damage data about one of the vehicles are missing or in accidents involving lateral parts of the vehicle as zones near the wheels or the front, that have different behaviour from that tested in the classical crash tests. The error analysis developed shows that the errors due to the application of the extended

  2. Ion-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon collisions: kinetic energy releases for specific fragmentation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitsma, G.; Zettergren, H.; Boschman, L.; Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report on 30 keV He2 + collisions with naphthalene (C10H8) molecules, which leads to very extensive fragmentation. To unravel such complex fragmentation patterns, we designed and constructed an experimental setup, which allows for the determination of the full momentum vector by measuring charged collision products in coincidence in a recoil ion momentum spectrometer type of detection scheme. The determination of fragment kinetic energies is found to be considerably more accurate than for the case of mere coincidence time-of-flight spectrometers. In fission reactions involving two cationic fragments, typically kinetic energy releases of 2-3 eV are observed. The results are interpreted by means of density functional theory calculations of the reverse barriers. It is concluded that naphthalene fragmentation by collisions with keV ions clearly is much more violent than the corresponding photofragmentation with energetic photons. The ion-induced naphthalene fragmentation provides a feedstock of various small hydrocarbonic species of different charge states and kinetic energy, which could influence several molecule formation processes in the cold interstellar medium and facilitates growth of small hydrocarbon species on pre-existing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  3. Explosive initiation practice and its effect on energy release in commercial explosives. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, B.; Joyce, D.K.

    1994-12-31

    In a previous paper, it was shown that a lack of clear understanding of the role of initiation mode on detonation characteristics often leads to under-utilization of the explosive system in blasting. This is of particular significance since the very large number of explosive initiation practices currently in use implicitly assumes that the blasting performance of an explosive is largely independent of the exact mode of initiation. This paper deals specifically with bulk-loaded and pneumatically-loaded ANFO under various initiation modes in small diameters. These include initiation by booster and detonating cords of various strengths, and combination of cords and boosters. The nature of energy release and energy partitioning between shock and gas energy have been studied in the underwater test as a function of charge diameter. The paper describes the relative merits of various initiation modes for specific charge geometries and confinement, under end- and side-initiated conditions. Guidelines have also been formulated for use in the field to match initiation practice with blasting requirements.

  4. Energy dissipation of Alfven wave packets deformed by irregular magnetic fields in solar-coronal arches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, Philippe L.; Sudan, R. N.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of field line geometry for shear Alfven wave dissipation in coronal arches is demonstrated. An eikonal formulation makes it possible to account for the complicated magnetic geometry typical in coronal loops. An interpretation of Alfven wave resonance is given in terms of gradient steepening, and dissipation efficiencies are studied for two configurations: the well-known slab model with a straight magnetic field, and a new model with stochastic field lines. It is shown that a large fraction of the Alfven wave energy flux can be effectively dissipated in the corona.

  5. Base release in nucleosides induced by low-energy electrons: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xifeng; Sanche, Léon; Sevilla, Michael D

    2006-06-01

    Low-energy electrons are known to induce strand breaks and base damage in DNA and RNA through fragmentation of molecular bonding. Recently the glycosidic bond cleavage of nucleosides by low-energy electrons has been reported. These experimental results call for a theoretical investigation of the strength of the C(1)'-N link in nucleosides (dA, dC and dT) between the base and deoxyribose before and after electron attachment. Through density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we compare the C(1)'-N bond strength, i.e., the bond dissociation energy of the neutral and its anionic radical, and find that an excess electron effectively weakens the C(1)'- N bond strength in nucleosides by 61-75 kcal/mol in the gas phase and 76-83 kcal/mol in the solvated environment. As a result, electron-induced fragmentation of the C(1)'-N bond in the gas phase is exergonic for dA (DeltaG=-14 kcal/mol) and for dT (DeltaG=-6 kcal/mol) and is endergonic (DeltaG=+1 kcal/ mol) only for dC. In the gas phase all the anionic nucleosides are found to be in valence states. Solvation is found to increase the exergonic nature by an additional 20 kcal, making the fragmentation both exothermic and exergonic for all nucleoside anion radicals. Thus C(1)'-N bond breaking in nucleoside anion radicals is found to be thermodynamically favorable both in the gas phase and under solvation. The activation barrier for the C(1)'-N bond breaking process was found to be about 20 kcal/mol in every case examined, suggesting that a 1 eV electron would induce spontaneous cleavage of the bond and that stabilized anion radicals on the DNA strand would undergo base release at only a modest rate at room temperature. These results suggest that base release from nucleosides and DNA is an expected consequence of low-energy electron-induced damage but that the high barrier would inhibit this process in the stable anion radicals. PMID:16802873

  6. A novel strain energy relationship for red blood cell membrane skeleton based on spectrin stiffness and its application to micropipette deformation.

    PubMed

    Svetina, Saša; Kokot, Gašper; Kebe, Tjaša Švelc; Žekš, Boštjan; Waugh, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) membrane skeleton is a closed two-dimensional elastic network of spectrin tetramers with nodes formed by short actin filaments. Its three-dimensional shape conforms to the shape of the bilayer, to which it is connected through vertical linkages to integral membrane proteins. Numerous methods have been devised over the years to predict the response of the RBC membrane to applied forces and determine the corresponding increase in the skeleton elastic energy arising either directly from continuum descriptions of its deformation, or seeking to relate the macroscopic behavior of the membrane to its molecular constituents. In the current work, we present a novel continuum formulation rooted in the molecular structure of the membrane and apply it to analyze model deformations similar to those that occur during aspiration of RBCs into micropipettes. The microscopic elastic properties of the skeleton are derived by treating spectrin tetramers as simple linear springs. For a given local deformation of the skeleton, we determine the average bond energy and define the corresponding strain energy function and stress-strain relationships. The lateral redistribution of the skeleton is determined variationally to correspond to the minimum of its total energy. The predicted dependence of the length of the aspirated tongue on the aspiration pressure is shown to describe the experimentally observed system behavior in a quantitative manner by taking into account in addition to the skeleton energy an energy of attraction between RBC membrane and the micropipette surface. PMID:26376642

  7. Fully discrete energy stable high order finite difference methods for hyperbolic problems in deforming domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkar, Samira; Nordström, Jan

    2015-06-01

    A time-dependent coordinate transformation of a constant coefficient hyperbolic system of equations which results in a variable coefficient system of equations is considered. By applying the energy method, well-posed boundary conditions for the continuous problem are derived. Summation-by-Parts (SBP) operators for the space and time discretization, together with a weak imposition of boundary and initial conditions using Simultaneously Approximation Terms (SATs) lead to a provable fully-discrete energy-stable conservative finite difference scheme. We show how to construct a time-dependent SAT formulation that automatically imposes boundary conditions, when and where they are required. We also prove that a uniform flow field is preserved, i.e. the Numerical Geometric Conservation Law (NGCL) holds automatically by using SBP-SAT in time and space. The developed technique is illustrated by considering an application using the linearized Euler equations: the sound generated by moving boundaries. Numerical calculations corroborate the stability and accuracy of the new fully discrete approximations.

  8. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  9. Theoretical analysis of piezoelectric energy harvesting from traffic induced deformation of pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, H. J.; Wang, J. J.; Shi, Z. F.; Zhang, Z. W.

    2013-09-01

    The problem of energy harvesting using piezoelectric transducers for pavement system applications is formulated with a focus on moving vehicle excitations. The pavement behavior is described by an infinite Bernoulli-Euler beam subjected to a moving line load and resting on a Winkler foundation. A closed-form dynamic response of the pavement is determined by a Fourier transform and the residue theorem. The voltage and power outputs of the piezoelectric harvester embedded in the pavements are then obtained by the direct piezoelectric effect. A comprehensive parametric study is conducted to show the effect of damping, the Winkler modulus, and the velocity of moving vehicles on the voltage and power output of the piezoelectric harvester. It is found that the output increases sharply when the velocity of the vehicle is close to the so-called critical velocity.

  10. Performance of pre-deformed flexible piezoelectric cantilever in energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengyingkai; Sui, Li; Shi, Gengchen; Liu, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel structure for pre-rolled flexible piezoelectric cantilevers that use wind energy to power a submunition electrical device. Owing to the particular installation position and working environment, the submunition piezoelectric cantilever should be rolled when not working, but this pre-rolled state can alter the energy harvesting performance. Herein, a working principle and installation method for piezoelectric cantilevers used in submunitions are introduced. To study the influence of the pre-rolled state, pre-rolled piezoelectric cantilevers of different sizes were fabricated and their performances were studied using finite element analysis simulations and experiments. The simulation results show that the resonance frequency and stiffness of the pre-rolled structure is higher than that of a flat structure. Results show that, (1) for both the pre-rolled and flat cantilever, the peak voltage will increase with the wind speed. (2) The pre-rolled cantilever has a higher critical wind speed than the flat cantilever. (3) For identical wind speeds and cantilever sizes, the peak voltage of the flat cantilever (45 V) is less than that of the pre-rolled cantilever (56 V). (4) Using a full-bridge rectifier, the output of the pre-rolled cantilever can sufficiently supply a 10 μF capacitor, whose output voltage may be up to 23 V after 10 s. These results demonstrate that the pre-rolled piezoelectric cantilever and its installation position used in this work are more suitable for submunition, and its output sufficiently meets submunition requirements.

