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Sample records for deformation linear response

  1. Dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of maraging steel linear cellular alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam E.; Fredenberg, David A.; McCoy, Tammy; Thadhani, Naresh; Cochran, Joe K.

    2012-03-01

    The dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of 25% dense 9-cell linear cellular alloy (LCA) made of unaged 250 maraging steel, fabricated using a direct reduction and extrusion technique, is investigated. Explicit finite element simulations were implemented using AUTODYN finite element code. The maraging steel properties were defined using a Johnson-Cook strength model with previously validated parameters. Rod-on-anvil impact tests were performed using the 7.6mm helium gas gun and the transient deformation and fragmentation response was recorded with highspeed imaging. Analysis of observed deformation states of specimens and finite element simulations reveal that in the case of the 9-cell LCA, dissipation of stress and strain occurs along the interior cell wells resulting in significant and ubiquitous buckling prior to confined fragmentation.

  2. Dynamic Deformation and Fragmentation Response of Maraging Steel Linear Cellular Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam; Fredenburg, D. A.; McCoy, T.; Thadhani, N. N.; Cochran, J.

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of 25% dense 9-cell linear cellular alloy (LCA) made of unaged 250 maraging steel, fabricated using a direct reduction and extrusion technique, is investigated. Explicit finite element simulations were implemented using AUTODYN. The maraging steel properties were defined using a Johnson-Cook strength model with previously validated parameters. Rod-on-anvil impact tests were performed using the 7.6 mm helium gas gun and the transient deformation and fragmentation response was recorded with high-speed imaging. For purpose of comparison, the response of 25% dense hollow cylinders of same density as the 9-cell LCA was also studied. Analysis of observed states of specimens and finite element simulations reveal that in the case of the 9-cell LCA, dissipation of stress and strain occurs along the interior cell wells resulting in significant and ubiquitous buckling prior to confined fragmentation. In comparison, the simple hollow cylinder undergoes significant radial lipping, eventually producing larger sized, external fragments. DTRA Grant No. HDTRA1-07-1-0018 and NDSEG Fellowship Program.

  3. Linear response of light deformed nuclei investigated by self-consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Losa, C.; Doessing, T.; Pastore, A.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2010-06-15

    We present a calculation of the properties of vibrational states in deformed, axially-symmetric even-even nuclei, within the framework of a fully self-consistent quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). The same Skyrme energy density and density-dependent pairing functionals are used to calculate the mean field and the residual interaction in the particle-hole and particle-particle channels. We have tested our software in the case of spherical nuclei against fully self-consistent calculations published in the literature, finding excellent agreement. We investigate the consequences of neglecting the spin-orbit and Coulomb residual interactions in QRPA. Furthermore we discuss the improvement obtained in the QRPA result associated with the removal of spurious modes. Isoscalar and isovector responses in the deformed {sup 24-26}Mg, {sup 34}Mg isotopes are presented and compared to experimental findings.

  4. Capsule deformation and orientation in general linear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmary, Alex; Eggleton, Charles

    2010-11-01

    We considered the response of spherical and non-spherical capsules to general flows. (A capsule is an elastic membrane enclosing a fluid, immersed in fluid.) First, we established that nonspherical capsules align with the imposed irrotational linear flow; this means that initial orientation does not affect steady-state capsule deformation, so this steady-state deformation can be determined entirely by the capillary number and the type of flow. The type of flow is characterized by r: r=0 for axisymmetric flows, and r=1 for planar flows; intermediate values of r are combinations of planar and axisymmetric flow. By varying the capillary number and r, all irrotational linear Stokes flows can be generated. For the same capillary number, planar flows lead to more deformation than uniaxial or biaxial extensional flows. Deformation varies monotonically with r, so one can determine bounds on capsule deformation in general flow by only looking at uniaxial, biaxial, and planar flow. These results are applicable to spheres in all linear flows and to ellipsoids in irrotational linear flow.

  5. Linear, non-linear and plastic bending deformation of cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Ogawa, Yu; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Ismail, Ahmed E; Mazeau, Karim

    2016-07-20

    The deformation behaviour of cellulose nanocrystals under bending loads was investigated by using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and finite element analysis (FEA), and compared with electron micrographs of ultrasonicated microfibrils. The linear elastic, non-linear elastic, and plastic deformation regions were observed with increasing bending displacements. In the linear elastic region, the deformation behaviour was highly anisotropic with respect to the bending direction. This was due to the difference in shear modulus, and the deformation could be approximated by standard continuum mechanics using the corresponding elastic tensors. Above the linear elastic region, the shear deformation became a dominant factor as the amplitude of shear strain drastically increased. Plastic deformation limit was observed at the bending angle above about 60°, independent of the bending direction. The morphology of the atomistic model of plastically deformed cellulose crystals showed a considerable similarity to the kinked cellulose microfibrils observed by transmission electron microscopy. Our observations highlight the importance of shear during deformation of cellulose crystals and provide an understanding of basic deformations occurring during the processing of cellulose materials. PMID:27388579

  6. Linear and Nonlinear Photoinduced Deformations of Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, D.; Warner, M.

    2007-10-01

    Glassy and elastomeric nematic networks with dye molecules present can be very responsive to illumination, huge reversible strains being possible. If absorption is appreciable, strain decreases with depth into a cantilever, leading to bend that is the basis of micro-opto-mechanical systems (MOMS). Bend actually occurs even when Beer’s law suggests a tiny penetration of light into a heavily dye-doped system. We model the nonlinear opto-elastic processes behind this effect. In the regime of cantilever thickness giving optimal bending for a given incident light intensity, there are three neutral surfaces. In practice such nonlinear absorptive effects are very important since heavily doped systems are commonly used.

  7. Deformable silicon membrane for dynamic linear laser beam diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, J.; Bich, A.; Herzig, H. P.; Bitterli, R.; Noell, W.; Scharf, T.; Voelkel, R.; Weible, K. J.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2010-02-01

    We present a dynamic laser beam shaper based on MEMS technology. We show a prototype of a dynamic diffuser made of single crystal silicon. A linearly deformable silicon micromembrane is used to diffuse a laser beam in one dimension. Resonance frequencies of the membrane can range from 1 kHz to 20 kHz. Mode shapes of the deformable mirror are excited using magnetic actuation. Diffusing angle can be tuned by adjusting the driving current in the membrane. We measured a diffusing angle of 1° for an applied current of 40 mA. The aluminum coated mirror can handle 140 W/cm2 of visible to infrared optical power. Application to smooth out interference pattern generated by a static diffuser is shown.

  8. Meshless analysis of shear deformable shells: the linear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Jorge C.; Tiago, Carlos M.; Pimenta, Paulo M.

    2013-10-01

    This work develops a kinematically linear shell model departing from a consistent nonlinear theory. The initial geometry is mapped from a flat reference configuration by a stress-free finite deformation, after which, the actual shell motion takes place. The model maintains the features of a complete stress-resultant theory with Reissner-Mindlin kinematics based on an inextensible director. A hybrid displacement variational formulation is presented, where the domain displacements and kinematic boundary reactions are independently approximated. The resort to a flat reference configuration allows the discretization using 2-D Multiple Fixed Least-Squares (MFLS) on the domain. The consistent definition of stress resultants and consequent plane stress assumption led to a neat formulation for the analysis of shells. The consistent linear approximation, combined with MFLS, made possible efficient computations with a desired continuity degree, leading to smooth results for the displacement, strain and stress fields, as shown by several numerical examples.

  9. Linear Response for Intermittent Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, Viviane; Todd, Mike

    2016-02-01

    We consider the one parameter family {α mapsto T_{α}} ({α in [0,1)} ) of Pomeau-Manneville type interval maps {T_{α}(x) = x(1+2^{α} x^{α})} for {x in [0,1/2)} and {T_{α}(x)=2x-1} for {x in [1/2, 1]} , with the associated absolutely continuous invariant probability measure {μ_{α}} . For {α in (0,1)} , Sarig and Gouëzel proved that the system mixes only polynomially with rate {n^{1-1/{α}}} (in particular, there is no spectral gap). We show that for any {ψ in Lq} , the map {α to int_01 ψ d μ_{α}} is differentiable on {[0,1-1/q)} , and we give a (linear response) formula for the value of the derivative. This is the first time that a linear response formula for the SRB measure is obtained in the setting of slowly mixing dynamics. Our argument shows how cone techniques can be used in this context. For {α ≥ 1/2} we need the {n^{-1/{α}}} decorrelation obtained by Gouëzel under additional conditions.

  10. Deformation propagation in responsive polymer network films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Surya K.; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    We study the elastic deformations in a cross-linked polymer network film triggered by the binding of submicron particles with a sticky surface, mimicking the interactions of viral pathogens with thin films of stimulus-responsive polymeric materials such as hydrogels. From extensive Langevin Dynamics simulations we quantify how far the network deformations propagate depending on the elasticity parameters of the network and the adhesion strength of the particles. We examine the dynamics of the collective area shrinkage of the network and obtain some simple relations for the associated characteristic decay lengths. A detailed analysis elucidates how the elastic energy of the network is distributed between stretching and compression modes in response to the particle binding. We also examine the force-distance curves of the repulsion or attraction interactions for a pair of sticky particles in the polymer network film as a function of the particle-particle separation. The results of this computational study provide new insight into collective phenomena in soft polymer network films and may, in particular, be applied to applications for visual detection of pathogens such as viruses via a macroscopic response of thin films of cross-linked hydrogels.

  11. Deformation and fracture processes in graphene nanoribbons with linear quadrupoles of disclinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochnev, A. S.; Morozov, N. F.; Ovid'ko, I. A.; Semenov, B. N.

    2016-05-01

    The deformation and fracture processes in graphene nanoribbons containing linear quadrupoles of disclinations are investigated by the method of molecular dynamics. Special attention is given to estimating the effect of the curvature formed by disclinations and free boundaries in graphene nanoribbons with linear quadrupoles of disclinations on their mechanical characteristics (the stress-strain curve, the strength at the single-axis tension, and the degree of plastic deformation).

  12. Optically isolated signal coupler with linear response

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    An optocoupler for isolating electrical signals that translates an electrical input signal linearly to an electrical output signal. The optocoupler comprises a light emitter, a light receiver, and a light transmitting medium. The light emitter, preferably a blue, silicon carbide LED, is of the type that provides linear, electro-optical conversion of electrical signals within a narrow wavelength range. Correspondingly, the light receiver, which converts light signals to electrical signals and is preferably a cadmium sulfide photoconductor, is linearly responsive to light signals within substantially the same wavelength range as the blue LED.

  13. Study of the influence of actin-binding proteins using linear analyses of cell deformability.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Gustavo R; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Mirzaei, Zahra; Simmons, Craig A

    2015-07-21

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in the deformability of the cell and in mechanosensing. Here we analyze the contributions of three major actin cross-linking proteins, myosin II, α-actinin and filamin, to cell deformability, by using micropipette aspiration of Dictyostelium cells. We examine the applicability of three simple mechanical models: for small deformation, linear viscoelasticity and drop of liquid with a tense cortex; and for large deformation, a Newtonian viscous fluid. For these models, we have derived linearized equations and we provide a novel, straightforward methodology to analyze the experiments. This methodology allowed us to differentiate the effects of the cross-linking proteins in the different regimes of deformation. Our results confirm some previous observations and suggest important relations between the molecular characteristics of the actin-binding proteins and the cell behavior: the effect of myosin is explained in terms of the relation between the lifetime of the bond to actin and the resistive force; the presence of α-actinin obstructs the deformation of the cytoskeleton, presumably mainly due to the higher molecular stiffness and to the lower dissociation rate constants; and filamin contributes critically to the global connectivity of the network, possibly by rapidly turning over cross-links during the remodeling of the cytoskeletal network, thanks to the higher rate constants, flexibility and larger size. The results suggest a sophisticated relationship between the expression levels of actin-binding proteins, deformability and mechanosensing. PMID:26059185

  14. Linear Response Laws and Causality in Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuffa, Alex J.; Scales, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Linear response laws and causality (the effect cannot precede the cause) are of fundamental importance in physics. In the context of classical electrodynamics, students often have a difficult time grasping these concepts because the physics is obscured by the intermingling of the time and frequency domains. In this paper, we analyse the linear…

  15. Characterization of Composites Response at High Rates of Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to experimentally study the effect of strain rate on mechanical response (deformation and failure) of IM-7/977-2 carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites. The experimental data will provide the information needed for the development of a nonlinear, rate dependent deformation and strength model for this material that can subsequently be used in design.

  16. Linear response to nonstationary random excitation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, T.

    1972-01-01

    Development of a method for computing the mean-square response of linear systems to nonstationary random excitation of the form given by y(t) = f(t) x(t), in which x(t) = a stationary process and f(t) is deterministic. The method is suitable for application to multidegree-of-freedom systems when the mean-square response at a point due to excitation applied at another point is desired. Both the stationary process, x(t), and the modulating function, f(t), may be arbitrary. The method utilizes a fundamental component of transient response dependent only on x(t) and the system, and independent of f(t) to synthesize the total response. The role played by this component is analogous to that played by the Green's function or impulse response function in the convolution integral.

  17. Prediction of Undsteady Flows in Turbomachinery Using the Linearized Euler Equations on Deforming Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, William S.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1994-01-01

    A linearized Euler solver for calculating unsteady flows in turbomachinery blade rows due to both incident gusts and blade motion is presented. The model accounts for blade loading, blade geometry, shock motion, and wake motion. Assuming that the unsteadiness in the flow is small relative to the nonlinear mean solution, the unsteady Euler equations can be linearized about the mean flow. This yields a set of linear variable coefficient equations that describe the small amplitude harmonic motion of the fluid. These linear equations are then discretized on a computational grid and solved using standard numerical techniques. For transonic flows, however, one must use a linear discretization which is a conservative linearization of the non-linear discretized Euler equations to ensure that shock impulse loads are accurately captured. Other important features of this analysis include a continuously deforming grid which eliminates extrapolation errors and hence, increases accuracy, and a new numerically exact, nonreflecting far-field boundary condition treatment based on an eigenanalysis of the discretized equations. Computational results are presented which demonstrate the computational accuracy and efficiency of the method and demonstrate the effectiveness of the deforming grid, far-field nonreflecting boundary conditions, and shock capturing techniques. A comparison of the present unsteady flow predictions to other numerical, semi-analytical, and experimental methods shows excellent agreement. In addition, the linearized Euler method presented requires one or two orders-of-magnitude less computational time than traditional time marching techniques making the present method a viable design tool for aeroelastic analyses.

  18. Ballistic transport in graphene beyond linear response

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenstein, B.; Korniyenko, Y.; Lewkowicz, M.; Kao, H. C.

    2010-01-15

    The process of coherent creation of particle-hole excitations by an electric field in graphene is quantitatively described beyond linear response. We calculate the evolution of current density, number of pairs and energy in ballistic regime for electric field E using the tight-binding model. While for ballistic flight times smaller than t{sub nl}propor toE{sup -1/2} current is linear in E and independent of time, for larger ballistic times the current increases after t{sub nl} as Jpropor toE{sup 3/2}t and finally at yet larger times (t>t{sub B}propor toE{sup -1}) Bloch oscillations set in. It is shown that the number of pairs follows the 2D generalization of the Schwinger's creation rate npropor toE{sup 3/2} only on certain time segments with a prefactor different from that obtained using the asymptotic formula.

  19. Linear and Non-Linear Long-Term Terrain Deformation with DInSAR (CPT: Coherent Pixels Technique)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallorqui, J. J.; Mora, O.; Blanco, P.; Broquetas, A.

    2004-06-01

    / In this paper, an advanced technique for the generation of deformation maps using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data is presented. The algorithm, called the Coherent Pixels Technique, estimates the linear and non-linear components of the displacement, the error of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) used to cancel the topographic terms, and the atmospheric artifacts from a reduced set of low spatial resolution interferograms. The pixel candidates are selected from those presenting a good coherence level in the whole set of interferograms and the resulting non-uniform mesh tessellated with the Delauney triangulation to establish connections among them. The linear component of movement and DEM error are estimated adjusting a linear model to the data only on the connections. Later on, this information, once integrated to retrieve the absolute values, is used to calculate the non-linear component of movement and atmospheric artifacts with alternate filtering techniques in both temporal and spatial domains. The method presents high flexibility with respect to the required number of images and the baselines length. However, better results are obtained with large datasets of short baseline interferograms. The technique has been tested with ERS SAR data from an area of Catalonia (Spain) and the Campi Flegrei area (Naples, Italy) and validated with on-field precise levelling measurements.

  20. Random Response of Linear Hysteretic Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Floris, Claudio

    2008-07-08

    The probabilistic characterization of the response of a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) oscillator with linear hysteretic damping excited by ground motion described by zero mean stationary Gaussian processes is achieved by profiting from a steady-state solution of the motion equation, valid when the excitation is given by the superposition of harmonics. The model of linear hysteretic damping has been introduced to fit damping mechanisms in which the dissipation rate is independent of frequency, and mathematically it is described by the Hilbert transform of the response. Though this model is debated since it violates the principle of causality, its intrinsic simplicity makes it preferable to other models. The steady-state solution of the motion equation proposed in this paper allows a closed form evaluation of the respone mean square value. However, the numerical examples show that this quantity is affected by the mechanism of energy dissipation only when this is large. On the contrary, for a low capacity of dissipation the response mean square value is rather insensitive to the dissipation mechanism.

  1. Deformation Response and Life of Metallic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2005-01-01

    The project was initially funded for one year (for $100,764) to investigate the potential of particulate reinforced metals for aeropropulsion applications and to generate fatigue results that quantify the mean stress effect for a titanium alloy matrix material (TIMETAL 21S). The project was continued for a second year (for $85,000) to more closely investigate cyclic deformation, especially ratcheting, of the titanium alloy matrix at elevated temperature. Equipment was purchased (for $19,000) to make the experimental program feasible; this equipment included an extensometer calibrator and a multi-channel signal conditioning amplifier. The project was continued for a third year ($50,000) to conduct cyclic relaxation experiments aimed at validating the elastic-viscoelastic-viscoplastic model that NASA GRC had developed for the titanium alloy. Finally, a one-year no cost extension was granted to enable continued analysis of the experimental results and model comparisons.

  2. A non-linear elastic constitutive framework for replicating plastic deformation in solids.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Scott Alan; Schunk, Peter Randall

    2014-02-01

    Ductile metals and other materials typically deform plastically under large applied loads; a behavior most often modeled using plastic deformation constitutive models. However, it is possible to capture some of the key behaviors of plastic deformation using only the framework for nonlinear elastic mechanics. In this paper, we develop a phenomenological, hysteretic, nonlinear elastic constitutive model that captures many of the features expected of a plastic deformation model. This model is based on calculating a secant modulus directly from a materials stress-strain curve. Scalar stress and strain values are obtained in three dimensions by using the von Mises invariants. Hysteresis is incorporated by tracking an additional history variable and assuming an elastic unloading response. This model is demonstrated in both single- and multi-element simulations under varying strain conditions.

  3. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  4. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  5. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, Thiago V; Bonança, Marcus V S; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. With the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found-quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. Finally, we propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times. PMID:26565209

  6. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. With the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. Finally, we propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  7. Linear response and hydrodynamics for granular fluids.

    PubMed

    Dufty, James; Baskaran, Aparna; Brey, J Javier

    2008-03-01

    A formal derivation of linear hydrodynamics for a granular fluid is given. The linear response to small spatial perturbations of a homogeneous reference state is studied in detail, using methods of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. A transport matrix for macroscopic excitations in the fluid is defined in terms of the response functions. An expansion in the wave vector to second order allows identification of all phenomenological susceptibilities and transport coefficients through Navier-Stokes order in terms of appropriate time correlation functions. The transport coefficients in this representation are the generalization to granular fluids of the familiar Helfand and Green-Kubo relations for normal fluids. The analysis applies to a variety of collision rules. Important differences in both the analysis and results from those for normal fluids are identified and discussed. A scaling limit is described corresponding to the conditions under which idealized inelastic hard sphere models can apply. Further details and interpretation are provided in the paper following this one, by specialization to the case of smooth, inelastic hard spheres with constant coefficient of restitution. PMID:18517373

  8. Hydration thermodynamics beyond the linear response approximation.

    PubMed

    Raineri, Fernando O

    2016-10-19

    The solvation energetics associated with the transformation of a solute molecule at infinite dilution in water from an initial state A to a final state B is reconsidered. The two solute states have different potentials energies of interaction, [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], with the solvent environment. Throughout the A [Formula: see text] B transformation of the solute, the solvation system is described by a Hamiltonian [Formula: see text] that changes linearly with the coupling parameter ξ. By focusing on the characterization of the probability density [Formula: see text] that the dimensionless perturbational solute-solvent interaction energy [Formula: see text] has numerical value y when the coupling parameter is ξ, we derive a hierarchy of differential equation relations between the ξ-dependent cumulant functions of various orders in the expansion of the appropriate cumulant generating function. On the basis of this theoretical framework we then introduce an inherently nonlinear solvation model for which we are able to find analytical results for both [Formula: see text] and for the solvation thermodynamic functions. The solvation model is based on the premise that there is an upper or a lower bound (depending on the nature of the interactions considered) to the amplitude of the fluctuations of Y in the solution system at equilibrium. The results reveal essential differences in behavior for the model when compared with the linear response approximation to solvation, particularly with regards to the probability density [Formula: see text]. The analytical expressions for the solvation properties show, however, that the linear response behavior is recovered from the new model when the room for the thermal fluctuations in Y is not restricted by the existence of a nearby bound. We compare the predictions of the model with the results from molecular dynamics computer simulations for aqueous solvation, in which either (1) the solute

  9. Microscopic response to inhomogeneous deformations in curvilinear coordinates.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    A mechanical deformation of a continuum can be expressed as a generalized coordinate transformation of space. Consequently, the equations of electrostatics in deformable media must satisfy covariance requirements with respect to such transformations, a problem that has long been addressed in the context of general relativity. Here we show how these ideas can be incorporated into the framework of density-functional perturbation theory, providing access to the microscopic charge density and electrostatic potential response to an arbitrary deformation field. We demonstrate the power of our approach by deriving, in full generality, the surface contributions to the flexoelectric response of a finite object, a topic that has recently been a matter of controversy. The breakdown of translational periodicity produces consequences that might seem highly paradoxical at first sight: for example, the macroscopic bulk polarization does not always correspond to the physical surface charge. PMID:24189935

  10. Erythrocyte deformability - A partner of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Silva-Herdade, Ana Santos; Andolina, Giulia; Faggio, Caterina; Calado, Ângelo; Saldanha, Carlota

    2016-09-01

    We aim to establish an in vivo animal model of acute inflammation using PAF (platelet activating factor) as inflammatory agent and to study the erythrocyte deformability changes induced by the inflammatory response. Counting the number of rolling and adherent neutrophils to endothelium after 2, 4 and 6h of intrascrotal injection of PAF we showed the induction of an inflammatory state. Blood samples are collected in order to measure the erythrocyte deformability and to quantify NO efflux from the red blood cells (RBCs). The results show an increased number of rolling and adherent neutrophils after 2h and 4h of inflammation as well as decreased values of erythrocyte deformability in the same time-points. This result is in line with the need of a low blood viscosity to the recruitment process that will improve leukocyte migration towards the endothelial wall. NO efflux from RBCs is also affected by the inflammatory response at the first hours of inflammation. This animal model demonstrates in vivo the association between an acute inflammatory response and the rheological properties of the blood, namely the RBCs deformability. For those reasons we consider this as an adequate model to study acute inflammatory responses as well as hemorheological parameters. PMID:27142964

  11. Linear friction weld process monitoring of fixture cassette deformations using empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, O. J.; Gibson, C.; Wilson, P.; Lohse, N.; Popov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Due to its inherent advantages, linear friction welding is a solid-state joining process of increasing importance to the aerospace, automotive, medical and power generation equipment industries. Tangential oscillations and forge stroke during the burn-off phase of the joining process introduce essential dynamic forces, which can also be detrimental to the welding process. Since burn-off is a critical phase in the manufacturing stage, process monitoring is fundamental for quality and stability control purposes. This study aims to improve workholding stability through the analysis of fixture cassette deformations. Methods and procedures for process monitoring are developed and implemented in a fail-or-pass assessment system for fixture cassette deformations during the burn-off phase. Additionally, the de-noised signals are compared to results from previous production runs. The observed deformations as a consequence of the forces acting on the fixture cassette are measured directly during the welding process. Data on the linear friction-welding machine are acquired and de-noised using empirical mode decomposition, before the burn-off phase is extracted. This approach enables a direct, objective comparison of the signal features with trends from previous successful welds. The capacity of the whole process monitoring system is validated and demonstrated through the analysis of a large number of signals obtained from welding experiments.

  12. On The Linearity of Enso's Atmospheric Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, S.; Deweaver, E.

    The linearity, or extent of anti-symmetry, of El Nino and La Nina heating and circula- tion anomalies is examined by compositing the winter season anomalies for positive and negative values of the Nino3.4 SST index in excess of one standard deviation. Eight winters meet this condition in each ENSO phase during 1950-2000, and the warm and cold years are equitably distributed relative to the 1976/77 climate transi- tion. ENSO SSTs have a direct effect on the large-scale atmospheric circulation through their impact on diabatic heating and subsequent upper-level divergence over the equa- torial Pacific. These fields show a significant westward displacement for the La Nina composite compared to the El Nino composite, as expected from the SST threshold condition for convection. But despite the westward shift in convection, the 200mb height composites are almost anti-symmetric over the Pacific, with only a small (about 10) westward shift for the extratropical La Nina pattern. The upper-level height re- sponse in the tropics, including the position of the El Nino anticyclones, is found to be even more anti-symmetric than the extratropical response. Our finding of anti-symmetry in the upper-level Pacific height responses to warm and cold ENSO events is in disagreement with the observational composites of Hoerling et al. (1997), which show a large shift between El Nino and La Nina height patterns over the North Pacific. In their composites, the La Nina response resembles the PNA pat- tern, a result not in evidence here. This difference can be understood as a consequence of decadal variability, particularly the 1976/77 climate transition.

  13. Study of non-linear deformation of vocal folds in simulations of human phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurabh, Shakti; Bodony, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation is performed on a two-dimensional compressible, viscous fluid interacting with a non-linear, viscoelastic solid as a model for the generation of the human voice. The vocal fold (VF) tissues are modeled as multi-layered with varying stiffness in each layer and using a finite-strain Standard Linear Solid (SLS) constitutive model implemented in a quadratic finite element code and coupled to a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver through a boundary-fitted fluid-solid interface. The large non-linear mesh deformation is handled using an elliptic/poisson smoothening technique. Supra-glottal flow shows asymmetry in the flow, which in turn has a coupling effect on the motion of the VF. The fully compressible simulations gives direct insight into the sound produced as pressure distributions and the vocal fold deformation helps study the unsteady vortical flow resulting from the fluid-structure interaction along the full phonation cycle. Supported by the National Science Foundation (CAREER Award Number 1150439).

  14. Electrical resistivity response due to elastic-plastic deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of many materials is sensitive to changes in the electronic band configurations surrounding the atoms, changes in the electron-phonon interaction cross-sections, and changes in the density of intrinsic defect structures. These changes are most directly dependent on interatomic measures of relative deformation. For this reason, a model for resistivity response is developed in terms of interatomic measures of relative deformation. The relative deformation consists of two terms, a continuous function to describe the recoverable displacement between two atoms in the atomic lattice structure and a functional to describe the nonrecoverable displacement between two atoms as a result of interatomic discontinuities from dislocation kinetics. This model for resistivity extends the classical piezoresistance representation and relates electric resistance change directly to physical mechanisms. An analysis for the resistivity change of a thin foil ideally embedded in a material that undergoes elastic-plastic deformation is presented. For the case of elastic deformations, stress information in the material surrounding the thin foil is inferred for the cases of pure strain coupling boundary conditions, pure stress coupling boundary conditions, and a combination of stress-strain coupling boundary conditions. 42 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Fluctuation Relation beyond Linear Response Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, A.; Zamponi, F.; Gallavotti, G.

    2005-05-01

    The Fluctuation Relation (FR) is an asymptotic result onthe distribution of certain observables averaged over timeintervals τ as τ → ∞ and it is a generalization of thefluctuation-dissipation theorem to far from equilibrium systemsin a steady state, which reduces to the usual Green-Kubo (GK)relation in the limit of small external non-conservative forces.FR is a theorem for smooth uniformly hyperbolic systems, and it isassumed to be true in all dissipative `chaotic enough' systemsin a steady state. In this paper, we develop a theory of finitetime corrections to FR, needed to compare the asymptoticprediction of FR with numerical observations, which necessarilyinvolve fluctuations of observables averaged over finite timeintervals τ. We perform a numerical test of FR in two cases inwhich non-Gaussian fluctuations are observable, while GK does notapply and we get a non-trivial verification of FR that is independent of and different from linear response theory.Our results are compatible with the theory of finite timecorrections to FR, while FR would be observably violated,well within the precision of our experiments, if such correctionswere neglected.

  16. Deformation and annealing response of TD-nickel chromium sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The deformation and annealing response of TD-nickel chromium (TD-NiCr) 0.1 inch thick sheet was examined using various cold-rolling and annealing treatments. Upon annealing (above 816 C (1500 F), the as-received material was converted from an initially ultra-fine grain size (average grain dimension 0.51 micron) to a large grain structure. Increases in grain size by a factor of 100 to 200 were observed for this transformation. However, in those material states where the large grain transformation was absent, a fine grain recrystallized structure formed upon annealing (above 732 C (1350 F)). The deformation and annealing response of TD-NiCr sheet was evaluated with respect to the processing related variables as mode and severity of deformation and annealing temperature. Results indicate that the large grain transformation, classical primary recrystallization occurs. Using selected materials produced during the deformation and annealing study, the elevated temperature tensile properties of TD-NiCr sheet were examined in the temperature range 593 C (1100 F) to 1093 C (2000 F). It was observed that the elevated temperature tensile properties of TD-NiCr sheet could be optimized by the stabilization of a large grain size in this material using the cold working and/or annealing treatments developed during the present investigation.

