Sample records for degraded dna samples

  1. Extensive evaluation of DNA polymerase performance for highly degraded human DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kijeong; Bazarragchaa, Munkhtsetseg; Brenner, Charles H; Choi, Byung-Sun; Kim, Kyung-Yong

    2015-06-01

    Highly degraded human DNA is commonly encountered in the forensic studies. Despite many efforts, the poor quality and quantity of the DNA often result in unsuccessful DNA analysis. There has been no extensive evaluation of DNA polymerase performance for the successful PCR of highly degraded DNA samples. We evaluated the most efficient DNA polymerases, based on real-time PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis analyses for a single copy gene amplification, with 200 ancient DNA (aDNA) samples of various origins. Nine commercially available DNA polymerases were tested, which included enzymes that are reportedly effective for PCR-inhibitory samples. The first screening test for the polymerases with 20 aDNA samples showed that Pico Maxx HF, FastStart Taq, and Ex Taq HS DNA polymerases were the most effective. Further tests with 180 aDNA samples showed that AmpliTaq Gold (control) amplified PCR products from 52 aDNA samples, PicoMaxx HF from 62, FastStart Taq from 64, and Ex Taq HS from 65. The use of two or more of Ex Taq HS, FastStart Taq, and PicoMaxx HF resulted in a significantly higher success rate than that of AmpliTaq Gold alone. With 37 positive samples tested in duplicate, Ex Taq HS showed the highest reproducibility (13 samples) and AmpliTaq Gold, the lowest (four samples); this difference was significant. The data also showed preferential amplification by the enzymes; Ex Taq HS exclusively produced amplification from two samples, FastStart Taq from one, and PicoMaxx HF from one. We suggest that the initial use of these three DNA polymerases will increase the probability of successfully amplifying DNA from highly degraded human DNA samples. PMID:25912182

  2. Balancing sample accumulation and DNA degradation rates to optimize noninvasive genetic sampling of sympatric carnivores.

    PubMed

    Lonsinger, Robert C; Gese, Eric M; Dempsey, Steven J; Kluever, Bryan M; Johnson, Timothy R; Waits, Lisette P

    2015-07-01

    Noninvasive genetic sampling, or noninvasive DNA sampling (NDS), can be an effective monitoring approach for elusive, wide-ranging species at low densities. However, few studies have attempted to maximize sampling efficiency. We present a model for combining sample accumulation and DNA degradation to identify the most efficient (i.e. minimal cost per successful sample) NDS temporal design for capture-recapture analyses. We use scat accumulation and faecal DNA degradation rates for two sympatric carnivores, kit fox (Vulpes macrotis) and coyote (Canis latrans) across two seasons (summer and winter) in Utah, USA, to demonstrate implementation of this approach. We estimated scat accumulation rates by clearing and surveying transects for scats. We evaluated mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear (nDNA) DNA amplification success for faecal DNA samples under natural field conditions for 20 fresh scats/species/season from <1-112 days. Mean accumulation rates were nearly three times greater for coyotes (0.076 scats/km/day) than foxes (0.029 scats/km/day) across seasons. Across species and seasons, mtDNA amplification success was ?95% through day 21. Fox nDNA amplification success was ?70% through day 21 across seasons. Coyote nDNA success was ?70% through day 21 in winter, but declined to <50% by day 7 in summer. We identified a common temporal sampling frame of approximately 14 days that allowed species to be monitored simultaneously, further reducing time, survey effort and costs. Our results suggest that when conducting repeated surveys for capture-recapture analyses, overall cost-efficiency for NDS may be improved with a temporal design that balances field and laboratory costs along with deposition and degradation rates. PMID:25454561

  3. Capillary electrophoresis of miniSTR markers to genotype highly degraded DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Coble, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    The amplification of short tandem repeat (STR) markers throughout the human nuclear DNA genome are used to associate crime scene evidence to the perpetrator's profile in criminal investigations. For highly challenged or compromised materials such as stains exposed to the elements, skeletal remains from missing persons cases, or fragmented and degraded samples from mass disasters, obtaining a full STR profile may be difficult if not impossible. With the introduction of short amplicon STR or "miniSTR" typing, it is possible to obtain STR genetic information from highly challenged samples without the need to sequence the hypervariable regions of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome. Non-Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) STR markers have been developed to obtain information beyond the core CODIS loci. This chapter will focus on the steps necessary to prepare and use one of the non-CODIS (NC) multiplexes, NC01 (Coble and Butler 2005), for analysis on capillary electrophoresis instrumentation. PMID:22139651

  4. Characterization of 26 miniSTR loci for improved analysis of degraded DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Hill, Carolyn R; Kline, Margaret C; Coble, Michael D; Butler, John M

    2008-01-01

    An additional 20 novel mini-short tandem repeat (miniSTR) loci have been developed and characterized beyond the six previously developed by our laboratory for a total of 26 non-CODIS miniSTR markers. These new markers produce short PCR products in the target range of 50-150 base pairs (bp) by moving the primer sequences as close as possible-often directly next to the identified repeat region. These candidate loci were initially screened based on their small amplicon sizes and locations on chromosomes currently unoccupied by the 13 CODIS STR loci or at least 50 Mb away from them on the same chromosome. They were sequenced and evaluated across more than 600 samples, and their population statistics were determined. The heterozygosities of the new loci were compared with those of the 13 CODIS loci and all were found to be comparable. Only five of the new loci had lower values than the CODIS loci; however, all of these were much smaller in size. This data suggests that these 26 miniSTR loci will serve as useful complements to the CODIS loci to aid in the forensic analysis of degraded DNA, as well as missing persons work and parentage testing with limited next-of-kin reference samples. PMID:18005005

  5. Thermal degradation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Karni, Moshe; Zidon, Dolev; Polak, Pazit; Zalevsky, Zeev; Shefi, Orit

    2013-06-01

    In this article, we investigate the thermal degradation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). We find that under dry conditions, complete DNA degradation occurs at above 190°C. In addition, as the boiling temperature of water is pressure dependent, we have investigated the thermal degradation of the DNA in water for different applied partial pressures. This information is important for fundamental understanding of DNA structure and energetics, and can be useful for biomedical applications such as thermal targeting of DNA in cancer cells, as well as for basic research. PMID:23621849

  6. Evaluating the interaction of faecal pellet deposition rates and DNA degradation rates to optimize sampling design for DNA-based mark-recapture analysis of Sonoran pronghorn.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, S P; Johnson, T R; Waits, L P

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of population demographics is important for species management but can be challenging in low-density, wide-ranging species. Population monitoring of the endangered Sonoran pronghorn (Antilocapra americana sonoriensis) is critical for assessing the success of recovery efforts, and noninvasive DNA sampling (NDS) could be more cost-effective and less intrusive than traditional methods. We evaluated faecal pellet deposition rates and faecal DNA degradation rates to maximize sampling efficiency for DNA-based mark-recapture analyses. Deposition data were collected at five watering holes using sampling intervals of 1-7 days and averaged one pellet pile per pronghorn per day. To evaluate nuclear DNA (nDNA) degradation, 20 faecal samples were exposed to local environmental conditions and sampled at eight time points from one to 124 days. Average amplification success rates for six nDNA microsatellite loci were 81% for samples on day one, 63% by day seven, 2% by day 14 and 0% by day 60. We evaluated the efficiency of different sampling intervals (1-10 days) by estimating the number of successful samples, success rate of individual identification and laboratory costs per successful sample. Cost per successful sample increased and success and efficiency declined as the sampling interval increased. Results indicate NDS of faecal pellets is a feasible method for individual identification, population estimation and demographic monitoring of Sonoran pronghorn. We recommend collecting samples >7 days old and estimate that a sampling interval of 4-7 days in summer conditions (i.e. extreme heat and exposure to UV light) will achieve desired sample sizes for mark-recapture analysis while also maximizing efficiency. PMID:25522240

  7. Sequencing Degraded DNA from Non-Destructively Sampled Museum Specimens for RAD-Tagging and Low-Coverage Shotgun Phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Tin, Mandy Man-Ying; Economo, Evan Philip; Mikheyev, Alexander Sergeyevich

    2014-01-01

    Ancient and archival DNA samples are valuable resources for the study of diverse historical processes. In particular, museum specimens provide access to biotas distant in time and space, and can provide insights into ecological and evolutionary changes over time. However, archival specimens are difficult to handle; they are often fragile and irreplaceable, and typically contain only short segments of denatured DNA. Here we present a set of tools for processing such samples for state-of-the-art genetic analysis. First, we report a protocol for minimally destructive DNA extraction of insect museum specimens, which produced sequenceable DNA from all of the samples assayed. The 11 specimens analyzed had fragmented DNA, rarely exceeding 100 bp in length, and could not be amplified by conventional PCR targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene. Our approach made these samples amenable to analysis with commonly used next-generation sequencing-based molecular analytic tools, including RAD-tagging and shotgun genome re-sequencing. First, we used museum ant specimens from three species, each with its own reference genome, for RAD-tag mapping. Were able to use the degraded DNA sequences, which were sequenced in full, to identify duplicate reads and filter them prior to base calling. Second, we re-sequenced six Hawaiian Drosophila species, with millions of years of divergence, but with only a single available reference genome. Despite a shallow coverage of 0.37±0.42 per base, we could recover a sufficient number of overlapping SNPs to fully resolve the species tree, which was consistent with earlier karyotypic studies, and previous molecular studies, at least in the regions of the tree that these studies could resolve. Although developed for use with degraded DNA, all of these techniques are readily applicable to more recent tissue, and are suitable for liquid handling automation. PMID:24828244

  8. Construction of two fluorescence-labeled non-combined DNA index system miniSTR multiplex systems to analyze degraded DNA samples in the Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Li, Shujin; Cong, Bin; Li, Xia; Guo, Xia; He, Lujun; Ye, Jian; Pei, Li

    2010-09-01

    MiniSTR loci have been demonstrated to be an effective approach in recovering genetic information from degraded specimens, because of the reduced PCR amplicon sizes which improved the PCR efficiency. Eight non-combined DNA index system miniSTR loci suitable for the Chinese Han Population were analyzed in 300 unrelated Chinese Han individuals using two novel five fluorescence-labeled miniSTR multiplex systems(multiplex I: D10S1248, D2S441, D1S1677 and D9S2157; multiplex II: D9S1122, D10S1435, D12ATA63, D2S1776 and Amelogenin). The allele frequency distribution and forensic parameters in the Chinese Han Population were reported in this article. The Exact Test demonstrated that all loci surveyed here were found to be no deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The accumulated power of discrimination and power of exclusion for the eight loci were 0.999999992 and 0.98, respectively. The highly degraded DNA from artificially degraded samples and the degraded forensic case work samples was assessed with the two miniSTR multiplex systems, and the results showed that the systems were quite effective. PMID:20715124

  9. Development and validation of InnoQuant™, a sensitive human DNA quantitation and degradation assessment method for forensic samples using high copy number mobile elements Alu and SVA.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Gina M; Montgomery, Anne H; Thompson, Robyn; Indest, Brooke; Carroll, Marion; Sinha, Sudhir K

    2014-11-01

    There is a constant need in forensic casework laboratories for an improved way to increase the first-pass success rate of forensic samples. The recent advances in mini STR analysis, SNP, and Alu marker systems have now made it possible to analyze highly compromised samples, yet few tools are available that can simultaneously provide an assessment of quantity, inhibition, and degradation in a sample prior to genotyping. Currently there are several different approaches used for fluorescence-based quantification assays which provide a measure of quantity and inhibition. However, a system which can also assess the extent of degradation in a forensic sample will be a useful tool for DNA analysts. Possessing this information prior to genotyping will allow an analyst to more informatively make downstream decisions for the successful typing of a forensic sample without unnecessarily consuming DNA extract. Real-time PCR provides a reliable method for determining the amount and quality of amplifiable DNA in a biological sample. Alu are Short Interspersed Elements (SINE), approximately 300bp insertions which are distributed throughout the human genome in large copy number. The use of an internal primer to amplify a segment of an Alu element allows for human specificity as well as high sensitivity when compared to a single copy target. The advantage of an Alu system is the presence of a large number (>1000) of fixed insertions in every human genome, which minimizes the individual specific variation possible when using a multi-copy target quantification system. This study utilizes two independent retrotransposon genomic targets to obtain quantification of an 80bp "short" DNA fragment and a 207bp "long" DNA fragment in a degraded DNA sample in the multiplex system InnoQuant™. The ratio of the two quantitation values provides a "Degradation Index", or a qualitative measure of a sample's extent of degradation. The Degradation Index was found to be predictive of the observed loss of STR markers and alleles as degradation increases. Use of a synthetic target as an internal positive control (IPC) provides an additional assessment for the presence of PCR inhibitors in the test sample. In conclusion, a DNA based qualitative/quantitative/inhibition assessment system that accurately predicts the status of a biological sample, will be a valuable tool for deciding which DNA test kit to utilize and how much target DNA to use, when processing compromised forensic samples for DNA testing. PMID:25212510

  10. Detecting STR peaks in degraded DNA samples Emanuela Marasco, Arun Ross, Jeremy Dawson, Tina Moroose, Tanya Ambrose

    E-print Network

    Ross, Arun Abraham

    :{tina.moroose, tanya.ambrose}@mail.wvu.edu Abstract--Human identification from DNA is typically based on 13 short DNA degradation using ultraviolet radiation, 2) data provided by NIST obtained by varying cycle counts for the PCR processing step. Experiments indicate the efficacy of the algorithm in allelic peak detection

  11. DNA sampling and informed consent.

    PubMed Central

    Knoppers, B M; Laberge, C

    1989-01-01

    Standard consent forms for blood and tissue sampling are inadequate for DNA sampling. However, creating new and separate forms for each type of activity associated with DNA analysis (banking, linkage analysis and genetic diagnosis) tends to dissociate the participant from what is essentially a medical continuum. Furthermore, DNA sampling involves the sharing of samples and data among centres. To ensure patient control throughout this multifaceted process, we have developed an integrated approach to obtaining consent for DNA sampling at each level of participation. Movement from one level to another is reflected in the choices offered to participants. This inclusive approach is based on the underlying principle of informed consent, namely the respect for individuality, confidentiality and freedom of choice. This approach should help practitioners of medical genetics recognize the medical context of DNA sampling. PMID:2565159

  12. Human DNA Sampling and Banking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuel Spanakis

    \\u000a The first era of DNA research, from the discovery of DNA itself by Friedrich Miescher in 1869 (Harbers 1969) to the completion of the human genome sequencing project scheduled for the year 2005 (Table 2.1), is about to end. The argument put forward in this chapter is that the existing DNA sampling and storing techniques were\\u000a set up to satisfy

  13. DNA degradation of genetically modified cottonseed meal during feed processing.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qingfeng; Wang, Xiumin; Teng, Da; Yang, Yalin; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    The effects of dry heating, wet heating, and extrusion on the degradation of DNA in cottonseed meal (CSM) were studied using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR approach. Both the sad1 DNA, ranging between 128 and 883 bp in size, and the cry1Ab/c gene, ranging between 183 and 652 bp in size, were detectable in all dry-heated CSM and cottonseed. During wet heating, the sad1 gene (?883 bp) and the cry1Ab/c (?952 bp) gene were thoroughly degraded at 105 and 120 °C, respectively. Sizes from 128 to 530 bp for the sad1 gene and sizes from 183 to 652 bp for the cry1Ab/c gene were detected during extrusion at temperatures ranging from 75 to 135 °C. Fragments ?883 bp for the sad1 gene and ?952 bp for the cry1Ab/c gene were detected in all of the extruded samples with water content varying between 26 and 34 %. The copy number ratio of cry1Ab/c to sad1 in samples of Bt cottonseed meal decreased rapidly when the temperature increased during the heating process. In conclusion, feed processing markedly degrades the larger DNA fragments of sad1 and cry1Ab/c, with high temperature and water content being the main factors for that degradation. PMID:23188658

  14. Whole genome amplification of degraded and nondegraded DNA for forensic purposes.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Jakubowska, Joanna; Paw?owski, Ryszard

    2013-03-01

    Degraded DNA is often analyzed in forensic genetics laboratories. Reliable analysis of degraded DNA is of great importance, since its results impact the quality and reliability of expert testimonies. Recently, a number of whole genome amplification (WGA) methods have been proposed as preamplification tools. They work on the premise of being able to generate microgram quantities of DNA from as little as the quantity of DNA from a single cell. We chose, investigated, and compared seven WGA methods to evaluate their ability to "recover" degraded and nondegraded DNA: degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR, primer extension preamplification PCR, GenomePlex™ WGA commercial kit (Sigma), multiple displacement amplification, GenomiPhi™ Amplification kit (Amersham Biosciences), restriction and circularization-aided rolling circle amplification, and blunt-end ligation-mediated WGA. The efficiency and reliability of those methods were analyzed and compared using SGMPlus, YFiler, mtDNA, and Y-chromosome SNP typing. The best results for nondegraded DNA were obtained with GenomiPhi and PEP methods. In the case of degraded DNA (200 bp), the best results were obtained with GenomePlex which successfully amplified also severely degraded DNA (100 bp), thus enabling correct typing of mtDNA and Y-SNP loci. WGA may be very useful in analysis of low copy number DNA or degraded DNA in forensic genetics, especially after introduction of some improvements (sample pooling and replicate DNA typing). PMID:22940764

  15. Characterization of human DNA in environmental samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary H. Toothman; Karen M. Kester; Jarrod Champagne; Tracey Dawson Cruz; Bonnie L. Brown

    2008-01-01

    Environmental samples from indoor surfaces can be confounded by dust, which is composed largely of human skin cells and has been documented to contain roughly tens of micrograms of total DNA per gram of dust. This study complements previous published work by providing estimates of the quantity of amplifiable human DNA found in environmental samples from a typical indoor environment,

  16. Evaluating DNA degradation rates in faecal pellets of the endangered pygmy rabbit.

    PubMed

    DeMay, Stephanie M; Becker, Penny A; Eidson, Chad A; Rachlow, Janet L; Johnson, Timothy R; Waits, Lisette P

    2013-07-01

    Noninvasive genetic sampling of faecal pellets can be a valuable method for monitoring rare and cryptic wildlife populations, like the pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis). To investigate this method's efficiency for pygmy rabbit monitoring, we evaluated the effect of sample age on DNA degradation in faecal pellets under summer field conditions. We placed 275 samples from known individuals in natural field conditions for 1-60 days and assessed DNA quality by amplifying a 294-base-pair (bp) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) locus and five nuclear DNA (nDNA) microsatellite loci (111-221 bp). DNA degradation was influenced by sample age, DNA type, locus length and rabbit sex. Both mtDNA and nDNA exhibited high PCR success rates (94.4%) in samples <1 day old. Success rates for microsatellite loci declined rapidly from 80.0% to 42.7% between days 5 and 7, likely due to increased environmental temperature. Success rates for mtDNA amplification remained higher than nDNA over time, with moderate success (66.7%) at 21 days. Allelic dropout rates were relatively high (17.6% at <1 day) and increased to 100% at 60 days. False allele rates ranged from 0 to 30.0% and increased gradually over time. We recommend collecting samples as fresh as possible for individual identification during summer field conditions. Our study suggests that this method can be useful for future monitoring efforts, including occupancy surveys, individual identification, population estimation, parentage analysis and monitoring of genetic diversity both of a re-introduced population in central Washington and across their range. PMID:23590236

  17. Enhancing PCR Amplification From Diluted DNA Samples Using Experimental Formulas from Biomatrica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abby Siebert

    2009-01-01

    Very dilute DNA samples present problem for forensic analysts. These samples often degrade, and their low concentration makes DNA amplification difficult or impossible. Recently a new compound was produced (PCRboost, Biomatrica) based on molecules found in water bears (tardigrades, see image). These tiny remarkable animals can live up to 120 years without water, survive temperatures from close to absolute zero

  18. Bayesian Inference of Errors in Ancient DNA Caused by Postmortem Degradation

    E-print Network

    via postmortem degradation of the aDNA sequences. A computer program, BYPASSR-degr, was developed 2000). However, the validity of an an- cient sample may also be compromised by postmortem damage is influenced by a variety of factors related to the en- vironment and the storage conditions. Biochemical pro

  19. Microfluidic DNA sample preparation method and device

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Wang, Xiao-Bo (San Diego, CA); Mariella, Raymond P. (Danville, CA); Gascoyne, Peter R. C. (Bellaire, TX); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Manipulation of DNA molecules in solution has become an essential aspect of genetic analyses used for biomedical assays, the identification of hazardous bacterial agents, and in decoding the human genome. Currently, most of the steps involved in preparing a DNA sample for analysis are performed manually and are time, labor, and equipment intensive. These steps include extraction of the DNA from spores or cells, separation of the DNA from other particles and molecules in the solution (e.g. dust, smoke, cell/spore debris, and proteins), and separation of the DNA itself into strands of specific lengths. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a phenomenon whereby polarizable particles move in response to a gradient in electric field, can be used to manipulate and separate DNA in an automated fashion, considerably reducing the time and expense involved in DNA analyses, as well as allowing for the miniaturization of DNA analysis instruments. These applications include direct transport of DNA, trapping of DNA to allow for its separation from other particles or molecules in the solution, and the separation of DNA into strands of varying lengths.

  20. Anaerobic methyl tert-butyl ether-degrading microorganisms identified in wastewater treatment plant samples by stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weimin; Sun, Xiaoxu; Cupples, Alison M

    2012-04-01

    Anaerobic methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) degradation potential was investigated in samples from a range of sources. From these 22 experimental variations, only one source (from wastewater treatment plant samples) exhibited MTBE degradation. These microcosms were methanogenic and were subjected to DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) targeted to both bacteria and archaea to identify the putative MTBE degraders. For this purpose, DNA was extracted at two time points, subjected to ultracentrifugation, fractioning, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP). In addition, bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed. The SIP experiments indicated bacteria in the phyla Firmicutes (family Ruminococcaceae) and Alphaproteobacteria (genus Sphingopyxis) were the dominant MTBE degraders. Previous studies have suggested a role for Firmicutes in anaerobic MTBE degradation; however, the putative MTBE-degrading microorganism in the current study is a novel MTBE-degrading phylotype within this phylum. Two archaeal phylotypes (genera Methanosarcina and Methanocorpusculum) were also enriched in the heavy fractions, and these organisms may be responsible for minor amounts of MTBE degradation or for the uptake of metabolites released from the primary MTBE degraders. Currently, limited information exists on the microorganisms able to degrade MTBE under anaerobic conditions. This work represents the first application of DNA-based SIP to identify anaerobic MTBE-degrading microorganisms in laboratory microcosms and therefore provides a valuable set of data to definitively link identity with anaerobic MTBE degradation. PMID:22327600

  1. Anaerobic Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Microorganisms Identified in Wastewater Treatment Plant Samples by Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weimin; Sun, Xiaoxu

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) degradation potential was investigated in samples from a range of sources. From these 22 experimental variations, only one source (from wastewater treatment plant samples) exhibited MTBE degradation. These microcosms were methanogenic and were subjected to DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) targeted to both bacteria and archaea to identify the putative MTBE degraders. For this purpose, DNA was extracted at two time points, subjected to ultracentrifugation, fractioning, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP). In addition, bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed. The SIP experiments indicated bacteria in the phyla Firmicutes (family Ruminococcaceae) and Alphaproteobacteria (genus Sphingopyxis) were the dominant MTBE degraders. Previous studies have suggested a role for Firmicutes in anaerobic MTBE degradation; however, the putative MTBE-degrading microorganism in the current study is a novel MTBE-degrading phylotype within this phylum. Two archaeal phylotypes (genera Methanosarcina and Methanocorpusculum) were also enriched in the heavy fractions, and these organisms may be responsible for minor amounts of MTBE degradation or for the uptake of metabolites released from the primary MTBE degraders. Currently, limited information exists on the microorganisms able to degrade MTBE under anaerobic conditions. This work represents the first application of DNA-based SIP to identify anaerobic MTBE-degrading microorganisms in laboratory microcosms and therefore provides a valuable set of data to definitively link identity with anaerobic MTBE degradation. PMID:22327600

  2. A general approach for DNA encapsulation in degradable polymer microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Zelikin, Alexander N; Becker, Alisa L; Johnston, Angus P R; Wark, Kim L; Turatti, Fabio; Caruso, Frank

    2007-08-01

    We report a general and facile method for the encapsulation of DNA in nanoengineered, degradable polymer microcapsules. Single-stranded (ss), linear double-stranded (ds), and plasmid DNA were encapsulated into disulfide-cross-linked poly(methacrylic acid) (PMA) capsules. The encapsulation procedure involves four steps: adsorption of DNA onto amine-functionalized silica (SiO(2)(+)) particles; sequential deposition of thiolated PMA (PMA (SH)) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) to form multilayers; cross-linking of the thiol groups of the PMA (SH) in the multilayers into disulfide linkages; and removal of the sacrificial SiO(2)(+) particles. Multilayer growth was dependent on the surface coverage of DNA on the SiO(2)(+) particles, with stable capsules formed from particles with up to 50% DNA surface coverage. The encapsulation strategy applies to nucleic acids with varied size and conformation and allows DNA to be concentrated over 100-fold from dilute solutions into monodisperse, uniformly loaded polymer capsules. The capsule loading can be controlled by the DNA:SiO(2)(+)particle ratio, and for 1 microm diameter capsules, loadings of approximately 1000 chains of 800 bp dsDNA and more than 10,000 chains of 20-mer ssDNA can be achieved. The encapsulated DNA was released and successfully used in polymerase chain reactions as both templates (linear dsDNA and plasmid DNA) and primer sequences (ssDNA), confirming the functionality and structural integrity of the encapsulated DNA. These DNA-loaded polymer microcapsules hold promise as delivery vehicles for gene therapy and diagnostic applications. PMID:19203131

  3. Characterization of new miniSTR loci to aid analysis of degraded DNA.

    PubMed

    Coble, Michael D; Butler, John M

    2005-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that successful analysis of degraded DNA specimens from mass disasters or forensic evidence improves with smaller sized polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. We have scanned the literature for new STR loci, unlinked from the CODIS markers, which can generate amplicons less than 125 bp in size and would therefore be helpful in testing degraded DNA samples. New PCR primers were designed and tested for the STR loci D1S1677, D2S441, D4S2364, D10S1248, D14S1434, and D22S1045, arranged into two miniSTR triplexes. All loci show a moderate degree of polymorphism among 474 U.S. population samples tested and were reliable and sensitive to at least 100 pg of DNA template under controlled laboratory conditions and pristine DNA samples. The utility of these new loci were confirmed in comparing the success of the miniSTR assays for typing degraded bone samples while partial profiles were observed with the majority of the samples using a commercial STR kit. PMID:15830996

  4. Flow cytometric detection method for DNA samples

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi,Shanavaz (Livermore, CA); Langlois, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S. (Round Rock, TX)

    2011-07-05

    Disclosed herein are two methods for rapid multiplex analysis to determine the presence and identity of target DNA sequences within a DNA sample. Both methods use reporting DNA sequences, e.g., modified conventional Taqman.RTM. probes, to combine multiplex PCR amplification with microsphere-based hybridization using flow cytometry means of detection. Real-time PCR detection can also be incorporated. The first method uses a cyanine dye, such as, Cy3.TM., as the reporter linked to the 5' end of a reporting DNA sequence. The second method positions a reporter dye, e.g., FAM.TM. on the 3' end of the reporting DNA sequence and a quencher dye, e.g., TAMRA.TM., on the 5' end.

  5. Flow cytometric detection method for DNA samples

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz (Livermore, CA); Langlois, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-08-01

    Disclosed herein are two methods for rapid multiplex analysis to determine the presence and identity of target DNA sequences within a DNA sample. Both methods use reporting DNA sequences, e.g., modified conventional Taqman.RTM. probes, to combine multiplex PCR amplification with microsphere-based hybridization using flow cytometry means of detection. Real-time PCR detection can also be incorporated. The first method uses a cyanine dye, such as, Cy3.TM., as the reporter linked to the 5' end of a reporting DNA sequence. The second method positions a reporter dye, e.g., FAM, on the 3' end of the reporting DNA sequence and a quencher dye, e.g., TAMRA, on the 5' end.

  6. Species identification of protected carpet pythons suitable for degraded forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Ciavaglia, Sherryn; Donnellan, Stephen; Henry, Julianne; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we report on the identification of a section of mitochondrial DNA that can be used to identify the species of protected and illegally traded pythons of the genus Morelia. Successful enforcement of wildlife laws requires forensic tests that can identify the species nominated in the relevant legislation. The potentially degraded state of evidentiary samples requires that forensic investigation using molecular genetic species identification is optimized to interrogate small fragments of DNA. DNA was isolated from 35 samples of Morelia spilota from which the complete cytochrome b was sequenced. The ND6 gene was also sequenced in 32 of these samples. Additional DNA sequences were generated from 9 additional species of Morelia. The sequences were aligned by Geneious and imported into MEGA to create phylogenetic trees based on the entire complex of approximately 1,706 base pairs (bp). To mimic degraded DNA, which is usually found in forensic cases, short sub-sections of the full alignment were used to generate phylogenetic trees. The sub-sections that had the greatest DNA sequence information were in parts of the cytochrome b gene. Our results highlight that legislation is presently informed by inadequate taxonomy. We demonstrated that a 278 bp region of the cytochrome b gene recovered the topology of the phylogenetic tree found with the entire gene sequence and correctly identified species of Morelia with a high degree of confidence. The locus described in this report will assist in the successful prosecution of alleged illegal trade in python species. PMID:24915762

  7. Novel Phenanthrene-Degrading Bacteria Identified by DNA-Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chunling; Zhang, Dayi; Zhang, Gan

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms responsible for the degradation of phenanthrene in a clean forest soil sample were identified by DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). The soil was artificially amended with either 12C- or 13C-labeled phenanthrene, and soil DNA was extracted on days 3, 6 and 9. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) results revealed that the fragments of 219- and 241-bp in HaeIII digests were distributed throughout the gradient profile at three different sampling time points, and both fragments were more dominant in the heavy fractions of the samples exposed to the 13C-labeled contaminant. 16S rRNA sequencing of the 13C-enriched fraction suggested that Acidobacterium spp. within the class Acidobacteria, and Collimonas spp. within the class Betaproteobacteria, were directly involved in the uptake and degradation of phenanthrene at different times. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the genus Collimonas has the ability to degrade PAHs. Two PAH-RHD? genes were identified in 13C-labeled DNA. However, isolation of pure cultures indicated that strains of Staphylococcus sp. PHE-3, Pseudomonas sp. PHE-1, and Pseudomonas sp. PHE-2 in the soil had high phenanthrene-degrading ability. This emphasizes the role of a culture-independent method in the functional understanding of microbial communities in situ. PMID:26098417

  8. 28 CFR 28.12 - Collection of DNA samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Collection of DNA samples. 28.12 Section 28.12 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM DNA Sample Collection, Analysis, and Indexing §...

  9. 28 CFR 28.12 - Collection of DNA samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Collection of DNA samples. 28.12 Section 28.12 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM DNA Sample Collection, Analysis, and Indexing §...

  10. 28 CFR 28.12 - Collection of DNA samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Collection of DNA samples. 28.12 Section 28.12 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM DNA Sample Collection, Analysis, and Indexing §...

  11. Degradation of poly(glycoamidoamine) DNA delivery vehicles: polyamide hydrolysis at physiological conditions promotes DNA release.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yemin; Reineke, Theresa M

    2010-02-01

    Poly(glycoamidoamine)s (PGAAs) are a group of efficient and degradable gene delivery vehicles that consist of three main functionalities: carbohydrate groups, secondary amines, and amide bonds. Herein, we have created nonhydroxylated models to these structures by polymerizing oxylate, succinate, or adipate groups with pentaethylenehexamine. The resulting polymers (named O4, S4, and A4, respectively) were created to understand how the absence of hydroxyl groups and changes in the amide bond spacing affect polymer degradation, plasmid DNA (pDNA) complexation, toxicity, and transfection efficiency in vitro. An additional model was also created that retains a galactaramide unit, but we have replaced the secondary amines with ethyleneoxide units (GO2) to understand the effects of the amine groups on polymer degradation. We have found that the secondary amines and hydroxyls are necessary to facilitate rapid degradation of these polymers, and analogues lacking hydroxyls or amines did not degrade over the time course of the study. Through electron-withdrawing and hydrogen bonding, the hydroxyls appear to activate the carbonyls of the amide bond to hydrolysis via an inductive electron withdrawing effect. Through titration experiments, PGAA degradation appears not to affect the polymer buffering capacity. Furthermore, we have found that PGAA degradation may enhance gene expression by releasing pDNA from polyplexes (polymer-pDNA complexes) and, thus, exposing it to undergo transcription and translation. The difference in the optimal pH that promotes degradation of the PGAAs and the hydroxyl-free analogues may prove to be a useful means to achieve pH-regulated DNA release from polyplexes by specifically modulating the chemical structures. PMID:20058913

  12. Characterization and performance of new MiniSTR loci for typing degraded samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Coble; C. R. Hill; P. M. Vallone; J. M. Butler

    2006-01-01

    Forensic DNA analysts often perform short tandem repeat (STR) typing on highly degraded biological material and then turn to mitochondrial DNA testing if many or all of the STRs fail. The commercially available kits for multiplex amplification of the 13 CODIS (FBI's COmbined DNA Index System) STR loci usually exhibit allele or locus-dropout for larger sized loci with degraded DNA

  13. Geminin, an Inhibitor of DNA Replication, Is Degraded during Mitosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas J McGarry; Marc W Kirschner

    1998-01-01

    We describe a novel 25 kDa protein, geminin, which inhibits DNA replication and is degraded during the mitotic phase of the cell cycle. Geminin has a destruction box sequence and is ubiquitinated anaphase-promoting complex (APC) in vitro. In synchronized HeLa cells, geminin is absent during G1 phase, accumulates during S, G2, and M phases, and disappears at the time of

  14. Metagenomics: DNA sequencing of environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah Green; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-09-01

    While genomics has classically focused on pure,easy-to-obtain samples, such as microbes that grow readily in culture orlarge animals and plants, these organisms represent but a fraction of theliving or once living organisms of interest. Many species are difficultto study in isolation, because they fail to grow in laboratory culture,depend on other organisms for critical processes, or have become extinct.DNA sequence-based methods circumvent these obstacles, as DNA can bedirectly isolated from live or dead cells in a variety of contexts, andhave led to the emergence of a new field referred to asmetagenomics.

  15. Characterization of New MiniSTR Loci to Aid Analysis of Degraded DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael D. Coble; John M. Butler

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT: AnumberofstudieshavedemonstratedthatsuccessfulanalysisofdegradedDNAspecimensfrommassdisastersorforensicevidence improves with smaller sized polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. We have scanned the literature for new STR loci, unlinked from the CODIS markers, which can generate amplicons less than 125bp in size and would therefore be helpful in testing degraded DNA samples. New PCR primers were designed and tested for the STR loci D1S1677, D2S441, D4S2364, D10S1248, D14S1434,

  16. Assessment of DNA degradation induced by thermal and UV radiation processing: implications for quantification of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Ballari, Rajashekhar V; Martin, Asha

    2013-12-01

    DNA quality is an important parameter for the detection and quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMO's) using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Food processing leads to degradation of DNA, which may impair GMO detection and quantification. This study evaluated the effect of various processing treatments such as heating, baking, microwaving, autoclaving and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the relative transgenic content of MON 810 maize using pRSETMON-02, a dual target plasmid as a model system. Amongst all the processing treatments examined, autoclaving and UV irradiation resulted in the least recovery of the transgenic (CaMV 35S promoter) and taxon-specific (zein) target DNA sequences. Although a profound impact on DNA degradation was seen during the processing, DNA could still be reliably quantified by Real-time PCR. The measured mean DNA copy number ratios of the processed samples were in agreement with the expected values. Our study confirms the premise that the final analytical value assigned to a particular sample is independent of the degree of DNA degradation since the transgenic and the taxon-specific target sequences possessing approximately similar lengths degrade in parallel. The results of our study demonstrate that food processing does not alter the relative quantification of the transgenic content provided the quantitative assays target shorter amplicons and the difference in the amplicon size between the transgenic and taxon-specific genes is minimal. PMID:23870938

  17. Proteasomal degradation of herpes simplex virus capsids in macrophages releases DNA to the cytosol for recognition by DNA sensors1

    PubMed Central

    Horan, Kristy A.; Hansen, Kathrine; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Holm, Christian K.; Søby, Stine; Unterholzner, Leonie; Thompson, Mikayla; West, John A.; Iversen, Marie B.; Rasmussen, Simon B.; Ellermann-Eriksen, Svend; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn; Landolfo, Santo; Damania, Blossom; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Bowie, Andrew G.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Paludan, Søren R.

