Science.gov

Sample records for deforming patient model

  1. Patient-specific liver deformation modeling for tumor tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Young-Taek; Hwang, Youngkyoo; Kim, Jung-Bae; Bang, Won-Chul; Kim, James D. K.; Kim, Chang Yeong

    2013-03-01

    We present a new method for patient-specific liver deformation modeling for tumor tracking. Our method focuses on deforming two main blood vessels of the liver - hepatic and portal vein - to utilize them as features. A novel centerline editing algorithm based on ellipse fitting is introduced for vessel deformation. Centerline-based blood vessel model and various interpolation methods are often used for generating a deformed model at the specific time t. However, it may introduce artifacts when models used in interpolation are not consistent. One of main reason of this inconsistency is the location of bifurcation points differs from each image. To solve this problem, our method generates a base model from one of patient's CT images. Next, we apply a rigid iterative closest point (ICP) method to the base model with centerlines of other images. Because the transformation is rigid, the length of each vessel's centerline is preserved while some part of the centerline is slightly deviated from centerlines of other images. We resolve this mismatch using our centerline editing algorithm. Finally, we interpolate three deformed models of liver, blood vessels, tumor using quadratic Bézier curves. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach with the real patient data.

  2. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  3. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  4. Development of patient-specific biomechanical models for predicting large breast deformation.

    PubMed

    Han, Lianghao; Hipwell, John H; Tanner, Christine; Taylor, Zeike; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Cardoso, Jorge; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hawkes, David J

    2012-01-21

    Physically realistic simulations for large breast deformation are of great interest for many medical applications such as cancer diagnosis, image registration, surgical planning and image-guided surgery. To support fast, large deformation simulations of breasts in clinical settings, we proposed a patient-specific biomechanical modelling framework for breasts, based on an open-source graphics processing unit-based, explicit, dynamic, nonlinear finite element (FE) solver. A semi-automatic segmentation method for tissue classification, integrated with a fully automated FE mesh generation approach, was implemented for quick patient-specific FE model generation. To solve the difficulty in determining material parameters of soft tissues in vivo for FE simulations, a novel method for breast modelling, with a simultaneous material model parameter optimization for soft tissues in vivo, was also proposed. The optimized deformation prediction was obtained through iteratively updating material model parameters to maximize the image similarity between the FE-predicted MR image and the experimentally acquired MR image of a breast. The proposed method was validated and tested by simulating and analysing breast deformation experiments under plate compression. Its prediction accuracy was evaluated by calculating landmark displacement errors. The results showed that both the heterogeneity and the anisotropy of soft tissues were essential in predicting large breast deformations under plate compression. As a generalized method, the proposed process can be used for fast deformation analyses of soft tissues in medical image analyses and surgical simulations. PMID:22173131

  5. Development of patient-specific biomechanical models for predicting large breast deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lianghao; Hipwell, John H.; Tanner, Christine; Taylor, Zeike; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Cardoso, Jorge; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hawkes, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Physically realistic simulations for large breast deformation are of great interest for many medical applications such as cancer diagnosis, image registration, surgical planning and image-guided surgery. To support fast, large deformation simulations of breasts in clinical settings, we proposed a patient-specific biomechanical modelling framework for breasts, based on an open-source graphics processing unit-based, explicit, dynamic, nonlinear finite element (FE) solver. A semi-automatic segmentation method for tissue classification, integrated with a fully automated FE mesh generation approach, was implemented for quick patient-specific FE model generation. To solve the difficulty in determining material parameters of soft tissues in vivo for FE simulations, a novel method for breast modelling, with a simultaneous material model parameter optimization for soft tissues in vivo, was also proposed. The optimized deformation prediction was obtained through iteratively updating material model parameters to maximize the image similarity between the FE-predicted MR image and the experimentally acquired MR image of a breast. The proposed method was validated and tested by simulating and analysing breast deformation experiments under plate compression. Its prediction accuracy was evaluated by calculating landmark displacement errors. The results showed that both the heterogeneity and the anisotropy of soft tissues were essential in predicting large breast deformations under plate compression. As a generalized method, the proposed process can be used for fast deformation analyses of soft tissues in medical image analyses and surgical simulations.

  6. Estimating patient-specific and anatomically correct reference model for craniomaxillofacial deformity via sparse representation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Ren, Yi; Gao, Yaozong; Tang, Zhen; Chen, Ken-Chung; Li, Jianfu; Shen, Steve G. F.; Yan, Jin; Lee, Philip K. M.; Chow, Ben; Xia, James J.; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A significant number of patients suffer from craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformity and require CMF surgery in the United States. The success of CMF surgery depends on not only the surgical techniques but also an accurate surgical planning. However, surgical planning for CMF surgery is challenging due to the absence of a patient-specific reference model. Currently, the outcome of the surgery is often subjective and highly dependent on surgeon’s experience. In this paper, the authors present an automatic method to estimate an anatomically correct reference shape of jaws for orthognathic surgery, a common type of CMF surgery. Methods: To estimate a patient-specific jaw reference model, the authors use a data-driven method based on sparse shape composition. Given a dictionary of normal subjects, the authors first use the sparse representation to represent the midface of a patient by the midfaces of the normal subjects in the dictionary. Then, the derived sparse coefficients are used to reconstruct a patient-specific reference jaw shape. Results: The authors have validated the proposed method on both synthetic and real patient data. Experimental results show that the authors’ method can effectively reconstruct the normal shape of jaw for patients. Conclusions: The authors have presented a novel method to automatically estimate a patient-specific reference model for the patient suffering from CMF deformity. PMID:26429255

  7. Effects of Degree of Surgical Correction for Flatfoot Deformity in Patient-Specific Computational Models.

    PubMed

    Spratley, E M; Matheis, E A; Hayes, C W; Adelaar, R S; Wayne, J S

    2015-08-01

    A cohort of adult acquired flatfoot deformity rigid-body models was developed to investigate the effects of isolated tendon transfer with successive levels of medializing calcaneal osteotomy (MCO). Following IRB approval, six diagnosed flatfoot sufferers were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their scans used to derive patient-specific models. Single-leg stance was modeled, constrained solely through physiologic joint contact, passive soft-tissue tension, extrinsic muscle force, body weight, and without assumptions of idealized mechanical joints. Surgical effect was quantified using simulated mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) X-rays, pedobarography, soft-tissue strains, and joint contact force. Radiographic changes varied across states with the largest average improvements for the tendon transfer (TT) + 10 mm MCO state evidenced through ML and AP talo-1st metatarsal angles. Interestingly, 12 of 14 measures showed increased deformity following TT-only, though all increases disappeared with inclusion of MCO. Plantar force distributions showed medial forefoot offloading concomitant with increases laterally such that the most corrected state had 9.0% greater lateral load. Predicted alterations in spring, deltoid, and plantar fascia soft-tissue strain agreed with prior cadaveric and computational works suggesting decreased strain medially with successive surgical repair. Finally, joint contact force demonstrated consistent medial offloading concomitant with variable increases laterally. Rigid-body modeling thus offers novel advantages for the investigation of foot/ankle biomechanics not easily measured in vivo. PMID:25465617

  8. Fully-deformable patient motion models from cone-beam CT for radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.; McClelland, J.; Yip, C.; Thomas, C.; Hartill, C.; Ahmad, S.; Meir, I.; Landau, D.; Hawkes, D.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a method to build a fully deformable motion model directly from cone-beam CT (CBCT) projections. This allows inter-fraction variations in the respiratory motion to be accounted for. It is envisaged that the model be used to track the tumour, and monitor organs at risk (OAR), during gated or tracked radiotherapy (RT) treatment of lung cancer. The method is tested on CBCT projections from a simulated phantom in two cases. The simulations are generated from a patient respiratory trace and associated CBCT scanner geometry. Without and with motion correction, l2 norm maximum errors were reduced from 24.5 to 0.698 mm in case 1, and 20.0 to 0.101 mm in case 2, respectively.

  9. A biophysical model of brain deformation to simulate and analyze longitudinal MRIs of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Bishesh; Lorenzi, Marco; Ayache, Nicholas; Pennec, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We propose a framework for developing a comprehensive biophysical model that could predict and simulate realistic longitudinal MRIs of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The framework includes three major building blocks: i) atrophy generation, ii) brain deformation, and iii) realistic MRI generation. Within this framework, this paper focuses on a detailed implementation of the brain deformation block with a carefully designed biomechanics-based tissue loss model. For a given baseline brain MRI, the model yields a deformation field imposing the desired atrophy at each voxel of the brain parenchyma while allowing the CSF to expand as required to globally compensate for the locally prescribed volume loss. Our approach is inspired by biomechanical principles and involves a system of equations similar to Stokes equations in fluid mechanics but with the presence of a non-zero mass source term. We use this model to simulate longitudinal MRIs by prescribing complex patterns of atrophy. We present experiments that provide an insight into the role of different biomechanical parameters in the model. The model allows simulating images with exactly the same tissue atrophy but with different underlying deformation fields in the image. We explore the influence of different spatial distributions of atrophy on the image appearance and on the measurements of atrophy reported by various global and local atrophy estimation algorithms. We also present a pipeline that allows evaluating atrophy estimation algorithms by simulating longitudinal MRIs from large number of real subject MRIs with complex subject-specific atrophy patterns. The proposed framework could help understand the implications of different model assumptions, regularization choices, and spatial priors for the detection and measurement of brain atrophy from longitudinal brain MRIs. PMID:27039699

  10. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    2001-01-01

    The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation and attitude of a wind-tunnel model. Hardware of the system includes a video-rate CCD camera, a computer with an image acquisition frame grabber board, illumination lights, and retroreflective or painted targets on a wind tunnel model. Custom software includes routines for image acquisition, target-tracking/identification, target centroid calculation, camera calibration, and deformation calculations. Applications of the VMD technique at five large NASA wind tunnels are discussed.

  11. Modelling magnetically deformed neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, B.; Samuelsson, L.; Glampedakis, K.; Andersson, N.

    2008-03-01

    Rotating deformed neutron stars are important potential sources for ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO, GEO600 and VIRGO. One mechanism that may lead to significant non-asymmetries is the internal magnetic field. It is well known that a magnetic star will not be spherical and, if the magnetic axis is not aligned with the spin axis, the deformation will lead to the emission of gravitational waves. The aim of this paper is to develop a formalism that would allow us to model magnetically deformed stars, using both realistic equations of state and field configurations. As a first step, we consider a set of simplified model problems. Focusing on dipolar fields, we determine the internal magnetic field which is consistent with a given neutron star model and calculate the associated deformation. We discuss the relevance of our results for current gravitational wave detectors and future prospects.

  12. Patient-specific non-linear finite element modelling for predicting soft organ deformation in real-time: application to non-rigid neuroimage registration.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Adam; Joldes, Grand; Couton, Mathieu; Warfield, Simon K; Miller, Karol

    2010-12-01

    Long computation times of non-linear (i.e. accounting for geometric and material non-linearity) biomechanical models have been regarded as one of the key factors preventing application of such models in predicting organ deformation for image-guided surgery. This contribution presents real-time patient-specific computation of the deformation field within the brain for six cases of brain shift induced by craniotomy (i.e. surgical opening of the skull) using specialised non-linear finite element procedures implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU). In contrast to commercial finite element codes that rely on an updated Lagrangian formulation and implicit integration in time domain for steady state solutions, our procedures utilise the total Lagrangian formulation with explicit time stepping and dynamic relaxation. We used patient-specific finite element meshes consisting of hexahedral and non-locking tetrahedral elements, together with realistic material properties for the brain tissue and appropriate contact conditions at the boundaries. The loading was defined by prescribing deformations on the brain surface under the craniotomy. Application of the computed deformation fields to register (i.e. align) the preoperative and intraoperative images indicated that the models very accurately predict the intraoperative deformations within the brain. For each case, computing the brain deformation field took less than 4 s using an NVIDIA Tesla C870 GPU, which is two orders of magnitude reduction in computation time in comparison to our previous study in which the brain deformation was predicted using a commercial finite element solver executed on a personal computer. PMID:20868706

  13. Deformation quantization of cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Rubén; García-Compeán, Hugo; Turrubiates, Francisco J.

    2011-06-01

    The Weyl-Wigner-Groenewold-Moyal formalism of deformation quantization is applied to cosmological models in the minisuperspace. The quantization procedure is performed explicitly for quantum cosmology in a flat minisuperspace. The de Sitter cosmological model is worked out in detail and the computation of the Wigner functions for the Hartle-Hawking, Vilenkin and Linde wave functions are done numerically. The Wigner function is analytically calculated for the Kantowski-Sachs model in (non)commutative quantum cosmology and for string cosmology with dilaton exponential potential. Finally, baby universes solutions are described in this context and the Wigner function is obtained.

  14. Deformable human body model development

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, W.O.; Aida, T.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A Deformable Human Body Model (DHBM) capable of simulating a wide variety of deformation interactions between man and his environment has been developed. The model was intended to have applications in automobile safety analysis, soldier survivability studies and assistive technology development for the disabled. To date, we have demonstrated the utility of the DHBM in automobile safety analysis and are currently engaged in discussions with the U.S. military involving two additional applications. More specifically, the DHBM has been incorporated into a Virtual Safety Lab (VSL) for automobile design under contract to General Motors Corporation. Furthermore, we have won $1.8M in funding from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command for development of a noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement system. The proposed research makes use of the detailed head model that is a component of the DHBM; the project duration is three years. In addition, we have been contacted by the Air Force Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory concerning possible use of the DHBM in analyzing the loads and injury potential to pilots upon ejection from military aircraft. Current discussions with Armstrong involve possible LANL participation in a comparison between DHBM and the Air Force Articulated Total Body (ATB) model that is the current military standard.

  15. Reconstruction of 3D lung models from 2D planning data sets for Hodgkin's lymphoma patients using combined deformable image registration and navigator channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Angela; Nguyen, Thao-Nguyen; Moseley, Joanne L.; Hodgson, David C.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Late complications (cardiac toxicities, secondary lung, and breast cancer) remain a significant concern in the radiation treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). To address this issue, predictive dose-risk models could potentially be used to estimate radiotherapy-related late toxicities. This study investigates the use of deformable image registration (DIR) and navigator channels (NCs) to reconstruct 3D lung models from 2D radiographic planning images, in order to retrospectively calculate the treatment dose exposure to HL patients treated with 2D planning, which are now experiencing late effects. Methods: Three-dimensional planning CT images of 52 current HL patients were acquired. 12 image sets were used to construct a male and a female population lung model. 23 ''Reference'' images were used to generate lung deformation adaptation templates, constructed by deforming the population model into each patient-specific lung geometry using a biomechanical-based DIR algorithm, MORFEUS. 17 ''Test'' patients were used to test the accuracy of the reconstruction technique by adapting existing templates using 2D digitally reconstructed radiographs. The adaptation process included three steps. First, a Reference patient was matched to a Test patient by thorax measurements. Second, four NCs (small regions of interest) were placed on the lung boundary to calculate 1D differences in lung edges. Third, the Reference lung model was adapted to the Test patient's lung using the 1D edge differences. The Reference-adapted Test model was then compared to the 3D lung contours of the actual Test patient by computing their percentage volume overlap (POL) and Dice coefficient. Results: The average percentage overlapping volumes and Dice coefficient expressed as a percentage between the adapted and actual Test models were found to be 89.2{+-}3.9% (Right lung=88.8%; Left lung=89.6%) and 89.3{+-}2.7% (Right=88.5%; Left=90.2%), respectively. Paired T-tests demonstrated that the

  16. Analytical volcano deformation source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Primary volcanic landforms are created by the ascent and eruption of magma. The ascending magma displaces and interacts with surrounding rock and fluids as it creates new pathways, flows through cracks or conduits, vesiculates, and accumulates in underground reservoirs. The formation of new pathways and pressure changes within existing conduits and reservoirs stress and deform the surrounding rock. Eruption products load the crust. The pattern and rate of surface deformation around volcanoes reflect the tectonic and volcanic processes transmitted to the surface through the mechanical properties of the crust.

  17. Deformable template models for emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Y. . Dept. of Statistics); Manbeck, K.M. . Div. of Applied Mathematics)

    1993-06-01

    The reconstruction of emission tomography data is an ill-posed inverse problem and, as such, requires some form of regularization. Previous efforts to regularize the restoration process have incorporated rather general assumptions about the isotope distribution within a patient's body. Here, the authors present a theoretical and algorithmic framework in which the notion of a deformable template can be used to identify and quantify brain tumors in pediatric patients. Patient data and computer simulation experiments are presented which illustrate the performance of the deformable template approach to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  18. Models of the Dynamic Deformations of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzhievsky, Lev; Voronin, Mihail; Korchagina, Anna

    2013-06-01

    In the process of deformation under the influence of external loading polymeric mediums show the complicated behavior connected with features of their structure. For amorphous polymers distinguish three physical conditions - glasslike, highlyelastic and viscoplastic. To each of the listed conditions there corresponds to mikro - meso- and macrostructural mechanisms of irreversible deformation. In the report the review of results of construction of models for the description of dynamic and shock-wave deformation of the polymers which are based on developed authors representations about mechanisms of irreversible deformation is made. Models include the formulation of the equations of conservation laws, considering effect of a relaxation of shear stresses in the process of deformation. For closing of models the equations of states with nonspherical tensor of deformations and relation for time of a relaxation of shear stresses are constructed. With using of the formulated models a number of problems of dynamic and shock wave deformations has been solved. The results are compared with corresponding experimental date. Development of the used approach are in summary discussed. To taking into account memory and fractal properties of real polymers is supposed of derivatives and integrals of a fractional order to use. Examples of constitutive equations with derivatives of a fractional order are presented. This work is supported by the Integration project of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science 64 and grant RFBR 12-01-00726.

  19. Decoherence of spin-deformed bosonic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dehdashti, Sh.; Mahdifar, A.; Bagheri Harouni, M.; Roknizadeh, R.

    2013-07-15

    The decoherence rate and some parameters affecting it are investigated for the generalized spin-boson model. We consider the spin-bosonic model when the bosonic environment is modeled by the deformed harmonic oscillators. We show that the state of the environment approaches a non-linear coherent state. Then, we obtain the decoherence rate of a two-level system which is in contact with a deformed bosonic environment which is either in thermal equilibrium or in the ground state. By using some recent realization of f-deformed oscillators, we show that some physical parameters strongly affect the decoherence rate of a two-level system. -- Highlights: •Decoherence of the generalized spin-boson model is considered. •In this model the environment consists of f-oscillators. •Via the interaction, the state of the environment approaches non-linear coherent states. •Effective parameters on decoherence are considered.

  20. Digital deformation model for fisheye image rectification.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenguang; Ding, Mingyue; Qin, Nannan; Lai, Xudong

    2012-09-24

    Fisheye lens can provide a wide view over 180°. It then has prominence advantages in three dimensional reconstruction and machine vision applications. However, the serious deformation in the image limits fisheye lens's usage. To overcome this obstacle, a new rectification method named DDM (Digital Deformation Model) is developed based on two dimensional perspective transformation. DDM is a type of digital grid representation of the deformation of each pixel on CCD chip which is built by interpolating the difference between the actual image coordinate and pseudo-ideal coordinate of each mark on a control panel. This method obtains the pseudo-ideal coordinate according to two dimensional perspective transformation by setting four mark's deformations on image. The main advantages are that this method does not rely on the optical principle of fisheye lens and has relatively less computation. In applications, equivalent pinhole images can be obtained after correcting fisheye lens images using DDM. PMID:23037373

  1. Model the Deformation and Failure of Solids

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-19

    EMU models the deformation and failure of solids based on a reformulated theory of continuum mechanics known as the Peridynamic model. This approach allows dynamic fracture and other failure mechanisms to be simulated with a minimum of mesh effeces and without a need for supplementary kinetic relations for crack growth. Penetration by a rigid projectile is also included in the code.

  2. Modelling deformation and fracture in confectionery wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Idris K.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Williams, J. Gordon; Rasburn, John

    2015-01-22

    The aim of this research is to model the deformation and fracture behaviour of brittle wafers often used in chocolate confectionary products. Three point bending and compression experiments were performed on beam and circular disc samples respectively to determine the 'apparent' stress-strain curves in bending and compression. The deformation of the wafer for both these testing types was observed in-situ within an SEM. The wafer is modeled analytically and numerically as a composite material with a core which is more porous than the skins. X-ray tomography was used to generate a three dimensional volume of the wafer microstructure which was then meshed and used for quantitative analysis. A linear elastic material model, with a damage function and element deletion, was used and the XMT generated architecture was loaded in compression. The output from the FE simulations correlates closely to the load-deflection deformation observed experimentally.

  3. Modelling deformation and fracture in confectionery wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Idris K.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Williams, J. Gordon; Rasburn, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to model the deformation and fracture behaviour of brittle wafers often used in chocolate confectionary products. Three point bending and compression experiments were performed on beam and circular disc samples respectively to determine the 'apparent' stress-strain curves in bending and compression. The deformation of the wafer for both these testing types was observed in-situ within an SEM. The wafer is modeled analytically and numerically as a composite material with a core which is more porous than the skins. X-ray tomography was used to generate a three dimensional volume of the wafer microstructure which was then meshed and used for quantitative analysis. A linear elastic material model, with a damage function and element deletion, was used and the XMT generated architecture was loaded in compression. The output from the FE simulations correlates closely to the load-deflection deformation observed experimentally.

  4. Mathematical modeling of deformation during hot rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, D.; Stachowiak, R.G.; Samarasekera, I.V.; Brimacombe, J.K.

    1994-12-31

    The deformation that occurs in the roll bite during the hot rolling of steel, particularly the strain-rate and strain distribution, has been mathematically modeled using finite-element analysis. In this paper three different finite-element models are compared with one another and with industrial measurements. The first model is an Eulerian analysis based on the flow formulation method, while the second utilizes an Updated Lagrangian approach. The third model is based on a commercially available program DEFORM which also utilizes a Lagrangian reference frame. Model predictions of strain and strain-rate distribution, particularly near the surface of the slab, are strongly influenced by the treatment of friction at the boundary and the magnitude of the friction coefficient or shear factor. Roll forces predicted by the model have been compared with industrial rolling loads from a seven-stand hot-strip mill.

  5. Deformity incidence in leprosy patients treated with multidrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Subramanian, M; Subramanian, G

    1994-01-01

    The records of 2,285 (2,007 paucibacillary (PB) and 278 multibacillary (MB)) cases of leprosy which were declared as released from treatment (RFT) after multidrug therapy (MDT) and under surveillance as per the National Leprosy Eradication Programme (NLEP) guidelines in the rural field practice area of Central Leprosy Teaching & Research Institute (CLTRI), Chengalpattu, between September 1986 and September 1993 were analyzed for collecting data on the incidence of deformity. Of the 2,285 cases 2,053 (1,947 PB and 106 MB) did not have deformity at the commencement of treatment. Three MB cases and one PB case out of the 2,053 developed deformity (all grade II) during the course of treatment. No patient developed deformity during surveillance. Thus the deformity incidence in the population of patients was 0.681 per 1000 person-years of observation. Age, sex, type of disease, prior dapsone monotherapy and nerve involvement at the commencement of treatment appear to influence the deformity incidence. The risk of development of deformity in patients treated with MDT appear to be very low and analysis of larger data sets is suggested to corroborate the above findings as the information would be useful for planning prevention and management of deformity services. PMID:7714354

  6. Management of Spinal Deformity in Adult Patients With Neuromuscular Disease.

    PubMed

    Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Boniello, Anthony J; Schwab, Frank J

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of neuromuscular diseases, including Parkinson disease, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and myopathy, are associated with spinal deformities. The most common postural deformities include anterocollis, Pisa syndrome (pleurothotonus), scoliosis, and camptocormia. Nonsurgical management of spinal deformity in patients with neuromuscular disease centers on maximizing the medical management of the underlying neurodegenerative pathology before surgical intervention is contemplated. Surgical management can include decompression alone, or decompression and fusion with short or long fusion constructs. Patients with neuromuscular disease are susceptible to postoperative medical complications, such as delirium, epidural hematomas, pulmonary emboli, and cardiac events. Compared with outcomes in the typical patient with spinal deformity, postoperative outcomes in patients with neuromuscular disease have higher rates of surgical complications, such as instrumentation failure, proximal junctional kyphosis, loss of correction, and the need for revision surgery, regardless of the magnitude of surgical treatment. PMID:27471900

  7. Measurement of ship deformation based on ARX model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xianglu; Qin, Shiqiao; Wang, Xingshu; Hu, Feng; Wu, Wei; Zheng, JiaXing

    2016-01-01

    Ship deformation is the main error source of partial reference. Such deformation can be estimated by laser gyro units and Kalman filter technology. For Kalman filter, deformation was divide into two parts, dynamic deformation, and static deformation. Traditionally, dynamic deformation is treated as AR2 model .In this paper, dynamic deformation is taken as a kind of ARX model. Based on actual data measured by Yuanwang-3 Space Survey Ship, simulation experiments are studied. Results show that the novel model can improve the measurement precision.

  8. Unified Model Deformation and Flow Transition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Liu, Tianshu; Garg, Sanjay; Bell, James H.; Morgan, Daniel G.

    1999-01-01

    The number of optical techniques that may potentially be used during a given wind tunnel test is continually growing. These include parameter sensitive paints that are sensitive to temperature or pressure, several different types of off-body and on-body flow visualization techniques, optical angle-of-attack (AoA), optical measurement of model deformation, optical techniques for determining density or velocity, and spectroscopic techniques for determining various flow field parameters. Often in the past the various optical techniques were developed independently of each other, with little or no consideration for other techniques that might also be used during a given test. Recently two optical techniques have been increasingly requested for production measurements in NASA wind tunnels. These are the video photogrammetric (or videogrammetric) technique for measuring model deformation known as the video model deformation (VMD) technique, and the parameter sensitive paints for making global pressure and temperature measurements. Considerations for, and initial attempts at, simultaneous measurements with the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) and the videogrammetric techniques have been implemented. Temperature sensitive paint (TSP) has been found to be useful for boundary-layer transition detection since turbulent boundary layers convect heat at higher rates than laminar boundary layers of comparable thickness. Transition is marked by a characteristic surface temperature change wherever there is a difference between model and flow temperatures. Recently, additional capabilities have been implemented in the target-tracking videogrammetric measurement system. These capabilities have permitted practical simultaneous measurements using parameter sensitive paint and video model deformation measurements that led to the first successful unified test with TSP for transition detection in a large production wind tunnel.

  9. A deformable model for tracking tumors across consecutive imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Nosher, John L.; Schneider, M. D. Benjamin; Foran, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective A deformable registration technique was developed and evaluated to track and quantify tumor response to radiofrequency ablation for patients with liver malignancies. Materials and methods The method uses the combined power of global and local alignment of pre- and post-treatment computed tomography image data sets. The strategy of the algorithm is to infer volumetric deformation based upon surface displacements using a linearly elastic finite element model (FEM). Using this framework, the major challenge for tracking tumor location is not the tissue mechanical properties for FEM modeling but rather the evaluation of boundary conditions. Three different methods were systematically investigated to automatically determine the boundary conditions defined by the correspondences on liver surfaces. Results Using both 2D synthetic phantoms and imaged 3D beef liver data we performed gold standard registration while measuring the accuracy of non-rigid deformation. The fact that the algorithms could support mean displacement error of tumor deformation up to 2 mm indicates that this technique may serve as a useful tool for surgical interventions. The method was further demonstrated and evaluated using consecutive imaging studies for three liver cancer patients. Conclusion The FEM-based surface registration technique provides accurate tracking and monitoring of tumor and surrounding tissue during the course of treatment and follow-up. PMID:19774096

  10. Adaptive deformable model for mouth boundary detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Ali R.; Yan, Hong; Lam, Kin-Man

    1998-03-01

    A new generalized algorithm is proposed to automatically extract a mouth boundary model form human face images. Such an algorithm can contribute to human face recognition and lip-reading-assisted speech recognition systems, in particular, and multimodal human computer interaction system, in general. The new model is an iterative algorithm based on a hierarchical model adaptation scheme using deformable templates, as a generalization of some of the previous works. The role of prior knowledge is essential for perceptual organization in the algorithm. The prior knowledge about the mouth shape is used to define and initialize a primary deformable mode. Each primary boundary curve of a mouth is formed on three control points, including two mouth corners, whose locations are optimized using a primary energy functional. This energy functional essentially captures the knowledge of the mouth shape to perceptually organize image information. The primary model is finely tuned in the second stage of optimization algorithm using a generalized secondary energy functional. Basically each boundary curve is finely tuned using more control points. The primary model is replaced by an adapted model if there is an increase in the secondary energy functional. The results indicate that the new model adaptation technique satisfactorily generalizes the mouth boundary model extraction in an automated fashion.

  11. Modelling highly deformable metal extrusion using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Mahesh; Cleary, Paul W.

    2015-05-01

    Computational modelling is often used to reduce trial extrusions through accurate defect prediction. Traditionally, metal extrusion is modelled using mesh based finite element methods. However, large plastic deformations can lead to heavy re-meshing and numerical diffusion. Here we use the mesh-less smoothed particle hydrodynamics method since it allows simulation of large deformations without re-meshing and the tracking of history dependent properties such as plastic strain making it suitable for defect prediction. The variation in plastic strain and deformation for aluminium alloy in a cylindrical 3D geometry with extrusion ratio and die angle is evaluated. The extrusion process is found to have three distinct phases consisting of an initial sharp rise in extrusion force, a steady phase requiring constant force and terminating in a sharp decline in force as metal is completely extruded. Deformation and plastic strain increased significantly with extrusion ratio but only moderately with die angle. Extrusion force increased by 150 % as the extrusion ratio increased from 2:1 to 4:1 but had only a marginal change with die angle. A low strain zone in the centre of the extruded product was found to be a function of extrusion ratio but was persistent and did not vary with die angle. Simulation of a complex 3D building industry component showed large variations in plastic strain along the length of the product at two scales. These were due to change in metal behaviour as extrusion progressed from phase 1 to phase 2. A stagnation zone at the back of the die was predicted that could lead to the "funnel" or "pipe" defect.

  12. Uncertainty estimation in reconstructed deformable models

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; McKee, R.

    1996-12-31

    One of the hallmarks of the Bayesian approach to modeling is the posterior probability, which summarizes all uncertainties regarding the analysis. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique, it is possible to generate a sequence of objects that represent random samples drawn from the posterior distribution. We demonstrate this technique for reconstructions of two-dimensional objects from noisy projections taken from two directions. The reconstructed object is modeled in terms of a deformable geometrically-defined boundary with a constant interior density yielding a nonlinear reconstruction problem. We show how an MCMC sequence can be used to estimate uncertainties in the location of the edge of the reconstructed object.

  13. Tracking of object deformations in color and depth video: deformation models and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordt, Andreas; Reinhold, Stefan; Koch, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    The research on deformation tracking based on color image data has continuously gained a wide interest in the last 15 years. In addition, using depth sensors such as the Microsoft Kinect, allows to mitigate the ambiguity problems that arise when trying to solve the deformation tracking tasks on color images only, by adding depth information. However, the fusion of color and depth data is not straight forward, and the deformation tracking task is still ill-posed due to the lack of a general deformation model. The problem is usually circumvented by providing special deformation functions for the task at hand, e.g., skeleton-based for reconstructing people or triangle-based for tracking planar surfaces. In this article we summarize the Analysis by Synthesis (AbS) approach for deformation tracking in depth and color video and show some successful applications of specialized deformation functions. To overcome the issues with NURBS based deformation tracking we propose a new geodesic RBF-based deformation model, which can adapt to any surface topology and shape, while keeping the number of deformation parameters low. Example deformations for objects of different topologies are given, showing the versatility and efficiency of the proposed model.

  14. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Santagiuliana, R.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution.

  15. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Santagiuliana, R; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, B A

    2015-01-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution. PMID:25427284

  16. Discrete element modelling of subglacial sediment deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, A. D.; Egholm, D. L.; Piotrowski, J. A.; Tulaczyk, S.

    2012-04-01

    Soft, deformable sediments are often present under glaciers. Subglacial sediments deform under the differential load of the ice, and this causes the overlying glacier to accelerate its motion. Understanding the rheology of subglacial sediment is therefore important for models of glacial dynamics. Previous studies of the mechanical behaviour of subglacial sediments have primarily relied on analytical considerations and laboratory shearing experiments. As a novel approach, the Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to explore the highly nonlinear dynamics of a granular bed that is exposed to stress conditions comparable to subglacial environments. The numerical approach allows close monitoring of the mechanical and rheological behaviour under a range of conditions. Of special interest is bed shear strength, strain distribution and -localization, mode of deformation, and role of effective normal pressure during shearing. As a calibration benchmark, results from laboratory ring-shear experiments on granular material are compared to similar numerical experiments. The continuously recorded stress dynamics in the laboratory shear experiments are compared to DEM experiments, and the micro-mechanical parameters in the contact model of the DEM code are calibrated to match the macroscopic Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria parameters, constrained from successive laboratory shear tests under a range of normal pressures. The data-parallel nature of the basic DEM formulation makes the problem ideal for utilizing the high arithmetic potential of modern general-purpose GPUs. Using the Nvidia Cuda C toolkit, the algorithm is formulated for spherical particles in three dimensions with a soft-body contact model. Scene rendering is performed using a custom Cuda ray-tracing algorithm. Efforts on optimization of the particle algorithm are discussed, and future plans of expansion are presented.