  17. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2003-12-01

    This project covers three distinct features of thin film fracture and deformation in which the current experimental technique of nanoindentation demonstrates limitations. The first feature is film fracture, which can be generated either by nanoindentation or bulge testing thin films. Examples of both tests will be shown, in particular oxide films on metallic or semiconductor substrates. Nanoindentations were made into oxide films on aluminum and titanium substrates for two cases; one where the metal was a bulk (effectively single crystal) material and the other where the metal was a 1 pm thick film grown on a silica or silicon substrate. In both cases indentation was used to produce discontinuous loading curves, which indicate film fracture after plastic deformation of the metal. The oxides on bulk metals fractures occurred at reproducible loads, and the tensile stress in the films at fracture were approximately 10 and 15 GPa for the aluminum and titanium oxides respectively. Similarly, bulge tests of piezoelectric oxide films have been carried out and demonstrate film fracture at stresses of only 100's of MPa, suggesting the importance of defects and film thickness in evaluating film strength. The second feature of concern is film adhesion. Several qualitative and quantitative tests exist today that measure the adhesion properties of thin films. A relatively new technique that uses stressed overlayers to measure adhesion has been proposed and extensively studied. Delamination of thin films manifests itself in the form of either telephone cord or straight buckles. The buckles are used to calculate the interfacial fracture toughness of the film-substrate system. Nanoindentation can be utilized if more energy is needed to initiate buckling of the film system. Finally, deformation in metallic systems can lead to non-linear deformation due to 'bursts' of dislocation activity during nanoindentation. An experimental study to examine the structure of dislocations around

  18. Fatigueless response of spider draglines in cyclic torsion facilitated by reversible molecular deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, Kamal P.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate that spider draglines exhibit a fatigueless response in extreme cyclic torsion up to its breaking limit. The well defined Raman bands at 1095 and 1245 cm-1 shifted linearly towards lower wavenumbers versus increasing twist in both clockwise and counter-clockwise directions. Under thousands of continuous loading cycles of twist strain approaching its breaking limit, all the Raman bands were preserved and the characteristic Raman peak shifts were found to be reversible. Besides, nanoscale surface profile of the worked silk appeared as good as the pristine silk. This unique fatigueless twist response of draglines, facilitated by reversible deformation of protein molecules, could find applications in durable miniatured devices.

  19. Extension of non-linear beam models with deformable cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I.; Krylov, S.; Harari, I.

    2015-12-01

    Geometrically exact beam theory is extended to allow distortion of the cross section. We present an appropriate set of cross-section basis functions and provide physical insight to the cross-sectional distortion from linear elastostatics. The beam formulation in terms of material (back-rotated) beam internal force resultants and work-conjugate kinematic quantities emerges naturally from the material description of virtual work of constrained finite elasticity. The inclusion of cross-sectional deformation allows straightforward application of three-dimensional constitutive laws in the beam formulation. Beam counterparts of applied loads are expressed in terms of the original three-dimensional data. Special attention is paid to the treatment of the applied stress, keeping in mind applications such as hydrogel actuators under environmental stimuli or devices made of electroactive polymers. Numerical comparisons show the ability of the beam model to reproduce finite elasticity results with good efficiency.

  20. The large deformation elastic response of woven Kevlar fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    The large deformation elastic response of a plane woven Kevlar fabric is investigated analytically and experimentally. The analysis assumes the undeformed geometry to be a sequence of interlaced arcs of circles which reverse at each yarn midpoint, ad each yarn is modeled as an extensible elastical subject to certain compatibility conditions. Deflection-force relations for the fabric are determined in terms of the initial weave geometry and the elastic properties of the individual yarns. The theoretical results agree well with the results of experiments performed on a fabric woven from 400 denier Kevlar yarns under conditions of uniaxial loading in both warp and fill directions. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Response of a rotorcraft model with damping non-linearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongue, B. H.

    1985-11-01

    The linearized equations of motion of a helicopter in contact with the ground have solutions which can be linearly stable or unstable, depending on the system parameters. The present study includes physical non-linearities in the helicopter model. This allows one to determine if a steady-state response exists and, if so, what the frequency and amplitude of the oscillations will be. In this way, one can determine how serious the linearly unstable operating regime is and whether destructive oscillations are possible when the system is in the linearly stable regime. The present analysis applies to helicopters having fully articulated rotors.

  2. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2006-02-15

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  3. Descriptive Linear modeling of steady-state visual evoked response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Junker, A. M.; Kenner, K.

    1986-01-01

    A study is being conducted to explore use of the steady state visual-evoke electrocortical response as an indicator of cognitive task loading. Application of linear descriptive modeling to steady state Visual Evoked Response (VER) data is summarized. Two aspects of linear modeling are reviewed: (1) unwrapping the phase-shift portion of the frequency response, and (2) parsimonious characterization of task-loading effects in terms of changes in model parameters. Model-based phase unwrapping appears to be most reliable in applications, such as manual control, where theoretical models are available. Linear descriptive modeling of the VER has not yet been shown to provide consistent and readily interpretable results.

  4. Deformation Bands as Linear Elastic Fractures: Progress in Theory and Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternlof, K.; Pollard, D.

    2001-12-01

    Deformation bands (DBs) are thin, tabular, bounded features of highly localized shear and/or compaction that commonly occur as systematic and pervasive arrays in porous sandstone. They also constitute an active area of theoretical and experimental research into the compressive failure of granular materials. Based on our ongoing study of DBs in the field, we propose that they originate at stress concentrations and propagate as brittle fractures in a linear elastic medium. Furthermore, we suggest that individual DB morphology is largely dominated by the closing (anti-mode I) component of the displacement discontinuity accommodated. The notion of DBs as "anti-cracks" akin to pressure solution surfaces is not new. But close examination of real DB arrays within the unifying context of linear elastic fracture mechanics is needed to add depth and bring quantitative rigor to our understanding of the phenomenon. Thus, we are building a body of detailed data based on field observation and thin-section analysis to substantiate and expand our central hypothesis, while also laying the foundation for an effort to replicate realistic DB arrays using numerical modeling techniques. Our field effort focuses on the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone as exposed in and around the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada. This area offers expansive and varied DB exposures within a thick and relatively consistent sequence of dune-dominated aeolian sandstone. We will present interim results, interpretations and conclusions specific to the elastic nature of DBs, in particular comparing our data to the three distinct fracture-tip models: the dislocation, and the crack with and without cohesive end zones. Each of these models predicts substantially different near-tip stress fields for the same material under the same remote loading conditions, leading to different expectations for basic DB shape, structure, and propagation and mechanical interaction behavior. These expectations will be compared to and judged

  5. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  6. In situ sensing of non-linear deformation and damage in epoxy particulate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadlamani, Venkat K.; Chalivendra, Vijaya; Shukla, Arun; Yang, Sze

    2012-07-01

    Damage sensing of epoxy particulate composites was investigated using multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) under quasi-static uniaxial tensile loading. Two types of particulates, namely (a) aluminum silicate hollow microspheres (cenospheres), and (b) liquid carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber were considered in this study. The influence of three different volume fractions of cenospheres (10%, 20% and 30%) and three different weight fractions of CTBN resin (10, 20 and 30 phr) on the electromechanical response was studied. A four-circumferential ring probe (FCRP) technique was employed to measure the electrical resistance of the test specimen as a function of the axial strain. The resistance-strain curve is compared with a simultaneously measured mechanical stress-strain curve. The electromechanical measurement show additional stages of material deformation not readily revealed from the mechanical stress-strain curve. The resistance change associated with the unfolding of entangled polymer chains and further straightening of the polymer chains decreased the distance between CNTs, causing improved electron hopping in all composites except 30% cenospheres composite. The U-shaped electrical response demonstrated by both 20 and 30 phr rubber composites exploited the CNT sensory network successfully by providing early warning of composite failure due to micro-crack propagation which resulted in breaking of the CNT network.

  7. Linear optical response of finite systems using multishift linear system solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Hübener, Hannes; Giustino, Feliciano

    2014-07-28

    We discuss the application of multishift linear system solvers to linear-response time-dependent density functional theory. Using this technique the complete frequency-dependent electronic density response of finite systems to an external perturbation can be calculated at the cost of a single solution of a linear system via conjugate gradients. We show that multishift time-dependent density functional theory yields excitation energies and oscillator strengths in perfect agreement with the standard diagonalization of the response matrix (Casida's method), while being computationally advantageous. We present test calculations for benzene, porphin, and chlorophyll molecules. We argue that multishift solvers may find broad applicability in the context of excited-state calculations within density-functional theory and beyond.

  8. Frontal Wave Stability during Moist Deformation Frontogenesis. Part I: Linear Wave Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Craig H.; Thorpe, Alan J.

    1994-03-01

    It has been shown that lower tropospheric potential vorticity zones formed during moist deformation frontogenesis will support growing waves if at some time the frontogenesis ceases. In this paper, the ways in which these waves are affected by the frontogenetic process are identified.Observations show that fronts in the eastern Atlantic commonly feature saturated ascent regions characterized by zero moist potential vorticity. Furthermore, in many cases the horizontal temperature gradient in the lowest one to two kilometers of the atmosphere is rather weak. These features are incorporated in an analytical archetype. The dynamical implications of saturated ascent in conditions of zero moist potential vorticity are represented in the model by assuming that adiabatic temperature changes are precisely balanced by diabatic tendencies. The observed small temperature gradient at low levels is represented in the model by taking it to be zero in the lowest two kilometers. Consequently, the forcing of the low-level moist ageostrophic vortex stretching that strengthens the low-level potential vorticity anomaly is confined to middle and upper levels.A semianalytical initial value solution for the linear development of waves on the evolving low-level potential vorticity anomaly is obtained. The waves approximately satisfy the inviscid primitive equations whenever the divergent part of the perturbation is negligible relative to the rotational part. The range of nonmodal wave developments supported by the front is summarized using RT phase diagrams. This analysis shows that the most dramatic effects of frontogenesis on frontal wave growth are due to (a) the increase in time of the potential vorticity and hence potential instability of the flow and (b) the increase in time of the alongfront wavelength relative to the width of the strip. An optimally growing streamfunction wave is described. Finally, a diagnostic technique suitable for identifying small amplitude frontal waves in

  9. Conceptual DFT: chemistry from the linear response function.

    PubMed

    Geerlings, Paul; Fias, Stijn; Boisdenghien, Zino; De Proft, Frank

    2014-07-21

    Within the context of reactivity descriptors known in conceptual DFT, the linear response function (χ(r,r')) remained nearly unexploited. Although well known, in its time dependent form, in the solid state physics and time-dependent DFT communities the study of the "chemistry" present in the kernel was, until recently, relatively unexplored. The evaluation of the linear response function as such and its study in the time independent form are highlighted in the present review. On the fundamental side, the focus is on the approaches of increasing complexity to compute and represent χ(r,r'), its visualisation going from plots of the unintegrated χ(r,r') to an atom condensed matrix. The study on atoms reveals its physical significance, retrieving atomic shell structure, while the results on molecules illustrate that a variety of chemical concepts are retrieved: inductive and mesomeric effects, electron delocalisation, aromaticity and anti-aromaticity, σ and π aromaticity,…. The applications show that the chemistry of aliphatic (saturated and unsaturated) chains, saturated and aromatic/anti-aromatic rings, organic, inorganic or metallic in nature, can be retrieved via the linear response function, including the variation of the electronic structure of the reagents along a reaction path. The connection of the linear response function with the concept of nearsightedness and the alchemical derivatives is also highlighted. PMID:24531142

  10. Testing Linear Models for Ability Parameters in Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; Hendrawan, Irene

    2005-01-01

    Methods for testing hypotheses concerning the regression parameters in linear models for the latent person parameters in item response models are presented. Three tests are outlined: A likelihood ratio test, a Lagrange multiplier test and a Wald test. The tests are derived in a marginal maximum likelihood framework. They are explicitly formulated…

  11. Qubit Measurement with a Nonlinear Cavity Detector Beyond Linear Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflamme, Catherine; Clerk, Aashish

    2012-02-01

    We consider theoretically the use of a driven, nonlinear superconducting microwave cavity to measure a coupled superconducting qubit. This is similar to setups studied in recent experiments.ootnotetextM. Hatridge et al. Phys.Rev.B, 83,134501 (2011)^,ootnotetextF.R. Ong et al. PRL 106,167002 (2011) In a previous work, we demonstrated that for weak coupling (where linear response theory holds) one misses the quantum limit on QND detection in this system by a large factor proportional to the parametric gain.ootnotetextC. Laflamme and A.A. Clerk, Phys. Rev. A 83, 033803 (2011) Here we calculate measurement backaction beyond linear response by using an approximate mapping to a detuned degenerate parametric amplifier having both linear and dispersive couplings to the qubit. We find surprisingly that the backaction dephasing rate is far more sensitive to corrections beyond linear response than the detector response. Thus, increasing the coupling strength can significantly increase the efficiency of the measurement. We interpret this behavior in terms of the non-Gaussian photon number fluctuations of the nonlinear cavity. Our results have applications to quantum information processing and quantum amplification with superconducting microwave circuits.

  12. Non-linear dielectric response of ferrofluids under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licinio, Pedro; Teixeira, Alvaro V.; Figueiredo, José Marcos A.

    2005-03-01

    The dielectric response of a water-based magnetic fluid is investigated at room temperature and in the frequency range of 100-10 7 rad/s. The response is linear in the electric fields used. Upon application of a constant magnetic field of 40 mT, which is well below the sample saturation, the response becomes non-linear. Magnetic field effects are isolated by performing a differential analysis of the inverse dielectric permittivity with and without applied field in both perpendicular and parallel configurations. The imaginary part of the differential inverse permittivity displays two peaks. The low-frequency peak is seen to correspond to the orientation relaxation of aggregates also detected in SAXS, photon correlation and atomic force microscopy measurements. The high-frequency peak corresponds to single magnetic particle reorientation.

  13. Parametric instability of a many point-vortex system in a multi-layer flow under linear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, Eugene A.; Koshel, Konstantin V.

    2016-05-01

    The paper deals with a dynamical system governing the motion of many point vortices located in different layers of a multi-layer flow under external deformation. The deformation consists of generally independent shear and rotational components. First, we examine the dynamics of the system's vorticity center. We demonstrate that the vorticity center of such a multi-vortex multi-layer system behaves just like the one of two point vortices interacting in a homogeneous deformation flow. Given nonstationary shear and rotational components oscillating with different magnitudes, the vorticity center may experience parametric instability leading to its unbounded growth. However, we then show that one can shift to a moving reference frame with the origin coinciding with the position of the vorticity center. In this new reference frame, the new vorticity center always stays at the origin of coordinates, and the equations governing the vortex trajectories look exactly the same as if the vorticity center had never moved in the original reference frame. Second, we studied the relative motion of two point vortices located in different layers of a two-layer flow under linear deformation. We analyze their regular and chaotic dynamics identifying parameters resulting in effective and extensive destabilization of the vortex trajectories.

  14. Contact nonlinearities and linear response in jammed particulate packings.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Carl P; Liu, Andrea J; Nagel, Sidney R

    2014-08-01

    Packings of frictionless athermal particles that interact only when they overlap experience a jamming transition as a function of packing density. Such packings provide the foundation for the theory of jamming. This theory rests on the observation that, despite the multitude of disordered configurations, the mechanical response to linear order depends only on the distance to the transition. We investigate the validity and utility of such measurements that invoke the harmonic approximation and show that, despite particles coming in and out of contact, there is a well-defined linear regime in the thermodynamic limit. PMID:25215727

  15. Linearity in the response of photopolymers as optical recording media.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Sergi; Marquez, Andrés; Guardiola, Francisco J; Riquelme, Marina; Fernández, Roberto; Pascual, Inmaculada; Beléndez, Augusto

    2013-05-01

    Photopolymer are appealing materials for diffractive elements recording. Two of their properties when they are illuminated are useful for this goal: the relief surface changes and the refractive index modifications. To this goal the linearity in the material response is crucial to design the optimum irradiance for each element. In this paper we measured directly some parameters to know how linear is the material response, in terms of the refractive index modulation versus exposure, then we can predict the refractive index distributions during recording. We have analyzed at different recording intensities the evolution of monomer diffusion during recording for photopolymers based on PVA/Acrylamide. This model has been successfully applied to PVA/Acrylamide photopolymers to predict the transmitted diffracted orders and the agreement with experimental values has been increased. PMID:23669956

  16. Gaussian fluctuations and linear response in an electron transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    In response to charge separation or transfer, polar liquids respond in a simple linear fashion. A similar linear response for proteins might be expected from the central limit theorem and is postulated in widely used theories of protein electrostatics, including the Marcus electron transfer theory and dielectric continuum theories. Although these theories are supported by a variety of experimental data, the exact validity of a linear protein dielectric response has been difficult to determine. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented that establish a linear dielectric response of both protein and surrounding solvent over the course of a biologically relevant electron transfer reaction: oxido-reduction of yeast cytochrome c in solution. Using an umbrella-sampling free energy approach with long simulations, an accurate treatment of long-range electrostatics and both classical and quantum models of the heme, good agreement is obtained with experiment for the redox potential relative to a heme–octapeptide complex. We obtain a reorganization free energy that is only half that for heme–octapeptide and is reproduced with a dielectric continuum model where the heme vicinity has a dielectric constant of only 1.1. This value implies that the contribution of protein reorganization to the electron transfer free energy barrier is reduced almost to the theoretical limit (a dielectric of one), and that the fluctuations of the electrostatic potential on the heme have a simple harmonic form, in accord with Marcus theory, even though the fluctuations of many individual protein groups (especially at the protein surface) are anharmonic. PMID:12011418

  17. An experimental-theoretical correlation study of non-linear bending and torsion deformations of a cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Traybar, J.; Hodges, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study of the large deformation of a cantilevered beam under a gravity tip load has been made. The beam root is rotated so that the tip load is oriented at various angles with respect to the beam principal axes. Static twist and bending deflections of the tip and bending natural frequencies have been measured as a function of tip load magnitude and orientation. The experimental data are compared with the results of a recently developed non-linear structural theory. Agreement is reasonably good when bending deflections are small compared to the beam span, but systematic differences occur for larger deflections.

  18. Linear response of tripartite entanglement to infinitesimal noise

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fu-Lin; Chen, Jing-Ling

    2014-10-15

    Recent experimental progress in prolonging the coherence time of a quantum system prompts us to explore the behavior of quantum entanglement at the beginning of the decoherence process. The response of the entanglement under an infinitesimal noise can serve as a signature of the robustness of entangled states. A crucial problem of this topic in multipartite systems is to compute the degree of entanglement in a mixed state. We find a family of global noise in three-qubit systems, which is composed of four W states. Under its influence, the linear response of the tripartite entanglement of a symmetrical three-qubit pure state is studied. A lower bound of the linear response is found to depend completely on the initial tripartite and bipartite entanglement. This result shows that the decay of tripartite entanglement is hastened by the bipartite one. - Highlights: • We study a set of W-type noise and its linear effect on symmetric pure states. • Its effect on two-qubit entanglement depends only on the initial concurrence. • A lower bound of the effect on 3-tangle is found in terms of initial entanglements. • We obtain the time of three-tangle sudden death for two families of typical states. • These reveal that the bipartite entanglement speeds up the decay of the tripartite one.

  19. Identifying the Hamiltonian structure in linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Coriani, Sonia; Christiansen, Ove; Kongsted, Jacob

    2014-06-01

    We present a unifying framework for linear response eigenvalue equations that encompasses both variational Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham density functional theory as well as non-variational coupled-cluster theory. The joint description is rooted in the so-called Hamiltonian structure of the response kernel matrices, whose properties permit an immediate identification of the well-known paired eigenvalue spectrum describing a molecule in the isolated state. Recognizing the Hamiltonian structure underlying the equations further enables a generalization to the case of a polarizable-embedded molecule treated in variational and, in particular, in non-variational theories.

  20. Linear response to long wavelength fluctuations using curvature simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Tobias; Seljak, Uroš; Senatore, Leonardo; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2016-09-01

    We study the local response to long wavelength fluctuations in cosmological N-body simulations, focusing on the matter and halo power spectra, halo abundance and non-linear transformations of the density field. The long wavelength mode is implemented using an effective curved cosmology and a mapping of time and distances. The method provides an alternative, more direct, way to measure the isotropic halo biases. Limiting ourselves to the linear case, we find generally good agreement between the biases obtained from the curvature method and the traditional power spectrum method at the level of a few percent. We also study the response of halo counts to changes in the variance of the field and find that the slope of the relation between the responses to density and variance differs from the naïve derivation assuming a universal mass function by approximately 8–20%. This has implications for measurements of the amplitude of local non-Gaussianity using scale dependent bias. We also analyze the halo power spectrum and halo-dark matter cross-spectrum response to long wavelength fluctuations and derive second order halo bias from it, as well as the super-sample variance contribution to the galaxy power spectrum covariance matrix.

  1. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture on the nanometer scale.

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2005-11-01

    This work covers three distinct aspects of deformation and fracture during indentations. In particular, we develop an approach to verification of nanoindentation induced film fracture in hard film/soft substrate systems; we examine the ability to perform these experiments in harsh environments; we investigate the methods by which the resulting deformation from indentation can be quantified and correlated to computational simulations, and we examine the onset of plasticity during indentation testing. First, nanoindentation was utilized to induce fracture of brittle thin oxide films on compliant substrates. During the indentation, a load is applied and the penetration depth is continuously measured. A sudden discontinuity, indicative of film fracture, was observed upon the loading portion of the load-depth curve. The mechanical properties of thermally grown oxide films on various substrates were calculated using two different numerical methods. The first method utilized a plate bending approach by modeling the thin film as an axisymmetric circular plate on a compliant foundation. The second method measured the applied energy for fracture. The crack extension force and applied stress intensity at fracture was then determined from the energy measurements. Secondly, slip steps form on the free surface around indentations in most crystalline materials when dislocations reach the free surface. Analysis of these slip steps provides information about the deformation taking place in the material. Techniques have now been developed to allow for accurate and consistent measurement of slip steps and the effects of crystal orientation and tip geometry are characterized. These techniques will be described and compared to results from dislocation dynamics simulations.

  2. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory in the linear response formalism.

    PubMed

    Zuehlsdorff, T J; Hine, N D M; Spencer, J S; Harrison, N M; Riley, D J; Haynes, P D

    2013-08-14

    We present an implementation of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) in the linear response formalism enabling the calculation of low energy optical absorption spectra for large molecules and nanostructures. The method avoids any explicit reference to canonical representations of either occupied or virtual Kohn-Sham states and thus achieves linear-scaling computational effort with system size. In contrast to conventional localised orbital formulations, where a single set of localised functions is used to span the occupied and unoccupied state manifold, we make use of two sets of in situ optimised localised orbitals, one for the occupied and one for the unoccupied space. This double representation approach avoids known problems of spanning the space of unoccupied Kohn-Sham states with a minimal set of localised orbitals optimised for the occupied space, while the in situ optimisation procedure allows for efficient calculations with a minimal number of functions. The method is applied to a number of medium sized organic molecules and a good agreement with traditional TDDFT methods is observed. Furthermore, linear scaling of computational cost with system size is demonstrated on (10,0) carbon nanotubes of different lengths. PMID:23947840

  3. Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Salil; Evans, Katherine J.; Hack, James J.; Truesdale, John

    2013-04-19

    The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $W^{-1}m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $ PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

  4. The Exact Solution for Linear Thermoelastic Axisymmetric Deformations of Generally Laminated Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed exact solution is presented for laminated-composite circular cylinders with general wall construction and that undergo axisymmetric deformations. The overall solution is formulated in a general, systematic way and is based on the solution of a single fourth-order, nonhomogeneous ordinary differential equation with constant coefficients in which the radial displacement is the dependent variable. Moreover, the effects of general anisotropy are included and positive-definiteness of the strain energy is used to define uniquely the form of the basis functions spanning the solution space of the ordinary differential equation. Loading conditions are considered that include axisymmetric edge loads, surface tractions, and temperature fields. Likewise, all possible axisymmetric boundary conditions are considered. Results are presented for five examples that demonstrate a wide range of behavior for specially orthotropic and fully anisotropic cylinders.

  5. Deformation Response of Unsymmetrically Laminated Plates Subjected to Inplane Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochinero, Tomoya T.; Hyer, Michael W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the out-of-plane deformation behavior of unsymmetric cross-ply composite plates compressed inplane by displacing one edge of the plate a known amount. The plates are assumed to be initially flat and several boundary conditions are considered. Geometrically nonlinear behavior is assumed. The primary objectives are to study the out-of-plane behavior as a function of increasing inplane compression and to determine if bifurcation behavior and secondary buckling can occur. It is shown that, depending on the boundary conditions, both can occur, though the characteristics are different than the pre and post-buckling behavior of a companion symmetric cross-ply plate. Furthermore, while a symmetric cross-ply plate can postbuckle with either a positive or negative out-of-plane displacement, the unsymmetric cross-ply plates studied deflect out-of-plane only in one direction throughout the range of inplane compression, the direction again depending on the boundary conditions

  6. Scaling the Non-linear Impact Response of Flat and Curved Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Feraboli, Paolo; Jackson, Wade C.

    2005-01-01

    The application of scaling laws to thin flat and curved composite panels exhibiting nonlinear response when subjected to low-velocity transverse impact is investigated. Previous research has shown that the elastic impact response of structural configurations exhibiting geometrically linear response can be effectively scaled. In the present paper, a preliminary experimental study is presented to assess the applicability of the scaling laws to structural configurations exhibiting geometrically nonlinear deformations. The effect of damage on the scalability of the structural response characteristics, and the effect of scale on damage development are also investigated. Damage is evaluated using conventional methods including C-scan, specimen de-plying and visual inspection of the impacted panels. Coefficient of restitution and normalized contact duration are also used to assess the extent of damage. The results confirm the validity of the scaling parameters for elastic impacts. However, for the panels considered in the study, the extent and manifestation of damage do not scale according to the scaling laws. Furthermore, the results indicate that even though the damage does not scale, the overall panel response characteristics, as indicated by contact force profiles, do scale for some levels of damage.

  7. On nonlinear viscoelastic deformations: a reappraisal of Fung's quasi-linear viscoelastic model

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Riccardo; Abrahams, I. David; Parnell, William J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a reappraisal of Fung's model for quasi-linear viscoelasticity. It is shown that a number of negative features exhibited in other works, commonly attributed to the Fung approach, are merely a consequence of the way it has been applied. The approach outlined herein is shown to yield improved behaviour and offers a straightforward scheme for solving a wide range of models. Results from the new model are contrasted with those in the literature for the case of uniaxial elongation of a bar: for an imposed stretch of an incompressible bar and for an imposed load. In the latter case, a numerical solution to a Volterra integral equation is required to obtain the results. This is achieved by a high-order discretization scheme. Finally, the stretch of a compressible viscoelastic bar is determined for two distinct materials: Horgan–Murphy and Gent. PMID:24910527

  8. Finite orbit energetic particle linear response to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Ye, Huanchun . Inst. for Fusion Studies); Breizman, B.N. . Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1991-07-01

    The linear response of energetic particles to the TAE modes is calculated taking into account their finite orbit excursion from the flux surfaces. The general expression reproduces the previously derived theory for small banana width: when the banana width {triangle}{sub b} is much larger than the mode thickness {triangle}{sub m}, we obtain a new compact expression for the linear power transfer. When {triangle}{sub m}/{triangle}{sub b} {much lt} 1, the banana orbit effect reduces the power transfer by a factor of {triangle}{sub m}/{triangle}{sub b} from that predicted by the narrow orbit theory. A comparison is made of the contribution to the TAE growth rate of energetic particles with a slowing-down distribution arising from an isotropic source, and a balance-injected beam source when the source speed is close to the Alfven speed. For the same stored energy density, the contribution from the principal resonances ({vert bar}{upsilon}{sub {parallel}}{vert bar} = {upsilon}{sub A} is substantially enhanced in the beam case compared to the isotropic case, while the contribution at the higher sidebands ({vert bar}{upsilon}{sub {parallel}}{vert bar}) = {upsilon}{sub A}/(2{ell} {minus} 1) with {ell} {ge} 2) is substantially reduced. 10 refs.

  9. Nonequilibrium thermal transport and its relation to linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrasch, C.; Ilan, R.; Moore, J. E.

    2013-11-01

    We study the real-time dynamics of spin chains driven out of thermal equilibrium by an initial temperature gradient TL≠TR using density matrix renormalization group methods. We demonstrate that the nonequilibrium energy current saturates fast to a finite value if the linear-response thermal conductivity is infinite, i.e., if the Drude weight D is nonzero. Our data suggest that a nonintegrable dimerized chain might support such dissipationless transport (D>0). We show that the steady-state value JE of the current for arbitrary TL≠TR is of the functional form JE=f(TL)-f(TR), i.e., it is completely determined by the linear conductance. We argue for this functional form, which is essentially a Stefan-Boltzmann law in this integrable model; for the XXX ferromagnet, f can be computed via the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz in good agreement with the numerics. Inhomogeneous systems exhibiting different bulk parameters as well as Luttinger liquid boundary physics induced by single impurities are discussed briefly.

  10. Geyser periodicity and the response of geysers to deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Rojstaczer, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical simulations of multiphase fluid and heat transport through a porous medium define combinations of rock properties and boundary conditions which lead to geyser-like periodic discharge. Within the rather narrow range of conditions that allow geyser-like behavior, eruption frequency and discharge are highly sensitive to the intrinsic permeabilities of the geyser conduit and the surrounding rock matrix, to the relative permeability functions assumed, and to pressure gradients in the matrix. In theory, heats pipes (concomitant upward flow of steam and downward flow of liquid) can exist under similar conditions, but our simulations suggest that the periodic solution is more stable. Simulated time series of geyser discharge are chaotic, but integrated quantities such as eruption frequency and mass discharge per eruption are free of chaos. These results may explain the observed sensitivity of natural geysers to small strains such as those caused by remote earthquakes, if ground motion is sufficient to induce permeability changes. Changes in geyser behavior caused by minor preseismic deformation, periodic surface loading, and Earth tides are more difficult to explain in the context of our current model. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Linear versus nonlinear response of a forced wave turbulence system.

