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Sample records for degenerative lumbar stenosis

  1. DEGENERATIVE STENOSIS OF THE LUMBAR SPINE

    PubMed Central

    Zylbersztejn, Sérgio; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Rodrigues, Nilson Rodinei; Werlang, Pablo Mariotti; Kisaki, Yorito; Rios, Aldemar Roberto Mieres; Bello, Cesar Dall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an update on degenerative stenosis of the lumbar spine, which is a common pathological condition among patients over the age of 65 years. The anamnesis and physical examination need to be precise, since radiography often only provides indirect signs. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary if the symptoms persist. The treatment for lumbar stenosis is a matter of controversy. However, there seems to be some benefit from surgical treatment rather than conservative treatment, such that surgery brings improvements in symptoms and functions for a period of up to two years. PMID:27042635

  2. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and its imposters: three case studies

    PubMed Central

    Ammendolia, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis causing neurogenic claudicaton is a common condition impacting walking ability in older adults. There are other highly prevalent conditions in this patient population that have similar signs and symptoms and cause limited walking ability. The purpose of this study is to highlight the diagnostic challenges using three case studies of older adults who present with limited walking ability who have imaging evidence of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:25202160

  3. Aperius interspinous device for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Ashwanth; Lyons, Frank; Kelleher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    With an aging population, degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) leading to neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC) is a growing problem. For patients suffering from this condition, interspinous process distraction devices (IPDs) offer an effective and cheap alternative to conservative or decompressive surgery. Aperius is one such device that has been gaining popularity for its percutaneous insertion under local anesthetic, short operative time, and low risk of complications. The main objective of this review was to carry out a comprehensive search of the literature to evaluate the effectiveness and potential complications of Aperius. A database search, including PubMed, Clinical trials.gov, Cochrane (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Scopus, was carried out to identify relevant articles written in English reporting on complications with a minimum 12-month follow-up. The literature search resulted in six eligible studies; two nonrandomized comparative and four prospective case series were available. The analysis revealed that in total, 433 patients underwent treatment with Aperius, with all studies demonstrating an improvement in outcome measures. The average follow-up was 17 months with an overall complication rate of 10.62 %. Overall, the quality of evidence is low, suggesting that currently, the evidence is not compelling and further prospective randomized trials including cost-effectiveness studies are required. PMID:26324829

  4. Evaluation and Surgical Management of Adult Degenerative Scoliosis Associated With Lumbar Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Cui, Xingang; Jiang, Zhensong; Li, Tao; Liu, Xiaoyang; Sun, Jianmin

    2016-04-01

    Adult degenerative scoliosis associated with lumbar stenosis has become a common issue in the elderly population. But its surgical management is on debating. The main issue condenses on the management priority of scoliosis or stenosis.This study is to investigate surgical management strategy and outcome of adult degenerative scoliosis associated with lumbar stenosis.Between January 2003 and December 2010, 108 patients were admitted to the authors' institution for adult degenerative scoliosis associated with lumbar stenosis. They were divided into 3 groups based on the symptom. Then the surgical management was carried out. The clinical outcome was evaluated according to the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Scoliosis Research Society-22 score (SRS-22 score) at follow up. Group 1 was with primary lumbar stenosis symptom, local decompression and short fusion were performed. Group 2 was with compensated spinal imbalance symptom, local decompression of the symptomatic spinal stenosis and short fusion were performed. Group 3 was with primary spinal imbalance, correction surgery and long fusion were performed.For Group 1, the ODI scores declined from 62.5 ± 4.2 preoperatively to 21.8 ± 2.5 at final follow up, the SRS-22 scores decreased from 44.8 ± 3.2 preoperatively to 70.9 ± 6.0 at final follow up. For Group 2, the ODI and SRS-22 scores were 73.4 ± 8.4 and 40.8 ± 8.5 before the surgery, declined to 22.4 ± 4.2 and 73.2 ± 7.9 at final follow up. For Group 3, the ODI and SRS-22 scores were 73.4 ± 4.9 and 45.3 ± 6.4 before surgery, declined to 30.4 ± 8.9 and 68.8 ± 8.1 at final follow up.It was effective to perform decompression and short fusion for Group 1 and correction surgery and long fusion for Group 3. For Group 2, the compensated imbalance symptom was always provoked by the symptomatic lumbar stenosis. The cases in the Group 2 got well clinical improvements after local surgical intervene on the symptomatic spinal stenosis and short fusion, leaving the deformity untreated. PMID:27082612

  5. Effectiveness of Surgery for Lumbar Stenosis and Degenerative Spondylolisthesis in the Octogenarian Population

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Jeffrey A.; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Zhao, Wenyan; Lurie, Jon D.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Albert, Todd J.; Weinstein, James

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgery is an effective option for the treatment of stenosis of the lumbar spine and degenerative spondylolisthesis in the octogenarian population. Methods: An as-treated analysis of patients with lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis enrolled in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) was performed. Patients who were at least eighty years of age (n = 105) were compared with those younger than eighty years (n = 1130). Baseline patient and clinical characteristics were noted, and the difference in improvement from baseline between operative and nonoperative treatment was determined for each group at each follow-up time period up to four years. Results: There were no significant baseline differences in the primary or secondary patient-reported clinical outcome measures between the two patient age groups. Patients at least eighty years of age had higher prevalences of multilevel stenosis, severe stenosis, and asymmetric motor weakness. Patients at least eighty years of age also had higher prevalences of hypertension, heart disease, osteoporosis, and joint problems at baseline, but they had a lower body mass index and lower prevalences of depression and smoking. Fifty-eight of the 105 patients at least eighty years of age and 749 of the 1130 younger patients underwent operative management. There were no differences in the rates of intraoperative or postoperative complications, reoperation, or postoperative mortality between the older and younger groups. Averaged over a four-year follow-up period, operatively treated patients at least eighty years of age had significantly greater improvement in all primary and secondary outcome measures compared with nonoperatively treated patients. The treatment effects in patients at least eighty years of age were similar to those in younger patients for all primary and secondary measures except the SF-36 (Short Form-36) bodily pain domain and the percentage who self-rated their progress as a major improvement, in both of which the treatment effect was significantly smaller. Conclusions: Operative treatment of lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis offered a significant benefit over nonoperative treatment in patients at least eighty years of age (p < 0.05). There were no significant increases in the complication and mortality rates following surgery in this patient population compared with younger patients (p > 0.05). Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:25653317

  6. Interspinous Implant with Unilateral Laminotomy for Bilateral Decompression of Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sung-Joo

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the safety and efficacy of one level unilateral laminotomy bilateral decompression (ULBD) with the placement of a device for intervertebral assisted motion (DIAM) compared with one level ULBD only in elderly patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS). Methods A non randomized prospective analysis was performed on 16 patients who underwent one level ULBD with DIAM (Group A) and 20 patients with one level ULBD only (Group B) between February 2007 and March 2008. Radiographic imaging, visual analog scale (VAS) and MacNab outcome scale were obtained before and after surgery at a mean interval of 21 months (range 17-27 months). Results The disc height, interpedicular distance, slip distance and segmental lordotic angle were similar between two groups. In the group A, there was no significant difference between the pre- and post-operative imaging in terms of the sagittal balance and disc height. Both groups showed significant improvement in the clinical outcomes. In addition, there was significantly less low-back pain in the group A than in the group B at the last follow up, while the clinical improvement of the leg pain and MacNab outcome scale showed no significant difference in the two groups. There were no major complications or DIAM associated complications. Conclusion ULBD with DIAM is a safe and efficacious treatment for selective elderly patients with DLSS, particularly for relieving low back pain comparing to ULBD. ULBD with DIAM did not alter the disc height or sagittal alignment at the mean 21 months follow-up interval. PMID:20539792

  7. Quantitative evaluation of the lumbosacral sagittal alignment in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Makirov, Serik K.; Jahaf, Mohammed T.; Nikulina, Anastasia A.

    2015-01-01

    Goal of the study This study intends to develop a method of quantitative sagittal balance parameters assessment, based on a geometrical model of lumbar spine and sacrum. Methods One hundred eight patients were divided into 2 groups. In the experimental group have been included 59 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis on L1-5 level. Forty-nine healthy volunteers without history of any lumbar spine pathlogy were included in the control group. All patients have been examined with supine MRI. Lumbar lordosis has been adopted as circular arc and described either anatomical (lumbar lordosis angle), or geometrical (chord length, circle segment height, the central angle, circle radius) parameters. Moreover, 2 sacral parameters have been assessed for all patients: sacral slope and sacral deviation angle. Both parameters characterize sacrum disposition in horizontal and vertical axis respectively. Results Significant correlation was observed between anatomical and geometrical lumbo-sacral parameters. Significant differences between stenosis group and control group were observed in the value of the “central angle” and “sacral deviation” parameters. We propose additional parameters: lumbar coefficient, as ratio of the lordosis angle to the segmental angle (Kl); sacral coefficient, as ratio of the sacral tilt (ST) to the sacral deviation (SD) angle (Ks); and assessment modulus of the mathematical difference between sacral and lumbar coefficients has been used for determining lumbosacral balance (LSB). Statistically significant differences between main and control group have been obtained for all described coefficients (p = 0.006, p = 0.0001, p = 0.0001, accordingly). Median of LSB value of was 0.18 and 0.34 for stenosis and control groups, accordingly. Conclusion Based on these results we believe that that spinal stenosis is associated with an acquired deformity that is measureable by the described parameters. It's possible that spinal stenosis occurs in patients with an LSB of 0.2 or less, so this value can be predictable for its development. It may suggest that spinal stenosis is more likely to occur in patients with the spinal curvature of this type because of abnormal distribution of the spine loads. This fact may have prognostic significance for develop vertebral column disease and evaluation of treatment results. PMID:26767160

  8. Minimally invasive space shuttle laminotomy for degenerative lumbar spinal canal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Asamoto, Shunji; Muto, Jun; Jimbo, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Technical note. Objectives: To show microsurgical technique, considering the meticulous anatomy of the ligamentum flavum (LF). Background: Different methods are available for treating lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS). A minimally invasive surgery, namely, space shuttle laminotomy, has recently been proposed. Here, we describe the surgical method for this novel technique. To conduct this surgery accurately, surgeons must have perfect knowledge of anatomy, especially regarding the LF. Materials and Methods and Results: We use this interlaminectomy technique for all cases of LSCS. All patients with LSCS recovered from their neurological deficits in shorter hoslital stays than regular laminectomy. Conclusion: Minimally invasive space shuttle laminotomy (MISSL), which involves a microsurgical technique, is a safe, complication-free procedure. PMID:27041887

  9. Single Versus Multilevel Fusion, For Single Level Degenerative Spondylolisthesis And Multilevel Lumbar Stenosis. Four-Year Results of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smorgick, Yossi; Park, Daniel K.; Baker, Kevin C; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Herkowitz, Harry; Fischgrund, Jeffrey S; Weinstein, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Study design A subanalysis study. Objective To compare surgical outcomes and complications of multi level decompression and single level fusion to multi level decompression and multi level fusion for patients with multilevel lumbar stenosis and single level degenerative spondylolisthesis. Summary of Background Data In patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis who are treated surgically, decompression and fusion provides a better clinical outcome than decompression alone. Surgical treatment for multilevel lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis typically includes decompression and fusion of the spondylolisthesis segment and decompression with or without fusion for the other stenotic segments. To date, no study has compared the results of these two surgical options for single level degenerative spondylolisthesis with multilevel stenosis. Methods The results from a multicenter randomized and observational study, the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) comparing multilevel decompression and single level fusion and multi level decompression and multi level fusion for spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis, were analyzed. The primary outcomes measures were the Bodily Pain and Physical Function scales of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form General Health Survey (SF-36) and the modified Oswestry Disability Index at 1,2, 3 and 4 years postoperatively. Secondary analysis consisted of stenosis bothersomeness index, low back pain bothersomeness, leg pain, patient satisfaction, and self-rated progress. Results Overall 207 patients were enrolled to the study, 130 had multlilevel decompression with one level fusion and 77 patients had multi level decompression and multi-level fusion. For all primary and secondary outcome measures, there were no statistically significant differences in surgical outcomes between the two surgical techniques. However, operative time and intraoperative blood loss were significantly higher in the multilevel fusion group. Conclusion Decompression and single level fusion and decompression and multi level fusion provide similar outcomes in patients with multilevel lumbar stenosis and single level degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:23169068

  10. Acquired lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Deasy, JoAnn

    2015-04-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most frequent reason for spinal surgery in patients over age 65 years. In this condition, narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal and nerve root canals leads to painful, debilitating compression of spinal nerves and blood vessels. As the population ages, an increasing number of patients will be diagnosed and treated for lumbar spinal stenosis by primary care providers. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of lumbar spinal stenosis in adults over age 50 years. PMID:25763664

  11. Lumbar Interspinous Process Fixation and Fusion with Stand-Alone Interlaminar Lumbar Instrumented Fusion Implant in Patients with Degenerative Spondylolisthesis Undergoing Decompression for Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Postacchini, Franco; Menchetti, Pier Paolo Maria; Sessa, Pasquale; Paolino, Michela; Cinotti, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To assess the ability of a stand-alone lumbar interspinous implant (interspinous/interlaminar lumbar instrumented fusion, ILIF) associated with bone grafting to promote posterior spine fusion in degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) with vertebral instability. Overview of Literature A few studies, using bilateral laminotomy (BL) or bilateral decompression by unilateral laminotomy (BDUL), found satisfactory results in stenotic patients with decompression alone, but others reported increased olisthesis, or subsequent need for fusion in DS with or without dynamic instability. Methods Twenty-five patients with Grade I DS, leg pain and chronic low back pain underwent BL or BDUL and ILIF implant. Olisthesis was 13% to 21%. Follow-up evaluations were performed at 4 to 12 months up to 25 to 44 months (mean, 34.4). Outcome measures were numerical rating scale (NRS) for back and leg pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI) and short-form 36 health survey (SF-36) of body pain and function. Results Fusion occurred in 21 patients (84%). None had increased olisthesis or instability postoperatively. Four types of fusion were identified. In Type I, the posterior part of the spinous processes were fused. In Type II, fusion extended to the base of the processes. In Type III, bone was present also around the polyetheretherketone plate of ILIF. In Type IV, even the facet joints were fused. The mean NRS score for back and leg pain decreased by 64% and 80%, respectively. The mean ODI score was decreased by 52%. SF-36 bodily pain and physical function mean scores increased by 53% and 58%, respectively. Computed tomography revealed failed fusion in four patients, all of whom still had vertebral instability postoperatively. Conclusions Stand-alone ILIF with interspinous bone grafting promotes vertebral fusion in most patients with lumbar stenosis and unstable Grade I DS undergoing BL or BDUL. PMID:26949455

  12. Superion® InterSpinous Spacer for treatment of moderate degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: durable three-year results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vikas V; Nunley, Pierce D; Whang, Peter G; Haley, Thomas R; Bradley, W Daniel; Davis, Raphael P; Block, Jon E; Geisler, Fred H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This report provides the 3-year clinical outcomes from the randomized, controlled US Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trial of the Superion® for the treatment of moderate degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Patients and methods The Superion® was evaluated in the treatment of subjects aged 45 years or older suffering from symptoms of intermittent neurogenic claudication, secondary to a confirmed diagnosis of moderate degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis at one or two contiguous levels from L1 to L5. Patients were treated between June 2008 and December 2011 at 31 investigational sites. Three hundred ninety-one subjects were included in the randomized study group consisting of 190 Superion® and 201 X-STOP® control subjects. The primary composite endpoint was individual patient success based on four components: improvement in two of three domains of the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire, no reoperations at the index level, no major implant/procedure-related complications, and no clinically significant confounding treatments. Results At 3 years, the proportion of subjects achieving the primary composite endpoint was greater for Superion® (63/120, 52.5%) than for X-STOP® (49/129, 38.0%) (P=0.023) and the corresponding success rates exceeded 80% for each of the individual components of the primary endpoint in the Superion® group (range: 81%–91%). Improvements in back and leg pain severity as well as back- and disease-specific functional outcomes were also maintained through 36 months. Conclusion The 3-year outcomes from this randomized controlled trial demonstrate durable clinical improvement consistently across all clinical outcomes for the Superion® in the treatment of patients with moderate degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:26491369

  13. Clinical outcomes and radiological instability following decompressive lumbar laminectomy for degenerative spinal stenosis: a comparison of patients undergoing concomitant arthrodesis versus decompression alone.

    PubMed

    Fox, M W; Onofrio, B M; Onofrio, B M; Hanssen, A D

    1996-11-01

    One hundred twenty-four patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis underwent decompression with fusion (32 patients) and without fusion (92 patients) during a 30-month period between 1986 and 1988. Patient-reported satisfaction at a mean follow-up period of 5.8 years (range 4.6-6.8 years) revealed a 79% good or fair outcome and a 21% poor outcome (26 patients). Seven patients (6%) developed lumbar instability, three patients (2%) developed new stenosis at an adjacent unoperated level, and three patients (2%) developed a new disc herniation between 2 and 5 years after surgery. Progressive postoperative spondylolisthesis occurred in 31% of patients with normal preoperative alignment (mean 7.8 mm, range 2-20 mm) and in 73% of patients with preoperative subluxation (mean 5.1 mm, range 2-13 mm) in whom fusion was not attained. Radiological progression did not correlate well with patient-reported outcome. The major conclusions from this study are the following: 1) the majority of patients respond well to this surgery, but complication (22%) and late deterioration (10%) rates are not insignificant; 2) radiological instability is common after decompression for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, but this correlates poorly with clinical outcome; 3) there are no definitive clinical or radiological factors that preoperatively predict patients at risk for a poor outcome; 4) post-operative radiological instability is more likely to occur when the following criteria are present: preoperative spondy-degenerated L-4 or a markedly degenerated L-3 disc; and when a radical and extensive decompression greater than one level is planned; and 5) the group at greatest risk for a poor outcome consists of those patients with normal preoperative alignment who do not suffer slippage following surgery. PMID:8893716

  14. Semi-Circumferential Decompression: Microsurgical Total en-bloc Ligamentum Flavectomy to Treat Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Grade I Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Cheol; Oh, Sang Hun; Park, Sub Ri; Park, Sang Jun; Cho, Nam Ik

    2015-01-01

    Background To describe and assess clinical outcomes of the semi-circumferential decompression technique for microsurgical en-bloc total ligamentum flavectomy with preservation of the facet joint to treat the patients who have a lumbar spinal stenosis with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and radiologic outcomes of 19 patients who have a spinal stenosis with Meyerding grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis. They were treated using the "semi-circumferential decompression" method. We evaluated improvements in back and radiating pain using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). We also evaluated occurrence of spinal instability on radiological exam using percentage slip and slip angle. Results The mean VAS score for back pain decreased significantly from 6.3 to 4.3, although some patients had residual back pain. The mean VAS for radiating pain decreased significantly from 8.3 to 2.5. The ODI score improved significantly from 25.3 preoperatively to 10.8 postoperatively. No significant change in percentage slip was observed (10% preoperatively vs. 12.2% at the last follow-up). The dynamic percentage slip (gap in percentage slip between flexion and extension X-ray exams) did not change significantly (5.2% vs. 5.8%). Slip angle and dynamic slip angle did not change (3.2° and 8.2° vs. 3.6° and 9.2°, respectively). Conclusions The results suggested that semi-circumferential decompression is a clinically recommendable procedure that can improve pain. This procedure does not cause spinal instability when treating patients who have a spinal stenosis with degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:26640630

  15. Posterior lumbar dynamic stabilization instead of arthrodesis for symptomatic adjacent-segment degenerative stenosis: description of a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Mashaly, Hazem; Paschel, Erin E; Khattar, Nicolas K; Goldschmidt, Ezequiel; Gerszten, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The development of symptomatic adjacent-segment disease (ASD) is a well-recognized consequence of lumbar fusion surgery. Extension of a fusion to a diseased segment may only lead to subsequent adjacent-segment degeneration. The authors report the use of a novel technique that uses dynamic stabilization instead of arthrodesis for the surgical treatment of symptomatic ASD following a prior lumbar instrumented fusion. METHODS A cohort of 28 consecutive patients was evaluated who developed symptomatic stenosis immediately adjacent to a previous lumbar instrumented fusion. All patients had symptoms of neurogenic claudication refractory to nonsurgical treatment and were surgically treated with decompression and dynamic stabilization instead of extending the fusion construct using a posterior lumbar dynamic stabilization system. Preoperative symptoms, visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, and perioperative complications were recorded. Clinical outcome was gauged by comparing VAS scores prior to surgery and at the time of last follow-up. RESULTS The mean follow-up duration was 52 months (range 17-94 months). The mean interval from the time of primary fusion surgery to the dynamic stabilization surgery was 40 months (range 10-96 months). The mean patient age was 51 years (range 29-76 years). There were 19 (68%) men and 9 (32%) women. Twenty-three patients (82%) presented with low-back pain at time of surgery, whereas 24 patients (86%) presented with lower-extremity symptoms only. Twenty-four patients (86%) underwent operations that were performed using single-level dynamic stabilization, 3 patients (11%) were treated at 2 levels, and 1 patient underwent 3-level decompression and dynamic stabilization. The most commonly affected and treated level (46%) was L3-4. The mean preoperative VAS pain score was 8, whereas the mean postoperative score was 3. No patient required surgery for symptomatic degeneration rostral to the level of dynamic stabilization during the follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS The use of posterior lumbar dynamic stabilization may offer a valid and safe option for the management of patients who develop ASD rostral to a previously instrumented arthrodesis. The technique may serve as an alternative to multilevel arthrodesis in this patient population. By implanting a dynamic stabilization device instead of an extension of a rigid construct, this might translate into a reduction in the development of yet another level of ASD. PMID:26721579

  16. The effects of aquatic walking and jogging program on physical function and fall efficacy in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Sung, Eunsook

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 12-week aqua walking and jogging program on muscle function, ankle range of motion (ROM), balance and fell efficacy in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) patients. Six patients (2 males, 4 females) with DLSS participated in aquatic exercise program 3 times per week with each session of 60 min (warming-up, aqua walking, aqua jogging and cool down) at 1 m 20 cm–1 m 30 cm deep pool. Janda’s muscle function test, ankle ROM, Berg balance scale (BBS) and fall efficacy scale (FES) were analyzed before and after the training intervention. We found significant increases in balance, muscle function, ankle ROM and fall efficacy after training intervention. In conclusion, aquatic exercise seems to affect physical function and fall efficacy positively in elderly DLSS patients. PMID:26535218

  17. Complications in patients undergoing combined transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation with deformity correction for degenerative scoliosis and spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Burneikiene, Sigita; Nelson, E. Lee; Mason, Alexander; Rajpal, Sharad; Serxner, Benjamin; Villavicencio, Alan T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Utilization of the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) approach for scoliosis offers the patients deformity correction and interbody fusion without the additional morbidity associated with more invasive reconstructive techniques. Published reports on complications associated with these surgical procedures are limited. The purpose of this study was to quantify the intra- and postoperative complications associated with the TLIF surgical approach in patients undergoing surgery for spinal stenosis and degenerative scoliosis correction. Methods: This study included patients undergoing TLIF for degenerative scoliosis with neurogenic claudication and painful lumbar degenerative disc disease. The TLIF technique was performed along with posterior pedicle screw instrumentation. The average follow-up time was 30 months (range, 15–47). Results: A total of 29 patients with an average age of 65.9 years (range, 49–83) were evaluated. TLIFs were performed at 2.2 levels on average (range, 1–4) in addition to 6.0 (range, 4–9) levels of posterolateral instrumented fusion. The preoperative mean lumbar lordosis was 37.6° (range, 16°–55°) compared to 40.5° (range, 26°–59.2°) postoperatively. The preoperative mean coronal Cobb angle was 32.3° (range, 15°–55°) compared to 15.4° (range, 1°–49°) postoperatively. The mean operative time was 528 min (range, 276–906), estimated blood loss was 1091.7 mL (range, 150–2500), and hospitalization time was 8.0 days (range, 3–28). A baseline mean Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score of 7.6 (range, 4–10) decreased to 3.6 (range, 0–8) postoperatively. There were a total of 14 (49%) hardware and/or surgical technique related complications, and 8 (28%) patients required additional surgeries. Five (17%) patients developed pseudoarthrosis. The systemic complications (31%) included death (1), cardiopulmonary arrest with resuscitation (1), myocardial infarction (1), pneumonia (5), and pulmonary embolism (1). Conclusion: This study suggests that although the TLIF approach is a feasible and effective method to treat degenerative adult scoliosis, it is associated with a high rate of intra- and postoperative complications and a long recovery process. PMID:22439116

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging of lumbar spinal nerve in subjects with degenerative lumbar disorders.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Eguchi, Yawara; Inoue, Gen; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Go; Inage, Kazuhide; Saino, Takeshi; Sato, Hirotaka; Ando, Hiroki; Kojima, Masatoshi; Okumura, Kenichiro; Masuda, Yoshitada; Watanabe, Atsuya; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Recently several authors have reported that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) might provide a new understanding of sciatica. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical feasibility of DTI for the evaluation of lumbar spinal nerve of patients with sciatica associated with lumbar degenerative disorders. Thirty-four patients (25men, mean age63. 3years) with degenerated lumbar disease, 14 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with foraminal stenosis, 12 with lumbar spinal stenosis without foraminal stenosis, five with lumbar disc herniation, two with discogenic low back pain, and one with spondylolysis who underwent 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and surgical treatment were included in the present study. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was calculated from an FA map, and tractography was investigated. In asymptomatic nerves, tractography showed all L3-S1 spinal nerve roots clearly. Abnormalities of tractography were classified into three types by shape; "Disrupted", "Narrowing", and "Tapering". More abnormalities of tractography were found in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis, and especially in patients with foraminal stenosis. The disrupted type was the most common. The mean FA of entrapped symptomatic nerves was less than seen on the intact side. This study demonstrates that tractography shows abnormal findings for nerve roots in lumbar spinal degeneration and that FA decreases in symptomatic roots. DTI may offer not only morphological evaluation, but also quantitative evaluation. We believe that DTI can be used as a tool for the diagnosis of lumbar spinal degenerative disease. PMID:25979227

  19. Asymptomatic Stenosis in the Cervical and Thoracic Spines of Patients with Symptomatic Lumbar Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Moon Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lyu, Ho Dong; Lee, Jae-Hoo; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Studies on age-related degenerative changes causing concurrent stenoses in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spines (triple stenosis) are rare in the literature. Our objectives were to determine: (1) the incidence of asymptomatic radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis in elderly patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis, (2) the incidence of concurrent radiologic spinal stenosis in the cervical and thoracic spines, and (3) the radiologic features of cervical stenosis that might predict concurrent thoracic stenosis. Methods Whole-spine T2 sagittal magnetic resonance images of patients older than 80 and diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis between January 2003 and January 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. We included patients with asymptomatic spondylotic cervical and thoracic stenosis. We measured the anteroposterior diameters of the vertebral body, bony spinal canal, and spinal cord, along with the Pavlov ratio and anterior or posterior epidural stenosis at the level of the disk for each cervical and thoracic level. We compared the radiologic parameters between the subgroups of cervical stenosis with and without thoracic stenosis. Results Among the 460 patients with lumbar stenosis, 110 (23.9%) had concurrent radiologic cervical stenosis and 112 (24.3%) had concurrent radiologic thoracic stenosis. Fifty-six patients (12.1%) had combined radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis in addition to their symptomatic lumbar stenosis (triple stenosis). Anterior epidural stenosis at C7–T1 was associated with a high prevalence of thoracic stenosis. Conclusions It appears that asymptomatic radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis is common in elderly patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. PMID:26430589

  20. Percutaneous endoscopic decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong

    2014-11-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy has become a representative minimally invasive spine surgery for lumbar disc herniation. Due to the remarkable evolution in the techniques available, the paradigm of spinal endoscopy is shifting from treatments of soft disc herniation to those of lumbar spinal stenosis. Lumbar spinal stenosis can be classified into three categories according to pathological zone as follows: central stenosis, lateral recess stenosis and foraminal stenosis. Moreover, percutaneous endoscopic decompression (PED) techniques may vary according to the type of lumbar stenosis, including interlaminar PED, transforaminal PED and endoscopic lumbar foraminotomy. However, these techniques are continuously evolving. In the near future, PED for lumbar stenosis may be an efficient alternative to conventional open lumbar decompression surgery. PMID:25033889

  1. Degenerative Spondylolisthesis Is Associated with Low Spinal Bone Density: A Comparative Study between Spinal Stenosis and Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Finn B.; Langdahl, Bente L.; Ernst, Carsten; Fruensgaard, Søren; Østergaard, Jørgen; Andersen, Jens Langer; Niedermann, Bent; Høy, Kristian; Helmig, Peter; Holm, Randi; Egund, Niels; Bünger, Cody

    2013-01-01

    Spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis share many symptoms and the same treatment, but their causes remain unclear. Bone mineral density has been suggested to play a role. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in spinal bone density between spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis patients. 81 patients older than 60 years, who underwent DXA-scanning of their lumbar spine one year after a lumbar spinal fusion procedure, were included. Radiographs were assessed for disc height, vertebral wedging, and osteophytosis. Pain was assessed using the Low Back Pain Rating Scale pain index. T-score of the lumbar spine was significantly lower among degenerative spondylolisthesis patients compared with spinal stenosis patients (−1.52 versus −0.52, P = 0.04). Thirty-nine percent of degenerative spondylolisthesis patients were classified as osteoporotic and further 30% osteopenic compared to only 9% of spinal stenosis patients being osteoporotic and 30% osteopenic (P = 0.01). Pain levels tended to increase with poorer bone status (P = 0.06). Patients treated surgically for symptomatic degenerative spondylolisthesis have much lower bone mass than patients of similar age treated surgically for spinal stenosis. Low BMD might play a role in the development of the degenerative spondylolisthesis, further studies are needed to clarify this. PMID:24024179

  2. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200,000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality. PMID:26727925

  3. Efficacy of a Human Amniotic Tissue-derived Allograft, NuCel, in Patients Undergoing Posteriolateral Lumbar Fusions for Degenerative Disc Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease; Spinal Stenosis; Spondylolisthesis; Spondylosis; Intervertebral Disk Displacement; Intervertebral Disk Degeneration; Spinal Diseases; Bone Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Spondylolysis

  4. [Imaging of lumbar stenosis].

    PubMed

    Morvan, G

    2002-09-01

    The spinal canal is a type of articulated pipe, with rigid rings articulated by joints. It can be divided into a central part, which contains the dural sac, and lateral parts, which contain the nerve roots. The role of imaging is to detect the presence and characterize the nature, level, and severity of stenotic lesions and their impact on neural elements. Stenoses can be constitutional or acquired and involve the central and/or lateral canal. Constitutional stenoses affect both rigid and soft segments whereas acquired stenoses affect mainly the mobile segments. Signs of constitutional stenoses at conventional radiography, CT and MRI will be described. Acquired stenoses are multi-factorial in etiology and more difficult to evaluate. Intra-spinal soft tissues and dynamic factors, poorly assessed at CT and MRI (static imaging), play a major role in this type of stenoses. Currently, only myelography with dynamic evaluation is able to demonstrate the importance of these factors or degree of dynamic stenosis. The lateral canal is divided in three parts: two mobile segments (disco-articular interval, and intervertebral foramen) on each side of a fixed bony segment (lateral recess). The different types of stenoses involving these segments and best imaging technique to demonstrate their presence are described. PMID:12223974

  5. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Who Should Be Fused? An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Ashjazadeh, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is mostly caused by osteoarthritis (spondylosis). Clinically, the symptoms of patients with LSS can be categorized into two groups; regional (low back pain, stiffness, and so on) or radicular (spinal stenosis mainly presenting as neurogenic claudication). Both of these symptoms usually improve with appropriate conservative treatment, but in refractory cases, surgical intervention is occasionally indicated. In the patients who primarily complain of radiculopathy with an underlying biomechanically stable spine, a decompression surgery alone using a less invasive technique may be sufficient. Preoperatively, with the presence of indicators such as failed back surgery syndrome (revision surgery), degenerative instability, considerable essential deformity, symptomatic spondylolysis, refractory degenerative disc disease, and adjacent segment disease, lumbar fusion is probably recommended. Intraoperatively, in cases with extensive decompression associated with a wide disc space or insufficient bone stock, fusion is preferred. Instrumentation improves the fusion rate, but it is not necessarily associated with improved recovery rate and better functional outcome. PMID:25187873

  6. Stabilising effect of dynamic interspinous spacers in degenerative low-grade lumbar instability.

    PubMed

    Holinka, Johannes; Krepler, Petra; Matzner, Michael; Grohs, Josef G

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the stabilising effect of dynamic interspinous spacers (IS) in combination with interlaminar decompression in degenerative low-grade lumbar instability with lumbar spinal stenosis and to compare its clinical effect to patients with lumbar spinal stenosis in stable segments treated by interlaminar decompression only. Fifty consecutive patients with a minimum age of 60 years were scheduled for interlaminar decompression for clinically and radiologically confirmed lumbar spinal stenosis. Twenty-two of these patients (group DS) with concomitant degenerative low-grade lumbar instability up to 5 mm translational slip were treated by interlaminar decompression and additional dynamic IS implantation. The control group (D) with lumbar spinal stenosis in stable segments included 28 patients and underwent only interlaminar decompression. The mean follow-up was 46 months in group D and 44 months in group DS. A visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and walking distance were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. The segmental instability was evaluated in flexion-extension X-rays. The implantation of an IS significantly reduced the lumbar instability on flexion-extension X-rays. At the time of follow-up walking distance, VAS and ODI showed a significant improvement in both groups, but no statistical significance between groups D and DS. Four patients each in groups D and DS had revision surgery during the period of evaluation. The stabilising effect of dynamic IS in combination with interlaminar decompression offers an opportunity for an effective treatment for degenerative low-grade lumbar instability with lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:20419452

  7. MRI Evaluation of Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Mehta, Chetan; Patel, Narrotam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is a condition that affects young to middle-aged persons with peak incidence at approximately 40 y. MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the characterization, extent, and changes associated with the degenerative lumbar disc disease by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Study Design: Cross-sectional and observational study. Materials and Methods: A total 109 patients of the lumbar disc degeneration with age group between 17 to 80 y were diagnosed & studied on 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine. MRI findings like lumbar lordosis, Schmorl’s nodes, decreased disc height, disc annular tear, disc herniation, disc bulge, disc protrusion and disc extrusion were observed. Narrowing of the spinal canal, lateral recess and neural foramen with compression of nerve roots observed. Ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was observed. Result: Males were more commonly affected in Degenerative Spinal Disease & most of the patients show loss of lumbar lordosis. Decreased disc height was common at L5-S1 level. More than one disc involvement was seen per person. L4 – L5 disc was the most commonly involved. Annular disc tear, disc herniation, disc extrusion, narrowing of spinal canal, narrowing of lateral recess, compression of neural foramen, ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was common at the L4 –L5 disc level. Disc buldge was common at L3 – L4 & L4 – L5 disc level. Posterior osteophytes are common at L3 - L4 & L5 –S1 disc level. L1- L2 disc involvement and spondylolisthesis are less common. Conclusion: Lumbar disc degeneration is the most common cause of low back pain. Plain radiograph can be helpful in visualizing gross anatomic changes in the intervertebral disc. But, MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. PMID:26023617

  8. Diabetes Mellitus, a New Risk Factor for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Asadian, Leila; Haddadi, Kaveh; Aarabi, Mohsen; Zare, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with spinal stenosis and lumbar vertebral disk degeneration, and the correlation of diabetes with these diseases. STUDY DESIGN This is a cross-sectional study. METHODS This case–control study was performed during 2012–2014 with 110 patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis and 110 patients with lumbar disk herniation, who were diagnosed using clinical and radiological evidences. Additionally, 110 participants who were referred to the clinic and did not show clinical signs of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine entered the study as a control group. Demographic data and medical histories of the patients were collected using checklists. RESULTS A total of 50 patients (15.2%) were diagnosed with diabetes, which comprised 32 (29.1%) in the stenosis group, 7 (6.4%) in the lumbar disk herniation group, and 11 (10%) in the control group. The prevalence of diabetes in women with spinal stenosis and women with lumbar disk herniation was 35.9% and 10.3%, respectively, whereas prevalence of diabetes in women was 10.9% in the control group. This difference was statistically significant in the spinal stenosis group in comparison with the controls (P < 0.0001). Conversely, no significant difference was found in men. CONCLUSIONS There is an association between diabetes and lumbar spinal stenosis. Diabetes mellitus may be a predisposing factor for the development of lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:27168730

  9. Guidelines for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 9: fusion in patients with stenosis and spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Daniel K; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Dailey, Andrew T; Groff, Michael W; Khoo, Larry; Matz, Paul G; Mummaneni, Praveen; Watters, William C; Wang, Jeffrey; Walters, Beverly C; Hadley, Mark N

    2005-06-01

    The best medical evidence available in the literature confirms the utility of fusion for improving patient outcomes following decompression for stenosis associated with spondylolisthesis. The majority of evidence from other studies comparing outcomes after decompression alone or decompression combined with PLF in patients with stenosis and spondylolisthesis also favors the performance of PLF. The medical evidence regarding the use of pedicle screw fixation in this patient population is rated as Class III and is inconsistent. A consistent benefit associated with the use of pedicle screw fixation has been reported in patients with preoperative instability or kyphosis. Iatrogenic instability following decompression is associated with poor outcomes and may also be treated with PLF involving supplemental instrumentation. The precise definition of instability or kyphosis has varied among researchers and requires further study. PMID:16028737

  10. Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Surendra Mohan; Kapoor, Varun; Jain, Anil K; Jain, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Iatrogenic instability following laminectomy occurs in patients with degenerative lumbar canal stenosis. Long segment fusions to obviate postoperative instability result in loss of motion of lumbar spine and predisposes to adjacent level degeneration. The best alternative would be an adequate decompressive laminectomy with a nonfusion technique of preserving the posterior ligament complex integrity. We report a retrospective analysis of multilevel lumbar canal stenosis that were operated for posterior decompression and underwent spinaplasty to preserve posterior ligament complex integrity for outcome of decompression and iatrogenic instability. Materials and Methods: 610 patients of degenerative lumbar canal stenosis (n=520) and development spinal canal stenosis (n=90), with a mean age 58 years (33–85 years), underwent multilevel laminectomies and spinaplasty procedure. At followup, changes in the posture while walking, increase in the walking distance, improvement in the dysesthesia in lower limb, the motor power, capability to negotiate stairs and sphincter function were assessed. Forward excursion of vertebrae more than 4 mm in flexion–extension lateral X-ray of the spine as compared to the preoperative movements was considered as the iatrogenic instability. Clinical assessment was done in standing posture regarding active flexion–extension movement, lateral bending and rotations Results: All patients were followed up from 3 to 10 years. None of the patients had neurological deterioration or pain or catch while movement. Walking distance improved by 5–10 times, with marked relief (70–90%) in neurogenic claudication and preoperative stooping posture, with improvement in sensation and motor power. There was no significant difference in the sagittal alignment as well as anterior translation. Two patients with concomitant scoliosis and one with cauda equine syndrome had incomplete recovery. Two patients who developed disc protrusion, underwent a second operation for a symptomatic disc prolapse. Conclusion: Spinaplasty following posterior decompression for multilevel lumbar canal stenosis is a simple operation, without any serious complications, retaining median structures, maintaining the tension band and the strength with least disturbance of kinematics, mobility, stability and lordosis of the lumbar spine. PMID:21886919

  11. Spectrum of magnetic resonance imaging findings in congenital lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Chalian, Majid; Thawait, Shrey; Belzberg, Alan J; Eng, John; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether congenital lumbar spinal stenosis (CLSS) is associated with a specific degenerative changes of the lumbar spine. METHODS: The lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging studies of 52 subjects with CLSS and 48 control subjects were retrospectively evaluated. In each examination, the five lumbar levels were assessed for the presence or absence of circumferential or shallow annular bulges, annular tears, anterior or posterior disc herniations, epidural lipomatosis, Schmorl’s nodes, spondylolisthesis, pars defects, and stress reactions of the posterior vertebral elements. RESULTS: Compared to control individuals, subjects with CLSS exhibited increased incidence of circumferential and shallow annular bulges, annular tears, disc herniations and spondylolisthesis (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: CLSS is associated with increased incidence of degenerative changes in specific osseous and soft-tissue elements of the lumbar spine. PMID:25516864

  12. Lumbar Lordosis of Spinal Stenosis Patients during Intraoperative Prone Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Keon; Song, Kyung-Sub; Park, Byung-Moon; Lim, Sang-Youn; Jang, Geun; Lee, Beom-Seok; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of spondylolisthesis on lumbar lordosis on the OSI (Jackson; Orthopaedic Systems Inc.) frame. Restoration of lumbar lordosis is important for maintaining sagittal balance. Physiologic lumbar lordosis has to be gained by intraoperative prone positioning with a hip extension and posterior instrumentation technique. There are some debates about changing lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame after an intraoperative prone position. We evaluated the effect of spondylolisthesis on lumbar lordosis after an intraoperative prone position. Methods Sixty-seven patients, who underwent spinal fusion at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of Gwangmyeong Sungae Hospital between May 2007 and February 2012, were included in this study. The study compared lumbar lordosis on preoperative upright, intraoperative prone and postoperative upright lateral X-rays between the simple stenosis (SS) group and spondylolisthesis group. The average age of patients was 67.86 years old. The average preoperative lordosis was 43.5° (± 14.9°), average intraoperative lordosis was 48.8° (± 13.2°), average postoperative lordosis was 46.5° (± 16.1°) and the average change on the frame was 5.3° (± 10.6°). Results Among all patients, 24 patients were diagnosed with simple spinal stenosis, 43 patients with spondylolisthesis (29 degenerative spondylolisthesis and 14 isthmic spondylolisthesis). Between the SS group and spondylolisthesis group, preoperative lordosis, intraoperative lordosis and postoperative lordosis were significantly larger in the spondylolisthesis group. The ratio of patients with increased lordosis on the OSI frame compared to preoperative lordosis was significantly higher in the spondylolisthesis group. The risk of increased lordosis on frame was significantly higher in the spondylolisthesis group (odds ratio, 3.325; 95% confidence interval, 1.101 to 10.039; p = 0.033). Conclusions Intraoperative lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame with a prone position was larger in the SS patients than the spondylolisthesis patients, which also produced a larger postoperative lordosis angle after posterior spinal fusion surgery. An increase in lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame should be considered during posterior spinal fusion surgery, especially in spondylolisthesis patients. PMID:26929801

  13. Effect of fusion following decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Min; Li, Xue-Feng; Wang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The surgical methods of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis include spinal decompression with or without instrumented or non-instrumented spinal fusion. Previous meta-analysis and systematic reviews have reported the contrast between surgical management and nonsurgical management for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, while no literature did among surgical managements. And it is evidenced that whether fusion should be added to spinal decompression in patients of lumbar spinal stenosis is still divisive. So our purpose is to identify whether spinal fusion with or without decompression has a better effect than decompression alone for patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) for reports before November 2014 and PubMed, EMBASE, GOOGLE SCHOLAR for those before December 2014. We also searched the reference lists included in studies and previous reviews. Randomized Controlled Trials and prospective or retrospective cohort studies of patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis after spinal decompression with or without fusion were eligible. Abstracted outcomes from retrieved articles included clinical outcome and reoperation rate of two aspects. Both random-effects and fixed-effects models were used to calculate the end-points. Results: We identified 23 studies with data collected from 61576 patients. The combined relative risk (RR) of clinical outcome for the spinal fusion compared with the spinal decompression was 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85 to 0.98), and little evidence of heterogeneity was observed. Namely, a satisfactory clinical outcome was significantly more likely with fusion than with decompression alone. But there was a trend toward a higher reoperation rate with fusion compared with decompression alone (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.88 to 0.97). Conclusion: This meta-analysis provides robust evidence of a better clinical outcome but a higher reoperation rate for spinal fusion compared with decompression alone. PMID:26628944

  14. Diagnosis of Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis using Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Yawara; Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Munetaka; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Hajime; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis remains difficult. Here, we report on a case in which bilateral lumbar foraminal stenosis was difficult to diagnose, and in which diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was useful. The patient was a 52-year-old woman with low back pain and pain in both legs that was dominant on the right. Right lumbosacral nerve compression due to a massive uterine myoma was apparent, but the leg pain continued after a myomectomy was performed. No abnormalities were observed during nerve conduction studies. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated bilateral L5 lumbar foraminal stenosis. DTI imaging was done. The extraforaminal values were decreased and tractography was interrupted in the foraminal region. Bilateral L5 vertebral foraminal stenosis was treated by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and the pain in both legs disappeared. The case indicates the value of DTI for diagnosing vertebral foraminal stenosis. PMID:26949473

  15. Diagnosis of Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Munetaka; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Hajime; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis remains difficult. Here, we report on a case in which bilateral lumbar foraminal stenosis was difficult to diagnose, and in which diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was useful. The patient was a 52-year-old woman with low back pain and pain in both legs that was dominant on the right. Right lumbosacral nerve compression due to a massive uterine myoma was apparent, but the leg pain continued after a myomectomy was performed. No abnormalities were observed during nerve conduction studies. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated bilateral L5 lumbar foraminal stenosis. DTI imaging was done. The extraforaminal values were decreased and tractography was interrupted in the foraminal region. Bilateral L5 vertebral foraminal stenosis was treated by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and the pain in both legs disappeared. The case indicates the value of DTI for diagnosing vertebral foraminal stenosis. PMID:26949473

  16. Degenerative Mitral Stenosis: Unmet Need for Percutaneous Interventions.

    PubMed

    Sud, Karan; Agarwal, Shikhar; Parashar, Akhil; Raza, Mohammad Q; Patel, Kunal; Min, David; Rodriguez, Leonardo L; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Mick, Stephanie L; Gillinov, A Marc; Tuzcu, E Murat; Kapadia, Samir R

    2016-04-19

    Degenerative mitral stenosis (DMS) is an important cause of mitral stenosis, developing secondary to severe mitral annular calcification. With the increase in life expectancy and improved access to health care, more patients with DMS are likely to be encountered in developed nations. These patients are generally elderly with multiple comorbidities and often are high-risk candidates for surgery. The mainstay of therapy in DMS patients is medical management with heart rate control and diuretic therapy. Surgical intervention might be delayed until symptoms are severely limiting and cannot be managed by medical therapy. Mitral valve surgery is also challenging in these patients because of the presence of extensive calcification. Hence, there is a need to develop an alternative percutaneous treatment approach for patients with DMS who are otherwise inoperable or at high risk for surgery. In this review, we summarize the available data on the epidemiology of DMS and diagnostic considerations and current treatment strategies for these patients. PMID:27142604

  17. Total Disc Arthroplasty for Treating Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Lumber disc arthroplasty is a technological advancement that has occurred in the last decade to treat lumbar degenerative disk diseases. Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to establish the impact and outcomes of managing patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease who have been treated with lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA). Overview of Literature Several studies have shown promising results following this surgery. Methods We reviewed the files of 104 patients at the Department of Neurosurgery in Colmar (France) who had been operated on by lumbar spine arthroplasty (Prodisc) between April 2002 and October 2008. Results Among the 104 patients, 67 were female and 37 were male with an average age of 33.1 years. We followed the cases for a mean of 20 months. The most frequent level of discopathy was L4-L5 with 62 patients (59.6%) followed by L5-S1 level with 52 patients (50%). Eighty-three patients suffered from low back pain, 21 of which were associated with radiculopathy. The status of 82 patients improved after surgery according to the Oswestry Disability Index score, and 92 patients returned to work. Conclusions The results indicate that TDA is a good alternative treatment for lumbar spine disk disease, particularly for patients with disabling and chronic low back pain. This technique contributes to improve living conditions with correct patient selection for surgery. PMID:25705336

  18. Percutaneous biportal endoscopic decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis: a technical note and preliminary clinical results.

    PubMed

    Hwa Eum, Jin; Hwa Heo, Dong; Son, Sang Kyu; Park, Choon Keun

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE The use of conventional uniportal spinal endoscopic decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis can be limited by technical difficulties and a restricted field of vision. The purpose of this study is to describe the technique for percutaneous biportal endoscopic decompression (PBED) for lumbar spinal stenosis and analysis of clinical postoperative results. METHODS The authors performed a unilateral laminotomy with bilateral foraminal decompression using a unilateral biportal endoscopic system in patients with single-level lumbar stenosis. The authors enrolled only patients who underwent follow-up for longer than 12 months after PBED. Fifty-eight patients were enrolled in this study. This approach was based on 2 portals: one portal was used for continuous irrigation and endoscopic viewing and the other portal was used to manipulate the instruments used in the decompression procedures. Clinical parameters such as the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Macnab criteria, and postoperative complications were analyzed. RESULTS Neural decompression was effectively performed in all enrolled patients. The mean ODI was significantly lower after PBED. Of 58 patients, 47 (81.0%) had a good or excellent result according to the Macnab criteria. Postoperative ODI and visual analog scale scores were significantly improved compared with preoperative values. CONCLUSIONS From a surgical point of view, percutaneous biportal endoscopy is very similar to microscopic spinal surgery, permitting good visualization of the contralateral sublaminar and medial foraminal areas. The authors suggest that the PBED, which is a minimally invasive procedure, is an alternative treatment option for degenerative lumbar stenosis. PMID:26722954

  19. The Pitfalls in Surgical Management of Lumbar Canal Stenosis Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuyama, Tetsuryu; Kubota, Motoo; Yuzurihara, Masahito; Mizuno, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ryo; Ando, Ryo; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    There have been few clinical studies in the area of cervical spine that focused on surgery for treating degenerative lumbar disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). High rates of wound complications and instrumentation failure have been reported more for RA than for non-RA patients, although clinical outcomes are similar between the two groups. Lumbar canal stenosis in RA is caused not only by degeneration but also by RA-related spondylitis, which includes facet arthritis and inflammation around the vertebral endplate. The pitfalls in surgical management of lumbar canal stenosis in RA patients are highlighted in this study. The study reviewed 12 patients with RA,who were surgically treated for lumbar canal stenosis. Two out of five patients with pulmonary fibrosis died of worsened pulmonary condition, even though there were no perioperative pulmonary complications. Two patients with pedicle screw fixation showed no instrumentation failure, but two patients with spinous process fixation needed re-operation or vertebral fracture. Surgical treatment for lumbar canal stenosis in RA patients needs to be individually adjusted. Preoperative assessments and treatments of pulmonary fibrosis and osteopenia are essential. Surgery for lumbar canal stenosis with RA should be deferred for patients with advanced pulmonary fibrosis because of its potential life-threatening risk. Fusion surgery is indicated only in patients with kyphosis or severe symptoms caused by intervertebral instability. Pedicle screw fixation with hydroxyapatite granules or sublaminar tape is recommended. Closer follow-up after surgery is necessary because of possible delayed wound infection, instrumentation failure, pathological fracture, and respiratory deterioration. PMID:24140780

  20. Retrolisthesis as a Compensatory Mechanism in Degenerative Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ikchan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Posterior vertebral translation as a type of spondylolisthesis, retrolisthesis is observed commonly in patients with degenerative spinal problems. Nevertheless, there is insufficient literature on retrolisthesis compared to anterolisthesis. The purpose of this study is to clarify the clinical features of retrolisthesis, and its developmental mechanism associated with a compensatory role in sagittal imbalance of the lumbar spine. Methods From 2003 to 2012, 230 Korean patients who underwent spinal surgery in our department under the impression of degenerative lumbar spinal disease were enrolled. All participants were divided into four groups : 35 patients with retrolisthesis (group R), 32 patients with simultaneous retrolisthesis and anterolisthesis (group R+A), 76 patients with anterolisthesis (group A), and 87 patients with non-translation (group N). The clinical features and the sagittal parameters related to retrolisthesis were retrospectively analyzed based on the patients' medical records. Results There were different clinical features and developmental mechanisms between retrolisthesis and anterolisthesis. The location of retrolisthesis was affected by the presence of simultaneous anterolisthesis, even though it predominantly manifest in L3. The relative lower pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, and lumbar lordosis compared to anterolisthesis were related to the generation of retrolisthesis, with the opposite observations of patients with anterolisthesis. Conclusion Retrolisthesis acts as a compensatory mechanism for moving the gravity axis posteriorly for sagittal imbalance in the lumbar spine under low pelvic incidence and insufficient intra-spinal compensation. PMID:25810857

  1. Controversies about Interspinous Process Devices in the Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spine Diseases: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Galarza, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    A large number of interspinous process devices (IPD) have been recently introduced to the lumbar spine market as an alternative to conventional decompressive surgery in managing symptomatic lumbar spinal pathology, especially in the older population. Despite the fact that they are composed of a wide range of different materials including titanium, polyetheretherketone, and elastomeric compounds, the aim of these devices is to unload spine, restoring foraminal height, and stabilize the spine by distracting the spinous processes. Although the initial reports represented the IPD as a safe, effective, and minimally invasive surgical alternative for relief of neurological symptoms in patients with low back degenerative diseases, recent studies have demonstrated less impressive clinical results and higher rate of failure than initially reported. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview on interspinous implants, their mechanisms of action, safety, cost, and effectiveness in the treatment of lumbar stenosis and degenerative disc diseases. PMID:24822224

  2. Cervical and lumbar MRI in asymptomatic older male lifelong athletes: Frequency of degenerative findings

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, J.F.; Healy, B.B.; Wong, W.H.M.; Olson, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    The athletic activity of the adult U.S. population has increased markedly in the last 20 years. To evaluate the possible long-term effects of such activity on the cervical and lumbar spine, we studied a group of asymptomatic currently very active lifelong male athletes over age 40 (41-69 years old, av. age 53). Nineteen active, lifelong male athletes were studied with MRI and the results compared with previous imaging studies of other populations. An athletic history and a spine history were also taken. Evidence of asymptomatic degenerative spine disease was similar to that seen in published series of other populations. Degenerative changes including disk protrusion and herniation, spondylosis, and spinal stenosis were present and increased in incidence with increasing patient age. In this group, all MRI findings proved to be asymptomatic and did not limit athletic activity. The incidence of lumbar degenerative changes in our study population of older male athletes was similar to those seen in other populations. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Lumbar Stenosis: A Recent Update by Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lee, Seung Jin

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc results in initial relative instability, hypermobility, and hypertrophy of the facet joints, particularly at the superior articular process. This finally leads to a reduction of the spinal canal dimensions and compression of the neural elements, which can result in neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by venous congestion and arterial hypertension around nerve roots. Most patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis had neurogenic intermittent claudication with the risk of a fall. However, although the physical findings and clinical symptoms in lumbar stenosis are not acute, the radiographic findings are comparatively severe. Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and good method for evaluation of lumbar stenosis. Though there are very few studies pertaining to the natural progression of lumbar spinal stenosis, symptoms of spinal stenosis usually respond favorably to non-operative management. In patients who fail to respond to non-operative management, surgical treatments such as decompression or decompression with spinal fusion are required. Restoration of a normal pelvic tilt after lumbar fusion correlates to a good clinical outcome. PMID:26435805

  4. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods.

    PubMed

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK(®)-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA(®) polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  5. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods

    PubMed Central

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK®-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA® polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  6. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  7. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun Kun

    2015-11-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  8. A Comparative Study of Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander P.; Sama, Andrew A.; Girardi, Federico P.; Lebl, Darren R.; Cammisa, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Level 4 retrospective review. Purpose To compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes between posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) with posterior segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI) for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Both PLIF and LLIF have been performed for degenerative spondylolisthesis with good results, but no study has directly compared these two techniques so far. Methods The electronic medical and radiographic records of 78 matched patients were analyzed. In one group, 39 patients underwent PLIF with SSI at 41 levels (L3-4/L4-5), while in the other group, 39 patients underwent the LLIF procedure at 48 levels (L3-4/L4-5). Radiological outcomes such as restoration of disc height and neuroforaminal height, segmental lumbar lordosis, total lumbar lordosis, incidence of endplate fracture, and subsidence were measured. Perioperative parameters were also recorded in each group. Clinical outcome in both groups was assessed by the short form-12, Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale scores. The average follow-up period was 16.1 months in the LLIF group and 21 months in the PLIF group. Results The restoration of disc height, foraminal height, and segmental lumbar lordosis was significantly better in the LLIF group (p<0.001). The duration of the operation was similar in both groups, but the average blood loss was significantly lower in the LLIF group (p<0.001). However, clinical outcome scores were similar in both groups. Conclusions Safe, effective interbody fusion can be achieved at multiple levels with neuromonitoring by the lateral approach. LLIF is a viable treatment option in patients with new onset symptoms due to degenerative spondylolisthesis who have had previous lumbar spine surgery, and it results in improved sagittal alignment and indirect foraminal decompression. PMID:26435782

  9. Comparison of the Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization System and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Shan, Jian-Lin; Liu, Xiu-Mei; Li, Fang; Guan, Kai; Sun, Tian-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been few studies comparing the clinical and radiographic outcomes between the Dynesys dynamic stabilization system and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys and PLIF for lumbar degenerative disease. Methods Of 96 patients with lumbar degenerative disease included in this retrospectively analysis, 46 were treated with the Dynesys system and 50 underwent PLIF from July 2008 to March 2011. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated. We also evaluated the occurrence of radiographic and symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Results The mean follow-up time in the Dynesys group was 53.6 ± 5.3 months, while that in the PLIF group was 55.2 ± 6.8 months. At the final follow-up, the Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale score were significantly improved in both groups. The range of motion (ROM) of stabilized segments in Dynesys group decreased from 7.1 ± 2.2° to 4.9 ± 2.2° (P < 0.05), while that of in PLIF group decreased from 7.3 ± 2.3° to 0° (P < 0.05). The ROM of the upper segments increased significantly in both groups at the final follow-up, the ROM was higher in the PLIF group. There were significantly more radiographic ASDs in the PLIF group than in the Dynesys group. The incidence of complications was comparable between groups. Conclusions Both Dynesys and PLIF can improve the clinical outcomes for lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to PLIF, Dynesys stabilization partially preserves the ROM of the stabilized segments, limits hypermobility in the upper adjacent segment, and may prevent the occurrence of ASD. PMID:26824851

  10. Advances in surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Silber, Jeff S; Anderson, D Greg; Hayes, Victor M; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2002-07-01

    The past several years have seen many advances in spine technology. Some of these advances have improved the quality of life of patients suffering from disabling low back pain from degenerative disk disease. Traditional fusion procedures are trending toward less invasive approaches with less iatrogenic soft-tissue morbidity. The diversity of bone graft substitutes is increasing with the potential for significant improvements in fusion success with the future introduction of several well tested bone morphogenic proteins to the spinal market. Biologic solutions to modify the natural history of disk degeneration are being investigated. Recently, electrothermal modulation of the posterior annulus fibrosis has been published as a semi-invasive technique to relieve low back pain generated by fissures in the outer annulus and ingrowing nociceptors (intradiskal electrothermal therapy, and intradiskal electrothermal annuloplasty). Initial results are promising, however, prospective randomized studies comparing this technique with conservative therapy are still lacking. The same is true for artificial nucleus pulposus replacement using hydrogel cushions implanted in the intervertebral space after removal of the nucleus pulposus posterior or through an anterior approach. Intervertebral disk prostheses are presently being studied in small prospective patient cohorts. As with all new developments, careful prospective, long-term trials are needed to fully define the role of these technologies in the management of symptomatic lumbar degenerative disk disease. PMID:12138967

  11. Diagnostic value of the lumbar extension-loading test in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The gait-loading test is a well known, important test with which to assess the involved spinal level in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. The lumbar extension-loading test also functions as a diagnostic loading test in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis; however, its efficacy remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of the lumbar extension-loading test with that of the gait-loading test in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods A total of 116 consecutive patients (62 men and 54 women) diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis were included in this cross-sectional study of the lumbar extension-loading test. Subjective symptoms and objective neurological findings (motor, sensory, and reflex) were examined before and after the lumbar extension-loading and gait-loading tests. The efficacy of the lumbar extension-loading test for establishment of a correct diagnosis of the involved spinal level was assessed and compared with that of the gait-loading test. Results There were no significant differences between the lumbar extension-loading test and the gait-loading test in terms of subjective symptoms, objective neurological findings, or changes in the involved spinal level before and after each loading test. Conclusions The lumbar extension-loading test is useful for assessment of lumbar spinal stenosis pathology and is capable of accurately determining the involved spinal level. PMID:25080292

  12. [Spinal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Munehito

    2014-10-01

    Spinal stenosis is an abnormal narrowing of the spinal canal that mainly occurs in the cervical and lumbar regions. The number of the patients of spinal stenosis is increasing in the aging society like Japan because the major reason for the stenosis is the degeneration of the spinal components including the intervertebral disc, facet, and ligamentum flavum. The development of the disease-concept is historically different between cervical spinal stenosis and lumbar spinal stenosis. Therefore, some confusion is still present in the definition and diagnosing criteria of these conditions. In this report, we mainly describe about the degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, which is most common in the outpatient clinic, concerning the diagnosis, various options of conservative therapy, and the surgical indication. PMID:25509800

  13. Biomechanical evaluation of segmental instability in degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Hasegewa, Kazuhiro; Kitahara, Ko; Hara, Toshiaki; Takano, Ko; Shimoda, Haruka

    2009-04-01

    Here we investigated the biomechanical properties of spinal segments in patients with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS) using a novel intraoperative measurement system. The measurement system comprised spinous process holders, a motion generator, a load cell, an optical displacement transducer, and a computer. Cyclic displacement of the holders produced flexion-extension of the segment with all ligamentous structures intact. Stiffness, absorption energy (AE), and neutral zone (NZ) were determined from the load-deformation data. Forty-one patients with DLS (M/F = 15/26, mean age 68.6 years; Group D) were studied. Adjacent segments with normal discs in six patients (M/F = 3/3, mean age 35 years) were included as a control group (Group N). Flexion stiffness was significantly lower in Group D than in Group N. The NZ, however, was significantly greater in Group D than in Group N. Thus, compared to normal segments, spinal segments with DLS had a lower flexion stiffness and a higher NZ. NZs in Group D were, however, widely distributed compared to those in Group N that showed NZ <2 mm/N in all cases, suggesting that the segment with DLS is not always unstable and that the segments with NZ >2 mm/N can be considered as unstable. PMID:19066987

  14. Only fixation for lumbar canal stenosis: Report of an experience with seven cases

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Study Design and Objective: The author reports experience with treatment of degenerative lumbar canal stenosis that involved fixation-arthrodesis of the affected spinal segment using double insurance transarticular screws for each joint. No direct bone, ligament or disc resection is done for decompression of the spinal dural tube or root canal. Methods and Summary of Background Data: During the period March 2011-September 2011, seven patients having lumbar canal stenosis were treated with a modification of transarticular method of screw fixation that involved insertion of two or double insurance screws at each articular joint. The operation involved section of the spinous process at its base, opening up of the facet joint, denuding of articular cartilage, insertion of intra-articular bone graft and insertion of two transarticular screws at each facet joint. The fixation was done in four levels in two patients, at three levels in four patients and at two levels in one patient. Oswestry disability index and visual analog scale were used to clinically assess the patients before and after the surgery and at follow-up. Results: During the average period of follow-up of 26.9 months (range 24-30 months), there was varying degree of recovery of symptoms. The procedure resulted in firm stabilization and fixation of the spinal segment and provided a ground for arthrodesis. During the period of follow-up, one patient underwent re-exploration and decompressive laminectomy as she continued to have significant pain symptom. Conclusions: Vertical instability and telescoping, listhesis or overriding of the facets on physical activity seems to be the defining phenomenon in the pathogenesis of lumbar canal stenosis. The clinical outcome in our patients suggest that fixation of the spinal segment can be a rationale form of treatment. Double insurance transarticular method of treatment is a simple, safe, and effective method of spinal stabilization. PMID:25013342

  15. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disorders: Mini-open TLIF and Corrective TLIF

    PubMed Central

    HARA, Masahito; NISHIMURA, Yusuke; NAKAJIMA, Yasuhiro; UMEBAYASHI, Daisuke; TAKEMOTO, Masaya; YAMAMOTO, Yuu; HAIMOTO, Shoichi

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) as a short fusion is widely accepted among the spine surgeons. However in the long fusion for degenerative kyphoscoliosis, corrective spinal fixation by an open method is thought to be frequently selected. Our objective is to study whether the mini-open TLIF and corrective TLIF contribute to the improvement of the spinal segmental and global alignment. We divided the patients who performed lumbar fixation surgery into three groups. Group 1 (G1) consisted of mini-open TLIF procedures without complication. Group 2 (G2) consisted of corrective TLIF without complication. Group 3 (G3) consisted of corrective TLIF with instrumentation-related complication postoperatively. In all groups, the lumbar lordosis (LL) highly correlated with developing surgical complications. LL significantly changed postoperatively in all groups, but was not corrected in the normal range in G3. There were statistically significant differences in preoperative and postoperative LL and mean difference between the pelvic incidence (PI) and LL between G3 and other groups. The most important thing not to cause the instrumentation-related failure is proper correction of the sagittal balance. In the cases with minimal sagittal imbalance with or without coronal imbalance, short fusion by mini-open TLIF or long fusion by corrective TLIF contributes to good clinical results if the lesion is short or easily correctable. However, if the patients have apparent sagittal imbalance with or without coronal imbalance, we should perform proper correction of the sagittal spinal alignment introducing various technologies. PMID:26119895

  16. Does Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Have Advantages over Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis?

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Takahito; Le, Hai; Schairer, William W.; Berven, Sigurd H.; Qamirani, Erion; Hu, Serena S.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in the treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods This study compared 24 patients undergoing TLIF and 32 patients undergoing PLF with instrumentation. The clinical outcomes were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) for low back pain and leg pain, physical component summary (PCS) of the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiographic parameters included slippage of the vertebra, local disk lordosis, the anterior and posterior disk height, lumbar lordosis, and pelvic parameters. Results The improvement of VAS of leg pain was significantly greater in TLIF than in PLF unilaterally (3.4 versus 1.0; p = 0.02). The improvement of VAS of low back pain was significantly greater in TLIF than in PLF (3.8 versus 2.2; p = 0.02). However, there was no significant difference in improvement of ODI or PCS between TLIF and PLF. Reduction of slippage and the postoperative disk height was significantly greater in TLIF than in PLF. There was no significant difference in local disk lordosis, lumbar lordosis, or pelvic parameters. The fusion rate was 96% in TLIF and 84% in PLF (p = 0.3). There was no significant difference in fusion rate, estimated blood loss, adjacent segmental degeneration, or complication rate. Conclusions TLIF was superior to PLF in reduction of slippage and restoring disk height and might provide better improvement of leg pain. However, the health-related outcomes were not significantly different between the two procedures. PMID:25844282

  17. Decompression alone versus decompression with limited fusion for treatment of degenerative lumbar scoliosis in the elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Daubs, Michael D.; Lenke, Lawrence G.; Bridwell, Keith H.; Cheh, Gene; Kim, Yongjung J.; Stobbs, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Retrospective cohort study. Objective: To analyze the surgical results of a group of patients older than 65 years treated for mild degenerative lumbar scoliosis (<30°) with stenosis, treated with decompression alone or decompression and limited fusion. Methods: We evaluated 55 patients, all older than 65 years from our prospectively collected database with mild degenerative scoliosis (<30°) and stenosis who underwent surgery. Laminectomy alone was performed in 16 patients, and laminectomy and limited fusion in 39 patients. Mean follow-up was 4.6 years in the decompression group and 5.0 years in the fusion group. Clinical results were graded by patients' self-reported satisfaction and length of symptom-free period to recurrence. Results: In the decompression alone group, 6 (37%) of 16 patients developed recurrent stenosis at the previously decompressed level and five developed recurrence within 6 months postoperatively versus the decompression and fusion group where 3 (8%) of 39 (P = .0476) developed symptomatic stenosis supra adjacent to the fusion. Of 16 patients in the decompression alone group, 12 (75%) had recurrence of symptoms by the 5-year follow-up period versus only 14 (36%) patients in the decompression and fusion group (P = .016). Adjacent segment degenerative changes were common in the fusion group, but only 7% developed symptomatic stenosis. Conclusions: Decompression with limited fusion prevents early return of stenotic symptoms compared with decompression alone in the setting of mild degenerative scoliosis (<30°) and symptomatic stenosis in patients 65 years and older. Final class of evidence–prognosis Study design  RCT  Cohort •  Case control  Case series Methods  Concealed allocation (RCT)  Intention to treat (RCT)  Blinded/independent evaluation of primary outcome  F/U ≥ 85% •  Adequate sample size  Control for confounding Overall class of evidence III The definiton of the different classes of evidence is available on page 67. PMID:23531707

  18. Surgical Treatment of Spinal Stenosis with and without Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: Cost-Effectiveness after 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    Tosteson, Anna N.A.; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Herkowitz, Harry; Albert, Todd; Boden, Scott D.; Bridwell, Keith; Longley, Michael; Andersson, Gunnar B.; Blood, Emily A.; Grove, Margaret R.; Weinstein, James N.