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune system is important for control of infections, including herpesvirus infections. Intracellular DNA potently stimulates antiviral IFN responses. It is known that plasmacytoid dendritic cells sense herpesvirus DNA in endosomes via TLR9, and that non-immune tissue cells can sense herpesvirus DNA in the nucleus. However, it remains unknown how and where myeloid cells, like macrophages and conventional dendritic cells, detect infections with herpesviruses. Here we demonstrate that the HSV-1 capsid was ubiquitinated in the cytosol and degraded by the proteasome, hence releasing genomic DNA into the cytoplasm for detection by DNA sensors. In this context, the DNA sensor IFI16 is important for induction of IFN-? in human macrophages after infection with HSV-1 and CMV. Viral DNA localized to the same cytoplasmic regions as IFI16, with DNA sensing being independent of viral nuclear entry. Thus, proteasomal degradation of herpesvirus capsids releases DNA to the cytoplasm for recognition by DNA sensors. PMID:23345332

  18. Kinetics of ethanol degradation in forensic blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L A; Triszcz, J M; Giannuzzi, L

    2006-09-12

    To determine ethanol in human post-mortem blood samples is problematic, largely due to the inappropriate and variable methods of preserving and storing, which can cause decomposition and loss of alcohol concentration. In this study, four crucial parameters of sample conservation were studied: temperature (T), percentage of air chamber in container (%CA), ethanol concentration in blood and post-mortem time. Blood samples from post-mortem cases were stored under different conditions (ethanol levels were known in all cases); factorial design variables: (%CA) 0, 5, 20, 35, 65%; storage temperature: 25, 4 and -10 degrees C; in a total of 15 experiments. No preserving agent was used in samples. Quantification of ethanol in blood was carried out by gas chromatography with head-space FID detector. Initial ethanol concentration ranged from 0.50 to 4.30 g/L. The kinetics of degradation observed was pseudo-first-order. The parameter that characterised the kinetics of ethanol degradation (k(0)) ranged from (4 x 10(-4) and 5.0 x 10(-1) day(-1)), depending on storage conditions. A strong dependence between ethanol degradation and the content of the air chamber was observed and this dependence was found to be stronger than that between degradation and temperature; there was an experimental relation between (k(0)) and (%CA). Activation energy for different conditions, i.e. 0, 5, 20, 35 and 65 (%CA), were calculated and contour plots were made. A mathematical equation relating air chamber, temperature and ethanol concentration at a certain time was determined. This equation allowed estimation of initial concentrations of ethanol with minimal error. A good correlation between experimental data and data calculated with the equation was obtained (r(2) = 0.9998). The best storage conditions were: 0% CA and storage at -10 degrees C, obtaining an ethanol degradation of 0.01% after 15 days. However, 33% of ethanol degradation was obtained with 35% CA at 25 degrees C after 15 days. This equation is useful in forensic cases in which original concentration of ethanol has to be estimated under different sample storage conditions. PMID:16872775

  19. Waikato DNA Sequencing Facility Please send samples to

    E-print Network

    Waikato, University of

    Waikato DNA Sequencing Facility Please send samples to: Attention: Waikato DNA Sequencing Facility: ............................................... Dilution Factor: ................................ Template Name Template Type (ss/dsDNA or PCR product pairs) Primer Name Primer Conc. Please supply at 5pmol/uL DNA Purification Method

  20. Visualization EX Situ of Single DNA Molecules Incubation:. a First Step for Quantitative Analysis on Multi-Site Degradation and Enzymatic Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinyan; Yang, Haijun; Wang, Huabin; Wang, Peng; Li, Hai

    Herein, we showed a different approach to directly single-molecule level visualization of the degradation of DNA in vitro tests using DNase I incubation based on high-resolution AFM imaging ex situ with fine relocation nanotechnology. A method of nanomanipulation termed as "modified dynamic molecular combing" (MDMC) was used to pattern DNA samples for further degradation and enzymatic kinetics. This strategy is potentially able to quantitatively address the mechanical-induced kinetic profiles of multi-site degradation of individual DNA molecules with very stable tension and strong immobilization on a surface and discover the mechanochemistry.

  1. Automated DNA extraction for large numbers of plant samples.

    PubMed

    Mehle, Nataša; Nikoli?, Petra; Rupar, Matevž; Boben, Jana; Ravnikar, Maja; Dermastia, Marina

    2013-01-01

    The method described here is a rapid, total DNA extraction procedure applicable to a large number of plant samples requiring pathogen detection. The procedure combines a simple and quick homogenization step of crude extracts with DNA extraction based upon the binding of DNA to magnetic beads. DNA is purified in an automated process in which the magnetic beads are transferred through a series of washing buffers. The eluted DNA is suitable for efficient amplification in PCR reactions. PMID:22987412

  2. Degradation and Turnover of Extracellular DNA in Marine Sediments: Ecological and Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia

    2004-01-01

    Degradation rates of extracellular DNA determined in marine sediments were much higher than those in the water column. However, due to the high sediment DNA content, turnover times were much shorter in seawater. Results reported here provide new insights into the role of extracellular DNA in P cycling in marine ecosystems. PMID:15240325

  3. A new sensitive short pentaplex (ShoP) PCR for typing of degraded DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Meissner; P. Bruse; E. Mueller; M. Oehmichen

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of short tandem repeat makers has become the most powerful tool for DNA typing in forensic casework analysis. Unfortunately, typing of DNA extracted from telogen shed hairs, bones buried in the soil or from paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed tissue often reveals no results due to the degradation of DNA. The reduction in size of the target fragments by development of new

  4. Degradation of DNA and endonuclease activity associated with senescence in the leaves of pea of normal and aphyllous genotypes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. I. Aleksandrushkina; E. M. Kof; A. V. Seredina; A. A. Borzov; B. F. Vanyushin

    2008-01-01

    Senescence and wilting of the leaves of pea (Pisum sativum L.) of normal (AfAf) and aphyllous (afaf) genotypes were accompanied by DNA degradation. In young (12th–9th) subapical leaves of AfAf plants, total DNA was high-polymeric; in the 6th leaf, DNA degradation was appreciable; and in the 4th and 3rd leaves, hydrolysis\\u000a of DNA was pronounced. Similar degradation of DNA was

  5. Targeted DNA degradation using a CRISPR device stably carried in the host genome

    PubMed Central

    Caliando, Brian J.; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Once an engineered organism completes its task, it is useful to degrade the associated DNA to reduce environmental release and protect intellectual property. Here we present a genetically encoded device (DNAi) that responds to a transcriptional input and degrades user-defined DNA. This enables engineered regions to be obscured when the cell enters a new environment. DNAi is based on type-IE CRISPR biochemistry and a synthetic CRISPR array defines the DNA target(s). When the input is on, plasmid DNA is degraded 108-fold. When the genome is targeted, this causes cell death, reducing viable cells by a factor of 108. Further, the CRISPR nuclease can direct degradation to specific genomic regions (for example, engineered or inserted DNA), which could be used to complicate recovery and sequencing efforts. DNAi can be stably carried in an engineered organism, with no impact on cell growth, plasmid stability or DNAi inducibility even after passaging for >2 months. PMID:25988366

  6. Chromosomal lesion suppression and removal in Escherichia coli via linear DNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Anabel; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2003-01-01

    RecBCD is a DNA helicase/exonuclease implicated in degradation of foreign linear DNA and in RecA-dependent recombinational repair of chromosomal lesions in E. coli. The low viability of recA recBC mutants vs. recA mutants indicates the existence of RecA-independent roles for RecBCD. To distinguish among possible RecA-independent roles of the RecBCD enzyme in replication, repair, and DNA degradation, we introduced wild-type and mutant combinations of the recBCD chromosomal region on a low-copy-number plasmid into a DeltarecA DeltarecBCD mutant and determined the viability of resulting strains. Our results argue against ideas that RecBCD is a structural element in the replication factory or is involved in RecA-independent repair of chromosomal lesions. We found that RecBCD-catalyzed DNA degradation is the only activity important for the recA-independent viability, suggesting that degradation of linear tails of sigma-replicating chromosomes could be one of the RecBCD's roles. However, since the weaker DNA degradation capacity due a combination of the RecBC helicase and ssDNA-specific exonucleases restores viability of the DeltarecA DeltarecBCD mutant to a significant extent, we favor suppression of chromosomal lesions via linear DNA degradation at reversed replication forks as the major RecA-independent role of the RecBCD enzyme. PMID:12702673

  7. XPB mediated retroviral cDNA degradation coincides with entry to the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, Kristine E., E-mail: yoder.176@osu.ed [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology, and Medical Genetics, Ohio State University Medical Center and Comprehensive Cancer Center (United States) and Human Cancer Genetics, Ohio State University Medical Center and Comprehensive Cancer Center (United States); Roddick, William; Hoellerbauer, Pia [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology, and Medical Genetics, Ohio State University Medical Center and Comprehensive Cancer Center (United States); Fishel, Richard, E-mail: rfishel@osu.ed [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology, and Medical Genetics, Ohio State University Medical Center and Comprehensive Cancer Center (United States); Human Cancer Genetics, Ohio State University Medical Center and Comprehensive Cancer Center (United States); Physics Department, Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-02-20

    Retroviruses must integrate their cDNA to a host chromosome, but a significant fraction of retroviral cDNA is degraded before integration. XPB and XPD are part of the TFIIH complex which mediates basal transcription and DNA nucleotide excision repair. Retroviral infection increases when XPB or XPD are mutant. Here we show that inhibition of mRNA or protein synthesis does not affect HIV cDNA accumulation suggesting that TFIIH transcription activity is not required for degradation. Other host factors implicated in the stability of cDNA are not components of the XPB and XPD degradation pathway. Although an increase of retroviral cDNA in XPB or XPD mutant cells correlates with an increase of integrated provirus, the integration efficiency of pre-integration complexes is unaffected. Finally, HIV and MMLV cDNA degradation appears to coincide with nuclear import. These results suggest that TFIIH mediated cDNA degradation is a nuclear host defense against retroviral infection.

  8. Sample-to-Sample Fluctuations in Heterogeneous DNA ZH. S. GEVORKIAN,1,2,3

    E-print Network

    fluctuations of the free energy (and other thermodynamical quantities). For higher temperatures, these sample-to-sample contribution to the free energy, therefore, free energy is less random and sample-to-sample fluctuationsSample-to-Sample Fluctuations in Heterogeneous DNA ZH. S. GEVORKIAN,1,2,3 MAI SUAN LI,4,5 CHIN

  9. Population study of small-sized short tandem repeat in Japan and its application to analysis of degraded samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Asamura; K. Tsukada; M. Ota; H. Sakai; K. Takayanagi; K. Kobayashi; S. Saito; H. Fukushima

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on genetic population data of six small-sized short tandem repeat (STR) markers D1S1677, D2S441, D4S2364, D10S1248, D14S1434, and D22S1045 in samples from 100 unrelated Japanese individuals. In addition, testing was performed on highly degraded DNA to compare the analyses of the miniSTR loci against analyses performed using a commercial kit. Consequently, all loci showed a moderate degree

  10. Co-extraction of DNA and PLFA from soil samples.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Sheridan; Techtmann, Stephen M; Mahmoudi, Nagissa; Niang, Dijibril; Pfiffner, Susan; Hazen, Terry C

    2015-08-01

    Lipid/DNA co-extraction from one sample is attractive in limiting biases associated with microbial community analysis from separate extractions. We sought to enhance established co-extraction methods and use high-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing to identify preferentially extracted taxa from co-extracted DNA. Co-extraction results in low DNA yields and distinct community structure changes. PMID:26027542

  11. Assessing PreCR™ repair enzymes for restoration of STR profiles from artificially degraded DNA for human identification.

    PubMed

    Robertson, James M; Dineen, Shauna M; Scott, Kristina A; Lucyshyn, Jonathan; Saeed, Maria; Murphy, Devonie L; Schweighardt, Andrew J; Meiklejohn, Kelly A

    2014-09-01

    Forensic scientists have used several approaches to obtain short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from compromised DNA samples, including supplementing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with enhancers and using procedures yielding reduced-length amplicons. For degraded DNA, the peak intensities of the alleles separated by electrophoresis generally decrease as the length of the allele increases. When the intensities of the alleles decrease below an established threshold, they are described as drop-outs, thus contributing to a partial STR profile. This work assesses the use of repair enzymes to improve the STR profiles from artificially degraded DNA. The commercial PreCR™ repair kit of DNA repair enzymes was tested on both purified DNA and native DNA in body fluids exposed to oxidizing agents, hydrolytic conditions, ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, and desiccation. The strategy was to restrict the level of DNA damage to that which yields partial STR profiles in order to test for allele restoration as opposed to simple allele enhancement. Two protocols were investigated for allele restoration: a sequential protocol using the manufacturer's repair procedure and a modified protocol reportedly designed for optimal STR analysis of forensic samples. Allele restoration was obtained with both protocols, but the peak height appeared to be higher for the modified protocol (determined by Mann-Kendall Trend Test). The success of the approach using the PreCR™ repair enzymes was sporadic; it led to allele restoration as well as allele drop-out. Additionally, allele restoration with the PreCR™ enzymes was compared with restoration by alternative, but commonly implemented approaches using Restorase™, PCRBoost™, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the Minifiler™ STR system. The alternative methods were also successful in improving the STR profile, but their success also depended on the quality of the template encountered. Our results indicate the PreCR™ repair kit may be useful for restoring STR profiles from damaged DNA, but further work is required to develop a generalized approach. PMID:24997322

  12. Volume reduction solid phase extraction of DNA from dilute, large-volume biological samples.

    PubMed

    Reedy, Carmen R; Bienvenue, Joan M; Coletta, Lisa; Strachan, Briony C; Bhatri, Naila; Greenspoon, Susan; Landers, James P

    2010-04-01

    Microdevices are often designed to process sample volumes on the order of tens of microliters and cannot typically accommodate larger volume samples without adversely affecting efficiency and greatly increasing analysis time. However, dilute, large-volume biological samples are frequently encountered, especially in forensic or clinical laboratories. A microdevice, capable of efficiently processing 0.5-1 mL samples has been developed for solid phase extraction (SPE) of DNA. SPE was carried out on a microdevice utilizing magnetic silica particles and an optimized volumetric flow rate and elution buffer, resulting in a 50-fold decrease in volume and a 15-fold increase in DNA concentration. Device characterization studies showed DNA extraction efficiencies comparable with previously reported silica-based purification methods, with robust performance demonstrated by the successful amplification of a fragment from the gelsolin gene extracted from dilute whole blood. In addition, the microchip-based method for SPE of large volume, dilute samples was also used to demonstrate the first successful on-chip purification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from both dilute whole blood and a degraded blood stain. PMID:20215033

  13. Specific and nonhepatotoxic degradation of nuclear hepatitis B virus cccDNA.

    PubMed

    Lucifora, Julie; Xia, Yuchen; Reisinger, Florian; Zhang, Ke; Stadler, Daniela; Cheng, Xiaoming; Sprinzl, Martin F; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Makowska, Zuzanna; Volz, Tassilo; Remouchamps, Caroline; Chou, Wen-Min; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Hüser, Norbert; Durantel, David; Liang, T Jake; Münk, Carsten; Heim, Markus H; Browning, Jeffrey L; Dejardin, Emmanuel; Dandri, Maura; Schindler, Michael; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Protzer, Ulrike

    2014-03-14

    Current antiviral agents can control but not eliminate hepatitis B virus (HBV), because HBV establishes a stable nuclear covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). Interferon-? treatment can clear HBV but is limited by systemic side effects. We describe how interferon-? can induce specific degradation of the nuclear viral DNA without hepatotoxicity and propose lymphotoxin-? receptor activation as a therapeutic alternative. Interferon-? and lymphotoxin-? receptor activation up-regulated APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B cytidine deaminases, respectively, in HBV-infected cells, primary hepatocytes, and human liver needle biopsies. HBV core protein mediated the interaction with nuclear cccDNA, resulting in cytidine deamination, apurinic/apyrimidinic site formation, and finally cccDNA degradation that prevented HBV reactivation. Genomic DNA was not affected. Thus, inducing nuclear deaminases-for example, by lymphotoxin-? receptor activation-allows the development of new therapeutics that, in combination with existing antivirals, may cure hepatitis B. PMID:24557838

  14. Sliding Window Analyses for Optimal Selection of Mini-Barcodes, and Application to 454-Pyrosequencing for Specimen Identification from Degraded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Stephane; Brown, Samuel D. J.; Collins, Rupert A.; Cruickshank, Robert H.; Lefort, Marie-Caroline; Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba; Wratten, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding remains a challenge when applied to diet analyses, ancient DNA studies, environmental DNA samples and, more generally, in any cases where DNA samples have not been adequately preserved. Because the size of the commonly used barcoding marker (COI) is over 600 base pairs (bp), amplification fails when the DNA molecule is degraded into smaller fragments. However, relevant information for specimen identification may not be evenly distributed along the barcoding region, and a shorter target can be sufficient for identification purposes. This study proposes a new, widely applicable, method to compare the performance of all potential ‘mini-barcodes’ for a given molecular marker and to objectively select the shortest and most informative one. Our method is based on a sliding window analysis implemented in the new R package SPIDER (Species IDentity and Evolution in R). This method is applicable to any taxon and any molecular marker. Here, it was tested on earthworm DNA that had been degraded through digestion by carnivorous landsnails. A 100 bp region of 16 S rDNA was selected as the shortest informative fragment (mini-barcode) required for accurate specimen identification. Corresponding primers were designed and used to amplify degraded earthworm (prey) DNA from 46 landsnail (predator) faeces using 454-pyrosequencing. This led to the detection of 18 earthworm species in the diet of the snail. We encourage molecular ecologists to use this method to objectively select the most informative region of the gene they aim to amplify from degraded DNA. The method and tools provided here, can be particularly useful (1) when dealing with degraded DNA for which only small fragments can be amplified, (2) for cases where no consensus has yet been reached on the appropriate barcode gene, or (3) to allow direct analysis of short reads derived from massively parallel sequencing without the need for bioinformatic consolidation. PMID:22666489

  15. RNA cell typing and DNA profiling of mixed samples: can cell types and donors be associated?

    PubMed

    Harteveld, Joyce; Lindenbergh, Alexander; Sijen, Titia

    2013-09-01

    Forensic samples regularly involve mixtures, which are readily recognised in forensic analyses. Combined DNA and mRNA profiling is an upcoming forensic practice to examine donors and cell types from the exact same sample. From DNA profiles individual genotypes may be deconvoluted, but to date no studies have established whether the cell types identified in corresponding RNA profiles can be associated with individual donors. Although RNA expression levels hold many variables from which an association may not be expected, proof of concept is important to forensic experts who may be cross examined about this possible correlation in court settings. Clearly, the gender-specificity of certain body fluids (semen, vaginal mucosa, menstrual secretion) can be instructive. However, when donors of the same gender or gender-neutral cell types are involved, alternatives are needed. Here we analyse basic two-component mixtures (two cell types provided by different donors) composed of six different cell types, and assess whether the heights of DNA and RNA peaks may guide association of donor and cell type. Divergent results were obtained; for some mixtures RNA peak heights followed the DNA results, but for others the major DNA component did not present higher RNA peaks. Also, variation in mixture ratios was observed for RNA profiling replicates and when different donor couples gave the same two body fluids. As sample degradation may affect the two nucleic acids and/or distinct cell types differently (and thus influence donor and cell type association), mixtures were subjected to elevated temperature or UV-light. Variation in DNA and RNA stability was observed both between and within cell types and depended on the method inducing degradation. Taken together, we discourage to associate cell types and donors from peak heights when performing RNA and DNA profiling. PMID:23937933

  16. Degradation of transgene DNA in genetically modified herbicide-tolerant rice during food processing.

    PubMed

    Song, Shangxin; Zhou, Guanghong; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Liangyan; Dai, Sifa; Xu, Xinglian; Xiao, Hongmei

    2011-12-01

    In order to assess the effect of food processing on the degradation of exogenous DNA components in sweet rice wine and rice crackers made from genetically modified (GM) rice (Oryza sativa L.), we developed genomic DNA extraction methods and compared the effect of different food processing procedures on DNA degradation. It was found that the purity, quantity and quality of DNA by alkaline lysis method were higher than by CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) method. For sweet rice wine, CAMV35S (cauliflower mosaic virus 35S) promoter and NOS (nopaline synthase) terminator were degraded by the third day, whereas the exogenous gene Bar (bialaphos resistance) remained unaffected. For rice crackers, boiling, drying and microwaving contributed to the initial degradations of DNA. Baking resulted in further degradations, and frying led to the most severe changes. These results indicated that the stability of DNA in GM rice was different under different processing conditions. For sweet rice wine, Bar was most stable, followed by NOS, CAMV35S, and SPS. For rice crackers, CAMV35S was most stable, followed by SPS, NOS, and Bar. PMID:21871942

  17. Rapid extraction and preservation of genomic DNA from human samples

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanasundaram, D.; Kim, J.-H.; Yeo, W.-H.; Oh, K.; Lee, K.-H.; Kim, M.-H.; Ryew, S.-M.; Ahn, S.-G.; Gao, D.; Cangelosi, G. A.; Chung, J.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Simple and rapid extraction of human genomic DNA remains a bottle neck for genome analysis and disease diagnosis. Current methods using microfilters require cumbersome, multiple handling steps in part because salt conditions must be controlled for attraction and elution of DNA in porous silica. We report a novel extraction method of human genomic DNA from buccal swab- and saliva samples. DNA is attracted on to a gold-coated microchip by an electric field and capillary action while the captured DNA is eluted by thermal heating at 70 °C. A prototype device was designed to handle 4 microchips, and a compatible protocol was developed. The extracted DNA using microchips was characterized by qPCR for different sample volumes, using different lengths of PCR amplicon, and nuclear and mitochondrial genes. In comparison with a commercial kit, an equivalent yield of DNA extraction was achieved with fewer steps. Room-temperature preservation for one month was demonstrated for captured DNA, facilitating straightforward collection, delivery and handling of genomic DNA in an environment-friendly protocol. PMID:23307121

  18. Preparation of DNA and nucleoprotein samples for AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2010-01-01

    Sample preparation techniques allowing reliable and reproducible imaging of DNA with various structures, topologies and complexes with proteins are reviewed. The major emphasis is given to methods utilizing chemical functionalization of mica, enabling preparation of the surfaces with required characteristics. The methods are illustrated by examples of imaging of different DNA structures. Special attention is given to the possibility of AFM to image the dynamics of DNA at the nanoscale. The capabilities of time-lapse AFM in aqueous solutions are illustrated by imaging of dynamic processes as transitions of local alternative structures (transition of DNA between H and B forms). The application of AFM to studies of protein-DNA complexes is illustrated by a few examples of imaging site-specific complexes, as well as such systems as chromatin. The time-lapse AFM studies of protein-DNA complexes including very recent advances with the use of high-speed AFM are reviewed. PMID:20864349

  19. Sequencing the hypervariable regions of human mitochondrial DNA using massively parallel sequencing: Enhanced data acquisition for DNA samples encountered in forensic testing.

    PubMed

    Davis, Carey; Peters, Dixie; Warshauer, David; King, Jonathan; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA testing is a useful tool in the analysis of forensic biological evidence. In cases where nuclear DNA is damaged or limited in quantity, the higher copy number of mitochondrial genomes available in a sample can provide information about the source of a sample. Currently, Sanger-type sequencing (STS) is the primary method to develop mitochondrial DNA profiles. This method is laborious and time consuming. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) can increase the amount of information obtained from mitochondrial DNA samples while improving turnaround time by decreasing the numbers of manipulations and more so by exploiting high throughput analyses to obtain interpretable results. In this study 18 buccal swabs, three different tissue samples from five individuals, and four bones samples from casework were sequenced at hypervariable regions I and II using STS and MPS. Sample enrichment for STS and MPS was PCR-based. Library preparation for MPS was performed using Nextera® XT DNA Sample Preparation Kit and sequencing was performed on the MiSeq™ (Illumina, Inc.). MPS yielded full concordance of base calls with STS results, and the newer methodology was able to resolve length heteroplasmy in homopolymeric regions. This study demonstrates short amplicon MPS of mitochondrial DNA is feasible, can provide information not possible with STS, and lays the groundwork for development of a whole genome sequencing strategy for degraded samples. PMID:25459369

  20. DNA damage-induced activation of CUL4B targets HUWE1 for proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Juan; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Wang, Xiaozhen; Cao, Li; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2015-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 plays an important role in integrating/coordinating diverse cellular processes such as DNA damage repair and apoptosis. A previous study has shown that HUWE1 is required for the early step of DNA damage-induced apoptosis, by targeting MCL-1 for proteasomal degradation. However, HUWE1 is subsequently inactivated, promoting cell survival and the subsequent DNA damage repair process. The mechanism underlying its regulation during this process remains largely undefined. Here, we show that the Cullin4B-RING E3 ligase (CRL4B) is required for proteasomal degradation of HUWE1 in response to DNA damage. CUL4B is activated in a NEDD8-dependent manner, and ubiquitinates HUWE1 in vitro and in vivo. The depletion of CUL4B stabilizes HUWE1, which in turn accelerates the degradation of MCL-1, leading to increased induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, cells deficient in CUL4B showed increased sensitivity to DNA damage reagents. More importantly, upon CUL4B depletion, these phenotypes can be rescued through simultaneous depletion of HUWE1, consistent with the role of CUL4B in regulating HUWE1. Collectively, these results identify CRL4B as an essential E3 ligase in targeting the proteasomal degradation of HUWE1 in response to DNA damage, and provide a potential strategy for cancer therapy by targeting HUWE1 and the CUL4B E3 ligase. PMID:25883150

  1. Identification of forensic samples by using an infrared-based automatic DNA sequencer.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Ugo; Sani, Ilaria; Klintschar, Michael; Cerri, Nicoletta; De Ferrari, Francesco; Giovannucci Uzielli, Maria Luisa

    2003-06-01

    We have recently introduced a new protocol for analyzing all core loci of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) with an infrared (IR) automatic DNA sequencer (LI-COR 4200). The amplicons were labeled with forward oligonucleotide primers, covalently linked to a new infrared fluorescent molecule (IRDye 800). The alleles were displayed as familiar autoradiogram-like images with real-time detection. This protocol was employed for paternity testing, population studies, and identification of degraded forensic samples. We extensively analyzed some simulated forensic samples and mixed stains (blood, semen, saliva, bones, and fixed archival embedded tissues), comparing the results with donor samples. Sensitivity studies were also performed for the four multiplex systems. Our results show the efficiency, reliability, and accuracy of the IR system for the analysis of forensic samples. We also compared the efficiency of the multiplex protocol with ultraviolet (UV) technology. Paternity tests, undegraded DNA samples, and real forensic samples were analyzed with this approach based on IR technology and with UV-based automatic sequencers in combination with commercially-available kits. The comparability of the results with the widespread UV methods suggests that it is possible to exchange data between laboratories using the same core group of markers but different primer sets and detection methods. PMID:12808722

  2. Virology. Comment on "Specific and nonhepatotoxic degradation of nuclear hepatitis B virus cccDNA".

    PubMed

    Chisari, Francis V; Mason, William S; Seeger, Christoph

    2014-06-13

    Lucifora et al. (Research Articles, 14 March 2014, p. 1221) report that the hepatitis B virus (HBV) transcriptional template, a long-lived covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) molecule, is degraded noncytolytically by agents that up-regulate APOBEC3A and 3B. If these results can be independently confirmed, they would represent a critical first step toward development of a cure for the 400 million patients who are chronically infected by HBV. PMID:24926010

  3. 28 CFR 28.13 - Analysis and indexing of DNA samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Analysis and indexing of DNA samples. 28.13 Section 28.13 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM DNA Sample Collection, Analysis, and Indexing §...

  4. 28 CFR 28.13 - Analysis and indexing of DNA samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Analysis and indexing of DNA samples. 28.13 Section 28.13 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM DNA Sample Collection, Analysis, and Indexing §...

  5. 28 CFR 28.13 - Analysis and indexing of DNA samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Analysis and indexing of DNA samples. 28.13 Section 28.13 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM DNA Sample Collection, Analysis, and Indexing §...

  6. Improved reproducibility in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis for PAXgene-fixed samples compared with restored formalin fixation and paraffin-embedding DNA.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Gitte Brinch; Hager, Henrik; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Tost, Jörg

    2014-09-30

    Formalin fixation has been the standard method for conservation of clinical specimens for decades. However, a major drawback is the high degradation of nucleic acids, which complicates its use in genome-wide analyses. Unbiased identification of biomarkers, however, requires genome-wide studies, precluding the use of the valuable archives of specimens with long-term follow-up data. Therefore, restoration protocols for DNA from formalin fixation and paraffin-embedding (FFPE) samples have been developed, although they are cost-intensive and time-consuming. An alternative to FFPE and snap-freezing is the PAXgene Tissue System, developed for simultaneous preservation of morphology, proteins, and nucleic acids. In the current study, we compared the performance of DNA from either PAXgene or formalin-fixed tissues to snap-frozen material for genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using the Illumina 450K BeadChip. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis demonstrated that the methylation profile in PAXgene-fixed tissues showed, in comparison with restored FFPE samples, a higher concordance with the profile detected in frozen samples. We demonstrate, for the first time, that DNA from PAXgene conserved tissue performs better compared with restored FFPE DNA in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. In addition, DNA from PAXgene tissue can be directly used on the array without prior restoration, rendering the analytical process significantly more time- and cost-effective. PMID:25277813

  7. Ancient DNA studies: new perspectives on old samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In spite of past controversies, the field of ancient DNA is now a reliable research area due to recent methodological improvements. A series of recent large-scale studies have revealed the true potential of ancient DNA samples to study the processes of evolution and to test models and assumptions commonly used to reconstruct patterns of evolution and to analyze population genetics and palaeoecological changes. Recent advances in DNA technologies, such as next-generation sequencing make it possible to recover DNA information from archaeological and paleontological remains allowing us to go back in time and study the genetic relationships between extinct organisms and their contemporary relatives. With the next-generation sequencing methodologies, DNA sequences can be retrieved even from samples (for example human remains) for which the technical pitfalls of classical methodologies required stringent criteria to guaranty the reliability of the results. In this paper, we review the methodologies applied to ancient DNA analysis and the perspectives that next-generation sequencing applications provide in this field. PMID:22697611

  8. Controls to validate plasma samples for cell free DNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Pallisgaard, Niels; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Brandslund, Ivan; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-06-15

    Recent research has focused on the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) in serum and plasma for clinical application, especially in oncology. The literature holds promise of cfDNA as a valuable tumour marker to be used for treatment selection, monitoring and follow-up. The results, however, are diverging due to methodological differences with lack of standardisation and definition of sensitivity. The new biological information has not yet come into routine use. The present study presents external standardisation by spiking with non-human DNA fragments to control for loss of DNA during sample preparation and measurement. It also suggests a method to control for admixture of DNA from normal lymphocytes by utilizing the unique immunoglobulin gene rearrangement in the B-cells. The results show that this approach improves the quality of the analysis and lowers the risk of falsely increased values. In conclusion we suggest a new method to improve the accuracy of cfDNA measurements easily incorporated in the current technology. PMID:25896958

  9. Environmental DNA (eDNA) Sampling Improves Occurrence and Detection Estimates of Invasive Burmese Pythons.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Margaret E; Oyler-McCance, Sara J; Dorazio, Robert M; Fike, Jennifer A; Smith, Brian J; Hunter, Charles T; Reed, Robert N; Hart, Kristen M

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods are used to detect DNA that is shed into the aquatic environment by cryptic or low density species. Applied in eDNA studies, occupancy models can be used to estimate occurrence and detection probabilities and thereby account for imperfect detection. However, occupancy terminology has been applied inconsistently in eDNA studies, and many have calculated occurrence probabilities while not considering the effects of imperfect detection. Low detection of invasive giant constrictors using visual surveys and traps has hampered the estimation of occupancy and detection estimates needed for population management in southern Florida, USA. Giant constrictor snakes pose a threat to native species and the ecological restoration of the Florida Everglades. To assist with detection, we developed species-specific eDNA assays using quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), Northern African python (P. sebae), boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), and the green (Eunectes murinus) and yellow anaconda (E. notaeus). Burmese pythons, Northern African pythons, and boa constrictors are established and reproducing, while the green and yellow anaconda have the potential to become established. We validated the python and boa constrictor assays using laboratory trials and tested all species in 21 field locations distributed in eight southern Florida regions. Burmese python eDNA was detected in 37 of 63 field sampling events; however, the other species were not detected. Although eDNA was heterogeneously distributed in the environment, occupancy models were able to provide the first estimates of detection probabilities, which were greater than 91%. Burmese python eDNA was detected along the leading northern edge of the known population boundary. The development of informative detection tools and eDNA occupancy models can improve conservation efforts in southern Florida and support more extensive studies of invasive constrictors. Generic sampling design and terminology are proposed to standardize and clarify interpretations of eDNA-based occupancy models. PMID:25874630

  10. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling improves occurrence and detection estimates of invasive Burmese pythons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret E.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dorazio, Robert M.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Smith, Brian J.; Hunter, Charles T.; Reed, Robert N.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods are used to detect DNA that is shed into the aquatic environment by cryptic or low density species. Applied in eDNA studies, occupancy models can be used to estimate occurrence and detection probabilities and thereby account for imperfect detection. However, occupancy terminology has been applied inconsistently in eDNA studies, and many have calculated occurrence probabilities while not considering the effects of imperfect detection. Low detection of invasive giant constrictors using visual surveys and traps has hampered the estimation of occupancy and detection estimates needed for population management in southern Florida, USA. Giant constrictor snakes pose a threat to native species and the ecological restoration of the Florida Everglades. To assist with detection, we developed species-specific eDNA assays using quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), Northern African python (P. sebae), boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), and the green (Eunectes murinus) and yellow anaconda (E. notaeus). Burmese pythons, Northern African pythons, and boa constrictors are established and reproducing, while the green and yellow anaconda have the potential to become established. We validated the python and boa constrictor assays using laboratory trials and tested all species in 21 field locations distributed in eight southern Florida regions. Burmese python eDNA was detected in 37 of 63 field sampling events; however, the other species were not detected. Although eDNA was heterogeneously distributed in the environment, occupancy models were able to provide the first estimates of detection probabilities, which were greater than 91%. Burmese python eDNA was detected along the leading northern edge of the known population boundary. The development of informative detection tools and eDNA occupancy models can improve conservation efforts in southern Florida and support more extensive studies of invasive constrictors. Generic sampling design and terminology are proposed to standardize and clarify interpretations of eDNA-based occupancy models.

  11. c-Myc degradation induced by DNA damage results in apoptosis of CHO Man-Rong Jiang1

    E-print Network

    Tian, Weidong

    c-Myc degradation induced by DNA damage results in apoptosis of CHO cells Man-Rong Jiang1 , Yuan of UV41 cells by TC treatment. Further analysis showed that degradation of the c-Myc protein in TC, MG132, reduced both the degradation of c-Myc and apoptosis in TC-treated UV41 cells. Expression

  12. Dual-degradable disulfide-containing PEI–Pluronic/DNA polyplexes: transfection efficiency and balancing protection and DNA release

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifen; Chen, Zhenzhen; Li, Yanfeng

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric gene-delivery vectors to achieve lack of toxicity and a balance between protection and DNA release remains a formidable challenge. Incorporating intracellular environment-responsive degradable bonds is an appreciable step toward developing safer transfection agents. In this study, novel, dual-degradable polycation copolymers (Pluronic-diacrylate [PA]–polyethyleneimine [PEI]–SS) were synthesized through the addition of low molecular weight (800 Da) PEI cross-linked with SS (PEI-SS) to PA. Three PA-PEI-SS copolymers (PA-PEI-SS1, 2, and 3) with different PEI-SS to Pluronic molar ratios were investigated and found to strongly condense plasmid DNA into positively charged nanoparticles with an average particle size of approximately 200 nm and to possess higher stability against DNase I digestion and sodium heparin. Disulfide and ester bonds of the copolymers were susceptible to intracellular redox conditions. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the PA-PEI-SS copolymers had significantly lower cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency in both BGC-823 and 293T cell lines than the controls of degradable PEI-SS and nondegradable 25 kDa PEI. Transfection activity was influenced by the PEI-SS content in the polymers and PA-PEI-SS1 showed the highest efficiency of the three copolymers. These studies suggest that these dual-degradable copolymers could be used as potential biocompatible gene delivery carriers. PMID:24109182

  13. Microbial colonization and degradation of forage samples incubated in vitro at different initial pH

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. V. Kozloski; L. D. Lima; R CADORINJR; L. M. Bonnecarrère Sanchez; C. C. D. Senger; G. Fiorentini; C. J. Härter

    2008-01-01

    Microbial colonization, degradation, and gas production kinetics of tropical and temperate forage samples incubated in vitro at initial pH (pHi) of 5.5, 6.0, 6.5 and 7.0 were measured. Dried, ground samples of oat (Avena strigosa), ryegrass (Lolium multifllorum), dwarf elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum. cv. Mott.) and ricegrass (Echinochloa sp.) were used. Microbial colonization on residues and extent of degradation

  14. Proteotoxic stress induces a cell cycle arrest by stimulating Lon to degrade the replication initiator DnaA

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Kristina; Liu, Jing; Chien, Peter; Laub, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The decision to initiate DNA replication is a critical step in the cell cycle of all organisms. Cells often delay replication in the face of stressful conditions, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate in Caulobacter crescentus that proteotoxic stress induces a cell cycle arrest by triggering the degradation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator. A depletion of available Hsp70 chaperone, DnaK, either through genetic manipulation or heat shock, induces synthesis of the Lon protease, which can directly degrade DnaA. Unexpectedly, we find that unfolded proteins, which accumulate following a loss of DnaK, also allosterically activate Lon to degrade DnaA, thereby ensuring a cell cycle arrest. Our work reveals a new mechanism for regulating DNA replication under adverse growth conditions. Additionally, our data indicate that unfolded proteins can actively and directly alter substrate recognition by cellular proteases. PMID:23911325

  15. ATM regulates Mre11-dependent DNA end-degradation and microhomology-mediated end joining.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Elias A; Henricksen, Leigh A; Li, Yuling; Williams, R Scott; Tainer, John A; Dixon, Kathleen

    2010-07-15

    The human disorder ataxia telangiectasia (AT), which is characterized by genetic instability and neurodegeneration, results from mutation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. The loss of ATM leads to cell cycle checkpoint deficiencies and other DNA damage signaling defects that do not fully explain all pathologies associated with A-T including neuronal loss. In addressing this enigma, we find here that ATM suppresses DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ). We show that ATM repression of DNA end-degradation is dependent on its kinase activities and that Mre11 is the major nuclease behind increased DNA end-degradation and MMEJ repair in A-T. Assessment of MMEJ by an in vivo reporter assay system reveals decreased levels of MMEJ repair in Mre11-knockdown cells and in cells treated with Mre11-nuclease inhibitor mirin. Structure-based modeling of Mre11 dimer engaging DNA ends suggests the 5' ends of a bridged DSB are juxtaposed such that DNA unwinding and 3'-5' exonuclease activities may collaborate to facilitate simultaneous pairing of extended 5' termini and exonucleolytic degradation of the 3' ends in MMEJ. Together our results provide an integrated understanding of ATM and Mre11 in MMEJ: ATM has a critical regulatory function in controlling DNA end-stability and error-prone DSB repair and Mre11 nuclease plays a major role in initiating MMEJ in mammalian cells. These functions of ATM and Mre11 could be particularly important in neuronal cells, which are post-mitotic and therefore depend on mechanisms other than homologous recombination between sister chromatids to repair DSBs. PMID:20647759

  16. Evaluation of methods that subdue the effects of polymerase chain reaction inhibitors in the study of ancient and degraded DNA

    E-print Network

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Evaluation of methods that subdue the effects of polymerase chain reaction inhibitors in the study Keywords: Ancient DNA Degraded DNA Polymerase chain reaction inhibitors Polymerases Species identification chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors as possible while preserving DNA yield. In order to further explore

  17. Genotyping of plant and animal samples without prior DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Chum, Pak Y; Haimes, Josh D; André, Chas P; Kuusisto, Pia K; Kelley, Melissa L

    2012-01-01

    The Direct PCR approach facilitates PCR amplification directly from small amounts of unpurified samples, and is demonstrated here for several plant and animal tissues (Figure 1). Direct PCR is based on specially engineered Thermo Scientific Phusion and Phire DNA Polymerases, which include a double-stranded DNA binding domain that gives them unique properties such as high tolerance of inhibitors. PCR-based target DNA detection has numerous applications in plant research, including plant genotype analysis and verification of transgenes. PCR from plant tissues traditionally involves an initial DNA isolation step, which may require expensive or toxic reagents. The process is time consuming and increases the risk of cross contamination. Conversely, by using Thermo Scientific Phire Plant Direct PCR Kit the target DNA can be easily detected, without prior DNA extraction. In the model demonstrated here, an example of derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence analysis (dCAPS) is performed directly from Arabidopsis plant leaves. dCAPS genotyping assays can be used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by SNP allele-specific restriction endonuclease digestion. Some plant samples tend to be more challenging when using Direct PCR methods as they contain components that interfere with PCR, such as phenolic compounds. In these cases, an additional step to remove the compounds is traditionally required. Here, this problem is overcome by using a quick and easy dilution protocol followed by Direct PCR amplification (Figure 1). Fifteen year-old oak leaves are used as a model for challenging plants as the specimen contains high amounts of phenolic compounds including tannins. Gene transfer into mice is broadly used to study the roles of genes in development, physiology and human disease. The use of these animals requires screening for the presence of the transgene, usually with PCR. Traditionally, this involves a time consuming DNA isolation step, during which DNA for PCR analysis is purified from ear, tail or toe tissues. However, with the Thermo Scientific Phire Animal Tissue Direct PCR Kit transgenic mice can be genotyped without prior DNA purification. In this protocol transgenic mouse genotyping is achieved directly from mouse ear tissues, as demonstrated here for a challenging example where only one primer set is used for amplification of two fragments differing greatly in size. PMID:23051689

  18. Genotyping of Plant and Animal Samples without Prior DNA Purification

    PubMed Central

    Chum, Pak Y.; Haimes, Josh D.; André, Chas P.; Kuusisto, Pia K.; Kelley, Melissa L.