    PubMed

    Cadot, Olivier; Touzé, Cyril; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2010-10-01

    A vibrating plate is set into a chaotic state of wave turbulence by a forcing having periodic and random components. Both components are weighted in order to explore continuously intermediate forcing from the periodic to the random one, but keeping constant its rms value. The transverse velocity of the plate is measured at the application point of the force. It is found that whatever the detail of the forcing is, the velocity spectra exhibit a universal cascade for frequencies larger than the forcing frequency range. In contrast, the velocity spectra strongly depend on the nature of the forcing within the range of forcing frequencies. The coherence function is used to extract the contribution of the velocity fluctuations that display a linear relationship with the forcing. The nonlinear contribution to the velocity fluctuations is found to be almost constant, about 55% of the total velocity fluctuations whatever the nature of the forcing from random to periodic. On the other hand, the nonlinear contribution to the fluctuations of the injected power depends on the nature of the forcing; it is significantly larger for the periodic forcing (60%) and decreases continuously as the randomness is increased, reaching a value of 40% for the pure random forcing. For all the cases of intermediate forcing from random to periodic, a simple model of the velocity response recovers in a fairly good agreement the probability density function of the injected power. The consequence of the existence of a linear-response component is discussed in the context of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem validation in experiments of out-of-equilibrium systems. PMID:21230369

  12. Comparison of thermomechanical calculations for highly non-linear quasistatic drift deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Wayland, J.R.; Bertholf, L.D.

    1980-07-01

    Results of code calculations for the November 14, 1979, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Code Benchmark Workshop are compared. The results from five different codes (COUPLEFLO, JAC, SANCHO, SPECTROM, and STEALTH) are given for a problem involving the creep closure of an underground drift. The basic features of the codes are summarized and the codes are evaluated in terms of their applicability to WIPP problems. The codes predicted essentially the same response for this problem, and they appear to be nearly equally applicable to problems of this type. Also, a new benchmark problem is suggested along with a more realistic creep model for bedded salt.

  13. Responses of proteins to different ionic environment are linearly interrelated.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luisa A; Madeira, Pedro P; Uversky, Alexey V; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2015-03-27

    Protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) is widely used as a convenient, inexpensive, and readily scaled-up separation technique. Protein partition behavior in ATPS is known to be readily manipulated by ionic composition. However, the available data on the effects of salts and buffer concentrations on protein partitioning are very limited. To fill this gap, partitioning of 15 proteins was examined in dextran-poly(ethylene glycol) ATPSs with different salt additives (Na2SO4, NaClO4, NaSCN, CsCl) in 0.11 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. This analysis reveals that there is a linear relationship between the logarithms of the protein partition coefficients determined in the presence of different salts. This relationship suggests that the protein response to ionic environment is determined by the protein structure and type and concentrations of the ions present. Analysis of the differences between protein structures (described in terms of proteins responses to different salts) and that of cytochrome c chosen as a reference showed that the peculiarities of the protein surface structure and B-factor used as a measure of the protein flexibility are the determining parameters. Our results provide better insight into the use of different salts in manipulating protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems. These data also demonstrate that the protein responses to different ionic environments are interrelated and are determined by the structural peculiarities of protein surface. It is suggested that changes in ionic microenvironment of proteins may regulate protein transport and behavior in biological systems. PMID:25708470

  14. Superimposed linear psoriasis: differential therapeutic response of linear and nonlinear lesions.

    PubMed

    Seitz, C S; Garbaraviciene, J; Bröcker, E-B; Hamm, H

    2009-07-01

    Linear psoriasis is a very unusual clinical variation of psoriasis. Typical clinical features include early onset of erythematosquamous lesions along Blaschko's lines, ability to elicit psoriatic features, absence of pruritus and positive family history for psoriasis. Recently, the term 'superimposed linear psoriasis' was coined for cases with development of nonlinear psoriatic lesions at predilection sites in later life. We report a 19-year-old woman meeting all criteria for the diagnosis of superimposed linear psoriasis including typical histological features. Remarkably, treatment with topical steroids and dithranol cleared the psoriatic lesions on predilection sites whereas the linear lesions were resistant to topical therapy. Linear psoriatic lesions are believed to be caused by genetic alterations in early embryogenesis leading to loss of heterozygosity at a gene locus involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Comparison of mosaic keratinocytes derived from linear lesions with wild-type keratinocytes from the same person may therefore allow identification of key regulatory genes. PMID:19094135

  15. Dynamic Deformation Response of Maraging Steel Hollow Sphere and Aluminum Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Gregory; Scripka, David; Welchel, Ricky; Cochran, Joe; Sanders, Tom; Thadhani, Naresh

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic deformation response of a light-weight composite system consisting of maraging steel hollow spheres in an aluminum matrix is investigated. The composite system made by in-filtrating aluminum alloy melt around the high strength and toughness maraging steel hollow spheres, enables design of a light-weight energy-absorbing structural material. Rod-on-anvil Taylor impact tests are conducted to study the behavior of the composite material under uniaxial stress loading. The transient deformation states are captured using high-speed digital imaging for correlation with AUTODYN simulations. The recovered impacted samples are characterized using microscopy to determine the deformation response of the hollow spheres and the influence of the matrix-sphere interface on the overall properties of the composite material.

  16. Design of polarization-dependent, flexural-torsional deformation in photo responsive liquid crystalline polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew L; Lee, Kyung Min; White, Timothy J; Vaia, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    Light responsive materials that exhibit wirelessly actuated, multidimensional deformation are excellent candidates for programmable matter applications such as morphing structures or soft robotics. A central challenge to designing adaptive structures from these materials is the ability accurately predict three dimensional deformations. Previous modeling efforts have focused almost exclusively on pure bending. Herein we examine key material parameters affecting light driven flexural-torsional response in azobenzene functionalized liquid crystal polymer networks. We show that a great deal of control can be obtained by specifying material alignment and actuating the material with polarized light. Insight gained from the theoretical framework here lays the foundation for more extensive modeling efforts to combine polarization controlled flexural-torsional deformations with complex geometry, boundary conditions, and loading conditions. PMID:24651881

  17. Linear plasma response, electrostatic fluctuations and Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, Wojciech; Zheng, Zhen; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Brantov, Andrei V.

    2011-10-01

    Our nonlocal and nonstationary transport theory provides a method of solution of the initial value problem for the full set of linearized Fokker-Planck kinetic equations with Landau collision operators. The closure relations reduce the problem of finding particle distribution functions to the solution of the close set of fluid equations. This has been recently realized for the electron-ion plasma in the entire range of plasma collisionality. No particular choice of the initial distribution function is necessary to derive the longitudinal plasma susceptibility from the full set of kinetic equations. We will discuss new complete results for in electron-ion plasmas. The full description of the longitudinal plasma response is used in the derivation of damping and dispersion relations for electrostatic fluctuations such as Langmuir waves, ion-acoustic and entropy modes. Particle collision effects are rigorously accounted for. The Onsager's regression of fluctuations method is applied to derive dynamical form factor S(k,w) and Thomson scattering (TS) cross-section from the set of fluid equations. We will discuss application of the nonlocal hydrodynamics to the derivation of S(k,w). In particular, we will examine the importance of an entropy mode peak as the direct measure of ion temperature in TS experiments.

  18. Patient-specific non-linear finite element modelling for predicting soft organ deformation in real-time: application to non-rigid neuroimage registration.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Adam; Joldes, Grand; Couton, Mathieu; Warfield, Simon K; Miller, Karol

    2010-12-01

    Long computation times of non-linear (i.e. accounting for geometric and material non-linearity) biomechanical models have been regarded as one of the key factors preventing application of such models in predicting organ deformation for image-guided surgery. This contribution presents real-time patient-specific computation of the deformation field within the brain for six cases of brain shift induced by craniotomy (i.e. surgical opening of the skull) using specialised non-linear finite element procedures implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU). In contrast to commercial finite element codes that rely on an updated Lagrangian formulation and implicit integration in time domain for steady state solutions, our procedures utilise the total Lagrangian formulation with explicit time stepping and dynamic relaxation. We used patient-specific finite element meshes consisting of hexahedral and non-locking tetrahedral elements, together with realistic material properties for the brain tissue and appropriate contact conditions at the boundaries. The loading was defined by prescribing deformations on the brain surface under the craniotomy. Application of the computed deformation fields to register (i.e. align) the preoperative and intraoperative images indicated that the models very accurately predict the intraoperative deformations within the brain. For each case, computing the brain deformation field took less than 4 s using an NVIDIA Tesla C870 GPU, which is two orders of magnitude reduction in computation time in comparison to our previous study in which the brain deformation was predicted using a commercial finite element solver executed on a personal computer. PMID:20868706

  19. Modeling and Simulation of the Impact Response of Filled and Unfilled Linear Cellular Alloys for Structural Energetic Material Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam; Fredenburg, Anthony; Thadhani, Naresh

    2008-04-01

    We are investigating the mechanics of impact-induced stress transfer between a linear cellular alloy (LCA) and a reactive filler to determine the effect of cell geometry on deformation and fragmentation. LCAs are honeycomb structures made of maraging steel, and provide structural integrity for the reactive filler such as a powder mixture of Ta+Fe2O3. 3-D computations are used to determine stress and strain distributions in both filled and unfilled LCAs during impact. The strength and failure models used for maraging steel and the response of Ta+Fe2O3 are validated through experiment. The failure response of three different geometries: 9-cell, pie, and reinforced pie, are compared with the response of a hollow cylinder, for impact velocities of 100, 200, and 300 m/s. Unfilled, the cylindrical geometry provides the least resistance to deformation and fragmentation, while the reinforced pie LCA provides the most resistance. Understanding of the mechanics of deformation and failure is used to determine the most effective geometry for stress transfer to the filler.

  20. The deformation and failure response of closed-cell PMDI foams subjected to dynamic impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Koohbor, Behrad; Mallon, Silas; Kidane, Addis; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-04-07

    The present work aims to investigate the bulk deformation and failure response of closed-cell Polymeric Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (PMDI) foams subjected to dynamic impact loading. First, foam specimens of different initial densities are examined and characterized in quasi-static loading conditions, where the deformation behavior of the samples is quantified in terms of the compressive elastic modulus and effective plastic Poisson's ratio. Then, the deformation response of the foam specimens subjected to direct impact loading is examined by taking into account the effects of material compressibility and inertia stresses developed during deformation, using high speed imaging in conjunction with 3D digital image correlation. The stress-strain response and the energy absorption as a function of strain rate and initial density are presented and the bulk failure mechanisms are discussed. As a result, it is observed that the initial density of the foam and the applied strain rates have a substantial influence on the strength, bulk failure mechanism and the energy dissipation characteristics of the foam specimens.

  1. The deformation and failure response of closed-cell PMDI foams subjected to dynamic impact loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Koohbor, Behrad; Mallon, Silas; Kidane, Addis; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-04-07

    The present work aims to investigate the bulk deformation and failure response of closed-cell Polymeric Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (PMDI) foams subjected to dynamic impact loading. First, foam specimens of different initial densities are examined and characterized in quasi-static loading conditions, where the deformation behavior of the samples is quantified in terms of the compressive elastic modulus and effective plastic Poisson's ratio. Then, the deformation response of the foam specimens subjected to direct impact loading is examined by taking into account the effects of material compressibility and inertia stresses developed during deformation, using high speed imaging in conjunction with 3D digitalmore » image correlation. The stress-strain response and the energy absorption as a function of strain rate and initial density are presented and the bulk failure mechanisms are discussed. As a result, it is observed that the initial density of the foam and the applied strain rates have a substantial influence on the strength, bulk failure mechanism and the energy dissipation characteristics of the foam specimens.« less

  2. The Effect of Crosslinking on the Microscale Stress Response and Molecular Deformations in Actin Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurmessa, Bekele; Fitzpatrick, Robert; Valdivia, Jonathon; Anderson, Rae M. R.

    Actin, the most abundant protein in eukaryotic cells, is a semi-flexible biopolymer in the cytoskeleton that plays a crucial structural and mechanical role in cell stability, motion and replication, as well as muscle contraction. Most of these mechanically driven structural changes in cells stem from the complex viscoelastic nature of entangled actin networks and the presence of a myriad of proteins that cross-link actin filaments. Despite their importance, the mechanical response of actin networks is not yet well understood, particularly at the molecular level. Here, we use optical trapping - coupled with fluorescence microscopy - to characterize the microscale stress response and induced filament deformations in entangled and cross-linked actin networks subject to localized mechanical perturbations. In particular, we actively drive a microsphere 10 microns through an entangled or cross- linked actin network at a constant speed and measure the resistive force that the deformed actin filaments exert on the bead during and following strain. We simultaneously visualize and track individual sparsely-labeled actin filaments to directly link force response to molecular deformations, and map the propagation of the initially localized perturbation field throughout the rest of the network (~100 um). By varying the concentration of actin and cross-linkers we directly determine the role of crosslinking and entanglements on the length and time scales of stress propagation, molecular deformation and relaxation mechanisms in actin networks.

  3. Viscoelastoplastic Deformation and Damage Response of Titanium Alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saleeb, Atef F.; Kasemer, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Time-dependent deformation and damage behavior can significantly affect the life of aerospace propulsion components. Consequently, one needs an accurate constitutive model that can represent both reversible and irreversible behavior under multiaxial loading conditions. This paper details the characterization and utilization of a multi-mechanism constitutive model of the GVIPS class (Generalized Viscoplastic with Potential Structure) that has been extended to describe the viscoelastoplastic deformation and damage of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Associated material constants were characterized at five elevated temperatures where viscoelastoplastic behavior was observed, and at three elevated temperatures where damage (of both the stiffness reduction and strength reduction type) was incurred. Experimental data from a wide variety of uniaxial load cases were used to correlate and validate the proposed GVIPS model. Presented are the optimized material parameters, and the viscoelastoplastic deformation and damage responses at the various temperatures.

  4. Broadband linear and nonlinear optical response of plasmonic quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravishankar, Ajith P.; Yallapragada, V. J.; Kasture, S.; Nagarajan, Arvind; Achanta, Venu Gopal

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic quasicrystals with 5-fold rotation symmetry are shown to offer broadband transmission enhancement. The observed linear transmission enhancement leads to broadband second harmonic generation in a wide incident angle range contrary to unpatterned gold film. From the measured linear and harmonic transmitted powers, we estimate the 2nd order susceptibility values in the 760-840 nm range.

  5. Deformation partitioning during transpression in response to Early Devonian oblique convergence, northern Appalachian orogen, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solar, Gary S.; Brown, Michael

    2001-06-01

    Transpressive deformation was distributed heterogeneously within the Central Maine belt shear zone system, which formed in response to Early Devonian oblique convergence during the Acadian orogeny in the northern Appalachians. 'Straight' belts are characterized by tight folds, S>L fabrics and sub-parallel form lines, and asymmetric structures that together indicate dextral-SE-side-up kinematics. In contrast, intervening zones between 'straight' belts are characterized by open folds and L≫S fabrics. Within both types of zone, metasedimentary rocks have fabrics defined by the same minerals at the same metamorphic grade, including a penetrative, moderately to steeply NE-plunging mineral lineation. Thus, we interpret accumulation of plastic deformation and regional metamorphic (re-) crystallization to have been synchronous across the Central Maine belt shear zone system. Discordance between inclusion trails in regionally developed porphyroblasts of garnet and staurolite and matrix fabrics in 'straight' belt rocks records shortening by tightening of folds and greater reorientation of matrix fabrics with respect to porphyroblasts. Kinematic partitioning of flow was responsible for the contrasting states of finite deformation recorded in the Central Maine belt shear zone system. Perturbations in the flow were caused by serially developed thrust-ramp anticlines in the stratigraphic succession immediately above the Avalon-like basement, at which décollement of the shear zone system was initially rooted. General shear deformation at the ramps involved strain softening with an enhanced component of noncoaxial flow. In contrast, deformation during extrusion in the intervening zones involved strain hardening with a greater component of coaxial flow. Part of the thickening stratigraphic succession exceeded Tsolidus, reflected by the occurrence of migmatites and granites. The latter were partly sourced from the underlying Avalon-like basement that was involved in the

  6. Thermally-induced structural dynamic response of flexural configurations influenced by linear/non-linear thermal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namburu, Raju R.; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1991-01-01

    The thermally-induced strucural dynamic response of flexural configurations influenced by linear/nonlinear thermal effects is presented in conjunction with 'unified' transient approaches for effectively tackling this class of interdisciplinary problems. For illustrative purposes, the flexural structural models are assumed to be of the Euler-Bernoulli type. The purpose of the present paper is to not only provide an understanding of the influence of general linear/nonlinear thermal effects on flexural configurations, but also to provide to the analyst effective computational tools which help preserve a unified technology for the interdisciplinary areas encompassing structural mechanics/dynamics and thermal sciences. Several numerical test models illustrate the representative thermally-induced structural dynamic response of flexural configurations subjected to general linear/nonlinear temperature effects.

  7. Linear optical response of carbon nanotubes under axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2010-04-01

    We considered single walled carbon naotubes (SWCNTs) as real three dimensional (3D) systems in a cylindrical coordinate. The optical matrix elements and linear susceptibility, χ(ω), in the tight binding approximation in terms of one-dimensional wave vector, kz and subband index, l are calculated. In an external axial magnetic field optical frequency dependence of linear susceptibility are investigated. We found that axial magnetic field has two effects on the imaginary part of the linear susceptibility spectrum, in agreement with experimental results. The first effect is broadening and the second, splitting. Also we found that for all metallic zigzag and armchair SWCNTs, the axial magnetic field leads to the creation of a peak with energy less than 1.5 eV, contrary to what is observed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  8. Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic modeling of plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Orain, F.; Bécoulet, M.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Fil, A.; Ratnani, A.; Huijsmans, G.; Pamela, S.; Chapman, I.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A.; Cahyna, P.

    2013-10-15

    The interaction of static Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) with the plasma flows is modeled in toroidal geometry, using the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, which includes the X-point and the scrape-off-layer. Two-fluid diamagnetic effects, the neoclassical poloidal friction and a source of toroidal rotation are introduced in the model to describe realistic plasma flows. RMP penetration is studied taking self-consistently into account the effects of these flows and the radial electric field evolution. JET-like, MAST, and ITER parameters are used in modeling. For JET-like parameters, three regimes of plasma response are found depending on the plasma resistivity and the diamagnetic rotation: at high resistivity and slow rotation, the islands generated by the RMPs at the edge resonant surfaces rotate in the ion diamagnetic direction and their size oscillates. At faster rotation, the generated islands are static and are more screened by the plasma. An intermediate regime with static islands which slightly oscillate is found at lower resistivity. In ITER simulations, the RMPs generate static islands, which forms an ergodic layer at the very edge (ψ≥0.96) characterized by lobe structures near the X-point and results in a small strike point splitting on the divertor targets. In MAST Double Null Divertor geometry, lobes are also found near the X-point and the 3D-deformation of the density and temperature profiles is observed.

  9. Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic modeling of plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orain, F.; Bécoulet, M.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Huijsmans, G.; Pamela, S.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Fil, A.; Ratnani, A.; Chapman, I.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A.; Hoelzl, M.; Cahyna, P.

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of static Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) with the plasma flows is modeled in toroidal geometry, using the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, which includes the X-point and the scrape-off-layer. Two-fluid diamagnetic effects, the neoclassical poloidal friction and a source of toroidal rotation are introduced in the model to describe realistic plasma flows. RMP penetration is studied taking self-consistently into account the effects of these flows and the radial electric field evolution. JET-like, MAST, and ITER parameters are used in modeling. For JET-like parameters, three regimes of plasma response are found depending on the plasma resistivity and the diamagnetic rotation: at high resistivity and slow rotation, the islands generated by the RMPs at the edge resonant surfaces rotate in the ion diamagnetic direction and their size oscillates. At faster rotation, the generated islands are static and are more screened by the plasma. An intermediate regime with static islands which slightly oscillate is found at lower resistivity. In ITER simulations, the RMPs generate static islands, which forms an ergodic layer at the very edge (ψ ≥0.96) characterized by lobe structures near the X-point and results in a small strike point splitting on the divertor targets. In MAST Double Null Divertor geometry, lobes are also found near the X-point and the 3D-deformation of the density and temperature profiles is observed.

  10. Simulating Thermal Cycling and Isothermal Deformation Response of Polycrystalline NiTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manchiraju, Sivom; Gaydosh, Darrell J.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Anderson, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    A microstructure-based FEM model that couples crystal plasticity, crystallographic descriptions of the B2-B19' martensitic phase transformation, and anisotropic elasticity is used to simulate thermal cycling and isothermal deformation in polycrystalline NiTi (49.9at% Ni). The model inputs include anisotropic elastic properties, polycrystalline texture, DSC data, and a subset of isothermal deformation and load-biased thermal cycling data. A key experimental trend is captured.namely, the transformation strain during thermal cycling is predicted to reach a peak with increasing bias stress, due to the onset of plasticity at larger bias stress. Plasticity induces internal stress that affects both thermal cycling and isothermal deformation responses. Affected thermal cycling features include hysteretic width, two-way shape memory effect, and evolution of texture with increasing bias stress. Affected isothermal deformation features include increased hardening during loading and retained martensite after unloading. These trends are not captured by microstructural models that lack plasticity, nor are they all captured in a robust manner by phenomenological approaches. Despite this advance in microstructural modeling, quantitative differences exist, such as underprediction of open loop strain during thermal cycling.

  11. Experimental and numerical studies of nonlinear ultrasonic responses on plastic deformation in weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Xun, Xiang; Wu-Jun, Zhu; Ming-Xi, Deng; Fu-Zhen, Xuan

    2016-02-01

    The experimental measurements and numerical simulations are performed to study ultrasonic nonlinear responses from the plastic deformation in weld joints. The ultrasonic nonlinear signals are measured in the plastic deformed 30Cr2Ni4MoV specimens, and the results show that the nonlinear parameter monotonically increases with the plastic strain, and that the variation of nonlinear parameter in the weld region is maximal compared with those in the heat-affected zone and base regions. Microscopic images relating to the microstructure evolution of the weld region are studied to reveal that the change of nonlinear parameter is mainly attributed to dislocation evolutions in the process of plastic deformation loading. Meanwhile, the finite element model is developed to investigate nonlinear behaviors of ultrasonic waves propagating in a plastic deformed material based on the nonlinear stress-strain constitutive relationship in a medium. Moreover, a pinned string model is adopted to simulate dislocation evolution during plastic damages. The simulation and experimental results show that they are in good consistency with each other, and reveal a rising acoustic nonlinearity due to the variations of dislocation length and density and the resulting stress concentration. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51325504, 11474093, and 11474361) and the Shanghai Rising-Star Program, China (Grant No. 14QA1401200).

  12. CFORM- LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: CLOSED FORM SOLUTION AND TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF THE LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    CFORM was developed by the Kennedy Space Center Robotics Lab to assist in linear control system design and analysis using closed form and transient response mechanisms. The program computes the closed form solution and transient response of a linear (constant coefficient) differential equation. CFORM allows a choice of three input functions: the Unit Step (a unit change in displacement); the Ramp function (step velocity); and the Parabolic function (step acceleration). It is only accurate in cases where the differential equation has distinct roots, and does not handle the case for roots at the origin (s=0). Initial conditions must be zero. Differential equations may be input to CFORM in two forms - polynomial and product of factors. In some linear control analyses, it may be more appropriate to use a related program, Linear Control System Design and Analysis (KSC-11376), which uses root locus and frequency response methods. CFORM was written in VAX FORTRAN for a VAX 11/780 under VAX VMS 4.7. It has a central memory requirement of 30K. CFORM was developed in 1987.

  13. A single charge in the actin binding domain of fascin can independently tune the linear and non-linear response of an actin bundle network.

    PubMed

    Maier, M; Müller, K W; Heussinger, C; Köhler, S; Wall, W A; Bausch, A R; Lieleg, O

    2015-05-01

    Actin binding proteins (ABPs) not only set the structure of actin filament assemblies but also mediate the frequency-dependent viscoelastic moduli of cross-linked and bundled actin networks. Point mutations in the actin binding domain of those ABPs can tune the association and dissociation dynamics of the actin/ABP bond and thus modulate the network mechanics both in the linear and non-linear response regime. We here demonstrate how the exchange of a single charged amino acid in the actin binding domain of the ABP fascin triggers such a modulation of the network rheology. Whereas the overall structure of the bundle networks is conserved, the transition point from strain-hardening to strain-weakening sensitively depends on the cross-linker off-rate and the applied shear rate. Our experimental results are consistent both with numerical simulations of a cross-linked bundle network and a theoretical description of the bundle network mechanics which is based on non-affine bending deformations and force-dependent cross-link dynamics. PMID:26004635

  14. Micro-Structural Response of DP 600 to High Strain Rate Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamburg, Brian; Schneider, Judy; Jones, Stanley E.

    2008-01-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the micro-structural response of DP 600 subjected to high strain rate, ballistic impact tests. The ballistic tests were conducted using normal impact of a hardened steel penetrator into a 2 mm thick sheet of DP 600. The average strain rates produced from this test method are on the order of 10(exp 5)/s. Electron microscopy was used to investigate the microstructure before and after high strain rate deformation. A variation in material response was observed between tests conducted at 0.8 x 105 and 25 x 10(exp 5)/s.

  15. Response of silicon-Based Linear Energy Transfer Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aman, A.; Bman, B.; Badhwar, G. D.; ONeill, P. M. O.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon-based linear energy transfer (LET) telescope,(e. g., DOSTEL and RRMD) have recently been flown in space. LET spectra measured using tissue equivalent proportional counters show differences that need to be fully understood. A Monte Carlo technique based on: 1. radiation transport cluster intra-cascade model. 2. Landau-Vavilov distribution, 3. telescope geometry and detector coincidence & discriminator settings, 4. spacecraft shielding geometry, and 5. the external free space radiation environment, including recent albedo measurements, was developed.

  16. The Simplest Complete Model of Choice Response Time: Linear Ballistic Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    We propose a linear ballistic accumulator (LBA) model of decision making and reaction time. The LBA is simpler than other models of choice response time, with independent accumulators that race towards a common response threshold. Activity in the accumulators increases in a linear and deterministic manner. The simplicity of the model allows…

  17. The role of purinergic signaling on deformation induced injury and repair responses of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Belete, Hewan A; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Wang, Shaohua; Singh, Raman-Deep

    2011-01-01

    Cell wounding is an important driver of the innate immune response of ventilator-injured lungs. We had previously shown that the majority of wounded alveolus resident cells repair and survive deformation induced insults. This is important insofar as wounded and repaired cells may contribute to injurious deformation responses commonly referred to as biotrauma. The central hypothesis of this communication states that extracellular adenosine-5' triphosphate (ATP) promotes the repair of wounded alveolus resident cells by a P2Y2-Receptor dependent mechanism. Using primary type 1 alveolar epithelial rat cell models subjected to micropuncture injury and/or deforming stress we show that 1) stretch causes a dose dependent increase in cell injury and ATP media concentrations; 2) enzymatic depletion of extracellular ATP reduces the probability of stretch induced wound repair; 3) enriching extracellular ATP concentrations facilitates wound repair; 4) purinergic effects on cell repair are mediated by ATP and not by one of its metabolites; and 5) ATP mediated cell salvage depends at least in part on P2Y2-R activation. While rescuing cells from wounding induced death may seem appealing, it is possible that survivors of membrane wounding become governors of a sustained pro-inflammatory state and thereby perpetuate and worsen organ function in the early stages of lung injury syndromes. Means to uncouple P2Y2-R mediated cytoprotection from P2Y2-R mediated inflammation and to test the preclinical efficacy of such an undertaking deserve to be explored. PMID:22087324

  18. The strain path dependence of plastic deformation response of AA5754: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Minh-Son; Hu, Lin; Iadicola, Mark; Creuziger, Adam; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2013-12-16

    This work presents modeling of experiments on a balanced biaxial (BB) pre-strained AA5754 alloy, subsequently reloaded uniaxially along the rolling direction and transverse direction. The material exhibits a complex plastic deformation response during the change in strain path due to 1) crystallographic texture, 2) aging (interactions between dislocations and Mg atoms) and 3) recovery (annihilation and re-arrangement of dislocations). With a BB prestrain of about 5 %, the aging process is dominant, and the yield strength for uniaxially deformed samples is observed to be higher than the flow stress during BB straining. The strain hardening rate after changing path is, however, lower than that for pre-straining. Higher degrees of pre-straining make the dynamic recovery more active. The dynamic recovery at higher strain levels compensates for the aging effect, and results in: 1) a reduction of the yield strength, and 2) an increase in the hardening rate of re-strained specimens along other directions. The yield strength of deformed samples is further reduced if these samples are left at room temperature to let static recovery occur. The synergistic influences of texture condition, aging and recovery processes on the material response make the modeling of strain path dependence of mechanical behavior of AA5754 challenging. In this study, the influence of crystallographic texture is taken into account by incorporating the latent hardening into a visco-plastic self-consistent model. Different strengths of dislocation glide interaction models in 24 slip systems are used to represent the latent hardening. Moreover, the aging and recovery effects are also included into the latent hardening model by considering strong interactions between dislocations and dissolved atom Mg and the microstructural evolution. These microstructural considerations provide a powerful capability to successfully describe the strain path dependence of plastic deformation behavior of AA5754.

  19. The in vitro passive elastic response of chicken pectoralis muscle to applied tensile and compressive deformation.

    PubMed

    Mohammadkhah, Melika; Murphy, Paula; Simms, Ciaran K

    2016-09-01

    The mechanics of passive skeletal muscle are important in impact biomechanics, surgical simulation, and rehabilitation engineering. Existing data from porcine tissue has shown a significant tension/compression asymmetry, which is not captured by current constitutive modelling approaches using a single set of material parameters, and an adequate explanation for this effect remains elusive. In this paper, the passive elastic deformation properties of chicken pectoralis muscle are assessed for the first time, to provide deformation data on a skeletal muscle which is very different to porcine tissue. Uniaxial, quasi-static compression and tensile tests were performed on fresh chicken pectoralis muscle in the fibre and cross-fibre directions, and at 45° to the fibre direction. Results show that chicken muscle elastic behaviour is nonlinear and anisotropic. The tensile stress-stretch response is two orders of magnitude larger than in compression for all directions tested, which reflects the tension/compression asymmetry previously observed in porcine tissue. In compression the tissue is stiffest in the cross-fibre direction. However, tensile deformation applied at 45° gives the stiffest response, and this is different to previous findings relating to porcine tissue. Chicken muscle tissue is most compliant in the fibre direction for both tensile and compressive applied deformation. Generally, a small percentage of fluid exudation was observed in the compressive samples. In the future these data will be combined with microstructural analysis to assess the architectural basis for the tension/compression asymmetry now observed in two different species of skeletal muscle. PMID:27281164

  20. Response Characteristics of a Linear Rotorcraft Vibration Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Donald L.