  17. Modelling Polymer Deformation during 3D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlroy, Claire; Olmsted, Peter

    Three-dimensional printing has the potential to transform manufacturing processes, yet improving the strength of printed parts, to equal that of traditionally-manufactured parts, remains an underlying issue. The fused deposition modelling technique involves melting a thermoplastic, followed by layer-by-layer extrusion to fabricate an object. The key to ensuring strength at the weld between layers is successful inter-diffusion. However, prior to welding, both the extrusion process and the cooling temperature profile can significantly deform the polymer micro-structure and, consequently, how well the polymers are able to ``re-entangle'' across the weld. In particular, polymer alignment in the flow can cause de-bonding of the layers and create defects. We have developed a simple model of the non-isothermal extrusion process to explore the effects that typical printing conditions and material rheology have on the conformation of a polymer melt. In particular, we incorporate both stretch and orientation using the Rolie-Poly constitutive equation to examine the melt structure as it flows through the nozzle, the subsequent alignment with the build plate and the resulting deformation due to the fixed nozzle height, which is typically less than the nozzle radius.

  18. A geometric deformable model for echocardiographic image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hang, X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Gradient vector flow (GVF), an elegant external force for parametric deformable models, can capture object boundaries from both sides. A new geometric deformable model is proposed that combines GVF and the geodesic active contour model. The level set method is used as the numerical method of this model. The model is applied for echocardiographic image segmentation.

  19. Predicting tumor location by modeling the deformation of the breast.

    PubMed

    Pathmanathan, Pras; Gavaghan, David J; Whiteley, Jonathan P; Chapman, S Jonathan; Brady, J Michael

    2008-10-01

    Breast cancer is one of the biggest killers in the western world, and early diagnosis is essential for improved prognosis. The shape of the breast varies hugely between the scenarios of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (patient lies prone, breast hanging down under gravity), X-ray mammography (breast strongly compressed) and ultrasound or biopsy/surgery (patient lies supine), rendering image fusion an extremely difficult task. This paper is concerned with the use of the finite-element method and nonlinear elasticity to build a 3-D, patient-specific, anatomically accurate model of the breast. The model is constructed from MR images and can be deformed to simulate breast shape and predict tumor location during mammography or biopsy/surgery. Two extensions of the standard elasticity problem need to be solved: an inverse elasticity problem (arising from the fact that only a deformed, stressed, state is known initially), and the contact problem of modeling compression. The model is used for craniocaudal mediolateral oblique mammographic image matching, and a number of numerical experiments are performed. PMID:18838373

  20. Discrete element modeling of subglacial sediment deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David L.; Piotrowski, Jan A.; Tulaczyk, Slawek; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Tylmann, Karol

    2013-12-01

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used in this study to explore the highly nonlinear dynamics of a granular bed when exposed to stress conditions comparable to those at the bed of warm-based glaciers. Complementary to analog experiments, the numerical approach allows a detailed analysis of the material dynamics and the shear zone development during progressive shear strain. The geometry of the heterogeneous stress network is visible in the form of force-carrying grain bridges and adjacent, volumetrically dominant, inactive zones. We demonstrate how the shear zone thickness and dilation depend on the level of normal (overburden) stress, and we show how high normal stress can mobilize material to great depths. The particle rotational axes tend to align with progressive shear strain, with rotations both along and reverse to the shear direction. The results from successive laboratory ring-shear experiments on simple granular materials are compared to results from similar numerical experiments. The simulated DEM material and all tested laboratory materials deform by an elastoplastic rheology under the applied effective normal stress. These results demonstrate that the DEM is a viable alternative to continuum models for small-scale analysis of sediment deformation. It can be used to simulate the macromechanical behavior of simple granular sediments, and it provides an opportunity to study how microstructures in subglacial sediments are formed during progressive shear strain.

  1. Modeling Secular Deformation of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnett, D. K.; Montgomery-Brown, E. D.; Casu, F.; Segall, P.; Fukushima, Y.; Miklius, A.; Poland, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, is a dynamic volcanic and tectonic system that hosts rift intrusions and eruptions, summit inflation/deflation and eruptions, flank earthquakes and slow slip events, as well as quasi-steady flank motion. We seek to identify and characterize the actively deforming structures on Kilauea and study their interactions using a combination of GPS, InSAR, and seismic data. In addition we examine whether the change from summit subsidence to inflation in 2003, led to changes elsewhere in the volcano. We begin by modeling velocities of 16 continuous GPS and 28 campaign GPS sites and mean velocities from three ENVISAT tracks (T93 ascending: 10 acquisitions from 20030120 to 20041115; T200 descending: 13 acquisitions from 20030127 to 20041122, T429 descending: 10 acquisitions from 20030212 to 20041103) between 2003 and 2004, a period lacking major episodic events. We use triangular dislocations to mesh the curving rift zones and décollement. The southwest and east rift zones are continuous through the summit caldera area, where we also include a point center of dilatation beneath the southwest caldera. A décollement beginning about 12 km offshore at seven km depth dips approximately eight degrees northwest to achieving a depth of nine kilometers beneath the summit/rift zone. The décollement mesh continues at a shallower dip beneath the north flank of Kilauea reaching a final depth of 9.5 km beneath the north flank of Kilauea/south flank of Mauna Loa. Kinematic constraints enforce that opening at the base of the rift equal the differential décollement slip across the rift. Future modeling will include tests of Koae and Hilina fault geometries as well as time-dependent modeling of the deformation field.

  2. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement System User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismond, Harriett R.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide the user of the NASA VMD system, running the MDef software, Version 1.10, all information required to operate the system. The NASA Videogrammetric Model Deformation system consists of an automated videogrammetric technique used to measure the change in wing twist and bending under aerodynamic load in a wind tunnel. The basic instrumentation consists of a single CCD video camera and a frame grabber interfaced to a computer. The technique is based upon a single view photogrammetric determination of two-dimensional coordinates of wing targets with fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate, namely the span-wise location. The major consideration in the development of the measurement system was that productivity must not be appreciably reduced.

  3. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in prone position in patients with spinal deformities

    PubMed Central

    Izol, Volkan; Aridogan, Ibrahim Atilla; Borekoglu, Ali; Gokalp, Fatih; Hatipoglu, Zehra; Bayazit, Yildirim; Zeren, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The feasibility, safety and efficacy of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in patients with spinal deformities were evaluated and the results of a single centre experience were reported. Patients and methods: Between July 1999 and December 2014, 16 patients with spinal deformities underwent PCNL. The anomalies included 5 cases with kyphoscoliosis, 4 with post-polio syndrome, 3 with osteogenesis imperfecta, 3 with myotonic dystrophy, and 1 with ankylosing spondylitis. All patients were preoperatively evaluated by an intravenous urogram and computerized tomography to assess the anatomy and appropriate access. The operative details, stone clearance rates, and complications were retrospectivelyanalyzed. Results: A total of 16 standard PCNL procedures were performed on 16 renal-units. The mean age of the patients was 30.7 ± 17.2 (5-62) years, and the mean stone burden was 609.6 ± 526.9 (100-1800) mm2. The mean operative and fluoroscopy times were 76.6 ± 35.1 (35-150) minutes and 12.5 ± 8.5 (3-34) minutes, respectively. At the end of the surgery, 13 (81.2%) of the patients were stone free. The overall success rate was 93.7% with the inclusion of 2 patients with clinically insignificant residual fragments (<3 mm). Complications (31.2%) included haemorrhage requiring a transfusion in 2 patients, prolonged urine leakage requiring double J catheter insertion in 1, infection in 1, and nephrectomy due to bleeding in 1. Mean hospitalization time was 4.6 ± 2.4 (3-13) days. Conclusion: PCNL is an effective, safe and minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of kidney stones in patients with spinal deformities, and it can be performed with low morbidity and high success rates. To achieve better results and minimizing the risk factors, systematic and anatomic evaluations for anaesthesia and operative planning are crucial before surgery. PMID:26885036

  4. Nonlinear modeling and estimation of slew induced structural deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer, T. A. W., III; Karray, F.

    1988-01-01

    A model of the nonlinear dynamics of a deformable maneuvering multibody system is described, whereby elastic deformation are modeled by restoring forces and dissipative forces at point mass appendages. This model is brought into bilinear form. Estimation of deformations occasioned by rapid slewing maneuvers is carried out by a filter based on a globally equivalent linear model of the bilinear dynamics, and is shown to be an improvement over the extended Kalman filter. To further alleviate the computational burden, the estimated deformation state is propagated between observations by a low dimensional operator spline interpolator of bilinear system Volterra series, which is easily implemented.

  5. Tracheal stent prediction using statistical deformable models of tubular shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, R.; Huysmans, T.; Vos, W.; Sijbers, J.

    2008-03-01

    Tracheal stenosis is a narrowing of the trachea that impedes normal breathing. Tracheotomy is one solution, but subjects patients to intubation. An alternative technique employs tracheal stents, which are tubular structures that push the walls of the stenotic areas to their original location. They are implanted with endoscopes, therefore reducing the surgical risk to the patient. Stents can also be used in tracheal reconstruction to aid the recovery of reconstructed areas. Correct preoperative stent length and diameter specification is crucial to successful treatment, otherwise stents might not cover the stenotic area nor push the walls as required. The level of stenosis is usually measured from inside the trachea, either with endoscopes or with image processing techniques that, eg compute the distance from the centre line to the walls of the trachea. These methods are not suited for the prediction of stent sizes because they can not trivially estimate the healthy calibre of the trachea at the stenotic region. We propose an automatic method that enables the estimation of stent dimensions with statistical shape models of the trachea. An average trachea obtained from a training set of CT scans of healthy tracheas is placed in a CT image of a diseased person. The shape deforms according to the statistical model to match the walls of the trachea, except at stenotic areas. Since the deformed shape gives an estimation of the healthy trachea, it is possible to predict the size and diameter of the stent to be implanted in that specific subject.

  6. dMODELS: A software package for modeling volcanic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, M.

    2013-12-01

    dMODELS is software package including the most common source models used to interpret deformation measurements near active volcanic centers. The emphasis is on estimating the parameters of analytical models of deformation by inverting data from the Global Positioning System (GPS), InSAR, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include: (a) pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal and sill-like magma chambers in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space; and (b) pressurized spherical magma chamber with correction for the effect of topography (i.e., Williams and Wadge, 1998). All the expressions have been extended to include deformation and strain within the Earth's crust (as opposed to only the Earth's surface) and verified against finite element models. The software has been developed using Matlab but compiled versions that can be run using the free Matlab Compiler Runtime (MCR) are available for Linux, and Windows 7 (32bit and 64bit). The MATLAB scripts and compiled files are open source and intended for teaching and research. The software can be downloaded from the USGS web site pubs.usgs.gov/tm/13/b1/. Please e-mail the author at mbattaglia@usgs.gov if you would like to be included in the dMODELS mail list to get information about the release of software updates.

  7. Deformations of Geometric Structures in Topological Sigma Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bytsenko, A. A.

    2010-11-25

    We study a Lie algebra of formal vector fields W{sub n} with it application to the perturbative deformed holomorphic symplectic structure in the A-model, and a Calabi-Yau manifold with boundaries in the B-model. We show that equivalent classes of deformations are described by a Hochschild cohomology of the DG-algebra A = (A,Q), Q = {partial_derivative}-bar+{partial_derivative}{sub deform,} which is defined to be the cohomology of (-1){sup n}Q+d{sub Hoch}. Here {partial_derivative}-bar is the initial non-deformed BRST operator while {partial_derivative}{sub deform} is the deformed part whose algebra is a Lie algebra of linear vector fields gl{sub n}.

  8. Meshless Modeling of Deformable Shapes and their Motion

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Bart; Ovsjanikov, Maks; Wand, Michael; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Guibas, Leonidas J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new framework for interactive shape deformation modeling and key frame interpolation based on a meshless finite element formulation. Starting from a coarse nodal sampling of an object’s volume, we formulate rigidity and volume preservation constraints that are enforced to yield realistic shape deformations at interactive frame rates. Additionally, by specifying key frame poses of the deforming shape and optimizing the nodal displacements while targeting smooth interpolated motion, our algorithm extends to a motion planning framework for deformable objects. This allows reconstructing smooth and plausible deformable shape trajectories in the presence of possibly moving obstacles. The presented results illustrate that our framework can handle complex shapes at interactive rates and hence is a valuable tool for animators to realistically and efficiently model and interpolate deforming 3D shapes. PMID:24839614

  9. Deformation modeling and constitutive modeling for anisotropic superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Walter W.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1989-01-01

    A study of deformation mechanisms in the single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 was conducted. Monotonic and cyclic tests were conducted from 20 to 1093 C. Both (001) and near-(123) crystals were tested, at strain rates of 0.5 and 50 percent/minute. The deformation behavior could be grouped into two temperature regimes: low temperatures, below 760 C; and high temperatures, above 820 to 950 C depending on the strain rate. At low temperatures, the mechanical behavior was very anisotropic. An orientation dependent CRSS, a tension-compression asymmetry, and anisotropic strain hardening were all observed. The material was deformed by planar octahedral slip. The anisotropic properties were correlated with the ease of cube cross-slip, as well as the number of active slip systems. At high temperatures, the material was isotropic, and deformed by homogeneous gamma by-pass. It was found that the temperature dependence of the formation of superlattice-intrinsic stacking faults was responsible for the local minimum in the CRSS of this alloy at 400 C. It was proposed that the cube cross-slip process must be reversible. This was used to explain the reversible tension-compression asymmetry, and was used to study models of cross-slip. As a result, the cross-slip model proposed by Paidar, Pope and Vitek was found to be consistent with the proposed slip reversibility. The results were related to anisotropic viscoplastic constitutive models. The model proposed by Walter and Jordan was found to be capable of modeling all aspects of the material anisotropy. Temperature and strain rate boundaries for the model were proposed, and guidelines for numerical experiments were proposed.

  10. Jordanian deformation of the open sℓ(2) Gaudin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    António, N. Cirilo; Manojlović, N.; Nagy, Z.

    2014-04-01

    We derive a deformed sℓ( 2) Gaudin model with integrable boundaries. Starting from the Jordanian deformation of the SL( 2)-invariant Yang R-matrix and generic solutions of the associated reflection equation and the dual reflection equation, we obtain the corresponding inhomogeneous spin- 1/2 XXX chain. The semiclassical expansion of the transfer matrix yields the deformed sℓ( 2) Gaudin Hamiltonians with boundary terms.

  11. Analysis of deformable image registration accuracy using computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hualiang; Kim, Jinkoo; Chetty, Indrin J

    2010-03-01

    Computer aided modeling of anatomic deformation, allowing various techniques and protocols in radiation therapy to be systematically verified and studied, has become increasingly attractive. In this study the potential issues in deformable image registration (DIR) were analyzed based on two numerical phantoms: One, a synthesized, low intensity gradient prostate image, and the other a lung patient's CT image data set. Each phantom was modeled with region-specific material parameters with its deformation solved using a finite element method. The resultant displacements were used to construct a benchmark to quantify the displacement errors of the Demons and B-Spline-based registrations. The results show that the accuracy of these registration algorithms depends on the chosen parameters, the selection of which is closely associated with the intensity gradients of the underlying images. For the Demons algorithm, both single resolution (SR) and multiresolution (MR) registrations required approximately 300 iterations to reach an accuracy of 1.4 mm mean error in the lung patient's CT image (and 0.7 mm mean error averaged in the lung only). For the low gradient prostate phantom, these algorithms (both SR and MR) required at least 1600 iterations to reduce their mean errors to 2 mm. For the B-Spline algorithms, best performance (mean errors of 1.9 mm for SR and 1.6 mm for MR, respectively) on the low gradient prostate was achieved using five grid nodes in each direction. Adding more grid nodes resulted in larger errors. For the lung patient's CT data set, the B-Spline registrations required ten grid nodes in each direction for highest accuracy (1.4 mm for SR and 1.5 mm for MR). The numbers of iterations or grid nodes required for optimal registrations depended on the intensity gradients of the underlying images. In summary, the performance of the Demons and B-Spline registrations have been quantitatively evaluated using numerical phantoms. The results show that parameter

  12. Analysis of deformable image registration accuracy using computational modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Hualiang; Kim, Jinkoo; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2010-03-15

    Computer aided modeling of anatomic deformation, allowing various techniques and protocols in radiation therapy to be systematically verified and studied, has become increasingly attractive. In this study the potential issues in deformable image registration (DIR) were analyzed based on two numerical phantoms: One, a synthesized, low intensity gradient prostate image, and the other a lung patient's CT image data set. Each phantom was modeled with region-specific material parameters with its deformation solved using a finite element method. The resultant displacements were used to construct a benchmark to quantify the displacement errors of the Demons and B-Spline-based registrations. The results show that the accuracy of these registration algorithms depends on the chosen parameters, the selection of which is closely associated with the intensity gradients of the underlying images. For the Demons algorithm, both single resolution (SR) and multiresolution (MR) registrations required approximately 300 iterations to reach an accuracy of 1.4 mm mean error in the lung patient's CT image (and 0.7 mm mean error averaged in the lung only). For the low gradient prostate phantom, these algorithms (both SR and MR) required at least 1600 iterations to reduce their mean errors to 2 mm. For the B-Spline algorithms, best performance (mean errors of 1.9 mm for SR and 1.6 mm for MR, respectively) on the low gradient prostate was achieved using five grid nodes in each direction. Adding more grid nodes resulted in larger errors. For the lung patient's CT data set, the B-Spline registrations required ten grid nodes in each direction for highest accuracy (1.4 mm for SR and 1.5 mm for MR). The numbers of iterations or grid nodes required for optimal registrations depended on the intensity gradients of the underlying images. In summary, the performance of the Demons and B-Spline registrations have been quantitatively evaluated using numerical phantoms. The results show that parameter

  13. HSR Model Deformation Measurements from Subsonic to Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Erickson, G. E.; Goodman, W. L.; Fleming, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the video model deformation technique (VMD) used at five NASA facilities and the projection moire interferometry (PMI) technique used at two NASA facilities. Comparisons between the two techniques for model deformation measurements are provided. Facilities at NASA-Ames and NASA-Langley where deformation measurements have been made are presented. Examples of HSR model deformation measurements from the Langley Unitary Wind Tunnel, Langley 16-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel, and the Ames 12-foot Pressure Tunnel are presented. A study to improve and develop new targeting schemes at the National Transonic Facility is also described. The consideration of milled targets for future HSR models is recommended when deformation measurements are expected to be required. Finally, future development work for VMD and PMI is addressed.

  14. Discrete element modeling of subglacial sediment deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damsgaard, A.; Egholm, D. L.; Piotrowski, J. A.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Larsen, N. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to explore the highly nonlinear dynamics of a granular bed when exposed to stress conditions comparable to those at the bed of warm-based glaciers. In the DEM, the material is simulated on a grain-by-grain basis, and defining the micromechanical properties of the inter-particle contacts parameterizes the model. For validating the numerical approach, the macromechanical behavior of the numerical material is compared to the results from successive laboratory ring-shear experiments. Overall, there is a good agreement between the geotechnical behavior of the real granular materials and the numerical results. The materials deform by an elasto-plastic rheology under the applied effective normal stress and horizontal shearing. The peak and ultimate shear strengths depend linearly on the magnitude of the normal stress by the Mohr-Coulomb constitutive relationship. The numerical approach allows for a detailed analysis of the material dynamics and shear zone development during progressive shear strain. We demonstrate how the shear zone thickness and dilation increase with the magnitude of the normal stress. The stresses are distributed heterogeneously through the granular material along stress-carrying force chains. Between the force chains are the volumetrically dominant inactive zones. Overall, the force chain orientation is parallel to the maximum compressive stress. The data-parallel nature of the basic DEM formulation makes the problem ideal for utilizing the high arithmetic potential of modern general-purpose GPUs. Using the Nvidia CUDA C toolkit, the algorithm is formulated for spherical particles in three dimensions with a linear-elastic soft-body contact model. We have coupled the DEM model to a model for porewater flow, and we present early results of particle-porewater interactions. The two-way mechanical coupling is used to investigate pore-pressure feedbacks, which may be very important for the dynamics of soft

  15. Robust Deformable Image Registration using Prior Shape Information for Atlas to Patient Registration

    PubMed Central

    Ellingsen, Lotta M.; Chintalapani, Gouthami; Taylor, Russell H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2009-01-01

    Statistical atlases enable the individualization of atlas information for patient specific applications such as surgical planning. In this paper, a statistical atlas comprising a point distribution model defined on the vertices of a tetrahedral mesh is registered to a subject’s computed tomography scan of the human pelvis. The approach consists of a volumetric deformable registration method augmented to maintain the topology of the atlas mesh after deformation as well as incorporating the dominant three-dimensional shape modes in the atlas. Experimental results demonstrate that incorporation of the statistical shape atlas helps to stabilize the registration and improves robustness and registration accuracy. PMID:19515532

  16. Effect of Material Property Heterogeneity on Biomechanical Modeling of Prostate under Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Samavati, Navid; McGrath, Deirdre M.; Jewett, Michael A.S.; van der Kwast, Theo; Ménard, Cynthia; Brock, Kristy K.

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical model based deformable image registration has been widely used to account for prostate deformation in various medical imaging procedures. Biomechanical material properties are important components of a biomechanical model. In this study, the effect of incorporating tumor-specific material properties in the prostate biomechanical model was investigated to provide insight into the potential impact of material heterogeneity on the prostate deformation calculations First, a simple spherical prostate and tumor model was used to analytically describe the deformations and demonstrate the fundamental effect of changes in the tumor volume and stiffness in the modeled deformation. Next, using clinical prostate model, a parametric approach was used to describe the variations in the heterogeneous prostate model by changing tumor volume, stiffness, and location, to show the differences in the modeled deformation between heterogeneous and homogeneous prostate models. Finally, five clinical prostatectomy examples were used in separately performed homogeneous and heterogeneous biomechanical model based registrations to describe the deformations between 3D reconstructed histopathology images and ex vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and examine the potential clinical impact of modeling biomechanical heterogeneity of the prostate. The analytical formulation showed that increasing the tumor volume and stiffness could significantly increase the impact of heterogeneous prostate model in the calculated displacement differences compared to homogeneous model. The parametric approach using a single prostate model indicated up to 4.8 mm of displacement difference at the tumor boundary compared to a homogeneous model. . Such differences in the deformation of prostate could bepotentially clinically significant given the voxel size of the ex vivo MR images (0.3×0.3×0.3 mm). However, no significant changes in the registration accuracy were observed using heterogeneous models

  17. Preliminary deformation model for National Seismic Hazard map of Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Meilano, Irwan; Gunawan, Endra; Sarsito, Dina; Prijatna, Kosasih; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Susilo,; Efendi, Joni

    2015-04-24

    Preliminary deformation model for the Indonesia’s National Seismic Hazard (NSH) map is constructed as the block rotation and strain accumulation function at the elastic half-space. Deformation due to rigid body motion is estimated by rotating six tectonic blocks in Indonesia. The interseismic deformation due to subduction is estimated by assuming coupling on subduction interface while deformation at active fault is calculated by assuming each of the fault‘s segment slips beneath a locking depth or in combination with creeping in a shallower part. This research shows that rigid body motion dominates the deformation pattern with magnitude more than 15 mm/year, except in the narrow area near subduction zones and active faults where significant deformation reach to 25 mm/year.

  18. Modeling thermomechanical processes in shape memory polymers under finite deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogovoi, A. A.; Stolbova, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    A model taking into account finite deformations is constructed for the behavior of a shape memory polymer which undergoes a transition from the highly elastic to the vitreous state and back during deformation and temperature change. The obtained relations are tested on problems which have experimental support.

  19. A quantitative evaluation of models for Aegean crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyst, M.; Thatcher, W.

    2003-04-01

    Modeling studies of eastern Mediterranean tectonics show that Aegean deformation is mainly determined by WSW directed expulsion of Anatolia and SW directed extension due to roll-back of African lithosphere along the Hellenic trench. How motion is transferred across the Aegean remains a subject of debate. The two most widely used hypotheses for Aegean tectonics assert fundamentally different mechanisms. The first model describes deformation as a result of opposing rotations of two rigid microplates separated by a zone of extension. In the second model most motion is accommodated by shear on a series of dextral faults and extension on graben systems. These models make different quantitative predictions for the crustal deformation field that can be tested by a new, spatially dense GPS velocity data set. To convert the GPS data into crustal deformation parameters we use different methods to model complementary aspects of crustal deformation. We parameterize the main fault and plate boundary structures of both models and produce representations for the crustal deformation field that range from purely rigid rotations of microplates, via interacting, elastically deforming blocks separated by crustal faults to a continuous velocity gradient field. Critical evaluation of these models indicates strengths and limitations of each and suggests new measurements for further refining understanding of present-day Aegean tectonics.

  20. Dystrophic Spinal Deformities in a Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dalong; Yang, Hao; Chen, Shi; Wu, Xiaohua; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Xianlin; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Guise, Theresa A.; Bergner, Amanda L.; Stevenson, David A.; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf1flox/−;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf1flox/−;Col2.3Cre mice, with analogous histological features present in a human patient with dystrophic scoliosis. Intriguingly, 36–60% of Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf1flox/−;Col2.3Cre mice exhibit segmental vertebral fusion anomalies with boney obliteration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). While analogous findings have not yet been reported in the NF1 patient population, we herein present two case reports of IVD defects and interarticular vertebral fusion in patients with NF1. Collectively, these data provide novel insights regarding the pathophysiology of dystrophic spinal anomalies in NF1, and provide impetus for future radiographic analyses of larger patient cohorts to determine whether IVD and vertebral fusion defects may have been previously overlooked or underreported in the NF1 patient population. PMID:25786243

  1. Dystrophic spinal deformities in a neurofibromatosis type 1 murine model.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Steven D; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Dalong; Yang, Hao; Chen, Shi; Wu, Xiaohua; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Xianlin; Mohammad, Khalid S; Guise, Theresa A; Bergner, Amanda L; Stevenson, David A; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice, with analogous histological features present in a human patient with dystrophic scoliosis. Intriguingly, 36-60% of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice exhibit segmental vertebral fusion anomalies with boney obliteration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). While analogous findings have not yet been reported in the NF1 patient population, we herein present two case reports of IVD defects and interarticular vertebral fusion in patients with NF1. Collectively, these data provide novel insights regarding the pathophysiology of dystrophic spinal anomalies in NF1, and provide impetus for future radiographic analyses of larger patient cohorts to determine whether IVD and vertebral fusion defects may have been previously overlooked or underreported in the NF1 patient population. PMID:25786243

  2. Deformation texture development in a model composite system

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, W.J.; MacEwen, S.; Kocks, U.F.; Embury, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    Model composites fabricated with a polycrystalline copper matrix and continuous tungsten fibres were deformed in plane strain compression with the fibres perpendicular to the loading axis and parallel to the direction of zero strain. The development of texture in the matrix due to deformation was measured using x-ray diffraction. It was observed that the macroscopic texture development in the composite was weaker than for unreinforced copper. The pattern of deformation in the matrix was quantified using experimental measurements and finite element method calculations. By carefully sectioning the composite after deformation, texture measurements were conducted for regions which exhibited characteristic types of deformation. These measurements showed that there is a variety of local textures (some weaker, some stronger than the texture in the unreinforced matrix) which when summed give the result of a weak global texture. This result is in agreement with the predictions from the computer simulations of Bolmaro et al.

  3. Modeling and inversion of volcanic surface deformation based on Mogi model and McTigue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srigutomo, Wahyu; Trimadona, Martakusumah, Rocky; Anwar, Hairil

    2015-04-01

    Surface deformation occurred in a volcano is related strongly to the magmatic deformation beneath it. In this work we calculate the surface vertical and horizontal displacements due to hydrostatic pressure change of magma cavity based on point pressure source (Mogi) model and finite spherical source (McTigue) model. We apply the Levenberg-Marquardt inversion scheme to estimate the physical parameters contributing to the deformation.

  4. Droplet Deformation Prediction With the Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model (DDB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model was used to predict deformation of droplets approaching the leading edge stagnation line of an airfoil. The quasi-steady model was solved for each position along the droplet path. A program was developed to solve the non-linear, second order, ordinary differential equation that governs the model. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the equation. Experimental slip velocities from droplet breakup studies were used as input to the model which required slip velocity along the particle path. The center of mass displacement predictions were compared to the experimental measurements from the droplet breakup studies for droplets with radii in the range of 200 to 700 mm approaching the airfoil at 50 and 90 m/sec. The model predictions were good for the displacement of the center of mass for small and medium sized droplets. For larger droplets the model predictions did not agree with the experimental results.

  5. Deformable models with sparsity constraints for cardiac motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Shaoting; Li, Kang; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2014-08-01

    Deformable models integrate bottom-up information derived from image appearance cues and top-down priori knowledge of the shape. They have been widely used with success in medical image analysis. One limitation of traditional deformable models is that the information extracted from the image data may contain gross errors, which adversely affect the deformation accuracy. To alleviate this issue, we introduce a new family of deformable models that are inspired from the compressed sensing, a technique for accurate signal reconstruction by harnessing some sparseness priors. In this paper, we employ sparsity constraints to handle the outliers or gross errors, and integrate them seamlessly with deformable models. The proposed new formulation is applied to the analysis of cardiac motion using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI), where the automated tagging line tracking results are very noisy due to the poor image quality. Our new deformable models track the heart motion robustly, and the resulting strains are consistent with those calculated from manual labels. PMID:24721617

  6. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Cervelli; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  7. A fractal model for crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    It is hypothesized that crustal deformation occurs on a scale-invariant matrix of faults. For simplicity, a two-dimensional pattern of hexagons on which strike-slip faulting occurs is considered. The behavior of the system is controlled by a single parameter, the fractal dimension. Deformation occurs on all scales of faults. The fractal dimension determines the fraction of the total displacement that occurs on the first-order or primary faults. The value of the fractal dimension can be obtained from the frequency-magnitude relation for earthquakes. The results are applied to the San Andreas fault system in central California. Earthquake studies give D = 1.90. The main strand of the San Andreas fault is associated with the primary faults of the fractal system. It is predicted that the relative velocity across the main strand is 2.93 cm/yr. The remainder of the relative velocity of 5.5 cm/yr between the Pacific and North American plates occurs on higher-order faults. The predicted value is in reasonably good agreement with the value 3.39 + or - 0.29 cm/yr obtained from geological studies.

  8. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams’ deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young’s moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams’ survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. PMID:26821264

  9. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles.

    PubMed

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A; Wuite, Gijs J L; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams' deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young's moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams' survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. PMID:26821264

  10. Collaborative multi organ segmentation by integrating deformable and graphical models.

    PubMed

    Uzunbaş, Mustafa Gökhan; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Shaoting; Poh, Kilian M; Li, Kang; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    Organ segmentation is a challenging problem on which significant progress has been made. Deformable models (DM) and graphical models (GM) are two important categories of optimization based image segmentation methods. Efforts have been made on integrating two types of models into one framework. However, previous methods are not designed for segmenting multiple organs simultaneously and accurately. In this paper, we propose a hybrid multi organ segmentation approach by integrating DM and GM in a coupled optimization framework. Specifically, we show that region-based deformable models can be integrated with Markov Random Fields (MRF), such that multiple models' evolutions are driven by a maximum a posteriori (MAP) inference. It brings global and local deformation constraints into a unified framework for simultaneous segmentation of multiple objects in an image. We validate this proposed method on two challenging problems of multi organ segmentation, and the results are promising. PMID:24579136

  11. Sparse deformable models with application to cardiac motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Shaoting; Huang, Junzhou; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Deformable models have been widely used with success in medical image analysis. They combine bottom-up information derived from image appearance cues, with top-down shape-based constraints within a physics-based formulation. However, in many real world problems the observations extracted from the image data often contain gross errors, which adversely affect the deformation accuracy. To alleviate this issue, we introduce a new family of deformable models that are inspired from compressed sensing, a technique for efficiently reconstructing a signal based on its sparseness in some domain. In this problem, we employ sparsity to represent the outliers or gross errors, and combine it seamlessly with deformable models. The proposed new formulation is applied to the analysis of cardiac motion, using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI), where the automated tagging line tracking results are very noisy due to the poor image quality. Our new deformable models track the heart motion robustly, and the resulting strains are consistent with those calculated from manual labels. PMID:24683970

  12. Computational model of deformable lenses actuated by dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tongqing; Cai, Shengqiang; Wang, Huiming; Suo, Zhigang

    2013-09-01

    A recent design of deformable lens mimics the human eye, adjusting its focal length in response to muscle-like actuation. The artificial muscle is a membrane of a dielectric elastomer subject to a voltage. Here, we calculate the coupled and inhomogeneous deformation of the lens and the dielectric elastomer actuator by formulating a nonlinear boundary-value problem. We characterize the strain-stiffening elastomer with the Gent model and describe the voltage-induced deformation using the model of ideal dielectric elastomer. The computational predictions agree well with experimental data. We use the model to explore the space of parameters, including the prestretch of the membrane, the volume of the liquid in the lens, and the size of the dielectric elastomer actuator relative to the lens. We examine how various modes of failure limit the minimum radius of curvature.