    2012-01-01

    The Direct PCR approach facilitates PCR amplification directly from small amounts of unpurified samples, and is demonstrated here for several plant and animal tissues (Figure 1). Direct PCR is based on specially engineered Thermo Scientific Phusion and Phire DNA Polymerases, which include a double-stranded DNA binding domain that gives them unique properties such as high tolerance of inhibitors. PCR-based target DNA detection has numerous applications in plant research, including plant genotype analysis and verification of transgenes. PCR from plant tissues traditionally involves an initial DNA isolation step, which may require expensive or toxic reagents. The process is time consuming and increases the risk of cross contamination1, 2. Conversely, by using Thermo Scientific Phire Plant Direct PCR Kit the target DNA can be easily detected, without prior DNA extraction. In the model demonstrated here, an example of derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence analysis (dCAPS)3,4 is performed directly from Arabidopsis plant leaves. dCAPS genotyping assays can be used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by SNP allele-specific restriction endonuclease digestion3. Some plant samples tend to be more challenging when using Direct PCR methods as they contain components that interfere with PCR, such as phenolic compounds. In these cases, an additional step to remove the compounds is traditionally required2,5. Here, this problem is overcome by using a quick and easy dilution protocol followed by Direct PCR amplification (Figure 1). Fifteen year-old oak leaves are used as a model for challenging plants as the specimen contains high amounts of phenolic compounds including tannins. Gene transfer into mice is broadly used to study the roles of genes in development, physiology and human disease. The use of these animals requires screening for the presence of the transgene, usually with PCR. Traditionally, this involves a time consuming DNA isolation step, during which DNA for PCR analysis is purified from ear, tail or toe tissues6,7. However, with the Thermo Scientific Phire Animal Tissue Direct PCR Kit transgenic mice can be genotyped without prior DNA purification. In this protocol transgenic mouse genotyping is achieved directly from mouse ear tissues, as demonstrated here for a challenging example where only one primer set is used for amplification of two fragments differing greatly in size. PMID:23051689

  19. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria enriched by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill identified by cultivation and DNA-SIP.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Singleton, David R; Berry, David; Yang, Tingting; Aitken, Michael D; Teske, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The massive influx of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster triggered dramatic microbial community shifts in surface oil slick and deep plume waters. Previous work had shown several taxa, notably DWH Oceanospirillales, Cycloclasticus and Colwellia, were found to be enriched in these waters based on their dominance in conventional clone and pyrosequencing libraries and were thought to have had a significant role in the degradation of the oil. However, this type of community analysis data failed to provide direct evidence on the functional properties, such as hydrocarbon degradation of organisms. Using DNA-based stable-isotope probing with uniformly (13)C-labelled hydrocarbons, we identified several aliphatic (Alcanivorax, Marinobacter)- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (Alteromonas, Cycloclasticus, Colwellia)-degrading bacteria. We also isolated several strains (Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Cycloclasticus, Halomonas, Marinobacter and Pseudoalteromonas) with demonstrable hydrocarbon-degrading qualities from surface slick and plume water samples collected during the active phase of the spill. Some of these organisms accounted for the majority of sequence reads representing their respective taxa in a pyrosequencing data set constructed from the same and additional water column samples. Hitherto, Alcanivorax was not identified in any of the previous water column studies analysing the microbial response to the spill and we discuss its failure to respond to the oil. Collectively, our data provide unequivocal evidence on the hydrocarbon-degrading qualities for some of the dominant taxa enriched in surface and plume waters during the DWH oil spill, and a more complete understanding of their role in the fate of the oil. PMID:23788333

  20. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria enriched by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill identified by cultivation and DNA-SIP

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Tony; Singleton, David R; Berry, David; Yang, Tingting; Aitken, Michael D; Teske, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The massive influx of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster triggered dramatic microbial community shifts in surface oil slick and deep plume waters. Previous work had shown several taxa, notably DWH Oceanospirillales, Cycloclasticus and Colwellia, were found to be enriched in these waters based on their dominance in conventional clone and pyrosequencing libraries and were thought to have had a significant role in the degradation of the oil. However, this type of community analysis data failed to provide direct evidence on the functional properties, such as hydrocarbon degradation of organisms. Using DNA-based stable-isotope probing with uniformly 13C-labelled hydrocarbons, we identified several aliphatic (Alcanivorax, Marinobacter)- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (Alteromonas, Cycloclasticus, Colwellia)-degrading bacteria. We also isolated several strains (Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Cycloclasticus, Halomonas, Marinobacter and Pseudoalteromonas) with demonstrable hydrocarbon-degrading qualities from surface slick and plume water samples collected during the active phase of the spill. Some of these organisms accounted for the majority of sequence reads representing their respective taxa in a pyrosequencing data set constructed from the same and additional water column samples. Hitherto, Alcanivorax was not identified in any of the previous water column studies analysing the microbial response to the spill and we discuss its failure to respond to the oil. Collectively, our data provide unequivocal evidence on the hydrocarbon-degrading qualities for some of the dominant taxa enriched in surface and plume waters during the DWH oil spill, and a more complete understanding of their role in the fate of the oil. PMID:23788333

  1. Salt-tolerant phenol-degrading microorganisms isolated from Amazonian soil samples.

    PubMed

    Bastos, A E; Moon, D H; Rossi, A; Trevors, J T; Tsai, S M

    2000-11-01

    Two phenol-degrading microorganisms were isolated from Amazonian rain forest soil samples after enrichment in the presence of phenol and a high salt concentration. The yeast Candida tropicalis and the bacterium Alcaligenes faecoalis were identified using several techniques, including staining, morphological observation and biochemical tests, fatty acid profiles and 16S/18S rRNA sequencing. Both isolates, A. faecalis and C. tropicalis, were used in phenol degradation assays, with Rhodococcus erythropolis as a reference phenol-degrading bacterium, and compared to microbial populations from wastewater samples collected from phenol-contaminated environments. C. tropicalis tolerated higher concentrations of phenol and salt (16 mM and 15%, respectively) than A. faecalis (12 mM and 5.6%). The yeast also tolerated a wider pH range (3-9) during phenol degradation than A. faecalis (pH 7-9). Phenol degradation was repressed in C. tropicalis by acetate and glucose, but not by lactate. Glucose and acetate had little effect, while lactate stimulated phenol degradation in A. faecalis. To our knowledge, these soils had never been contaminated with man-made phenolic compounds and this is the first report of phenol-degrading microorganisms from Amazonian forest soil samples. The results support the idea that natural uncontaminated environments contain sufficient genetic diversity to make them valid choices for the isolation of microorganisms useful in bioremediation. PMID:11131025

  2. Regulated degradation of Chk1 by chaperone-mediated autophagy in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Park, Caroline; Suh, Yousin; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is activated in response to cellular stressors to prevent cellular proteotoxicity through selective degradation of altered proteins in lysosomes. Reduced CMA activity contributes to the decrease in proteome quality in disease and ageing. Here, we report that CMA is also upregulated in response to genotoxic insults and that declined CMA functionality leads to reduced cell survival and genomic instability. This role of CMA in genome quality control is exerted through regulated degradation of activated checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) by this pathway after the genotoxic insult. Nuclear accumulation of Chk1 in CMA-deficient cells compromises cell cycle progression and prolongs the time that DNA damage persists in these cells. Furthermore, blockage of CMA leads to hyperphosphorylation and destabilization of the MRN (Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1) complex, which participates in early steps of particular DNA repair pathways. We propose that CMA contributes to maintain genome stability by assuring nuclear proteostasis. PMID:25880015

  3. Bacterial Argonaute samples the transcriptome to identify foreign DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olovnikov, Ivan; Chan, Ken; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Newman, Dianne K.; Aravin, Alexei A.

    2013-01-01

    summary Eukaryotic Argonautes bind small RNAs and use them as guides to find complementary RNA targets and induce gene silencing. Though homologs of eukaryotic Argonautes are present in many bacteria and archaea their small RNA partners and functions are unknown. We found that the Argonaute of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RsAgo) associates with 15-19 nt RNAs that correspond to the majority of transcripts. RsAgo also binds single-stranded 22-24 nt DNA molecules that are complementary to the small RNAs and enriched in sequences derived from exogenous plasmids as well as genome-encoded foreign nucleic acids such as transposons and phage genes. Expression of RsAgo in the heterologous E. coli system leads to formation of plasmid– derived small RNA and DNA and plasmid degradation. In a R. sphaeroides mutant lacking RsAgo, expression of plasmid-encoded genes is elevated. Our results indicate that RNAi-related processes found in eukaryotes are also conserved in bacteria and target foreign nucleic acids. PMID:24034694

  4. Association of Global DNA Methylation and Global DNA Hydroxymethylation with Metals and Other Exposures in Human Blood DNA Samples

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wan-yee; Shang, Yan; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Ledesma, Marta; Leon, Montserrat; Laclaustra, Martin; Pollak, Jonathan; Guallar, Eliseo; Cole, Shelley A.; Fallin, M. Dani; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between human blood DNA global methylation and global hydroxymethylation has not been evaluated in population-based studies. No studies have evaluated environmental determinants of global DNA hydroxymethylation, including exposure to metals. Objective: We evaluated the association between global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation in 48 Strong Heart Study participants for which selected metals had been measured in urine at baseline and DNA was available from 1989–1991 (visit 1) and 1998–1999 (visit 3). Methods: We measured the percentage of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in samples using capture and detection antibodies followed by colorimetric quantification. We explored the association of participant characteristics (i.e., age, adiposity, smoking, and metal exposure) with both global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation. Results: The Spearman’s correlation coefficient for 5-mC and 5-hmC levels was 0.32 (p = 0.03) at visit 1 and 0.54 (p < 0.001) at visit 3. Trends for both epigenetic modifications were consistent across potential determinants. In cross-sectional analyses, the odds ratios of methylated and hydroxymethylated DNA were 1.56 (95% CI: 0.95, 2.57) and 1.76 (95% CI: 1.07, 2.88), respectively, for the comparison of participants above and below the median percentage of dimethylarsinate. The corresponding odds ratios were 1.64 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.65) and 1.16 (95% CI: 0.70, 1.94), respectively, for the comparison of participants above and below the median cadmium level. Arsenic exposure and metabolism were consistently associated with both epigenetic markers in cross-sectional and prospective analyses. The positive correlation of 5-mC and 5-hmC levels was confirmed in an independent study population. Conclusions: Our findings support that both epigenetic measures are related at the population level. The consistent trends in the associations between these two epigenetic modifications and the characteristics evaluated, especially arsenic exposure and metabolism, suggest the need for understanding which of the two measures is a better biomarker for environmental epigenetic effects in future large-scale epidemiologic studies. Citation: Tellez-Plaza M, Tang WY, Shang Y, Umans JG, Francesconi KA, Goessler W, Ledesma M, Leon M, Laclaustra M, Pollak J, Guallar E, Cole SA, Fallin MD, Navas-Acien A. 2014. Association of global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation with metals and other exposures in human blood DNA samples. Environ Health Perspect 122:946–954;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306674 PMID:24769358

  5. Comparison of DNA preservation methods for environmental bacterial community samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Michael A.; Pratte, Zoe A.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2013-01-01

    Field collections of environmental samples, for example corals, for molecular microbial analyses present distinct challenges. The lack of laboratory facilities in remote locations is common, and preservation of microbial community DNA for later study is critical. A particular challenge is keeping samples frozen in transit. Five nucleic acid preservation methods that do not require cold storage were compared for effectiveness over time and ease of use. Mixed microbial communities of known composition were created and preserved by DNAgard™, RNAlater®, DMSO–EDTA–salt (DESS), FTA® cards, and FTA Elute® cards. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and clone libraries were used to detect specific changes in the faux communities over weeks and months of storage. A previously known bias in FTA® cards that results in lower recovery of pure cultures of Gram-positive bacteria was also detected in mixed community samples. There appears to be a uniform bias across all five preservation methods against microorganisms with high G + C DNA. Overall, the liquid-based preservatives (DNAgard™, RNAlater®, and DESS) outperformed the card-based methods. No single liquid method clearly outperformed the others, leaving method choice to be based on experimental design, field facilities, shipping constraints, and allowable cost.

  6. The Effect of Geographical Scale of Sampling on DNA Barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Bergsten, Johannes; Bilton, David T.; Fujisawa, Tomochika; Elliott, Miranda; Monaghan, Michael T.; Balke, Michael; Hendrich, Lars; Geijer, Joja; Herrmann, Jan; Foster, Garth N.; Ribera, Ignacio; Nilsson, Anders N.; Barraclough, Timothy G.; Vogler, Alfried P.

    2012-01-01

    Eight years after DNA barcoding was formally proposed on a large scale, CO1 sequences are rapidly accumulating from around the world. While studies to date have mostly targeted local or regional species assemblages, the recent launch of the global iBOL project (International Barcode of Life), highlights the need to understand the effects of geographical scale on Barcoding's goals. Sampling has been central in the debate on DNA Barcoding, but the effect of the geographical scale of sampling has not yet been thoroughly and explicitly tested with empirical data. Here, we present a CO1 data set of aquatic predaceous diving beetles of the tribe Agabini, sampled throughout Europe, and use it to investigate how the geographic scale of sampling affects 1) the estimated intraspecific variation of species, 2) the genetic distance to the most closely related heterospecific, 3) the ratio of intraspecific and interspecific variation, 4) the frequency of taxonomically recognized species found to be monophyletic, and 5) query identification performance based on 6 different species assignment methods. Intraspecific variation was significantly correlated with the geographical scale of sampling (R-square = 0.7), and more than half of the species with 10 or more sampled individuals (N = 29) showed higher intraspecific variation than 1% sequence divergence. In contrast, the distance to the closest heterospecific showed a significant decrease with increasing geographical scale of sampling. The average genetic distance dropped from > 7% for samples within 1 km, to < 3.5% for samples up to > 6000 km apart. Over a third of the species were not monophyletic, and the proportion increased through locally, nationally, regionally, and continentally restricted subsets of the data. The success of identifying queries decreased with increasing spatial scale of sampling; liberal methods declined from 100% to around 90%, whereas strict methods dropped to below 50% at continental scales. The proportion of query identifications considered uncertain (more than one species < 1% distance from query) escalated from zero at local, to 50% at continental scale. Finally, by resampling the most widely sampled species we show that even if samples are collected to maximize the geographical coverage, up to 70 individuals are required to sample 95% of intraspecific variation. The results show that the geographical scale of sampling has a critical impact on the global application of DNA barcoding. Scale-effects result from the relative importance of different processes determining the composition of regional species assemblages (dispersal and ecological assembly) and global clades (demography, speciation, and extinction). The incorporation of geographical information, where available, will be required to obtain identification rates at global scales equivalent to those in regional barcoding studies. Our result hence provides an impetus for both smarter barcoding tools and sprouting national barcoding initiatives—smaller geographical scales deliver higher accuracy. PMID:22398121

  7. Analyzing insulin samples by size-exclusion chromatography: a column degradation study.

    PubMed

    Teska, Brandon M; Kumar, Amit; Carpenter, John F; Wempe, Michael F

    2015-04-01

    Investigating insulin analogs and probing their intrinsic stability at physiological temperature, we observed significant degradation in the size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) signal over a moderate number of insulin sample injections, which generated concerns about the quality of the separations. Therefore, our research goal was to identify the cause(s) for the observed signal degradation and attempt to mitigate the degradation in order to extend SEC column lifespan. In these studies, we used multiangle light scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods to evaluate column degradation. The results from these studies illustrate: (1) that zinc ions introduced by the insulin product produced the observed column performance issues; and (2) that including ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, a zinc chelator, in the mobile phase helped to maintain column performance. PMID:25581527

  8. Identification of a new degradation product of the antifouling agent Irgarol 1051 in natural samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    A main degradation product of Irgarol [2-(methylthio)-4-(tert-butylamino)-6-(cyclopropylamino)-s-triazine], one of the most widely used compounds in antifouling paints, was detected at trace levels in seawater and sediment samples collected from several marinas on the Mediterranean coast. This degradation product was identified as 2-methylthio-4-tert-butylamino-s-triazine. The unequivocal identification of this compound in seawater samples was carried out by solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled on-line with liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). SPE was carried out by passing 150 ml of seawater sample through a cartridge containing a polymeric phase (PLRP-s), with recoveries ranging from 92 to 108% (n=5). Using LC-MS detection in positive ion mode, useful structural information was obtained by increasing the fragmentor voltage, thus permitting the unequivocal identification of this compound in natural samples. Method detection limits were in the range of 0.002 to 0.005 ??g/l. Overall, the combination of on-line SPE and LC-APCI-MS represents an important advance in environmental analysis of herbicide degradation products in seawater, since it demonstrates that trace amounts of new polar metabolites may be determined rapidly. This paper reports the LC-MS identification of the main degradation product of Irgarol in seawater and sediment samples. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a quantitative PCR assay for residual mouse DNA and comparison of four sample purification methods for DNA isolation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hui; Gu, Xuelin; Scanlan, Mary S; Lively, Chris R

    2011-04-28

    Reliable and sensitive assays are required to determine whether a pharmaceutical product meets current regulatory guidelines for residual host cell DNA. In this study, the sensitivity of the qPCR assay was significantly improved by targeting the repetitive elements of mouse genome. This improved method allowed for sensitive and accurate quantitation of mouse genomic DNA in the range of 1 to 10(6)pg/mL. In addition, four sample purification methods for DNA isolation (Wako DNA extractor kit, MasterPure™ DNA purification kit, PrepSEQ™ residual DNA sample preparation kit, and phenol-chloroform extraction method with addition of glycogen), each representing a different strategy for DNA isolation from proteinaceous solutions, were evaluated by isolating DNA from a mouse monoclonal IgG antibody. Among these methods, Wako DNA extractor kit and MasterPure™ DNA purification kit demonstrated superior DNA recovery, repeatability, and sensitivity, with quantitation limits of 1pg/mL. To further evaluate these two DNA isolation methods, six replicates of an unspiked mouse polyclonal IgG antibody sample were tested by both methods, and both methods demonstrated a good degree of precision. Therefore, the residual mouse DNA quantitation methods described here represented rapid, accurate, precise, and sensitive procedures that can be used in quality control testing for regulatory compliance in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:21295933

  10. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, ?-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening. PMID:23847654

  11. Time-Resolved DNA Stable Isotope Probing Links Desulfobacterales- and Coriobacteriaceae-Related Bacteria to Anaerobic Degradation of Benzene under Methanogenic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Mana; Kurisu, Futoshi; Kasuga, Ikuro; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    To identify the microorganisms involved in benzene degradation, DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP) with 13C-benzene was applied to a methanogenic benzene-degrading enrichment culture. Pyrosequencing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences revealed that the community structure was highly complex in spite of a 3-year incubation only with benzene. The culture degraded 98% of approximately 1 mM 13C-benzene and mineralized 72% of that within 63 d. The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles of the buoyant density fractions revealed the incorporation of 13C into two phylotypes after 64 d. These two phylotypes were determined to be Desulfobacterales- and Coriobacteriaceae-related bacteria by cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in the 13C-labeled DNA abundant fraction. Comparative pyrosequencing analysis of the buoyant density fractions of 12C- and 13C-labeled samples indicated the incorporation of 13C into three bacterial and one archaeal OTUs related to Desulfobacterales, Coriobacteriales, Rhodocyclaceae, and Methanosarcinales. The first two OTUs included the bacteria detected by T-RFLP-cloning-sequencing analysis. Furthermore, time-resolved SIP analysis confirmed that the activity of all these microbes appeared at the earliest stage of degradation. In this methanogenic culture, Desulfobacterales- and Coriobacteriaceae-related bacteria were most likely to be the major benzene degraders. PMID:24909708

  12. Comparison of seven methods for extraction of bacterial DNA from fecal and cecal samples of mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Janina; Patron, Kevin; Legrand-Frossi, Christine; Frippiat, Jean-Pol; Merlin, Christophe; Alauzet, Corentine; Lozniewski, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Analysis of bacterial DNA from fecal samples of mice is commonly performed in experimental studies. Although DNA extraction is a critical step in various molecular approaches, the efficiency of methods that may be used for DNA extraction from mice fecal samples has never been evaluated. We compared the efficiencies of six widely used commercial kits (MasterPure™ Gram Positive DNA Purification Kit, QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit; NucliSENS® easyMAG®, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep™, FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Feces and FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil) and a non-commercial method for DNA isolation from mice feces and cecal contents. DNA quantity and quality were assessed by fluorometry, spectrophotometry, gel electrophoresis and qPCR. Cell lysis efficiencies were evaluated by qPCR targeting three relevant bacteria in spiked specimens. For both feces and intestinal contents, the most efficient extraction method was the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil. PMID:25093756

  13. Protein Degradation Pathways Regulate the Functions of Helicases in the DNA Damage Response and Maintenance of Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Joshua A.; Suhasini, Avvaru N.; Brosh, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Degradation of helicases or helicase-like proteins, often mediated by ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways, plays important regulatory roles in cellular mechanisms that respond to DNA damage or replication stress. The Bloom’s syndrome helicase (BLM) provides an example of how helicase degradation pathways, regulated by post-translational modifications and protein interactions with components of the Fanconi Anemia (FA) interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair pathway, influence cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair, and replication restart. The FANCM DNA translocase can be targeted by checkpoint kinases that exert dramatic effects on FANCM stability and chromosomal integrity. Other work provides evidence that degradation of the F-box DNA helicase (FBH1) helps to balance translesion synthesis (TLS) and homologous recombination (HR) repair at blocked replication forks. Degradation of the helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), a DNA translocase and ubiquitylating enzyme, influences the choice of post replication repair (PRR) pathway. Stability of the Werner syndrome helicase-nuclease (WRN) involved in the replication stress response is regulated by its acetylation. Turning to transcription, stability of the Cockayne Syndrome Group B DNA translocase (CSB) implicated in transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is regulated by a CSA ubiquitin ligase complex enabling recovery of RNA synthesis. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that helicases can be targeted for degradation to maintain genome homeostasis. PMID:25906194

  14. DNA-SIP Reveals That Syntrophaceae Play an Important Role in Methanogenic Hexadecane Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; Ding, Chen; Li, Qiang; He, Qiao; Dai, Li-rong; Zhang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The methanogenic degradation of linear alkanes is a common process in oil-impacted environments. However, little is known about the key players involved in this process. Here, the hexadecane-degrading organisms in a methanogenic, hexadecane-degrading consortium designated M82 obtained from Shengli oilfield and maintained at 35°C for over 4 years, were identified by DNA-stable isotope probing with UL-13C-hexadecane, followed by density-resolved terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, cloning and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments. Compared to the fractions of the 12C treatment, the relative abundance of two phylotypes significantly increased in the heavy fractions of the 13C-hexadecane incubated microcosm. One belongs to a uncultured member of the bacterial family Syntrophaceae, which show 95–97% rRNA sequence identity with Smithella propionica, and the other is affiliated with Methanoculleus receptaculi (>99% sequence identity). The results of the present study prove the significant role of uncultured Syntrophaceae in degradation of hexadecane, probably through syntrophic interactions with hydrogenotrophic methanogens. PMID:23840866

  15. A Simple, Efficient Method for the Separation of Humic Substances and DNA from Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C. R.; Harper, J. P.; Willoughby, D.; Roden, E. E.; Churchill, P. F.

    1997-01-01

    Three different gels (Sepharose 4B, Sephadex G-200, and Sephadex G-50) were evaluated as a means of removing humic contaminants from DNA extracts of environmental samples. Sepharose 4B gave superior separation of DNA from humics, and DNA purified in this way showed consistently greater amplification than DNA purified by the other materials. PMID:16535760

  16. A rapid wire-based sampling method for DNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong; Catcheside, David E A; Stephenson, Alice; Hefford, Chris; Kirkbride, K Paul; Burgoyne, Leigh A

    2012-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a commission to develop a field deployable rapid short tandem repeat (STR)-based DNA profiling system to enable discrimination between tissues derived from a small number of individuals. Speed was achieved by truncation of sample preparation and field deployability by use of an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyser(TM). Human blood and tissues were stabbed with heated stainless steel wire and the resulting sample dehydrated with isopropanol prior to direct addition to a PCR. Choice of a polymerase tolerant of tissue residues and cycles of amplification appropriate for the amount of template expected yielded useful profiles with a custom-designed quintuplex primer set suitable for use with the Bioanalyser(TM). Samples stored on wires remained amplifiable for months, allowing their transportation unrefrigerated from remote locations to a laboratory for analysis using AmpFlSTR(®) Profiler Plus(®) without further processing. The field system meets the requirements for discrimination of samples from small sets and retains access to full STR profiling when required. PMID:22211864

  17. An evaluation of long-term preservation methods for brown bear (Ursus arctos) faecal DNA samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, M.A.; Waits, L.P.; Kendall, K.C.; Wasser, S.K.; Higbee, J.A.; Bogden, R.

    2002-01-01

    Relatively few large-scale faecal DNA studies have been initiated due to difficulties in amplifying low quality and quantity DNA template. To improve brown bear faecal DNA PCR amplification success rates and to determine post collection sample longevity, five preservation methods were evaluated: 90% ethanol, DETs buffer, silica-dried, oven-dried stored at room temperature, and oven-dried stored at -20??C. Preservation effectiveness was evaluated for 50 faecal samples by PCR amplification of a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) locus (???146 bp) and a nuclear DNA (nDNA) locus (???200 bp) at time points of one week, one month, three months and six months. Preservation method and storage time significantly impacted mtDNA and nDNA amplification success rates. For mtDNA, all preservation methods had ??? 75% success at one week, but storage time had a significant impact on the effectiveness of the silica preservation method. Ethanol preserved samples had the highest success rates for both mtDNA (86.5%) and nDNA (84%). Nuclear DNA amplification success rates ranged from 26-88%, and storage time had a significant impact on all methods but ethanol. Preservation method and storage time should be important considerations for researchers planning projects utilizing faecal DNA. We recommend preservation of faecal samples in 90% ethanol when feasible, although when collecting in remote field conditions or for both DNA and hormone assays a dry collection method may be advantageous.

  18. Specific amplification of bacterial DNA by optimized so-called universal bacterial primers in samples rich of plant DNA.

    PubMed

    Dorn-In, Samart; Bassitta, Rupert; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann; Hölzel, Christina S

    2015-06-01

    Universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S-rRNA-gene allow quantification of the total bacterial load in variable sample types by qPCR. However, many universal primer pairs also amplify DNA of plants or even of archaea and other eukaryotic cells. By using these primers, the total bacterial load might be misevaluated, whenever samples contain high amounts of non-target DNA. Thus, this study aimed to provide primer pairs which are suitable for quantification and identification of bacterial DNA in samples such as feed, spices and sample material from digesters. For 42 primers, mismatches to the sequence of chloroplasts and mitochondria of plants were evaluated. Six primer pairs were further analyzed with regard to the question whether they anneal to DNA of archaea, animal tissue and fungi. Subsequently they were tested with sample matrix such as plants, feed, feces, soil and environmental samples. To this purpose, the target DNA in the samples was quantified by qPCR. The PCR products of plant and feed samples were further processed for the Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism method followed by sequence analysis. The sequencing results revealed that primer pair 335F/769R amplified only bacterial DNA in samples such as plants and animal feed, in which the DNA of plants prevailed. PMID:25863142

  19. Optimization of kinetic parameters for the degradation of plasmid DNA in rat plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Q. A.

    2014-12-01

    Biotechnology is a rapidly growing area of research work in the field of pharmaceutical sciences. The study of pharmacokinetics of plasmid DNA (pDNA) is an important area of research work. It has been observed that the process of gene delivery faces many troubles on the transport of pDNA towards their target sites. The topoforms of pDNA has been termed as super coiled (S-C), open circular (O-C) and linear (L), the kinetic model of which will be presented in this paper. The kinetic model gives rise to system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), the exact solution of which has been found. The kinetic parameters, which are responsible for the degradation of super coiled, and the formation of open circular and linear topoforms have a great significance not only in vitro but for modeling of further processes as well, therefore need to be addressed in great detail. For this purpose, global optimization techniques have been adopted, thus finding the optimal results for the said model. The results of the model, while using the optimal parameters, were compared against the measured data, which gives a nice agreement.

  20. Effect of DNA extraction and sample preservation method on rumen bacterial population.

    PubMed

    Fliegerova, Katerina; Tapio, Ilma; Bonin, Aurelie; Mrazek, Jakub; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Bani, Paolo; Bayat, Alireza; Vilkki, Johanna; Kope?ný, Jan; Shingfield, Kevin J; Boyer, Frederic; Coissac, Eric; Taberlet, Pierre; Wallace, R John

    2014-10-01

    The comparison of the bacterial profile of intracellular (iDNA) and extracellular DNA (eDNA) isolated from cow rumen content stored under different conditions was conducted. The influence of rumen fluid treatment (cheesecloth squeezed, centrifuged, filtered), storage temperature (RT, -80 °C) and cryoprotectants (PBS-glycerol, ethanol) on quality and quantity parameters of extracted DNA was evaluated by bacterial DGGE analysis, real-time PCR quantification and metabarcoding approach using high-throughput sequencing. Samples clustered according to the type of extracted DNA due to considerable differences between iDNA and eDNA bacterial profiles, while storage temperature and cryoprotectants additives had little effect on sample clustering. The numbers of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were lower (P < 0.01) in eDNA samples. The qPCR indicated significantly higher amount of Firmicutes in iDNA sample frozen with glycerol (P < 0.01). Deep sequencing analysis of iDNA samples revealed the prevalence of Bacteroidetes and similarity of samples frozen with and without cryoprotectants, which differed from sample stored with ethanol at room temperature. Centrifugation and consequent filtration of rumen fluid subjected to the eDNA isolation procedure considerably changed the ratio of molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Intracellular DNA extraction using bead-beating method from cheesecloth sieved rumen content mixed with PBS-glycerol and stored at -80 °C was found as the optimal method to study ruminal bacterial profile. PMID:24125910

  1. DNA-SIP identifies sulfate-reducing Clostridia as important toluene degraders in tar-oil-contaminated aquifer sediment.

    PubMed

    Winderl, Christian; Penning, Holger; Netzer, Frederick von; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Lueders, Tillmann

    2010-10-01

    Global groundwater resources are constantly challenged by a multitude of contaminants such as aromatic hydrocarbons. Especially in anaerobic habitats, a large diversity of unrecognized microbial populations may be responsible for their degradation. Still, our present understanding of the respective microbiota and their ecophysiology is almost exclusively based on a small number of cultured organisms, mostly within the Proteobacteria. Here, by DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP), we directly identified the most active sulfate-reducing toluene degraders in a diverse sedimentary microbial community originating from a tar-oil-contaminated aquifer at a former coal gasification plant. On incubation of fresh sediments with (13)C(7)-toluene, the production of both sulfide and (13)CO(2) was clearly coupled to the (13)C-labeling of DNA of microbes related to Desulfosporosinus spp. within the Peptococcaceae (Clostridia). The screening of labeled DNA fractions also suggested a novel benzylsuccinate synthase alpha-subunit (bssA) sequence type previously only detected in the environment to be tentatively affiliated with these degraders. However, carbon flow from the contaminant into degrader DNA was only ?50%, pointing toward high ratios of heterotrophic CO(2)-fixation during assimilation of acetyl-CoA originating from the contaminant by these degraders. These findings demonstrate that the importance of non-proteobacterial populations in anaerobic aromatics degradation, as well as their specific ecophysiology in the subsurface may still be largely ungrasped. PMID:20428224

  2. The room temperature preservation of filtered environmental DNA samples and assimilation into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Mark A; Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; McVeigh, Margaret M; Lodge, David M

    2015-01-01

    Current research targeting filtered macrobial environmental DNA (eDNA) often relies upon cold ambient temperatures at various stages, including the transport of water samples from the field to the laboratory and the storage of water and/or filtered samples in the laboratory. This poses practical limitations for field collections in locations where refrigeration and frozen storage is difficult or where samples must be transported long distances for further processing and screening. This study demonstrates the successful preservation of eDNA at room temperature (20 °C) in two lysis buffers, CTAB and Longmire's, over a 2-week period of time. Moreover, the preserved eDNA samples were seamlessly integrated into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol (PCI) DNA extraction protocol. The successful application of the eDNA extraction to multiple filter membrane types suggests the methods evaluated here may be broadly applied in future eDNA research. Our results also suggest that for many kinds of studies recently reported on macrobial eDNA, detection probabilities could have been increased, and at a lower cost, by utilizing the Longmire's preservation buffer with a PCI DNA extraction. PMID:24834966

  3. DNA Amounts in Two Samples of Angiosperm Weeds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL D. BENNETT; ILIA J. LEITCH; LYNDA HANSON

    1998-01-01

    Of the world's 250000 angiosperm species, only about 200 are recognized as important weeds. 4C nuclear DNA amounts were estimated for 39 such species. Success for many important weeds is suggested to reflect several traits known to correlate with low DNA C-value, so such weeds may have smaller DNA C-values than other species. Our work tests this hypothesis, comparing DNA

  4. Analysis of environmental samples for explosives and explosives degradation products by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, P.M.; Furlong, E.T.; Lindley, C.E.; Burkhardt, M.R. [Geological Survey, Arvada, CO (United States). National Water Quality Lab.

    1994-12-31

    Nitroaromatic explosives and their degradation products are regulated water-soluble contaminants that may pose a hazard to human health and could be important water contaminants. The reliable identification of most explosives, in particular, the identification of degradation products, is a major shortcoming in most analytical methods. As an improvement, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (coupled to Thermospray) mass spectrometry was used to determine compound molecular weights, and tandem-mass spectrometry was applied to confirm molecular structure. Compounds were separated isocratically using methanol-water with an octadecylsilane HPLC column. The identities of known nitroaromatic explosives were confirmed by combined ultraviolet absorbance and negative ion mass spectra. For optimal detection of known compounds, selected ion monitoring mass spectrometry was used. Calibration curves fit quadratic models, with correlation coefficients typically exceeding 0.995 over two orders of magnitude. Instrument detection limits ranged from 2.5 to 10 nanograms per injection, resulting in method-detection limits from about 100 to 400 nanograms per liter for a typical water sample. Unknown analytes (indicated by optical spectra) were identified by full scan and tandem mass spectrometry experiments on sample extracts or isolated extract fractions. This combined ultraviolet-diode array mass spectrometric approach is a superior method for analyzing soil or water samples where known explosives and unknown degradation products might be present.

  5. Fluorescence formation from the interaction of DNA with lipid oxidation degradation products.

    PubMed

    Frankel, E N; Neff, W E; Brooks, D D; Fujimoto, K

    1987-06-23

    To clarify the mechanism of fluorescence formation between DNA and lipid degradation products in the presence of ferric chloride and ascorbic acid, a number of carbonyl compounds and decomposition products of pure methyl linolenate hydroperoxides were examined. Keto derivatives of methyl ricinoleate, linoleate, and oleate, alkanals and 2-alkenals produced little or no fluorescence with DNA in the presence of ferric chloride-ascorbic acid. 2,4-Alkadienals were more active and 2,4,7-decatrienal was the most active. Mixtures of volatile aldehydes prepared from linolenate hydroperoxide decomposed either thermally or with iron and ascorbate had the same activity as 2,4,7-decatrienal. Higher molecular-weight products from the decomposition of methyl linolenate hydroperoxides showed relatively low activity. beta-Carotene, alpha-tocopherol and other antioxidants effectively reduced the amount of fluorescence formed by linolenate hydroperoxides. The results suggest that, in addition to hydroperoxide decomposition products, singlet oxygen and/or free radical species contribute significantly to the fluorescence formed from the interaction of methyl linolenate hydroperoxides with DNA in the presence of ferric chloride and ascorbic acid. PMID:3593747

  6. Wild chimpanzee infant urine and saliva sampled noninvasively usable for DNA analyses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eiji Inoue; Miho Inoue-Murayama; Osamu Takenaka; Toshisada Nishida

    2007-01-01

    In many genetic studies on the great apes, fecal or hair samples have been used as sources of DNA. However, feces and hairs\\u000a are difficult to collect from chimpanzee infants under 3 years of age. As alternative DNA sources, we investigated the efficiency\\u000a of collecting urine samples from infants compared with fecal samples, as well as the validity of the DNA

  7. USP17- and SCF?TrCP-Regulated Degradation of DEC1 Controls the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihoon; D'Annibale, Sara; Magliozzi, Roberto; Low, Teck Yew; Jansen, Petra; Shaltiel, Indra A.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; Medema, Rene H.