    1982-01-01

    A fully coupled vibration model, consisting of a rotor with only flapping degrees of freedom plus pylon and fuselage pitching motion, was used in a parametric study undertaken to investigate the response characteristics of a simplified helicopter. Among the parameters studied were uncoupled body frequency, blade stiffness, hinge offset, advance ratio, and mast height. Results from the harmonic balance solution of the equations of motion show how each of these quantities affects the response of the model. The results also indicate that there is a potential for reducing vibration response through the judicious definition of the design parameters.

  1. Linear Response Theory for Hard and Soft Glassy Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, J.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Despite qualitative differences in their underlying physics, both hard and soft glassy materials exhibit almost identical linear rheological behaviors. We show that these nearly universal properties emerge naturally in a shear-transformation-zone (STZ) theory of amorphous plasticity, extended to include a broad distribution of internal thermal-activation barriers. The principal features of this barrier distribution are predicted by nonequilibrium, effective-temperature thermodynamics. Our theoretical loss modulus G{double_prime}({omega}) has a peak at the {alpha} relaxation rate, and a power law decay of the form {omega}{sup -{zeta}} for higher frequencies, in quantitative agreement with experimental data.

  2. Linear response of doped graphene sheets to vector potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principi, A.; Polini, Marco; Vignale, G.

    2009-08-01

    A two-dimensional gas of massless Dirac fermions (MDFs) is a very useful model to describe low-energy electrons in monolayer graphene. Because the MDF current operator is directly proportional to the (sublattice) pseudospin operator, the MDF current-current response function, which describes the response to a vector potential, happens to coincide with the pseudospin-pseudospin response function. In this work, we present analytical results for the wave vector- and frequency-dependent longitudinal and transverse pseudospin-pseudospin response functions of noninteracting MDFs. The transverse response in the static limit is then used to calculate the noninteracting orbital magnetic susceptibility. These results are a starting point for the construction of approximate pseudospin-pseudospin response functions that would take into account electron-electron interactions (for example at the random-phase-approximation level). They also constitute a very useful input for future applications of current-density-functional theory to graphene sheets subjected to time and spatially varying vector potentials.

  3. The stratospheric response to external factors based on MERRA data using linear multivariate linear regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozubek, M.; Rozanov, E.; Krizan, P.

    2014-09-01

    The stratosphere is influenced by many external forcings (natural or anthropogenic). There are many studies which are focused on this problem and that is why we can compare our results with them. This study is focused on the variability and trends of temperature and circulation characteristics (zonal and meridional wind component) in connection with different phenomena variation in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere. We consider the interactions between the troposphere-stratosphere-lower mesosphere system and external and internal phenomena, e.g. solar cycle, QBO, NAO or ENSO using multiple linear techniques. The analysis was applied to the period 1979-2012 based on the current reanalysis data, mainly the MERRA reanalysis dataset (Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications) for pressure levels: 1000-0.1 hPa. We do not find a strong temperature signal for solar flux over the tropics about 30 hPa (ERA-40 results) but the strong positive signal has been observed near stratopause almost in the whole analyzed area. This could indicate that solar forcing is not represented well in the higher pressure levels in MERRA. The analysis of ENSO and ENSO Modoki shows that we should take into account more than one ENSO index for similar analysis. Previous studies show that the volcanic activity is important parameter. The signal of volcanic activity in MERRA is very weak and insignificant.

  4. Item Response Theory Using Hierarchical Generalized Linear Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravand, Hamdollah

    2015-01-01

    Multilevel models (MLMs) are flexible in that they can be employed to obtain item and person parameters, test for differential item functioning (DIF) and capture both local item and person dependence. Papers on the MLM analysis of item response data have focused mostly on theoretical issues where applications have been add-ons to simulation…

  5. MODELING STREAM-AQUIFIER INTERACTIONS WITH LINEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The problem of stream-aquifer interactions is pertinent to conjunctive-use management of water resources and riparian zone hydrology. Closed form solutions are derived for stream-aquifer interactions in rates and volumes expressed as convolution integrals of impulse response and ...

  6. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT

    SciTech Connect

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue; Govind, Niranjan; Yang, Chao; Saad, Yousef; Ng, Esmond

    2015-10-06

    We present two iterative algorithms for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within linear response of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. These methods do not attempt to compute eigenvalues or eigenvectors of the linear response matrix. They are designed to approximate the absorption spectrum as a function directly. They take advantage of the special structure of the linear response matrix. Neither method requires the linear response matrix to be constructed explicitly. They only require a procedure that performs the multiplication of the linear response matrix with a vector. These methods can also be easily modified to efficiently estimate the density of states (DOS) of the linear response matrix without computing the eigenvalues of this matrix. We show by computational experiments that the methods proposed in this paper can be much more efficient than methods that are based on the exact diagonalization of the linear response matrix. We show that they can also be more efficient than real-time TDDFT simulations. We compare the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost.

  7. SU-E-J-148: Evaluating Tumor Response with a Commercially Available Deformable Registration System

    SciTech Connect

    Bowling, J; Ramsey, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present a method for evaluating the response to treatment using a commercially available deformable image registration software package (Velocity Medical Systems) and repeat PET/CT imaging. This technique can be used to identify volumes that are risk for tumor recurrence. Methods: Response to treatment was evaluated using PET/CT images acquired prior-to and post-treatment for radiation therapy patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. Velocity (Version 3.0.1) was used to deform the initial PET/CT to the post treatment PET/CT. The post-treatment PET images were then subtracted from the pre-treatment PET images. The resulting re-sampled image is a three-dimensional SUV difference map that shows pixels with increasing SUV values. SUV values increases greater than 2.5 in the post treatment images were identified for additional follow-up. Results: A total of 5 Lung patients were analyzed as part of this study. One lung patient in the cohort had an SUV increase of +3.28 that was identified using the SUV difference map. This volume of increased uptake was located outside the treatment field and adjacent to the 35 Gy isodose line. The remaining four patients all had SUV decreases inside the planning target volume, and no unexpected areas of increase outside the irradiated volumes. All five patients were analyzed using standard tools inside the Velocity application. Conclusion: The response to treatment can easily be measured using serial PET/CT images and a commercially available deformable image registration. This provides both the radiation oncologists and medical oncologists with a quantitative assessment of their treatment to use in patient follow-up.

  8. A novel method to characterize the elastic/plastic deformation response of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, R.J.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Porter, V.L.

    1996-07-01

    A novel experimental/numerical test method has been developed which allows accurate characterization of the elastic and large-strain plastic mechanical response of thin films. Silicon micromachining techniques have been used to fabricate isolated film features which are mechanically tested using our ultralow-load indentation test system. Macro-scale laboratory testing and finite element analysis were employed to optimize the design of the geometric feature used and to benchmark our analysis capabilities. A simple rigid-plastic geometric analysis of our test structure is developed and applied to the observed force-displacement response, allowing us to extract the uniaxial inelastic stress-strain response of micrometer-scale thin film structures. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the inelastic deformation behavior of metal alloy features of this size scale has been quantitatively determined.

  9. Critical scaling in linear response of frictionless granular packings near jamming.

    PubMed

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G; Somfai, Ellák; van Hecke, Martin; van Saarloos, Wim

    2006-12-22

    We study the origin of the scaling behavior in frictionless granular media above the jamming transition by analyzing their linear response. The response to local forcing is non-self-averaging and fluctuates over a length scale that diverges at the jamming transition. The response to global forcing becomes increasingly nonaffine near the jamming transition. This is due to the proximity of floppy modes, the influence of which we characterize by the local linear response. We show that the local response also governs the anomalous scaling of elastic constants and contact number. PMID:17280395

  10. Thermal shifts and intermittent linear response of aging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibani, Paolo; Christiansen, Simon

    2008-04-01

    At time t after an initial quench, an aging system responds to a perturbation turned on at time twresponse on the ratio t/tw . Further insight is obtained imposing small temperature steps, so-called T shifts. The average response as a function of t/tw,eff , where tw,eff is the effective age, is similar to the response of a system aged isothermally at the final temperature. Using an Ising model with plaquette interactions, the applicability of analytic formulas for the average isothermal magnetization is confirmed. The T -shifted aging behavior of the model is approximately described using effective ages. Large positive shifts nearly reset the effective age. Negative T shifts offer a more detailed probe of the dynamics. Assuming the marginal stability of the “current” attractor against thermal noise fluctuations, the scaling form tw,eff=twx and the dependence of the exponent x on the aging temperatures before and after the shift are theoretically available. The predicted form of x has no adjustable parameters. Both the algebraic scaling of the effective age and the form of the exponent reasonably agree with the data. The present simulations thus confirm the crucial role of marginal stability in glassy relaxation.

  11. RESPONSE LINEARIZATION OF A DIODE DETECTOR TYPE RADIO FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELD PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An EPROM-based linearization circuit with a resolution of 0.1 percent of full scale has been designed to linearize the response of an orthogonal dipole electric field probe terminated with diodes. Design approach, performance, and probe characteristics are discussed. The nonlinea...

  12. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  13. Experimental study on the dynamic response of in-plane deformation of dielectric elastomer under alternating electric load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Chen, Hualing; Sheng, Junjie; Zhang, Junshi; Wang, Yongquan; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-02-01

    Recently, dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) have garnered remarkable attention mainly due to their ability of large deformation. Previously, the dynamic responses of out-of-plane deformations of inflated and clamped dielectric elastomer (DE) membranes were experimentally investigated, and a quasi-static model of large deformation concerned with the configuration was derived. However, the research work on the time-varying response of in-plane deformation of DE is insufficient. In this paper, we studied the dynamic response of the in-plane deformation of a dielectric elastomer membrane under a pure-shear state. We experimentally analysed how this response was affected by the peak voltage, frequency, pre-stretching, and signal waveform. The deformation equilibrium position of the membrane drifted severely during vibration, which may be attributable to the high viscoelasticity of the membrane and may lead to issues when designing precise instruments. We also studied how the peak voltage, frequency, pre-stretching, and waveform affected this viscoelastic drifting.

  14. Research of dynamical Characteristics of slow deformation Waves as Massif Responses on Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Oleg; Shipeev, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    The research of massif state with use of approaches of open system theory [1-3] was developed for investigation the criterions of dissipation regimes for real rock massifs, which are under heavy man-caused influence. For realization of that research we used the data of seismic catalogue of Tashtagol mine. As a result of the analyze of that data we defined character morphology of phase trajectories of massif response, which was locally in time in a stable state: on the phase plane with coordinates released by the massif during the dynamic event energy E and lg(dE/dt) there is a local area as a ball of twisted trajectories and some not great bursts from that ball, which are not greater than 105 joules. In some time intervals that burst can be larger, than 105 joules, achieving 106 joules and yet 109 joules. [3]. Evidently there are two reciprocal depend processes: the energy accumulation in the attracted phase trajectories area and resonance fault of the accumulated energy. But after the fault the system returns again to the same attracted phase trajectories area. For analyzing of the thin structure of the chaotic area we decided to add the method of processing of the seismic monitoring data by new parameters. We shall consider each point of explosion as a source of seismic or deformation waves. Using the kinematic approach of seismic information processing we shall each point of the massif response use as a time point of the first arrival of the deformation wave for calculation of the wave velocity, because additionally we know the coordinates of the fixed response and the coordinates of explosion. The use of additional parameter-velocity of slow deformation wave propagation allowed us with use method of phase diagrams identify their hierarchic structure, which allow us to use that information for modeling and interpretation the propagation seismic and deformation waves in hierarchic structures. It is researched with use of that suggested processing method the thin

  15. Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric response of charged cellular polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kressmann, Reiner

    2001-10-01

    Piezoelectricity in a charged cellular polypropylene, called EMFi, is investigated with respect to nonlinearities to explain the strong differences in longitudinal piezoelectric constants published in the literature and ranging from 90 to 250 pC/N. The inverse constant was measured interferometrically to be 90 pm/V. Quasistatic and dynamic measurements with small loads yielded the same value for the direct constant. The direct constant was also investigated with respect to large-signal behavior becoming noticeable at static and dynamic loads higher than 10 kPa. Both the quasistatic and the dynamic constant increase up to 130 pC/N at such loads. Furthermore, an additional resonance appears under strong loading in the range of about 10 Hz shifting down with increasing load. In addition, the piezoelectric constant increases also with increasing dynamic load under constant static load. The nonlinearity also results in the generation of harmonics. Finally, boundary effects can be detected if just a small area of the sample is loaded. This effect appearing mainly at frequencies below 20 Hz is attributed to airflow between the air bubbles. A load-dependent Young's modulus, mainly responsible for the nonlinear behavior, is calculated from the experiments. It diminishes from 2 to 1.5 MPa at a load of 60 kPa.

  16. An implicit three-dimensional model for describing the inelastic response of solids undergoing finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, K. R.; Srinivasa, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a new unified class of 3D nonlinear anisotropic finite deformation inelasticity model that (1) exhibits rate-independent or dependent hysteretic response (i.e., response wherein reversal of the external stimuli does not cause reversal of the path in state space) with or without yield surfaces. The hysteresis persists with quasistatic loading. (2) Encompasses a wide range of different types of inelasticity models (such as Mullins effect in rubber, rock and soil mechanics, traditional metal plasticity, hysteretic behavior of shape memory materials) into a simple unified framework that is relatively easy to implement in computational schemes and (3) does not require any a priori particular notion of plastic strain or yield function. The core idea behind the approach is the development of an system of implicit rate equations that allow for the continuity of the response but with different rates along different directions. The theory, which is in purely mechanical setting, subsumes and generalizes many commonly used approaches for hypoelasticity and rate-independent plasticity. We illustrate its capability by modeling the Mullins effect which is the inelastic behavior of certain rubbery materials. We are able to simulate the entire cyclic response without the use of additional internal variables, i.e., the entire response is modeled by using an implicit function of stress and strain measures and their rates.

  17. Linear and cubic response to the initial eccentricity in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn; Yan, Li; Gardim, Fernando G.; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    We study the relation between elliptic flow, v2, and the initial eccentricity, ɛ2, in heavy-ion collisions, using hydrodynamic simulations. Significant deviations from linear eccentricity scaling are seen in more peripheral collisions. We identify the mechanism responsible for these deviations as a cubic response, which we argue is a generic property of the hydrodynamic response to the initial density profile. The cubic response increases elliptic flow fluctuations, thereby improving agreement of initial condition models with experimental data.

  18. Prediction of Nociceptive Responses during Sedation by Linear and Non-Linear Measures of EEG Signals in High Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Melia, Umberto; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Borrat, Xavier; Valencia, Jose Fernando; Jospin, Mathieu; Jensen, Erik Weber; Gambus, Pedro; Caminal, Pere

    2015-01-01

    The level of sedation in patients undergoing medical procedures evolves continuously, affected by the interaction between the effect of the anesthetic and analgesic agents and the pain stimuli. The monitors of depth of anesthesia, based on the analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG), have been progressively introduced into the daily practice to provide additional information about the state of the patient. However, the quantification of analgesia still remains an open problem. The purpose of this work is to improve the prediction of nociceptive responses with linear and non-linear measures calculated from EEG signal filtered in frequency bands higher than the traditional bands. Power spectral density and auto-mutual information function was applied in order to predict the presence or absence of the nociceptive responses to different stimuli during sedation in endoscopy procedure. The proposed measures exhibit better performances than the bispectral index (BIS). Values of prediction probability of Pk above 0.75 and percentages of sensitivity and specificity above 70% were achieved combining EEG measures from the traditional frequency bands and higher frequency bands. PMID:25901571

  19. Peripharyngeal tissue deformation, stress distributions, and hyoid bone movement in response to mandibular advancement.

    PubMed

    Amatoury, Jason; Kairaitis, Kristina; Wheatley, John R; Bilston, Lynne E; Amis, Terence C

    2015-02-01

    Mandibular advancement (MA) increases upper airway (UA) patency and decreases collapsibility. Furthermore, MA displaces the hyoid bone in a cranial-anterior direction, which may contribute to MA-associated UA improvements via redistribution of peripharyngeal tissue stresses (extraluminal tissue pressure, ETP). In the present study, we examined effects of MA on ETP distributions, deformation of the peripharyngeal tissue surface (UA geometry), and hyoid bone position. We studied 13 supine, anesthetized, tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing adult male New Zealand White rabbits. Graded MA was applied from 0 to ∼4.5 mm. ETP was measured at six locations distributed throughout three UA regions: tongue, hyoid, and epiglottis. Axial computed tomography images of the UA (nasal choanae to glottis) were acquired and used to measure lumen geometry (UA length; regional cross-sectional area) and hyoid displacement. MA resulted in nonuniform decreases in ETP (greatest at tongue region), ranging from -0.11 (-0.15 to -0.06) to -0.82 (-1.09 to -0.54) cmH2O/mm MA [linear mixed-effects model slope (95% confidence interval)], across all sites. UA length decreased by -0.5 (-0.8 to -0.2) %/mm accompanied by nonuniform increases in cross-sectional area (greatest at hyoid region) ranging from 7.5 (3.6-11.4) to 18.7 (14.9-22.5) %/mm. The hyoid bone was displaced in a cranial-anterior direction by 0.42 (0.36-0.44) mm/mm MA. In summary, MA results in nonuniform changes in peripharyngeal tissue pressure distributions and lumen geometry. Displacement of the hyoid bone with MA may play a pivotal role in redistributing applied MA loads, thus modifying tissue stress/deformation distributions and determining resultant UA geometry outcomes. PMID:25505028

  20. Ligand-Induced Protein Responses and Mechanical Signal Propagation Described by Linear Response Theories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lee-Wei; Kitao, Akio; Huang, Bang-Chieh; Gō, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a general linear response theory (LRT) is formulated to describe time-dependent and -independent protein conformational changes upon CO binding with myoglobin. Using the theory, we are able to monitor protein relaxation in two stages. The slower relaxation is found to occur from 4.4 to 81.2 picoseconds and the time constants characterized for a couple of aromatic residues agree with those observed by UV Resonance Raman (UVRR) spectrometry and time resolved x-ray crystallography. The faster “early responses”, triggered as early as 400 femtoseconds, can be best described by the theory when impulse forces are used. The newly formulated theory describes the mechanical propagation following ligand-binding as a function of time, space and types of the perturbation forces. The “disseminators”, defined as the residues that propagate signals throughout the molecule the fastest among all the residues in protein when perturbed, are found evolutionarily conserved and the mutations of which have been shown to largely change the CO rebinding kinetics in myoglobin. PMID:25229149

  1. The role of non-linear deformation analyses in the design of a reinforced soil berm at Red River U-frame lock No. 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Robert M.; Peters, John F.; Mosher, Reed L.

    1997-11-01

    This paper describes a design application of non-linear deformation analysis to a complex soil-structure-foundation interaction problem through use of a finite element analysis. The problem consists of a proposed renovation to an existing soil-founded U-frame lock structure consisting of construction of a densely reinforced soil berm adjacent to an existing lock wall. Major questions facing the designer involve reduction of the earth pressure on the lock wall, layout of the reinforcing in the soil berm, and collateral effects of berm construction on the U-frame lock structure. A non-linear deformation analysis played a central role in addressing all of these questions. Berm construction and four operational load cases were used to understand the performance of the reinforced berm and to discern interactions among the lock, the backfill, the foundation strata of the U-frame lock, the reinforced berm, and the foundation strata of the reinforced berm. Insight gained from the soil-structure-foundation interaction analyses led to an alteration to the proposed reinforcement layout to enhance the performance of the reinforced soil berm.

  2. Activation of bone remodeling after fatigue: differential response to linear microcracks and diffuse damage.

    PubMed

    Herman, B C; Cardoso, L; Majeska, R J; Jepsen, K J; Schaffler, M B

    2010-10-01

    Recent experiments point to two predominant forms of fatigue microdamage in bone: linear microcracks (tens to a few hundred microns in length) and "diffuse damage" (patches of diffuse stain uptake in fatigued bone comprised of clusters of sublamellar-sized cracks). The physiological relevance of diffuse damage in activating bone remodeling is not known. In this study microdamage amount and type were varied to assess whether linear or diffuse microdamage has similar effects on the activation of intracortical resorption. Activation of resorption was correlated to the number of linear microcracks (Cr.Dn) in the bone (R(2)=0.60, p<0.01). In contrast, there was no activation of resorption in response to diffuse microdamage alone. Furthermore, there was no significant change in osteocyte viability in response to diffuse microdamage, suggesting that osteocyte apoptosis, which is known to activate remodeling at typical linear microcracks in bone, does not result from sublamellar damage. These findings indicate that inability of diffuse microdamage to activate resorption may be due to lack of a focal injury response. Finally, we found that duration of loading does not affect the remodeling response. In conclusion, our data indicate that osteocytes activate resorption in response to linear microcracks but not diffuse microdamage, perhaps due to lack of a focal injury-induced apoptotic response. PMID:20633708

  3. Comparison of Finite Element Non-Linear Beam Random Response with Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. R.; Mei, C.; Wolfe, HF

    1996-09-01

    A finite element formulation combined with the equivalent linearization technique and normal mode method is developed for the non-linear random response of beams subjected to acoustic and thermal loads applied simultaneously. To validate the present formulation and solution procedure, results are compared with the classical continuum solution and the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation solution. Comparison is also made with experimental data for a pre-stretched clamped beam. Random responses of thermally buckled simply supported beam, clamped beam and simply supported-clamped beam are presented. The comparison of the present simultaneously loaded response with the existing sequentially loaded results shows a significant difference between them.

  4. Reconstruction of coup de sabre deformity (linear localized scleroderma) by using galeal frontalis muscle flap and demineralized bone matrix combination.

    PubMed

    Cavusoglu, Tarik; Yazici, Ilker; Vargel, Ibrahim; Karakaya, Esen Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    In this clinical report, we are presenting the combination of demineralized bone matrix combined with bilateral galea frontalis flaps. Based on our 6-month results, this seems to be a reasonable combination to accomplish long-lasting restoration of forehead defects related to en coup de sabre linear localized scleroderma. PMID:21233742

  5. The spin polarized linear response from density functional theory: theory and application to atoms.

    PubMed

    Fias, Stijn; Boisdenghien, Zino; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2014-11-14

    Within the context of spin polarized conceptual density functional theory, the spin polarized linear response functions are introduced both in the [N, N(s)] and [N(α), N(β)] representations. The mathematical relations between the spin polarized linear response functions in both representations are examined and an analytical expression for the spin polarized linear response functions in the [N(α), N(β)] representation is derived. The spin polarized linear response functions were calculated for all atoms up to and including argon. To simplify the plotting of our results, we integrated χ(r, r') to a quantity χ(r, r'), circumventing the θ and ϕ dependence. This allows us to plot and to investigate the periodicity throughout the first three rows in the periodic table within the two different representations. For the first time, χ(αβ)(r, r'), χ(βα)(r, r'), and χ(SS)(r, r') plots have been calculated and discussed. By integration of the spin polarized linear response functions, different components to the polarisability, α(αα), α(αβ), α(βα), and α(ββ) have been calculated. PMID:25399132

  6. The spin polarized linear response from density functional theory: Theory and application to atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fias, Stijn Boisdenghien, Zino; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2014-11-14

    Within the context of spin polarized conceptual density functional theory, the spin polarized linear response functions are introduced both in the [N, N{sub s}] and [N{sub α}, N{sub β}] representations. The mathematical relations between the spin polarized linear response functions in both representations are examined and an analytical expression for the spin polarized linear response functions in the [N{sub α}, N{sub β}] representation is derived. The spin polarized linear response functions were calculated for all atoms up to and including argon. To simplify the plotting of our results, we integrated χ(r, r′) to a quantity χ(r, r{sup ′}), circumventing the θ and ϕ dependence. This allows us to plot and to investigate the periodicity throughout the first three rows in the periodic table within the two different representations. For the first time, χ{sub αβ}(r, r{sup ′}), χ{sub βα}(r, r{sup ′}), and χ{sub SS}(r, r{sup ′}) plots have been calculated and discussed. By integration of the spin polarized linear response functions, different components to the polarisability, α{sub αα}, α{sub αβ}, α{sub βα}, and α{sub ββ} have been calculated.

  7. NMR nuclear magnetic shielding anisotropy of linear molecules within the linear response within the elimination of the small component approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C.; Giribet, Claudia G.; Melo, Juan I.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the spin-Zeeman (SZ) operator in the evaluation of the spin-orbit effect on the nuclear magnetic shielding tensor in the context of the linear response within the elimination of the small component approach is critically discussed. It is shown that such term yields no contribution to the isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constant, but it may be of great importance in the determination of individual tensor components, and particularly of the tensor anisotropy. In particular, an interesting relation between the SZ and orbital Zeeman contributions to the spin-orbit effect for the case of linear molecules is shown to hold. Numerical examples for the BrH, IH, and XeF2 molecules are presented which show that, provided the SZ term is taken into account, results of the individual shielding tensor components and the tensor anisotropy are in good agreement with those obtained by other theoretical methods, and particularly by the Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach.

  8. Response of a fluid-immersed microcantilever close to a deformable body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, R. J.; Bachtiar, V.; Lee, T. C.; Cater, J. E.; Minton, J.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of hydrodynamics upon the response of a microcantilever immersed in a viscous fluid has been well established [J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 84, 64 (1998); C. A. Eysden and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 101, 044908 (2007)]. It has previously been shown that the presence of a nearby rigid planar surface can significantly alter a microcantilever's non-contact response, through microcantilever-surface hydrodynamic interactions [C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, Phys. Fluids 17, 073102 (2005); C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 98, 114913 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., J. Fluid Mech. 545, 397426 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 050801 (2006).]. In cases where the nearby surface is a finite-sized deformable body, such as in noncontact microrheology measurements, we expect to see further changes in the microcantilever's response. Hence, we here compute the thermal spectra of several microcantilevers in the presence of different compliant samples that have the characteristics of soft biological fibres. Our findings demonstrate that the elastohydrodynamic regime can substantially dictate the extent to which the compliance of a given body is evident in the microcantilever's thermal spectra, and suggest that certain nondimensional quantities should lie within particular, ranges for this to be the case. We expect these findings to be of interest in areas such as Atomic Force Microscopy, microsensing, and non-contact microrheology.

  9. Response of a fluid-immersed microcantilever close to a deformable body

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, R. J.; Lee, T. C.; Cater, J. E.; Bachtiar, V.; Minton, J.

    2015-03-07

    The importance of hydrodynamics upon the response of a microcantilever immersed in a viscous fluid has been well established [J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 84, 64 (1998); C. A. Eysden and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 101, 044908 (2007)]. It has previously been shown that the presence of a nearby rigid planar surface can significantly alter a microcantilever's non-contact response, through microcantilever–surface hydrodynamic interactions [C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, Phys. Fluids 17, 073102 (2005); C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 98, 114913 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., J. Fluid Mech. 545, 397426 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 050801 (2006).]. In cases where the nearby surface is a finite-sized deformable body, such as in noncontact microrheology measurements, we expect to see further changes in the microcantilever's response. Hence, we here compute the thermal spectra of several microcantilevers in the presence of different compliant samples that have the characteristics of soft biological fibres. Our findings demonstrate that the elastohydrodynamic regime can substantially dictate the extent to which the compliance of a given body is evident in the microcantilever's thermal spectra, and suggest that certain nondimensional quantities should lie within particular, ranges for this to be the case. We expect these findings to be of interest in areas such as Atomic Force Microscopy, microsensing, and non-contact microrheology.

  10. Linear Viscoelastic Response of PBX-9501 Binder using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davande, Hemali

    2005-03-01

    Quantum-chemistry based force fields for Estane, bis-dinitropropyl formal (BDNPF) and bis dinitropropyl acetal (BDNPA) plasticizer have been developed, validated and utilized in atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a model PBX-9501 binder. The viscoelastic response of unentangled binder melt using MD simulations was studied. These results were then used in prediction of linear viscoelastic response of an entangled melt using theoretical models for viscoelastic response of block copolymers and compared with experiments.

  11. Linear-response calculation in the time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Inakura, Tsunenori; Avogadro, Paolo; Ebata, Shuichiro; Sato, Koichi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2012-11-12

    Linear response calculations based on the time-dependent density-functional theory are presented. Especially, we report results of the finite amplitude method which we have recently proposed as an alternative and feasible approach to the (quasiparticle-)random-phase approximation. Calculated properties of the giant resonances and low-energy E1 modes are discussed. We found a universal linear correlation between the low-energy E1 strength and the neutron skin thickness.

  12. Effect of geometric elastic non-linearities on the impact response of flexible multi-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakr, E. M.; Shabana, A. A.

    1987-02-01

    The intermittent motion behavior of large scale geometrically non-linear flexible multi-body systems due to impact loading is investigated. Impacts and the associated impulsive forces are incorporated into the dynamic formulation by using a generalized momentum balance. The solution of the momentum equation provides the jump discontinuities in the system velocities and reaction forces. Flexible components in the system are discretized by using the finite element method. Because of the large rotations of the system components, a set of reference co-ordinates are employed to describe the motion of a selected body reference. The rigid body modes of the finite element shape functions are eliminated by using a set of reference conditions and accordingly a unique displacement field is defined. In order to account for the inertia and elastic non-linearities which are, respectively, the results of the large rotations and finite deformations, the system inertia and stiffness characteristics have to be iteratively updated. Two numerical examples of different nature are presented. The first example is a high speed slider crank mechanism with a flexible connecting rod. In the second example, however, the dynamic response of a flexible multi-body aircraft during the touch down impact is predicted.