  13. Symmetries and deformations in the spherical shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Pittel, S.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss symmetries of the spherical shell model that make contact with the geometric collective model of Bohr and Mottelson. The most celebrated symmetry of this kind is SU(3), which is the basis of Elliott’s model of rotation. It corresponds to a deformed mean field induced by a quadrupole interaction in a single major oscillator shell N and can be generalized to include several major shells. As such, Elliott’s SU(3) model establishes the link between the spherical shell model and the (quadrupole component of the) geometric collective model. We introduce the analogue symmetry induced by an octupole interaction in two major oscillator shells N-1 and N, leading to an octupole-deformed solution of the spherical shell model. We show that in the limit of large oscillator shells, N\\to ∞ , the algebraic octupole interaction tends to that of the geometric collective model.

  14. Ground and Structure Deformation 3d Modelling with a Tin Based Property Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TIAN, T.; Zhang, J.; Jiang, W.

    2013-12-01

    With the development of 3D( three-dimensional) modeling and visualization, more and more 3D tectonics are used to assist the daily work in Engineering Survey, in which the prediction of deformation field in strata and structure induced by underground construction is an essential part. In this research we developed a TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network) based property model for the 3D (three dimensional) visualization of ground deformation filed. By record deformation vector for each nodes, the new model can express the deformation with geometric-deformation-style by drawing each node in its new position and deformation-attribute-distribution-style by drawing each node in the color correspond with its deformation attribute at the same time. Comparing with the volume model based property model, this new property model can provide a more precise geometrical shape for structure objects. Furthermore, by recording only the deformation data of the user-interested 3d surface- such as the ground surface or the underground digging surface, the new property model can save a lot of space, which makes it possible to build the deformation filed model of a much more large scale. To construct the models of deformation filed based on TIN model, the refinement of the network is needed to increase the nodes number, which is necessary to express the deformation filed with a certain resolution. The TIN model refinement is a process of sampling the 3D deformation field values on points on the TIN surface, for which we developed a self-adapting TIN refinement method. By set the parameter of the attribute resolution, this self-adapting method refines the input geometric-expressing TIN model by adding more vertexes and triangles where the 3D deformation filed changing faster. Comparing with the even refinement method, the self-adapting method can generate a refined TIN model with nodes counted less by two thirds. Efficiency Comparison between Self-adapting Refinement Method and Even

  15. Interpretation of postseismic deformation with a viscoelastic relaxation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, J.; Wyss, M.

    1980-01-01

    A viscoelastic relaxation model is used to interpret postseismic surface deformation for the large-magnitude Aleutian earthquakes of 1957 and 1965. The lithosphere and asthenosphere are modeled as elastic solids with an anomalous viscoelastic inclusion below the island arc volcanoes. It is found that the observed postseismic surface deformation is a corollary of the known island arc structure. A satisfactory fit to the uplift following the 1957 earthquake is found for a viscoelastic volume with 80-km width extending from a depth of 50 to 200 km.

  16. Modeling Large-Strain, High-Rate Deformation in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D R; Kay, G J; LeBlanc, M M

    2001-07-20

    The large strain deformation response of 6061-T6 and Ti-6Al-4V has been evaluated over a range in strain rates from 10{sup -4} s{sup -1} to over 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. The results have been used to critically evaluate the strength and damage components of the Johnson-Cook (JC) material model. A new model that addresses the shortcomings of the JC model was then developed and evaluated. The model is derived from the rate equations that represent deformation mechanisms active during moderate and high rate loading. Another model that accounts for the influence of void formation on yield and flow behavior of a ductile metal (the Gurson model) was also evaluated. The characteristics and predictive capabilities of these models are reviewed.

  17. Uncertainties in tomographic reconstructions based on deformable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Kenneth M.; Cunningham, Gregory S.; McKee, Robert J.

    1997-04-01

    Deformable geometric models fit very naturally into the context of Bayesian analysis. The prior probability of boundary shapes is taken to proportional to the negative exponential of the deformation energy used to control the boundary. This probabilistic interpretation is demonstrated using a Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) technique, which permits one to generate configurations that populate the prior. One of may uses for deformable models is to solve ill-posed tomographic reconstruction problems, which we demonstrate by reconstructing a two-dimensional object from two orthogonal noisy projections. We show how MCMC samples drawn from the posterior can be used to estimate uncertainties in the location of the edge of the reconstructed object.

  18. Matrix model description of baryonic deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Murayama, Hitoshi; Roiban, Radu; Tatar, Radu

    2003-03-13

    We investigate supersymmetric QCD with N{sub c} + 1 flavors using an extension of the recently proposed relation between gauge theories and matrix models.The impressive agreement between the two sides provides a beautiful confirmation of the extension of the gauge theory-matrix model relation to this case.

  19. Modeling deformation behavior of the baseball.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Rochelle Llewelyn; Miller, Karol; Elliott, Bruce C

    2005-02-01

    Regulating ball response to impact is one way to control ball exit velocity in baseball. This is necessary to reduce injuries to defensive players and maintain the balance between offense and defense in the game. This paper presents a model for baseball velocity-dependent behavior. Force-displacement data were obtained using quasi-static compression tests to 50% of ball diameter (n = 70 baseballs). The force-displacement curves for a very stiff baseball (Model B) and a softer type (Model C) were characterized by a Mooney-Rivlin model using implicit finite element analysis (ANSYS software, version 6.1). Agreement between experimental and numerical results was excellent for both Model B (C(10) = 0, C(01) = 3.7e(6) Pa) and Model C (C(10) = 0, C(01) = 2.6e(6) Pa). However, this material model was not available in the ANSYS/LSDYNA explicit dynamic software (version 6.1) used to quantify the transient behavior of the ball. Therefore the modeling process was begun again using a linear viscoelastic material. G(infinity), the long-term shear modulus of the material, was determined by the same implicit FEA procedure. Explicit FEA was used to quantify the time-dependent response of each ball in terms of instantaneous shear modulus (G0) and a decay term (beta). The results were evaluated with respect to published experimental data for the ball coefficient of restitution at five velocities (13.4-40.2 ms(-1)) and were in agreement with the experimental values. The model forms the basis for future research on baseball response to impact with the bat. PMID:16131702

  20. Target Recognition Using Neural Networks for Model Deformation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Richard W.; Hibler, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Optical measurements provide a non-invasive method for measuring deformation of wind tunnel models. Model deformation systems use targets mounted or painted on the surface of the model to identify known positions, and photogrammetric methods are used to calculate 3-D positions of the targets on the model from digital 2-D images. Under ideal conditions, the reflective targets are placed against a dark background and provide high-contrast images, aiding in target recognition. However, glints of light reflecting from the model surface, or reduced contrast caused by light source or model smoothness constraints, can compromise accurate target determination using current algorithmic methods. This paper describes a technique using a neural network and image processing technologies which increases the reliability of target recognition systems. Unlike algorithmic methods, the neural network can be trained to identify the characteristic patterns that distinguish targets from other objects of similar size and appearance and can adapt to changes in lighting and environmental conditions.

  1. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique for Wind Tunnel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.

    2006-01-01

    Videogrammetric measurement technique developments at NASA Langley were driven largely by the need to quantify model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This paper summarizes recent wind tunnel applications and issues at the NTF and other NASA Langley facilities including the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel, 8-Ft high Temperature Tunnel, and the 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel. In addition, several adaptations of wind tunnel techniques to non-wind tunnel applications are summarized. These applications include wing deformation measurements on vehicles in flight, determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements, measurements on ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures, and the use of an object-to-image plane scaling technique to support NASA s Space Exploration program.

  2. Deformable part models for object detection in medical images

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Object detection in 3-D medical images is often necessary for constraining a segmentation or registration task. It may be a task in its own right as well, when instances of a structure, e.g. the lymph nodes, are searched. Problems from occlusion, illumination and projection do not arise, making the problem simpler than object detection in photographies. However, objects of interest are often not well contrasted against the background. Influence from noise and other artifacts is much stronger and shape and appearance may vary substantially within a class. Methods Deformable models capture the characteristic shape of an anatomic object and use constrained deformation for hypothesing object boundaries in image regions of low or non-existing contrast. Learning these constraints requires a large sample data base. We show that training may be replaced by readily available user knowledge defining a prototypical deformable part model. If structures have a strong part-relationship, or if they may be found based on spatially related guiding structures, or if the deformation is rather restricted, the supporting data information suffices for solving the detection task. We use a finite element model to represent anatomic variation by elastic deformation. Complex shape variation may be represented by a hierarchical model with simpler part variation. The hierarchy may be represented explicitly as a hierarchy of sub-shapes, or implicitly by a single integrated model. Data support and model deformation of the complete model can be represented by an energy term, serving as quality-of-fit function for object detection. Results The model was applied to detection and segmentation tasks in various medical applications in 2- and 3-D scenes. It has been shown that model fitting and object detection can be carried out efficiently by a combination of a local and global search strategy using models that are parameterized for the different tasks. Conclusions A part-based elastic

  3. A New Model for Episodic Caldera Deformation at Yellowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, P. F.; Gervais, S. M.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Wicks, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    For nearly 90 years, geodetic measurements at Yellowstone have shown recurring episodes of uplift and subsidence confined mostly to the caldera but also extending into the Norris Geyser Basin. The most recent such episode began in late 2004 with the onset of caldera-wide uplift that continued for about 5 years before switching to subsidence in late 2009. The physical mechanism driving the deformation is unknown, though several researchers have proposed kinematic models that can reproduce the observed data. The "Lake" earthquake swarm, which occurred in the northern part of Yellowstone Lake from December 2008 through January 2009, provides a new constraint on caldera deformation models. The timing of the swarm correlates with an abrupt change in local deformation, which preceded the gradual transition from uplift to subsidence in late 2009. Thus, caldera deformation, at least in the vicinity of Yellowstone Lake, consists of two (or more) distinct parts, implying the existence of two (or more) distinct deformation sources. This fresh information leads us to propose a new kinematic model for deformation at Yellowstone, which we develop from the last 15 years of continuous GPS and InSAR data. Our new model consists of three deformation sources: (1) a cauldron block source that is subject to a constant displacement at its base while its surrounding ring fault remains locked; (2) a pressurizing (or depressurizing) spherical cavity near the Norris Geyser Basin, which is known to deform separately from the caldera; and (3) a pressurizing (or depressurizing) spherical cavity at the Sour Creek Dome, which we infer from the abrupt change in deformation rate after the Lake Swarm. We use the GPS and InSAR data from the period of strongest signal, summer 2005 through summer 2007, to optimize the geometry of the three sources: the locations and depths of the spherical cavity, and the perimeter of the cauldron block. We then, while holding their geometry fixed, estimate the

  4. Finite element modelling of frictional instability between deformable rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, H. L.; Makinouchi, A.

    2003-10-01

    Earthquakes are recognized as resulting from a stick-slip frictional instability along faults. Based on the node-to-point contact element strategy (an arbitrarily shaped contact element strategy applied with the static-explicit algorithm for modelling non-linear frictional contact problems proposed by authors), a finite element code for modelling the 3-D non-linear friction contact between deformable bodies has been developed and extended here to analyse the non-linear stick-slip frictional instability between deformable rocks with a rate- and state-dependent friction law. A typical fault bend model is taken as an application example to be analysed here. The variations of the normal contact force, the frictional force, the transition of stick-slip instable state and the related relative slip velocity along the fault between the deformable rocks and the stress evolution in the total bodies during the different stages are investigated, respectively. The calculated results demonstrate the usefulness of this code for simulating the non-linear frictional instability between deformable rocks. Copyright

  5. Analysis on sheet cyclic plastic deformation using mixed hardening model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; Jin, Miao; Yuxin, Zhu

    2013-05-01

    Treating the cyclic deformation problem of sheet flowing through drawbead as the object of the research, using HILL anisotropy yield criterion and mixed hardening model, the cyclic plastic deformation mechanism of sheet was studied, the deformation characteristics of sheet subjected to cyclic loads were revealed, and the influence of Bauschinger effect on stress-strain circulating relationship and the influence of bending neutral layer migration on the stress of sheet's intermediate integral point were analyzed as well. The effectiveness of the model was verified by experiments. The results of analysis were showed that the stress values influenced by Bauschinger effect were different at the yield point of reverse loading and the point of unloading during the cyclic deformation. The stress rate at the yield point of reverse loading and the point of unloading in different loading branches was also different. The stress-strain circulating relationship in different loading branches can be approximately treated as bilinear. The tangent modulus of each loading branch showed a significant downward trend as the times of the reverse loading increased. The tangent modulus calculated by the mixed hardening model after the second loading branch reduced to less than 21% of the first loading tangent modulus. Effected by the neutral layer migration, the stress-strain curve of integral point of sheet's intermediate layer showed alternating transition phenomenon of the tensile stress and compressive stress.

  6. Reappraisal of a model for deformed special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Magueijo, João

    2016-06-01

    We revisit one of the earliest proposals for deformed dispersion relations in the light of recent results on dynamical dimensional reduction and production of cosmological fluctuations. Depending on the specification of the measure of integration and the addition rule in momentum space the model may be completed so as to merely deform Lorentz invariance, or so as to introduce a preferred frame. Models which violate Lorentz invariance have a negative UV asymptotic dimension and a very red spectrum of quantum vacuum fluctuations. Instead, models which preserve frame independence can exhibit running to a UV dimension of two, and a scale-invariant spectrum of fluctuations. The bispectrum of the fluctuations is another point of divergence between the two casings proposed here for the original model.

  7. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.

    2009-04-01

    Numerical modelling of brittle deformation in the uppermost crust can be challenging owing to the requirement of an accurate pressure calculation, the ability to achieve post-yield deformation and localisation, and the choice of rheology (plasticity law). One way to approach these issues is to conduct model comparisons that can evaluate the effects of different implementations of brittle behaviour in crustal deformation models. We present a comparison of three brittle shortening experiments for fourteen different numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference, boundary element and distinct element techniques. Our aim is to constrain and quantify the variability among models in order to improve our understanding of causes leading to differences between model results. Our first experiment of translation of a stable sand-like wedge serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions (e.g., taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work). The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. All models accommodate shortening by in-sequence formation of forward shear zones. We analyse the location, dip angle and spacing of thrusts in detail as previous comparisons have shown that these can be highly variable in numerical and analogue models of crustal shortening and extension. We find that an accurate implementation of boundary friction is important for our models. Our results are encouraging in the overall agreement in their dynamic evolution, but show at the same time the effort that is needed to understand shear zone evolution. GeoMod2008 Team: Markus Albertz, Michele Cooke, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Kristin Hughes, Katrin Huhn, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Christophe Pascal, Anton Popov, Guido Schreurs, Christopher Beaumont, Tony Crook, Mario Del Castello and Yves Leroy

  8. Meshless deformable models for 3D cardiac motion and strain analysis from tagged MRI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Shaoting; Schaerer, Joël; Qian, Zhen; Huh, Suejung; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (TMRI) provides a direct and noninvasive way to visualize the in-wall deformation of the myocardium. Due to the through-plane motion, the tracking of 3D trajectories of the material points and the computation of 3D strain field call for the necessity of building 3D cardiac deformable models. The intersections of three stacks of orthogonal tagging planes are material points in the myocardium. With these intersections as control points, 3D motion can be reconstructed with a novel meshless deformable model (MDM). Volumetric MDMs describe an object as point cloud inside the object boundary and the coordinate of each point can be written in parametric functions. A generic heart mesh is registered on the TMRI with polar decomposition. A 3D MDM is generated and deformed with MR image tagging lines. Volumetric MDMs are deformed by calculating the dynamics function and minimizing the local Laplacian coordinates. The similarity transformation of each point is computed by assuming its neighboring points are making the same transformation. The deformation is computed iteratively until the control points match the target positions in the consecutive image frame. The 3D strain field is computed from the 3D displacement field with moving least squares. We demonstrate that MDMs outperformed the finite element method and the spline method with a numerical phantom. Meshless deformable models can track the trajectory of any material point in the myocardium and compute the 3D strain field of any particular area. The experimental results on in vivo healthy and patient heart MRI show that the MDM can fully recover the myocardium motion in three dimensions. PMID:25157446

  9. Meshless deformable models for 3D cardiac motion and strain analysis from tagged MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Shaoting; Schaerer, Joël; Qian, Zhen; Huh, Suejung; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (TMRI) provides a direct and noninvasive way to visualize the in-wall deformation of the myocardium. Due to the through-plane motion, the tracking of 3D trajectories of the material points and the computation of 3D strain field call for the necessity of building 3D cardiac deformable models. The intersections of three stacks of orthogonal tagging planes are material points in the myocardium. With these intersections as control points, 3D motion can be reconstructed with a novel meshless deformable model (MDM). Volumetric MDMs describe an object as point cloud inside the object boundary and the coordinate of each point can be written in parametric functions. A generic heart mesh is registered on the TMRI with polar decomposition. A 3D MDM is generated and deformed with MR image tagging lines. Volumetric MDMs are deformed by calculating the dynamics function and minimizing the local Laplacian coordinates. The similarity transformation of each point is computed by assuming its neighboring points are making the same transformation. The deformation is computed iteratively until the control points match the target positions in the consecutive image frame. The 3D strain field is computed from the 3D displacement field with moving least squares. We demonstrate that MDMs outperformed the finite element method and the spline method with a numerical phantom. Meshless deformable models can track the trajectory of any material point in the myocardium and compute the 3D strain field of any particular area. The experimental results on in vivo healthy and patient heart MRI show that the MDM can fully recover the myocardium motion in three dimensions. PMID:25157446

  10. Phenomenological model for transient deformation based on state variables

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M S; Cho, C W; Alexopoulos, P; Mughrabi, H; Li, C Y

    1980-01-01

    The state variable theory of Hart, while providing a unified description of plasticity-dominated deformation, exhibits deficiencies when it is applied to transient deformation phenomena at stresses below yield. It appears that the description of stored anelastic strain is oversimplified. Consideration of a simple physical picture based on continuum dislocation pileups suggests that the neglect of weak barriers to dislocation motion is the source of these inadequacies. An appropriately modified description incorporating such barriers then allows the construction of a macroscopic model including transient effects. Although the flow relations for the microplastic element required in the new theory are not known, tentative assignments may be made for such functions. The model then exhibits qualitatively correct behavior when tensile, loading-unloading, reverse loading, and load relaxation tests are simulated. Experimental procedures are described for determining the unknown parameters and functions in the new model.

  11. Dynamic deformable models for 3D MRI heart segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Leonid; Bao, Zhaosheng; Gusikov, Igor; Wood, John; Breen, David E.

    2002-05-01

    Automated or semiautomated segmentation of medical images decreases interstudy variation, observer bias, and postprocessing time as well as providing clincally-relevant quantitative data. In this paper we present a new dynamic deformable modeling approach to 3D segmentation. It utilizes recently developed dynamic remeshing techniques and curvature estimation methods to produce high-quality meshes. The approach has been implemented in an interactive environment that allows a user to specify an initial model and identify key features in the data. These features act as hard constraints that the model must not pass through as it deforms. We have employed the method to perform semi-automatic segmentation of heart structures from cine MRI data.

  12. Multiplanar Deformities Correction Using Taylor Spatial Frame in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Lior; Keren, Yaniv; Eidelman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background: Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF) is a modern circular external fixator that, using a virtual hinge, is able to correct six axis deformities simultaneously. Despite the growing popularity of this method, few reports exist about its use in children and adolescents. To evaluate the effectiveness of TSF in correcting multiplanar deformities in patients with open physis, we reviewed the results of treatment in children who had at least two planes deformities of lower limbs. Methods: Over a period of 8 years, we treated 51 patients, 40 boys, 11 girls, with a mean age of 12.4 years (range, 2-16 years). All patients had open physis at the time of the TSF application. All patients had at least two deformities (angular and/or rotational). Fifty-five osteotomies (11 femoral, 44 tibial) were performed. Patients were divided into four groups: 13 with post-traumatic malunions, 18 with tibia vara, six with rickets, and 14 with miscellaneous deformities. Correction goal was determined as correction of deformities to population-average parameters of the lower limbs in frontal and sagittal views and normal mechanical axis deviation. Results: Correction goal was achieved in all except one patient; four patients had recurrence of deformities post-operatively and were re-operated. Most common complications were pin tract infection (20 patients), delayed union (2), regenerate translation (1), post-removal femoral fractures (2), knee subluxation (1), nonunion (1), and one patient developed chronic osteomyelitis secondary to deep pin tract infection. Conclusion: TSF allowed accurate correction of complex limb deformities in children and adolescents with relatively few serious complications. Level of Evidence: Level IV. Case series. PMID:27347235

  13. Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Jungk, John Michael; Cordill, Megan J.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moody, Neville Reid; Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha (New Mexico Institure of Mining and Technology)

    2006-12-01

    Frictional contact results in surface and subsurface damage that could influence the performance, aging, and reliability of moving mechanical assemblies. Changes in surface roughness, hardness, grain size and texture often occur during the initial run-in period, resulting in the evolution of subsurface layers with characteristic microstructural features that are different from those of the bulk. The objective of this LDRD funded research was to model friction-induced microstructures. In order to accomplish this objective, novel experimental techniques were developed to make friction measurements on single crystal surfaces along specific crystallographic surfaces. Focused ion beam techniques were used to prepare cross-sections of wear scars, and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and TEM to understand the deformation, orientation changes, and recrystallization that are associated with sliding wear. The extent of subsurface deformation and the coefficient of friction were strongly dependent on the crystal orientation. These experimental observations and insights were used to develop and validate phenomenological models. A phenomenological model was developed to elucidate the relationships between deformation, microstructure formation, and friction during wear. The contact mechanics problem was described by well-known mathematical solutions for the stresses during sliding friction. Crystal plasticity theory was used to describe the evolution of dislocation content in the worn material, which in turn provided an estimate of the characteristic microstructural feature size as a function of the imposed strain. An analysis of grain boundary sliding in ultra-fine-grained material provided a mechanism for lubrication, and model predictions of the contribution of grain boundary sliding (relative to plastic deformation) to lubrication were in good qualitative agreement with experimental evidence. A nanomechanics-based approach has been developed for characterizing the

  14. Resurgence in η-deformed Principal Chiral Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demulder, Saskia; Dorigoni, Daniele; Thompson, Daniel C.

    2016-07-01

    We study the SU(2) Principal Chiral Model (PCM) in the presence of an integrable η-deformation. We put the theory on {R}× {S}^1 with twisted boundary conditions and then reduce the circle to obtain an effective quantum mechanics associated with the Whittaker-Hill equation. Using resurgent analysis we study the large order behaviour of perturbation theory and recover the fracton events responsible for IR renormalons. The fractons are modified from the standard PCM due to the presence of this η-deformation but they are still the constituents of uniton-like solutions in the deformed quantum field theory. We also find novel SL(2,{C}) saddles, thus strengthening the conjecture that the semi-classical expansion of the path integral gives rise to a resurgent transseries once written as a sum over Lefschetz thimbles living in a complexification of the field space. We conclude by connecting our quantum mechanics to a massive deformation of the {N} = 2 4-d gauge theory with gauge group SU(2) and N f = 2.

  15. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this paper, I present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in the analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  16. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, O.

    2012-04-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this contribution, I will present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored in 3D. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  17. Dislocation models of interseismic deformation in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; McCrory, P.; Svarc, J.; Murray, J.

    2008-01-01

    The GPS-derived crustal velocity field of the western United States is used to construct dislocation models in a viscoelastic medium of interseismic crustal deformation. The interseismic velocity field is constrained by 1052 GPS velocity vectors spanning the ???2500-km-long plate boundary zone adjacent to the San Andreas fault and Cascadia subduction zone and extending ???1000 km into the plate interior. The GPS data set is compiled from U.S. Geological Survey campaign data, Plate Boundary Observatory data, and the Western U.S. Cordillera velocity field of Bennett et al. (1999). In the context of viscoelastic cycle models of postearthquake deformation, the interseismic velocity field is modeled with a combination of earthquake sources on ???100 known faults plus broadly distributed sources. Models that best explain the observed interseismic velocity field include the contributions of viscoelastic relaxation from faulting near the major plate margins, viscoelastic relaxation from distributed faulting in the plate interior, as well as lateral variations in depth-averaged rigidity in the elastic lithosphere. Resulting rigidity variations are consistent with reduced effective elastic plate thickness in a zone a few tens of kilometers wide surrounding the San Andreas fault (SAF) system. Primary deformation characteristics are captured along the entire SAF system, Eastern California Shear Zone, Walker Lane, the Mendocino triple junction, the Cascadia margin, and the plate interior up to ???1000 km from the major plate boundaries.

  18. Dislocation models of interseismic deformation in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, Fred F.; McCrory, Patricia; Svarc, Jerry; Murray, Jessica

    2008-04-01

    The GPS-derived crustal velocity field of the western United States is used to construct dislocation models in a viscoelastic medium of interseismic crustal deformation. The interseismic velocity field is constrained by 1052 GPS velocity vectors spanning the ˜2500-km-long plate boundary zone adjacent to the San Andreas fault and Cascadia subduction zone and extending ˜1000 km into the plate interior. The GPS data set is compiled from U.S. Geological Survey campaign data, Plate Boundary Observatory data, and the Western U.S. Cordillera velocity field of Bennett et al. (1999). In the context of viscoelastic cycle models of postearthquake deformation, the interseismic velocity field is modeled with a combination of earthquake sources on ˜100 known faults plus broadly distributed sources. Models that best explain the observed interseismic velocity field include the contributions of viscoelastic relaxation from faulting near the major plate margins, viscoelastic relaxation from distributed faulting in the plate interior, as well as lateral variations in depth-averaged rigidity in the elastic lithosphere. Resulting rigidity variations are consistent with reduced effective elastic plate thickness in a zone a few tens of kilometers wide surrounding the San Andreas fault (SAF) system. Primary deformation characteristics are captured along the entire SAF system, Eastern California Shear Zone, Walker Lane, the Mendocino triple junction, the Cascadia margin, and the plate interior up to ˜1000 km from the major plate boundaries.

  19. Active deformation in Western Turkey: new GPS observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocquet, J.; Aktug, B.; Parsons, B.; Cingoz, A.; England, P.; Erkan, Y.; Soyer, N.; Akdeniz, H.; Kilicoglu, A.

    2007-12-01

    How the continents deform remains a matter of debate. One view postulates that continental deforming zones are comprised of a limited numbers of rigid (elastic) microplates. If true, the surface motion can then be described by the relative rotation of blocks, and strain should be localized along the major faults separating the blocks. An alternative view is that the deformation at depth is distributed over wide areas, can be modelled by a viscous flow responding to boundary conditions applied on it and gravitational potential energy gradients related to variations in topography, and the surface strain simply reflects this deformation. Western Turkey is a region of crustal extension, part of the Nubia/Eurasia plate boundary. Its kinematics is often modelled by the relative motion of a small number of rigid blocks (Nyst & Thatcher, 2005, Reilinger et al., 2006). However, until now, the limited number of GPS velocity vectors available has prevented a detailed examination of which is the more appropriate description. We present a new geodetic velocity field including ~100 sites from the longitude the Central Anatolian plateau to the Aegean coast, derived from a combination of campaigns carried out between 1997 and 2006, and continuous GPS operating since 2003, which we use to test the different models. While the kinematics of the area can be correctly modelled by a block model, a good fit to the velocity field requires blocks with sizes smaller than 100 km and still fails to adequately predict the strain rate observed within blocks . Alternatively, we test an approach where the lithosphere is modelled as a thin viscous sheet, responding to the gravitational potentiel energy contrast between the high plateau of eastern Turkey to the east and the subduction along the Hellenic trench in the southwest. The simplistic model has only one free parameter (the force applied by the subducting oceanic lithosphere on the Aegean ), but provides a good agreement with the observed

  20. 3D deformable organ model based liver motion tracking in ultrasound videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Bae; Hwang, Youngkyoo; Oh, Young-Taek; Bang, Won-Chul; Lee, Heesae; Kim, James D. K.; Kim, Chang Yeong

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method of using 2D ultrasound (US) cine images during image-guided therapy to accurately track the 3D position of a tumor even when the organ of interest is in motion due to patient respiration. Tracking is possible thanks to a 3D deformable organ model we have developed. The method consists of three processes in succession. The first process is organ modeling where we generate a personalized 3D organ model from high quality 3D CT or MR data sets captured during three different respiratory phases. The model includes the organ surface, vessel and tumor, which can all deform and move in accord with patient respiration. The second process is registration of the organ model to 3D US images. From 133 respiratory phase candidates generated from the deformable organ model, we resolve the candidate that best matches the 3D US images according to vessel centerline and surface. As a result, we can determine the position of the US probe. The final process is real-time tracking using 2D US cine images captured by the US probe. We determine the respiratory phase by tracking the diaphragm on the image. The 3D model is then deformed according to respiration phase and is fitted to the image by considering the positions of the vessels. The tumor's 3D positions are then inferred based on respiration phase. Testing our method on real patient data, we have found the accuracy of 3D position is within 3.79mm and processing time is 5.4ms during tracking.

  1. Modeling and analysis methodology for aeroelastically tailored chordwise deformable wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Chang, Stephen; Zischka, Peter J.

    1992-01-01

    Structural concepts have been created which produce chordwise camber deformation that results in enhanced lift. A wing box can be tailored to utilize each of these with composites. In attempting to optimize the aerodynamic benefits, we have found there are two optimal designs that are of interest. There is a weight optimum which corresponds to the maximum lift per unit structural weight. There is also a lift optimum that corresponds to maximum absolute lift. New structural models, the basic deformation mechanisms that are utilized and typical analytical results are presented. It appears that lift enhancements of sufficient magnitude can be produced to render this type of wing tailoring of practical interest. Experiments and finite element correlations are performed which confirm the validity of the theoretical models utilized.

  2. Virasoro irregular conformal block and beta deformed random matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang Kwan; Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Virasoro irregular conformal block is presented as the expectation value of Jack-polynomials of the beta-deformed Penner-type matrix model and is compared with the inner product of Gaiotto states with arbitrary rank. It is confirmed that there are non-trivial modifications of the Gaiotto states due to the normalization of the states. The relation between the two is explicitly checked for rank 2 irregular conformal block.

  3. Model Deformation Measurements at a Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Using Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    A photogrammetric closed circuit television system to measure model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) is described. The photogrammetric approach was chosen because of its inherent rapid data recording of the entire object field. Video cameras are used to acquire data instead of film cameras due to the inaccessibility of cameras which must be housed within the cryogenic, high pressure plenum of this facility. Data reduction procedures and the results of tunnel tests at the NTF are presented.

  4. Model deformation measurements at a cryogenic wind tunnel using photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    A photogrammetric closed circuit television system to measure model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) is described. The photogrammetric approach was chosen because of its inherent rapid data recording of the entire object field. Video cameras are used to acquire data instead of film cameras due to the inaccessibility of cameras which must be housed within the cryogenic, high pressure plenum of this facility. Data reduction procedures and the results of tunnel tests at the NTF are presented.

  5. Evaluation and Surgical Management of the Overcorrected Clubfoot Deformity in the Adult Patient.

    PubMed

    Burger, Dawid; Aiyer, Amiethab; Myerson, Mark S

    2015-12-01

    Adult patients presenting with an overcorrected clubfoot often have had a posteromedial release. They present later in life and have compensated quite well despite the development of deformity. Minor trauma may lead to the onset of acute symptoms. A spectrum of deformity exists. Key features include a dorsally subluxated navicular, a dorsal bunion from overpull of the tibialis anterior tendon, valgus of the ankle or hindfoot or both, and a flattop talus. This article details the diagnostic approach to the overcorrected clubfoot patient and options for management of the various components of the deformity. PMID:26589080

  6. Heterogeneous Deformable Modeling of Bio-Tissues and Haptic Force Rendering for Bio-Object Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiyong; Lee, Yuan-Shin; Narayan, Roger J.