    2009-01-01

    Background The SPORT (Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial) reported favorable surgery outcomes over 2 years among patients with stenosis with and without degenerative spondylolisthesis, but the economic value of these surgeries is uncertain. Objective To assess the short-term cost-effectiveness of spine surgery relative to nonoperative care for stenosis alone and for stenosis with spondylolisthesis. Design Prospective cohort study. Data Sources Resource utilization, productivity, and EuroQol EQ-5D score measured at 6 weeks and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment among SPORT participants. Target Population Patients with image-confirmed spinal stenosis, with and without degenerative spondylolisthesis. Time Horizon 2 years. Perspective Societal. Intervention Nonoperative care or surgery (primarily decompressive laminectomy for stenosis and decompressive laminectomy with fusion for stenosis associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis). Outcome Measures Cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Results of Base-Case Analysis Among 634 patients with stenosis, 394 (62%) had surgery, most often decompressive laminectomy (320 of 394 [81%]). Stenosis surgeries improved health to a greater extent than nonoperative care (QALY gain, 0.17 [95% CI, 0.12 to 0.22]) at a cost of $77 600 (CI, $49 600 to $120 000) per QALY gained. Among 601 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, 368 (61%) had surgery, most including fusion (344 of 368 [93%]) and most with instrumentation (269 of 344 [78%]). Degenerative spondylolisthesis surgeries significantly improved health versus non-operative care (QALY gain, 0.23 [CI, 0.19 to 0.27]), at a cost of $115 600 (CI, $90 800 to $144 900) per QALY gained. Result of Sensitivity Analysis Surgery cost markedly affected the value of surgery. Limitation The study used self-reported utilization data, 2-year time horizon, and as-treated analysis to address treatment non-adherence among randomly assigned participants. Conclusion The economic value of spinal stenosis surgery at 2 years compares favorably with many health interventions. Degenerative spondylolisthesis surgery is not highly cost-effective over 2 years but could show value over a longer time horizon. PMID:19075203

  19. [Degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine Total disc replacement as an alternative to lumbar fusion?].

    PubMed

    Mayer, H M

    2005-10-01

    Spinal fusion is accepted worldwide as a therapeutic option for the treatment of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. Because there are only few evidence-based data available supporting the usefulness of lumbar spinal fusion, its questionable benefit as well as the potential for complications are the reasons for an ongoing discussion. In recent years, total disc replacement with implants has emerged as an alternative treatment. Although early results are promising, there is still a lack of evidence-based data as well as of long-term results for this technology. This article gives a critical update on the implant systems currently in use (SB Charité, Prodisc II L, Maverick, Flexicore, Mobidisc), which all have to be considered as "first-generation" implants. Morphological and clinical sequelae of the different biomechanical properties, designs, and materials have not yet been sufficiently investigated. There is no international consensus on the indication spectrum and on the preoperative diagnosis of discogenic low back pain. The same is true for the (minimally invasive) surgical access strategies. Complication rates seem to be somewhat lower compared to spinal fusion techniques. There are no standardized revision concepts in cases of implant failure. Lumbar disc replacement has opened a new era in spinal surgery with a still unproven benefit for the patient. It is strongly recommended that these techniques should only be applied by experienced and well-trained spine surgeons. Until evidence-based data are available, all patients should be treated under scientific study conditions with close postoperative follow-up. PMID:16034627

  20. Prognostic Factors of Surgical Outcome after Spinous Process-Splitting Laminectomy for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Toshiya; Inoue, Shinichi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective case review. Purpose To assess the clinical and radiographic outcomes and identify the predictive factors associated with poor clinical outcomes after lumbar spinous process-splitting laminectomy (LSPSL) for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Overview of Literature LSPSL is an effective surgical treatment for LSS. Special care should be taken in patients with degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS). Methods A consecutive retrospective case review of patients undergoing LSPSL for LSS with a minimum 2-year follow-up was performed. Mild DLS and mild degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) were included in the study. The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and recovery rate were reviewed. Poor clinical outcome was defined as a recovery rate <50% using Hirabayashi's method. Results A total of 52 patients (mean age, 72 years) met the inclusion criteria and had a mean follow-up of 2.6 years (range, 2-4.5 years). The preoperative diagnosis was LSS in 19, DS in 19, and DLS in 14 cases. The mean JOA score significantly increased from 14.6 to 23.2 at the final follow-up. The overall mean recovery rate was 60.1%. Thirteen patients (25%) were assigned to the poor outcome group. A higher rate of pre-existing DLS was observed in the poor outcome (poor) group (good, 15%; poor, 62%; p=0.003) than in the good outcome (good) group. None of the patient factors examined were associated with a poor outcome. A progression of slippage ≥5 mm was found in 8 of 24 patients (33%) in the DS group. A progression of curvature ≥5° was found in 5 of 14 patients (36%) in the DLS group. The progression of scoliosis and slippage did not influence the clinical outcome. Conclusions The clinical and radiographic outcomes of LSPSL for LSS were favorable. Pre-existing DLS was significantly associated with poor clinical outcome. PMID:26435788

  1. Sacroiliac joint motion in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders.

    PubMed

    Nagamoto, Yukitaka; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sakaura, Hironobu; Sugiura, Tsuyoshi; Fujimori, Takahito; Matsuo, Yohei; Kashii, Masafumi; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugamoto, Kazuomi

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Usually additional anchors into the ilium are necessary in long fusion to the sacrum for degenerative lumbar spine disorders (DLSDs), especially for adult spine deformity. Although the use of anchors is becoming quite common, surgeons must always keep in mind that the sacroiliac (SI) joint is mobile and they should be aware of the kinematic properties of the SI joint in patients with DLSDs, including adult spinal deformity. No previous study has clarified in vivo kinematic changes in the SI joint with respect to patient age, sex, or parturition status or the presence of DLSDs. The authors conducted a study to clarify the mobility and kinematic characteristics of the SI joint in patients with DLSDs in comparison with healthy volunteers by using in vivo 3D motion analysis with voxel-based registration, a highly accurate, noninvasive method. METHODS Thirteen healthy volunteers (the control group) and 20 patients with DLSDs (the DLSD group) underwent low-dose 3D CT of the lumbar spine and pelvis in 3 positions (neutral, maximal trunk flexion, and maximal trunk extension). SI joint motion was calculated by computer processing of the CT images (voxel-based registration). 3D motion of the SI joint was expressed as both 6 df by Euler angles and translations on the coordinate system and a helical axis of rotation. The correlation between joint motion and the cross-sectional area of the trunk muscles was also investigated. RESULTS SI joint motion during trunk flexion-extension was minute in healthy volunteers. The mean rotation angles during trunk flexion were 0.07° around the x axis, -0.02° around the y axis, and 0.16° around the z axis. The mean rotation angles during trunk extension were 0.38° around the x axis, -0.08° around the y axis, and 0.08° around the z axis. During trunk flexion-extension, the largest amount of motion occurred around the x axis. In patients with DLSDs, the mean rotation angles during trunk flexion were 0.57° around the x axis, 0.01° around the y axis, and 0.19° around the z axis. The mean rotation angles during trunk extension were 0.68° around the x axis, -0.11° around the y axis, and 0.05° around the z axis. Joint motion in patients with DLSDs was significantly greater, with greater individual difference, than in healthy volunteers. Among patients with DLSDs, women had significantly more motion than men did during trunk extension. SI joint motion was significantly negatively correlated with the cross-sectional area of the trunk muscles during both flexion and extension of the trunk. CONCLUSIONS The authors elucidated the mobility and kinematic characteristics of the SI joint in patients with DLSDs compared with healthy volunteers for the first time. This information is useful for spine surgeons because of the recent increase in spinopelvic fusion for the treatment of DLSDs. PMID:25978076

  2. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis Classification Criteria: A New Tool

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Hassan Reza; Benzel, Edward C.; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Purpose To design a new tool for classifying lumbar spinal canal stenosis (CLSCS). Overview of Literature Grading of patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) is controversial. Methods The Oswestry disability index (ODI) and the neurogenic claudication outcome score (NCOS) were recorded. Four parameters, which indicate the severity of LSCS disease, including Hufschmidt-grade, grading of magnetic resonance imaging, self-paced walking test, and stenosis ratio (SR) were employed. For the SR, quartile analysis was applied for classifying LSCS and the Hufschmidt-grade was modified into a 4-grade score. An initial score was assigned to each metric based on the severity of LSCS. Using the inverse-variance weighting method, the relative weights of these domains and their categories were determined. The score for all of the cases was obtained based on their weight by summing up the points of the four variables. Quartile analysis was used and a CLSCS score was proposed. Finally, intra- and interobserver reliability, and validity were assessed. Results A total of 357 patients were studied. The final CLSCS score for each case ranged from 4 to 16.5. Based on the quartile analysis, using the new criteria set, the CLSCS score was divided into four categories: CLSCS<7 (grade 0); 7≤CLSCS<10 (grade 1); 10≤CLSCS<13 (grade 2); and 13≤CLSCS≤16.5 (grade 3). The kappa values of for the CLSCS score indicated a perfect agreement. The CLSCS was correlated with the ODI and NCOS. All patients with grade 3 CLSCS were observed in the surgical group. Conclusions The CLSCS score can be helpful for classifying LSCS patients and in the decision-making process. PMID:26097655

  3. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion utilizing BMP-2 in treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis: neither safe nor cost effective

    PubMed Central

    Moatz, Bradley; Tortolani, P. Justin

    2013-01-01

    Background: With the rise of health care costs, there is increased emphasis on evaluating the cost of a particular surgical procedure for quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Recent data have shown that surgical intervention for the treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) is as cost-effective as total joint arthroplasty. Despite these excellent outcomes, some argue that the addition of interbody fusion supplemented with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) enhances the value of this procedure. Methods: This review examines the current research regarding the cost-effectiveness of the surgical management of lumbar DS utilizing interbody fusion along with BMP. Results: Posterolateral spinal fusion with instrumentation for focal lumbar spinal stenosis with DS can provide and maintain improvement in self-reported quality of life. Based on the available literature, including nonrandomized comparative studies and case series, the addition of interbody fusion along with BMP does not lead to significantly better clinical outcomes and increases costs when compared with more routine posterolateral fusion techniques. Conclusions: To enhance the value of the surgical management for DS, costs must decrease or there should be substantial improvement in effectiveness as measured by clinical outcomes. To date, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of interbody fusion devices along with BMP to treat routine cases of focal stenosis accompanied by DS, which are routinely adequately treated utilizing posterolateral fusion techniques. PMID:23646277

  4. The 2-Year Cost-Effectiveness of 3 options to Treat Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Udeh, Belinda L.; Costandi, Shrif; Dalton, Jarrod E.; Ghosh, Raktim; Yousef, Hani; Mekhail, Nagy

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) may result from degenerative changes of the spine, which lead to neural ischemia, neurogenic claudication, and a significant decrease in quality of life. Treatments for LSS range from conservative management including epidural steroid injections (ESI) to laminectomy surgery. Treatments vary greatly in cost and success. ESI is the least costly treatment may be successful for early stages of LSS but often must be repeated frequently. Laminectomy surgery is more costly and has higher complication rates. Minimally invasive lumbar decompression (mild®) is an alternative. Using a decision-analytic model from the Medicare perspective, a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed comparing mild® to ESI or laminectomy surgery. The analysis population included patients with LSS who have moderate to severe symptoms and have failed conservative therapy. Costs included initial procedure, complications, and repeat/revision or alternate procedure after failure. Effects measured as change in quality-adjusted life years (QALY) from preprocedure to 2 years postprocedure. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were determined, and sensitivity analysis conducted. The mild® strategy appears to be the most cost-effective ($43,760/QALY), with ESI the next best alternative at an additional $37,758/QALY. Laminectomy surgery was the least cost-effective ($125,985/QALY). PMID:24393198

  5. Discrimination between Lumbar Intraspinal Stenosis and Foraminal Stenosis using Diffusion Tensor Imaging Parameters: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Munetaka; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Hajime; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective observational study. Purpose To examine fractional anisotropy (FA) values and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of damaged nerves to discriminate between lumbar intraspinal stenosis (IS) and foraminal stenosis (FS) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) Overview of Literature It is important in the selection of surgical procedure to discriminate between lumbar IS and FS, but such discrimination is difficult. Methods There were 9 cases of IS, 7 cases of FS, and 5 healthy controls. The regions of interest were established in the lumbar intraspinal zone (Iz), nerve root (N), and extraforaminal zone (Ez). The FA and ADC values were measured on the affected and unaffected sides of the nerves. The FA ratio and the ADC ratio were calculated as the affected side/unaffected side ×100 (%). Results In the Ez, the FA value was significantly lower in FS than in IS (p<0.01). FA ratio was significantly lower in FS than in IS for the Ez (p<0.01). In the Iz, the ADC value was significantly higher in IS than FS (p<0.01). ADC ratio was significantly higher in FS than in IS for the N and Ez (p<0.05). For the Ez, receiver operating characteristic analysis of parameters revealed that the FA values showed a higher accuracy for the diagnosis of FS than the ADC values, and the FA value cut-off value was 0.42 (sensitivity: 85.7%, false positive: 11.1%) and the FA ratio cut-off value was 83.9% (sensitivity: 85.7%, false positive: 22.2%). Conclusions The low FA value in the extraforaminal zone suggests the presence of foraminal stenosis. When the FA value and FA ratio cut-off value were established as 0.42 and 83.9%, respectively, the accuracy was high for the diagnosis of foraminal stenosis. It may be possible to use DTI parameters to help in the discrimination between IS and FS. PMID:27114775

  6. Retrospective, Demographic, and Clinical Investigation of the Causes of Postoperative Infection in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Who Underwent Posterior Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Yaldiz, Can; Yaldiz, Mahizer; Ceylan, Nehir; Kacira, Ozlem Kitiki; Ceylan, Davut; Kacira, Tibet; Kizilcay, Gokhan; Tanriverdi, Taner

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Owing to the increasing population of elderly patients, a large number of patients with degenerative spondylosis are currently being surgically treated. Although basic measures for decreasing postoperative surgical infections (PSIs) are considered, it still remains among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to present possible causes leading to PSI in patients who underwent surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylosis and highlight how it can be avoided to decrease morbidity and mortality. The study included 540 patients who underwent posterior stabilization due to degenerative lumbar stenosis between January 2013 and January 2014. The data before and after surgery was retrieved from the hospital charts. Patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis who were operated upon in this study had >2 levels of laminectomy and facetectomy. For this reason, posterior stabilization was performed for all the patients included in this study. Determining the causes of postoperative infection (PI) following spinal surgeries performed with instrumentation is a struggle. Seventeen different parameters that may be related to PI were evaluated in this study. The presence of systemic diseases, unknown glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions were among the parameters that increased the prevalence of PI. Alternatively, prolene sutures, double-layered gloves, and the use of rifampicin Sv (RIS) decreased the incidence of PI. Although the presence of systemic diseases, unnoticed glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions increased PIs, prolene suture material, double-layered gloves, and the use of RIS decreased PIs. PMID:26200620

  7. Current concepts on spinal arthrodesis in degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Lykissas, Marios G; Aichmair, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Back pain is a common chronic disorder that represents a large burden for the health care system. There is a broad spectrum of available treatment options for patients suffering from chronic lower back pain in the setting of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, including both conservative and operative approaches. Lumbar arthrodesis techniques can be divided into sub-categories based on the part of the vertebral column that is addressed (anterior vs posterior). Furthermore, one has to differentiate between approaches aiming at a solid fusion in contrast to motion-sparing techniques with the proposed advantage of a reduced risk of developing adjacent disc disease. However, the field of application and long-term outcomes of these novel motion-preserving surgical techniques, including facet arthroplasty, nucleus replacement, and lumbar disc arthroplasty, need to be more precisely evaluated in long-term prospective studies. Innovative surgical treatment strategies involving minimally invasive techniques, such as lateral lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, as well as percutaneous implantation of transpedicular or transfacet screws, have been established with the reported advantages of reduced tissue invasiveness, decreased collateral damage, reduced blood loss, and decreased risk of infection. The aim of this study was to review well-established procedures for lumbar spinal fusion with the main focus on current concepts on spinal arthrodesis and motion-sparing techniques in degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. PMID:24303453

  8. Percutaneous Decompression of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with a New Interspinous Device

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario Alberto Volpi, Tommaso; Calabria, Eros; Novegno, Federica; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2012-04-15

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of the implantation of a new interspinous device (Falena) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. The clinical outcomes and imaging results were assessed by orthostatic MR during an up to 6-month follow-up period. Methods: Between October 2008 and February 2010, the Falena was implanted at a single level in 26 patients (17 men; mean age, 69 (range, 54-82) years) who were affected by degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. All of the patients were clinically evaluated before the procedure and at 1 and 3 months. Furthermore, 20 patients have completed a 6-month follow-up. Pain was assessed before and after the intervention using the Visual Analogue Scale score and the Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire. Orthostatic MR imaging was performed before the implantation and at 3 months to assess the correlation with the clinical outcome. Results: The mean ODI score decreased from 48.9 before the device implantation to 31.2 at 1 month (p < 0.0001). The mean VAS score decreased from 7.6 before to 3.9 (p < 0.0001) at 1 month and 3.6 at 3 months after the procedure (p = 0.0115). These values were stable at 6 months evaluation. No postimplantation major complications were recorded. MRI evaluation documented in most cases an increased size of the spinal canal area. Similarly a bilateral foraminal area improvement was found. The variation of the intervertebral space height measured on the posterior wall was not significant. Conclusions: In our preliminary experience with the Falena in a small cohort of patients, we obtained clinical and imaging results aligned to those reported with similar interspinous devices.

  9. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Rods in Lumbar Spine Degenerative Disease: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Ormond, David Ryan; Albert, Ladislau; Das, Kaushik

    2012-10-16

    STUDY DESIGN:: Retrospective Case Series. OBJECTIVE:: The purpose of our study was to retrospectively review the results of posterior lumbar fusion using PEEK rods. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:: Pedicle screw and rod instrumentation has become the preferred technique for performing stabilization and fusion in the lumbar spine for degenerative disease. Rigid fixation with titanium (Ti) rods leads to high fusion rates but may also contribute to stress shielding and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Thus, some have advocated using semirigid rods made of polyetherether ketone (PEEK). Although the biomechanical properties of PEEK rods have shown improved stress shielding characteristics and anterior load sharing properties, there are very few clinical studies evaluating their application in the lumbar spine. METHODS:: We evaluated a retrospective cohort of 42 patients who underwent posterior lumbar fusion from 2007 to 2009 for the treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disease using PEEK rods. Reoperation rate was the primary outcome evaluated. Fusion rate was also evaluated. RESULTS:: 8 of the 42 patients with PEEK rods required reoperation. Reasons for reoperation mainly included ASD (5/8) and non-union with cage migration (3/8). Radiographically documented fusion rate was 86%. Mean follow up was 31.4 months. No statistical differences were found in fusion rates or reoperation between age over 55 and younger than 55 (P=1.00), male and female (P=0.110), single or multilevel fusion (P=0.67), and fusion with and without and interbody graft (P=0.69). Smokers showed a trend towards increased risk of reoperation for ASD or instrumentation failure (P=0.056). CONCLUSIONS:: PEEK rods demonstrate a similar fusion and reoperation rate in comparison with other instrumentation modalities in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spine disease. PMID:23075859

  10. [Prediction of outcomes of surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar disk disease].

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Iu I; Nazarenko, G I; Cherkashov, A M; Riazanov, V V; Nazarenko, A G

    2009-01-01

    The paper focuses on algorithms of outcomes assessment of surgical treatment of the patients with degenerative lumbar disk disease. From 1997 to 2006 389 patients with discogenic lumbar pain were operated in the Medical Center of Central Bank of Russia. 185 patients underwent radiofrequency destruction of facet nerves, laser percutaneous lumbar discectomy was performed in 39 patients, microdiscectomy -- in 131, and decompression combined with lumbar spine stabilization -- in 31 cases. Clinical and radiological data of each patient were recorded in the database using 3-point scale according to intensity of the feature. Assessment of patients' condition was performed pre- and postoperatively (after discharge and after 6, 12 and 24 months interval). Postoperative outcome was recorded for the current period in compliance with modified criteria of Kawabata et al. Obtained data were mathematically and statistically processed. Developed algorithms allowed assessment of postoperative outcome in the patients with degenerative lumbar disk disease. Outcome data can be used for evaluation of feasibility of surgical treatment as well as for selection of surgical technique. PMID:19505029

  11. [Locomotive syndrome and frailty. Lumbar canal stenosis as an underlying disorder in the locomotive syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yoshihito

    2012-04-01

    Lumbar canal stenosis most commonly affects the elderly population by entrapment of the cauda equine roots surrounding the spinal canal often associated with pain in the back and lower extremities, difficulty ambulating. The locomotive syndrome refers to high-risk conditions under requiring care services, and lumbar canal stenosis is an important underlying disease. As one of the key capacities of frailty identified muscluloskeletal function, the locomotive syndrome is considered to musculoskeletal frail syndrome. Surgical treatment should be recommended to take the pressure off the nerves in the lumbar spine when the conservative treatments failed, and several studies revealed that the surgery generally resulted in a preferable outcome in the lumbar canal stenosis patients. Among lumbar canal stenosis patients treated with surgery, locomotive syndrome was contained 44% and many of which were seen in thin females. The patients with locomotive syndrome had lower muscle volume both in the extremities and the trunk than those without locomotive syndrome, and surgical results were poorer in the activity of daily life whereas the pain relief was adequately obtained. Treatment of the lumbar canal stenosis should be attended to locomotive frailty, and muscle strengthening training should be incorporated into pre and postoperative therapy. PMID:22460512

  12. A minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion using percutaneous long arm pedicle screw system for degenerative lumbar disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Er-Xing; Cui, Ji-Hao; Yin, Zhi-Xun; Li, Chuang; Tang, Cheng; He, Yi-Qian; Liu, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of patients with lumbar degeneration and instability treated with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation and minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion. Twenty-one patients were selected in our hospital from November, 2012 to March, 2013. The patients with an average age 55.62 years, including 8 vertebral spondylolisthesis, 4 lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, and 9 lumbar spinal canal stenosis cases. All the patients were managed to take the lumbar MRI and radiographs. The comparison of preoperative and postoperative (3 days, 2 weeks, 3 months) VAS and ODI score were analyzed. The results indicated that VAS scores were 7.14 ± 0.79 before operation, and 5.19 ± 0.81 in 3 days after operation, 4 ± 0.84 after 2 weeks, and 2.67 ± 0.66 after 3 months. The pain was relieved, and the postoperative VAS score was lower than that before treatment (P < 0.05). ODI score was 55.8 ± 11.4 before operation, 47.38 ± 9.38 after 3 days, 41.38 ± 8.09 after 2 weeks, 35.76 ± 4.50 after 3 months. ODI score was obviously decreased (P < 0.05). In conclusion, percutaneous pedicle screw fixation combined with minimally invasive interbody fusion is a safe, effective, feasible minimally invasive spine operation, with worthy for spreading. PMID:25550904

  13. Neuropathic Pain Components in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    An, Howard S; Moon, Seong Hwan; Lee, Hwan Mo; Suh, Seung Woo; Chen, Ding; Jeon, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence and characteristics of neuropathic pain (NP) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) according to subgroup analysis of symptoms. Materials and Methods We prospectively enrolled subjects with LSS (n=86) who were scheduled to undergo spinal surgery. The patients were divided into two groups according to a chief complaint of radicular pain or neurogenic claudication. We measured patient's pain score using the visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Leads Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS). According to LANSS value, the prevalence of NP component pain in patients with LSS was assessed. Statistical analysis was performed to find the relationship between LANSS scores and the other scores. Results From our sample of 86 patients, 31 (36.0%) had a NP component, with 24 (63.4%) in the radicular pain group having NP. However, only seven patients (15.6%) in the neurogenic claudication group had NP. The LANSS pain score was not significantly correlated with VAS scores for back pain, but did correlate with VAS scores for leg pain (R=0.73, p<0.001) and with ODI back pain scores (R=0.54, p<0.01). Conclusion One-third of the patients with LSS had a NP component. The presence of radicular pain correlated strongly with NP. The severity of leg pain and ODI score were also closely related to a NP component. This data may prove useful to understanding the pain characteristics of LSS and in better designing clinical trials for NP treatment in patients with LSS. PMID:26069129

  14. Lumbar spinal stenosis CAD from clinical MRM and MRI based on inter- and intra-context features with a two-level classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Jaehan; Alomari, Raja S.; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2011-03-01

    An imaging test has an important role in the diagnosis of lumbar abnormalities since it allows to examine the internal structure of soft tissues and bony elements without the need of an unnecessary surgery and recovery time. For the past decade, among various imaging modalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has taken the significant part of the clinical evaluation of the lumbar spine. This is mainly due to technological advancements that lead to the improvement of imaging devices in spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and multi-planar capabilities. In addition, noninvasive nature of MRI makes it easy to diagnose many common causes of low back pain such as disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc diseases. In this paper, we propose a method to diagnose lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), a narrowing of the spinal canal, from magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) images. Our method segments the thecal sac in the preprocessing stage, generates the features based on inter- and intra-context information, and diagnoses lumbar disc stenosis. Experiments with 55 subjects show that our method achieves 91.3% diagnostic accuracy. In the future, we plan to test our method on more subjects.

  15. Increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor is associated with hypertrophic ligamentum flavum in lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jirathanathornnukul, Napaphat; Limthongkul, Worawat; Yingsakmongkol, Wicharn; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Parkpian, Vinai; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2016-04-01

    Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) is the most common spinal disorder in elderly patients, causing low back and leg pain, radiculopathy, and cauda equina syndrome. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent regulator of many cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, wound healing, and angiogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate the pattern of VEGF expression in the ligamentum flavum (LF) of patients with LSCS. 24 patients with LSCS were recruited in this prospective study. We quantified and localized VEGF expression in LF tissues obtained during surgery. VEGF messenger RNA and protein expression in LF were determined using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA. VEGF expression was significantly higher in the hypertrophic LF group than in the non-pathological LF group (p<0.01) as quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. Further ELISA analysis showed that the average concentration of VEGF in the hypertrophic LF was significantly elevated compared with that of controls (p<0.01). There was no correlation between the tissue VEGF expression of non-pathological LF and patient age in patients with LSCS. Moreover, the immunohistochemical study revealed that VEGF was positively stained on fibroblasts, inflammatory cells, and endothelial cells representing neovascularization within hypertrophic LF compared to the non-pathological LF of controls. The increased expression of VEGF was associated with the degenerative changes of hypertrophic LF, suggesting that VEGF could contribute to one of the mechanisms of pathogenesis in lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:26956787

  16. Outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion for L4-L5 degenerative spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Kawahara, Norio; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has become the standard in the treatment for degenerative spondylolisthesis since improvement of spinal instrumentation However, few published studies have reported long term outcomes of PLIF using a same surgical procedure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a long term outcome of PLIF using a same surgical procedure for L4-L5 degenerative spondylolisthesis. Materials and Methods: Out of 45 patients who underwent L4-L5 PLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis between 1995 and 2003, 37 patients (16 males and 21 females) were evaluated in this study. Mean age was 61.8 years. The average followup period was 121 months. We evaluated % slip, lordosis at L4/L5, lumbar lordosis, Japanese Orthopedic Association's (JOA) score and adjacent segment degeneration. Results: The % slip significantly improved from an average of 17.0% before surgery to 9.7% at the last followup. Lordosis at L4/L5 averaged 3.6° before surgery, 8.2° after surgery and 6.9° at the last followup. Although patients experienced some loss of correction at last followup, their lordosis at L4/L5 at last followup still was significantly different from their lordosis at L4/L5 before surgery. Lumbar lordosis did not significantly change. Mean JOA score was 13.4 before surgery and 24.5 at the last followup; mean recovery ratio was 71.2%. Adjacent segment degeneration occurred in 40.5% of patients, almost all of which occurred in the cranial adjacent segment. Three patients (8.1%) required reoperation due to adjacent segment degeneration, at an average of 76 months after their initial surgery. Conclusions: With more than 10-year followup after L4-L5 PLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis, the adjacent segment degeneration occurred in 40.5% and reoperation was required in 8.1%. PMID:26015627

  17. Surgical Outcome of Reduction and Instrumented Fusion in Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Hassankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Shiravani, Reza; Mirkazemi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS) is a degenerative slippage of the lumbar vertebrae. We aimed to evaluate the surgical outcome of degenerative spondylolisthesis with neural decompression, pedicular screw fixation, reduction, and posterolateral fusion. Methods: This before-after study was carried out on 45 patients (37 female and 8 male) with LDS operated from August 2008 to January 2011. The patients’ pain and disability were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) questionnaire. In surgery, we applied distraction force to facilitate slip reduction. All the intra- and postoperative complications were recorded. The paired t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean age of patients and mean follow-up period were 58.3±3.5 years and 31.2±4.8 months, respectively. The mean slip correction rate was 52.2% with a mean correction loss of 4.8%. Preoperative VAS and ODI improved from 8.8 and 71.6 to postoperative 2.1 and 28.7, respectively. Clinical improvement was more prominent in more reduced patients, but Pearson coefficient could not find a significant correlation. Conclusion: Although spinal decompression with fusion and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment of the patients with LDS result in satisfactory outcome, vertebral reduction cannot significantly enhance the clinical improvement. PMID:26722140

  18. Comparison of the Oswestry Disability Index and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Lumbar Canal Stenosis: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Goni, Vijay G; Hampannavar, Aravind; Singh, Paramjeet; Sudesh, Pebam; Logithasan, Rajesh Kumar; Sharma, Anurag; BK, Shashidhar; Sament, Radheshyam

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Purpose The aim of the study was to determine relationship between the degrees of radiologically demonstrated anatomical lumbar canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its correlation with the patient's disability level, using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Overview of Literature The relationship between the imaging studies and clinical symptoms has been uncertain in patients suffering from symptomatic lumbar canal stenosis. There is a limited number of studies which correlates the degree of stenosis with simple reproducible scoring methods. Methods Fifty patients were selected from 350 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The patients answered the national-language translated form of ODI. The ratio of disability was interpreted, and the patients were grouped accordingly. They were subjected to MRI; and the anteroposterior diameters of the lumbar intervertebral disc spaces and the thecal sac cross sectional area were measured. Comparison was performed between the subdivisions of the degree of lumbar canal stenosis, based on the following: anteroposterior diameter (three groups: normal, relative stenosis and absolute stenosis); subdivisions of the degree of central canal stenosis, based on the thecal sac cross-sectional area, measured on axial views (three groups: normal, moderately stenotic and severely stenotic); and the ODI outcome, which was also presented in 20 percentiles. Results No significant correlation was established between the radiologically depicted anatomical lumbar stenosis and the Oswestry Disability scores. Conclusions Magnetic resonance imaging alone should not be considered in isolation when assessing and treating patients diagnosed with lumbar canal stenosis. PMID:24596604

  19. Dynamic Stabilization for Challenging Lumbar Degenerative Diseases of the Spine: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, Tuncay; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2013-01-01

    Fusion and rigid instrumentation have been currently the mainstay for the surgical treatment of degenerative diseases of the spine over the last 4 decades. In all over the world the common experience was formed about fusion surgery. Satisfactory results of lumbar spinal fusion appeared completely incompatible and unfavorable within years. Rigid spinal implants along with fusion cause increased stresses of the adjacent segments and have some important disadvantages such as donor site morbidity including pain, wound problems, infections because of longer operating time, pseudarthrosis, and fatigue failure of implants. Alternative spinal implants were developed with time on unsatisfactory outcomes of rigid internal fixation along with fusion. Motion preservation devices which include both anterior and posterior dynamic stabilization are designed and used especially in the last two decades. This paper evaluates the dynamic stabilization of the lumbar spine and talks about chronologically some novel dynamic stabilization devices and thier efficacies. PMID:23662211

  20. The Prognostic Importance of Patient Pre-Operative Expectations of Surgery for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iversen, Maura D.; Daltroy, Lawren H.; Fossel, Anne H.; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    1998-01-01

    Examines patients (N=257) with lumbar spinal stenosis preoperatively and at six months to relate patient expectation to baseline function and pain and to determine how patient expectations and preoperative function interact to predict postoperative outcomes. Results show that patients with many preoperative expectations, particularly those with…

  1. Predictive Factors for Subjective Improvement in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Patients with Nonsurgical Treatment: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsudaira, Ko; Hara, Nobuhiro; Oka, Hiroyuki; Kunogi, Junichi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Takeshita, Katsushi; Atsushi, Seichi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment in consecutive patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Materials and Methods Patients with LSS were enrolled from 17 medical centres in Japan. We followed up 274 patients (151 men; mean age, 71 ± 7.4 years) for 3 years. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess the predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment. Results In 30% of patients, conservative treatment led to a subjective improvement in the symptoms; in 70% of patients, the symptoms remained unchanged, worsened, or required surgical treatment. The multivariable analysis of predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment showed that the absence of cauda equina symptoms (only radicular symptoms) had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.31 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.50–7.31); absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis had an OR of 2.53 (95% CI: 1.13–5.65); <1-year duration of illness had an OR of 3.81 (95% CI: 1.46–9.98); and hypertension had an OR of 2.09 (95% CI: 0.92–4.78). Conclusions The predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment in LSS patients were the presence of only radicular symptoms, absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis, and an illness duration of <1 year. PMID:26863214

  2. [Evaluation of the quality of life in patients with degenerative disorders of lumbar spine].

    PubMed

    Nemec, F; Chaloupka, R; Krbec, M; Messner, P

    2009-02-01

    The review article deals with issues related to the evaluation of life quality, using questionnaire techniques, in patients with degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. The topic is introduced with the complexity of health definition and life quality evaluation. Then degenerative spinal disorders are defined. The options for assessment of success in surgical treatment of degenerative spine by both objective and subjective methods are presented. The use of questionnaires and distinction between generic and specific ones are described, advantages and disadvantages are analysed and the most important types of questionnaires currently used in international studies, and recently also in this country, are mentioned. Complications associated with the use of these methods are shown. The paper is concluded with a brief summary of the data presented. The aim of this paper is to stimulate interest in attending surgeons so that they should pay attention to the evaluation of outcomes in their patients and thus provide relevant data for comparison with the international literature. PMID:19268044

  3. Does football cause an increase in degenerative disease of the lumbar spine?

    PubMed

    Gerbino, Peter G; d'Hemecourt, Pierre A

    2002-02-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is exceedingly common. Whether any specific activity increases the likelihood of developing degenerative disc disease (DDD) or facet degeneration (FD) has enormous implications. Within the field of occupational medicine there are specific activities, occupations, and morphologic characteristics that have been related to low back pain. Several specific risk factors have been conclusively linked to low back pain, and in particular DDD and FD. Within the sport of American football, there has long been the feeling that many athletes have or will develop low back pain, DDD, and FD. Proving that certain risk factors present in football will predictably lead to an increase in LBP, DDD, and FD is more difficult. At this time, it can be said that football players, in general, increase their risk of developing low back pain, DDD, and FD as their years of involvement with their sport increase. Because specific spine injuries like fracture, disc herniation, and spondylolysis are more frequent in football players, the resulting DDD and FD are greater than that of the general population. The weightlifting and violent hyperextension that are part of American football are independent risk factors for degenerative spine disease. PMID:12831647

  4. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Uninstrumented Posterolateral Fusion in the Degenerative Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jalalpour, Kourosh; Neumann, Pavel; Johansson, Christer; Hedlund, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Objective Despite a large number of publications of outcomes after spinal fusion surgery, there is still no consensus on the efficacy of the several different fusion methods. The aim of this study was to determine whether transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) results in an improved clinical outcome compared with uninstrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF) in the surgical treatment for chronic low back pain. Methods This study included 135 patients with degenerative disk disease (n = 96) or postdiskectomy syndrome (n = 39). Inclusion criteria were at least 1 year of back pain with or without leg pain in patients aged 20 to 65 with one- or two-level disease. Exclusion criteria were sequestration of disk hernia, psychosocial instability, isthmic spondylolisthesis, drug abuse, and previous spine surgery other than diskectomy. Pain was assessed by visual analog scale (pain index). Functional disability was quantified by the disability rating index and Oswestry Disability Index. The global outcome was assessed by the patient and classified as much better, better, unchanged, or worse. The patients were randomized to conventional uninstrumented PLF (n = 67) or TLIF (n = 68). PLF was performed in a standardized fashion using autograft. TLIF was performed with pedicle titanium screw fixation and a porous tantalum interbody spacer with interbody and posterolateral autograft. The clinical outcome measurements were obtained preoperatively and at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. The 2-year follow-up rate was 98%. Results The two treatment groups improved significantly from preoperatively to 2 years' follow-up. At final follow-up, the results in the TLIF group were significantly superior to those in the PLF group in pain index (2.0 versus 3.9, p = 0.007) and in disability rating index (22 versus 36, p = 0.003). The Oswestry Disability Index was better in the TLIF group (20 versus 28, p = 0.110, not significant). The global assessment was clearly superior in the TLIF group: 63% of patients scored “much better” in the TLIF group as compared with 48% in the PLF group (p = 0.017). Conclusions The results of the current study support the use of TLIF rather than uninstrumented PLF in the surgical treatment of the degenerative lumbar spine. The less optimal outcome after uninstrumented PLF may be explained by the much higher reoperation rate. PMID:26225282

  5. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage after Surgery for Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yong; Kim, Do Keun

    2015-01-01

    Spine surgery has been increased as the population ages, but the occurrence of unusual complication such as remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is not well understood. We recently experienced a case of RCH in a 60-year-old woman showed neurologic dysfunction after degenerative lumbar spine surgery. There was no definite dural tearing and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) loss during operation. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebellar hemorrhage. The patient received conservative management and rehabilitation program. Most other reports have been suggested that RCH after spinal surgery might be related with excessive CSF drainage perioperatively. Minimizing of CSF loss during operation would be helpful to reduce the risk of RCH. If large volume of CSF has been lost accompanied by neurologic deterioration, brain imaging is necessary simultaneously. PMID:27169095

  6. Correction of Coronal Imbalance in Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease Following Direct Lateral Interbody Fusion (DLIF)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Seong; Lee, Hyo Sang; Shin, Dong Ah; Yoon, Do Heum

    2012-01-01

    Objective The authors have recently been using a surgical technique of minimally invasive direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) for correcting of coronal imbalance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcome and complication of DLIF. Methods We undertook retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of 8 DLIF procedures in Degenerative lumbar spine disease since May 2011. Four patients underwent DLIF only, and the others underwent combined DLIF and posterior fixation. Data on intra- and postoperative complications were collected. The pre- and postoperative X-rays were reviewed. We investigated coronal deformity, Cobb's angle, and apical vertebral translation (AVT). The mean follow-up period was months with a range of 2 to 8 months. Results A mean preoperative coronal Cobb's angle was 21.8° (range 11.5-32.4°). Following after DLIF, the mean Cobb's angle was decreased to 13.0° (range 2.9-21.5°). Following additional posterior screw fixation, mean Cobb's angle was further decreased to 7.4° (range 2.9-13.2°). A mean preoperative AVT was 2.0 cm(range 0.6-3.5 cm), and improved to 1.4 cm(range 0.3-2.4 cm) and 0.8 cm(range 0.2-1.8 cm) postoperatively (DLIF and, posterior fixation respectively). One patient (12.5%) showed cage migration during follow-up period. Two patients (25%) developed motor weakness, and 4 patients (50%) experienced postoperative thigh paresthesias or dysesthesias. During follow up period, motor weakness had resolved in 1 patient. Sensory symptoms were improved in all patients at the last follow-up. Conclusion Degenerative lumbar disease can be effectively corrected by DLIF with acceptable complications. PMID:25983811

  7. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore; Tarantino, Umberto; Nano, Giovanni; Iundusi, Riccardo; Fiori, Roberto Da Ros, Valerio Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  8. Two Portal Percutaneous Endoscopic Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Dilokhuttakarn, Thitinut

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose To report the outcomes of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis treated with percutaneous endoscopic decompression, focusing on the results of clinical evaluations. Overview of Literature There are no studies about two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods Medical and surgical complications were examined and clinical results were analyzed for 30 patients who consecutively underwent two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis were reviewed. The operations were performed by unilateral laminotomy for bilateral decompression. Results All patients displayed clinical improvement when were evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS) score of pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI) and Macnab criteria. The improvement of VAS and ODI was 8.3±0.7 to 2.3±2.6 and 65.2±13.7 to 24.0±15.5, respectively (both p<0.05). Complications were the same as for open decompression. The most common complication was transient nerve root paresthesia. Conclusions Surgical decompression with two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression has initial benefits, but long-term studies should pay more attention to the risks of postoperative instability and restenosis as well as the need for re-operation. Further investigations with long-term results are thus required. PMID:27114776

  9. How Does Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease Affect the Disc Deformation at the Cephalic Levels In Vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobai; Xia, Qun; Passias, Peter; Li, Weishi; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Objective . To evaluate the effect of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD) on the disc deformation at the adjacent level and at the level one above the adjacent level during end ranges of lumbar motion. Summary of Background Data It has been reported that in patients with DDD, the intervertebral discs adjacent to the diseased levels have a greater tendency to degenerate. Although altered biomechanics have been suggested to be the causative factors, few data have been reported on the deformation characteristics of the adjacent discs in patients with DDD. Methods Ten symptomatic patients with discogenic low back pain between L4 and S1 and with healthy discs at the cephalic segments were involved. Eight healthy subjects recruited in our previous studies were used as a reference comparison. The in vivo kinematics of L3–L4 (the cephalic adjacent level to the degenerated discs) and L2–L3 (the level one above the adjacent level) lumbar discs of both groups were obtained using a combined magnetic resonance imaging and dual fluoroscopic imaging technique at functional postures. Deformation characteristics, in terms of areas of minimal deformation (defined as less than 5%), deformations at the center of the discs, and maximum tensile and shear deformations, were compared between the two groups at the two disc levels. Results In the patients with DDD, there were significantly smaller areas of minimal disc deformation at L3–L4 and L2–L3 than the healthy subjects (18% compared with 45% of the total disc area, on average). Both L2–L3 and L3–L4 discs underwent larger tensile and shear deformations in all postures than the healthy subjects. The maximum tensile deformations were higher by up to 23% (of the local disc height in standing) and the maximum shear deformations were higher by approximately 25% to 40% (of the local disc height in standing) compared with those of the healthy subjects. Conclusion Both the discs of the adjacent level and the level one above experienced higher tensile and shear deformations during end ranges of lumbar motion in the patients with DDD before surgical treatments when compared with the healthy subjects. The larger disc deformations at the cephalic segments were otherwise not detectable using conventional magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Future studies should investigate the effect of surgical treatments, such as fusion or disc replacement, on the biomechanics of the adjacent segments during end ranges of lumbar motion. PMID:21245781

  10. Motion-preserving technologies for degenerative lumbar spine: The past, present, and future horizons

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Hassan; Mhatre, Devdatt; Defossez, Henri; Bono, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few decades, remarkable advancements in the understanding of the origin of low-back pain and lumbar spinal disorders have been achieved. Spinal fusion is generally considered the “gold standard” in the treatment of low-back pain; however, fusion is also associated with accelerated degeneration of adjacent levels. Spinal arthroplasty and dynamic stabilization technologies, as well as the continuous improvement in diagnosis and surgical interventions, have opened a new era of treatment options. Recent advancements in nonfusion technologies such as motion-preservation devices and posterior dynamic stabilization may change the gold standard. These devices are designed with the intent to provide stabilization and eliminate pain while preserving motion of the functional spinal unit. The adaption of nonfusion technologies by the surgical community and payers for the treatment of degenerative spinal conditions will depend on the long-term clinical outcome of controlled randomized clinical studies. Although the development of nonfusion technology has just started and the adoption is very slow, it may be considered a viable option for motion preservation in coming years. This review article provides technical and surgical views from the past and from the present, as well as a glance at the future endeavors and challenges in instrumentation development for lumbar spinal disorders. © 2011 SAS - The International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. PMID:25802672

  11. Dynamic and Static Overloading Induce Early Degenerative Processes in Caprine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Cornelis P. L.; Schoorl, Tom; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A.; Zandieh Doulabi, Behrouz; van der Veen, Albert J.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Smit, Theo H.; van Royen, Barend J.; Helder, Marco N.; Mullender, Margriet G.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical overloading of the spine is associated with low back pain and intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. How excessive loading elicits degenerative changes in the IVD is poorly understood. Comprehensive knowledge of the interaction between mechanical loading, cell responses and changes in the extracellular matrix of the disc is needed in order to successfully intervene in this process. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether dynamic and static overloading affect caprine lumbar discs differently and what mechanisms lead to mechanically induced IVD degeneration. Lumbar caprine IVDs (n = 175) were cultured 7, 14 and 21 days under simulated-physiological loading (control), high dynamic or high static loading. Axial deformation and stiffness were continuously measured. Cell viability, cell density, and gene expression were assessed in the nucleus, inner- and outer annulus. The extracellular matrix (ECM) was analyzed for water, glycosaminoglycan and collagen content. IVD height loss and changes in axial deformation were gradual with dynamic and acute with static overloading. Dynamic overloading caused cell death in all IVD regions, whereas static overloading mostly affected the outer annulus. IVDs expression of catabolic and inflammation-related genes was up-regulated directly, whereas loss of water and glycosaminoglycan were significant only after 21 days. Static and dynamic overloading both induced pathological changes to caprine lumbar IVDs within 21 days. The mechanism by which they inflict biomechanical, cellular, and extracellular changes to the nucleus and annulus differed. The described cascades provide leads for the development of new pharmacological and rehabilitative therapies to halt the progression of DDD. PMID:23638074

  12. Surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with microdecompression and interspinous distraction device insertion. A case series

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Interspinous distraction devices (IPDD) are indicated as stand-alone devices for the treatment of spinal stenosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of patients undergoing surgery for spinal stenosis with a combination of unilateral microdecompression and interspinous distraction device insertion. Methods This is a prospective clinical and radiological study of minimum 2 years follow-up. Twenty-two patients (average age 64.5 years) with low-back pain and unilateral sciatica underwent decompressive surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. Visual Analogue Scale, Oswestry Disability Index and walking capacity plus radiologic measurements of posterior disc height of the involved level and lumbar lordosis Cobb angle were documented both preoperatively and postoperatively. One-sided posterior subarticular and foraminal decompression was conducted followed by dynamic stabilization of the diseased level with an IPDD (X-STOP). Results The average follow-up time was 27.4 months. Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry Disability Index improved statistically significantly (p < 0.001) in the last follow-up exam. Also, the walking distance increased in all patients but two. Posterior intervertebral disc height of the diseased level widened average 1.8 mm in the postoperative radiograph compared to the preoperative. No major complication, including implant failure or spinous process breakage, has been observed. Conclusions The described surgical technique using unilateral microdecompression and IPDD insertion is a clinically effective and radiologically viable treatment method for symptoms of spinal stenosis resistant to non-operative treatment. PMID:23107358

  13. Minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion for adult degenerative scoliosis with 1 or 2 dislocated levels.

    PubMed

    Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri; Ratte, Louis; Poignard, Alexandre; Auregan, Jean-Charles; Queinnec, Steffen; Hernigou, Philippe; Allain, Jrme

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Frequent complications of posterolateral instrumented fusion have been reported after treatment of degenerative scoliosis in elderly patients. Considering that in some cases, most of the symptomatology of adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) is a consequence of the segmental instability at the dislocated level, the use of minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) to manage symptoms can be advocated to reduce surgical morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the midterm outcomes of 1- or 2-level minimally invasive ALIFs in ADS patients with 1- or 2-level dislocations. METHODS A total of 47 patients (average age 64 years; range 43-80 years) with 1- or 2-level ALIF performed for ADS (64 levels) in a single institution were included in the study. An independent spine surgeon retrospectively reviewed all the patients' medical records and radiographs to assess operative data and surgery-related complications. Clinical outcome was reported using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the visual analog scale (VAS) for lumbar and leg pain. Intraoperative data and complications were collected. Fusion and risk for adjacent-level degeneration were assessed. RESULTS The mean follow-up duration was 3 years (range 1-10 years). ODI, and back and leg pain VAS scores were significantly improved at last follow-up. A majority of patients (74%) had a statistically significant improvement in their ODI score of more than 20 points at latest follow-up and 1 had a worsening of his disability. The mean operating time was 166 minutes (range 70-355 minutes). The mean estimated blood loss was 410 ml (range 50-1700 ml). Six (5 major and 1 minor) surgical complications (12.7% of patients) and 13 (2 major and 11 minor) medical complications (27.7% of patients) occurred without death or wound infection. Fusion was achieved in 46 of 47 patients. Surgery resulted in a slight but significant decrease of the Cobb angle, and improved the pelvic parameters and lumbar lordosis, but had no effect on the global sagittal balance. At latest follow-up, 9 patients (19.1%) developed adjacent-segment disease at a mean of 2 years' delay from the index surgery; 4 were symptomatic but treated medically, and none required iterative surgery. CONCLUSIONS Single- or 2-level minimally invasive fusion through a minimally invasive anterior approach in some selected cases of ADS produced a good functional outcome with a high fusion rate. They were associated with a significantly lower rate of complications in this study than the historical control. PMID:26315959

  14. Therapeutic sustainability and durability of coflex interlaminar stabilization after decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis: a four year assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyun W.; Lauryssen, Carl; Maislin, Greg; Leary, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background Approved treatment modalities for the surgical management of lumbar spinal stenosis encompass a variety of direct and indirect methods of decompression, though all have varying degrees of limitations and morbidity which potentially limit the efficacy and durability of the treatment. The coflex® interlaminar stabilization implant (Paradigm Spine, New York, NY), examined under a United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) clinical trial, is shown to have durable outcomes when compared to posterolateral fusion in the setting of post-decompression stabilization for stenotic patients. Other clinical and radiographic parameters, more indicative of durability, were also evaluated. The data collected from these parameters were used to expand the FDA composite clinical success (CCS) endpoint; thus, creating a more stringent Therapeutic Sustainability Endpoint (TSE). The TSE allows more precise calculation of the durability of interlaminar stabilization (ILS) when compared to the fusion control group. Methods A retrospective analysis of data generated from a prospective, randomized, level-1 trial that was conducted at 21 US sites was carried out. Three hundred forty-four per-protocol subjects were enrolled and randomized to ILS or fusion after decompression for lumbar stenosis with up to grade 1 degenerative spondylolisthesis. Clinical, safety, and radiographic data were collected and analyzed in both groups. Four-year outcomes were assessed, and the TSE was calculated for both cohorts. The clinical and radiographic factors thought to be associated with therapeutic sustainability were added to the CCS endpoints which were used for premarket approval (PMA). Results Success rate, comprised of no second intervention and an ODI improvement of ≥ 15 points, was 57.6% of ILS and 46.7% of fusion patients (p = 0.095). Adding lack of fusion in the ILS cohort and successful fusion in the fusion cohort showed a CCS of 42.7% and 33.3%, respectively. Finally, adding adjacent level success to both cohorts and maintenance of foraminal height in the coflex cohort showed a CCS of 36.6% and 25.6%, respectively. With additional follow-up to five years in the U.S. PMA study, these trends are expected to continue to show the superior therapeutic sustainability of ILS compared to posterolateral fusion after decompression for spinal stenosis. Conclusion There are clear differences in both therapeutic sustainability and intended clinical effect of ILS compared to posterolateral fusion with pedicle screw fixation after decompression for spinal stenosis. There are CCS differences between coflex and fusion cohorts noted at four years post-op similar to the trends revealed in the two year data used for PMA approval. When therapeutic sustainability outcomes are added to the CCS, ILS is proven to be a sustainable treatment for stabilization of the vertebral motion segment after decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:26056630

  15. Initial Clinical Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Disease: A Preliminary Report on the Experience of a Single Institution with 30 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Na, Young Cheol; Lee, Hyo Sang; Shin, Dong Ah; Ha, Yoon; Yoon, Do Heum

    2012-01-01

    Objective The object of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion. Methods This study included 30 patients who underwent minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion at our hospital between May 2011 and February 2012 for the following diagnoses: degenerative disc disease, adjacent-segment degeneration, degenerative spondylolisthesis and lumbar degenerative scoliosis. Pain assessment was reported from 0 to 10 using a subjective visual analog scale (VAS) upon admission and at every follow-up day. Lumbar X-rays were obtained in the standing position upon admission and the 1st and 5th postoperative day, and at every follow-up day after the operation. The heights of the intervertebral disc space and neural foramen were measured using an electronic caliper with the PACS software. The surgical outcome was assessed as excellent, good, fair or poor using the Odom scale at the last follow-up. Results The mean VAS for low back pain were 4.93±1.47 on admission and 2.01±1.35 at last follow-up, respectively, and for leg pain, the scores were 4.87±2.16 on admission and 1.58±1.52 at last follow-up. The mean height of intervertebral disc space increased by 34% (7.93±2.33 preoperatively, and 11.09±4.33 immediately after surgery, p<0.01). The mean height of neural foramen also increased by 6.4% without any statistical significance (19.17±2.84 preoperatively, and 20.49±4.50 immediately after the surgery). Minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion was successful in 27 patients (90%) at last follow-up. Surgical complications were reported as transient postoperative thigh sensory changes (5 patients, 16.7%), transient psoas muscle weakness (3 patients, 10%), cage migration (2 patients, 6.7%), lumbar plexus injury (1 patient, 3.3%), and pain aggravation (1 patient, 3.3%). Conclusion The minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a safe and effective procedure for treating degenerative lumbar disease with good outcomes and moderate complications. Further follow-up is necessary to establish its safety and efficacy. PMID:25983813

  16. Radiological Evaluation of the Initial Fixation between Cortical Bone Trajectory and Conventional Pedicle Screw Technique for Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique versus conventional pedicle screws (PS) in radiographs of postsurgical lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Few reports have documented the holding strength of CBT technique for spondylolisthesis cases. Methods From October 2009 to June 2014, 21 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis were surgically treated in our institution. Ten were treated with conventional PS technique and 11 of with CBT technique. Mean lumbar lordosis and percent slippage were evaluated preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and 6 months and 1 year postoperatively using radiographs. We also investigated percent loss of slip reduction. Results There were statistically significant differences between preoperative percent slippage and postoperative slippage in both PS and CBT procedures over 1 year, and both techniques showed good slip reduction. On the other hand, lumbar lordosis did not change significantly in either the PS or CBT groups over 1 year. Conclusions CBT technique showed similarly good initial fixation compared with the PS procedure in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:27114765

  17. Artificial Discs for Lumbar and Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease –Update

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) technology for degenerative disc disease (DDD). Clinical Need Degenerative disc disease is the term used to describe the deterioration of 1 or more intervertebral discs of the spine. The prevalence of DDD is roughly described in proportion to age such that 40% of people aged 40 years have DDD, increasing to 80% among those aged 80 years or older. Low back pain is a common symptom of lumbar DDD; neck and arm pain are common symptoms of cervical DDD. Nonsurgical treatments can be used to relieve pain and minimize disability associated with DDD. However, it is estimated that about 10% to 20% of people with lumbar DDD and up to 30% with cervical DDD will be unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments. In these cases, surgical treatment is considered. Spinal fusion (arthrodesis) is the process of fusing or joining 2 bones and is considered the surgical gold standard for DDD. Artificial disc replacement is the replacement of the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial disc in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical spine that has been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments for at least 6 months. Unlike spinal fusion, ADR preserves movement of the spine, which is thought to reduce or prevent the development of adjacent segment degeneration. Additionally, a bone graft is not required for ADR, and this alleviates complications, including bone graft donor site pain and pseudoarthrosis. It is estimated that about 5% of patients who require surgery for DDD will be candidates for ADR. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a computerized search of the literature published between 2003 and September 2005 to answer the following questions: What is the effectiveness of ADR in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical regions of the spine compared with spinal fusion surgery? Does an artificial disc reduce the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) compared with spinal fusion? What is the rate of major complications (device failure, reoperation) with artificial discs compared with surgical spinal fusion? One reviewer evaluated the internal validity of the primary studies using the criteria outlined in the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group Quality Assessment Tool. The quality of concealment allocation was rated as: A, clearly yes; B, unclear; or C, clearly no. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to evaluate the overall quality of the body of evidence (defined as 1 or more studies) supporting the research questions explored in this systematic review. A random effects model meta-analysis was conducted when data were available from 2 or more randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and when there was no statistical and or clinical heterogeneity among studies. Bayesian analyses were undertaken to do the following: Examine the influence of missing data on clinical success rates; Compute the probability that artificial discs were superior to spinal fusion (on the basis of clinical success rates); Examine whether the results were sensitive to the choice of noninferiority margin. Summary of Findings The literature search yielded 140 citations. Of these, 1 Cochrane systematic review, 1 RCT, and 10 case series were included in this review. Unpublished data from an RCT reported in the grey literature were obtained from the manufacturer of the device. The search also yielded 8 health technology assessments evaluating ADR that are also included in this review. Six of the 8 health technology assessments concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support the use of either lumbar or cervical ADR. The results of the remaining 2 assessments (one each for lumbar and cervical ADR) led to a National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidance document supporting the safety and effectiveness of lumbar and cervical ADR with the proviso that an ongoing audit of all clinical outcomes be undertaken owing to a lack of long-term outcome data from clinical trials. Regarding lumbar ADR, data were available from 2 noninferiority RCTs to complete a meta-analysis. The following clinical, health systems, and adverse event outcome measures were synthesized: primary outcome of clinical success, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, pain VAS scores, patient satisfaction, duration of surgery, amount of blood loss, length of hospital stay, rate of device failure, and rate of reoperation. The meta-analysis of overall clinical success supported the noninferiority of lumbar ADR compared with spinal fusion at 24-month follow-up. Of the remaining clinical outcome measures (ODI, pain VAS scores, SF-36 scores [mental and physical components], patient satisfaction, and return to work status), only patient satisfaction and scores on the physical component scale of the SF-36 questionnaire were significantly improved in favour of lumbar ADR compared with spinal fusion at 24 months follow-up. Blood loss and surgical time showed statistical heterogeneity; therefore, meta-analysis results are not interpretable. Length of hospital stay was significantly shorter in patients receiving the ADR compared with controls. Neither the number of device failures nor the number of neurological complications at 24 months was statistically significantly different between the ADR and fusion treatment groups. However, there was a trend towards fewer neurological complications at 24 months in the ADR treatment group compared with the spinal fusion treatment group. Results of the Bayesian analyses indicated that the influence of missing data on the outcome measure of clinical success was minimal. The Bayesian model indicated that the probability for ADR being better than spinal fusion was 79%. The probability of ADR being noninferior to spinal fusion using a -10% noninferiority bound was 92%, and using a -15% noninferiority bound was 94%. The probability of artificial discs being superior to spinal fusion in a future trial was 73%. Six case series were reviewed, mainly to characterize the rate of major complications for lumbar ADR. The Medical Advisory Secretariat defined a major complication as any reoperation; device failure necessitating a revision, removal or reoperation; or life-threatening event. The rates of major complications ranged from 0% to 13% per device implanted. Only 1 study reported the rate of ASD, which was detected in 2 (2%) of the 100 people 11 years after surgery. There were no RCT data available for cervical ADR; therefore, data from 4 case series were reviewed for evidence of effectiveness and safety. Because data were sparse, the effectiveness of cervical ADR compared with spinal fusion cannot be determined at this time. The rate of major complications was assessed up to 2 years after surgery. It was found to range from 0% to 8.1% per device implanted. The rate of ASD is not reported in the clinical trial literature. The total cost of a lumbar ADR procedure is $15,371 (Cdn; including costs related to the device, physician, and procedure). The total cost of a lumbar fusion surgery procedure is $11,311 (Cdn; including physicians’ and procedural costs). Conclusions Lumbar Artificial Disc Replacement Since the 2004 Medical Advisory Secretariat health technology policy assessment, data from 2 RCTs and 6 case series assessing the effectiveness and adverse events profile of lumbar ADR to treat DDD has become available. The GRADE quality of this evidence is moderate for effectiveness and for short-term (2-year follow-up) complications; it is very low for ASD. The effectiveness of lumbar ADR is not inferior to that of spinal fusion for the treatment of lumbar DDD. The rates for device failure and neurological complications 2 years after surgery did not differ between ADR and fusion patients. Based on a Bayesian meta-analysis, lumbar ADR is 79% superior to lumbar spinal fusion. The rate of major complications after lumbar ADR is between 0% and 13% per device implanted. The rate of ASD in 1 case series was 2% over an 11-year follow-up period. Outcome data for lumbar ADR beyond a 2-year follow-up are not yet available. Cervical Artificial Disc Replacement Since the 2004 Medical Advisory Secretariat health technology policy assessment, 4 case series have been added to the body of evidence assessing the effectiveness and adverse events profile of cervical ADR to treat DDD. The GRADE quality of this evidence is very low for effectiveness as well as for the adverse events profile. Sparse outcome data are available. Because data are sparse, the effectiveness of cervical ADR compared with spinal fusion cannot be determined at this time. The rate of major complications was assessed up to 2 years after surgery; it ranged from 0% to 8.1% per device implanted. The rate of ASD is not reported in the clinical trial literature. PMID:23074480

  18. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central spinal stenosis; Foraminal spinal stenosis; Degenerative spine disease; Back pain - spinal stenosis ... or pain in the back, buttocks, thighs, or calves, or in the neck, shoulders, or arms Weakness ...