    2014-01-01

    In response to genotoxic stress, DNA damage checkpoints maintain the integrity of the genome by delaying cell cycle progression to allow for DNA repair. Here we show that the degradation of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor DEC1, a critical regulator of cell fate and circadian rhythms, controls the DNA damage response. During unperturbed cell cycles, DEC1 is a highly unstable protein that is targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation by the SCF?TrCP ubiquitin ligase in cooperation with CK1. Upon DNA damage, DEC1 is rapidly induced in an ATM/ATR-dependent manner. DEC1 induction results from protein stabilization via a mechanism that requires the USP17 ubiquitin protease. USP17 binds and deubiquitylates DEC1, markedly extending its half-life. Subsequently, during checkpoint recovery, DEC1 proteolysis is reestablished through ?TrCP-dependent ubiquitylation. Expression of a degradation-resistant DEC1 mutant prevents checkpoint recovery by inhibiting the downregulation of p53. These results indicate that the regulated degradation of DEC1 is a key factor controlling the DNA damage response. PMID:25202122

  8. Flow cytofluorometric assay of human whole blood leukocyte DNA degradation in response to Yersinia pestis and Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Grebenyukova, Tatyana P.; Bobyleva, Elena V.; Golovko, Elena M.; Malyukova, Tatyana A.; Lyapin, Mikhail N.; Kostyukova, Tatyana A.; Yezhov, Igor N.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.

    2001-05-01

    Human leukocytes containing less than 2C DNA per cell (damaged or dead cells) were detected and quantified by flow cytometry and DNA-specific staining with ethidium bromide and mithramycin in whole blood infected with Staphylococcus aureus or Yersinia pestis. Addition of live S. aureus to the blood (100 microbe cells per one leukocyte) resulted in rapid degradation of leukocyte DNA within 3 to 6 hours of incubation at 37 degree(s)C. However, only about 50 percent cells were damaged and the leukocytes with the intact genetic apparatus could be found in the blood for a period up to 24 hours. The leukocyte injury was preceded by an increase of DNA per cell content (as compared to the normal one) that was likely to be connected with the active phagocytosis of S. aureus by granulocytes (2C DNA of diploid phagocytes plus the all bacterial DNA absorbed). In response to the same dose of actively growing (at 37 degree(s)C) virulent Y. pestis cells, no increase in DNA content per cell could be observed in the human blood leukocytes. The process of the leukocyte DNA degradation started after a 6-hour incubation, and between 18 to 24 hours of incubation about 90 percent leukocytes (phagocytes and lymphocytes) lost their specific DNA fluorescence. These results demonstrated a high potential of flow cytometry in comparative analysis in vitro of the leukocyte DNA degradation process in human blood in response to bacteria with various pathogenic properties. They agree with the modern idea of an apoptotic mechanism of immunosuppression in plague.

  9. A Simple Method of Genomic DNA Extraction from Human Samples for PCR-RFLP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Souvik; Muthukumaran, Rajendra Bose; Nachimuthu, Senthil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Isolation of DNA from blood and buccal swabs in adequate quantities is an integral part of forensic research and analysis. The present study was performed to determine the quality and the quantity of DNA extracted from four commonly available samples and to estimate the time duration of the ensuing PCR amplification. Here, we demonstrate that hair and urine samples can also become an alternate source for reliably obtaining a small quantity of PCR-ready DNA. We developed a rapid, cost-effective, and noninvasive method of sample collection and simple DNA extraction from buccal swabs, urine, and hair using the phenol-chloroform method. Buccal samples were subjected to DNA extraction, immediately or after refrigeration (4–6°C) for 3 days. The purity and the concentration of the extracted DNA were determined spectrophotometerically, and the adequacy of DNA extracts for the PCR-based assay was assessed by amplifying a 1030-bp region of the mitochondrial D-loop. Although DNA from all the samples was suitable for PCR, the blood and hair samples provided a good quality DNA for restriction analysis of the PCR product compared with the buccal swab and urine samples. In the present study, hair samples proved to be a good source of genomic DNA for PCR-based methods. Hence, DNA of hair samples can also be used for the genomic disorder analysis in addition to the forensic analysis as a result of the ease of sample collection in a noninvasive manner, lower sample volume requirements, and good storage capability. PMID:24294115

  10. EPICOR-II resin degradation results from first resin samples of PF-8 and PF-20

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1985-12-01

    The 28 March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 released approximately 560,000 gallons of contaminated water to the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings. The water was decontaminated using a demineralization system called EPICOR-II developed by Epicor, Inc. The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Project is studying the chemical and physical conditions of the synthetic ion exchange resins found in several EPICOR-II prefilters. This report summarizes results and analyses of the first sampling of ion exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PE-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated Epicor, Inc. resins to determine if degradation has occurred due to the high internal radiation dose received by the EPICOR-II resins. Results also are compared with recent findings on resin degradation by Battelle Columbus Laboratories and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Analyses comparing test results of resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 with unirradiated resins obtained from Epicor, Inc. show resin degradation has occurred in some of the EPICOR-II resins examined. The mechanism of degradation is compared with work of other researchers and is consistent with their findings. The strong acid cation resins (divinylbenzene, styrene base structure) are losing effective cross-linking along with scission of functional groups and are experiencing first an increase and eventually a decrease in total exchange capacity as the absorbed radiation dose increases. The phenolic cation resins (phenol-formaldehyde base structure) show a loss of effective cross-linking and oxidation of the polymer chain. Analyses of resins removed from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 over the next several years should show a further increase in degradation.

  11. Method and apparatus for transport, introduction, atomization and excitation of emission spectrum for quantitative analysis of high temperature gas sample streams containing vapor and particulates without degradation of sample stream temperature

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, David E. (Ankeny, IA); Hass, William J. (Ames, IA)

    1989-05-30

    A sample transport, sample introduction, and flame excitation system for spectrometric analysis of high temperature gas streams which eliminates degradation of the sample stream by condensation losses.

  12. DNA ISOLATION FROM SMALL TISSUE SAMPLES USING SALT AND SPERMINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Common DNA isolation methods rely upon protein denaturation by organic solvents such as phenol and chloroform. hese solvents pose some risk to the user and require special disposal procedures. e have previously reported a method for isolating DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes...

  13. DNA sequence alignment by microhomology sampling during homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi; Redding, Sy; Lee, Ja Yil; Gibb, Bryan; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Gaines, William A; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C

    2015-02-26

    Homologous recombination (HR) mediates the exchange of genetic information between sister or homologous chromatids. During HR, members of the RecA/Rad51 family of recombinases must somehow search through vast quantities of DNA sequence to align and pair single-strand DNA (ssDNA) with a homologous double-strand DNA (dsDNA) template. Here, we use single-molecule imaging to visualize Rad51 as it aligns and pairs homologous DNA sequences in real time. We show that Rad51 uses a length-based recognition mechanism while interrogating dsDNA, enabling robust kinetic selection of 8-nucleotide (nt) tracts of microhomology, which kinetically confines the search to sites with a high probability of being a homologous target. Successful pairing with a ninth nucleotide coincides with an additional reduction in binding free energy, and subsequent strand exchange occurs in precise 3-nt steps, reflecting the base triplet organization of the presynaptic complex. These findings provide crucial new insights into the physical and evolutionary underpinnings of DNA recombination. PMID:25684365

  14. Leishmania DNA is rapidly degraded following parasite death: An analysis by microscopy and real-time PCR.

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Leishmania DNA is rapidly degraded following parasite death: An analysis by microscopy and real du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris cédex 15, France b Unité de Biologie des Interactions Hôte-Parasite of parasite burden during chemotherapy patient follow-up as well as in pharmacological studies performed

  15. Conditions for collection of serum samples for the measurement of fibrin(ogen) degradation products by radioimmunoassay of fragment E

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M J Martin; Y B Gordon; S M Ratky; L R Baker; T Chard

    1976-01-01

    A number of conditions have been assessed for the collection of serum samples for the measurement of fibrin(ogen) degradation products using a radioimmunoassay for degradation fragment E, which permits precise quantitation of differences. Blood should be collected using minimal venous occlusion into glass tubes containing 10 mg\\/ml of epsilon amino caproic acid and allowed to clot at 4 to 20

  16. Solid supported in situ derivatization extraction of acidic degradation products of nerve agents from aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Purohit, Ajay; Singh, Varoon; Tak, Vijay; Dubey, D K; Pardasani, Deepak

    2014-09-12

    This study deals with the solid supported in situ derivatization extraction of acidic degradation products of nerve agents present in aqueous samples. Target analytes were alkyl alkylphosphonic acids and alkylphosphonic acids, which are important environmental signatures of nerve agents. The method involved tert-butyldimethylchlorosilane mediated in situ silylation of analytes on commercially available diatomaceous solid phase extraction cartridges. Various parameters such as derivatizing reagent, its concentration, reaction time, temperature and eluting solvent were optimized. Recoveries of the analytes were determined by GC-MS which ranged from 60% to 86%. The limits of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) with selected analytes were achieved down to 78 and 213ngmL(-1) respectively, in selected ion monitoring mode. The successful applicability of method was also demonstrated on samples of biological origin such as plasma and to the samples received in 34th official proficiency test conducted by the Organization for Prohibition the of Chemical Weapons. PMID:25103280

  17. Calcium phosphate/DNA co-precipitates encapsulated fast-degrading polymer films for substrate-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Zhao, Dong; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2009-10-01

    Calcium-phosphate/deoxyribose nucleic acid (Ca-P/DNA) co-precipitates were deposited on or encapsulated in fast-degrading polymer films with surface erosion degradation mechanism to mediate cell transfection. The polymer, cholic acid functionalized star poly(DL-lactide), was synthesized through the ring-opening polymerization of DL-lactide initiated by cholic acid. The releases of DNA from the Ca-P/DNA co-precipitates deposited film and the Ca-P/DNA co-precipitates encapsulated film were determined and compared. The in vitro gene transfections of HEK293 cells, Hela cells, and NIH 3T3 cells showed that the expression of pGL3-Luc plasmid could be effectively mediated by the Ca-P/DNA co-precipitates deposited and encapsulated polymer films. In addition, the films did not exhibit any additional cytotoxicity to the cells during the transfections, indicating that the fast-degrading polymer films have great potential in localized gene delivery. PMID:19402141

  18. Estimating occupancy and abundance of stream amphibians using environmental DNA from filtered water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilliod, David S.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Arkle, Robert S.; Waits, Lisette P.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods for detecting aquatic species are advancing rapidly, but with little evaluation of field protocols or precision of resulting estimates. We compared sampling results from traditional field methods with eDNA methods for two amphibians in 13 streams in central Idaho, USA. We also evaluated three water collection protocols and the influence of sampling location, time of day, and distance from animals on eDNA concentration in the water. We found no difference in detection or amount of eDNA among water collection protocols. eDNA methods had slightly higher detection rates than traditional field methods, particularly when species occurred at low densities. eDNA concentration was positively related to field-measured density, biomass, and proportion of transects occupied. Precision of eDNA-based abundance estimates increased with the amount of eDNA in the water and the number of replicate subsamples collected. eDNA concentration did not vary significantly with sample location in the stream, time of day, or distance downstream from animals. Our results further advance the implementation of eDNA methods for monitoring aquatic vertebrates in stream habitats.

  19. Storage and shipping of tissue samples for DNA analyses: A case study on earthworms?

    PubMed Central

    Straube, Daniela; Juen, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, molecular analyses play an important role in studies of soil dwelling animals, for example in taxonomy, phylogeography or food web analyses. The quality of the DNA, used for later molecular analyses, is an important factor and depends on collection and preservation of samples prior to DNA extraction. Ideally, DNA samples are frozen immediately upon collection, but if samples are collected in the field, suitable preservation methods might be limited due to unavailability of resources or remote field sites. Moreover, shipping samples over long distances can cause loss of DNA quality e.g. by thawing or leaking of preservation liquid. In this study we use earthworms, a key organism in soil research, to compare three different DNA preservation methods – freezing at ?20 °C, storing in 75% ethanol, and freeze drying. Samples were shipped from the United States of America to Austria. The DNA of the samples was extracted using two different extraction methods, peqGOLD™ and Chelex® 100. The DNA amplification success was determined by amplifying four DNA fragments of different length. The PCR amplification success is significantly influenced by preservation method and extraction method and differed significantly depending on the length of the DNA fragment. Freeze drying samples was the best preservation method when samples were extracted using the silica based extraction method peqGOLD™. For samples that were extracted with Chelex® 100, storage in ethanol was the best preservation method. However, the overall amplification success was significantly lower for the extraction procedure based on Chelex® 100. The detection of the small DNA fragments was higher and independent from the extraction method, while the amplification success was significantly reduced for the longer DNA fragments. We recommend freeze drying of DNA samples, especially when they have to be shipped for longer distances. No special packaging or declaration is needed for freeze dried samples, and the risk of thawing is excluded. Storage of freeze dried samples also reduces costs because samples can be kept at room temperature in a desiccator. It should be noted, that the extraction methods showed significant differences in DNA amplification success. Thus, the extraction method should be taken into account when choosing the preservation method.

  20. Sources of pre-analytical variations in yield of DNA extracted from blood samples: analysis of 50,000 DNA samples in EPIC.

    PubMed

    Caboux, Elodie; Lallemand, Christophe; Ferro, Gilles; Hémon, Bertrand; Mendy, Maimuna; Biessy, Carine; Sims, Matt; Wareham, Nick; Britten, Abigail; Boland, Anne; Hutchinson, Amy; Siddiq, Afshan; Vineis, Paolo; Riboli, Elio; Romieu, Isabelle; Rinaldi, Sabina; Gunter, Marc J; Peeters, Petra H M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Travis, Ruth; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Canzian, Federico; Sánchez, Maria-José; Skeie, Guri; Olsen, Karina Standahl; Lund, Eiliv; Bilbao, Roberto; Sala, Núria; Barricarte, Aurelio; Palli, Domenico; Navarro, Carmen; Panico, Salvatore; Redondo, Maria Luisa; Polidoro, Silvia; Dossus, Laure; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Lagiou, Pagona; Boeing, Heiner; Fisher, Eva; Tumino, Rosario; Agnoli, Claudia; Hainaut, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) is a long-term, multi-centric prospective study in Europe investigating the relationships between cancer and nutrition. This study has served as a basis for a number of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) and other types of genetic analyses. Over a period of 5 years, 52,256 EPIC DNA samples have been extracted using an automated DNA extraction platform. Here we have evaluated the pre-analytical factors affecting DNA yield, including anthropometric, epidemiological and technical factors such as center of subject recruitment, age, gender, body-mass index, disease case or control status, tobacco consumption, number of aliquots of buffy coat used for DNA extraction, extraction machine or procedure, DNA quantification method, degree of haemolysis and variations in the timing of sample processing. We show that the largest significant variations in DNA yield were observed with degree of haemolysis and with center of subject recruitment. Age, gender, body-mass index, cancer case or control status and tobacco consumption also significantly impacted DNA yield. Feedback from laboratories which have analyzed DNA with different SNP genotyping technologies demonstrate that the vast majority of samples (approximately 88%) performed adequately in different types of assays. To our knowledge this study is the largest to date to evaluate the sources of pre-analytical variations in DNA extracted from peripheral leucocytes. The results provide a strong evidence-based rationale for standardized recommendations on blood collection and processing protocols for large-scale genetic studies. PMID:22808065

  1. Sources of Pre-Analytical Variations in Yield of DNA Extracted from Blood Samples: Analysis of 50,000 DNA Samples in EPIC

    PubMed Central

    Caboux, Elodie; Lallemand, Christophe; Ferro, Gilles; Hémon, Bertrand; Mendy, Maimuna; Biessy, Carine; Sims, Matt; Wareham, Nick; Britten, Abigail; Boland, Anne; Hutchinson, Amy; Siddiq, Afshan; Vineis, Paolo; Riboli, Elio; Romieu, Isabelle; Rinaldi, Sabina; Gunter, Marc J.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Travis, Ruth; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Canzian, Federico; Sánchez, Maria-José; Skeie, Guri; Olsen, Karina Standahl; Lund, Eiliv; Bilbao, Roberto; Sala, Núria; Barricarte, Aurelio; Palli, Domenico; Navarro, Carmen; Panico, Salvatore; Redondo, Maria Luisa; Polidoro, Silvia; Dossus, Laure; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Lagiou, Pagona; Boeing, Heiner; Fisher, Eva; Tumino, Rosario; Agnoli, Claudia; Hainaut, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) is a long-term, multi-centric prospective study in Europe investigating the relationships between cancer and nutrition. This study has served as a basis for a number of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) and other types of genetic analyses. Over a period of 5 years, 52,256 EPIC DNA samples have been extracted using an automated DNA extraction platform. Here we have evaluated the pre-analytical factors affecting DNA yield, including anthropometric, epidemiological and technical factors such as center of subject recruitment, age, gender, body-mass index, disease case or control status, tobacco consumption, number of aliquots of buffy coat used for DNA extraction, extraction machine or procedure, DNA quantification method, degree of haemolysis and variations in the timing of sample processing. We show that the largest significant variations in DNA yield were observed with degree of haemolysis and with center of subject recruitment. Age, gender, body-mass index, cancer case or control status and tobacco consumption also significantly impacted DNA yield. Feedback from laboratories which have analyzed DNA with different SNP genotyping technologies demonstrate that the vast majority of samples (approximately 88%) performed adequately in different types of assays. To our knowledge this study is the largest to date to evaluate the sources of pre-analytical variations in DNA extracted from peripheral leucocytes. The results provide a strong evidence-based rationale for standardized recommendations on blood collection and processing protocols for large-scale genetic studies. PMID:22808065

  2. A comparison of five methods for extraction of bacterial DNA from human faecal samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra L. McOrist; Michelle Jackson; Anthony R. Bird

    2002-01-01

    The purity of DNA extracted from faecal samples is a key issue in the sensitivity and usefulness of biological analyses such as PCR for infectious pathogens and non-pathogens. We have compared the relative efficacy of extraction of bacterial DNA (both Gram negative and positive origin) from faeces using four commercial kits (FastDNA® kit, Bio 101; Nucleospin® C+T kit, Macherey-Nagal; Quantum

  3. Non-degradative Intracellular Trafficking of Highly Compacted Polymeric DNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Anthony J.; Boylan, Nicholas J.; Suk, Jung Soo; Lai, Samuel K.; Hanes, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Highly compacted DNA nanoparticles (DNPs) composed of polyethylene glycol linked to a 30-mer of poly-L-lysine via a single cysteine residue (CK30PEG) have previously been shown to provide efficient gene delivery to the brain, eyes and lungs. In this study, we used a combination of flow cytometry, high-resolution live-cell confocal microscopy, and multiple particle tracking (MPT) to investigate the intracellular trafficking of highly compacted CK30PEG DNPs made using two different molecular weights of PEG, CK30PEG10k and CK30PEG5k. We found that PEG MW did not have a major effect on particle morphology nor nanoparticle intracellular transport. CK30PEG10k and CK30PEG5k DNPs both entered human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells via a caveolae-mediated pathway, bypassing degradative endolysosomal trafficking. Both nanoparticle formulations were found to rapidly accumulate in the perinuclear region of cells within 2 h, 37 ± 19 % and 47 ± 8 % for CK30PEG10k and CK30PEG5k, respectively. CK30PEG10k and CK30PEG5k DNPs moved within live cells at average velocities of 0.09 ± 0.04 µm/s and 0.11 ± 0.04 µm/s, respectively, in good agreement with reported values for caveolae. These findings show that highly compacted DNPs employ highly regulated trafficking mechanisms similar to biological pathogens to target specific intracellular compartments. PMID:22079809

  4. Lactoferrin Directly Scavenges Hydroxyl Radicals and Undergoes Oxidative Self-Degradation: A Possible Role in Protection against Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Yuki; Imase, Megumi; Oda, Hirotsugu; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the protective effect of lactoferrin against DNA damage induced by various hydroxyl radical generation systems. Lactoferrin (LF) was examined with regard to its potential role as a scavenger against radical oxygen species using bovine milk LF. Native LF, iron-saturated LF (holo-LF), and apolactoferrin (apo-LF) effectively suppressed strand breaks in plasmid DNA due to hydroxyl radicals produced by the Fenton reaction. In addition, both native LF and holo-LF clearly protected calf thymus DNA from fragmentation due to ultraviolet irradiation in the presence of H2O2. We also demonstrated a protective effect of all three LF molecules against 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation in calf thymus DNA following ultraviolet (UV) irradiation with H2O2. Our results clearly indicate that native LF has reactive oxygen species-scavenging ability, independent of its nature as a masking component for transient metals. We also demonstrated that the protective effect of LF against oxidative DNA damage is due to degradation of LF itself, which is more susceptible to degradation than other bovine milk proteins. PMID:24424315

  5. To Clone or Not To Clone: Method Analysis for Retrieving Consensus Sequences In Ancient DNA Samples

    E-print Network

    Kemp, Brian M.

    To Clone or Not To Clone: Method Analysis for Retrieving Consensus Sequences In Ancient DNA Samples methods considered to be ``gold standards'' in the field, including cloning aDNA amplicons as opposed of clones to sequence, how a consensus sequence is most appropriately derived, or how results should

  6. A technique for sampling ancient DNA that minimizes damage to museum specimens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M. Wisely; J. E. Maldonado; R. C. Fleischer

    2004-01-01

    Because of the utility of ancient DNA to conservation genetics (Baker 1994), the number of requests to collect tissue from museum specimens has increased. A drawback of consumptive sampling is that it requires removal and destruction of part of the specimen. Epithelium, hair, dried skeletal muscle, and bone have been used as sources of ancient DNA taken from skulls, postcranial

  7. Assessing the Value of DNA Barcodes for Molecular Phylogenetics: Effect of Increased Taxon Sampling in Lepidoptera

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John James Wilson; Ahmed Moustafa

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundA common perception is that DNA barcode datamatrices have limited phylogenetic signal due to the small number of characters available per taxon. However, another school of thought suggests that the massively increased taxon sampling afforded through the use of DNA barcodes may considerably increase the phylogenetic signal present in a datamatrix. Here I test this hypothesis using a large dataset

  8. The prevalence of mixed DNA profiles in fingernail samples taken from individuals in the general population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivia Cook; Lindsey Dixon

    2007-01-01

    The fingernail hyponychium is an isolated area where biological material may accumulate and can provide a valuable source of evidential material in police investigations. DNA transfer between the victim and suspect frequently occurs during violent crimes and in court there is often reasonable doubt that a mixed DNA profile in a fingernail sample has originated from the assault as the

  9. Affinity Purification of DNA and RNA from Environmental Samples with Peptide Nucleic Acid Clamps

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Stults, Jennie R.; Cebula, Sharon; Schuck, Beatrice L.; Weaver, Derek W.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Egholm, Michael; Brockman, Fred J.

    2000-01-01

    Bispeptide nucleic acids (bis-PNAs; PNA clamps), PNA oligomers, and DNA oligonucleotides were evaluated as affinity purification reagents for subfemtomolar 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and rRNA targets in soil, sediment, and industrial air filter nucleic acid extracts. Under low-salt hybridization conditions (10 mM NaPO4, 5 mM disodium EDTA, and 0.025% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]) a PNA clamp recovered significantly more target DNA than either PNA or DNA oligomers. The efficacy of PNA clamps and oligomers was generally enhanced in the presence of excess nontarget DNA and in a low-salt extraction-hybridization buffer. Under high-salt conditions (200 mM NaPO4, 100 mM disodium EDTA, and 0.5% SDS), however, capture efficiencies with the DNA oligomer were significantly greater than with the PNA clamp and PNA oligomer. Recovery and detection efficiencies for target DNA concentrations of ?100 pg were generally >20% but depended upon the specific probe, solution background, and salt condition. The DNA probe had a lower absolute detection limit of 100 fg of target (830 zM [1 zM = 10?21 M]) in high-salt buffer. In the absence of exogenous DNA (e.g., soil background), neither the bis-PNA nor the PNA oligomer achieved the same absolute detection limit even under a more favorable low-salt hybridization condition. In the presence of a soil background, however, both PNA probes provided more sensitive absolute purification and detection (830 zM) than the DNA oligomer. In varied environmental samples, the rank order for capture probe performance in high-salt buffer was DNA > PNA > clamp. Recovery of 16S rRNA from environmental samples mirrored quantitative results for DNA target recovery, with the DNA oligomer generating more positive results than either the bis-PNA or PNA oligomer, but PNA probes provided a greater incidence of detection from environmental samples that also contained a higher concentration of nontarget DNA and RNA. Significant interactions between probe type and environmental sample indicate that the most efficacious capture system depends upon the particular sample type (and background nucleic acid concentration), target (DNA or RNA), and detection objective. PMID:10919804

  10. Non-lethal sampling of honey bee, Apis mellifera , DNA using wing tips

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolas Châline; Francis L. W. Ratnieks; Nigel E. Raine; Nichola S. Badcock; Terry Burke

    2004-01-01

    DNA sampling of insects frequently relies upon lethal or invasive methods. Because insect colonies contain numerous workers it is often possible to destructively sample workers for genetic analysis. However, this is not possible if queens or workers must remain alive after sampling. Neither is it possible to remove an entire leg, wing or other appendage as this will often hinder

  11. Identification of in situ 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-degrading soil microorganisms using DNA-stable isotope probing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alison M. Cupples; Gerald K. Sims

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to investigate the microorganisms responsible for degradation of the herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in soil samples. Soils were unamended or amended with either unlabeled 2,4-D or UL(ring) 13C-2,4-D. Degradation of 2,4-D was complete after 17 days, whereas little removal (11±3%) was observed in the sterile controls. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) on soil

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Evaluating the impact of non-lethal DNA sampling on two

    E-print Network

    Landis, Doug

    ORIGINAL PAPER Evaluating the impact of non-lethal DNA sampling on two butterflies, Vanessa cardui of Vanessa cardui and Satyrodes eurydice. Based on these studies we were successful in obtaining a permit

  13. Assessing genetic polymorphisms using DNA extracted from cells present in saliva samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Technical advances following the Human Genome Project revealed that high-quality and -quantity DNA may be obtained from whole saliva samples. However, usability of previously collected samples and the effects of environmental conditions on the samples during collection have not been assessed in detail. In five studies we document the effects of sample volume, handling and storage conditions, type of collection device, and oral sampling location, on quantity, quality, and genetic assessment of DNA extracted from cells present in saliva. Methods Saliva samples were collected from ten adults in each study. Saliva volumes from .10-1.0 ml, different saliva collection devices, sampling locations in the mouth, room temperature storage, and multiple freeze-thaw cycles were tested. One representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the catechol-0-methyltransferase gene (COMT rs4680) and one representative variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region) were selected for genetic analyses. Results The smallest tested whole saliva volume of .10 ml yielded, on average, 1.43 ± .77 ?g DNA and gave accurate genotype calls in both genetic analyses. The usage of collection devices reduced the amount of DNA extracted from the saliva filtrates compared to the whole saliva sample, as 54-92% of the DNA was retained on the device. An "adhered cell" extraction enabled recovery of this DNA and provided good quality and quantity DNA. The DNA from both the saliva filtrates and the adhered cell recovery provided accurate genotype calls. The effects of storage at room temperature (up to 5 days), repeated freeze-thaw cycles (up to 6 cycles), and oral sampling location on DNA extraction and on genetic analysis from saliva were negligible. Conclusions Whole saliva samples with volumes of at least .10 ml were sufficient to extract good quality and quantity DNA. Using 10 ng of DNA per genotyping reaction, the obtained samples can be used for more than one hundred candidate gene assays. When saliva is collected with an absorbent device, most of the nucleic acid content remains in the device, therefore it is advisable to collect the device separately for later genetic analyses. PMID:22182470

  14. Family selection study among DNA samples collected from Amerindian ethnic group (Wayuu) in northern Colombia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshimichi Yamamoto; Tadashi Gomyoda; Toshinari Ito; Kaoru Saijo; Inaho Danjoh; Yukio Nakamura

    In the Sonoda-Tajima Cell Collection, one of the cell bank of RIKEN BioResource Center, DNA samples from an Amerindian ethnic minority group (Wayuu) in Colombia analysed for 21 autosomal STRs, 17 Y-STRs and HV-I and -II regions in mtDNA to select the kinships among those samples in order to study on how the kinships influence population genetic analysis. As a

  15. Study of a novel sample injection method (floating electrokinetic supercharging) for high-performance microchip electrophoresis of DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Takeshi; Takayama, Yoichi; Arai, Akihiro; Xu, Zhongqi

    2008-05-01

    Aiming to achieve high-performance analysis of DNA fragments using microchip electrophoresis, we developed a novel sample injection method, which was given the name of floating electrokinetic supercharging (FEKS). In the method, electrokinetic injection (EKI) and ITP preconcentration of samples was performed in a separation channel, connecting two reservoir ports (P3 and P4) on a cross-geometry microchip. At these two stages, side channels, crossing the separation channel, and their ports (P1 and P2) were electrically floated. After the ITP-stacked zones passed the cross-part, they were eluted for detection by using leading ions from P1 and P2 that enabled electrophoresis mode changing rapidly from ITP to zone electrophoresis (ZE). Possible sample leakage at the cross-part toward P1 and P2 was studied in detail on the basis of computer simulation using a CFD-ACE+ software and real experiments, through which it was validated that the analyte recovery to the separation channel was almost complete. The FEKS method successfully contributed to higher resolution and shorter analysis time of DNA fragments on the cross-microchip owing to more rapid switching from ITP status to ZE separation in comparison with our previous EKS procedure realized on a single-channel microchip. Without any degradation of resolution, the achieved LODs were on average ten times better than using conventional pinched injection. PMID:18393341

  16. Simplified method for DNA and protein staining of human hematopoietic cell samples

    SciTech Connect

    Crissman, H.A.; Egmond, J.V.; Holdrinet, R.S.; Pennings, A.; Haanen, C.

    1980-01-01

    A rapid reproducible method yielding high resolution analysis of DNA and protein in human hematopoietic cell samples was developed by modification of the propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) procedure. Cell staining involved sequential addition of each reagent (RNase, FITC, and PI) to ethanol-fixed cells and requires no centrifiguation steps. Stained cells are analyzed in the reagent solutions. Analysis of bone marrow samples from multiple myeloma patients revealed mixed 2C DNA and aneuploid populations with the aneuploid cells having a significantly higher protein content. This approach permitted differential cell cycle kinetic analysis of the 2C DNA and the aneuploid population.

  17. DNA isolation and sample preparation for quantification of adduct levels by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dingley, Karen H; Ubick, Esther A; Vogel, John S; Haack, Kurt W

    2005-01-01

    A protocol is described for the isolation of DNA and subsequent preparation of samples for the measurement of adduct levels by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS is a highly sensitive technique used for the quantification of adducts following exposure to carbon-14- or tritium-labeled chemicals, with detection limits in the range of one adduct per 10(11)-10(12) nucleotides. However, special precautions must be taken to avoid cross-contamination of isotope between samples and to produce a sample that is compatible with AMS. The DNA isolation method described is based on digestion of tissue with proteinase K, followed by extraction of DNA using Qiagen DNA isolation columns. DNA is then precipitated with isopropanol, washed repeatedly with 70% ethanol to remove salt, and then dissolved in water. This method has been used to generate reliably good yields of uncontaminated, pure DNA from animal and human tissues for analysis of adduct levels. For quantification of adduct levels from 14C-labeled compounds, DNA samples are then converted to graphite, and the 14C content is measured by AMS. PMID:15502208

  18. Sample processing for DNA chip array-based analysis of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC)

    PubMed Central

    Basselet, Pascal; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Enfors, Sven-Olof; Gabig-Ciminska, Magdalena

    2008-01-01

    Background Exploitation of DNA-based analyses of microbial pathogens, and especially simultaneous typing of several virulence-related genes in bacteria is becoming an important objective of public health these days. Results A procedure for sample processing for a confirmative analysis of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) on a single colony with DNA chip array was developed and is reported here. The protocol includes application of fragmented genomic DNA from ultrasonicated colonies. The sample processing comprises first 2.5 min of ultrasonic treatment, DNA extraction (2×), and afterwards additional 5 min ultrasonication. Thus, the total sample preparation time for a confirmative analysis of EHEC is nearly 10 min. Additionally, bioinformatic revisions were performed in order to design PCR primers and array probes specific to most conservative regions of the EHEC-associated genes. Six strains with distinct pathogenic properties were selected for this study. At last, the EHEC chip array for a parallel and simultaneous detection of genes etpC-stx1-stx2-eae was designed and examined. This should permit to sense all currently accessible variants of the selected sequences in EHEC types and subtypes. Conclusion In order to implement the DNA chip array-based analysis for direct EHEC detection the sample processing was established in course of this work. However, this sample preparation mode may also be applied to other types of EHEC DNA-based sensing systems. PMID:18851736

  19. Field guide for didymo DNA sample CBER Contract Report 65

    E-print Network

    Waikato, University of

    sample collection 3 C. Decontamination equipment (to be supplied locally) · "Janola" household wipes with active ingredient benzalkonium chloride (for disinfecting hands and arms instead of using bleach) · 2.5 L

  20. Effects of oral antioxidant treatment upon the dynamics of human sperm DNA fragmentation and subpopulations of sperm with highly degraded DNA.

    PubMed

    Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Gosálvez, J; Coward, K; Hannaoui, N; Benet, J; García-Peiró, A; Prats, J

    2013-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral antioxidant treatment (1500 mg of l-Carnitine; 60 mg of vitamin C; 20 mg of coenzyme Q10; 10 mg of vitamin E; 10 mg of zinc; 200 ?g of vitamin B9; 50 ?g of selenium; 1 ?g of vitamin B12) during a time period of 3 months upon the dynamics of sperm DNA fragmentation following varying periods of sperm storage (0 h, 2 h, 6 h, 8 h and 24 h) at 37 °C in a cohort of 20 infertile patients diagnosed with asthenoteratozoospermia. A secondary objective was to use the sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCD) to study antioxidant effects upon a specific subpopulation of highly DNA degraded sperm (DDS). Semen parameters and pregnancy rate (PR) were also determined. Results showed a significant improvement of DNA integrity at all incubation points (P < 0.01). The proportion of DDS was also significantly reduced (P < 0.05). Semen analysis data showed a significant increase in concentration, motility, vitality and morphology parameters. Our results suggest that antioxidant treatment improves sperm quality not only in terms of key seminal parameters and basal DNA damage, but also helps to maintain DNA integrity. Prior administration of antioxidants could therefore promote better outcomes following assisted reproductive techniques. PMID:22943406

  1. A comparison of six methods for genomic DNA extraction suitable for PCR-based genotyping applications using ovine milk samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Androniki Psifidi; Chrysostomos I. Dovas; Georgios Banos

    2010-01-01

    Isolation of amplifiable genomic DNA is a prerequisite for the genetic assessment of diseases and disease susceptibility in farm animals. Milk somatic cells are a practical, animal friendly and cost-effective source of genomic DNA in milking ruminants. In this study, six different DNA extraction methods were optimized, evaluated and compared for the isolation of DNA from ovine milk samples. Methods

  2. DNA Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Genotoxic Compounds in Soil Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bagni, Graziana; Hernandez, Silvia; Mascini, Marco; Sturchio, Elena; Boccia, Priscilla; Marconi, Simona

    2005-01-01

    An electrochemical DNA-based biosensor is proposed as a fast and easy screening method for the detection of genotoxic compounds in soil samples. The biosensor was assembled by immobilising double stranded Calf thymus DNA on screen-printed electrodes. The interactions between DNA and environmental pollutants can cause variations of the electrochemical proprieties of DNA when they cause a DNA damage. Preliminary studies were performed using benzene, naphthalene and anthracene derivatives as model compounds. The effect of these compounds on the surface-confined DNA was found to be linearly related to their concentration in solution. On the other hand, the objective was to optimise the ultrasonic extraction conditions of these compounds from artificially spiked soil samples. Then, the applicability of such a biosensor was evaluated by analysing soil samples from an Italian region with ecological risk (ACNA of Cengio, SV). DNA biosensor for qualitative analysis of soil presented a good correlation with a semi-quantitative method for aromatic ring systems determination as fixed wavelength fluorescence and interestingly, according results were found also with other bioassays. This kind of biosensors represent a new, easy and fast way of analysis of polluted sites, therefore they can be used as early warnings devices in areas with ecological risk as in situ measurement.