    This paper presents a novel technique for modeling soft biological tissues as well as the development of an innovative interface for bio-manufacturing and medical applications. Heterogeneous deformable models may be used to represent the actual internal structures of deformable biological objects, which possess multiple components and nonuniform material properties. Both heterogeneous deformable object modeling and accurate haptic rendering can greatly enhance the realism and fidelity of virtual reality environments. In this paper, a tri-ray node snapping algorithm is proposed to generate a volumetric heterogeneous deformable model from a set of object interface surfaces between different materials. A constrained local static integration method is presented for simulating deformation and accurate force feedback based on the material properties of a heterogeneous structure. Biological soft tissue modeling is used as an example to demonstrate the proposed techniques. By integrating the heterogeneous deformable model into a virtual environment, users can both observe different materials inside a deformable object as well as interact with it by touching the deformable object using a haptic device. The presented techniques can be used for surgical simulation, bio-product design, bio-manufacturing, and medical applications.

  7. Surrogate modeling of deformable joint contact using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2015-09-01

    Deformable joint contact models can be used to estimate loading conditions for cartilage-cartilage, implant-implant, human-orthotic, and foot-ground interactions. However, contact evaluations are often so expensive computationally that they can be prohibitive for simulations or optimizations requiring thousands or even millions of contact evaluations. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel surrogate contact modeling method based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). The method uses special sampling techniques to gather input-output data points from an original (slow) contact model in multiple domains of input space, where each domain represents a different physical situation likely to be encountered. For each contact force and torque output by the original contact model, a multi-layer feed-forward ANN is defined, trained, and incorporated into a surrogate contact model. As an evaluation problem, we created an ANN-based surrogate contact model of an artificial tibiofemoral joint using over 75,000 evaluations of a fine-grid elastic foundation (EF) contact model. The surrogate contact model computed contact forces and torques about 1000 times faster than a less accurate coarse grid EF contact model. Furthermore, the surrogate contact model was seven times more accurate than the coarse grid EF contact model within the input domain of a walking motion. For larger input domains, the surrogate contact model showed the expected trend of increasing error with increasing domain size. In addition, the surrogate contact model was able to identify out-of-contact situations with high accuracy. Computational contact models created using our proposed ANN approach may remove an important computational bottleneck from musculoskeletal simulations or optimizations incorporating deformable joint contact models. PMID:26220591

  8. Electrohydrodynamic Model of Vesicle Deformation in Alternating Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vlahovska, Petia M.; Gracià, Rubèn Serral; Aranda-Espinoza, Said; Dimova, Rumiana

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We develop an analytical theory to explain the experimentally observed morphological transitions of quasispherical giant vesicles induced by alternating electric fields. The model treats the inner and suspending media as lossy dielectrics, and the membrane as an impermeable flexible incompressible–fluid sheet. The vesicle shape is obtained by balancing electric, hydrodynamic, bending, and tension stresses exerted on the membrane. Our approach, which is based on force balance, also allows us to describe the time evolution of the vesicle deformation, in contrast to earlier works based on energy minimization, which are able to predict only stationary shapes. Our theoretical predictions for vesicle deformation are consistent with experiment. If the inner fluid is more conducting than the suspending medium, the vesicle always adopts a prolate shape. In the opposite case, the vesicle undergoes a transition from a prolate to oblate ellipsoid at a critical frequency, which the theory identifies with the inverse membrane charging time. At frequencies higher than the inverse Maxwell-Wagner polarization time, the electrohydrodynamic stresses become too small to alter the vesicle's quasispherical rest shape. The model can be used to rationalize the transient and steady deformation of biological cells in electric fields. PMID:19527639

  9. Linking plate reconstructions with deforming lithosphere to geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R. D.; Gurnis, M.; Flament, N.; Seton, M.; Spasojevic, S.; Williams, S.; Zahirovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    While global computational models are rapidly advancing in terms of their capabilities, there is an increasing need for assimilating observations into these models and/or ground-truthing model outputs. The open-source and platform independent GPlates software fills this gap. It was originally conceived as a tool to interactively visualize and manipulate classical rigid plate reconstructions and represent them as time-dependent topological networks of editable plate boundaries. The user can export time-dependent plate velocity meshes that can be used either to define initial surface boundary conditions for geodynamic models or alternatively impose plate motions throughout a geodynamic model run. However, tectonic plates are not rigid, and neglecting plate deformation, especially that of the edges of overriding plates, can result in significant misplacing of plate boundaries through time. A new, substantially re-engineered version of GPlates is now being developed that allows an embedding of deforming plates into topological plate boundary networks. We use geophysical and geological data to define the limit between rigid and deforming areas, and the deformation history of non-rigid blocks. The velocity field predicted by these reconstructions can then be used as a time-dependent surface boundary condition in regional or global 3-D geodynamic models, or alternatively as an initial boundary condition for a particular plate configuration at a given time. For time-dependent models with imposed plate motions (e.g. using CitcomS) we incorporate the continental lithosphere by embedding compositionally distinct crust and continental lithosphere within the thermal lithosphere. We define three isostatic columns of different thickness and buoyancy based on the tectonothermal age of the continents: Archean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. In the fourth isostatic column, the oceans, the thickness of the thermal lithosphere is assimilated using a half-space cooling model. We also

  10. A nonaffine network model for elastomers undergoing finite deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jacob D.; Goulbourne, N. C.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we construct a new physics-based model of rubber elasticity to capture the strain softening, strain hardening, and deformation-state dependent response of rubber materials undergoing finite deformations. This model is unique in its ability to capture large-stretch mechanical behavior with parameters that are connected to the polymer chemistry and can also be easily identified with the important characteristics of the macroscopic stress-stretch response. The microscopic picture consists of two components: a crosslinked network of Langevin chains and an entangled network with chains confined to a nonaffine tube. These represent, respectively, changes in entropy due to thermally averaged chain conformations and changes in entropy due to the magnitude of these conformational fluctuations. A simple analytical form for the strain energy density is obtained using Rubinstein and Panyukov's single-chain description of network behavior. The model only depends on three parameters that together define the initial modulus, extent of strain softening, and the onset of strain hardening. Fits to large stretch data for natural rubber, silicone rubber, VHB 4905 (polyacrylate rubber), and b186 rubber (a carbon black-filled rubber) are presented, and a comparison is made with other similar constitutive models of large-stretch rubber elasticity. We demonstrate that the proposed model provides a complete description of elastomers undergoing large deformations for different applied loading configurations. Moreover, since the strain energy is obtained using a clear set of physical assumptions, this model may be tested and used to interpret the results of computer simulation and experiments on polymers of known microscopic structure.

  11. Quasiequilibrium models for triaxially deformed rotating compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xing; Markakis, Charalampos; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Uryū, Kōji

    2008-12-01

    Quasiequilibrium models of rapidly rotating triaxially deformed stars are computed in general relativistic gravity, assuming a conformally flat spatial geometry (Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews formulation) and a polytropic equation of state. Highly deformed solutions are calculated on the initial slice covered by spherical coordinate grids, centered at the source, in all angular directions up to a large truncation radius. Constant rest mass sequences are calculated from nearly axisymmetric to maximally deformed triaxial configurations. Selected parameters are to model (proto-) neutron stars; the compactness is M/R=0.001, 0.1, 0.14, and 0.2 for polytropic index n=0.3 and M/R=0.001, 0.1, 0.12, and 0.14 for n=0.5, where M/R refers to that of a nonrotating spherical star having the same rest mass. We confirmed that the triaxial solutions exist for these parameters as in the case of Newtonian polytropes. However, it is also found that the triaxial sequences become shorter for higher compactness, and those disappear at a certain large compactness for the n=0.5 case. In the scenario of the contraction of proto-neutron stars being subject to strong viscosity and rapid cooling, it is plausible that, once the viscosity driven secular instability sets in during the contraction, the proto-neutron stars are always maximally deformed triaxial configurations, as long as the compactness and the equation of state parameters allow such triaxial sequences. Detection of gravitational waves from such sources may be used as another probe for the nuclear equation of state.

  12. Myocardial deformation recovery from cine MRI using a nearly incompressible biventricular model.

    PubMed

    Bistoquet, Arnaud; Oshinski, John; Skrinjar, Oskar

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a method for biventricular myocardial deformation recovery from cine MRI. The method is based on a deformable model that is nearly incompressible, a desirable property since the myocardium has been shown to be nearly incompressible. The model uses a matrix-valued radial basis function to represent divergence-free displacement fields, which is a first order approximation of incompressibility. This representation allows for deformation modeling of an arbitrary topologies with a relatively small number of parameters, which is suitable for representing the motion of the multi-chamber structure of the heart. The myocardium needs to be segmented in an initial frame after which the method automatically determines the tissue deformation everywhere in the myocardium throughout the cardiac cycle. Two studies were carried out to validate the method. In the first study the myocardial deformation was recovered from a 3D anatomical cine MRI sequence of a healthy volunteer and then validated against the manual segmentation of the biventricular wall and against the corresponding 3D tagged cine MRI sequence. The average volume agreement between the model and the manual segmentation had a false positive rate of 3.2%, false negative rate of 2.8% and true positive rate of 91.4%. The average distance between the model and manually determined intersections of perpendicular tag planes was 1.7mm (1.2 pixel). The same procedures was repeated on another set of 3D anatomical and tagged MRI scans of the same volunteer taken four months later. The recovered deformation was very similar to the one obtained from the first set of scans. In the second study the method was applied to 3D anatomical cine MRI scans of three patients with ventricular dyssynchrony and three age-matched healthy volunteers. The recovered strains of the normal subjects were clearly stronger than the recovered strains of the patients and they were similar to those reported by other researchers. The

  13. Statistical modeling of interfractional tissue deformation and its application in radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vile, Douglas J.

    In radiation therapy, interfraction organ motion introduces a level of geometric uncertainty into the planning process. Plans, which are typically based upon a single instance of anatomy, must be robust against daily anatomical variations. For this problem, a model of the magnitude, direction, and likelihood of deformation is useful. In this thesis, principal component analysis (PCA) is used to statistically model the 3D organ motion for 19 prostate cancer patients, each with 8-13 fractional computed tomography (CT) images. Deformable image registration and the resultant displacement vector fields (DVFs) are used to quantify the interfraction systematic and random motion. By applying the PCA technique to the random DVFs, principal modes of random tissue deformation were determined for each patient, and a method for sampling synthetic random DVFs was developed. The PCA model was then extended to describe the principal modes of systematic and random organ motion for the population of patients. A leave-one-out study tested both the systematic and random motion model's ability to represent PCA training set DVFs. The random and systematic DVF PCA models allowed the reconstruction of these data with absolute mean errors between 0.5-0.9 mm and 1-2 mm, respectively. To the best of the author's knowledge, this study is the first successful effort to build a fully 3D statistical PCA model of systematic tissue deformation in a population of patients. By sampling synthetic systematic and random errors, organ occupancy maps were created for bony and prostate-centroid patient setup processes. By thresholding these maps, PCA-based planning target volume (PTV) was created and tested against conventional margin recipes (van Herk for bony alignment and 5 mm fixed [3 mm posterior] margin for centroid alignment) in a virtual clinical trial for low-risk prostate cancer. Deformably accumulated delivered dose served as a surrogate for clinical outcome. For the bony landmark setup

  14. Craniofacial deformities in transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients in Malaysia: prevalence and effect of treatment.

    PubMed

    Toman, Heba Ahmed; Hassan, Rozita; Hassan, Rosline; Nasir, Ariffin

    2011-09-01

    This comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in the pediatric daycare unit, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia to determine the prevalence of craniofacial deformities (CFD) and the association between these deformities and different clinical presentations among thalassemia patients. Patients were classified as either craniofacial deformity positive (CFD+) or craniofacial deformity negative (CFD-) by two examiners based on the presence or absence of deformity of the cheeks, frontal and/or maxillary bones. Fifteen clinical parameters were compared between the groups. Nineteen out of 43 patients (44.2%; confidence interval, 30.2-58.2%) had craniofacial deformities (CFD+). Both groups were comparable among the clinical parameters studied. Patients in the CFD+ group did not start their blood transfusions significantly earlier than the CFD- group (p = 0.50) and had a nonsignificantly lower mean pretransfusion hemoglobin level than the CFD- group (p = 0.71). Patients receiving regular monthly blood transfusions had a nonsignificantly smaller percentage of CFD than those transfused less often (p = 0.495). CFD+ patients had a splenectomy at a nonsignificantly younger age than CFD- patients (p = 0.36). HbE/beta thalassemia patients were not significantly less likely to develop CFD than other varieties (p = 0.50) and males had a nonsignificantly higher percentage of CFD than females (p = 0.29). This study shows CFD in thalassemia patients are still prevalent but no significant associated factors were found; however, a nonsignificantly higher prevalence of CFD was observed in patients with signs of severe disease and less efficient treatment. PMID:22299450

  15. A GPU based high-resolution multilevel biomechanical head and neck model for validating deformable image registration

    SciTech Connect

    Neylon, J. Qi, X.; Sheng, K.; Low, D. A.; Kupelian, P.; Santhanam, A.; Staton, R.; Pukala, J.; Manon, R.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Validating the usage of deformable image registration (DIR) for daily patient positioning is critical for adaptive radiotherapy (RT) applications pertaining to head and neck (HN) radiotherapy. The authors present a methodology for generating biomechanically realistic ground-truth data for validating DIR algorithms for HN anatomy by (a) developing a high-resolution deformable biomechanical HN model from a planning CT, (b) simulating deformations for a range of interfraction posture changes and physiological regression, and (c) generating subsequent CT images representing the deformed anatomy. Methods: The biomechanical model was developed using HN kVCT datasets and the corresponding structure contours. The voxels inside a given 3D contour boundary were clustered using a graphics processing unit (GPU) based algorithm that accounted for inconsistencies and gaps in the boundary to form a volumetric structure. While the bony anatomy was modeled as rigid body, the muscle and soft tissue structures were modeled as mass–spring-damper models with elastic material properties that corresponded to the underlying contoured anatomies. Within a given muscle structure, the voxels were classified using a uniform grid and a normalized mass was assigned to each voxel based on its Hounsfield number. The soft tissue deformation for a given skeletal actuation was performed using an implicit Euler integration with each iteration split into two substeps: one for the muscle structures and the other for the remaining soft tissues. Posture changes were simulated by articulating the skeletal structure and enabling the soft structures to deform accordingly. Physiological changes representing tumor regression were simulated by reducing the target volume and enabling the surrounding soft structures to deform accordingly. Finally, the authors also discuss a new approach to generate kVCT images representing the deformed anatomy that accounts for gaps and antialiasing artifacts that may

  16. Facial Performance Transfer via Deformable Models and Parametric Correspondence.

    PubMed

    Asthana, Akshay; de la Hunty, Miles; Dhall, Abhinav; Goecke, Roland

    2012-09-01

    The issue of transferring facial performance from one person's face to another's has been an area of interest for the movie industry and the computer graphics community for quite some time. In recent years, deformable face models, such as the Active Appearance Model (AAM), have made it possible to track and synthesize faces in real time. Not surprisingly, deformable face model-based approaches for facial performance transfer have gained tremendous interest in the computer vision and graphics community. In this paper, we focus on the problem of real-time facial performance transfer using the AAM framework. We propose a novel approach of learning the mapping between the parameters of two completely independent AAMs, using them to facilitate the facial performance transfer in a more realistic manner than previous approaches. The main advantage of modeling this parametric correspondence is that it allows a "meaningful" transfer of both the nonrigid shape and texture across faces irrespective of the speakers' gender, shape, and size of the faces, and illumination conditions. We explore linear and nonlinear methods for modeling the parametric correspondence between the AAMs and show that the sparse linear regression method performs the best. Moreover, we show the utility of the proposed framework for a cross-language facial performance transfer that is an area of interest for the movie dubbing industry. PMID:21931176

  17. Characterization and modeling of heterogeneous deformation in commercial purity titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y; Wang, Leyun; Zambaldi, Dr C; Eisenlohr, P; Barabash, Rozaliya; Liu, W.; Stoudt, Dr M R; Crimp, Prof M A; Bieler, Prof T R

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous deformation, including local dislocation shear activity and lattice rotation, was analyzed in microstructure patches of polycrystalline commercial purity titanium specimens using three different experimental methods. The measurements were compared with crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) simulations for the same region that incorporate a local phenomenological hardening constitutive model. The dislocation activity was measured using techniques associated with atomic force microscopy (AFM), confocal microscopy, three-dimensional-X-ray diffraction (3D-XRD), and nano-indentation. These measurements allow assessment and guidance for strategic improvement of the accuracy of CPFE model development. The CPFE model successfully predicted most types of active dislocation systems within grains at the correct magnitudes, but the simulation of spatial distribution of strain was not always similar to experimental observations. To obtain an accurate CPFE model, the critical resolved shear stresses for major deformation systems in -titanium were assessed using an optimization strategy with CPFE predictions of the measured pile-up topography surrounding axisymmetric nano-indentation. Only modest improvements were noted over the simulations done without such optimized parameters. This indicates that a major challenge for model development is to effectively predict conditions where slip transfer occurs, and where geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) accumulate.

  18. Recent progress in modelling 3D lithospheric deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B. J. P.; Popov, A.; May, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling 3D lithospheric deformation remains a challenging task, predominantly because the variations in rock types, as well as nonlinearities due to for example plastic deformation result in sharp and very large jumps in effective viscosity contrast. As a result, there are only a limited number of 3D codes available, most of which are using direct solvers which are computationally and memory-wise very demanding. As a result, the resolutions for typical model runs are quite modest, despite the use of hundreds of processors (and using much larger computers is unlikely to bring much improvement in this situation). For this reason we recently developed a new 3D deformation code,called LaMEM: Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model. LaMEM is written on top of PETSc, and as a result it runs on massive parallel machines and we have a large number of iterative solvers available (including geometric and algebraic multigrid methods). As it remains unclear which solver combinations work best under which conditions, we have implemented most currently suggested methods (such as schur complement reduction or Fully coupled iterations). In addition, we can use either a finite element discretization (with Q1P0, stabilized Q1Q1 or Q2P-1 elements) or a staggered finite difference discretization for the same input geometry, which is based on a marker and cell technique). This gives us he flexibility to test various solver methodologies on the same model setup, in terms of accuracy, speed, memory usage etc. Here, we will report on some features of LaMEM, on recent code additions, as well as on some lessons we learned which are important for modelling 3D lithospheric deformation. Specifically we will discuss: 1) How we combine a particle-and-cell method to make it work with both a finite difference and a (lagrangian, eulerian or ALE) finite element formulation, with only minor code modifications code 2) How finite difference and finite element discretizations compare in terms of

  19. Modeling and Predicting Tissue Movement and Deformation for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiangyun; Yuan, Zhiyong; Lai, Qianfeng; Guo, Jiaxiang; Zheng, Qi; Yu, Sijiao; Tong, Qianqian; Si, Weixin; Sun, Mingui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, the target tissue (such as a tumor) often moves and/or deforms in response to an external force. This problem creates difficulties in treating patients and can lead to the destruction of normal tissue. In order to solve this problem, we present a novel method to model and predict the movement and deformation of the target tissue during ultrasound-guided HIFU therapy. Methods Our method computationally predicts the position of the target tissue under external force. This prediction allows appropriate adjustments in the focal region during the application of HIFU so that the treatment head is kept aligned with the diseased tissue through the course of therapy. To accomplish this goal, we utilize the cow tissue as the experimental target tissue to collect spatial sequences of ultrasound images using the HIFU equipment. A Geodesic Localized Chan-Vese (GLCV) model is developed to segment the target tissue images. A 3D target tissue model is built based on the segmented results. A versatile particle framework is constructed based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the movement and deformation of the target tissue. Further, an iterative parameter estimation algorithm is utilized to determine the essential parameters of the versatile particle framework. Finally, the versatile particle framework with the determined parameters is used to estimate the movement and deformation of the target tissue. Results To validate our method, we compare the predicted contours with the ground truth contours. We found that the lowest, highest and average Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) values between predicted and ground truth contours were, respectively, 0.9615, 0.9770 and 0.9697. Conclusion Our experimental result indicates that the proposed method can effectively predict the dynamic contours of the moving and deforming tissue during ultrasound-guided HIFU therapy. PMID:25993644

  20. Dislocation model for aseismic crustal deformation at Hollister, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuura, Mitsuhiro; Jackson, David D.; Cheng, Abe

    1986-01-01

    A model of crustal deformation during the interseismic phase is developed and applied (using the improved Bayesian inversion algorithm described by Jackson and Matsu'ura, 1985) to trilateration data for the USGS Hollister (CA) network. In the model, rigid blocks in motion relative to each other experience friction only in a brittle upper zone, while their ductile lower zones slide freely; the Hollister model comprises five blocks and nine rectangular fault patches. The data and results are presented in tables, graphs, and maps and characterized in detail. The model predicts steady block motion on time scales between 10 yr and 1 Myr, with net motion across the San Andreas/Calaveras fault system 38 + or - 3 mm/yr and brittle/ductile transition depths ranging from 0.4 to 11 km. Two San Andreas segments with higher probabilities of moderate-to-large earthquakes are identified.

  1. Development and treatment of spinal deformity in patients with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I

    2010-01-01

    Scoliosis is a common deformity in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. This is usually associated with pelvic obliquity due to extension of the curve to the sacrum. Sagittal plane deformity is less common and often develops along with scoliosis. Spinal deformity in patients with severe neurological handicaps can affect their ability to sit and cause significant back pain or pain due to rib impingement against the elevated side of the pelvis on the concavity of the curvature. Surgical correction followed by spinal arthrodesis is indicated in patients with progressive deformities which interfere with their level of function and quality of life. Spinal deformity correction is a major task in children with multiple medical co-morbidities and can be associated with a high risk of complications including death. A well-coordinated multidisciplinary approach is required in the assessment and treatment of this group of patients with the aim to minimize the complication rate and secure a satisfactory surgical outcome. Good knowledge of the surgical and instrumentation techniques, as well as the principles of management is needed to achieve optimum correction of the deformity and balancing of the spine and pelvis. Spinal fusion has a well-documented positive impact even in children with quadriplegia or total body involvement and is the only surgical procedure which has such a high satisfaction rate among parents and caregivers. PMID:20419001

  2. Comparison of Three Optical Methods for Measuring Model Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Fleming, G. A.; Hoppe, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the current state-of-the-art of the following three optical techniques under study by NASA for measuring model deformation in wind tunnels: (1) video photogrammetry, (2) projection moire interferometry, and (3) the commercially available Optotrak system. An objective comparison of these three techniques should enable the selection of the best technique for a particular test undertaken at various NASA facilities. As might be expected, no one technique is best for all applications. The techniques are also not necessarily mutually exclusive and in some cases can be complementary to one another.

  3. Algebraic approach to the projected deformed oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asherova, R. M.; Smirnov, Yu. F.; Tolstoy, V. N.; Shustov, A. P.

    1981-03-01

    A new method of calculation in terms of the projected deformed oscillator model is proposed. The method involves expansion of its wave functions in terms of the wave functions of an isotropic oscillator potential. Only overlap integrals between projected wave functions and reduced probabilities B(E2) of E2 transitions are examined. B(E2) values are expressed as a series containing the corresponding values of the Elliott SU(3) scheme. The convergence of these expansions is shown to be fairly good. The expectation values of operators ( QQ) and ( QQQ), which characterize the effective internal non-sphericity and non-axiality of the nucleus, are also calculated and discussed.

  4. Modeling and Prediction of Hot Deformation Flow Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzadeh, Hamed; Cabrera, Jose Maria; Najafizadeh, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    The modeling of hot flow stress and prediction of flow curves for unseen deformation conditions are important in metal-forming processes because any feasible mathematical simulation needs accurate flow description. In the current work, in an attempt to summarize, generalize, and introduce efficient methods, the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) flow curves of a 17-4 PH martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel, a medium carbon microalloyed steel, and a 304 H austenitic stainless steel were modeled and predicted using (1) a hyperbolic sine equation with strain dependent constants, (2) a developed constitutive equation in a simple normalized stress-normalized strain form and its modified version, and (3) a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). These methods were critically discussed, and the ANN technique was found to be the best for the modeling available flow curves; however, the developed constitutive equation showed slightly better performance than that of ANN and significantly better predicted values than those of the hyperbolic sine equation in prediction of flow curves for unseen deformation conditions.

  5. Multimodality Tumor Delineation and Predictive Modelling via Fuzzy-Fusion Deformable Models and Biological Potential Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Richard Marc

    The radiation therapy treatment planning (RTTP) process may be subdivided into three planning stages: gross tumor delineation, clinical target delineation, and modality dependent target definition. The research presented will focus on the first two planning tasks. A gross tumor target delineation methodology is proposed which focuses on the integration of MRI, CT, and PET imaging data towards the generation of a mathematically optimal tumor boundary. The solution to this problem is formulated within a framework integrating concepts from the fields of deformable modelling, region growing, fuzzy logic, and data fusion. The resulting fuzzy fusion algorithm can integrate both edge and region information from multiple medical modalities to delineate optimal regions of pathological tissue content. The subclinical boundaries of an infiltrating neoplasm cannot be determined explicitly via traditional imaging methods and are often defined to extend a fixed distance from the gross tumor boundary. In order to improve the clinical target definition process an estimation technique is proposed via which tumor growth may be modelled and subclinical growth predicted. An in vivo, macroscopic primary brain tumor growth model is presented, which may be fit to each patient undergoing treatment, allowing for the prediction of future growth and consequently the ability to estimate subclinical local invasion. Additionally, the patient specific in vivo tumor model will be of significant utility in multiple diagnostic clinical applications.

  6. The impact of patient self assessment of deformity on HRQL in adults with scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Tones, Megan J; Moss, Nathan D

    2007-01-01

    Background Body image and HRQL are significant issues for patients with scoliosis due to cosmetic deformity, physical and psychological symptoms, and treatment factors. A selective review of scoliosis literature revealed that self report measures of body image and HRQL share unreliable correlations with radiographic measures and clinician recommendations for surgery. However, current body image and HRQL measures do not indicate which aspects of scoliosis deformity are the most distressing for patients. The WRVAS is an instrument designed to evaluate patient self assessment of deformity, and may show some promise in identifying aspects of deformity most troubling to patients. Previous research on adolescents with scoliosis supports the use of the WRVAS as a clinical tool, as the instrument shares strong correlations with radiographic measures and quality of life instruments. There has been limited use of this instrument on adult populations. Methods The WRVAS and the SF-36v2, a HRQL measure, were administered to 71 adults with scoliosis, along with a form to report age and gender. Preliminary validation analyses were performed on the WRVAS (floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency and collinearity, correlations with the SF-36v2, and multiple regression with the WRVAS total score as the predictor, and SF-36v2 scores as outcomes). Results The psychometric properties of the WRVAS were acceptable. Older participants perceived their deformities as more severe than younger participants. More severe deformities were associated with lower scores on the Physical Component Summary Score of the SF-36v2. Total WRVAS score also predicted Physical Component Summary scores. Conclusion The results of the current study indicate that the WRVAS is a reliable tool to use with adult patients, and that patient self assessment of deformity shared a relationship with physical rather than psychological aspects of HRQL. The current and previous studies concur that revision of the

  7. Multi-view and 3D deformable part models.

    PubMed

    Pepik, Bojan; Stark, Michael; Gehler, Peter; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-11-01

    As objects are inherently 3D, they have been modeled in 3D in the early days of computer vision. Due to the ambiguities arising from mapping 2D features to 3D models, 3D object representations have been neglected and 2D feature-based models are the predominant paradigm in object detection nowadays. While such models have achieved outstanding bounding box detection performance, they come with limited expressiveness, as they are clearly limited in their capability of reasoning about 3D shape or viewpoints. In this work, we bring the worlds of 3D and 2D object representations closer, by building an object detector which leverages the expressive power of 3D object representations while at the same time can be robustly matched to image evidence. To that end, we gradually extend the successful deformable part model [1] to include viewpoint information and part-level 3D geometry information, resulting in several different models with different level of expressiveness. We end up with a 3D object model, consisting of multiple object parts represented in 3D and a continuous appearance model. We experimentally verify that our models, while providing richer object hypotheses than the 2D object models, provide consistently better joint object localization and viewpoint estimation than the state-of-the-art multi-view and 3D object detectors on various benchmarks (KITTI [2] , 3D object classes [3] , Pascal3D+ [4] , Pascal VOC 2007 [5] , EPFL multi-view cars[6] ). PMID:26440264

  8. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement. PMID:26110494

  9. Phase field modeling of partially saturated deformable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, Giulio

    2016-09-01

    A poromechanical model of partially saturated deformable porous media is proposed based on a phase field approach at modeling the behavior of the mixture of liquid water and wet air, which saturates the pore space, the phase field being the saturation (ratio). While the standard retention curve is expected still^ to provide the intrinsic retention properties of the porous skeleton, depending on the porous texture, an enhanced description of surface tension between the wetting (liquid water) and the non-wetting (wet air) fluid, occupying the pore space, is stated considering a regularization of the phase field model based on an additional contribution to the overall free energy depending on the saturation gradient. The aim is to provide a more refined description of surface tension interactions. An enhanced constitutive relation for the capillary pressure is established together with a suitable generalization of Darcy's law, in which the gradient of the capillary pressure is replaced by the gradient of the so-called generalized chemical potential, which also accounts for the "force", associated to the local free energy of the phase field model. A micro-scale heuristic interpretation of the novel constitutive law of capillary pressure is proposed, in order to compare the envisaged model with that one endowed with the concept of average interfacial area. The considered poromechanical model is formulated within the framework of strain gradient theory in order to account for possible effects, at laboratory scale, of the micro-scale hydro-mechanical couplings between highly localized flows (fingering) and localized deformations of the skeleton (fracturing).

  10. Continuum modeling of deformation and aggregation of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Daegeun; You, Donghyun

    2016-07-26

    In order to gain better understanding for rheology of an isolated red blood cell (RBC) and a group of multiple RBCs, new continuum models for describing mechanical properties of cellular structures of an RBC and inter-cellular interactions among multiple RBCs are developed. The viscous property of an RBC membrane, which characterizes dynamic behaviors of an RBC under stress loading and unloading processes, is determined using a generalized Maxwell model. The present model is capable of predicting stress relaxation and stress-strain hysteresis, of which prediction is not possible using the commonly used Kelvin-Voigt model. Nonlinear elasticity of an RBC is determined using the Yeoh hyperelastic material model in a framework of continuum mechanics using finite-element approximation. A novel method to model inter-cellular interactions among multiple adjacent RBCs is also developed. Unlike the previous modeling approaches for aggregation of RBCs, where interaction energy for aggregation is curve-fitted using a Morse-type potential function, the interaction energy is analytically determined. The present aggregation model, therefore, allows us to predict various effects of physical parameters such as the osmotic pressure, the thickness of a glycocalyx layer, the penetration depth, and the permittivity, on the depletion and electrostatic energy among RBCs. Simulations for elongation and recovery deformation of an RBC and for aggregation of multiple RBCs are conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the present continuum modeling methods. PMID:26706720

  11. Custom stems for femoral deformity in patients less than 40 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Michael; Aldinger, Guenther; Krahmer, Knut; Bruckner, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Femoral deformity associated with osteoarthritis is a challenge for both the surgeon and the implant. Many of the patients with these deformities are young. Standard implants can be difficult to fit into these femurs. We prospectively evaluated the outcome of custom uncemented femoral stems in young patients. Methods 61 consecutive patients (72 hips) underwent surgery for osteoarthritis because of femoral deformity at a mean age of 35 (22–40) years. The patients received a CT3D-A custom-made femoral stem and an uncemented cup. The mean follow-up time was 14 (10–16) years. 2 patients died at 7 and 8 years after surgery, otherwise, none of the patients were lost to follow-up. Results At follow-up, the femoral prosthesis had not been revised in 59 patients (70 hips). 3 patients (3 hips) had required revision surgery due to loosening of the acetabular component; 2 hips were awaiting revision surgery for loosening of the acetabular cup. There were no cases of dislocation or infection. At review, all stems were considered stable according to the radiographic criteria. No migration or subsidence was observed on plain radiographs. Interpretation Our results are comparable to published results of custom stems regarding survival and outcome. Considering the young age and the deformities in this series of uncemented custom femoral stems, and the fact that there was follow-up of up to 16 years, the survival is remarkable. This technique appears to be a reasonable alternative in younger patients with femoral deformities. PMID:19513891

  12. Modelling couplings between reaction, fluid flow and deformation: Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2016-04-01

    Mineral assemblages out of equilibrium are commonly found in metamorphic rocks testifying of the critical role of kinetics for metamorphic reactions. As experimentally determined reaction rates in fluid-saturated systems generally indicate complete reaction in less than several years, i.e. several orders of magnitude faster than field-based estimates, metamorphic reaction kinetics are generally thought to be controlled by transport rather than by processes at the mineral surface. However, some geological processes like earthquakes or slow-slip events have shorter characteristic timescales, and transport processes can be intimately related to mineral surface processes. Therefore, it is important to take into account the kinetics of mineral surface processes for modelling fluid/rock interactions. Here, a model coupling reaction, fluid flow and deformation was improved by introducing a delay in the achievement of equilibrium. The classical formalism for dissolution/precipitation reactions was used to consider the influence of the distance from equilibrium and of temperature on the reaction rate, and a dependence on porosity was introduced to model evolution of reacting surface area during reaction. The fitting of experimental data for three reactions typically occurring in metamorphic systems (serpentine dehydration, muscovite dehydration and calcite decarbonation) indicates a systematic faster kinetics close from equilibrium on the dehydration side than on the hydration side. This effect is amplified through the porosity term in the reaction rate since porosity is formed during dehydration. Numerical modelling indicates that this difference in reaction rate close from equilibrium plays a key role in microtextures formation. The developed model can be used in a wide variety of geological systems where couplings between reaction, deformation and fluid flow have to be considered.