  11. Intermittent Flare Energy Release: A Signature of Contracting Magnetic Islands from Reconnection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many flares show short-lived enhancements of emission that protrude above their smooth underlying emission. These spikes have been observed over a vast energy spectrum, from radio to hard x-rays. In hard X-rays, for example, their duration ranges from 0.2 to 2 s, with the majority occurring during the flare impulsive phase (Cheng 2012). In most cases, this intermittent energy release is situated at the footpoints of flare arcades where ionized particles, previously accelerated to high energies at coronal heights, are decelerated by the dense solar surface. It is not yet understood what mechanisms accelerate ionized particles to the energies required to produce the observed emission spikes. Drake et al. (2006) proposed a kinetic mechanism for accelerating electrons from contracting magnetic islands that form as reconnection proceeds, analogous to the energy gain of a ball bouncing between converging walls. They estimated that multi-island regions of macroscopic dimensions might account for the required acceleration rates in flares, but at this time it is impractical to simulate large-scale systems in kinetic models. On the other hand, our recent high-resolution MHD simulations of a breakout eruptive flare (Karpen et al. 2012) allow us to resolve in detail the generation and evolution of macroscopic magnetic islands in a flare current sheet. Incorporating a rigorous kinetic model into our global simulations is not feasible at present. However, we intend to breach the gap between kinetic and fluid models by characterizing the contractions of islands as they move away from the main reconnection site, to determine their plausibility as candidates for the observed bursts of radiation. With our null-tracking capabilities, we follow the creation and evolution of the X- and O-type (island) nulls that result from spatially and temporally localized reconnection. Different regimes of current-sheet reconnection (slow/fast), island sizes, rates of island coalescence, and rates

  12. Ionic fragmentation of the CO molecule by impact of 10-keV electrons: Kinetic-energy-release distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raj; Bhatt, Pragya; Yadav, Namita; Shanker, R.

    2013-02-01

    The ionic fragmentation of a multiply charged CO molecule is studied under impact of 10-keV electrons using recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy. The kinetic-energy-release distributions for the various fragmentation channels arising from the dissociation of COq+ (q = 2-4) are measured and discussed in light of theoretical calculations available in the literature. It is observed that the present kinetic-energy-release values are much smaller than those predicted by the Coulomb explosion model. The kinetic-energy-release distribution for the C++O+ channel is suggested to arise from the tunneling process. It is seen that the peak of kinetic-energy-release distribution is larger for that dissociation channel that arises from the same molecular ion which has higher charge on the oxygen atom. Further, the relative ionic fractions for seven ion species originating from ionization and subsequent dissociation of the CO molecule are obtained and compared with the existing data reported at low energy of the electron impact. The precursor-specific relative partial ionization cross sections are also obtained and shown to be about 66.4% from single ionization, 29.9% from double ionization, 3.3% from triple ionization, and about 0.4% from quadruple ionization of the precursor CO molecule contributing to the total fragment ion yield.

  13. Calcium Carbonate Nanoplate Assemblies with Directed High-Energy Facets: Additive-Free Synthesis, High Drug Loading, and Sustainable Releasing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Yu; Xie, Hao; Su, Bao-Lian; Yao, Bin; Yin, Yixia; Li, Shipu; Chen, Fang; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-07-29

    Developing drug delivery systems (DDSs) with high drug-loading capacity and sustainable releasing is critical for long-term chemotherapeutic efficacy, and it still remains challenging. Herein, vaterite CaCO3 nanoplate assemblies with exposed high-energy {001} facets have been synthesized via a novel, additive-free strategy. The product shows a high doxorubicin-loading capacity (65%); the best of all the CaCO3-based DDSs so far. Also, the product's sustainable releasing performance and its inhibition of the initial burst release, together, endow it with long-term drug efficacy. The work may shed light on exposing directed high-energy facets for rationally designing of a drug delivery system with long-term efficacy. PMID:26161808

  14. Quaternary deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Displaced or deformed rock units and landforms record the past 2 m.y. of faulting, folding, uplift, and subsidence in California. Properly interpreted, such evidence provides a quantitative basis for predicting future earthquake activity and for relating many diverse structures and landforms to the 5 cm/yr of horizontal motion at the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Modern techniques of geologic dating and expanded research on earthquake hazards have greatly improved our knowledge of the San Andreas fault system. Much of this new knowledge has been gained since 1965, and that part which concerns crustal deformation during the past 2 m.y. is briefly summarized here.

  15. Multiple loop activations and continuous energy release in the solar flare of June 15, 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widing, K. G.; Dere, K. P.

    1977-01-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the high-temperature plasma in the solar flare of June 15, 1973, is studied using XUV spectroheliograms and X-ray filtergrams obtained from Skylab. The analysis focuses on the changing forms and brightness of Fe XXIII 263-A and Fe XXIV 255-A images. Temperatures and emission measures computed for different times during the flare are compared with those derived from Solrad-9 flux data, the electron temperature in the bright compact core of the Fe XXIV image is determined, and a coronal origin is suggested for this bright core. The observational evidence shows that the overall flare event involved a number of different preexisting loops and arches which were activated in succession. The activation and heating are found to have persisted well past the end of the burst phase, implying that the energy release did not end when the impulsive phase was over. The overall development of the flare is summarized on the basis of the observed order of appearance of the loops.

  16. Limits on the thermal energy release from radioactive wastes in a mined geologic repository

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The theraml energy release of nuclear wastes is a major factor in the design of geologic repositories. Thermal limits need to be placed on various aspets of the geologic waste disposal system to avoid or retard the degradation of repository performance because of increased temperatures. The thermal limits in current use today are summarized in this report. These limits are placed in a hierarchial structure of thermal criteria consistent with the failure mechanism they are trying to prevent. The thermal criteria hierarchy is used to evaluate the thermal performance of a sample repository design. The design consists of disassembled BWR spent fuel, aged 10 years, close packed in a carbon steel canister with 15 cm of crushed salt backfill. The medium is bedded salt. The most-restrictive temperature for this design is the spent-fuel centerline temperature limit of 300/sup 0/C. A sensitivity study on the effects of additional cooling prior to disposal on repository thermal limits and design is performed.

  17. The statistical analysis of energy release in small-scale coronal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanov, Artyom; Kuzin, Sergey; Bogachev, Sergey

    We present the results of statistical analysis of impulsive flare-like brightenings, which numerously occur in the quiet regions of solar corona. For our study, we utilized high-cadence observations performed with two EUV-telescopes - TESIS/Coronas-Photon and AIA/SDO. In total, we processed 6 sequences of images, registered throughout the period between 2009 and 2013, covering the rising phase of the 24th solar cycle. Based on high-speed DEM estimation method, we developed a new technique to evaluate the main parameters of detected events (geometrical sizes, duration, temperature and thermal energy). We then obtained the statistical distributions of these parameters and examined their variations depending on the level of solar activity. The results imply that near the minimum of the solar cycle the energy release in quiet corona is mainly provided by small-scale events (nanoflares), whereas larger events (microflares) prevail on the peak of activity. Furthermore, we investigated the coronal conditions that had specified the formation and triggering of registered flares. By means of photospheric magnetograms obtained with MDI/SoHO and HMI/SDO instruments, we examined the topology of local magnetic fields at different stages: the pre-flare phase, the peak of intensity and the ending phase. To do so, we introduced a number of topological parameters including the total magnetic flux, the distance between magnetic sources and their mutual arrangement. The found correlation between the change of these parameters and the formation of flares may offer an important tool for application of flare forecasting.

  18. Static and dynamic strain energy release rates in toughened thermosetting composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Douglas S.

    1992-01-01

    In this work, the static and dynamic fracture properties of several thermosetting resin based composite laminates are presented. Two classes of materials are explored. These are homogeneous, thermosetting resins and toughened, multi-phase, thermosetting resin systems. Multi-phase resin materials have shown enhancement over homogenous materials with respect to damage resistance. The development of new dynamic tests are presented for composite laminates based on Width Tapered Double Cantilevered Beam (WTDCB) for Mode 1 fracture and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) specimen. The WTDCB sample was loaded via a low inertia, pneumatic cylinder to produce rapid cross-head displacements. A high rate, piezo-electric load cell and an accelerometer were mounted on the specimen. A digital oscilloscope was used for data acquisition. Typical static and dynamic load versus displacement plots are presented. The ENF specimen was impacted in three point bending with an instrumented impact tower. Fracture initiation and propagation energies under static and dynamic conditions were determined analytically and experimentally. The test results for Mode 1 fracture are relatively insensitive to strain rate effects for the laminates tested in this study. The test results from Mode 2 fracture indicate that the toughened systems provide superior fracture initiation and higher resistance to propagation under dynamic conditions. While the static fracture properties of the homogeneous systems may be relatively high, the apparent Mode 2 dynamic critical strain energy release rate drops significantly. The results indicate that static Mode 2 fracture testing is inadequate for determining the fracture performance of composite structures subjected to conditions such as low velocity impact. A good correlation between the basic Mode 2 dynamic fracture properties and the performance is a combined material/structural Compression After Impact (CAI) test is found. These results underscore the importance of

  19. Effect of lateral contraction and magnetism on the energy release upon fracture in metals: First-principles computational tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z. X.; Yan, J. X.; Xiao, W.; Geng, W. T.