  19. Design of the Verbiest trial: cost-effectiveness of surgery versus prolonged conservative treatment in patients with lumbar stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Degenerative changes of lumbar spine anatomy resulting in the encroachment of neural structures are often regarded progressive, ultimately necessitating decompressive surgery. However the natural course is not necessarily progressive and the efficacy of a variety of nonsurgical interventions has also been described. At present there is insufficient data to compare surgical and nonsurgical interventions in terms of their relative benefit and safety. Previous attempts failed to provide clear clinical recommendations or to distinguish subgroups that substantially benefit from a certain treatment strategy. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial on (cost-) effectiveness of surgical decompression versus prolonged conservative treatment in patients with neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by lumbar stenosis. Methods/Design The aim of the Verbiest trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of prolonged conservative treatment compared to decompressive surgery. The study is a multi-center randomized controlled trial with two parallel groups design. Patients (age over 50) presenting to the neurologist or neurosurgeon with at least 3 months complaints of neurogenic intermittent claudication and considering surgical treatment are eligible for inclusion. Participants are randomly allocated to either prolonged conservative treatment, receiving further treatment from their general practitioner and physical therapist, or allocated to surgery and operated within 4 weeks. Primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient as measured by the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire at 24 months of follow-up. Data is analyzed according to the intention to treat principle. Discussion With a cost-effectiveness analysis the trade off between the costs of prolonged conservative treatment and delayed surgery in a smaller number of patients are compared with the current policy of surgical management. As surgery is expected to be inevitable in certain subgroups of patients, the distinction of and classification by predictive patient characteristics is most relevant to clinical practice. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2216 PMID:21371314

  20. Total disc replacement surgery for symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disease: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    van den Eerenbeemt, Karin D; Ostelo, Raymond W; van Royen, Barend J; Peul, Wilco C; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of total disc replacement surgery compared with spinal fusion in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc degeneration. Low back pain (LBP), a major health problem in Western countries, can be caused by a variety of pathologies, one of which is degenerative disc disease (DDD). When conservative treatment fails, surgery might be considered. For a long time, lumbar fusion has been the "gold standard" of surgical treatment for DDD. Total disc replacement (TDR) has increased in popularity as an alternative for lumbar fusion. A comprehensive systematic literature search was performed up to October 2008. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts, and relevant full text articles for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted relevant data and outcomes. Three randomized controlled trials and 16 prospective cohort studies were identified. In all three trials, the total disc replacement was compared with lumbar fusion techniques. The Charité trial (designed as a non-inferiority trail) was considered to have a low risk of bias for the 2-year follow up, but a high risk of bias for the 5-year follow up. The Charité artificial disc was non-inferior to the BAK Interbody Fusion System on a composite outcome of "clinical success" (57.1 vs. 46.5%, for the 2-year follow up; 57.8 vs. 51.2% for the 5-year follow up). There were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Prodisc artificial disc (also designed as a non-inferiority trail) was found to be statistically significant more effective when compared with the lumbar circumferential fusion on the composite outcome of "clinical success" (53.4 vs. 40.8%), but the risk of bias of this study was high. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Flexicore trial, with a high risk of bias, found no clinical relevant differences on pain and physical function when compared with circumferential spinal fusion at 2-year follow up. Because these are preliminary results, in addition to the high risk of bias, no conclusions can be drawn based on this study. In general, these results suggest that no clinical relevant differences between the total disc replacement and fusion techniques. The overall success rates in both treatment groups were small. Complications related to the surgical approach ranged from 2.1 to 18.7%, prosthesis related complications from 2.0 to 39.3%, treatment related complications from 1.9 to 62.0% and general complications from 1.0 to 14.0%. Reoperation at the index level was reported in 1.0 to 28.6% of the patients. In the three trials published, overall complication rates ranged from 7.3 to 29.1% in the TDR group and from 6.3 to 50.2% in the fusion group. The overall reoperation rate at index-level ranged from 3.7 to 11.4% in the TDR group and from 5.4 to 26.1% in the fusion group. In conclusion, there is low quality evidence that the Charité is non-inferior to the BAK cage at the 2-year follow up on the primary outcome measures. For the 5-year follow up, the same conclusion is supported only by very low quality evidence. For the ProDisc, there is very low quality evidence for contradictory results on the primary outcome measures when compared with anterior lumbar circumferential fusion. High quality randomized controlled trials with relevant control group and long-term follow-up is needed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TDR. PMID:20508954

  1. Total disc replacement surgery for symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disease: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    van den Eerenbeemt, Karin D.; van Royen, Barend J.; Peul, Wilco C.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of total disc replacement surgery compared with spinal fusion in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc degeneration. Low back pain (LBP), a major health problem in Western countries, can be caused by a variety of pathologies, one of which is degenerative disc disease (DDD). When conservative treatment fails, surgery might be considered. For a long time, lumbar fusion has been the “gold standard” of surgical treatment for DDD. Total disc replacement (TDR) has increased in popularity as an alternative for lumbar fusion. A comprehensive systematic literature search was performed up to October 2008. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts, and relevant full text articles for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted relevant data and outcomes. Three randomized controlled trials and 16 prospective cohort studies were identified. In all three trials, the total disc replacement was compared with lumbar fusion techniques. The Charité trial (designed as a non-inferiority trail) was considered to have a low risk of bias for the 2-year follow up, but a high risk of bias for the 5-year follow up. The Charité artificial disc was non-inferior to the BAK® Interbody Fusion System on a composite outcome of “clinical success” (57.1 vs. 46.5%, for the 2-year follow up; 57.8 vs. 51.2% for the 5-year follow up). There were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Prodisc artificial disc (also designed as a non-inferiority trail) was found to be statistically significant more effective when compared with the lumbar circumferential fusion on the composite outcome of “clinical success” (53.4 vs. 40.8%), but the risk of bias of this study was high. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Flexicore trial, with a high risk of bias, found no clinical relevant differences on pain and physical function when compared with circumferential spinal fusion at 2-year follow up. Because these are preliminary results, in addition to the high risk of bias, no conclusions can be drawn based on this study. In general, these results suggest that no clinical relevant differences between the total disc replacement and fusion techniques. The overall success rates in both treatment groups were small. Complications related to the surgical approach ranged from 2.1 to 18.7%, prosthesis related complications from 2.0 to 39.3%, treatment related complications from 1.9 to 62.0% and general complications from 1.0 to 14.0%. Reoperation at the index level was reported in 1.0 to 28.6% of the patients. In the three trials published, overall complication rates ranged from 7.3 to 29.1% in the TDR group and from 6.3 to 50.2% in the fusion group. The overall reoperation rate at index-level ranged from 3.7 to 11.4% in the TDR group and from 5.4 to 26.1% in the fusion group. In conclusion, there is low quality evidence that the Charité is non-inferior to the BAK cage at the 2-year follow up on the primary outcome measures. For the 5-year follow up, the same conclusion is supported only by very low quality evidence. For the ProDisc, there is very low quality evidence for contradictory results on the primary outcome measures when compared with anterior lumbar circumferential fusion. High quality randomized controlled trials with relevant control group and long-term follow-up is needed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TDR. PMID:20508954

  2. Radiological analysis of degenerative lumbar scoliosis in relation to pelvic incidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of pelvic incidence (PI) on spinopelvic parameters in patients with degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) and compare them with those of a normal population. Methods: There were two groups in this study. One group was composed by 136 patients with DLS and another was composed by 120 participants free of spinal disease. In each group there were three subgroups according to PI, which were low (PI less than 45°), middle (PI between 45° and 60°) and high PI group (PI more than 60°). Sagittal spinopelvic parameters were compared between the DLS patients and asymptomatic participants in each PI group. Results: The number of DLS patients with low, middle, and high PI were 38 (27.9%), 50 (36.8%), and 48 (35.3%), respectively. In the control group, the number of low, middle, and high PI participants were 52 (43.3%), 41 (34.2%), and 27 (22.5%), respectively. There were significant difference in PT, SS, LL, SVA and TLJ between the three subgroups in the DLS patients. Patients with high PI showed large TLJ, LL, PT, SS and small SVA. In the Control group and DLS group, PI determined pelvic orientation (PT, SS) and sagittal spinal parameters (LL, TLJ). In terms of correlation between SS and LL, between SS and TLJ, both DLS and Control groups showed significant correlations. In terms of correlation between PT and SVA, between PT and TLJ, only the DLS group showed a significant correlation. Compared with the asymptomatic participants, DLS patients showed a high PT and low SS as well as kyphotic TLJ, lumbar hypolordosis and thoracic hypokyphosis in all PI groups. Conclusions: The changes in spinopelvic parameters and pelvic compensatory mechanisms differ according to PI in patients with DLS, restoration of LL based on individual PI could help in accomplishing a balanced spinopelvic alignment. PMID:26885212

  3. The effects of transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the activation of deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with lumbar degenerative kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Jin Hyun; Jung, Gil Su; Baek, Seung Ok; Jones, Rodney; Ahn, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effectiveness of three different neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) protocols for the deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with LDK were recruited. Three stimulation protocols were investigated: stimulation of the abdominal muscles (protocol A); stimulation of the lumbar muscles (protocol B); and simultaneous stimulation of the abdominal and lumbar muscles (protocol A+B). Images of the obliquus externus (OE), obliquus internus (OI), transversus abdominis (TrA), and lumbar multifidus (LM) muscles were captured by real-time ultrasound imaging (RUSI). [Results] The thickness of LM was significantly greater during stimulation than at rest for all three protocols. Thicknesses of the abdominal muscles (TrA, OI, and OE) were significantly greater during stimulation than at rest for protocols A and A+B. Thickness increases in LM were significantly greater during protocols B and A+B, but not during protocol A. Thickness increases in the abdominal muscles (TrA, OI, and OE) were significantly greater during protocols A and A+B, but not during protocol B. [Conclusion] NMES can significantly activate the deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with LDK. Protocol A+B of NMES is recommended to aid postural correction and low back pain (LBP) in patients with LDK. PMID:27064323

  4. Radicular pain from lumbar canal stenosis in addition to pre-existing phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, S O; Ghani, I; Waldvogel, D; Hausmann, O

    2013-12-01

    Phantom limb (PL) is a term used to designate the sensation of the presence of an extremity following amputation, and it may be seen immediately after injury or years later in the part of the body that is deafferented or amputated. Phantom limb pain (PLP) is the term used to describe painful sensations referred to the absent limb. We present a case of a 71-year-old male with spinal claudication from discoligamentous lumbar canal stenosis L3-L4 and L4-L5 with L5 radicular pain in the left PL 13 years after the amputation. The patient had a disappearance of his radicular pain in the left PL following microsurgical lumbar decompression of L3-L4 and L4-L5. This is one of the rare cases reported in the literature in which a radicular pain in the PL disappeared following surgical decompression of the spinal canal. PMID:23427034

  5. Single transverse-orientation cage via MIS-TLIF approach for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease: a technical note

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Jin; Han, Ying-Chao; Pan, Fu-Min; Ma, Bin; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Single transverse cage placed in the anterior vertebral column can better maintain lumbar lordosis and sagittal alignment and is frequently used via the lateral transpsoas approach. However, there is no clear description in the literature of the steps required to place the single transverse cage during the instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) procedure for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease. The objective of this study is to describe the technique using single transverse-orientation cage when performing TLIF procedures. Materials and methods: We present 18 illustrative cases in which single transverse-orientation cage was placed according to a step-by-step technique that can be used during the TLIF procedure. Information acquired included procedure time, intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications. The preoperative and postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were recorded. Changes in disc height and segmental lordosis were measured at radiographs. Results: The single transverse-orientation cage was successfully placed in 18 patients in a stepwise technique to achieve lumbar fusion. Using this technique, the patients significantly improved clinically and radiographically at postoperative visits. Conclusions: This is the first report demonstrating the safety and efficacy of instrumented TLIF with single transverse-orientation cage for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease. Single transverse-orientation cage via MIS-TLIF approach can maintain greater lumbar lordosis and avoid the unique complications of lateral transpsoas approach. Understanding the options for cage placement is important for surgeons considering the use of this technique. PMID:26550387

  6. Evaluations of Computed Tomography Images and Lumbar Specimens in Mimic Operations of Transverse Rotation Laminoplasty for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xian-Wu; Liang, Yong-Hui; Zhang, Hui; Gong, Zi-Shun; Song, Hong-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laminectomy is a major method to treat lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), but it has lots of flaws such as scar tissue can form around the dura again or spinal instability. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of transverse rotation laminoplasty (TRL) in the treatment of LSS. Methods: The mimic operations of TRL were performed both in the computerized image processing and on the lumbar specimen. Computed tomography (CT) images were either collected from 80 clinical patients with complaints of lumbago or obtained from 40 sets of lumbar specimens after rebuild of spinal canals. In the CT image processing the heights of the spinous process and laminae at L3–L5 were measured. The total length of the spinous process plus one side laminae after the operation was evaluated and compared with the length of inner margin of pedical before the operation. The areas of the vertebral canal were examined before and after the operation. Results: In the CT images, the height of spinous process of L3, L4 and L5 was 24.74 ± 3.45, 22.68 ± 5.96 and 21.54 ± 4.12 mm respectively, and that of laminae was 23.66 ± 2.32, 22.68 ± 5.36 and 20.99 ± 3.67 mm respectively (P > 0.05). Distance of inner border of pedical of L3, L4 and L5 was 23.01 ± 6.59, 24.65 ± 5.54 and 26.03 ± 7.34 mm respectively, and length of spinous process with laminae of those was 29.76 ± 4.91, 29.31 ± 6.43 and 32.53 ± 5.76 mm respectively (P < 0.05). Preoperative area of spinal canals of L3, L4 and L5 was 299.81 ± 10.09, 297.66 ± 9.54 and 308.22 ± 10.04 mm2 respectively, and postoperative area was 480.01 ± 9.33, 487.32 ± 8.65 and 501.03 ± 9.12 mm2 respectively (P < 0.05). In the human lumbar vertebrae specimen, the data similar to the former. Conclusions: The excised canal posterior was covered, and the lumbar canals enlarged by TRL. The TRL provided a new alternative in the treatment of LSS. PMID:25591561

  7. [Controversies about instrumented surgery and pain relief in degenerative lumbar spine pain. Results of scientific evidence].

    PubMed

    Robaina-Padrón, F J

    2007-10-01

    Investigation and development of new techniques for intrumented surgery of the spine is not free of conflicts of interest. The influence of financial forces in the development of new technologies an its immediately application to spine surgery, shows the relationship between the published results and the industry support. Even authors who have defend eagerly fusion techniques, it have been demonstrated that them are very much involved in the revision of new articles to be published and in the approval process of new spinal technologies. When we analyze the published results of spine surgery, we must bear in mind what have been call in the "American Stock and Exchange" as "the bubble of spine surgery". The scientific literature doesn't show clear evidence in the cost-benefit studies of most instrumented surgical interventions of the spine compare with the conservative treatments. It has not been yet demonstrated that fusion surgery and disc replacement are better options than the conservative treatment. It's necessary to point out that at present "there are relationships between the industry and back pain, and there is also an industry of the back pain". Nonetheless, the "market of the spine surgery" is growing up because patients are demanding solutions for their back problems. The tide of scientific evidence seams to go against the spinal fusions in the degenerative disc disease, discogenic pain and inespecific back pain. After decades of advances in this field, the results of spinal fusions are mediocre. New epidemiological studies show that "spinal fusion must be accepted as a non proved or experimental method for the treatment of back pain". The surgical literature on spinal fusion published in the last 20 years following the Cochrane's method establish that: 1- this is at least incomplete, not reliable and careless; 2- the instrumentation seems to slightly increase the fusion rate; 3- the instrumentation doesn't improve the clinical results in general, lacking studies in subgroups of patients. We still are needing randomized studies to compare the surgical results with the natural history of the disease, the placebo effect, or the conservative treatment. The European Guidelines for lumbar chronic pain management show a "strong evidence" indicating that complex and demanding spine surgery where different instrumentation is used, is not more effective than a simple, safer and cheaper posterolateral fusion without instrumentation. Recently, the literature published in this field is sending a message to use "minimally invasive techniques", abandon transpedicular fusions and clearly indicating that we must apply the knowledge accumulated at least along the last 20 years based on the scientific evidence. In conclusion, based in recent information, we must recommend the "abandon of the instrumented pathway" in a great number of present indications for degenerative spine surgery, and look for new strategies in the field of rehabilitation and conservative treatments correctly apply, using before the decompressive and instrumented surgery all the interventional and minimally invasive techniques that are presently offer in the field of modem lumbar chronic pain treatment. PMID:18008014

  8. Gait Analysis Using a Support Vector Machine for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Toribatake, Yasumitsu; Murakami, Hideki; Yoneyama, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tetsuyou; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS) is diagnosed based on physical examination and radiological documentation of lumbar spinal canal narrowing. Differential diagnosis of the level of lumbar radiculopathy is difficult in multilevel spinal stenosis. Therefore, the authors focused on gait analysis as a classification method to improve diagnostic accuracy. The goal of this study was to identify gait characteristics of L4 and L5 radiculopathy in patients with LSS and to classify L4 and L5 radiculopathy using a support vector machine (SVM). The study group comprised 13 healthy volunteers (control group), 11 patients with L4 radiculopathy (L4 group), and 22 patients with L5 radiculopathy (L5 group). Light-emitting diode markers were attached at 5 sites on the affected side, and walking motion was analyzed using video recordings and the authors' development program. Potential gait characteristics of each group were identified to use as SVM parameters. In the knee joint of the L4 group, the waveform was similar to that of normal gait, but knee extension at initial contact was slightly greater than that of the other groups. In the ankle joint of the L5 group, the one-peak waveform pattern with disappearance of the second peak was present in 10 (45.5%) of 22 cases. The total classification accuracy was 80.4% using the SVM. The highest and lowest classification accuracies were obtained in the control group (84.6%) and the L4 group (72.7%), respectively. The authors' walking motion analysis system identified several useful factors for differentiating between healthy individuals and patients with L4 and L5 radiculopathy, with a high accuracy rate. PMID:26558674

  9. [The results of decompression and anterior lumbar interbody fusion with the use of interbody cages for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis].

    PubMed

    Luczkiewicz, Piotr; Smoczyński, Andrzej; Smoczyński, Maciej; Pankowski, Rafał; Piotrowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed 28 patients who had been treated surgically for lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. They were operated between 1998-2003. The decompression and anterior lumbar interbody fusion with the use of interbody cages, was performed in all of them. The outcome was assessed using rating system of Prolo and VAPS. The disc height, degree of slippage and segmental lordosis were measured, on the radiographs, before surgery, after 6 weeks and at the time of final follow-up. In all cases spinal fusion was achieved. The disc height, degree of slipage and segmental lordosis were improved and these results were stable in time. A significant decrease in radicular pain and low back pain were seen but the relation between clinical and radiological autcomes was not observed. PMID:17131721

  10. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Results of Posterolateral Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the Treatment of L4 Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kuraishi, Shugo; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Shimizu, Masayuki; Ikegami, Shota; Futatsugi, Toshimasa; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Hashidate, Hiroyuki; Tateiwa, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Hisatoshi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Multicenter analysis of two groups of patients surgically treated for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of posterolateral fusion (PLF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis is widely performed. However, few reports have compared the outcome of PLF to that of PLIF for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Methods Patients with L4 unstable spondylolisthesis with Meyerding grade II or more, slip of >10° or >4 mm upon maximum flexion and extension bending, and posterior opening of >5 degree upon flexion bending were studied. Patients were treated from January 2008 to January 2010. Patients who underwent PLF (n=12) and PLIF (n=19) were followed-up for >2 years. Radiographic findings and clinical outcomes evaluated by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score were compared between the two groups. Radiographic evaluation included slip angle, translation, slip angle and translation during maximum flexion and extension bending, intervertebral disc height, lumbar lordotic angle, and fusion rate. Results JOA scores of the PLF group before surgery and at final follow-up were 12.3±4.8 and 24.1±3.7, respectively; those of the PLIF group were 14.7±4.8 and 24.2±7.8, respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups. Correction of slip estimated from postoperative slip angle, translation, and maintenance of intervertebral disc height in the PLIF group was significantly (p<0.05) better than those in the PLF group. However, there was no significant difference in lumbar lordotic angle, slip angle and translation angle upon maximum flexion, or extension bending. Fusion rates of the PLIF and PLF groups had no significant difference. Conclusions The L4–L5 level posterior instrumented fusion for unstable spondylolisthesis using both PLF and PLIF could ameliorate clinical symptoms when local stability is achieved. PMID:26949470

  11. Sagittal balance of the pelvis-spine complex and lumbar degenerative diseases. A comparative study about 85 cases

    PubMed Central

    Jund, Jérôme; Noseda, Olivier; Roussouly, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the spino-pelvic alignment in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease. Several previous publications reported the analysis of spino-pelvic alignment in the normal and low back pain population. Data suggested that patients with lumbar diseases have variations of sagittal alignment such as less distal lordosis, more proximal lumbar lordosis and a more vertical sacrum. Nevertheless most of these variations have been reported without reference to the pelvis shape which is well-known to strongly influence spino-pelvic alignment. The objective of this study was to analyse spino-pelvic parameters, including pelvis shape, in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease and compare these patients with a control group of normal volunteers. We analysed three different lumbar degenerative diseases: disc herniation (DH), n = 25; degenerative disc disease (DDD), n = 32; degenerative spondylolisthesis (DSPL), n = 28. Spino-pelvic alignment was analysed pre-operatively on full spine radiographs. Spino-pelvic parameters were measured as following: pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, spino-sacral angle and positioning of C7 plumb line. For each group of patients the sagittal profile was compared with a control population of 154 asymptomatic adults that was the subject of a previous study. In order to understand variations of spino-pelvic parameters in the patients’ population a stratification (matching) according to the pelvic incidence was done between the control group and each group of patients. Concerning first the pelvis shape, patients with DH and those with DDD demonstrated to have a mean pelvic incidence equal to 49.8° and 51.6°, respectively, versus 52° for the control group (no significant difference). Only young patients, less than 45 years old, with a disc disease (DH or DDD) demonstrated to have a pelvic incidence significantly lower (48.3°) than the control group, P < 0.05. On the contrary, in the DSPL group the pelvic incidence was significantly greater (60°) than the control group (52°), P < 0.0005. Secondly the three groups of patients were characterized by significant variations in spino-pelvic alignment: anterior translation of the C7 plumb line (P < 0.005 for DH, P < 0.05 for DDD and P < 0.05 for DSPL); loss of lumbar lordosis after matching according to pelvic incidence (P < 0.0005 for DH, DDD and DSPL); decrease of sacral slope after matching according to pelvic incidence (P = 0.001 for DH, P < 0.0005 for DDD and P < 0.0005 for DSPL). Measurement of the pelvic incidence and matching according to this parameter between each group of patients and the control group permitted to understand variations of spino-pelvic parameters in a population of patients. PMID:17211522

  12. Posterior Interspinous Fusion Device for One-Level Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease : Comparison with Pedicle Screw Fixation - Preliminary Report of at Least One Year Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Jung; Chun, Hyoung Joon; Oh, Suck Jun; Kang, Tae Hoon; Yang, Moon Sool

    2012-01-01

    Objective Transpedicular screw fixation has some disadvantages such as postoperative back pain through wide muscle dissection, long operative time, and cephalad adjacent segmental degeneration (ASD). The purposes of this study are investigation and comparison of radiological and clinical results between interspinous fusion device (IFD) and pedicle screw. Methods From Jan. 2008 to Aug. 2009, 40 patients underwent spinal fusion with IFD combined with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). In same study period, 36 patients underwent spinal fusion with pedicle screw fixation as control group. Dynamic lateral radiographs, visual analogue scale (VAS), and Korean version of the Oswestry disability index (K-ODI) scores were evaluated in both groups. Results The lumbar spine diseases in the IFD group were as followings; spinal stenosis in 26, degenerative spondylolisthesis in 12, and intervertebral disc herniation in 2. The mean follow up period was 14.24 months (range; 12 to 22 months) in the IFD group and 18.3 months (range; 12 to 28 months) in pedicle screw group. The mean VAS scores was preoperatively 7.16±2.1 and 8.03±2.3 in the IFD and pedicle screw groups, respectively, and improved postoperatively to 1.3±2.9 and 1.2±3.2 in 1-year follow ups (p<0.05). The K-ODI was decreased significantly in an equal amount in both groups one year postoperatively (p<0.05). The statistics revealed a higher incidence of ASD in pedicle screw group than the IFD group (p=0.029). Conclusion Posterior IFD has several advantages over the pedicle screw fixation in terms of skin incision, muscle dissection and short operative time and less intraoperative estimated blood loss. The IFD with PLIF may be a favorable technique to replace the pedicle screw fixation in selective case. PMID:23133725

  13. Effectiveness of Surgery for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Gustavo C.; Ferreira, Paulo H.; Harris, Ian A.; Pinheiro, Marina B.; Koes, Bart W.; van Tulder, Maurits; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Maher, Chris G.; Ferreira, Manuela L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The management of spinal stenosis by surgery has increased rapidly in the past two decades, however, there is still controversy regarding the efficacy of surgery for this condition. Our aim was to investigate the efficacy and comparative effectiveness of surgery in the management of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods Electronic searches were performed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, Web of Science, LILACS and Cochrane Library from inception to November 2014. Hand searches were conducted on included articles and relevant reviews. We included randomised controlled trials evaluating surgery compared to no treatment, placebo/sham, or to another surgical technique in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Primary outcome measures were pain, disability, recovery and quality of life. The PEDro scale was used for risk of bias assessment. Data were pooled with a random-effects model, and the GRADE approach was used to summarise conclusions. Results Nineteen published reports (17 trials) were included. No trials were identified comparing surgery to no treatment or placebo/sham. Pooling revealed that decompression plus fusion is not superior to decompression alone for pain (mean difference –3.7, 95% confidence interval –15.6 to 8.1), disability (mean difference 9.8, 95% confidence interval –9.4 to 28.9), or walking ability (risk ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.4 to 1.9). Interspinous process spacer devices are slightly more effective than decompression plus fusion for disability (mean difference 5.7, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 10.0), but they resulted in significantly higher reoperation rates when compared to decompression alone (28% v 7%, P < 0.001). There are no differences in the effectiveness between other surgical techniques for our main outcomes. Conclusions The relative efficacy of various surgical options for treatment of spinal stenosis remains uncertain. Decompression plus fusion is not more effective than decompression alone. Interspinous process spacer devices result in higher reoperation rates than bony decompression. PMID:25822730

  14. Trends, Major Medical Complications, and Charges Associated with Surgery for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Mirza, Sohail K.; Martin, Brook I.; Kreuter, William; Goodman, David C.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.

    2010-01-01

    Context In recent decades, the fastest growth in lumbar surgery occurred in older patients with spinal stenosis. Trials indicate that for selected patients, decompressive surgery offers an advantage over non-operative treatment, but surgeons often recommend more invasive fusion procedures. Comorbidity is common in elderly patients, so benefits and risks must be carefully weighed in the choice of surgical procedure. Objective Examine trends in use of different types of stenosis operations and the association of complications and resource use with surgical complexity. Design, Setting, and Patients Retrospective cohort analysis of Medicare claims for 2002–2007, focusing on 2007 to assess complications and resource use in U.S. hospitals. Operations for Medicare recipients undergoing surgery for lumbar stenosis (n=32,152 in the first 11 months of 2007) were grouped into 3 gradations of invasiveness: decompression alone, simple fusion (one or two disc levels, single surgical approach) or complex fusion (more than 2 disc levels or combined anterior and posterior approach). Main Outcome Measures Rates of the 3 types of surgery, major complications, postoperative mortality, and resource use. Results Overall, surgical rates declined slightly from 2002–2007, but the rate of complex fusion procedures increased 15-fold, from 1.3 to 19.9 per 100,000 beneficiaries. Life-threatening complications increased with increasing surgical invasiveness, from 2.3% among patients having decompression alone to 5.6% among those having complex fusions. After adjustment for age, comorbidity, previous spine surgery, and other features, the odds ratio (OR) of life-threatening complications for complex fusion compared to decompression alone was 2.95 (95% CI 2.50–3.49). A similar pattern was observed for rehospitalization within 30 days, which occurred for 7.8% of patients undergoing decompression and 13.0% having a complex fusion (adjusted OR 1.94; 95% CI 1.74–2.17). Adjusted mean hospital charges for complex fusion procedures were $80,888 compared to $23,724 for decompression alone. Conclusions Among Medicare recipients, between 2002 and 2007, the frequency of complex fusion procedures for spinal stenosis increased, while the frequency of decompression surgery and simple fusions decreased. In 2007, compared with decompression, simple fusion and complex fusion were associated with increased risk of major complications, 30-day mortality, and resource use. PMID:20371784

  15. Mid-range outcomes in 64 consecutive cases of multilevel fusion for degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Röllinghoff, Marc; Schlüter-Brust, Klaus; Groos, Daniel; Sobottke, Rolf; Michael, Joern William-Patrick; Eysel, Peer; Delank, Karl Stefan

    2010-01-01

    In the treatment of multilevel degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, spondylodesis plays a controversial role. Most patients can be treated conservatively with success. Multilevel lumbar fusion with instrumentation is associated with severe complications like failed back surgery syndrome, implant failure, and adjacent segment disease (ASD). This retrospective study examines the records of 70 elderly patients with degenerative changes or instability of the lumbar spine treated between 2002 and 2007 with spondylodesis of more than two segments. Sixty-four patients were included; 5 patients had died and one patient was lost to follow-up. We evaluated complications, clinical/radiological outcomes, and success of fusion. Flexion-extension and standing X-rays in two planes, MRI, and/or CT scans were obtained pre-operatively. Patients were assessed clinically using the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Surgery performed was dorsolateral fusion (46.9%) or dorsal fusion with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF; 53.1%). Additional decompression was carried out in 37.5% of patients. Mean follow-up was 29.4±5.4 months. Average patient age was 64.7±4.3 years. Clinical outcomes were not satisfactory for all patients. VAS scores improved from 8.6±1.3 to 5.6±3.0 pre- to post-operatively, without statistical significance. ODI was also not significantly improved (56.1±22.3 pre- and 45.1±26.4 post-operatively). Successful fusion, defined as adequate bone mass with trabeculation at the facets and transverse processes or in the intervertebral segments, did not correlate with good clinical outcomes. Thirty-five of 64 patients (54%) showed signs of pedicle screw loosening, especially of the screws at S1. However, only 7 of these 35 (20%) complained of corresponding back pain. Revision surgery was required in 24 of 64 patients (38%). Of these, indications were adjacent segment disease (16 cases), pedicle screw loosening (7 cases), and infection (one case). At follow-up of 29.4 months, patients with radiographic ASD had worse ODI scores than patients without (54.7 vs. 36.6; P<0.001). Multilevel fusion for degenerative disease still has a high rate of complications, up to 50%. The problem of adjacent segment disease after fusion surgery has not yet been solved. This study underscores the need for strict indication guidelines to perform lumbar spine fusion of more than two levels. PMID:21808698

  16. Risk factors for postoperative complication after spinal fusion and instrumentation in degenerative lumbar scoliosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Relatively few studies have focused on the major medical complications that are more common in older adults. Furthermore, these studies have generally not reported how accurately a risk factor, or combination of risk factors, can distinguish between those who will have a complication and those who will not. Methods A total of 236 consecutive patients who had undergone surgical treatment for degenerative lumbar scoliosis between June 2008 and June 2012 were included retrospectively in this study. The demographic distribution, medical history, and clinical data were collected to investigate the predictive factors of postoperative complications by logistic regression. Results Among 236 eligible patients, major medical complications occurred in 7.2% of cases and wound complications occurred in 1.7% of cases. Ninety-day mortality rate was 0.4%. Postoperative complications were strongly associated with history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (P = 0.031), dyspnea with minimal exertion (P = 0.041), being at least partially dependent (P = 0.041), smoking within the past year (P = 0.044), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class of more than 2 (P = 0.000), diabetes treated with insulin (P = 0.003), and steroid use for chronic condition (P = 0.003). In logistic regressions, operation time (odds ratio 2.45, 95% confidence interval 1.11–4.78), ASA class (class 3 or 4 vs. class 1 or 2: odds ratio 2.21, 95% confidence interval 1.22–3.45), insulin-dependent diabetes (odds ratio 1.72, 95% confidence interval 1.18–2.43), and steroid use for chronic condition (odds ratio 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.06–2.32) may be reasonable predictors for an individual's likelihood of surgical complications. Conclusions The occurrence of postoperative complications is most likely multifactorial and is related to operation time, ASA class, insulin-dependent diabetes and steroid use for chronic condition. PMID:24606963

  17. Postoperative lumbar spinal stenosis after intertransverse fusion with granules of hydroxyapatite: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the present case of postoperative lumbar spinal stenosis after non-instrumented intertransverse fusion with granules of hydroxyapatite (HA), bone union was not completed and the patient felt the recurrence of his symptoms within two years. We performed re-decompression with fusion, and in hematoxylin and eosin staining of HA granulation harvested during revision surgery, fibrous tissue with hyaline degeneration surrounded the cavity where the HA had existed. Multinuclear giant cells and lymphocytes infiltrated some parts of the marginal layer of the cavity, and no obvious bony bridge had regenerated from autologous bone. No tartrate-resistant acid phosphate (TRAP) -positive osteoclasts could be seen in the new bone, suggesting that the activity of osteoclasts in the new bone decreased during the seven years after the primary surgery. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/3483360258050263 PMID:23134668

  18. Change in onset times of the abdominal muscles following functional task in lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Seung; Park, Seong Doo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference in the onset times of the abdominal muscle following a rapid arm task in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). In total, 32 patients with LSS were recruited from W oriental hospital. Muscle activity onset of the internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles was measured by electromyography (EMG) activity with a rapid arm movement and during the performance of a walking task. The LSS group demonstrated a significantly later onset of the IO, EO, and rectus abdominal (RA) muscles than the normal group. The deltoid reaction time of the normal group demonstrated significantly earlier activations of IO and EO, while the deltoid reaction time of the LSS group demonstrated significantly delayed activations of IO and RA. The EMG measurements of the IO, EO, and RA muscles while standing and walking were reliable and they offer empirical information about the trunk muscle activation of LSS patients. PMID:25426468

  19. Accuracy and reproducibility of a retrospective outcome assessment for lumbar spinal stenosis surgery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Retrospective assessment of surgery outcome is considered problematic. The aims of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility and accuracy of a retrospective outcome assessment of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery with reference to prospective outcome scale measurements. Method Outcome of surgery from 100 lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) patients was evaluated retrospectively from patient files of a 3-month outpatient visit performed according to a standard clinical protocol by two independent researchers. In the retrospective analysis, outcome was graded as 2 = good if the clinical condition had clearly improved, 1 = moderate if it had just slightly improved, 0 = poor if it had not improved or was even worse than before the surgical treatment (Retrospective 3- point scale). A prospectively assessed Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire (ODI), Visual analogue pain scale (VAS) and a patient satisfaction questionnaire were used as references of standards. Reproducibility of the measurements was evaluated. Results The retrospective 3-point scale correlated with ODI (r = 0.528; P < 0.001) and VAS (r = 0.368; P < 0.001). The agreement was better in the good and poor outcome than in the moderate outcome. Retrospective 3-point scale demonstrated substantial intra-rater and inter-rater repeatability (κ = 0.682, P < 0.001 and κ = 0.630, P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Retrospective assessment of spinal surgery outcome is highly reproducible. Accuracy is highest in the patients with poor and good surgical result. PMID:22642923

  20. Pedicle-Screw-Based Dynamic Systems and Degenerative Lumbar Diseases: Biomechanical and Clinical Experiences of Dynamic Fusion with Isobar TTL

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Cédric; Perrin, Gilles; Champain, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic systems in the lumbar spine are believed to reduce main fusion drawbacks such as pseudarthrosis, bone rarefaction, and mechanical failure. Compared to fusion achieved with rigid constructs, biomechanical studies underlined some advantages of dynamic instrumentation including increased load sharing between the instrumentation and interbody bone graft and stresses reduction at bone-to-screw interface. These advantages may result in increased fusion rates, limitation of bone rarefaction, and reduction of mechanical complications with the ultimate objective to reduce reoperations rates. However published clinical evidence for dynamic systems remains limited. In addition to providing biomechanical evaluation of a pedicle-screw-based dynamic system, the present study offers a long-term (average 10.2 years) insight view of the clinical outcomes of 18 patients treated by fusion with dynamic systems for degenerative lumbar spine diseases. The findings outline significant and stable symptoms relief, absence of implant-related complications, no revision surgery, and few adjacent segment degenerative changes. In spite of sample limitations, this is the first long-term report of outcomes of dynamic fusion that opens an interesting perspective for clinical outcomes of dynamic systems that need to be explored at larger scale. PMID:25031874

  1. Usefulness of the Core Outcome Measures Index in Daily Clinical Practice for Assessing Patients with Degenerative Lumbar Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Álvarez, Carlos; Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Saló, Guillem; Molina, Antoni; Lladó, Andreu; Ramírez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Outcome evaluation is an important aspect of the treatment of patients with degenerative lumbar disease. We evaluated the usefulness of the Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) in assessing people affected by degenerative lumbar disease in daily clinical practice. Methods. We evaluated 221 patients who had completed preoperatively and 2 years after surgery VAS pain, Short Form-36 (SF-36), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and COMI. We calculated the change of scores and its sensitivity to change. The internal consistency of the COMI items and the correlation between the COMI scores and the scores of the other measurements were assessed. Results. Statistically significant differences were observed between the mean scores of the preoperative and 2 years questionnaires for nearly all measurements. COMI showed a good internal consistency, except for the preoperative pain subscale. The sensitivity to change was high for the total COMI and its pain and well-being subscales and moderate for the rest. The COMI demonstrated strong correlation with the other measurements. Conclusions. The COMI is a useful tool for assessing the patient-based outcome in the studied population. Given its simplicity, good correlation with the SF-36 and ODI and its good sensitivity to change, it could replace more cumbersome instruments in daily clinical practice. PMID:22518325

  2. Degenerative Pathways of Lumbar Motion Segments - A Comparison in Two Samples of Patients with Persistent Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Rikke K.; Kjaer, Per; Jensen, Tue S.; Albert, Hanne; Kent, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to identify spinal pathoanatomy in people with persistent low back pain. However, the clinical relevance of spinal degenerative MRI findings remains uncertain. Although multiple MRI findings are almost always present at the same time, research into the association with clinical outcomes (such as pain) has predominantly focused on individual MRI findings. This study aimed to: (i) investigate how multiple MRI lumbar spine findings cluster together within two different samples of patients with low back pain, (ii) classify these clusters into hypothetical pathways of degeneration based on scientific knowledge of disco-vertebral degeneration, and (iii) compare these clusters and degenerative pathways between samples. Methods We performed a secondary cross-sectional analysis on two dissimilar MRI samples collected in a hospital department: (1) data from the spinal MRI reports of 4,162 low back pain patients and (2) data from an MRI research protocol of 631 low back pain patients. Latent Class Analysis was used in both samples to cluster MRI findings from lumbar motion segments. Using content analysis, each cluster was then categorised into hypothetical pathways of degeneration. Results Six clusters of MRI findings were identified in each of the two samples. The content of the clusters in the two samples displayed some differences but had the same overall pattern of MRI findings. Although the hypothetical degenerative pathways identified in the two samples were not identical, the overall pattern of increasing degeneration within the pathways was the same. Conclusions It was expected that different clusters could emerge from different samples, however, when organised into hypothetical pathways of degeneration, the overall pattern of increasing degeneration was similar and biologically plausible. This evidence of reproducibility suggests that Latent Class Analysis may provide a new approach to investigating the relationship between MRI findings and clinically important characteristics such as pain and activity limitation. PMID:26807697

  3. Hospital and Surgeon Variation in Complications and Repeat Surgery Following Incident Lumbar Fusion for Common Degenerative Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Brook I; Mirza, Sohail K; Franklin, Gary M; Lurie, Jon D; MacKenzie, Todd A; Deyo, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify factors that account for variation in complication rates across hospitals and surgeons performing lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Data Sources Discharge registry including all nonfederal hospitals in Washington State from 2004 to 2007. Study Design We identified adults (n = 6,091) undergoing an initial inpatient lumbar fusion for degenerative conditions. We identified whether each patient had a subsequent complication within 90 days. Logistic regression models with hospital and surgeon random effects were used to examine complications, controlling for patient characteristics and comorbidity. Principal Findings Complications within 90 days of a fusion occurred in 4.8 percent of patients, and 2.2 percent had a reoperation. Hospital effects accounted for 8.8 percent of the total variability, and surgeon effects account for 14.4 percent. Surgeon factors account for 54.5 percent of the variation in hospital reoperation rates, and 47.2 percent of the variation in hospital complication rates. The discretionary use of operative features, such as the inclusion of bone morphogenetic proteins, accounted for 30 and 50 percent of the variation in surgeons' reoperation and complication rates, respectively. Conclusions To improve the safety of lumbar spinal fusion surgery, quality improvement efforts that focus on surgeons' discretionary use of operative techniques may be more effective than those that target hospitals. PMID:22716168

  4. Surgical Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Spondylolisthesis and Degenerative Segmental Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Joong Won; Lee, Yun Tae; Oh, Hyun Chul; Yoo, Ju Hyung; Kim, Hyung Bok

    2011-01-01

    Study Design This is a retrospective case study. Purpose This study was designed to analyze the surgical outcomes of patients who underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for the treatment of spondylolisthesis and degenerative segmental instability. Overview of Literature If the surgical outcomes of a procedure are evaluated together with multiple indications, it is not clear how the procedure helped each subgroup of patients. For the reason that some indications achieve better outcomes than the others, we performed a subgroup analysis using validated outcome measures to demonstrate the optimal indications and the treatment results of TLIF. Methods We conducted subgroup analyses by comparing the prospectively collecting data from the consecutive patients who underwent single-level minimally invasive TLIF for the treatment of the following 3 subgroups of indications: 23 cases of low-grade spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, 24 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis, and 19 cases of degenerative segmental instability. Results The average duration of follow up was 36.1 ± 9.9 months (range, 24 to 63 months). The preoperative pain and disability scores were significantly improved at final postoperative follow-up in all the subgroups (all measurements: p < 0.0001). The 3 subgroups exhibited an equivalent improvement of the pain and disability scores at the final follow-up. The rates of radiographic solid fusion and complications were also similar among the 3 groups. Conclusions Our data suggests that minimally invasive TLIF optimally and equivalently alleviates all of the associated symptoms and disabilities from low-grade spondylolisthesis and degenerative segmental instability. Furthermore, these patients seem to have optimal surgical indications for minimally invasive TLIF, while maintaining favorable surgical outcomes. PMID:22164317

  5. Guidelines for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 6: magnetic resonance imaging and discography for patient selection for lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Daniel K; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Dailey, Andrew T; Groff, Michael W; Khoo, Larry; Matz, Paul G; Mummaneni, Praveen; Watters, William C; Wang, Jeffrey; Walters, Beverly C; Hadley, Mark N

    2005-06-01

    Discography is an exquisitely sensitive but not specific diagnostic test for the diagnosis of discogenic low-back pain. The restriction of the definition of a positive discographic study to one that elicits concordant pain from a morphologically abnormal disc improves the definition's accuracy. Fusion surgery based on discography alone, however, is not reliably associated with clinical success. Therefore, discography is not recommended as a standalone test for treatment decisions in patients with low-back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging is a sensitive and noninvasive test for the presence of degenerative disc disease. Discography should not be attempted in patients with normal lumbar MR images. Discography appears to have a role in the evaluation of patients with low-back pain, but it is best limited to the evaluation of abnormal interspaces identified on MR imaging, the investigation of adjacent-level disc disease, and as a means to rule out cases of nonorganic pain from surgical consideration. PMID:16028734

  6. Case Report: A case report highlighting bilateral EDB wasting as a clinical marker for lumbar canal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bijoy Mohan; Munakomi, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Herein we discuss a case of a 55 year old male presenting with history suggestive of sciatica on the left leg. Straight leg raising (SLR) test was positive at 45 degrees on the left side. His ankle reflex was absent and the power of extensor hallusus longus (EHL) was 4/5 on the same side. MRI lumbosacral spine revealed left paramedian disc prolapsed on L4/L5 level with spinal canal diameter of 9mm.However since his bilateral extensor digitorm brevis (EDB) were wasted, we suspected associated lumbar canal stenosis and thereby opted for laminectomy and discectomy in this case. Intraoperatively dural wasting, hypertrophied facets and narrow canal were confirmed. Laminectomy, medial facectectomy and discectomy were carried out. The patient recovered uneventfully with resolution of his sciatica-like pain. Bilateral EDB wasting thereby provides a clinical clue to the underlying lumbar canal stenosis and can help in making correct therapeutic decisions. PMID:26535113

  7. Comparison of non-surgical treatment methods for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most common reason for spinal surgery in older adults. Previous studies have shown that surgery is effective for severe cases of stenosis, but many patients with mild to moderate symptoms are not surgical candidates. These patients and their providers are seeking effective non-surgical treatment methods to manage their symptoms; yet there is a paucity of comparative effectiveness research in this area. This knowledge gap has hindered the development of clinical practice guidelines for non-surgical treatment approaches for lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods/design This study is a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial that will be conducted from November 2013 through October 2016. The sample will consist of 180 older adults (>60 years) who have both an anatomic diagnosis of stenosis confirmed by diagnostic imaging, and signs/symptoms consistent with a clinical diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis confirmed by clinical examination. Eligible subjects will be randomized into one of three pragmatic treatment groups: 1) usual medical care; 2) individualized manual therapy and rehabilitative exercise; or 3) community-based group exercise. All subjects will be treated for a 6-week course of care. The primary subjective outcome is the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire, a self-reported measure of pain/function. The primary objective outcome is the Self-Paced Walking Test, a measure of walking capacity. The secondary objective outcome will be a measurement of physical activity during activities of daily living, using the SenseWear Armband, a portable device to be worn on the upper arm for one week. The primary analysis will use linear mixed models to compare the main effects of each treatment group on the changes in each outcome measure. Secondary analyses will include a responder analysis by group and an exploratory analysis of potential baseline predictors of treatment outcome. Discussion Our study should provide evidence that helps to inform patients and providers about the clinical benefits of three non-surgical approaches to the management of lumbar spinal stenosis symptoms. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01943435 PMID:24872875

  8. Evaluation of the results of operative management of lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Islam, M S; Ara, R; Salam, M A; Rahman, M W; Alam, M J; Karim, M R; Rahman, M; Alam, M N; Hussain, M F

    2013-10-01

    Lumber spinal canal stenosis is an important cause of low back pain and it frequently presents with low backache with neurogenic claudication. Operative management of lumbar spinal canal stenosis by decompression surgery is an effective method. This prospective interventional (quasi experimental) study was performed in patient having history of characteristic clinical features like low backache with radicular pain, neurogenic claudication, signs of root compression, positive MRI findings attending in the department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Neurosurgery, Dhaka Medical College Hospital and NITOR. Dhaka, from July 2008 to June 2010. Thirty patients were evaluated among those 18(60%) were 50 years and above. Male to female ratio was roughly 9:1. About 87% of the patients had sensory deficit and 50% had neurogenic claudication. Majority (83.3%) of the patients at presentation had a suffering of 12 or >12 months. Diagnosis shows that 3.5% of patients had L4 lesion, 60% L5, 6.5% patients had L4 & L5 and 30% S1. Laminectomy was done in 43.3% of patients, laminectomy and disectomy in 30% and laminectomy, discectomy & foraminal decompression in 26.7% of patients. Relief of symptoms occurred in 25(83.5%) of patients. Over three-quarter (76.7%) of patients exhibited minimal disability and 23.3% moderate disability based on Oswestry Disability Index, while by MacNab criteria, most (80%) of patients was excellent, 10% good and another 10% fair. Repeated measure ANOVA statistics showed that mean Oswestry score decreased significantly from 54.5% at baseline to 22% at the end of 1 year (p<0.001). PMID:24292296

  9. Comparative effectiveness of microdecompression and laminectomy for central lumbar spinal stenosis: study protocol for an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Nerland, Ulf S; Jakola, Asgeir S; Solheim, Ole; Weber, Clemens; Rao, Vidar; Lønne, Greger; Solberg, Tore K; Salvesen, Øyvind; Carlsen, Sven M; Nygaard, Øystein P; Gulati, Sasha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This observational study is designed to test the equivalence between the clinical effectiveness of microdecompression and laminectomy in the surgical treatment of central lumbar spinal stenosis. Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most frequent indication for spinal surgery in the elderly, and as the oldest segment of the population continues to grow its prevalence is likely to increase. However, data on surgical outcomes are limited. Open or wide decompressive laminectomy, often combined with medial facetectomy and foraminotomy, was formerly the standard treatment. In recent years a growing tendency towards less invasive decompressive procedures has emerged. At present, many spine surgeons perform microdecompression for central lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods and analysis Prospectively registered treatment and outcome data are obtained from the Norwegian Registry for Spine Surgery. The primary outcome measure is change in Oswestry disability index between baseline and 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcome measures are changes in health-related quality of life measured by the Euro-Qol-5D between baseline and 12-month follow-up, perioperative complications, and duration of surgical procedures and length of hospital stay. Ethics and dissemination The study has been evaluated and approved by the regional committee for medical research in central Norway and all participants provided written informed consent. The findings of this study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications. Trial registration number Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02006901). PMID:24650809

  10. Effects of flexion-distraction manipulation therapy on pain and disability in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jioun; Lee, Sangyong; Jeon, Chunbae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of flexion-distraction manipulation therapy on pain and disability in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. [Subjects] Thirty patients with lumbar spinal stenosis were divided into two groups: a conservative treatment group (n=15) and a flexion-distraction manipulation group (n=15). [Methods] The conservative treatment group received conservative physical therapy, and the flexion-distraction group received both conservative physical therapy and flexion-distraction manipulation therapy. Both groups received treatment 3 times a week for 6 weeks. The Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain intensity, and the Oswestry Disability Index was used to evaluate the level of disability caused by the pain. [Results] The Visual Analog Scale scores for pain were significantly decreased in both groups. In the between-group comparison, the decrease in pain was more significant in the flexion-distraction group. According to the Oswestry Disability Index, the level of disability was significantly decreased in both groups, but the decrease was more significant in the flexion-distraction group. [Conclusion] Flexion-distraction manipulation appears to be an effective intervention for pain and disability among patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:26180352

  11. Minimally Invasive Unilateral vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation and Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Treatment of Multi-Segment Lumbar Degenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Guangrun; Wang, Jiefeng; Zhang, Heqing

    2015-01-01

    Background The choice for instrumentation with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in treatment of degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD) remains controversial. The goal of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes in consecutive patients with multi-segment DLD treated with unilateral pedicle screw (UPS) vs. bilateral pedicle screw (BPS) instrumented TLIF. Material/Methods Eighty-four consecutive patients who had multi-level MIS-TLIF were retrospectively reviewed. All data were collected to compare the clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. Results Both groups showed similar clinical function scores in VAS and ODI. The two groups differed significantly in operative time (P<0.001), blood loss (P<0.001), and fusion rate (P=0.043), respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated similar clinical outcomes between UPS fixation and BPS procedure after MIS-TLIF for multi-level DLD. Moreover, UPS technique was superior in operative time and blood loss, but represented lower fusion rate than the BPS construct did. PMID:26603050

  12. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Discogenic Low Back Pain: Evaluation of L4-S1 Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianqiang; Fang, Xiutong; Zhong, Weiye; Liu, Ning; Wood, Kirkham B

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of degenerative discogenic pain is controversial, and anterior lumbar fusion for the treatment of degenerative discogenic low back pain has also been a controversial topic for over a generation.The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the outcome of different anterior lumbar fusion levels for degenerative discogenic low back pain.In this study, we performed a clinical outcome subgroup analysis. The outcomes of 84 consecutive patients who underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, hospital stay, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analog scale (VAS) results, and complication rate were recorded separately.Medical indications were degenerative disc disease (73.8%), postdiscectomy disc disease (16.1%), and disc herniation (9.5%). Patients with severe spondylolysis or disc degeneration, with more than 3 or multilevel lesions, were excluded.The mean operative time was 124.5 ± 10.9 min (range 51-248 min), the mean intraoperative blood loss was 242.1 ± 27.7 mL (range 50-2700 mL), the mean hospital stay was 3.9 ± 1.1 days (range 3-6 days), the mean preoperative VAS score was 7.5 ± 1.4, and the mean preoperative ODI score was 60.0 ± 5.7. At the 1-year follow-up, the mean postoperative VAS score was 3.3 ± 1.3 and the mean postoperative ODI score was 13.6 ± 3.4 (P < 0.05). L4-L5 disc fusion led to better clinical results than 2-level L4-L5/L5-S1 disc fusion. Additionally, the 2-level fusion of L4-L5/L5-S1 had better clinical results than the L5-S1 disc fusion at both the 1 and 2-year postoperative follow-ups regarding the VAS score and the ODI score. The rate of complications was more frequent in the 2-level L4-L5/L5-S1 group (27.3%) (group C) than in the L4-L5 group (9.1%) (group A) and the L5-S1 group (12.5%) (group B). There was no difference between the L4-L5 group (9.1%) and the L5-S1 group (12.5%). A venous tear occurred during surgery and was successfully repaired in 6 of the 84 patients. Also, out of the 84 patients, 6 were found with pseudarthrosis during the follow-up, and these patients underwent a spinal fusion with instrumentation, with a posterior approach after a mean of 1 year. The complications secondary to the surgical approach were persistent abdominal pain (1/84, 1.2%) and wound dehiscence (1/84, 1.2%).Anterior lumbar interbody fusion for L4-L5 had better clinical results than the 2-segmental L4-L5/L5-S1 disc fusion, and the 2-segmental L4-L5/L5-S1 disc fusion had better clinical results than the L5-S1 disc fusion. Also, the 2-segmental L4-L5/L5-S1 disc fusion had a higher complication rate (27.3%), but there was no difference between the L4-L5 group (9.1%) and the L5-S1 group (12.5%). PMID:26512594

  13. Membrane-Stabilizing Agents Improve Quality-of-Life Outcomes for Patients with Lumbar Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Sachin; Lubelski, Daniel; Thompson, Nicolas R.; Shah, Ali A.; Mazanec, Daniel J.; Benzel, Edward C.; Khalaf, Tagreed

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Retrospective cohort controlled study. Objective?To determine quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) treated with membrane-stabilizing agents (MSAs). Methods?Patients with LSS and concordant neurogenic claudication treated with MSAs (n?=?701) or conservatively without MSAs (n?=?2104) at a single tertiary care hospital were identified. Patient QOL measures (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ9], EuroQOL-5 Dimensions [EQ-5D], Pain Disability Questionnaire [PDQ]) were recorded pretreatment and then 4 months following treatment. Propensity score matching was used to account for baseline demographic differences between the two groups. The primary outcome measure was posttreatment improvement in these QOL measures. Results?Patients in both groups had statistically significant improvements in the EQ-5D. However, the EQ-5D improvement in the MSA group was significantly greater than the improvement in the control group (0.11 versus 0.06; p?=?0.0494). The EQ-5D change in the MSA group also exceeded the minimum clinically important difference, thereby suggesting a clinical significance. Both groups had significant pre- to posttreatment improvements in PDQ and PHQ-9, but these changes were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusion?The results of this study suggest that patients with LSS and neurogenic claudication can have greater QOL improvements when treated with MSAs compared with other forms of conservative management without MSAs. PMID:26933615

  14. Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of intermittent claudication in patients with lumbar canal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Spinal nerve roots have a peculiar structure, different from the arrangements in the peripheral nerve. The nerve roots are devoid of lymphatic vessels but are immersed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the subarachnoid space. The blood supply of nerve roots depends on the blood flow from both peripheral direction (ascending) and the spinal cord direction (descending). There is no hypovascular region in the nerve root, although there exists a so-called water-shed of the bloodstream in the radicular artery itself. Increased mechanical compression promotes the disturbance of CSF flow, circulatory disturbance starting from the venous congestion and intraradicular edema formation resulting from the breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier. Although this edema may diffuse into CSF when the subarachnoid space is preserved, the endoneurial fluid pressure may increase when the area is closed by increased compression. On the other hand, the nerve root tissue has already degenerated under the compression and the numerous macrophages releasing various chemical mediators, aggravating radicular symptoms that appear in the area of Wallerian degeneration. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) is a potent vasodilator as well as an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and has therefore attracted interest as a therapeutic drug for lumbar canal stenosis. However, investigations in the clinical setting have shown that PGE1 is effective in some patients but not in others, although the reason for this is unclear. PMID:24829876

  15. Thoracic epidural spinal angiolipoma with coexisting lumbar spinal stenosis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Benvenutti-Regato, Mario; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal angiolipomas (SALs) are uncommon benign lesions that may present insidiously with back pain or acutely with weakness due to tumor bleeding/thrombosis. Given their rarity, these lesions are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of epidural masses. The purpose of this article is to report the case of an epidural SAL and to conduct a literature review on the topic. Methods A case report and review of the literature using the PubMed/Medline databases. All case reports and case series were reviewed up to June 2015. Results A 65-year old female presented with neurogenic claudication and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed lumbar spinal stenosis. Following decompressive surgery, she experienced symptom resolution, but three months postoperatively she presented to the emergency department with acute paraparesis. A thoracic MRI revealed a lesion located between T8 and T10 causing severe spinal cord compression. Following emergent laminectomy and en bloc resection, the patient regained function and the lesion was diagnosed as SAL. Our literature review revealed 178 reported cases, with a female and thoracic predominance. The majority of patients underwent surgical treatment, achieving a gross total resection in most cases. Similarly, complete symptom resolution was the most common outcome. Conclusion Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon spinal tumors. However, they may be treated as any other space-occupying lesion, and surgical resection allows for complete symptom recovery in most patients. PMID:26767159

  16. Nonoperative Korean Medicine Combination Therapy for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Retrospective Case-Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiok; Jeong, Yongjae; Youn, Yousuk; Choi, Jeongcheol; Kim, Jaehong; Chung, Wonseok; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2015-01-01

    This is a retrospective case series exploring the therapeutic benefits and harm of nonoperative Korean medicine combination therapy for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). The medical records of a total of 33 LSS patients, who were treated as inpatients at Mokhuri Neck and Back Hospital, Republic of Korea, from November 2010 to January 2012, were reviewed first and telephone survey on these patients was conducted after one year. Body acupuncture, pharmacoacupuncture, Chuna, and oral administration of herbal medicines were offered to all patients. A Visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain and the walking duration without pain were used to assess the patients during the approximately 1-month treatment period. The average VAS score of pain and the walking duration improved significantly; the VAS score decreased from 9 (SD, 1.15) to 2.75 (2.22) (p < 0.01), and the walking duration increased from 5.5 (6.66) to 16.75 (13.00) minutes (p < 0.01). No adverse event was reported during the treatment. In addition, the decreased pain level and improved function continued for over one year. Although we did not find definitive evidence, the study results suggest that KM combination therapy may be beneficial for decreasing pain and improving function in LSS patients and may produce comparatively few adverse events. PMID:26543486

  17. [The use of minimally invasive instrumental spinal surgical technique in lumbar diseases of degenerative or traumatic origin].

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Attila; Kasó, Gábor; Büki, András; Dóczi, Tamás

    2013-03-30

    Paradigm change has recently taken place in spine surgery with the application of minimally invasive techniques. Minimally invasive techniques have several advantages over the open traditional techniques: less blood loss, preservation of spine muscle integrity, shorter hospitalization, early mobilization, reduced pain levels, lower risk of infection. The presented cases cover following lumbar pathologies: segmental spinal instability, LV-SI grade II. spondylolisthesis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spine trauma. Unilateral or bilateral mini-open technique was employed in the degenerative cases, depending on symptoms and signes. If unilateral symptoms--pathology was identified, screws and rod were implanted percutaneously on the side contralateral to the pathology. The segmental fusion between vertebral bodies was always assured by a cage and autologous bone. The presented trauma case involved combined AO type A2 and B fractures. The anterior column was strengthened with vertebral body stents filled with bone cement, the posterior column was fixed with a percutaneously implanted screw rod system. Insertion of stents in the collapsed vertebra significantly increased the vertebral body height and also improved the stability of the spine. Minimally invasive spine surgery techniques appear more advantageous over the traditional open spine surgery that necessitates for large midline approaches. PMID:23750428

  18. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Indications, Outcomes, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian; Kim, David Hanwuk

    2016-02-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a minimally invasive spinal fusion technique that uses the retroperitoneal approach to the anterior spinal column. Mechanical and technical results of the technique compare favorably with those of anterior lumbar interbody fusion in regard to large graft placement, graft volumes, and early initial stability. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion uses the transpsoas approach and traverses near the lumbar plexus. It is not, however, without its unique complications. Groin pain or numbness is well tolerated and often temporary; however, quadriceps palsy can be long-lasting and debilitating. Rarer but serious complications include vascular and visceral injury. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion has been used successfully to treat common degenerative spinal conditions such as spinal instability, stenosis, scoliosis, and degenerative disk disease. While understanding of the lumbar plexus and the technical challenges of the procedure improves, lateral lumbar interbody fusion will continue to provide safe and successful clinical outcomes with less morbidity than traditional procedures. PMID:26803545

  19. Clinical and Radiological Results of Microsurgical Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Decompression without Posterior Instrumentation for Lateral Recess Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Şişman, Lokman; Türkmen, Faik; Efe, Duran; Pekince, Oğuzhan; Göncü, Recep Gani; Sever, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A single-center, retrospective patient review of clinical and radiological outcomes of microsurgical posterior lumbar interbody fusion and decompression, without posterior instrumentation, for the treatment of lateral recess stenosis. Purpose This study documented the clinical and radiological results of microsurgical posterior lumbar interbody fusion and decompression of the lateral recess using interbody cages without posterior instrumentation for the treatment of lateral recess stenosis. Overview of Literature Although microsurgery has some advantages, various complications have been reported following microsurgical decompression, including cage migration, pseudoarthrosis, neurologic deficits, and persistent pain. Methods A total of 34 patients (13 men, 21 women), with a mean age of 56.65±9.1 years (range, 40-77 years) confirmed spinal stability, and preoperative radiological findings of lateral recess stenosis, were included in the study. Interbody polyetheretherketone cages and auto grafts were used in all patients. Posterior instrumentation was not used because of limited resection of the posterior lumbar structures. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging were assessed and compared to images taken at the final follow-up. Functional recovery was also evaluated according to the Macnab criteria at the final follow-up. Results The average follow-up time was 35.05±8.65 months (range, 24-46 months). The clinical results, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, and duration of hospital stay were similar to previously published results; the fusion rate (85.2%) was decreased and the migration rate (5.8%) was increased, compared with prior reports. Conclusions Although microsurgery has some advantages, migration and pseudoarthrosis remain challenges to achieving adequate lumbar interbody fusion. PMID:26435789

  20. One-Year Follow-Up of a Series of 100 Patients Treated for Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis by Means of HeliFix Interspinous Process Decompression Device

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Alberto; Alexandre, Andrea Maria; De Pretto, Mario; Corò, Luca; Saggini, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. New interspinous process decompression devices (IPDs) provide an alternative to conservative treatment and decompressive surgery for patients with neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC) due to degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS). HeliFix is a minimally invasive IPD that can be implanted percutaneously. This is a preliminary evaluation of safety and effectiveness of this IPD up to 12 months after implantation. Methods. After percutaneous implantation in 100 patients with NIC due to DLSS, data on symptoms, quality of life, pain, and use of pain medication were obtained for up to 12 months. Results. Early symptoms and physical function improvements were maintained for up to 12 months. Leg, buttock/groin, and back pain were eased throughout, and the use and strength of related pain medication were reduced. Devices were removed from 2% of patients due to lack of effectiveness. Conclusions. Overall, in a period of up to 12-month follow-up, the safety and effectiveness of the HeliFix offered a minimally invasive option for the relief of NIC complaints in a high proportion of patients. Further studies are undertaken in order to provide insight on outcomes and effectiveness compared to other decompression methods and to develop guidance on optimal patient selection. PMID:24822181

  1. Early clinical effects of the Dynesys system plus transfacet decompression through the Wiltse approach for the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Lei; Tian, Ji-wei

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigated early clinical effects of Dynesys system plus transfacet decompression through the Wiltse approach in treating lumbar degenerative diseases. Material/Methods 37 patients with lumbar degenerative disease were treated with the Dynesys system plus transfacet decompression through the Wiltse approach. Results Results showed that all patients healed from surgery without severe complications. The average follow-up time was 20 months (9–36 months). Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry Disability Index scores decreased significantly after surgery and at the final follow-up. There was a significant difference in the height of the intervertebral space and intervertebral range of motion (ROM) at the stabilized segment, but no significant changes were seen at the adjacent segments. X-ray scans showed no instability, internal fixation loosening, breakage, or distortion in the follow-up. Conclusions The Dynesys system plus transfacet decompression through the Wiltse approach is a therapeutic option for mild lumbar degenerative disease. This method can retain the structure of the lumbar posterior complex and the motion of the fixed segment, reduce the incidence of low back pain, and decompress the nerve root. PMID:24859831

  2. Microendoscopy-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar degenerative disease: short-term and medium-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Bin; Rong, Li-Min; Chen, Rui-Qiang; Dong, Jian-Wen; Xie, Pei-Gen; Zhang, Liang-Ming; Feng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate short-term and medium-term outcomes of microendoscopy-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) and open TLIF for lumbar degenerative disease. Methods: In this prospective, randomized control study, 50 cases received microendoscopy-assisted MIS-TLIF (MIS group), while another well-matched 50 cases accepted open TLIF (open group). Parameters between both groups, including surgical duration, intraoperative blood loss and radiologic exposure, postoperative analgesic usage and ambulatory time, visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg, functional scores, self-evaluation of surgical outcome (modified MacNab criteria), interbody fusion rate, adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) rate, as well as complication incidence were compared at 1 month and 24 months postoperatively. Results: Intraoperative blood loss and postoperative analgesic usage were significantly reduced in MIS group (P<0.05). Patients undergoing microendoscopy-assisted MIS-TLIF were able to ambulate earlier postoperatively than those receiving open TLIF (P<0.05). However, it showed prolonged surgical duration and enhanced radiologic exposure in MIS group (P<0.05). At 1 month postoperatively, MIS group was associated with more improvement of VAS and functional scores compared with open group (P<0.05). While at 24 months postoperatively, both groups revealed similar VAS and functional scores (P>0.05). Excellent and perfect scale rating by modified MacNab criteria, interbody fusion rate, ASD rate and complication incidence between both groups were nearly the same (P>0.05). Conclusions: Microendoscopy-assisted MIS-TLIF owns advantages of less iatrogenic injury, decreased blood loss, reduced analgesic usage and earlier rehabilitation, while it has drawbacks of more surgical duration and radiologic exposure. It is superior than open TLIF in terms of short-term clinical outcomes and has similar medium-term clinical outcomes. PMID:26885072

  3. Clinical outcomes of lumbar degenerative disc disease treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion allograft spacer: a prospective, multicenter trial with 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Paul M; Robbins, Stephen; Paullus, Wayne; Faust, Stephen; Holt, Richard; McGuire, Robert

    2009-07-01

    The clinical benefits and complications of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) have been studied over the past 60 years. In recent years, spine surgeons have had the option of treating low back pain caused by degenerative disc disease using PLIF with machined allograft spacers and posterior pedicle fixation. The purpose of this clinical series was to assess the clinical benefits of using a machined PLIF allograft spacer and posterior pedicle fixation to treat degenerative disc disease, both in terms of fusion rates and patient outcomes, and to compare these results with those in previous studies using autograft and metal interbody fusion devices. Results were also compared with results from studies using transverse process fusion. This prospective, nonrandomized clinical series was conducted at 10 US medical centers. Eighty-nine (55 male, 34 female) patients underwent PLIF with a presized, machined allograft spacer and posterior pedicle fixation between January 2000 and April 2003. Their outcomes were compared with outcomes in previous series described in the literature. All patients had experienced at least 6 months of low back pain that had been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatment. Physical examinations were performed before surgery, after surgery, and at 4 follow-up visits (6 weeks, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months). At each interval, we obtained radiographs and patient outcome measures, including SF-36 Bodily Pain Score, visual analog scale pain rating, and Oswestry Disability Index. The primary outcome was fusion results at 12 and 24 months; the secondary outcomes were pain, disability, function/quality of life, and satisfaction. One-level PLIFs were performed in 65 patients, and 2-level PLIFs in 24 patients. Flexion-extension radiographs at 12 and 24 months revealed a 98% fusion rate. Of the 72 patients who reached the 12-month follow-up, 86% reported decreased pain and disability as measured with the Oswestry Disability Index. Decreased pain as measured with the SF-36 Bodily Pain Score was reported by 74% of patients who reached the 12-month follow-up. The graft-related complication rate among all patients who underwent PLIF was 1.61%. When performed with machined allograft spacers and posterior pedicle fixation, PLIF is a safe and effective surgical treatment for low back pain caused by degenerative disc disease. The patients in this clinical series had outcomes equal or superior to the outcomes in previous series. PMID:19714280

  4. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 14: brace therapy as an adjunct to or substitute for lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Andrew T; Ghogawala, Zoher; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Watters, William C; Resnick, Daniel K; Sharan, Alok; Eck, Jason C; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Wang, Jeffrey C; Groff, Michael W; Dhall, Sanjay S; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    The utilization of orthotic devices for lumbar degenerative disease has been justified from both a prognostic and therapeutic perspective. As a prognostic tool, bracing is applied prior to surgery to determine if immobilization of the spine leads to symptomatic relief and thus justify the performance of a fusion. Since bracing does not eliminate motion, the validity of this assumption is questionable. Only one low-level study has investigated the predictive value of bracing prior to surgery. No correlation between response to bracing and fusion outcome was observed; therefore a trial of preoperative bracing is not recommended. Based on low-level evidence, the use of bracing is not recommended for the prevention of low-back pain in a general working population, since the incidence of low-back pain and impact on productivity were not reduced. However, in laborers with a history of back pain, a positive impact on lost workdays was observed when bracing was applied. Bracing is recommended as an option for treatment of subacute low-back pain, as several higher-level studies have demonstrated an improvement in pain scores and function. The use of bracing following instrumented posterolateral fusion, however, is not recommended, since equivalent outcomes have been demonstrated with or without the application of a brace. PMID:24980591

  5. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility of the novel transcription method for selection of potential nerve root compression in MRI study in degenerative disease of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Gasik, Robert; ŁabędŸ, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Background Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is characterized by symptoms related to the affected nerve root. A recently described method allows the classification of the roots in relation to the occurrence of compression on its course. This method can serve as a clinical selection tool and decision support for semi-invasive pain therapy in back pain patients. Material/Methods We examined 40 lumbar spine MRIs in 3 sessions of transcription each, according to the method being evaluated. Every MRI evaluation was performed by each of 3 different observers. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility was calculated using chance-corrected agreement using a weighted kappa (κ) value with quadratic weights to assess reliability for each nerve root separately. Results We found high intraobserver agreement in indication of the root with most pronounced interference due to potential compression by degenerative changes, at the level mean κ=0.81 (with 95% CI, range 0.04). Less agreement was observed in the interobserver evaluation test with the mean κ=0.75 (95% CI within the range not exceeding 0.03), although it still reached the substantial agreement. Conclusions This zstudy provides evidence for substantial inter- and intraobserver agreement for the decision support method allowing selection of the most serious nerve structure compression in degenerative disease of the lumbar spine based on of the MRI description. PMID:23524527

  6. Assessment of Effectiveness of Percutaneous Adhesiolysis in Managing Chronic Low Back Pain Secondary to Lumbar Central Spinal Canal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A.; McManus, Carla D.; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic persistent low back and lower extremity pain secondary to central spinal stenosis is common and disabling. Lumbar surgical interventions with decompression or fusion are most commonly performed to manage severe spinal stenosis. However, epidural injections are also frequently performed in managing central spinal stenosis. After failure of epidural steroid injections, the next sequential step is percutaneous adhesiolysis and hypertonic saline neurolysis with a targeted delivery. The literature on the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis in managing central spinal stenosis after failure of epidural injections has not been widely studied. Study Design: A prospective evaluation. Setting: An interventional pain management practice, a specialty referral center, a private practice setting in the United States. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis in patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain with lumbar central spinal stenosis. Methods: Seventy patients were recruited. The initial phase of the study was randomized, double-blind with a comparison of percutaneous adhesiolysis with caudal epidural injections. The 25 patients from the adhesiolysis group continued with follow-up, along with 45 additional patients, leading to a total of 70 patients. All patients received percutaneous adhesiolysis and appropriate placement of the Racz catheter, followed by an injection of 5 mL of 2% preservative-free lidocaine with subsequent monitoring in the recovery room. In the recovery room, each patient also received 6 mL of 10% hypertonic sodium chloride solution, and 6 mg of non-particulate betamethasone, followed by an injection of 1 mL of sodium chloride solution and removal of the catheter. Outcomes Assessment: Multiple outcome measures were utilized including the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), the Oswestry Disability Index 2.0 (ODI), employment status, and opioid intake with assessment at 3, 6, and 12, 18 and 24 months post treatment. The primary outcome measure was 50% or more improvement in pain scores and ODI scores. Results: Overall, a primary outcome or significant pain relief and functional status improvement of 50% or more was seen in 71% of patients at the end of 2 years. The overall number of procedures over a period of 2 years were 5.7 ± 2.73. Limitations: The lack of a control group and a prospective design. Conclusions: Significant relief and functional status improvement as seen in 71% of the 70 patients with percutaneous adhesiolysis utilizing local anesthetic steroids and hypertonic sodium chloride solution may be an effective management strategy in patients with chronic function limiting low back and lower extremity pain with central spinal stenosis after failure of conservatie management and fluoroscopically directed epidural injections. PMID:23289005

  7. Disc nucleus fortification for lumbar degenerative disc disease: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Brad Bellotte, J; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal stability is attributed in part to osteoligamentous structures, including the vertebral body, facets, intervertebral discs, and posterior elements. The materials in this study provide an opportunity to augment the degenerated nucleus without removing native disc material, a procedure introduced here as "fortification." The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nucleus fortification on lumbar disc biomechanics. METHODS The authors performed in vitro analysis of human cadaveric functional spinal units (FSUs), along with characterization and quantification of movement of the units using biomechanical data in intact, disc-only, and fortified specimens. The units underwent removal of all posterior elements and annulus and were fortified by injecting a biogel into the nucleus pulposus. Each specimen was subjected to load testing, range of motion (ROM) quantification, and disc bulge measurements. Optoelectric tracking was used to quantify disc bulge. These criteria were assessed in the intact, disc-only, and fortified treatments. RESULTS Disc-only FSUs resulted in increased ROM when compared with intact and fortified conditions. Fortification of the FSU resulted in partial restoration of normal ROM in the treatment groups. Analysis of hysteresis loops showed more linear response in the fortified groups when compared with the intact and disc-only groups. CONCLUSIONS Disc nucleus fortification increases linearity and decreases ROM. PMID:26771371