  13. Frequency Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models with Linear and Nonlinear Material Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Stephanie M.; Thomson, Scott L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency during anterior-posterior stretching. Method Three materially linear and three materially nonlinear models were created and stretched up to 10 mm in 1 mm increments. Phonation onset pressure (Pon) and fundamental frequency (F0) at Pon were recorded for each length. Measurements were repeated as the models were relaxed in 1 mm increments back to their resting lengths, and tensile tests were conducted to determine the stress-strain responses of linear versus nonlinear models. Results Nonlinear models demonstrated a more substantial frequency response than did linear models and a more predictable pattern of F0 increase with respect to increasing length (although range was inconsistent across models). Pon generally increased with increasing vocal fold length for nonlinear models, whereas for linear models, Pon decreased with increasing length. Conclusions Nonlinear synthetic models appear to more accurately represent the human vocal folds than linear models, especially with respect to F0 response. PMID:22271874

  14. Quasi-Linear Cochlear Responses to Noise Can Result from Instantaneous Nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Wen; Neely, Stephen T.

    2011-11-01

    Responses to acoustic stimuli in the cochlea are known to be nonlinear. Many existing models of cochlear mechanics were built upon three basic assumptions: traveling-wave amplification is provided by active mechanisms in the outer hair cells (OHCs). Second, as the stimulus level increases, the gain decreases due to saturation nonlinearity in the OHCs. Finally, the saturation non-linearity is "instantaneous"; its input-output relation does not possess memory. These assumptions were recently challenged by reports that basilar-membrane (BM) responses to noise can be predicted well by level-dependent Wiener filters and are thus quasi-linear. It was argued that the quasi-linear responses could not result from instantaneous nonlinearity. In this paper, we present a model of cochlear mechanics which has instantaneous OHC saturation nonlinearity but produces quasi-linear responses to noise. Correlation coefficients were consistently greater than 0.9 between simulated noise responses and the responses predicted by equivalent Wiener filters. Further, Gaussianity in the acoustic stimuli was preserved on the BM. We conclude that the results support the common understandings and assumptions of cochlear mechanics.

  15. Linear response theory for symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O (N ) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry-improved two-particle irreducible effective action (SI-2PIEA) formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are overdetermined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the overdetermining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O (N ) covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear response approximation and possible ways forward.

  16. Deformation responses of slow moving landslides to precipitation in the Northern Apennines (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Benedikt; Simoni, Alessandro; Schmidt, David; Bertello, Lara; Berti, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Slow moving landslides are a frequent feature in the Northern Apennines of Italy and one of the main landscape forming agents. Among the most common landslide types are complex earth flows that occur in chaotic clay-shales and complex rock slides in highly fractured flysch. We present the results of an InSAR-based survey in the Reno and Panaro river catchments, which are located South of Bologna and Modena in the Northern Apennines of Italy. We processed Envisat and Cosmo-SkyMed radar data using the Stanford Method of Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) and documented movement on 62 deep-seated landslides. These landslides were compared to the regional landslide inventory that contains information about the type of landslide, its state of activity and the lithological characteristics of the host rock. Of the landslides found using InSAR, 42 % correspond to active landslide bodies in the regional inventory, while 48 % are mapped as dormant and 10% are not previously mapped. InSAR-derived landslides often do not correspond to the exact extent of mapped landslide bodies. InSAR results show two recurring styles of deformation: (1) earthflows involving chaotic clay-shale units that exhibit steady state displacement, or exhibit long-term (multi-annual) accelerations and decelerations, or (2) complex landslides in flysch units that are characterized by distinct increases in displacement rate following periods (weeks-to-months) of intense precipitation. Such differences in behavior might be due to inherent differences in the mechanical and hydraulic characteristics of the material in relation to the specific climatic forcing experienced during the observation period (2003 and 2015). Flysch units are relatively more fragile and have higher permeability when compared to clay-shale units. Hence the deformation response to the precipitation is likely faster and characterized by more abrupt accelerations and decelerations.

  17. Quenched Stresses And Linear Elastic Response Of Random Packings Of Frictionless Particles Near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Kamran

    We study stress correlations and elastic response in large-scale computer simulations of particle packings near jamming. We show that there are characteristic lengths in both the stresses and elastic response that diverge in similar ways as the confining pressure approaches zero from above. For the case of the stress field, we show that the power spectrum of the hydrostatic pressure and shear stress agrees with a field-theoretic framework proposed by Henkes and Chakraborty [15] at short to intermediate wavelengths (where the power is flat in Fourier space), but contains significant excess power at wavelengths larger than about 50 to 100 particle diameters, with the specific crossover point going to larger wavelength at decreasing pressure, consistent with a divergence at p = 0. These stress correlations were missed in previous studies by other groups due to limited system size. For the case of the elastic response, we probe the system in three ways: i) point forcing, ii) constrained homogeneous deformation where the system is driven with no-slip boundary conditions, and iii) free periodic homogeneous deformation. For the point force, we see distinct characteristic lengths for longitudinal and transverse modes each of which diverges in a different way with decreasing pressure with xiT ˜ p--1/4 and xiL ˜ p--0.4 respectively. For the constrained homogeneous deformation we see a scaling of the local shear modulus with the size of the probing region consistent with xi ˜ p--1/2 similar to the xiL ˜ p --0.4 observed in the longitudinal component of the point response and in perfect agreement with the rigidity length discussed in recently proposed scenarios for jamming. Finally, we show that the transverse and longitudinal contributions to the strain field in response to unconstrained deformation (either volumetric or shear) have markedly different behavior. The transverse contribution is surprisingly invariant with respect to p with localized shear transformations

  18. The deformation response of three-dimensional woven composites subjected to high rates of loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, Mark Robert

    The use of polymer matrix composites is widespread, with development in automotive, aerospace and recreational equipment. These applications have produced loading scenarios which are unfamiliar and not well understood. Several applications involve impact loading, which produces large strain rates and delamination failure. New manufacturing methods have led to three dimensional (3D) weave geometries that provide composites with damage protection. This is accomplished through elimination of delamination, and localizing the extent of damage. The present work is a combined experimental and computational study aimed at developing a mechanism based deformation response model for 3D woven composites, including the prediction of failure strengths at high loading rates. Three unique experimental configurations have been developed; along with finite element based simulations to predict the material response and failure mechanisms that are experimentally observed. End Notch Flexure (ENF) tests were used to determine the effectiveness of the Z-fiber at resisting crack propagation. The crack propagation was found to have rate dependent properties, with architecture based parameters required to predict the strength and resistance. The computational results reinforced the experimental observations. A new FE implementation captured the effectiveness of the Z-fiber reinforcement bridging the growing crack. Shock impact testing was performed to simulate the effects of blast loading on the material. New experimental measurement methods were utilized to record the deformations and strains which led to observations of matrix micro-cracking, the first failure mode. Computational models were developed to predict the material behavior subjected to shock loading, including matrix micro-cracking, which was predicted accurately. Finally, split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing was done to understand the high strain rate behavior of the material in compression in all three directions. The

  19. Galilean invariance and linear response theory for Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Andrey; Abanov, Alexandre

    2013-03-01

    We study a general effective field theory of Galilean invariant two-dimensional charged fluid in external electro-magnetic and gravitational fields. We find that combination of the generalized Galilean and gauge invariance implies nontrivial Ward identities between gravitational and electro-magnetic linear responses in the system. This identity appears to hold in all orders of gradient expansion and it generalizes the relation between Hall viscosity and Hall conductivity recently found by Hoyos and Son. We also check the relation in the case of free electrons with integer filling of Landau levels where corresponding linear responses can be calculated directly. Was supported by the NSF under Grant No. DMR-1206790.

  20. Transition to Coherence in Populations of Coupled Chaotic Oscillators: A Linear Response Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Topaj, Dmitri; Kye, Won-Ho; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2001-08-13

    We consider the collective dynamics in an ensemble of globally coupled chaotic maps. The transition to the coherent state with a macroscopic mean field is analyzed in the framework of the linear response theory. The linear response function for the chaotic system is obtained using the perturbation approach to the Frobenius-Perron operator. The transition point is defined from this function by virtue of the self-excitation condition for the feedback loop. Analytical results for the coupled Bernoulli maps are confirmed by the numerics.

  1. The linearity response of the Planck-LFI flight model receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennella, A.; Villa, F.; Terenzi, L.; Cuttaia, F.; Battaglia, P.; Bersanelli, M.; Butler, R. C.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Artal, E.; Davis, R.; Frailis, M.; Franceschet, C.; Galeotta, S.; Gregorio, A.; Hughes, N.; Jukkala, P.; Kettle, D.; Kilpiä, V.-H.; Laaninen, M.; Lapolla, P. M.; Leonardi, R.; Leutenegger, P.; Lowe, S.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Meinhold, P.; Mendes, L.; Miccolis, M.; Morgante, G.; Roddis, N.; Sandri, M.; Silvestri, R.; Stringhetti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Zacchei, A.; Varis, J.; Wilkinson, A.; Zonca, A.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the linearity response of the Planck-LFI receivers, with particular reference to signal compression measured on the 30 and 44 GHz channels. In the article we discuss the various sources of compression and present a model that accurately describes data measured during tests performed with individual radiomeric chains. After discussing test results we present the best parameter set representing the receiver response and discuss the impact of non linearity on in-flight calibration, which is shown to be negligible.

  2. Application of linear response theory to magnetotransport properties of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J. R.; Redmer, R.; Reinholz, H.

    2010-03-15

    Linear response theory, as developed within the Zubarev formalism, is a quantum statistical approach for describing systems out of but close to equilibrium, which has been successfully applied to a wide variety of plasmas in an external electric field and/or containing a temperature gradient. We present here an extension of linear response theory to include the effects of an external magnetic field. General expressions for the complete set of relevant transport properties are given. In particular, the Hall effect and the influence of a magnetic field on the dc electrical conductivity are discussed. Low-density limits including electron-electron scattering are presented as well as results for arbitrary degeneracy.

  3. Near-linear response of mean monsoon strength to a broad range of radiative forcings.

    PubMed

    Boos, William R; Storelvmo, Trude

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical models have been used to argue that seasonal mean monsoons will shift abruptly and discontinuously from wet to dry stable states as their radiative forcings pass a critical threshold, sometimes referred to as a "tipping point." Further support for a strongly nonlinear response of monsoons to radiative forcings is found in the seasonal onset of the South Asian summer monsoon, which is abrupt compared with the annual cycle of insolation. Here it is shown that the seasonal mean strength of monsoons instead exhibits a nearly linear dependence on a wide range of radiative forcings. First, a previous theory that predicted a discontinuous, threshold response is shown to omit a dominant stabilizing term in the equations of motion; a corrected theory predicts a continuous and nearly linear response of seasonal mean monsoon strength to forcings. A comprehensive global climate model is then used to show that the seasonal mean South Asian monsoon exhibits a near-linear dependence on a wide range of isolated greenhouse gas, aerosol, and surface albedo forcings. This model reproduces the observed abrupt seasonal onset of the South Asian monsoon but produces a near-linear response of the mean monsoon by changing the duration of the summer circulation and the latitude of that circulation's ascent branch. Thus, neither a physically correct theoretical model nor a comprehensive climate model support the idea that seasonal mean monsoons will undergo abrupt, nonlinear shifts in response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol emissions, or land surface albedo. PMID:26811462

  4. Project REPONS: Offshore Faults, Tectonic Deformation and Turbidite Record in Response to the January 12 2010 Earthquake, Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, C. M.; Gulick, S. P.; Cormier, M.; Dieudonne, N.; Diebold, J. B.; Douilly, R.; Hornbach, M.; Johnson, H. E.; Mishkin, K.; Seeber, L.; Sorlien, C. C.; Steckler, M. S.; Symithe, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    As part of an NSF RAPID response to the January 12, 2010 earthquake, we mapped the underwater continuation of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGF) west of Léogâne. Multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, chirp subbottom profiler, sediment sampling and CTD measurements were conducted in water depths of 2 m to 1750 m from the R/V Endeavor and from a small inflatable boat. The offshore segment of the EPGF is manifested by two steep, 50-80 m high linear ridges and at least two subsurface faults. The submarine EPGF is part of a transition from releasing to restraining segment. To the east, it joins its onshore trace in a releasing bend and continues to the west in a restraining bend that perhaps caused the Tapion ridge. Within the Baies de Petit and Grand Goâve, river outlets are correlated with lateral spreading and/or subsidence where we observed increased local damage to structures. Lateral spreading and/or subsidence appears to have increased tsunami effects locally. Coral uplift NE and SW of offshore fault traces offer evidence of the January 12, 2010 surface deformation. While a seafloor rupture is not evident from the data collected we do image deformation within the upper 20 m in both bays. Mass wasting and gravity flow deposits from the last and older earthquakes were tracked from the Léogâne delta and along the coast to the deepest depocenter. Th-234 and Be-7 with half-lives of 24 and 53 days, respectively verified the January 12 turbidite and indicated an influx of terrigenous sediment mixed with marine sources. Coral debris was sampled in the shelf and upper slope (100-300 m) near the EPGF; basalt sand derived from the highlands and wood fragments at intermediate water depths (1000-1100 m); lastly an ~0.03 km3 and >1 m thick turbidite was deposited over 50 km2 in the Canal du Sud depocenter (1750 m). The sandy parts of all cores recovered from Canal du Sud depocenter have alternate episodes of traction deposition and erosion that reflect

  5. A theoretical and experimental investigation of the linear and nonlinear impulse responses from a magnetoplasma column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grody, N. C.

    1973-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear responses of a magnetoplasma resulting from inhomogeneity in the background plasma density are studied. The plasma response to an impulse electric field was measured and the results are compared with the theory of an inhomogeneous cold plasma. Impulse responses were recorded for the different plasma densities, static magnetic fields, and neutral pressures and generally appeared as modulated, damped oscillations. The frequency spectra of the waveforms consisted of two separated resonance peaks. For weak excitation, the results correlate with the linear theory of a cold, inhomogeneous, cylindrical magnetoplasma. The damping mechanism is identified with that of phase mixing due to inhomogeneity in plasma density. With increasing excitation voltage, the nonlinear impulse responses display stronger damping and a small increase in the frequency of oscillation.

  6. Modeling and Simulation of the Impact Response of Maraging Steel Linear Cellular Alloys for Structural Energetic Material Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam; Fredenburg, Anthony; McCoy, Tammy; Cochran, Joe; Thadhani, Naresh

    2009-06-01

    A refined Johnson-Cook material strength model is developed for predicting the dynamic strain and fracture response of Maraging 250 steel at high-strain rates. Finite element simulations of rod-on-anvil impacts are carried out at velocities exceeding 100m/s and compared with experimental impact tests performed on a 7.62mm gas gun. The transient and final dimensions of the simulated and experimentally impacted rods are compared and Johnson-Cook strength parameters are modified accordingly. The newly developed Maraging 250 steel Johnson-cook strength model is then applied to simulate the impact response of multiple, 25% dense linear cellular alloys (LCA) of various geometries at velocities exceeding 100m/s. Analyses of the deformation, fragmentation, and stress transfer behavior of the simulated LCAs are performed and validated through comparison of corresponding impact experiments performed on the LCAs produced via an extrusion and reduction process. Stress transfer to the interior walls varies as a function of LCA geometry, which also influences the outward fragmentation and energy retention at the cross-section of impact.

  7. VIBRA: An interactive computer program for steady-state vibration response analysis of linear damped structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive steady state frequency response computer program with graphics is documented. Single or multiple forces may be applied to the structure using a modal superposition approach to calculate response. The method can be reapplied to linear, proportionally damped structures in which the damping may be viscous or structural. The theoretical approach and program organization are described. Example problems, user instructions, and a sample interactive session are given to demonstate the program's capability in solving a variety of problems.

  8. Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

    2003-11-01

    Seated human subjects have been exposed to vertical whole-body vibration so as to investigate the non-linearity in their biodynamic responses and quantify the response in directions other than the direction of excitation. Twelve males were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25-25 Hz at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s -2 r.m.s.). The subjects sat in four sitting postures having varying foot heights so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat (feet hanging, feet supported with maximum thigh contact, feet supported with average thigh contact, and feet supported with minimum thigh contact). Forces were measured in the vertical, fore-and-aft, and lateral directions on the seat and in the vertical direction at the footrest. The characteristic non-linear response of the human body with reducing resonance frequency at increasing vibration magnitudes was seen in all postures, but to a lesser extent with minimum thigh contact. Appreciable forces in the fore-and-aft direction also showed non-linearity, while forces in the lateral direction were low and showed no consistent trend. Forces at the feet were non-linear with a multi-resonant behaviour and were affected by the position of the legs. The decreased non-linearity with the minimum thigh contact posture suggests the tissues of the buttocks affect the non-linearity of the body more than the tissues of the thighs. The forces in the fore-and-aft direction are consistent with the body moving in two directions when exposed to vertical vibration. The non-linear behaviour of the body, and the considerable forces in the fore-aft direction should be taken into account when optimizing vibration isolation devices.

  9. Flutter and Forced Response Analyses of Cascades using a Two-Dimensional Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, O.

    1999-01-01

    Flutter and forced response analyses for a cascade of blades in subsonic and transonic flow is presented. The structural model for each blade is a typical section with bending and torsion degrees of freedom. The unsteady aerodynamic forces due to bending and torsion motions. and due to a vortical gust disturbance are obtained by solving unsteady linearized Euler equations. The unsteady linearized equations are obtained by linearizing the unsteady nonlinear equations about the steady flow. The predicted unsteady aerodynamic forces include the effect of steady aerodynamic loading due to airfoil shape, thickness and angle of attack. The aeroelastic equations are solved in the frequency domain by coupling the un- steady aerodynamic forces to the aeroelastic solver MISER. The present unsteady aerodynamic solver showed good correlation with published results for both flutter and forced response predictions. Further improvements are required to use the unsteady aerodynamic solver in a design cycle.

  10. Study of non-linear energy response of POLAR plastic scintillators to electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Xiao, Hualin; Yu, Boxiang; Orsi, Silvio; Wu, Bobing; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-10-01

    The POLAR experiment is a joint Chinese-European project conceived for a precise measurement of gamma ray polarization and optimized for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the energy range 50-500 keV. POLAR is a novel compact space-borne Compton polarimeter consisting of 1600 low-Z plastic scintillator bars (EJ-248M), read out by 25 flat-panel multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. In the paper, we first present a dedicated experiment to study the non-linear energy response of EJ-248M plastic scintillator bars to electrons and the detailed data analysis. Second we obtained the Birks' constant of EJ-248M plastic scintillator as kB = 0.143 mm / MeV by least squares fitting. Finally we used Geant4 simulation to study the influence of non-linear energy response on the performance of POLAR, through which it was found that non-linear energy response will lead to a significant decrease in statistics and result in larger uncertainty in polarization measurement. The paper presents a general solution to the study of non-linear energy response of plastic scintillators to electrons.

  11. IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?
    Preston, RJ. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    For considerations of cancer risk assessment from exposure to environmenta...

  12. Analysis of bipolar linear circuit response mechanisms for high and low dose rate total dose irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, H.; Tausch, H.J.; Turfler, R.; Cole, P.; Baker, P.; Pease, R.L.

    1996-12-01

    A methodology is presented for the identification of circuit total dose response mechanisms in bipolar linear microcircuits irradiated at high and low dose rates. This methodology includes manual circuit analysis, circuit simulations with SPICE using extracted device parameters, and selective irradiations of portions of the circuit using a scanning electron microscope.

  13. Determining polarizable force fields with electrostatic potentials from quantum mechanical linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2016-06-14

    We developed a new method to calculate the atomic polarizabilities by fitting to the electrostatic potentials (ESPs) obtained from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations within the linear response theory. This parallels the conventional approach of fitting atomic charges based on electrostatic potentials from the electron density. Our ESP fitting is combined with the induced dipole model under the perturbation of uniform external electric fields of all orientations. QM calculations for the linear response to the external electric fields are used as input, fully consistent with the induced dipole model, which itself is a linear response model. The orientation of the uniform external electric fields is integrated in all directions. The integration of orientation and QM linear response calculations together makes the fitting results independent of the orientations and magnitudes of the uniform external electric fields applied. Another advantage of our method is that QM calculation is only needed once, in contrast to the conventional approach, where many QM calculations are needed for many different applied electric fields. The molecular polarizabilities obtained from our method show comparable accuracy with those from fitting directly to the experimental or theoretical molecular polarizabilities. Since ESP is directly fitted, atomic polarizabilities obtained from our method are expected to reproduce the electrostatic interactions better. Our method was used to calculate both transferable atomic polarizabilities for polarizable molecular mechanics' force fields and nontransferable molecule-specific atomic polarizabilities. PMID:27305996

  14. Analysis of aromaticity in planar metal systems using the linear response kernel.

    PubMed

    Fias, Stijn; Boisdenghien, Zino; Stuyver, Thijs; Audiffred, Martha; Merino, Gabriel; Geerlings, Paul; de Proft, Frank

    2013-04-25

    The linear response kernel is used to gain insight into the aromatic behavior of the less classical metal aromatic E4(2-) and CE4(2-) (E = Al, Ga) clusters. The effect of the systematic replacement of the aluminum atoms in Al4(2-) and CAl4(2-) by germanium atoms is studied using, Al3Ge-, Al2Ge2, AlGe3+, Ge4(2+), CAl3Ge-, CAl2Ge2, CAlGe3+, and CGe4(2+). The results are compared with the values of the delocalization index (δ(1,3)) and nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS(zz)). Unintegrated plots of the linear response, computed for the first time on molecules, are used to analyze the delocalization in these clusters. All aromaticity indices studied, the linear response, δ(1,3), and NICS(zz), predict that the systems with a central carbon are less aromatic than the systems without a central carbon atom. Also, the linear response is more pronounced in the σ-electron density than in the π-density, pointing out that the systems are mainly σ-aromatic. PMID:23534921

  15. Evaluating and interpreting the chemical relevance of the linear response kernel for atoms II: open shell.

    PubMed

    Boisdenghien, Zino; Fias, Stijn; Van Alsenoy, Christian; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2014-07-28

    Most of the work done on the linear response kernel χ(r,r') has focussed on its atom-atom condensed form χAB. Our previous work [Boisdenghien et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2013, 9, 1007] was the first effort to truly focus on the non-condensed form of this function for closed (sub)shell atoms in a systematic fashion. In this work, we extend our method to the open shell case. To simplify the plotting of our results, we average our results to a symmetrical quantity χ(r,r'). This allows us to plot the linear response kernel for all elements up to and including argon and to investigate the periodicity throughout the first three rows in the periodic table and in the different representations of χ(r,r'). Within the context of Spin Polarized Conceptual Density Functional Theory, the first two-dimensional plots of spin polarized linear response functions are presented and commented on for some selected cases on the basis of the atomic ground state electronic configurations. Using the relation between the linear response kernel and the polarizability we compare the values of the polarizability tensor calculated using our method to high-level values. PMID:24837234

  16. Evaluating and Interpreting the Chemical Relevance of the Linear Response Kernel for Atoms.

    PubMed

    Boisdenghien, Zino; Van Alsenoy, Christian; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2013-02-12

    Although a lot of work has been done on the chemical relevance of the atom-condensed linear response kernel χAB regarding inductive, mesomeric, and hyperconjugative effects as well as (anti)aromaticity of molecules, the same cannot be said about its not condensed form χ(r,r'). Using a single Slater determinant KS type ansatz involving second order perturbation theory, we set out to investigate the linear response kernel for a number of judiciously chosen closed (sub)shell atoms throughout the periodic table and its relevance, e.g., in relation to the shell structure and polarizability. The numerical results are to the best of our knowledge the first systematic study on this noncondensed linear response function, the results for He and Be being in line with earlier work by Savin. Different graphical representations of the kernel are presented and discussed. Moreover, a frontier orbital approach has been tested illustrating the sensitivity of the nonintegrated kernel to the nodal structure of the orbitals. As a test of our method, a numerical integration of the linear response kernel was performed, yielding an accuracy of 10(-4). We also compare calculated values of the polarizability tensor and their evolution throughout the periodic table to high-level values found in the literature. PMID:26588743

  17. A study of non-linearity in rainfall-runoff response using 120 UK catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, Simon A.; McIntyre, Neil; Oughton, Rachel H.

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a catchment characteristic sensitivity analysis concerning the non-linearity of rainfall-runoff response in 120 UK catchments. Two approaches were adopted. The first approach involved, for each catchment, regression of a power-law to flow rate gradient data for recession events only. This approach was referred to as the recession analysis (RA). The second approach involved calibrating a rainfall-runoff model to the full data set (both recession and non-recession events). The rainfall-runoff model was developed by combining a power-law streamflow routing function with a one parameter probability distributed model (PDM) for soil moisture accounting. This approach was referred to as the rainfall-runoff model (RM). Step-wise linear regression was used to derive regionalization equations for the three parameters. An advantage of the RM approach is that it utilizes much more of the observed data. Results from the RM approach suggest that catchments with high base-flow and low annual precipitation tend to exhibit greater non-linearity in rainfall-runoff response. In contrast, the results from the RA approach suggest that non-linearity is linked to low evaporative demand. The difference in results is attributed to the aggregation of storm-flow and base-flow into a single system giving rise to a seemingly more non-linear response when applying the RM approach to catchments that exhibit a strongly dual storm-flow base-flow response. The study also highlights the value and limitations in a regionlization context of aggregating storm-flow and base-flow pathways into a single non-linear routing function.

  18. Optical measurement of the weak non-linearity in the eardrum vibration response to auditory stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Johan

    The mammalian hearing organ consists of the external ear (auricle and ear canal) followed by the middle ear (eardrum and ossicles) and the inner ear (cochlea). Its function is to convert the incoming sound waves and convert them into nerve pulses which are processed in the final stage by the brain. The main task of the external and middle ear is to concentrate the incoming sound waves on a smaller surface to reduce the loss that would normally occur in transmission from air to inner ear fluid. In the past it has been shown that this is a linear process, thus without serious distortions, for sound waves going up to pressures of 130 dB SPL (˜90 Pa). However, at large pressure changes up to several kPa, the middle ear movement clearly shows non-linear behaviour. Thus, it is possible that some small non-linear distortions are also present in the middle ear vibration at lower sound pressures. In this thesis a sensitive measurement set-up is presented to detect this weak non-linear behaviour. Essentially, this set-up consists of a loud-speaker which excites the middle ear, and the resulting vibration is measured with an heterodyne vibrometer. The use of specially designed acoustic excitation signals (odd random phase multisines) enables the separation of the linear and non-linear response. The application of this technique on the middle ear demonstrates that there are already non-linear distortions present in the vibration of the middle ear at a sound pressure of 93 dB SPL. This non-linear component also grows strongly with increasing sound pressure. Knowledge of this non-linear component can contribute to the improvement of modern hearing aids, which operate at higher sound pressures where the non-linearities could distort the signal considerably. It is also important to know the contribution of middle ear non-linearity to otoacoustic emissions. This are non-linearities caused by the active feedback amplifier in the inner ear, and can be detected in the external and

  19. Dynamic Deformation and Recovery Response of Red Blood Cells to a Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow: Effects of Frequency of Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow and Shear Stress Level

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic deformation and recovery responses of red blood cells (RBCs) to a cyclically reversing shear flow generated in a 30-μm clearance, with the peak shear stress of 53, 108, 161, and 274 Pa at the frequency of 1, 2, 3, and 5 Hz, respectively, were studied. The RBCs' time-varying velocity varied after the glass plate velocity without any time lag, whereas the L/W change, where L and W were the major and minor axes of RBCs' ellipsoidal shape, exhibited a rapid increase and gradual decay during the deformation and recovery phase. The time of minimum L/W occurrence lagged behind the zero-velocity time of the glass plate (zero stress), and the delay time normalized to the one-cycle duration remained constant at 8.0%. The elongation of RBCs at zero stress time became larger with the reversing frequency. A simple mechanical model consisting of an elastic linear element during a rapid elongation period and a parallel combination of elements such as a spring and dashpot during the nonlinear recovery phase was suggested. The dynamic response behavior of RBCs under a cyclically reversing shear flow was different from the conventional shape change where a steplike force was applied to and completely released from the RBCs. PMID:16766612

  20. Disentangling linear and nonlinear brain responses to evoked deep tissue pain

    PubMed Central

    Loggia, Marco L.; Edwards, Robert R.; Kim, Jieun; Vangel, Mark G.; Wasan, Ajay; Gollub, Randy L.; Harris, Richard E.; Park, Kyungmo; Napadow, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Pain stimuli evoke widespread responses in the brain. However, our understanding of the physiological significance underlying heterogeneous response within different pain-activated and -deactivated regions is still limited. Using functional MRI, we evaluated brain responses to a wide range of stimulus intensity levels (1 innocuous, 7 painful) in order to estimate region-specific stimulus-response functions, which we hypothesized could illuminate that region’s functional relationship to pain. Linear and nonlinear brain responses to pain were estimated through independent Legendre polynomial transformations of pain ratings within a general linear model. This approach identified at least five different, regionally-specific activity profiles in the brain. Linearly increasing (e.g., primary somatosensory/motor cortex, insulae) and intensity-independent (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex) activation was noted in traditional pain processing areas, potentially reflecting sensory encoding and all-or-none salience responses, respectively. Multiple activity profiles were seen in areas of the default mode network (DMN): intensity-independent deactivation (e.g., posterior cingulate cortex), linearly decreasing (e.g., contralateral inferior parietal lobule), and quadratic (U-shaped; e.g., medial prefrontal cortex). The latter observation suggests that: 1) different DMN subregions exhibit functional heterogeneity and 2) some DMN subregions respond in a percept-related manner to pain, suggesting closer linkage between the DMN and pain processing than previously thought. Future studies should apply a similar approach using innocuous stimuli of multiple intensities in order to evaluate whether the response profiles reported here can also be generalized to nonpainful somatosensory processing. PMID:22883925

  1. Mechanical characterization and modeling of non-linear deformation and fracture of a fiber reinforced metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic mechanical behavior of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced with continuous alumina fibers was determined experimentally. The mechanical behavior of the composite were modeled by assuming that the composite has a periodical microstructure. The resulting unit cell problem was solved with the finite element method. Excellent agreement was found between theoretically predicted and measured stress-strain responses for various tensile and shear loadings. The stress-strain responses for transverse and inplane shear were found to be identical and this will provide a simplification of the constitutive equations for the composite. The composite has a very low ductility in transverse tension and a limited ductility in transverse shear that was correlated to high hydrostatic stresses that develop in the matrix. The shape of the initial yield surface was calculated and good agreement was found between the calculated shape and the experimentally determined shape.