    2009-04-01

    On many occasions, there is an energy release upon fracture of materials. Taking the Σ5 (210) grain boundary in nickel as an example, we have studied the effect of lateral contraction (the Poisson effect) upon stretching and the effect of magnetism on the energy release at the break point, using density-functional theory computational tensile tests. For both clean and sulfur segregated grain boundaries, our calculations show that the Poisson effect can reduce the total energy of the grain-boundary system remarkably. For Σ3 (111) grain boundary, however, lateral optimization of the computation cell has only a minor effect because of the close packing of the Ni (111) plane. Surprisingly, magnetism is found to reduce much of the energy release upon fracture for grain boundaries for such a weak magnetic metal. As a result, the calculated ultimate tensile strength of the material will be significantly diminished. Segregated sulfur atoms reduce the energy barrier between metastable and ground-state configurations in straining procedure. Near the break point, spin polarization of the interfacial atoms is significantly enhanced which introduces an extra energy lowering of the system.

  20. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Net electron-phonon scattering rates in InN/GaN multiple quantum wells: The effects of an energy dependent acoustic deformation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, H. Patterson, R.; Feng, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Conibeer, G.

    2014-08-11

    The rates of charge carrier relaxation by phonon emission are of substantial importance in the field of hot carrier solar cell, primarily in investigation of mechanisms to slow down hot carrier cooling. In this work, energy and momentum resolved deformation potentials relevant to electron-phonon scattering are computed for wurtzite InN and GaN as well as an InN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) superlattice using ab-initio methods. These deformation potentials reveal important features such as discontinuities across the electronic bandgap of the materials and variations over tens of eV. The energy dependence of the deformation potential is found to be very similar for wurtzite nitrides despite differences between the In and Ga pseudopotentials and their corresponding electronic band structures. Charge carrier relaxation by this mechanism is expected to be minimal for electrons within a few eV of the conduction band edge. However, hole scattering at energies more accessible to excitation by solar radiation is possible between heavy and light hole states. Moderate reductions in overall scattering rates are observed in MQW relative to the bulk nitride materials.

  2. Net electron-phonon scattering rates in InN/GaN multiple quantum wells: The effects of an energy dependent acoustic deformation potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, H.; Patterson, R.; Feng, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Conibeer, G.

    2014-08-01

    The rates of charge carrier relaxation by phonon emission are of substantial importance in the field of hot carrier solar cell, primarily in investigation of mechanisms to slow down hot carrier cooling. In this work, energy and momentum resolved deformation potentials relevant to electron-phonon scattering are computed for wurtzite InN and GaN as well as an InN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) superlattice using ab-initio methods. These deformation potentials reveal important features such as discontinuities across the electronic bandgap of the materials and variations over tens of eV. The energy dependence of the deformation potential is found to be very similar for wurtzite nitrides despite differences between the In and Ga pseudopotentials and their corresponding electronic band structures. Charge carrier relaxation by this mechanism is expected to be minimal for electrons within a few eV of the conduction band edge. However, hole scattering at energies more accessible to excitation by solar radiation is possible between heavy and light hole states. Moderate reductions in overall scattering rates are observed in MQW relative to the bulk nitride materials.

  3. Madelung deformity.

    PubMed

    Ghatan, Andrew C; Hanel, Douglas P

    2013-06-01

    Madelung deformity is a rare congenital anomaly of the wrist caused by asymmetric growth at the distal radial physis secondary to a partial ulnar-sided arrest. The deformity is characterized by ulnar and palmar curvature of the distal radius, positive ulnar variance, and proximal subsidence of the lunate. It more commonly occurs in females than males and typically affects both wrists. The deformity can occur in isolation or as part of a genetic syndrome. The pattern of inheritance varies, with some cases following a pseudoautosomal pattern and many others lacking a clear family history. Nonsurgical management is typically advocated in asymptomatic patients. Few studies exist on the natural history of the condition; however, extensor tendon ruptures have been reported in severe and chronic cases. Stiffness, pain, and patient concerns regarding wrist cosmesis have been cited as indications for surgery. Various techniques for surgical management of Madelung deformity have been described, but clear evidence to support the use of any single approach is lacking. PMID:23728962

  4. Deformation Monitoring of AN Active Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events and other deformation phenomena, new for geophysics, change our understanding of how the energy accumulated in the Earth's crust do release. The new geophysical data make one revise the underlying mechanism of geomechanical processes taking place in fault zones. Conditions for generating different slip modes are still unclear. The most vital question is whether a certain slip mode is intrinsic for a fault or may be controlled by external factors. This work presents the results of two and a half year deformation monitoring of a discontinuity in the zone of the Main Sayanskiy Fault. Main Sayanskiy Fault is right-lateral strike-slip fault. Observations were performed in the tunnel of Talaya seismic station (TLY), Irkutsk region, Russia. Measurements were carried out 70 m away from the entrance of the tunnel, the thickness of overlying rock was about 30 m. Inductive sensors of displacement were mounted at the both sides of a discontinuity, which recorded three components of relative fault side displacement with the accuracy of 0.2 mcm. Temperature variation inside the tunnel didn't exceed 0.5oC during the all period of observations. Important information about deformation properties of an active fault was obtained. A pronounced seasonality of deformation characteristics of discontinuity is observed in the investigated segment of rock. A great number of slow slip events with durations from several hours to several weeks were registered. Besides that alterations of fault deformation characteristics before the megathrust earthquake M9.0 Tohoku Oki 11 March 2011 and reaction to the event itself were detected. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-17-00719).

  5. Ionic fragmentation of CO and H2O under impact of 10 keV electrons: kinetic energy release distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raj; Bhatt, Pragya; Yadav, Namita; Shanker, R.

    2014-04-01

    Dissociative ionization of COq+ (q=2-4) and H2Oq+ (q=2-3) molecular ions produced from the collisions of CO and H2O with 10 keV electrons is studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometer and position sensitive detector with multi-hit ability, respectively. The kinetic energy release distributions for these channels are obtained. We found that a pure Coulomb explosion model is insufficient to explain the observed kinetic release distributions for the Coulomb explosion channels. A detail of this study is given in references [3, 4].

  6. Kinematic Models of Southern California Deformation calibrated to GPS Velocities and a Strain Energy Minimization Criterion: How do they Differ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, E. H.

    2015-12-01

    Fault slip rates inferred from GPS-calibrated kinematic models may be influenced by seismic-cycle and other transient effects, whereas models that minimize strain energy ("TSEM models") represent average deformation rates over geological timescales. To explore differences in southern California fault slip rates inferred from these two approaches, I have developed kinematic, finite-element models incorporating the UCERF3 block model-bounding fault geometry and slip rates from the UCERF3 report (Field et al., 2014). A fault segment (the "Ventura-Oak Ridge segment") was added to represent shortening accommodated collectively by the San Cayetano, Ventura, Oak Ridge, Red Mountain and other faults in the Transverse Ranges. Fault slip rates are randomly sampled from ranges given in the UCERF3 report, assuming a "boxcar" distribution, and models are scored by their misfit to GPS site velocities or to their total strain energy, for cases with locked and unlocked faults. Both Monte Carlo and Independence Sampler MCMC methods are used to identify the best models of each category. All four suites of models prefer low slip rates (i.e. less than about 5 mm/yr) on the Ventura-Oak Ridge fault system. For TSEM models, low rates (< 12 mm/yr) are strongly preferred for the San Gorgonio segment of the SAF. The GPS-constrained, locked model prefers a high slip rate for the Imperial Fault (over 30 mm/yr), though the TSEM models prefer slip rates lower than 30 mm/yr. When slip rates for the Ventura-Oak Ridge fault system are restricted to less than 5 mm/yr, GPS-constrained models show a preference for high slip rates on the southern San Jacinto and Palos Verde Faults ( > 13 and > 3 mm/yr, respectively), and a somewhat low rate for the Mojave segment of the SAF (25-34 mm/yr). Because blind thrust faults of the Los Angeles Basin are not represented in the model, the inferred Ventura-Oak Ridge slip rate should be high, but the opposite is observed. GPS-calibrated models decisively prefer a

  7. Experimental Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, J. L.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite is an important iron ore mineral and the most prominent Fe-oxide phase in the Earth's crust. The systematic occurrence of magnetite in zones of intense deformation in oceanic core complexes suggests that it may play a role in strain localization in some silicate rocks. We performed a series of high-temperature deformation experiments on synthetic magnetite aggregates and natural single crystals to characterize the rheological behavior of magnetite. As starting material, we used fine-grained magnetite powder that was hot isostatically pressed at 1100°C for several hours, resulting in polycrystalline material with a mean grain size of around 40 μm and containing 3-5% porosity. Samples were deformed to 15-20% axial strain under constant load (approximating constant stress) conditions in a Paterson-type gas apparatus for triaxial deformation at temperatures between 900 and 1100°C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The aggregates exhibit typical power-law creep behavior. At high stresses, samples deformed by dislocation creep exhibit stress exponents close to 3, revealing a transition to near-Newtonian creep with stress exponents around 1.3 at lower stresses. Natural magnetite single crystals deformed at 1 atm pressure and temperatures between 950°C and 1150 °C also exhibit stress exponents close to 3, but with lower flow stresses and a lower apparent activation energy than the aggregates. Such behavior may result from the different oxygen fugacity buffers used. Crystallographic-preferred orientations in all polycrystalline samples are very weak and corroborate numerical models of CPO development, suggesting that texture development in magnetite may be inherently slow compared with lower symmetry phases. Comparison of our results with experimental deformation data for various silicate minerals suggests that magnetite should be weaker than most silicates during ductile creep in dry igneous rocks.

  8. Relative Proton Affinities from Kinetic Energy Release Distributions for Dissociation of Proton-Bound Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Hache, John J.; Laskin, Julia ); Futrell, Jean H.)