  8. The efficacy of epiduroscopic neural decompression with Ho:YAG laser ablation in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun Woo; Jang, Soo-Jin; Kim, Jae-Do

    2014-07-01

    Although epiduroscopy is one of the popular interventions for the management of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), only a part of these patients show improvement in pain and functional level. Consequently, the authors thought that holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser can be a reasonable alternative as an adjunct of epiduroscopic procedure, but has not been thoroughly determined yet which influence is resulted by it. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the efficacy of epiduroscopic neural decompression (END) and END with Ho:YAG laser (ELND) in patients with LSS. Forty-seven patients with LSS were enrolled, all of whom underwent END or ELND and were followed up for 2 years or more. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain and the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). Procedure-related complications, especially including laser-related complications, were also evaluated. The only laser-related complication that occurred was transient mild motor paralysis in one case (3.1 %). In the END group, clinical score is exhibiting V-shaped upward trend that ended after procedure with the almost similar score obtained with preoperative status. However, in the ELND group, it is exhibiting relatively consistent improvement after procedure. There was a statistically significant improvement in the VAS and RMDQ score after 6 months after ELND procedure compared with END procedure (p = 0.01, 0.03, respectively). ELND could produce significant improvement of low back pain (LBP) at the last follow-up time (p = 0.01), but radiating pain of leg could not be improved significantly (p = 0.09). In conclusion, the current study suggests that performing Ho:YAG laser ablation concurrently with END could produce more decreased intensity of pain and prolonged effect of pain relief compared with END in LSS patients. LSS patients with LBP would be an ideal candidate for ELND, but radiating pain of LSS might not be managed effectively with ELND. PMID:24398702

  9. Combined transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with posterolateral instrumented fusion for degenerative disc disease can be a safe and effective treatment for lower back pain

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J; Cianciabella, Augusto J; Cutright, Jason; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lumbar fusion is a proven treatment for chronic lower back pain (LBP) in the setting of symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis; however, fusion is controversial when the primary diagnosis is degenerative disc disease (DDD). Our objective was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of lumbar fusion in the treatment of LBP due to DDD. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred and five consecutive patients with single or multi-level DDD underwent lumbar decompression and instrumented fusion for the treatment of chronic LBP between the years of 2008 and 2011. The primary outcome measures in this study were back and leg pain visual analogue scale (VAS), patient reported % resolution of preoperative back pain and leg pain, reoperation rate, perioperative complications, blood loss and hospital length of stay (LOS). Results: The average resolution of preoperative back pain per patient was 84% (n = 205) while the average resolution of preoperative leg pain was 90% (n = 190) while a mean follow-up period of 528 days (1.5 years). Average VAS for combined back and leg pain significantly improved from a preoperative value of 9.0 to a postoperative value of 1.1 (P ≤ 0.0001), a change of 7.9 points for the cohort. The average number of lumbar disc levels fused per patient was 2.3 (range 1-4). Median postoperative LOS in the hospital was 1.2 days. Average blood loss was 108 ml perfused level. Complications occurred in 5% of patients (n = 11) and the rate of reoperation for symptomatic adjacent segment disease was 2% (n = 4). Complications included reoperation at index level for symptomatic pseudoarthrosis with hardware failure (n = 3); surgical site infection (n = 7); repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak (n = 1), and one patient death at home 3 days after discharge. Conclusion: Lumbar fusion for symptomatic DDD can be a safe and effective treatment for medically refractory LBP with or without leg pain. PMID:26692696

  10. Outcomes in cases of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis more than 5 years after treatment with minimally invasive decompression: examination of pre- and postoperative slippage, intervertebral disc changes, and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Mori, Gen; Mikami, Yasuo; Arai, Yuji; Ikeda, Takumi; Nagae, Masateru; Tonomura, Hitoshi; Takatori, Ryota; Sawada, Koshiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT There are reports that fusion is the standard treatment of choice for cases of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS) associated with lumbar spinal canal stenosis with a large degree of slippage. The reasons why, however, have not been clarified. On the other hand, it is known that the progress of slippage decreases and restabilization occurs over the natural course of LDS. Therefore, if minimally invasive decompression could be performed, there would be little possibility of it influencing the natural course of LDS, so it would not be necessary to include preoperative percentage slip in the criteria for the selection of fusion. This study examined the course of LDS cases more than 5 years after treatment with minimally invasive decompression to determine whether pre- and postoperative slippage and disc changes influence the clinical results. METHODS A total of 51 intervertebral segments in 51 cases with the chief complaint of radicular or cauda equina symptoms due to lumbar spinal canal stenosis were examined after prospective treatment with minimally invasive decompression for LDS. The mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 66.7 years and the mean follow-up period was 7 years 4 months. Minimally invasive decompression was performed regardless of the degree of low-back pain or percentage slip. The outcome variables were clinical results and changes in imaging findings. RESULTS Over the follow-up period, postoperative percentage slip increased and disc height decreased, but the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score improved. Regardless of the preoperative percentage slip, disc height, or degree of intervertebral disc degeneration or segmental instability, the clinical results were favorable. In the high preoperative percentage slip group, low disc height group, and progressive disc degeneration group, there was little postoperative progress of slippage. In the group with a postoperative slippage increase of more than 5%, slippage increased significantly at postoperative year 2, but no significant difference was observed at the final follow-up. CONCLUSIONS When minimally invasive decompression was performed to treat LDS, the postoperative change in slippage was no different from that during the natural course. Furthermore, regardless of the degree of preoperative slippage or intervertebral disc degeneration, the clinical results were favorable. Also, the higher the preoperative percentage slip and the more that disc degeneration progressed, the more the progress of postoperative slippage decreased. Because the postoperative progress of slippage decreased, it is believed that even after minimally invasive decompression, restabilization occurs as it would during the natural course. If minimally invasive decompression can be performed to treat LDS, it is believed that preoperative percentage slip and intervertebral disc degeneration do not have to be included in the appropriateness criteria for fusion. PMID:26613282

  11. Minimally invasive decompression versus open laminectomy for central stenosis of the lumbar spine: pragmatic comparative effectiveness study

    PubMed Central

    Nerland, Ulf S; Jakola, Asgeir S; Solheim, Ole; Weber, Clemens; Rao, Vidar; Lønne, Greger; Solberg, Tore K; Salvesen, Øyvind; Carlsen, Sven M; Nygaard, Øystein P

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the equivalence for clinical effectiveness between microdecompression and laminectomy in patients with central lumbar spinal stenosis. Design Multicentre observational study. Setting Prospective data from the Norwegian Registry for Spine Surgery. Participants 885 patients with central stenosis of the lumbar spine who underwent surgery at 34 Norwegian orthopaedic or neurosurgical departments. Patients were treated from October 2006 to December 2011. Interventions Laminectomy and microdecompression. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was change in Oswestry disability index score one year after surgery. Secondary endpoints were quality of life (EuroQol EQ-5D), perioperative complications, and duration of surgical procedures and hospital stays. A blinded biostatistician performed predefined statistical analyses in unmatched and propensity matched cohorts. Results The study was powered to detect a difference between the groups of eight points on the Oswestry disability index at one year. 721 patients (81%) completed the one year follow-up. Equivalence between microdecompression and laminectomy was shown for the Oswestry disability index (difference 1.3 points, 95% confidence interval −1.36 to 3.92, P<0.001 for equivalence). Equivalence was confirmed in the propensity matched cohort and full information regression analyses. No difference was found between groups in quality of life (EQ-5D) one year after surgery. The number of patients with complications was higher in the laminectomy group (15.0% v 9.8%, P=0.018), but after propensity matching for complications the groups did not differ (P=0.23). The duration of surgery for single level decompression was shorter in the microdecompression group (difference 11.2 minutes, 95% confidence interval 4.9 to 17.5, P<0.001), but after propensity matching the groups did not differ (P=0.15). Patients in the microdecompression group had shorter hospital stays, both for single level decompression (difference 1.5 days, 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 2.6, P<0.001) and two level decompression (0.8 days, 1.0 to 2.2, P=0.003). Conclusion At one year the effectiveness of microdecompression is equivalent to laminectomy in the surgical treatment of central stenosis of the lumbar spine. Favourable outcomes were observed at one year in both treatment groups. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02006901. PMID:25833966

  12. Diagnosis of a 64-year-old patient presenting with suspected lumbar spinal stenosis: an evidence-based case report

    PubMed Central

    Emary, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present an evidence-based case report on the diagnosis of a patient with suspected lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Case: A 64-year-old man presented with signs and symptoms suggestive of LSS, but physical examination and diagnostic imaging findings were inconclusive. Other co-morbidities included diabetes, congestive heart failure, and left hip joint osteoarthritis. Outcome: PubMed was searched for systematic reviews of diagnostic studies on LSS. Two recent articles were found and appraised with respect to their validity, importance, and applicability in diagnosing the current patient. Copies of his magnetic resonance imaging were also obtained and used in combination with the appraised literature, including diagnostic test specificities and likelihood ratios, to confirm an LSS diagnosis. Summary: This case illustrates how research evidence can be used in clinical practice, particularly in the diagnosis of an individual patient. PMID:25729085

  13. The SNAP trial: a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial of a silicon nitride versus a PEEK cage in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been widely used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disc disorders, and show good clinical results. Still, complications such as subsidence and migration of the cage are frequently seen. A lack of osteointegration and fibrous tissues surrounding PEEK cages are held responsible. Ceramic implants made of silicon nitride show better biocompatible and osteoconductive qualities, and therefore are expected to lower complication rates and allow for better fusion. Purpose of this study is to show that fusion with the silicon nitride cage produces non-inferior results in outcome of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire at all follow-up time points as compared to the same procedure with PEEK cages. Methods/Design This study is designed as a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial with repeated measures analysis. 100 patients (18–75 years) presenting with symptomatic lumbar degenerative disorders unresponsive to at least 6 months of conservative treatment are included. Patients will be randomly assigned to a PEEK cage or a silicon nitride cage, and will undergo a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation. Primary outcome measure is the functional improvement measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcome parameters are the VAS leg, VAS back, SF-36, Likert scale, neurological outcome and radiographic assessment of fusion. After 1 year the fusion rate will be measured by radiograms and CT. Follow-up will be continued for 2 years. Patients and clinical observers who will perform the follow-up visits will be blinded for type of cage used during follow-up. Analyses of radiograms and CT will be performed independently by two experienced radiologists. Discussion In this study a PEEK cage will be compared with a silicon nitride cage in the treatment of symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial in which the silicon nitride cage is compared with the PEEK cage in patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders. Trial registration NCT01557829 PMID:24568365

  14. Application of classification based cognitive functional therapy for a patient with lumbar spinal stenosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Irfan, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    This report describes the case of a 52 year old male administrative assistant presenting with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Despite patho-anatomical considerations, the patient's pain related functional behaviour, mal-adapted presentation, motor control strategies, incorrect belief system, and faulty cognition of associating disc healing with a lordotic posture adversely contributed to his presentation. With limited specific guidelines in the literature for this specific lumbar spine condition, the patient response during the assessment guided the intervention. Treatment that incorporated a cognitive functional therapy resulted in a successful outcome. The patient attended for twelve treatment sessions in three months and demonstrated improvement in overall function. By week 12, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) reduced from 68% to 19% and further reduced to 15% at three months following discharge. The patient's self-reported tolerance for standing improved from 10 min to 60 min and his self-reported tolerance of walking improved from 200 m to three kilometres. The effects were maintained three months post discharge. This case report supports the clinical utility of a patient-centred multidimensional classification system that utilised cognitive functional therapy in a patient with LSS. PMID:26476566

  15. Limited Unilateral Decompression and Pedicle Screw Fixation with Fusion for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Unilateral Radiculopathy: A Retrospective Analysis of 25 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Miao, Hai-xiong; Wang, Yong; Chen, An-fu; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lumbar spinal stenosis is conventionally treated with surgical decompression. However, bilateral decompression and laminectomy is more invasive and may not be necessary for lumbar stenosis patients with unilateral radiculopathy. We aimed to report the outcomes of unilateral laminectomy and bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. Methods Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with unilateral lower extremity radiculopathy who received limited unilateral decompression and bilateral pedicle screw fixation were included and evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores preoperatively and at follow-up visits. Ligamentum flavum thickness of the involved segments was measured on axial magnetic resonance images. Results Twenty-five patients were included. The mean preoperative VAS score was 6.6±1.6 and 4.6±3.1 for leg and back pain, respectively. Ligamentum flavum thickness was comparable between the symptomatic and asymptomatic side (p=0.554). The mean follow-up duration was 29.2 months. The pain in the symptomatic side lower extremity (VAS score, 1.32±1.2) and the back (VAS score, 1.75±1.73) significantly improved (p=0.000 vs. baseline for both). The ODI improved significantly postoperatively (6.60±6.5; p=0.000 vs. baseline). Significant improvement in VAS pain and ODI scores were observed in patients receiving single or multi-segment decompression fusion with fixation (p<0.01). Conclusion Limited laminectomy and unilateral spinal decompression followed by bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion achieves satisfactory outcomes in patients with spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. This procedure is less damaging to structures that are important for maintaining posterior stability of the spine. PMID:26279816

  16. Descriptive Epidemiology and Prior Healthcare Utilization of Patients in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial’s (SPORT) Three Observational Cohorts: Disc Herniation, Spinal Stenosis and Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Justin; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor; Hanscom, Brett; Abdu, William A.; Birkmeyer, Nancy J. O.; Herkowitz, Harry; Weinstein, James

    2009-01-01

    Study Design Prospective Observational Cohorts Objective To describe sociodemographic and clinical features, and non-operative (medical) resource utilization prior to enrollment, in patients who are candidates for surgical intervention for intervertebral disc herniation (IDH), spinal stenosis (SpS), and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) according to SPORT criteria. Summary of Background Data Intervertebral disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative spondylolisthesis with stenosis are the three most common diagnoses of low back and leg symptoms for which surgery is performed. There is a paucity of descriptive literature examining large patient cohorts for the relationships among baseline characteristics and medical resource utilization with these three diagnoses. Methods The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) conducts three randomized and three observational cohort studies of surgical and non-surgical treatments for patients with IDH, SPS, and DS. Baseline data include demographic information, prior treatments received, and functional status measured by SF-36 and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI-AAOS/Modems version). The data presented represents all 1,417 patients (745 IDH, 368 SpS, 304 DS) enrolled in the SPORT observational cohorts. Multiple logistic regression was used to generate independent predictors of utilization adjusted for sociodemographic variables, diagnosis, and duration of symptoms. Results The average age was 41 years for the IDH group, 64 years for the SPS group, and 66 years for the DS group. At enrollment, IDH patients presented with the most pain as reported on the SF-36 (BP 26.2 vs 33 SPS and 33.7 DS) and were the most impaired (ODI 51 vs 42.3 SPS and 41.5 DS). IDH patients utilized more chiropractic treatment (42% vs 33% SPS and 26% DS); had more Emergency Department (ED) visits (21% vs 7 % SPS and 4% DS); and used more opiate analgesics (50% vs 29% SPS and 28% DS). After adjusting for age, gender, diagnosis, education, race, duration of symptoms, and compensation, Medicaid patients used significantly more opiate analgesics (58% Medicaid vs 41% no insurance, 42% employer, 33% Medicare, and 32% private) and had more ED visits compared to other insurance types. (31% Medicaid vs 22% no insurance, 16% employer, 3% Medicare, and 11% private). Conclusion IDH patients appear to have differences in sociodemographics, resource utilization, and functional impairment when compared to the SpS/DS patients. In addition, the differences in resource utilization for Medicaid patients may reflect differences in access to care. The data provided from these observational cohorts will serve as an important comparison to the SPORT randomized cohorts in the future. PMID:16582855

  17. Short-Term Clinical Result of Cortical Bone Trajectory Technique for the Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis with More than 1-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Kazuya; Nakamura, Akira; Imai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective follow-up study on the result of surgical treatment for patients with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS) using cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique. Purpose To evaluate the capability of CBT to manage patients with DLS. Overview of Literature CBT is a recently advocated, novel, less-invasive technique of lumbar pedicle screw, which provides enhanced screw purchase by maximizing the thread contact with higher density bone surface. Despite the frequent use of CBT technique in the lumbar spine surgery, little is known of the capability of this technique to manage patients with DLS. Methods Thirty two consecutive patients (5 males, 27 females) surgically treated with single-level DLS in our institute using CBT were included. All patients were followed up at least 12 months (mean 24 months). Their clinical and radiological features were measured. Results Good leg pain relief was achieved in all patients. The mean postoperative percentage slip demonstrated significant reduction with significant neurological recovery when compared with preoperative percentage slip, and it was maintained until the latest follow-up. Loss of correction of more than 3 mm during the follow-up period was observed in 3 cases. Surgical site infection was observed in one case; however, pull-out of PSs or neurological deterioration was not found. No patient needed additional surgery during the follow-up period. Conclusions These preliminary results confirmed that CBT is useful for the treatment for patients with DLS. This technique allows good reduction of spondylolisthesis and neurological improvement. PMID:27114763

  18. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  19. Bilateral Decompression via Microscopic Tubular Crossing Laminotomy (MTCL) for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Technique and Early Surgical Result

    PubMed Central

    SHIN, Myung-Hoon; KIM, Jin-Sung; RYU, Kyeong-Sik; HUR, Jung-Woo

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of bilateral decompression procedure via microscopic tubular crossing laminotomy (MTCL) for treating lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Seventeen patients with LSS underwent bilateral decompression via an MTCL procedure in which tubular retractor was placed. The mean age was 72 (range 59–84) years and there were 10 men and 7 women. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative dynamic lumbar x-ray, magnetic resonance (MR) image, and computed tomography. To verify the efficacy of this technique, pre- and postoperative cross-sectional area (CSA) of thecal sac, facet resection, and fatty infiltration (FI) of multifidus were measured. Clinical results were evaluated using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), back and leg visual analog scale (VAS). The mean follow-up period was 17.5 months (range 12.1–21.2). 70.5% of MTCL was performed at the level of L4–5 and one case of dural violation (5.8%) was noted at the level of L5–S1. The mean preoperative CSA was 70.5 mm2 (range 25.1–87.6) and it increased to 198.8 mm2 (range 177.3–219.2) postoperatively (p = 0.00). The mean facet resection rate was 18.4% (range 9.9–26.9) and no radiological instability was noted postoperatively. MR image showed no increase in FI of the multifidus after 12 months of follow-up (p = 0.53). Preoperative clinical symptoms improved significantly at postoperative 6 months and 12 months of follow-up. These results indicate that an MTCL with use of tubular retractor system can be an effective procedure to achieve neural decompression for the treatment of LSS and it may be beneficial in preserving both facet joint and multifidus muscle. PMID:26119892

  20. Interspinous Spacers Compared to Decompression or Fusion for Lumbar Stenosis: Complications and Repeat Operations in the Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Martin, Brook I.; Ching, Alex; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Kreuter, William; Mirza, Sohail K.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort analysis of Medicare claims for 2006-2009. Objective To examine whether interspinous distraction procedures are used selectively in patients with more advanced age or comorbidity; and whether they are associated with fewer complications, lower costs, and less revision surgery than laminectomy or fusion surgery. Summary of Background Data A manufacturer-sponsored randomized trial suggested an advantage of interspinous spacer surgery over non-surgical care, but there are few comparisons with other surgical procedures. Furthermore, there are few population-based data evaluating patterns of use of these devices. Methods We used Medicare inpatient claims data to compare age and comorbidity for patients with spinal stenosis having surgery (n=99,084) with (1) an interspinous process spacer alone; (2) laminectomy and a spacer; (3) decompression alone; or (4) lumbar fusion (1-2 level). We also compared these four groups for cost of surgery and rates of revision surgery, major medical complications, wound complications, mortality, and 30-day readmission rates. Results Patients who received spacers were older than those receiving decompression or fusion, but had little evidence of greater comorbidity. Patients receiving a spacer alone had fewer major medical complications than those undergoing decompression or fusion surgery (1.2% versus 1.8% and 3.3% respectively), but had higher rates of further inpatient lumbar surgery (16.7% versus 8.5% for decompression and 9.8% for fusion at 2 years). Hospital payments for spacer surgery were greater than for decompression alone, but less than for fusion procedures. These associations persisted in multivariate models adjusting for patient age, sex, comorbidity score, and previous hospitalization. Conclusions Compared to decompression or fusion, interspinous distraction procedures pose a trade-off in outcomes: fewer complications for the index operation, but higher rates of revision surgery. This information should help patients make more informed choices, but further research is needed to define optimal indications for these new devices. PMID:23324936

  1. Analysis of surgeries for Degenerative lumbarstenosis in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bin; Li, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the effect of decompression alone and combined decompression, fusion and internal fixation procedure for degenerative lumbar stenosis in elderly patients. Methods: We reviewed 168 lumbar stenosis patients treated using decompression alone or with combined procedures in the department of orthopaedics of Tianjin 4th Centre Hospital from October 2010 to January 2014. The clinical data including age, gender, procedure type, operation time, follow-up period, blood loss, preoperative and postoperative JOA and ODI scores were recorded. The patients were divided into decompression alone group and combined surgeries group according to the procedure type. Results: The combined surgeries group presented with larger blood loss (p<0.05) and more operation time (p<0.05), compared with the group of decompression alone. The preoperative and postoperative JOA scores were significantly higher (p<0.05), and the ODI scores significantly lower in the decompression alone group (P<0.05), but at the final follow-up, there were no significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05). The complication rate was lower in the group of decompression alone, but there was no significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Both the decompression alone and combined surgeries can result in a satisfactory effects in elderly patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, but the combined surgeries presented with a relatively higher complication rate.

  2. The Effect and Safety of Steroid Injection in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: With or Without Local Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sung Hyuk; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Park, Jin Woo; Lee, Ho Jun; Nam, Ki Yeun; Kim, Hyojun; Kim, Seung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the long-term effect and safety of an epidural steroid injection in spinal stenosis patients, with or without local anesthetics. Methods Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with spinal stenosis were included and randomly divided into two groups. Translaminar epidural and selective nerve root spinal injection procedures were performed using steroids mixed with local anesthetics or normal saline. The effects of spinal injection procedures were measured with visual analogue scale (VAS) and functional rate index (FRI). These measurements were performed before injection, at 1 month after injection and at 3 months after injection. The occurrence of side effects was investigated each time. Results The VAS and FRI scores were significantly reduced in both the local anesthetics group and normal saline group at 1 and 3 months after the injection. However, there was no significant difference in VAS and FRI score reduction between the two groups each time. Side effects are not noted in both groups. Conclusion The spinal injection procedures using steroids mixed either with local anesthetics or normal saline have an effect in reducing pain and improving functional activities. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in relation to side effects and the long-term effects of pain and function. PMID:26949664

  3. Nonsurgical Korean Integrative Treatments for Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Three-Armed Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiok; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Seo, Bok-Nam; Jung, So-Young; Youn, Yousuk; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jaehong; Qu, Wenchun

    2016-01-01

    This is a study protocol for a pilot three-armed randomized controlled trial on nonsurgical integrative Korean medicinal treatment for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Thirty-six participants who have been diagnosed with (LSS) and recommended for spinal surgery by neurosurgeons or orthopedics and have had spinal symptoms such as severe low back pain and neurological claudication regardless of at least three months of conservative treatments will be recruited. Participants will be randomly assigned to be one of the three intervention groups, including the Mokhuri treatment program group 1 or 2 or usual care group. All treatments will be administered in inpatient units over a period of 4 weeks. The primary outcomes are 0 to 100 Visual Analogue Scales for low back pain and leg pain and the secondary outcomes are Oswestry Disability Index; EQ-5D; Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire; Oxford Claudication Score; physical function test, including treadmill test, walking duration, and distance assessment for free leg pain; radiologic testing; and adverse events which will be assessed during the 4-week treatment period as well as after 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Then, we will assess the feasibility of the clinical trial design as well as a nonsurgical integrative treatment program. This trial is registered with CRIS registration number: KCT0001218. PMID:26941823

  4. Nonsurgical Korean Integrative Treatments for Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Three-Armed Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Protocol.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kiok; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Seo, Bok-Nam; Jung, So-Young; Youn, Yousuk; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jaehong; Qu, Wenchun; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-01-01

    This is a study protocol for a pilot three-armed randomized controlled trial on nonsurgical integrative Korean medicinal treatment for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Thirty-six participants who have been diagnosed with (LSS) and recommended for spinal surgery by neurosurgeons or orthopedics and have had spinal symptoms such as severe low back pain and neurological claudication regardless of at least three months of conservative treatments will be recruited. Participants will be randomly assigned to be one of the three intervention groups, including the Mokhuri treatment program group 1 or 2 or usual care group. All treatments will be administered in inpatient units over a period of 4 weeks. The primary outcomes are 0 to 100 Visual Analogue Scales for low back pain and leg pain and the secondary outcomes are Oswestry Disability Index; EQ-5D; Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire; Oxford Claudication Score; physical function test, including treadmill test, walking duration, and distance assessment for free leg pain; radiologic testing; and adverse events which will be assessed during the 4-week treatment period as well as after 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Then, we will assess the feasibility of the clinical trial design as well as a nonsurgical integrative treatment program. This trial is registered with CRIS registration number: KCT0001218. PMID:26941823

  5. 100 Consecutive Cases of Degenerative Lumbar Conditions Using a Non-Threaded Locking Screw System With a 90-Degree Locking Cap

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bryan W.; Tortolani, P. Justin; Fedder, Ira L.; Sefter, John C.; Davis, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background This prospective study analyzes the perioperative outcomes and long-term fusion success of 100 consecutive lumbar degenerative cases. The cases were managed using a non-threaded locking screw system, in conjunction with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages, for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedures. These 100 cases were compared to another prospective study treating patients with the same inclusion and exclusion criteria using conventional plate-based pedicle screw spinal instrumentation augmented with carbon fiber interbody cages. Methods A total of 167 operative levels were treated in 100 patients (51 single-level, 39 two-level and 10 three-level cases). Eleven cases were revisions and 67 patients received interbody fusion cages. Patients had an average of 22.8 ± 4.0 months followup. Results: There was one instrumentation failure but no significant subsidence at the interbody fusion level. The disc space height was restored as part of the surgical procedure at the interbody cage levels: from 7.5 ± 2.3 mm preoperative to 9.0 ± 2.1 mm postoperative. There were 2 cases of pseudarthrosis (2 / 100 = 2%). The average operative time for 1-level cases was 111 ± 25 minutes; for 2-level cases it was 132.4 ± 21.8 minutes; and for 3-level cases it was 162.6 ± 33 minutes. Blood loss averaged 800 ± 473 cc for 1-level cases, 1055 ± 408 cc for 2 levels, and 1155 ± 714 cc for 3 levels. The length of stay was similar between the 3 groups (4.4 ± 1.2 days for single-level cases, 4.7 ± 1.1 for 2 levels, and 5.0 ± 1.1 for 3 levels; P > .05). There were 3 incidental durotomies, and 4 other patients developed infections postoperatively that required reoperation. Conclusion The disc and foraminal heights can be restored and maintained with a unilateral cage and pedicle screw construct. Unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using a PEEK cage combined with a non-threaded locking pedicle screw and rod system results in similar fusion rates to those achieved using the bilateral Brantigan interbody fusion cage or a single BAK Vista implant. When compared to the bilateral Brantigan cages, decreased operative time (P < .001), decreased blood loss (P < .001) and reduced incidence of dural tears (P < .001) are advantages of using a non-threaded locking screw system and single PEEK interbody cage for lumbar degenerative conditions without compromising subsequent fusion rates. PMID:25802623

  6. Minimally Invasive Versus Open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis Grades 1-2: Patient-Reported Clinical Outcomes and Cost-Utility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Wale A. R.; Singh, Manish

    2014-01-01

    Background Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is the standard surgical treatment for patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis who do not respond to a 6-week course of conservative therapy. A number of morbidities are associated with the conventional open-TLIF method, so minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques for TLIF (MIS-TLIF) have been introduced to reduce the trauma to paraspinal muscles and hasten postoperative recovery. Because providing cost-effective medical treatment is a core initiative of healthcare reforms, a comparison of open-TLIF and MIS-TLIF must include a cost-utility analysis in addition to an analysis of clinical effectiveness. Methods We compared patient-reported clinical functional outcomes and hospital direct costs in age-matched patients treated surgically with either open-TLIF or MIS-TLIF. Patients were followed for at least 1 year, and patient scores on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale (VAS) were analyzed at 6 weeks, 6 months, and ≥1 year postoperatively in the 2 treatment groups. Results Compared to their preoperative scores, patients in both the open-TLIF and MIS-TLIF groups had significant improvements in the ODI and VAS scores at each follow-up point, but no significant difference in functional outcome occurred between the open-TLIF and MIS-TLIF groups (P=0.46). However, open-TLIF is significantly more costly compared to MIS-TLIF (P=0.0002). Conclusion MIS-TLIF is a more cost-effective treatment than open-TLIF for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and is equally effective as the conventional open-TLIF procedure, although further financial analysis—including an analysis of indirect costs—is needed to better understand the full benefit of MIS-TLIF. PMID:24688330

  7. Minimum 5 year follow-up of multi-segmental lumbar degenerative disease treated with discectomy and the Wallis interspinous device.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun-qi; Che, Wu; Wang, Hui-ren; Li, Ruo-yu; Li, Xi-lei; Dong, Jian

    2015-07-01

    We evaluate the clinical effects and radiological findings of the Wallis interspinous device (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) for the treatment of multi-segmental lumbar degenerative disease after a minimum 5 year follow-up period. A total of 26 adult patients underwent a primary discectomy followed by fixation of the segment with the Wallis interspinous device between December 2007 and August 2008. Twelve men and 14 women with an age range of 43 to 56 years (average: 47.6) were included. The visual analogue scale (VAS) for low back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), foraminal height (FH), anterior disc height (aDH) and posterior disc height (pDH), range of motion (ROM) and Pfirrmann grades were obtained and compared before and after surgery. The VAS and ODI significantly decreased postoperatively (p < 0.05). The postoperative FH and pDH values increased significantly compared with the preoperative levels (p < 0.01) and the increase in the FH and pDH values remained statistically significant during the follow-up period. There were no statistically significant changes in the aDH values before and after surgery (p > 0.05). Also, there were no statistically significant changes in the ROM and Pfirrmann grade at the instrumented level and at the cephalad-adjacent segment (p>0.05). In our study, no patient underwent further surgery because of a re-prolapse or progression of index level degeneration or adjacent segment disease. The Wallis interspinous device was a useful alternative for treating multi-segmental lumbar degenerative disease and it offered a significant minimum 5 year symptom control. PMID:25890774

  8. Sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Oliver P; Corniola, Marco V; Smoll, Nicolas R; Joswig, Holger; Schaller, Karl; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Stienen, Martin N

    2016-05-01

    Sex differences in pain perception are known to exist; however, the exact pathomechanism remains unclear. This work aims to elucidate sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease. In a prospective 2-center study, back and leg pain (visual analogue scale [VAS]), functional disability (Oswestry Disability Index and Roland-Morris Disability Index), and HRQoL (EuroQol-5D and Short Form [SF12]) were collected for consecutive patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Objective functional impairment (OFI) was estimated using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values for the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. A healthy cohort of n = 110 subjects served as the control group. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to test the association between sex and pain, subjective and OFIs, and HRQoL. The study comprised n = 305 patients (41.6% females). Female patients had more VAS back pain (P = 0.002) and leg pain (P = 0.014). They were more likely to report higher functional impairment in terms of Oswestry Disability Index (P = 0.005). Similarly, HRQoL measured with the EuroQol-5D index (P = 0.012) and SF12 physical composite score (P = 0.005) was lower in female patients. Female patients reported higher VAS back and leg pain, functional impairment, and reduced HRQoL than male patients. However, there were no sex differences with respect to the presence and degree of OFI measured by the TUG test using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values. As such, the TUG may be a good test to overcome sex bias for the clinical assessment of patients with degenerative disc disease. PMID:26761383

  9. Spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Melancia, João Levy; Francisco, António Fernandes; Antunes, João Lobo

    2014-01-01

    Narrowing of the spinal canal or foramina is a common finding in spine imaging of the elderly. Only when symptoms of neurogenic claudication and/or cervical myelopathy are present is a spinal stenosis diagnosis made, either of the lumbar spine, cervical spine or both (only very rarely is the thoracic spine involved). Epidemiological data suggest an incidence of 1 case per 100 000 for cervical spine stenosis and 5 cases per 100 000 for lumbar spine stenosis. Cervical myelopathy in patients over 50 years of age is most commonly due to cervical spine stenosis. Symptomatic spinal narrowing can be congenital, or, more frequently, acquired. The latter may be the result of systemic illneses, namely endocrinopathies (such as Cushing disease or acromegaly), calcium metabolism disorders (including hyporarthyroidism and Paget disease), inflammatory diseases (such as rheumathoid arthritis) and infectious diseases. Physical examination is more often abnormal in cervical spondylotic myeloptahy whereas in lumbar spinal stenosis it is typically normal. Therefore spinal stenosis diagnosis relies on the clinical picture corresponding to conspicuous causative changes identified by imaging techniques, most importantly CT and MRI. Other ancillary diagnostic tests are more likely to be yielding for establishing a differential diagnosis, namely vascular claudication. Most patients have a progressive presentation and are offered non operative management as first treatment strategy. Surgery is indicated for progressive intolerable symptoms or, more rarely, for the neurologically catastrophic initial presentations. Surgical strategy consists mainly of decompression (depending on the anatomical level and type of narrowing: laminectomy, foraminotomy, discectomy, corporectomy) with additional instrumentation should spinal stability and sagittal balance be at risk. For cervical spine stenosis the main objective of surgery is to halt disease progression. There is class 1b evidence that surgery is of benefit for lumbar stenosis at least in the short term. PMID:24365318

  10. Predictors of Walking Performance and Walking Capacity in People with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, Low Back Pain and Asymptomatic Controls

    PubMed Central

    Tomkins-Lane, Christy C.; Holz, Sara Christensen; Yamakawa, KS; Phalke, Vaishali V.; Quint, Doug J.; Miner, Jennifer; Haig, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Examine predictors of community walking performance and walking capacity in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), compared to individuals with low back pain and asymptomatic controls. Design Retrospective analysis. Setting University Spine Program. Participants 126 participants (50 LSS, 44 low back pain and 32 asymptomatic controls), aged 55–80 yrs. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) 7-day community walking distance measured by pedometer (walking performance) and a 15 minute walking test (walking capacity). All participants had a lumbosacral MRI, electrodiagnostic testing, and a history and physical examination including history of pain and neurologic symptoms, straight leg raise test, tests for directional symptoms, reflexes, strength, and nerve tension signs. The study questionnaire included demographic information, history of back/leg pain, questions about walking, exercise frequency, and pain level, as well as the standardized Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale. Results BMI, pain, age and female sex predicted walking performance (r2 = 0.41) and walking capacity (r2=0.41). The diagnosis of LSS itself had no clear relationship with either walking variable. Compared to the asymptomatic group, LSS participants had significantly lower values for all walking parameters, with the exception of stride length, while there was no significant difference between the LSS and low back pain groups. Conclusions BMI, pain, female sex, and age predict walking performance and capacity in people with LSS, low back pain, and asymptomatic controls. While pain was the strongest predictor of walking capacity, BMI was the strongest predictor of walking performance. Average pain, rather than leg pain was predictive of walking. Obesity and pain are modifiable predictors of walking deficits that could be targets for future intervention studies aimed at increasing walking performance and capacity in both the low back pain and LSS populations. PMID:22365377

  11. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 16: bone graft extenders and substitutes as an adjunct for lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Michael G; Groff, Michael W; Watters, William C; Ghogawala, Zoher; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dailey, Andrew T; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Eck, Jason C; Sharan, Alok; Wang, Jeffrey C; Dhall, Sanjay S; Resnick, Daniel K

    2014-07-01

    In an attempt to enhance the potential to achieve a solid arthrodesis and avoid the morbidity of harvesting autologous iliac crest bone (AICB) for a lumbar fusion, numerous alternatives have been investigated. The use of these fusion adjuncts has become routine despite a lack of convincing evidence demonstrating a benefit to justify added costs or potential harm. Potential alternatives to AICB include locally harvested autograft, calcium-phosphate salts, demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and the family of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). In particular, no option has created greater controversy than the BMPs. A significant increase in the number of publications, particularly with respect to the BMPs, has taken place since the release of the original guidelines. Both DBM and the calciumphosphate salts have demonstrated efficacy as a graft extender or as a substitute for AICB when combined with local autograft. The use of recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) as a substitute for AICB, when performing an interbody lumbar fusion, is considered an option since similar outcomes have been observed; however, the potential for heterotopic bone formation is a concern. The use of rhBMP-2, when combined with calcium phosphates, as a substitute for AICB, or as an extender, when used with local autograft or AICB, is also considered an option as similar fusion rates and clinical outcomes have been observed. Surgeons electing to use BMPs should be aware of a growing body of literature demonstrating unique complications associated with the use of BMPs. PMID:24980593

  12. A Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Muscle Fat Content in the Lumbar Paraspinal Muscles with Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Patients with Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease and Focal Disk Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Bhadresha, Ashwin; Lawrence, Owen John; McCarthy, Michael J H

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objectives To assess the fatty atrophy of the lumbar paraspinal muscles (LPMs) as determined using magnetic resonance imaging in patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease (DDD) and focal disk herniation and to determine if fatty atrophy is associated with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS). Methods One hundred sixty-five patients with lumbar DDD were identified from a PROMS database of >1,500 patients. These patients were divided into two study groups: DDD alone (n = 58) and DDD with disk herniation (n = 107). A grid was randomly applied to the axial scans at the L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 levels. The muscle-to-fat ratio of the LPMs was recorded and compared with PROMS data. Subcutaneous fat thickness at each level was also measured. Results This study found no difference in the muscle-to-fat ratio between the DDD and disk herniation groups. There was no association between the muscle-to-fat ratio and PROMS data in either group. There was significantly more subcutaneous fat at all levels in the DDD group as compared with the disk prolapse group. In DDD and disk prolapses, subcutaneous fat was thicker in women (p = 0.013 and 0.001). In patients with DDD, more subcutaneous fat was associated with disability (p < 0.001). Muscle content of erector spinae and multifidus negatively correlated with increasing age in both groups at the L3-L4 level. Conclusions Muscle fat content in the LPM does not appear to relate to PROMS. Muscle content decreases with age. Those with low back pain (DDD) have greater subcutaneous fat thickness. PMID:27190744

  13. Clinical outcomes of two types of cages used in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases: n-HA/PA66 cages versus PEEK cages.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qian-Xing; Ou, Yun-Sheng; Zhu, Yong; Zhao, Zeng-Hui; Liu, Bo; Huang, Qiu; Du, Xing; Jiang, Dian-Ming

    2016-06-01

    This study reports the clinical effects of nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide66 cages (n-HA/PA66 cages) and compares the clinical outcomes between n-HA/PA66 and polyetheretherketone cages (PEEK cages) for application in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). A retrospective and case-control study involving 124 patients using n-HA/PA66 cages and 142 patients using PEEK cages was conducted. All patients underwent TLIF and had an average of 2-years of follow-up. The Oswestry Disability Index and Visual Analog Scale were selected to assess the pain of low back and leg, as well as neurological status. The intervertebral space height and segmental angle were also measured to estimate the radiological changes. At the 1-year and final follow-ups, the fusion and subsidence rates were evaluated. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding clinical and radiological results. At the final follow-up, the bony fusion rate was 92.45 and 91.57 % for the n-HA/PA66 and PEEK groups, respectively, and the subsidence rate was 7.55 and 8.99 %, respectively. The study indicated that both n-HA/PA66 and PEEK cages could promote effective clinical and radiographic outcomes when used to treat degenerative lumbar diseases. The high fusion and low subsidence rates revealed that n-HA/PA66 cages could be an alternative ideal choice as the same to PEEK cages for lumbar reconstruction after TLIF. PMID:27091044

  14. Complete cage migration/subsidence into the adjacent vertebral body after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Corniola, Marco V; Jägersberg, Max; Stienen, Martin N; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2015-03-01

    A variety of implant-related short and long-term complications after lumbar fusion surgery are recognized. Mid to long-term complications due to cage migration and/or cage subsidence are less frequently reported. Here, we report a patient with a complete cage migration into the superior adjacent vertebral body almost 20 years after the initial posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure. In this patient, the cage migration/subsidence was clinically silent, but a selective decompression for adjacent segment degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis was performed. We discuss the risk factors for cage migration/subsidence in view of the current literature. PMID:25455736

  15. [Tactics of surgical treatment of degenerative-dystrophic lesions of the lumbosacral spine in case of HIP-SPINE-syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kavalerskiĭ, G M; Korkunov, A L; Lychagin, A V; Sereda, A P; Cherepanov, V G

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is definition of surgical treatment tactics of multilevel degenerative-dystrophic lesions of the lumbosacral spine in case of HIP-SPINE-syndrome. It was presented the experience of surgical treatment of multilevel degenerative-dystrophic lesions of the lumbosacral spine in 52 patients aged from 48 to 81 years. Lumbar stenosis prevailed in 38 (73.1%) cases. There was degenerative spondylolisthesis in 9 (17.3%) cases, and degenerative scoliosis was detected in 5 (9.6%) patients. Different types of decompressive-stabilizing interventions according to direction of compression and the presence of degenerative instability were performed in all patients. Evaluation of surgical treatment was done by using of visual analog scale and questionnaire Oswestry Disability Index. It was revealed significant improvement of life quality by reducing of pain and increasing of daily activity. Maximal time of observation was 36 months. PMID:24874225

  16. Trends in hospital admissions and surgical procedures for degenerative lumbar spine disease in England: a 15-year time-series study

    PubMed Central

    Sivasubramaniam, Vinothan; Patel, Hitesh C; Ozdemir, Baris A; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Low back pain (LBP), from degenerative lumbar spine disease, represents a significant burden on healthcare resources. Studies worldwide report trends attributable to their country's specific demographics and healthcare system. Considering England's specific medico-socioeconomic conditions, we investigate recent trends in hospital admissions and procedures for LBP, and discuss the implications for the allocation of healthcare resources. Design Retrospective cohort study using Hospital Episode Statistics data relating to degenerative lumbar spine disease in England, between 1999 and 2013. Regression models were used to analyse trends. Outcome measures Trends in the number of admissions and procedures for LBP, mean patient age, gender and length of stay. Results Hospital admissions and procedures have increased significantly over the study period, from 127.09 to 216.16 and from 24.5 to 48.83 per 100 000, respectively, (p<0.001). The increase was most marked in the oldest age groups with a 1.9 and 2.33-fold increase in admissions for patients aged 60–74 and ≥75 years, respectively, and a 2.8-fold increase in procedures for those aged ≥60 years. Trends in hospital admissions were characterised by a widening gender gap, increasing mean patient age, and decreasing mean hospital stay (p<0.001). Trends in procedures were characterised by a narrowing gender gap, increasing mean patient age (p=0.014) and decreasing mean hospital stay (p<0.001). Linear regression models estimate that each hospital admission translates to 0.27 procedures, per 100 000 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.30, r 0.99, p<0.001; r, Pearson's correlation coefficient). Hospital admissions are increasing at 3.5 times the rate of surgical procedures (regression gradient 7.63 vs 2.18 per 100 000/year). Conclusions LBP represents a significant and increasing workload for hospitals in England. These trends demonstrate an increasing demand for specialists involved in the surgical and non-surgical management of this disease, and highlight the need for services capable of dealing with the increased comorbidity burden associated with an ageing patient group. PMID:26671956

  17. Surgical Correction in Patients with Lumbar Degenerative Kyphosis Who Had Low Bone Mineral Density: An Analysis of 40 Patients with a Minimum Follow-Up of Two Years

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Tack; Lee, Sang Hun; Huh, Dae Seok; Son, Eun Seok

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To investigate influence of bone mineral density (BMD) on the surgical correction of lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK). Overview of Literature No studies so far have reported the influence of BMD on the surgical correction of LDK. Methods Forty LDK patients with more than 2 years follow-up were studied. Pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt, sacral slope, sagittal vertical axis (SVA), lumbar lordosis (LL), and thoracic kyphosis were measured preoperatively, immediate postoperatively and at final follow-up. Adverse outcomes: proximal adjacent fractures, sagittal decompensation, pseudoarthrosis, and cage subsidence were documented. Results There were 37 females and 3 males. Average age was 65.1±4.5 years and mean follow-up was 34.2±16.7 months. 42.5% were Takemitsu type 3 curves, 27.5% type 2, 20.0% type 4 and 10.0% type 1. 37.5% had osteopenia, 40.0% osteoporosis and 22.5% had severe osteoporosis. SVA improved from 237.0±96.7 mm preoperatively to 45.3±41.8 mm postoperatively (p=0.000). LL improved from 10.5°±14.7° to -40.6°±10.9° postoperatively (p=0.000). At final follow-up SVA deteriorated to 89.8±72.2 mm and LL to 34.7°±15.8° (p=0.000). The association between late sagittal decompensation, pseudoarthrosis, or proximal adjacent fractures and osteoporosis was insignificant. The difference between immediate postoperative LL and PI (PIDiff) had a significant association with sagittal decompensation and pseudoarthrosis. Conclusions Osteoporosis did not influence the degree of correction, late sagittal decompensation, proximal adjacent fractures, and pseudoarthrosis in LDK. PIDiff had a significant association with sagittal decompensation and pseudoarthrosis. PMID:25705337

  18. A minimally invasive technique for percutaneous lumbar facet augmentation: Technical description of a novel device

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary A.; Armin, Sean; Raphael, Dan; Khoo, Larry T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: We describe a new posterior dynamic stabilizing system that can be used to augment the mechanics of the degenerating lumbar segment. The mechanism of this system differs from other previously described surgical techniques that have been designed to augment lumbar biomechanics. The implant and technique we describe is an extension-limiting one, and it is designed to support and cushion the facet complex. Furthermore, it is inserted through an entirely percutaneous technique. The purpose of this technical note is to demonstrate a novel posterior surgical approach for the treatment of lumbar degenerative. Methods: This report describes a novel, percutaneously placed, posterior dynamic stabilization system as an alternative option to treat lumbar degenerative disk disease with and without lumbar spinal stenosis. The system does not require a midline soft-tissue dissection, nor subperiosteal dissection, and is a truly minimally invasive means for posterior augmentation of the functional facet complex. This system can be implanted as a stand-alone procedure or in conjunction with decompression procedures. Results: One-year clinical results in nine individual patients, all treated for degenerative disease of the lower lumbar spine, are presented. Conclusions: This novel technique allows for percutaneous posterior dynamic stabilization of the lumbar facet complex. The use of this procedure may allow a less invasive alternative to traditional approaches to the lumbar spine as well as an alternative to other newly developed posterior dynamic stabilization systems. PMID:22145084

  19. Results of surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis in patients aged 80 years or more. A retrospective study of thirty-four cases.

    PubMed

    Ishac, R; Alhayek, G; Fournier, D; Mercier, P; Guy, G

    1996-03-01

    As life expectancy increases and spinal imaging techniques improve, surgery is being increasingly viewed as a therapeutic alternative for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis in patients older than 80 years. Thirty-four patients (21 men and 13 women) who had surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis in our department between 1979 and 1994 were studied retrospectively. The most common initial symptoms were walking-related disorders (n = 29) and sciatica or femoral neuralgia (n = 34). All 34 patients underwent laminectomy at one or more levels. Ten patients also had a herniated disk. There were no deaths and only two patients had serious complications (persistent foot drop in one and left-sided hemiplegia in the other). Results were evaluated immediately after surgery and after three and 12 months. The overall result on pain and walking-related disorders was good in 53% of cases, acceptable in 32%, and poor in 15%. Our data suggest that surgery is a reasonable alternative in symptomatic elderly patients who are in good general health. Satisfactory results can be obtained although disabling complications can occur. PMID:8731237

  20. Epidural Steroid Injections Are Associated with Less Improvement in the Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A subgroup analysis of the SPORT

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Kris; Kepler, Christopher; Hilibrand, Alan; Rihn, Jeffrey; Zhao, Wenyan; Lurie, Jon; Tosteson, Tor; Vaccaro, Alexander; Albert, Todd; Weinstein, James

    2013-01-01

    Summary of Background Data Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common incidental finding among adults over the age of 60, The use of ESI in these patients is common, although there is little evidence in the literature to demonstrate the long-term benefit of ESI in the treatment of lumbar stenosis. Objective The hypothesis of this study was that patients who received epidural steroid injections (ESI) during initial treatment as part of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) would have improved clinical outcomes and a lower rate of crossover to surgery compared to patients who did not receive ESI. Methods Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis who received epidural steroid injections within the first three months of enrollment in SPORT (ESI) were compared to patients who did not receive epidural injections during the first three months of the study (No ESI). Results There were 69 ESI patients and 207 No-ESI patients. There were no significant differences in demographic factors, baseline clinical outcome scores, or operative details although there was a significant increase in baseline preference for nonsurgical treatment among ESI patients (62% vs. 33%, p <0.001). There was an average 26 minute increase in operative time and an increased length of stay by 0.9 days among the ESI patients who ultimately underwent surgical treatment. Averaged over four years, there was significantly less improvement in SF36 PF among surgically treated ESI patients (ESI 14.8 vs. No-ESI 22.5, p=0.025). In addition, there was also significantly less improvement among the nonsurgically treated patients in SF36 BP (ESI 7.3 vs. No-ESI 16.7, p=0.007) and SF36 PF (ESI 5.5 vs. No-ESI 15.2, p=0.009). Of the patients assigned to surgical treatment, there was a significantly increased crossover to nonsurgical treatment among patients who received an ESI (ESI 33% vs. No ESI 11%, p=0.012). Of the patients assigned to non-operative treatment, there was a significantly increased crossover to surgical treatment in the ESI patients (ESI 58% vs. No ESI 32%, p=0.003). Conclusion Despite equivalent baseline status, ESI were associated with significantly less improvement at four years among all patients with spinal stenosis in SPORT. Furthermore, ESI were associated with longer duration of surgery and longer hospital stay. There was no improvement in outcome with ESI whether patients were treated surgically or nonsurgically. PMID:23238485

  1. Use of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins in Spinal Fusion Surgery for Older Adults with Lumbar Stenosis: Trends, Complications, Repeat Surgery, and Charges

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Ching, Alex; Matsen, Laura; Martin, Brook I.; Kreuter, William; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Angier, Heather; Mirza, Sohail K.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study of Medicare claims. Objective Examine trends and patterns in the use of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) in surgery for lumbar stenosis; compare complications, reoperation rates, and charges for patients undergoing lumbar fusion with and without BMP. Summary of Background Data Small randomized trials have demonstrated higher rates of solid fusion with BMP than with allograft bone alone, with few complications, and in some studies, reduced rates of revision surgery. However, complication and reoperation rates from large population-based cohorts in routine care are unavailable. Methods We identified patients with a primary diagnosis of lumbar stenosis who had fusion surgery in 2003 or 2004 (n=16,822). We identified factors associated with BMP use; major medical complications during the index hospitalization, rates of rehospitalization within 30 days, and rates of reoperation within 4 years of follow-up (through 2008). Results Use of BMP increased rapidly, from 5.5% of fusion cases in 2003 to 28.1% of fusion cases in 2008. BMP use was greater among patients with previous surgery and among those having complex fusion procedures (combined anterior and posterior approach, or greater than 2 disc levels). Major medical complications, wound complications, and 30-day rehospitalization rates were nearly identical with or without BMP. Reoperation rates were also very similar, , even after stratifying by previous surgery or surgical complexity, and after adjusting for demographic and clinical features. On average, adjusted hospital charges for operations involving BMP were about $15,000 greater than hospital charges for fusions without BMP, though reimbursement under Medicare's Diagnosis-Related Group (DRG) system averaged only about $850 greater Significantly fewer patients receiving BMP were discharged to a skilled nursing facility (15.9% vs. 19.0%, p<0.001) Conclusion In this older population having fusion surgery for lumbar stenosis, uptake of BMP was rapid, and greatest among patients with prior surgery or having complex fusion procedures. BMP appeared safe in the perioperative period, with no increase in major medical complications. Use of BMP was associated with greater hospital charges but fewer nursing home discharges, and was not associated with reduced likelihood of reoperation. PMID:21494195

  2. Effect of complications within 90 days on patient-reported outcomes 3 months and 12 months following elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Sielatycki, J Alex; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There is a paradigm shift toward rewarding providers for quality rather than volume. Complications appear to occur at a fairly consistent frequency in large aggregate data sets. Understanding how complications affect long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following degenerative lumbar surgery is vital. The authors hypothesized that 90-day complications would adversely affect long-term PROs. METHODS Nine hundred six consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease over a period of 4 years were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. The following PROs were recorded at baseline and 12-month follow-up: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, quality of life (EQ-5D scores), general physical and mental health (SF-12 Physical Component Summary [PCS] and Mental Component Summary [MCS] scores) and responses to the North American Spine Society (NASS) satisfaction questionnaire. Previously published minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold were used to define meaningful improvement. Complications were divided into major (surgicalsite infection, hardware failure, new neurological deficit, pulmonary embolism, hematoma and myocardial infarction) and minor (urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and deep venous thrombosis). RESULTS Complications developed within 90 days of surgery in 13% (118) of the patients (major in 12% [108] and minor in 8% [68]). The mean improvement in ODI scores, EQ-5D scores, SF-12 PCS scores, and satisfaction at 3 months after surgery was significantly less in the patients with complications than in those who did not have major complications (ODI: 13.5 21.2 vs 21.7 19, < 0.0001; EQ-5D: 0.17 0.25 vs 0.23 0.23, p = 0.04; SF-12 PCS: 8.6 13.3 vs 13.0 11.9, 0.001; and satisfaction: 76% vs 90%, p = 0.002). At 12 months after surgery, the patients with major complications had higher ODI scores than those without complications (29.1 17.7 vs 25.3 18.3, p = 0.02). However, there was no difference in the change scores in ODI and absolute scores across all other PROs between the 2 groups. In multivariable linear regression analysis, after controlling for an array of preoperative variables, the occurrence of a major complication was not associated with worsening ODI scores 12 months after surgery. There was no difference in the percentage of patients achieving the MCID for disability (66% vs 64%), back pain (55% vs 56%), leg pain (62% vs 59%), or quality of life (19% vs 14%) or in patient satisfaction rates (82% vs 80%) between those without and with major complications. CONCLUSIONS Major complications within 90 days following lumbar spine surgery have significant impact on the short-term PROs. Patients with complications, however, do eventually achieve clinically meaningful outcomes and report satisfaction equivalent to those without major complications. This information allows a physician to counsel patients on the fact that a complication creates frustration, cost, and inconvenience; however, it does not appear to adversely affect clinically meaningful long-term outcomes and satisfaction. PMID:26621422

  3. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually easy to diagnose and is known as sciatica. Sciatica usually causes back pain that shoots down one leg along the path of the sciatic nerve. Sciatica can happen any time, not just when you ...

  4. Effects of Spinal Stabilization Exercise on the Cross-sectional Areas of the Lumbar Multifidus and Psoas Major Muscles, Pain Intensity, and Lumbar Muscle Strength of Patients with Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongho; Kim, Hyungguen; Chung, Jaeyeop

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using spinal stabilizing exercise to reduce atrophy of the multifidus and psoas major muscles, reduce the levels of pain and disability, and increase paraspinal muscle strength in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD). [Subjects and Methods] In 33 patients (Age range: 25-65 years) diagnosed with DDD, spinal stabilization exercise was conducted for 8 weeks. The levels of pain and disability were measured before and after exercise using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Paraspinal muscular strength in four directions was evaluated with a CENTAUR 3D Spatial Rotation Device. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of both the left and right multifidus and the psoas major at the upper endplate of L4 were measured before and after exercise using computed tomography (CT). [Results] After 8 weeks of spinal stabilization exercise, the pain and lumbar disability in subjects decreased significantly from 6.12±1.24 to 2.43±1.14. The ODI score also improved from 20.18±7.14 to 8.81±5.73. In addition, paraspinal muscle strength increased significantly, while the CSAs of the left and right multifidus and psoas major widened as compared with the pre-exercise size. [Conclusion] Spinal stabilization exercise was effective for reducing pain and disability in DDD patients. It was an effective adjunct to aid rehabilitation in these cases. PMID:24764637

  5. Systematic Review of Thigh Symptoms after Lateral Transpsoas Interbody Fusion for Adult Patients with Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gammal, Isaac D.; Bendo, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) is a minimally invasive technique for achieving lumbar spinal fusion. While it has many advantages over open techniques it carries with it a distinct set of risks, most commonly post-operative ipsilateral thigh pain, weakness and sensory disturbances. It is vital for both the surgeon and patient to understand the risks for and outcomes of injury associated with this procedure. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the incidence, risks, and long-term clinical outcomes of post-operative thigh symptoms in patients treated with LTIF. Methods We conducted a search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane Collaboration Library, using keywords and MeSH terms, for English-language literature published through September 2014, as well as reference lists from key articles. Studies were then manually filtered to retrieve articles that met inclusion criteria. We were interested in studies that reported postoperative lower extremity symptoms after LTIF, such as pain, weakness and changes in sensation. The strength of evidence was determined based on precepts outlined by the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group (GRADE). Results A total of 392 articles were initially retrieved, with 24 ultimately meeting criteria for inclusion. The incidence of any post-operative thigh symptom varied, ranging as high as 60.7%, with 9.3% of patients experiencing a motor deficit related to direct nerve injury. Several studies reported cases of persistent symptoms at 6 months follow up. Additionally, inclusion of the L4-5 disc space and a longer duration of surgery were both identified as risks for developing postoperative thigh symptoms. Conclusion The risk of postoperative thigh symptoms after LTIF is high. Thigh pain, paresthesias and weakness were the most commonly reported symptoms. While most patients’ symptoms resolved by 6 months follow up, several studies reported patients with symptoms persistent as far as 12 months removed from surgery. Surgery at the L4-5 disc space and longer surgical duration place the patient at greater risk for developing postoperative and long-term thigh symptoms. PMID:26767154

  6. “Outside-in” Technique, Clinical Results, and Indications with Transforaminal Lumbar Endoscopic Surgery: a Retrospective Study on 220 Patients on Applied Radiographic Classification of Foraminal Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze and describe appropriate surgical indications for endoscopically performed transforaminal decompression with the outside-in technique with foraminoplasty in patients with lateral stenosis with and without herniated disc. Background and Significance Endoscopic microdiscectomy is growing in popularity for the removal of lumbar disc herniations. Recent advances in surgical techniques allow for percutaneous endoscopically assisted bony decompression as well. Materials and Methods A retrospective study of 220 consecutive patients undergoing percutaneous endoscopic transforaminal foraminoplasty and microdiscectomy at 228 levels was conducted with intent of identifying appropriate surgical indications in patients with monoradiculopathy. The mean follow up was 46 months ranging from 26 to 54 months. Preoperatively, foraminal and lateral recess stenosis was graded on preoperative MRI and CT scans by dividing the lumbar neuroforamen into three zones: a) entry zone, b) middle zone, and c) exit zone. In addition, the presence of disc herniation causing neural element compression in the lateral recess and neuroforamen was noted. Disc herniations, if present, were recorded as either extruded and contained disc herniations. Surgical outcomes were classified according to the Macnab criteria. In addition, reductions in VAS scores were assessed. Results According to the Macnab criteria, excellent and good results were obtained in 85% (186/220) of patients with monoradiculopathy. The mean VAS score decreased from 7.5 ± 1.5 preoperatively to 2.8 ± 1.9 at the final follow-up (P < 0.01). Concomitant extruded disc herniations and contained disc bulges were recorded in 24 and 82 patients, respectively. There were no approach-related complications. Clinical failures occurred in patients with bony stenosis in the lateral recess and entry zone of the neuroforamen. Less favorable outcomes were observed in patients with concomitant contained disc herniations when compared to extruded disc herniations (P < 0.03) as well in patients older than 50 years of age (P < 0.021). Conclusions Percutaneous, endoscopic decompression using outside-in technique works well in patients with monoradiculopathy due to lateral stenosis in the mid and exit zone of the neuroforamen. Decompression in the entry zone maybe inadequate using the transforaminal outside-in approach. Future studies with greater statistical power should determine as to whether pain relief was achieved via microdiscectomy or foraminoplasty. PMID:25694915

  7. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the lumbar spine, do more nerve root injuries occur utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques versus open lumbar procedures? To answer this question, we compared the frequency of nerve root injuries for multiple open versus MIS operations including diskectomy, laminectomy with/without fusion addressing degenerative disc disease, stenosis, and/or degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods: Several of Desai et al. large Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial studies showed the frequency for nerve root injury following an open diskectomy ranged from 0.13% to 0.25%, for open laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion it was 0%, and for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion it was 2%. Results: Alternatively, one study compared the incidence of root injuries utilizing MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) techniques; 7.8% of PLIF versus 2% of TLIF patients sustained root injuries. Furthermore, even higher frequencies of radiculitis and nerve root injuries occurred during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIFs) versus extreme lateral interbody fusions (XLIFs). These high frequencies were far from acceptable; 15.8% following ALIF experienced postoperative radiculitis, while 23.8% undergoing XLIF sustained root/plexus deficits. Conclusions: This review indicates that MIS (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) lumbar surgery resulted in a higher incidence of root injuries, radiculitis, or plexopathy versus open lumbar surgical techniques. Furthermore, even a cursory look at the XLIF data demonstrated the greater danger posed to neural tissue by this newest addition to the MIS lumbar surgical armamentariu. The latter should prompt us as spine surgeons to question why the XLIF procedure is still being offered to our patients? PMID:26904372

  8. Transforaminal Endoscopic Lumbar Decompression & Foraminoplasty: A 10 Year prospective survivability outcome study of the treatment of foraminal stenosis and failed back surgery

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Martin TN; Jago, Ingrid; Norris, Christopher; Midwinter, Lynne; Boynes, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background Conventional diagnosis between axial and foraminal stenosis is suboptimal and long-term outcomes limited to posterior decompression. Aware state Transforaminal Endoscopic Lumbar Decompression and Foraminoplasty (TELDF) offers a direct aware state means of localizing and treating neuro-claudicant back pain, referred pain and weakness associated with stenosis failing to respond to conventional rehabilitation, pain management or surgery. This prospective survivability study examines the outcomes 10 years after TELDF in patients with foraminal stenosis arising from degeneration or failed back surgery. Methods For 10 years prospective data were collected on 114 consecutive patients with multilevel spondylosis and neuro-claudicant back pain, referred pain and weakness with or without failed back surgery whose symptoms had failed to respond to conventional rehabilitation and pain management and who underwent TELDF. The level responsible for the predominant presenting symptoms of foraminal stenosis, determined on clinical grounds, MRI and or CT scans, was confirmed by transforaminal probing and discography. Patients underwent TELDF at the spinal segment at which the predominant presenting symptoms were reproduced. Those that required treatment at an additional segment were excluded. Outcomes were assessed by postal questionnaire with failures being examined by the independent authors using the Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAPS), the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the Prolo Activity Score. Results Cohort integrity was 69%. 79 patients were available for evaluation after removal of the deceased (12), untraceable (17) and decliners (6) from the cohort. VAP scores improved from a pre-operative mean of 7.3 to 2.4 at year 10. The ODI improved from a mean of 58.5 at baseline to 17.5 at year 10. 72% of reviewed patients fulfilled the definition of an “Excellent” or “Good Clinical Impact” at review using the Spinal Foundation Outcome Score. Based on the Prolo scale, 61 patients (77%) were able to return and continue in full or part-time work or retirement activity post-TELDF. Complications of TELDF were limited to transient nerve irritation, which affected 19% of the cohort for 2 – 4 weeks. TELDF was equally beneficial in those with failed back surgery. Conclusions TELDF is a beneficial intervention for the long-term treatment of severely disabled patients with neuro-claudicant symptoms arising from spinal or foraminal stenosis with a dural diameter of more than 3mm, who have failed to respond to conventional rehabilitation or chronic pain management. It results in considerable improvements in symptoms and function sustained 10 years later despite co-morbidity, ageing or the presence of failed back surgery. Clinical Relevance The long term outcome of TELDF in severely disabled patients with neuro-claudicant symptoms arising from foraminal stenosis which had failed to respond to conventional rehabilitation, surgery or chronic pain management suggests that foraminal pathology is a major cause of lumbar axial and referred pain and that TELDF should be offered as primary treatment for these conditions even in the elderly and infirm. The application of TELDF at multiple levels may further widen the benefits of this technique. PMID:25694924

  9. Adult's Degenerative Scoliosis: Midterm Results of Dynamic Stabilization without Fusion in Elderly Patients—Is It Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Di Silvestre, Mario; Lolli, Francesco; Greggi, Tiziana; Vommaro, Francesco; Baioni, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. A retrospective study. Purpose. Posterolateral fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation used for degenerative lumbar scoliosis can lead to several complications. In elderly patients without sagittal imbalance, dynamic stabilization could represent an option to avoid these adverse events. Methods. 57 patients treated by dynamic stabilization without fusion were included. All patients had degenerative lumbar de novo scoliosis (average Cobb angle 17.2°), without sagittal imbalance, associated in 52 cases (91%) with vertebral canal stenosis and in 24 (42%) with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Nineteen patients (33%) had previously undergone lumbar spinal surgery. Results. At an average followup of 77 months, clinical results improved with statistical significance. Scoliosis Cobb angle was 17.2° (range, 12° to 38°) before surgery and 11.3° (range, 4° to 26°) at last follow-up. In the patients with associated spondylolisthesis, anterior vertebral translation was 19.5% (range, 12% to 27%) before surgery, 16.7% (range, 0% to 25%) after surgery, and 17.5% (range, 0% to 27%) at followup. Complications incidence was low (14%), and few patients required revision surgery (4%). Conclusions. In elderly patients with mild degenerative lumbar scoliosis without sagittal imbalance, pedicle screw-based dynamic stabilization is an effective option, with low complications incidence, granting curve stabilization during time and satisfying clinical results. PMID:23781342

  10. Adult's Degenerative Scoliosis: Midterm Results of Dynamic Stabilization without Fusion in Elderly Patients-Is It Effective?