  3. A comparison of ARMS and DNA sequencing for mutation analysis in clinical biopsy samples

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We have compared mutation analysis by DNA sequencing and Amplification Refractory Mutation System™ (ARMS™) for their ability to detect mutations in clinical biopsy specimens. Methods We have evaluated five real-time ARMS assays: BRAF 1799T>A, [this includes V600E and V600K] and NRAS 182A>G [Q61R] and 181C>A [Q61K] in melanoma, EGFR 2573T>G [L858R], 2235-2249del15 [E746-A750del] in non-small-cell lung cancer, and compared the results to DNA sequencing of the mutation 'hot-spots' in these genes in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour (FF-PET) DNA. Results The ARMS assays maximised the number of samples that could be analysed when both the quality and quantity of DNA was low, and improved both the sensitivity and speed of analysis compared with sequencing. ARMS was more robust with fewer reaction failures compared with sequencing and was more sensitive as it was able to detect functional mutations that were not detected by DNA sequencing. DNA sequencing was able to detect a small number of lower frequency recurrent mutations across the exons screened that were not interrogated using the specific ARMS assays in these studies. Conclusions ARMS was more sensitive and robust at detecting defined somatic mutations than DNA sequencing on clinical samples where the predominant sample type was FF-PET. PMID:20925915

  4. Y-STRs in forensic medicine: DNA analysis in semen samples of azoospermic individuals.

    PubMed

    Soares-Vieira, José Arnaldo; Billerbeck, Ana Elisa Correia; Iwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazato; Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Gattás, Gilka Jorge Fígaro; Munoz, Daniel Romero; Hallak, Jorge; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Lucon, Antonio Marmo

    2007-05-01

    The incidence of rape has increased, especially in metropolitan areas, such as the city of São Paulo. In Brazil, studies about it have shown that the majority of this type of crime is committed by the relatives and persons close to the victim. This has made the crime more difficult to be denounced, as only 10% of the cases are reported to competent police authorities. Usually, cytological exams are carried out in sex crime investigations. The difficulty in showing the presence of spermatozoa is frequent, but it does not exclude the presence of male DNA. The absence of spermatozoa in material collected from rape victims can be due to several factors, including the fact that the agressor suffers from azoospermia. This condition can be the result of a successful vasectomy. As the majority of DNA in the ejaculation sample is from spermatozoa, there is much less DNA to be analyzed. This study presents the application of Y-STRs (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, and DYS393) in DNA analysis of sperm samples from 105 vasectomized men. The study demonstrated a great variation in DNA concentration. DNA extraction and amplification was possible in all sperm samples even in the absence of spermatozoa. The same profile was observed, for each individual, from DNA extracted from blood, pre- and postvasectomy semen samples. The use of markers specific for Y chromosome in sex crime cases, especially in the absence of spermatozoa, is very important, mainly because in most situations there is a small quantity of the agressor's DNA in the medium and a large quantity of the victim's DNA. PMID:17456093

  5. Species-Specific Identification from Incomplete Sampling: Applying DNA Barcodes to Monitoring Invasive Solanum Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Fan, Xiaohong; Zhu, Shuifang; Zhao, Hong; Fu, Lianzhong

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive sampling is crucial to DNA barcoding, but it is rarely performed because materials are usually unavailable. In practice, only a few rather than all species of a genus are required to be identified. Thus identification of a given species using a limited sample is of great importance in current application of DNA barcodes. Here, we selected 70 individuals representing 48 species from each major lineage of Solanum, one of the most species-rich genera of seed plants, to explore whether DNA barcodes can provide reliable specific-species discrimination in the context of incomplete sampling. Chloroplast genes ndhF and trnS-trnG and the nuclear gene waxy, the commonly used markers in Solanum phylogeny, were selected as the supplementary barcodes. The tree-building and modified barcode gap methods were employed to assess species resolution. The results showed that four Solanum species of quarantine concern could be successfully identified through the two-step barcoding sampling strategy. In addition, discrepancies between nuclear and cpDNA barcodes in some samples demonstrated the ability to discriminate hybrid species, and highlights the necessity of using barcode regions with different modes of inheritance. We conclude that efficient phylogenetic markers are good candidates as the supplementary barcodes in a given taxonomic group. Critically, we hypothesized that a specific-species could be identified from a phylogenetic framework using incomplete sampling–through this, DNA barcoding will greatly benefit the current fields of its application. PMID:23409092

  6. Monofunctional alkylating agent-induced inactivation, mutagenesis and DNA degradation in an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in DNA polymerase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. B. Smirnov; Yu. N. Favorskaya; A. G. Skavronskaya

    1971-01-01

    The DNA polymerase deficient mutantE. coli P3478polA1 is extremely sensitive to the lethal action of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NG) and methyl-methanesulfonate (MMS). ThepolA1 mutant has an almost unaffected mutability induced by NG or MMS and shows reduced ability to propagate MMS-treated phage T7. NG and MMS induce marked breakdown of DNA and inhibit significantly DNA synthesis in thepolA1 mutant. The obtained results

  7. High Throughput Processing of DNA Samples on FTA Paper for PCR Stanislav Vitha1

    E-print Network

    Meagher, Mary

    and other sources. For analysis, a small disc is punched from the FTA paper containing the DNA sample disc punching, washing and PCR. On the other end of the spectrum, a small number of discs can be placed manifold. Further improvement in sample processing speed was achieved in disc punching. We use a modified 1

  8. Stable isotope probing reveals the importance of Comamonas and Pseudomonadaceae in RDX degradation in samples from a Navy detonation site.

    PubMed

    Jayamani, Indumathy; Cupples, Alison M

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the microorganisms involved in hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) degradation from a detonation area at a Navy base. Using Illumina sequencing, microbial communities were compared between the initial sample, samples following RDX degradation, and controls not amended with RDX to determine which phylotypes increased in abundance following RDX degradation. The effect of glucose on these communities was also examined. In addition, stable isotope probing (SIP) using labeled ((13)C3, (15)N3-ring) RDX was performed. Illumina sequencing revealed that several phylotypes were more abundant following RDX degradation compared to the initial soil and the no-RDX controls. For the glucose-amended samples, this trend was strong for an unclassified Pseudomonadaceae phylotype and for Comamonas. Without glucose, Acinetobacter exhibited the greatest increase following RDX degradation compared to the initial soil and no-RDX controls. Rhodococcus, a known RDX degrader, also increased in abundance following RDX degradation. For the SIP study, unclassified Pseudomonadaceae was the most abundant phylotype in the heavy fractions in both the presence and absence of glucose. In the glucose-amended heavy fractions, the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes of Comamonas and Anaeromxyobacter were also present. Without glucose, the heavy fractions also contained the 16S rRNA genes of Azohydromonas and Rhodococcus. However, all four phylotypes were present at a much lower level compared to unclassified Pseudomonadaceae. Overall, these data indicate that unclassified Pseudomonadaceae was primarily responsible for label uptake in both treatments. This study indicates, for the first time, the importance of Comamonas for RDX removal. PMID:25721530

  9. Exploring Hidden Genetic Divergence Within Sunda Colugos by Means of Novel DNA Capture Methods and Next Generation Sequencing 

    E-print Network

    Mason, Victor C

    2012-07-11

    colugo (Galeopterus variegatus) to redefine the evolutionary relationships between disjunct populations of this poorly understood mammal, using a novel DNA capture method to isolate degraded mtDNA fragments from museum samples, by hybridization to DNA...

  10. Powerful bacterial killing by buckwheat honeys is concentration-dependent, involves complete DNA degradation and requires hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Abubaker, Kamal; Wang, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of bacterial cells to honey inhibits their growth and may cause cell death. Our previous studies showed a cause-effect relationship between hydroxyl radical generated from honey hydrogen peroxide and growth arrest. Here we explored the role of hydroxyl radicals as inducers of bacterial cells death. The bactericidal effect of ·OH on antibiotic-resistant clinical isolates of MRSA and VRE and standard bacterial strains of E. coli and B. subtiles was examined using a broth microdilution assay supplemented with 3?-(p-aminophenyl) fluorescein (APF) as the ·OH trap, followed by colony enumeration. Bactericidal activities of eight honeys (six varieties of buckwheat, blueberry and manuka honeys) were analyzed. The MBC/MIC ratio ?4 and the killing curves indicated that honeys exhibited powerful, concentration-dependent bactericidal effect. The extent of killing depended on the ratio of honey concentration to bacterial load, indicating that honey dose was critical for its bactericidal efficacy. The killing rate and potency varied between honeys and ranged from over a 6-log10 to 4-log10 CFU/ml reduction of viable cells, equivalent to complete bacterial eradication. The maximal killing was associated with the extensive degradation of bacterial DNA. Honey concentration at which DNA degradation occurred correlated with cell death observed in the concentration-dependent cell-kill on agar plates. There was no quantitative relationship between the ·OH generation by honey and bactericidal effect. At the MBC, where there was no surviving cells and no DNA was visible on agarose gels, the ·OH levels were on average 2–3x lower than at Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MICs) (p < 0.0001). Pre-treatment of honey with catalase, abolished the bactericidal effect. This raised possibilities that either the abrupt killing prevented accumulation of ·OH (dead cells did not generate ·OH) or that DNA degradation and killing is the actual footprint of ·OH action. In conclusion, honeys of buckwheat origin exhibited powerful, concentration-dependent bactericidal effect. The killing and DNA degradation showed a cause-effect relationship. Hydrogen peroxide was an active part of honey killing mechanism. PMID:22783246

  11. Trigger-responsive, fast-degradable poly(?-amino ester)s for enhanced DNA unpackaging and reduced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaojian; Zheng, Nan; Song, Ziyuan; Yin, Lichen; Cheng, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Poly(?-amino ester)s (PBAEs) represent an important class of cationic gene delivery materials which, however, suffer from uncontrolled DNA release due in part to the slow degradation of their polyester backbone. Additionally, PBAEs with high molecular weight (MW) also show considerable toxicities. In this study, we designed and developed PBAEs with trigger-responsive domains built in polymer backbones that can be rapidly cleaved upon external UV light triggering to promote intracellular DNA release as well as reduce material toxicity. Photo-responsive PBAEs were prepared via polyaddition of (2-nitro-1,3-phenylene)bis(methylene) diacrylate and a bisfunctional amine. The nitrobenzene moiety was placed in each repeating unit of the PBAE to allow fast response to external UV irradiation, and thus the ester linkers were cleaved and the polymers were degraded within several minutes upon UV irradiation. Cationic PBAEs with high MWs were able to mediate effective intracellular gene delivery, while upon UV irradiation post-transfection, enhanced DNA unpackaging and reduced material toxicity were observed, which collectively contributed to greatly improved transfection efficiencies in various mammalian cell types tested. This strategy allows precise manipulation of material toxicity and gene release profiles of PBAEs, and thus provides an effective design approach to address critical issues in non-viral gene delivery. PMID:24674461

  12. Pre-PCR DNA quantitation of soil and sediment samples: method development and instrument design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. C. Stark; K. I. Mullen; K. Banton; R. Russotti; D. Soran; C. R. Kuske

    2000-01-01

    A simple and straightforward method for the quantitation of dsDNA in soil and sediment matrices has been developed to support rapid, in-the-field PCR analysis of environmental samples. This method uses PicoGreen nucleic acid stain, and a combination of UV\\/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, to quantitate dsDNA in the presence of interfering humic materials. The practical utility of this approach is that

  13. An evaluation of long-term preservation methods for brown bear ( Ursus arctos ) faecal DNA samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melanie A. Murphy; Lisette P. Waits; Katherine C. Kendall; Samuel K. Wasser; Jerry A. Higbee; Robert Bogden

    2002-01-01

    Relatively few large-scale faecal DNA studieshave been initiated due to difficulties inamplifying low quality and quantity DNAtemplate. To improve brown bear faecal DNA PCRamplification success rates and to determinepost collection sample longevity, fivepreservation methods were evaluated: 90%ethanol, DETs buffer, silica-dried, oven-driedstored at room temperature, and oven-driedstored at -20 °C. Preservationeffectiveness was evaluated for 50 faecalsamples by PCR amplification of a

  14. Feasibility of collecting self-sampled vaginal swabs by mail: quantity and quality of genomic DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. F. D. Baay; V. Verhoeven; H. A. J. Lambrechts; G. G. O. Pattyn; F. Lardon; P. Van Royen; J. B. Vermorken

    2009-01-01

    Vaginal self-sampling may be valuable as an alternative method of cervical cancer screening in areas of poor resources, to\\u000a enrol women who, otherwise, would not participate in population-based cervical cancer screening and in epidemiological follow-up\\u000a studies. We assessed the reliability of mailed vaginal samples by evaluating the quantity and quality of genomic DNA in the\\u000a samples. Mailed swabs (n?=?201) were

  15. Iron gall ink-induced corrosion of cellulose: aging, degradation and stabilization. Part 2: application on historic sample material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ute Henniges; Rebecca Reibke; Gerhard Banik; Enke Huhsmann; Ulrike Hähner; Thomas Prohaska; Antje Potthast

    2008-01-01

    Degradation of cellulose in historic paper by iron gall ink is a synergistic process of both, acid hydrolysis caused by acidic\\u000a ink ingredients and oxidation catalyzed by free iron and\\/or copper ions. The interplay of both reactions was studied according\\u000a to the CCOA method on historic paper samples. Only minute amounts (few mg) of the samples were required to obtain

  16. Revised Final Independent External Peer Review Report Environmental DNA (eDNA) Science and

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    began testing water samples for the presence of DNA of bighead and silver carp (collectively referred as mucoidal secretions (slime), feces, and urine. These substances and the DNA within them slowly degrade by researchers at UND. The process of testing eDNA is not instantaneous, but DNA can be held in suspension

  17. DNA polyplexes based on degradable oligoethylenimine-derivatives: combination with EGF receptor targeting and endosomal release functions.

    PubMed

    Kloeckner, Julia; Boeckle, Sabine; Persson, Daniel; Roedl, Wolfgang; Ogris, Manfred; Berg, Kristian; Wagner, Ernst

    2006-11-28

    Combination of the degradable polymeric gene carriers OEI-HD-1 and LT- OEI-HD-1 with an EGF targeting conjugate resulted in strongly (up to 900-fold) enhanced polyplex activity in EGF-receptor rich HUH7 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The targeting ligand effect was DNA dose dependent, could be blocked by competitive receptor binding with unbound EGF ligand, and was not observed in receptor-negative control cells. Measures which enhance intracellular endosomal escape, either photochemically enhanced intracellular release (PCI) or the incorporation of a novel membrane-active melittin analog NMA-3, further enhanced gene transfer activity of EGF/OEI-HD-1 polyplexes. PMID:16959361

  18. Detection of PCV-2 DNA in stool samples from infants vaccinated with RotaTeq®

    PubMed Central

    Esona, Mathew D; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Yen, Catherine; Parashar, Umesh D; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D; LaRussa, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccines have led to a dramatic reduction in rotavirus disease worldwide. However, the detection of porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV-1) and 2 (PCV-2) DNA in these vaccines raised some safety concerns. Studies examining shedding of rotavirus in stool from rotavirus vaccine recipients have been performed but no published data exist regarding the shedding of PCV virus in stools of vaccinees. The goal of this study was to determine if PCV-1 and/or PCV-2 is shed in the feces of infants vaccinated with RotaTeq®. Using multiple PCR assays for detection of PCV DNA, we tested for PCV-1 and PCV-2 in 826 stool swab samples collected serially during the first 9 d after vaccination from 102 children vaccinated with RotaTeq®. Since the vaccine is recommended and uptake is high, we did not have samples from unvaccinated infants. A total of 235 (28.5%) samples from 59 vaccine recipients were positive for PCV-2 DNA by one or more assays used in this study. PCV-1 DNA was not detected in RotaTeq® or any of the stool swab extracts. Twenty-two of the 102 vaccine recipients (21.6%) shed RotaTeq® vaccine strain and 10 of these vaccinees (9.8%) were shedding both PCV DNA and rotavirus vaccine RNA. PCV DNA was detected up to 9 d post vaccination and was most frequently detected in the first 5 d after vaccination. This study demonstrated shedding of PCV-2 DNA by RotaTeq® vaccinees but we did not find evidence that this DNA was associated with viable PCV. Findings from this study support the continued use of current rotavirus vaccines. PMID:24104203

  19. Quantitative field testing Heterodera glycines from metagenomic DNA samples isolated directly from soil under agronomic production.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Lawrence, Gary W; Lu, Shien; Balbalian, Clarissa; Klink, Vincent P

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative PCR procedure targeting the Heterodera glycines ortholog of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated-78 gene was developed. The procedure estimated the quantity of H. glycines from metagenomic DNA samples isolated directly from field soil under agronomic production. The estimation of H. glycines quantity was determined in soil samples having other soil dwelling plant parasitic nematodes including Hoplolaimus, predatory nematodes including Mononchus, free-living nematodes and biomass. The methodology provides a framework for molecular diagnostics of nematodes from metagenomic DNA isolated directly from field soil. PMID:24587100

  20. Setting up an ancient DNA laboratory.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Tara L

    2012-01-01

    Entering into the world of ancient DNA research is nontrivial. Because the DNA in most ancient specimens is degraded to some extent, the potential for contamination of ancient samples and DNA extracts with modern DNA is considerable. To minimize the risk associated with working with ancient DNA, experimental protocols specific to handling ancient specimens have been introduced. Here, I outline the challenges associated with working with ancient DNA and describe guidelines for setting up a new ancient DNA laboratory. I also discuss steps that can be taken at the sample collection and preparation stage to minimize the potential for contamination with exogenous sources of DNA. PMID:22237515

  1. Colorimetric detection of clinical DNA samples using an intercalator-conjugated polydiacetylene sensor.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-10-15

    We herein developed a novel colorimetric polydiacetylene (PDA) sensor for very convenient detection of clinical DNA samples based on the interaction between an intercalator and dsDNA. We modified the terminal carboxyl group of a diacetylene monomer (10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid; PCDA) with the intercalator 9-aminoacridine (9AA) and prepared 9AA-modified PDA liposomes containing PCDA-9AA/PCDA/phospholipid (1,2-dimyristoyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine) at a molar ratio of 1.5:6.5:2.0. The PDA sensor underwent an obvious color transition from blue to red in the presence of dsDNA molecules that were PCR-amplified from genomic DNA due to the insertion of the 9AA head group of PDA into the dsDNA. DNA concentrations as low as 20nM and relatively small molecules (around 100 base pairs) could be detected by the sensor within 1h without DNA electrophoresis. This novel colorimetric method is simple, does not require any instrument, and is therefore appropriate for POCT or portable molecular diagnostic kit. PMID:25978440

  2. Screening a human population sample for DNA repair gene deficiencies utilizing the protein truncation test.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Yu, Z; Ford, B N; Brackley, M E; Haesevoets, R J; Khaidakov, M; Glickman, B W

    2000-01-01

    A significant fraction of human cancers are thought to have a genetic component and several lines of evidence suggest that deficiencies in DNA repair may be a contributing factor. Little is known, however, about the frequency and distribution of variants of DNA repair genes in the general human population. The protein truncation test (PTT) was used to screen 136 healthy volunteers for protein-truncating variants of 10 DNA repair genes: APE, CDK7, ERCC1, WAF1, HOGG1, MGMT, POLB, UNG, HAAG, and CCNH. This sample consisted of 41males (30%) and 95 females (70%) with an average age of 25.3 years, ranging from 17 to 60 years of age. No truncating mutations were found in the 10 genes examined in any of the subjects. The 95% confidence interval for a proportion of 0 over the 272 alleles examined per locus is 0-0.01. The calculated frequency of truncating mutations in each of these genes, among the general population, is thus less than 1%. Among the 10 genes tested in 136 people, a single sample had no PCR product for HAAG, even though PCR products were obtained on all other genes. Total RNA dot hybridization confirmed the presence of HAAG mRNA transcripts in this sample. Despite identification of this single DNA repair variant, these results indicate a low frequency of truncating mutations in DNA repair genes in the general population. PMID:11044904

  3. DNA DNA DNA (d)DNA DNA DNA

    E-print Network

    Hagiya, Masami

    DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA [ 2008] (d)DNA DNA DNA DNA 2 3 DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA (a) (c) (b) (d) #12;DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA (b) DNA [Tanaka et al.2008] DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA #12;iGEM MIT MIT

  4. Genetic identification of missing persons: DNA analysis of human remains and compromised samples.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cubero, M J; Saiz, M; Martinez-Gonzalez, L J; Alvarez, J C; Eisenberg, A J; Budowle, B; Lorente, J A

    2012-01-01

    Human identification has made great strides over the past 2 decades due to the advent of DNA typing. Forensic DNA typing provides genetic data from a variety of materials and individuals, and is applied to many important issues that confront society. Part of the success of DNA typing is the generation of DNA databases to help identify missing persons and to develop investigative leads to assist law enforcement. DNA databases house DNA profiles from convicted felons (and in some jurisdictions arrestees), forensic evidence, human remains, and direct and family reference samples of missing persons. These databases are essential tools, which are becoming quite large (for example the US Database contains 10 million profiles). The scientific, governmental and private communities continue to work together to standardize genetic markers for more effective worldwide data sharing, to develop and validate robust DNA typing kits that contain the reagents necessary to type core identity genetic markers, to develop technologies that facilitate a number of analytical processes and to develop policies to make human identity testing more effective. Indeed, DNA typing is integral to resolving a number of serious criminal and civil concerns, such as solving missing person cases and identifying victims of mass disasters and children who may have been victims of human trafficking, and provides information for historical studies. As more refined capabilities are still required, novel approaches are being sought, such as genetic testing by next-generation sequencing, mass spectrometry, chip arrays and pyrosequencing. Single nucleotide polymorphisms offer the potential to analyze severely compromised biological samples, to determine the facial phenotype of decomposed human remains and to predict the bioancestry of individuals, a new focus in analyzing this type of markers. PMID:22722562

  5. Effective detection of rare variants in pooled DNA samples using Cross-pool tailcurve analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Sequencing targeted DNA regions in large samples is necessary to discover the full spectrum of rare variants. We report an effective Illumina sequencing strategy utilizing pooled samples with novel quality (Srfim) and filtering (SERVIC4E) algorithms. We sequenced 24 exons in two cohorts of 480 samples each, identifying 47 coding variants, including 30 present once per cohort. Validation by Sanger sequencing revealed an excellent combination of sensitivity and specificity for variant detection in pooled samples of both cohorts as compared to publicly available algorithms. PMID:21955804

  6. An efficient and sensitive method for preparing cDNA libraries from scarce biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Catherine H.; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Ambros, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The preparation and high-throughput sequencing of cDNA libraries from samples of small RNA is a powerful tool to quantify known small RNAs (such as microRNAs) and to discover novel RNA species. Interest in identifying the small RNA repertoire present in tissues and in biofluids has grown substantially with the findings that small RNAs can serve as indicators of biological conditions and disease states. Here we describe a novel and straightforward method to clone cDNA libraries from small quantities of input RNA. This method permits the generation of cDNA libraries from sub-picogram quantities of RNA robustly, efficiently and reproducibly. We demonstrate that the method provides a significant improvement in sensitivity compared to previous cloning methods while maintaining reproducible identification of diverse small RNA species. This method should have widespread applications in a variety of contexts, including biomarker discovery from scarce samples of human tissue or body fluids. PMID:25056322

  7. Sample preparation methods for quantitative detection of DNA by molecular assays and marine biosensors.

    PubMed

    Cox, Annie M; Goodwin, Kelly D

    2013-08-15

    The need for quantitative molecular methods is growing in environmental, food, and medical fields but is hindered by low and variable DNA extraction and by co-extraction of PCR inhibitors. DNA extracts from Enterococcus faecium, seawater, and seawater spiked with E. faecium and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were tested by qPCR for target recovery and inhibition. Conventional and novel methods were tested, including Synchronous Coefficient of Drag Alteration (SCODA) and lysis and purification systems used on an automated genetic sensor (the Environmental Sample Processor, ESP). Variable qPCR target recovery and inhibition were measured, significantly affecting target quantification. An aggressive lysis method that utilized chemical, enzymatic, and mechanical disruption enhanced target recovery compared to commercial kit protocols. SCODA purification did not show marked improvement over commercial spin columns. Overall, data suggested a general need to improve sample preparation and to accurately assess and account for DNA recovery and inhibition in qPCR applications. PMID:23790450

  8. DNA barcoding meets molecular scatology: short mtDNA sequences for standardized species assignment of carnivore noninvasive samples.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Paulo B; Graeff, Vanessa G; Lion, Marília B; Oliveira, Larissa R; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Although species assignment of scats is important to study carnivore biology, there is still no standardized assay for the identification of carnivores worldwide, which would allow large-scale routine assessments and reliable cross-comparison of results. Here, we evaluate the potential of two short mtDNA fragments [ATP6 (126 bp) and cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI) (187 bp)] to serve as standard markers for the Carnivora. Samples of 66 species were sequenced for one or both of these segments. Alignments were complemented with archival sequences and analysed with three approaches (tree-based, distance-based and character-based). Intraspecific genetic distances were generally lower than between-species distances, resulting in diagnosable clusters for 86% (ATP6) and 85% (COI) of the species. Notable exceptions were recently diverged species, most of which could still be identified using diagnostic characters and uniqueness of haplotypes or by reducing the geographic scope of the comparison. In silico analyses were also performed for a 110-bp cytochrome b (cytb) segment, whose identification success was lower (70%), possibly due to the smaller number of informative sites and/or the influence of misidentified sequences obtained from GenBank. Finally, we performed case studies with faecal samples, which supported the suitability of our two focal markers for poor-quality DNA and allowed an assessment of prey DNA co-amplification. No evidence of prey DNA contamination was found for ATP6, while some cases were observed for COI and subsequently eliminated by the design of more specific primers. Overall, our results indicate that these segments hold good potential as standard markers for accurate species-level identification in the Carnivora. PMID:21883979

  9. Direct identification of chlamydiae from clinical samples using a DNA microarray assay—A validation study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicole Borel; Evelyne Kempf; Helmut Hotzel; Evelyn Schubert; Paul Torgerson; Peter Slickers; Ralf Ehricht; Taurai Tasara; Andreas Pospischil; Konrad Sachse

    2008-01-01

    While DNA microarrays have become a widely accepted tool for mRNA expression monitoring, their use in rapid diagnosis of bacterial and viral pathogens is only emerging. So far, insufficient sensitivity and high costs have been the major limiting factors preventing more widespread use of microarray platforms in direct testing of clinical samples. In the present study, a total of 339

  10. Evaluation and Optimization of DNA Extraction and Purification Procedures for Soil and Sediment Samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. N. MILLER; J. E. BRYANT; E. L. MADSEN; W. C. GHIORSE

    1999-01-01

    We compared and statistically evaluated the effectiveness of nine DNA extraction procedures by using frozen and dried samples of two silt loam soils and a silt loam wetland sediment with different organic matter contents. The effects of different chemical extractants (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), chloroform, phenol, Chelex 100, and guanadinium isothiocyanate), different physical disruption methods (bead mill homogeniza- tion and

  11. DNA-based determination of microbial biomass suitable for frozen and alkaline soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Blagodatskaya, Evgeniya; Kogut, Boris; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Microbial biomass is a sensitive indicator of changes due to soil management, long before other basic soil measures such as Corg or Ntot. Improvement of methods for determination of microbial biomass still remains relevant, and these methods should be correctly applicable for the soil samples being in various state. This study was designed to demonstrate the applicability of DNA-based determination of microbial biomass under conditions when the common basic approaches, namely chloroform fumigation-extraction (CFE) and substrate-induced respiration (SIR), are restricted by certain soil properties, experimental designs or research needs, e.g. in frozen, alkaline or carbonaceous soils. We compared microbial biomass determined by CFE, SIR and by DNA approaches in the range of neutral and slightly alkaline Chernozem and alkaline Calcisol of semi-arid climate. The samples of natural and agricultural ecosystems were taken throughout the soil profile from long-term static field experiments in the European part of Russia. Extraction and subsequent quantification of dsDNA revealed a strong agreement with SIR and CFE when analyzing the microbial biomass content in soils with pH below 8. The conversion factors (FDNA) from dsDNA to SIR-Cmic (5.10) and CFE-Cmic (4.41) were obtained by testing a range of the soil samples down to 1.5 m depth and indicated a good reproducibility of DNA-based estimations. In alkaline soils (pH > 8), CO2 retention due to alkaline pH and exchange with carbonates resulted in a strong underestimation of soil microbial biomass by SIR or even in the absence of any CO2 emission, especially at low absolute values of microbial biomass in subsoil. Correction of CO2 efflux by theoretical retention pH-dependent factors caused overestimation of SIR-biomass. In alkaline conditions, DNA extraction proved to be a reliable alternative for microbial biomass determination. Moreover, the DNA-based approach can serve as an excellent alternative enabling correct estimation of microbial biomass in geographically widespread soils after their freezing. The DNA-based approach can also be applied to calculate eco-physiological indexes, e.g. Cmic:Corg ratio. The DNA-Cmic revealed that although the absolute values of microbial biomass in Chernozem were expectedly higher than in Calcisol, the Cmic:Corg ratio was greater in Calcisol versus Chernozem. Therefore, Chernozems can be characterized by a low proportion of microbiologically active C in total Corg. DNA-based determination of Cmic and Cmic:Corg ratios revealed that agrogenic impact does not always lead to negative consequences for soil status and cannot be considered as a solely negative phenomenon.

  12. DNA-based and culture-based characterization of a hydrocarbon-degrading consortium enriched from Arctic soil.

    PubMed

    Thomassin-Lacroix, E J; Yu, Z; Eriksson, M; Reimer, K J; Mohn, W W

    2001-12-01

    A hydrocarbon-degrading consortium was enriched from fuel-contaminated soil from the northeastern tip of Ellesmere Island (82 degrees 30'N, 62 degrees 19'W). The enrichment culture was grown on Jet A-1 fuel at 7 degrees C. Bacterial 16S RNA gene (rDNA) fragments were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from members of the above consortium and cloned into a plasmid vector. Partial sequences (approximately 500 bp) were determined for 29 randomly selected rDNA clones. The majority of sequences were most similar to the corresponding rDNA sequences of Rhodococcus erythropolis (15 sequences), Sphingomonas spp. (six sequences), and Pseudomonas synxantha (four sequences). Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis confirmed that a larger set of 50 clones had frequencies of the three phylotypes similar to those above. Phylotype-specific PCR assays were developed and validated for the above three phylotypes. The consortium was plated and grown on Jet A-1 fuel vapors, and randomly selected isolated colonies were screened with the above PCR assays. Of 17 colonies, six matched the Rhodococcus phylotype, and three matched the Pseudomonas phylotype. A representative strain of each phylotype was physiologically characterized. Both isolates grew on alkanes at low temperature and had general characteristics consistent with their respective phylotypes. During growth of the consortium, the three phylotype populations were monitored by a most probable number PCR assay. All three phylotypes were detected, but their relative abundance was not consistent with that of the phylotypes in the clone library. The relative abundance of all three phylotypes changed substantially during long-term incubation of the consortium. The DNA-based approach used identified phylotypes consistently present in the consortium, but it failed to predict the relative abundance of their populations. PMID:11822837

  13. How DNA is damaged by external electric fields: selective mutation vs. random degradation.

    PubMed

    Cerón-Carrasco, José Pedro; Cerezo, Javier; Jacquemin, Denis

    2014-05-14

    DNA is constantly exposed to exogenous agents that randomly damage the genetic code. However, external perturbations might also be used to induce malignant cell death if the mutation processes are controlled. The present communication reports a set of parameters allowing DNA mutation through the use of intense external electric fields. This is a step towards the design of pulsed electric field therapy for genetic diseases. PMID:24343518

  14. Taxonomic characterization of two rubber degrading bacteria belonging to the species Gordonia polyisoprenivorans and analysis of hyper variable regions of 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Arenskötter, M; Baumeister, D; Berekaa, M M; Pötter, G; Kroppenstedt, R M; Linos, A; Steinbüchel, A

    2001-12-18

    Two cis-1,4-polyisoprene (isoprene rubber) degrading bacteria, strains VH2 and Y2K, were identified as strains of the species Gordonia polyisoprenivorans belonging to the Corynebacterineae, a suborder of the order Actinomycetales. Both showed characteristic growth and degradation of isoprene rubber as described previously for the type strain of G. polyisoprenivorans Kd2 (DSM 44302(T)). For strain VH2 the chemotaxonomic properties were investigated, and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments with the type strain revealed the affiliation to the species G. polyisoprenivorans. The comparison of the 16S rDNA sequences, and especially hyper variable regions of these, led to the classification of strain Y2K to the same species. At present, the species G. polyisoprenivorans comprises three different isolates which share the ability to degrade isoprene rubber potently but which were obtained from different geographic regions. PMID:11750816

  15. Increased DNA amplification success of non-invasive genetic samples by successful removal of inhibitors from faecal samples collected in the field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louise Hebert; Safi K. Darden; Bo Vest Pedersen; Torben Dabelsteen

    2011-01-01

    The use of non-invasive genetic sampling (NGS) is becoming increasingly important in the study of wild animal populations.\\u000a Obtaining DNA from faecal samples is of particular interest because faeces can be collected without deploying sample capture\\u000a devices. However, PCR amplification of DNA extracted from faeces is problematic because of high concentrations of inhibitors.\\u000a Here we present a method for increasing

  16. A gene encoding a novel extremely thermostable 1,4-ß-xylanase isolated directly from an environmental DNA sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anwar Sunna; Peter L. Bergquist

    2003-01-01

    Small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes (rDNA) were amplified by PCR from a hot pool environmental DNA sample using Bacteria- or Archaea-specific rDNA primers. Unique rDNA types were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and representative sequences were determined. Family 10 glycoside hydrolase consensus PCR primers were used to explore the occurrence and diversity of xylanase genes in the hot

  17. Degradation of mitochondrial DNA in cryoprotectant-treated hard coral (Echinopora spp.) oocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sujune; Chen, Jiann-Chu; Spikings, Emma; Li, Jan-Jung; Lin, Chiahsin

    2015-06-01

    A critical step for successful cryopreservation is to determine the optimal cryoprotectant treatment that can provide protective effects against cryoinjury during freezing and with minimal toxicity. Most cryoprotectants have chemical and osmotic effects when used at high concentrations. Cryoprotectants can damage coral mitochondrial distributions and membrane potentials, which results in reduced ATP production. As mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for components of the electron transport chain (ETC) and plays a critical role in ATP synthesis capacity, we determined the effects of cryoprotectants on mtDNA in hard coral (Echinopora spp.) oocytes using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results showed that an insult from a cryoprotectant may be compensated for by the genetic defense mechanisms of these cells. Methanol was found to have the least effect on coral oocytes with regard to their energy status. A single oocyte without cryoprotectant treatment produced an average of 4,220,645?±?169,990 mtDNA copies, which was greater than that in mammals. However, relatively lower mtDNA copy numbers (<2,000,000) were observed when oocytes were treated with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG), ethylene glycol (EG), or glycerol at a concentration of 3?M for 20?min. These results provide direct evidence that hard coral (Echinopora spp.) oocytes are extremely susceptible to cryoprotectants and support the concerns with regard to the adverse effects of cryoprotectants. PMID:24460160

  18. An In-Solution Hybridisation Method for the Isolation of Pathogen DNA from Human DNA-rich Clinical Samples for Analysis by NGS

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Miriam; Campino, Susana; Gu, Yong; Clark, Taane G.; Otto, Thomas D.; Maslen, Gareth; Manske, Magnus; Imwong, Mallika; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Quail, Michael A.; Swerdlow, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Studies on DNA from pathogenic organisms, within clinical samples, are often complicated by the presence of large amounts of host, e.g., human DNA. Isolation of pathogen DNA from these samples would improve the efficiency of next-generation sequencing (NGS) and pathogen identification. Here we describe a solution-based hybridisation method for isolation of pathogen DNA from a mixed population. This straightforward and inexpensive technique uses probes made from whole-genome DNA and off-the-shelf reagents. In this study, Escherichia coli DNA was successfully enriched from a mixture of E.coli and human DNA. After enrichment, genome coverage following NGS was significantly higher and the evenness of coverage and GC content were unaffected. This technique was also applied to samples containing a mixture of human and Plasmodium falciparum DNA. The P.falciparum genome is particularly difficult to sequence due to its high AT content (80.6%) and repetitive nature. Post enrichment, a bias in the recovered DNA was observed, with a poorer representation of the AT-rich non-coding regions. This uneven coverage was also observed in pre-enrichment samples, but to a lesser degree. Despite the coverage bias in enriched samples, SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) calling in coding regions was unaffected and the majority of samples had over 90% of their coding region covered at 5× depth. This technique shows significant promise as an effective method to enrich pathogen DNA from samples with heavy human contamination, particularly when applied to GC-neutral genomes. PMID:24273626

  19. Factors affecting the amount of genomic DNA extracted from ape faeces and the identification of an improved sample storage method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. NSUBUGA; M. M. ROBBINS; A. D. ROEDER; P. A. MORIN; C. BOESCH; L. VIGILANT

    2004-01-01

    Genetic analysis using noninvasively collected samples such as faeces continues to pose a formidable challenge because of unpredictable variation in the extent to which usable DNA is obtained. We investigated the influence of multiple variables on the quantity of DNA extracted from faecal samples from wild mountain gorillas and chimpanzees. There was a small negative correlation between temperature at time

  20. Characterization of 26 MiniSTR Loci for Improved Analysis of Degraded DNA Samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carolyn R. Hill; Margaret C. Kline; Michael D. Coble; John M. Butler

    2008-01-01

    An additional 20 novel mini-short tandem repeat (miniSTR) loci have been developed and characterized beyond the six previously developed by our laboratory for a total of 26 non-CODIS miniSTR markers. These new markers produce short PCR products in the target range of 50-150 base pairs (bp) by moving the primer sequences as close as possible—often directly next to the identified

  1. Development of a novel miniSTR multiplex assay for typing degraded DNA samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronny Decorte; Chi Fung Liu; Nancy Vanderheyden; Jean-Jacques Cassiman

    2008-01-01

    A multiplex PCR was developed for the analysis of the sex-determining gene Amelogenin, four conventional STR (short tandem repeat; THO1, D18S51, D21S11 and FGA) loci with a reduced amplicon size and four miniSTR loci (D1S1677, D2S441, D10S1248 and D22S1045). A concordance study in a population of 198 Belgians revealed no differences for the conventional STR loci while a sensitivity study

  2. A mathematical model of DNA degradation: Possible role of magnetic nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. N. Binhi

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model of genome degradation is proposed that takes into\\u000aaccount a variable rate of mutation and increasing number of cells in a\\u000adeveloping human organism. The model explains known properties of cancer\\u000adevelopment, in particular, a synergism between different mutagens and an\\u000aincreased probability of cancer in the early years of life. An iteration\\u000aequation is suggested that

  3. DNA recognition by peptide nucleic acid-modified PCFs: from models to real samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selleri, S.; Coscelli, E.; Poli, F.; Passaro, D.; Cucinotta, A.; Lantano, C.; Corradini, R.; Marchelli, R.