  2. Weld heat-affected-zone response to elevated-temperature deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.J.; Nippes, E.F.

    1996-11-01

    The mechanical response to elevated-temperature deformation was assessed for weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ) and base-metal microstructures in 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. A constant-displacement-rate (CDR) test, capable of determining long-time, notch-sensitivity tendencies, was implemented on a Gleeble 1,500 thermal/mechanical simulator and an Instron. Microstructures representative of the coarse-grained, grain-refined, and intercritical regions of the HAZ were simulated on a Gleeble. Microstructural reproduction reflected the preheat and postweld heat treatments in accordance with the required codes. A K{sub 1} analysis of the data was conducted, which showed that small-scale yielding criteria were adhered to throughout the test. The test results indicated that the high-temperature extensometer control of the Instron was better able to maintain stable crack growth after peak load than the crosshead control of the Gleeble. The CDR test was seen to be an effective, short-time procedure to delineate and compare the strength and relative service life of the structures present in the weld HAZ.

  3. Characterization of actin filament deformation in response to actively driven microspheres propagated through entangled actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Tobias; Blair, Savanna; Robertson-Anderson, Rae

    2014-03-01

    The semi-flexible biopolymer actin is a ubiquitous component of nearly all biological organisms, playing an important role in many biological processes such as cell structure and motility, cancer invasion and metastasis, muscle contraction, and cell signaling. Concentrated actin networks possess unique viscoelastic properties that have been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. However, much is still unknown regarding the correlation of the applied stress on the network to the induced filament strain at the molecular level. Here, we use dual optical traps alongside fluorescence microscopy to carry out active microrheology measurements that link mechanical stress to structural response at the micron scale. Specifically, we actively drive microspheres through entangled actin networks while simultaneously measuring the force the surrounding filaments exert on the sphere and visualizing the deformation and subsequent relaxation of fluorescent labeled filaments within the network. These measurements, which provide much needed insight into the link between stress and strain in actin networks, are critical for clarifying our theoretical understanding of the complex viscoelastic behavior exhibited in actin networks.

  4. Crustal vertical deformation response to different spatial scales of GRACE and GCMs surface loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haoming; Chen, Wu; Yuan, Linguo

    2016-01-01

    Crustal vertical deformation (CVD) observed by continuous GPS height time-series can be explained largely by surface loading effects recovered from both Gravity Recover and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and General Circulation Models (GCMs) data. We first show that lower degree CVD spatial spectrum due to the Earth's elastic response to a uniform surface loading plays more important roles than that of high-degree case. We then demonstrate that GRACE data with 300-400 km spatial resolution have the ability to detect 99 per cent power of global and regional CVD in spatial spectrum domain using a global frequency-wavenumber spectrum method. We can just use either GRACE or GCMs 36 degree/order (d/o) spherical harmonic coefficients (SHCs) which correspond to 500 km spatial resolution to acquire more than 90 per cent variance of total CVD modeled by up to 180 d/o SHCs at 98 per cent global gridpoints. Globally, CVD modeled by GRACE loading can explain 72 per cent annual amplitude and 69 per cent variance of GPS observed height time-series, which is better than the GCMs results of 64 per cent for annual amplitude and 41 per cent for variance. Using a three cornered hat method, we also show that the noise level of monthly averaged CVD is about 3 mm for both GPS height time-series and GRACE loading result, while that of GCMs result is only 1.3 mm.

  5. Evolution of a fold-thrust belt deforming a unit with pre-existing linear asperities: Insights from analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burberry, Caroline M.; Swiatlowski, Jerlyn L.

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneity, whether geometric or rheologic, in crustal material undergoing compression affects the geometry of the structures produced. This study documents the thrust fault geometries produced when discrete linear asperities are introduced into an analog model, scaled to represent bulk upper crustal properties, and compressed. Varying obliquities of the asperities are used, relative to the imposed compression, and the resultant development of thrust fault traces and branch lines in map view is tracked. Once the model runs are completed, cross-sections are created and analyzed. The models show that asperities confined to the base layer promote the clustering of branch lines in the surface thrusts. Strong clustering in branch lines is also noted where several asperities are in close proximity or cross. Slight reverse-sense reactivation of asperities cut through the sedimentary sequence is noted in cross-section, where the asperity and the subsequent thrust belt interact. The model results are comparable to the situation in the Dinaric Alps, where pre-existing faults to the SW of the NE Adriatic Fault Zone contribute to the clustering of branch lines developed in the surface fold-thrust belt. These results can therefore be used to evaluate the evolution of other basement-involved fold-thrust belts worldwide.

  6. Microscale modeling of fluid flow-geomechanics-seismicity: Relationship between permeability and seismic source response in deformed rock joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raziperchikolaee, S.; Alvarado, V.; Yin, S.

    2014-09-01

    Studying rock joint deformation including both slippage and opening mechanisms provides an opportunity to investigate the connection between the permeability and seismic source mechanisms. A microscale fluid flow-geomechanics-seismicity model was built to evaluate the transport response and failure mechanism of microcracks developed along a joint in Berea sandstone samples during deformation. The modeling method considers comprehensive grain-cement interactions. Fluid flow behavior is obtained through a realistic network model of the pore space in the compacted assembly. The geometric description of the complex pore structure is characterized to predict permeability of the rock sample as a function of rock deformation by using a dynamic pore network model. As a result of microcracks development, forces and displacements in grains involved in bond breakage are measured to determine seismic moment tensor. Shear and nonshear displacements are applied to the joint samples to investigate their effects on permeability evolution and failure mechanism of microcracks during joint deformation. In addition, the effect of joint roughness is analyzed by performing numerical compression tests. We also investigate how confining pressure affects volumetric deformation leading to opening or closure of developed microcracks and permeability changes of samples with joints.

  7. Linear response theory for annealing of radiation damage in semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, Vitaly

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical study of the radiation/annealing response of MOS ICs is described. Although many experiments have been performed in this field, no comprehensive theory dealing with radiation/annealing response has been proposed. Many attempts have been made to apply linear response theory, but no theoretical foundation has been presented. The linear response theory outlined here is capable of describing a broad area of radiation/annealing response phenomena in MOS ICs, in particular, both simultaneous irradiation and annealing, as well as short- and long-term annealing, including the case when annealing is nearing completion. For the first time, a simple procedure is devised to determine the response function from experimental radiation/annealing data. In addition, this procedure enables us to study the effect of variable temperature and dose rate, effects which are of interest in spaceflight. In the past, the shift in threshold potential due to radiation/annealing has usually been assumed to depend on one variable: the time lapse between an impulse dose and the time of observation. While such a suggestion of uniformity in time is certainly true for a broad range of radiation annealing phenomena, it may not hold for some ranges of the variables of interest (temperature, dose rate, etc.). A response function is projected which is dependent on two variables: the time of observation and the time of the impulse dose. This dependence on two variables allows us to extend the theory to the treatment of a variable dose rate. Finally, the linear theory is generalized to the case in which the response is nonlinear with impulse dose, but is proportional to some impulse function of dose. A method to determine both the impulse and response functions is presented.

  8. GPS analysis of ground surface deformation in response to 2011 drought in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karegar, M. A.; Dixon, T. H.; Malservisi, R.

    2014-12-01

    A precise process and analysis of a dense network of CGPS observations are used to infer the long term and seasonal deformation patterns of ground surface over the state of Texas. The state covers 9 major aquifers which supply more than 50 percent of the water utilized in the state and spread over ~75% of the state area. Pumping of groundwater from many aquifers for irrigation, industrial and human consumption has resulted in a significant water level declines, and in many areas caused long term ground surface subsidence. While more than 70 percent of GPS sites, located on the top of aquifers, experience subsidence, the remained sites located outside the aquifers present significant uplift as a result of elastic response to the changes in loading due to soil moisture and surface water. However, a significant episodic uplift (up 6 mm/yr) from 2010 to 2012 appears in all GPS time series corresponding to 2011 extreme drought in Texas and adjacent states. Such episodic uplift is inferred as an elastic response of ground surface to reduced surface load. While most of drought indicators rely on precipitation index, soil moisture model, satellite vegetation health index and streamflow data, we suggest using regional CGPS vertical displacement as a further proxy for the indication of a drought. Inverting the vertical displacement from GPS it is possible to estimate total water storage including the portion of groundwater storage. In this abstract, the uplifts during drought period are inverted to derive total water storage loss using load Green's function. The GPS-based estimate of water loss is compared with GRACE-based and Land Surface Models estimates of total water storage (e.g. NLDAS and GLDAS). The limitations and uncertainty associated with each technique are discussed.

  9. The response of a linear baroclinic equatorial ocean to periodic forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, M. A.; Sarachik, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding the periodic response of the linear inviscid shallow water equations in a meridionally unbounded basin to zonal forcings at a single low frequency omega. A general solution in the long wave approximation and on an equatorial beta-plane is obtained by summing the Kelvin mode and the finite sum of Rossby modes whose turning points lie equatorward of the turning latitude at frequency omega. The results of the investigation suggest that even if the low frequency forcing has a simple structure, considerable spatial inhomogeneity in the deep ocean response would have to be expected. On the basis of linear inviscid theory, some conclusions are drawn about the causes of the differences between equatorial thermocline response in the Atlantic and Pacific.

  10. Effects of Cyclic and Monotonic Deformations on Nonlinear Ultrasonic Response of Austenitic Stainless Steel: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Xiang, Yanxun; Zhao, Peng

    2016-05-01

    The effect of plastic deformations on the nonlinear ultrasonic response in austenite stainless steel was investigated under the tensile, asymmetric cyclic, and symmetric cyclic loadings. Nonlinear ultrasonic wave measurement was performed on the interrupted specimens. Results show that cyclic and monotonic plastic deformations lead to the significantly different acoustic nonlinear response. The increase of dislocation density and martensite transformation causes the increase of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrast, the well-developed cell structures decrease the acoustic nonlinear response. Under the asymmetric cyclic loading condition, the lightly decrease of acoustic nonlinearity is caused by the development of cell structures, while the slight increase of acoustic nonlinearity should be attributed to the increase of martensite transformation. Comparatively, the severe increase of acoustic nonlinearity during the first stage under symmetric cyclic loading is ascribed to the fast generation of dislocation structures and martensite transformation.

  11. Vestibular afferent responses to linear accelerations in the alert squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somps, Christopher J.; Schor, Robert H.; Tomko, David L.

    1994-01-01

    The spontaneous activity of 40 otolith afferents and 44 canal afferents was recorded in 4 alert, intact squirrel monkeys. Polarization vectors and response properties of otolith afferents were determined during static re-orientations relative to gravity and during Earth-horizontal, sinusoidal, linear oscillations. Canal afferents were tested for sensitivity to linear accelerations. For regular otolith afferents, a significant correlation between upright discharge rate and sensitivity to dynamic acceleration in the horizontal plane was observed. This correlation was not present in irregular units. The sensitivity of otolith afferents to both static tilts and dynamic linear acceleration was much greater in irregularly discharging units than in regularly discharging units. The spontaneous activity and static and dynamic response properties of regularly discharging otolith afferents were similar to those reported in barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Irregular afferents also had similar dynamic response properties when compared to anesthetized monkeys. However, this sample of irregular afferents in alert animals had higher resting discharge rates and greater sensitivity to static tilts. The majority of otolith polarization vectors were oriented near the horizontal in the plane of the utricular maculae; however, directions of maximum sensitivity were different during dynamic and static testing. Canal afferents were not sensitive to static tilts or linear oscillations of the head.

  12. The role of linear interference in the Annular Mode response to Tropical SST forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, C. G.; Kushner, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies in different parts of the Tropics are known to drive very different teleconnections into the extratropics on monthly-to-seasonal timescales. For example, wintertime El Nino SST warming in the tropical Pacific Ocean (TPO) is associated with an equatorward shifted subtropical jet, a weaker stratospheric polar vortex, and high pressure over the northern polar regions characteristic of the negative phase of the Northern Annular Mode (NAM). By contrast, SST warming in the Tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) has been shown to be associated with a poleward shifted subtropical jet, strengthened polar vortex, and and a positive phase NAM. This study presents a simple dynamical framework for understanding these different responses. It is shown that the sign and strength of the NAM response to tropical SST forcing is often simply related to the phasing, and hence the linear interference, between the Rossby wave response and the climatological stationary wave. The TPO (TIO) wave response reinforces (attenuates) the climatological wave and therefore weakens (strengthens) the stratospheric jet and leads to a negative (positive) NAM response. In additional simulations, it is shown that decreasing the strength of the climatological stationary wave reduces the importance of linear interference and increases the importance of nonlinearity. This work demonstrates that the simulated extratropical Annular Mode responses to climate forcings can depend sensitively on the amplitude and phase of the climatological stationary wave and the wave response.

  13. Encoding of head acceleration in vestibular neurons. I. Spatiotemporal response properties to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, G. A.; Perachio, A. A.; Angelaki, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    1. Extracellular recordings were made in and around the medial vestibular nuclei in decerebrated rats. Neurons were functionally identified according to their semicircular canal input on the basis of their responses to angular head rotations around the yaw, pitch, and roll head axes. Those cells responding to angular acceleration were classified as either horizontal semicircular canal-related (HC) or vertical semicircular canal-related (VC) neurons. The HC neurons were further characterized as either type I or type II, depending on the direction of rotation producing excitation. Cells that lacked a response to angular head acceleration, but exhibited sensitivity to a change in head position, were classified as purely otolith organ-related (OTO) neurons. All vestibular neurons were then tested for their response to sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. 2. Convergence of macular and canal inputs onto central vestibular nuclei neurons occurred in 73% of the type I HC, 79% of the type II HC, and 86% of the VC neurons. Out of the 223 neurons identified as receiving macular input, 94 neurons were further studied, and their spatiotemporal response properties to sinusoidal stimulation with pure linear acceleration were quantified. Data were obtained from 33 type I HC, 22 type II HC, 22 VC, and 17 OTO neurons. 3. For each neuron the angle of the translational stimulus vector was varied by 15, 30, or 45 degrees increments in the horizontal head plane. In all tested neurons, a direction of maximum sensitivity was identified. An interesting difference among neurons was their response to translation along the direction perpendicular to that that produced the maximum response ("null" direction). For the majority of neurons tested, it was possible to evoke a nonzero response during stimulation along the null direction always had response phases that varied as a function of stimulus direction. 4. These spatiotemporal response properties were quantified in two

  14. Linear response as a singular limit for a periodically driven closed quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russomanno, Angelo; Silva, Alessandro; Santoro, Giuseppe E.

    2013-09-01

    We address the issue of the validity of linear response theory for a closed quantum system subject to a periodic external driving. Linear response theory (LRT) predicts energy absorption at frequencies of the external driving where the imaginary part of the appropriate response function is different from zero. Here we show that, for a fairly general nonlinear many-body system on a lattice subject to an extensive perturbation, this approximation should be expected to be valid only up to a time t* depending on the strength of the driving, beyond which the true coherent Schrödinger evolution departs from the linear response prediction and the system stops absorbing energy from the driving. We exemplify this phenomenon in detail with the example of a quantum Ising chain subject to a time-periodic modulation of the transverse field, by comparing an exact Floquet analysis with the standard results of LRT. In this context, we also show that if the perturbation is just local, the system is expected in the thermodynamic limit to keep absorbing energy, and LRT works at all times. We finally argue more generally the validity of the scenario presented for closed quantum many-body lattice systems with a bound on the energy-per-site spectrum, discussing the experimental relevance of our findings in the context of cold atoms in optical lattices and ultra-fast spectroscopy experiments.

  15. Improving linear accelerator service response with a real- time electronic event reporting system.

    PubMed

    Hoisak, Jeremy D P; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Fletcher, Richard; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-01-01

    To track linear accelerator performance issues, an online event recording system was developed in-house for use by therapists and physicists to log the details of technical problems arising on our institution's four linear accelerators. In use since October 2010, the system was designed so that all clinical physicists would receive email notification when an event was logged. Starting in October 2012, we initiated a pilot project in collaboration with our linear accelerator vendor to explore a new model of service and support, in which event notifications were also sent electronically directly to dedicated engineers at the vendor's technical help desk, who then initiated a response to technical issues. Previously, technical issues were reported by telephone to the vendor's call center, which then disseminated information and coordinated a response with the Technical Support help desk and local service engineers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the improvements to clinical operations resulting from this new service model. The new and old service models were quantitatively compared by reviewing event logs and the oncology information system database in the nine months prior to and after initiation of the project. Here, we focus on events that resulted in an inoperative linear accelerator ("down" machine). Machine downtime, vendor response time, treatment cancellations, and event resolution were evaluated and compared over two equivalent time periods. In 389 clinical days, there were 119 machine-down events: 59 events before and 60 after introduction of the new model. In the new model, median time to service response decreased from 45 to 8 min, service engineer dispatch time decreased 44%, downtime per event decreased from 45 to 20 min, and treatment cancellations decreased 68%. The decreased vendor response time and reduced number of on-site visits by a service engineer resulted in decreased downtime and decreased patient treatment cancellations. PMID

  16. Near-linear response of mean monsoon strength to a broad range of radiative forcings

    PubMed Central

    Boos, William R.; Storelvmo, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models have been used to argue that seasonal mean monsoons will shift abruptly and discontinuously from wet to dry stable states as their radiative forcings pass a critical threshold, sometimes referred to as a “tipping point.” Further support for a strongly nonlinear response of monsoons to radiative forcings is found in the seasonal onset of the South Asian summer monsoon, which is abrupt compared with the annual cycle of insolation. Here it is shown that the seasonal mean strength of monsoons instead exhibits a nearly linear dependence on a wide range of radiative forcings. First, a previous theory that predicted a discontinuous, threshold response is shown to omit a dominant stabilizing term in the equations of motion; a corrected theory predicts a continuous and nearly linear response of seasonal mean monsoon strength to forcings. A comprehensive global climate model is then used to show that the seasonal mean South Asian monsoon exhibits a near-linear dependence on a wide range of isolated greenhouse gas, aerosol, and surface albedo forcings. This model reproduces the observed abrupt seasonal onset of the South Asian monsoon but produces a near-linear response of the mean monsoon by changing the duration of the summer circulation and the latitude of that circulation’s ascent branch. Thus, neither a physically correct theoretical model nor a comprehensive climate model support the idea that seasonal mean monsoons will undergo abrupt, nonlinear shifts in response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol emissions, or land surface albedo. PMID:26811462

  17. The adequate stimulus for avian short latency vestibular responses to linear translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.; Colbert, S.

    1998-01-01

    Transient linear acceleration stimuli have been shown to elicit eighth nerve vestibular compound action potentials in birds and mammals. The present study was undertaken to better define the nature of the adequate stimulus for neurons generating the response in the chicken (Gallus domesticus). In particular, the study evaluated the question of whether the neurons studied are most sensitive to the maximum level of linear acceleration achieved or to the rate of change in acceleration (da/dt, or jerk). To do this, vestibular response thresholds were measured as a function of stimulus onset slope. Traditional computer signal averaging was used to record responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli. Stimulus onset slope was systematically varied. Acceleration thresholds decreased with increasing stimulus onset slope (decreasing stimulus rise time). When stimuli were expressed in units of jerk (g/ms), thresholds were virtually constant for all stimulus rise times. Moreover, stimuli having identical jerk magnitudes but widely varying peak acceleration levels produced virtually identical responses. Vestibular response thresholds, latencies and amplitudes appear to be determined strictly by stimulus jerk magnitudes. Stimulus attributes such as peak acceleration or rise time alone do not provide sufficient information to predict response parameter quantities. Indeed, the major response parameters were shown to be virtually independent of peak acceleration levels or rise time when these stimulus features were isolated and considered separately. It is concluded that the neurons generating short latency vestibular evoked potentials do so as "jerk encoders" in the chicken. Primary afferents classified as "irregular", and which traditionally fall into the broad category of "dynamic" or "phasic" neurons, would seem to be the most likely candidates for the neural generators of short latency vestibular compound action potentials.

  18. Linear response range characterization and in vivo application of laser speckle imaging of blood flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bernard; Ramírez-San-Juan, Julio C.; Lotfi, Justin; Nelson, J. S.

    2006-07-01

    Noninvasive blood flow imaging can provide critical information on the state of biological tissue and the efficacy of approaches to treat disease. With laser speckle imaging (LSI), relative changes in blood flow are typically reported, with the assumption that the measured values are on a linear scale. A linear relationship between the measured and actual flow rate values has been suggested. The actual flow rate range, over which this linear relationship is valid, is unknown. Herein we report the linear response range and velocity dynamic range (VDR) of our LSI instrument at two relevant camera integration times. For integration times of 1 and 10 ms, the best case VDR was 80 and 60 dB, respectively, and the worst case VDR was 20 and 50 dB. The best case VDR values were similar to those reported in the literature for optical Doppler tomography. We also demonstrate the potential of LSI for monitoring blood flow dynamics in the rodent dorsal skinfold chamber model. These findings imply that LSI can provide accurate wide-field maps of microvascular blood flow rate dynamics and highlight heterogeneities in flow response to the application of exogenous agents.

  19. Communication: A reduced-space algorithm for the solution of the complex linear response equations used in coupled cluster damped response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Christiansen, Ove; Coriani, Sonia

    2013-12-01

    We present a reduced-space algorithm for solving the complex (damped) linear response equations required to compute the complex linear response function for the hierarchy of methods: coupled cluster singles, coupled cluster singles and iterative approximate doubles, and coupled cluster singles and doubles. The solver is the keystone element for the development of damped coupled cluster response methods for linear and nonlinear effects in resonant frequency regions.

  20. Linear response to leadership, effective temperature and decision making in flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Daniel; Giomi, Luca

    The Vicsek model is the prototypical system for studying collective behavior of interacting self propelled particles (SPPs). It has formed the basis for models explaining the collective behavior of many active systems including flocks of birds and swarms of insects. To the standard Vicsek model we introduce a small angular torque to a subset of the particles and observe how this effects the direction of polarisation of the entire swarm. This is analogous to a few informed birds trying to lead the rest of a large flock by initiating a turn. We find a linear response to this perturbation and fluctuations that are in agreement with fluctuation dissipation theorem. This allows the identification of an effective temperature for the Vicsek model that follows a power law with the noise amplitude. The linear response can also be extended to the process of decision-making, wherein flocks must decide between the behaviors of two competing subgroups of individuals.

  1. New computational method for non-LTE, the linear response matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Graziani, F. R.; Harte, J. A.; Libby, S. B.; More, R. M.; Rathkopf, J.; Zimmerman, G. B.

    1998-10-01

    We investigate non-local thermodynamic equilibrium atomic kinetics using nonequilibrium thermodynamics and linear response theory. This approach gives a rigorous general framework for exploiting results from non-LTE kinetic calculations and offers a practical data-tabulation scheme suitable for use in plasma simulation codes. We describe how this method has been implemented to supply a fast and accurate non-LTE option in Lasnex.

  2. Challenges within the linear response approximation when studying enzyme catalysis and effects of mutations.

    PubMed

    Sharir-Ivry, Avital; Varatharaj, Rajapandian; Shurki, Avital

    2015-01-13

    Various aspects of the linear response approximation (LRA) approach were examined when calculating reaction barriers within an enzyme and its different mutants. Scaling the electrostatic interactions is shown to slightly affect the absolute values of the barriers but not the overall trend when comparing wild-type and mutants. Convergence of the overall energetics was shown to depend on the sampling. Finally, the contribution of particular residues was shown to be significant, despite its small value. PMID:26574227

  3. Function projective synchronization in partially linear drive-response chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong; Xu, Zhen-Yuan

    2010-12-01

    This paper gives the definition of function projective synchronization with less conservative demand for a scaling function, and investigates the function projective synchronization in partially linear drive-response chaotic systems. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, it has been shown that the function projective synchronization with desired scaling function can be realized by simple control law. Moreover it does not need scaling function to be differentiable, bounded and non-vanished. The numerical simulations are provided to verify the theoretical result.

  4. The Mexican Ridges Fold Belt, Gulf of Mexico: Deformation, Dynamics of Deposition of Growth Strata, and the Delay of Sedimentary Response to Tectonic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarbuh Lugo, U. I.; Contreras, J.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation of the Mexican Ridges fold belt (MRFB), western Gulf of Mexico, initiated in the Late Neogene in response to normal faulting along the Quetzalcoatl Extensional System offshore Veracruz. Previous authors analyzed stacking patterns of growth strata concluding deformation occurred in two stages: the western section of the fold belt developed during the Upper Miocene whereas the eastern part became active during the Lower Pliocene. Here we analyze a regional seismic line to determine whether deformation migrated progressively eastward. In contrast to previous studies we do not use stacking patterns but excess area. This parameter provides direct information of both linear shortening, and superficial mass transport. We construct excess-area plots for each of the folds comprising the MRFB; from them we estimate the shortening and the degradation path of the seafloor deformed by folding. Moreover, by assuming denudation is in steady state, we are able to differentiate sediments derived locally from sediments transported from distant sources. Results show tectonic transport in the MRFB is 11.8 km; shortening of individual folds ranges 3-16%, with an average strain for the entire MRFB of ~10%; structures grew at a mean uplift rate of 0.2 mm/yr. We estimate the constant of mass diffusivity, which controls the rate of degradation, has a mean value of 0.27 m2/yr. This value is characteristic of rapid, episodic mass movements. Finally, the sedimentation rate is ~0.2 mm/yr. Those parameters, however, are not constant; they decrease toward the deepwater portion of the fold belt. The structures proximal to the continental shelf are rising rapidly and are being degraded more intensely than those in the distal part of the fold belt. Our results reveal that deformation started synchronously throughout the MRFB during the Late Miocene and not in two episodes as previously reported. The reason for the seeming discrepancy is due to the copious sedimentation in the eastern

  5. Thermodynamics of the mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine beyond the linear-response regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Hatano, Naomichi

    2015-10-01

    Mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine is much anticipated as a device that allows us to utilize with high efficiency wasted heat inaccessible by conventional heat engines. However, the derivation of the heat current in this engine seems to be either not general or described too briefly, even inappropriately in some cases. In this paper, we give a clear-cut derivation of the heat current of the engine with suitable assumptions beyond the linear-response regime. It resolves the confusion in the definition of the heat current in the linear-response regime. After verifying that we can construct the same formalism as that of the cyclic engine, we find the following two interesting results within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism: the efficiency of the mesoscopic thermoelectric engine reaches the Carnot efficiency if and only if the transmission probability is finite at a specific energy and zero otherwise; the unitarity of the transmission probability guarantees the second law of thermodynamics, invalidating Benenti et al.'s argument in the linear-response regime that one could obtain a finite power with the Carnot efficiency under a broken time-reversal symmetry [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230602 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.230602]. These results demonstrate how quantum mechanics constrains thermodynamics.

  6. Thermodynamics of the mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine beyond the linear-response regime.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Hatano, Naomichi

    2015-10-01

    Mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine is much anticipated as a device that allows us to utilize with high efficiency wasted heat inaccessible by conventional heat engines. However, the derivation of the heat current in this engine seems to be either not general or described too briefly, even inappropriately in some cases. In this paper, we give a clear-cut derivation of the heat current of the engine with suitable assumptions beyond the linear-response regime. It resolves the confusion in the definition of the heat current in the linear-response regime. After verifying that we can construct the same formalism as that of the cyclic engine, we find the following two interesting results within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism: the efficiency of the mesoscopic thermoelectric engine reaches the Carnot efficiency if and only if the transmission probability is finite at a specific energy and zero otherwise; the unitarity of the transmission probability guarantees the second law of thermodynamics, invalidating Benenti et al.'s argument in the linear-response regime that one could obtain a finite power with the Carnot efficiency under a broken time-reversal symmetry [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230602 (2011)]. These results demonstrate how quantum mechanics constrains thermodynamics. PMID:26565226

  7. Development of a linearized unsteady aerodynamic analysis for cascade gust response predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1990-01-01

    A method for predicting the unsteady aerodynamic response of a cascade of airfoils to entropic, vortical, and acoustic gust excitations is being developed. Here, the unsteady flow is regarded as a small perturbation of a nonuniform isentropic and irrotational steady background flow. A splitting technique is used to decompose the linearized unsteady velocity into rotational and irrotational parts leading to equations for the complex amplitudes of the linearized unsteady entropy, rotational velocity, and velocity potential that are coupled only sequentially. The entropic and rotational velocity fluctuations are described by transport equations for which closed-form solutions in terms of the mean-flow drift and stream functions can be determined. The potential fluctuation is described by an inhomogeneous convected wave equation in which the source term depends on the rotational velocity field, and is determined using finite-difference procedures. The analytical and numerical techniques used to determine the linearized unsteady flow are outlined. Results are presented to indicate the status of the solution procedure and to demonstrate the impact of blade geometry and mean blade loading on the aerodynamic response of cascades to vortical gust excitations. The analysis described herein leads to very efficient predictions of cascade unsteady aerodynamic response phenomena making it useful for turbomachinery aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design applications.

  8. Study on The Response Improvement of A Linear Actuator Using Temperature-Sensitive Magnetic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Katsuhiro; Kanzaki, Yasunori; Ota, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Kawase, Yoshihiro

    We have been studying a linear actuator for the thermostatic switch using temperature-sensitive magnetic material (TSMM). In this paper, the effect of the geometry of TSMM on response time is investigated by computing the dynamic characteristics of the actuator employing the 3-D finite element method coupled with the equations of magnetic field, heat transfer and motion. As a result, it is found that the response of the actuator is greatly improved. The validity of the computation is clarified though the comparison with the measurement of a prototype.

  9. Microsecond linear optical response in the unusual nematic phase of achiral bimesogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, V. P.; Balachandran, R.; Nagaraj, M.; Vij, J. K.; Tamba, M. G.; Kohlmeier, A.; Mehl, G. H.

    2011-12-01

    Some hydrocarbon linked mesogenic dimers are known to exhibit an additional nematic phase (Nx) below a conventional uniaxial nematic (Nu) phase. Although composed of non-chiral molecules, the Nx phase is found to exhibit linear (polar) switching under applied electric field. This switching has remarkably low response time of the order of a few microseconds. Two chiral domains with opposite handedness and consequently opposite responses are found in planar cells. Uniformly lying helix, electroclinic, and flexoelectric effects are given as possible causes for this intriguing phenomenon.