    PubMed

    Di Silvestre, Mario; Lolli, Francesco; Greggi, Tiziana; Vommaro, Francesco; Baioni, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. A retrospective study. Purpose. Posterolateral fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation used for degenerative lumbar scoliosis can lead to several complications. In elderly patients without sagittal imbalance, dynamic stabilization could represent an option to avoid these adverse events. Methods. 57 patients treated by dynamic stabilization without fusion were included. All patients had degenerative lumbar de novo scoliosis (average Cobb angle 17.2°), without sagittal imbalance, associated in 52 cases (91%) with vertebral canal stenosis and in 24 (42%) with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Nineteen patients (33%) had previously undergone lumbar spinal surgery. Results. At an average followup of 77 months, clinical results improved with statistical significance. Scoliosis Cobb angle was 17.2° (range, 12° to 38°) before surgery and 11.3° (range, 4° to 26°) at last follow-up. In the patients with associated spondylolisthesis, anterior vertebral translation was 19.5% (range, 12% to 27%) before surgery, 16.7% (range, 0% to 25%) after surgery, and 17.5% (range, 0% to 27%) at followup. Complications incidence was low (14%), and few patients required revision surgery (4%). Conclusions. In elderly patients with mild degenerative lumbar scoliosis without sagittal imbalance, pedicle screw-based dynamic stabilization is an effective option, with low complications incidence, granting curve stabilization during time and satisfying clinical results. PMID:23781342

  11. Dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease: a clinical and radiological outcomes-based meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Chi Heon; Park, Sung-Bae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, Hyun-Jib; Lee, Soo-Eon

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Dynesys, a pedicle-based dynamic stabilization (PDS) system, was introduced to overcome the drawbacks of fusion procedures. Nevertheless, the theoretical advantages of PDS over fusion have not been clearly confirmed. The aim of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of patients who underwent PDS using the Dynesys system with those who underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). METHODS The authors searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Database. Studies that reported outcomes of patients who underwent PDS or PLIF for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease were included. The primary efficacy end points were perioperative outcomes. The secondary efficacy end points were changes in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and back and leg pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores and in range of motion (ROM) at the treated and adjacent segments. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate weighted mean differences (WMDs), 95% confidence intervals, Q statistics, and I(2) values. Forest plots were constructed for each analysis group. RESULTS Of the 274 retrieved articles, 7 (which involved 506 participants [Dynesys, 250; PLIF, 256]) met the inclusion criteria. The Dynesys group showed a competitive advantage in mean surgery duration (20.73 minutes, 95% CI 8.76-32.70 minutes), blood loss (81.87 ml, 95% CI 45.11-118.63 ml), and length of hospital stay (1.32 days, 95% CI 0.23-2.41 days). Both the Dynesys and PLIF groups experienced improved ODI and VAS scores after 2 years of follow-up. Regarding the ODI and VAS scores, no statistically significant difference was noted according to surgical procedure (ODI: WMD 0.12, 95% CI -3.48 to 3.72; back pain VAS score: WMD -0.15; 95% CI -0.56 to 0.26; leg pain VAS score: WMD -0.07; 95% CI -0.47 to 0.32). The mean ROM at the adjacent segment increased in both groups, and there was no substantial difference between them (WMD 1.13; 95% CI -0.33 to 2.59). Although the United States is the biggest market for Dynesys, no eligible study from the United States was found, and 4 of 8 enrolled studies were performed in China. The results must be interpreted with caution because of publication bias. During Dynesys implantation, surgeons have to decide the length of the spacer and cord pretension. These values are debatable and can vary according to the surgeon's experience and the patient's condition. Differences between the surgical procedures were not considered in this study. CONCLUSIONS Fusion still remains the method of choice for advanced degeneration and gross instability. However, spinal degenerative disease with or without Grade I spondylolisthesis, particularly in patients who require a quicker recovery, will likely constitute the main indication for PDS using the Dynesys system. PMID:26721581

  12. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery: Let's tell someone

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In a recent study entitled: “More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF): A review”, Epstein documented that more nerve root injuries occurred utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) versus open lumbar surgery for diskectomy, decompression of stenosis (laminectomy), and/or fusion for instability. Methods: In large multicenter Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial reviews performed by Desai et al., nerve root injury with open diskectomy occurred in 0.13–0.25% of cases, occurred in 0% of laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion cases, and just 2% for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion. Results: In another MIS series performed largely for disc disease (often contained nonsurgical disc herniations, therefore unnecessary procedures) or spondylolisthesis, the risk of root injury was 2% for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus 7.8% for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Furthermore, the high frequencies of radiculitis/nerve root/plexus injuries incurring during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIF: 15.8%) versus extreme lumbar interbody fusions (XLIF: 23.8%), addressing disc disease, failed back surgery, and spondylolisthesis, were far from acceptable. Conclusions: The incidence of nerve root injuries following any of the multiple MIS lumbar surgical techniques (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) resulted in more nerve root injuries when compared with open conventional lumbar surgical techniques. Considering the majority of these procedures are unnecessarily being performed for degenerative disc disease alone, spine surgeons should be increasingly asked why they are offering these operations to their patients? PMID:26904373

  13. Adult Degenerative Scoliosis with Spinal Stenosis Treated with Stand-Alone Cage via an Extreme Lateral Transpsoas Approach; a Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    von Keudell, Arvind; Alimi, Marjan; Gebhard, Harry; Härtl, Roger

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old female with severe degenerative scoliosis and back and leg pain that was successfully treated with stand- alone cages via an extreme lateral transpsoas approach. This patient had declined open surgery and instrumentation due to her advanced age concerns about potential side effects. PMID:26110180

  14. Epidural injections with or without steroids in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hai; Fei, Qi; Wang, Bingqiang; Yang, Yong; Li, Dong; Li, Jinjun; Su, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidural injections of anesthetic with or without steroids are widely used for treating lumbar spinal stenosis, a common cause of chronic low back pain, but there is a lack of rigorous data comparing the effectiveness of epidural injections of anesthetic with and without steroids. This meta-analysis presents a current, comprehensive picture of how epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids compare with those using local anesthetic alone. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched from their inception through February 5, 2015. Weight mean difference, risk ratio, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. A random effects model or fixed effects model was used to pool the estimates, according to the heterogeneity between the included studies. Results We included 13 randomized controlled trials, involving 1,465 patients. Significant pain relief (≥50%) was demonstrated in 53.7% of patients administered with epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids (group 1) and in 56.4% of those administered with local anesthetic alone (group 2). Patients showed a reduction in numeric rating scale pain score of 3.7 and 3.6 in the two groups, respectively. Significant functional improvement was achieved in 65.2% of patients in group 1 and 63.1% of patients in group 2, with Oswestry Disability Index reductions of 13.8 and 14.5 points, respectively. The overall number of injections per year was 3.2±1.3 and 3.4±1.2 with average total relief per year of 29.3±19.7 and 33.8±19.3 weeks, respectively. The opioid intakes decreased from baseline by 12.4 and 7.8 mg, respectively. Among the outcomes listed, only total relief time differed significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Both epidural injections with steroids or with local anesthetic alone provide significant pain relief and functional improvement in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis, and the inclusion of steroids confers no advantage compared to local anesthetic alone. PMID:26316704

  15. Coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis and spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Özaras, Nihal; Poyraz, Emine; Toprak, Hüseyin; Güler, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Osteopoikilosis is a rare hereditary bone disease that is usually asymptomatic. It is generally diagnosed incidentally on plain radiography. The coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis or spinal stenosis is rarely reported. Here, we report the case of a 27-year-old male patient with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. [Subject] A 27-year-old male patient with buttock pain and back pain radiating to the legs. [Methods] A plain anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis revealed numerous round and oval sclerotic bone areas of varying size. Investigation of the knee joints showed similar findings, and the patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis. Lumbar magnetic resonance images showed spinal stenosis and degenerative changes in his lumbar facet joints. Magnetic resonance images of the sacroiliac joints showed bilateral involvement with narrowing of both sacroiliac joints, nodular multiple sclerotic foci, and contrast enhancement in both joint spaces and periarticular areas. HLA B-27 test was negative. [Results] The patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. Treatment included asemetasin twice daily and exercise therapy. [Conclusion] Symptomatic patients with osteopoikilosis should be investigated for other possible coexisting medical conditions; this will shorten the times to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26157277

  16. Coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis and spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Özaras, Nihal; Poyraz, Emine; Toprak, Hüseyin; Güler, Mustafa

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] Osteopoikilosis is a rare hereditary bone disease that is usually asymptomatic. It is generally diagnosed incidentally on plain radiography. The coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis or spinal stenosis is rarely reported. Here, we report the case of a 27-year-old male patient with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. [Subject] A 27-year-old male patient with buttock pain and back pain radiating to the legs. [Methods] A plain anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis revealed numerous round and oval sclerotic bone areas of varying size. Investigation of the knee joints showed similar findings, and the patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis. Lumbar magnetic resonance images showed spinal stenosis and degenerative changes in his lumbar facet joints. Magnetic resonance images of the sacroiliac joints showed bilateral involvement with narrowing of both sacroiliac joints, nodular multiple sclerotic foci, and contrast enhancement in both joint spaces and periarticular areas. HLA B-27 test was negative. [Results] The patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. Treatment included asemetasin twice daily and exercise therapy. [Conclusion] Symptomatic patients with osteopoikilosis should be investigated for other possible coexisting medical conditions; this will shorten the times to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26157277

  17. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Norwegian version of the spinal stenosis measure.

    PubMed

    Thornes, Elisabeth; Grotle, Margreth

    2008-03-01

    In order to satisfy the need of a tool for assessing the treatment of patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, an evaluation was made of the reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness of the Norwegian version of Spinal Stenosis Measure (SSM, original by Stucki)). This study was a part of a prospective, cohort study. About 75 patients referred for surgery for spinal stenosis participated in the study. A subsample of 30 patients answered the questionnaire twice, test and retest, with at least one week in between. The SSM was translated according to the Guillemin criteria. Reliability was assessed by Bland and Altman's repeatability, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the coefficient of variance (CV). Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Construct validity was analysed by correlation analyses. Responsiveness was calculated by the effect size. The reliability between test and retest scores was good for all three subscales of SSM as the ICC-values were above 0.9 and the CVs were below 15%. Cronbach's alpha was above 0.8. The correlation analyses showed high correlation between scales that assessed the same construct, and low to moderate correlation between scales that assessed different constructs. Large effect sizes were found in all the SSM subscales with effect sizes > or =1.2. The Norwegian SSM version has added a highly useful tool for assessing the disease specific status and outcome after treatment in patients who suffer from degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:18193302

  18. Percutaneous Adhesiolysis Versus Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Chronic Radicular Pain Caused by Lumbar Foraminal Spinal Stenosis: A Retrospective Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongbum; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Jae Ki; Nam, Hee-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of percutaneous adhesiolysis (PA) compared to fluoroscopy (FL)-guided transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) in patients with radicular pain caused by lumbar foraminal spinal stenosis (LFSS) by assessing pain relief and functional improvement at 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure. Methods This retrospective study included 45 patients who underwent PA or FL-guided TFSEI for radicular pain caused by LFSS of at least 3 months' duration. Outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Verbal Numeric Pain Scale (VNS) before the procedure and at 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure. A successful outcome was defined by >50% improvement in the VNS score and >40% improvement in the ODI score. Results ODI and VNS scores improved 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure in both groups. Statistically significant differences between groups were observed in ODI and VNS at 12 weeks (p<0.05). The proportion of patients with successful outcomes was significantly different between the two groups only at the 12-week time point. Conclusion Our study suggests that PA is effective for pain reduction and functional improvement in patients with chronic radicular pain caused by LFSS. Therefore, PA can be considered for patients with previous ineffective responses to conservative treatment. Although PA seems to be more effective than TFEFI according to the results of our study, in order to fully elucidate the difference in effectiveness, a prospective study with a larger sample size is necessary. PMID:26798608

  19. Clinical outcomes and safety assessment in elderly patients undergoing decompressive laminectomy for lumbar spinal stenosis: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To assess safety, risk factors and clinical outcomes in elderly patients with spinal stenosis after decompressive laminectomy. Methods A prospective cohort of patients 70 years and older with spinal stenosis undergoing conventional laminectomy without fusion (n = 101) were consecutively enrolled from regular clinical practice and reassessed at 3 and 12 months. Primary outcome was change in health related quality of life measured (HRQL) with EuroQol-5 D (EQ-5D). Secondary outcomes were safety assessment, changes in Oswestry disability index (ODI), Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-VAS) score for self reported health, VAS score for leg and back pain and patient satisfaction. We used regression analyses to evaluate risk factors for less improvement. Results The mean EQ-5 D total score were 0.32, 0.63 and 0.60 at baseline, 3 months and 12 months respectively, and represents a statistically significant (P < 0.001) improvement. Effect size was > 0.8. Mean ODI score at baseline was 44.2, at 3 months 25.6 and at 27.9. This represents an improvement for all post-operative scores. A total of 18 (18.0%) complications were registered with 6 (6.0%) classified as major, including one perioperative death. Patients stating that the surgery had been beneficial at 3 months was 82 (89.1%) and at 12 months 73 (86.9%). The only predictor found was patients with longer duration of leg pain had less improvement in ODI (P < 0.001). Increased age or having complications did not predict a worse outcome in any of the outcome variables. Conclusions Properly selected patients of 70 years and older can expect a clinical meaningful improvement of HRQL, functional status and pain after open laminectomy without fusion. The treatment seems to be safe. However, patients with longstanding leg-pain prior to operation are less likely to improve one year after surgery. PMID:21092227

  20. Effect of autologous platelet leukocyte rich plasma injections on atrophied lumbar multifidus muscle in low back pain patients with monosegmental degenerative disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Mohamed; Hussein, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lumbar multifidus muscle dysfunction and chronic low back pain are strongly correlated. There is no consensus regarding treatment of chronic LBP. The effect of platelet leukocyte rich plasma (PLRP) injections on atrophied lumbar multifidus (LMF) muscle and chronic low back pain has never been studied before. Patients and methods: One hundred fifteen patients with chronic non-specific LBP fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Patients were treated with weekly PLRP injections for six weeks and followed up for 24 months. Primary outcome measures included Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Secondary outcome measures included Patient Satisfaction Index (PSI), modified MacNab criteria, and lumbar MRI at 12 months follow-up. Results: One hundred and four patients completed the trial. There were no serious complications. NRS significantly improved gradually from a mean of 8.8 ± 8 pre-injection to 3.45 ± 2.9 by 12 months and ODI significantly improved gradually from a mean of 36.7 ± 3.9 to 14.6 ± 12.8 by 12 months (P < 0.005). After reaching maximum improvement between 12 and 18 months, all outcome measures remained stable till the end of the 24 months follow-up period with statistically insignificant changes (P > 0.05). 87.8% (65/74) of the satisfied patients showed increased cross-sectional area and decreased fatty degeneration of LMF muscle on MRI at 12 months follow-up. Conclusion: PLRP injections into atrophied lumbar multifidus muscle represent a safe, effective method for relieving chronic low back pain and disability with long-term patient satisfaction and success rate of 71.2%. We recommend the use of the lumbar PLRP injections of LMF muscle to refine the inclusion criteria of lumbar fusion to avoid failed back syndrome.

  1. Degenerative Changes of Spine in Helicopter Pilots

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Joo Hyeon; Kim, Jung Won; Jeong, Ho Joong; Sim, Young Joo; Kim, Dong Kyu; Choi, Jong Kyoung; Im, Hyoung June

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between whole body vibration (WBV) induced helicopter flights and degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spine. Methods We examined 186 helicopter pilots who were exposed to WBV and 94 military clerical workers at a military hospital. Questionnaires and interviews were completed for 164 of the 186 pilots (response rate, 88.2%) and 88 of the 94 clerical workers (response rate, 93.6%). Radiographic examinations of the cervical and the lumbar spines were performed after obtaining informed consent in both groups. Degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spines were determined using four radiographs per subject, and diagnosed by two independent, blinded radiologists. Results There was no significant difference in general and work-related characteristics except for flight hours and frequency between helicopter pilots and clerical workers. Degenerative changes in the cervical spine were significantly more prevalent in the helicopter pilots compared with control group. In the cervical spine multivariate model, accumulated flight hours (per 100 hours) was associated with degenerative changes. And in the lumbar spine multivariate model, accumulated flight hours (per 100 hours) and age were associated with degenerative changes. Conclusion Accumulated flight hours were associated with degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spines in helicopter pilots. PMID:24236259

  2. Efficacy of post-operative analgesia after posterior lumbar instrumented fusion for degenerative disc disease: a prospective randomized comparison of epidural catheter and intravenous administration of analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Kluba, Torsten; Hofmann, Fabian; Bredanger, Sabine; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Niemeyer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to compare the efficacy of epidural (EDA) versus intravenous (PCA) application of analgesics after lumbar fusion. Fifty-two patients scheduled for elective posterior instrumented lumbar fusion were randomized into two groups. EDA patients received an epidural catheter intraoperatively, and administration of ropivacain and sulfentanil was started after a normal postoperative wake-up test in the recovery room area. PCA patients received intravenous opioids in the post-operative period. Differences between EDA and PCA groups in terms of patient satisfaction with respect to pain relief were not significant. Nevertheless, EDA patients reported less pain on the third day after surgery. There were significantly more side effects in the EDA group, including complete reversible loss of sensory function and motor weakness. There were no major side effects, such as infection or persisting neurological deficits, in either group. The routine use of epidural anesthesia for lumbar spine surgery has too many risks and offers very little advantage over PCA. PMID:21808704

  3. Percutaneous Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (pTLIF) with a Posterolateral Approach for the Treatment of Degenerative Disk Disease: Feasibility and Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Interbody fusion by open discectomy is the usual treatment for degenerative disk disease but requires a relatively long recovery period. The transforaminal posterolateral approach is a well-known standard in endoscopic spine surgery that allows direct access to the disk with progressive tissue dilation. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of percutaneous transforaminal interbody fusion (pTLIF) with insertion of an expandable or a standard rigid interbody implant for patients with degenerative disk disease with or without spondylolisthesis and for revision surgery. Methods Between 2009 and 2014, the pTLIF procedure was performed in 30 patients. Ten patients underwent insertion of a rigid implant (group A) and the remaining 20 underwent insertion of an expandable titanium interbody implant as the initial procedure (n = 10) (group B) or after failed back surgery (n = 10) (group C). Patient outcomes were scored with visual analogic scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and modified Macnab criteria. Results The mean follow-up period was 38 (17) (range 11 to 67) months. The outcome was excellent in 18, good in 10 and fair in 2. No poor results and no major complications were reported. No differences in VAS and ODI scores according to the study group were found. Median postoperative time until hospital discharge was 26 hours (20 to 68 hours). Postoperative values for VAS and ODI scores improved significantly (p<0.05) compared to preoperative data in all study groups. Conclusions These preliminary results have shown the feasibility and efficacy of the pTLIF procedure using a posterolateral approach for the treatment of degenerative disk disease with or without spondylolisthesis up to grade 2 and in revision surgery. No significant differences in outcome were observed between an expandable and a rigid cage. Median postoperative time until hospital discharge was faster compared to standard TLIF (26 hours vs. 9.3 days). PMID:26484004

  4. Two-year clinical outcomes of a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing two interspinous spacers for treatment of moderate lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interspinous spacers are a minimally invasive surgical alternative for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) unresponsive to conservative care. The purpose of this prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial was to compare 2-year clinical outcomes in patients with moderate LSS treated with the Superion® (Experimental) or the X-Stop®, a FDA-approved interspinous spacer (Control). Methods A total of 250 patients with moderate LSS unresponsive to conservative care were randomly allocated to treatment with the Experimental (n = 123) or Control (n = 127) interspinous spacer and followed through 2 years post-treatment. Complication data were available for all patients and patient-reported outcomes were available for 192 patients (101 Experimental, 91 Control) at 2 years. Results Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) Symptom Severity and Physical Function scores improved 34% to 36% in both groups through 2 years (all p < 0.001). Patient Satisfaction scores at 2 years were 1.8 ± 0.9 with Experimental and 1.6 ± 0.8 with Control. Axial pain decreased from 59 ± 26 mm at baseline to 21 ± 26 mm at 2 years with Experimental and from 55 ± 26 mm to 21 ± 25 mm with Control (both p < 0.001). Extremity pain decreased from 67 ± 24 mm to 14 ± 22 mm at 2 years with Experimental and from 63 ± 24 mm to 18 ± 23 mm with Control (both p < 0.001). Back function assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index similarly improved with Experimental (37 ± 12% to 18 ± 16%) and Control (39 ± 12% to 20 ± 16%) (both p < 0.001). Freedom from reoperation at the index level was 84% for Experimental and 83% for Control (log-rank: p = 0.38) at 2 years. Conclusions Both interspinous spacers effectively alleviated pain and improved back function to a similar degree through 2 years in patients with moderate LSS who were unresponsive to conservative care. Trial registration NCT00692276. PMID:24996648

  5. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 3: assessment of economic outcome.

    PubMed

    Ghogawala, Zoher; Whitmore, Robert G; Watters, William C; Sharan, Alok; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dailey, Andrew T; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Eck, Jason C; Groff, Michael W; Wang, Jeffrey C; Resnick, Daniel K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    A comprehensive economic analysis generally involves the calculation of indirect and direct health costs from a societal perspective as opposed to simply reporting costs from a hospital or payer perspective. Hospital charges for a surgical procedure must be converted to cost data when performing a cost-effectiveness analysis. Once cost data has been calculated, quality-adjusted life year data from a surgical treatment are calculated by using a preference-based health-related quality-of-life instrument such as the EQ-5D. A recent cost-utility analysis from a single study has demonstrated the long-term (over an 8-year time period) benefits of circumferential fusions over stand-alone posterolateral fusions. In addition, economic analysis from a single study has found that lumbar fusion for selected patients with low-back pain can be recommended from an economic perspective. Recent economic analysis, from a single study, finds that femoral ring allograft might be more cost-effective compared with a specific titanium cage when performing an anterior lumbar interbody fusion plus posterolateral fusion. PMID:24980580

  6. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 4: radiographic assessment of fusion status.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Tanvir F; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dhall, Sanjay S; Eck, Jason C; Groff, Michael W; Ghogawala, Zoher; Watters, William C; Dailey, Andrew T; Resnick, Daniel K; Sharan, Alok; Wang, Jeffrey C; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    The ability to identify a successful arthrodesis is an essential element in the management of patients undergoing lumbar fusion procedures. The hypothetical gold standard of intraoperative exploration to identify, under direct observation, a solid arthrodesis is an impractical alternative. Therefore, radiographic assessment remains the most viable instrument to evaluate for a successful arthrodesis. Static radiographs, particularly in the presence of instrumentation, are not recommended. In the absence of spinal instrumentation, lack of motion on flexion-extension radiographs is highly suggestive of a successful fusion; however, motion observed at the treated levels does not necessarily predict pseudarthrosis. The degree of motion on dynamic views that would distinguish between a successful arthrodesis and pseudarthrosis has not been clearly defined. Computed tomography with fine-cut axial images and multiplanar views is recommended and appears to be the most sensitive for assessing fusion following instrumented posterolateral and anterior lumbar interbody fusions. For suspected symptomatic pseudarthrosis, a combination of techniques including static and dynamic radiographs as well as CT images is recommended as an option. Lack of facet fusion is considered to be more suggestive of a pseudarthrosis compared with absence of bridging posterolateral bone. Studies exploring additional noninvasive modalities of fusion assessment have demonstrated either poor potential, such as with (99m)Tc bone scans, or provide insufficient information to formulate a definitive recommendation. PMID:24980581

  7. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Correction of Spondylolisthesis and Adult Degenerative Scoliosis in High-Risk Patients: Early Radiographic Results and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Brad; Briski, David; Qadir, Rabah; Godoy, Gustavo; Houston, Allison Howard; Rudman, Ernest; Zavatsky, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is not associated with many of the complications seen in other interbody fusion techniques. This study used computed tomography (CT) scans, the radiographic gold standard, to assess interbody fusion rates achieved utilizing the LLIF technique in high-risk patients. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent LLIF between January 2008 and July 2013. Forty-nine patients underwent nonstaged or staged LLIF on 119 levels with posterior correction and augmentation. Per protocol, patients received CT scans at their 1-year follow-up. Of the 49 patients, 21 patients with LLIF intervention on 54 levels met inclusion criteria. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists and the senior surgeon (JZ) assessed fusion. Results Of the 21 patients, 6 patients had had previous lumbar surgery, and the cohort's comorbidities included osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, and smoking, among others. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (57.1%) patients and included anterior thigh pain and weakness in 6 patients, all of which resolved by 6 months. Two cases of proximal junctional kyphosis occurred, along with 1 case of hardware pullout. Two cases of abdominal atonia occurred. By CT scan assessment, each radiologist found fusion was achieved in 53 of 54 levels (98%). The radiologists' findings were in agreement with the senior surgeon. Conclusion Several studies have evaluated LLIF fusion and reported fusion rates between 88%-96%. Our results demonstrate high fusion rates using this technique, despite multiple comorbidities in the patient population. Spanning the ring apophysis with large LLIF cages along with supplemental posterior pedicle screw augmentation can enhance stability of the fusion segment and increase fusion rates. PMID:24688329

  8. An International Multicenter Study Assessing the Role of Ethnicity on Variation of Lumbar Facet Joint Orientation and the Occurrence of Degenerative Spondylolisthesis in Asia Pacific: A Study from the AOSpine Asia Pacific Research Collaboration Consortium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Richard; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Goss, Ben; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Acharya, Shankar; Kawakami, Mamoru; Satoh, Shigenobu; Chen, Wen-Jer; Park, Chun-Kun; Lee, Chong-Suh; Foocharoen, Thanit; Nagashima, Hideki; Kuh, Sunguk; Zheng, Zhaomin; Condor, Richard; Ito, Manabu; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jeong, Je Hoon; Luk, Keith D K; Prijambodo, Bambang; Rege, Amol; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Luo, Zhuojing; Tassanawipas, Warat; Acharya, Narayana; Pokharel, Rohit; Shen, Yong; Ito, Takui; Zhang, Zhihai; Aithala P, Janardhana; Kumar, Gomatam Vijay; Jabir, Rahyussalim Ahmad; Basu, Saumyajit; Li, Baojun; Moudgil, Vishal; Sham, Phoebe; Samartzis, Dino

    2016-02-01

    Study Design A multinational, multiethnic, cross-sectional image-based study was performed in 33 institutions, representing 10 countries, which were part of the AOSpine Asia Pacific Research Collaboration Consortium. Objective Lumbar facet joint orientation has been reported to be associated with the development of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). The role of ethnicity regarding facet joint orientation remains uncertain. As such, the following study was performed across a wide-ranging population base to assess the role of ethnicity in facet joint orientation in patients with DS in the Asia Pacific region. Methods Lateral standing X-rays and axial magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained for patients with lumbar DS. The DS parameters and facet joint angulations were assessed from L3-S1. Sex, age, body mass index (BMI), and ethnicity were also noted. Results The study included 371 patients with known ethnic origin (mean age: 62.0 years; 64% males, 36% females). The mean BMI was 25.6 kg/m(2). The level of DS was most prevalent at L4-L5 (74.7%). There were 28.8% Indian, 28.6% Japanese, 18.1% Chinese, 8.6% Korean, 6.5% Thai, 4.9% Caucasian, 2.7% Filipino, and 1.9% Malay patients. Variations in facet joint angulations were noted from L3 to S1 and between patients with and without DS (p < 0.05). No differences were noted with regards to sex and overall BMI to facet joint angulations (p > 0.05); however, increasing age was found to increase the degree of angulation throughout the lumbar spine (p < 0.05). Accounting for age and the presence or absence of DS at each level, no statistically significant differences between ethnicity and degree of facet joint angulations from L3-L5 were noted (p > 0.05). Ethnic variations were noted in non-DS L5-S1 facet joint angulations, predominantly between Caucasian, Chinese, and Indian ethnicities (p < 0.05). Conclusions This study is the first to suggest that ethnicity may not play a role in facet joint orientation in the majority of cases of DS in the Asia-Pacific region. Findings from this study may facilitate future comparative studies in other multiethnic populations. An understanding of ethnic variability may assist in identifying those patients at risk of postsurgical development or progression of DS. This study also serves as a model for large-scale multicenter studies across different ethnic groups and cultural boundaries in Asia. PMID:26835200

  9. An International Multicenter Study Assessing the Role of Ethnicity on Variation of Lumbar Facet Joint Orientation and the Occurrence of Degenerative Spondylolisthesis in Asia Pacific: A Study from the AOSpine Asia Pacific Research Collaboration Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richard; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Goss, Ben; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Acharya, Shankar; Kawakami, Mamoru; Satoh, Shigenobu; Chen, Wen-Jer; Park, Chun-Kun; Lee, Chong-Suh; Foocharoen, Thanit; Nagashima, Hideki; Kuh, Sunguk; Zheng, Zhaomin; Condor, Richard; Ito, Manabu; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jeong, Je Hoon; Luk, Keith D. K.; Prijambodo, Bambang; Rege, Amol; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Luo, Zhuojing; Tassanawipas, Warat; Acharya, Narayana; Pokharel, Rohit; Shen, Yong; Ito, Takui; Zhang, Zhihai; Aithala P, Janardhana; Kumar, Gomatam Vijay; Jabir, Rahyussalim Ahmad; Basu, Saumyajit; Li, Baojun; Moudgil, Vishal; Sham, Phoebe; Samartzis, Dino

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A multinational, multiethnic, cross-sectional image-based study was performed in 33 institutions, representing 10 countries, which were part of the AOSpine Asia Pacific Research Collaboration Consortium. Objective Lumbar facet joint orientation has been reported to be associated with the development of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). The role of ethnicity regarding facet joint orientation remains uncertain. As such, the following study was performed across a wide-ranging population base to assess the role of ethnicity in facet joint orientation in patients with DS in the Asia Pacific region. Methods Lateral standing X-rays and axial magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained for patients with lumbar DS. The DS parameters and facet joint angulations were assessed from L3–S1. Sex, age, body mass index (BMI), and ethnicity were also noted. Results The study included 371 patients with known ethnic origin (mean age: 62.0 years; 64% males, 36% females). The mean BMI was 25.6 kg/m2. The level of DS was most prevalent at L4–L5 (74.7%). There were 28.8% Indian, 28.6% Japanese, 18.1% Chinese, 8.6% Korean, 6.5% Thai, 4.9% Caucasian, 2.7% Filipino, and 1.9% Malay patients. Variations in facet joint angulations were noted from L3 to S1 and between patients with and without DS (p < 0.05). No differences were noted with regards to sex and overall BMI to facet joint angulations (p > 0.05); however, increasing age was found to increase the degree of angulation throughout the lumbar spine (p < 0.05). Accounting for age and the presence or absence of DS at each level, no statistically significant differences between ethnicity and degree of facet joint angulations from L3–L5 were noted (p > 0.05). Ethnic variations were noted in non-DS L5–S1 facet joint angulations, predominantly between Caucasian, Chinese, and Indian ethnicities (p < 0.05). Conclusions This study is the first to suggest that ethnicity may not play a role in facet joint orientation in the majority of cases of DS in the Asia-Pacific region. Findings from this study may facilitate future comparative studies in other multiethnic populations. An understanding of ethnic variability may assist in identifying those patients at risk of postsurgical development or progression of DS. This study also serves as a model for large-scale multicenter studies across different ethnic groups and cultural boundaries in Asia. PMID:26835200

  10. Does 360° lumbar spinal fusion improve long-term clinical outcomes after failure of conservative treatment in patients with functionally disabling single-level degenerative lumbar disc disease? Results of 5-year follow-up in 75 postoperative patients

    PubMed Central

    Zigler, Jack E.; Delamarter, Rick B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment of patients with mechanical degenerative disc disease has been controversial, but improvements in clinical outcomes have been shown in properly selected patients with disease-specific diagnoses, with fusion arguably now becoming the “gold standard” for surgical management of these patients. No published study thus far has been designed for prospective enrollment of patients with specific inclusion/exclusion criteria in whom at least 6 months of conservative therapy has failed and who are then offered a standardized surgical procedure and are followed up for 5 years. Methods The study group was composed of the patients in the prospective, randomized Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trial comparing ProDisc-L (Synthes Spine, West Chester, Pennsylvania) with 360° fusion for the treatment of single-level symptomatic disc degeneration. Of 80 patients randomized to 360° fusion after failure of non-operative care, 75 were treated on protocol with single-level fusions. Follow-up of this treatment cohort was 97% at 2 years and 75% at 5 years and serves as the basis for this report. Patients in the trial were required to have failure of at least 6 months of nonoperative care and in fact had failure of an average of 9 months of nonoperative treatment. The mean Oswestry Disability Index score indicated greater than 60% impairment. The mean entry-level pain score on a visual analog scale was greater than 8 of 10. Results After fusion, not only did patients have significant improvements in measurable clinical outcomes such as the Oswestry Disability Index score and pain score on a visual analog scale but there were also substantial improvements in their functional status and quality of life. Specifically, over 80% of patients in this study had improvements in recreational status that was maintained 5 years after index surgery, indicating substantial improvements in life quality that were not afforded by months of conservative care. The percentage of patients using narcotics at the 5-year follow-up visit was less than half the percentage of patients who had used narcotics as part of their prior conservative treatment. Conclusions The 5-year results of this post hoc analysis of 75 patients involved in a multicenter, multi-surgeon trial support 360° fusion surgery as a predictable and lasting treatment option to improve pain and function in properly selected patients with mechanical degenerative disc disease. These improvements occurred dramatically immediately after surgery and have been maintained through the scope of this follow-up period, with 98% follow-up at 2 years and 75% of patients available at 5 years. PMID:25694895

  11. Aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic valve stenosis; Rheumatic aortic stenosis; Calcific aortic stenosis ... As the aortic valve narrows, the left ventricle has to work harder to pump blood out through the valve. To do this extra ...

  12. Quality of life in preoperative patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction is at least as depressed as in other lumbar spinal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cher, Daniel Joseph; Reckling, W Carlton

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain from the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is an under-recognized cause of low back pain. The degree to which SIJ pain decreases quality of life has not been directly compared to other more familiar conditions of the lumbar spine. Methods Multivariate regression analysis of individual patient data from two prospective multicenter clinical trials of SIJ fusion and three prospective multicenter clinical trials of surgical treatments for degenerative lumbar spine conditions. Results Controlling for baseline demographic parameters as well as a validated disability score, quality of life scores (EuroQOL 5-D and SF-36) were, in most cases, lower in the SIJ cohorts compared to the three other spine surgery cohorts. Conclusion Patients with SIJ dysfunction considering surgery have decrements in quality of life as or more severe compared to patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, and intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:26396547

  13. Lumbosacral Plexopathy Caused by Presacral Recurrence of Colon Cancer Mimicking Degenerative Spinal Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Se Yeong; Jeong, Je Hoon; Cha, Jang Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Radiculopathy triggered by degenerative spinal disease is the most common cause of spinal surgery, and the number of affected elderly patients is increasing. Radiating pain that is extraspinal in origin may distract from the surgical decision on how to treat a neurological presentation in the lower extremities. A 54-year-old man with sciatica visited our outpatient clinic. He had undergone laminectomy and discectomy to treat spinal stenosis at another hospital, but his pain remained. Finally, he was diagnosed with a plexopathy caused by late recurrence of colorectal cancer, which compressed the lumbar plexus in the presacral area. This case report illustrates the potential for misdiagnosis of extraspinal plexopathy and the value of obtaining an accurate history. Although the symptoms are similar, spinal surgeons should consider both spinal and extraspinal origins of sciatica. PMID:26217393

  14. Iatrogenic neurologic deficit after lumbar spine surgery: A review.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, George M; Williams, Kim A; Arnold, Paul; Fehlings, Michael; Harrop, James S

    2015-12-01

    Iatrogenic neurologic deficits after lumbar spine surgery are rare complications, but important to recognize and manage. Complications such as radiculopathy, spinal cord compression, motor deficits (i.e. foot drop with L5 radiculopathy), and new onset radiculitis, while uncommon do occur. Attempts at mitigating these complications with the use of neuromonitoring have been successful. Guidance in the literature as to the true rate of iatrogenic neurologic deficit is limited to several case studies and retrospective designed studies describing the management, prevention and treatment of these deficits. The authors review the lumbar spinal surgery literature to examine the incidence of iatrogenic neurologic deficit in the lumbar spinal surgery literature. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 from January 1, 2004 through May 14, 2015, using the following MeSH search terms "postoperative complications," then subterms "lumbar vertebrae," treatment outcome," "spinal fusion," and "radiculopathy" were included together with "postoperative complications" in a single search. Postoperative complications including radiculopathy, weakness, and spinal cord compression were included. The definition of iatrogenic neurologic complication was limited to post-operative radiculopathy, motor weakness or new onset pain/radiculitis. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 using all of the above terms together yielded 21 results. After careful evaluation, 11 manuscripts were excluded and 10 were carefully reviewed. The most common indications for surgery were degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylosis, scoliosis, and lumbar stenosis. In 2783 patients in 12 total studies, there were 56 patients who had reported a postoperative neurologic deficit for a rate of 5.7. The rates of deficits ranged from 0.46% to 17% in the studies used. The average rate of reported neurologic complications within these papers was 9% (range 0.46-24%). Thirty patients of a total of 731 (4.1%) had a new onset neurologic injury after anterior lumber interbody fusion or lateral lumber interbody fusion. Thirty-seven out of 2052 (1.9%) patients had a neurologic injury after posterior decompression and fusion. Screw malposition was responsible for 11 deficits. Spinal surgery for lumbar degenerative disease carries a low but definite rate of neurologic deficits. Despite the introduction of neuromonitoring, these complications still occur. Interpretation of neurologic injury rates for lumbar surgery is limited by the few prospective and cohort-matched controlled studies. Likewise, most injuries were associated with the placement of instrumentation despite the type of approach. PMID:26386902

  15. Evaluation of Decompression and Interlaminar Stabilization Compared with Decompression and Fusion for the Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: 5-year Follow-up of a Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lauryssen, Carl; Davis, Reginald J.; Bae, Hyun W.; Peloza, John H.; Guyer, Richard D.; Zigler, Jack E.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.; Leary, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Introduction If nonoperative treatment for lumbar stenosis fails, surgery may be considered. This traditionally includes decompression often combined with fusion. Desire for less extensive surgery led to developing new techniques and implants, including an interlaminar device designed with the goal of providing segmental stability without fusion, following decompression. The purpose of this study was to investigate 5-year outcomes associated with an interlaminar device. Methods This prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted at 21 centers. Patients with moderate to severe lumbar stenosis at one or two contiguous levels and up to Grade I spondylolisthesis were randomized (2:1 ratio) to decompression and interlaminar stabilization (D+ILS; n=215) using the coflex® Interlaminar Stabilization® device (Paradigm Spine, LLC) or decompression and fusion with pedicle screws (D+PS; n=107). Clinical evaluations were made preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months postoperatively. Overall Food and Drug Administration success criteria required that a patient meet 4 criteria: 1) >15 point improvement in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score; 2) no reoperation, revision, removal, or supplemental fixation; 3) no major device-related complication; and 4) no epidural steroid injection after surgery. Results At 5 years, 50.3% of D+ILS vs. 44% of D+PS patients (p>0.35) met the composite success criteria. Reoperation/revision rates were similar in the two groups (16.3% vs. 17.8%; p >0.90). Both groups had statistically significant improvement through 60 months in ODI scores with 80.6% of D+ILS patients and 73.2% of D+PS patients demonstrating >15 point improvement (p>0.30). VAS, SF-12, and ZCQ scores followed a similar pattern of maintained significant improvement throughout follow-up. On the SF-12 and ZCQ, D+ILS group scores were statistically significantly better during early follow-up compared to D+PS. In the D+ILS group, foraminal height, disc space height, and range of motion at the index level were maintained through 5 years. Conclusion Both treatment groups achieved and maintained statistically significant improvements on multiple outcome assessments throughout 5-year follow-up. On some clinical measures, there were statistically significant differences during early follow-up favoring D+ILS. At no point were there significant differences favoring D+PS. Results of this 5-year follow-up study demonstrate that decompression and interlaminar stabilization with coflex is a viable alternative to traditional decompression and fusion in the treatment of patients with moderate to severe stenosis at one or two lumbar levels. Level of Evidence and Ethical Statements This is a Level I study. Institutional approval was received at each of the sites participating in the trial. Each patient gave informed consent to participate in the trial. PMID:26913226

  16. Lumbar disc replacement: update.

    PubMed

    Heider, F C; Mayer, H M; Siepe, C J

    2015-06-01

    Over the last decades, fusion of lumbar spinal motion segments has represented the mainstay of treatment of lumbar degenerative conditions which failed to respond adequately to conservative therapy. Increasing demands and expectations from patients as well as the necessity to avoid fusion related negative side effects such as adjacent level disc degeneration, considerable complication and reoperation rates, cranial facet joint violations, pseudarthrosis and others led to the development of motion preserving technologies such as total lumbar disc replacement (TDR). The first and rudimentary attempts to preserve motion of lumbar motion segments can be dated back to the early 1950s. Over the past two to three decades, a variety of new implants with different motion characteristics have been developed and introduced into the market. Despite of the extensive knowledge which has been gained in this field of research, insurers in the United States have refused to reimburse surgeons due to fear of late complications and reoperations as well as unknown secondary costs, which led to a global decline in the numbers of TDR procedures. The current literature review intends to provide a concise summary of the adequate indications for TDR as well as outcome determining factors and delineate the role of TDR in the currently available armamentarium for the treatment of low back pain (LBP) resulting from degenerative disc disease (DDD) without instabilities or deformities. PMID:25649068

  17. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    DiPaola, Christian P; Molinari, Robert W

    2008-03-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) create intervertebral fusion by means of a posterior approach. Both techniques are useful in managing degenerative disk disease, severe instability, spondylolisthesis, deformity, and pseudarthrosis. Successful results have been reported with allograft, various cages (for interbody support), autograft, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. Interbody fusion techniques may facilitate reduction and enhance fusion. The rationale for PLIF and TLIF is biomechanically sound. However, clinical outcomes of different anterior and posterior spinal fusion techniques tend to be similar. PLIF has a high complication rate (dural tear, 5.4% to 10%; neurologic injury, 9% to 16%). These findings, coupled with the versatility of TLIF throughout the entire lumbar spine, may make TLIF the ideal choice for an all-posterior interbody fusion. PMID:18316711

  18. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnose spinal stenosis with a physical exam and imaging tests. Treatments include medications, physical therapy, braces, and surgery. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  19. Endoscopic lumbar foraminotomy.

    PubMed

    Evins, Alexander I; Banu, Matei A; Njoku, Innocent; Elowitz, Eric H; Härtl, Roger; Bernado, Antonio; Hofstetter, Christoph P

    2015-04-01

    Foraminal stenosis frequently causes radiculopathy in lumbar degenerative spondylosis. Endoscopic transforaminal techniques allow for foraminal access with minimal tissue disruption. However, the effectiveness of foraminal decompression by endoscopic techniques has yet to be studied. We evaluate radiographic outcome of endoscopic transforaminal foraminotomies performed at L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 on cadaveric specimens. Before and after the procedures, three dimensional CT scans were obtained to measure foraminal height and area. Following the foraminotomies, complete laminectomies and facetectomies were performed to assess for dural tears or nerve root damage. L3-L4 preoperative foraminal height increased by 8.9%, from 2.12±0.13cm to 2.27±0.14cm (p<0.01), and foraminal area increased by 24.8% from 2.21±0.18cm(2) to 2.72±0.19cm(2) (p<0.01). At L4-L5, preoperative foraminal height was 1.87±0.17cm and area was 1.78±0.18cm(2). Endoscopic foraminotomies resulted in a 15.3% increase of foraminal height (2.11±0.15cm, p<0.05) and 44.8% increase in area of (2.51±0.21cm(2), p<0.01). At L5-S1, spondylitic changes caused diminished foraminal height (1.26±0.14cm) and foraminal area (1.17±0.18cm(2)). Postoperatively, foraminal height increased by 41.6% (1.74±0.09cm, p<0.05) and area increased by 98.7% (2.08±0.17cm(2), p<0.01). Subsequent inspection via a standard midline approach revealed one dural tear of an S1 nerve root. Endoscopic foraminotomies allow for effective foraminal decompression, though clinical studies are necessary to further evaluate complications and efficacy. PMID:25744073

  20. Erections on walking as a symptom of spinal canal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, A; Clarke, C; Brindley, G

    1987-01-01

    Two patients reported that on walking they developed tingling and weakness of the legs and penile erections. The symptoms proved to be due to stenosis of the lumbar were canal, and were relieved by operative decompression. Images PMID:3681316

  1. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, combined with instrumented posterolateral fusion: a study of 75 cases.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Kumar; Shah, Kalpesh; Wheelwright, Eugene F

    2008-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with cages can be combined with decompression of the spinal canal and with instrumented posterolateral fusion (IPLF) with pedicle screws, through a single posterior incision. The authors wanted to assess retrospectively the clinical and radiological outcome of PLIF + IPLF performed by the senior author. Between July 1997 and December 2003, 75 patients underwent PLIF with cages and IPLF with transpedicular instrumentation, for either degenerative disc disease, stenosis, spondylolisthesis or post-discectomy syndrome. The clinical outcome was evaluated according to the criteria of Kirkaldy-Willis. Flexion/extension radiographs and CT-scans were obtained in cases where there was any doubt about the fixation/fusion status. The mean age was 48.7 years (range: 30 to 75). The mean duration of follow-up was 29.17 months (range: 12 to 67). The clinical outcome was excellent or good in 85.3% of the patients. There were 4/75 patients (5.3%) who failed to return to their original occupation. Four posterolateral fusions were uncertain, but all anterior fusions succeeded: thus circumferential fusion was obtained in 71 out of 75 cases, or 94.6%. Three patients sustained a neurological complication, but only one was left with a partial drop foot. The results were comparable with similar studies. Therefore the authors recommend further use of PLIF + IPLF in painful lumbar degenerative spinal disease where conservative management has failed. PMID:18564483

  2. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  3. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  4. Cervical Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Epidermal Cysts of the Vulva Skene Duct Cyst Noncancerous Ovarian Growths Polyps of the Cervix Cervical stenosis is ... and Epidermal Cysts of the Vulva Skene Duct Cyst Noncancerous Ovarian Growths Polyps of the Cervix NOTE: This is ...

  5. Treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis: potential impact of dynamic stabilization based on imaging analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lawhorne, Thomas W.; Girardi, Federico P.; Pappou, Iaonnis; Cammisa, Frank P.

    2009-01-01

    Intraspinous and pedicle screw-based (PSB) dynamic instrumentation systems have been in use for a decade now. By direct or indirect decompression, these devices theoretically establish less painful segmental motion by diminishing pathologic motion and unloading painful disks. Ideally, dynamics should address instability in the early stages of degenerative spondylolisthesis before excessive translation occurs. Evidence to date indicates that Grade II or larger slips requiring decompression should be fused. In addition, multiple segment listhesis, severe coronal plane deformities, increasing age, and osteoporosis have all been listed as potential contraindications to dynamic stabilization. We reviewed the exclusion and inclusion criteria found in various dynamic stabilization studies and investigational drug exemption (IDE) protocols. We summarize the reported limitations for both pedicle- and intraspinous-based systems. We then conducted a retrospective chart and imaging review of 100 consecutive cases undergoing fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis. All patients in our cohort had been indicated for and eventually underwent decompression of lumbar stenosis secondary to spondylolisthesis. We estimated how many patients in our population would have been candidates for dynamic stabilization with either interspinous or pedicle-based systems. Using the criteria for instability outlined in the literature, 32 patients demonstrated translation requiring fusion surgery and 24 patients had instability unsuitable for dynamic stabilization. Six patients had two-level slips and were excluded. Two patients had coronal imbalance too great for dynamic systems. Twelve patients were over the age of 80 and 16 demonstrated osteoporosis as diagnosed by bone scan. Finally, we found two of our patients to have vertebral compression fractures adjacent to the site of instrumentation, which is a strict exclusion criteria in all dynamic trials. Thirty-four patients had zero exclusion criteria for intraspinous devices and 23 patients had none for PSB dynamic stabilization. Therefore, we estimate that 34 and 23% of degenerative spondylolisthesis patients indicated for surgery could have been treated with either intraspinous or pedicle-based dynamic devices, respectively. PMID:19330364

  6. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve pulmonary stenosis; Pulmonary stenosis; Stenosis - pulmonary valve; Balloon valvuloplasty - pulmonary ... water pills) Treat abnormal heartbeats and rhythms Percutaneous balloon pulmonary dilation (valvuloplasty) may be performed when no ...

  7. [TREATMENT OF POST-SPONDYLODESIS, ADJACENT-SEGMENT DISEASE WITH MINIMALLY INVASIVE, ANTEROLATERAL SURGERY ON THE LUMBAR SPINE: IS THERE IS NO NEED FOR DORSAL OPERATION?].

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Attila; Szakály, Péter; Büki, András; Dóczi, Tamás

    2015-07-30

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) occurs with a probability of 30% in the lumbar spine following spinal fusion surgery. Usually advanced degenerative changes happen cranially to the fused lumbar segment. Thus, secondary spinal instability, stenosis, spodylolisthesis, foraminal stenosis can lead to the recurrence of the pain not always amenable to conservative measures. A typical surgical solution to treat ASD consists of posterior revision surgery including decompression, change or extension of the instrumentation and fusion to the rostral level. It results in a larger operation with considerable risk of complications. We present a typical case of ASD treated surgically with a new minimally invasive method not yet performed in Hungary. We use anterolateral abdominal muscle splitting approach to reach the lumbar spine through the retroperitoneum. A discectomy is performed by retracting the psoas muscle dorsally. The intervertebral bony fusion is achieved by implanting a cage with large volume that is stuffed with autologous bone or tricalcium phosphate. A cage with large volume results in excellent annulus fibrosus tension, immediate stability and provides large surface for bony fusion. A stand-alone cage construct can be supplemented with lateral screw/rod/plate fixation. The advantage of the new technique for the treatment of ASD includes minimal blood loss, short operation time, significantly less postoperative pain and much lower complication rate. PMID:26380422

  8. [Diagnostic value of saccoradiculography and scanner in lumbar stenoses].

    PubMed

    Arrault, I; Benoist, M; Rocolle, J; Busson, J; Lassale, B; Deburge, A

    1987-10-01

    Radiculographic X-rays and CAT scans of 60 patients operated on for stenosis of the lumbar canal were analyzed separately and retrospectively by rheumatologists, a radiologist and surgeons working jointly, without knowledge of findings revealed by surgery. Comparison of findings with a detailed surgical report reveals that in the case of central lumbar canal stenosis, CAT scan provides a higher degree of reliability (72%) in diagnosis than does radiculography (56%). With lateral stenosis of the lateral cleft, reliability of both tests is identical (62%). The diagnostic deficiencies of these two examinations are discussed as well as diagnostic criteria employed and possible avenues of research. Currently, in the case of stenosis of the lumbar canal, it is still necessary to perform both of these examinations in combination and to accept the fact that, in certain cases, only one of the two tests reveals the stenosis, to be able to attain a preoperative rate of correct diagnosis greater than 80%. PMID:3423708

  9. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  10. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  11. [Lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Teiblum, Sandra Sofie; Hjørne, Flemming Pii; Bisgaard, Thue

    2010-03-22

    Lumbar hernia is a rare condition. Lumbar hernia should be considered a rare differential diagnosis to unexplained back pain. Symptoms are scarce and diffuse and can vary with the size and content of the hernia. As there is a 25% risk of incarceration, operation is indicated even in asymptomatic hernias. We report a case of lumbar hernia in a woman with a slow growing mass in the lumbar region. She presented with pain and a computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. She underwent open surgery and fully recovered with recurrence within the first half year. PMID:20334799

  12. Surgical Treatment of Adult Degenerative Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Tae; Shin, Sang-hyun; Suk, Se-Il

    2014-01-01

    The rapid increase of elderly population has resulted in increased prevalence of adult scoliosis. Adult scoliosis is divided into adult idiopathic scoliosis and adult degenerative scoliosis. These two types of scoliosis vary in patient age, curve pattern and clinical symptoms, which necessitate different surgical indications and options. Back pain and deformity are major indications for surgery in adult idiopathic scoliosis, whereas radiating pain to the legs due to foraminal stenosis is what often requires surgery in adult degenerative scoliosis. When selecting a surgical method, major symptoms and underlying medical diseases should be carefully evaluated, not only to relieve symptoms but also to minimize postoperative complications. Surgical options for adult degenerative scoliosis include: decompression alone; decompression and limited short fusion; and decompression coupled with long fusion and correction of deformity. Decompression and limited short fusion can be applied to patients with a small Cobb's angle and normal sagittal imbalance. For those with a large Cobb's angle and positive sagittal imbalance, long fusion with correction of deformity is required. When long fusion is applied, a careful decision regarding the extent of fusion level should be made when selecting L5 or S1 as the distal fusion level and T10 or the thoracolumbar junction as the proximal fusion level. For the fusion extending to the sacrum, restoration of sagittal balance and rigid fixation with additional iliac screws should be considered. Any surgical procedures for adult degenerative scoliosis are known to have relatively high occurrences of complications; therefore, risks and benefits should be meticulously considered before selecting a surgical procedure. PMID:24967054

  13. Adult Degenerative Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Graham, Randall B; Sugrue, Patrick A; Koski, Tyler R

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis begins in the outpatient setting when evaluating a patient both radiographically. Assessing the flexibility of the deformity is essential in determining what techniques will be required to achieve the goals of correction. Ultimately the surgeon's comfort and experience and the patient's medical risk stratification determine the strategy needed to address either a focal pathology or ultimate deformity correction. PMID:26945131

  14. Degenerative Spinal Deformity.

    PubMed

    Ailon, Tamir; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Lenke, Lawrence G; Brodke, Darrel; Harrop, James S; Fehlings, Michael; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-10-01

    Degenerative spinal deformity afflicts a significant portion of the elderly and is increasing in prevalence. Recent evidence has revealed sagittal plane malalignment to be a key driver of pain and disability in this population and has led to a significant shift toward a more evidence-based management paradigm. In this narrative review, we review the recent literature on the epidemiology, evaluation, management, and outcomes of degenerative adult spinal deformity (ASD). ASD is increasing in prevalence in North America due to an aging population and demographic shifts. It results from cumulative degenerative changes focused in the intervertebral discs and facet joints that occur asymmetrically to produce deformity. Deformity correction focuses on restoration of global alignment, especially in the sagittal plane, and decompression of the neural elements. General realignment goals have been established, including sagittal vertical axis <50 mm, pelvic tilt <22°, and lumbopelvic mismatch <±9°; however, these should be tailored to the patient. Operative management, in carefully selected patients, yields satisfactory outcomes that appear to be superior to nonoperative strategies. ASD is characterized by malalignment in the sagittal and/or coronal plane and, in adults, presents with pain and disability. Nonoperative management is recommended for patients with mild, nonprogressive symptoms; however, evidence of its efficacy is limited. Surgery aims to restore global spinal alignment, decompress neural elements, and achieve fusion with minimal complications. The surgical approach should balance the desired correction with the increased risk of more aggressive maneuvers. In well-selected patients, surgery yields excellent outcomes. PMID:26378361

  15. The lumbar spine in Neanderthals shows natural kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, Carsten Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, lumbar spondylosis is one of the most frequent causes of lower back pain. In order to improve our understanding of the lumbar spine anatomy and functionality over time, we compared the lumbar vertebrae of Neanderthals with those of anatomically modern humans. The fossil record reports on only two Neanderthal skeletons (i.e., Kebara 2 and Shanidar 3, both predating the appearance of modern humans) with full preservation of the entire lumbar spine. Examination of these early hominids showed that they display natural lumbar kyphosis, with only mild degenerative changes of the lumbar spine (ages at death: 30–35 years, Kebara 2; and 35–50 years, Shanidar 3). This finding is highly unexpected since Neanderthals are known to have had extraordinary physical activity due to demanding living conditions. The adult lumbar spines discussed here therefore show no correlation between high physical activity and degenerative spine disease as known from recent times. We speculate that both the kyphosis itself and the massive and heavily muscled skeleton of Neanderthals are causative for the minimal bone degeneration. We conclude that a kyphotic lumbar spine is the natural anatomy in these two Neanderthal individuals. Future research will reveal if this holds true for the entire Neanderthal species.

  16. Older literature review of increased risk of adjacent segment degeneration with instrumented lumbar fusions

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following lumbar spine surgery occurs in up to 30% of cases, and descriptions of such changes are not new. Here, we review some of the older literature concerning the rate of ASD, typically more severe cephalad than caudad, and highly correlated with instrumented fusions. Therefore, for degenerative lumbar disease without frank instability, ASD would be markedly reduced by avoiding instrumented fusions. Methods: In a prior review, the newer literature regarding the frequency of ASD following lumbar instrumented fusions (e.g., transforaminal or posterior lumbar interbody fusions [TLIF/PLIF] fusions or occasionally, posterolateral fusions [PLFs]) was presented. Some studies cited an up to an 18.5% incidence of ASD following instrumented versus noninstrumented fusions/decompressions alone (5.6%). A review of the older literature similarly documents a higher rate of ASD following instrumented fusions performed for degenerative lumbar disease alone. Results: More frequent and more severe ASD follows instrumented lumbar fusions performed for degenerative lumbar disease without instability. Alternatively, this entity should be treated with decompressions alone or with noninstrumented fusions, without the addition of instrumentation. Conclusions: Too many studies assume that TLIF, PLIF, and even PLF instrumented fusions are the “gold standard of care” for dealing with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine without documented instability. It is time to correct that assumption, and reassess the older literature along with the new to confirm that decompression alone and noninstrumented fusion avoid significant morbidity and even potentially mortality attributed to unnecessary instrumentation. PMID:26904370

  17. Classification of degenerative arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, N. S.; Cruess, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the former division of degenerative arthritis into idiopathic types and those secondary to some disease process is no longer valid. Recent studies have indicated that abnormal concentrations of force on cartilage lead to the development of this disease. A classification is presented that is based on the assumption that the process is initiated by abnormal concentrations of force on normal cartilage matrix, normal concentrations of force on abnormal cartilage matrix or normal concentrations of force on normal cartilage matrix that is supported by bone of abnormal consistency. PMID:907947

  18. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis Updated:May 25,2016 About Valve Stenosis ... This content was last reviewed May 2016. Heart Valve Problems and Disease • Home • About Heart Valves • Heart ...

  19. Lumbar spine: pretest predictability of CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, D.J.; Thomas, R.J.; Osborn, A.G.; Clayton, P.D.; Miller, M.H.; Bahr, A.L.; Frederick, P.R.; O'Connor, G.D.; Ostler, D.

    1984-03-01

    Demographic and symptomatic data gathered from 460 patients referred for lumbosacral CT examinations were analyzed to determine if the prescan probability of normal or abnormal findings could be predicted accurately. The authors were unable to predict the presence of herniated disk on the basis of patient-supplied data alone. Age was the single most significant predictor of an abnormality and was sharply related to degenerative disease and spinal stenosis.

  20. Radiculopathy in the setting of lumbar nerve root compression due to an extradural intraforaminal lipoma: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Loriaux, Daniel B; Adogwa, Owoicho; Gottfried, Oren N

    2015-07-01

    A true adult spinal lipoma is an exceedingly rare cause of lumbar compression neuropathy. Only 5 cases of true extradural intraforaminal lipomas have been documented in the medical literature. The diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines for this specific lipoma have yet to be established. This report features 3 histologically confirmed cases of extradural intraforaminal spinal lipomas that recently presented to the authors' practice. In addition, the literature was surveyed to include the 5 previously reported cases of true adult extradural intraforaminal spinal lipomas. The consistency in presentation, response to surgical intervention, and postoperative recovery in these 8 cases supports surgical intervention at the time of diagnosis. The authors' findings support elevated clinical suspicion, efficient diagnosis based on MRI, and early surgical intervention for this rare pathological entity. All cases presented in this report were symptomatic and occurred in the absence of other significant pathologies such as general spinal epidural lipomatosis, intradural lesions, tethering, or severe degenerative stenosis or herniated discs. The clinical, neuroradiological, and histological findings characteristic of a true adult extradural intraforaminal lipoma are emphasized to differentiate this lesion from the more common etiologies for lumbar compression neuropathy. Heightened awareness and clinical suspicion for the focal, foraminal spinal lipoma as a cause of radiculopathy symptoms will enable more efficient diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25840038

  1. Endoscopic inter laminar management of lumbar disease

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Kher, Yatin; Bhatele, Pushp Raj

    2016-01-01

    Discectomy for lumbar disc provides faster relief in acute attack than does conservative management. Long-term results of open, microscopy-, and endoscopy-assisted discectomy are same. Early results of endoscopy-assisted surgery are better as compared to that of open surgery in terms of better visualization, smaller incision, reduced hospital stay, better education, lower cost, less pain, early return to work, and rehabilitation. Although microscopic discectomy also has comparable advantages, endoscopic-assisted technique better addresses opposite side pathology. Inter laminar technique (ILT) and trans foraminal technique (TFT) are two main endoscopic approaches for lumbar pathologies. Endoscopy-assisted ILT can be performed in recurrent, migrated, and calcified discs. All lumbar levels including L5-S1 level, intracanalicular, foraminal disc, lumbar canal and lateral recess stenosis, multiple levels, and bilateral lesions can be managed by ILT. Migrated, calcified discs, L5-S1 pathology, lumbar canal, and lateral recess stenosis can be better approached by ILT than by TFT. Most spinal surgeons are familiar with anatomy of ILT. It can be safely performed in foramen stenosis and in uncooperative and anxious patients. There is less risk of exiting nerve root damage, especially in short pedicles and in presence of facet osteophytes as compared to TFT. On the other hand, ILT is more invasive than TFT with more chances of perforations of the dura matter, pseudomeningocele formation, and cerebrospinal fluid fistula in early learning curve. Obtaining microsurgical experience, attending workshops, and suitable patient selection can help shorten the learning curve. Once adequate skill is acquired, this procedure is safe and effective. The surgeon must be prepared to convert to an open procedure, especially in early learning curve. Spinal endoscopy is likely to achieve more roles in future. Endoscopy-assisted ILT is a safer alternative to the microscopic technique. PMID:26889271

  2. Endoscopic inter laminar management of lumbar disease.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Kher, Yatin; Bhatele, Pushp Raj

    2016-01-01

    Discectomy for lumbar disc provides faster relief in acute attack than does conservative management. Long-term results of open, microscopy-, and endoscopy-assisted discectomy are same. Early results of endoscopy-assisted surgery are better as compared to that of open surgery in terms of better visualization, smaller incision, reduced hospital stay, better education, lower cost, less pain, early return to work, and rehabilitation. Although microscopic discectomy also has comparable advantages, endoscopic-assisted technique better addresses opposite side pathology. Inter laminar technique (ILT) and trans foraminal technique (TFT) are two main endoscopic approaches for lumbar pathologies. Endoscopy-assisted ILT can be performed in recurrent, migrated, and calcified discs. All lumbar levels including L5-S1 level, intracanalicular, foraminal disc, lumbar canal and lateral recess stenosis, multiple levels, and bilateral lesions can be managed by ILT. Migrated, calcified discs, L5-S1 pathology, lumbar canal, and lateral recess stenosis can be better approached by ILT than by TFT. Most spinal surgeons are familiar with anatomy of ILT. It can be safely performed in foramen stenosis and in uncooperative and anxious patients. There is less risk of exiting nerve root damage, especially in short pedicles and in presence of facet osteophytes as compared to TFT. On the other hand, ILT is more invasive than TFT with more chances of perforations of the dura matter, pseudomeningocele formation, and cerebrospinal fluid fistula in early learning curve. Obtaining microsurgical experience, attending workshops, and suitable patient selection can help shorten the learning curve. Once adequate skill is acquired, this procedure is safe and effective. The surgeon must be prepared to convert to an open procedure, especially in early learning curve. Spinal endoscopy is likely to achieve more roles in future. Endoscopy-assisted ILT is a safer alternative to the microscopic technique. PMID:26889271

  3. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... Saunders; 2015:chap 128. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  4. A conceptual model of compensation/decompensation in lumbar segmental instability.

    PubMed

    Barz, T; Melloh, M; Lord, S J; Kasch, R; Merk, H R; Staub, L P

    2014-09-01

    Lumbar spinal instability (LSI) is a common spinal disorder and can be associated with substantial disability. The concept of defining clinically relevant classifications of disease or 'target condition' is used in diagnostic research. Applying this concept to LSI we hypothesize that a set of clinical and radiological criteria can be developed to identify patients with this target condition who are at high risk of 'irreversible' decompensated LSI for whom surgery becomes the treatment of choice. In LSI, structural deterioration of the lumbar disc initiates a degenerative cascade of segmental instability. Over time, radiographic signs become visible: traction spurs, facet joint degeneration, misalignment, stenosis, olisthesis and de novo scoliosis. Ligaments, joint capsules, local and distant musculature are the functional elements of the lumbar motion segment. Influenced by non-functional factors, these functional elements allow a compensation of degeneration of the motion segment. Compensation may happen on each step of the degenerative cascade but cannot reverse it. However, compensation of LSI may lead to an alleviation or resolution of clinical symptoms. In return, the target condition of decompensation of LSI may cause the new occurrence of symptoms and pain. Functional compensation and decompensation are subject to numerous factors that can change which makes estimation of an individual's long-term prognosis difficult. Compensation and decompensation may influence radiographic signs of degeneration, e.g. the degree of misalignment and segmental angulation caused by LSI is influenced by the tonus of the local musculature. This conceptual model of compensation/decompensation may help solve the debate on functional and psychosocial factors that influence low back pain and to establish a new definition of non-specific low back pain. Individual differences of identical structural disorders could be explained by compensated or decompensated LSI leading to changes in clinical symptoms and pain. Future spine surgery will have to carefully define and measure functional aspects of LSI, e.g. to identify a point of no return where multidisciplinary interventions do not allow a re-compensation and surgery becomes the treatment of choice. PMID:25001025

  5. Degenerative disease of the spine.

    PubMed

    Gallucci, Massimo; Limbucci, Nicola; Paonessa, Amalia; Splendiani, Alessandra

    2007-02-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a definition that includes a wide spectrum of degenerative abnormalities. Degeneration involves bony structures and the intervertebral disk, although many aspects of spine degeneration are strictly linked because the main common pathogenic factor is identified in chronic overload. During life the spine undergoes continuous changes as a response to physiologic axial load. These age-related changes are similar to pathologic degenerative changes and are a common asymptomatic finding in adults and elderly persons. A mild degree of degenerative changes is paraphysiologic and should be considered pathologic only if abnormalities determine symptoms. Imaging allows complete evaluation of static and dynamic factors related to degenerative disease of the spine and is useful in diagnosing the different aspects of spine degeneration. PMID:17493541

  6. Preliminary study showing safety/efficacy of nanoss bioactive versus vitoss as bone graft expanders for lumbar noninstrumented fusions

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The lateral fusion mass for multilevel lumbar laminectomies with noninstrumented posterolateral fusions now often utilizes lamina autograft and bone marrow aspirate (BMA) mixed with one of two bone graft expanders: either Vitoss (Orthovita, Malvern, PA, USA) or NanOss Bioactive (Regeneration Technologies Corporation: RTI, Alachua, FL, USA). Methods: Here, we compared two sequential prospective the times to fusion, fusion rates, complications, and infection rates for two prospective cohorts of patients utilizing either Vitoss (first 213 patients) or NanOss (subsequent 45 patients) respectively, undergoing multilevel lumbar laminectomies (average 4.6 vs. 4.5 levels) with noninstrumented fusions (average 1.3 vs. 1.2 levels). Surgery addressed stenosis/ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL) (all patients), with subsets exhibiting degenerative spondylolisthesis synovial cysts, and disc disease. Fusion was documented by two independent neuroradiologists blinded to the study design, utilizing dynamic X-rays and two dimensional computed tomography (2D-CT) studies up to 6 months postoperatively, and up to 1 year where indicated. Results: Comparison of patients receiving Vitoss versus NanOss as bone graft expanders revealed nearly comparable; times to fusion (5.3 months vs. 4.8 months), fusion rates (210 [98.6%] vs. 45 [100%] patients), pseudarthroses (3 [1.4%] vs. 0), postoperative seromas (2 [0.94%] vs. 0), and deep wound infections (2 [0.94%] vs. 0). Conclusion: In this preliminary study of patients undergoing multilevel lumbar lamienctomies with posterolateral noninstrumented fusions, results were nearly comparable utilizing Vitoss or NanOss as bone graft expanders. Although the number of NanOss patients was substantially lower, the comparable efficacy and absence of postoperative complications for noninstrumented fusions is promising. PMID:26167369

  7. [Microsurgery of canalicular stenosis].