    2010-04-01

    The increased concern, emerged in the last few years, on food products safety has stimulated the research on new techniques for traceability of raw food materials. DNA analysis is one of the most powerful tools for the certification of food quality, and it is presently performed through the polymerase chain reaction technique. Photonic crystal fibers, due to the presence of an array of air holes running along their length, can be exploited for performing DNA recognition by derivatizing hole surfaces and checking hybridization of complementary nucledotide chains in the sample. In this paper the application of a suspended core photonic crystal fiber in the recognition of DNA sequences is discussed. The fiber is characterized in terms of electromagnetic properties by means of a full-vector modal solver based on the finite element method. Then, the performances of the fiber in the recognition of mall synthetic oligonucleotides are discussed, together with a test of the possibility to extend this recognition to samples of DNA of applicative interest, such as olive leaves.

  4. Protein Quantity on the Air-Solid Interface Determines Degradation Rates of Human Growth Hormone in Lyophilized Samples

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yemin; Grobelny, Pawel; von Allmen, Alexander; Knudson, Korben; Pikal, Michael; Carpenter, John F.; Randolph, Theodore W.

    2014-01-01

    rhGH was lyophilized with various glass-forming stabilizers, employing cycles that incorporated various freezing and annealing procedures to manipulate glass formation kinetics, associated relaxation processes and glass specific surface areas (SSA’s). The secondary structure in the cake was monitored by IR and in reconstituted samples by CD. The rhGH concentrations on the surface of lyophilized powders were determined from ESCA. Tg, SSA’s and water contents were determined immediately after lyophilization. Lyophilized samples were incubated at 323 K for 16 weeks, and the resulting extents of rhGH aggregation, oxidation and deamidation were determined after rehydration. Water contents and Tg were independent of lyophilization process parameters. Compared to samples lyophilized after rapid freezing, rhGH in samples that had been annealed in frozen solids prior to drying, or annealed in glassy solids after secondary drying retained more native-like protein secondary structure, had a smaller fraction of the protein on the surface of the cake and exhibited lower levels of degradation during incubation. A simple kinetic model suggested that the differences in the extent of rhGH degradation during storage in the dried state between different formulations and processing methods could largely be ascribed to the associated levels of rhGH at the solid-air interface after lyophilization. PMID:24623139

  5. CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBON DEGRADATION PRODUCTS FROM SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to characterize the polar components, mainly polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) derivatives, in air samples and to determine whether these compounds are from sampling artifacts or from the sampled air. A literature survey was conducted to review...

  6. Assessment of microbial diversity in human colonic samples by 16S rDNA sequence analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georgina L Hold; Susan E Pryde; Valerie J Russell; Elizabeth Furrie; Harry J Flint

    2002-01-01

    The bacterial species diversity of three colonic tissue samples from elderly people was investigated by sequence analysis of randomly cloned eubacterial 16S rDNA. The majority of sequences (87%) clustered within three bacterial groups: (1) Bacteroides; (2) low G+C content Gram-positives related to Clostridium coccoides (cluster XIVa); (3) Gram-positives related to Clostridium leptum (cluster IV). These groups have been shown to

  7. Use of Buccal Swabs for Sampling DNA from Nestling and Adult Birds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    COLLEEN M. HANDEL; LISA M. PAJOT; SANDRA L. TALBOT; GEORGE K. SAGE

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of using swabs to collect buccal epithelial cells from small (2- to 13-g) birds as a source of DNA for genetic studies. We used commercially available buccal swab kits to collect samples from 42 adult and 39 nestling (4- to 8-day-old) black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) and from 6 4-day-old nestling boreal chickadees (P. hudsonica).

  8. Release of Free DNA by Membrane-Impaired Bacterial Aerosols Due to Aerosolization and Air Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Huajun; Han, Taewon; Fennell, Donna E.

    2013-01-01

    We report here that stress experienced by bacteria due to aerosolization and air sampling can result in severe membrane impairment, leading to the release of DNA as free molecules. Escherichia coli and Bacillus atrophaeus bacteria were aerosolized and then either collected directly into liquid or collected using other collection media and then transferred into liquid. The amount of DNA released was quantified as the cell membrane damage index (ID), i.e., the number of 16S rRNA gene copies in the supernatant liquid relative to the total number in the bioaerosol sample. During aerosolization by a Collison nebulizer, the ID of E. coli and B. atrophaeus in the nebulizer suspension gradually increased during 60 min of continuous aerosolization. We found that the ID of bacteria during aerosolization was statistically significantly affected by the material of the Collison jar (glass > polycarbonate; P < 0.001) and by the bacterial species (E. coli > B. atrophaeus; P < 0.001). When E. coli was collected for 5 min by filtration, impaction, and impingement, its ID values were within the following ranges: 0.051 to 0.085, 0.16 to 0.37, and 0.068 to 0.23, respectively; when it was collected by electrostatic precipitation, the ID values (0.011 to 0.034) were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those with other sampling methods. Air samples collected inside an equine facility for 2 h by filtration and impingement exhibited ID values in the range of 0.30 to 0.54. The data indicate that the amount of cell damage during bioaerosol sampling and the resulting release of DNA can be substantial and that this should be taken into account when analyzing bioaerosol samples. PMID:24096426

  9. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  10. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark A.; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  11. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples.

    PubMed

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U; Mustafa, S; Man, Y B Che; Yusop, M H M; Bari, M F; Islam, Kh N; Hasan, M F

    2011-05-13

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55?°C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml(-1) swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species. PMID:21430321

  12. Association of telomere length and mitochondrial DNA copy number in a community sample of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Tyrka, Audrey R; Carpenter, Linda L; Kao, Hung-Teh; Porton, Barbara; Philip, Noah S; Ridout, Samuel J; Ridout, Kathryn K; Price, Lawrence H

    2015-06-01

    Cellular aging plays a role in longevity and senescence, and has been implicated in medical and psychiatric conditions, including heart disease, cancer, major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Telomere shortening and mitochondrial dysfunction are thought to be central to the cellular aging process. The present study examined the association between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and telomere length in a sample of medically healthy adults. Participants (total n=392) were divided into 4 groups based on the presence or absence of early life adversity and lifetime psychopathology: No Adversity/No Disorder, n=136; Adversity/No Disorder, n=91; No Adversity/Disorder, n=46; Adversity/Disorder, n=119. Telomere length and mtDNA copy number were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. There was a positive correlation between mtDNA and telomere length in the entire sample (r=0.120, p<0.001) and in each of the four groups of participants (No Adversity/No Disorder, r=0.291, p=0.001; Adversity/No Disorder r=0.279, p=0.007; No Adversity/Disorder r=0.449, p=0.002; Adversity/Disorder, r=0.558, p<0.001). These correlations remained significant when controlling for age, smoking, and body mass index and establish an association between mtDNA and telomere length in a large group of women and men both with and without early adversity and psychopathology, suggesting co-regulation of telomeres and mitochondrial function. The mechanisms underlying this association may be important in the pathophysiology of age-related medical conditions, such as heart disease and cancer, as well as for stress-associated psychiatric disorders. PMID:25845980

  13. Amplification volume reduction on DNA database samples using FTA™ Classic Cards.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hang Yee; Lim, Eng Seng Simon; Tan-Siew, Wai Fun

    2012-03-01

    The DNA forensic community always strives towards improvements in aspects such as sensitivity, robustness, and efficacy balanced with cost efficiency. Therefore our laboratory decided to study the feasibility of PCR amplification volume reduction using DNA entrapped in FTA™ Classic Card and to bring cost savings to the laboratory. There were a few concerns the laboratory needed to address. First, the kinetics of the amplification reaction could be significantly altered. Second, an increase in sensitivity might affect interpretation due to increased stochastic effects even though they were pristine samples. Third, statics might cause FTA punches to jump out of its allocated well into another thus causing sample-to-sample contamination. Fourth, the size of the punches might be too small for visual inspection. Last, there would be a limit to the extent of volume reduction due to evaporation and the possible need of re-injection of samples for capillary electrophoresis. The laboratory had successfully optimized a reduced amplification volume of 10 ?L for FTA samples. PMID:21543276

  14. Small-Scale DNA Sample Preparation Method for Field PCR Detection of Microbial Cells and Spores in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kuske, Cheryl R.; Banton, Kaysie L.; Adorada, Dante L.; Stark, Peter C.; Hill, Karen K.; Jackson, Paul J.

    1998-01-01

    Efficient, nonselective methods to obtain DNA from the environment are needed for rapid and thorough analysis of introduced microorganisms in environmental samples and for analysis of microbial community diversity in soil. A small-scale procedure to rapidly extract and purify DNA from soils was developed for in-the-field use. Amounts of DNA released from bacterial vegetative cells, bacterial endospores, and fungal conidia were compared by using hot-detergent treatment, freeze-thaw cycles, and bead mill homogenization. Combining a hot-detergent treatment with bead mill homogenization gave the highest DNA yields from all three microbial cell types and provided DNA from the broadest range of microbial groups in a natural soil community. Only the bead mill homogenization step was effective for DNA extraction from Bacillus globigii (B. subtilis subsp. niger) endospores or Fusarium moniliforme conidia. The hot-detergent–bead mill procedure was simplified and miniaturized. By using this procedure and small-scale, field-adapted purification and quantification procedures, DNA was prepared from four different soils seeded with Pseudomonas putida cells or B. globigii spores. In a New Mexico soil, seeded bacterial targets were detected with the same sensitivity as when assaying pure bacterial DNA (2 to 20 target gene copies in a PCR mixture). The detection limit of P. putida cells and B. globigii spores in different soils was affected by the amount of background DNA in the soil samples, the physical condition of the DNA, and the amount of DNA template used in the PCR. PMID:9647816

  15. Protocols for metagenomic DNA extraction and Illumina amplicon library preparation for faecal and swab samples.

    PubMed

    Vo, A-T E; Jedlicka, J A

    2014-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has extraordinarily enhanced the scope of research in the life sciences. To broaden the application of NGS to systems that were previously difficult to study, we present protocols for processing faecal and swab samples into amplicon libraries amenable to Illumina sequencing. We developed and tested a novel metagenomic DNA extraction approach using solid phase reversible immobilization (SPRI) beads on Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana) samples stored in RNAlater. Compared with the MO BIO PowerSoil Kit, the current standard for the Human and Earth Microbiome Projects, the SPRI-based method produced comparable 16S rRNA gene PCR amplification from faecal extractions but significantly greater DNA quality, quantity and PCR success for both cloacal and oral swab samples. We furthermore modified published protocols for preparing highly multiplexed Illumina libraries with minimal sample loss and without post-adapter ligation amplification. Our library preparation protocol was successfully validated on three sets of heterogeneous amplicons (16S rRNA gene amplicons from SPRI and PowerSoil extractions as well as control arthropod COI gene amplicons) that were sequenced across three independent, 250-bp, paired-end runs on Illumina's MiSeq platform. Sequence analyses revealed largely equivalent results from the SPRI and PowerSoil extractions. Our comprehensive strategies focus on maximizing efficiency and minimizing costs. In addition to increasing the feasibility of using minimally invasive sampling and NGS capabilities in avian research, our methods are notably not avian-specific and thus applicable to many research programmes that involve DNA extraction and amplicon sequencing. PMID:24774752

  16. DNA Damage Focus Analysis in Blood Samples of Minipigs Reveals Acute Partial Body Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lamkowski, Andreas; Forcheron, Fabien; Agay, Diane; Ahmed, Emad A.; Drouet, Michel; Meineke, Viktor; Scherthan, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Radiation accidents frequently involve acute high dose partial body irradiation leading to victims with radiation sickness and cutaneous radiation syndrome that implements radiation-induced cell death. Cells that are not lethally hit seek to repair ionizing radiation (IR) induced damage, albeit at the expense of an increased risk of mutation and tumor formation due to misrepair of IR-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). The response to DNA damage includes phosphorylation of histone H2AX in the vicinity of DSBs, creating foci in the nucleus whose enumeration can serve as a radiation biodosimeter. Here, we investigated ?H2AX and DNA repair foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes of Göttingen minipigs that experienced acute partial body irradiation (PBI) with 49 Gy (±6%) Co-60 ?-rays of the upper lumbar region. Blood samples taken 4, 24 and 168 hours post PBI were subjected to ?-H2AX, 53BP1 and MRE11 focus enumeration. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of 49 Gy partial body irradiated minipigs were found to display 1–8 DNA damage foci/cell. These PBL values significantly deceed the high foci numbers observed in keratinocyte nuclei of the directly ?-irradiated minipig skin regions, indicating a limited resident time of PBL in the exposed tissue volume. Nonetheless, PBL samples obtained 4 h post IR in average contained 2.2% of cells displaying a pan-?H2AX signal, suggesting that these received a higher IR dose. Moreover, dispersion analysis indicated partial body irradiation for all 13 minipigs at 4 h post IR. While dose reconstruction using ?H2AX DNA repair foci in lymphocytes after in vivo PBI represents a challenge, the DNA damage focus assay may serve as a rapid, first line indicator of radiation exposure. The occurrence of PBLs with pan-?H2AX staining and of cells with relatively high foci numbers that skew a Poisson distribution may be taken as indicator of acute high dose partial body irradiation, particularly when samples are available early after IR exposure. PMID:24498326

  17. DNA damage focus analysis in blood samples of minipigs reveals acute partial body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lamkowski, Andreas; Forcheron, Fabien; Agay, Diane; Ahmed, Emad A; Drouet, Michel; Meineke, Viktor; Scherthan, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Radiation accidents frequently involve acute high dose partial body irradiation leading to victims with radiation sickness and cutaneous radiation syndrome that implements radiation-induced cell death. Cells that are not lethally hit seek to repair ionizing radiation (IR) induced damage, albeit at the expense of an increased risk of mutation and tumor formation due to misrepair of IR-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). The response to DNA damage includes phosphorylation of histone H2AX in the vicinity of DSBs, creating foci in the nucleus whose enumeration can serve as a radiation biodosimeter. Here, we investigated ?H2AX and DNA repair foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes of Göttingen minipigs that experienced acute partial body irradiation (PBI) with 49 Gy (± 6%) Co-60 ?-rays of the upper lumbar region. Blood samples taken 4, 24 and 168 hours post PBI were subjected to ?-H2AX, 53BP1 and MRE11 focus enumeration. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of 49 Gy partial body irradiated minipigs were found to display 1-8 DNA damage foci/cell. These PBL values significantly deceed the high foci numbers observed in keratinocyte nuclei of the directly ?-irradiated minipig skin regions, indicating a limited resident time of PBL in the exposed tissue volume. Nonetheless, PBL samples obtained 4 h post IR in average contained 2.2% of cells displaying a pan-?H2AX signal, suggesting that these received a higher IR dose. Moreover, dispersion analysis indicated partial body irradiation for all 13 minipigs at 4 h post IR. While dose reconstruction using ?H2AX DNA repair foci in lymphocytes after in vivo PBI represents a challenge, the DNA damage focus assay may serve as a rapid, first line indicator of radiation exposure. The occurrence of PBLs with pan-?H2AX staining and of cells with relatively high foci numbers that skew a Poisson distribution may be taken as indicator of acute high dose partial body irradiation, particularly when samples are available early after IR exposure. PMID:24498326

  18. The molecular characterization of a depurinated trial DNA sample can be a model to understand the reliability of the results in forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, Paolo; Previderè, Carlo; Sorçaburu-Cigliero, Solange; Marrubini, Giorgio; Alù, Milena; Barbaro, Anna M; Carnevali, Eugenia; Carracedo, Angel; Casarino, Lucia; Consoloni, Lara; Corato, Silvia; Domenici, Ranieri; Fabbri, Matteo; Giardina, Emiliano; Grignani, Pierangela; Baldassarra, Stefania Lonero; Moratti, Marco; Nicolin, Vanessa; Pelotti, Susi; Piccinini, Andrea; Pitacco, Paola; Plizza, Laura; Resta, Nicoletta; Ricci, Ugo; Robino, Carlo; Salvaderi, Luca; Scarnicci, Francesca; Schneider, Peter M; Seidita, Gregorio; Trizzino, Lucia; Turchi, Chiara; Turrina, Stefania; Vatta, Paolo; Vecchiotti, Carla; Verzeletti, Andrea; De Stefano, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    The role of DNA damage in PCR processivity/fidelity is a relevant topic in molecular investigation of aged/forensic samples. In order to reproduce one of the most common lesions occurring in postmortem tissues, a new protocol based on aqueous hydrolysis of the DNA was developed in vitro. Twenty-five forensic laboratories were then provided with 3.0 ?g of a trial sample (TS) exhibiting, in mean, the loss of 1 base of 20, and a molecular weight below 300 bp. Each participating laboratory could freely choose any combination of methods, leading to the quantification and to the definition of the STR profile of the TS, through the documentation of each step of the analytical approaches selected. The results of the TS quantification by qPCR showed significant differences in the amount of DNA recorded by the participating laboratories using different commercial kits. These data show that only DNA quantification "relative" to the used kit (probe) is possible, being the "absolute" amount of DNA inversely related to the length of the target region (r(2) = 0.891). In addition, our results indicate that the absence of a shared stable and certified reference quantitative standard is also likely involved. STR profiling was carried out selecting five different commercial kits and amplifying the TS for a total number of 212 multiplex PCRs, thus representing an interesting overview of the different analytical protocols used by the participating laboratories. Nine laboratories decided to characterize the TS using a single kit, with a number of amplifications varying from 2 to 12, obtaining only partial STR profiles. Most of the participants determined partial or full profiles using a combination of two or more kits, and a number of amplifications varying from 2 to 27. The performance of each laboratory was described in terms of number of correctly characterized loci, dropped-out markers, unreliable genotypes, and incorrect results. The incidence of unreliable and incorrect genotypes was found to be higher for participants carrying out a limited number of amplifications, insufficient to define the correct genotypes from damaged DNA samples such as the TS. Finally, from a dataset containing about 4500 amplicons, the frequency of PCR artifacts (allele dropout, allele drop-in, and allelic imbalance) was calculated for each kit showing that the new chemistry of the kits is not able to overcome the concern of template-related factors. The results of this collaborative exercise emphasize the advantages of using a standardized degraded DNA sample in the definition of which analytical parameters are critical for the outcome of the STR profiles. PMID:25176610

  19. Microsatellite-Based Parentage Analysis of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Using Nonlethal DNA Sampling

    PubMed Central

    WONG, JACKLYN; CHU, YUI YIN; STODDARD, STEVEN T.; LEE, YOOSOOK; MORRISON, AMY C.; SCOTT, THOMAS W.

    2012-01-01

    To track Aedes aegypti (L.) egg-laying behavior in the field in Iquitos, Peru, we developed methods for 1) sampling DNA from live mosquitoes and 2) high through-put parentage analysis using microsatellite markers. We were able to amplify DNA extracted from a single hind leg, but not from the pupal exuvia. Removal of a leg from teneral females caused no significant changes in female behavioral or life history traits (e.g., longevity, blood feeding frequency, fecundity, egg hatch rate, gonotrophic cycle length, or oviposition behavior). Using a panel of nine microsatellite markers and an exclusion-based software program, we matched offspring to parental pairs in 10 Ae. aegypti test families in which parents originated from natural development sites in Iquitos. By mating known individuals in the laboratory, retaining the male, sampling the female’s DNA before release, and collecting offspring in the field, the technique we developed can be used to genotype large numbers of Ae. aegypti, reconstruct family relationships, and track the egg-laying behavior of individual Ae. aegypti in nature. PMID:22308775

  20. Automation and integration of multiplexed on-line sample preparation with capillary electrophoresis for DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.

    1999-03-31

    The purpose of this research is to develop a multiplexed sample processing system in conjunction with multiplexed capillary electrophoresis for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The concept from DNA template to called bases was first demonstrated with a manually operated single capillary system. Later, an automated microfluidic system with 8 channels based on the same principle was successfully constructed. The instrument automatically processes 8 templates through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in a parallel fashion. A multiplexed freeze/thaw switching principle and a distribution network were implemented to manage flow direction and sample transportation. Dye-labeled terminator cycle-sequencing reactions are performed in an 8-capillary array in a hot air thermal cycler. Subsequently, the sequencing ladders are directly loaded into a corresponding size-exclusion chromatographic column operated at {approximately} 60 C for purification. On-line denaturation and stacking injection for capillary electrophoresis is simultaneously accomplished at a cross assembly set at {approximately} 70 C. Not only the separation capillary array but also the reaction capillary array and purification columns can be regenerated after every run. DNA sequencing data from this system allow base calling up to 460 bases with accuracy of 98%.

  1. A noninvasive hair sampling technique to obtain high quality DNA from elusive small mammals.

    PubMed

    Henry, Philippe; Henry, Alison; Russello, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Noninvasive genetic sampling approaches are becoming increasingly important to study wildlife populations. A number of studies have reported using noninvasive sampling techniques to investigate population genetics and demography of wild populations. This approach has proven to be especially useful when dealing with rare or elusive species. While a number of these methods have been developed to sample hair, feces and other biological material from carnivores and medium-sized mammals, they have largely remained untested in elusive small mammals. In this video, we present a novel, inexpensive and noninvasive hair snare targeted at an elusive small mammal, the American pika (Ochotona princeps). We describe the general set-up of the hair snare, which consists of strips of packing tape arranged in a web-like fashion and placed along travelling routes in the pikas' habitat. We illustrate the efficiency of the snare at collecting a large quantity of hair that can then be collected and brought back to the lab. We then demonstrate the use of the DNA IQ system (Promega) to isolate DNA and showcase the utility of this method to amplify commonly used molecular markers including nuclear microsatellites, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), mitochondrial sequences (800bp) as well as a molecular sexing marker. Overall, we demonstrate the utility of this novel noninvasive hair snare as a sampling technique for wildlife population biologists. We anticipate that this approach will be applicable to a variety of small mammals, opening up areas of investigation within natural populations, while minimizing impact to study organisms. PMID:21445038

  2. A DNA pooling based system to detect Escherichia coli virulence factors in fecal and wastewater samples

    PubMed Central

    Luz María Chacón, J; Lizeth Taylor, C; Carmen Valiente, A; Irene Alvarado, P; Ximena Cortés, B

    2012-01-01

    The availability of a useful tool for simple and timely detection of the most important virulent varieties of Escherichia coli is indispensable. To this end, bacterial DNA pools which had previously been categorized were obtained from isolated colonies as well as selected in terms of utilized phenotype; the pools were assessed by two PCR Multiplex for the detection of virulent E. coli eaeA, bfpA, stx1, stx2, ipaH, ST, LT, and aatA genes, with the 16S gene used as DNA control. The system was validated with 66 fecal samples and 44 wastewater samples. At least one positive isolate was detected by a virulent gene among the 20 that were screened. The analysis of fecal samples from children younger than 6 years of age detected frequencies of 25% LT positive strains, 8.3% eae, 8.3% bfpA, 16.7% ipaH, as well as 12.5 % aatA and ST. On the other hand, wastewater samples revealed frequencies of 25.7% eaeA positive, 30.3% stx1, 15.1% LT and 19.7% aatA. This study is an initial step toward carrying out epidemiological field research that will reveal the presence of these bacterial varieties. PMID:24031959

  3. The importance of Guthrie cards and other medical samples for the direct matching of disaster victims using DNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Hartman, D; Benton, L; Morenos, L; Beyer, J; Spiden, M; Stock, A

    2011-02-25

    The identification of disaster victims through the use of DNA analysis is an integral part of any Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) response, regardless of the scale and nature of the disaster. As part of the DVI response to the 2009 Victorian Bushfires Disaster, DNA analysis was performed to assist in the identification of victims through kinship (familial matching to relatives) or direct (self source sample) matching of DNA profiles. Although most of the DNA identifications achieved were to reference samples from relatives, there were a number of DNA identifications (12) made through direct matching. Guthrie cards, which have been collected in Australia over the past 30 years, were used to provide direct reference samples. Of the 236 ante-mortem (AM) samples received, 21 were Guthrie cards and one was a biopsy specimen; all yielding complete DNA profiles when genotyped. This publication describes the use of such Biobanks and medical specimens as a sample source for the recovery of good quality DNA for comparisons to post-mortem (PM) samples. PMID:20691551

  4. Antibiotic Resistance Genes in the Bacteriophage DNA Fraction of Human Fecal Samples

    PubMed Central

    Quirós, Pablo; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Martínez-Castillo, Alexandre; Miró, Elisenda; Argente, Marc; Jofre, Juan; Navarro, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    A group of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (blaTEM, blaCTX-M-1, mecA, armA, qnrA, and qnrS) were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) in bacteriophage DNA isolated from feces from 80 healthy humans. Seventy-seven percent of the samples were positive in phage DNA for one or more ARGs. blaTEM, qnrA, and, blaCTX-M-1 were the most abundant, and armA, qnrS, and mecA were less prevalent. Free bacteriophages carrying ARGs may contribute to the mobilization of ARGs in intra- and extraintestinal environments. PMID:24165177

  5. Detection of pyrethroid pesticides and their environmental degradation products in duplicate diet samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract is for an oral presentation at the Asilomar Conference on Mass Spectrometry: Mass Spectrometry in Environmental Chemistry, Toxicology, and Health. It describes analytical method development and sample results for determination of pyrethroid pesticides and environme...

  6. Reverse Sample Genome Probing, a New Technique for Identification of Bacteria in Environmental Samples by DNA Hybridization, and Its Application to the Identification of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Oil Field Samples

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, Gerrit; Voordouw, Johanna K.; Karkhoff-Schweizer, Roxann R.; Fedorak, Phillip M.; Westlake, Donald W. S.

    1991-01-01

    A novel method for the identification of bacteria in environmental samples by DNA hybridization is presented. It is based on the fact that, even within a genus, the genomes of different bacteria may have little overall sequence homology. This allows the use of the labeled genomic DNA of a given bacterium (referred to as a “standard”) to probe for its presence and that of bacteria with highly homologous genomes in total DNA obtained from an environmental sample. Alternatively, total DNA extracted from the sample can be labeled and used to probe filters on which denatured chromosomal DNA from relevant bacterial standards has been spotted. The latter technique is referred to as reverse sample genome probing, since it is the reverse of the usual practice of deriving probes from reference bacteria for analyzing a DNA sample. Reverse sample genome probing allows identification of bacteria in a sample in a single step once a master filter with suitable standards has been developed. Application of reverse sample genome probing to the identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in 31 samples obtained primarily from oil fields in the province of Alberta has indicated that there are at least 20 genotypically different sulfate-reducing bacteria in these samples. Images PMID:16348574

  7. Determination of linear alkylbenzenesulfonates and their degradation products in water samples by gas chromatography with ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ding, W H; Lo, J H; Tzing, S H

    1998-09-01

    A method was developed for the analysis of linear alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS) and their degradation products, sulfophenylcarboxylic acids (SPC), in samples of sewage effluent and river water. This method involved extraction of the samples by graphitized carbon black cartridge, esterification by a two-step thionyl chloride-trifluoroethanol derivatization procedure, and separation, identification and quantitation by ion-trap GC-MS with EI and low pressure CI modes. High selectivity with few signals was observed in the low pressure CI mass spectra of LAS and SPC. Enhanced sensitivity with protonated molecular ion chromatograms of homologous C10-C13 LAS by CI-MS permit the determination of LAS and SPC at trace concentrations in environmental samples. Recovery rates of LAS and SPC in spiked water samples ranged from 75 to 112% with R.S.D. values from 3 to 26%. The limit of quantitation for both LAS and SPC was estimated to be 0.01 microgram/l in 100 ml of water sample. PMID:9770311

  8. Dry sampling of gas-phase isocyanates and isocyanate aerosols from thermal degradation of polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Gylestam, Daniel; Riddar, Jakob B; Karlsson, Daniel; Dahlin, Jakob; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    The performance of a dry sampler, with an impregnated denuder in series with a glass fibre filter, using di-n-butylamine (DBA) for airborne isocyanates (200ml min(-1)) is investigated and compared with an impinger flask with a glass fibre filter in series (1 l min(-1)). An exposure chamber containing 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI), and 2,4- and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate (TDI) in the concentration range of 5-205 ?g m(-3) [0.7-33 p.p.b.; relative humidity (RH) 50%], generated by gas- and liquid-phase permeation, was used for the investigation. The precision for the dry sampling for five series with eight samplers were in the range of 2.0-6.1% with an average of 3.8%. During 120-min sampling (n = 4), no breakthrough was observed when analysing samplers in series. Sixty-four exposed samplers were analysed after storage for 0, 7, 14, and 21 days. No breakdown of isocyanate derivatives was observed. Twenty-eight samplers in groups of eight were collecting isocyanates during 0.5-32h. Virtually linear relationships were obtained with regard to sampling time and collected isocyanates with correlation coefficients in the range of 0.998-0.999 with the intercept close to the origin. Pre- or post-exposure to ambient air did not affect the result. Dry sampling (n = 48) with impinger-filter sampling (n = 48) of thermal decomposition product of polyurethane polymers, at RH 20, 40, 60, and 90%, was compared for 11 isocyanate compounds. The ratio between the different isocyanates collected with dry samplers and impinger-filter samplers was in the range of 0.80-1.14 for RH = 20%, 0.8-1.25 for RH = 40%, 0.76-1.4 for RH = 60%, and 0.72-3.7 for RH = 90%. Taking into account experimental errors, it seems clear that isocyanic acid DBA derivatives are found at higher levels in the dry samples compared with impinger-filter samplers at elevated humidity. The dry sampling using DBA as the reagent enables easy and robust sampling without the need of field extraction. PMID:23960047

  9. Selective Nucleic Acid Removal via Exclusion (SNARE): Capturing mRNA and DNA from a single sample

    PubMed Central

    Strotman, Lindsay; O’Connell, Rachel; Casavant, Benjamin P.; Berry, Scott M.; Sperger, Jamie M.; Lang, Joshua M.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The path from gene (DNA) to gene product (RNA or protein) is the foundation of genotype giving rise to phenotype. Comparison of genomic analyses (DNA) with paired transcriptomic studies (mRNA) is critical to evaluating the pathogenic processes that give rise to human disease. The ability to analyze both DNA and mRNA from the same sample is not only important for biologic interrogation but also to minimize variance (e.g. sample loss) unrelated to the biology. Existing methods for RNA and DNA purification from a single sample are typically time consuming and labor intensive or require large sample sizes to split for separate RNA and DNA extraction procedures. Thus, there is a need for more efficient and cost effective methods to purify both RNA and DNA from a single sample. To address this need, we have developed a technique, termed SNARE (Selective Nucleic Acid Removal via Exclusion), that uses pinned oil interfaces to simultaneous purify mRNA and DNA from a single sample. A unique advantage of SNARE is the elimination of dilutive wash and centrifugation processes that are fundamental to conventional methods where sample is typically discarded. This minimizes loss and maximizes recovery by allowing non-dilutive re-interrogation of the sample. We demonstrate that SNARE is more sensitive than commercially available kits; robustly and repeatably achieving mRNA and DNA purification from extremely low numbers of cells for downstream analyses. In addition to sensitivity, SNARE is fast, easy to use, cost-effective and requires no laboratory infrastructure or hazardous chemicals. We demonstrate the clinical utility of the SNARE with prostate cancer circulating tumor cells to demonstrate its ability to perform both genomic and transcriptomic interrogation on rare cell populations that would be difficult to achieve with any current method. PMID:24016179

  10. Quantification of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutations for DNA samples in the low picogram range by nested real-time ARMS-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Stefania; Bortot, Barbara; Carrozzi, Marco; Severini, Giovanni Maria

    2011-06-01

    In many mitochondrial diseases, different clinical manifestations are related to tissue-specific distribution of mutated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In this study, we describe an assay for the determination of mutated mtDNA copy number in small clinical samples, using standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by SYBR Green real-time allelic-specific PCR [amplification refractory mutation system-quantitative PCR (ARMS-qPCR)]. To assess the degree of heteroplasmy in a patient harboring 2 cosegregating mtDNA mutations (4415A>G and 9922A>C) starting from picogram amounts of DNA, we first amplified the mutated target sequence by standard PCR, and then analyzed it by real-time ARMS-qPCR. To validate this method, we analyzed by real-time ARMS-qPCR the PCR amplification products derived from different mixtures containing known proportions of mutant and wild-type cloned mtDNA fragments. The correlation coefficient of 0.994 between expected and observed values for the percentage of mutant A4415G confirms that the relative proportion of mutated and wild-type mtDNA was maintained after the first PCR amplification. This method allows the precise quantification of heteroplasmic mutations in DNA samples extracted from hairs, urine, small stomach biopsies, and, more importantly, single-muscle fiber, with a limit of detection close to 0.5%. This nested real-time ARMS-PCR represents a rapid, efficient, and less expensive method for the detection and quantification of heteroplasmic mutant mtDNA, even in very small clinical samples. PMID:21532488

  11. Comparison of Eleven Methods for Genomic DNA Extraction Suitable for Large-Scale Whole-Genome Genotyping and Long-Term DNA Banking Using Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Psifidi, Androniki; Dovas, Chrysostomos I.; Bramis, Georgios; Lazou, Thomai; Russel, Claire L.; Arsenos, Georgios; Banos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, next generation sequencing and microarray technologies have revolutionized scientific research with their applications to high-throughput analysis of biological systems. Isolation of high quantities of pure, intact, double stranded, highly concentrated, not contaminated genomic DNA is prerequisite for successful and reliable large scale genotyping analysis. High quantities of pure DNA are also required for the creation of DNA-banks. In the present study, eleven different DNA extraction procedures, including phenol-chloroform, silica and magnetic beads based extractions, were examined to ascertain their relative effectiveness for extracting DNA from ovine blood samples. The quality and quantity of the differentially extracted DNA was subsequently assessed by spectrophotometric measurements, Qubit measurements, real-time PCR amplifications and gel electrophoresis. Processing time, intensity of labor and cost for each method were also evaluated. Results revealed significant differences among the eleven procedures and only four of the methods yielded satisfactory outputs. These four methods, comprising three modified silica based commercial kits (Modified Blood, Modified Tissue, Modified Dx kits) and an in-house developed magnetic beads based protocol, were most appropriate for extracting high quality and quantity DNA suitable for large-scale microarray genotyping and also for long-term DNA storage as demonstrated by their successful application to 600 individuals. PMID:25635817

  12. Expanding Character Sampling for Ciliate Phylogenetic Inference Using Mitochondrial SSU-rDNA as a Molecular Marker

    PubMed Central

    Dunthorn, Micah; Foissner, Wilhelm; Katz, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular systematics of ciliates, particularly at deep nodes, has largely focused on increasing taxon sampling using the nuclear small subunit rDNA (nSSU-rDNA) locus. These previous analyses have generally been congruent with morphologically-based classifications, although there is extensive non-monophyly at many levels. However, caution is needed in interpreting these results as nSSU-rDNA is just a single molecular marker. Here the mitochondrial small subunit rDNA (mtSSU-rDNA) is evaluated for deep ciliate nodes using the Colpodea as an example. Overall, well-supported nodes in the mtSSU-rDNA and concatenated topologies are well supported in the nSSU-rDNA topology; e.g., the non-monophyly of the Cyrtolophosidida. The two moderately-to well-supported incongruences between the loci are the placement of the Sorogenida and Colpoda aspera. Our analyses of mtSSU-rDNA support the conclusion, originally derived from nSSU-rDNA, that the morphological characters used in taxonomic circumscriptions of the Colpodea represent a mixture of ancestral and derived states. This demonstration of the efficacy of the mtSSU-rDNA will enable phylogenetic reconstructions of deep nodes in the ciliate tree of life to move from a single-locus to a multi-locus approach. PMID:20708960

  13. Effects of sampling conditions on DNA-based estimates of American black bear abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laufenberg, Jared S.; Van Manen, Frank T.; Clark, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    DNA-based capture-mark-recapture techniques are commonly used to estimate American black bear (Ursus americanus) population abundance (N). Although the technique is well established, many questions remain regarding study design. In particular, relationships among N, capture probability of heterogeneity mixtures A and B (pA and pB, respectively, or p, collectively), the proportion of each mixture (?), number of capture occasions (k), and probability of obtaining reliable estimates of N are not fully understood. We investigated these relationships using 1) an empirical dataset of DNA samples for which true N was unknown and 2) simulated datasets with known properties that represented a broader array of sampling conditions. For the empirical data analysis, we used the full closed population with heterogeneity data type in Program MARK to estimate N for a black bear population in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee. We systematically reduced the number of those samples used in the analysis to evaluate the effect that changes in capture probabilities may have on parameter estimates. Model-averaged N for females and males were 161 (95% CI?=?114–272) and 100 (95% CI?=?74–167), respectively (pooled N?=?261, 95% CI?=?192–419), and the average weekly p was 0.09 for females and 0.12 for males. When we reduced the number of samples of the empirical data, support for heterogeneity models decreased. For the simulation analysis, we generated capture data with individual heterogeneity covering a range of sampling conditions commonly encountered in DNA-based capture-mark-recapture studies and examined the relationships between those conditions and accuracy (i.e., probability of obtaining an estimated N that is within 20% of true N), coverage (i.e., probability that 95% confidence interval includes true N), and precision (i.e., probability of obtaining a coefficient of variation ?20%) of estimates using logistic regression. The capture probability for the larger of 2 mixture proportions of the population (i.e., pA or pB, depending on the value of ?) was most important for predicting accuracy and precision, whereas capture probabilities of both mixture proportions (pA and pB) were important to explain variation in coverage. Based on sampling conditions similar to parameter estimates from the empirical dataset (pA?=?0.30, pB?=?0.05, N?=?250, ??=?0.15, and k?=?10), predicted accuracy and precision were low (60% and 53%, respectively), whereas coverage was high (94%). Increasing pB, the capture probability for the predominate but most difficult to capture proportion of the population, was most effective to improve accuracy under those conditions. However, manipulation of other parameters may be more effective under different conditions. In general, the probabilities of obtaining accurate and precise estimates were best when p??0.2. Our regression models can be used by managers to evaluate specific sampling scenarios and guide development of sampling frameworks or to assess reliability of DNA-based capture-mark-recapture studies.