    2002-12-19

    Kinetic energy release distributions (KERDs) upon dissociation of proton-bound dimers are utilized along with Finite Heat Bath theory analysis to obtain relative proton affinities of monomeric species composing the dimer. The proposed approach allows accurate measurement of relative proton affinities based on KERD measurements for the compound with unknown thermochemical properties versus a single reference base. It also allows distinguishing the cases when dissociation of proton-bound dimers is associated with reverse activation barrier, for which both our approach and the kinetic method become inapplicable. Results are reported for the n-butanol-n-propanol dimer, for which there is no significant difference in entropy effects for two reactions and for the pyrrolidine-1,2-ethylenediamine dimer, which is characterized by a significant difference in entropy effects for the two competing reactions. Relative protonation affinities of -1.0?0.3 kcal/mol for the n-butanol-n-propanol pair and 0.27?0.10 kcal/mol for the pyrrolidine-1,2-ethylenediamine pair are in good agreement with literature values. Relative reaction entropies were extracted from the branching ratio and KERD measurements. Good correspondence was found between the relative reaction entropies for the n-butanol-n-propanol dimer (D(DS?)=-0.3?1.5 cal/mol K) and the relative protonation entropy for the two monomers (D(DSp)=0). However, the relative reaction entropy for the pyrrolidine-1,2-ethylenediamine dimer is higher than the difference in protonation entropies (D(DS?)=8.2?0.5 cal/mol K vs. D(DSp)=5 cal/mol K).

  9. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  10. Diagnosing physical conditions near the flare energy-release sites from observations of solar microwave type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bao-Lin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Huang, Guang-Li

    2016-05-01

    In the physics of solar flares, it is crucial to diagnose the physical conditions near the flare energy-release sites. However, so far it is unclear how to diagnose these physical conditions. A solar microwave type III burst is believed to be a sensitive signature of primary energy release and electron accelerations in solar flares. This work takes into account the effect of the magnetic field on the plasma density and develops a set of formulas which can be used to estimate the plasma density, temperature, magnetic field near the magnetic reconnection site and particle acceleration region, and the velocity and energy of electron beams. We apply these formulas to three groups of microwave type III pairs in an X-class flare, and obtained some reasonable and interesting results. This method can be applied to other microwave type III bursts to diagnose the physical conditions of source regions, and provide some basic information to understand the intrinsic nature and fundamental processes occurring near the flare energy-release sites.

  11. Toxic Chemicals in Production-Related Wastes Combusted for Energy Recovery, Released, Treated, or Recycled

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes trends in the quantities of reportable toxic chemicals generated, managed, and/or released by manufacturing operations, certain service businesses, and federal facilities across the United States from 2001 to 2009. Persistent bioaccumulative and toxic ...

  12. Static and dynamic deformation effects in the fusion cross section of light heavy ions at sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, M.S.; Canto, L.F.; Donangelo, R.

    1980-02-01

    The static and dynamic deformation effects on the sub-barrier fusion cross section of light heavy ions are investigated by performing a coupled channel calculation for the system /sup 12/C+/sup 16/O. It is found that dynamic effects are negligible whereas static effects could be important, and they appear to show up partly through absorption under the barrier.

  13. A concept for energy harvesting from quasi-static structural deformations through axially loaded bilaterally constrained columns with multiple bifurcation points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajnef, N.; Burgueño, R.; Borchani, W.; Sun, Y.

    2014-05-01

    A major obstacle limiting the development of deployable sensing and actuation solutions is the scarcity of power. Converted energy from ambient loading using piezoelectric scavengers is a possible solution. Most of the previously developed research focused on vibration-based piezoelectric harvesters which are typically characterized by a response with a narrow natural frequency range. Several techniques were used to improve their effectiveness. These methods focus only on the transducer’s properties and configurations, but do little to improve the stimuli from the source. In contrast, this work proposes to focus on the input deformations generated within the structure, and the induction of an amplified amplitude and up-converted frequency toward the harvesters’ natural spectrum. This paper introduces the concept of using mechanically-equivalent energy converters and frequency modulators that can transform low-amplitude and low-rate service deformations into an amplified vibration input to the piezoelectric transducer. The introduced concept allows energy conversion within the unexplored quasi-static frequency range (≪1 Hz). The post-buckling behavior of bilaterally constrained columns is used as the mechanism for frequency up-conversion. A bimorph cantilever polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric beam is used for energy conversion. Experimental prototypes were built and tested to validate the introduced concept and the levels of extractable power were evaluated for different cases under varying input frequencies. Finally, finite element simulations are reported to provide insight into the scalability and performance of the developed concept.

  14. Strain-energy-release rate analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen using the finite-element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Raju, I. S.; Obrien, T. K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite-element analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen was performed using 8-node isoparametric, parabolic elements to evaluate compliance and mode II strain energy release rates, G sub II. The G sub II values were computed using two different techniques: the virtural crack-closure technique (VCCT) and the rate of change of compliance with crack length (compliance derivative method). The analysis was performed for various crack-length-to-semi-span (a/L) ratios ranging from 0.2 to 0.9. Three material systems representing a wide range of material properties were analyzed. The compliance and strain energy release rates of the specimen calculated with the present finite-element analysis agree very well with beam theory equations including transverse shear. The G sub II values calculated using the compliance derivative method compared extremely well with those calculated using the VCCT. The G sub II values obtained by the compliance derivative method using the top or bottom beam deflections agreed closely with each other. The strain energy release rates from a plane-stress analysis were higher than the plane-strain values by only a small percentage, indicating that either assumption may be used in the analysis. The G sub II values for one material system calculated from the finite-element analysis agreed with one solution in the literature and disagreed with the other solution in the literature.

  15. Variation in electromagnetic radiation during plastic deformation under tension and compression of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ranjana; Lal, S. P.; Misra, Ashok

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents some significant variations in the intermittent electromagnetic radiation (EMR) during plastic deformation under tension and compression of some metals with selected crystal structure, viz. zinc, hexagonal closed packed (hcp), copper, face-centred cubic (fcc: stacking fault energy 0.08 J/m2), aluminium (fcc: stacking fault energy 0.2 J/m2) and 0.18 % carbon steel, body-centred cubic (bcc). The intermittent EMR signals starting near yielding are either oscillatory or exponential under both modes of deformation except a very few intermediate signals, random in nature, in zinc under compression. The number and amplitude of EMR signals exhibit marked variations under tension and compression. The smooth correlation between elastic strain energy release rate and average EMR energy release rate suggests a novel technique to determine the fracture toughness of metals. The first EMR emission amplitude and EMR energy release rate occurring near the yield increase, but maximum EMR energy burst frequency decreases almost linearly with increase in Debye temperature of the metals under tension while all EMR parameters decrease nonlinearly under compression. These results can be developed into a new technique to evaluate dislocation velocity. The EMR amplitude and energy release rate of the first EMR emission vary parabolically showing a maxima with increase in electronic heat constant of the metals under tension while they first sharply decrease and then become asymptotic during compression. However, the variation in EMR maximum energy burst frequency is apparently similar under both modes of deformation. These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of EMR emission during plastic deformation of metals involves not only the interaction of conduction electrons with the lattice periodic potential as presented in the previous theoretical models but also the interaction of conduction electrons with phonons. However, during crack propagation and fracture

  16. High-energy X-ray diffuse scattering studies on deformation-induced spatially confined martensitic transformations in multifunctional Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. P.; Wang, Y. D.; Hao, Y. L.; Wang, H. L.; Wang, Y.; Nie, Z. H.; Su, R.; Wang, D.; Ren, Y.; Lu, Z. P.; Wang, J. G.; Hui, X. D.; Yang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Two main explanations exist for the deformation mechanisms in Ti-Nb-based gum metals, i.e. the formation of reversible nanodisturbance and reversible stress-induced martensitic transformation. In this work, we used the in situ synchrotron-based high-energy X-ray diffuse-scattering technique to reveal the existence of a specific deformation mechanism, i.e. deformation-induced spatially confined martensitic transformations, in Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn-0.10O single crystals with cubic 13 parent phase, which explains well some anomalous mechanical properties of the alloy such as low elastic modulus and nonlinear superelasticity. Two kinds of nanosized martensites with different crystal structures were found during uniaxial tensile loading along the [11 0](beta) axis at room temperature and 190 K, respectively. The detailed changes in the martensitic phase transformation characteristics and the transformation kinetics were experimentally observed at different temperatures. The domain switch from non-modulated martensite to a modulated one occurred at 190 K, with its physical origin attributed to the heterogeneity of local phonon softening depending on temperature and inhomogeneous composition in the parent phase. An in-depth understanding of the formation of stress-induced spatially confined nanosized martensites with a large gradient in chemical composition may benefit designs of high-strength and high-ductility alloys. (C) 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Kinetic-energy release distributions of fragment anions from collisions of potassium atoms with D-Ribose and tetrahydrofuran*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebelo, André; Cunha, Tiago; Mendes, Mónica; da Silva, Filipe Ferreira; García, Gustavo; Limão-Vieira, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    Kinetic-energy release distributions have been obtained from the width and shapes of the time-of-flight (TOF) negative ion mass peaks formed in collisions of fast potassium atoms with D-Ribose (DR) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) molecules. Recent dissociative ion-pair formation experiments yielding anion formation have shown that the dominant fragment from D-Ribose is OH- [D. Almeida, F. Ferreira da Silva, G. García, P. Limão-Vieira, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114304 (2013)] whereas in the case of THF is O- [D. Almeida, F. Ferreira da Silva, S. Eden, G. García, P. Limão-Vieira, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 690 (2014)]. The results for DR and THF show an energy distribution profile reminiscent of statistical degradation via vibrational excitation and partly due to direct transformation of the excess energy in translational energy.