    PubMed

    Serra, F

    2005-04-01

    The microsurgical treatment of canalicular stenosis is indicated in localized stenosis. The goal is to restore lacrymal mucosa continuity in order to re-establish spontaneous lacrymal drainage. Stenosis located close to the puncti can be reached by the direct approach, those close to the lacrymal sac require an approach via the common canaliculus. The surgical indications and techniques are developed, with particular attention given to common canaliculus repair and the new surgical approach to reach it. PMID:15973206

  8. Lumbar Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kirkham B

    2016-04-01

    When a patient presents with spine problems, the spine surgeon would do well to avoid use of, reliance on, and acceptance of radiographs as the sole or primary source of information. Measurement of pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis, although crucial, does not take into account the effort the patient must make to move, the level of involvement of other parts of the body, and the history of previous procedures and outcomes. Radiographs may show pathology that is not consistent with the appearance of the patient. How should we assess this situation? PMID:27015064

  9. Clinical applications of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar foraminal nerve root entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Ohtori, Seiji; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Munetaka; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Arai, Gen; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Masuda, Yoshitada; Ochi, Shigehiro; Kikawa, Takashi; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Toyone, Tomoaki; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can provide valuable structural information about tissues that may be useful for clinical applications in evaluating lumbar foraminal nerve root entrapment. Our purpose was to visualize the lumbar nerve root and to analyze its morphology, and to measure its apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in healthy volunteers and patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis using 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging. Fourteen patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis and 14 healthy volunteers were studied. Regions of interest were placed at the fourth and fifth lumbar root at dorsal root ganglia and distal spinal nerves (at L4 and L5) and the first sacral root and distal spinal nerve (S1) on DWI to quantify mean ADC values. The anatomic parameters of the spinal nerve roots can also be determined by neurography. In patients, mean ADC values were significantly higher in entrapped roots and distal spinal nerve than in intact ones. Neurography also showed abnormalities such as nerve indentation, swelling and running transversely in their course through the foramen. In all patients, leg pain was ameliorated after selective decompression (n = 9) or nerve block (n = 5). We demonstrated the first use of DWI and neurography of human lumbar nerves to visualize and quantitatively evaluate lumbar nerve entrapment with foraminal stenosis. We believe that DWI is a potential tool for diagnosis of lumbar nerve entrapment. PMID:20632042

  10. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy - early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Takeda, Masaaki; Itoh, Yasunobu; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We report our early clinical experience with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in the lumbar spine. We introduced PELD to our clinical practice in June 2009. A total of 311 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were treated in our hospital up to August 2011. Thirty-seven patients with lumbar HNP were treated by PELD. PELD was carried out under local anesthesia, and the endoscope was continuously irrigated with saline. Twenty-eight patients were treated through the transforaminal approach, 5 were treated through the interlaminar approach, and 4 were treated through the extraforaminal approach. Surgery was discontinued due to uncontrollable intraoperative pain or anatomical inaccessibility in one case of the interlaminar approach and 2 cases of the extraforaminal approach. In the other 34 patients, the elapsed time of surgery was 34 to 103 minutes (mean 62.4 minutes). Extracorporeal blood loss was insignificant. Immediate symptom relief was achieved in all patients, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed sufficient removal of the HNP. The length of the postoperative hospital stay was 1 or 2 days in all patients. The surgical method of PELD is completely different from percutaneous nucleotomy, and the aim is to directly remove the HNP with minimum damage to the musculoskeletal structure. Although this study is based on our early clinical outcomes, PELD seemed to be a promising minimally invasive surgery for HNP in the lumbar spine. PMID:23006872

  11. Adjacent level disease following lumbar spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instrumented lumbar spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Multiple studies have explored the various risk factors contributing to ASD that include; fusion length (especially, three or more levels), sagittal malalignment, facet injury, advanced age, and prior cephalad degenerative disease. Methods: In this selective review of ASD, following predominantly instrumented fusions for lumbar degenerative disease, patients typically underwent open versus minimally invasive surgery (MIS), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (TLIFs), posterior lumbar interbody fusions (PLIFs), or rarely posterolateral lumbar instrumented or noninstrumented fusions (posterolateral lumbar fusion). Results: The incidence of ASD, following open or MI lumbar instrumented fusions, ranged up to 30%; notably, the addition of instrumentation in different series did not correlate with improved outcomes. Alternatively, in one series, at 164 postoperative months, noninstrumented lumbar fusions reduced the incidence of ASD to 5.6% versus 18.5% for ASD performed with instrumentation. Of interest, dynamic instrumented/stabilization techniques did not protect patients from ASD. Furthermore, in a series of 513 MIS TLIF, there was a 15.6% incidence of perioperative complications that included; a 5.1% frequency of durotomy and a 2.3% instrumentation failure rate. Conclusions: The incidence of postoperative ASD (up to 30%) is greater following either open or MIS instrumented lumbar fusions (e.g., TLIF/PLIF), while decompressions with noninstrumented fusions led to a much smaller 5.6% risk of ASD. Other findings included: MIS instrumented fusions contributed to higher perioperative complication rates, and dynamic stabilization did not protect against ASD. PMID:26693387

  12. Endoscopic Foraminal Decompression Preceding Oblique Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion To Decrease The Incidence Of Post Operative Dysaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Katzell, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumbar interbody fusion has become a well established method to diminish axial back pain as well as radiculopathy in patients with degenerative disc disease, stenosis, and instability. The concept of indirect decompression of the neural foramen and spinal canal while performing fusion became popular in the mid 1990’s with description of ALIF techniques. Morphometric analysis confirmed the extent of decompression of posterior elements with interbody height restoration. In an attempt to diminish potential complications associated with anterior or posterior approaches to the spine for interbody fusion, and with the hope of accomplishing fusion in a less invasive manner, lateral lumbar interbody fusion has become quite popular. This transpsoas approach to the disc space has been associated with a high incidence of neurologic complications. Even though this is the first technique to routinely recommend EMG monitoring to increase safety in the approach, neurologic injuries still occur. A newer oblique lateral lumbar interbody (OLLIF) approach has recently been described to lessen the incidence of neurologic injury. This technique also advocates use of EMG testing to lessen neurologic trauma. In spite of this precaution, neurologic insult has not been eliminated. In fact, even in patients whose electrical stimulation thresholds suggested a safe entry space into the disc, transient dysaesthesia continues to occur in 20-25 percent of cases. Purpose This pilot study reflects data and observations of a subset of patients treated with endoscopic foraminotomy preceding oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion (OLLIF) to assess specifically potential improvements in dysaesthesia rates. Methods A select subset of patients undergoing OLLIF failed to meet electrodiagnostic criteria for safe disc access through Kambin’s triangle. These patients underwent an endoscopic foraminotomy and exiting nerve decompression prior to discectomy, endplate preparation and cage insertion. Results Dysaesthesia did not occur in these patients whom otherwise would have likely been at risk for neurologic deficit. Conclusions These findings suggest that patients at risk for neurologic insult during oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion can be protected by foraminoplasty. PMID:25694923

  13. Increasing Incidence of Degenerative Spinal Diseases in Japan during 25 Years: The Registration System of Spinal Surgery in Tohoku University Spine Society.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Toshimi; Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kusakabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuhisa; Hoshikawa, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Ko; Kanno, Haruo; Morozumi, Naoki; Koizumi, Yutaka; Sato, Tetsuro; Hyodo, Hironori; Kasama, Fumio; Ogawa, Shinji; Murakami, Eiichi; Kawahara, Chikashi; Yahata, Jun-Ichiro; Ishii, Yushin; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Spinal disorders affect mainly older people and cause pain, paralysis and/or deformities of the trunk and/or extremities, which could eventually disturb locomotive functions. For ensuring safe and high-quality treatment of spinal disorders, in 1987, the Tohoku University Spine Society (TUSS) was established by orthopedic departments in Tohoku University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals in and around Miyagi Prefecture. All spine surgeries have been enrolled in the TUSS Spine Registry since 1988. Using the data from this registration system between 1988 and 2012, we demonstrate here the longitudinal changes in surgical trends for spinal disorders in Japan that has rushed into the most advanced "aging society" in the world. In total, data on 56,744 surgeries were retrieved. The number of spinal surgeries has annually increased approximately 4-fold. There was a particular increase among patients aged ≥ 70 years and those aged ≥ 80 years, with a 20- to 90-fold increase. Nearly 90% of the spinal operations were performed for degenerative disorders, with their number increasing approximately 5-fold from 705 to 3,448. The most common disease for surgery was lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) (35.9%), followed by lumbar disc herniation (27.7%) and cervical myelopathy (19.8%). In 2012, approximately half of the patients with LSS and cervical myelopathy were ≥ 70 years of age. In conclusion, the number of spinal operations markedly increased during the 25-year period, particularly among older patients. As Japan has a notably aged population, the present study could provide a near-future model for countries with aging population. PMID:26876801

  14. Spinal stenosis presenting as "the postpolio syndrome". Review of four cases.

    PubMed

    LaBan, M M; Sanitate, S S; Taylor, R S

    1993-12-01

    The diagnosis of postpolio syndrome is based primarily on a thorough history supported by both clinical and laboratory examination. Similarly, the presence of an occult spinal stenosis may be suspected initially by a history of progressive lumbar or cervical radicular pain, as well as concomitant extremity weakness and/or myelopathic signs. Appropriate electrodiagnostic examinations, including somatosensory spinal-evoked potentials and electroneuromyography, as well as imaging studies, computer-assisted tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging and/or myelography are all useful in confirming the clinical diagnosis of either cervical spinal stenosis or lumbar spinal stenosis in patients who also may have had a history of poliomyelitis. Four patients (three men and one woman) previously diagnosed as having postpolio syndrome were referred with predominate complaints of spinal and extremity pain as well as associated motor weakness. It was subsequently recognized that these patients, ranging in age from 45-65 yr, were actually presenting with symptomatic spinal stenosis. It was discovered that two patients had cervical spinal stenosis; the other two had lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:8260134

  15. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G.; Norvell, Daniel C.; Anderson, Paul A.; Hart, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives (1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ≥3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of reoperation in the fusion group compared with lumbar TDR, although this risk decreased to 1.1 at 5-year follow-up. However, given the lack of quality and consistency in the methods of recording and reporting of AEs, we are unable to make a clear recommendation of one treatment over the other. Conclusions Based on the currently available literature, lumbar TDR appears to be comparable in safety to lumbar fusion. However, due to lack of consistency in reporting of AEs, it is difficult to make conclusions regarding the true safety profile of lumbar TDR. Standardization in AE reporting will significantly improve the reliability of the current literature. PMID:26682099

  16. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G; Norvell, Daniel C; Anderson, Paul A; Hart, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives (1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ≥3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of reoperation in the fusion group compared with lumbar TDR, although this risk decreased to 1.1 at 5-year follow-up. However, given the lack of quality and consistency in the methods of recording and reporting of AEs, we are unable to make a clear recommendation of one treatment over the other. Conclusions Based on the currently available literature, lumbar TDR appears to be comparable in safety to lumbar fusion. However, due to lack of consistency in reporting of AEs, it is difficult to make conclusions regarding the true safety profile of lumbar TDR. Standardization in AE reporting will significantly improve the reliability of the current literature. PMID:26682099

  17. Comparative analysis of serum proteomes of degenerative scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong; Han, Shijie; Zhao, Hong; Liang, Jinqian; Zhai, Jiliang; Wu, Zhihong; Qiu, Guixing

    2011-12-01

    Degenerative scoliosis (DS) is an important degenerative lumbar disease causing spinal dysfunction and affecting the quality of life of the elderly, and is associated not only with severe back or leg pain but also with complicated surgical outcomes. The pathogenesis of DS is still unknown. Therefore, it is very important to ascertain the etiology of degenerative scoliosis and establish related molecular markers predicting and controlling the scoliosis. For the first time, we used two-dimensional fluorescence DIGE to compare the serum proteome profiles of 12 DS patients and controls. Proteins found to be differentially expressed were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis, coupled with database interrogation. Eleven spots that were differentially expressed in the sera of DS patients were found, and eight gene products were identified among these spots. Clusterin, CLU cDNA FLJ57622, ALB cDNA FLJ50830, Hypothetical short protein, HLA-A MHC class 1 antigen. (Fragment), ALB 23 kDa protein, Isoform 1 of G protein-regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1 (GPRIN I)and Ficolin-3 were down-regulated in the sera of DS patients. The decreased levels of Clusterin and Ficolin-3 were confirmed by Western blot. The information obtained with this proteomic analysis will be very useful in understanding the pathophysiology of DS as well as in finding candidates as drug targets of DS. These results may provide a novel approach for the pathogenesis study of DS. PMID:21647955

  18. Spine imaging after lumbar disc replacement: pitfalls and current recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Yohan; Sandén, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Background Most lumbar artificial discs are still composed of stainless steel alloys, which prevents adequate postoperative diagnostic imaging of the operated region when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thus patients with postoperative radicular symptoms or claudication after stainless steel implants often require alternative diagnostic procedures. Methods Possible complications of lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) are reviewed from the available literature and imaging recommendations given with regard to implant type. Two illustrative cases are presented in figures. Results Access-related complications, infections, implant wear, loosening or fracture, polyethylene inlay dislodgement, facet joint hypertrophy, central stenosis, and ankylosis of the operated segment can be visualised both in titanium and stainless steel implants, but require different imaging modalities due to magnetic artifacts in MRI. Conclusion Alternative radiographic procedures should be considered when evaluating patients following TDR. Postoperative complications following lumbar TDR including spinal stenosis causing radiculopathy and implant loosening can be visualised by myelography and radionucleotide techniques as an adjunct to plain film radiographs. Even in the presence of massive stainless steel TDR implants lumbar radicular stenosis and implant loosening can be visualised if myelography and radionuclide techniques are applied. PMID:19619332

  19. What Is Spinal Stenosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... To order the Sports Injuries Handout on Health full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ... publication. To order the Spinal Stenosis Q&A full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ...

  20. Infundibulopelvic stenosis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Lucaya, J.; Enriquez, G.; Delgado, R.; Castellote, A.

    1984-03-01

    Of 11,500 children who underwent excretory urography during a 17-year period, three were found to have the rare renal malformation infundibulopelvic stenosis, characterized by caliceal dilatation, infundibular stenosis, and hypoplasia or stenosis of the renal pelvis. The contralateral kidney was absent in two cases and normal in the other. Voiding cystourethrograms were normal in all three. Renal sonography showed a variable degree of caliceal dilatation without associated pelvic dilatation. The diagnosis was confirmed by retrograde ureteropyelography in one case. Two patients were followed for 12 and 18 months, respectively; both remained asymptomatic with normal renal function, and sequential sonographic examinations of their kidneys have shown no significant changes. The third patient died of an unrelated condition. Infundibulopelvic stenosis has highly characteristic radiographic features, and prognosis is good for most affected patients.

  1. Taking it to the next level: lumbar radiculopathy from thoracic nerve schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Ukaigwe, Anene; Olugbodi, Akintomi; Alweis, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve and its branches, the common fibular and tibial nerves, causes sciatica which is a common syndrome characterized most often by radiating pain from the lower back down the legs and also manifesting as sensory and motor deficits. Sciatica is a common presentation of lumbosacral disc prolapse and degenerative disease of the lumbar spine in ambulatory settings. Schwannomas rarely cause sciatica; hence, it is seldom considered in evaluation of a patient with radiculopathy. Our patient presented with lumbar radiculopathy, mild degenerative changes on lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, and failed conservative treatment. Myelopathy was confirmed with electromyogram (EMG). Thoracolumbar spine MRI revealed the schwannoma in the thoracic region. He recovered neurologic function after tumor excision. This case highlights the diagnostic challenge that may arise in evaluating a patient with lumbar radiculopathy, negative lumbosacral spine imaging, and failure of conservative therapy. PMID:25656663

  2. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gstoettner, Michaela; Michaela, Gstoettner; Heider, Denise; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael; Bach, Christian Michael; Michael, Bach Christian

    2008-11-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  3. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Michaela, Gstoettner; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  4. Current status of bone graft options for anterior interbody fusion of the cervical and lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Chau, Anthony Minh Tien; Xu, Lileane Liang; Wong, Johnny Ho-Yin; Mobbs, Ralph Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) are common surgical procedures for degenerative disc disease of the cervical and lumbar spine. Over the years, many bone graft options have been developed and investigated aimed at complimenting or substituting autograft bone, the traditional fusion substrate. Here, we summarise the historical context, biological basis and current best evidence for these bone graft options in ACDF and ALIF. PMID:23743981

  5. A contrast-enhancing lumbar ligamentum flavum haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghent, Finn; Ye, Xuan; Yan, Max; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of lower back pain with lumbar nerve compromise due to a ligamentum flavum haematoma which was successfully treated surgically. A 62-year-old man was evaluated for lower back pain with associated leg pain and early signs of cauda equina syndrome. MRI of the lumbar spine demonstrated a contrast-enhancing mass adjacent to the lamina of L3 which was causing severe canal stenosis. Surgical excision of the lesion was recommended. The patient underwent an L3 laminectomy with excision of the epidural lesion. Histopathology showed it to be a haematoma of the ligamentum flavum with no untoward features. The patient recovered without complication. PMID:24642178

  6. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25992955

  7. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-05-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression.

  8. Characteristics of lumbar scoliosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although a substantial percentage of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience low back pain, the characteristics of lumbar spine pathology in RA patients has been poorly investigated. In our institutions, lumbar spine radiographs indicated scoliosis in 26 patients. The present study aimed to clarify the characteristics of lumbar scoliosis in RA patients. Methods This is a retrospective study of 26 RA patients with lumbar scoliosis. Patient characteristics such as disease duration, disease stage and class according to Steinbrocker's classification, and medication for RA and osteoporosis were reviewed. Radiologic evaluation of scoliosis was performed at two different time points by measuring Cobb angles. The progression of scoliosis per year was calculated by dividing the change in Cobb angles by the number of years. Apical vertebral rotation, lateral listhesis, and the level of the intercrestal line at the first observation were also measured. The correlation between different factors and changes in the Cobb angles per year was analyzed. Results Majority of the patients had a long disease duration and were classified as stage 3 or 4 according to Steinbrocker's classification. During the observation period, most patients were treated with glucocorticoids. Unlike the previous studies on degenerative scoliosis, apical vertebral rotation, lateral listhesis, and the level of the intercrestal line at initial observation were not significantly related to the progression of scoliosis. Initial Cobb angles were inversely related to the progression of scoliosis. Patients who were treated with bisphosphonates showed slower progression of scoliosis. Conclusions Our results indicate that the characteristics of lumbar scoliosis in RA patients differ from those of degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Bone fragility due to the long disease duration, poor control of disease activity, and osteoporosis is possibly related to its progression. PMID:24767138

  9. Surgical treatment of low lumbar osteoporotic vertebral collapse: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Uchida, Kenzo; Honjoh, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Takumi; Kitade, Makoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Low lumbar osteoporotic vertebral collapse (OVC) has not been well documented compared with OVC of the thoracolumbar spine. The differences between low lumbar and thoracolumbar lesions should be studied to provide better treatment. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical and imaging features as well as outcomes of low lumbar OVC and to discuss the appropriate surgical treatment. METHODS Thirty patients (10 men; 20 women; mean age 79.3 ± 4.7 years [range 70-88 years]) with low lumbar OVC affecting levels below L-3 underwent surgical treatment. The clinical symptoms, morphological features of affected vertebra, sagittal spinopelvic alignment, neurological status before and after surgery, and surgical procedures were reviewed at a mean follow-up period of 2.4 years. RESULTS The main clinical symptom was radicular leg pain. Most patients had old compression fractures at the thoracolumbar level. The affected vertebra was flat-type and concave or H-shaped type, not wedge type as often found in thoracolumbar OVC. There were mismatches between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis on plain radiographs. On CT and MR images, foraminal stenosis was seen in 18 patients (60%) and canal stenosis in 24 patients (80%). Decompression with short fusion using a posterior approach was performed. Augmentations of vertebroplasty, posterolateral fusion, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion were performed based on the presence/absence of local kyphosis of lumbar spine, cleft formation, and/or intervertebral instability. Although the neurological and visual analog scale scores improved postoperatively, 8 patients (26.7%) developed postoperative complications mainly related to instrumentation failure. In patients with postoperative complications, lumbar spine bone mineral density was significantly low, but the spinopelvic alignment showed no correlation when compared with those without complications. CONCLUSIONS The main types of low lumbar OVC were flat-type and concave type, which resulted in neurological symptoms by retropulsed bony fragments generating foraminal stenosis and/or canal stenosis. For patients with low lumbar OVC, decompression of the foraminal and canal stenosis with short fusion surgery via posterior approach can improve neurological symptoms. Since these patients are elderly with poor bone quality and other complications, treatments for both OVC and osteoporosis should be provided to achieve good clinical outcome. PMID:26384132

  10. Comparing Miniopen and Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Interbody Fusion in Single-Level Lumbar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wei-Lun; Lin, Chien-Min; Yeh, Yi-Shian; Tseng, Yuan-Yun; Yang, Shun-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine, which are common among elderly people, cause back pain and radicular symptoms and lead to a poor quality of life. Lumbar spinal fusion is a standardized and widely accepted surgical procedure used for treating degenerative lumbar diseases; however, the classical posterior approach used in this procedure is recognized to cause vascular and neurologic damage of the lumbar muscles. Various studies have suggested that using the minimally invasive transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF) technique provides long-term clinical outcomes comparable to those of open TLIF approaches in selected patients. In this study, we compared the perioperative and short-term advantages of miniopen, MI, and open TLIF. Compared with open TLIF, MI-TLIF and miniopen TLIF were associated with less blood loss, shorter hospital stays, and longer operative times; however, following the use of these procedures, no difference in quality of life was measured at 6 months or 1 year. Whether miniopen TLIF or MI-TLIF can replace traditional TLIF as the surgery of choice for treating degenerative lumbar deformity remains unclear, and additional studies are required for validating the safety and efficiency of these procedures. PMID:25629037

  11. [Nursing Care of Lumbar Spine Fusion Surgery Using a Semi-Rigid Device (ISOBAR)].

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Shan; Su, Shu-Fen

    2016-04-01

    Aging frequently induces degenerative changes in the spine. Patients who suffer from lumbar degenerative disease tend to have lower back pain, neurological claudication, and neuropathy. Furthermore, incontinence may be an increasing issue as symptoms become severe. Lumbar spine fusion surgery is necessary if clinical symptoms continue to worsen or if the patient fails to respond to medication, physical therapy, or alternative treatments. However, this surgical procedure frequently induces adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is evidenced by the appearance of pathological changes in the upper and lower sections of the spinal surgical sites. In 1997, ISOBAR TTL dynamic rod stabilization was developed for application in spinal fusion surgery to prevent ASD-related complications. The device has proven effective in reducing pain in the lower back and legs, decreasing functional disability, improving quality of life, and retarding disc degeneration. However, the effectiveness of this intervention in decreasing the incidence of ASD requires further research investigation, and relevant literature and research in Taiwan is still lacking. This article discusses lumbar degenerative disease, its indications, the contraindications of lumbar spine fusion surgery using ISOBAR, and related postoperative nursing care. We hope this article provides proper and new knowledge to clinical nurses for the care of patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion surgery with ISOBAR. PMID:27026564

  12. Involvement of Immune Cell Network in Aortic Valve Stenosis: Communication between Valvular Interstitial Cells and Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a heart disease prevalent in the elderly characterized by valvular calcification, fibrosis, and inflammation, but its exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Previously, aortic valve stenosis was thought to be caused by chronic passive and degenerative changes associated with aging. However, recent studies have demonstrated that atherosclerotic processes and inflammation can induce valvular calcification and bone deposition, leading to valvular stenosis. In particular, the most abundant cell type in cardiac valves, valvular interstitial cells, can differentiate into myofibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells, leading to valvular calcification and stenosis. Differentiation of valvular interstitial cells can be trigged by inflammatory stimuli from several immune cell types, including macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, B cells, and mast cells. This review indicates that crosstalk between immune cells and valvular interstitial cells plays an important role in the development of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:26937229

  13. Involvement of Immune Cell Network in Aortic Valve Stenosis: Communication between Valvular Interstitial Cells and Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Choi, Jae-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a heart disease prevalent in the elderly characterized by valvular calcification, fibrosis, and inflammation, but its exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Previously, aortic valve stenosis was thought to be caused by chronic passive and degenerative changes associated with aging. However, recent studies have demonstrated that atherosclerotic processes and inflammation can induce valvular calcification and bone deposition, leading to valvular stenosis. In particular, the most abundant cell type in cardiac valves, valvular interstitial cells, can differentiate into myofibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells, leading to valvular calcification and stenosis. Differentiation of valvular interstitial cells can be trigged by inflammatory stimuli from several immune cell types, including macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, B cells, and mast cells. This review indicates that crosstalk between immune cells and valvular interstitial cells plays an important role in the development of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:26937229

  14. Ligamentum flavum cyst in the lumbar spine: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bareksei, Y.; Albanna, W.; Schirmer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Degenerative changes in the lumbar spine can be followed by cystic changes. Most reported intraspinal cysts are ganglion or synovial cysts. Ligamentum flavum pseudocyst, as a cystic lesion in the lumbar spine, is a rare and unusual cause of neurologic signs and symptoms and is usually seen in elderly persons (due to degenerative changes). They are preferentially located in the lower lumbar region, while cervical localization is rare. Complete removal of the cyst leads to excellent results and seems to preclude recurrence. We report the case of a right-sided ligamentum flavum cyst occurring at L3L4 level in a 70-year-old woman, which was surgically removed with excellent postoperative results and complete resolution of symptoms. In addition, we discuss and review reports in the literature. PMID:20582448

  15. Motor Neuron Diseases Accompanying Spinal Stenosis: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Shin, HyeonJu; Park, Sun Kyung; HaeJin, Suh; Choi, Yun Suk

    2016-03-01

    A 75-year-old man, who was healthy, visited the hospital because of shooting pain and numbness in both lower limbs (right > left). The patient had an L4/5 moderate right foraminal stenosis and right subarticular disc protrusion and received a lumbar epidural block. The patient experienced severe weakness in the right lower limb after 2 days. Lumbar and cervical magnetic resonance images were taken and electromyography and a nerve conduction study were performed to arrive at the diagnosis of a motor neuron disease. The patient expired 4 months later with respiratory failure due to motor neuron disease. This case suggests that any abnormal neurological symptoms that occur after an epidural block should be examined thoroughly via testing and consultations to identify the cause of the symptoms. PMID:27008301

  16. Surgical treatment of anal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Vanella, Serafino; Cadeddu, Federica; Marniga, Gaia; Mazzeo, Pasquale; Brandara, Francesco; Maria, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Anal stenosis is a rare but serious complication of anorectal surgery, most commonly seen after hemorrhoidectomy. Anal stenosis represents a technical challenge in terms of surgical management. A Medline search of studies relevant to the management of anal stenosis was undertaken. The etiology, pathophysiology and classification of anal stenosis were reviewed. An overview of surgical and non-surgical therapeutic options was developed. Ninety percent of anal stenosis is caused by overzealous hemorrhoidectomy. Treatment, both medical and surgical, should be modulated based on stenosis severity. Mild stenosis can be managed conservatively with stool softeners or fiber supplements. Sphincterotomy may be quite adequate for a patient with a mild degree of narrowing. For more severe stenosis, a formal anoplasty should be performed to treat the loss of anal canal tissue. Anal stenosis may be anatomic or functional. Anal stricture is most often a preventable complication. Many techniques have been used for the treatment of anal stenosis with variable healing rates. It is extremely difficult to interpret the results of the various anaplastic procedures described in the literature as prospective trials have not been performed. However, almost any approach will at least improve patient symptoms. PMID:19399922

  17. Biomechanics of Degenerative Spinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Justin A; Jakoi, Andre M; Singla, Anuj

    2016-04-01

    The spine has several important functions including load transmission, permission of limited motion, and protection of the spinal cord. The vertebrae form functional spinal units, which represent the smallest segment that has characteristics of the entire spinal column. Discs and paired facet joints within each functional unit form a three-joint complex between which loads are transmitted. Surrounding the spinal motion segment are ligaments, composed of elastin and collagen, and joint capsules which restrict motion to within normal limits. Ligaments have variable strengths and act via different lever arm lengths to contribute to spinal stability. As a consequence of the longer moment arm from the spinous process to the instantaneous axis of rotation, inherently weaker ligaments (interspinous and supraspinous) are able to provide resistance to excessive flexion. Degenerative processes of the spine are a normal result of aging and occur on a spectrum. During the second decade of life, the intervertebral disc demonstrates histologic evidence of nucleus pulposus degradation caused by reduced end plate blood supply. As disc height decreases, the functional unit is capable of an increased range of axial rotation which subjects the posterior facet capsules to greater mechanical loads. A concurrent change in load transmission across the end plates and translation of the instantaneous axis of rotation further increase the degenerative processes at adjacent structures. The behavior of the functional unit is impacted by these processes and is reflected by changes in the stress-strain relationship. Back pain and other clinical symptoms may occur as a result of the biomechanical alterations of degeneration. PMID:27114783

  18. Biomechanics of Degenerative Spinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Justin A.; Jakoi, Andre M.

    2016-01-01

    The spine has several important functions including load transmission, permission of limited motion, and protection of the spinal cord. The vertebrae form functional spinal units, which represent the smallest segment that has characteristics of the entire spinal column. Discs and paired facet joints within each functional unit form a three-joint complex between which loads are transmitted. Surrounding the spinal motion segment are ligaments, composed of elastin and collagen, and joint capsules which restrict motion to within normal limits. Ligaments have variable strengths and act via different lever arm lengths to contribute to spinal stability. As a consequence of the longer moment arm from the spinous process to the instantaneous axis of rotation, inherently weaker ligaments (interspinous and supraspinous) are able to provide resistance to excessive flexion. Degenerative processes of the spine are a normal result of aging and occur on a spectrum. During the second decade of life, the intervertebral disc demonstrates histologic evidence of nucleus pulposus degradation caused by reduced end plate blood supply. As disc height decreases, the functional unit is capable of an increased range of axial rotation which subjects the posterior facet capsules to greater mechanical loads. A concurrent change in load transmission across the end plates and translation of the instantaneous axis of rotation further increase the degenerative processes at adjacent structures. The behavior of the functional unit is impacted by these processes and is reflected by changes in the stress-strain relationship. Back pain and other clinical symptoms may occur as a result of the biomechanical alterations of degeneration. PMID:27114783

  19. Anatomic basis of minimal anterior extraperitoneal approach to the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Lazennec, J Y; Pouzet, B; Ramare, S; Mora, N; Hansen, S; Trabelsi, R; Guérin-Surville, H; Saillant, G

    1999-01-01

    Anterior lumbar spine approaches may be indicated for fusion in degenerative lumbar spine disorders or to fill discal and bone gaps after fracture reduction. We present an anterior extraperitoneal approach applicable to any discal and vertebral levels from T12 to S1. The anatomic study, based on 25 cadavers, highlights retroperitoneal dissection principles for easy kidney and duodenopancreatic mobilisation and direct left anterior access to the entire lumbar spine. We established a precise description of the lumbar veins and the anastomoses between the left renal vein and hemiazygos system, in order to define different topographic and anatomic factors related to safe and easily reproducible approaches for cage or graft implementation. Independent of the level and previous intraperitoneal surgery, lumbar spine access with this approach safeguards the kidney, ureter, spleen, hypogastric plexus and duodenopancreatic system. Regarding operating time, blood-loss and possibilities for freshening and grafting, this technique seems an effective counterbalance to the difficulties and complex technology of endoscopic approaches. The clinical study includes our first 42 cases in traumatic and degenerative lesions. Avoiding the neurologic or hemorrhagic risk inherent in classical posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) techniques, it can be considered as a reasonable and valid alternative. This technique could be used in the near future for mini invasive discal prosthesis insertion. PMID:10370987

  20. Clinical outcomes of single-level lumbar artificial disc replacement compared with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Ting; Liu, Gabriel; Thambiah, Joseph; Wong, Hee Kit

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this study was to examine the clinical outcome of single-level lumbar artificial disc replacement (ADR) compared to that of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative disc disease (DDD) in an Asian population. METHODS This was a retrospective review of 74 patients who had surgery performed for discogenic lower backs that involved only the L4/5 and L5/S1 levels. All the patients had lumbar DDD without radiculopathy or spondylolithesis, and concordant pain with discogram at the pathological level. The patients were divided into two groups – those who underwent ADR and those who underwent TLIF. RESULTS A trend suggesting that the ADR group had better perioperative outcomes (less blood loss, shorter operating time, shorter hospital stay and shorter time to ambulation) than the TLIF group was observed. However, a trend indicating that surgical-approach-related complications occurred more frequently in the ADR group than the TLIF group was also observed. The rate of revision surgery was comparable between the two groups. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that for the treatment of discogenic lower back pain, lumbar ADR has better perioperative outcomes and a similar revision rate when compared with TLIF. However, the use of ADR was associated with a higher incidence of surgical-approach-related complications. More studies with bigger cohort sizes and longer follow-up periods are needed to determine the long-term efficacy and safety of ADR in lumbar DDD. PMID:25917472

  1. Lumbar artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Flügel, P C; Henschke, S; Peck, W; Neumann, F-J; Zeller, T

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of lumbar artery aneurysm. We report the case of a 54-years-old male patient who was misdiagnosed over years having a chronic infrarenal aortic aneurysm. A 64-slice CT at our institution revealed a large lumbar artery aneurysm. The conclusion of this case report is that a lumbar or accessory renal artery aneurysm has to be taken into consideration if there is a localized enlargement of the lower abdominal aorta and a high resolution CT-scan is strongly recommended to make the exact diagnosis. PMID:19229807

  2. [Diagnosis and differential therapy of mitral stenosis].

    PubMed

    Fassbender, D; Schmidt, H K; Seggewiss, H; Mannebach, H; Bogunovic, N

    1998-11-01

    Clinical symptoms and diagnostic findings in patients with mitral stenosis are usually determined by the extent of the stenosis. Compared to a normal mitral valve area (MVA) of > 4 cm2, MVA in patients with severe mitral stenosis is usually reduced to < 1.5 cm2. In older patients symptoms are frequently influenced by concomitant diseases (e.g. atrial fibrillation, arterial hypertension or lung disease). An important diagnostic element besides anamnesis, auscultation, ECG and chest X-ray is echocardiography, which is required in order to measure non-invasively and reliably the mitral valve gradient (MVG), the MVA and morphologic changes to the valves, as well as concomitant valvular disease, ventricular functions and, where appropriate, left-atrial thrombi. In addition to the surgical treatment of patients with severe mitral stenosis, which has been an established procedure for 50 years, percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty (MVP) has recently established itself as an alternative option. At the current time, the Inoue technique seems to display the most advantages. Following transseptal puncture, the Inoue balloon is guided transvenously into the left atrium and then into the left ventricle using a special support wire. The balloon is short and soft. Its special unfolding character enables it to be placed securely in the mitral valve without any risk of ventricular perforation (Figure 1). As with surgical commissurotomy, balloon valvuloplasty leads to a separation of fused commissures. This results in a significant reduction of MVG, accompanied by an increase in the MVA (Figure 2). The results and success of MVP are influenced by the morphology of the valves and the changes to the subvalvular apparatus. In randomized studies, the results of surgical commissurotomy were comparable with those of balloon mitral valvulotomy. In our hospital, an increase in MVA from 1.0 to 1.8 cm2 could be achieved in 899 patients (mean age 56 +/- 3 years). In younger patients with less significantly changed valves, the results were correspondingly more favorable than in older patients (Figure 3). Provided valve morphology is suitable, a relapse following previous surgical commissurotomy is not a contraindication for MVP. The MVP complication rate is very low in skilled hands: mortality is below 1%; mitral insufficiency occurs in 3 to 10% of interventions; we observed a severe mitral insufficiency in 5% of our patient group. Thromboembolic complications may be prevented after exclusion of atrial thrombi by transesophageal echocardiography. The occurrence of a hemodynamically significant atrial septum defect is a very rare event. The mid-term results (5 to 10 years) and the low restenosis rate following MVP in patients with suitable valves are comparable with those of surgical commissurotomy. In older patients with considerably changed, calcified and fibrotic valves, restenosis may be expected within 1 to 5 years. In these patients MVP represents no more than a palliative intervention in order to prolong the point of surgery, for example in patients where a concomitant aortic valve disease in itself is not yet an indication for surgery. Special indications are to be found in young patients with severe mitral stenosis yet few symptoms, in pregnant females and in emergency situations, as well as in patients with Grade II mitral stenosis with intermittent atrial fibrillation. Catheter therapy is much less invasive than surgery. In case of failure the patient still has the option of surgical therapy. Patients with morphologically significantly altered valves usually receive a valve replacement since an unsuccessful reconstruction would lead to a second operation within a very short time interval. Contraindications for MVP are thrombi in the left atrium, a previously existing > Grade II mitral regurgitation and marked, degenerative destruction of the subvalvular apparatus or extensive calcification of the valves. MVP thus represents a significant addi PMID:9859036

  3. Lumbar pseudarthrosis: a review of current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chun, Danielle S; Baker, Kevin C; Hsu, Wellington K

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Failed solid bony fusion, or pseudarthrosis, is a well-known complication of lumbar arthrodesis. Recent advances in radiographic technology, biologics, instrumentation, surgical technique, and understanding of the local biology have all aided in the prevention and treatment of pseudarthrosis. Here, the current literature on the diagnosis and management of lumbar pseudarthroses is reviewed. METHODS A systematic literature review was conducted using the MEDLINE and Embase databases in order to search for the current radiographie diagnosis and surgical treatment methods published in the literature (1985 to present). Inclusion criteria included: 1) published in English; 2) level of evidence I-III; 3) diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spine conditions and/or history of lumbar spine fusion surgery; and 4) comparative studies of 2 different surgical techniques or comparative studies of imaging modality versus surgical exploration. RESULTS Seven studies met the inclusion criteria for current radiographie imaging used to diagnose lumbar pseudarthrosis. Plain radiographs and thin-cut CT scans were the most common method for radiographie diagnosis. PET has been shown to be a valid imaging modality for monitoring in vivo active bone formation. Eight studies compared the surgical techniques for managing and preventing failed lumbar fusion. The success rates for the treatment of pseudarthrosis are enhanced with the use of rigid instrumentation. CONCLUSIONS Spinal fusion rates have improved secondary to advances in biologies, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and understanding of local biology. Treatment of lumbar pseudarthrosis includes a variety of surgical options such as replacing loose instrumentation, use of more potent biologies, and interbody fusion techniques. Prevention and recognition are important tenets in the algorithm for the management of spinal pseudarthrosis. PMID:26424334

  4. No publication bias in industry funded clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine.

    PubMed

    Son, Colin; Tavakoli, Samon; Bartanusz, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    Industry sponsorship of clinical research of degenerative diseases of the spine has been associated with excessive positive published results as compared to research carried out without industry funding. We sought the rates of publication of clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine based on funding source as a possible explanation for this phenomenon. We reviewed all clinical trials registered at clinicaltrials.gov relating to degenerative diseases of the spine as categorized under six medical subject heading terms (spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, spondylolysis, spondylosis, failed back surgery syndrome, intervertebral disc degeneration) and with statuses of completed or terminated. These collected studies were categorized as having, or not having, industry funding. Published results for these studies were then sought within the clinicaltrials.gov database itself, PubMed and Google Scholar. One hundred sixty-one clinical trials met these criteria. One hundred nineteen of these trials had industry funding and 42 did not. Of those with industry funding, 45 (37.8%) had identifiable results. Of those without industry funding, 17 (40.5%) had identifiable results. There was no difference in the rates of publication of results from clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine no matter the funding source. PMID:26545332

  5. Subglottic tracheal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Venuta, Federico; Rendina, Erino Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Benign subglottic stenosis represents a major therapeutic challenge. Interventional bronchoscopic treatment has a limited role in this setting due to anatomical and technical reasons. The benefit with these techniques is generally temporary, due to frequent recurrences, need for repeated procedures and risk of extending the area of damage. Laryngotracheal resection is at present the curative treatment of choice. Literature data show that surgical treatment may allow very high success rates at long term with low perioperative morbidity and mortality. Technical aspects and results are reported and discussed. PMID:26981264

  6. End Plate Disproportion and Degenerative Disc Disease: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Poureisa, Masoud; Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein; Mesbahi, Sepideh; Hagigi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case-control. Purpose To determine whether a disproportion between two neighboring vertebral end plates is associated with degenerative disc disease. Overview of Literature Recently, it has been suggested that disproportion of the end plates of two adjacent vertebrae may increase the risk of disc herniation. Methods Magnetic resonance (MR) images (n=160) with evidence of grades I-II lumbar degenerative disc disease (modified Pfirrmann's classification) and normal MR images of the lumbar region (n=160) were reviewed. On midsagittal sections, the difference of anteroposterior diameter of upper and lower end plates neighboring a degenerated (in the case group) or normal (in the control group) intervertebral disc was calculated (difference of end plates [DEP]). Results Mean DEP was significantly higher in the case group at the L5-S1 level (2.73±0.23 mm vs. 2.21±0.12 mm, p=0.03). Differences were not statistically significant at L1-L2 (1.31±0.13 mm in the cases vs. 1.28±0.08 mm in the controls, p=0.78), L2-L3 (1.45±0.12 mm in the cases vs. 1.37±0.08 mm in the controls, p=0.58), L3-L4 (1.52±0.13 mm in the cases vs. 1.49±0.10 mm in the controls, p=0.88), and L4-L5 (2.15±0.21 mm in the cases vs. 2.04±0.20 mm in the controls, p=0.31) levels. The difference at the L5-S1 level did not remain significant after adjusting for body mass index (BMI), which was significantly higher in the patients. Conclusions End plate disproportion may be a significant, BMI-dependent risk factor for lumbar degenerative disc disease. PMID:25187856

  7. Paraplegia after epidural-general anesthesia in a Morquio patient with moderate thoracic spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Krane, Elliot J.; Tomatsu, Shunji; Theroux, Mary C.; Lee, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We describe an instance in which complete paraplegia was evident immediately postoperatively after apparently uneventful lumbar epidural-general anesthesia in a patient with Morquio Type A syndrome (Morquio A) with moderate thoracic spinal stenosis. Clinical features A 16-yr-old male with Morquio A received lumbar epidural-general anesthesia for bilateral distal femoral osteotomies. Preoperative imaging had revealed a stable cervical spine and moderate thoracic spinal stenosis with a mild degree of spinal cord compression. Systolic blood pressure (BP) was maintained within 20% of the pre-anesthetic baseline value. The patient sustained a severe thoracic spinal cord infarction. The epidural anesthetic contributed to considerable delay in the recognition of the diagnosis of paraplegia. Conclusion This experience leads us to suggest that, in patients with Morquio A, it may be prudent to avoid the use of epidural anesthesia without very firm indication, to support BP at or near baseline levels in the presence of even moderate spinal stenosis, and to avoid flexion or extension of the spinal column in intraoperative positioning. If the spinal cord/column status is unknown or if the patient is known to have any degree of spinal stenosis, we suggest that the same rigorous BP support practices that are typically applied in other patients with severe spinal stenosis, especially stenosis with myelomalacia, should apply to patients with Morquio A and that spinal cord neurophysiological monitoring should be employed. In the event that cord imaging is not available, e.g., emergency procedures, it would be prudent to assume the presence of spinal stenosis. PMID:25323122

  8. The Use of Chymopapain in Degenerative Disc Disease: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Dennis S.; Macnab, Ian

    1970-01-01

    On the basis of the early results of the use of intradiscal injection of chymopapain in 15 patients with degenerative lumbar disc disease, the following statements are warranted: The injection can be beneficial in selected patients with lumbar disc disease. The relief of leg symptoms seems to be more striking than that of the accompanying low back symptoms although both are apparent. The exact mechanism by which pain is relieved is still obscure, but helpful information has been obtained from the early results of this investigation. The failure of chymopapain in carefully selected patients has resulted in only a brief time delay in operative intervention. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10 PMID:5445694

  9. Comparison of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion in Monosegmental Vacuum Phenomenon within an Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    An, Ki-Chan; Kong, Gyu-Min; Park, Dae-Hyun; Youn, Ji-Hong; Lee, Woon-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of posterolateral lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc. Overview of Literature The vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc is a serious form of degenerative disease that destabilizes the intervertebral body. Outcomes of PLIF and PLF in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon are unclear. Methods Monosegmental instrumented PLIF and PLF was performed on 84 degenerative lumbar disease patients with monosegmental vacuum phenomenon (PLIF, n=38; PLF, n=46). Minimum follow-up was 24 months. Clinical outcomes of leg and back pain were assessed using visual analogue scales for leg pain (LVAS) and back pain (BVAS), and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). The radiographic outcome was the estimated bony union rate. Results LVAS, BVAS, and ODI improved in both groups. There was no significant difference in the degree of these improvements between PLIF and PLF patients (p>0.05). Radiological union rate was 91.1% in PLIF group and 89.4% in PLF group at postoperative 24 months (p>0.05). Conclusions No significant differences in clinical results and union rates were found between PLIF and PLF patients. Selection of the operation technique will reflect the surgeon's preferences and patient condition. PMID:26949464

  10. Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J F; Pedersen-Bjergaard, O; Stage, P; Efsen, F

    1975-04-01

    The clinical and laboratory findings in 29 patients with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis are presented. Dyspnoea during exercise, angina pectoris, syncope combined with left ventricular hyperthrophy on ECG and chest X-ray and a systolic ejection murmur at the apex and the left sternal border are the most important findings. The findings were different in patients below and above 30 years of age. Most of the patients below 30 were in function group I, had a normal heart volume on chest X-+ray, and syncope was related to exercise. All patients above 30 had symptoms, nearly all were in function groups II-IV and often complained of palpitations, had increased heart volume on chest X-ray, sign of enlarged left atrium or atrial fibrillation of ECG. Syncope was not related to exercise, but always associated with palpitation in patients above 35 years of age. Pathologic Q waves were found more often in the younger age group. The differential diagnosis is discussed in relation to fixed aortic stenosis, mitral valve disease, ventricular septal defect, coronary artery disease, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy without outflow tract obstruction. PMID:1169870

  11. Advancement in idiopathic intracranial hypertension pathogenesis: focus on sinus venous stenosis.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Roberto; Ranieri, Angelo; Bonavita, Vincenzo

    2010-06-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is consistently associated with venous outflow disturbances. Sinus venous stenosis are found at magnetic resonance venography in the large majority of IIH patients and may have various conformations, ranging from functional smooth narrowings of sinus segments associated or not with definite flow gaps, to segmental hypoplasia or aplasia of one or more central venous collectors. Stenosis are currently believed to be a consequence of a primary altered cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure since it may normalize after CSF subtraction with lumbar puncture or shunting procedures. In this paper a "self-sustained venous collapse" is proposed as a crucial causative mechanism in predisposed subjects, leading to a self-sustained intracranial hypertension in presence of a wide range of triggering factors. The proposed mechanisms predict the long-term remission of IIH syndromes frequently observed after a single or few serial CSF subtractions by lumbar puncture. PMID:20464580

  12. Exploring the utility of axial lumbar MRI for automatic diagnosis of intervertebral disc abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the importance of axial lumbar MRI slices for automatic detection of abnormalities. In the past, only the sagittal views were taken into account for lumbar CAD systems, ignoring the fact that a radiologist scans through the axial slices as well, to confirm the diagnosis and quantify various abnormalities like herniation and stenosis. Hence, we present an automatic diagnosis system from axial slices using CNN(Convolutional Neural Network) for dynamic feature extraction and classification of normal and abnormal lumbar discs. We show 80:81% accuracy (with a specificity of 85:29% and sensitivity of 75:56%) on 86 cases (391 discs) using only an axial slice for each disc, which implies the usefulness of axial views for automatic lumbar abnormality diagnosis in conjunction with sagittal views.

  13. Aortic Stenosis and Vascular Calcifications in Alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Hwaida; Introne, Wendy J.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Lee, Sook-Jin; O'Brien, Kevin; Suwannarat, Pim; Kayser, Michael A.; Gahl, William A.; Sachdev, Vandana

    2011-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disorder of tyrosine catabolism in which homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates and is deposited throughout the spine, large joints, cardiovascular system, and various tissues throughout the body. In the cardiovascular system, pigment deposition has been described in the heart valves, endocardium, pericardium, aortic intima and coronary arteries. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with alkaptonuria varies in previous reports . We present a series of 76 consecutive adult patients with alkaptonuria who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between 2000 and 2009. A subgroup of 40 patients enrolled in a treatment study underwent non-contrast CT scans and these were assessed for vascular calcifications. Six of the 76 patients had aortic valve replacement. In the remaining 70 patients, 12 patients had aortic sclerosis and 7 patients had aortic stenosis. Unlike degenerative aortic valve disease, we found no correlation with standard cardiac risk factors. There was a modest association between the severity of aortic valve disease and joint involvement, however, we saw no correlation with urine HGA levels. Vascular calcifications were seen in the coronaries, cardiac valves, aortic root, descending aorta and iliac arteries. These findings suggest an important role for echocardiographic screening of alkaptonuria patients to detect valvular heart disease and cardiac CT to detect coronary artery calcifications. PMID:22100375

  14. Idiopathic laryngotracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Christina L; Mathisen, Douglas J

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic laryngotracheal stenosis (ILTS) is a rare inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Infectious, traumatic and immunologic processes must first be excluded. The majority of patients affected are female who present with progressive symptoms of upper airway obstruction, which can extend over a number of years. ILTS is characterized by short segment, circumferential stenotic lesions, located particularly at the level of the cricoid. Bronchoscopic evaluation is essential for establishing the diagnosis and operative planning. Various temporizing interventions have historically been utilized, including dilation and laser ablation, for symptomatic management. However these interventions have demonstrated diminishing returns and poor long-term outcomes. Patients with ILTS should be considered early for definitive surgical intervention to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. Laryngotracheal resection and reconstruction is a viable intervention, which has demonstrated good long-term results and low recurrence rates for this patient population. PMID:26981272

  15. Renal-Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Lance D.; Cooper, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old former smoker with a history of hypertension and dyslipidemia presents to the emergency department with shortness of breath. His blood pressure is 160/75 mm Hg, heart rate 60 beats per minute, and respiratory rate 24 breaths per minute. Chest auscultation reveals diffuse rales, and there is 1+ pitting edema. The serum creatinine level is 1.4 mg per deciliter (124 µmol per liter) (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 52 ml per minute), and urinalysis shows 1+ protein. His condition improves after treatment with intravenous diuretics, but his systolic blood pressure remains elevated, at 170 mm Hg. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) reveals a diseased aorta, a high-grade ostial lesion of the left renal artery that is consistent with atherosclerotic stenosis, and a normal right renal artery. How should he be further evaluated and treated? PMID:19907044

  16. Idiopathic laryngotracheal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Costantino, Christina L.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic laryngotracheal stenosis (ILTS) is a rare inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Infectious, traumatic and immunologic processes must first be excluded. The majority of patients affected are female who present with progressive symptoms of upper airway obstruction, which can extend over a number of years. ILTS is characterized by short segment, circumferential stenotic lesions, located particularly at the level of the cricoid. Bronchoscopic evaluation is essential for establishing the diagnosis and operative planning. Various temporizing interventions have historically been utilized, including dilation and laser ablation, for symptomatic management. However these interventions have demonstrated diminishing returns and poor long-term outcomes. Patients with ILTS should be considered early for definitive surgical intervention to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. Laryngotracheal resection and reconstruction is a viable intervention, which has demonstrated good long-term results and low recurrence rates for this patient population. PMID:26981272

  17. Interobserver discrepancies in distance measurements from lumbar spine CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Beers, G.J.; Carter, A.P.; Leiter, B.E.; Tilak, S.P.; Shah, R.R.

    1985-02-01

    Lumbar spine computed tomographic (CT) scans of 10 patients were examined independently at two levels by five experienced radiologists. At each level the minimum midline sagittal diameter was measured, and at each intervertebral space the left foramen was measured for its minimum diameter. Statistically significant differences were found between the measurements of different observers, differences that in a number of cases could have led to disagreement over whether or not stenosis was present. There were reasonably strong correlations between different observers' readings of midline sagittal diameters but generally not of foraminal diameters. Reasons for discrepancies between observers in spine CT measurements are reviewed briefly.

  18. [Aortic stenosis of alkaptonuric genesis].

    PubMed

    Barsukov, A V; Bagaeva, Z V; Sveklina, T S; Shelukhin, V A; Shustov, S B; Shikhverdiev, N N; Khubulava, G G

    2010-01-01

    Main approaches to intravital diagnosis of alcaptonuria are described. Attention is focused on damages determining invalidisation of patients. A clinical case is presented which demonstrates success of surgical treatment of aortic stenosis of alkaptonuric genesis. PMID:20831054

  19. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tagliarini, Jos V; Nakajima, Victor; Castilho, Emanuel C

    2005-01-01

    The congenital stenosis of pyriform aperture is an unusual cause of neonatal nasal obstruction. It is due to bony overgrowth of the nasal lateral process of the maxilla. Initially this narrowest part of nasal airway was considered an isolated deformity; subsequently the congenital Stenosis of pyriform aperture was thought to represent a microform of holoprosencephaly. In this report a male neonate had respiratory distress, cyclic cyanosis and apnea after delivery. The patient underwent surgical correction of pyriform stenosis by sublabial access. In the follow up, the patient had good evolution. The report of this deformity shows an important cause of neonatal nasal obstruction and its differential diagnosis with bilateral choanal atresia. Congenital stenosis of nasal pyriform aperture can be surgically corrected when necessary. PMID:16446925

  20. Risk factors for degenerative spondylolisthesis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    DeVine, John G.; Schenk-Kisser, Jeannette M.; Skelly, Andrea C.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic literature review. Rationale: Many authors have postulated on various risk factors associated with the pathogenesis of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS), yet controversies regarding those risk factors still exist. Objective: To critically appraise and summarize evidence on risk factors for DS. Methods: Articles published before October 15, 2011, were systematically reviewed using PubMed and bibliographies of key articles. Each article was subject to quality rating and was analyzed by two independent reviewers. Results: From 382 citations, 30 underwent full-text review. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria. All but two were considered poor quality. Female gender and higher facet joint angle were consistently associated with an increased risk of DS across multiple studies. Multiple studies also consistently reported no association between back pain and prolonged occupational sitting. Associations between age, parity, lumbosacral angle, lumbar lordosis, facet joint tropism, and pelvic inclination angles were inconsistent. Conclusions: There appears to be consistent evidence to suggest that the risk of DS increases with increasing age and is greater for females and people with a greater facet joint angle. PMID:23230415

  1. Chordoma of the Lumbar Spine Presenting as Sciatica and Treated with Vertebroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Somenath; Bodhey, Narendra Kuber Gupta, Arun Kumar; Periakaruppan, Alagappan

    2010-12-15

    The lumbar spine is a less common location for chordoma. Here we describe a 44-year-old woman presenting with pain due to a L4 vertebral expansile lesion that caused significant canal stenosis and neural foraminal compromise. Vertebroplasty was performed and resulted in immediate pain relief. For patients with painful lumbar chordoma who are unwilling to undergo surgery, vertebroplasty can play a palliative role as in patients with other vertebral lesions. Treating pain and stabilizing vertebra by way of vertebroplasty in a case of chordoma has not yet been reported.

  2. Aortic Stenosis: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Grimard, Brian H; Safford, Robert E; Burns, Elizabeth L

    2016-03-01

    Aortic stenosis affects 3% of persons older than 65 years. Although survival in asymptomatic patients is comparable to that in age- and sex-matched control patients, it decreases rapidly after symptoms appear. During the asymptomatic latent period, left ventricular hypertrophy and atrial augmentation of preload compensate for the increase in afterload caused by aortic stenosis. As the disease worsens, these compensatory mechanisms become inadequate, leading to symptoms of heart failure, angina, or syncope. Aortic valve replacement is recommended for most symptomatic patients with evidence of significant aortic stenosis on echocardiography. Watchful waiting is recommended for most asymptomatic patients. However, select patients may also benefit from aortic valve replacement before the onset of symptoms. Surgical valve replacement is the standard of care for patients at low to moderate surgical risk. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement may be considered in patients at high or prohibitive surgical risk. Patients should be educated about the importance of promptly reporting symptoms to their physicians. In asymptomatic patients, serial Doppler echocardiography is recommended every six to 12 months for severe aortic stenosis, every one to two years for moderate disease, and every three to five years for mild disease. Cardiology referral is recommended for all patients with symptomatic moderate and severe aortic stenosis, those with severe aortic stenosis without apparent symptoms, and those with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Medical management of concurrent hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and coronary artery disease will lead to optimal outcomes. PMID:26926974

  3. Management of carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Louridas, George; Junaid, Asad

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To clarify the definition of carotid artery diseases, the appropriateness of screening for disease, investigation and management of patients presenting with transient ischemic attacks, and management of asymptomatic carotid bruits. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using the terms carotid endarterectomy, carotid disease, and carotid stenosis. Most studies offer level II or III evidence. Consensus statements and guidelines from various neurovascular societies were also consulted. MAIN MESSAGE Patients with symptoms of hemispheric transient ischemic attacks associated with >70% stenosis of the internal carotid artery are at highest risk of major stroke or death. Risk is greatest within 48 hours of symptom onset; patients should have urgent evaluation by a vascular surgeon for consideration of carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Patients with 50% to 69% stenosis might benefit from urgent surgical intervention depending on clinical features and associated comorbidity. Patients with <50% stenosis do not benefit from surgery. Asymptomatic patients with >60% stenosis should be considered for elective CEA. CONCLUSION Symptomatic carotid artery syndromes need urgent carotid duplex evaluation to determine the need for urgent surgery. Those with the greatest degree of stenosis derive the greatest benefit from timely CEA. PMID:16060177

  4. Discrete subaortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M M; Varma, M P; Cleland, J; O'Kane, H O; Webb, S W; Mulholland, H C; Adgey, A A

    1981-01-01

    Data concerning 17 consecutive patients with discrete subaortic stenosis are recorded. Twelve patients underwent operative resection of the obstructing lesion. Of these all except one were symptomatic and all had electrocardiographic evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular hypertrophy with strain. They had a peak resting systolic left ventricular outflow tract gradient of greater than 50 mmHg as predicted from the combined cuff measurement of systolic blood pressure and the echocardiographically estimated left ventricular systolic pressure and/or as determined by cardiac catheterisation. The outflow tract gradient as predicted from M-mode echocardiography and peak systolic pressure showed close correlation with that measured at cardiac catheterisation or operation. During the postoperative follow-up from one month to 11 years, of 11 patients, one patient required a further operation for recurrence of the obstruction four years after the initial operation. All patients are now asymptomatic. Five patients have not had an operation. The left ventricular outflow tract gradient as assessed at the time of cardiac catheterisation was greater than 50 mmHg. One patient has been lost to follow-up. The remaining four have been followed from four to eight years and have remained asymptomatic and the electrocardiograms have remained unchanged. Careful follow-up of all patients is essential with continuing clinical assessment, electrocardiograms, M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiograms, and if necessary cardiac catheterisation. Prophylaxis against bacterial endocarditis is also essential. Images PMID:6457617

  5. Lumbar hernia: a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Tausif; Ranjan, Rajeeva; Saha, Subhendu Bikas; Singh, Balbodh

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is one of the rare cases that most surgeons are not exposed to. Hence the diagnosis can be easily missed. This leads to delay in the treatment causing increased morbidity. We report a case of lumbar hernia in a middle-aged woman. It was misdiagnosed as lipoma by another surgeon. It was a case of primary acquired lumbar hernia in the superior lumbar triangle. Clinical and MRI findings were correlated to reach the diagnosis. We also highlight the types, the process of diagnosis and the surgical repair of lumbar hernias. We wish to alert our fellow surgeons to keep the differential diagnosis of the lumbar hernia in mind before diagnosing any lumbar swelling as lipoma. PMID:24810439

  6. The Effect of Zoledronic Acid on the Volume of the Fusion-Mass in Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Sik; Baek, Seung-Wook; Kong, Dong-Yi; Ryu, Jeong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies have explored the effects of bisphosphonates on bony healing in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery. Most previous studies used animal models and found that bisphosphonate shows negative effects on spinal fusion consolidation. We intended to evaluate the effect of a single-dose of zoledronic acid on the volume of the fusion-mass in lumbar spinal fusion. Methods A retrospective review was carried out on 44 patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent one or two-level posterolateral fusion from January 2008 and January 2011. They were divided into 4 groups: group 1, autograft and zoledronic acid; group 2, allograft and zoledronic acid; group 3, autograft alone; and group 4, allograft alone. Functional radiography and three-dimensional computed tomography scans were used to evaluate and quantify the volume of the fusion-mass. The visual analog scale (VAS), the Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the short form 36 (SF-36) were used to evaluate the clinical outcomes. Results The mean volume of the fusion-mass per level was 8,814 mm3, 8,035 mm3, 8,383 mm3, and 7,550 mm3 in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, but there were no significant differences between the groups (p = 0.829). There were no significant decreases in the volume of the fusion-mass (p = 0.533) in the zoledronic acid groups (groups 1 and 2). The VAS, the ODI, and the SF-36 at the 6-month follow-up after surgery were not significantly different (p > 0.05) among the 4 groups. The VAS, the ODI, and the SF-36 were not correlated with the volume of the fusion-mass (p = 0.120, 0.609, 0.642). Conclusions A single dose of zoledronic acid does not decrease the volume of the fusion-mass in patients undergoing spinal fusion with osteoporosis. Therefore, we recommend that zoledronic acid may be used after spinal fusion in osteoporotic patients. PMID:24340149

  7. Lumbar Corsets Can Decrease Lumbar Motion in Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Kei; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hattori, Ryo; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Toshio; Ohno, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K.), full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC), with a soft corset (SC), and with a hard corset (HC), with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity) in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt) were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38) or HC (28) than under WOC (44) conditions (p < 0.05). The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94/sec) than under SC (177/sec) and WOC (191 /sec) conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC. Key points Rotational and extension forces on the lumbar spine may cause golf-related low back pain Wearing lumbar corsets during a golf swing can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles and angular velocity. Wearing lumbar corsets increased the rotational motion of the hip joint while reducing the rotation of the lumbar spine. PMID:24149729

  8. The clinical challenge of concomitant aortic and mitral valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Unger, Philippe; Lancellotti, Patrizzio; de Cannière, Didier

    2016-02-01

    The coexistence of mitral and aortic stenosis is not exceptional. Whereas rheumatic fever is currently plummeting in the Western countries, the incidence of degenerative disease is inversely increasing. The haemodynamic interactions which may interfere both with the usual echocardiographic parameters and with the invasive assessment may render the diagnosis difficult. The therapeutic challenges raised by this entity should not be underestimated. The increased morbidity and mortality of multivalvular surgery has to be balanced with the risk of a second operation down the line if one valvular involvement, deemed of a lesser importance, is neglected. This complex situation requires the multidisciplinary approach of a heart team involving surgeons, cardiologists, geriatrists if need be and imaging specialists. PMID:26853247

  9. Ischemic enteritis with intestinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshikawa, Yorimitsu; Matsuura, Minoru; Yoshino, Takuya; Honzawa, Yusuke; Minami, Naoki; Yamada, Satoshi; Yasuhara, Yumiko; Fujii, Shigehiko; Kusaka, Toshihiro; Manaka, Dai; Kokuryu, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with sudden onset of vomiting and abdominal distension. The patient was taking medication for arrhythmia. Computed tomography showed stenosis of the ileum and a small bowel dilatation on the oral side from the region of stenosis. A transnasal ileus tube was placed. Enteroclysis using contrast medium revealed an approximately 6-cm afferent tubular stenosis 10 cm from the terminal ileum and thumbprinting in the proximal bowel. Transanal double-balloon enteroscopy showed a circumferential shallow ulcer with a smooth margin and edema of the surrounding mucosa. The stenosis was so extensive that we could not perform endoscopic balloon dilation therapy. During hospitalization, the patient's nutritional status deteriorated. In response, we surgically resected the region of stenosis. Histologic examination revealed disappearance of the mucosal layer and transmural ulceration with marked fibrosis, especially in the submucosal layer. Hemosiderin staining revealed sideroferous cells in the submucosal layers. Based on the pathologic findings, the patient was diagnosed with ischemic enteritis. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:26884740

  10. Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Foraminotomy: An Advanced Surgical Technique and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun-Kyong; Kim, Ho; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Haeng-Nam

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although several authors have reported the use of endoscopic techniques to treat lumbar foraminal stenosis, the practical application of these techniques has been limited to soft disc herniation. OBJECTIVE: To describe the details of the percutaneous endoscopic lumbar foraminotomy (ELF) technique for bony foraminal stenosis and to demonstrate the clinical outcomes. METHODS: Two years of prospective data were collected from 33 consecutive patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis who underwent ELF. The surgical outcomes were assessed using the visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and modified MacNab criteria. The procedure begins at the safer extraforaminal zone rather than the riskier intraforaminal zone. Then, a full-scale foraminal decompression can be performed using a burr and punches under endoscopic control. RESULTS: The mean age of the 18 female and 15 male patients was 64.2 years. The mean visual analog scale score for leg pain improved from 8.36 at baseline to 3.36 at 6 weeks, 2.03 at 1 year, and 1.97 at 2 years post-surgery (P < .001). The mean Oswestry Disability Index improved from 65.8 at baseline to 31.6 at 6 weeks, 19.7 at 1 year, and 19.3 at 2 years post-surgery (P < .001). Based on the modified MacNab criteria, excellent or good results were obtained in 81.8% of the patients, and symptomatic improvements were obtained in 93.9%. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous ELF under local anesthesia could be an efficacious surgical procedure for the treatment of foraminal stenosis. This procedure may offer safe and reproducible results, especially for elderly or medically compromised patients. ABBREVIATIONS: ELF,endoscopic lumbar foraminotomy ODI, Oswestry Disability Index VAS, visual analog scale PMID:24691470

  11. Comparison of Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Direct Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Clinical and Radiological Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Seok; Park, Seung Won; Chung, Chan

    2014-01-01

    Objective The use of direct lumbar interbody fusion (DLIF) has gradually increased; however, no studies have directly compared DLIF and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). We compared DLIF and TLIF on the basis of clinical and radiological outcomes. Methods A retrospective review was performed on the medical records and radiographs of 98 and 81 patients who underwent TLIF and DLIF between January 2011 and December 2012. Clinical outcomes were compared with a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). The preoperative and postoperative disc heights, segmental sagittal/coronal angles, and lumbar lordosis were measured on radiographs. Fusion rates, operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), length of hospital stay, and complications were assessed. Results DLIF was superior to TLIF regarding its ability to restore disc height, foraminal height, and coronal balance (p<0.001). As the extent of surgical level increased, DLIF displayed significant advantages over TLIF considering the operative time and EBL. However, fusion rates at 12 months post-operation were lower for DLIF (87.8%) than for TLIF (98.1%) (p=0.007). The changes of VAS and ODI between the TLIF and DLIF were not significantly different (p>0.05). Conclusion Both DLIF and TLIF are less invasive and thus good surgical options for treating degenerative lumber diseases. DLIF has higher potential in increasing neural foramina and correcting coronal balance, and involves a shorter operative time and reduced EBL, in comparison with TLIF. However, DLIF displayed a lower fusion rate than TLIF, and caused complications related to the transpsoas approach. PMID:25628805

  12. The effect of age on sagittal plane profile of the lumbar spine according to standing, supine, and various sitting positions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The sagittal alignment of the spine changes depending on body posture and degenerative changes. This study aimed to observe changes in sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine with different positions (standing, supine, and various sitting postures) and to verify the effect of aging on lumbar sagittal alignment. Methods Whole-spine lateral radiographs were obtained for young volunteers (25.4 ± 2.3 years) and elderly volunteers (66.7 ± 1.7 years). Radiographs were obtained in standing, supine, and sitting (30°, 60°, and 90°) positions respectively. We compared the radiological changes in the lordotic and segmental angles in different body positions and at different ages. Upper and lower lumbar lordosis were defined according to differences in anatomical sagittal mobility and kinematic behavior. Results Lumbar lordosis was greater in a standing position (52.79° and 53.90° in young and old groups, respectively) and tended to decrease as position changed from supine to sitting. Compared with the younger group, the older group showed significantly more lumbar lordosis in supine and 60° and 90° sitting positions (P = 0.043, 0.002, 0.011). Upper lumbar lordosis in the younger group changed dynamically in all changed positions compared with the old group (P = 0.019). Lower lumbar lordosis showed a decreasing pattern in both age groups, significantly changing as position changed from 30° to 60° (P = 0.007, 0.007). Conclusions Lumbar lordosis decreases as position changes from standing to 90°sitting. The upper lumbar spine is more flexible in individuals in their twenties compared to those in their sixties. Changes in lumbar lordosis were concentrated in the lower lumbar region in the older group in sitting positions. PMID:24571953

  13. Severe aortic stenosis: forgotten associations.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Ana Rita; Amorim, Sandra; Campelo, Manuel; Martins, Elisabete; Lopez Rodriguez, Elisa; Coelho, Rosa; Macedo, Guilherme; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2014-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 68-year-old man with predominantly right heart failure in the context of severe aortic stenosis associated with pulmonary hypertension. Anemia was diagnosed which, after endoscopic study, was considered to be secondary to angiodysplasia and a diagnosis of Heyde syndrome was made. After valve replacement surgery the patient's heart failure improved and hemoglobin levels stabilized. We present this case to show the need to recognize less common associations of severe aortic stenosis, in order to provide immediate and appropriate treatment. PMID:25242677

  14. Lumbar spine chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Hatem, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare tumor arising from notochord remnants in the spine. It is slow-growing, which makes it difficult to diagnose and difficult to follow up after treatment. Typically, it occurs in the base of the skull and sacrococcygeal spine; it rarely occurs in other parts of the spine. CT-guided biopsy of a suspicious mass enabled diagnosis of lumbar spine chordoma.