  13. On the Modeling of Plastic Deformation of Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ertuerk, S.; Steglich, D.; Bohlen, J.; Letzig, D.; Brocks, W.

    2007-05-17

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials due to their low density and therefore high specific strength. However, the industrial application is not well established so far, especially for wrought products such as sheets or profiles. Due to its hexagonal crystallographic structure, deformation mechanisms observed in magnesium alloys are rather different from those in face centered cubic metals such as aluminum alloys. This leads not only to a mechanical anisotropy, but also to a tension-compression asymmetry, i.e. unequal compressive and tensile yield strength. The resulting complexity in the yielding behavior of such materials cannot be captured by conventional models of J2 plasticity. Cazacu and Barlat, therefore, proposed a phenomenological yield potential which accounts for the respective phenomena by introducing the third invariant of the stress tensor. Simulations based on this model are performed with ABAQUS/Explicit and a user defined routine VUMAT for validating the respective implementation. The application aims at simulating the extrusion process of magnesium alloys.

  14. Meshless analysis of shear deformable shells: the linear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Jorge C.; Tiago, Carlos M.; Pimenta, Paulo M.

    2013-10-01

    This work develops a kinematically linear shell model departing from a consistent nonlinear theory. The initial geometry is mapped from a flat reference configuration by a stress-free finite deformation, after which, the actual shell motion takes place. The model maintains the features of a complete stress-resultant theory with Reissner-Mindlin kinematics based on an inextensible director. A hybrid displacement variational formulation is presented, where the domain displacements and kinematic boundary reactions are independently approximated. The resort to a flat reference configuration allows the discretization using 2-D Multiple Fixed Least-Squares (MFLS) on the domain. The consistent definition of stress resultants and consequent plane stress assumption led to a neat formulation for the analysis of shells. The consistent linear approximation, combined with MFLS, made possible efficient computations with a desired continuity degree, leading to smooth results for the displacement, strain and stress fields, as shown by several numerical examples.

  15. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1985-01-15

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earch region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed.

  16. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1984-09-07

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earth region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed. 18 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. A micromechanical model for the deformation behavior of titanium polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, V.; Balokhonov, R.; Shakhidjanov, V.; Zinovieva, O.

    2015-10-01

    A microstructure-based constitutive model for a polycrystalline titanium alloy is constructed on the basis of anisotropic elasticity and crystal plasticity theory, with allowance made for the prismatic and basal slip systems. A three-dimensional polycrystalline structure consisting of 1600 grains is designed by a step-by-step packing method and introduced explicitly into finite-element calculations. Numerical modeling of uniaxial tension is performed using Abaqus/Explicit. Grains unfavorably oriented to the loading axis are shown to remain elastic, while slip occurs in the neighboring grains. As this takes place, rotational modes of deformation are activated in addition to shear strain (translational) modes, and surface grains with a low ability to yield demonstrate a tendency towards extrusion.

  18. Variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of a super-high arch dam.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhongwen; Gu, Chongshi; Qin, Dong

    2016-01-01

    This study determines dam deformation similarity indexes based on an analysis of deformation zoning features and panel data clustering theory, with comprehensive consideration to the actual deformation law of super-high arch dams and the spatial-temporal features of dam deformation. Measurement methods of these indexes are studied. Based on the established deformation similarity criteria, the principle used to determine the number of dam deformation zones is constructed through entropy weight method. This study proposes the deformation zoning method for super-high arch dams and the implementation steps, analyzes the effect of special influencing factors of different dam zones on the deformation, introduces dummy variables that represent the special effect of dam deformation, and establishes a variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of super-high arch dams. Based on different patterns of the special effect in the variable-intercept panel model, two panel analysis models were established to monitor fixed and random effects of dam deformation. Hausman test method of model selection and model effectiveness assessment method are discussed. Finally, the effectiveness of established models is verified through a case study. PMID:27386345

  19. Neotectonic deformation model of the Northern Algeria from Paleomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derder, M. E. M.; Henry, B.; Maouche, S.; Amenna, M.; Bayou, B.; Djellit, H.; Ymel, H.; Gharbi, S.; Abtout, A.; Ayache, M.

    2012-04-01

    The seismic activity of the Western Mediterranean area is partly concentrated in northern Africa, particularly in northern Algeria, as it is shown by the strongest recent earthquakes of "Zemmouri" 21 May 2003 Mw=6.9 and the "El Asnam" 10 October 1980 Ms= 7.3. This seismicity is due to the tectonic activity related to the convergence between Africa and Eurasia plates since at least the Oligocene. The deformation is mostly compressional with associated folds, strike-slip faults and thrusts, and a direction of shortening between N-S and NNW-SSE. This convergence involves a tectonic transpression which is expressed by active deformation along the plate boundary. In northern Algeria, the seismicity is concentrated in a coastal E-W thin band zone (the Tell Atlas). Active structures define there NE-SW trending folds and NE-SW sinistral transpressive faults, which affect the intermountain and coastal Neogene to Quaternary sedimentary basins (e.g. " Cheliff "basin, " Mitidja "basin, …). These reverse faults are associated with NW-SE to E-W strike-slips deep faults. The active tectonics could be explained by a simple blocks rotation kinematics model. In order to test the validity of this kinematic model, three different paleomagnetic studies have been conducted. The first one concerned the "Cheliff" basin where sedimentary Neogene formations were extensively sampled (66 sites). The second study was carried out on Miocene andesite and dacite rocks cropping out along the northern coastal zone of the "Cheliff" basin ("Beni Haoua" area, 19 sites). The third study has been carried out on the Miocene magmatic rocks (rhyolites and basalts) cropping out north-eastern part of the "Mitidja" basin ("Cap Djinet" - "Boumerdes" area, 23 sites). The obtained results show existence of paleomagnetic clockwise rotations in all the studied areas and then validates the kinematics block rotation model. Accordingly, the deformation related to the convergence between the Africa and Eurasia

  20. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on red blood cells deformability in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Nikolaos, S; George, A; Telemachos, T; Maria, S; Yannis, M; Konstantinos, M

    2000-01-01

    Anemia is a serious problem in hemodialysis patients, the main cause of which is erythropoietin deficiency. After the discovery of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) at the end of the last decade, the hematological profile of hemodialysis patients improved significantly but at considerable expense. The deformability of red blood cells (RBC) influences their microcirculation and tissue oxygen delivery along with their life span. We investigated the deformabilty of RBCs in 15 hemodialysis patients before and after three months on L-carnitine supplementation (30 mg/Kg body wt/dialysis session). We excluded from the study all patients who received blood transfusions three months before or during the study, patients who had hemorrhagic episodes, those with hyperparathyroidism or infections, and any who required surgical intervention during the study. The serum iron, folic acid and vitamin B-12 levels were kept normal during the duration of the study. The erythropoietin dose taken before the beginning of L-cartnitine supplementation was not changed. The deformability of RBCs before and after dialysis, prior to and following three months on L-carnitine was determined and compared to the deformability of RBCs from a control group. Hematocrit levels were measured before entry into the study and every month for three months. We found that the deformability of RBCs before the dialysis session was significantly greater than that found in the control group (t-test, p < 0.00001), and that there was a further increase after the end of the dialysis session. Three months following L-carnitine supplementation, we found a significant reduction of RBCs deformability (paired t-test, p < 0.004), and a significant increase in the hematocrit (ANOVA, p < 0.0001). We concluded that abnormalities in the deformability of RBCs improved after L-carnitine and that this was responsible for the increase in the hematocrit. This may allow a substantial reduction in rHuEpo dose. PMID:10718283

  1. Quantitative ultrasound does not identify patients with an inflammatory disease at risk of vertebral deformities

    PubMed Central

    Heijckmann, A Caroline; Dumitrescu, Bianca; Nieuwenhuijzen Kruseman, Arie C; Geusens, Piet; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; De Vries, Jolanda; Drent, Marjolein; Huijberts, Maya SP

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous studies from our group have shown that a high prevalence of vertebral deformities suggestive of fracture can be found in patients with an inflammatory disease, despite a near normal bone mineral density (BMD). As quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the heel can be used for refined assessment of bone strength, we evaluated whether QUS can be used to identify subjects with an inflammatory disease with an increased chance of having a vertebral fracture. Methods 246 patients (mean age: 44 ± 12.4 years) with an inflammatory disease (sarcoidosis or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)) were studied. QUS of the heel and BMD of the hip (by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)) were measured. Furthermore lateral single energy densitometry of the spine for assessment of vertebral deformities was done. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the strength of association between the prevalence of a vertebral deformity and BMD and QUS parameters, adjusted for gender and age. Results Vertebral deformities (ratio of <0.80) were found in 72 vertebrae of 54 subjects (22%). In contrast to the QUS parameters BUA (broadband ultrasound attenuation) and SOS (speed of sound), T-score of QUS and T-scores of the femoral neck and trochanter (DXA) were lower in the group of patients with vertebral deformities. Logistic regression analysis showed that the vertebral deformity risk increases by about 60 to 90% per 1 SD reduction of BMD (T-score) determined with DXA but not with QUS. Conclusion Our findings imply that QUS measurements of the calcaneus in patients with an inflammatory condition, such as sarcoidosis and IBD, are likely of limited value to identify patients with a vertebral fracture. PMID:18492278

  2. Statistical Modeling of CTV Motion and Deformation for IMRT of Early-Stage Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, Luiza; Intven, Martijn; Burbach, J.P. Maarten; Budiarto, Eka; Kleijnen, Jean-Paul; Philippens, Marielle; Asselen, Bram van; Seravalli, Enrica; Reerink, Onne; Raaymakers, Bas

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To derive and validate a statistical model of motion and deformation for the clinical target volume (CTV) of early-stage rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: For 16 patients, 4 to 5 magnetic resonance images (MRI) were acquired before each fraction was administered. The CTV was delineated on each MRI. Using a leave-one-out methodology, we constructed a population-based principal component analysis (PCA) model of the CTV motion and deformation of 15 patients, and we tested the model on the left-out patient. The modeling error was calculated as the amount of the CTV motion-deformation of the left-out-patient that could not be explained by the PCA model. Next, the PCA model was used to construct a PCA target volume (PCA-TV) by accumulating motion-deformations simulated by the model. A PCA planning target volume (PTV) was generated by expanding the PCA-TV by uniform margins. The PCA-PTV was compared with uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins. To allow comparison, geometric margins were determined to ensure adequate coverage, and the volume difference between the PTV and the daily CTV (CTV-to-PTV volume) was calculated. Results: The modeling error ranged from 0.9 ± 0.5 to 2.9 ± 2.1 mm, corresponding to a reduction of the CTV motion-deformation between 6% and 60% (average, 23% ± 11%). The reduction correlated with the magnitude of the CTV motion-deformation (P<.001, R=0.66). The PCA-TV and the CTV required 2-mm and 7-mm uniform margins, respectively. The nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 4 mm in the left, right, inferior, superior, and posterior directions and 8 mm in the anterior direction. Compared to uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins, the PCA-based PTV significantly decreased (P<.001) the average CTV-to-PTV volume by 128 ± 20 mL (49% ± 4%) and by 35 ± 6 mL (20% ± 3.5%), respectively. Conclusions: The CTV motion-deformation of a new patient can be explained by a population-based PCA model. A PCA model

  3. Modeling Cyclic Deformation of HSLA Steels Using Crystal Plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Xie, Chunlei

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-time scale modeling technique for analyzing cyclic plastic deformation in crystalline solids subject to periodic loading. An asymptotic expansion of the variables in the time domain, together with homogenization forms the basis of multi-time scaling. In the macroscopic scale analysis, the oscillatory behavior of the load is averaged out and neglected, and the rate of averaged material behavior is quite slow in cyclic deformation. Implicitly, this means that the periodicity of some variables may be assumed for the oscillatory potion of the material behavior may be approximated. In this formulation, the governing equations are divided into two initial-boundary value problems with two different time scale: one is long time scale problem for describing the smooth averaged solution (global problem) and the other is for the remaining oscillatory potion (local problem). For the global problem, long time increments, which are longer than one cycle period, can be used and this multi-time scaling becomes an effective integrator.

  4. A Computational Model of Deformable Cell Rolling in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleton, Charles; Jadhav, Sameer

    2005-03-01

    Selectin-mediated rolling of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) on activated endothelium is critical to their recruitment to sites of inflammation. The cell rolling velocity is influenced by bond interactions on the molecular scale that oppose hydrodynamic forces at the mesoscale. Recent studies have shown that PMN rolling velocity on selectin-coated surfaces in shear flow is significantly slower compared to that of microspheres bearing a similar density of selectin ligands. To investigate whether cell deformability is responsible for these differences, we developed a 3-D computational model which simulates rolling of a deformable cell on a selectin-coated surface under shear flow with a stochastic description of receptor-ligand bond interaction. We observed that rolling velocity increases with increasing membrane stiffness and this effect is larger at high shear rates. The average bond lifetime, number of receptor-ligand bonds and the cell-substrate contact area decreased with increasing membrane stiffness. This study shows that cellular properties along with the kinetics of selectin-ligand interactions affect leukocyte rolling on selectin-coated surfaces.

  5. A unified asperity-deformation model for cracked rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, K.; Gibson, R. L.; Ge, J.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic velocities in rocks increase with pressure, a pattern often explained by changes in cracks within the rock volume. Specifically, the width of microcracks will decrease, increasing the contact area of crack surfaces, which in turn leads to increased stiffness of the crack. This causes P- and S-wave velocities to increase, and having accurate models of this behavior is important in many applications where it is important to related stress changes and observed seismic velocities, such as investigations of both fault zones and changing conditions in geothermal fields or hydrocarbon reservoirs. Several different models have been proposed to explain and quantify the relationship between confining pressure and the physical properties of cracked rocks, including a number of solutions describing cracks as ellipsoidal voids (penny-shaped cracks) of with varying aspect ratios that close at different pressures. Differential effective medium theories based on this model will typically use a fairly large number of parameters to fit measured data. An alternative approach describes cracks or fractures as rough surfaces that do not fully close with increasing pressure, and estimates the increase in contact area as asperities come into contact. An asperity-deformation model of this type was developed by, e.g., Gangi and Carlson (1985), and it parameterizes asperities on crack surfaces in terms of a set of cylindrical rods with heights following power-law distribution. The model results in a simple expression for the increase in velocity caused by increased number of asperities (rods) in contact with increasing pressure, an expression that accurately models increases in velocity using only three parameters. However, the model was formulated only for normal modulus of the cracks, the modulus relevant for P-wave propagation across the crack. Since S-waves are controlled by the tangential or shear modulus of the crack, this model cannot be used to jointly invert both P- and S

  6. An elastoviscoplastic finite element model of lithospheric deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Richard Alan

    1998-12-01

    Via the finite element method, the stress state and deformation of the lithosphere were investigated with topographic loading. An elastoviscoplastic (EVP) rheology governed the mechanical response in a 40 km thick lithospheric plate of wet olivine. The viscous aspect of the rheology utilized a steady-state dislocation creep constitutive relation. The plastic part of the rheology treated frictional slip on faults within pervasively fractured rock via Byerlee's rule. The first studies use a time-invariant, steady-state conduction temperature distribution in the plate. These studies involved topographic loading with different maximum loads and different load growth rates. The EVP results were compared to elastic perfectly-plastic (EPP) solutions for plate bending as constrained by the Yield Strength Envelope (YSE) formulation for lithospheric mechanics. The EVP results included the often-overlooked effect that the load has on strengthening underlying rock against brittle deformation. The creep strain rate in the EVP models varied with time, depth, and lateral location, unlike the EPP/YSE models that constrain all creep to a single a priori creep strain rate. At the transition from frictional slip to creep, the EVP models showed a three km zone with contributions from both mechanisms, relative to the EPP/YSE's artificially sharp and immediate transition. The last study incorporated two variations on the temperature distribution in the EVP lithosphere. The "whole-lithosphere cooling model" cooled the plate during and after the load growth period, following the half-space cooling model for oceanic lithosphere. Unlike its non-cooling counterpart, the whole-lithosphere cooling model showed no further frictional slip after the load growth period. The "magma conduit model" used an initial temperature distribution that had a high temperature along a vertical symmetry axis during loading to approximate temperature effects from a magma conduit. After loading, its temperature

  7. 3D Face Modeling Using the Multi-Deformable Method

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper. PMID:23201976

  8. Unified constitutive model for single crystal deformation behavior with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, K. P.; Meyer, T. G.; Jordan, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    Single crystal materials are being used in gas turbine airfoils and are candidates for other hot section components because of their increased temperature capabilities and resistance to thermal fatigue. Development of a constitutive model which assesses the inelastic behavior of these materials has been studied in 2 NASA programs: Life Prediction and Constitutive Models for Engine Hot Section Anisotropic Materials and Biaxial Constitutive Equation Development for Single Crystals. The model has been fit to a large body of constitutive data for single crystal PWA 1480 material. The model uses a unified approach for computing total inelastic strains (creep plus plasticity) on crystallographic slip systems reproducing observed directional and strain rate effects as a natural consequence of the summed slip system quantities. The model includes several of the effects that have been reported to influence deformation in single crystal materials, such as shear stress, latent hardening, and cross slip. The model is operational in a commercial Finite Element code and is being installed in a Boundary Element Method code.

  9. Nasal septal deformities in chronic rhinosinusitis patients: clinical and radiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Poje, G; Zinreich, J S; Skitarelić, N; Đurić Vuković, K; Passàli, G C; Passàli, D; Mladina, R

    2014-04-01

    Septal deformities are very frequent in patients suffering from chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The question is whether or not some types of septal deformities are involved more frequently in this process or not. The authors observed the incidence of particular types of septal deformities in a group of CRS patients using Mladina classification. The same has been done with a control group that consisted of healthy volunteers. In the literature, type 7 has been found very frequently, i.e. in nearly 30% of all CRS cases. Herein, type 7 was mostly composed of types 3 and 5. Type 3 can be accurately recognised on axial MSCT scans, while type 5 can be accurately recognised on coronal views. Concomitant septal surgery at the time of endoscopic sinus surgery is recommended. PMID:24843222

  10. Learning intervention-induced deformations for non-rigid MR-CT registration and electrode localization in epilepsy patients

    PubMed Central

    Onofrey, John A.; Staib, Lawrence H.; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for learning a statistical model of non-rigid deformations induced by interventional procedures. We make use of this learned model to perform constrained non-rigid registration of pre-procedural and post-procedural imaging. We demonstrate results applying this framework to non-rigidly register post-surgical computed tomography (CT) brain images to pre-surgical magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of epilepsy patients who had intra-cranial electroencephalography electrodes surgically implanted. Deformations caused by this surgical procedure, imaging artifacts caused by the electrodes, and the use of multi-modal imaging data make non-rigid registration challenging. Our results show that the use of our proposed framework to constrain the non-rigid registration process results in significantly improved and more robust registration performance compared to using standard rigid and non-rigid registration methods. PMID:26900569

  11. Video model deformation system for the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    A photogrammetric closed circuit television system to measure model deformation at the National Transonic Facility is described. The photogrammetric approach was chosen because of its inherent rapid data recording of the entire object field. Video cameras are used to acquire data instead of film cameras due to the inaccessibility of cameras which must be housed within the cryogenic, high pressure plenum of this facility. A rudimentary theory section is followed by a description of the video-based system and control measures required to protect cameras from the hostile environment. Preliminary results obtained with the same camera placement as planned for NTF are presented and plans for facility testing with a specially designed test wing are discussed.

  12. Lung deformations and radiation-induced regional lung collapse in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Quentin Kavanagh, Brian; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed; Garg, Kavita

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To differentiate radiation-induced fibrosis from regional lung collapse outside of the high dose region in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Lung deformation maps were computed from pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) scans using a point-to-point translation method. Fifty anatomical landmarks inside the lung (vessel or airway branches) were matched on planning and follow-up scans for the computation process. Two methods using the deformation maps were developed to differentiate regional lung collapse from fibrosis: vector field and Jacobian methods. A total of 40 planning and follow-ups CT scans were analyzed for 20 lung SBRT patients. Results: Regional lung collapse was detected in 15 patients (75%) using the vector field method, in ten patients (50%) using the Jacobian method, and in 12 patients (60%) by radiologists. In terms of sensitivity and specificity the Jacobian method performed better. Only weak correlations were observed between the dose to the proximal airways and the occurrence of regional lung collapse. Conclusions: The authors presented and evaluated two novel methods using anatomical lung deformations to investigate lung collapse and fibrosis caused by SBRT treatment. Differentiation of these distinct physiological mechanisms beyond what is usually labeled “fibrosis” is necessary for accurate modeling of lung SBRT-induced injuries. With the help of better models, it becomes possible to expand the therapeutic benefits of SBRT to a larger population of lung patients with large or centrally located tumors that were previously considered ineligible.

  13. Modeling of ductile deformation in anisotropic rocks with slip surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    Flanking structures and sheath folds can develop in layered rocks due to flow perturbation around slip surfaces in shear zones (Exner and Dabrowski, 2010; Reber et al., submitted). Mechanical anisotropy of the host rock has been shown to play a major role in determining the slip rate and the flow pattern around it (Kocher and Mancktelow, 2006; Fletcher, 2011). In addition, anisotropic fluids such as ductile foliated rocks have a 'memory' of deformation due to evolving microstructure. For example, the rotation of a rigid circular inclusion embedded in a layered host in layer-parallel shear results in the structural reorganization around it, which leads to the modification of the flow pattern in the host and in consequence to a massive reduction of the inclusion rotation rate (Dabrowski and Schmid, 2011). Willis (1964) derived an analytical elastic solution for an elliptical inclusion in a homogeneous anisotropic matrix subject to a uniform load in the far field. The solution can be reduced to the case of an incompressible viscous medium. The case of an arbitrarily oriented inviscid slit under shear parallel to the principal axis of anisotropy can be obtained by reducing it even further. Although derived for the initial state of homogeneous planar anisotropy, the solution provides useful insights into the large deformation behavior of the system. In this study, I will use different models and numerical modeling techniques to assess the impact of mechanical anisotropy and structural development on the perturbing flow around an inviscid slit (slip surface) embedded in a host comprising discrete isotropic layers in layer-parallel simple shear. In the limit of thin layers (the number of layers intercepting the slit tends to infinity), the host is modeled as an anisotropic fluid. The anisotropic viscosity is determined by the bulk anisotropic viscosity of the layered system. The layering is initially planar or equivalently the anisotropy is initially homogeneous. Both non

  14. Modelling of reactive fluid transport in deformable porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, V. M.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.

    2009-04-01

    One outstanding challenge in geology today is the formulation of an understanding of the interaction between rocks and fluids. Advances in such knowledge are important for a broad range of geologic settings including partial melting and subsequent migration and emplacement of a melt into upper levels of the crust, or fluid flow during regional metamorphism and metasomatism. Rock-fluid interaction involves heat and mass transfer, deformation, hydrodynamic flow, and chemical reactions, thereby necessitating its consideration as a complex process coupling several simultaneous mechanisms. Deformation, chemical reactions, and fluid flow are coupled processes. Each affects the others. Special effort is required for accurate modelling of the porosity field through time. Mechanical compaction of porous rocks is usually treated under isothermal or isoentropic simplifying assumptions. However, joint consideration of both mechanical compaction and reactive porosity alteration requires somewhat greater than usual care about thermodynamic consistency. Here we consider the modelling of multi-component, multi-phase systems, which is fundamental to the study of fluid-rock interaction. Based on the conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy in the form adopted in the theory of mixtures, we derive a thermodynamically admissible closed system of equations describing the coupling of heat and mass transfer, chemical reactions, and fluid flow in a deformable solid matrix. Geological environments where reactive transport is important are located at different depths and accordingly have different rheologies. In the near surface, elastic or elastoplastic properties would dominate, whereas viscoplasticity would have a profound effect deeper in the lithosphere. Poorly understood rheologies of heterogeneous porous rocks are derived from well understood processes (i.e., elasticity, viscosity, plastic flow, fracturing, and their combinations) on the microscale by considering a

  15. Research on geometrical model and mechanism for metal deformation based on plastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, H. P.; Rui, Z. Y.; Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    Starting with general conditions of metal plastic deformation, it analyses the relation between the percentage spread and geometric parameters of a forming body with typical machining process are studied. A geometrical model of deforming metal is set up according to the characteristic of a flowing metal particle. Starting from experimental results, the effect of technological parameters and friction between workpiece and dies on plastic deformation of a material were studied and a slippage deformation model of mass points within the material was proposed. Finally, the computing methods for strain and deformation energy and temperature rise are derived from homogeneous deformation. The results can be used to select technical parameters and compute physical quantities such as strain, deformation energy, and temperature rise.

  16. Modeling Step-Strain Relaxation and Cyclic Deformations of Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A.R.; Mead, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Data for step-strain relaxation and cyclic compressive deformations of highly viscous short elastomer cylinders are modeled using a large strain rubber viscoelastic constitutive theory with a rate-independent friction stress term added. In the tests, both small and large amplitude cyclic compressive strains, in the range of 1% to 10%, were superimposed on steady state compressed strains, in the range of 5% to 20%, for frequencies of 1 and 10 Hz. The elastomer cylinders were conditioned prior to each test to soften them. The constants in the viscoclastic-friction constitutive theory are determined by employing a nonlinear least-squares method to fit the analytical stresses for a Maxwell model, which includes friction, to measured relaxation stresses obtained from a 20% step-strain compression test. The simulation of the relaxation data with the nonlinear model is successful at compressive strains of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%. Simulations of hysteresis stresses for enforced cyclic compressive strains of 20% +/- 5% are made with the model calibrated by the relaxation data. The predicted hysteresis stresses are lower than the measured stresses.

  17. Model of plastic deformation for extreme loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Dean L.; Tonks, Davis L.; Wallace, Duane C.

    2003-01-01

    We present a model of metallic plastic flow suitable for numerical simulations of explosive loading and high velocity impacts. The dependence of the plastic strain rate on applied stress at low strain rates is of the Arrhenius form but with an activation energy that is singular at zero stress so that the deformation rate vanishes in that limit. Work hardening is modeled as a generalized Voce law. At strain rates exceeding 109s-1, work hardening is neglected, and the rate dependence of the flow stress is calculated using Wallace's theory of overdriven shocks in metals [D.C. Wallace, Phys. Rev. B 24, 5597 (1981); 24, 5607 (1981)]. The thermal-activation regime is continuously merged into the strong shock limit, yielding a model applicable over the 15 decades in strain rate from 10-3 to 1012 s-1. The model represents all aspects of constitutive behavior seen in Hopkinson bar and low-rate data, including a rapid increase in the constant-strain rate sensitivity, with 10% accuracy. High-pressure behavior is controlled by the shear modulus, G(ρ,T), and the melting temperature, Tm(ρ). There are eleven material parameters in addition to G(ρ,T) and Tm(ρ). Parameters for Cu, U, Ta, Mo, V, Be, 304 SS, and 21-6-9 SS are provided.

  18. Modeling Airflow Using Subject-Specific 4DCT-Based Deformable Volumetric Lung Models.

    PubMed

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun J; Li, Zhiliang; Seyfi, Behnaz; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P

    2012-01-01

    Lung radiotherapy is greatly benefitted when the tumor motion caused by breathing can be modeled. The aim of this paper is to present the importance of using anisotropic and subject-specific tissue elasticity for simulating the airflow inside the lungs. A computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) based approach is presented to simulate airflow inside a subject-specific deformable lung for modeling lung tumor motion and the motion of the surrounding tissues during radiotherapy. A flow-structure interaction technique is employed that simultaneously models airflow and lung deformation. The lung is modeled as a poroelastic medium with subject-specific anisotropic poroelastic properties on a geometry, which was reconstructed from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation for known airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effects of anisotropy are also presented on both the spatiotemporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis. PMID:23365554

  19. Modeling Airflow Using Subject-Specific 4DCT-Based Deformable Volumetric Lung Models

    PubMed Central

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun J.; Li, Zhiliang; Seyfi, Behnaz; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2012-01-01

    Lung radiotherapy is greatly benefitted when the tumor motion caused by breathing can be modeled. The aim of this paper is to present the importance of using anisotropic and subject-specific tissue elasticity for simulating the airflow inside the lungs. A computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) based approach is presented to simulate airflow inside a subject-specific deformable lung for modeling lung tumor motion and the motion of the surrounding tissues during radiotherapy. A flow-structure interaction technique is employed that simultaneously models airflow and lung deformation. The lung is modeled as a poroelastic medium with subject-specific anisotropic poroelastic properties on a geometry, which was reconstructed from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation for known airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effects of anisotropy are also presented on both the spatiotemporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis. PMID:23365554

  20. In-room breathing motion estimation from limited projection views using a sliding deformation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmon, V.; Vandemeulebroucke, J.; Pinho, R.; Vila Oliva, M.; Sarrut, D.; Rit, S.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate in-room breathing motion from a limited number of 2D cone-beam (CB) projection images by registering them to a phase of the 4D planning CT. Methods: Breathing motion was modelled using a piecewise continuous B-spline representation [1], allowing to preserve the sliding along the thoracic wall while limiting the degrees of freedom. The deformed target 3D image was subsequently used to generate Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRR). The Normalized Correlation Coefficient (NCC) between the measured projection images and the DRR was computed in the 2D projection space. However, the partial derivatives of the NCC relative to the transform parameters were backprojected into the 3D space, avoiding the projection of the transform Jacobian matrix which is computationally intractable [2]. Results: The method was quantitatively evaluated on 16 lung cancer patients. 40 CB projection images were simulated using the end-exhale phase of the 4D planning CT and the geometric parameters of a clinical CB protocol. The end-inhale phase was deformed to match these simulated projections. The Target Registration Error (TRE) decreased from 8.8 mm to 2.0 mm while the TRE obtained from the 3D/3D registration of the reconstructed CBCT was significantly worse (2.6 mm), due to view aliasing artefacts. We also provide the motion compensated image reconstructed from a real CB acquisition showing the quality improvement brought by the in-room deformation model compared to the planning motion model. Conclusions: We have developed a 2D/3D deformable registration algorithm that enables in-room breathing motion estimation from cone-beam projection images.