  18. Procedure of recovery of pin-by-pin fields of energy release in the core of VVER-type reactor for the BIPR-8 code

    SciTech Connect

    Gordienko, P. V. Kotsarev, A. V.; Lizorkin, M. P.

    2014-12-15

    The procedure of recovery of pin-by-pin energy-release fields for the BIPR-8 code and the algorithm of the BIPR-8 code which is used in nodal computation of the reactor core and on which the recovery of pin-by-pin fields of energy release is based are briefly described. The description and results of the verification using the module of recovery of pin-by-pin energy-release fields and the TVS-M program are given.

  19. Unimolecular reactions of halogeno phenylarsenium ions: Kinetic energy release during the elimination of halogen hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Dirk; Grützmacher, Hans-Friedrich; Grützmacher, Hansjörg

    2006-03-01

    The four dihalogeno phenylarsanes C6H5AsF2, 1, C6H5AsCl2, 2, C6H5AsBr2, 3, and C6H5AsI2, 4, produce in the 70 eV-EI mass spectra by loss of a halogen atom abundant halogeno phenylarseniun ions C6H5As+-X, 1a+-4a+. The further fragmentation reactions of ions 1a+-4a+ are elimination of a molecule halogen hydride HX and/or loss of a halogen atom X. The preferred route of fragmentation depends clearly on the strength of the As-X bond. The metastable fluoro ion 1a+ and chloro ion 2a+, respectively, fragment only by loss of HF and HCl, the metastable bromo derivative 3a+ exhibits losses of HBr and Br of about equal intensity, and the metastable iodo ion 4a+ fragments only by loss of an I atom. The loss of HX is associated with a large kinetic energy release (KER) which yield a dish-topped peak in the MIKE spectrum of 1a+ ( = 845 meV) and 2a+ ( = 550 meV) and a broad round-topped peak on the MIKE spectrum of 3a+ ( = 369 meV). Theoretical calculations (UBHLYP/6-311 + G(2d,p)/-/UBHLYP/6-31 + G(d)) confirm that the elimination of HX requires an enthalpy of activation [Delta]H#, and that in the case of 3a+ this [Delta]H# and the reaction enthalpy for loss of Br are of similar size. The [Delta]H# of HX elimination is also responsible for the reverse enthalpy of activation and the KER during this process. The observed amounts to 78% (1a+), 55% (2a+), and 40% (3a+) of the calculated value of . Thus, the KER as well as the distribution of the KER (KERD) and the competition between elimination of HX and loss of X are very specific for the halogen ligand at the As atom. Metastable (4-fluorophenyl) arsenium ions 1b+, F-C6H4As+-H, and (4-chlorophenyl) arsenium ions 2b+, Cl-C6H4As+-H+, eliminate HF or HCl with virtually identical KERD as metastable 1a+ or 2a+, C6H5As+-Cl, proving an identical transition state for both isomers. Accordingly, 1b+ and 2b+ rearrange to 1a+ and 2a+ prior to HCl elimination. Such a rearrangement by a reductive elimination/oxidative insertion of

  20. The North Korean nuclear test in 2016 - release of shear energy determined by 3D moment tensor inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    On January 6, 2016 the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) carried out an announced nuclear test, which was the fourth after tests conducted in 2006, 2009, and 2013. An important task in discriminating a man-made explosion and a natural tectonic earthquake is the analysis of seismic waveforms. To determine the isotropic and non-isotropic characteristics of the detonation source, I invert long-period seismic data for the full seismic moment tensor to match the observed seismic signals by synthetic waveforms based on a 3D earth model. Here, I show that the inversion of long-period seismic data of the 2016 test reveals a clear explosive (isotropic) component combined with a significant release of shear energy by the double-couple part of the moment tensor. The short- and long-period waveforms of the recent test are very similar to the previous ones. First data show that the energy release of the recent event on long periods greater than 10 s is enlarged by 20-30% compared to the nuclear test in 2013. As shown previously, the double-couple part of the 2009 event was lower by a factor of 0.55 compared to the explosion in 2013, while the isotropic parts of the nuclear tests in 2009 and 2013 were similar (Barth, 2014). However, the recent test again shows a rather small double-couple part, indicating a lower amount of shear-energy radiation than in 2013. This highlights the importance of considering the release of shear energy in understanding near source damaging effects and the containment of nuclear explosions.

  1. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of glass ionomer cements indicated for atraumatic restorative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sudhanshu; Tiwari, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare constituents of glass powder, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of new atraumatic restorative treatment material with zirconia fillers and conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) type IX. Materials and Methods: Thisin vitro study comparing Zirconomer and Fuji IX was executed in three parts: (1) energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of glass powders (2) analysis of fluoride release at 1st, 3rd, 7th, 15th, and 30th day, and (3) antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Candida albicans at 48 hours. Data was analyzed using unpaired t-test and two way analysis of variance followed by least significant difference post hoc test. A P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed that, in both Zirconomer and Fuji IX glass powders, mean atomic percentage of oxygen was more than 50%. According to the weight percentage, zirconium in Zirconomer and silica in Fuji IX were the second main elements. Calcium, zinc, and zirconium were observed only in Zirconomer. At all the time intervals, statistically significant higher amount of fluoride release was observed with Zirconomer than Fuji IX. At 48 hours, mean ± standard deviation (SD) of zone of inhibition against Streptococcus mutans was 11.14 ± 0.77 mm and 8.51 ± 0.43 mm for Zirconomer and Fuji IX, respectively. Against Lactobacillus casei, it was 14.06 ± 0.71 mm for Zirconomer and 11.70 ± 0.39 mm for Fuji IX. No antifungal activity was observed against Candida albicans by Zirconomer and Fuji IX. Conclusion: Zirconomer had higher antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei, which may be attributed to its composition and higher fluoride release. However, it failed to show antifungal effect againstCandida albicans. PMID:27583226

  2. Influence of ultrasonic energy on dispersion of aggregates and released amounts of organic matter and polyvalent cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M.; Kleber, M.; Berhe, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    Aggregates play important roles in soil carbon storage and stabilization. Identification of scale-dependent mechanisms of soil aggregate formation and stability is necessary to predict and eventually manage the flow of carbon through terrestrial ecosystems. Application of ultrasonic energy is a common tool to disperse soil aggregates. In this study, we used ultra sonic energy (100 to 2000 J cm-3) to determine the amount of polyvalent cations and organic matter involved in aggregation processes in three arable and three forest soils that varied in soil mineral composition. To determine the amount of organic matter and cations released after application of different amount of ultrasonic energy, we removed the coarse fraction (>250 µm). The remaining residue (<250 µm) was mixed with water and ultrasonically dispersed by application of 100, 200, 400, 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 J cm-3 energy. After centrifugation the supernatant was filtered and the solid residue freeze dried before we analyzed the amounts of water-extracted organic carbon (OC), Fe, Al, Ca, Mn, and Mg in the filtrates. The extracted OM and solid residues were further characterized by Fourier Transformed Infra Red spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Our results show a linear increase in amount of dissolved OC with increasing amounts of ultra sonic energy up to 1500 J cm-3 indicating maximum dispersion of soil aggregates at this energy level independent from soil type or land use. In contrast to Mn, and Mg, the amounts of dissolved Ca, Fe, and Al increase with increasing ultra sonic energy up to 1500 J cm-3. At 1500 J cm-3, the absolute amounts of OC, Ca, Fe, and Al released were specific for each soil type, likely indicating differences in type of OM-mineral interactions involved in micro-scaled aggregation processes. The amounts of dissolved Fe, and Al released after an application of 1500 J cm-3 are not related to oxalate- and dithionite- extractable, or total Al content indicating less

  3. [Spectrum research on metamorphic and deformation of tectonically deformed coals].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Ju, Yi-Wen; Hou, Quan-Lin; Lin, Hong

    2011-08-01

    The structural and compositive evolution of tectonically deformed coals (TDCs) and their influencing factors were investigated and analyzed in detail through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser Raman spectra analysis. The TDC samples (0.7% < Ro,max <3.1%) were collected from Huaibei coalfield with different deformation mechanisms and intensity. The FTIR of TDCs shows that the metamorphism and the deformation affect the degradation and polycondensation process of macromolecular structure to different degree. The Raman spectra analysis indicates that secondary structure defects can be produced mainly by structural deformation, also the metamorphism influences the secondary structure defects and aromatic structure. Through comprehensive analysis, it was discussed that the ductile deformation could change to strain energy through the increase and accumulation of dislocation in molecular structure units of TDC, and it could make an obvious influence on degradation and polycondensation. While the brittle deformation could change to frictional heat energy and promote the metamorphism and degradation of TDC structure, but has less effect on polycondensation. Furthermore, degradation is the main reason for affecting the structural evolution of coal in lower metamorphic stage, and polycondensation is the most important controlling factor in higher metamorphic stage. Under metamorphism and deformation, the small molecules which break and fall off from the macromolecular tructure of TDC are preferentially replenished and embedded into the secondary structure defects or the residual aromatic rings were formed into aromatic structure by polycondensation. This process improved the stability of coal structure. It is easier for ductile deformation of coal to induce the secondary structure defects than brittle deformation. PMID:22007412