  10. The role of twinning deformation on the hardening response of polycrystalline magnesium from discrete dislocation dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Haidong; Aubry, Sylvie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; El-Awady, Jaafar A.

    2015-04-13

    The mechanical response of micro-twinned polycrystalline magnesium was studied through three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD). A systematic interaction model between dislocations and (1012) tension twin boundaries (TBs) was proposed and introduced into the DDD framework. In addition, a nominal grain boundary (GB) model agreeing with experimental results was also introduced to mimic the GB’s barrier effect. The current simulation results show that TBs act as a strong obstacle to gliding dislocations, which contributes significantly to the hardening behavior of magnesium. On the other hand, the deformation accommodated by twinning plays a softening role. Therefore, the concave shape of the Mg stress-strain curve results from the competition between dislocation-TB induced hardening and twinning deformation induced softening. At low strain levels, twinning deformation induced softening dominates and a decreasing hardening rate is observed in Stage-I. In Stage-II, both the hardening and softening effects decline, but twinning deformation induced softening declines faster, which leads to an increasing hardening rate.

  11. The role of twinning deformation on the hardening response of polycrystalline magnesium from discrete dislocation dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fan, Haidong; Aubry, Sylvie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; El-Awady, Jaafar A.

    2015-04-13

    The mechanical response of micro-twinned polycrystalline magnesium was studied through three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD). A systematic interaction model between dislocations and (1012) tension twin boundaries (TBs) was proposed and introduced into the DDD framework. In addition, a nominal grain boundary (GB) model agreeing with experimental results was also introduced to mimic the GB’s barrier effect. The current simulation results show that TBs act as a strong obstacle to gliding dislocations, which contributes significantly to the hardening behavior of magnesium. On the other hand, the deformation accommodated by twinning plays a softening role. Therefore, the concave shape of the Mgmore » stress-strain curve results from the competition between dislocation-TB induced hardening and twinning deformation induced softening. At low strain levels, twinning deformation induced softening dominates and a decreasing hardening rate is observed in Stage-I. In Stage-II, both the hardening and softening effects decline, but twinning deformation induced softening declines faster, which leads to an increasing hardening rate.« less

  12. Linearization of dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Aldelaijan, Saad; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Chan, Maria F.; Lewis, Dave

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Despite numerous advantages of radiochromic film dosimeter (high spatial resolution, near tissue equivalence, low energy dependence) to measure a relative dose distribution with film, one needs to first measure an absolute dose (following previously established reference dosimetry protocol) and then convert measured absolute dose values into relative doses. In this work, we present result of our efforts to obtain a functional form that would linearize the inherently nonlinear dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system. Methods: Functional form [{zeta}= (-1){center_dot}netOD{sup (2/3)}/ln(netOD)] was derived from calibration curves of various previously established radiochromic film dosimetry systems. In order to test the invariance of the proposed functional form with respect to the film model used we tested it with three different GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign film models (EBT, EBT2, and EBT3) irradiated to various doses and scanned on a same scanner. For one of the film models (EBT2), we tested the invariance of the functional form to the scanner model used by scanning irradiated film pieces with three different flatbed scanner models (Epson V700, 1680, and 10000XL). To test our hypothesis that the proposed functional argument linearizes the response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system, verification tests have been performed in clinical applications: percent depth dose measurements, IMRT quality assurance (QA), and brachytherapy QA. Results: Obtained R{sup 2} values indicate that the choice of the functional form of the new argument appropriately linearizes the dose response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system we used. The linear behavior was insensitive to both film model and flatbed scanner model used. Measured PDD values using the green channel response of the GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign EBT3 film model are well within {+-}2% window of the local relative dose value when compared to the tabulated Cobalt-60 data. It was also

  13. The Pole Term in Linear Response Theory: An Example From the Transverse Response of the Electron Gas

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Zachary H.; Cockayne, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In linear response theory, the dielectric response at zero frequency sometimes appears to violate the f-sum rule, which has apparent implications for causality. Here, we study the origin of this apparent discrepancy, focusing on Lindhard’s formula for the transverse response of the electron gas. At non-zero frequency, first-order poles contribute to the imaginary part of the dielectric function in the usual way. At zero frequency, second-order poles contribute in a way which forces a careful consideration of the notation of summation and integration to avoid an error. A compact formula for the contribution of the second-order poles is presented. The sense in which the f-sum rule is satisfied is discussed. PMID:27096129

  14. Spatiotemporal processing of linear acceleration: primary afferent and central vestibular neuron responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Spatiotemporal convergence and two-dimensional (2-D) neural tuning have been proposed as a major neural mechanism in the signal processing of linear acceleration. To examine this hypothesis, we studied the firing properties of primary otolith afferents and central otolith neurons that respond exclusively to horizontal linear accelerations of the head (0.16-10 Hz) in alert rhesus monkeys. Unlike primary afferents, the majority of central otolith neurons exhibited 2-D spatial tuning to linear acceleration. As a result, central otolith dynamics vary as a function of movement direction. During movement along the maximum sensitivity direction, the dynamics of all central otolith neurons differed significantly from those observed for the primary afferent population. Specifically at low frequencies (linear velocity, in contrast to primary afferents that peaked in phase with linear acceleration. At least three different groups of central response dynamics were described according to the properties observed for motion along the maximum sensitivity direction. "High-pass" neurons exhibited increasing gains and phase values as a function of frequency. "Flat" neurons were characterized by relatively flat gains and constant phase lags (approximately 20-55 degrees ). A few neurons ("low-pass") were characterized by decreasing gain and phase as a function of frequency. The response dynamics of central otolith neurons suggest that the approximately 90 degrees phase lags observed at low frequencies are not the result of a neural integration but rather the effect of nonminimum phase behavior, which could arise at least partly through spatiotemporal convergence. Neither afferent nor central otolith neurons discriminated between gravitational and inertial components of linear acceleration. Thus response sensitivity was indistinguishable during 0.5-Hz pitch oscillations and fore-aft movements

  15. Research the dynamical characteristics of slow deformation waves as a rock massif response to explosions during its outworking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Oleg; Shipeev, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    As a result of long-term natural geomechanics and geophysical observation data on mines of complex ore rocks, generalization of the non-linear reaction of rock massif to heavy dynamic influences have been established. In addition, pendulum type waves have been observed and the sources of them have been located inside geoblocks of different hierarchic levels (Oparin et al., 2010). At the same time, these waves propagate with wide low (compared with seismic waves) velocity values (Kurlenja et al., 1993; Oparin et al., 2006). Research into the massif state with the use of the dynamic systems theory approach (Naimark et al., 2009; Chulichkov, 2003; Hachay et al., 2010) has been developed to ascertain the criteria of dissipative regimes changing for real rock massifs, which are under heavy man-caused influence. To realize such research we used the data from the seismic record of the Tashtagol mine for the two-year period from June 2006 up to June 2008. We used the space-time coordinates for all dynamic massif event responses, which occurred during that period inside the mine space and for the explosions - values fixed by seismic station energy (Hachay et al., 2010). The phase diagrams of the massif state for the northern and southern parts of the mine space were plotted in coordinates Ev(t) and d(Ev(t))/dt, t - time - in parts of 24 hours, Ev - the dissipated massive seismic energy - in joules. Hachay et al., (2010) analysed the morphology of seismic response phase trajectories on the explosion influences during different serial intervals in the southern part of the mine. In that period, according to data for different explosions in the mine, the majority of the total energy had been injected into the southern part of the mine. Moreover, at the end of 2007, just in the southern part, the strongest rock burst during the whole history of the working mine happened. We developed a new processing method of seismological information in real, which we can use directly in the

  16. Optical response of silver clusters and their hollow shells from linear-response TDDFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, Peter; Marchesin, Federico; Foerster, Dietrich; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the optical response of compact and hollow icosahedral clusters containing up to 868 silver atoms by means of time-dependent density functional theory. We have studied the dependence on size and morphology of both the sharp plasmonic resonance at 3–4 eV (originated mainly from sp-electrons), and the less studied broader feature appearing in the 6–7 eV range (interband transitions). An analysis of the effect of structural relaxations, as well as the choice of exchange correlation functional (local density versus generalised gradient approximations) both in the ground state and optical response calculations is also presented. We have further analysed the role of the different atom layers (surface versus inner layers) and the different orbital symmetries on the absorption cross-section for energies up to 8 eV. We have also studied the dependence on the number of atom layers in hollow structures. Shells formed by a single layer of atoms show a pronounced red shift of the main plasmon resonances that, however, rapidly converge to those of the compact structures as the number of layers is increased. The methods used to obtain these results are also carefully discussed. Our methodology is based on the use of localised basis (atomic orbitals, and atom-centered and dominant-product functions), which bring several computational advantages related to their relatively small size and the sparsity of the resulting matrices. Furthermore, the use of basis sets of atomic orbitals also allows the possibility of extending some of the standard population analysis tools (e.g. Mulliken population analysis) to the realm of optical excitations. Some examples of these analyses are described in the present work.

  17. Optical response of silver clusters and their hollow shells from linear-response TDDFT.

    PubMed

    Koval, Peter; Marchesin, Federico; Foerster, Dietrich; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the optical response of compact and hollow icosahedral clusters containing up to 868 silver atoms by means of time-dependent density functional theory. We have studied the dependence on size and morphology of both the sharp plasmonic resonance at 3-4 eV (originated mainly from sp-electrons), and the less studied broader feature appearing in the 6-7 eV range (interband transitions). An analysis of the effect of structural relaxations, as well as the choice of exchange correlation functional (local density versus generalised gradient approximations) both in the ground state and optical response calculations is also presented. We have further analysed the role of the different atom layers (surface versus inner layers) and the different orbital symmetries on the absorption cross-section for energies up to 8 eV. We have also studied the dependence on the number of atom layers in hollow structures. Shells formed by a single layer of atoms show a pronounced red shift of the main plasmon resonances that, however, rapidly converge to those of the compact structures as the number of layers is increased. The methods used to obtain these results are also carefully discussed. Our methodology is based on the use of localised basis (atomic orbitals, and atom-centered and dominant-product functions), which bring several computational advantages related to their relatively small size and the sparsity of the resulting matrices. Furthermore, the use of basis sets of atomic orbitals also allows the possibility of extending some of the standard population analysis tools (e.g. Mulliken population analysis) to the realm of optical excitations. Some examples of these analyses are described in the present work. PMID:27147701

  18. New differential equations governing the response cross-correlations of linear systems subjected to coloured loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsone, G.; Settineri, D.

    2011-06-01

    A procedure for evaluating the response cross-correlation of a linear structural system subjected to the action of stationary random multi-correlated processes is presented in this work. It is based on the definition of the fourth-order differential equation governing the modal response cross-correlation and of the corresponding solution. This is expressed in terms of the corresponding fundamental matrix, whose expression is related to the fundamental matrices of the differential equations governing the modal responses. The properties of this matrix allows to define a particular unconditionally stable numerical integration approach, which is composed of two independent step-by-step procedures, a progressive one and a regressive one. The applications have shown a level of accuracy comparable to that corresponding to the numerical solution of the double convolution integral, but the presented approach is characterised by a reduced computational effort.

  19. Cancer risk assessment: Optimizing human health through linear dose-response models.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Shamoun, Dima Yazji; Hanekamp, Jaap C

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes that generic cancer risk assessments be based on the integration of the Linear Non-Threshold (LNT) and hormetic dose-responses since optimal hormetic beneficial responses are estimated to occur at the dose associated with a 10(-4) risk level based on the use of a LNT model as applied to animal cancer studies. The adoption of the 10(-4) risk estimate provides a theoretical and practical integration of two competing risk assessment models whose predictions cannot be validated in human population studies or with standard chronic animal bioassay data. This model-integration reveals both substantial protection of the population from cancer effects (i.e. functional utility of the LNT model) while offering the possibility of significant reductions in cancer incidence should the hormetic dose-response model predictions be correct. The dose yielding the 10(-4) cancer risk therefore yields the optimized toxicologically based "regulatory sweet spot". PMID:25916915

  20. Linearized formulation for fluid-structure interaction: Application to the linear dynamic response of a pressurized elastic structure containing a fluid with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schotté, J.-S.; Ohayon, R.

    2013-05-01

    To control the linear vibrations of structures partially filled with liquids is of prime importance in various industries such as aerospace, naval, civil and nuclear engineering. It is proposed here to investigate a linearized formulation adapted to a rational computation of the vibrations of such coupled systems. Its particularity is to be fully Lagrangian since it considers the fluid displacement field with respect to a static equilibrium configuration as the natural variable describing the fluid motion, as classically done in structural dynamics. As the coupled system considered here is weakly damped in the low frequency domain (low modal density), the analysis of the vibrations of the associated undamped conservative system constitutes the main objective of this paper. One originality of the present formulation is to take into account the effect of the pressurization of the tank on the dynamics of the system, particularly in the case of a compressible liquid. We propose here a new way of deriving the linearized equations of the coupled problem involving a deformable structure and an inner inviscid liquid with a free surface. A review of the classical case considering a heavy incompressible liquid is followed by an application to the new case involving a light compressible liquid. A solution procedure in the frequency domain is proposed and a numerical discretization using the finite element method is discussed. In order to reduce the computational costs, an appropriate reduced order matrix model using modal synthesis approach is also presented.

  1. High-resolution time-lapse tomography of rat vertebrae during compressive loading: deformation response analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fíla, T.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Kumpová, I.; Doktor, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jiroušek, O.

    2014-05-01

    This paper is focused on investigation of mechanical properties of rat vertebrae during compressive loading in the longitudinal direction of rat's spine. High-resolution time-lapse micro-tomography was used as a tool to create models of the inner structure and deformed shape in pre-defined deformation steps. First, peripheral areas of vertebra specimen were embedded in polymethyl methacrylate to obtain proper boundary conditions of contact between specimen and loading plattens. Experimental loading device designed for application in X-ray setups was utilized to compress the vertebrae in several deformation steps. High-resolution micro-tomography scanning was carried out at each deformation step. Specimen was irradiated in tomography device equipped with microfocus X-ray tube with 5μm focal spot size and large area flat panel detector. Spatial resolution of reconstructed three-dimensional images was approximately 10μm. Digital volume correlation algorithm was utilized in order to assess displacements in the microstructure in every loading increment. Finite element model of vertebra was created from volumetric data reconstructed from tomography of the undeformed specimen. Simulated compressive test of the developed finite element model was performed in order to compare stiffness and displacements obtained by digital volume correlation and finite element simulation.

  2. Transient response of multidegree-of-freedom linear systems to forcing functions with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to analyze the transient response of discrete linear systems to forcing functions with unknown time dependence but having known bounds. Particular attention is given to forcing functions which include: (1) maximum displacement of any given mass element, (2) maximum relative displacement of any two adjacent masses, and (3) maximum acceleration of a given mass. Linear mechanical systems with an arbitrary number of degrees of freedom and only one forcing function acting are considered. In the general case, the desired forcing function is found to be a function that switches from the upper-to-lower bound and vice-versa at certain moments of time. A general procedure for finding such switching times is set forth.

  3. Vestibular short latency responses to pulsed linear acceleration in unanesthetized animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    Linear acceleration transients were used to elicit vestibular compound action potentials in non-invasively prepared, unanesthetized animals for the first time (chicks, Gallus domesticus, n = 33). Responses were composed of a series of up to 8 dominant peaks occurring within 8 msec of the stimulus. Response amplitudes for 1.0 g stimulus ranged from 1 to 10 microV. A late, slow, triphasic, anesthesia-labile component was identified as a dominant response feature in unanesthetized animals. Amplitudes increased and latencies decreased as stimulus intensity was increased (MANOVA P less than 0.05). Linear regression slope ranges were: amplitudes = 1.0-5.0 microV/g; latencies = -300 to -1100 microseconds/g. Thresholds for single polarity stimuli (0.035 +/- 0.022 g, n = 11) were significantly lower than those of alternating polarity (0.074 +/- 0.028 g, n = 18, P less than 0.001). Bilateral labyrinthectomy eliminated responses whereas bilateral extirpation of cochleae did not significantly change response thresholds. Intense acoustic masking (100/104 dB SL) produced no effect in 2 animals, but did produce small to moderate effects on response amplitudes in 7 others. Changes were attributed to effects on vestibular end organs. Results of unilateral labyrinth blockade (tetrodotoxin) suggest that P1 and N1 preferentially reflect ipsilateral eighth nerve compound action potentials whereas components beyond approximately 2 msec reflect activity from vestibular neurons that depend on both labyrinths. The results demonstrate that short latency vestibular compound action potentials can be measured in unanesthetized, non-invasively prepared animals.

  4. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Tbeodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modem three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  5. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Theodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modern three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  6. SANTOS - a two-dimensional finite element program for the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-07-01

    SANTOS is a finite element program designed to compute the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric solids. The code is derived from the transient dynamic code PRONTO 2D. The solution strategy used to compute the equilibrium states is based on a self-adaptive dynamic relaxation solution scheme, which is based on explicit central difference pseudo-time integration and artificial mass proportional damping. The element used in SANTOS is a uniform strain 4-node quadrilateral element with an hourglass control scheme to control the spurious deformation modes. Finite strain constitutive models for many common engineering materials are included. A robust master-slave contact algorithm for modeling sliding contact is implemented. An interface for coupling to an external code is also provided. 43 refs., 22 figs.

  7. Laser speckle strain and deformation sensor using linear array image cross-correlation method for specifically arranged triple-beam triple-camera configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrafzadeh-Khoee, Adel K. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides a method of triple-beam and triple-sensor in a laser speckle strain/deformation measurement system. The triple-beam/triple-camera configuration combined with sequential timing of laser beam shutters is capable of providing indications of surface strain and structure deformations. The strain and deformation quantities, the four variables of surface strain, in-plane displacement, out-of-plane displacement and tilt, are determined in closed form solutions.

  8. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model. PMID:26723661

  9. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Gázquez, José L. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Vela, Alberto E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  10. Extrinsic contribution and non-linear response in lead-free KNN-modified piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, D. A.; García, J. E.; Pérez, R.; Gomis, V.; Albareda, A.; Rubio-Marcos, F.; Fernández, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Finding lead-free ceramics with good piezoelectric properties is nowadays one of the most important challenges in materials science. The (K, Na, Li)(Nb, Ta, Sb)O3 system is one of the most promising candidates as a lead-free ceramic for transducer applications and is currently the object of important research work. In this paper, (K0.44Na0.52Li0.04)(Nb0.86Ta0.10Sb0.04)O3 was prepared by a conventional ceramic processing route. For this composition, orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition was observed at temperatures very close to room temperature. As a consequence, good room temperature electromechanical properties were observed, displaying good thermal stability. We show that the most important contribution to dielectric, piezoelectric and elastic response comes from extrinsic effects, as was observed in other perovskite based materials. Nonlinearities in electromechanical properties induced by high electric field or mechanical stress were studied. Non-linear dielectric response was found to be less important than for soft PZT ceramics and was analysed within the Rayleigh framework. The results reveal that the non-linear response at room temperature in this material is mainly due to the irreversible wall domain movement.

  11. Skew-normal/independent linear mixed models for censored responses with applications to HIV viral loads

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Lachos, Victor H.; Castro, Luis M.; Dey, Dipak K.

    2012-01-01

    Often in biomedical studies, the routine use of linear mixed-effects models (based on Gaussian assumptions) can be questionable when the longitudinal responses are skewed in nature. Skew-normal/elliptical models are widely used in those situations. Often, those skewed responses might also be subjected to some upper and lower quantification limits (viz. longitudinal viral load measures in HIV studies), beyond which they are not measurable. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian analysis of censored linear mixed models replacing the Gaussian assumptions with skew-normal/independent (SNI) distributions. The SNI is an attractive class of asymmetric heavy-tailed distributions that includes the skew-normal, the skew-t, skew-slash and the skew-contaminated normal distributions as special cases. The proposed model provides flexibility in capturing the effects of skewness and heavy tail for responses which are either left- or right-censored. For our analysis, we adopt a Bayesian framework and develop a MCMC algorithm to carry out the posterior analyses. The marginal likelihood is tractable, and utilized to compute not only some Bayesian model selection measures but also case-deletion influence diagnostics based on the Kullback-Leibler divergence. The newly developed procedures are illustrated with a simulation study as well as a HIV case study involving analysis of longitudinal viral loads. PMID:22685005

  12. Thermodynamic bounds and general properties of optimal efficiency and power in linear responses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2014-10-01

    We study the optimal exergy efficiency and power for thermodynamic systems with an Onsager-type "current-force" relationship describing the linear response to external influences. We derive, in analytic forms, the maximum efficiency and optimal efficiency for maximum power for a thermodynamic machine described by a N×N symmetric Onsager matrix with arbitrary integer N. The figure of merit is expressed in terms of the largest eigenvalue of the "coupling matrix" which is solely determined by the Onsager matrix. Some simple but general relationships between the power and efficiency at the conditions for (i) maximum efficiency and (ii) optimal efficiency for maximum power are obtained. We show how the second law of thermodynamics bounds the optimal efficiency and the Onsager matrix and relate those bounds together. The maximum power theorem (Jacobi's Law) is generalized to all thermodynamic machines with a symmetric Onsager matrix in the linear-response regime. We also discuss systems with an asymmetric Onsager matrix (such as systems under magnetic field) for a particular situation and we show that the reversible limit of efficiency can be reached at finite output power. Cooperative effects are found to improve the figure of merit significantly in systems with multiply cross-correlated responses. Application to example systems demonstrates that the theory is helpful in guiding the search for high performance materials and structures in energy researches. PMID:25375457

  13. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear plasma response models for non-axisymmetric perturbationsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Ferraro, N. M.; Izzo, V. A.; Lazarus, E. A.; Park, J.-K.; Cooper, W. A.; Hirshman, S. P.; Lao, L. L.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Reiman, A.; Turco, F.

    2013-05-01

    With the installation of non-axisymmetric coil systems on major tokamaks for the purpose of studying the prospects of ELM-free operation, understanding the plasma response to the applied fields is a crucial issue. Application of different response models, using standard tools, to DIII-D discharges with applied non-axisymmetric fields from internal coils, is shown to yield qualitatively different results. The plasma response can be treated as an initial value problem, following the system dynamically from an initial unperturbed state, or from a nearby perturbed equilibrium approach, and using both linear and nonlinear models [A. D. Turnbull, Nucl. Fusion 52, 054016 (2012)]. Criteria are discussed under which each of the approaches can yield a valid response. In the DIII-D cases studied, these criteria show a breakdown in the linear theory despite the small 10-3 relative magnitude of the applied magnetic field perturbations in this case. For nonlinear dynamical evolution simulations to reach a saturated nonlinear steady state, appropriate damping mechanisms need to be provided for each normal mode comprising the response. Other issues arise in the technical construction of perturbed flux surfaces from a displacement and from the presence of near nullspace normal modes. For the nearby equilibrium approach, in the absence of a full 3D equilibrium reconstruction with a controlled comparison, constraints relating the 2D system profiles to the final profiles in the 3D system also need to be imposed to assure accessibility. The magnetic helicity profile has been proposed as an appropriate input to a 3D equilibrium calculation and tests of this show the anticipated qualitative behavior.

  14. Long-term prediction test procedure for most ICs, based on linear response theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, V.; Ivakhnenko, I.

    1991-01-01

    Experimentally, thermal annealing is known to be a factor which enables a number of different integrated circuits (IC's) to recover their operating characteristics after suffering radiation damage in the space radiation environment; thus, decreasing and limiting long term cumulative total-dose effects. This annealing is also known to be accelerated at elevated temperatures both during and after irradiation. Linear response theory (LRT) was applied, and a linear response function (LRF) to predict the radiation/annealing response of sensitive parameters of IC's for long term (several months or years) exposure to the space radiation environment were constructed. Compressing the annealing process from several years in orbit to just a few hours or days in the laboratory is achieved by subjecting the IC to elevated temperatures or by increasing the typical spaceflight dose rate by several orders of magnitude for simultaneous radiation/annealing only. The accomplishments are as follows: (1) the test procedure to make predictions of the radiation response was developed; (2) the calculation of the shift in the threshold potential due to the charge distribution in the oxide was written; (3) electron tunneling processes from the bulk Si to the oxide region in an MOS IC were estimated; (4) in order to connect the experimental annealing data to the theoretical model, constants of the model of the basic annealing process were established; (5) experimental data obtained at elevated temperatures were analyzed; (6) time compression and reliability of predictions for the long term region were shown; (7) a method to compress test time and to make predictions of response for the nonlinear region was proposed; and (8) nonlinearity of the LRF with respect to log(t) was calculated theoretically from a model.

  15. Linear and nonlinear electrodynamic responses of bulk CaC6 in the microwave regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreone, A.; Cifariello, G.; Di Gennaro, E.; Lamura, G.; Emery, N.; Hérold, C.; Marêché, J. F.; Lagrange, P.

    2007-08-01

    The linear and nonlinear responses to a microwave electromagnetic field of two c-axis oriented polycrystalline samples of the recently discovered superconductor CaC6 (TC≈11.5K ) is studied in the superconducting state down to 2K. The surface resistance RS and the third order intermodulation distortion, arising from a two-tone excitation, have been measured as a function of temperature and microwave circulating power. Experiments are carried out using a dielectrically loaded copper cavity operating at 7GHz in a "hot finger" configuration. The results confirm recent experimental findings that CaC6 behaves as a weakly coupled, fully gapped, superconductor.

  16. Reduced-Order Models Based on Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a method for the identification and application of reduced-order models based on linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse responses. The Volterra theory of nonlinear systems and an appropriate kernel identification technique are described. Insight into the nature of kernels is provided by applying the method to the nonlinear Riccati equation in a non-aerodynamic application. The method is then applied to a nonlinear aerodynamic model of RAE 2822 supercritical airfoil undergoing plunge motions using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes flow solver with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Results demonstrate the computational efficiency of the technique.

  17. Reduced Order Models Based on Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a method for the identification and application of reduced-order models based on linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse responses. The Volterra theory of nonlinear systems and an appropriate kernel identification technique are described. Insight into the nature of kernels is provided by applying the method to the nonlinear Riccati equation in a non-aerodynamic application. The method is then applied to a nonlinear aerodynamic model of an RAE 2822 supercritical airfoil undergoing plunge motions using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes flow solver with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Results demonstrate the computational efficiency of the technique.

  18. Stray magnetic-field response of linear birefringent optical current sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, Trevor W.; Hutchinson, Ted F.

    1995-07-01

    It is well known that the line integral, describing Faraday rotation in an optical medium, reduces to zero at low frequencies for a closed path that does not encircle a current source. If the closed optical path possesses linear birefringence in addition to Faraday rotation, the cumulative effects on the state of polarization result in a response to externally located current-carrying conductors. This effect can induce a measurable error of the order of 0.3% during certain steady-state operating conditions.

  19. Linear and nonlinear response to parameter variations in a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, J.; Snyder, C.

    2009-04-01

    It is widely recognized that ensemble prediction system (EPS) skill can improve when considering model error in the system design. Typical approaches include varying physical parameterization schemes or entire modeling systems within an EPS, and including stochastic terms in the dynamical equations. But perhaps the simplest approach to accounting for uncertainty in a model is to perturb inherently uncertain parameters within sub-grid parameterization schemes. Although it almost certainly cannot introduce all the modes of variability produced by other methods, its simplicity alone suggests that its effect on prediction skill and variability deserves quantitative scrutiny. In this work we seek to understand how perturbations to uncertain parameters manifest in a mesoscale model, and evaluate the potential for use in EPSs or data assimilation systems that can exploit ensemble covariances and linear or nonlinear responses. A set of four parameters are varied, corresponding to one each in cumulus, cloud microphysics, boundary-layer turbulence, and radiation schemes within the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. Parameters are drawn only once from distributions intended to capture the uncertainty estimated by experts and reported in the literature. Each set of parameters is drawn with a Latin Hypercube Sampling technique that ensures the parameter sets are independent and fill the four-dimensional space spanned by the parameters. The parameter sets are then fixed and an ensemble of 10 members uses them for approximately 30 ensemble forecasts that are also subject to initial-condition, lateral boundary-condition and land-surface uncertainty. We show that the parameters and state variables have clear linear relationship in certain regions and at certain times; elsewhere there may be either little dependence of the state on the parameter, or a nonlinear dependence. Linear response and ensemble sensitivity are quantified with

  20. Gamow-Teller response in deformed even and odd neutron-rich Zr and Mo isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarriguren, P.; Algora, A.; Pereira, J.

    2014-03-01

    β-decay properties of neutron-rich Zr and Mo isotopes are investigated within a microscopic theoretical approach based on the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The underlying mean field is described self-consistently from deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock calculations with pairing correlations. Residual separable particle-hole and particle-particle forces are also included in the formalism. The structural evolution in these isotopic chains including both even and odd isotopes is analyzed in terms of the equilibrium deformed shapes. Gamow-Teller strength distributions, β-decay half-lives, and β-delayed neutron-emission probabilities are studied, stressing their relevance to describe the path of the nucleosynthesis rapid neutron capture process.

  1. Deformation mechanisms responsible for the creep resistance of Ti-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.A.; Lipe, T.

    1997-12-31

    Two {gamma}-based Ti-Al alloys with similar grain sizes and, respectively, lamellar and duplex microstructures have been creep tested at 700 C and constant stresses ranging between 280 and 430 MPa. TEM observations have confirmed that the duplex alloy deforms by extensive mechanical twinning whose density increases with applied stress and increasing strain. The new twin interfaces subdivide the {gamma} grains throughout the primary stage of creep. At the onset of the minimum creep rate, the twin interfaces in the duplex alloy behave in the same way as the {gamma}/{gamma} or the {alpha}{sub 2}/{gamma} interfaces in the lamellar alloy. However, single dislocations were also present and it appears that in both alloys the deformation process is controlled by the accumulation and emission of dislocations from the different interfaces.