  14. Initial clinical laboratory experience in noninvasive prenatal testing for fetal aneuploidy from maternal plasma DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    Futch, Tracy; Spinosa, John; Bhatt, Sucheta; de Feo, Eileen; Rava, Richard P; Sehnert, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to report the experience of noninvasive prenatal DNA testing using massively parallel sequencing in an accredited clinical laboratory. Methods Laboratory information was examined for blood samples received for testing between February and November 2012 for chromosome 21 (Chr21), Chr18, and Chr13. Monosomy X (MX) testing was available from July 2012 for cystic hygroma indication. Outcomes were collected from providers on samples with positive results. Results There were 5974 samples tested, and results were issued within an average of 5.1 business days. Aneuploidy was detected in 284 (4.8%) samples (155 Chr21, 66 Chr18, 19 Chr13, 40 MX, and four double aneuploidy). Follow-ups are available for 245/284 (86%), and 77/284 (27.1%) are confirmed, including one double-aneuploidy case concordant with cytogenetics from maternal malignancy. Fourteen (0.2%) discordant (putative false-positive) results (one Chr21, six Chr18, three Chr13, three MX, and one Chr21/13) have been identified. Five (0.08%) false-negative cases are reported (two trisomy 21, two trisomy 18, and one MX). In 170 (2.8%) cases, the result for a single chromosome was indefinite. Conclusions This report suggests that clinical testing of maternal cell-free DNA for fetal aneuploidy operates within performance parameters established in validation studies. Noninvasive prenatal testing is sensitive to biological contributions from placental and maternal sources. ©2013 Verinata Health, Inc. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23592485

  15. A novel methyl-binding domain protein enrichment method for identifying genome-wide tissue-specific DNA methylation from nanogram DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests that DNA methylation plays a role in tissue-specific differentiation. Current approaches to methylome analysis using enrichment with the methyl-binding domain protein (MBD) are restricted to large (?1 ?g) DNA samples, limiting the analysis of small tissue samples. Here we present a technique that enables characterization of genome-wide tissue-specific methylation patterns from nanogram quantities of DNA. Results We have developed a methodology utilizing MBD2b/MBD3L1 enrichment for methylated DNA, kinase pre-treated ligation-mediated PCR amplification (MeKL) and hybridization to the comprehensive high-throughput array for relative methylation (CHARM) customized tiling arrays, which we termed MeKL-chip. Kinase modification in combination with the addition of PEG has increased ligation-mediated PCR amplification over 20-fold, enabling >400-fold amplification of starting DNA. We have shown that MeKL-chip can be applied to as little as 20 ng of DNA, enabling comprehensive analysis of small DNA samples. Applying MeKL-chip to the mouse retina (a limited tissue source) and brain, 2,498 tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs) were characterized. The top five T-DMRs (Rgs20, Hes2, Nfic, Cckbr and Six3os1) were validated by pyrosequencing. Conclusions MeKL-chip enables genome-wide methylation analysis of nanogram quantities of DNA with a wide range of observed-to-expected CpG ratios due to the binding properties of the MBD2b/MBD3L1 protein complex. This methodology enabled the first analysis of genome-wide methylation in the mouse retina, characterizing novel T-DMRs. PMID:23759032

  16. The effect of pharmaceutical waste-fungal biomass, treated to degrade DNA, on the composition of eubacterial and ammonia oxidizing populations of soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Teresa Ceccherini; Judith Ascher; Giacomo Pietramellara; Stefano Mocali; Carlo Viti; Paolo Nannipieri

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study variations in the composition of eubacteria and ammonia-oxidizing populations of soil, both\\u000a determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), after the addition of a pharmaceutical fungal biomass, treated\\u000a to degrade its DNA. This waste can be used as an amendment. The fungal biomass waste was added at three rates: 0.05, 0.1,\\u000a and

  17. Developmental toxicity and DNA damage from exposure to parking lot runoff retention pond samples in the Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Meryl D.; Kwok, Kevin W.H.; Brandon, Jennifer A.; Warren, Isaac H.; Ryde, Ian T.; Cooper, Ellen M.; Hinton, David E.; Rittschof, Daniel; Meyer, Joel N.

    2015-01-01

    Parking lot runoff retention ponds (PLRRP) receive significant chemical input, but the biological effects of parking lot runoff are not well understood. We used the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model to study the toxicity of water and sediment samples from a PLRRP in Morehead City, NC. Medaka exposed in ovo to a dilution series of PLRRP water had increased odds of death before hatching, but not teratogenesis or delayed hatching. Next, we adapted a long-amplicon quantitative PCR (LA-QPCR) assay for DNA damage for use with the Japanese medaka. We employed LA-QPCR to test the hypotheses that PLRRP water and sediments would cause nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage with and without full-spectrum, natural solar radiation. Fluoranthene with and without natural sunlight was a positive control for phototoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced DNA damage. Fluoranthene exposure did not result in detectable DNA damage by itself, but in combination with sunlight caused significant DNA damage to both genomes. PLRRP samples caused DNA damage to both genomes, and this was not increased by sunlight exposure, suggesting the DNA damage was unlikely the result of PAH phototoxicity. We report for the first time that PLRRP-associated pollutants cause both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, and that fluoranthene-mediated phototoxicity results in similar levels of damage to the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. These effects may be especially significant in sensitive marine ecosystems. PMID:24816191

  18. Developmental toxicity and DNA damage from exposure to parking lot runoff retention pond samples in the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Colton, Meryl D; Kwok, Kevin W H; Brandon, Jennifer A; Warren, Isaac H; Ryde, Ian T; Cooper, Ellen M; Hinton, David E; Rittschof, Daniel; Meyer, Joel N

    2014-08-01

    Parking lot runoff retention ponds (PLRRP) receive significant chemical input, but the biological effects of parking lot runoff are not well understood. We used the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model to study the toxicity of water and sediment samples from a PLRRP in Morehead City, NC. Medaka exposed in ovo to a dilution series of PLRRP water had increased odds of death before hatching, but not teratogenesis or delayed hatching. Next, we adapted a long-amplicon quantitative PCR (LA-QPCR) assay for DNA damage for use with the Japanese medaka. We employed LA-QPCR to test the hypotheses that PLRRP water and sediments would cause nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage with and without full-spectrum, natural solar radiation. Fluoranthene with and without natural sunlight was a positive control for phototoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced DNA damage. Fluoranthene exposure did not result in detectable DNA damage by itself, but in combination with sunlight caused significant DNA damage to both genomes. PLRRP samples caused DNA damage to both genomes, and this was not increased by sunlight exposure, suggesting the DNA damage was unlikely the result of PAH phototoxicity. We report for the first time that PLRRP-associated pollutants cause both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, and that fluoranthene-mediated phototoxicity results in similar levels of damage to the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. These effects may be especially significant in sensitive marine ecosystems. PMID:24816191

  19. Methyllysine Reader Plant Homeodomain (PHD) Finger Protein 20-like 1 (PHF20L1) Antagonizes DNA (Cytosine-5) Methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Estève, Pierre-Olivier; Terragni, Jolyon; Deepti, Kanneganti; Chin, Hang Gyeong; Dai, Nan; Espejo, Alexsandra; Corrêa, Ivan R.; Bedford, Mark T.; Pradhan, Sriharsa

    2014-01-01

    Inheritance of DNA cytosine methylation pattern during successive cell division is mediated by maintenance DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). Lysine 142 of DNMT1 is methylated by the SET domain containing lysine methyltransferase 7 (SET7), leading to its degradation by proteasome. Here we show that PHD finger protein 20-like 1 (PHF20L1) regulates DNMT1 turnover in mammalian cells. Malignant brain tumor (MBT) domain of PHF20L1 binds to monomethylated lysine 142 on DNMT1 (DNMT1K142me1) and colocalizes at the perinucleolar space in a SET7-dependent manner. PHF20L1 knockdown by siRNA resulted in decreased amounts of DNMT1 on chromatin. Ubiquitination of DNMT1K142me1 was abolished by overexpression of PHF20L1, suggesting that its binding may block proteasomal degradation of DNMT1K142me1. Conversely, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PHF20L1 or incubation of a small molecule MBT domain binding inhibitor in cultured cells accelerated the proteasomal degradation of DNMT1. These results demonstrate that the MBT domain of PHF20L1 reads and controls enzyme levels of methylated DNMT1 in cells, thus representing a novel antagonist of DNMT1 degradation. PMID:24492612

  20. The PFA-AMeX method achieves a good balance between the morphology of tissues and the quality of RNA content in DNA microarray analysis with laser-capture microdissection samples.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Kato, Atsuhiko; Terashima, Hiromichi; Matsubara, Koichi; Chen, Yu Jau; Adachi, Kenji; Mizuno, Hideaki; Suzuki, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Recently, large-scale gene expression profiling is often performed using RNA extracted from unfixed frozen or formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples. However, both types of samples have drawbacks in terms of the morphological preservation and RNA quality. In the present study, we investigated 30 human prostate tissues using the PFA-AMeX method (fixation using paraformaldehyde (PFA) followed by embedding in paraffin by AMeX) with a DNA microarray combined with laser-capture microdissection. Morphologically, in contrast to the case of atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, loss of basal cells in prostate adenocarcinomas was as obvious in PFA-AMeX samples as in FFPE samples. As for quality, the loss of rRNA peaks 18S and 28S on the capillary electropherograms from both FFPE and PFA-AMeX samples showed that the RNA was degraded equally during processing. However, qRT-PCR with 3' and 5' primer sets designed against human beta-actin revealed that, although RNA degradation occurred in both methods, it occurred more mildly in the PFA-AMeX samples. In conclusion, the PFA-AMeX method is good with respect to morphology and RNA quality, which makes it a promising tool for DNA microarrays combined with laser-capture microdissection, and if the appropriate RNA quality criteria are used, the capture of credible GeneChip data is well over 80% efficient, at least in human prostate specimens. PMID:26023261

  1. Amplification of Mitochondrial COII Gene from DNA Extracted from Hair Samples in Some Species of New World Monkeys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariana S. Ascunce; Luciana Oklander; Marta D. Mudry

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays, non‐invasive genotyping of wild and captive animals is the challenge [Morin et al., 1994; Constable et al., 2001]. Our group has been working for years on genetics of New World monkeys (NWM), employing blood samples as a source of DNA [Delprat et al., 1992; Ascunce et al., 2002], but we wanted to use alternative samples, such as hair and

  2. Rapid Colorimetric Assays to Qualitatively Distinguish RNA and DNA in Biomolecular Samples

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Jennifer; Mura, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical experimentation generally requires accurate knowledge, at an early stage, of the nucleic acid, protein, and other biomolecular components in potentially heterogeneous specimens. Nucleic acids can be detected via several established approaches, including analytical methods that are spectrophotometric (e.g., A260), fluorometric (e.g., binding of fluorescent dyes), or colorimetric (nucleoside-specific chromogenic chemical reactions).1 Though it cannot readily distinguish RNA from DNA, the A260/A280 ratio is commonly employed, as it offers a simple and rapid2 assessment of the relative content of nucleic acid, which absorbs predominantly near 260 nm and protein, which absorbs primarily near 280 nm. Ratios < 0.8 are taken as indicative of 'pure' protein specimens, while pure nucleic acid (NA) is characterized by ratios > 1.53. However, there are scenarios in which the protein/NA content cannot be as clearly or reliably inferred from simple uv-vis spectrophotometric measurements. For instance, (i) samples may contain one or more proteins which are relatively devoid of the aromatic amino acids responsible for absorption at ?280 nm (Trp, Tyr, Phe), as is the case with some small RNA-binding proteins, and (ii) samples can exhibit intermediate A260/A280 ratios (~0.8 < ~1.5), where the protein/NA content is far less clear and may even reflect some high-affinity association between the protein and NA components. For such scenarios, we describe herein a suite of colorimetric assays to rapidly distinguish RNA, DNA, and reducing sugars in a potentially mixed sample of biomolecules. The methods rely on the differential sensitivity of pentoses and other carbohydrates to Benedict's, Bial's (orcinol), and Dische's (diphenylamine) reagents; the streamlined protocols can be completed in a matter of minutes, without any additional steps of having to isolate the components. The assays can be performed in parallel to differentiate between RNA and DNA, as well as indicate the presence of free reducing sugars such as glucose, fructose, and ribose (Figure 1). PMID:23407542

  3. Insights into biodiversity sampling strategies for freshwater microinvertebrate faunas through bioblitz campaigns and DNA barcoding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biodiversity surveys have long depended on traditional methods of taxonomy to inform sampling protocols and to determine when a representative sample of a given species pool of interest has been obtained. Questions remain as to how to design appropriate sampling efforts to accurately estimate total biodiversity. Here we consider the biodiversity of freshwater ostracods (crustacean class Ostracoda) from the region of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. Through an analysis of observed species richness and complementarity, accumulation curves, and richness estimators, we conduct an a posteriori analysis of five bioblitz-style collection strategies that differed in terms of total duration, number of sites, protocol flexibility to heterogeneous habitats, sorting of specimens for analysis, and primary purpose of collection. We used DNA barcoding to group specimens into molecular operational taxonomic units for comparison. Results Forty-eight provisional species were identified through genetic divergences, up from the 30 species previously known and documented in literature from the Churchill region. We found differential sampling efficiency among the five strategies, with liberal sorting of specimens for molecular analysis, protocol flexibility (and particularly a focus on covering diverse microhabitats), and a taxon-specific focus to collection having strong influences on garnering more accurate species richness estimates. Conclusions Our findings have implications for the successful design of future biodiversity surveys and citizen-science collection projects, which are becoming increasingly popular and have been shown to produce reliable results for a variety of taxa despite relying on largely untrained collectors. We propose that efficiency of biodiversity surveys can be increased by non-experts deliberately selecting diverse microhabitats; by conducting two rounds of molecular analysis, with the numbers of samples processed during round two informed by the singleton prevalence during round one; and by having sub-teams (even if all non-experts) focus on select taxa. Our study also provides new insights into subarctic diversity of freshwater Ostracoda and contributes to the broader “Barcoding Biotas” campaign at Churchill. Finally, we comment on the associated implications and future research directions for community ecology analyses and biodiversity surveys through DNA barcoding, which we show here to be an efficient technique enabling rapid biodiversity quantification in understudied taxa. PMID:23557180

  4. DNA binding specificity of ATAF2, a NAC domain transcription factor targeted for degradation by Tobacco mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Control of the host transcriptome represents a key battleground in the interaction of plants and pathogens. Specifically, plants have evolved complex defense systems that induce profound transcriptional changes in response to pathogen attack while pathogens have evolved mechanisms to subvert or disable these defenses. Several NAC transcription factors such as ATAF2 have been linked to plant defense responses, including those targeting viruses. The replication protein of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has been shown to interact with and target the degradation of ATAF2. These findings suggest that the transcriptional targets of ATAF2 are involved in defense against TMV. Results To detect potential ATAF2 transcriptional targets, a genomic pull-down assay was utilized to identify ATAF2 promoter binding sequences. Subsequent mobility shift and DNA footprinting assays identified a 30-bp ATAF2 binding sequence. An in vivo GUS reporter system confirmed the function of the identified 30-bp binding sequence as an ATAF2 specific transcriptional activator in planta. Gel filtration studies of purified ATAF2 protein and mutagenesis studies of the 30-bp binding sequence indicate ATAF2 functions as a dimer. Computational analysis of interacting promoter sequences identified a corresponding 25-bp A/T-rich consensus sequence with repeating [GC]AAA motifs. Upon ATAF2 induction real-time qRT-PCR studies confirmed the accumulation of select gene transcripts whose promoters contain this consensus sequence. Conclusion We report the identification of a cis-regulatory binding sequence for ATAF2. Different from other known NAC protein binding sequences, the A/T-rich ATAF2 binding motif represents a novel binding sequence for NAC family proteins. Combined this information represents a unique tool for the identification of ATAF2 target genes. PMID:22937923

  5. Development of tetranucleotide microsatellite loci and a non-invasive DNA sampling method for Texas horned lizards ( Phrynosoma cornutum )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dean A. Williams; Cory Leach; Amanda M. Hale; Kristopher B. Karsten; Emmanuela Mujica; Diane Barber; Lee Ann Linam; Nathan Rains

    We developed a non-invasive DNA sampling method and 15 tetranucleotide microsatellite markers for Texas horned lizards (Phrynosoma cornutum). Swabbing the cloaca with a small cotton swab and preserving the cells in lysis buffer was an effective method to obtain\\u000a tissue for DNA extraction. Loci were highly polymorphic with 8–25 alleles and observed heterozygosity was high (0.71–0.96).\\u000a Some of these loci

  6. Bacterial diversity in a soil sample from a subtropical Australian environment as determined by 16S rDNA analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. STACK; BRANIYr W. LIESACX; B. M. GOEBEL

    In order to investigate the genetic diver- sity of streptomycetes in an acid forested soil sample from Mt. Coot-tha, Brisbane, Australia, cells were mechani- cally lysed within the soil matrix and genomic DNA was isolated and purified. 16S ribosomal (r)DNA was am- plified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using one primer conserved for members of the domain Bacteria

  7. Note: Sample types that are not for use in the FESEM are, magnetic sample, liquid or oily sample, some epoxy samples if they out gas, or any sample that will degrade

    E-print Network

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    " and "EO Control" buttons, behind the left front door at the top, and. DO NOT TURN OFF THE COMPUTER for "Sample Exchange Chamber" lights in the "Chamber Vacuum" section to show a green light at the top. 8. Write in the log book, your name, advisor and MoCode, time started, and the SEM current Ip, (ion pump

  8. Piezoresistive microcantilever-based DNA sensor for sensitive detection of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae O1 in food sample.

    PubMed

    Khemthongcharoen, Numfon; Wonglumsom, Wijit; Suppat, Assawapong; Jaruwongrungsee, Kata; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Promptmas, Chamras

    2015-01-15

    Pathogenic Vibrio cholerae produces a cholera toxin which is the cause of a severe diarrheal disease called "Cholera". Available detection methods, including standard bacteriological test and immuno-based detection, are specific to the suspected pathogenic V. cholerae O1 and O139, but they are not specific to the cholera toxin producible strain. This work combined the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of cholera toxin gene, ctxA gene, and microcantilever-based DNA sensor to improve the sensitivity and specificity of detection. Gold coated microcantilever, 250 µm long and 50 µm wide, with an embedded polysilicon wire acting as a piezoresistive material was modified by a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) for immobilization of specific DNA probe via avidin layer on the surface. The avidin and 5' biotinylated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe concentrations were optimized for the immobilization at 50 µg/mL and 1 µM, respectively. The hybridization between ssDNA probe on this DNA sensor and target DNA creates nanomechanical bending and resistance change of piezoresistive material inside the beam. This microcantilever-based DNA sensor offers a detection sensitivity of 3.25 pg or 14 nM of DNA template for ctxA gene detection. The lowest number of V. cholerae O1 in food sample with and without the enrichment process that the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ctxA gene combined with this DNA sensor can detect is 0.835 and 835 cells/g, respectively. This detection sensitivity is 10 times higher than that of the conventional PCR method. PMID:25113053

  9. The impact of data degradation and sample size on the performance of two similarity coefficients used in behavioural linkage analysis.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Craig; Gauthier, Donna; Gauthier, Donald; Melnyk, Tamara; Musolino, Evanya

    2010-06-15

    In order to determine whether a series of unsolved crimes has been committed by the same offender, the police often must rely on an analysis of behavioural evidence. When carrying out this task, some type of similarity coefficient is typically relied on to assess the degree of behavioural stability and distinctiveness that exists across a set of crimes and questions inevitably arise as to which coefficient to use. In cases of juvenile sex offences, research has suggested that a taxonomic similarity index outperforms the most commonly used metric at the moment, Jaccard's coefficient, especially under conditions of data degradation (missing data). However, recent research has failed to replicate this result in cases of serial homicide and burglary, especially when relatively large sample sizes are used. The current study provides further support for these recent findings using adult serial sexual assault data. Across a range of conditions, the current study demonstrates that Jaccard's coefficient slightly outperforms the taxonomic similarity index on a measure of linking accuracy. Potential explanations for the results are provided, implications are discussed, and future research directions are presented. PMID:20456879

  10. Human sperm DNA integrity in normal and abnormal semen samples and its correlation with sperm characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. Varghese; F. M. Bragais; D. Mukhopadhyay; S. Kundu; M. Pal; A. K. Bhattacharyya; A. Agarwal

    2009-01-01

    Summary Reports indicate an increase in the incidence of DNA fragmentation in male factor infertility and its role in the outcome of assisted reproductive techniques (ART). However, reports are conflicting between the relationships of sperm DNA integrity with conventional semen parameters. We examined the relation- ship between conventional sperm parameters and DNA integrity using acridine orange (AO) test. The study

  11. Lack of reliability of nanotechnology in the of free plasma DNA in samples of patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies seek biological markers that give diagnostic and degree of tumor development. The aim of this study was to validate the determination of plasma DNA using nanotechnology (Nanovue™-NV) in samples of 80 patients with prostate cancer. Methods Blood samples of 80 patients of the Urology Ambulatory of Faculdade de Medicina do ABC with prostate cancer confirmed by anatomical-pathology criteria were analyzed. DNA extraction was performed using a GFX TM kit (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech, Inc, USA) following the adapted protocol. Plasma was subjected to centrifugation. Results There was a big difference between the first and the second value obtained by NanoVue Only two samples had no differences between duplicates. Maximum difference between duplicates was 38??g/mL. Average variation between 51 samples was 10.29??g/mL, although 21 samples had differences above this average. No correlation was observed between pDNA obtained by traditional spectrophotometry and by nanotechnology. Conclusion Determination of plasma DNA by nanotechnology was not reproducible. PMID:23311763

  12. New procedure for recovering extra- and intracellular DNA from marine sediment samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawi, M.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a ubiquitous biological compound in aquatic sediment and soil. Despite major methodological advances, analysis of DNA from sediment is still technically challenging, not just because of the co-elution of inhibitory substances, but also due to co-elution of extracellular DNA, which potentially leads to an overestimate of the actual diversity. Previous studies suggested that eDNA might play an important role in biogeochemical element cycling, horizontal gene transfer and stabilization of biofilm structures. Several protocols based on the precipitation of eDNA e.g. with CTAB and ethanol have already been published. However, using these methods we did not succeed in quantifying very low amounts of eDNA (e.g. <1?g eDNA/g dry wt) in marine sediment even when using DNA carriers like glycogen. Since the recovery of eDNA by precipitation strongly depends on its concentration, these previously published procedures are not adequate for deep biosphere sediment due to the low eDNA content. We have focused on the question whether eDNA could be a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for microbes in the subseafloor biosphere. Therefore we developed a new method for the (semi)-quantitative extraction of eDNA from sediment. The new extraction procedure is based on sequential washing of the sediment to remove simultaneously eDNA and microbial cells without lysing them. After separation of the cells by centrifugation, the eDNA was extracted from the supernatant and purified by adsorption onto a solid phase, followed by removal of the solids and subsequent elution of the pure eDNA. Intracellular DNA (iDNA) was extracted and purified from the cell pellet using a commercial DNA extraction kit. Additional to a very low detection limit and reproducible quantification, this new method allows separation and purification of both extracellular and intracellular DNA to an extent that inhibitors are removed and downstream applications like PCR can be performed. To evaluate the new extraction method two sediments with rather opposing composition were analyzed. Sediment from the South Pacific Gyre, the most oligotrophic oceanic region on earth and organic-rich Baltic Sea sediment (Northern Germany) were processed. Using this new procedure high purity genomic iDNA and eDNA with a molecular size range between 20 bp and 50k bp can be simultaneously recovered even from very oligotrophic sediment with very low cell abundances. The main fraction of recovered eDNA was suitable for downstream applications like PCR and had a molecular size that indicates minimal shearing. Despite about two decades of research many questions about deep subsurface life remain unanswered. The fact that microbes can be found even in deep oligotrophic marine sediment raises the fundamental questions of the types and availability of substrates and their biogeochemical cycling. This is the first study that provides evidence that eDNA is an important potential substrate for microorganisms in the deep biosphere. Also, our results show a link between cell counts and eDNA content, indicating that the eDNA pool in the investigated sediment consist mainly of microbial DNA. Comparative sequence analysis of extracted iDNA and eDNA will provide deeper insights into the origin and turnover of eDNA and the apparent microbial community composition in the deep biosphere.

  13. Detection of Bacillus anthracis DNA in Complex Soil and Air Samples Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Be, Nicholas A.; Thissen, James B.; Gardner, Shea N.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y.; Koshinsky, Heather; Ellingson, Sally R.; Brettin, Thomas S.; Jackson, Paul J.; Jaing, Crystal J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the potentially lethal etiologic agent of anthrax disease, and is a significant concern in the realm of biodefense. One of the cornerstones of an effective biodefense strategy is the ability to detect infectious agents with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity in the context of a complex sample background. The nature of the B. anthracis genome, however, renders specific detection difficult, due to close homology with B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. We therefore elected to determine the efficacy of next-generation sequencing analysis and microarrays for detection of B. anthracis in an environmental background. We applied next-generation sequencing to titrated genome copy numbers of B. anthracis in the presence of background nucleic acid extracted from aerosol and soil samples. We found next-generation sequencing to be capable of detecting as few as 10 genomic equivalents of B. anthracis DNA per nanogram of background nucleic acid. Detection was accomplished by mapping reads to either a defined subset of reference genomes or to the full GenBank database. Moreover, sequence data obtained from B. anthracis could be reliably distinguished from sequence data mapping to either B. cereus or B. thuringiensis. We also demonstrated the efficacy of a microbial census microarray in detecting B. anthracis in the same samples, representing a cost-effective and high-throughput approach, complementary to next-generation sequencing. Our results, in combination with the capacity of sequencing for providing insights into the genomic characteristics of complex and novel organisms, suggest that these platforms should be considered important components of a biosurveillance strategy. PMID:24039948

  14. Comparison of five commercial DNA extraction kits for the recovery of Francisella tularensis DNA from spiked soil samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris A. Whitehouse; Hannah E. Hottel

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the etiologic agent of the zoonotic disease tularemia and is thought to be maintained in the environment principally by various terrestrial and aquatic vertebrate animals. The organism is known to persist in water or mud for long periods of time and Francisella-specific DNA has been identified from water and soil. To gain a better understanding of the

  15. Detection of herpesvirus DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in vitreous samples from patients with necrotising retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, M; Siqueira, R; Freitas, N; Amorim, J; Bonjardim, C; Ferreira, P; Orefice, F; Kroon, E

    2001-01-01

    Aims—Viral uveitis and retinitis, usually caused by herpesviruses, are common in immunosuppressed patients. The diagnosis of viral anterior uveitis and retinitis is usually clinical. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been used for the diagnosis of some viral infections, especially those caused by herpesviruses. This paper reports the use of PCR in the diagnosis of viral retinitis in vitreous samples from Brazilian patients. Methods—PCR was used for the diagnosis of necrotising retinitis in vitreous samples from patients from the Hospital São Geraldo, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil. The vitreous samples were collected by paracentesis and stored until analysis. Samples were analysed by PCR using specific primers designed to amplify herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), varicella zoster virus (VZV), or human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In a case of anterior uveitis, PCR was performed with a sample from the anterior chamber. Results—Herpesvirus DNA was amplified in 11 of 17 samples. HCVM DNA was detected in nine samples but DNA from HSV-1 and VZV were detected only once each. Conclusion—These results strongly suggest that PCR could be used for a rapid complementary diagnosis of viral uveitis and retinitis. A prospective study to evaluate the PCR results, clinical evolution, and treatment is imperative to corroborate the real value of PCR in diagnosis and how it could help the clinicians' approach. Key Words: polymerase chain reaction • uveitis • retinitis PMID:11215276

  16. High Prevalence of Human Parvovirus B19 DNA in Myocardial Autopsy Samples from Subjects without Myocarditis or Dilative Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Thomas; Enders, Martin; Pollak, Stefan; Hahn, Ralph; Huzly, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 has been linked to a variety of cardiac diseases, as well as to erythema infectiosum, acute arthropathy, and fetal hydrops. A causal association between viral infection and cardiac disease was frequently postulated following the detection of B19 DNA by PCR in endomyocardial biopsy specimens. Since the lifelong persistence of B19 DNA in bone marrow, skin, synovia, tonsils, and liver was previously reported, the aim of our study was to investigate the possibility of asymptomatic B19 DNA persistence in heart tissue. Myocardial autopsy and postmortem blood samples were prospectively collected from 69 bodies sent to the Department of Forensic Medicine, Freiburg University Medical Center, for inquests. All study subjects were screened for B19-specific antibodies using a commercial enzyme immunoassay. Tissue samples were analyzed by real-time PCR for the presence of viral DNA. Since the presence of B19 genotype 2, known to have been circulating before 1960, would prove long-lasting persistence, the presence of the B19 genotype was retrospectively determined in seven of the study subjects by melting temperature analysis and sequencing of the PCR product. B19 DNA was found in myocardial samples from 46 of 48 seropositive and in none of 21 seronegative individuals. B19 genotype 1 was found in three patients born between 1950 and 1969. Genotype 2 was found in four patients born between 1927 and 1957. Our findings suggest lifelong persistence of B19 DNA in heart tissue. Thus, the detection of B19 DNA in myocardial biopsy specimens alone is not sufficient to postulate a relationship between B19 infection and cardiac disease. PMID:19005147

  17. Effects of ascorbic acid on sperm motility, viability, acrosome reaction and DNA integrity in teratozoospermic samples

    PubMed Central

    Fanaei, Hamed; Khayat, Samira; Halvaei, Iman; Ramezani, Vahid; Azizi, Yaser; Kasaeian, Amir; Mardaneh, Jalal; Parvizi, Mohammad Reza; Akrami, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress in teratozoospermic semen samples caused poor assisted reproductive techniques (ART) outcomes. Among antioxidants, ascorbic acid is a naturally occurring free radical scavenger and as such its presence assists various other mechanisms in decreasing numerous disruptive free radical processes. Objective: The main goal of this study was to evaluate potential protective effects of ascorbic acid supplementation during in vitro culture of teratozoospermic specimens. Materials and Methods: Teratozoospermic semen samples that collected from 15 volunteers were processed, centrifuged and incubated at 37oC until sperm swimmed-up. Supernatant was divided into four groups and incubated at 37oC for one hour under different experimental conditions: Control, 10 µm A23187, 600µm ascorbic acid and 10 µm A23187+600 µm ascorbic acid. After incubation sperm motility, viability, acrosome reaction, DNA damage and malondialdehyde levels were evaluated. Results: Our results indicated that after one hour incubation, ascorbic acid significantly reduced malondialdehyde level in ascorbic acid group (1.4±0.11 nmol/ml) compared to control group (1.58±0.13 nmol/ml) (p<0.001). At the end of incubation, progressive motility and viability in ascorbic acid group (64.5±8.8% and 80.3±6.4%, respectively) were significantly (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) higher than the control group (54.5±6.8% and 70.9±7.3%, respectively). A23187 significantly (p<0.0001) increased acrosome reaction in A23187 group (37.3±5.6%) compared to control group (8.5±3.2%) and this effect of A23187 attenuated by ascorbic acid in ascorbic acid+A23187 group (17.2±4.4%). DNA fragmentation in ascorbic acid group (20±4.1%) was significantly (p<0.001) lower than controls (28.9±4.6%). Conclusion: In vitro ascorbic acid supplementation during teratozoospermic semen processing for ART could protect teratozoospermic specimens against oxidative stress, and it could improve ART outcome. PMID:24799867

  18. Simultaneous assessment of the macrobiome and microbiome in a bulk sample of tropical arthropods through DNA metasystematics

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Joel; Shokralla, Shadi; Porter, Teresita M.; King, Ian; van Konynenburg, Steven; Janzen, Daniel H.; Hallwachs, Winnie; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Conventional assessments of ecosystem sample composition are based on morphology-based or DNA barcode identification of individuals. Both approaches are costly and time-consuming, especially when applied to the large number of specimens and taxa commonly included in ecological investigations. Next-generation sequencing approaches can overcome the bottleneck of individual specimen isolation and identification by simultaneously sequencing specimens of all taxa in a bulk mixture. Here we apply multiple parallel amplification primers, multiple DNA barcode markers, 454-pyrosequencing, and Illumina MiSeq sequencing to the same sample to maximize recovery of the arthropod macrobiome and the bacterial and other microbial microbiome of a bulk arthropod sample. We validate this method with a complex sample containing 1,066 morphologically distinguishable arthropods from a tropical terrestrial ecosystem with high taxonomic diversity. Multiamplicon next-generation DNA barcoding was able to recover sequences corresponding to 91% of the distinguishable individuals in a bulk environmental sample, as well as many species present as undistinguishable tissue. 454-pyrosequencing was able to recover 10 more families of arthropods and 30 more species than did conventional Sanger sequencing of each individual specimen. The use of other loci (16S and 18S ribosomal DNA gene regions) also added the detection of species of microbes associated with these terrestrial arthropods. This method greatly decreases the time and money necessary to perform DNA-based comparisons of biodiversity among ecosystem samples. This methodology opens the door to much cheaper and increased capacity for ecological and evolutionary studies applicable to a wide range of socio-economic issues, as well as a basic understanding of how the world works. PMID:24808136

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban air particulate matter: decadal and seasonal trends, chemical degradation, and sampling artifacts.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Christian; Niessner, Reinhard; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2003-07-01

    Aerosol filter samples collected at a major urban traffic junction (LKP) and at a suburban residential location (IWC) in the metropolitan area of Munich (Germany) throughout the years 2001 and 2002 have been analyzed for 12 of the 16 EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollutants by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The mean mass concentration of the sum of all investigated PAH in the sampled air at LKP (1.9-5.0 ng m(-3)) was roughly two times higher than at IWC (0.8-2.9 ng m(-3)), and at both locations it was about 2-3 times higher in winter (heating season) than in summer and spring or autumn. Comparisons with earlier measurement campaigns indicate a steep decrease of PAH abundance by almost an order of magnitude from 1980 to 1993 and a much slower decrease since then. Distinctly different seasonal trends and short-term fluctuations have been observed for semivolatile 3- and 4-ring PAH and for particle-bound 5- and 6-ring PAH. Based on systematic correlation analyses with a wide range of air quality parameters, most of the differences can be attributed to not only varying emissions but also chemical reactions with atmospheric oxidants which were found to play an important role. The results of denuder experiments prove that substantial degradation of the particularly toxic tracer benzo[a]pyrene and of the other investigated 5- and 6-ring PAH can occur during filter sampling and on airborne particles (formation of oxygenated and nitrated derivatives). Filter reaction artifacts are shown to lead to an underestimation of the actual PAH content of urban air particulate matter by up to 100% of the measurement value or more, with a near-linear dependence on ozone volume mixing ratio. The role and applicability of ozone as a tracer of atmospheric oxidizing capacity for particle-bound PAH is discussed and confirmed by comparison with earlier investigations and by complementary laboratory experiments (reaction kinetics and product studies). PMID:12875387

  20. Effects of the most common methods for the enhancement of latent fingerprints on DNA extraction from forensic samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Gino; M. Omedei

    The aim of the research was to understand if the use of chemicals compounds used to enhance latent fingerprints, might interfere with the extraction and amplification of DNA from biological samples on crime scenes. Only three methods were used: powders (black and white ones, used on non porous surfaces, and here applied on glass), cyanoacrylate (used on non porous surfaces,

  1. Evaluating the efficacy of various thermo-stable polymerases against co-extracted PCR inhibitors in ancient DNA samples

    E-print Network

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Evaluating the efficacy of various thermo-stable polymerases against co-extracted PCR inhibitors,41] witnessed by a sample cannot be controlled, co-purified PCR inhibitors remain as the greatest threat inhibitors can normally be confirmed visually as DNA extractions ranging from tinged yellow to dark brown

  2. Fungal DNA Detected in Blood Samples of Patients Who Received Contaminated Methylprednisolone Injections Reveals Increased Complexity of Causative Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanan; Armeanu, Emilian; DiVerniero, Richard; Lewis, Terri A.; Dobson, Richard C.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Roilides, Emmanuel; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Using Exserohilum rostratum-specific and panfungal real-time PCR, we studied 24 blood samples and 2 synovial fluid specimens from 20 patients with persistent or worsening pain following injections of contaminated methylprednisolone. Seven blood specimens from 6 patients were significantly positive for fungal DNA by panfungal PCR, with multiple fungal species identified. PMID:24719442

  3. C/EBP? regulates CRL4(Cdt2)-mediated degradation of p21 in response to UVB-induced DNA damage to control the G1/S checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jonathan R; Bereman, Michael S; Nepomuceno, Angelito I; Thompson, Elizabeth A; Muddiman, David C; Smart, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    The bZIP transcription factor, C/EBP? is highly inducible by UVB and other DNA damaging agents in keratinocytes. C/EBP?-deficient keratinocytes fail to undergo cell cycle arrest in G1 in response to UVB-induced DNA damage and mice lacking epidermal C/EBP? are highly susceptible to UVB-induced skin cancer. The mechanism through which C/EBP? regulates the cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage is unknown. Here we report untreated C/EBP?-deficient keratinocytes have normal levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21, however, UVB-treated C/EBP?-deficient keratinocytes fail to up-regulate nuclear p21 protein levels despite normal up-regulation of Cdkn1a mRNA levels. UVB-treated C/EBP?-deficient keratinocytes displayed a 4-fold decrease in nuclear p21 protein half-life due to the increased proteasomal degradation of p21 via the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4(Cdt2). Cdt2 is the substrate recognition subunit of CRL4(Cdt2) and Cdt2 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in UVB-treated C/EBP?-deficient keratinocytes. Knockdown of Cdt2 restored p21 protein levels in UVB-treated C/EBP?-deficient keratinocytes. Lastly, the failure to accumulate p21 in response to UVB in C/EBP?-deficient keratinocytes resulted in decreased p21 interactions with critical cell cycle regulatory proteins, increased CDK2 activity, and inappropriate entry into S-phase. These findings reveal C/EBP? regulates G1/S cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage via the control of CRL4(Cdt2) mediated degradation of p21. PMID:25483090

  4. Affinity Purification of DNA and RNA from Environmental Samples with Peptide Nucleic Acid Clamps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DARRELL P. CHANDLER; JENNIE R. STULTS; SHARON CEBULA; BEATRICE L. SCHUCK; DEREK W. WEAVER; KEVIN K. ANDERSON; MICHAEL EGHOLM; FRED J. BROCKMAN

    2000-01-01

    Bispeptide nucleic acids (bis-PNAs; PNA clamps), PNA oligomers, and DNA oligonucleotides were evaluated as affinity purification reagents for subfemtomolar 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and rRNA targets in soil, sed- iment, and industrial air filter nucleic acid extracts. Under low-salt hybridization conditions (10 mM NaPO4, 5 mM disodium EDTA, and 0.025% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) a PNA clamp recovered significantly more

  5. Analysis of artificially degraded DNA using STRs and SNPs—results of a collaborative European (EDNAP) exercise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Dixon; A. E. Dobbins; H. K. Pulker; J. M. Butler; P. M. Vallone; M. D. Coble; W. Parson; B. Berger; P. Grubwieser; H. S. Mogensen; N. Morling; K. Nielsen; J. J. Sanchez; E. Petkovski; A. Carracedo; P. Sanchez-Diz; E. Ramos-Luis; M. Bri?n; J. A. Irwin; R. S. Just; O. Loreille; T. J. Parsons; D. Syndercombe-Court; H. Schmitter; B. Stradmann-Bellinghausen; K. Bender; P. Gill

    2006-01-01

    Recently, there has been much debate about what kinds of genetic markers should be implemented as new core loci that constitute national DNA databases. The choices lie between conventional STRs, ranging in size from 100 to 450bp; mini-STRs, with amplicon sizes less than 200bp; and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). There is general agreement by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP)

  6. Comparison of in-house and commercial sample preparation and PCR amplification systems for detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA in blood samples from Tanzanian adults.