  1. STATISTICAL MECHANICS MODELING OF MESOSCALE DEFORMATION IN METALS

    SciTech Connect

    Anter El-Azab

    2013-04-08

    The research under this project focused on a theoretical and computational modeling of dislocation dynamics of mesoscale deformation of metal single crystals. Specifically, the work aimed to implement a continuum statistical theory of dislocations to understand strain hardening and cell structure formation under monotonic loading. These aspects of crystal deformation are manifestations of the evolution of the underlying dislocation system under mechanical loading. The project had three research tasks: 1) Investigating the statistical characteristics of dislocation systems in deformed crystals. 2) Formulating kinetic equations of dislocations and coupling these kinetics equations and crystal mechanics. 3) Computational solution of coupled crystal mechanics and dislocation kinetics. Comparison of dislocation dynamics predictions with experimental results in the area of statistical properties of dislocations and their field was also a part of the proposed effort. In the first research task, the dislocation dynamics simulation method was used to investigate the spatial, orientation, velocity, and temporal statistics of dynamical dislocation systems, and on the use of the results from this investigation to complete the kinetic description of dislocations. The second task focused on completing the formulation of a kinetic theory of dislocations that respects the discrete nature of crystallographic slip and the physics of dislocation motion and dislocation interaction in the crystal. Part of this effort also targeted the theoretical basis for establishing the connection between discrete and continuum representation of dislocations and the analysis of discrete dislocation simulation results within the continuum framework. This part of the research enables the enrichment of the kinetic description with information representing the discrete dislocation systems behavior. The third task focused on the development of physics-inspired numerical methods of solution of the coupled

  2. Towards Personalized Statistical Deformable Model and Hybrid Point Matching for Robust MR-TRUS Registration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Lin, Muqing; Qin, Jing; Luo, Xiongbiao; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng Ann

    2016-02-01

    Registration and fusion of magnetic resonance (MR) and 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate gland can provide high-quality guidance for prostate interventions. However, accurate MR-TRUS registration remains a challenging task, due to the great intensity variation between two modalities, the lack of intrinsic fiducials within the prostate, the large gland deformation caused by the TRUS probe insertion, and distinctive biomechanical properties in patients and prostate zones. To address these challenges, a personalized model-to-surface registration approach is proposed in this study. The main contributions of this paper can be threefold. First, a new personalized statistical deformable model (PSDM) is proposed with the finite element analysis and the patient-specific tissue parameters measured from the ultrasound elastography. Second, a hybrid point matching method is developed by introducing the modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND) to weight the Euclidean distance between points to establish reliable surface point correspondence. Third, the hybrid point matching is further guided by the PSDM for more physically plausible deformation estimation. Eighteen sets of patient data are included to test the efficacy of the proposed method. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach provides more accurate and robust MR-TRUS registration than state-of-the-art methods do. The averaged target registration error is 1.44 mm, which meets the clinical requirement of 1.9 mm for the accurate tumor volume detection. It can be concluded that the presented method can effectively fuse the heterogeneous image information in the elastography, MR, and TRUS to attain satisfactory image alignment performance. PMID:26441446

  3. Fluid-Structure interaction modeling in deformable porous arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakerzadeh, Rana; Zunino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    A computational framework is developed to study the coupling of blood flow in arteries interacting with a poroelastic arterial wall featuring possibly large deformations. Blood is modeled as an incompressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid using the Navier-Stokes equations and the arterial wall consists of a thick material which is modeled as a Biot system that describes the mechanical behavior of a homogeneous and isotropic elastic skeleton, and connecting pores filled with fluid. Discretization via finite element method leads to the system of nonlinear equations and a Newton-Raphson scheme is adopted to solve the resulting nonlinear system through consistent linearization. Moreover, interface conditions are imposed on the discrete level via mortar finite elements or Nitsche's coupling. The discrete linearized coupled FSI system is solved by means of a splitting strategy, which allows solving the Navier-Stokes and Biot equations separately. The numerical results investigate the effects of proroelastic parameters on the pressure wave propagation in arteries, filtration of incompressible fluids through the porous media, and the structure displacement. The fellowship support from the Computational Modeling & Simulation PhD program at University of Pittsburgh for Rana Zakerzadeh is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. A simulation model for analysing brain structure deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bona, Sergio; Lutzemberger, Ludovico; Salvetti, Ovidio

    2003-12-01

    Recent developments of medical software applications—from the simulation to the planning of surgical operations—have revealed the need for modelling human tissues and organs, not only from a geometric point of view but also from a physical one, i.e. soft tissues, rigid body, viscoelasticity, etc. This has given rise to the term 'deformable objects', which refers to objects with a morphology, a physical and a mechanical behaviour of their own and that reflects their natural properties. In this paper, we propose a model, based upon physical laws, suitable for the realistic manipulation of geometric reconstructions of volumetric data taken from MR and CT scans. In particular, a physically based model of the brain is presented that is able to simulate the evolution of different nature pathological intra-cranial phenomena such as haemorrhages, neoplasm, haematoma, etc and to describe the consequences that are caused by their volume expansions and the influences they have on the anatomical and neuro-functional structures of the brain.

  5. Automated 3D Motion Tracking using Gabor Filter Bank, Robust Point Matching, and Deformable Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Chung, Sohae; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging (tagged MRI or tMRI) provides a means of directly and noninvasively displaying the internal motion of the myocardium. Reconstruction of the motion field is needed to quantify important clinical information, e.g., the myocardial strain, and detect regional heart functional loss. In this paper, we present a three-step method for this task. First, we use a Gabor filter bank to detect and locate tag intersections in the image frames, based on local phase analysis. Next, we use an improved version of the Robust Point Matching (RPM) method to sparsely track the motion of the myocardium, by establishing a transformation function and a one-to-one correspondence between grid tag intersections in different image frames. In particular, the RPM helps to minimize the impact on the motion tracking result of: 1) through-plane motion, and 2) relatively large deformation and/or relatively small tag spacing. In the final step, a meshless deformable model is initialized using the transformation function computed by RPM. The model refines the motion tracking and generates a dense displacement map, by deforming under the influence of image information, and is constrained by the displacement magnitude to retain its geometric structure. The 2D displacement maps in short and long axis image planes can be combined to drive a 3D deformable model, using the Moving Least Square method, constrained by the minimization of the residual error at tag intersections. The method has been tested on a numerical phantom, as well as on in vivo heart data from normal volunteers and heart disease patients. The experimental results show that the new method has a good performance on both synthetic and real data. Furthermore, the method has been used in an initial clinical study to assess the differences in myocardial strain distributions between heart disease (left ventricular hypertrophy) patients and the normal control group. The final results show that the proposed method

  6. A True-Stress Creep Model Based on Deformation Mechanisms for Polycrystalline Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijia; Williams, Steve; Gong, Diguang

    2012-11-01

    A true-stress creep model has been developed based on well-recognized deformation mechanisms, i.e., dislocation glide, dislocation climb, and grain boundary sliding. The model provides a physics-based description of the entire creep deformation process with regards to the strain-time history (primary, secondary, and tertiary creep), rupture strain and lifetime, which finds good agreement with experimental observations for Waspaloy. A deformation-mechanism map is constructed for Waspaloy, and a creep failure criterion is defined by the dominant deformation mechanisms leading to intergranular/transgranular fracture. Thus, the model is a self-consistent tool for creep life prediction.

  7. Joint segmentation and deformable registration of brain scans guided by a tumor growth model.

    PubMed

    Gooya, Ali; Pohl, Kilian M; Bilello, Michel; Biros, George; Davatzikos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for joint segmentation and deformable registration of brain scans of glioma patients to a normal atlas. The proposed method is based on the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm that incorporates a glioma growth model for atlas seeding, a process which modifies the normal atlas into one with a tumor and edema. The modified atlas is registered into the patient space and utilized for the posterior probability estimation of various tissue labels. EM iteratively refines the estimates of the registration parameters, the posterior probabilities of tissue labels and the tumor growth model parameters. We have applied this approach to 10 glioma scans acquired with four Magnetic Resonance (MR) modalities (T1, T1-CE, T2 and FLAIR) and validated the result by comparing them to manual segmentations by clinical experts. The resulting segmentations look promising and quantitatively match well with the expert provided ground truth. PMID:21995070

  8. Model Attitude and Deformation Measurements at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is currently participating in an American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) sponsored Model Attitude and Deformation Working Group. This working group is chartered to develop a best practices document dealing with the measurement of two primary areas of wind tunnel measurements, 1) model attitude including alpha, beta and roll angle, and 2) model deformation. Model attitude is a principle variable in making aerodynamic and force measurements in a wind tunnel. Model deformation affects measured forces, moments and other measured aerodynamic parameters. The working group comprises of membership from industry, academia, and the Department of Defense (DoD). Each member of the working group gave a presentation on the methods and techniques that they are using to make model attitude and deformation measurements. This presentation covers the NASA Glenn Research Center s approach in making model attitude and deformation measurements.

  9. Treatment of combined spinal deformity in patient with ollier disease and abnormal vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Ryabykh, S О; Gubin, A V; Prudnikova, Capital O Cyrillic G; Kobyzev, Capital A Cyrillic Е

    2013-06-01

    We report staged treatment of severe combined spinal deformity in an 11-year-old patient with Ollier disease and abnormal cervical vertebra. Combined scoliosis with systemic pathology and abnormal vertebrae is a rare condition and features atypical deformity location and rapid progression rate and frequently involves the rib cage and pelvis, disturbing the function of chest organs and skeleton. Progressive deformity resulted in cachexia and acute respiratory failure. A halo-pelvic distraction device assembled of Ilizarov components was employed for a staged surgical treatment performed for lifesaving indications. After vital functions stabilized, the scoliosis curve of the cervical spine was corrected and fixed with a hybrid system of transpedicular supporting points, connecting rods, and connectors that provided staged distraction during growth. The treatment showed good functional and cosmetic result. PMID:24436859

  10. Treatment of Combined Spinal Deformity in Patient with Ollier Disease and Abnormal Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Ryabykh, S. О.; Gubin, A. V.; Prudnikova, О. G.; Kobyzev, А. Е.

    2012-01-01

    We report staged treatment of severe combined spinal deformity in an 11-year-old patient with Ollier disease and abnormal cervical vertebra. Combined scoliosis with systemic pathology and abnormal vertebrae is a rare condition and features atypical deformity location and rapid progression rate and frequently involves the rib cage and pelvis, disturbing the function of chest organs and skeleton. Progressive deformity resulted in cachexia and acute respiratory failure. A halo-pelvic distraction device assembled of Ilizarov components was employed for a staged surgical treatment performed for lifesaving indications. After vital functions stabilized, the scoliosis curve of the cervical spine was corrected and fixed with a hybrid system of transpedicular supporting points, connecting rods, and connectors that provided staged distraction during growth. The treatment showed good functional and cosmetic result. PMID:24436859

  11. Model for deformation in Long Valley, California, 1980-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, J.B.; Whitcomb, J.H.

    1984-10-10

    Geodetic data collected in Long Valley, California, from 1975 through 1981 define a pattern of uplift and strain which is evidently associated with a sequence of earthquakes occuring in May 1980 and subsequent swarm activity continuing until the present. We have constructed a model to explain the deformation observed since May 1980 in terms of inflation of two subsurface magma chambers, faulting in the south most region of the caldera, and slip in the Hilton Creek fault. The most significant new feature of the model is the shallow magma chamber at 5 km depth, located a few hundred meters to the east of the Casa Diablo hot spring area. Inflation of this chamber cause stresses which show consistency with various aspects of the seismicity in the south moat of the calcers. Calculations of stress across vertical planes over the magma chambers can be used together with failure criteria to estimate the inflation volume at which the rock layers intervening between the chamber and the surface will fail by extensional fracture.

  12. Numerical modeling on progressive internal deformation in down-built diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Lukas; Koyi, Hemin; Schmeling, Harro

    2014-09-01

    A two-dimensional finite difference code (FDCON) is used to estimate the finite deformation within a down-built diapir. The geometry of the down-built diapir is fixed by using two rigid rectangular overburden units which sink into a source layer of a constant viscosity. Thus, the model refers to diapirs consisting of a source layer feeding a vertical stem, and not to other salt structures (e.g. salt sheets or pillows). With this setup we study the progressive strain in three different deformation regimes within the “salt” material: (I) a squeezed channel-flow deformation regime and (II) a corner-flow deformation regime within the source layer, and (III) a pure channel-flow deformation regime within the stem. We analyze the evolution of finite deformation in each regime individually, progressive strain for particles passing all three regimes, and total 2D finite deformation within the salt layer. Model results show that the material which enters the stem bears inherited strain accumulated from the other two domains. Therefore, finite deformation in the stem differs from the expected channel-flow deformation, due to the deformation accumulated within the source layer. The stem displays a high deformation zone within its center and areas of decreasing progressive strain between its center and its boundaries. High deformation zones within the stem could also be observed within natural diapirs (e.g. Klodowa, Polen). The location and structure of the high deformation zone (e.g. symmetric or asymmetric) could reveal information about different rates of salt supplies from the source layer. Thus, deformation pattern could directly be correlated to the evolution of the diapir.

  13. Estimating Anatomically-Correct Reference Model for Craniomaxillofacial Deformity via Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yi; Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Tang, Zhen; Chen, Ken Chung; Li, Jianfu; Shen, Steve G.F.; Yan, Jin; Lee, Philip K.M.; Chow, Ben; Xia, James J.; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    The success of craniomaxillofacial (CMF) surgery depends not only on the surgical techniques, but also upon an accurate surgical planning. However, surgical planning for CMF surgery is challenging due to the absence of a patient-specific reference model. In this paper, we present a method to automatically estimate an anatomically correct reference shape of jaws for the patient requiring orthognathic surgery, a common type of CMF surgery. We employ the sparse representation technique to represent the normal regions of the patient with respect to the normal subjects. The estimated representation is then used to reconstruct a patient-specific reference model with “restored” normal anatomy of the jaws. We validate our method on both synthetic subjects and patients. Experimental results show that our method can effectively reconstruct the normal shape of jaw for patients. Also, a new quantitative measurement is introduced to quantify the CMF deformity and validate the method in a quantitative approach, which is rarely used before. PMID:25328919

  14. Kinematic and kinetic analysis of static sitting of patients with neuropathic spine deformity.

    PubMed

    Murans, Girts; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M; Saraste, Helena

    2011-10-01

    Wheelchair dependent children with neuropathic and neuromuscular diseases have up to 90% risk for progressive spine deformities. An unbalanced sitting can induce progression of spinal and pelvic deformities. Many current clinical assessment methods of sitting of such patients are semi-quantitative, or questionnaire-based. A 3D movement analysis offers quantitative and objective biomechanical analysis of sitting. The aim was to validate a method to describe quiet sitting and differences between patients and controls as well as to apply the methodology for pre- and post-operative comparison. The analysis was performed on 14 patients and 10 controls. Four patients were retested after spine surgery. Seat load asymmetry was up to 30% in the patient group comparing to maximum 7% in the control group. The asymmetric position of Ground Reaction Force vector between left and right sides was significant. Plumb line of cervical 7th vertebra over sacral 1st was different only in rotation. The location of Common Center of Pressure relative to inter-trochanteric midpoint was more anterior in controls than in patients. Pelvic inclination in patients was smaller, the obliquity and rotation was similar. There were no significant differences between patients and controls of the thorax position. Results with more changes in the seat-loading domain in comparison with posture indicate good postural control compensation of spinal deformity induced disequilibrium despite neuromuscular disease in the background. The comparison of the pelvic obliquity data from kinematics and X-ray showed good correlation. The four patients tested postoperatively improved after surgery. PMID:21816615

  15. An adaptive patient specific deformable registration for breast images of positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging using finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Cheng; Tang, Fuk-Hay

    2014-03-01

    A patient specific registration model based on finite element method was investigated in this study. Image registration of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) has been studied a lot. Surface-based registration is extensively applied in medical imaging. We develop and evaluate a registration method combine surface-based registration with biomechanical modeling. .Four sample cases of patients with PET and MRI breast scans performed within 30 days were collected from hospital. K-means clustering algorithm was used to segment images into two parts, which is fat tissue and neoplasm [2]. Instead of placing extrinsic landmarks on patients' body which may be invasive, we proposed a new boundary condition to simulate breast deformation during two screening. Then a three dimensional model with meshes was built. Material properties were assigned to this model according to previous studies. The whole registration was based on a biomechanical finite element model, which could simulate deformation of breast under pressure.

  16. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 2; Composite Micromechanical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this second paper of a two part report, a three-dimensional composite micromechanical model is described which allows for the analysis of the rate dependent, nonlinear deformation response of a polymer matrix composite. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations utilized to model the deformation response of a polymer are implemented within the micromechanics method. The deformation response of two representative laminated carbon fiber reinforced composite materials with varying fiber orientation has been predicted using the described technique. The predicted results compare favorably to both experimental values and the response predicted by the Generalized Method of Cells, a well-established micromechanics analysis method.

  17. Evaluation of model-based deformation correction in image-guided liver surgery via tracked intraoperative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Clements, Logan W; Collins, Jarrod A; Weis, Jared A; Simpson, Amber L; Adams, Lauryn B; Jarnagin, William R; Miga, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    Soft-tissue deformation represents a significant error source in current surgical navigation systems used for open hepatic procedures. While numerous algorithms have been proposed to rectify the tissue deformation that is encountered during open liver surgery, clinical validation of the proposed methods has been limited to surface-based metrics, and subsurface validation has largely been performed via phantom experiments. The proposed method involves the analysis of two deformation-correction algorithms for open hepatic image-guided surgery systems via subsurface targets digitized with tracked intraoperative ultrasound (iUS). Intraoperative surface digitizations were acquired via a laser range scanner and an optically tracked stylus for the purposes of computing the physical-to-image space registration and for use in retrospective deformation-correction algorithms. Upon completion of surface digitization, the organ was interrogated with a tracked iUS transducer where the iUS images and corresponding tracked locations were recorded. Mean closest-point distances between the feature contours delineated in the iUS images and corresponding three-dimensional anatomical model generated from preoperative tomograms were computed to quantify the extent to which the deformation-correction algorithms improved registration accuracy. The results for six patients, including eight anatomical targets, indicate that deformation correction can facilitate reduction in target error of [Formula: see text]. PMID:27081664

  18. Deformation-induced damage and recovery in model hydrogels - A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidek, Jan; Milchev, Andrey; Jancar, Josef; Vilgis, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation of a model hybrid cross-link hydrogel, we investigate the network damage evolution and the related structure transformations. We model the hydrogel structure as a network-connected assembly of crosslinked clusters whereby deformation-induced damage is considered along with network recovery. The two principal mechanisms involved in hydrogel recovery from deformation include segment hops of the building structure units (segments) between clusters and cluster shape modification. These mechanisms act either instantaneously, or with a certain time delay after the onset of deformation. By elucidating the conditions under which one of the mechanisms prevails, one may design hydrogel materials with a desired response to deformation.

  19. Effect of deformable registration on the dose calculated in radiation therapy planning CT scans of lung cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Armato, Samuel G.; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia; Contee, Clay; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of deformable image registration of serial computed tomography (CT) scans on the radiation dose calculated from a treatment planning scan. Methods: Eighteen patients who received curative doses (≥60 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction) of photon radiation therapy for lung cancer treatment were retrospectively identified. For each patient, a diagnostic-quality pretherapy (4–75 days) CT scan and a treatment planning scan with an associated dose map were collected. To establish correspondence between scan pairs, a researcher manually identified anatomically corresponding landmark point pairs between the two scans. Pretherapy scans then were coregistered with planning scans (and associated dose maps) using the demons deformable registration algorithm and two variants of the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm (“Fast” and “EMPIRE10”). Landmark points in each pretherapy scan were automatically mapped to the planning scan using the displacement vector field output from each of the three algorithms. The Euclidean distance between manually and automatically mapped landmark points (d{sub E}) and the absolute difference in planned dose (|ΔD|) were calculated. Using regression modeling, |ΔD| was modeled as a function of d{sub E}, dose (D), dose standard deviation (SD{sub dose}) in an eight-pixel neighborhood, and the registration algorithm used. Results: Over 1400 landmark point pairs were identified, with 58–93 (median: 84) points identified per patient. Average |ΔD| across patients was 3.5 Gy (range: 0.9–10.6 Gy). Registration accuracy was highest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm, with an average d{sub E} across patients of 5.2 mm (compared with >7 mm for the other two algorithms). Consequently, average |ΔD| was also lowest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm. |ΔD| increased significantly as a function of d{sub E} (0.42 Gy/mm), D (0.05 Gy/Gy), SD{sub dose} (1.4 Gy/Gy), and the algorithm used (≤1 Gy). Conclusions: An

  20. Effect of deformable registration on the dose calculated in radiation therapy planning CT scans of lung cancer patients a)

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Contee, Clay; Armato, Samuel G.; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of deformable image registration of serial computed tomography (CT) scans on the radiation dose calculated from a treatment planning scan. Methods: Eighteen patients who received curative doses (≥60 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction) of photon radiation therapy for lung cancer treatment were retrospectively identified. For each patient, a diagnostic-quality pretherapy (4–75 days) CT scan and a treatment planning scan with an associated dose map were collected. To establish correspondence between scan pairs, a researcher manually identified anatomically corresponding landmark point pairs between the two scans. Pretherapy scans then were coregistered with planning scans (and associated dose maps) using the demons deformable registration algorithm and two variants of the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm (“Fast” and “EMPIRE10”). Landmark points in each pretherapy scan were automatically mapped to the planning scan using the displacement vector field output from each of the three algorithms. The Euclidean distance between manually and automatically mapped landmark points (dE) and the absolute difference in planned dose (|ΔD|) were calculated. Using regression modeling, |ΔD| was modeled as a function of dE, dose (D), dose standard deviation (SDdose) in an eight-pixel neighborhood, and the registration algorithm used. Results: Over 1400 landmark point pairs were identified, with 58–93 (median: 84) points identified per patient. Average |ΔD| across patients was 3.5 Gy (range: 0.9–10.6 Gy). Registration accuracy was highest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm, with an average dE across patients of 5.2 mm (compared with >7 mm for the other two algorithms). Consequently, average |ΔD| was also lowest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm. |ΔD| increased significantly as a function of dE (0.42 Gy/mm), D (0.05 Gy/Gy), SDdose (1.4 Gy/Gy), and the algorithm used (≤1 Gy). Conclusions: An average error of <4 Gy in radiation

  1. A Novel Method of Modeling the Deformation Resistance for Clad Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Jianliang; Yi Youping; Xie Mantang

    2011-08-22

    Because of the excellent thermal conductivity, the clad sheet (3003/4004/3003) of aluminum alloy is extensively used in various heat exchangers, such as radiator, motorcar air conditioning, evaporator, and so on. The deformation resistance model plays an important role in designing the process parameters of hot continuous rolling. However, the complex behaviors of the plastic deformation of the clad sheet make the modeling very difficult. In this work, a novel method for modeling the deformation resistance of clad sheet was proposed by combining the finite element analysis with experiments. The deformation resistance model of aluminum 3003 and 4004 was proposed through hot compression test on the Gleeble-1500 thermo-simulation machine. And the deformation resistance model of clad sheet was proposed through finite element analysis using DEFORM-2D software. The relationship between cladding ratio and the deformation resistance was discussed in detail. The results of hot compression simulation demonstrate that the cladding ratio has great effects on the resistance of the clad sheet. Taking the cladding ratio into consideration, the mathematical model of the deformation resistance for clad sheet has been proved to have perfect forecasting precision of different cladding ratio. Therefore, the presented model can be used to predict the rolling force of clad sheet during the hot continuous rolling process.

  2. Mini-midvastus total knee arthroplasty in patients with severe varus deformity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Chen; Kuo, Feng-Chih; Huang, Chung-Chen; Wang, Jun-Wen

    2015-02-01

    Patients with severe varus deformity of the knee (≥15° varus) usually are not considered good candidates for minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The goal of this study was to retrospectively investigate outcomes in patients with severe varus deformity after minimally invasive TKA. A study group of 52 patients with a tibiofemoral mechanical axis of 195° or greater was compared with a matched control group of 55 patients with a tibiofemoral mechanical axis of less than 195°. Clinical and radiographic evaluations according to the American Knee Society rating system were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively, and postoperative patient satisfaction in the 2 groups was compared. All patients were followed at a mean of 3 years (range, 2-5 years). Preoperatively, clinical knee and function scores and range of motion were inferior in the study group compared with the control group (P<.001). However, at the latest follow-up, both groups of patients were satisfied with the clinical results, and no significant differences were found in the knee and function scores (P>.05). Radiographic evaluation showed no differences in the mechanical axis, femoral component valgus angle, and tibial component valgus angle, and all outliers of the radiographic parameters between the 2 groups postoperatively (P >.05). The study results showed that mini-midvastus TKA did not result in more inaccurate implant positioning in patients with severe varus deformity of the knee. The clinical outcome in the group with severe varus was comparable to that in the group with less severe varus PMID:25665115

  3. Modeling of regional earthquakes, aseismic deformation and fault patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, V.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2005-12-01

    and depth-dependent timescale of ductile stress relaxation. Thus, high strain rates generated by large earthquakes (mainshocks) lead to transient deepening of the brittle-ductile transition and gradual decrease of the maximum hypocenter depth with time from the mainshock. The ratio between the time scale of damage accumulation and time scale of damage-related irreversible strain controls the partition of the stored strain energy in the seismogenic zone between seismic and aseismic components of deformation. Analytical and numerical results show that properties of aftershock sequences are very sensitive to this ratio. Comparison between 3-D modeling and seismic activity in the Dead Sea region indicates that the degree of seismic coupling is very low in the central and northern parts of the Dead Sea Transform, in agreement with previous independent estimates.

  4. Using transverse isotropy to model arbitrary deformation-induced anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, R.M.

    1996-07-01

    A unifying framework is developed for the analysis of brittle materials. Heretofore diverse classes of models result from different choices for unspecified coefficient and distribution functions in the unified theory. Material response is described in terms of expectation integrals of transverse symmetry tensors. First, a canonical body containing cracks of all the same orientation is argued to possess macroscopic transverse isotropy. An orthogonal basis for the linear subspace consisting of all double-symmetric transversely-isotropic fourth-order tensors associated with a given material vector is introduced and applied to deduce the explicit functional dependence of the compliance of such contrived materials on the shared crack orientation. A principle of superposition of strain rates is used to write the compliance for a more realistic material consisting of cracks of random size and orientation as an expectation integral of the transverse compliance for each orientation times the joint distribution function for the size and orientation. Utilizing an evolving (initially exponential) size- dependence in the joint distribution, the general theory gives unprecedented agreement with measurements of the dynamic response of alumina to impact loading, especially upon release where the calculations predict the development of considerable deformation- induced anisotropy, challenging the conventional notion of shocks as isotropic phenomena.

  5. Water flow based geometric active deformable model for road network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leninisha, Shanmugam; Vani, Kaliaperumal

    2015-04-01

    A width and color based geometric active deformable model is proposed for road network extraction from remote sensing images with minimal human interception. Orientation and width of road are computed from a single manual seed point, from which the propagation starts both right and left hand directions of the starting point, which extracts the interconnected road network from the aerial or high spatial resolution satellite image automatically. Here the propagation (like water flow in canal with defined boundary) is restricted with color and width of the road. Road extraction is done for linear, curvilinear (U shape and S shape) roads first, irrespective of width and color. Then, this algorithm is improved to extract road with junctions in a shape of L, T and X along with center line. Roads with small break or disconnected roads are also extracts by a modified version of this same algorithm. This methodology is tested and evaluated with various remote sensing images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is efficient and extracting roads accurately with less computation time. However, in complex urban areas, the identification accuracy declines due to the various sizes of obstacles, over bridges, multilane etc.

  6. Four dimensional deformable image registration using trajectory modeling

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Edward; Castillo, Richard; Martinez, Josue; Shenoy, Maithili; Guerrero, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A four-dimensional deformable image registration (4D DIR) algorithm, referred to as 4D local trajectory modeling (4DLTM), is presented and applied to thoracic 4D computed tomography (4DCT) image sets. The theoretical framework on which this algorithm is built exploits the incremental continuity present in 4DCT component images to calculate a dense set of parameterized voxel trajectories through space as functions of time. The spatial accuracy of the 4DLTM algorithm is compared with an alternative registration approach in which component phase to phase (CPP) DIR is utilized to determine the full displacement between maximum inhale and exhale images. A publically available DIR reference database (http://www.dir-lab.com) is utilized for the spatial accuracy assessment. The database consists of ten 4DCT image sets and corresponding manually identified landmark points between the maximum phases. A subset of points are propagated through the expiratory 4DCT component images. Cubic polynomials were found to provide sufficient flexibility and spatial accuracy for describing the point trajectories through the expiratory phases. The resulting average spatial error between the maximum phases was 1.25 mm for the 4DLTM and 1.44 mm for the CPP. The 4DLTM method captures the long-range motion between 4DCT extremes with high spatial accuracy. PMID:20009196

  7. An asperity-deformation model for effective pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangi, Anthony F.; Carlson, Richard L.

    1996-05-01

    Variations of the mechanical and transport properties of cracked and/or porous rocks under isotropic stress depend on both the confining pressure ( Pc) and the pore-fluid pressure ( Pp). To a first approximation, these rock properties are functions of the differential pressure, Pd = Pc - Pp; at least for low differential pressures. However, at higher differential pressures, the properties depend in a more complicated way upon the two pressures. The concept of effective pressure, Pe, is used to denote this variation and it is defined as Pe( Pc, Pp) = Pc - n( Pc, Pp) Pp. If n = 1 (and therefore, is independent of Pc and Pp), the effective pressure is just the differential pressure. We have used an asperity-deformation model and a force-balance equation to derive expressions for the effective pressure. We equate the total external force (in one direction), Fc, to the total force on the asperities, Fa, and the force of the fluid, Fp, acting in that same direction. The fluid force, Fp, acts only on the parts of the crack (or pore-volume) faces which are not in contact. Then, the asperity pressure, Pa, is the average force per unit area acting on the crack (or grain) contacts P a = {F a}/{A} = {F c}/{A} - {F p}/{A} = P c - (1 - {A c}/{A})P p, where A is the total area over which Fc acts and Ac is the area of contact of the crack asperities or the grains. Thus, the asperity pressure, Pa, is greater than the differential pressure, Pd, because Pp acts on a smaller area, A- Ac, than the total area, A. For elastic asperities, the area of contact Ac and the strain (e.g., crack and pore openings) remain the same, to a high degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. Therefore, transport properties such as permeability, resistivity, thermal conductivity, etc. are constant, to the same degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. For these properties, the asperity pressure is, very accurately, the effective pressure, Pc. Using this model, we find that the

  8. Molecular modelling of structure and deformation mechanisms of auxetic behaviour in the α-quartz structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong Tao; Alderson, Andrew; Alderson, Kim Lesley

    2012-04-01

    Force field based simulation has been employed to predict the deformation mechanisms of auxetic nano-materials having tetrahedral framework. The structure of α-quartz was studied in detail for subjecting to uniaxial loading along the Z direction. The cooperative dilation and rotation of tetrahedra acting concurrently were demonstrated to be the main deformation mechanism of α-quartz, confirming previous analytical model. Slight tetrahedral distortion also existed for undeformed and deformed structure.

  9. Molecular modelling of structure and deformation mechanisms of auxetic behaviour in the α-quartz structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong Tao; Alderson, Andrew; Alderson, Kim Lesley

    2011-11-01

    Force field based simulation has been employed to predict the deformation mechanisms of auxetic nano-materials having tetrahedral framework. The structure of α-quartz was studied in detail for subjecting to uniaxial loading along the Z direction. The cooperative dilation and rotation of tetrahedra acting concurrently were demonstrated to be the main deformation mechanism of α-quartz, confirming previous analytical model. Slight tetrahedral distortion also existed for undeformed and deformed structure.