  4. Monitoring of gas and seismic energy release: new results from the multi-parametric benthic observatory SN-4 at MARsite location (Gulf of Izmit, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embriaco, Davide; Marinaro, Giuditta; Frugoni, Francesco; Monna, Stephen; Etiope, Giuseppe; Gasperini, Luca; Polonia, Alina; Del Bianco, Fabrizio; Namık Çaǧatay, M.; Ulgen, Umut B.; Favali, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Episodic gas seepage occurs at the seafloor in the Gulf of Izmit (Sea of Marmara, NW Turkey) along the submerged segment of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF), which ruptured during the 1999 Mw7.4 Izmit earthquake, and caused tectonic loading of the fault segment in front of the Istanbul metropolitan area. Marmara site was selected as one EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water column Observatory) node where establish a permanent sea-bottom observatory. An autonomous and long-term multiparametric benthic observatory (SN-4) was deployed in order to study gas seepage and seismic energy release along the NAF. SN-4 operated in the gulf at the western end of the 1999 Izmit earthquake rupture for about one-year at 166 m water depth. The SN-4 payload included a three-component broad-band seismometer, as well as gas and oceanographic sensors. We analysed data collected continuously for 161 days in the first part of the experiment, from October 2009 to March 2010. The main objective of our work was to verify whether tectonic deformation along the NAF could trigger methane seepage. Results from the SN-4 experiment in the Sea of Marmara suggest that neither low-magnitude local seismicity, nor regional events affect intensity and frequency of gas flows from the seafloor. The SN-4 observatory was recently re-deployed in the same site for another one year mission (September 2013) in the framework of MARsite (New Directions in Seismic Hazard assessment through Focused Earth Observation in the Marmara Supersite) EC project which aims assessing the 'state of the art' of seismic risk evaluation and management at European level by long-term monitoring activities in Marmara Sea. References EMSO web site: http://www.emso-eu.org MARsite web site: http://www.marsite.eu/

  5. Protein transfer to membranes upon shape deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagis, L. M. C.; Bijl, E.; Antono, L.; de Ruijter, N. C. A.; van Valenberg, H.

    2013-05-01

    Red blood cells, milk fat droplets, or liposomes all have interfaces consisting of lipid membranes. These particles show significant shape deformations as a result of flow. Here we show that these shape deformations can induce adsorption of proteins to the membrane. Red blood cell deformability is an important factor in several diseases involving obstructions of the microcirculatory system, and deformation induced protein adsorption will alter the rigidity of their membranes. Deformation induced protein transfer will also affect adsorption of cells onto implant surfaces, and the performance of liposome based controlled release systems. Quantitative models describing this phenomenon in biomaterials do not exist. Using a simple quantitative model, we provide new insight in this phenomenon. We present data that show convincingly that for cells or droplets with diameters upwards of a few micrometers, shape deformations induce adsorption of proteins at their interface even at moderate flow rates.

  6. Advanced Breeding, Development, and Release of High Biomass Energy Cane Cultivars in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research into alternative energy sources has been on the rise since the 1970s. Novel sources of carbon-neutral energy are currently in high demand, but can pose different challenges in their development. Energy cane is a relatively new generation crop being bred as a source for biofuel feedstock and...

  7. Decay of C60 by delayed ionization and C2 emission: Experiment and statistical modeling of kinetic energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeault, M.-A.; Baguenard, B.; Concina, B.; Calvo, F.; Climen, B.; Lépine, F.; Bordas, C.

    2012-08-01

    C60 molecules highly excited in the nanosecond regime decay following ionization and dissociation by emitting a series of carbon dimers, as well as other small fragments if excitation is strong enough. The fragmentation mass spectrum and kinetic energy release of all charged fragments obtained in these experiments are interpreted within the framework of the Weisskopf theory, using a realistic Monte Carlo procedure in which the rates of all relevant decay channels are modeled using Arrhenius expressions. Comparison between the measurements and the simulated spectra allows the distribution of deposited energy to be accurately estimated. The dependence of the fragment kinetic energies on the laser fluence, found in the simulation but not observed in the experimental results, indicates that the small fragments are not necessarily emitted from small fullerenes resulting from C60 by sequential decay. Rather, direct multifragmentation of C60 is invoked to interpret the observed patterns. The possible role of post-ionization of neutral emitted fragments is discussed.

  8. Volcanic Clast Cooling Model for the Estimation of the Thermal Energy Release from Vulcanian or Strombolian Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas-Sánchez, E.; De La Cruz-Reyna, S.; Varley, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    Images were obtained at Popocatepetl and Volcán de Colima, Mexico, during periods of high explosivity, wich resulted lava dome destructions during 1998-2002 and 2005-2007 respectively. We have developed a method to estimate the relative thermal energy release for explosions, and the degree of conversion into mechanical energy spent during fragmentation of the ejecta, based on the cooling rate inferred from successive thermal images obtained immediately after each explosion. The cooling rate was measured on selected pixels of the thermal images, and compared with different possible distributions of fragment sizes considering weighted averages of fragments in the pixels. The selected explosions threw significant amounts of hot debris on the volcano flanks. The optimal fitting of fragment distributions reveals the degree of fragmentation of individual explosions, and along with a model for the cooling process, permitted an estimation of the relative thermal energy release for the area covered by the image. Additionally, the results indicate that radiative thermal conductivity plays a significant role for the outer shell of the fragments, suggesting a free mean path of thermal infrared photons that may reach several millimeters or even a few centimeters.

  9. Estimation of the energy release and thermal properties of ejected clasts from explosive eruptions using a thermal imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Cruz-Reyna, S.; Cárdenas-Sánchez, E.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal images were obtained at Popocatépetl, central Mexico, during the period of high lava-dome destruction activity between 1998 and 2002. Similarly, thermal cameras have operated at Colima volcano, western Mexico during episodes of similar explosive activity in 2005 and 2007. We have developed a method to estimate the relative thermal energy release among explosions, and the degree of conversion into mechanical energy spent in the fragmentation of the ejecta, based on the cooling rate inferred from successive thermal images obtained immediately after each explosion. The thermal imaging cameras were located at about 11 km from the crater at Popocatépetl, and at about 6 km from the crater at Colima. The selected explosions threw significant amounts of hot debris on the volcano flanks. The cooling rate was then measured on selected pixels of the thermal images, and compared with different possible distributions of fragment sizes considering weighted averages of fragments in the pixels. The optimal fitting of fragment distributions reveals the degree of fragmentation of individual explosions, and along with a model for the cooling process, permitted to estimate the relative thermal energy release on the area covered by the image. Additionally, the results indicate that the radiative thermal conductivity plays a significant role on the outer shell of the fragments, suggesting a free mean path of thermal infrared photons that may reach several millimeters or even a few centimeters.

  10. Detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in diffusion bonding of steel hollow structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Li, H.; Li, M. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This study focused on the detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in similar diffusion bonding as well as on the fabrication of high quality martensitic stainless steel hollow structural components. A special surface with regular patterns was processed to be joined so as to observe the extent of surface asperity deformation under different bonding pressures. Results showed that an undamaged hollow structural component has been obtained with full interfacial contact and the same shear strength to that of base material. Fracture surface characteristic combined with surface roughness profiles distinctly revealed the enhanced surface asperity deformation as the applied pressure increases. The influence of surface asperity deformation mechanism on joint formation was analyzed: (a) surface asperity deformation not only directly expanded the interfacial contact areas, but also released deformation heat and caused defects, indirectly accelerating atomic diffusion, then benefits to void shrinkage; (b) surface asperity deformation readily introduced stored energy difference between two opposite sides of interface grain boundary, resulting in strain induced interface grain boundary migration. In addition, the influence of void on interface grain boundary migration was analyzed in detail.

  11. Strain energy release rate as a function of temperature and preloading history utilizing the edge delamination fatique test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    Static laminate and tension-tension fatigue tests of IM7/8551-7 composite materials was performed. The Edge Delamination Test (EDT) was utilized to evaluate the temperature and preloading history effect on the critical strain energy release rate. Static and fatigue testing was performed at room temperature and 180 F (82 C). Three preloading schemes were used to precondition fatigue test specimens prior to performing the normal tension-tension fatigue EDT testing. Computer software was written to perform all fatigue testing while monitoring the dynamic modulus to detect the onset of delamination and record the test information for later retrieval and reduction.

  12. Low effective activation energies for oxygen release from metal oxides: evidence for mass-transfer limits at high heating rates.

    PubMed

    Jian, Guoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Piekiel, Nicholas W; Zachariah, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Oxygen release from metal oxides at high temperatures is relevant to many thermally activated chemical processes, including chemical-looping combustion, solar thermochemical cycles and energetic thermite reactions. In this study, we evaluated the thermal decomposition of nanosized metal oxides under rapid heating (~10(5) K s(-1)) with time-resolved mass spectrometry. We found that the effective activation-energy values that were obtained using the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa isoconversional method are much lower than the values found at low heating rates, indicating that oxygen transport might be rate-determining at a high heating rate. PMID:24619858

  13. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, Dana Lynn

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  14. How to tackle the issues in free energy simulations of long amphiphiles interacting with lipid membranes: convergence and local membrane deformations.