  2. Scaling regimes and linear/nonlinear responses of last millennium climate to volcanic and solar forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, Shaun; Varotsos, Costas

    2016-02-01

    At scales much longer than the deterministic predictability limits (about 10 days), the statistics of the atmosphere undergoes a drastic transition, the high-frequency weather acts as a random forcing on the lower-frequency macroweather. In addition, up to decadal and centennial scales the equivalent radiative forcings of solar, volcanic and anthropogenic perturbations are small compared to the mean incoming solar flux. This justifies the common practice of reducing forcings to radiative equivalents (which are assumed to combine linearly), as well as the development of linear stochastic models, including for forecasting at monthly to decadal scales. In order to clarify the validity of the linearity assumption and determine its scale range, we use last millennium simulations, with both the simplified Zebiak-Cane (ZC) model and the NASA GISS E2-R fully coupled GCM. We systematically compare the statistical properties of solar-only, volcanic-only and combined solar and volcanic forcings over the range of timescales from 1 to 1000 years. We also compare the statistics to multiproxy temperature reconstructions. The main findings are (a) that the variability in the ZC and GCM models is too weak at centennial and longer scales; (b) for longer than ≈ 50 years, the solar and volcanic forcings combine subadditively (nonlinearly) compounding the weakness of the response; and (c) the models display another nonlinear effect at shorter timescales: their sensitivities are much higher for weak forcing than for strong forcing (their intermittencies are different) and we quantify this with statistical scaling exponents.

  3. The neuronal response at extended timescales: a linearized spiking input–output relation

    PubMed Central

    Soudry, Daniel; Meir, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Many biological systems are modulated by unknown slow processes. This can severely hinder analysis – especially in excitable neurons, which are highly non-linear and stochastic systems. We show the analysis simplifies considerably if the input matches the sparse “spiky” nature of the output. In this case, a linearized spiking Input–Output (I/O) relation can be derived semi-analytically, relating input spike trains to output spikes based on known biophysical properties. Using this I/O relation we obtain closed-form expressions for all second order statistics (input – internal state – output correlations and spectra), construct optimal linear estimators for the neuronal response and internal state and perform parameter identification. These results are guaranteed to hold, for a general stochastic biophysical neuron model, with only a few assumptions (mainly, timescale separation). We numerically test the resulting expressions for various models, and show that they hold well, even in cases where our assumptions fail to hold. In a companion paper we demonstrate how this approach enables us to fit a biophysical neuron model so it reproduces experimentally observed temporal firing statistics on days-long experiments. PMID:24765073

  4. Linearized Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of the Acoustic Response to Wake/Blade-Row Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Huff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional, linearized Euler analysis, LINFLUX, is being developed to provide a comprehensive and efficient unsteady aerodynamic scheme for predicting the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic responses of axial-flow turbomachinery blading. LINFLUX couples a near-field, implicit, wave-split, finite-volume solution to far-field acoustic eigensolutions, to predict the aerodynamic responses of a blade row to prescribed structural and aerodynamic excitations. It is applied herein to predict the acoustic responses of a fan exit guide vane (FEGV) to rotor wake excitations. The intent is to demonstrate and assess the LINFLUX analysis via application to realistic wake/blade-row interactions. Numerical results are given for the unsteady pressure responses of the FEGV, including the modal pressure responses at inlet and exit. In addition, predictions for the modal and total acoustic power levels at the FEGV exit are compared with measurements. The present results indicate that the LINFLUX analysis should be useful in the aeroacoustic design process, and for understanding the three-dimensional flow physics relevant to blade-row noise generation and propagation.

  5. Thin-skinned mass-wasting responsible for edifice-wide deformation at Arenal Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, Susanna; Biggs, Juliet; Muller, Cyril; Avard, Geoffroy

    2014-12-01

    The shape and stability of a volcano’s edifice depends on the relationship between eruption rate and the loss or redistribution of material due to erosion, mass-wasting or deformation. This work provides measurements of deformation and shallow mass-wasting at a stratovolcano immediately after an extended period of growth, and demonstrates that high rates of deformation can be associated with shallow edifice processes. We measure displacements and surface property changes on the upper flanks of Arenal, Costa Rica, after a ~40 year period of edifice growth. We present high-resolution satellite radar imagery of the 2011-2013 period that provides evidence of frequent rockfalls and of at least 16 slow-moving, shallow landslides (estimated to be 5-11 m thick, total volume = 2.4×107 m3 DRE). The 2012 Nicoya Earthquake (Mw 7.4) had no measurable impact on the velocities of sliding units at Arenal, but did result in an increase in the area affected by rockfall.

  6. Linear-response dynamics from the time-dependent Gutzwiller approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünemann, J.; Capone, M.; Lorenzana, J.; Seibold, G.

    2013-05-01

    Within a Lagrangian formalism, we derive the time-dependent Gutzwiller approximation for general multi-band Hubbard models. Our approach explicitly incorporates the coupling between time-dependent variational parameters and a time-dependent density matrix from which we obtain dynamical correlation functions in the linear-response regime. Our results are illustrated for the one-band model where we show that the interacting system can be mapped to an effective problem of fermionic quasiparticles coupled to ‘doublon’ (double occupancy) bosonic fluctuations. The latter have an energy on the scale of the on-site Hubbard repulsion U in the dilute limit but become soft at the Brinkman-Rice transition, which is shown to be related to an emerging conservation law of doublon charge and the associated gauge invariance. Coupling with the boson mode produces a structure in the charge response and we find that a similar structure appears in dynamical mean-field theory.

  7. Optimizing work output for finite-sized heat reservoirs: Beyond linear response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an optimization principle for the finite-time heat-work conversion process performed between two finite-sized heat reservoirs in the nonlinear response regime that is characterized by rather generic flux-force relations. We solve the problem of maximizing work output in a given time interval by means of the variational method. Moreover, in the limiting case that the cold reservoir is infinite, we find the corresponding optimized process can be determined by a single quantity, which plays the role similar to that of the Hamiltonian in classical mechanics. Some theoretical implications are discussed consequently, under the generalized tight-coupling condition which applies to both linear and nonlinear response cases. Our results can hopefully help design and control realistic thermodynamical processes. PMID:26871037

  8. Optimizing work output for finite-sized heat reservoirs: Beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an optimization principle for the finite-time heat-work conversion process performed between two finite-sized heat reservoirs in the nonlinear response regime that is characterized by rather generic flux-force relations. We solve the problem of maximizing work output in a given time interval by means of the variational method. Moreover, in the limiting case that the cold reservoir is infinite, we find the corresponding optimized process can be determined by a single quantity, which plays the role similar to that of the Hamiltonian in classical mechanics. Some theoretical implications are discussed consequently, under the generalized tight-coupling condition which applies to both linear and nonlinear response cases. Our results can hopefully help design and control realistic thermodynamical processes.

  9. Linear response approach to collective electronic excitations of solids and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhe; Gao, Shiwu

    2009-03-01

    We have developed a parallel computer program for the study of dynamic response of periodic systems. It computes the linear response of an interacting many-electron system from its ground-state electronic structures, which are obtained from ab initio band structure calculations in the plane-wave and pseudopotential scheme. As test examples, we applied this program to calculate the linear response of bulk aluminum and a beryllium monolayer. The excitation spectra show prominent plasmon resonances, which compare well with the available data and previous calculations. For surfaces or thin films, we found that removing periodicity perpendicular to the surface gives a more reliable description of the low-energy excitation spectra, especially in the long-wavelength limit. Program summaryProgram title: Dresponse Catalogue identifier: AECK_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECK_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 49 098 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11 836 088 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90/MPI Computer: Any architecture with a Fortran 90 compiler Operating system: Any Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 50 MB-2 GB per processor depending on system size Classification: 7.3 External routines: BLAS ( http://www.netlib.org/blas/), Lapack ( http://www.netlib.org/lapack/), MPI ( http://www-unix.mcs.anl.gov/mpi/), abinit (for ground-state calculations, http://www.abinit.org/) Nature of problem: The dynamic response of bulk and surface systems. It is usually dominated by collective electronic excitations (plasmons) at low-energy range. Solution method: The ground-state wavefunctions are obtained from ab initio density-functional calculation in the planewave and

  10. Linear response to leadership, effective temperature, and decision making in flocks.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Daniel J G; Giomi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Large collections of autonomously moving agents, such as animals or micro-organisms, are able to flock coherently in space even in the absence of a central control mechanism. While the direction of the flock resulting from this critical behavior is random, this can be controlled by a small subset of informed individuals acting as leaders of the group. In this article we use the Vicsek model to investigate how flocks respond to leadership and make decisions. Using a combination of numerical simulations and continuous modeling we demonstrate that flocks display a linear response to leadership that can be cast in the framework of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, identifying an effective temperature reflecting how promptly the flock reacts to the initiative of the leaders. The linear response to leadership also holds in the presence of two groups of informed individuals with competing interests, indicating that the flock's behavioral decision is determined by both the number of leaders and their degree of influence. PMID:27627365

  11. Damping of Bloch oscillations: Variational solutions of the Boltzmann equation beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, Stephan

    2014-11-01

    Variational solutions of the Boltzmann equation usually rely on the concept of linear response. We extend the variational approach for tight-binding models at high entropies to a regime far beyond linear response. We analyze both weakly interacting fermions and incoherent bosons on a lattice. We consider a case where the particles are driven by a constant force, leading to the well-known Bloch oscillations, and we consider interactions that are weak enough not to overdamp these oscillations. This regime is computationally demanding and relevant for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. We derive a simple theory in terms of coupled dynamic equations for the particle density, energy density, current, and heat current, allowing for analytic solutions. As an application, we identify damping coefficients for Bloch oscillations in the Hubbard model at weak interactions and compute them for a one-dimensional toy model. We also approximately solve the long-time dynamics of a weakly interacting, strongly Bloch-oscillating cloud of fermionic particles in a tilted lattice, leading to a subdiffusive scaling exponent.

  12. Lead-lag relationships between stock and market risk within linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysov, Stanislav; Balatsky, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We study historical correlations and lead-lag relationships between individual stock risks (standard deviation of daily stock returns) and market risk (standard deviation of daily returns of a market-representative portfolio) in the US stock market. We consider the cross-correlation functions averaged over stocks, using historical stock prices from the Standard & Poor's 500 index for 1994-2013. The observed historical dynamics suggests that the dependence between the risks was almost linear during the US stock market downturn of 2002 and after the US housing bubble in 2007, remaining at that level until 2013. Moreover, the averaged cross-correlation function often had an asymmetric shape with respect to zero lag in the periods of high correlation. We develop the analysis by the application of the linear response formalism to study underlying causal relations. The calculated response functions suggest the presence of characteristic regimes near financial crashes, when individual stock risks affect market risk and vice versa. This work was supported by VR 621-2012-2983.

  13. Linear information processing in the retina: a study of horizontal cell responses.

    PubMed Central

    Tranchina, D; Gordon, J; Shapley, R; Toyoda, J

    1981-01-01

    A basic question about visual perception is whether the retina produces a faithful or a distorted neural representation of the visual image. It is now well known that in some retinal pathways there are significant nonlinear transductions which distort the neural image. The next natural question is, What are the locations of the nonlinear stages within the retinal network? We report here on an investigation of linearity and nonlinearity of responses of horizontal cells in the turtle retina as an assay of the degree of nonlinearity in the outer plexiform layer of the retina. The visual stimuli were sinusoidal gratings; these patterns were modulated by contrast reversal with a sinusoidal time course. The conclusion from our experiments is that the turtle's horizontal cell responses show evidence only of linear spatial summation even at moderately high contrasts on moderately high background levels. Our work thus indicates that there is no significant distortion of the visual image by the photoreceptors or by the neural summation of photoreceptor signals by horizontal cells under normal physiological conditions. These results are consistent with the view that the major nonlinearities of the retina are proximal to the outer plexiform layer. PMID:6947242

  14. Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group: Efficient algorithms for strongly correlated excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Naoki; Wouters, Sebastian; Van Neck, Dimitri; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-01-01

    Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG-LRT) was first presented in terms of the DMRG renormalization projectors [J. J. Dorando, J. Hachmann, and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 184111 (2009)]. Later, with an understanding of the manifold structure of the matrix product state (MPS) ansatz, which lies at the basis of the DMRG algorithm, a way was found to construct the linear response space for general choices of the MPS gauge in terms of the tangent space vectors [J. Haegeman, J. I. Cirac, T. J. Osborne, I. Pižorn, H. Verschelde, and F. Verstraete, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 070601 (2011)]. These two developments led to the formulation of the Tamm-Dancoff and random phase approximations (TDA and RPA) for MPS. This work describes how these LRTs may be efficiently implemented through minor modifications of the DMRG sweep algorithm, at a computational cost which scales the same as the ground-state DMRG algorithm. In fact, the mixed canonical MPS form implicit to the DMRG sweep is essential for efficient implementation of the RPA, due to the structure of the second-order tangent space. We present ab initio DMRG-TDA results for excited states of polyenes, the water molecule, and a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Particle-Fluid Mixtures in a Subglacial Setting: Granular Deformation and Hydrological Flow Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damsgaard, A.; Egholm, D. L.; Piotrowski, J. A.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Larsen, N. K.

    2014-12-01

    The coupled mechanical response of ice, water and sediment may control the flow of warm-based glaciers residing on deformable sediment. This is most clearly expressed by the fast flowing ice streams in Greenland and Antarctica, where low levels of basal friction are thought to support the high flow rates. These ice streams are of particular interest since they are large constituents of the polar ice sheet mass balance. The study of these ice streams and their future impact on the ice sheets necessitates a deeper understanding of their basal dynamics, including the rheology of water-saturated sediment. We present the methodology and first results of a coupled numerical model for computational experiments on granular-fluid mixtures under dynamic conditions similar to those in subglacial settings. The granular phase is simulated on a per-particle basis by the soft body discrete element method. The fluid phase is handled as a continuum by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The particle and fluid phases are coupled by mass conservation and momentum exchanges. The hydraulic diffusivity and permeability is compared to previous laboratory studies on tills. We demonstrate how the onset and halt of granular deformation is an efficient mechanism to create fluid pressure fluctuations due to local porosity changes. These pressure anomalies are driving transient hydraulic flows, and they influence directly the rheology of granular-fluid mixtures. Our results highlight the nonlinear nature of water saturated granular deformation, and demonstrate how the mechanical behaviour of granular materials may include both brittle and viscous components depending on the rates of deformation and the hydrological properties.

  16. The Linear Response Function of an Idealized Atmosphere. Part I: Construction Using Green's Functions and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Kuang, Zhiming

    2016-09-01

    A linear response function (LRF) determines the mean-response of a nonlinear climate system to weak imposed forcings, and an eddy flux matrix (EFM) determines the eddy momentum and heat flux responses to mean-flow changes. Neither LRF nor EFM can be calculated from first principles due the lack of a complete theory for turbulent eddies. Here the LRF and EFM for an idealized dry atmosphere are computed by applying numerous localized weak forcings, one at a time, to a GCM with Held-Suarez physics and calculating the mean-responses. The LRF and EFM for zonally-averaged responses are then constructed using these forcings and responses through matrix inversion. Tests demonstrate that LRF and EFM are fairly accurate. Spectral analysis of the LRF shows that the most excitable dynamical mode, the neutral vector, strongly resembles the model's Annular Mode. The framework described here can be employed to compute the LRF/EFM for zonally-asymmetric responses and more complex GCMs. The potential applications of the LRF/EFM constructed here are i) forcing a specified mean-flow for hypothesis-testing, ii) isolating/quantifying the eddy-feedbacks in complex eddy-mean flow interaction problems, and iii) evaluating/improving more generally-applicable methods currently used to construct LRFs or diagnose eddy-feedbacks in comprehensive GCMs or observations. As an example for iii, in Part 2, the LRF is also computed using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT), and the previously-calculated LRF is exploited to investigate why FDT performs poorly in some cases. It is shown that dimension-reduction using leading EOFs, which is commonly used to construct LRFs from the FDT, can significantly degrade the accuracy due to the non-normality of the operator.

  17. A Fresh Look at Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as…

  18. Linear summation in the barn owl's brainstem underlies responses to interaural time differences.

    PubMed

    Kuokkanen, Paula T; Ashida, Go; Carr, Catherine E; Wagner, Hermann; Kempter, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The neurophonic potential is a synchronized frequency-following extracellular field potential that can be recorded in the nucleus laminaris (NL) in the brainstem of the barn owl. Putative generators of the neurophonic are the afferent axons from the nucleus magnocellularis, synapses onto NL neurons, and spikes of NL neurons. The outputs of NL, i.e., action potentials of NL neurons, are only weakly represented in the neurophonic. Instead, the inputs to NL, i.e., afferent axons and their synaptic potentials, are the predominant origin of the neurophonic (Kuokkanen PT, Wagner H, Ashida G, Carr CE, Kempter R. J Neurophysiol 104: 2274-2290, 2010). Thus in NL the monaural inputs from the two brain sides converge and create a binaural neurophonic. If these monaural inputs contribute independently to the extracellular field, the response to binaural stimulation can be predicted from the sum of the responses to ipsi- and contralateral stimulation. We found that a linear summation model explains the dependence of the responses on interaural time difference as measured experimentally with binaural stimulation. The fit between model predictions and data was excellent, even without taking into account the nonlinear responses of NL coincidence detector neurons, although their firing rate and synchrony strongly depend on the interaural time difference. These results are consistent with the view that the afferent axons and their synaptic potentials in NL are the primary origin of the neurophonic. PMID:23554438

  19. Linear summation in the barn owl's brainstem underlies responses to interaural time differences

    PubMed Central

    Kuokkanen, Paula T.; Ashida, Go; Carr, Catherine E.; Wagner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The neurophonic potential is a synchronized frequency-following extracellular field potential that can be recorded in the nucleus laminaris (NL) in the brainstem of the barn owl. Putative generators of the neurophonic are the afferent axons from the nucleus magnocellularis, synapses onto NL neurons, and spikes of NL neurons. The outputs of NL, i.e., action potentials of NL neurons, are only weakly represented in the neurophonic. Instead, the inputs to NL, i.e., afferent axons and their synaptic potentials, are the predominant origin of the neurophonic (Kuokkanen PT, Wagner H, Ashida G, Carr CE, Kempter R. J Neurophysiol 104: 2274–2290, 2010). Thus in NL the monaural inputs from the two brain sides converge and create a binaural neurophonic. If these monaural inputs contribute independently to the extracellular field, the response to binaural stimulation can be predicted from the sum of the responses to ipsi- and contralateral stimulation. We found that a linear summation model explains the dependence of the responses on interaural time difference as measured experimentally with binaural stimulation. The fit between model predictions and data was excellent, even without taking into account the nonlinear responses of NL coincidence detector neurons, although their firing rate and synchrony strongly depend on the interaural time difference. These results are consistent with the view that the afferent axons and their synaptic potentials in NL are the primary origin of the neurophonic. PMID:23554438

  20. Fully relativistic description of spin-orbit torques by means of linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, S.; Chadova, K.; Seemann, M.; Ködderitzsch, D.; Ebert, H.

    2016-08-01

    Symmetry and magnitude of spin-orbit torques (SOT), i.e., current-induced torques on the magnetization of systems lacking inversion symmetry, are investigated in a fully relativistic linear response framework based on the Kubo formalism. By applying all space-time symmetry operations contained in the magnetic point group of a solid to the relevant response coefficient, the torkance expressed as torque-current correlation function, restrictions to the shape of the direct and inverse response tensors are obtained. These are shown to apply to the corresponding thermal analogs as well, namely the direct and inverse thermal SOT in response to a temperature gradient or heat current. Using an implementation of the Kubo-Bastin formula for the torkance into a first-principles multiple-scattering Green function framework and accounting for disorder effects via the so-called coherent potential approximation, all contributions to the SOT in pure systems, dilute as well as concentrated alloys can be treated on equal footing. This way, material specific values for all torkance tensor elements in the fcc (111) trilayer alloy system Pt| FexCo1 -x|Cu are obtained over a wide concentration range and discussed in comparison to results for electrical and spin conductivity, as well as to previous work—in particular concerning symmetry with respect to magnetization reversal and the nature of the various contributions.

  1. Physical deformity as sequela of chronic catatonia and response to electroconvulsive therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Devi, Sugnyani; Behere, Rishikesh V; Varambally, Shivarama; Rao, Naren P; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2011-09-01

    Chronic catatonia with posturing can cause joint contractures leading to greater morbidity associated with the physical deformity. We report a case of a young man with chronic catatonic schizophrenia with posturing of bilateral upper limbs in flexion leading to fixed flexion contracture of left metacarpophalangeal joints. Initiation of electroconvulsive therapy along with physical rehabilitation measures helped him regain full range of motion in the right upper limb. The fixed flexion contracture, however, remained resistant to intensive treatment efforts. Early interventions in the form of electroconvulsive therapy and physical rehabilitation can be useful in reversing such potentially disabling complications. PMID:21865951

  2. THE RESPONSE OF DRUG EXPENDITURE TO NON-LINEAR CONTRACT DESIGN: EVIDENCE FROM MEDICARE PART D*

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy; Schrimpf, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We study the demand response to non-linear price schedules using data on insurance contracts and prescription drug purchases in Medicare Part D. We exploit the kink in individuals’ budget set created by the famous “donut hole,” where insurance becomes discontinuously much less generous on the margin, to provide descriptive evidence of the drug purchase response to a price increase. We then specify and estimate a simple dynamic model of drug use that allows us to quantify the spending response along the entire non-linear budget set. We use the model for counterfactual analysis of the increase in spending from “filling” the donut hole, as will be required by 2020 under the Affordable Care Act. In our baseline model, which considers spending decisions within a single year, we estimate that “filling” the donut hole will increase annual drug spending by about $150, or about 8 percent. About one-quarter of this spending increase reflects “anticipatory” behavior, coming from beneficiaries whose spending prior to the policy change would leave them short of reaching the donut hole. We also present descriptive evidence of cross-year substitution of spending by individuals who reach the kink, which motivates a simple extension to our baseline model that allows – in a highly stylized way – for individuals to engage in such cross year substitution. Our estimates from this extension suggest that a large share of the $150 drug spending increase could be attributed to cross-year substitution, and the net increase could be as little as $45 per year. PMID:26769984

  3. Near-LTE linear response calculations with a collisional-radiative model for He-like Al ions. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.; Kato, T.

    1998-04-06

    We investigate non-equilibrium atomic kinetics using a collisional- radiative model modified to include line absorption. Steady-state emission is calculated for He-like aluminum immersed in a specified radiation field having fixed deviations from a Planck spectrum. The calculated net emission is presented as a NLTE response matrix. In agreement with a rigorous general rule of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the linear response is symmetric. We compute the response matrix for 1% and {+-} 50% changes in the photon temperature and find linear response over a surprisingly large range.

  4. Radiation dose response simulation for biomechanical-based deformable image registration of head and neck cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Hunter, Shannon; Brock, Kristy

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical-based deformable image registration is conducted on the head and neck region. Patient specific 3D finite element models consisting of parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SG), tumor, vertebrae (VB), mandible, and external body are used to register pre-treatment MRI to post-treatment MR images to model the dose response using image data of five patients. The images are registered using combinations of vertebrae and mandible alignments, and surface projection of the external body as boundary conditions. In addition, the dose response is simulated by applying a new loading technique in the form of a dose-induced shrinkage using the dose-volume relationship. The dose-induced load is applied as dose-induced shrinkage of the tumor and four salivary glands. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) is calculated for the four salivary glands, and tumor to calculate the volume overlap of the structures after deformable registration. A substantial improvement in the registration is found by including the dose-induced shrinkage. The greatest registration improvement is found in the four glands where the average DSC increases from 0.53, 0.55, 0.32, and 0.37 to 0.68, 0.68, 0.51, and 0.49 in the left PG, right PG, left SG, and right SG, respectively by using bony alignment of vertebrae and mandible (M), body (B) surface projection and dose (D) (VB+M+B+D). PMID:26485227

  5. Radiation dose response simulation for biomechanical-based deformable image registration of head and neck cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Hunter, Shannon; Brock, Kristy

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical-based deformable image registration is conducted on the head and neck region. Patient specific 3D finite element models consisting of parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SG), tumor, vertebrae (VB), mandible, and external body are used to register pre-treatment MRI to post-treatment MR images to model the dose response using image data of five patients. The images are registered using combinations of vertebrae and mandible alignments, and surface projection of the external body as boundary conditions. In addition, the dose response is simulated by applying a new loading technique in the form of a dose-induced shrinkage using the dose-volume relationship. The dose-induced load is applied as dose-induced shrinkage of the tumor and four salivary glands. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) is calculated for the four salivary glands, and tumor to calculate the volume overlap of the structures after deformable registration. A substantial improvement in the registration is found by including the dose-induced shrinkage. The greatest registration improvement is found in the four glands where the average DSC increases from 0.53, 0.55, 0.32, and 0.37 to 0.68, 0.68, 0.51, and 0.49 in the left PG, right PG, left SG, and right SG, respectively by using bony alignment of vertebrae and mandible (M), body (B) surface projection and dose (D) (VB+M+B+D).

  6. Indoor calibration of Sky Quality Meters: Linearity, spectral responsivity and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravettoni, M.; Strepparava, D.; Cereghetti, N.; Klett, S.; Andretta, M.; Steiger, M.

    2016-09-01

    The indoor calibration of brightness sensors requires extremely low values of irradiance in the most accurate and reproducible way. In this work the testing equipment of an ISO 17025 accredited laboratory for electrical testing, qualification and type approval of solar photovoltaic modules was modified in order to test the linearity of the instruments from few mW/cm2 down to fractions of nW/cm2, corresponding to levels of simulated brightness from 6 to 19 mag/arcsec2. Sixteen Sky Quality Meter (SQM) produced by Unihedron, a Canadian manufacturer, were tested, also assessing the impact of the ageing of their protective glasses on the calibration coefficients and the drift of the instruments. The instruments are in operation on measurement points and observatories at different sites and altitudes in Southern Switzerland, within the framework of OASI, the Environmental Observatory of Southern Switzerland. The authors present the results of the calibration campaign: linearity; brightness calibration, with and without protective glasses; transmittance measurement of the glasses; and spectral responsivity of the devices. A detailed uncertainty analysis is also provided, according to the ISO 17025 standard.

  7. Linear sea-level response to abrupt ocean warming of major West Antarctic ice basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengel, M.; Feldmann, J.; Levermann, A.

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica's contribution to global sea-level rise has recently been increasing. Whether its ice discharge will become unstable and decouple from anthropogenic forcing or increase linearly with the warming of the surrounding ocean is of fundamental importance. Under unabated greenhouse-gas emissions, ocean models indicate an abrupt intrusion of warm circumpolar deep water into the cavity below West Antarctica's Filchner-Ronne ice shelf within the next two centuries. The ice basin's retrograde bed slope would allow for an unstable ice-sheet retreat, but the buttressing of the large ice shelf and the narrow glacier troughs tend to inhibit such instability. It is unclear whether future ice loss will be dominated by ice instability or anthropogenic forcing. Here we show in regional and continental-scale ice-sheet simulations, which are capable of resolving unstable grounding-line retreat, that the sea-level response of the Filchner-Ronne ice basin is not dominated by ice instability and follows the strength of the forcing quasi-linearly. We find that the ice loss reduces after each pulse of projected warm water intrusion. The long-term sea-level contribution is approximately proportional to the total shelf-ice melt. Although the local instabilities might dominate the ice loss for weak oceanic warming, we find that the upper limit of ice discharge from the region is determined by the forcing and not by the marine ice-sheet instability.

  8. Linear and Nonlinear Optical Response in Silver Nanoclusters: Insight from a Computational Investigation.

    PubMed

    Day, Paul N; Pachter, Ruth; Nguyen, Kiet A; Bigioni, Terry P

    2016-02-01

    We report a density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) investigation of the thiolated silver nanoclusters [Ag44(SR)30](4-), Ag14(SR)12(PR'3)8, Ag31(SG)19, Ag32(SG)19, and Ag15(SG)11, which were synthesized and for which one-photon absorption (OPA) characterization is available. Our computational investigation based on careful examination of the exchange-correlation functional used in DFT geometry optimization and for the linear optical properties predictions by TDDFT, demonstrated good agreement with the measured linear absorption spectra, however dependent on the applied functional. Following the benchmarking, we evaluated the two-photon absorption (TPA) response using TDDFT, noting that accurate prediction of OPA is important for suppositions on the spectral range for TPA enhancement because of the sensitivity to the excitation energies. Although the TPA cross-section results are complicated by resonance effects and quantifying TPA cross sections for these systems is difficult, our results indicate that the nanoclusters Ag15 and Ag31/32 are likely to have large TPA cross sections. The spherical symmetry of the Ag44 and Ag14 nanoclusters leads to applicability of superatom theory, while it is not as useful for the more oblate geometries of the Ag15 and Ag31/32 systems. PMID:26730764

  9. Asymptotic rates of response from forest tree breeding strategies using best linear unbiased prediction.

    PubMed

    Kerr, R J

    1998-03-01

    Genetic gain equations are developed for selection on multiple traits using either multi- or univariate best linear unbiased predictors (BLUP) and for selection under controlled and open pollination and polymix mating schemes. The equations assume an infinite population and account for the effects of selection. A comparison with simulated populations under the same mating schemes show that the gain equations predict selection response well, with the predictions having some upward bias. The gain equations are used to compare across mating schemes, to compare univariate to multivariate analyses, and to measure the reduction in the rate of genetic gain due to selection disequilibrium. Results show controlled pollination schemes can offer as much as a 56% advantage in genetic gain relative to open pollination. The reduction in the rate of genetic gain due to selection disequilibrium is approximately 27% under controlled pollination for the breeding goals studied. The results show a limited benefit in using multivariate analyses for predicting breeding values. PMID:24710888

  10. Acoustically determined linear piezoelectric response of lithium niobate up to 1100 V

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Branch, D. W.; Cular, S.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2014-04-21

    We present a method to measure high voltages using the piezoelectric crystal lithium niobate without using voltage dividers. A 36° Y-X cut lithium niobate crystal was coupled to two acoustic transducers, where direct current voltages were applied from 128–1100 V. The time-of-flight through the crystal was determined to be linearly dependent on the applied voltage. A model was developed to predict the time-delay in response to the applied voltage. The results show a sensitivity of 17 fs/V with a measurement error of 1 fs/V was achievable using this method. The sensitivity of this method can be increased by measuring the acoustic wave after multiple passes through the crystal. This method has many advantages over traditional techniques such as: favorable scalability for larger voltages, ease of use, cost effectiveness, and compactness.