  10. Surgical correction of ulnar deviation deformity of the wrist in patients with birth brachial plexus palsy sequelae.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Praveen; Parekh, Harshil; Venkatramani, Hari; Raja Sabapathy, S

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar deviation deformity of the wrist in patients with birth brachial plexus palsy is an important cosmetic concern among the patients and their relatives; especially in the patients who have recovered the basic limb functions. Though there is ample literature available regarding the management of the shoulder deformity there is paucity of literature regarding management of wrist ulnar deviation deformity. We report our experience with correction of this deformity in five cases with isolated ulnar deviation deformity without forearm rotational deformity or weakness of the wrist muscles. All the patients underwent extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) to extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) tendon transfer. At a minimum of 18 months follow-up all the patients and their families were satisfied with the cosmetic appearance of the limb. Correction of the deformity improves the appearance of the limb, improves self-confidence of the child, and allows them to integrate well into the society. Interestingly, the patients expressed improvement in their grip strength and overall hand function after this surgery. The notable functions which improved were easy reach of the hand-to-mouth for feeding and easy handling of the things requiring bimanual activities. Although the main aim of this operation was to correct the appearance of the hand it was found to be also functionally useful by the patients and hence we are encouraged to report it for wider use. The results were maintained during the follow-up period of as long as 47 months. PMID:25609294

  11. Madelung Deformity.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2015-10-01

    Madelung deformity of the wrist is more common in females and is often associated with Leri Weill dyschondrosteosis, a mesomelic form of dwarfism. Patients with Madelung deformity often report wrist deformity resulting from the prominence of the relatively long ulna. The typical Madelung deformity is associated with a Vickers ligament that creates a tether across the volar-ulnar radial physis that restricts growth across this segment. The distal radius deforms in the coronal (increasing radial inclination) and the sagittal (increasing volar tilt) planes. There is lunate subsidence and the proximal carpal row adapts to the deformity by forming an upside-down pyramid shape or triangle. Treatment depends on the age at presentation, degree of deformity, and magnitude of symptoms. Mild asymptomatic deformity warrants a period of nonsurgical management with serial x-ray examinations because the natural history is unpredictable. Many patients never require surgical intervention. Progressive deformity in the young child with considerable growth potential remaining requires release of Vickers ligament and radial physiolysis to prevent ongoing deterioration Concomitant ulnar epiphysiodesis may be necessary. Advanced asymptomatic deformity in older children with an unacceptable-appearing wrist or symptomatic deformity are indications for surgery. A dome osteotomy of the radius allows 3-dimensional correction of the deformity. Positive radiographic and clinical results after dome osteotomy have been reported. PMID:26341718

  12. Platelet Reactivity Is Independent of Left Atrial Wall Deformation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Nathan; Goh, Vincent; Mahadevan, Gnanadevan; Stewart, Simon; Horowitz, John

    2016-01-01

    It has been documented recently that left atrial (LA) deformation in AF patients (while in AF) is predictive of subsequent stroke risk. Additionally, diminished LA deformation during AF correlates with the presence of LA blood stasis. Given that endothelial function is dependent on laminar blood flow, the present study sought to investigate the effect of diminished LA deformation (during AF) on platelet reactivity and inflammation in AF patients. Patients (n = 17) hospitalised with AF underwent echocardiography (while in AF) for determination of peak positive LA strain (LASp). Whole blood impedance aggregometry was used to measure extent of ADP-induced aggregation and subsequent inhibitory response to the nitric oxide (NO) donor, sodium nitroprusside. Platelet thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) content was determined by immunohistochemistry. LASp tended (p = 0.078) to vary inversely with CHA2DS2VASc scores. However, mediators of inflammation (C-reactive protein, Txnip) did not correlate significantly with LASp nor did extent of ADP-induced platelet aggregation or platelet NO response. These results suggest that the thrombogenic risk associated with LA stasis is independent of secondary effects on platelet aggregability or inflammation. PMID:27069318

  13. Are cam and pincer deformities as common as dysplasia in Japanese patients with hip pain?

    PubMed

    Mori, R; Yasunaga, Y; Yamasaki, T; Nakashiro, J; Fujii, J; Terayama, H; Ohshima, S; Ochi, M

    2014-02-01

    In Japan, osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip secondary to acetabular dysplasia is very common, and there are few data concerning the pathogeneses and incidence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). We have attempted to clarify the radiological prevalence of painful FAI in a cohort of Japanese patients and to investigate the radiological findings. We identified 176 symptomatic patients (202 hips) with Tönnis grade 0 or 1 osteoarthritis, whom we prospectively studied between August 2011 and July 2012. There were 61 men (65 hips) and 115 women (137 hips) with a mean age of 51.8 years (11 to 83). Radiological analyses included the α-angle, centre-edge angle, cross-over sign, pistol grip deformity and femoral head neck ratio. Of the 202 hips, 79 (39.1%) had acetabular dysplasia, while 80 hips (39.6%) had no known aetiology. We found evidence of FAI in 60 hips (29.7%). Radiological FAI findings associated with cam deformity were the most common. There was a significant relationship between the pistol grip deformity and both the α-angle (p < 0.001) and femoral head-neck ratio (p = 0.024). Radiological evidence of symptomatic FAI was not uncommon in these Japanese patients. PMID:24493180

  14. Platelet Reactivity Is Independent of Left Atrial Wall Deformation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Procter, Nathan; Goh, Vincent; Mahadevan, Gnanadevan; Stewart, Simon; Horowitz, John

    2016-01-01

    It has been documented recently that left atrial (LA) deformation in AF patients (while in AF) is predictive of subsequent stroke risk. Additionally, diminished LA deformation during AF correlates with the presence of LA blood stasis. Given that endothelial function is dependent on laminar blood flow, the present study sought to investigate the effect of diminished LA deformation (during AF) on platelet reactivity and inflammation in AF patients. Patients (n = 17) hospitalised with AF underwent echocardiography (while in AF) for determination of peak positive LA strain (LASp). Whole blood impedance aggregometry was used to measure extent of ADP-induced aggregation and subsequent inhibitory response to the nitric oxide (NO) donor, sodium nitroprusside. Platelet thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) content was determined by immunohistochemistry. LASp tended (p = 0.078) to vary inversely with CHA2DS2VASc scores. However, mediators of inflammation (C-reactive protein, Txnip) did not correlate significantly with LASp nor did extent of ADP-induced platelet aggregation or platelet NO response. These results suggest that the thrombogenic risk associated with LA stasis is independent of secondary effects on platelet aggregability or inflammation. PMID:27069318

  15. A theoretical model of grainsize evolution during deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Y.; Bercovici, D.; Rozel, A.

    2007-12-01

    Lithospheric shear localization, as occurs in the formation of tectonic plate boundaries, is often associated with diminished grainsize (e.g., mylonites). Grainsize reduction is typically attributed to dynamic recrystallization; however, theoretical models of shear-localization arising from this hypothesis are problematic since (1) they require the simultaneous action of two exclusive creep mechanisms (diffusion and dislocation creep), and (2) the grain-growth ("healing") laws employed by these models are derived from static grain-growth or coarsening theory, although the shear-localization setting itself is far from static equilibrium. We present a new first-principles grained-continuum theory which accounts for both coarsening and damage-induced grainsize reduction. Damage per se is the generic process for generation of microcracks, defects, dislocations (including recrystallization), subgrains, nucleii and cataclastic breakdown of grains. The theory contains coupled statistical grain-scale and continuum macroscopic components. The grain-scale element of the theory prescribes both the evolution of the grainsize distribution, and a phenomenological grain-growth law derived from non-equilibrium thermodynamics; grain-growth thus incorporates the free energy differences between grains, including both grain-boundary surface energy (which controls coarsening) and the contribution of deformational work to these free energiesconservation and positivity of entropy production provide the phenomenological law for the statistical grain-growth law. We identify four potential mechanisms that affect the distribution of grainsize; two of them conserve the number of grains but change their relative masses and two of them change the number of grains by sticking them together or breaking them. In the limit of static equilibrium, only the two mechanisms that increase the average grainsize are allowed by the second law of thermodynamics. The first one is a diffusive mass transport

  16. Effect of Pedal Deformity on Gait in a Patient With Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wynes, Jacob; Lamm, Bradley M; Bhave, Anil; Elmallah, Randa K; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the case of an 81-year-old man who, despite an anatomically aligned total knee arthroplasty, continued to have knee pain. The patient's ipsilateral rigid flatfoot caused by an earlier partial pedal amputation resulted in a valgus moment during gait, thus creating clinical symptoms in the total knee arthroplasty. Because of the deformity and scarring within the flatfoot, this valgus deformity was corrected through a varus distal femoral osteotomy. The result was normalization of the mechanical axis of the lower limb and a pain-free total knee arthroplasty with an excellent clinical outcome. This case shows the importance of comprehensive lower-extremity clinical and radiographic examination as well as gait analysis to understand the biomechanical effect on total knee arthroplasty. Recognition of pedal deformities and lower limb malalignment is paramount for achieving optimal outcomes and long-term success of total knee arthroplasty. The authors show that a rigid or nonflexible pedal deformity can have negative biomechanical effects on total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26709556

  17. Neotectonic deformation models for probabilistic seismic hazard: a study in the External Dinarides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastelic, Vanja; Carafa, Michele M. C.; Visini, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    In Europe, common input data types for seismic hazard evaluation include earthquake catalogues, seismic zonation models and ground motion models, all with well-constrained epistemic uncertainties. In contrast, neotectonic deformation models and their related uncertainties are rarely considered in earthquake forecasting and seismic hazard studies. In this study, for the first time in Europe, we developed a seismic hazard model based exclusively on active fault and geodynamic deformation models. We applied it to the External Dinarides, a slow-deforming fold-and-thrust belt in the Central Mediterranean. The two deformation models furnish consistent long-term earthquake rates above the Mw 4.7 threshold on a latitude/longitude grid with 0.2° spacing. Results suggest that the use of deformation models is a valid alternative to empirical-statistical approaches in earthquake forecasting in slow-deforming regions of Europe. Furthermore, we show that the variability of different deformation models has a comparable effect on the peak ground motion acceleration uncertainty as do the ground motion prediction equations.

  18. Corrections of diverse forms of lower limb deformities in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Kenis, Vladimir; Melchenko, Eugeniy; Ghachem, Maher Ben; Csepan, Robert; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thoracolumbar kyphosis has been considered as the first presenting deformity and is often a key diagnostic clue noted in children with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IV (Morquio's syndrome). However, we observed that the progressive irregularities of the epiphyses of the long bones were the most prominent skeletal pathology, causing effectively the development of diverse forms of lower limbs deformities with extreme variation in age of onset. Materials and Methods: Ten patients (seven children and three adults) with an average age of 15 years have been enrolled in this study. Age of diagnosis of MPS IVA has a variable age of onset and a MISLEADING rate of severity. Hip dislocations, genu valgum, protrusio acetabuli and osteoarthritis were the most common lower limbs deformities in these patients. Clinical and radiographic phenotypes were the baseline tools of documentation. Urinary screening and genotypic characterizations have been applied accordingly. Results: Combined pelvic and femoral procedures for hip dislocation, epiphysiodeses and supracondylar osteotomy for genu valgum and hip arthroplasty for protrusio acetabuli have been performed. All patients manifested insufficient activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulphate sulphatase, an enzyme that degrades keratin sulphate and chondroitin-6 sulphate. Conclusion: The extensive clinical heterogeneity contributed significantly in the delay in establishing the diagnosis particularly in adult patients with MPS IV. The epiphyseal irregularities of the long bones and the progressive flattening pathology of MPS IV A were the reason to falsely diagnose some patients as spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenital and/or tarda. Proximal femoral osteotomy, realignment osteotomy and total hip arthroplasty have been performed for coxa vara, genu valgum and protrusio acetabuli, respectively, in children and adult group of patients. The importance of early diagnosis on MPS IV A is to receive enzyme replacement therapy

  19. Accurate Segmentation of CT Male Pelvic Organs via Regression-Based Deformable Models and Multi-Task Random Forests.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaozong; Shao, Yeqin; Lian, Jun; Wang, Andrew Z; Chen, Ronald C; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-06-01

    Segmenting male pelvic organs from CT images is a prerequisite for prostate cancer radiotherapy. The efficacy of radiation treatment highly depends on segmentation accuracy. However, accurate segmentation of male pelvic organs is challenging due to low tissue contrast of CT images, as well as large variations of shape and appearance of the pelvic organs. Among existing segmentation methods, deformable models are the most popular, as shape prior can be easily incorporated to regularize the segmentation. Nonetheless, the sensitivity to initialization often limits their performance, especially for segmenting organs with large shape variations. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to guide deformable models, thus making them robust against arbitrary initializations. Specifically, we learn a displacement regressor, which predicts 3D displacement from any image voxel to the target organ boundary based on the local patch appearance. This regressor provides a non-local external force for each vertex of deformable model, thus overcoming the initialization problem suffered by the traditional deformable models. To learn a reliable displacement regressor, two strategies are particularly proposed. 1) A multi-task random forest is proposed to learn the displacement regressor jointly with the organ classifier; 2) an auto-context model is used to iteratively enforce structural information during voxel-wise prediction. Extensive experiments on 313 planning CT scans of 313 patients show that our method achieves better results than alternative classification or regression based methods, and also several other existing methods in CT pelvic organ segmentation. PMID:26800531

  20. Deformations in the Shoulder Tissues During Load Carriage: A Computational Model.

    PubMed

    Hadid, Amir; Belzer, Noa; Shabshin, Nogah; Epstein, Yoram; Gefen, Amit

    2015-11-01

    Shoulder soft tissue deformations seem to be one of the limiting factors of load carriage among soldiers and recreational backpackers that are required to carry heavy loads. Yet, there are no loading limits related to the forces borne by the shoulders, and the backpacks designs are not consistent with providing pressure relief from this sensitive anatomical region. The aim of this study was to develop a model that will enable to study the biomechanical loads that develop in the shoulder under heavy loads and to help in optimizing load carriage systems design. A 3-dimensional, anatomically accurate finite element model of a human shoulder was constructed based on MRI scans. The model was developed to calculate the effective stresses on the skin below the shoulder strap (superficial loads) and the effective strain in the brachial plexus region (inner tissue deformation) for loads of up to 35 kg. The model successfully predicted deformations in the soft tissue surrounding the brachial plexus when compared with deformations measured from load-bearing MRI scans. The model yielded a skin pressure mapping, which showed pressure hotspots in the clavicle region. Inner tissue deformations mapping, as assessed by brachial plexus envelop strains, were found to peak at 30% effective strain at the lateral aspect below the pectoralis muscle. The newly developed model successfully predicted soft tissue deformations in the shoulder related to backpacks. This model can be used to optimize load carriage systems for better distribution of pressure over the shoulders and lower inner tissue deformations. PMID:26506178

  1. DEFORMATION DEPENDENT TUL MULTI-STEP DIRECT MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    WIENKE,H.; CAPOTE, R.; HERMAN, M.; SIN, M.

    2007-04-22

    The Multi-Step Direct (MSD) module TRISTAN in the nuclear reaction code EMPIRE has been extended in order to account for nuclear deformation. The new formalism was tested in calculations of neutron emission spectra emitted from the {sup 232}Th(n,xn) reaction. These calculations include vibration-rotational Coupled Channels (CC) for the inelastic scattering to low-lying collective levels, ''deformed'' MSD with quadrupole deformation for inelastic scattering to the continuum, Multi-Step Compound (MSC) and Hauser-Feshbach with advanced treatment of the fission channel. Prompt fission neutrons were also calculated. The comparison with experimental data shows clear improvement over the ''spherical'' MSD calculations and JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.3 evaluations.

  2. Patient-Specific Models of Cardiac Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H; McCulloch, Andrew D; Kerckhoffs, Roy Cp

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures. PMID:23729839

  3. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  4. Relationships among maxillofacial morphologies, bone properties, and bone metabolic markers in patients with jaw deformities.

    PubMed

    Saito, D; Mikami, T; Oda, Y; Hasebe, D; Nishiyama, H; Saito, I; Kobayashi, T

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships among bone properties, bone metabolic markers, and types of jaw deformity. The subjects were 55 female patients with jaw deformities. Skeletal morphology was examined using lateral cephalograms, and the patients were divided into three groups according to the type of anteroposterior skeletal pattern. Serum osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b, as well as deoxypyridinoline in urine, were measured as bone metabolic markers. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements were used to assess bone properties at the calcaneal bone. The bone volume and bone density of the condylar process were measured in 43 patients by computed tomography. There were no significant differences in bone metabolic markers and QUS parameters between the groups, although bone formation and resorption markers tended to be higher in patients with a protrusive mandible. On the other hand, patients with mandibular retrusion had a higher tendency to have small and dense condylar processes. In conclusion, the results suggest that growth depression or a degenerative change in the mandibular condyle is involved in the pathogenesis of mandibular retrusion, although risk factors for progressive condylar resorption were not determined. PMID:26972158

  5. A deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of Monogenean.

    PubMed

    Teo, Bee Guan; Dhillon, Sarinder Kaur; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a digital 3D model which allows for visualisation in three dimensions and interactive manipulation is explored as a tool to help us understand the structural morphology and elucidate the functions of morphological structures of fragile microorganisms which defy live studies. We developed a deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of dactylogyridean monogeneans that can subsequently be deformed into different desired anchor shapes by using direct manipulation deformation technique. We used point primitives to construct the rectangular building blocks to develop our deformable 3D model. Point primitives are manually marked on a 2D illustration of an anchor on a Cartesian graph paper and a set of Cartesian coordinates for each point primitive is manually extracted from the graph paper. A Python script is then written in Blender to construct 3D rectangular building blocks based on the Cartesian coordinates. The rectangular building blocks are stacked on top or by the side of each other following their respective Cartesian coordinates of point primitive. More point primitives are added at the sites in the 3D model where more structural variations are likely to occur, in order to generate complex anchor structures. We used Catmull-Clark subdivision surface modifier to smoothen the surface and edge of the generic 3D model to obtain a smoother and more natural 3D shape and antialiasing option to reduce the jagged edges of the 3D model. This deformable generic 3D model can be deformed into different desired 3D anchor shapes through direct manipulation deformation technique by aligning the vertices (pilot points) of the newly developed deformable generic 3D model onto the 2D illustrations of the desired shapes and moving the vertices until the desire 3D shapes are formed. In this generic 3D model all the vertices present are deployed for displacement during deformation. PMID:24204903

  6. A Deformable Generic 3D Model of Haptoral Anchor of Monogenean

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Bee Guan; Dhillon, Sarinder Kaur; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a digital 3D model which allows for visualisation in three dimensions and interactive manipulation is explored as a tool to help us understand the structural morphology and elucidate the functions of morphological structures of fragile microorganisms which defy live studies. We developed a deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of dactylogyridean monogeneans that can subsequently be deformed into different desired anchor shapes by using direct manipulation deformation technique. We used point primitives to construct the rectangular building blocks to develop our deformable 3D model. Point primitives are manually marked on a 2D illustration of an anchor on a Cartesian graph paper and a set of Cartesian coordinates for each point primitive is manually extracted from the graph paper. A Python script is then written in Blender to construct 3D rectangular building blocks based on the Cartesian coordinates. The rectangular building blocks are stacked on top or by the side of each other following their respective Cartesian coordinates of point primitive. More point primitives are added at the sites in the 3D model where more structural variations are likely to occur, in order to generate complex anchor structures. We used Catmull-Clark subdivision surface modifier to smoothen the surface and edge of the generic 3D model to obtain a smoother and more natural 3D shape and antialiasing option to reduce the jagged edges of the 3D model. This deformable generic 3D model can be deformed into different desired 3D anchor shapes through direct manipulation deformation technique by aligning the vertices (pilot points) of the newly developed deformable generic 3D model onto the 2D illustrations of the desired shapes and moving the vertices until the desire 3D shapes are formed. In this generic 3D model all the vertices present are deployed for displacement during deformation. PMID:24204903

  7. Model-based registration for assessment of spinal deformities in idiopathic scoliosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, Daniel; Lundström, Claes; Andersson, Mats; Knutsson, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Detailed analysis of spinal deformity is important within orthopaedic healthcare, in particular for assessment of idiopathic scoliosis. This paper addresses this challenge by proposing an image analysis method, capable of providing a full three-dimensional spine characterization. The proposed method is based on the registration of a highly detailed spine model to image data from computed tomography. The registration process provides an accurate segmentation of each individual vertebra and the ability to derive various measures describing the spinal deformity. The derived measures are estimated from landmarks attached to the spine model and transferred to the patient data according to the registration result. Evaluation of the method provides an average point-to-surface error of 0.9 mm ± 0.9 (comparing segmentations), and an average target registration error of 2.3 mm ± 1.7 (comparing landmarks). Comparing automatic and manual measurements of axial vertebral rotation provides a mean absolute difference of 2.5° ± 1.8, which is on a par with other computerized methods for assessing axial vertebral rotation. A significant advantage of our method, compared to other computerized methods for rotational measurements, is that it does not rely on vertebral symmetry for computing the rotational measures. The proposed method is fully automatic and computationally efficient, only requiring three to four minutes to process an entire image volume covering vertebrae L5 to T1. Given the use of landmarks, the method can be readily adapted to estimate other measures describing a spinal deformity by changing the set of employed landmarks. In addition, the method has the potential to be utilized for accurate segmentations of the vertebrae in routine computed tomography examinations, given the relatively low point-to-surface error.

  8. Modelling MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Celia

    As of July 2012, 777 exoplanets have been discovered utilizing mainly indirect detection techniques. The direct imaging of exoplanets is the next goal for astronomers, because it will reveal the diversity of planets and planetary systems, and will give access to the exoplanet's chemical composition via spectroscopy. With this spectroscopic knowledge, astronomers will be able to know, if a planet is terrestrial and, possibly, even find evidence of life. With so much potential, this branch of astronomy has also captivated the general public attention. The direct imaging of exoplanets remains a challenging task, due to (i) the extremely high contrast between the parent star and the orbiting exoplanet and (ii) their small angular separation. For ground-based observatories, this task is made even more difficult, due to the presence of atmospheric turbulence. High Contrast Imaging (HCI) instruments have been designed to meet this challenge. HCI instruments are usually composed of a coronagraph coupled with the full onaxis corrective capability of an Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) system. An efficient coronagraph separates the faint planet's light from the much brighter starlight, but the dynamic boiling speckles, created by the stellar image, make exoplanet detection impossible without the help of a wavefront correction device. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system is a high performance HCI instrument developed at Subaru Telescope. The wavefront control system of SCExAO consists of three wavefront sensors (WFS) coupled with a 1024- actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM). MEMS DMs offer a large actuator density, allowing high count DMs to be deployed in small size beams. Therefore, MEMS DMs are an attractive technology for Adaptive Optics (AO) systems and are particularly well suited for HCI instruments employing ExAO technologies. SCExAO uses coherent light modulation in the focal plane introduced by the DM, for

  9. Experimental Investigation of Aeroelastic Deformation of Slender Wings at Supersonic Speeds Using a Video Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    A video-based photogrammetric model deformation system was established as a dedicated optical measurement technique at supersonic speeds in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This system was used to measure the wing twist due to aerodynamic loads of two supersonic commercial transport airplane models with identical outer mold lines but different aeroelastic properties. One model featured wings with deflectable leading- and trailing-edge flaps and internal channels to accommodate static pressure tube instrumentation. The wings of the second model were of single-piece construction without flaps or internal channels. The testing was performed at Mach numbers from 1.6 to 2.7, unit Reynolds numbers of 1.0 million to 5.0 million, and angles of attack from -4 degrees to +10 degrees. The video model deformation system quantified the wing aeroelastic response to changes in the Mach number, Reynolds number concurrent with dynamic pressure, and angle of attack and effectively captured the differences in the wing twist characteristics between the two test articles.

  10. Deformable Surface Model for the Evaluation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with an Endovascular Sealing System.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, Mariano E; El-Batti, Salma; Chironi, Gilles; Simon, Alain; Mousseaux, Elie; Armentano, Ricardo L; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Craiem, Damian

    2016-05-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is responsible for 1-3% of all deaths among the elderly population in developed countries. A novel endograft proposes an endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) system that isolates the aneurysm wall from blood flow using a polymer-filled endobag that surrounds two balloon-expandable stents. The volume of injected polymer is determined by monitoring the endobag pressure but the final AAA expansion remains unknown. We conceived and developed a fully deformable surface model for the comparison of pre-operative sac lumen size and final endobag size (measured using a follow-up scan) with the volume of injected polymer. Computed tomography images were acquired for eight patients. Aneurysms were manually and automatically segmented twice by the same observer. The injected polymer volume resulted 9% higher than the aneurysm pre-operative lumen size (p < 0.05), and 11% lower than the final follow-up endobag volume (p < 0.01). The automated method required minimal user interaction; it was fast and used a single set of parameters for all subjects. Intra-observer and manual vs. automated variability of measured volumes were 0.35 ± 2.11 and 0.07 ± 3.04 mL, respectively. Deformable surface models were used to quantify AAA size and showed that EVAS system devices tended to expand the sac lumen size. PMID:26350505

  11. Construction of a Deformable Spatiotemporal MRI Atlas of the Fetal Brain: Evaluation of Similarity Metrics and Deformation Models

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Ali; Limperopoulos, Catherine; Clancy, Sean; Clouchoux, Cedric; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Estroff, Judy A.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2014-01-01

    The development and identification of best methods in fetal brain MRI analysis is crucial as we expect an outburst of studies on groupwise and longitudinal analysis of early brain development in the upcoming years. To address this critical need, in this paper, we have developed a mathematical framework for the construction of an unbiased deformable spatiotemporal atlas of the fetal brain MRI and compared it to alternative configurations in terms of similarity metrics and deformation models. Our contributions are twofold: first we suggest a novel approach to fetal brain spatiotemporal atlas construction that shows high capability in capturing anatomic variation between subjects; and second, within our atlas construction framework we evaluate and compare a set of plausible configurations for inter-subject fetal brain MRI registration and identify the most accurate approach that can potentially lead to most accurate results in population atlas construction, atlas-based segmentation, and group analysis. Our evaluation results indicate that symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration with cross correlation similarity metric outperforms other configurations in this application and results in sharp unbiased atlases that can be used in fetal brain MRI analysis. PMID:25485391

  12. Modelling continental deformation within global plate tectonic reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S.; Whittaker, J.; Heine, C.; Müller, P.

    2010-12-01

    A limitation of regional and global plate tectonic models is the way continental deformation is represented. Continental blocks are typically represented as rigid polygons - overlaps or gaps between adjacent continental blocks represent extension or compression respectively. Full-fit reconstructions of major ocean basins result in large overlaps between the conjugate continental plates, on the basis that the continental margins are highly extended compared to their pre-rift state. A fundamental challenge in generating more robust global-scale plate reconstructions is the incorporation of a more quantitative description of the kinematics within extended passive margins, based on observations. We have used the conjugate Southern Australia and Wilkes Land, Antarctica margins as a case study, and as part of this work have generated revised sediment thickness maps for these margins. These datasets are used to test different approaches for generating full-fit reconstructions in order to create a framework of methodologies that is globally applicable. One approach is to restore two conjugate continent-ocean boundaries (COBs) to their pre-rift configuration and then use the geometric fitting method of Hellinger (1981) and Royer and Chang (1991), used to generate fits of seafloor isochrons, to generate a “full-fit” Euler pole. To quantitatively restore the COBs to their palinspastic pre-rift configuration we integrate estimates of crustal thickness along small circle paths, defined by an initial estimate of the Euler stage pole describing plate motions during continental rifting. We then use the conjugate sets of restored COB’s as inputs to the geometric fitting method, treating them as isochrons, and so generate poles of rotation for the plate configuration prior to rifting. Two potential shortcomings of this methodology are that (1) the conjugate margins are treated independently, whereas in reality they were actually one continuous continental basin during rifting

  13. Volume Preserved Mass-Spring Model with Novel Constraints for Soft Tissue Deformation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuping; Huang, Weimin; Chang, Huibin; Chen, Wenyu; Zhou, Jiayin; Teo, Soo Kng; Su, Yi; Chui, Chee Kong; Chang, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    An interactive surgical simulation system needs to meet three main requirements, speed, accuracy, and stability. In this paper, we present a stable and accurate method for animating mass-spring systems in real time. An integration scheme derived from explicit integration is used to obtain interactive realistic animation for a multiobject environment. We explore a predictor-corrector approach by correcting the estimation of the explicit integration in a poststep process. We introduce novel constraints on positions into the mass-spring model (MSM) to model the nonlinearity and preserve volume for the realistic simulation of the incompressibility. We verify the proposed MSM by comparing its deformations with the reference deformations of the nonlinear finite-element method. Moreover, experiments on porcine organs are designed for the evaluation of the multiobject deformation. Using a pair of freshly harvested porcine liver and gallbladder, the real organ deformations are acquired by computed tomography and used as the reference ground truth. Compared to the porcine model, our model achieves a 1.502 mm mean absolute error measured at landmark locations for cases with small deformation (the largest deformation is 49.109 mm) and a 3.639 mm mean absolute error for cases with large deformation (the largest deformation is 83.137 mm). The changes of volume for the two deformations are limited to 0.030% and 0.057%, respectively. Finally, an implementation in a virtual reality environment for laparoscopic cholecystectomy demonstrates that our model is capable to simulate large deformation and preserve volume in real-time calculations. PMID:25398184

  14. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 4: Model deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of systems capable of model deformation measurements was conducted. The survey included stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers. Moire, holographic, and heterodyne interferometry techniques were also looked at. Stereo-cameras with passive or active targets are currently being deployed for model deformation measurements at NASA Ames and LaRC, Boeing, and ONERA. Scanners and digitizers are widely used in robotics, motion analysis, medicine, etc., and some of the scanner and digitizers can meet the model deformation requirements. Commercial stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers are being improved in accuracy, reliability, and ease of operation. A number of new systems are coming onto the market.

  15. [Research progress on real-time deformable models of soft tissues for surgery simulation].

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaoping; Liu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hua; Luo, Jie

    2010-04-01

    Biological tissues generally exhibit nonlinearity, anisotropy, quasi-incompressibility and viscoelasticity about material properties. Simulating the behaviour of elastic objects in real time is one of the current objectives of virtual surgery simulation which is still a challenge for researchers to accurately depict the behaviour of human tissues. In this paper, we present a classification of the different deformable models that have been developed. We present the advantages and disadvantages of each one. Finally, we make a comparison of deformable models and perform an evaluation of the state of the art and the future of deformable models. PMID:20481334

  16. Modeling of sharp change in magnetic hysteresis behavior of electrical steel at small plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablik, M. J.; Rios, S.; Landgraf, F. J. G.; Yonamine, T.; de Campos, M. F.

    2005-05-01

    In 2.2% Si electrical steel, the magnetic hysteresis behavior is sharply sheared by a rather small plastic deformation (0.5%). A modification to the Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model makes it possible to model magnetic effects of plastic deformation. In this paper, with this model, it is shown how a narrow hysteresis with an almost steplike hysteresis curve for an undeformed specimen is sharply sheared by plastic deformation. Computed coercivity and hysteresis loss show a sharp step to higher values at small strain due to an n =1/2 power law dependence on residual strain. The step is seen experimentally.

  17. Modeling of sharp change in magnetic hysteresis behavior of electrical steel at small plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Rios, S.; Landgraf, F.J.G.; Yonamine, T.; Campos, M.F. de

    2005-05-15

    In 2.2% Si electrical steel, the magnetic hysteresis behavior is sharply sheared by a rather small plastic deformation (0.5%). A modification to the Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model makes it possible to model magnetic effects of plastic deformation. In this paper, with this model, it is shown how a narrow hysteresis with an almost steplike hysteresis curve for an undeformed specimen is sharply sheared by plastic deformation. Computed coercivity and hysteresis loss show a sharp step to higher values at small strain due to an n=1/2 power law dependence on residual strain. The step is seen experimentally.

  18. Models for rupture mechanics of plate boundaries and crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur, A.

    1983-02-01

    The role of pull aparts and pushups in transcurrent systems, the rotation of faults and blocks within transcurrent fault systems, the role of accretion tectonics in plate boundary deformation, and power law creep behavior and the yielding at plate boundaries were investigated.

  19. Deformation Prediction and Geometrical Modeling of Head and Neck Cancer Tumor: A Data Mining Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, Maryam

    Radiation therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer tumors for several years and many cancer patients receive radiotherapy. It may be used as primary therapy or with a combination of surgery or other kinds of therapy such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy or some mixture of the three. The treatment objective is to destroy cancer cells or shrink the tumor by planning an adequate radiation dose to the desired target without damaging the normal tissues. By using the pre-treatment Computer Tomography (CT) images, most of the radiotherapy planning systems design the target and assume that the size of the tumor will not change throughout the treatment course, which takes 5 to 7 weeks. Based on this assumption, the total amount of radiation is planned and fractionated for the daily dose required to be delivered to the patient's body. However, this assumption is flawed because the patients receiving radiotherapy have marked changes in tumor geometry during the treatment period. Therefore, there is a critical need to understand the changes of the tumor shape and size over time during the course of radiotherapy in order to prevent significant effects of inaccuracy in the planning. In this research, a methodology is proposed in order to monitor and predict daily (fraction day) tumor volume and surface changes of head and neck cancer tumors during the entire treatment period. In the proposed method, geometrical modeling and data mining techniques will be used rather than repetitive CT scans data to predict the tumor deformation for radiation planning. Clinical patient data were obtained from the University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). In the first step, by using CT scan data, the tumor's progressive geometric changes during the treatment period are quantified. The next step relates to using regression analysis in order to develop predictive models for tumor geometry based on the geometric analysis results and the patients' selected attributes (age, weight

  20. Discrete Particle Model for Deformation of Assemblies of Steel Balls Under Extension: Application to Sandbox Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibee, M. A.; Calantoni, J.; Sclater, J. G.

    2005-05-01

    Experiments on sandboxes provide a useful tool for understanding the deformation of both sedimentary sequences and the continental crust. Boerner and Sclater (1992) have shown that the deformation under extension of assemblies of steel balls can reproduce many of the basic features of these experiments. We use a discrete particle model (DPM) to simulate previously performed physical experiments, which consisted of extending close-packed assemblies of steel balls placed on a rubber sheet attached to moveable boundaries. Steel balls are modeled with spherical elements in the DPM where normal and tangential forces generated at contact points are modeled with springs and friction, respectively. The simulations allow for a quantitative examination of the displacement and rotation of each steel ball as well as provide estimates of the contact forces between them. We perform a suite of simulations to explore the behavior of the model due to variations in the material properties of the balls and rate of extension of the assembly. Qualitative visual analysis shows that the simulations reproduce the qualitative features from the physical experiments such as dilation, rotation, and fault formation. Our success in matching most of the major features of the experiment indicates that the DPM may have a real future in improving our understanding of the deformation of both sedimentary sequences and the continental crust.