  15. Clinical and surgical outcomes after lumbar laminectomy: An analysis of 500 patients

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Abt, Nicholas B.; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to determine the clinical and surgical outcomes following lumbar laminectomy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of neurosurgical patients who underwent first-time, bilateral, 1-3 level laminectomies for degenerative lumbar disease. Patients with discectomy, complete facetectomy, and fusion were excluded. Results: Five hundred patients were followed for an average of 46.79 months. Following lumbar laminectomy, patients experienced statistically significant improvement in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, weakness, and sensory deficits. The rate of intraoperative durotomy was 10.00%; however, 1.60% experienced a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak. The risk of experiencing at least one postoperative complication with a lumbar laminectomy was 5.60%. Seventy-two patients (14.40%) required reoperations for progression of degenerative disease over a mean of 3.40 years. The most common symptoms prior to reoperation included back pain (54.17%), radiculopathy (47.22%), weakness (18.06%), sensory deficit (15.28%), and neurogenic claudication (19.44%). The relative risk of reoperation for patients with postoperative back pain was 6.14 times higher than those without postoperative back pain (P < 0.001). Of the 72 patients undergoing reoperations, 55.56% underwent decompression alone, while 44.44% underwent decompression and posterolateral fusions. When considering all-time reoperations, the lifetime risk of requiring a fusion after a lumbar laminectomy based on this study (average follow-up of 46.79 months) was 8.0%. Conclusion: Patients experienced statistically significant improvements in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, motor weakness, and sensory deficit following lumbar laminectomy. Incidental durotomy rate was 10.00%. Following a first-time laminectomy, the reoperation rate was 14.4% over a mean of 3.40 years. PMID:26005583

  16. Percutaneous cryodenervation of lumbar facet joints: a prospective clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Veihelmann, A.; Trouillier, H.; Hausdorf, J.; Devens, C.; Wegener, B.; Jansson, V.; von Schulze Pellengahr, C.

    2006-01-01

    Facet joint pain is an important aspect of degenerative lumbar spine disease, and radiofrequency medial branch neurotomy remains an established therapy, while cryodenervation has still been poorly examined. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of medial branch cryodenervation in the treatment of lumbar facet joint pain. This was a prospective clinical case series. Patient selection was based on the history, physical examination and positive medial branch blocks. Percutaneous medial branch cryodenervation was performed using a Lloyd Neurostat 2000. Target parameters were low back pain (VAS), limitation of activity (McNab) and overall satisfaction. Fifty patients were recruited, and 46 completed the study. The follow-up time was 1 year. At 6 weeks, 33 patients (72%) were pain free or had major improvement of low back pain; 13 (28%) had no or little improvement. Including failures, mean low back pain decreased significantly from 7.7 preoperatively to 3.2 at 6 weeks, 3.3 at 3 months, 3.0 at 6 months and 4.2 at 12 months (P<0.0001). Limitation of the activities of daily living improved parallel to reduced pain. Our results suggest that medial branch cryodenervation is a safe and effective treatment for lumbar facet joint pain. PMID:16927087

  17. Two-level total lumbar disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Bakaloudis, Georgios; Lolli, Francesco; Vommaro, Francesco; Parisini, Patrizio

    2009-01-01

    Total lumbar disc replacement (TDR) has been widely used as a treatment option for 2-level symptomatic degenerative disc disease. However, recent studies have presented conflicting results and some authors concluded that outcome deteriorated when disc replacement was performed bisegmentally, with an increase of complications for bisegmental replacements in comparison with monosegmental disc arthroplasty. The goal of the present retrospective study is to investigate results in a group of patients who have received bisegmental TDR with SB Charitè III artificial disc for degenerative disc disease with a minimum follow-up of 3 years, and to compare the results of 2-level disc replacement versus 1-level patients treated with the same prosthesis. A total of 32 patients had at least 3-years follow-up and were reviewed. The average age of the patients was 38.5 years. There were 11 males and 21 females. About 16 patients received 2-level TDR (SB Charitè III) and 16 received 1-level TDR (SB Charitè III). Both radiographic and functional outcome analysis, including patient’s satisfaction, was performed. There were no signs of degenerative changes of the adjacent segments in any case of the 2- or 1-level TDR. There was no statistically significant difference between 2- and 1-level TDR both at 12 months and at 3-years follow-up on functional outcome scores. There was a statistically insignificant difference concerning the patients satisfaction between 1- and 2-level surgeries at the last follow-up (P = 0.46). In the 2-level TDR patients, there were 5 minor complications (31.25%), whereas major complications occurred in 4 more patients (25%) and required a new surgery in 2 cases (12.5%). In the 1-level cases there were 2 minor complications (12.5%) and 2 major complications (12.5%) and a new revision surgery was required in 1 patient (6.25%). In conclusion, the use of 2-level disc replacement at last follow-up presented a higher incidence of complications than in cases with 1-level replacement. At the same time it was impossible to delineate a clear difference in evaluating the questionnaires between the follow-up results of patients receiving 2- and 1-level TDR: the 2-level group presented slightly lower scores at follow-up, but none was statistically significant. PMID:19399536

  18. Treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease - current status and trends.

    PubMed

    Korinth, M C

    2008-08-01

    Although less frequent than lumbar degenerative disc disease, cervical disc disease may be much more neurologically compromising due to anatomical particularities. Since its first description together with the typical signs and symptoms the operative therapy of cervical disc disease has undergone a changeful evolution over the years. The frequent shifts of paradigms in treatment are particularly noticeable compared to other neurosurgical diseases. Initially, the dorsal decompression of neural structures (laminectomy) with a more or less invasive posterior approach (posterior foraminotomy) was the primary aim of the operation. Because of anatomical limitations, a paradigm shift occurred in the middle of the last century, favouring an anterior approach and discectomy, without and with implantation of various spacers (arthrodesis). A large variety of different materials and designs for these implants as alternatives to autologous iliac crest bone were established, all with the aim of creating a solid fusion of the operated segment. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), regarded worldwide as the "gold standard" for the treatment of cervical disc disease, was later complemented by modified, minimally invasive or endoscopic techniques using anterior and posterior approaches. The fear of adjacent level disease in the vicinity of a fused cervical segment led to another paradigm shift in the last few years, away from fusing procedures, towards new motion preserving technologies (arthroplasty) and back to minimally invasive dorsal techniques for the treatment of cervical disc disease. This article reviews the evolution of the operative treatment of cervical disc disease in the last 80 years, outlines the advantages and disadvantages of each approach and technique and focuses on the rationale of the paradigm shifts. Current established and alternative treatment concepts are illuminated and discussed together with the currently relevant literature. PMID:18666050

  19. Modified Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Radiculopathy Following Healed Vertebral Collapse of the Middle-Lower Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tomoya; Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objectives Lumbar radiculopathy is rarely observed in patients who have achieved bony healing of vertebral fractures in the middle-lower lumbar spine. The objectives of the study were to clarify the clinical features of such radiculopathy and to evaluate the preliminary outcomes of treatment using a modified posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedure. Methods Fourteen patients with at least 2-year follow-up were enrolled in this study. The radiologic and clinical features of radiculopathy were retrospectively reviewed. As part of our modified PLIF procedure, a bone block was laid on chipped bone to fill the cavity of the fractured end plate and to flatten the cage–bone interface. Results The morphologic features of spinal deformity in our patients typically consisted of the intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, spondylolisthesis, and a retropulsed intervertebral disk with a vertebral rim in the damaged segment. Cranial end plate fracture resulted in radiculopathy of the traversing nerve roots due to lateral recess stenosis. On the other hand, caudal end plate fracture led to unilateral radiculopathy of the exiting nerve root due to foraminal stenosis. The mean recovery rate based on the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score was 65.0%. Solid fusion was achieved in all but one case. Conclusions Because of severe deterioration of the anterior column following end plate fracture, the foraminal zone must be decompressed in caudal end plate fractures. The modified PLIF procedure yielded satisfactory clinical outcomes due to anterior reconstruction and full decompression for both foraminal and lateral recess stenoses. PMID:25396106

  20. Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lindman, Brian R; Patel, Jay N

    2016-05-01

    Aortic stenosis is a disease of older adults; many have associated comorbidities. With the aging of the population and the emergence of transcatheter aortic valve replacement as a treatment, clinicians will increasingly be confronted with aortic stenosis and multimorbidity, making the evaluation, management, and treatment of aortic stenosis more complex. To optimize patient-centered clinical outcomes, new treatment paradigms are needed that recognize the import and influence of multimorbidity on patients with aortic stenosis. The authors review the prevalence of medical and aging-related comorbidities in patients with aortic stenosis, their impact on outcomes, and discuss how they influence management and treatment decisions. PMID:27113148

  1. Is running associated with degenerative joint disease

    SciTech Connect

    Panush, R.S.; Schmidt, C.; Caldwell, J.R.; Edwards, N.L.; Longley, S.; Yonker, R.; Webster, E.; Nauman, J.; Stork, J.; Pettersson, H.

    1986-03-07

    Little information is available regarding the long-term effects, if any, of running on the musculoskeletal system. The authors compared the prevalence of degenerative joint disease among 17 male runners with 18 male nonrunners. Running subjects (53% marathoners) ran a mean of 44.8 km (28 miles)/wk for 12 years. Pain and swelling of hips, knees, ankles and feet and other musculoskeletal complaints among runners were comparable with those among nonrunners. Radiologic examinations (for osteophytes, cartilage thickness, and grade of degeneration) also were without notable differences among groups. They did not find an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis among the runners. Our observations suggest that long-duration, high-mileage running need to be associated with premature degenerative joint disease in the lower extremities.

  2. Quality-of-Life Outcomes With Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Based on Long-Term Analysis of 304 Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Namath S.; White, G. Zachary; Begun, Evan M.; Collins, Robert A.; Fahim, Daniel K.; Hiremath, Girish K.; Adbi, Fadumo M.; Yacob, Sammy A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. This was a prospective clinical study that took place in an outpatient spine clinic. Objective. To demonstrate the short-/long-term outcomes from a large cohort of patients undergoing minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF). Summary of Background Data. Long-term prospective outcomes in patients undergoing minimally invasive spinal fusion for debilitating back pain has not been well studied. Methods. Presenting diagnosis was determined from clinical findings and radiographical (radiograph, magnetic resonance image, computed tomographic scan) evaluations preoperatively. Patients were assessed with outcome measures preoperatively, and postoperatively at 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months, and annually 2 to 7 years (mean follow-up: 47 mo) final follow-up. The rate of postoperative complications and reoperations at the initial level of MITLIF and adjacent level(s) were followed. Fusion rates were assessed blinded and independently by radiograph. Results. Visual analogue scale scores decreased significantly from 7.0 preoperatively to 3.5 at mean 47-month follow-up. Oswestry Disability Index scores declined from 43.1 preoperatively to 28.2 at mean 47-month follow-up. Short-Form 36 mental component scores increased from 43.8 preoperatively to 49.7 at 47-month follow-up. Short-Form 36 physical component scores increased from 30.6 preoperatively to 39.6 at 47-month follow-up (P < 0.05). Conclusion. This prospectively collected outcomes study shows long-term statistically significant clinical outcomes improvement after MITLIF in patients with clinically symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with or without stenosis. MITLIF resulted in a high rate of spinal fusion and very low rate of interbody fusion failure and/or adjacent segment disease requiring reoperation while reducing postoperative complications. Level of Evidence: 3 PMID:24150437

  3. Preliminary results of a soft novel lumbar intervertebral prothesis (DIAM) in the degenerative spinal pathology.

    PubMed

    Mariottini, A; Pieri, S; Giachi, S; Carangelo, B; Zalaffi, A; Muzii, F V; Palma, L

    2005-01-01

    The authors report a series of 43 patients suffering from lower limb pain, almost constantly associated with chronic or acute backpain, treated by microsurgical nerve root decompression and by implantation of a soft intervertebral prothesis (DIAM). Satisfying results were obtained in 97% of cases, inducing the authors to consider the device a reliable tool for curing low-back pain and sciatica. Selection criteria are exposed and discussed. PMID:15830984

  4. Degenerative disease supra- and infra-jacent to fused lumbar and lumbo-sacral levels.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, M-A; Lazennec, J-Y

    2016-02-01

    Disc degeneration is a normal age-related process. Accelerated degeneration of discs adjacent to fused spinal levels has been observed in numerous case-series studies. The available data document this phenomenon and provide information on its time to occurrence but show huge variations in incidence rates (5% to 70%). The supra-jacent disc is involved more often than the infra-jacent disc. Studies have clarified the underlying biomechanical rationale by showing increased loading of the adjacent discs. Risk factors have been the focus of the most recent studies. They include the number of fused levels, sagittal alignment, level of fusion, stiffness of the construct, and integrity of the posterior structures. Nevertheless, the many published studies have produced somewhat conflicting results. Various radiological criteria have been used to define degeneration of the adjacent disc. Although most patients have no symptoms, adverse effects on the spine and/or nerve roots may occur and, in some cases, require revision surgery. We draw attention to the many sources of bias in the published studies, of which we provide a critical and pragmatic discussion in the light of our personal experience. PMID:26797007

  5. Degenerative disease affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Eadie, M J

    1974-03-01

    The term "degenerative disease" is one which is rather widely used in relation to the nervous system and yet one which is rarely formally and carefully defined. The term appears to be applied to disorders of the nervous system which often occur in later life and which are of uncertain cause. In the Shorter Oxford Dictionary the word degeneration is defined as "a change of structure by which an organism, or an organ, assumes the form of a lower type". However this is not quite the sense in which the word is applied in human neuropathology, where it is conventional to restrict the use of the word to those organic disorders which are of uncertain or poorly understood cause and in which there is a deterioration or regression in the level of functioning of the nervous system. The concept of degenerative disorder is applied to other organs as well as to the brain, and as disease elsewhere in the body may affect the nervous system, it seems reasonable to include within the topic of degenerative disorder affecting the nervous system those conditions in which the nervous system is involved as a result of primary degenerations in other parts of the body. PMID:25026144

  6. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  7. Upper lumbar disk herniations.

    PubMed

    Cedoz, M E; Larbre, J P; Lequin, C; Fischer, G; Llorca, G

    1996-06-01

    Specific features of upper lumbar disk herniations are reviewed based on data from the literature and from a retrospective study of 24 cases treated surgically between 1982 and 1994 (seven at L1-L2 and 17 at L2-L3). Clinical manifestations are polymorphic, misleading (abdominogenital pain suggestive of a visceral or psychogenic condition, meralgia paresthetica, isolated sciatica; femoral neuralgia is uncommon) and sometimes severe (five cases of cauda equina syndrome in our study group). The diagnostic usefulness of imaging studies (radiography, myelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and results of surgery are discussed. The risk of misdiagnosis and the encouraging results of surgery are emphasized. PMID:8817752

  8. Cervical degenerative intraspinal cyst: a case report and literature review involving 132 cases

    PubMed Central

    Machino, Masaaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Ito, Keigo; Kato, Fumihiko

    2012-01-01

    Intraspinal and extradural cysts in the cervical spine are rare disorders that may cause myelopathy or radiculopathy. A synovial cyst or ganglion derived from the facet joint and that from a ligamentum flavum have been reported. We report a surgical case of degenerative intraspinal cyst, causing cervical myelopathy. MRI of a case revealed cystic lesion at C45. Spinal cord was compressed by cyst and symptoms of myelopathy were also observed. The patient with cervical spinal canal stenosis underwent laminoplasty and excision of the cyst. The patient recovered well immediately after the surgery. Literature review showed that 133 patients have been reported, including the present case. Previous reports indicated that most cysts occurred in old patients and at the atlantoaxial or C7T1 junction, and laminectomy or laminoplasty with excision of the cyst gave good results in most cases. PMID:23195823

  9. Outcomes and Complications of the Midline Anterior Approach 3 Years after Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Braaksma, Brian; Weinreb, Jeffrey H.; Nalbandian, Matthew; Spivak, Jeffrey M.; Petrizzo, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new questionnaire to assess outcomes related to the midline anterior lumbar approach and to identify risk factors for negative patient responses. Methods. A retrospective review of 58 patients who underwent anterior lumbar surgery at a single institution for either degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis in 2009 was performed. The outcome measures included our newly developed Anterior Lumbar Surgery Questionnaire (ALSQ), ODI, and EQ-5D. Results. There were 58 patients available for followup, 27 women and 31 men. The average age at surgery was 50.8 years, with an average followup of 2.92 years. The average change in ODI was 34.94 (22.7) and EQ-5D was 0.28 (0.29). The rate of complications with the anterior approach was 10.3% and there was one male patient (3.2%) with retrograde ejaculation. Determination of the effectiveness of the new ALSQ revealed that it significantly correlated to the EQ-5D and ODI (P < 0.05). Smoking was associated with a negative response on thirteen questions. BMP use was not associated with a negative response on any sexual function questions. Conclusions. Our new Anterior Lumbar Surgery Questionnaire determines patient perceived complications related to the midline anterior lumbar surgical approach. PMID:25610657

  10. Quality and Quantity of Published Studies Evaluating Lumbar Fusion during the Past 10 Years: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hart, Robert; Hermsmeyer, Jeffrey T; Sethi, Rajiv K; Norvell, Daniel C

    2015-06-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Clinical Questions (1) Has the proportion and number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as an indicator of quality of evidence regarding lumbar fusion increased over the past 10 years? (2) Is there a difference in the proportion of RCTs among the four primary fusion diagnoses (degenerative disk disease, spondylolisthesis, deformity, and adjacent segment disease) over the past 10 years? (3) Is there a difference in the type and quality of clinical outcomes measures reported among RCTs over time? (4) Is there a difference in the type and quality of adverse events measures reported among RCTs over time? (5) Are there changes in fusion surgical approach and techniques over time by diagnosis over the past 10 years? Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2013, to identify lumbar fusion RCTs. Fusion studies designed specifically to evaluate recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 or other bone substitutes, revision surgery studies, nonrandomized comparison studies, case reports, case series, and cost-effectiveness studies were excluded. Results Forty-two RCTs between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2013, met the inclusion criteria and form the basis for this report. There were 35 RCTs identified evaluating patients diagnosed with degenerative disk disease, 4 RCTs evaluating patients diagnosed with degenerative spondylolisthesis, and 3 RCTs evaluating patients with a combination of degenerative disk disease and degenerative spondylolisthesis. No RCTs were identified evaluating patients with deformity or adjacent segment disease. Conclusions This structured review demonstrates that there has been an increase in the available clinical database of RCTs using patient-reported outcomes evaluating the benefit of lumbar spinal fusion for the diagnoses of degenerative disk disease and degenerative spondylolisthesis. Gaps remain in the standardization of reportage of adverse events in such trials, as well as uniformity of surgical approaches used. Finally, continued efforts to develop higher-quality data for other surgical indications for lumbar fusion, most notably in the presence of adult spinal deformity and revision of prior surgical fusions, appear warranted. PMID:26131387

  11. Quality and Quantity of Published Studies Evaluating Lumbar Fusion during the Past 10 Years: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Robert; Hermsmeyer, Jeffrey T.; Sethi, Rajiv K.; Norvell, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Clinical Questions (1) Has the proportion and number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as an indicator of quality of evidence regarding lumbar fusion increased over the past 10 years? (2) Is there a difference in the proportion of RCTs among the four primary fusion diagnoses (degenerative disk disease, spondylolisthesis, deformity, and adjacent segment disease) over the past 10 years? (3) Is there a difference in the type and quality of clinical outcomes measures reported among RCTs over time? (4) Is there a difference in the type and quality of adverse events measures reported among RCTs over time? (5) Are there changes in fusion surgical approach and techniques over time by diagnosis over the past 10 years? Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2013, to identify lumbar fusion RCTs. Fusion studies designed specifically to evaluate recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 or other bone substitutes, revision surgery studies, nonrandomized comparison studies, case reports, case series, and cost-effectiveness studies were excluded. Results Forty-two RCTs between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2013, met the inclusion criteria and form the basis for this report. There were 35 RCTs identified evaluating patients diagnosed with degenerative disk disease, 4 RCTs evaluating patients diagnosed with degenerative spondylolisthesis, and 3 RCTs evaluating patients with a combination of degenerative disk disease and degenerative spondylolisthesis. No RCTs were identified evaluating patients with deformity or adjacent segment disease. Conclusions This structured review demonstrates that there has been an increase in the available clinical database of RCTs using patient-reported outcomes evaluating the benefit of lumbar spinal fusion for the diagnoses of degenerative disk disease and degenerative spondylolisthesis. Gaps remain in the standardization of reportage of adverse events in such trials, as well as uniformity of surgical approaches used. Finally, continued efforts to develop higher-quality data for other surgical indications for lumbar fusion, most notably in the presence of adult spinal deformity and revision of prior surgical fusions, appear warranted. PMID:26131387

  12. Developing Cellular Therapies for Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Kapil; Rao, Mahendra; Hull, Sara Chandros; Stroncek, David; Brooks, Brian P.; Feigal, Ellen; van Meurs, Jan C.; Huang, Christene A.; Miller, Sheldon S.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical advances in vision research have been greatly facilitated by the clinical accessibility of the visual system, its ease of experimental manipulation, and its ability to be functionally monitored in real time with noninvasive imaging techniques at the level of single cells and with quantitative end-point measures. A recent example is the development of stem cell–based therapies for degenerative eye diseases including AMD. Two phase I clinical trials using embryonic stem cell–derived RPE are already underway and several others using both pluripotent and multipotent adult stem cells are in earlier stages of development. These clinical trials will use a variety of cell types, including embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cell–derived RPE, bone marrow– or umbilical cord–derived mesenchymal stem cells, fetal neural or retinal progenitor cells, and adult RPE stem cells–derived RPE. Although quite distinct, these approaches, share common principles, concerns and issues across the clinical development pipeline. These considerations were a central part of the discussions at a recent National Eye Institute meeting on the development of cellular therapies for retinal degenerative disease. At this meeting, emphasis was placed on the general value of identifying and sharing information in the so-called “precompetitive space.” The utility of this behavior was described in terms of how it could allow us to remove road blocks in the clinical development pipeline, and more efficiently and economically move stem cell–based therapies for retinal degenerative diseases toward the clinic. Many of the ocular stem cell approaches we discuss are also being used more broadly, for nonocular conditions and therefore the model we develop here, using the precompetitive space, should benefit the entire scientific community. PMID:24573369

  13. Developing cellular therapies for retinal degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Kapil; Rao, Mahendra; Hull, Sara Chandros; Stroncek, David; Brooks, Brian P; Feigal, Ellen; van Meurs, Jan C; Huang, Christene A; Miller, Sheldon S

    2014-02-01

    Biomedical advances in vision research have been greatly facilitated by the clinical accessibility of the visual system, its ease of experimental manipulation, and its ability to be functionally monitored in real time with noninvasive imaging techniques at the level of single cells and with quantitative end-point measures. A recent example is the development of stem cell-based therapies for degenerative eye diseases including AMD. Two phase I clinical trials using embryonic stem cell-derived RPE are already underway and several others using both pluripotent and multipotent adult stem cells are in earlier stages of development. These clinical trials will use a variety of cell types, including embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPE, bone marrow- or umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells, fetal neural or retinal progenitor cells, and adult RPE stem cells-derived RPE. Although quite distinct, these approaches, share common principles, concerns and issues across the clinical development pipeline. These considerations were a central part of the discussions at a recent National Eye Institute meeting on the development of cellular therapies for retinal degenerative disease. At this meeting, emphasis was placed on the general value of identifying and sharing information in the so-called "precompetitive space." The utility of this behavior was described in terms of how it could allow us to remove road blocks in the clinical development pipeline, and more efficiently and economically move stem cell-based therapies for retinal degenerative diseases toward the clinic. Many of the ocular stem cell approaches we discuss are also being used more broadly, for nonocular conditions and therefore the model we develop here, using the precompetitive space, should benefit the entire scientific community. PMID:24573369

  14. [Degenerative lesions of the peripheral retina].

    PubMed

    Conart, J-B; Baron, D; Berrod, J-P

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative lesions of the peripheral retina are present from teenage years onwards and increase with age. These abnormabilities are frequent, some of them being benign while others predispose to retinal tears and detachment. In the latter case, the lesions are rhegmatogenous and may justify prophylactic treatment by laser photocoagulation. We distinguish congenital lesions of the peripheral retina and intraretinal, chorioretinal and vitreoretinal degenerations. The holes and tears observed in 2% of the population consist of round atrophic holes, "horseshoe" tears, oral dialyses and giant tears. PMID:24239217

  15. Ninety-day readmissions after degenerative cervical spine surgery: A single-center administrative database study

    PubMed Central

    Akamnonu, Chibuikem; Goldstein, Jeffrey A.; Errico, Thomas J.; Bendo, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Unplanned hospital readmissions result in significant clinical and financial burdens to patients and the healthcare system. Readmission rates and causes have been investigated using large administrative databases which have certain limitations in data reporting and coding. The objective of this study was to provide a description of 90 day post-discharge readmissions following surgery for common degenerative cervical spine pathologies at a large-volume tertiary hospital. The study also compared the readmission rates of patients who underwent anterior- and posterior-approach procedures. Methods The administrative records from a single-center, high-volume tertiary institution were queried using ICD-9 codes for common cervical pathology over a three year period to determine the rate and causes of readmissions within the 90 days following the index surgery. Results A total of 768 patients underwent degenerative cervical spine surgery during the three year study period. Within 90 days of discharge, 24 (3.13%) patients were readmitted; 16 (2.06%) readmissions were planned for lumbar surgery; 8 (1.04%) readmissions were unplanned. 640 patients underwent procedures involving an anterior approach and 128 patients underwent procedures involving a posterior approach. There were 14 (2.17%) planned readmissions in the anterior group and 2 (1.5%) in the posterior group. The unplanned readmission rate was 0.63% (4 patients) and 3.13% (4 patients) in the anterior and posterior groups, respectively. (p=0.0343). Conclusion The 90 day post-discharge unplanned readmission rate that followed elective degenerative cervical spine surgery was 1.04%. The unplanned readmission rate associated with posterior-approach procedures (3.13%) was significantly higher than that of anterior-approach procedures (0.63%). Level of evidence: IV PMID:26114088

  16. The Outcome of Using Closed Suction Wound Drains in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Waly, Feras; Alzahrani, Mohammad M.; Abduljabbar, Fahad H.; Landry, Tara; Ouellet, Jean; Moran, Kathryn; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objective Determine whether closed suction wound drains decrease the incidence of postoperative complications compared with no drain use in patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar degenerative conditions. Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched up through January 22, 2015, to identify studies comparing the use of closed suction wound drains with no drains in spine surgery for lumbar degenerative conditions. Outcomes assessed included the cumulative incidence of epidural hematoma, superficial and deep wound infection, and postoperative blood transfusion. The overall strength of evidence across studies was based on precepts outlined by the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group. Results Five heterogeneous studies, three randomized controlled trials, and two cohort studies form the evidence basis for this report. There was no difference in the incidence of hematoma, superficial wound infection, or deep infection in patients with compared with patients without closed suction wound drains after lumbar surgery. The upper bounds of the 95% confidence interval for hematoma ranged from 1.1 to 16.7%; for superficial infection, 1.0 to 7.3%; and for deep infection, 1.0 to 7.1%. One observational study reported a 3.5-fold increase in the risk of blood transfusion in patients with a drain. The overall strength of evidence for these findings is considered low or insufficient. Conclusions Conclusions from this systematic review are limited by the quality of included studies that assessed the use of closed suction wound drains in lumbar spine surgeries for degenerative conditions. We believe that spine surgeons should not routinely rely on closed suction wound drains in lumbar spine surgery until a higher level of evidence becomes available to support its use. PMID:26682098

  17. Outcome of Salvage Lumbar Fusion after Lumbar Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Harel

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Purpose This study aims to define the role of lumbar fusion for persistent back pains after the lumbar disc replacement. Overview of Literature Little is written about lumbar fusion after optimally placed lumbar arthroplasty in patients with persistent lower back pains. Methods Retrospective review of cases of lumbar artificial disc requiring subsequent fusion because of persistent back pains despite optimally placed artificial discs. Outcomes were evaluated using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analogue scale (VAS). Clinical improvements indicated 25% improvement in ODI and VAS values. Results Five patients met the study criteria. The mean baseline ODI for the five patients was 52. The mean baseline VAS scores for back and leg pains were 76 and 26, respectively. All the five patients had optimally placed prosthesis. The indication for surgery was the constant low back pains found in all the patients. Revision surgery involved disc explantation and fusion in two of the patients and posterolateral fusion without removing the prosthesis in three. None of the patients achieved adequate pain control after the revision surgery despite the solid bony fusion documented by postoperative computed tomography. The mean ODI value after the fusion was 55. The mean values for back and leg pains VAS were 72 and 30, respectively. Conclusions Lack of good pain relief after successful lumbar artifical disc replacements may indicate different etiology for the back pains. The spine-treating surgeons should have a high threshold level to perform salvage fusion at that level. PMID:24596600

  18. Percutaneous lumbar disc decompression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Derby, Richard

    2006-04-01

    Chronic low back pain is a major social, economic, and healthcare issue in the United States. Various techniques are utilized in managing discogenic pain, with or without disc herniation. Percutaneous techniques are rapidly replacing traditional open surgery in operations requiring discectomy, decompression, and fusion. The percutaneous access to the disc was first used in the 1950s to biopsy the disc with needles. Percutaneous access to the disc using endoscopic techniques was developed in the 1970s. Technical advances in the use of intradiscal therapies led to the development of intradiscal electrothermal annuloplasty (IDET), DISC Nucleoplasty, and DeKompressor, along with laser-assisted, endoscopic, and Nucleotome disc decompressions. The indications for percutaneous lumbar disc decompression include low back and lower extremity pain caused by a symptomatic disc. Internal disc disruptions and disc herniations are common causes of low back and/or lower extremity pain which may become chronic, if not diagnosed and treated. Annular tears lead to migration of the nuclear material and deranged internal architecture. In the chronically damaged intervertebral disc, leakage of nuclear material from annular tears can initiate, promote, and continue the inflammatory process and delay or stop recovery of vital remaining intradiscal tissue. The most often stated goal of central nuclear decompression is to lower the pressure in the nucleus and to allow room for the herniated fragment to implode inward. Provocative discography prior to percutaneous lumbar disc decompression is recommended. Percutaneous disc decompression may result in a small number of complications but occasionally, these could be serious. PMID:16703975

  19. Validation of the Korean Version of the DN4 Diagnostic Questionnaire for Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Lumbar or Lumbar-Radicular Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Park, Joon-Hee; Bouhassira, Didier; Shin, Jae-Hoon; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Baek, Chang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic value of the Korean version of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) questionnaire and to validate this questionnaire in terms of psychometric properties in patients with chronic pain due to degenerative spinal disease. Materials and Methods The Korean version of the DN4 questionnaire, which was translated and linguistically validated by the MAPI Research Group, was tested on 83 patients with lumbar or lumbar-radicular pain. Test-retest reliability was evaluated in a subsample of 40 patients who completed two assessments with an interval of 2 weeks. Nociceptive pain and neuropathic component pain were diagnosed in 40 and 43 patients, respectively. Results The Cronbach's α coefficient of internal consistency was 0.819, and the test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient (3, 1) (95% confidence interval) was 0.813 (0.776–0.847) (n=40). The area under the receiver-operator characteristics curve was 0.953 (p<0.001), with 95% confidence interval between 0.869 and 0.990. The Korean version of the DN4 questionnaire showed a sensitivity of 100% and 87.1%, and a specificity of 88.2% and 94.1% at the cutoff value of 3/10 and 4/10, respectively, for discriminating neuropathic component pain. Conclusion The present study demonstrated the good discriminatory power of DN4 between nociceptive pain and neuropathic component pain in patients with lumbar or lumbar-radicular pain. PMID:26847299

  20. Plasma gastrin in congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, I. M.; Drainer, I. K.; Moore, M. R.; Buchanan, K. D.

    1975-01-01

    Fasting plasma gastrin levels were measured in babies with pyloric stenosis and in normal babies of similar age. There was no difference in gastrin levels either before or after operation between the babies with pyloric stenosis and normal babies. Similarly, neither the fasting blood glucose nor the fasting gastric pH of the babies with pyloric stenosis differed significantly from the values obtained in normal babies. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that gastrin in the fasting baby has an aetiological role in the development of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis of infancy. An alternative hypothesis is suggested. PMID:238476

  1. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Ben; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Scott, Robert A.H.; Leadbeater, Wendy; Scheven, Ben A.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs) and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs), MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC), adipose tissues (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC), together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment. PMID:25752437

  2. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease.

    PubMed

    Mead, Ben; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Scott, Robert A H; Leadbeater, Wendy; Scheven, Ben A

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs) and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs), MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC), adipose tissues (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC), together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment. PMID:25752437

  3. The Effect of the Retroperitoneal Transpsoas Minimally Invasive Lateral Interbody Fusion on Segmental and Regional Lumbar Lordosis

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tien V.; Vivas, Andrew C.; Dakwar, Elias; Baaj, Ali A.; Uribe, Juan S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion (MIS LIF) in the lumbar spine can correct coronal Cobb angles, but the effect on sagittal plane correction is unclear. Methods. A retrospective review of thirty-five patients with lumbar degenerative disease who underwent MIS LIF without supplemental posterior instrumentation was undertaken to study the radiographic effect on the restoration of segmental and regional lumbar lordosis using the Cobb angles on pre- and postoperative radiographs. Mean disc height changes were also measured. Results. The mean follow-up period was 13.3 months. Fifty total levels were fused with a mean of 1.42 levels fused per patient. Mean segmental Cobb angle increased from 11.10° to 13.61° (P < 0.001) or 22.6%. L2-3 had the greatest proportional increase in segmental lordosis. Mean regional Cobb angle increased from 52.47° to 53.45° (P = 0.392). Mean disc height increased from 6.50 mm to 10.04 mm (P < 0.001) or 54.5%. Conclusions. The MIS LIF improves segmental lordosis and disc height in the lumbar spine but not regional lumbar lordosis. Anterior longitudinal ligament sectioning and/or the addition of a more lordotic implant may be necessary in cases where significant increases in regional lumbar lordosis are desired. PMID:22919332

  4. Cardiovascular syphilis with coronary stenosis and aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Satyendra; Moorthy, Nagaraja

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular manifestations of tertiary syphilis include aortitis, aortic root dilation, aneurysm formation, aortic regurgitation, and coronary ostial stenosis. Coronary ostial lesions have been detected in as many as 26% of patients with syphilitic aortitis. However nonostial coronary stenosis and coronary aneurysms in same patient is rarely described in cardiovascular syphilis. PMID:25634420

  5. Syphilitic aortitis causing bilateral coronary ostial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hosoba, Soh; Suzuki, Tomoaki; Koizumi, Yusuke; Asai, Tohru

    2011-02-01

    Coronary ostial stenosis in otherwise normal coronary vessels is a rare complication of syphilitic aortitis. A 47-year-old man with no coronary risk factors developed severe isolated ostial stenosis in the left main coronary artery and right coronary artery. He underwent coronary artery bypass grafting using the bilateral internal thoracic arteries and gastroepiploic artery and recovered uneventfully. PMID:21345777

  6. A Meta-Analysis of Unilateral versus Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation in Minimally Invasive Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Fei, Qi; Wang, Bingqiang; Lv, Pengfei; Chi, Cheng; Yang, Yong; Zhao, Fan; Lin, Jisheng; Ma, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Meta-analysis. Background Bilateral pedicle screw fixation (PS) after lumbar interbody fusion is a widely accepted method of managing various spinal diseases. Recently, unilateral PS fixation has been reported as effective as bilateral PS fixation. This meta-analysis aimed to comparatively assess the efficacy and safety of unilateral PS fixation and bilateral PS fixation in the minimally invasive (MIS) lumbar interbody fusion for one-level degenerative lumbar spine disease. Methods MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, BIOSIS Previews, and Cochrane Library were searched through March 30, 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) on unilateral versus bilateral PS fixation in MIS lumbar interbody fusion that met the inclusion criteria and the methodological quality standard were retrieved and reviewed. Data on participant characteristics, interventions, follow-up period, and outcomes were extracted from the included studies and analyzed by Review Manager 5.2. Results Six studies (5 RCTs and 1 CCT) involving 298 patients were selected. There were no significant differences between unilateral and bilateral PS fixation procedures in fusion rate, complications, visual analogue score (VAS) for leg pain, VAS for back pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI). Both fixation procedures had similar length of hospital stay (MD = 0.38, 95% CI = −0.83 to 1.58; P = 0.54). In contrast, bilateral PS fixation was associated with significantly more intra-operative blood loss (P = 0.002) and significantly longer operation time (P = 0.02) as compared with unilateral PS fixation. Conclusions Unilateral PS fixation appears as effective and safe as bilateral PS fixation in MIS lumbar interbody fusion but requires less operative time and causes less blood loss, thus offering a simple alternative approach for one-level lumbar degenerative disease. PMID:25375315

  7. Spinal stenosis prevalence and association with symptoms: The Framingham Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Leonid; Cole, Robert; Kim, David H.; Li, Ling; Suri, Pradeep; Guermazi, Ali; Hunter, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Context The prevalence of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) in the general population and association with low back pain (LBP) remains unclear. Purpose 1) to evaluate the prevalence of congenital and acquired LSS observed on computed tomography (CT) in a community-based sample; 2) to evaluate the association between LSS and LBP. Study design/Setting Cross-sectional observational study. This study was an ancillary project to the Framingham Heart Study. Sample 3529 participants underwent multi-detector CT. 191 were enrolled in this study. Outcome Measures Self-report Measures LBP in the preceding 12 months was evaluated using a self-report questionnaire. Physiologic Measures LSS (congenital and acquired) was characterized using two cut-points: 12 mm for relative LSS, and 10 mm for absolute LSS. Methods Using multiple logistic regression we examined the association between LSS and LBP, adjusting for sex, age and BMI. Results In the congenital group, relative LSS was found in 4.7% and absolute LSS in 2.6% of patients. Acquired LSS was found in 22.5% and in 7.3%, respectively. Acquired LSS showed increasing prevalence with age: <40 years, the prevalence of relative and absolute LSS was 20.0% and 4.0%, respectively; in those 60–69 years the prevalence was 47.2% and 19.4%, respectively. The presence of absolute LSS was associated with LBP with an odds ratio of 3.16 (95% CI: 1.05–9.53). Conclusions The prevalence of congenital and acquired LSS in a community-based sample was characterized. The prevalence of acquired stenosis increased with age. LSS is associated with a three-fold higher risk of experiencing LBP. PMID:19398386

  8. Early experience with endoscopic revision of lumbar spinal fusions.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Lynn B; Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; Wang, Michael Y; Hofstetter, Christoph P

    2016-02-01

    Approximately half a million spinal fusion procedures are performed annually in the US. It is estimated that up to one-third of arthrodesis constructs require revision surgeries. In this study the authors present endoscopic treatment strategies targeting 3 types of complications following arthrodesis surgery: 1) adjacent-level foraminal stenosis; 2) foraminal stenosis at an arthrodesis segment; and 3) stenosis caused by a displaced interbody cage. A retrospective chart review of 11 patients with a mean age of 68 ± 15 years was performed (continuous variables are shown as the mean ± SEM). All patients had a history of lumbar arthrodesis surgery and suffered from unilateral radiculopathy. Endoscopic revision surgeries were done as outpatient procedures, and there were no intraoperative or perioperative complications. The cohort included 3 patients with foraminal stenosis at the level of previous arthrodesis. They presented with unilateral radicular leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS] score: 7.3 ± 2.1) and were severely disabled, as evidenced by an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) of 46 ± 4.9. Transforaminal endoscopic foraminotomies were performed, and at a mean follow-up time of 9.0 ± 2.5 months VAS was reduced by an average of 6.3. The cohort also includes 7 patients suffering unilateral radiculopathy due to adjacent-level foraminal stenosis. Preoperative VAS for leg pain of the symptomatic side was 6.0 ± 1.6, VAS for back pain was 5.2 ± 1.7, and ODI was 40 ± 6.33. Endoscopic decompression led to reduction of the ipsilateral leg VAS score by an average of 5, resulting in leg pain of 1 ± 0.5 at an average of 8 months of follow-up. The severity of back pain remained stable (VAS 4.2 ± 1.4). Two of these patients required revision surgery for recurrent symptoms. Finally, this study includes 1 patient who presented with weakness and pain due to retropulsion of an L5/S1 interbody spacer. The patient underwent an endoscopic interlaminar approach with partial resection of the interbody cage, which resulted in complete resolution of her radicular symptoms. Endoscopic surgery may be a useful adjunct for management of certain arthrodesis-related complications. Endoscopic foraminal decompression of previously fused segments and resection of displaced interbody cages appears to have excellent outcomes, whereas decompression of adjacent segments remains challenging and requires further investigation. PMID:26828879

  9. Degenerative meniscus: Pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Richard; Kumar, Neil S; Patel, Nimit; Tom, James

    2014-01-01

    The symptomatic degenerative meniscus continues to be a source of discomfort for a significant number of patients. With vascular penetration of less than one-third of the adult meniscus, healing potential in the setting of chronic degeneration remains low. Continued hoop and shear stresses upon the degenerative meniscus results in gross failure, often in the form of complex tears in the posterior horn and midbody. Patient history and physical examination are critical to determine the true source of pain, particularly with the significant incidence of simultaneous articular pathology. Joint line tenderness, a positive McMurray test, and mechanical catching or locking can be highly suggestive of a meniscal source of knee pain and dysfunction. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging are frequently utilized to examine for osteoarthritis and to verify the presence of meniscal tears, in addition to ruling out other sources of pain. Non-operative therapy focused on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy may be able to provide pain relief as well as improve mechanical function of the knee joint. For patients refractory to conservative therapy, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy can provide short-term gains regarding pain relief, especially when combined with an effective, regular physiotherapy program. Patients with clear mechanical symptoms and meniscal pathology may benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, but surgery is not a guaranteed success, especially with concomitant articular pathology. Ultimately, the long-term outcomes of either treatment arm provide similar results for most patients. Further study is needed regarding the short and long-term outcomes regarding conservative and surgical therapy, with a particular focus on the economic impact of treatment as well. PMID:25405088

  10. The Use of Percutaneous Lumbar Fixation Screws for Bilateral Pedicle Fractures with an Associated Dislocation of a Lumbar Disc Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, William D.; Harrison, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Case report. Objective. To identify a safe technique for salvage surgery following complications of total disc replacement. Summary of Background Data. Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) is considered by some as the gold standard for discogenic back pain. Revision techniques for TDR and their complications are in their infancy. This case describes a successful method of fixation for this complex presentation. Methods and Results. A 48-year-old male with lumbar degenerative disc disease and no comorbidities. Approximately two weeks postoperatively for a TDR, the patient represented with acute severe back pain and the TDR polyethylene inlay was identified as dislocated anteriorly. Subsequent revision surgery failed immediately as the polyethylene inlay redislocated intraoperatively. Further radiology identified bilateral pedicle fractures, previously unseen on the plain films. The salvage fusion of L5/S1 reutilized the anterior approach with an interbody fusion cage and bone graft. The patient was then turned intraoperatively and redraped. The percutaneous pedicle screws were used to fix L5 to the sacral body via the paracoccygeal corridor. Conclusion. The robust locking screw in the percutaneous screw allowed a complete fixation of the pedicle fractures. At 3-year followup, the patient has an excellent result and has returned to playing golf. PMID:24294533

  11. Value of Pre-employment Radiographic Assessment of the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    La Rocca, Henry; Macnab, Ian; Olson, Carl

    1969-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that pre-employment radiographic examination provides information which permits identification of individuals who are likely to develop symptoms of lumbar pain under the stress of physical labour, the study reported was undertaken. Two groups of male labourers of minimum age 35 years were matched for important variables, and differentiated by the circumstance that one group alone had the additional characteristic of a positive history of lumbar disability. Study of the radiographs of these subjects allowed tabulation of all deviations from normal, both minor and major. A computerized comparative analysis was performed on the data. It was found that there is no developmental or degenerative change or combination of such changes which has predictive value when applied to the individual. Therefore, since this examination provides no legitimate criteria for prognostication, the hypothesis as stated is invalid, and the worth of the policy of pre-employment assessment is open to serious question. PMID:5344990

  12. Protective Effect of Ligustrazine on Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Degeneration of Rats Induced by Prolonged Upright Posture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Dao-Fang; Xi, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Yan; Li, Chen-Guang; Liu, Shu-Fen; Lu, Sheng; Zhao, Yong-Jian; Shi, Qi; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Most chronic low back pain is the result of degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral disc. Ligustrazine, an alkaloid from Chuanxiong, reportedly is able to relieve pain, suppress inflammation, and treat osteoarthritis and it has the protective effect on cartilage and chondrocytes. Therefore, we asked whether ligustrazine could reduce intervertebral disc degeneration. To determine the effect of ligustrazine on disc degeneration, we applied a rat model. The intervertebral disc degeneration of the rats was induced by prolonged upright posture. We found that pretreatment with ligustrazine for 1 month recovered the structural distortion of the degenerative disc; inhibited the expression of type X collagen, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, and MMP3; upregulated type II collagen; and decreased IL-1?, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. In conclusion, ligustrazine is a promising agent for treating lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration disease. PMID:24872832

  13. Changes in lumbosacral spinal nerve roots on diffusion tensor imaging in spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Zhong-jun; Huang, Yong; Fan, Zi-wen; Li, Xin-chun; Cao, Bing-yi

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral degenerative disc disease is a common cause of lower back and leg pain. Conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) scans are commonly used to image spinal cord degeneration. However, these modalities are unable to image the entire lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative assessment of compressed lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Subjects were 20 young healthy volunteers and 31 patients with lumbosacral stenosis. T2WI showed that the residual dural sac area was less than two-thirds that of the corresponding normal area in patients from L3 to S1 stenosis. On T1WI and T2WI, 74 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots from 31 patients showed compression changes. DTI showed thinning and distortion in 36 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (49%) and abruption in 17 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (23%). Moreover, fractional anisotropy values were reduced in the lumbosacral spinal nerve roots of patients with lumbosacral stenosis. These findings suggest that DTI can objectively and quantitatively evaluate the severity of lumbosacral spinal nerve root compression. PMID:26807125

  14. Investigation of biomechanical behavior of lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic stabilization device using finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoghare, Ashish B.; Kashyap, Siddharth; Padole, Pramod M.

    2013-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of lower back pain and significantly alters the biomechanics of the lumbar spine. Dynamic stabilization device is a remedial technique which uses flexible materials to stabilize the affected lumbar region while preserving the natural anatomy of the spine. The main objective of this research work is to investigate the stiffness variation of dynamic stabilization device under various loading conditions under compression, axial rotation and flexion. Three dimensional model of the two segment lumbar spine is developed using computed tomography (CT) scan images. The lumbar structure developed is analyzed in ANSYS workbench. Two types of dynamic stabilization are considered: one with stabilizing device as pedicle instrumentation and second with stabilization device inserted around the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis suggests that proper positioning of the dynamic stabilization device is of paramount significance prior to the surgery. Inserting the device in the posterior region indicates the adverse effects as it shows increase in the deformation of the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis executed by positioning stabilizing device around the inter-vertebral disc yields better result for various stiffness values under compression and other loadings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Lumbar interbody expanding cage. A preliminary study on an animal model.

    PubMed

    Manunta, M L; Careddu, G M; Masala, G; Columbano, N; Doria, C; Crissantu, L; Sanna Passino, E

    2008-01-01

    Interbody fusion devices are used in human medicine for treating degenerative diseases of the spine. Currently, there is not a universally accepted assessment tool for determining fusion, and the definitive criteria for diagnosing a successful interbody fusion remain controversial. The aim of this study was to describe microscopic and helical computed tomography (CT) imaging in the assessment of lumbar interbody fusion using cylindrical threaded titanium expanding cage in sheep. One cylindrical threaded expanding titanium cage (Proconcept--SA, Orange, France) was inserted through a transperitoneal approach after radical discectomy and packed with cancellous bone autograft in five adult sheep. The subjects were euthanatized after three, six, 12, 18 and 24 months. CT images revealed lumbar fusion at 12 months post operation, whereas microscopic evaluations indicated the presence of lumbar fusion at 18 months. CT and histological grades were the same in 65% of the cases observed. There were not a significant difference between CT, histological and micro radiographic grades. Helical CT scanning can be considered to be a suitable method for the monitoring of lumbar fusion as it enables observation of the deposition of bony bridging within the cage. PMID:18704248

  16. Chiropractic management of a patient with lumbar spine pain due to synovial cyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cox, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to report the findings resulting from chiropractic care using flexion distraction spinal manipulation for a patient with low back and radicular pain due to spinal stenosis caused by a synovial cyst. Case Report A 75-year-old man presented with low back pain radiating to the right anterior thigh and down the left posterior leg of 3 years' duration. Physical and imaging examinations showed a synovial cyst–induced spinal stenosis at the right L3-L4 level and bilateral L4-L5 spinal stenosis. Intervention and Outcomes Flexion distraction spinal manipulation and physiological therapeutics were applied at the levels of stenosis. After 4 visits, the patient noted total absence of the right and left lower extremity pain and no adverse reaction to treatment. After 3 months of treatment and 16 visits, his low back and buttock pain were minimal; and he had no leg pain. Conclusion Lumbar synovial cyst and stenosis–generated low back and radicular pain was 80% relieved in a 75-year-old man following Cox flexion distraction spinal manipulation. PMID:22942836

  17. Use of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Among Patients Undergoing Fusion for Degenerative Diagnoses in the United States, 2002–2012

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Jon D.; Deyo, Richard A.; Tosteson, Anna N.A.; Farrokhi, Farrokh Reza; Mirza, Sohail K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Context Use of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) as an adjunct to spinal fusion surgery proliferated following Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in 2002. Major safety concerns emerged in 2008. Purpose To examine whether published concerns about the safety of BMP altered clinical practice. Study Design/Setting Analysis of the National Inpatient Sample from 2002 through 2012. Patient Sample Adults (age >20) undergoing an elective fusion operation for common degenerative diagnoses, identified using codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 9th revisions, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). Outcome Measures Proportion of cervical and lumbar fusion operations, over time, that involved BMP. Methods We aggregated the data into a monthly time series and reported the proportion of cervical and lumbar fusion operations, over time, that involved BMP. Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average, a regression model for time series data, was used to test whether there was a statistically significant change in the overall rate of BMP use following a FDA Public Health Notification in 2008. The study was funded by federal research grants, and no investigator had any conflict of interests. Results Use of BMP in spinal fusion procedures increased rapidly until 2008, involving up to 45.2% of lumbar and 13.5% of cervical fusions. BMP use significantly decreased following the 2008 FDA Public Health Notification and revelations of financial payments to surgeons involved in the pivotal FDA approval trials. For lumbar fusion, the average annual increase was 7.9 percentage points per year from 2002 to 2008, followed by an average annual decrease of 11.7 percentage points thereafter (p = <0.001). Use of BMP in cervical fusion increased 2.0% per year until the FDA Notification, followed by a 2.8% per year decrease (p = 0.035). Conclusions Use of BMP in spinal fusion surgery declined subsequent to published safety concerns and revelations of financial conflicts-of-interest for investigators involved in the pivotal clinical trials. PMID:25523380

  18. Preoperative retrolisthesis as a risk factor of postdecompression lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shota; Tateishi, Kosuke; Hosono, Noboru; Mukai, Yoshihiro; Fuji, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT In this study, the authors aimed to identify specific risk factors for postdecompression lumbar disc herniation (PDLDH) in patients who have not undergone discectomy and/or fusion. METHODS Between 2007 and 2012, 493 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent bilateral partial laminectomy without discectomy and/or fusion in a single hospital. Eighteen patients (herniation group [H group]: 15 men, 3 women; mean age 65.1 years) developed acute sciatica as a result of PDLDH within 2 years after surgery. Ninety patients who did not develop postoperative acute sciatica were selected as a control group (C group: 75 men, 15 women; mean age 65.4 years). Patients in the C group were age and sex matched with those in the H group. The patients in the groups were also matched for decompression level, number of decompression levels, and surgery date. The radiographic variables measured included percentage of slippage, intervertebral angle, range of motion, lumbar lordosis, disc height, facet angle, extent of facet removal, facet degeneration, disc degeneration, and vertebral endplate degeneration. The threshold for PDLDH risk factors was evaluated using a continuous numerical variable and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The area under the curve was used to determine the diagnostic performance, and values greater than 0.75 were considered to represent good performance. RESULTS Multivariate analysis revealed that preoperative retrolisthesis during extension was the sole significant independent risk factor for PDLDH. The area under the curve for preoperative retrolisthesis during extension was 0.849; the cutoff value was estimated to be a retrolisthesis of 7.2% during extension. CONCLUSIONS The authors observed that bilateral partial laminectomy, performed along with the removal of the posterior support ligament, may not be suitable for lumbar spinal stenosis patients with preoperative retrolisthesis greater than 7.2% during extension. PMID:26654340

  19. Epiglottic laryngoplasty for complicated laryngeal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sobol, S M; Levine, H; Wood, B; Tucker, H M

    1981-01-01

    The technique of epiglottic laryngoplasty, previously described for reconstruction following near total laryngectomy for glottic carcinoma, has been used in selected patients with severe glottic and subglottic stenosis. Our experience in four patients suggests that it is useful for 1) laryngeal stenosis in which there is loss or collapse of the external cartilaginous framework, and 2) laryngeal stenosis which is refractory to the usual forms of therapy. The technique is a technically simple, one-stage procedure which provides its own endolaryngeal mucosal lining, as well as autogenous cartilaginous support. It has been successful in restoring adequate airway and preserving voice without interfering with deglutition or laryngeal competence in most patients. PMID:7271159

  20. Rheumatic aortic stenosis in young patients presenting with combined aortic and mitral stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, G; Cherian, G; Krishnaswami, S; SUKUMAR, I P; John, S

    1977-01-01

    This report describes 30 patients under the age of 30 years with rheumatic aortic stenosis, presenting with combined aortic and mitral stenosis. Three patients had additional tricuspid stenosis. Twenty-eight patients gave a history of rheumatic polyarthritis. The diagnosis was confirmed by right and left heart catheterisation in all. The murmur of aortic stenosis was not initially present in 8 out of 10 patients in congestive heart failure. Aortic valve calcification was not seen. Cineangiography showed a tricuspid aortic valve in all, unlike congenital aortic stenosis. A unique feature of this group was the raised pulmonary vascular resistance in 87 per cent of the patients. The present study shows that patients in India developing aortic stenosis after rheumatic fever do so early in the natural history of the disease. PMID:849390

  1. Proteomics to Understand the Degenerative Matter.

    PubMed

    Bergquist, Jonas

    2014-10-01

    No matter what we do, eat or practice - sooner or later we all will start loosing our abilities to control our bodily functions, maintain muscle control and innervations. Most of us will grow old and degrade by natural causes, while some of us unfortunately will be affected by fast or slow progressive diseases or even have accidents with traumas that will initiate dramatic degenerative effects. We have recently demonstrated that a shotgun proteomic approach coupled with relative quantitative dimethyl labeling (DML) method can analyze the global changes in the human brain and skeletal muscle proteome. Very limited amount of material (biopsy) is needed for comparison. The underlying objective of our studies are to identify potential protein biomarkers related to the development of degeneration but also to be able to get in detail structural characteristics of protein modifications that are initiated by disease. These proteins are involved in several biological processes including fundamental brain function, muscle development and contraction, metabolic process, enzyme activity, glycolysis, regulation of apoptosis and transport activity. We have identified a number of different factors behind this phenomenon that also reveals new knowledge about the natural aging. PMID:26461281

  2. Pursuing longevity: delay vs elimination of degenerative diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Olshansky, S J

    1985-01-01

    Using a new model which allows for projection of mortality change resulting from preventive health care measures, prospective changes in longevity for the resident United States population in 1978 were compared with projections of longevity gains occurring under a standard single cause-elimination model. Results indicate that equal or greater gains accrue from the prevention or delay of several major degenerative diseases, than from the complete elimination of some single major degenerative diseases. Observed declines in mortality from 1960 to 1978 have resulted in gains in longevity equivalent to the successful elimination of some major degenerative diseases. PMID:4003651

  3. Left coronary artery stenosis causing left ventricular dysfunction in two children with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Okan; Altin, Firat H; Kaya, Mehmet; Ozyılmaz, Isa; Guzeltas, Alper; Erek, Ersin

    2015-04-01

    Congenital supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS) is an arteriopathy associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) and other isolated elastin gene deletions. Cardiovascular manifestations associated with WBS are characterized by obstructive arterial lesions such as SVAS and pulmonary artery stenosis in addition to bicuspid aortic valve and mitral valve prolapse. However, coronary artery ostial stenosis may be associated with SVAS, and it increases the risk of sudden death and may complicate surgical management. In this report, we present our experience with two patients having SVAS and left coronary artery ostial stenosis with associated left ventricular dysfunction. PMID:25870356

  4. The Efficacy and Perioperative Complications Associated with Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery, Focusing on Geriatric Patients in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Chun; Kwon, Ki-Young; Lee, Jong-Ju; Lee, Jong-Won; Lee, Hyun-Koo

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy and perioperative complications associated with lumbar spinal fusion surgery, focusing on geriatric patients in the Republic of Korea. Methods We retrospectively investigated 485 patients with degenerative spinal diseases who had lumbar spinal fusion surgeries between March 2006 and December 2010 at our institution. Age, sex, comorbidity, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, fusion segments, perioperative complications, and outcomes were analyzed in this study. Risk factors for complications and their association with age were analyzed. Results In this study, 81 patients presented complications (16.7%). The rate of perioperative complications was significantly higher in patients 70 years or older than in other age groups (univariate analysis, p=0.015; multivariate analysis, p=0.024). The perioperative complications were not significantly associated with the other factors tested (sex, comorbidity, ASA class, and fusion segments). Post-operative outcomes of lumbar spinal fusion surgeries for the patients were determined on the basis of MacNab's criteria (average follow up period : 19.7 months), and 412 patients (85.0%) were classified as having "excellent" or "good" results. Conclusion Increasing age was an important risk factor for perioperative complications in patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery, whereas other factors were not significant. However, patients' satisfaction or return to daily activities when compared with younger patients did not show much difference. We recommend good clinical judgment as well as careful selection of geriatric patients for lumbar spinal fusion surgery. PMID:24294456

  5. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  6. Patterns of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis following Myodil myelography: the significance of spinal canal stenosis and previous surgery.

    PubMed

    Laitt, R; Jackson, A; Isherwood, I

    1996-08-01

    109 patients who had undergone Myodil myelography on at least one occasion were identified. The patterns of lumbar nerve root distribution in this group were examined using magnetic resonance imaging. The relationship between these patterns and the presence of spinal stenosis or previous surgery was investigated. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditic nerve root patterns were seen in 68 patients and were classified into three groups according to Delemarter et al. Central clumping of nerve roots (type 1) and complete opacification of the thecal sac (type 3), extending over at least one vertebral level, were significantly related to spinal stenosis at an adjacent level (p < 0.0001). Peripheral adhesion of nerve roots to the theca (type 2) was significantly related to previous surgery at the level of abnormality (p < 0.00005). Only a single case of arachnoiditic nerve root patterns was seen in the absence of stenosis or previous surgery. We conclude that chronic adhesive arachnoiditis is significantly related to previous Myodil myelography in the presence of spinal stenosis or previous surgery but that Myodil alone rarely produces these changes. PMID:8949669

  7. Hemodynamics of Curved Vessels with Stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghosian, Michael E.; Cassel, Kevin W.

    2007-11-01

    In hemodialysis access, the brachiocephalic or upper-arm fistula has less than optimal functional rates. The cause of this reduced patency is stenosis due to intimal hyperplasia in the cephalic vein. Stenosis typically leads to thrombosis and ultimately failure of the fistula. To increase our understanding of this process, numerical simulations of the unsteady, two-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the flow in an infinite channel having curvature and stenosis. Physiologically relevant Reynolds numbers ranging from 300 to 1500 and stenosis percentages of 0, 25, 50, and 75 are modeled. The post-stenotic flow is characterized by strong shear layers and recirculation regions. The largest shear stresses are found just upstream of the stenosis apex. The maximum shear stress increases with increasing Reynolds number and percent stenosis. The results indicate that hemodynamic conditions in the vein after fistula creation combined with curvature of the cephalic arch lead to shear stresses that exceed normal physiological values (both minimum and maximum). In some cases, the shear stresses are sufficiently large to cause damage to the endothelium and possibly denudation.