    PubMed

    Filipe, Hugo A L; Moreno, Maria João; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Loura, Luís M S

    2014-04-01

    One of the great challenges in membrane biophysics is to find a means to foster the transport of drugs across complex membrane structures. In this spirit, we elucidate methodological challenges associated with free energy computations of complex chainlike molecules across lipid membranes. As an appropriate standard molecule to this end, we consider 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl-labeled fatty amine, NBD-Cn, which is here dealt with as a homologous series with varying chain lengths. We found the membrane-water interface region to be highly sensitive to details in free energy computations. Despite considerable simulation times, we observed substantial hysteresis, the cause being the small frequency of insertion/desorption events of the amphiphile's alkyl chain in the membrane interface. The hysteresis was most pronounced when the amphiphile was pulled from water to the membrane and compromised the data that were not in line with experiments. The subtleties in umbrella sampling for computing distance along the transition path were also observed to be potential causes of artifacts. With the PGD (pull geometry distance) scheme, in which the distance from the molecule was computed to a reference plane determined by an average over all lipids in the membrane, we found marked deformations in membrane structure when the amphiphile was close to the membrane. The deformations were weaker with the PGC (pull geometry cylinder) method, where the reference plane is chosen based on lipids that are within a cylinder of radius 1.7 nm from the amphiphile. Importantly, the free energy results given by PGC were found to be qualitatively consistent with experimental data, while the PGD results were not. We conclude that with long amphiphiles there is reason for concern with regard to computations of their free energy profiles. The membrane-water interface is the region where the greatest care is warranted. PMID:24635540

  15. Coseismic deformation induced by the Sumatra earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, E.; Casarotti, E.; Devoti, R.; Melini, D.; Piersanti, A.; Pietrantonio, G.; Riguzzi, F.

    2006-08-01

    The giant Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of December 26, 2004 caused permanent deformations effects in a region of previously never observed extension. The GPS data from the worldwide network of permanent IGS sites show significant coseismic displacements in an area exceeding 10 7 km 2, reaching most of South-East Asia, besides Indonesia and India. We have analyzed long GPS time series histories in order to characterize the noise type of each site and, consequently, to precisely assess the formal errors of the coseismic offset estimates. The synthetic simulations of the coseismic displacement field obtained by means of a spherical model using different rupture histories indicate that a major part of the energy release took place in a fault plane similar to that obtained by Ammon et al. (2005) and Vigny et al. (2005) but with a larger amount of compressional slip on the northern segment of the fault area.

  16. A piece of cake: the ground-state energies in γ i -deformed = 4 SYM theory at leading wrapping order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokken, Jan; Sieg, Christoph; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    In the non-supersymmetric γi-deformed = 4 SYM theory, the scaling dimensions of the operators tr[ Z L ] composed of L scalar fields Z receive finite-size wrapping and prewrapping corrections in the 't Hooft limit. In this paper, we calculate these scaling dimensions to leading wrapping order directly from Feynman diagrams. For L ≥ 3, the result is proportional to the maximally transcendental `cake' integral. It matches with an earlier result obtained from the integrability-based Lüscher corrections, TBA and Y-system equations. At L = 2, where the integrability-based equations yield infinity, we find a finite rational result. This result is renormalization-scheme dependent due to the non-vanishing β-function of an induced quartic scalar double-trace coupling, on which we have reported earlier. This explicitly shows that conformal invariance is broken — even in the 't Hooft limit. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. FEDS user`s guide: Facility energy screening. Release 2.10

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) Model is under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US DOE Federal Energy Management Program (DOE-FEMP) and the US Army Construction Engineering REsearch Laboratory (USA-CERL). FEDS is a multi-level energy analysis software system designed to provide a comprehensive approach to fuel-neutral, technology-independent, integrated (energy) resource planning and acquisition. The FEDS system includes Level-1, which is a top-down, first-pass energy systems analysis and energy resource acquisition decision software model for buildings and facilities, and the Level-2 software model, which allows specific engineering inputs and provides detailed output. The basic intent of the model is to provide an installation with the information necessary to determine the minimum life-cycle cost (LCC) configuration of the installation`s energy generation and consumption infrastructure. The model has no fuel or technology bias; it simply selects the technologies that will provide an equivalent or superior level of service (e.g., heating, cooling, illumination) at the minimum LCC.

  18. Final Report: Safety of Plasma Components and Aerosol Transport During Hard Disruptions and Accidental Energy Release in Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bourham, Mohamed A.; Gilligan, John G.

    1999-08-14

    Safety considerations in large future fusion reactors like ITER are important before licensing the reactor. Several scenarios are considered hazardous, which include safety of plasma-facing components during hard disruptions, high heat fluxes and thermal stresses during normal operation, accidental energy release, and aerosol formation and transport. Disruption events, in large tokamaks like ITER, are expected to produce local heat fluxes on plasma-facing components, which may exceed 100 GW/m{sup 2} over a period of about 0.1 ms. As a result, the surface temperature dramatically increases, which results in surface melting and vaporization, and produces thermal stresses and surface erosion. Plasma-facing components safety issues extends to cover a wide range of possible scenarios, including disruption severity and the impact of plasma-facing components on disruption parameters, accidental energy release and short/long term LOCA's, and formation of airborne particles by convective current transport during a LOVA (water/air ingress disruption) accident scenario. Study, and evaluation of, disruption-induced aerosol generation and mobilization is essential to characterize database on particulate formation and distribution for large future fusion tokamak reactor like ITER. In order to provide database relevant to ITER, the SIRENS electrothermal plasma facility at NCSU has been modified to closely simulate heat fluxes expected in ITER.

  19. Q3DG: A computer program for strain-energy-release rates for delamination growth in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1986-01-01

    The Q3DG is a computer program developed to perform a quasi-three-dimensional stress analysis for composite laminates which may contain delaminations. The laminates may be subjected to mechanical, thermal, and hygroscopic loads. The program uses the finite element method and models the laminates with eight-noded parabolic isoparametric elements. The program computes the strain-energy-release components and the total strain-energy release in all three modes for delamination growth. A rectangular mesh and data file generator, DATGEN, is included. The DATGEN program can be executed interactively and is user friendly. The documentation includes sections dealing with the Q3D analysis theory, derivation of element stiffness matrices and consistent load vectors for the parabolic element. Several sample problems with the input for Q3DG and output from the program are included. The capabilities of the DATGEN program are illustrated with examples of interactive sessions. A microfiche of all the examples is included. The Q3DG and DATGEN programs have been implemented on CYBER 170 class computers. Q3DG and DATGEN were developed at the Langley Research Center during the early eighties and documented in 1984 to 1985.

  20. Shear deformation in granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bardenhagen, S.G.; Brackbill, J.U.; Sulsky, D.L.

    1998-12-31

    An investigation into the properties of granular materials is undertaken via numerical simulation. These simulations highlight that frictional contact, a defining characteristic of dry granular materials, and interfacial debonding, an expected deformation mode in plastic bonded explosives, must be properly modeled. Frictional contact and debonding algorithms have been implemented into FLIP, a particle in cell code, and are described. Frictionless and frictional contact are simulated, with attention paid to energy and momentum conservation. Debonding is simulated, with attention paid to the interfacial debonding speed. A first step toward calculations of shear deformation in plastic bonded explosives is made. Simulations are performed on the scale of the grains where experimental data is difficult to obtain. Two characteristics of deformation are found, namely the intermittent binding of grains when rotation and translation are insufficient to accommodate deformation, and the role of the binder as a lubricant in force chains.

  1. Kinetic Energy Release of the Singly and Doubly Charged Methylene Chloride Molecule: The Role of Fast Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, K F; Rocha, A B; Gomes, A H A; Wolff, W; Sigaud, L; Santos, A C F

    2016-09-01

    The center of mass kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) spectra of selected ionic fragments, formed through dissociative single and double photoionization of CH2Cl2 at photon energies around the Cl 2p edge, were extracted from the shape and width of the experimentally obtained time-of-flight (TOF) distributions. The KERD spectra exhibit either smooth profiles or structures, depending on the moiety and photon energy. In general, the heavier the ionic fragments, the lower their average KERDs are. In contrast, the light H(+) fragments are observed with kinetic energies centered around 4.5-5.5 eV, depending on the photon energy. It was observed that the change in the photon energy involves a change in the KERDs, indicating different processes or transitions taking place in the breakup process. In the particular case of double ionization with the ejection of two charged fragments, the KERDs present have characteristics compatible with the Coulombic fragmentation model. Intending to interpret the experimental data, singlet and triplet states at Cl 2p edge of the CH2Cl2 molecule, corresponding to the Cl (2p → 10a1*) and Cl (2p → 4b1*) transitions, were calculated at multiconfigurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) level and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). These states were selected to form the spin-orbit coupling matrix elements, which after diagonalization result in a spin-orbit manifold. Minimum energy pathways for dissociation of the molecule were additionally calculated aiming to give support to the presence of the ultrafast dissociation mechanism in the molecular breakup. PMID:27523328

  2. Band-head spectra of low-energy single-particle excitations in some well-deformed, odd-mass heavy nuclei within a microscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Meng-Hock; Duy Duc, Dao; Nhan Hao, T. V.; Thuy Long, Ha; Quentin, P.; Bonneau, L.

    2016-01-01

    In four well-deformed heavy odd nuclei, the energies of low-lying rotational band heads have been determined microscopically within a self-consistent Hartree-Fock-plus-BCS approach with blocking. A Skyrme nucleon-nucleon effective interaction has been used together with a seniority force to describe pairing correlations. Only such states which are phenomenologically deemed to be related to single-particle excitations have been considered. The polarization effects, including those associated with the genuine time-reversal symmetry breaking have been fully taken into account within our model assumptions. The calculated spectra are in reasonably good qualitative agreement with available data for the considered odd-neutron nuclei. This is not so much the case for the odd-proton nuclei. A potential explanation for such a difference in behavior is proposed.

  3. Model verification of thermal programmed desorption-mass spectrometry for estimation of release energy values for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on mineral sorbents.