  1. Two-dimensional numerical modeling for separation of deformable cells using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ting; Li, Hua; Lam, K Y

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we numerically explore the possibility of separating two groups of deformable cells, by a very small dielectrophoretic (DEP) microchip with the characteristic length of several cell diameters. A 2D two-fluid model is developed to describe the separation process, where three types of forces are considered, the aggregation force for cell-cell interaction, the deformation force for cell deformation, and the DEP force for cell dielectrophoresis. As a model validation, we calculate the levitation height of a cell subject to DEP force, and compare it with the experimental data. After that, we simulate the separation of two groups of cells with different dielectric properties at high and low frequencies, respectively. The simulation results show that the deformable cells can be separated successfully by a very small DEP microchip, according to not only their different permittivities at the high frequency, but also their different conductivities at the low frequency. In addition, both two groups of cells have a shape deformation from an original shape to a lopsided slipper shape during the separation process. It is found that the cell motion is mainly determined by the DEP force arising from the electric field, causing the cells to deviate from the centerline of microchannel. However, the cell deformation is mainly determined by the deformation force arising from the fluid flow, causing the deviated cells to undergo an asymmetric motion with the deformation of slipper shape. PMID:24981085

  2. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2006-02-15

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  3. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 1; Matrix Constitutive Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this first paper of a two part report, background information is presented, along with the constitutive equations which will be used to model the rate dependent nonlinear deformation response of the polymer matrix. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive models which were originally developed to model the viscoplastic deformation of metals have been adapted to model the nonlinear viscoelastic deformation of polymers. The modified equations were correlated by analyzing the tensile/ compressive response of both 977-2 toughened epoxy matrix and PEEK thermoplastic matrix over a variety of strain rates. For the cases examined, the modified constitutive equations appear to do an adequate job of modeling the polymer deformation response. A second follow-up paper will describe the implementation of the polymer deformation model into a composite micromechanical model, to allow for the modeling of the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composites.

  4. FISH analysis of a subtle familial Xp deletion in a female patient with Madelung deformity

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, T.Y.; Gibson, L.H.; Pober, B.R.

    1994-09-01

    A subtle deletion of Xp [del(X)(p22.32)]was identified by high-resolution chromosome analysis in a twelve-year-old female with short stature (<2 percentile) and Madelung deformity suggestive of Turner syndrome. The proband`s mother, who has short stature (<2 percentile) and demyelinating disorder, also showed this deletion. The maternal grandmother is of normal height and carries two normal X chromosomes. Both the patient and her mother have no other physical abnormalities and are of normal intelligence. To confirm and delineate this Xp deletion, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed on metaphases from the patient and her mother using probes of DXYS20 (a pseudoautosomal locus), DXS232A, and a newly isolated Xp YAC clone, YHX2, whose relative map position is unknown. Hybridization signals of DXS232A were detected on both X chromosomes, and DXYS20 and YHX2 were missing from one of the X`s of both the patient and her mother. YHX2 was thus placed distal to DXS232A (tel-DXYS20-YHX2-S232A-cen). This familial deletion with a breakpoint distal to DXS232A, which is located at -900 Kb telomeric to STS locus, appears to be the smallest Xp deletion reported thus far. Short stature is consistently associated with females carrying Xp deletions. Madelung deformity has been found in some patients with Turner syndrome or Dyschondrosteosis but it has not been reported in patients with Xp deletion. Our results suggest that the phenotype of our patient is associated with her chromosome abnormality. Due to the subtlety of the deletion identified in our patient and her mother, females presenting with short stature warrant careful clinical and cytogenetic evaluation.

  5. Learning deformation model for expression-robust 3D face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhe; Liu, Shu; Wang, Yi; Lei, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Expression change is the major cause of local plastic deformation of the facial surface. The intra-class differences with large expression change somehow are larger than the inter-class differences as it's difficult to distinguish the same individual with facial expression change. In this paper, an expression-robust 3D face recognition method is proposed by learning expression deformation model. The expression of the individuals on the training set is modeled by principal component analysis, the main components are retained to construct the facial deformation model. For the test 3D face, the shape difference between the test and the neutral face in training set is used for reconstructing the expression change by the constructed deformation model. The reconstruction residual error is used for face recognition. The average recognition rate on GavabDB and self-built database reaches 85.1% and 83%, respectively, which shows strong robustness for expression changes.

  6. Effects of orthognathic surgery on psychological status of patients with jaw deformities.

    PubMed

    Takatsuji, H; Kobayashi, T; Kojima, T; Hasebe, D; Izumi, N; Saito, I; Saito, C

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of orthognathic surgery on psychological status. The subjects were 119 patients (38 males and 81 females, mean age 25.5±9.4 years) who underwent orthognathic surgery. They were divided into class III (84 patients), class II (20 patients), and class I (15 patients) groups according to the anteroposterior skeletal pattern, and they were also divided into an asymmetry group (51 patients) and a symmetry group (68 patients). We assessed psychological status using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) before surgery and at more than 6 months after surgery. The MMPI scores for the depression, hysteria, psychasthenia, and social introversion scales were significantly higher than standard values before surgery, and the hypomania scale significantly lower. The cannot say scale, depression scale, and hysteria scale decreased significantly after surgery. A comparison of MMPI scores among the groups showed the depression scale in the class III group to be higher than those in the class I and II groups; there was no significant difference between the asymmetry and symmetry groups. In conclusion, orthognathic surgery has a positive influence on the psychological status of patients with jaw deformities, especially patients with skeletal class III malocclusion. PMID:26004311

  7. Medical image-guided surgery planning for breast reconstruction using deformable modeling and surface flattening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pengfei; Gu, Lixu; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Jingsi; Xu, Hua; Dong, Jiasheng; Chen, Weitao; Pei, Wei; Song, Jiasi; Li, Bowen; Xu, Jianrong

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, a virtual breast plastic surgery planning method is proposed, which reconstructs the breast after excision for certain diseases such as cancer. In order to achieve a rational result, we calculate shape, area, volume and depth of the skin and muscle for the reconstruction, based on the other healthy breast. The steps are as follows: 1) input breast's MRI data of patient; 2) get the healthy breast using balloon segmentation algorithm and get triangle mesh on breast surface; 3) flatten the triangulated skin of breast using deformable model to attain the shape and volume of the flap for breast reconstruction. Other methods such as mesh smoothing and cutting of triangulated surface are also introduced. The doctors validation and evaluation process are also provided to ensure the robust and stable result of virtual surgery planning.

  8. Unsupervised segmentation of lung fields in chest radiographs using multiresolution fractal feature vector and deformable models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Li; Chang, Koyin; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Segmenting lung fields in a chest radiograph is essential for automatically analyzing an image. We present an unsupervised method based on multiresolution fractal feature vector. The feature vector characterizes the lung field region effectively. A fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm is then applied to obtain a satisfactory initial contour. The final contour is obtained by deformable models. The results show the feasibility and high performance of the proposed method. Furthermore, based on the segmentation of lung fields, the cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) can be measured. The CTR is a simple index for evaluating cardiac hypertrophy. After identifying a suspicious symptom based on the estimated CTR, a physician can suggest that the patient undergoes additional extensive tests before a treatment plan is finalized. PMID:26530048

  9. A low-dimensional deformation model for cancer cells in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A. M.; Berny-Lang, M. A.; Liao, S.; Kanso, E.; Kuhn, P.; McCarty, O. J. T.; Newton, P. K.

    2012-08-01

    A low-dimensional parametric deformation model of a cancer cell under shear flow is developed. The model is built around an experiment in which MDA-MB-231 adherent cells are subjected to flow with increasing shear. The cell surface deformation is imaged using differential interference contrast microscopy imaging techniques until the cell releases into the flow. We post-process the time sequence of images using an active shape model from which we obtain the principal components of deformation. These principal components are then used to obtain the parameters in an empirical constitutive equation determining the cell deformations as a function of the fluid normal and shear forces imparted. The cell surface is modeled as a 2D Gaussian interface which can be deformed with three active parameters: H (height), σx (x-width), and σy (y-width). Fluid forces are calculated on the cell surface by discretizing the surface with regularized Stokeslets, and the flow is driven by a stochastically fluctuating pressure gradient. The Stokeslet strengths are obtained so that viscous boundary conditions are enforced on the surface of the cell and the surrounding plate. We show that the low-dimensional model is able to capture the principal deformations of the cell reasonably well and argue that active shape models can be exploited further as a useful tool to bridge the gap between experiments, models, and numerical simulations in this biological setting.

  10. Modeling for deformable mirrors and the adaptive optics optimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Haney, S.W.; Trenholme, J.B.; Thomas, M.

    1997-03-18

    We discuss aspects of adaptive optics optimization for large fusion laser systems such as the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL. By way of example, we considered the discrete actuator deformable mirror and Hartmann sensor system used on the Beamlet laser. Beamlet is a single-aperture prototype of the 11-0-5 slab amplifier design for NIF, and so we expect similar optical distortion levels and deformable mirror correction requirements. We are now in the process of developing a numerically efficient object oriented C++ language implementation of our adaptive optics and wavefront sensor code, but this code is not yet operational. Results are based instead on the prototype algorithms, coded-up in an interpreted array processing computer language.

  11. Outcome of major spinal deformity surgery in high-risk patients: comparison between two departments

    PubMed Central

    Murans, Girts; Gustavsson, Bengt; Saraste, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Study design: Retrospective cohort study Objective: To describe the outcome and resource use in major spine surgery on high-risk patients, and analyze possible differences between two surgical departments. Methods: Data from the deformity register and medical records of 136 patients, median age 12-years, with neuromuscular and congenital spinal deformities with and without intraspinal pathology, surgically treated by one surgeon from 1997 through 2004 at two departments. H1 with a pediatric multidisciplinary team, and H2 with focus on adult spine. Variables at baseline: age, gender, diagnosis, curve size, and type of surgical procedure. Result variables included clinical and radiographic outcome, surgery time, length of intensive care and hospital stay, relative blood loss, and occurrence of complications during 2 or more years follow-up. Results: There was no perioperative or postoperative mortality, no spinal-cord damage, no neurological or ambulatory function deterioration. The overall complication rate was 36%, and the overall major complication rate was 15.4%. The mean loss of correction was 2° during the follow-up. There were statistically significant differences between the H1 and H2 departments. At H1, deformity correction was better and surgery time shorter. Infections were more frequent at H2 (P = .04; 6/65 at H1; 16/71 at H2), tendency (P = .06) of more department-related complications was higher at H2. Conclusions: Major spine surgery in high-risk patients can be performed safely and with good outcoms. Impact of organization and workplace culture on the outcome might be important and worth further study. PMID:22956923

  12. Constitutive Modeling of Anisotropic Finite-Deformation Hyperelastic Behaviors of Soft Materials Reinforced by Tortuous Fibers.

    PubMed

    Kao, Philip H; Lammers, Steven R; Hunter, Kendall; Stenmark, Kurt R; Shandas, Robin; Qi, H Jerry

    2010-04-01

    Many biological materials are composites composed of a soft matrix reinforced with stiffer fibers. These stiffer fibers may have a tortuous shape and wind through the soft matrix. At small material deformation, these fibers deform in a bending mode and contribute little to the material stiffness; at large material deformation, these fibers deform in a stretching mode and induce a stiffening effect in the material behavior. The transition from bending mode deformation to stretching mode deformation yields a characteristic J-shape stress-strain curve. In addition, the spatial distribution of these fibers may render the composite an anisotropic behavior. In this paper, we present an anisotropic finite-deformation hyperelastic constitutive model for such materials. Here, the matrix is modeled as an isotropic neo-Hookean material. "The behaviors of single tortuous fiber are represented by a crimped fiber model". The anisotropic behavior is introduced by a structure tensor representing the effective orientation distribution of crimped fibers. Parametric studies show the effect of fiber tortuosity and fiber orientation distribution on the overall stress-strain behaviors of the materials. PMID:21822502

  13. Predictive Model for Temperature-Induced Deformation of Robot Mechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonyapak, Pranchalee

    The positioning accuracy and repeatability of a robot are critical for many industrial applications. Drift in repeatability can occur with changes in environmental and internal conditions, such as those seen with temperature-induced deformation. Thermal instability causes dimensional deformation, and a warm-up cycle is typically required to bring the robot to a thermally stable working condition. The elimination of warm-up cycles will ultimately enhance the positioning accuracy of the robots, their productivity, and reduce unnecessary energy consumption. The main objective of this research was to develop a robot controller algorithm that would provide, a priori, compensation for temperature-induced deformation associated with warm-up in robot mechanical systems. The research started at the fundamental stage of gaining insight into the thermal behaviour and corresponding temperature-induced deformation of simplified, i.e., one-dimensional, robot mechanical systems consisting of slender links and heat sources. The systems were studied using concomitant experimental, numerical and analytical models to provide cross-checking of the results. For the experimental model, the deformation was measured by tracking the drift of a laser diode spot across a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera chip. A non-contact measurement system consisting of an infrared camera, a CCD camera and a laser diode was developed to provide high accuracy measurement for the deformation. The numerical model was generated with a coupled thermal-mechanical finite element analysis incorporating thermal effects due to conduction and convection. The models were tested with the analytical model that was further extended using a finite difference technique. Once the three models showed excellent agreement, it was possible to develop a controller algorithm. Deformations predicted by the finite difference model were used as input for a validation experiment of the compensation algorithm. Results of the

  14. Modelling Deformation and Texture Evolution in OFHC Copper at Large Strain and High Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Nicola; Testa, Gabriel; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Hörnqvist, Magnus; Mortazavi, Nooshin

    2015-06-01

    In this work, a two-scale approach to simulate high rate deformation and texture evolution in OFHC copper is presented. The modified Rusinek-Klepaczko material model was used to simulate the response of the material at continuum scale accounting for different deformation mechanisms occurring over an extensive range of strain rate and temperature. Material model parameters were determined from characterization test (mainly uniaxial tests) results. Successively, the model was validated simulating material deformation in Taylor anvil impact, symmetric Taylor impact (rod-on-rod) and dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests. Texture evolution, under different deformation paths was simulated using the crystal plasticity package CPFEM and results were compared with those obtained by EBSD analysis. The possibility to incorporate the effect of grain size evolution and fragmentation at continuum scale is discussed.

  15. All-loop correlators of integrable λ-deformed σ-models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, George; Sfetsos, Konstantinos; Siampos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    We compute the 2- and 3-point functions of currents and primary fields of λ-deformed integrable σ-models characterized also by an integer k. Our results apply for any semisimple group G, for all values of the deformation parameter λ and up to order 1 / k. We deduce the OPEs and equal-time commutators of all currents and primaries. We derive the currents' Poisson brackets which assume Rajeev's deformation of the canonical structure of the isotropic PCM, the underlying structure of the integrable λ-deformed σ-models. We also present analogous results in two limiting cases of special interest, namely for the non-Abelian T-dual of the PCM and for the pseudodual model.

  16. Extension of continental lithosphere - A model for two scales of basin and range deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Parmentier, E. M.; Fletcher, R. C.

    1986-04-01

    The development of a model for deformation in an extending continental lithosphere that is stratified in density and strength is described. The lithosphere model demonstrates that the necking instabilities at two wavelengths originate due to a strong upper crust, a mantle layer, and a weak lower crust. It is observed that the dominant wavelengths of necking are controlled by layer thickness and the strength of the layers control the amplitude of the instabilities. The model is applied to the Basin and Range Province of the western U.S. where deformations in ranges and tile domains are detected. The relation between the Bouguer gravity anomaly and the deformations is studied. The data reveal that the horizontal scale of short wavelength necking correlates with the spacings of individual basins and ranges, and the longer wavelength corresponds to the width of tilt domains. The control of the Basin and Range deformation by two scales of extensional instability is proposed.

  17. Stress softening and permanent deformation in human aortas: Continuum and computational modeling with application to arterial clamping.

    PubMed

    Fereidoonnezhad, B; Naghdabadi, R; Holzapfel, G A

    2016-08-01

    Inelastic phenomena such as stress softening and unrecoverable inelastic deformations induced by supra-physiological loading have been observed experimentally in soft tissues such as arteries. These phenomena need to be accounted for in constitutive models of arterial tissues so that computational models can properly predict the outcome of interventional procedures such as arterial clamping and balloon angioplasty that involve non-physiological tissue loading. Motivated by experimental data, a novel pseudo-elastic damage model is proposed to describe discontinuous softening and permanent deformation in arterial tissues. The model is fitted to experimental data and specific material parameters for 9 abdominal and 14 thoracic aortas are provided. Furthermore, the model was implemented in a finite element code and numerically analyzed with respect to experimental tests, i.e. cyclic uniaxial tension in circumferential and longitudinal directions. Results showed that the model is able to capture specific features including anisotropy, nonlinearity, and damage-induced inelastic phenomena, i.e. stress softening and permanent deformation. Finite element results of a more complex boundary-value problem, i.e. aortic clamping considering the three aortic layers, residual stress, non-symmetric blood pressure after clamping, and patient-specific data are also presented. PMID:27233103

  18. Analysis of lymphocytes deformation in microchannel flows using compound drop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, K.; Haizumi, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Nakabe, K.

    2014-08-01

    To understand the physical properties of the lymphocytes and develop a numerical model that can predict the motion and deformation of lymphocytes in flows, three-dimensional numerical simulation of the lymphocytes flowing through the contraction region of the microchannel was carried out employing the compound drop model in this study. The present model considers the shear-thinning effect of the cytoplasm, and includes the nucleus by applying another drop inside the cell. The results were compared with the experimental ones measured by recording the lymphocyte deformation using the high-speed camera. The time- dependent characteristics of the deformation degree DI of the lymphocyte, and the effects of the flow rate and the nucleus position on the DI were discussed. The results showed that the conventional drop model applying the Newtonian fluid properties to the cytoplasm cannot predict the deformation in the contraction region correctly where the nonlinear effects become important. The present model, on the other hand, showed a good agreement with the measured one. Further, the nucleus showed a significant effect on the shape of the lymphocyte. The rigid nucleus supressed the cell deformation and a slight deviation of its position affected the deformation rate of the leading and trailing sides markedly.

  19. Modelling heat and mass transfer in bread baking with mechanical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, V.; Salagnac, P.; Glouannec, P.; Ploteau, J.-P.; Jury, V.; Boillereaux, L.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the thermo-hydric behaviour of bread during baking is studied. A numerical model has been developed with Comsol Multiphysics© software. The model takes into account the heat and mass transfers in the bread and the phenomenon of swelling. This model predicts the evolution of temperature, moisture, gas pressure and deformation in French "baguette" during baking. Local deformation is included in equations using solid phase conservation and, global deformation is calculated using a viscous mechanic model. Boundary conditions are specified with the sole temperature model and vapour pressure estimation of the oven during baking. The model results are compared with experimental data for a classic baking. Then, the model is analysed according to physical properties of bread and solicitations for a better understanding of the interactions between different mechanisms within the porous matrix.

  20. Modeling of porous scaffold deformation induced by medium perfusion.

    PubMed

    Podichetty, Jagdeep T; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we tested the possibility of calculating permeability of porous scaffolds utilized in soft tissue engineering using pore size and shape. We validated the results using experimental measured pressure drop and simulations with the inclusion of structural deformation. We prepared Polycaprolactone (PCL) and Chitosan-Gelatin (CG) scaffolds by salt leaching and freeze drying technique, respectively. Micrographs were assessed for pore characteristics and mechanical properties. Porosity for both scaffolds was nearly same but the permeability varied 10-fold. Elastic moduli were 600 and 9 kPa for PCL and CG scaffolds, respectively, while Poisson's ratio was 0.3 for PCL scaffolds and ∼1.0 for CG scaffolds. A flow-through bioreactor accommodating a 10 cm diameter and 0.2 cm thick scaffold was used to determine the pressure-drop at various flow rates. Additionally, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed by coupling fluid flow, described by Brinkman equation, with structural mechanics using a dynamic mesh. The experimentally obtained pressure drop matched the simulation results of PCL scaffolds. Simulations were extended to a broad range of permeabilities (10(-10) m(2) to 10(-14) m(2) ), elastic moduli (10-100,000 kPa) and Poisson's ratio (0.1-0.49). The results showed significant deviation in pressure drop due to scaffold deformation compared to rigid scaffold at permeabilities near healthy tissues. Also, considering the scaffold as a nonrigid structure altered the shear stress profile. In summary, scaffold permeability can be calculated using scaffold pore characteristics and deformation could be predicted using CFD simulation. These relationships could potentially be used in monitoring tissue regeneration noninvasively via pressure drop. PMID:24259467

  1. Effects of Exercise on Spinal Deformities and Quality of Life in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad; Abu Shaphe, Md.; Anwar, Dilshad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This systematic review was conducted to examine the effects of exercise on spinal deformities and quality of life in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Data Sources. Electronic databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, and Web of Science, were searched for research articles published from the earliest available dates up to May 31, 2015, using the key words “exercise,” “postural correction,” “posture,” “postural curve,” “Cobb's angle,” “quality of life,” and “spinal deformities,” combined with the Medical Subject Heading “scoliosis.” Study Selection. This systematic review was restricted to randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials on AIS published in English language. The quality of selected studies was assessed by the PEDro scale, the Cochrane Collaboration's tool, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation System (GRADE). Data Extraction. Descriptive data were collected from each study. The outcome measures of interest were Cobb angle, trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar kyphosis, vertebral rotation, and quality of life. Data Synthesis. A total of 30 studies were assessed for eligibility. Six of the 9 selected studies reached high methodological quality on the PEDro scale. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce the Cobb angle, angle of trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar lordosis and low-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce average lateral deviation. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions improve the quality of life. Conclusions. A supervised exercise program was superior to controls in reducing spinal deformities and improving the quality of life in patients with AIS. PMID:26583083

  2. Kinematic model of crustal deformation of Fenwei basin, China based on GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wei; Lu, Zhong; Zhang, Qin; Li, Zhenhong; Peng, Jianbin; Wang, Qingliang; Drummond, Jane; Zhang, Ming

    2014-04-01

    Using high precision GPS data for the period of 1999-2007 from the China Crustal Movement Observation Network, we have constructed a plate kinematic model of crustal deformation of Fenwei basin, China. We have examined different kinematic models that can fit the horizontal crustal deformation of the Fenwei basin using three steps of testing. The first step is to carry out unbiasedness and efficiency tests of various models. The second step is to conduct significance tests of strain parameters of the models. The third step is to examine whether strain parameters can fully represent the deformation characteristics of the 11 tectonic blocks over the Fenwei basin. Our results show that the degree of rigidity at the Ordos, Hetao, Yinshan and South China blocks is significant at the 95% confidence level, indicating the crustal deformation of these blocks can be represented by a rigid block model without the need to consider differential deformation within blocks. We have demonstrated that homogeneous strain condition is suitable for the Yinchuan basin but not for other 6 blocks. Therefore, inhomogeneous strains within blocks should be considered when establishing the crustal deformation model for these blocks. We have also tested that not all of the quadratic terms of strain parameters are needed for the Yuncheng-Linfen block. Therefore, four kinds of elastic kinematic models that can best represent the detailed deformation characteristics of the 11 blocks of Fenwei basin are finally obtained. Based on the established model, we have shown that the current tectonic strain feature of the Fenwei basin is mainly characterized by tensile strain in the NW-SE direction, and the boundaries betweem the Ganqing and Ordos blocks and the Shanxi graben possess the maximum shear strain. A comparison between our results and past geological and geophysical investigations further confirms that the model established in this paper is reasonable.

  3. Accuracy of implant positioning for minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty in patients with severe varus deformity.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Suda, Yasunori

    2010-04-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) reportedly yields decreased patient morbidity and a rapid return of function, but how much deformity can be accepted for MIS-TKA remains unclear. This study investigated 238 knees from 218 consecutive patients who underwent MIS-TKA. Patients were divided into groups with tibiofemoral mechanical axis (TFM) 195 degrees or greater and TFM less than 195 degrees, then clinical and radiographic results were compared. Similar improvements in knee score at 3 months postoperatively were obtained in the both groups, whereas radiographic accuracy of the coronal alignment in the TFM >or=195 degrees group was inferior to that in TFM <195 degrees group. Postoperative TFM was significantly worsened in patients with lateral bowing angle of the femoral shaft (LBFS) 4 degrees or greater, and 53% of patients in the TFM >or=195 degrees group displayed LBFS 4 degrees or greater, explaining the inferior radiographic accuracy in this group compared with the TFM <195 degrees group. These results indicate that use of MIS techniques decreases radiographic accuracy, particularly in patients with severe genu varum and increased LBFS. PMID:20347714

  4. Functional Outcomes of Decompressive Craniectomy in Patients with Malignant Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction and Their Association with Preoperative Thalamus Deformation: An Analysis of 12 Patients.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Takuya; Hayashi, Takeshi; Ohira, Masayuki; Kato, Yuji; Deguchi, Ichiro; Maruyama, Hajime; Abe, Tetsuya; Sano, Hiroyasu; Mizuno, Satoko; Nagamine, Yuito; Kurita, Hiroki; Takao, Masaki; Tanahashi, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Objective Decompressive craniectomy (DC) in patients with malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction is known to decrease the mortality rate. However, the functional outcomes (communication and oral intake) of this procedure remain unclear. Most patients with malignant MCA infarction exhibit a loss of consciousness, which may be principally governed by the thalamus. We herein investigated the functional outcomes of DC at 90 days after the onset of malignant MCA infarction and their association with preoperative thalamus deformation, which can occur due to pressure and edema. Methods Twelve of 2,692 patients with acute cerebral infarction were diagnosed with malignant MCA infarction and underwent DC. We evaluated preoperative thalamus damage using brain computed tomography and its association with communication and oral intake abilities and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Barthel index scores at 90 days after stroke onset. Results The mRS score at 90 days was 0-4 in five patients. Seven patients could communicate immediately after surgery, while five could do so by 90 days. Five patients were able to resume the oral intake of food at 90 days. All patients with preoperative thalamus deformation showed a poor recovery, while those with absent or slight preoperative thalamus deformation showed a good recovery. Conclusion Patients with preoperative thalamus deformation caused by pressure and edema show a poor oral intake and communication abilities after DC, suggesting that preoperative thalamus deformation is a predictor of poor functional outcomes after DC in patients with malignant MCA infarction. PMID:27477404

  5. Deformation of the UI-14at%Nb shape memory alloy: experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Robert D; Tome, Carlos N; Mc Cabe, Rodney J; Clarke, Amy J; Brown, Donald W; Tupper, Catherine N

    2010-12-22

    U-14at%Nb is a shape memory effect (SME) alloy that undergoes deformation by the motion of complex twins and twin related lath boundaries up to the limit of SME deformation ({approx}7%). All of the twins present in the as-transformed martensite and active during SME deformation are derived from those of the orthorhombic alpha-U phase, modified for the monoclinic distortion of the alpha martensite phase. In the SME regime a simple Bain strain model qualitatively predicts variant selection, texture development in polycrystalline samples, and stress-strain behavior as a function of parent phase orientation in single crystal micropillars. In the post-SME regime, unrecoverable deformation occurs by a combination of slip and twinning, with the first few percent of strain in tension apparently governed by a twin species specifically associated with the monoclinic distortion (i.e. not present in the orthorhombic alpha-U phase). The situation in compression is more complicated, with a combination of slip and twinning systems believed responsible for deformation. A review of the Bain strain model for SME deformation will be presented in conjunction with experimental data. In addition, results from modeling of post-SME behavior using the Visco-Plastic Self-Consistent (VPSC) model will be compared to experimental texture measurements.

  6. A Mechanism-based Model for Deformation Twinning in Polycrystalline FCC Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Sun, Xin; Wang, Y. D.; Hu, Xiaohua; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2014-06-01

    Deformation twinning, a common and important plastic deformation mechanism, is the key contributor to the excellent combination of strength and ductility in twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel. In the open literature, a significant amount of research has been reported on the microstructural characteristics of deformation twinning and its influence on the overall deformation behavior of TWIP steel. In this study, we examine the feasibility of a mechanism-based crystal plasticity model in simulating the microstructural level deformation characteristics of TWIP steel. To this end, a model considering both double-slip and double-twin is developed to investigate the stress-strain behavior and local microstructural features related to the formation and growth of micro-twins in low stacking fault energy (SFE) TWIP steel. The twin systems are described as pseudo-slips that can be activated when their resolved shear stress reaches the corresponding critical value. A hardening law that accounts for the interaction among the slip and twin systems is also developed. Numerical simulations for dDifferent mesh sizes and single crystal patch tests under different loading modes are carried out to verify the modeling procedure. Our simulation results reveal that, despite its simple nature, the double-slip/double-twin model can capture the key deformation features of TWIP steel, including twin volume fraction evolution, continuous strain hardening, and the final fracture in the form of strain localization.

  7. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  8. Modeling grain size during hot deformation of IN 718

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, S.C.; Prasad, Y.V.R.K.; Frazier, W.G.; Srinivasan, R.

    1999-12-17

    Aerospace gas turbine disks operate in an environment of relatively high stresses caused by centrifugal forces and elevated temperatures. These severe conditions necessitate the need for materials with high temperature strength and good low cycle fatigue resistance. One class of alloys used for this task is the nickel base superalloys, out of which, IN 718 is the most widely used in the aerospace industry. The properties of IN 718 are attributed to the combined effects of the chemistry, heat treatment, and microstructure. The chemistry is tailored not only for solid solution strengthening but also for precipitation hardening developed during heat treatment, which combined with a fine grained microstructure lead to excellent mechanical properties such as low cycle fatigue resistance and elevated temperature strength. The properties of a gas turbine disk are sensitive to the microstructure, in particular the grain size, which is dependent on the processing history. The ability to precisely control the microstructural development during forging is dependent on controlling the process so that the workpiece is deformed within a safe region where no microstructural damage or flow instabilities occur. The microstructural mechanisms during deformation may themselves vary within the age region and it is desirable to determine them within the range of parameters that are commonly used in industrial processing. The objective of this work is to establish a relationship between the grain size and the process control parameters i.e., temperature and strain rate, in the hot working of IN 178.

  9. q-Deformation of symplectic dynamical symmetries in algebraic models of nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Georgieva, A. I.; Sviratcheva, K. D.; Ivanov, M. I.; Draayer, J. P.

    2011-06-15

    With a view toward further nuclear structure applications of approaches based on quantum-deformed (or q-deformed) algebras, introduced to the authors by Yu.F. Smirnov, we construct a q analog of a boson realization of the symplectic noncompact sp(4, R) algebra together with a q analog of a fermion realization of the symplectic compact sp(4) algebra. The first study, on the q-deformed Sp(4,R) symmetry, is applied to the development of a q analog of the two-dimensional Interacting Boson Model with q-deformed SU(3) the underpinning dynamical symmetry group. An explicit realization in terms of q-tensor operators with respect to the standard su{sub q}(2) algebra is given. The group-subgroup structure of this framework yields the physical interpretation of the generators of the groups under consideration. The second symplectic algebra, the q-deformed sp(4), is applied to studying isovector pairing correlations in atomic nuclei. A specific q deformation of the sp(4) algebra is realized in terms of q deformed fermion creation and annihilation operators of the shell model. The generators of the algebra close on four distinct realizations of the u{sub q}(2) subalgebra. These reductions, which correspond to different types of pairing interactions, yield a complete classification of the basis states. An analysis of the role of the q deformation is based on a comparison of the results for energies of the lowest isovector-paired 0{sup +} states in the deformed and nondeformed cases.

  10. Surrogate-driven deformable motion model for organ motion tracking in particle radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassi, Aurora; Seregni, Matteo; Riboldi, Marco; Cerveri, Pietro; Sarrut, David; Battista Ivaldi, Giovanni; Tabarelli de Fatis, Paola; Liotta, Marco; Baroni, Guido

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is the development and experimental testing of a tumor tracking method for particle radiation therapy, providing the daily respiratory dynamics of the patient’s thoraco-abdominal anatomy as a function of an external surface surrogate combined with an a priori motion model. The proposed tracking approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, estimated from the four-dimensional (4D) planning computed tomography (CT) through deformable image registration. The model is adapted to the interfraction baseline variations in the patient’s anatomical configuration. The driving amplitude and phase parameters are obtained intrafractionally from a respiratory surrogate signal derived from the external surface displacement. The developed technique was assessed on a dataset of seven lung cancer patients, who underwent two repeated 4D CT scans. The first 4D CT was used to build the respiratory motion model, which was tested on the second scan. The geometric accuracy in localizing lung lesions, mediated over all breathing phases, ranged between 0.6 and 1.7 mm across all patients. Errors in tracking the surrounding organs at risk, such as lungs, trachea and esophagus, were lower than 1.3 mm on average. The median absolute variation in water equivalent path length (WEL) within the target volume did not exceed 1.9 mm-WEL for simulated particle beams. A significant improvement was achieved compared with error compensation based on standard rigid alignment. The present work can be regarded as a feasibility study for the potential extension of tumor tracking techniques in particle treatments. Differently from current tracking methods applied in conventional radiotherapy, the proposed approach allows for the dynamic localization of all anatomical structures scanned in the planning CT, thus providing complete information on density and WEL variations required for particle beam range adaptation.