  8. The Relation Between Sacral Angle and Vertical Angle of Sacral Curvature and Lumbar Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Haddadi, Kaveh; Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Ganjeh, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability and validity of a goniometric measurement of the vertical angle of the sacrum and sacral angle (SA), and their relationships to lumbar degeneration. A herniated lumbar disc is one of the most frequent medical issues. Investigators in a number of studies have reported associated risk factors for prevalent disc degeneration. Atypical lumbosacral angles and curvature are thought to contribute to the degradation of the spine by many researchers. This study analyzed 360 patients referred to our clinic from 2013 to 2015 due to low back pain. A cross-sectional case–control study was designed in order to compare the sagittal alignment of the lumbosacral area in 3 groups of patients suffering from LBP. A total 120 patients were in a control group with a normal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 120 patients had lumbar disk herniation (LDH), and 120 patients had spinal stenosis. From the sagittal plan of lumbar MRI, SA and vertical angle of sacral curvature (VASC) were determined and then analyzed. The means of VASC in these groups were: 38.98 (SD: 6.36 ± 0.58), 40.89 (SD: 7.69 ± 0.69), and 40.54 (SD: 7.13 ± 0.92), respectively (P = 0.089). Moreover, studies of SA in 3 groups showed that the means of SA were: 39.30 (SD: 6.69 ± 0.63), 40.52 (SD: 7.47 ± 0.65), and 35.63 (SD: 6.07 ± 0.79), respectively. Relation between SA and spinal stenosis was just statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05). One significant limitation of our study is the lack of standing MRI for increased accuracy of measurement. However, we were reluctant to give patients needless exposure to radiation from conventional X-ray, and instead used MRI scans. We did not find any significant correlation between the VASC and LDH in lumbar MRI. Also, SA is not an independent risk factor for LDH in men and women. We suggested that there are several biomechanical factors involved in LDH. PMID:26871821

  9. Contribution of Microglia-Mediated Neuroinflammation to Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Maria H.; Boia, Raquel; Santos, Paulo F.; Ambrósio, António F.; Santiago, Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are major causes of vision loss and blindness worldwide and are characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. One common feature of retinal degenerative diseases and brain neurodegenerative diseases is chronic neuroinflammation. There is growing evidence that retinal microglia, as in the brain, become activated in the course of retinal degenerative diseases, having a pivotal role in the initiation and propagation of the neurodegenerative process. A better understanding of the events elicited and mediated by retinal microglia will contribute to the clarification of disease etiology and might open new avenues for potential therapeutic interventions. This review aims at giving an overview of the roles of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in major retinal degenerative diseases like glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25873768

  10. Age-Related Loss of Lumbar Spinal Lordosis and Mobility – A Study of 323 Asymptomatic Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Dreischarf, Marcel; Albiol, Laia; Rohlmann, Antonius; Pries, Esther; Bashkuev, Maxim; Zander, Thomas; Duda, Georg; Druschel, Claudia; Strube, Patrick; Putzier, Michael; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Background The understanding of the individual shape and mobility of the lumbar spine are key factors for the prevention and treatment of low back pain. The influence of age and sex on the total lumbar lordosis and the range of motion as well as on different lumbar sub-regions (lower, middle and upper lordosis) in asymptomatic subjects still merits discussion, since it is essential for patient-specific treatment and evidence-based distinction between painful degenerative pathologies and asymptomatic aging. Methods and Findings A novel non-invasive measuring system was used to assess the total and local lumbar shape and its mobility of 323 asymptomatic volunteers (age: 20–75 yrs; BMI <26.0 kg/m2; males/females: 139/184). The lumbar lordosis for standing and the range of motion for maximal upper body flexion (RoF) and extension (RoE) were determined. The total lordosis was significantly reduced by approximately 20%, the RoF by 12% and the RoE by 31% in the oldest (>50 yrs) compared to the youngest age cohort (20–29 yrs). Locally, these decreases mostly occurred in the middle part of the lordosis and less towards the lumbo-sacral and thoraco-lumbar transitions. The sex only affected the RoE. Conclusions During aging, the lower lumbar spine retains its lordosis and mobility, whereas the middle part flattens and becomes less mobile. These findings lay the ground for a better understanding of the incidence of level- and age-dependent spinal disorders, and may have important implications for the clinical long-term success of different surgical interventions. PMID:25549085

  11. Aortic Stenosis: Changing Disease Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Rashedi, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) occurs in almost 10% of adults over age 80 years with a mortality about 50% at 2 years unless outflow obstruction is relieved by aortic valve replacement (AVR). Development of AS is associated with anatomic, clinical and genetic risk factors including a bicuspid valve in 50%; clinical factors that include older age, hypertension, smoking, diabetes and elevated serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels; and genetic factors such as a polymorphism in the Lp(a) locus. Early stages of AS are characterized by focal areas of leaflet thickening and calcification. The rate of hemodynamic progression is variable but eventual severe AS is inevitable once even mild valve obstruction is present. There is no specific medical therapy to prevent leaflet calcification. Basic principles of medical therapy for asymptomatic AS are patient education, periodic echocardiographic and clinical monitoring, standard cardiac risk factor evaluation and modification and treatment of hypertension or other comorbid conditions. When severe AS is present, a careful evaluation for symptoms is needed, often with an exercise test to document symptom status and cardiac reserve. In symptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR improves survival and relieves symptoms. In asymptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR also is appropriate if ejection fraction is < 50%, disease progression is rapid or AS is very severe (aortic velocity > 5 m/s). The choice of surgical or transcatheter AVR depends on the estimated surgical risk plus other factors such as frailty, other organ system disease and procedural specific impediments. PMID:26140146

  12. [Etiology, pathophysiology and conservative therapy of degenerative rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Jandrić, Slavica

    2002-01-01

    ETIOLOGY OF DEGENERATIVE JOINT DISEASES: Etiology of degenerative joint diseases is still not clearly understood and there is no specific management for this group of diseases. Various pathological conditions cause damage of the articular cartilage and lead to clinically and radiographically recognized impairment. Biomechanical, metabolic, genetic factors, inflammation and other risk factors contribute to development of osteoarthrosis. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF DEGENERATIVE JOINT DISEASES: Osteoarthrosis is characterized by progressive erosion of articular cartilage and bone overgrowth at the joint margins. Cartilage integrity requires balance between synthesis and degradation of matrix components. Chondrocytes react to various mechanical and chemical stresses in order to stabilize and restore the tissue. Failures in stabilizing and restoring the tissue lead to cartilage degeneration that may be irreversibile. For better understanding of conservative management of degenerative joint diseases it is important to know the impact of pathophysiology mechanisms on development of degenerative joint diseases. There is great variability in the rate of progression of erosive processes in articular cartilage in clinical, radiographic signs and course of the disease. This is in relation with many factors, as well as with management and response to therapy. TREATMENT OF DEGENERATIVE JOINT DISEASES: Treatment should vary depending on the severity of disease and patient's expectations and level of activity. Besides analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs, conventional and not conventional treatment and techniques can be used for management of osteoarthrosis. Physical therapy and exercises are very important for maintaining muscle strength, joint stability and mobility, but should be closely monitored for optimal efficacy. PMID:12037935

  13. Hybrid Surgery Combined with Dynamic Stabilization System and Fusion for the Multilevel Degenerative Disease of the Lumbosacral Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2015-01-01

    Background As motion-preserving technique has been developed, the concept of hybrid surgery involves simultaneous application of two different kinds of devices, dynamic stabilization system and fusion technique. In the present study, the application of hybrid surgery for lumbosacral degenerative disease involving two-segments and its long-term outcome were investigated. Methods Fifteen patients with hybrid surgery (Hybrid group) and 10 patients with two-segment fusion (Fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Results Preoperative grade for disc degeneration was not different between the two groups, and the most common operated segment had the most degenerated disc grade in both groups; L4-5 and L5-S1 in the Hybrid group, and L3-4 and L4-5 in Fusion group. Over 48 months of follow-up, lumbar lordosis and range of motion (ROM) at the T12-S1 global segment were preserved in the Hybrid group, and the segmental ROM at the dynamic stabilized segment maintained at final follow-up. The Fusion group had a significantly decreased global ROM and a decreased segmental ROM with larger angles compared to the Hybrid group. Defining a 2-mm decrease in posterior disc height (PDH) as radiologic adjacent segment pathology (ASP), these changes were observed in 6 and 7 patients in the Hybrid and Fusion group, respectively. However, the last PDH at the above adjacent segment had statistically higher value in Hybrid group. Pain score for back and legs was much reduced in both groups. Functional outcome measured by Oswestry disability index (ODI), however, had better improvement in Hybrid group. Conclusion Hybrid surgery, combined dynamic stabilization system and fusion, can be effective surgical treatment for multilevel degenerative lumbosacral spinal disease, maintaining lumbar motion and delaying disc degeneration. PMID:26484008

  14. Complications of intraoperative epidural steroid use in lumbar discectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Miller, Brandon A; Haussen, Diogo C; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The authors' aim in this paper was to review the intraoperative use of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy surgery with a focus on surgical complications. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was done using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Relevant papers were retrieved and analyzed. The authors performed a meta-analysis of all available data. Search terms included epidural, steroids, discectomy, lumbar disc surgery, herniated lumbar disc, methylprednisolone, and perioperative.The primary outcome was surgical complications such as wound infection or need for reoperation. Secondary outcomes were pain and postoperative narcotic usage. RESULTS Sixteen trials and 1 retrospective study (a total of 1933 patients) were eligible for inclusion in this study. In all studies, steroids were added epidurally over the nerve root before closure in cases, and control patients underwent discectomy alone. The mean age (42.7 years vs 42.4 years; RR 0.30 [95% CI -0.30 to 0.90], p = 0.32), overall complication rates (2.69% vs 1.18%; RR 1.94 [95% CI 0.72-5.26], p = 0.19), and infectious complication rates (0.94% vs 0.08%; RR 4.58 [95% CI 0.75-27.95], p = 0.10) were similar between the steroid group and control group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS There is good evidence that epidural steroids can decrease pain in the short term and decrease the usage of postoperative narcotics after lumbar spinal surgery for degenerative spinal disease. The authors' results demonstrate a trend toward increased infection with epidural steroid use, but there was not a statistically significant difference. More studies are needed to validate the long-term risk/benefit ratio of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy. PMID:26424336

  15. Retrospective analysis of co-occurrence of congenital aortic stenosis and pulmonary artery stenosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kander, M; Pasławska, U; Staszczyk, M; Cepiel, A; Pasławski, R; Mazur, G; Noszczyk-Nowak, A

    2015-01-01

    The study has focused on the retrospective analysis of cases of coexisting congenital aortic stenosis (AS) and pulmonary artery stenosis (PS) in dogs. The research included 5463 dogs which were referred for cardiological examination (including clinical examination, ECG and echocardiography) between 2004 and 2014. Aortic stenosis and PS stenosis were detected in 31 dogs. This complex defect was the most commonly diagnosed in Boxers - 7 dogs, other breeds were represented by: 4 cross-breed dogs, 2 Bichon Maltais, 3 Miniature Pinschers, 2 Bernese Mountain Dogs, 2 French Bulldogs, and individuals of following breeds: Bichon Frise, Bull Terrier, Czech Wolfdog, German Shepherd, Hairless Chinese Crested Dog, Miniature Schnauzer, Pug, Rottweiler, Samoyed, West Highland White Terrier and Yorkshire Terrier. In all the dogs, the murmurs could be heard, graded from 2 to 5 (on a scale of 1-6). Besides, in 9 cases other congenital defects were diagnosed: patent ductus arteriosus, mitral valve dysplasia, pulmonary or aortic valve regurgitation, tricuspid valve dysplasia, ventricular or atrial septal defect. The majority of the dogs suffered from pulmonary valvular stenosis (1 dog had supravalvular pulmonary artery stenosis) and subvalvular aortic stenosis (2 dogs had valvular aortic stenosis). Conclusions and clinical relevance - co-occurrence of AS and PS is the most common complex congenital heart defect. Boxer breed was predisposed to this complex defect. It was found that coexisting AS and PS is more common in male dogs and the degree of PS and AS was mostly similar. PMID:26812828

  16. Outcome scores in degenerative cervical disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Zoëga, B; Kärrholm, J; Lind, B

    2000-04-01

    Forty-six consecutive patients with neck pain and arm radiculopathy were treated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. All patients had neurological symptoms corresponding to a herniated disc and/or spondylosis at one or two cervical levels, verified by magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were stabilized with an anterior graft and randomized to either fixation with a CSLP plate or no internal fixation. Preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively the patients filled in a questionnaire that included a modified Million Index, a modified Oswestry Index and the Zung Depression Scale. They were also asked to register their pain in the arm and in the neck on a vertical visual analogue scale (VAS). At the 2-year follow-up, an unbiased observer graded the patients' clinical outcome using Odom's criteria. A test-retest procedure was carried out to examine the questionnaire reproducibility. In the group that was operated at one level, there was no significant improvement in any of the scores. Nevertheless, 81% of the patients were satisfied with the outcome of the surgery. All scores improved in the group operated at two levels. The pain in the neck and arm, as measured on a VAS, decreased in both groups. The improvement in arm pain was significantly more pronounced in patients operated with a plate at two levels compared to those who were operated without a plate. At the 2-year follow-up, patients with an excellent or good result according to Odom's criteria had a lower Million Index (P < 0.0005), Oswestry Index (P < 0.0005), and Zung (P = 0.024) score, than the group classified as fair or poor. There was a significant correlation (P < 0.0001 for all scores) between the test and retest results. We conclude that the modified Million Index and Oswestry Index are clinically useful tools in the evaluation of outcome after degenerative cervical disc surgery. The clinical benefits of plate fixation were minimal. The outcome after surgery, measured with the Oswestry Index, Million Index and VAS for arm and neck pain, seems to correlate well with the classification of outcome by Odom. PMID:10823430

  17. The Felix-trial. Double-blind randomization of interspinous implant or bony decompression for treatment of spinal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Decompressive laminotomy is the standard surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with canal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication. New techniques, such as interspinous process implants, claim a shorter hospital stay, less post-operative pain and equal long-term functional outcome. A comparative (cost-) effectiveness study has not been performed yet. This protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on (cost-) effectiveness of the use of interspinous process implants versus conventional decompression surgery in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods/Design Patients (age 40-85) presenting with intermittent neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis lasting more than 3 months refractory to conservative treatment, are included. Randomization into interspinous implant surgery versus bony decompression surgery will take place in the operating room after induction of anesthesia. The primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient measured by the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ), at 8 weeks and 1 year after surgery. Other outcome parameters include perceived recovery, leg and back pain, incidence of re-operations, complications, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism and costs. The study is a randomized multi-institutional trial, in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses are kept blinded of the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 1 year. Discussion Currently decompressive laminotomy is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Whether surgery with interspinous implants is a reasonable alternative can be determined by this trial. Trial register Dutch Trial register number: NTR1307 PMID:20507568

  18. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using rhBMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Schnöring, Mark; Hohaus, Christian; Minkus, Yvonne; Beier, Andre; Ganey, Timothy; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The use of biological technologies for the treatment of degenerative spinal diseases has undergone rapid clinical and scientific development. BMP strategies have gained wide support for an inherent potential to improve the ossification process. It has been extensively studied in combination with various techniques for spinal stabilisation from both anterior and posterior approach. We studied the fusion process after implantation of rhBMP-2 in 17 patients with degenerative lumbar spine diseases in combination with dorsal fixation with pedicle screws and poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) interbody cages. We used 12 mg rhBMP-2 carried by collagen sponge, 6 mg in every cage. Patient follow up consisted of pre-operative radiographic and clinical evaluation. Similar post-operative evaluations were performed at 3 and 6 months. Clinical assessment demonstrated clear improvement in all patients despite evidence of vertebral endplate osteoclastic activity in the 3-month radiographs. The 6-month radiograph, however, confirmed evidence of fusion, and no untoward results or outcomes were noted. While previous studies have shown exclusively positive results in both fusion rates and process, our study demonstrated an intermediate morphology at 3 months during the ossification process using Induct Os in combination with peek-cages using a PLIF-technique. The transient resorption of bone surrounding the peek cage did not result in subsidence, pain or complication, and fusion was reached in all cases within a 6-month-controlled evaluation. Although there was no negative influence on clinical outcome, the potential for osteoclastic or metabolic resorption bears watching during the post-surgical follow up. PMID:18839225

  19. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using rhBMP-2.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Hans Jörg; Schnöring, Mark; Hohaus, Christian; Minkus, Yvonne; Beier, Andre; Ganey, Timothy; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2008-12-01

    The use of biological technologies for the treatment of degenerative spinal diseases has undergone rapid clinical and scientific development. BMP strategies have gained wide support for an inherent potential to improve the ossification process. It has been extensively studied in combination with various techniques for spinal stabilisation from both anterior and posterior approach. We studied the fusion process after implantation of rhBMP-2 in 17 patients with degenerative lumbar spine diseases in combination with dorsal fixation with pedicle screws and poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) interbody cages. We used 12 mg rhBMP-2 carried by collagen sponge, 6 mg in every cage. Patient follow up consisted of pre-operative radiographic and clinical evaluation. Similar post-operative evaluations were performed at 3 and 6 months. Clinical assessment demonstrated clear improvement in all patients despite evidence of vertebral endplate osteoclastic activity in the 3-month radiographs. The 6-month radiograph, however, confirmed evidence of fusion, and no untoward results or outcomes were noted. While previous studies have shown exclusively positive results in both fusion rates and process, our study demonstrated an intermediate morphology at 3 months during the ossification process using Induct Os in combination with peek-cages using a PLIF-technique. The transient resorption of bone surrounding the peek cage did not result in subsidence, pain or complication, and fusion was reached in all cases within a 6-month-controlled evaluation. Although there was no negative influence on clinical outcome, the potential for osteoclastic or metabolic resorption bears watching during the post-surgical follow up. PMID:18839225

  20. Evidence for Management of Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIDA, Kazumichi; MIYAMOTO, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we presented the evidence concerning carotid artery stenosis treatment in symptomatic stenosis and asymptomatic stenosis separately, and discussed the future challenges. The validity of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) to treat moderate or greater degree of symptomatic carotid artery stenosis appears to be established. Due to the additional option of carotid artery stenting (CAS), it is necessary to comprehensively determine whether CEA or CAS is more appropriate for each individual patient. Moreover, since there are rapid advancements in devices for CAS and improvements in treatment outcomes, continual learning of the latest treatment method is essential. For asymptomatic stenosis, due to improvements in the outcomes with best medical treatment (BMT), it is essential to re-evaluate the use of invasive CEA/CAS. Continual verification of the latest randomized clinical trial that compares CEA, CAS, and BMT, and establishment of a diagnostic method that can accurately extract the group of patients who have the highest future risk of developing ischemia, are desired. PMID:25739437

  1. Myelography as a stand-alone diagnostic procedure for degenerative spine disease in developing nations.

    PubMed

    Park, Bert Edward; Kitya, David

    2010-04-01

    The use of "stand-alone" contrast myelography (i.e., without computed tomography) has a proven track record in developing nations where few patients have access to magnetic resonance imaging, whether on the basis of prohibitive cost or the absence of such a modality altogether. To substantiate the author's 12-year experience with more than 300 myelograms performed in 16 different countries (plus some 1500 studies during 30 years of practice in the United States), a prospective pilot study was undertaken over 1 month in a community-based neurosurgical setting in western Kenya. Forty patients underwent cervical or lumbar myelography at Tenwek Hospital under the auspices of the Neurosurgery Training Program for East, Central, and South Africa (NSTP-ECSA) following failure of conservative measures to treat spine-related pathology. Thirty-five of the forty patients (88%) came to definitive surgery on the basis of a positive study that correlated with their clinical history and physical examination. There were no significant complications from the procedures, and no false-positive studies, with virtually all patients returning to normal activity and/or gainful employment within 3 weeks of their surgery. Myelography as a stand-alone diagnostic procedure is a sensitive, specific, and cost-effective means of diagnosing symptomatic degenerative spine disorders. Accordingly, its use should be encouraged at every NSTP-ECSA training site to address such ubiquitous pathology. PMID:20849779

  2. Mast Quadrant-assisted Minimally Invasive Modified Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Single Incision Versus Double Incision

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xin-Lei; Wang, Hong-Li; Lyu, Fei-Zhou; Wang, Li-Xun; Ma, Xiao-Sheng; Jiang, Jian-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The concept of minimally invasive techniques is to make every effort to reduce tissue damage. Certainly, reducing skin incision is an important part of these techniques. This study aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility of Mast Quadrant-assisted modified transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with a small single posterior median incision. Methods: During the period of March 2011 to March 2012, 34 patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disease underwent the minimally invasive modified TLIF assisted by Mast Quadrant with a small single posterior median incision (single incision group). The cases in this group were compared to 37 patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disease in the double incision group. The perioperative conditions of patients in these two groups were statistically analyzed and compared. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores, and sacrospinalis muscle damage evaluation indicators before operation and 3, 12 months postoperation were compared. Results: A total of 31 and 35 cases in the single incision and double incision groups, respectively, completed at least 12 months of systemic follow-up. The differences in perioperative conditions between the two groups were not statistically significant. The incision length of the single incision group was significantly shorter than that of the double incision group (P < 0.01). The ODI and VAS scores of patients in both groups improved significantly at 3 and 12 months postoperation. However, these two indicators at 3 and 12 months postoperation and the sacrospinalis muscle damage evaluation indicators at 3 months postoperation did not differ significantly between the two groups (P ≥ 0.05). Conclusions: Mast Quadrant-assisted modified TLIF with a small single posterior median incision has excellent clinical feasibility compared to minimally invasive TLIF with a double paramedian incision. PMID:25836605

  3. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic bilateral lumbar sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Segers, B; Himpens, J; Barroy, J P

    2007-06-01

    The first retroperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy was performed in 1924 by Julio Diez. The classic procedure for sympathectomy is open surgery. We report a unilateral laparoscopic retroperitoneal approach to perform bilateral lumbar sympathectomy. This approach was performed for a 43-year-old man with distal arterial occlusive disease and no indication for direct revascularization. His predominant symptoms were intermittent claudication at 100 metres and cold legs. The patient was placed in a left lateral decubitus position. The optical system was placed first in an intra-abdominal position to check that the trocars were well positioned in the retroperitoneal space. The dissection of retroperitoneum was performed by CO2 insufflation. The inferior vena cava was reclined and the right sympathetic chain was individualized. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. The aorta was isolated on a vessel loop and careful anterior traction allowed a retro-aortic pre-vertebral approach between the lumbar vessels. The left sympathetic chain was dissected. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. PMID:17685269

  4. Lumbar lordosis of extinct hominins.

    PubMed

    Been, Ella; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Kramer, Patricia A

    2012-01-01

    The lordotic curvature of the lumbar spine (lumbar lordosis) in humans is a critical component in the ability to achieve upright posture and bipedal gait. Only general estimates of the lordotic angle (LA) of extinct hominins are currently available, most of which are based on the wedging of the vertebral bodies. Recently, a new method for calculating the LA in skeletal material has become available. This method is based on the relationship between the lordotic curvature and the orientation of the inferior articular processes relative to vertebral bodies in the lumbar spines of living primates. Using this relationship, we developed new regression models in order to calculate the LAs in hominins. The new models are based on primate group-means and were used to calculate the LAs in the spines of eight extinct hominins. The results were also compared with the LAs of modern humans and modern nonhuman apes. The lordotic angles of australopithecines (41° ± 4), H. erectus (45°) and fossil H. sapiens (54° ± 14) are similar to those of modern humans (51° ± 11). This analysis confirms the assumption that human-like lordotic curvature was a morphological change that took place during the acquisition of erect posture and bipedalism as the habitual form of locomotion. Neandertals have smaller lordotic angles (LA = 29° ± 4) than modern humans, but higher angles than nonhuman apes (22° ± 3). This suggests possible subtle differences in Neandertal posture and locomotion from that of modern humans. PMID:22052243

  5. Three Different Methods in Deformity Correction of Degenerative Flat Back: A Single Surgeon's Experience with 64 Consecutive Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Tack; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kang, Kyung-Jung; Lee, Jung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To evaluate the radiological and clinical results of three different methods in the deformity correction of a degenerative flat back. Overview of Literature There are no comparative studies about different procedures in the treatment of degenerative flat back. Methods Sixty-four patients who consecutively underwent corrective surgery for degenerative flat back were reviewed. The operations were performed by three different methods: posterior-only (group P, n=20), one-stage anterior-posterior (group AP, n=12), and two-stage anterior-posterior with iliac screw fixation (group AP-I, n=32). Medical and surgical complications were examined and radiological and clinical results were compared. Results The majority of medical and surgical complications were found in group AP (5/12) and group P (7/20). The sagittal vertical axes were within normal range immediately postoperatively in all groups, but only group AP-I showed normal sagittal alignment at the final follow-up. Postoperative lumbar lordosis was also significantly higher in group AP-I than in group P or group AP and the finding did not change through the last follow-up. The Oswestry disability index was significantly lower in groups AP and AP-I than in group P at the final follow-up. Meanwhile, the operating time was the longest in group AP-I, and total amount of blood loss was larger in group AP-I and group AP than in group P. Conclusions Anterior-posterior correction showed better clinical results than posterior-only correction. Two-staged anterior-posterior correction with iliac screw fixation showed better radiological results than posterior-only or one-staged anterior-posterior correction. Two-staged anterior-posterior correction with iliac screw fixation also showed a lower complication rate than one-staged anterior-posterior correction. PMID:26097651

  6. Direct Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Clinical and Radiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Young Baeg

    2014-01-01

    Objective According to the recent development of minimally invasive spinal surgery, direct lumbar interbody fusion (DLIF) was introduced as an effective option to treat lumbar degenerative diseases. However, comprehensive results of DLIF have not been reported in Korea yet. The object of this study is to summarize radiological and clinical outcomes of our DLIF experience. Methods We performed DLIF for 130 patients from May 2011 to June 2013. Among them, 90 patients, who could be followed up for more than 6 months, were analyzed retrospectively. Clinical outcomes were compared using visual analog scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Bilateral foramen areas, disc height, segmental coronal and sagittal angle, and regional sagittal angle were measured. Additionally, fusion rate was assessed. Results A total of 90 patients, 116 levels, were underwent DLIF. The VAS and ODI improved statistically significant after surgery. All the approaches for DLIF were done on the left side. The left and right side foramen area changed from 99.5 mm2 and 102.9 mm2 to 159.2 mm2 and 151.2 mm2 postoperatively (p<0.001). Pre- and postoperative segmental coronal and sagittal angles changed statistically significant from 4.1° and 9.9° to 1.1° and 11.1°. Fusion rates of 6 and 12 months were 60.9% and 87.8%. Complications occurred in 17 patients (18.9%). However, most of the complications were resolved within 2 months. Conclusion DLIF is not only effective for indirect decompression and deformity correction but also shows satisfactory mechanical stability and fusion rate. PMID:25132930

  7. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of lumbar hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Man Sup; Lee, Hae Wan; Yu, Chang Hee

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare surgical entity without a standard method of repair. With advancements in laparoscopic techniques, successful lumbar herniorrhaphy can be achieved by the creation of a completely extraperitoneal working space and secure fixation of a wide posterior mesh. We present a total extraperitoneal laparoendoscopic repair of lumbar hernia, which allowed for minimal invasiveness while providing excellent anatomical identification, easy mobilization of contents and wide secure mesh fixation. A total extraperitoneal method of lumbar hernia repair by laparoscopic approach is feasible and may be an ideal option. PMID:22111086

  8. Expandable Polyaryl-Ether-Ether-Ketone Spacers for Interbody Distraction in the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Alimi, Marjan; Shin, Benjamin; Macielak, Michael; Hofstetter, Christoph P.; Njoku, Innocent; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Elowitz, Eric; Härtl, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective StaXx XD (Spine Wave, Inc., Shelton, CT, United States) is an expandable polyaryl-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) wafer implant utilized in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. PEEK implants have been successfully used as interbody devices. Few studies have focused on expandable PEEK devices. The aim of the current study is to determine the radiographic and clinical outcome of expandable PEEK cages utilized for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with lumbar degenerative diseases. Methods Forty-nine patients who underwent lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of expandable PEEK cages and posterior instrumentation were included. The clinical outcome was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiographic parameters including disk height, foraminal height, listhesis, local disk angle of the index level/levels, regional lumbar lordosis, and graft subsidence were measured preoperatively, postoperatively, and at latest follow-up. Results At an average follow-up of 19.3 months, the minimum clinically important difference for the ODI and VAS back, buttock, and leg were achieved in 64, 52, 58, and 52% of the patients, respectively. There was statistically significant improvement in VAS back (6.42 versus 3.11, p < 0.001), VAS buttock (4.66 versus 1.97, p = 0.002), VAS leg (4.55 versus 1.96, p < 0.001), and ODI (21.7 versus 12.1, p < 0.001) scores. There was a significant increase in the average disk height (6.49 versus 8.18 mm, p = 0.037) and foraminal height (15.6 versus 18.53 mm, p = 0.0001), and a significant reduction in the listhesis (5.13 versus 3.15 mm, p = 0.005). The subsidence of 0.66 mm (7.4%) observed at the latest follow-up was not significant (p = 0.35). Conclusions Midterm results indicate that expandable PEEK spacers can effectively and durably restore disk and foraminal height and improve the outcome without significant subsidence. PMID:26131383

  9. Expandable Polyaryl-Ether-Ether-Ketone Spacers for Interbody Distraction in the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Alimi, Marjan; Shin, Benjamin; Macielak, Michael; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Njoku, Innocent; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Elowitz, Eric; Härtl, Roger

    2015-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective StaXx XD (Spine Wave, Inc., Shelton, CT, United States) is an expandable polyaryl-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) wafer implant utilized in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. PEEK implants have been successfully used as interbody devices. Few studies have focused on expandable PEEK devices. The aim of the current study is to determine the radiographic and clinical outcome of expandable PEEK cages utilized for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with lumbar degenerative diseases. Methods Forty-nine patients who underwent lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of expandable PEEK cages and posterior instrumentation were included. The clinical outcome was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiographic parameters including disk height, foraminal height, listhesis, local disk angle of the index level/levels, regional lumbar lordosis, and graft subsidence were measured preoperatively, postoperatively, and at latest follow-up. Results At an average follow-up of 19.3 months, the minimum clinically important difference for the ODI and VAS back, buttock, and leg were achieved in 64, 52, 58, and 52% of the patients, respectively. There was statistically significant improvement in VAS back (6.42 versus 3.11, p < 0.001), VAS buttock (4.66 versus 1.97, p = 0.002), VAS leg (4.55 versus 1.96, p < 0.001), and ODI (21.7 versus 12.1, p < 0.001) scores. There was a significant increase in the average disk height (6.49 versus 8.18 mm, p = 0.037) and foraminal height (15.6 versus 18.53 mm, p = 0.0001), and a significant reduction in the listhesis (5.13 versus 3.15 mm, p = 0.005). The subsidence of 0.66 mm (7.4%) observed at the latest follow-up was not significant (p = 0.35). Conclusions Midterm results indicate that expandable PEEK spacers can effectively and durably restore disk and foraminal height and improve the outcome without significant subsidence. PMID:26131383

  10. Endovascular interventions for central vein stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Central vein stenosis is common because of the placement of venous access and cardiac intravascular devices and compromises vascular access for dialysis. Endovascular intervention with angioplasty and/or stent placement is the preferred approach, but the results are suboptimal and limited. Primary patency after angioplasty alone is poor, but secondary patency can be maintained with repeated angioplasty. Stent placement is recommended for quick recurrence or elastic recoil of stenosis. Primary patency of stents is also poor, though covered stents have recently shown better patency than bare metal stents. Secondary patency requires repeated intervention. Recanalization of occluded central veins is tedious and not always successful. Placement of hybrid graft-catheter with a combined endovascular surgical approach can maintain patency in many cases. In the presence of debilitating symptoms, palliative approach with endovascular banding or occlusion of the access may be necessary. Prevention of central vein stenosis is the most desirable strategy. PMID:26779426

  11. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in three cats

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Takuma; SUNAHARA, Hiroshi; SUGIMOTO, Keisuke; ITO, Tetsuro; KANAI, Eiichi; FUJII, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Case 1 involved a 4-month-old intact male Somali cat in which peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPS) was recognized after a cardiac murmur remained following patent ductus arteriosus ligation. Case 2, which involved a 1-year-old neutered male Norwegian Forest cat, and Case 3, which involved a 6-month-old intact female American Curl cat, were referred, because of cardiac murmurs. Grades III to IV/VI systolic heart murmurs were auscultated at the left heart base in all 3 cats. All cases showed bilateral pulmonary artery stenosis, although there were no associated clinical signs. In Cases 1 and 2, the pressure gradient through the stenosis decreased after treatment with atenolol. PMID:25650057

  12. Principal component and factor analysis to study variations in the aging lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Khan, A A; Iliescu, D D; Sneath, R J; Hutchinson, C E; Shah, A A

    2015-03-01

    Human spine is a multifunctional structure of human body consisting of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles which all undergo a process of change with the age. A sudden change in these features either naturally or through injury can lead to some serious medical conditions which puts huge burden on health services and economy. While aging is inevitable, the effect of aging on different areas of spine is of clinical significance. This paper reports the growth and degenerative pattern of human spine using principal component analysis. Some noticeable lumbar spine features such as vertebral heights, disc heights, disc signal intensities, paraspinal muscles, subcutaneous fats, psoas muscles, and cerebrospinal fluid were used to study the variations seen on lumbar spine with the natural aging. These features were extracted from lumbar spine magnetic resonance images of 61 subjects with age ranging from 2 to 93 years. Principal component analysis is used to transform complex and multivariate feature space to a smaller meaningful representation. PCA transformation provided 2-D visualization and knowledge of variations among spinal features. Further useful information about correlation among the spinal features is acquired through factor analysis. The knowledge of age related changes in spinal features are important in understanding different spine related problems. PMID:25486654

  13. Objectively quantifying walking ability in degenerative spinal disorder patients using sensor equipped smart shoes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunghoon Ivan; Park, Eunjeong; Huang, Alex; Mortazavi, Bobak; Hayward Garst, Jordan; Jahanforouz, Nima; Espinal, Marie; Siero, Tiffany; Pollack, Sophie; Afridi, Marwa; Daneshvar, Meelod; Ghias, Saif; C Lu, Daniel; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2016-05-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a condition associated with the degeneration of spinal disks in the lower back. A significant majority of the elderly population experiences LSS, and the number is expected to grow. The primary objective of medical treatment for LSS patients has focused on improving functional outcomes (e.g., walking ability) and thus, an accurate, objective, and inexpensive method to evaluate patients' functional levels is in great need. This paper aims to quantify the functional level of LSS patients by analyzing their clinical information and their walking ability from a 10 m self-paced walking test using a pair of sensorized shoes. Machine learning algorithms were used to estimate the Oswestry Disability Index, a clinically well-established functional outcome, from a total of 29 LSS patients. The estimated ODI scores showed a significant correlation to the reported ODI scores with a Pearson correlation coefficient (r) of 0.81 and p<3.5×10(-11). It was further shown that the data extracted from the sensorized shoes contribute most to the reported estimation results, and that the contribution of the clinical information was minimal. This study enables new research and clinical opportunities for monitoring the functional level of LSS patients in hospital and ambulatory settings. PMID:26970892

  14. Acute Contralateral Radiculopathy after Unilateral Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Young-Baeg; Park, Yong-Sook; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Lee, Young-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cases of contralateral radiculopathy after a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with a single cage (unilateral TLIF) had been reported, but the phenomenon has not been explained satisfactorily. The purpose of this study was to determine its incidence, causes, and risk factors. Methods We did retrospective study with 546 patients who underwent a unilateral TLIF, and used CT and MRI to study the causes of contralateral radicular symptoms that appeared within a week postoperatively. Clinical and radiological results were compared by dividing the patients into the symptomatic group and asymptomatic group. Results Contralateral symptoms occurred in 32 (5.9%) of the patients underwent unilateral TLIF. The most common cause of contralateral symptoms was a contralateral foraminal stenosis in 22 (68.8%), screw malposition in 4 (12.5%), newly developed herniated nucleus pulposus in 3 (9.3%), hematoma in 1 (3.1%), and unknown origin in 2 patients (6.3%). 16 (50.0%) of the 32 patients received revision surgery. There was no difference in visual analogue scale and Oswestry disability index between the two groups at discharge. Both preoperative and postoperative contralateral foraminal areas were significantly smaller, and postoperative segmental angle was significantly greater in the symptomatic group comparing to those of the asymptomatic group (p<0.05). Conclusion The incidence rate is not likely to be small (5.9%). If unilateral TLIF is performed for cases when preoperative contralateral foraminal stenosis already exists or when a large restoration of segmental lordosis is required, the probability of developing contralateral radiculopathy is increased and caution from the surgeon is needed. PMID:26587189

  15. Effect of the Degenerative State of the Intervertebral Disk on the Impact Characteristics of Human Spine Segments.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sara E; Alkalay, Ron N; Myers, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Models of the dynamic response of the lumbar spine have been used to examine vertebral fractures (VFx) during falls and whole body vibration transmission in the occupational setting. Although understanding the viscoelastic stiffness or damping characteristics of the lumbar spine are necessary for modeling the dynamics of the spine, little is known about the effect of intervertebral disk degeneration on these characteristics at high loading rates. We hypothesize that disk degeneration significantly affects the viscoelastic response of spinal segments to high loading rate. We additionally hypothesize the lumbar spine stiffness and damping characteristics are a function of the degree of preload. A custom, pendulum impact tester was used to impact 19 L1-L3 human spine segments with an end mass of 20.9 kg under increasing preloads with the resulting force response measured. A Kelvin-Voigt model, fitted to the frequency and decay response of the post-impact oscillations was used to compute stiffness and damping constants. The spine segments exhibited a second-order, under-damped response with stiffness and damping values of 17.9-754.5 kN/m and 133.6-905.3 Ns/m respectively. Regression models demonstrated that stiffness, but not damping, significantly correlated with preload (p < 0.001). Degenerative disk disease, reflected as reduction in magnetic resonance T2 relaxation time, was weakly correlated with change in stiffness at low preloads. This study highlights the need to incorporate the observed non-linear increase in stiffness of the spine under high loading rates in dynamic models of spine investigating the effects of a fall on VFx and those investigating the response of the spine to vibration. PMID:25024122

  16. Effect of the Degenerative State of the Intervertebral Disk on the Impact Characteristics of Human Spine Segments

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sara E.; Alkalay, Ron N.; Myers, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Models of the dynamic response of the lumbar spine have been used to examine vertebral fractures (VFx) during falls and whole body vibration transmission in the occupational setting. Although understanding the viscoelastic stiffness or damping characteristics of the lumbar spine are necessary for modeling the dynamics of the spine, little is known about the effect of intervertebral disk degeneration on these characteristics at high loading rates. We hypothesize that disk degeneration significantly affects the viscoelastic response of spinal segments to high loading rate. We additionally hypothesize the lumbar spine stiffness and damping characteristics are a function of the degree of preload. A custom, pendulum impact tester was used to impact 19 L1–L3 human spine segments with an end mass of 20.9 kg under increasing preloads with the resulting force response measured. A Kelvin–Voigt model, fitted to the frequency and decay response of the post-impact oscillations was used to compute stiffness and damping constants. The spine segments exhibited a second-order, under-damped response with stiffness and damping values of 17.9–754.5 kN/m and 133.6–905.3 Ns/m respectively. Regression models demonstrated that stiffness, but not damping, significantly correlated with preload (p < 0.001). Degenerative disk disease, reflected as reduction in magnetic resonance T2 relaxation time, was weakly correlated with change in stiffness at low preloads. This study highlights the need to incorporate the observed non-linear increase in stiffness of the spine under high loading rates in dynamic models of spine investigating the effects of a fall on VFx and those investigating the response of the spine to vibration. PMID:25024122

  17. Lumbar congestive myelopathy mimicking neoplasia without concurrent vascular malformation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Abe, Yusuke; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori

    2009-07-01

    A 78-year-old male presented with congestive myelopathy manifesting as progressive gait disturbance following conservative therapy for lumbar spinal canal stenosis, with suspected spinal cord tumor in the conus medullaris. His past medical history was unremarkable and he was not aware of any traumatic injury in the back or infectious disease. On admission, he had clumsy hand, moderate paraparesis, significant sensory disturbance below the L5 level, and severe vesicorectal dysfunction. The deep tendon reflex was promoted in the upper extremities, but poorly induced in the lower extremities. Blood examination found no abnormalities including values of tumor markers. Cerebral, cervical, and thoracic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed no contributory pathology without spondylotic change at the C3-C6 levels. Lumbar MR imaging showed fusiform swelling of the cord from the T10 to T12-L1 levels, with rimlike enhancement at the T12-L1 levels by gadolinium. The patient underwent surgery. Intraoperatively, the dorsal surface of the affected cord was pale, not swollen, and sparsely vascularized without tortuous vessels. Midline myelotomy caused escape of creamy material that was identified as necrotic neural tissue. A collapsed vessel, located on the surface of the cord, was histologically identified as a thrombosed vein. The histological findings were compatible with spinal infarction caused by congestive myelopathy. Whole craniospinal and iliac angiography performed postoperatively failed to reveal any dural and paraspinal vascular malformation. His paraparesis, sensory disturbance, and vesicorectal dysfunction improved significantly after surgery. Congestive myelopathy may be caused by various angiographically occult etiologies other than dural arteriovenous fistula. PMID:19633406

  18. Coronary Ostial Stenosis after Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Antonios G.; Economou, Fotios I.; Charokopos, Nicholas A.; Pitsis, Antonios A.; Parharidou, Despina G.; Papadopoulos, Thomas I.; Parharidis, Georgios E.

    2010-01-01

    Coronary ostial stenosis is a rare but potentially serious sequela after aortic valve replacement. It occurs in the left main or right coronary artery after 1% to 5% of aortic valve replacement procedures. The clinical symptoms are usually severe and may appear from 1 to 6 months postoperatively. Although the typical treatment is coronary artery bypass grafting, patients have been successfully treated by means of percutaneous coronary intervention. Herein, we present the cases of 2 patients in whom coronary ostial stenosis developed after aortic valve replacement. In the 1st case, a 72-year-old man underwent aortic valve replacement and bypass grafting of the saphenous vein to the left anterior descending coronary artery. Six months later, he experienced a non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography revealed a critical stenosis of the right coronary artery ostium. In the 2nd case, a 78-year-old woman underwent aortic valve replacement and grafting of the saphenous vein to an occluded right coronary artery. Four months later, she experienced unstable angina. Coronary angiography showed a critical left main coronary artery ostial stenosis and occlusion of the right coronary artery venous graft. In each patient, we performed percutaneous coronary intervention and deployed a drug-eluting stent. Both patients were asymptomatic on 6-to 12-month follow-up. We attribute the coronary ostial stenosis to the selective ostial administration of cardioplegic solution during surgery. We conclude that retrograde administration of cardioplegic solution through the coronary sinus may reduce the incidence of postoperative coronary ostial stenosis, and that stenting may be an efficient treatment option. PMID:20844624

  19. Questions and Answers about Treating Arterial Stenosis and Preventing Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Answers About Treating Arterial Stenosis and Preventing Stroke A stroke is any sudden event affecting the ... and high cholesterol. How does stenosis contribute to stroke? Atherosclerosis can activate cells involved in blood clotting. ...

  20. Ventricular Tachycardia in Congenital Pulmonary Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ruckdeschel, Emily Sue; Schuller, Joseph; Nguyen, Duy Thai

    2016-03-01

    With modern surgical techniques, there is significantly increased life expectancy for those with congenital heart disease. Although congenital pulmonary valve stenosis is not as complex as tetralogy of Fallot, there are many similarities between the 2 lesions, such that patients with either of these conditions are at risk for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Those patients who have undergone surgical palliation for congenital pulmonary stenosis are at an increased risk for development of ventricular arrhythmias and may benefit from a more aggressive evaluation for symptoms of palpitations or syncope. PMID:26920196

  1. DOSE-RESPONSE Relationships Between Whole-Body Vibration and Lumbar Disk DISEASEA Field Study on 388 Drivers of Different Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, S.; Notbohm, G.; Dupuis, H.; Hartung, E.

    1998-08-01

    In a longitudinal study, the dose-response relationships between long term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and degenerative processes in the lumbar spine caused by the lumbar disks were examined. From 1990 to 1992, 388 vibration-exposed workers from different driving jobs were examined medically and by lumbar X-ray. For each individual, a history of all exposure conditions was recorded, and a cumulative vibration dose was calculated allowing comparisons between groups of low, middle, and high intensity of exposure. 310 subjects were selected for a follow-up four years later, of whom 906% (n=281) agreed to participate. In comparing the exposure groups, the results indicate that the limit value ofazw(8h)=08 m/s2should be reviewed. The best fit between the lifelong vibration dose and the occurrence of a lumbar syndrome was obtained by applying a daily reference ofazw(8h)=06 ms2as a limit value. The results became more distinct still when only those subjects were included in the statistical analysis who had had no lumbar symptoms up to the end of the first year of exposure. The prevalence of lumbar syndrome is 155 times higher in the highly exposed group when compared to the reference group with low exposure (CI95%=124/195). Calculating the cumulative incidence of new cases of lumbar syndrome in the follow-up period yields a relative risk ofRRMH=137 (CI95%=086/217) for the highly exposed group. It is concluded that the limit value for the calculation of an individual lifelong vibration dose should be based on a daily reference exposure ofazw(8h)=06 m/s2. With increasing dose it is more and more probable that cases of lumbar syndrome are caused by exposure to vibration.

  2. SIRT1 alleviates senescence of degenerative human intervertebral disc cartilage endo-plate cells via the p53/p21 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Nian; Lin, Xin; Dong, Wen; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Wei; Lin, Liangbo; Qiu, Quanhe; Zhang, Xiaojun; Shen, Jieliang; Song, Zhaojun; Liang, Xi; Hao, Jie; Wang, Dawu; Hu, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage end plates (CEP) degeneration plays an integral role in intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration resulting from nutrient diffusion disorders. Although cell senescence resulting from oxidative stress is known to contribute to degeneration, no studies concerning the role of senescence in CEP degeneration have been conducted. SIRT1 is a longevity gene that plays a pivotal role in many cellular functions, including cell senescence. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether senescence is more prominent in human degenerative CEP and whether SIRT1-regulated CEP cells senescence in degenerative IVD as well as identify the signaling pathways that control that cell fate decision. In this study, the cell senescence phenotype was found to be more prominent in the CEP cells obtained from disc degenerative disease (DDD) patients than in the CEP cells obtained from age-matched lumbar vertebral fractures (LVF) patients. In addition, the results indicated that p53/p21 pathway plays an important role in the senescence of CEP cells in vivo and vitro. Furthermore, SIRT1 was found to be capable of alleviating the oxidative stress-induced senescence of CEP cells in humans via p53/p21 pathway. Thus, the information presented in this study could be used to further investigate the underlying mechanisms of CEP. PMID:26940203

  3. SIRT1 alleviates senescence of degenerative human intervertebral disc cartilage endo-plate cells via the p53/p21 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nian; Lin, Xin; Dong, Wen; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Wei; Lin, Liangbo; Qiu, Quanhe; Zhang, Xiaojun; Shen, Jieliang; Song, Zhaojun; Liang, Xi; Hao, Jie; Wang, Dawu; Hu, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage end plates (CEP) degeneration plays an integral role in intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration resulting from nutrient diffusion disorders. Although cell senescence resulting from oxidative stress is known to contribute to degeneration, no studies concerning the role of senescence in CEP degeneration have been conducted. SIRT1 is a longevity gene that plays a pivotal role in many cellular functions, including cell senescence. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether senescence is more prominent in human degenerative CEP and whether SIRT1-regulated CEP cells senescence in degenerative IVD as well as identify the signaling pathways that control that cell fate decision. In this study, the cell senescence phenotype was found to be more prominent in the CEP cells obtained from disc degenerative disease (DDD) patients than in the CEP cells obtained from age-matched lumbar vertebral fractures (LVF) patients. In addition, the results indicated that p53/p21 pathway plays an important role in the senescence of CEP cells in vivo and vitro. Furthermore, SIRT1 was found to be capable of alleviating the oxidative stress-induced senescence of CEP cells in humans via p53/p21 pathway. Thus, the information presented in this study could be used to further investigate the underlying mechanisms of CEP. PMID:26940203

  4. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Taku

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  5. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  6. Is brain SPECT useful in degenerative dementia diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Farid, Karim; Caillat-Vigneron, Nadine; Sibon, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow assessment performed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain is used to detect early neuronal dysfunction associated with degenerative dementia. Patterns of perfusion abnormalities are different across dementia syndromes. These differences could be used for differential diagnoses and early detection of amnesic mild cognitive impairment in patients with a high risk of conversion to Alzheimer disease. This paper aimed to summarize the expected benefits of single-photon emission computed tomography of the brain in the exploration of degenerative dementias. PMID:21160432

  7. Quantitative Assessment of Lumbar Paraspinal Muscle Endurance

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, John M.; Graves, James E.; Murray, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the reliability and variability of repeated measurements of dynamic and static lumbar muscle endurance. Design and Setting: Participants performed an isometric lumbar-extension strength test followed by 2 trials of 4 separate lumbar muscular-endurance tests (with a 24-hour rest period between tests). Data were collected at a university musculoskeletal research laboratory. Subjects: Eight healthy, physically active volunteers (5 men, 3 women; age = 25.9 ± 4.3 years; height = 169.0 ± 4.6 cm; mass = 73.9 ± 33.1 kg) participated in this investigation. Measurements: We initially tested each participant's isometric lumbar-extension peak torque on a lumbar-extension dynamometer. Static (holding time) and dynamic (repetitions) lumbar-endurance tests were subsequently performed on the lumbar-extension dynamometer and a horizontal roman chair. Results: Interclass reliability was high for all endurance tests completed (r = 0.91 to 0.96, P ≤ .05). Variability (expressed as total error) for the static-dynamometer and roman-chair tests was 18.3 and 11.6 seconds, respectively, with 2.8 and 1.6 repetitions for the dynamic-dynamometer and roman-chair tests, respectively. Conclusions: Lumbar muscle endurance can be reliably assessed by both static and dynamic protocols on high- and low-technology devices. PMID:14608437

  8. Primary lumbar hernia: A rarely encountered hernia

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthy, Sharada; Suresh, H.B.; Anirudh, A.V.; Prakash Rozario, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar hernia is an uncommon abdominal wall hernia, making its diagnosis and management a challenge to the treating surgeon. Presentation may be misleading and diagnosis often missed. An imaging study forms an indispensable aid in the diagnosis and surgery is the only treatment option. Presentation of case A 42 year old male presented with history of pain in lower back of 4 years duration and was being treated symptomatically over 4 years with analgesics and physiotherapy. He had noticed a swelling over the left side of his mid-back and consequently on examination was found to have a primary acquired lumbar hernia arising from the deep superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt. Diagnosis was confirmed by Computed Tomographic imaging. Discussion A lumbar hernia may be primary or secondary with only about 300 cases of primary lumbar hernia reported in literature. Lumbar hernias manifest through two possible defects in the posterior abdominal wall, the superior being more common. Management remains surgical with various techniques emerging over the years. The patient at our center underwent an open sublay mesh repair with excellent outcome. Conclusion A surgeon may encounter a primary lumbar hernia perhaps once in his lifetime making it an interesting surgical challenge. Sound anatomical knowledge and adequate imaging are indispensable. Inspite of advances in minimally invasive surgery, it cannot be universally applied to patients with lumbar hernia and management requires a more tailored approach. PMID:26812667

  9. [Neonatal occlusion due to a lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Hunald, F A; Ravololoniaina, T; Rajaonarivony, M F V; Rakotovao, M; Andriamanarivo, M L; Rakoto-Ratsimba, H

    2011-10-01

    A Petit lumbar hernia is an uncommon hernia. Congenital forms are seen in children. Incarceration may occur as an unreducible lumbar mass, associated with bilious vomiting and abdominal distention. Abdominal X-ray shows sided-wall bowel gas. In this case, reduction and primary closure must be performed as emergency repair. PMID:21868206

  10. Rotational vertebrobasilar ischemia due to vertebral artery dynamic stenoses complicated by an ostial atherosclerotic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Natello, Gregory W; Carroll, Christine M; Katwal, Arabindra B

    2009-08-01

    We describe a patient with rotational vertebrobasilar ischemia (RVBI) due to vertebral artery (VA) compressive stenoses during neck rotation, complicated by an ostial atherosclerotic stenosis (OAS). Referred for 'near-syncopal spells', inquiry revealed a symptom-complex consistent with vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) provoked by head rotation. VA dynamic angiography with imaging via prevertebral subclavian injections in neck-rotated positions while reproducing symptoms, demonstrated two compressive stenoses not present in the neck-neutral position, establishing the diagnosis of RVBI due to CT-demonstrated cervical spondylosis. There was an occluded contralateral VA, isolated posterior circulation, and absent vertebral collateral flow. Disabling symptoms persisted despite using a cervical collar. Surgical decompression of the dynamic stenoses would not address the OAS, was considered high risk, and absence of a suitable donor artery precluded distal VA reconstruction. RVBI resolved with ostial stent placement by improving perfusion pressure across the compressive stenoses. To our knowledge, this is the first report of RVBI in which the affected VA had an obstructive atherosclerotic stenosis in addition to the characteristic rotation-induced dynamic stenoses, and the first report of stent placement in the culprit artery to treat this disorder. Diagnosis depends on recognizing the association of symptoms with positional neck changes and VA dynamic angiography demonstrating the compressive stenosis while reproducing symptoms. This case illustrates the management complexities when there are coexisting abnormalities, emphasizing the need to individualize treatment. RVBI is a potentially correctable cause of TIAs and particularly relevant due to the aging population which has a significant incidence of both degenerative cervical and atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:19651677

  11. Mini posterior lumbar interbody fusion with presacral screw stabilization in early lumbosacral instability

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Arjun; Kini, Abhishek R; Chacko, A; Sunil, Upadhyaya; Vinod, K; Geover, Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical options for the management of early lumbosacral spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with instability vary from open lumbar interbody fusion with transpedicular fixation to a variety of minimal access fusion and fixation procedures. We have used a combination of micro discectomy and axial lumbosacral interbody fusion with presacral screw fixation to treat symptomatic patients with lumbosacral spondylolisthesis or lumbosacral degenerative disc disease, which needed surgical stabilization. This study describes the above technique along with analysis of results. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients with symptomatic lumbosacral (L5-S1) instability and degenerative lumbosacral disc disease were treated by micro discectomy and interbody fusion using presacral screw stabilization. Patients with history of bowel, bladder dysfunction and local anorectal diseases were excluded from this study. Postoperatively all patients were evaluated neurologically and radiologically for screw position, fusion and stability. Oswestry disability index was used to evaluate results. Results: We had nine females and three males with a mean age of 47.33 years (range 26–68 years). Postoperative assessment revealed three patients to have screw placed in anterior 1/4th of the 1st sacral body, in rest nine the screws were placed in the posterior 3/4th of sacral body. At 2 years followup, eight patients (67%) showed evidence of bridging trabeculae at bone graft site and none of the patients showed evidence of instability or implant failure. Conclusion: Presacral screw fixation along with micro discectomy is an effective procedure to manage early symptomatic lumbosacral spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with instability. PMID:26015626

  12. Nitric oxide transport in an axisymmetric stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Xu, X. Yun; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that disturbed flow can impede the transport of nitric oxide (NO) in the artery and hence induce atherogenesis, we used a lumen–wall model of an idealized arterial stenosis with NO produced at the blood vessel–wall interface to study the transport of NO in the stenosis. Blood flows in the lumen and through the arterial wall were simulated by Navier–Stokes equations and Darcy's Law, respectively. Meanwhile, the transport of NO in the lumen and the transport of NO within the arterial wall were modelled by advection–diffusion reaction equations. Coupling of fluid dynamics at the endothelium was achieved by the Kedem–Katchalsky equations. The results showed that both the hydraulic conductivity of the endothelium and the non-Newtonian viscous behaviour of blood had little effect on the distribution of NO. However, the blood flow rate, stenosis severity, red blood cells (RBCs), RBC-free layer and NO production rate at the blood vessel–wall interface could significantly affect the transport of NO. The theoretical study revealed that the transport of NO was significantly hindered in the disturbed flow region distal to the stenosis. The reduced NO concentration in the disturbed flow region might play an important role in the localized genesis and development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22593099

  13. Symptomatic Triple-Region Spinal Stenosis Treated with Simultaneous Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Joseph C.; Raudenbush, Brandon L.; Molinari, Christine; Molinari, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objectives Symptomatic triple-region spinal stenosis (TRSS), defined as spinal stenosis in three different regions of the spine, is extremely rare. To our knowledge, treatment with simultaneous decompressive surgery is not described in the literature. We report a case of a patient with TRSS who was treated successfully with simultaneous decompressive surgery in three separate regions of the spine. Methods A 50-year-old man presented with combined progressive cervical and thoracic myelopathy along with severe lumbar spinal claudication and radiculopathy. He underwent simultaneous decompressive surgery in all three regions of his spine and concomitant instrumented fusion in the cervical and thoracic regions. Results Estimated blood loss for the procedure was 600 mL total (250 mL cervical, 250 mL thoracic, 100 mL lumbar) and operative time was ∼3.5 hours. No changes were noted on intraoperative monitoring. The postoperative course was uncomplicated. The patient was discharged to inpatient rehabilitation on postoperative day (POD) 7 and discharged home on POD 11. At 6-month follow-up, his gait and motor function was improved and returned to normal in all extremities. He remains partially disabled due to chronic back pain. Conclusions This report is the first of symptomatic TRSS treated with simultaneous surgery in three different regions of the spine. Simultaneous triple region stenosis surgery appears to be an effective treatment option for this rare condition, but may be associated with prolonged hospital stay after surgery. PMID:26682102

  14. Symptomatic Triple-Region Spinal Stenosis Treated with Simultaneous Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Joseph C; Raudenbush, Brandon L; Molinari, Christine; Molinari, Robert W

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Case report. Objectives Symptomatic triple-region spinal stenosis (TRSS), defined as spinal stenosis in three different regions of the spine, is extremely rare. To our knowledge, treatment with simultaneous decompressive surgery is not described in the literature. We report a case of a patient with TRSS who was treated successfully with simultaneous decompressive surgery in three separate regions of the spine. Methods A 50-year-old man presented with combined progressive cervical and thoracic myelopathy along with severe lumbar spinal claudication and radiculopathy. He underwent simultaneous decompressive surgery in all three regions of his spine and concomitant instrumented fusion in the cervical and thoracic regions. Results Estimated blood loss for the procedure was 600 mL total (250 mL cervical, 250 mL thoracic, 100 mL lumbar) and operative time was ∼3.5 hours. No changes were noted on intraoperative monitoring. The postoperative course was uncomplicated. The patient was discharged to inpatient rehabilitation on postoperative day (POD) 7 and discharged home on POD 11. At 6-month follow-up, his gait and motor function was improved and returned to normal in all extremities. He remains partially disabled due to chronic back pain. Conclusions This report is the first of symptomatic TRSS treated with simultaneous surgery in three different regions of the spine. Simultaneous triple region stenosis surgery appears to be an effective treatment option for this rare condition, but may be associated with prolonged hospital stay after surgery. PMID:26682102

  15. Management of carotid stenosis. History and today

    PubMed Central

    Jargiełło, Tomasz; Drelich-Zbroja, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Internal carotid stenosis constitutes a significant clinical challenge, since it is the cause of 20–25% of ischemic brain strokes. The management of the internal carotid stenosis for many years has been raising controversies amongst neurologists, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists mainly due to the introduction of endovascular stenting as an alternative to surgical treatment. Its application, however, requires knowledge of specific selection criteria for this kind of treatment as well as of the methods of monitoring patients after stent implantation into the internal carotid artery. Duplex Doppler ultrasound examination is currently a basis for the diagnosis of the arterial stenosis of precranial segments of the carotid arteries. It allows a reliable assessment of not only the course and morphology of the walls, but also of the hemodynamics of blood flow. Interventional treatment is applicable in patients with internal carotid stenosis of ≥70%, which is accompanied by an increase of the systolic flow velocity above 200 cm/s and the end-diastolic velocity above 50–60 cm/s in the stenotic lumen. In most cases, such a diagnosis in duplex Doppler ultrasound examination does not require any confirmation by additional diagnostic methods and if neurological symptoms are also present, it constitutes a single indication for interventional treatment. When deciding about choice of surgical or endovascular method of treatment, the following factors are of crucial importance: morphology of atherosclerotic plaque, its size, echogenicity, homogeneity of its structure, its surface and outlines. By means of ultrasound examinations, patients can be monitored after endovascular stent implantation. They enable evaluation of the degree of stent patency and allow for an early detection of symptoms indicating stenosis recurrence or presence of in-stent thrombosis. When interpreting the findings of the US checkup, it is essential to refer to the initial examination performed in the first days after the procedure and the next ones conducted during the monitoring period. PMID:26675711

  16. Progressive Agraphia Can Be a Harbinger of Degenerative Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukui, Toshiya; Lee, Eiyai

    2008-01-01

    By investigating three patients with progressive agraphia, we explored the possibility that this entity is an early sign of degenerative dementia. Initially, these patients complained primarily of difficulties writing Kanji (Japanese morphograms) while other language and cognitive impairments were relatively milder. Impairments in writing Kana…

  17. Early experience with endoscopic foraminotomy in patients with moderate degenerative deformity.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; McGrath, Lynn; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Wang, Michael Y

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Asymmetrical degeneration of the disc is one of the most common causes of primary degenerative scoliosis in adults. Coronal deformity is usually less symptomatic than a sagittal deformity because there is less expenditure of energy and hence less effort to maintain upright posture. However, nerve root compression at the fractional curve or at the concave side of the main curve can give rise to debilitating radiculopathy. METHODS This study was a retrospective analysis of 16 patients with coronal deformity of between 10° and 20°. All patients underwent endoscopic foraminal decompression surgery. The pre- and postoperative Cobb angle, visual analog scale (VAS), 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and Oswestry Disability Index scores were measured. RESULTS The average age of the patients was 70.0 ± 15.5 years (mean ± SD, range 61-86 years), with a mean followup of 7.5 ± 5.3 months (range 2-14 months). The average coronal deformity was 16.8° ± 4.7° (range 10°-41°). In 8 patients the symptomatic foraminal stenosis was at the level of the fractional curve, and in the remaining patients it was at the concave side of the main curve. One of the patients included in the current cohort had to undergo a repeat operation within 1 week for another disc herniation at the adjacent level. One patient had CSF leakage, which was repaired intraoperatively, and no further complications were noted. On average, preoperative VAS and SF-36 scores showed a tendency for improvement, whereas a dramatic reduction of VAS, by 65% (p = 0.003), was observed in radicular leg pain. CONCLUSIONS Patients with mild to moderate spinal deformity are often compensated and have tolerable levels of back pain. However, unilateral radicular pain resulting from foraminal stenosis can be debilitating. In select cases, an endoscopic discectomy or foraminotomy enables the surgeon to decompress the symptomatic foramen with preservation of essential biomechanical structures, delaying the need for a major deformity correction surgery. PMID:26828887

  18. 78 FR 65450 - Agency Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune, Crystalline and Infectious Arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... oira_submission@omb.eop.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900- NEW (Non-Degenerative...

  19. ISASS Policy Statement – Lumbar Artificial Disc

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this Policy Statement is to educate patients, physicians, medical providers, reviewers, adjustors, case managers, insurers, and all others involved or affected by insurance coverage decisions regarding lumbar disc replacement surgery. Procedures This Policy Statement was developed by a panel of physicians selected by the Board of Directors of ISASS for their expertise and experience with lumbar TDR. The panel's recommendation was entirely based on the best evidence-based scientific research available regarding the safety and effectiveness of lumbar TDR. PMID:25785243

  20. The Relation Between Sacral Angle and Vertical Angle of Sacral Curvature and Lumbar Disc Degeneration: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Haddadi, Kaveh; Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Ganjeh, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability and validity of a goniometric measurement of the vertical angle of the sacrum and sacral angle (SA), and their relationships to lumbar degeneration.A herniated lumbar disc is one of the most frequent medical issues. Investigators in a number of studies have reported associated risk factors for prevalent disc degeneration. Atypical lumbosacral angles and curvature are thought to contribute to the degradation of the spine by many researchers. This study analyzed 360 patients referred to our clinic from 2013 to 2015 due to low back pain. A cross-sectional case-control study was designed in order to compare the sagittal alignment of the lumbosacral area in 3 groups of patients suffering from LBP. A total 120 patients were in a control group with a normal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 120 patients had lumbar disk herniation (LDH), and 120 patients had spinal stenosis. From the sagittal plan of lumbar MRI, SA and vertical angle of sacral curvature (VASC) were determined and then analyzed.The means of VASC in these groups were: 38.98 (SD: 6.36 ± 0.58), 40.89 (SD: 7.69 ± 0.69), and 40.54 (SD: 7.13 ± 0.92), respectively (P = 0.089). Moreover, studies of SA in 3 groups showed that the means of SA were: 39.30 (SD: 6.69 ± 0.63), 40.52 (SD: 7.47 ± 0.65), and 35.63 (SD: 6.07 ± 0.79), respectively. Relation between SA and spinal stenosis was just statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05).One significant limitation of our study is the lack of standing MRI for increased accuracy of measurement. However, we were reluctant to give patients needless exposure to radiation from conventional X-ray, and instead used MRI scans. We did not find any significant correlation between the VASC and LDH in lumbar MRI. Also, SA is not an independent risk factor for LDH in men and women. We suggested that there are several biomechanical factors involved in LDH. PMID:26871821

  1. Laparoscopic management of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Gogolja, D; Visnjić, S; Maldini, B; Radesić, L; Roić, G; Zganjer, M; Fattorini, I

    2001-01-01

    Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a common problem in pediatric surgery. Conventional management by the upper laparotomy was the method of choice over the last few decades. Advanced minimally invasive surgery allows successful endoscopic management of this entity too. We report on our initial experience with endoscopic surgery in the treatment of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis with respect to some technical details. The operative procedure was well tolerated by the infant. After a short and uneventful postoperative course, the infant regained eating habits and was discharged from the hospital on the fifth postoperative day. Our favourable initial experience suggests that laparoscopic pyloromyotomy could be a safe and efficient alternative to the open surgery. PMID:11428282

  2. Pulsatile spiral blood flow through arterial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Linge, Fabian; Hye, Md Abdul; Paul, Manosh C

    2014-11-01

    Pulsatile spiral blood flow in a modelled three-dimensional arterial stenosis, with a 75% cross-sectional area reduction, is investigated by using numerical fluid dynamics. Two-equation k-ω model is used for the simulation of the transitional flow with Reynolds numbers 500 and 1000. It is found that the spiral component increases the static pressure in the vessel during the deceleration phase of the flow pulse. In addition, the spiral component reduces the turbulence intensity and wall shear stress found in the post-stenosis region of the vessel in the early stages of the flow pulse. Hence, the findings agree with the results of Stonebridge et al. (2004). In addition, the results of the effects of a spiral component on time-varying flow are presented and discussed along with the relevant pathological issues. PMID:23477498

  3. Microdecompression in spinal stenosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Park, H K; Chang, J C

    2014-06-01

    A goal of surgical treatment is to effectively treat pathology with minimizing injury of normal tissue. Microdecompression techniques are traditionally defined as procedures performed with a small incision using magnification and minimization of destruction to non-pathologic tissues. The good candidates are patients diagnosed of spinal stenosis who fail an appropriate course of non-operative management. These patients should have radiographic evidence of localized spinal stenosis without associated structural instability. Various techniques of microdecompression have been introduced until now. Although more technically challenging, microdecompression have produced long-lasting favorable outcomes via proper patient selection and surgeon training. In addition, the minimally invasive access techniques can greaten the results of microdecompression in the acute postoperative period. Through advanced minimally invasive techniques, the microdecompression will evolve in the future for sure. PMID:24819482

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Nasopharyngeal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C

    2016-07-01

    Choanal atresia is rare in small animal veterinary medicine, and most cases are misdiagnosed and are actually a nasopharyngeal stenosis (NPS), which is frustrating to treat because of the high recurrence rates encountered after surgical intervention. Minimally invasive treatment options like balloon dilation (BD), metallic stent placement (MS), or covered metallic stent (CMS) placement have been met with success but are associated with various complications that must be considered. The most common complication with BD alone is stenosis recurrence. The most common complications encountered with MS placement is tissue in-growth, chronic infections and the development of an oronasal fistula. The most common complications with a CMS is chronic infections and the development of an oronasal fistula, but stricture recurrence is avoided. PMID:27059368

  5. Pulmonary Vein Stenosis Mimicking Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Linga, Karthika R; Khoor, Andras; Phelan, Jonathan A; Mira-Avendano, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is a known complication after catheter ablation of arrhythmias. Surprisingly, little information is available on its manifestations in the lung. We describe the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented from an outside hospital with worsening shortness of breath after catheter ablation of pulmonary veins for atrial fibrillation. After an initial diagnosis of pneumonia and its nonimprovement with antibiotics, a surgical lung biopsy was done and interpreted as nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with vascular changes consistent with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Later, she was admitted to our institution where a transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and subsequent computed tomography (CT) angiogram of the heart showed severe stenosis of all four pulmonary veins. The previous lung biopsy was rereviewed and reinterpreted as severe parenchymal congestion mimicking NSIP. Our case demonstrates that PVS is an underrecognized complication of catheter ablation, and increased awareness among both clinicians and pathologists is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:26779359

  6. Endovascular treatment of extracranial vertebral artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kocak, Burak; Korkmazer, Bora; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous angioplasty and stenting for the treatment of extracranial vertebral artery (VA) stenosis seems a safe, effective and useful technique for resolving symptoms and improving blood flow to the posterior circulation, with a low complication rate and good long-term results. In patients with severe tortuosity of the vessel, stent placement is a real challenge. The new coronary balloon-expandable stents may be preferred. A large variability of restenosis rates has been reported. Drug-eluting stents may be the solution. After a comprehensive review of the literature, it can be concluded that percutaneous angioplasty and stenting of extracranial VA stenosis is technically feasible, but there is insufficient evidence from randomized trials to demonstrate that endovascular management is superior to best medical management. PMID:23024840

  7. Current management of renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Tomas; Schulte, Karl-Ludwig

    2016-03-01

    Severe renal artery stenosis may cause renovascular hypertension; in case of bilateral narrowing or in a stenotic solitary kidney, renal insufficiency (e.g. ischemic kidney disease) or pulmonary flash edema may ensue. Renal artery stenosis can be treated by revasularization, using either percutaneous angioplasty (with or without stenting) or less common open surgical procedures, both with excellent primary patency rates. However, several randomized trials of renal artery angioplasty or stenting in patients with arteriosclerotic disease have failed to demonstrate a longer-term benefit with regard to blood pressure control and renal function over medical management. It has not yet been demonstrated that renal revascularization leads to a prolongation of event-free survival. Furthermore, endovascular procedures are associated with substantial risks. If revascularization is envisaged careful patient selection, e.g. patients with refractory hypertension or progressive renal failure, is important to maximize the potential benefit. PMID:26730463

  8. Pulmonary Vein Stenosis Mimicking Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Linga, Karthika R.; Khoor, Andras; Phelan, Jonathan A.; Mira-Avendano, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is a known complication after catheter ablation of arrhythmias. Surprisingly, little information is available on its manifestations in the lung. We describe the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented from an outside hospital with worsening shortness of breath after catheter ablation of pulmonary veins for atrial fibrillation. After an initial diagnosis of pneumonia and its nonimprovement with antibiotics, a surgical lung biopsy was done and interpreted as nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with vascular changes consistent with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Later, she was admitted to our institution where a transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and subsequent computed tomography (CT) angiogram of the heart showed severe stenosis of all four pulmonary veins. The previous lung biopsy was rereviewed and reinterpreted as severe parenchymal congestion mimicking NSIP. Our case demonstrates that PVS is an underrecognized complication of catheter ablation, and increased awareness among both clinicians and pathologists is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:26779359

  9. Is that lumbar disc symptomatic? Herniated lumbar disc associated with contralateral radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Jalil, Muhammad Fahmi; Lam, Miu Fei; Wang, Yi Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc may be asymptomatic or associated with lower limb radiculopathy. Most spinal surgeons would offer surgery following a period of conservative measures if the radiological and clinical findings correlate. However, the existing dictum that lumbar radiculopathy should correlate with ipsilateral lumbar disc herniation may not be accurate as it can rarely present with contralateral sciatica. Literature regarding this phenomenon is scarce. Therefore, we report a patient with herniated lumbar disc presenting with predominantly contralateral motor weakness radiculopathy, which resolved after discectomy. PMID:24811105

  10. Do Trunk Muscles Affect the Lumbar Interbody Fusion Rate?: Correlation of Trunk Muscle Cross Sectional Area and Fusion Rates after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using Stand-Alone Cage

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Man Kyu; Park, Bong Jin; Park, Chang Kyu; Kim, Sung Min

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although trunk muscles in the lumbar spine preserve spinal stability and motility, little is known about the relationship between trunk muscles and spinal fusion rate. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the correlation between trunk muscles cross sectional area (MCSA) and fusion rate after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using stand-alone cages. Methods A total of 89 adult patients with degenerative lumbar disease who were performed PLIF using stand-alone cages at L4–5 were included in this study. The cross-sectional area of the psoas major (PS), erector spinae (ES), and multifidus (MF) muscles were quantitatively evaluated by preoperative lumbar magnetic resonance imaging at the L3–4, L4–5, and L5–S1 segments, and bone union was evaluated by dynamic lumbar X-rays. Results Of the 89 patients, 68 had bone union and 21 did not. The MCSAs at all segments in both groups were significantly different (p<0.05) for the PS muscle, those at L3–4 and L4–5 segments between groups were significantly different (p=0.048, 0.021) for the ES and MF muscles. In the multivariate analysis, differences in the PS MCSA at the L4–5 and L5–S1 segments remained significant (p=0.048, 0.043 and odds ratio=1.098, 1.169). In comparison analysis between male and female patients, most MCSAs of male patients were larger than female's. Fusion rates of male patients (80.7%) were higher than female's (68.8%), too. Conclusion For PLIF surgery, PS muscle function appears to be an important factor for bone union and preventing back muscle injury is essential for better fusion rate. PMID:27226860

  11. Carbon dioxide laser stomaplasty for tracheostomal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sani, A

    1998-05-01

    A method of treating tracheostomal stenosis post-laryngectomy is described. The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is used to fashion and ablate two triangular areas lateral to the stenosed stoma to provide an immediate enlarged stoma for comfortable breathing. This simple procedure is done under local anaesthesia, is almost bloodless, safe and takes just 10 minutes. Over the last five years eight patients underwent this procedure and seven had a satisfactory stoma without the need to use a tracheostomy tube. PMID:9747477

  12. Surgical management of meatal stenosis with meatoplasty.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Hsien

    2010-01-01

    Meatal stenosis is a common urologic complication after circumcision. Children present to their primary care physicians with complaints of deviated urinary stream, difficult-to-aim, painful urination, and urinary frequency. Clinical exam reveals a pinpoint meatus and if the child is asked to urinate, he will usually have an upward, thin, occasionally forceful urinary stream with incomplete bladder emptying. The mainstay of management is meatoplasty (reconstruction of the distal urethra /meatus). This educational video will demonstrate how this is performed. PMID:21178957

  13. Punctal stenosis: definition, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Soiberman, Uri; Kakizaki, Hirohiko; Selva, Dinesh; Leibovitch, Igal

    2012-01-01

    Acquired punctal stenosis is a condition in which the external opening of the lacrimal canaliculus is narrowed or occluded. This condition is a rare cause of symptomatic epiphora, but its incidence may be higher in patients with chronic blepharitis, in those treated with various topical medications, including antihypertensive agents, and especially in patients treated with taxanes for cancer. The purpose of this review is to cover the medical literature, focusing in particular on definition, incidence, risk factors, etiology and treatment options. PMID:22848141

  14. [Female urethral stenosis caused by vulvar dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Romero Prez, P; Schiefenbusch Munne, E; Lobato Encinas, J J; Mira Llinares, A

    1990-05-01

    A rare case of chronic obstructive uropathy from urethral stenosis secondary to valvular dystrophy presenting as complete acute urinary retention preceded by progressive dysuria in a 77-year-old patient is described. Patient age and ultrasound evidence of bil