    PubMed

    Nicholl, Sara I; Talley, Jeffrey W; Silliman, Stephan

    2004-11-01

    The physical availability of organic compounds in soil and sediment strongly influences their bioavailability and toxicity. Previous work has indicated that physical availability changes throughout the processes of aging and treatment and that it can be linked to the energy required to release the compound from its sorbent matrix, with a higher energy indicating a more tightly bound compound. This study focused on determining release energy values for various mineral geosorbents (glass beads, sand, and kaolin) contaminated with a 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixture. The sorbents were analyzed using thermal program desorption/mass spectrometry (TPD/MS) and the release energy values were calculated from the resulting thermograms utilizing a nonlinear fit of the analytical solution to a simplified version of the Polanyi-Wigner equation. This solution method resulted in a series of combinations of values for the pre-exponential factor (v) and release energy (E) that produced desorption rate curves with similar errors when fit to actual data sets. These combinations can be viewed as an error surface, which clearly shows a valley of minimum error values spanning the range of both E and v. This indicates that this method may not provide a unique set of E- and v-values and suggests that the simplified version of the Polanyi-Wigner equation cannot be used to determine release energy based on TPD data alone. PMID:15559267

  4. Improving the mechanical properties of Zr-based bulk metallic glass by controlling the activation energy for β-relaxation through plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Nozomu; Todaka, Yoshikazu Umemoto, Minoru; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko

    2014-09-29

    The mechanism of plastic deformation in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is widely believed to be based on a shear transformation zone (STZ). This model assumes that a shear-induced atomic rearrangement occurs at local clusters that are a few to hundreds of atoms in size. It was recently postulated that the potential energy barrier for STZ activation, W{sub STZ}, calculated using the cooperative shear model, is equivalent to the activation energy for β-relaxation, E{sub β}. This result suggested that the fundamental process for STZ activation is the mechanically activated β-relaxation. Since the E{sub β} value and the glass transition temperature T{sub g} of BMGs have a linear relation, that is, because E{sub β} ≈ 26RT{sub g}, the composition of the BMG determines the ease with which the STZ can be activated. Enthalpy relaxation experiments revealed that the BMG Zr{sub 50}Cu{sub 40}Al{sub 10} when deformed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) has a lower E{sub β} of 101 kJ/mol. The HPT-processed samples accordingly exhibited tensile plastic elongation (0.34%) and marked decreases in their yield strength (330 MPa). These results suggest that mechanically induced structural defects (i.e., the free volume and the anti-free volume) effectively act to reduce W{sub STZ} and increase the number of STZs activated during tensile testing to accommodate the plastic strain without requiring a change in the composition of the BMG. Thus, this study shows quantitatively that mechanically induced structural defects can overcome the compositional limitations of E{sub β} (or W{sub STZ}) and result in improvements in the mechanical properties of the BMG.

  5. Improving the mechanical properties of Zr-based bulk metallic glass by controlling the activation energy for β-relaxation through plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Nozomu; Todaka, Yoshikazu; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko; Umemoto, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    The mechanism of plastic deformation in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is widely believed to be based on a shear transformation zone (STZ). This model assumes that a shear-induced atomic rearrangement occurs at local clusters that are a few to hundreds of atoms in size. It was recently postulated that the potential energy barrier for STZ activation, WSTZ, calculated using the cooperative shear model, is equivalent to the activation energy for β-relaxation, Eβ. This result suggested that the fundamental process for STZ activation is the mechanically activated β-relaxation. Since the Eβ value and the glass transition temperature Tg of BMGs have a linear relation, that is, because Eβ ≈ 26RTg, the composition of the BMG determines the ease with which the STZ can be activated. Enthalpy relaxation experiments revealed that the BMG Zr50Cu40Al10 when deformed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) has a lower Eβ of 101 kJ/mol. The HPT-processed samples accordingly exhibited tensile plastic elongation (0.34%) and marked decreases in their yield strength (330 MPa). These results suggest that mechanically induced structural defects (i.e., the free volume and the anti-free volume) effectively act to reduce WSTZ and increase the number of STZs activated during tensile testing to accommodate the plastic strain without requiring a change in the composition of the BMG. Thus, this study shows quantitatively that mechanically induced structural defects can overcome the compositional limitations of Eβ (or WSTZ) and result in improvements in the mechanical properties of the BMG.

  6. Quasilocal energy for three-dimensional massive gravity solutions with chiral deformations of AdS{sub 3} boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Garbarz, Alan; Giribet, Gaston E-mail: af.goya-at@df.uba.ar; Goya, Andrés E-mail: af.goya-at@df.uba.ar; Leston, Mauricio

    2015-03-26

    We consider critical gravity in three dimensions; that is, the New Massive Gravity theory formulated about Anti-de Sitter (AdS) space with the specific value of the graviton mass for which it results dual to a two-dimensional conformai field theory with vanishing central charge. As it happens with Kerr black holes in four-dimensional critical gravity, in three-dimensional critical gravity the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes have vanishing mass and vanishing angular momentum. However, provided suitable asymptotic conditions are chosen, the theory may also admit solutions carrying non-vanishing charges. Here, we give simple examples of exact solutions that exhibit falling-off conditions that are even weaker than those of the so-called Log-gravity. For such solutions, we define the quasilocal stress-tensor and use it to compute conserved charges. Despite the drastic deformation of AdS{sub 3} asymptotic, these solutions have finite mass and angular momentum, which are shown to be non-zero.

  7. Diffuse volcanic degassing and thermal energy release 2015 surveys from the summit cone of Teide volcano, Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melián, Gladys; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padilla, Germán; Alonso, Mar; Halliwell, Simon; Sharp, Emerson; Butters, Damaris; Ingman, Dylan; Alexander, Scott; Cook, Jenny; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    The summit cone of Teide volcano (Spain) is characterized by the presence of a weak fumarolic system, steamy ground, and high rates of diffuse CO2 degassing all around this area. The temperature of the fumaroles (83° C) corresponds to the boiling point of water at discharge conditions. Water is the major component of these fumarolic emissions, followed by CO2, N2, H2, H2S, HCl, Ar, CH4, He and CO, a composition typical of hydrothermal fluids. Previous diffuse CO2 surveys have shown to be an important tool to detect early warnings of possible impending volcanic unrests at Tenerife Island (Melián et al., 2012; Pérez et al., 2013). In July 2015, a soil and fumarole gas survey was undertaken in order to estimate the diffuse volcanic degassing and thermal energy release from the summit cone of Teide volcano. A diffuse CO2 emission survey was performed selecting 170 observation sites according to the accumulation chamber method. Soil CO2 efflux values range from non-detectable (˜0.5 g m‑2d‑1) up to 10,672 g m‑2d‑1, with an average value of 601 g m‑2d‑1. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. Measurement of soil CO2 efflux allowed an estimation of 162 ± 14 t d‑1 of deep seated derived CO2. To calculate the steam discharge associated with this volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 output, we used the average H2O/CO2 mass ratio equal to 1.19 (range, 0.44-3.42) as a representative value of the H2O/CO2 mass ratios for Teide fumaroles. The resulting estimate of the steam flow associated with the gas flux is equal to 193 t d‑1. The condensation of this steam results in a thermal energy release of 5.0×1011J d‑1 for Teide volcano or a total heat flow of 6 MWt. The diffuse gas emissions and thermal energy released from the summit of Teide volcano are comparable to those observed at other volcanoes. Sustained surveillance using these methods will be valuable for monitoring the activity of Teide volcano.

  8. Kinetic-energy release in the dissociative capture-ionization of CO molecules by 97-MeV Ar14+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, R. L.; Sampoll, G.; Horvat, V.; Heber, O.

    1996-02-01

    The dissociation of COQ+ molecular ions (Q=4 to 9) produced in multiply ionizing collisions accompanied by the transfer of an electron to the projectile has been studied using time-of-flight techniques. Analysis of the coincident-ion-pair flight-time-difference distributions yielded average values of the kinetic-energy releases for the various dissociation reactions. These values were found to be as much as a factor of 2 greater than the kinetic-energy releases expected for dissociation along Coulombic potential curves. The average kinetic-energy release observed for a given ion pair with charges q1 and q2 are nearly equal to the point-charge Coulomb potential energies for an ion pair with charges q1+1 and q2+1, suggesting that the parent molecular ion is formed with two electrons, on average, in highly excited states that do not contribute to the screening of the nuclei.

  9. Numerical simulation of flare energy build-up and release via Joule dissipation. [solar MHD model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Bao, J. J.; Wang, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    A new numerical MHD model is developed to study the evolution of an active region due to photospheric converging motion, which leads to magnetic-energy buildup in the form of electric current. Because this new MHD model has incorporated finite conductivity, the energy conversion occurs from magnetic mode to thermal mode through Joule dissipation. In order to test the causality relationship between the occurrence of flare and photospheric motion, a multiple-pole configuration with neutral point is used. Using these results it is found that in addition to the converging motion, the initial magnetic-field configuration and the redistribution of the magnetic flux at photospheric level enhance the possibility for the development of a flare.

  10. Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Data Release 5.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    The Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) data set contains over 200 parameters formulated for assessing and designing renewable energy systems.The SSE data set is formulated from NASA satellite- and reanalysis-derived insolation and meteorological data for the 10-year period July 1983 through June 1993. Results are provided for 1 degree latitude by 1 degree longitude grid cells over the globe. Average daily and monthly measurements for 1195 World Radiation Data Centre ground sites are also available. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=1993-06-30] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1 degree; Longitude_Resolution=1 degree].