    PubMed Central

    Lyamuya, E; Bredberg-Rådén, U; Albert, J; Grankvist, O; Msangi, V; Kagoma, C; Mhalu, F; Biberfeld, G

    1997-01-01

    This study compared the performance of several in-house nested PCR systems and the Amplicor human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PCR kit in the detection of HIV-1 DNA in Tanzanian samples prepared by two different methods. All six of the in-house primer sets evaluated had a higher sensitivity for HIV DNA detection in samples prepared by the Amplicor PCR sample preparation method than in those prepared by the Ficoll-Isopaque (FIP) density gradient centrifugation method. A sensitivity of 100% was achieved by combining two in-house primer sets. The sensitivity of the standard Amplicor HIV-1 PCR kit was only 59%, whereas a modified Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test had a sensitivity of 98%. Our data show that Tanzanian samples prepared by the Amplicor preparation method are more suitable for HIV-1 PCR testing than samples prepared by the FIP method. The modified, but not the standard, Amplicor HIV-1 PCR kit provides an alternative to the nested in-house PCR technique for the diagnosis of HIV infection. PMID:8968925

  7. Development & evaluation of biotinylated DNA probe for clinical diagnosis of chikungunya infection in patients’ acute phase serum & CSF samples

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jyoti S.; Parida, Manmohan; Lakshmana Rao, P.V.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: The resurgence of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in the Indian Ocean Islands and India has drawn worldwide attention due to its explosive nature, high morbidity and complex clinico-pathological manifestations. The early confirmatory diagnosis of CHIKV is essential for management as well as control of unprecedented epidemics. The present study describes the development and evaluation of a highly sensitive and specific E1 structural gene specific biotinylated DNA probe for detection of chikungunya virus in clinical samples using a dot blot format. Methods: The complementary DNA (cDNA) of CHIKV was spotted on to nylon membrane. The membrane was subjected to prehybridization and hybridization and developed using a colour development solution containing DAB chromogen. Results: The CHIKV E1 specific DNA probe was highly sensitive detecting picogram levels of target nucleic acid. The comparative evaluation with SYBR Green I based real-time RT-PCR revealed 99 per cent accordance with a sensitivity and specificity of 99 and 98 per cent, respectively. The specificity of this assay was further confirmed through cross-reaction studies with confirmed dengue and Japanese encephalitis (JE) patient serum samples along with infected culture supernatant of Ross River and Saint Louis encephalitis and plasmid DNA of O’Nyong Nyong, Semlinki forest and Sindbis viruses. Interpretation & conclusion: The DNA probe reported in this study may be useful for specific, sensitive and confirmatory clinical diagnosis of chikungunya infection in acute phase human patient serum and CSF samples. This assay can also be used in the laboratory for quantification of viral antigen in cell culture supernatant for research purpose. PMID:24056565

  8. Extraction of DNA from plant and fungus tissues in situ

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When samples are collected in the field and transported to the lab, degradation of the nucleic acids contained in the samples is frequently observed. Immediate extraction and precipitation of the nucleic acids reduces degradation to a minimum, thus preserving accurate sequence information. An extraction method to obtain high quality DNA in field studies is described. Findings DNA extracted immediately after sampling was compared to DNA extracted after allowing the sampled tissues to air dry at 21°C for 48 or 72 hours. While DNA extracted from fresh tissues exhibited little degradation, DNA extracted from all tissues exposed to 21°C air for 48 or 72 hours exhibited varying degrees of degradation. Yield was higher for extractions from fresh tissues in most cases. Four microcentrifuges were compared for DNA yield: one standard electric laboratory microcentrifuge (max rcf?=?16,000×g), two battery-operated microcentrifuges (max rcf?=?5,000 and 3,000 ×g), and one manually-operated microcentrifuge (max rcf?=?120×g). Yields for all centrifuges were similar. DNA extracted under simulated field conditions was similar in yield and quality to DNA extracted in the laboratory using the same equipment. Conclusions This CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) DNA extraction method employs battery-operated and manually-operated equipment to isolate high quality DNA in the field. The method was tested on plant and fungus tissues, and may be adapted for other types of organisms. The method produced high quality DNA in laboratory tests and under simulated field conditions. The field extraction method should prove useful for working in remote sites, where ice, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen are unavailable; where degradation is likely to occur due to the long distances between the sample site and the laboratory; and in instances where other DNA preservation and transportation methods have been unsuccessful. It may be possible to adapt this method for genomic, metagenomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic projects using samples collected in situ. PMID:22672795

  9. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  10. The effect of dilution and the use of a post-extraction nucleic acid purification column on the accuracy, precision, and inhibition of environmental DNA samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Anna M.; Spear, Stephen F.; Pierson, Todd W.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of environmental DNA (eDNA) is an increasingly common method for detecting presence and assessing relative abundance of rare or elusive species in aquatic systems via the isolation of DNA from environmental samples and the amplification of species-specific sequences using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Co-extracted substances that inhibit qPCR can lead to inaccurate results and subsequent misinterpretation about a species’ status in the tested system. We tested three treatments (5-fold and 10-fold dilutions, and spin-column purification) for reducing qPCR inhibition from 21 partially and fully inhibited eDNA samples collected from coastal plain wetlands and mountain headwater streams in the southeastern USA. All treatments reduced the concentration of DNA in the samples. However, column purified samples retained the greatest sensitivity. For stream samples, all three treatments effectively reduced qPCR inhibition. However, for wetland samples, the 5-fold dilution was less effective than other treatments. Quantitative PCR results for column purified samples were more precise than the 5-fold and 10-fold dilutions by 2.2× and 3.7×, respectively. Column purified samples consistently underestimated qPCR-based DNA concentrations by approximately 25%, whereas the directional bias in qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed between stream and wetland samples for both dilution treatments. While the directional bias of qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed among treatments and locations, the magnitude of inaccuracy did not. Our results suggest that 10-fold dilution and column purification effectively reduce qPCR inhibition in mountain headwater stream and coastal plain wetland eDNA samples, and if applied to all samples in a study, column purification may provide the most accurate relative qPCR-based DNA concentrations estimates while retaining the greatest assay sensitivity.

  11. A filter paper-based microdevice for low-cost, rapid, and automated DNA extraction and amplification from diverse sample types.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wupeng; Zhuang, Bin; Zhang, Pengfei; Han, Junping; Li, Cai-Xia; Liu, Peng

    2014-10-01

    A plastic microfluidic device that integrates a filter disc as a DNA capture phase was successfully developed for low-cost, rapid and automated DNA extraction and PCR amplification from various raw samples. The microdevice was constructed by sandwiching a piece of Fusion 5 filter, as well as a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) membrane, between two PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) layers. An automated DNA extraction from 1 ?L of human whole blood can be finished on the chip in 7 minutes by sequentially aspirating NaOH, HCl, and water through the filter. The filter disc containing extracted DNA was then taken out directly for PCR. On-chip DNA purification from 0.25-1 ?L of human whole blood yielded 8.1-21.8 ng of DNA, higher than those obtained using QIAamp® DNA Micro kits. To realize DNA extraction from raw samples, an additional sample loading chamber containing a filter net with an 80 ?m mesh size was designed in front of the extraction chamber to accommodate sample materials. Real-world samples, including whole blood, dried blood stains on Whatman® 903 paper, dried blood stains on FTA™ cards, buccal swabs, saliva, and cigarette butts, can all be processed in the system in 8 minutes. In addition, multiplex amplification of 15 STR (short tandem repeat) loci and Sanger-based DNA sequencing of the 520 bp GJB2 gene were accomplished from the filters that contained extracted DNA from blood. To further prove the feasibility of integrating this extraction method with downstream analyses, "in situ" PCR amplifications were successfully performed in the DNA extraction chamber following DNA purification from blood and blood stains without DNA elution. Using a modified protocol to bond the PDMS and PMMA, our plastic PDMS devices withstood the PCR process without any leakage. This study represents a significant step towards the practical application of on-chip DNA extraction methods, as well as the development of fully integrated genetic analytical systems. PMID:25070548

  12. Evaluating the prevalence of DNA mixtures found in fingernail samples from victims and suspects in homicide cases.

    PubMed

    Nurit, Bublil; Anat, Gast; Michal, Shenfeld; Lilach, Front; Maya, Freund

    2011-11-01

    An important aspect of homicide investigations is the identification of the persons that had the last contact with the victim prior to death. Violent crimes are frequently characterized by a struggle between the victim and the perpetrator where biological material can be expected to be exchanged between them. Forensic DNA typing enables the generation of genetic profiles by extraction and amplification of cellular material found under fingernails. The evidential value of these samples may be critical if the secondary contributor found in a DNA mixture, can be matched with a potential suspect, or through a DNA database search. The amount of biological material transferred under the fingernails during "casual" activities is not sufficient to genotype reportable mixtures. This may not be the case with homicide victims that may have struggled and died under violent circumstances. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of DNA mixtures found under the fingernails of both victims and suspected perpetrators of violent deaths. We present a retrospective study of 137 DNA profiles genotyped from fingernail samples of homicide victims and suspects, collected at the Israeli National Center of Forensic Medicine. The majority of the samples produced single source profiles (n=107, 78%) that matched those of the donor's. DNA mixtures (n=30, 22%) were found in increased frequency among victims (n=25/100, 25%) compared to suspects (n=5/37, 13.5%). Mixtures were sub-divided into high level (n=15, 50%), low level (n=9, 30%) and residual (n=6, 20%), according to the number of the foreign contributors' alleles. Thus, this distinctive group of homicide victims was found to express both elevated frequency of DNA mixtures together with highly informative value of the secondary foreign profiles, as compared to other studied populations. These findings support an important aspect for the criminal investigation in murder cases, where a struggle may have ensued and the identification of an additional profile found in a mixture from a fingernail sample may point to a possible perpetrator of the crime. PMID:21216213

  13. Identification of grass-associated and toluene-degrading diazotrophs, Axoarcus spp., by analyses of partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Hurek, T.; Reinhold-Hurek, B. [Max-Planch-Institut fuer Terrestrische Mikrobiologie, Marburg (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    The genus Azoarcus includes nitrogen-fixing, grass-associated strains as well as denitrifying toluene degraders. In order to identify and group members of the genus Azoarcus, phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNAs) is proposed. 16S rRNA-targeted PCR using specific primers to exclude amplification in the majority of other members of the beta subclass of the class Proteobacteria was combined with direct sequencing of the PCR products. Tree inference from comparisons of 446-bp rDNA fragments yielded similar results for the three known Azoarcus spp. sequences and for analysis of the complete 16S rDNA sequence. These three species formed a phylogenetically coherent group with representatives of two other Azoarcus species which were subjected to 16S rRNA sequencing in this study. This group was related to Rhodocyclus purpureus and Thaurea selenatis. New isolates and also sequences of so far uncultured bacteria from roots of Kallar grass were assigned to the genus Azoarcus as well. Also, strains degrading monoaromatic hydrocarbons anaerobically in the presence of nitrate clustered within this genus, albeit not with grass-associated isolates. All representative members of the five species harboring rhizospheric bacteria were able to form N{sub 2}O from nitrate and showed anaerobic growth on malic acid with nitrate but not on toluene. In order to visualize different Azoarcus spp. by whole-cell in situ hybridizations, we generated 16S rRNA-targeted, fluorescent probes by in vitro transcription directly from PCR products which spanned the variable region V2. Hybridization was species specific for Azoarcus communis and Azoarcus indigens. The proposed scheme of phylogenetic analysis of PCR-generated 16S rDNA segements will facilitate studies on ecological distribution, host range, and diversity of Azoarcus spp. and may even allow rapid identification of unc ultured strains from environmental DNAs. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Differential Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Preservation in Post-Mortem Teeth with Implications for Forensic and Ancient DNA Studies

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B.; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard extraction methods, without the need for specialised equipment or large-volume demineralisation steps. PMID:25992635

  15. Differential nuclear and mitochondrial DNA preservation in post-mortem teeth with implications for forensic and ancient DNA studies.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard extraction methods, without the need for specialised equipment or large-volume demineralisation steps. PMID:25992635

  16. cord blood. Although having a paternal DNA sample makes such analysis easier, Fan and

    E-print Network

    Buesseler, Ken

    -invasively sequence the fetal genome improve prenatal care of the ramifications of complete genomic sequencing of a newborn's DNA, we now have threedemonstrationsofnon and practical questions about how prospective parents and physicians might use this genomic information

  17. Monitoring of an Alkaline 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol-Degrading Enrichment Culture by DNA Fingerprinting Methods and Isolation of the Responsible Organism, Haloalkaliphilic Nocardioides sp. Strain M6

    Microsoft Academic Search

    OLGA MALTSEVA; PATRICK ORIEL

    1997-01-01

    A site situated near Alkali Lake (Oregon) and highly contaminated by chloroaromatic compounds was chosen for isolation of alkaliphilic chlorophenol-degrading bacteria. Prolonged cultivation of an enrichment culture followed by successive transfers resulted in a strong increase in the 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) degradation rate. Repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis were applied to distinguish members of the enrichment

  18. Cellulose Degradation by Micromonosporas Recovered from Freshwater Lakes and Classification of These Actinomycetes by DNA Gyrase B Gene Sequencing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandre B. de Menezes; Robert J. Lockhart; Michael J. Cox; Heather E. Allison; Alan J. McCarthy

    2008-01-01

    A number of Micromonospora strains isolated from the water column, sediment, and cellulose baits placed in freshwater lakes were shown to be able to degrade cellulose in lake water without any addition of nutrients. A selective isolation method was also developed to demonstrate that CFU arose from both spores and hyphae that inhabit the lake environment. Gyrase B gene sequencing

  19. A Mouse Model Uncovers LKB1 as an UVB-Induced DNA Damage Sensor Mediating CDKN1A (p21WAF1/CIP1) Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Gil, Rosa; González-Sánchez, Elena; Bech-Serra, Joan Josep; Grueso, Judit; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Moliné, Teresa; Canals, Francesc; Ferrer, Berta; Cortés, Javier; Bastian, Boris; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana Maria; Vivancos, Ana; García-Patos, Vicenç; Recio, Juan Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight accounts for 90% of the symptoms of premature skin aging and skin cancer. The tumor suppressor serine-threonine kinase LKB1 is mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and in a spectrum of epithelial cancers whose etiology suggests a cooperation with environmental insults. Here we analyzed the role of LKB1 in a UV-dependent mouse skin cancer model and show that LKB1 haploinsufficiency is enough to impede UVB-induced DNA damage repair, contributing to tumor development driven by aberrant growth factor signaling. We demonstrate that LKB1 and its downstream kinase NUAK1 bind to CDKN1A. In response to UVB irradiation, LKB1 together with NUAK1 phosphorylates CDKN1A regulating the DNA damage response. Upon UVB treatment, LKB1 or NUAK1 deficiency results in CDKN1A accumulation, impaired DNA repair and resistance to apoptosis. Importantly, analysis of human tumor samples suggests that LKB1 mutational status could be a prognostic risk factor for UV-induced skin cancer. Altogether, our results identify LKB1 as a DNA damage sensor protein regulating skin UV-induced DNA damage response. PMID:25329316

  20. Direct detection of cytomegalovirus from bronchoalveolar lavage samples by using a rapid in situ DNA hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Gleaves, C A; Myerson, D; Bowden, R A; Hackman, R C; Meyers, J D

    1989-11-01

    An in situ DNA hybridization assay was compared with centrifugation culture for rapid detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. Eighty BAL samples were inoculated into both centrifugation culture and standard culture. Cytospin preparations of the BAL samples were studied in a 75-min in situ DNA hybridization assay using the PathoGene CMV kit (Enzo Biochem, Inc., New York, N.Y.). Of the 80 samples, 39 (49%) were positive for CMV; 37 of 39 (95%) were positive by centrifugation culture, 34 of 39 (87%) were positive in standard culture, 24 of 39 (62%) were positive by in situ hybridization, and 20 of 39 (56%) were positive by histologic and/or immunofluorescence techniques. The in situ hybridization assay detected 23 of the 37 samples positive in centrifugation culture, for a sensitivity of 62% and a specificity of 98%. We conclude that the in situ hybridization assay is a specific and more rapid test than centrifugation culture and standard culture for diagnosis of CMV pulmonary infection. For the clinical laboratory, however, current hybridization methods are not sufficiently sensitive to replace centrifugation culture for detection of CMV in BAL specimens. PMID:2553766

  1. Fragmentation of Contaminant and Endogenous DNA in Ancient Samples Determined by Shotgun Sequencing; Prospects for Human Palaeogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico; Ramirez, Oscar; Calafell, Francesc; Civit, Sergi; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the successful retrieval of genomes from past remains, the prospects for human palaeogenomics remain unclear because of the difficulty of distinguishing contaminant from endogenous DNA sequences. Previous sequence data generated on high-throughput sequencing platforms indicate that fragmentation of ancient DNA sequences is a characteristic trait primarily arising due to depurination processes that create abasic sites leading to DNA breaks. Methodology/Principals Findings To investigate whether this pattern is present in ancient remains from a temperate environment, we have 454-FLX pyrosequenced different samples dated between 5,500 and 49,000 years ago: a bone from an extinct goat (Myotragus balearicus) that was treated with a depurinating agent (bleach), an Iberian lynx bone not subjected to any treatment, a human Neolithic sample from Barcelona (Spain), and a Neandertal sample from the El Sidrón site (Asturias, Spain). The efficiency of retrieval of endogenous sequences is below 1% in all cases. We have used the non-human samples to identify human sequences (0.35 and 1.4%, respectively), that we positively know are contaminants. Conclusions We observed that bleach treatment appears to create a depurination-associated fragmentation pattern in resulting contaminant sequences that is indistinguishable from previously described endogenous sequences. Furthermore, the nucleotide composition pattern observed in 5? and 3? ends of contaminant sequences is much more complex than the flat pattern previously described in some Neandertal contaminants. Although much research on samples with known contaminant histories is needed, our results suggest that endogenous and contaminant sequences cannot be distinguished by the fragmentation pattern alone. PMID:21904610

  2. Bioinformatics analysis of abnormal DNA methylation in muscle samples from monozygotic twins discordant for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Sun, Qianqian; Wang, Lingxiao; Nie, Shuangshuang; Li, Jun

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to examine the changes in DNA methylation of gene promoters associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). The DNA methylation profile dataset GSE38291 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. A paired t-test was used to analyze differences in the DNA methylation of gene promoters between T2D and normal muscle samples. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis was performed using online tool, The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Whole-Genome rVISTA was used to analyze the enriched transcription factor (TF) binding sites upstream of the transcription start site in the differentially methylated genes. A total of 38 genes, including Sirtuin 1, N-acetyltransferase 6, phospholipase A2 group XIIB and nuclear factor of activated T cells calcineurin-dependent 1, were identified to be differentially methylated between these two groups. One GO term, DNA geometric change (GO:0032392), was significantly enriched (P<0.05) by the hyper-methylated genes. In addition, the binding sites of one gene, zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1, and three TFs, methyl CpG binding protein 2, TFEB and TFAP4, were significantly enriched in the hyper- and hypo-methylated genes, respectively. The resulting T2D?associated genes and potential TFs provided a novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of T2D. These genes may become promising target genes for the development of treatments for T2D. PMID:25760736

  3. Monitoring the degradation of a thermally aged EPDM terpolymer by 1H NMR relaxation measurements of solvent swelled samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger A. Assink; Kenneth T. Gillen; Briana Sanderson

    2002-01-01

    1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times were investigated as a method for monitoring the degradation of polymeric materials. The properties of an ethylene–propylene–diene (EPDM) terpolymer, oven aged at 140°C, were first characterized by traditional mechanical and solution measurements including ultimate tensile elongation, tensile strength, tensile modulus, gel fraction, solvent uptake and density. The elongation and density results provided a

  4. Detection of environmental DNA of Bigheaded Carps in samples collected from selected locations in the St. Croix River and in the Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amberg, Jon J.; McCalla, S. Grace; Miller, Loren; Sorensen, Peter; Gaikowski, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of molecular methods, such as the detection of environmental deoxyribonucleic acid (eDNA), have become an increasingly popular tool in surveillance programs that monitor for the presence of invasive species in aquatic systems. One early application of these methods in aquatic systems was surveillance for DNA of Asian carps (specifically bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis and silver carp H. molitrix) in water samples taken from the Chicago Area Waterway System. The ability to identify DNA of a species in an environmental sample presents a potentially powerful tool because these sensitive analyses can presumably detect the presence of DNA in water even when the species is not abundant or are difficult to catch or monitor with traditional gear. Prior to research presented in this report, an initial eDNA surveillance effort was completed in selected locations in the Upper Mississippi and St. Croix Rivers in 2011 after the capture of a bighead carp in the St. Croix River near Prescott, WI. Data presented in this report were developed to duplicate the 2011 monitoring results from the Upper Mississippi and St. Croix Rivers and to provide critical insight into the technique to inform future work in these locations. We specifically sought to understand the potential confounding effects of other pathways of eDNA movement (e.g., fish-eating birds, watercraft) on the variation in background DNA by collecting water samples from (1) sites within the St. Croix River and the upper Mississippi River where the DNA of silver carp was previously detected, (2) sites considered to be free of Asian carp, and (3) a site known to have a large population of Asian carp. We also sought to establish a baseline Asian carp eDNA signature to which future eDNA sampling efforts could be compared. All samples taken as part of this effort were processed using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) according to procedures outlined in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Quality Assurance Project Plan with minor deviations designed to enhance the rigor of our data. Presence of DNA in PCR-positive samples was confirmed by Sanger sequencing (forward and reverse) and sequences were considered positive only if sequences (forward and reverse) of ?150 base pairs had a match of ?95% to those of published sequences for bighead carp or silver carp. The DNA of bighead carp and silver carp was not detected in environmental samples collected above and below St. Croix Falls Dam on the St. Croix River, above and below the Coon Rapids Dam and below Lock and Dam 1 on the Upper Mississippi River, and from two negative control lakes, Square Lake and Lake Riley. The DNA of silver carp was detected in environmental samples collected below Lock and Dam 19 at Keokuk, Iowa, a reach of the river with high silver carp abundance. The portion (68%) of environmental samples taken below Lock and Dam 19 that were determined to contain the DNA of silver carp was similar to that reported in the scientific literature for other abundant species. The DNA of bighead carp, however, was not detected in environmental samples collected below Lock and Dam 19, a reach of the river known to have bighead carp. Previous reported detections of the DNA of silver carp in samples collected in 2011 were not replicated in this study. Additional analyses are planned for the DNA extracted from the samples collected in 2012. Those analyses may provide additional information regarding the lack of amplification of bighead carp DNA and the lengths of the sequences of silver carp DNA present in samples taken below Lock and Dam 19. These additional analyses may help inform the use of eDNA monitoring in large, complex systems like the Mississippi River.

  5. eSensor: an electrochemical detection-based DNA microarray technology enabling sample-to-answer molecular diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Robin H.; Longiaru, Mathew

    2009-05-01

    DNA microarrays are becoming a widespread tool used in life science and drug screening due to its many benefits of miniaturization and integration. Microarrays permit a highly multiplexed DNA analysis. Recently, the development of new detection methods and simplified methodologies has rapidly expanded the use of microarray technologies from predominantly gene expression analysis into the arena of diagnostics. Osmetech's eSensor® is an electrochemical detection platform based on a low-to- medium density DNA hybridization array on a cost-effective printed circuit board substrate. eSensor® has been cleared by FDA for Warfarin sensitivity test and Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Detection. Other genetic-based diagnostic and infectious disease detection tests are under development. The eSensor® platform eliminates the need for an expensive laser-based optical system and fluorescent reagents. It allows one to perform hybridization and detection in a single and small instrument without any fluidic processing and handling. Furthermore, the eSensor® platform is readily adaptable to on-chip sample-to-answer genetic analyses using microfluidics technology. The eSensor® platform provides a cost-effective solution to direct sample-to-answer genetic analysis, and thus have a potential impact in the fields of point-of-care genetic analysis, environmental testing, and biological warfare agent detection.

  6. Technical Note: Whole-Genome Amplification of DNA Extracted from Cattle Semen Samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Hawken; J. A. L. Cavanagh; J. R. S. Meadows; M. S. Khatkar; Y. Husaini; K. R. Zenger; S. McClintock; A. E. McClintock; H. W. Raadsma

    2006-01-01

    The bovine genome sequence project and the discov- ery of many thousands of bovine single nucleotide poly- morphisms has opened the door for large-scale genotyp- ing studies to identify genes that contribute to economi- cally important traits with relevance to the beef and dairy industries. Large amounts of DNA will be re- quired for these research projects. This study reports

  7. DNA stable-isotope probing of oil sands tailings pond enrichment cultures reveals different key players for toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfidogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Laban, Nidal Abu; Dao, Anh; Foght, Julia

    2015-05-01

    Oil sands tailings ponds are anaerobic repositories of fluid wastes produced by extraction of bitumen from oil sands ores. Diverse indigenous microbiota biodegrade hydrocarbons (including toluene) in situ, producing methane, carbon dioxide and/or hydrogen sulfide, depending on electron acceptor availability. Stable-isotope probing of cultures enriched from tailings associated specific taxa and functional genes to (13)C6- and (12)C7-toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions. Total DNA was subjected to isopycnic ultracentrifugation followed by gradient fraction analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and construction of 16S rRNA, benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrB) gene clone libraries. T-RFLP analysis plus sequencing and in silico digestion of cloned taxonomic and functional genes revealed that Clostridiales, particularly Desulfosporosinus (136 bp T-RF) contained bssA genes and were key toluene degraders during methanogenesis dominated by Methanosaeta. Deltaproteobacterial Desulfobulbaceae (157 bp T-RF) became dominant under sulfidogenic conditions, likely because the Desulfosporosinus T-RF 136 apparently lacks dsrB and therefore, unlike its close relatives, is presumed incapable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. We infer incomplete oxidation of toluene by Desulfosporosinus in syntrophic association with Methanosaeta under methanogenic conditions, and complete toluene oxidation by Desulfobulbaceae during sulfate reduction. PMID:25873466

  8. Characterization of a cDNA encoding a manganese peroxidase, from the lignin-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysoporium

    SciTech Connect

    Pribnow, D.; Mayfield, M.B.; Nipper, V.J.; Brown, J.A.; Gold, M.H. (Oregon Graduate Center, Beaverton (United States))

    1989-03-25

    A cDNA clone of a manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was isolated and characterized. The cDNA contains 1,314 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and the coding region has 68% G + C content. The deduced mature MnP protein contains 357 amino acids and is preceded by a 21-amino acid leader sequence. The experimentally determined N-terminal sequence of the purified MnP-1 protein, pI=4.9, corresponds to the deduced N-terminal sequence of the gene. The M{sub r} of the mature MnP-1 deduced from the cDNA is 37,439, which is {approximately}81.4% of the experimentally determined molecular weight. The difference is due to glycosylation and a single potential N-glycosylation site with the general sequence Asn-X-Thr/Ser is present in the deduced Mnp-1 sequence. Consistent with the peroxidase mechanism of MnP, the proximal histidine, the distal histidine, and the distal arginine are all conserved and regions flanking these residues display homology with other peroxidases. Northern blot analysis indicates that MnP expression is controlled by nutrient nitrogen at the level of transcription. Southern blot hybridization analysis suggests that MnP-1 is a member of a family of MnP genes.

  9. Estimation of the minimum uncertainty of DNA concentration in a genetically modified maize sample candidate certified reference material.

    PubMed

    Prokisch, J; Zeleny, R; Trapmann, S; Le Guern, L; Schimmel, H; Kramer, G N; Pauwels, J

    2001-08-01

    Homogeneity testing and the determination of minimum sample mass are an important part of the certification of reference materials. The smallest theoretically achievable uncertainty of certified concentration values is limited by the concentration distribution of analyte in the different particle size fractions of powdered biological samples. This might be of special importance if the reference material is prepared by dry mixing, a dilution technique which is used for the production of the new and third generation of genetically modified (GMO) plant certified reference materials. For the production of dry mixed PMON 810 maize reference material a computer program was developed to calculate the theoretically smallest uncertainty for a selected sample intake. This model was used to compare three differently milled maize samples, and the effect of dilution on the uncertainty of the DNA content of GMO maize was estimated as well. In the case of a 50-mg sample mass the lowest achievable standard deviation was 2% for the sample containing 0.1% GMO and the minimum deviation was less than 0.5% for the sample containing 5% GMO. PMID:11569879

  10. Concentrations of Glyphosate, Its Degradation Product, Aminomethylphosphonic Acid, and Glufosinate in Ground- and Surface-Water, Rainfall, and Soil Samples Collected in the United States, 2001-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, Elisabeth A.; Battaglin, William A.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a number of studies from 2001 through 2006 to investigate and document the occurrence, fate, and transport of glyphosate, its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), and glufosinate in 2,135 ground- and surface-water samples, 14 rainfall samples, and 193 soil samples. Analytical methods were developed to detect and measure glyphosate, AMPA, and glufosinate in water, rainfall, and soil. Results show that AMPA was detected more frequently and occurred at similar or higher concentrations than the parent compound, glyphosate, whereas glufosinate was seldom found in the environment. Glyphosate and AMPA were detected more frequently in surface water than in ground water. Trace levels of glyphosate and AMPA may persist in the soil from year to year. The methods and data described in this report are useful to researchers and regulators interested in the occurrence, fate, and transport of glyphosate and AMPA in the environment.

  11. A miniature quantitative PCR device for directly monitoring a sample processing on a microfluidic rapid DNA system.

    PubMed

    Hurth, Cedric; Yang, Jianing; Barrett, Matthew; Brooks, Carla; Nordquist, Alan; Smith, Stanley; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    We report a microfluidic device and measurement method to perform real-time PCR (or qPCR) in a miniaturized configuration for on-chip implementation using reaction volumes of less than 20 ?L. The qPCR bioreactor is designed as a module to be embedded in an automated sample-in/profile-out system for rapid DNA biometrics or human identification. The PCR mixture is excited with a 505 nm diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) and the fluorescence build-up is measured using optical fibers directly embedded to the sidewalls of the microfluidic qPCR bioreactor. We discuss manufacturing and operating parameters necessary to adjust the internal surface conditions and temperature profiles of the bioreactor and to optimize the yield and quality of the PCR reaction for the amplification of 62 bp hTERT intron fragments using the commercial Quantifiler® kit (Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA) commonly accepted for genotyping analysis. We designed a microfluidic device suitable for continuously processing a specimen by efficiently mixing the reagents from the kit to a set volume of DNA template on chip. Our approach relies on a calibration curve for the specific device using control DNA. We successfully applied this method to determine the concentration of genomic DNA extracted from a buccal swab on separate microfluidic devices which are operated upstream the qPCR device and perform buccal swab lysis and buccal DNA extraction. A precise correlation between the amount determined on chip and that obtained using a commercial cycler is demonstrated. PMID:25106501

  12. Evaluation of novel carbon nano-tube particles in the bacterial and viral DNA and RNA extraction from the clinical samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nguyen KC; Vo DXA; Hoang HN; Ho LTT; Pham HV

    2010-01-01

    Molecular techniques have become the most im- portant methods of detecting bacterial and viral pathogens. However, current genomic extraction methods are currently limited in term of automation. In this study, carbon nano-tube was used as the vector to trap DNA and RNA molecules. The capability of carbon nano-tube to trap DNA and RNA was evaluated using samples (TB and HBV

  13. Use of synthetic oligonucleotide DNA probes for identification and direct detection of Bacteroides forsythus in plaque samples.

    PubMed Central

    Moncla, B J; Motley, S T; Braham, P; Ewing, L; Adams, T H; Vermeulen, N M

    1991-01-01

    Oligonucleotide DNA probes complementary to the hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA of Bacteroides forsythus were tested for their specificity and sensitivity against reference and clinical isolates of 73 different species of bacteria. The probes were used to detect the organism directly from nucleic acid extracts of subgingival plaque samples, and the results were compared with results of detection by culture methods. The data demonstrate that the probes are very specific (100%) and sensitive (100% when they are compared with those obtained by the culture method) and could reliably detect the organism in plaque samples. When a probe to a conserved region of the 16S rRNA (UP9A) was used to estimate the quantity of bacteria present in plaque samples, it gave results comparable to those of culture methods. The data suggest that total microbial load may be a parameter in periodontal disease. PMID:1719022

  14. DNA damage, lysosomal degradation and Bcl-xL deamidation in doxycycline- and minocycline-induced cell death in the K562 leukemic cell line.

    PubMed

    Fares, Mona; Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr; Hassan, Moustapha; Potácová, Zuzana

    2015-07-31

    We investigated mechanisms of cytotoxicity induced by doxycycline (doxy) and minocycline (mino) in the chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cell line. Doxy and mino induced cell death in exposure-dependent manner. While annexin V/propidium iodide staining was consistent with apoptosis, the morphological changes in Giemsa staining were more equivocal. A pancaspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK partially reverted cell death morphology, but concurrently completely prevented PARP cleavage. Mitochondrial involvement was detected as dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome C release. DNA double strand breaks detected with ?H2AX antibody and caspase-2 activation were found early after the treatment start, but caspase-3 activation was a late event. Decrement of Bcl-xL protein levels and electrophoretic shift of Bcl-xL molecule were induced by both drugs. Phosphorylation of Bcl-xL at serine 62 was ruled out. Similarly, Bcr/Abl tyrosine kinase levels were decreased. Lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine restored Bcl-xL and Bcr/Abl protein levels and inhibited caspase-3 activation. Thus, the cytotoxicity of doxy and mino in K562 cells is mediated by DNA damage, Bcl-xL deamidation and lysosomal degradation with activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. PMID:26022120

  15. Intratumoral DNA content heterogeneity in breast carcinomas demonstrated by core punch tissue sampling and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhouwei; Weaver, Donald L; Munjal, Kavita; Evans, Mark F

    2014-09-01

    Further to advancements in instrumentation and fluorescent dye technologies, there has been a resurgence of interest in the flow cytometric assay of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens. Here we present a novel, simple and effective alternative to whole block sectioning that allows selective multisampling of tissues within a specimen block and the investigation of intratumoral heterogeneity. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast carcinoma specimens were core-punched using 1.0?mm diameter needles and assayed by flow cytometry using a modified Hedley method. Intratumoral heterogeneity for DNA index and per cent S-phase fraction was detected in 10 of 23 (44%) and 11 of 23 (47%) specimens respectively. Macro-level genomic heterogeneity is common in breast cancer even within a single surgical specimen block. Studies investigating the relationship of DNA content heterogeneity to other markers of genomic instability such as mutations, deletions, insertions and translocations are warranted. PMID:24942799

  16. Concerted Action of the Ubiquitin-Fusion Degradation Protein 1 (Ufd1) and Sumo-Targeted Ubiquitin Ligases (STUbLs) in the DNA-Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Køhler, Julie Bonne; Jørgensen, Maria Louise Mønster; Beinoraité, Gabriele; Thorsen, Michael; Thon, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes many players in the DNA-damage response (DDR) catalyze protein sumoylation or ubiquitylation. Emphasis has been placed on how these modifications orchestrate the sequential recruitment of repair factors to sites of DNA damage or stalled replication forks. Here, we shed light on a pathway in which sumoylated factors are eliminated through the coupled action of Sumo-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) and the ubiquitin-fusion degradation protein 1 (Ufd1). Ufd1 is a subunit of the Cdc48-Ufd1-Npl4 complex implicated in the sorting of ubiquitylated substrates for degradation by the proteasome. We find that in fission yeast, Ufd1 interacts physically and functionally with the Sumo-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) Rfp1, homologous to human RNF4, and with the Sumo E3 ligase Pli1, homologous to human PIAS1. Deleting a C-terminal domain of Ufd1 that mediates the interaction of Ufd1 with Rfp1, Pli1, and Sumo (ufd1?Ct213-342) lead to an accumulation of high-molecular-weight Sumo conjugates and caused severe genomic instabilities. The spectrum of sensitivity of ufd1?Ct213-342 cells to genotoxins, the epistatic relationships of ufd1?Ct213-342 with mutations in DNA repair factors, and the localization of the repair factor Rad22 in ufd1?Ct213-342 cells point to ufd1?Ct213-342 cells accumulating aberrant structures during replication that require homologous recombination (HR) for their repair. We present evidence that HR is however often not successful in ufd1?Ct213-342 cells and we identify Rad22 as one of the high-molecular-weight conjugates accumulating in the ufd1?Ct213-342 mutant consistent with Rad22 being a STUbL/Ufd1 substrate. Suggesting a direct role of Ufd1 in the processing of Sumo-conjugates, Ufd1 formed nuclear foci colocalizing with Sumo during the DDR, and Sumo-conjugates accumulated in foci in the ufd1?Ct213-342 mutant. Broader functional relationships between Ufd1 and STUbLs conceivably affect numerous cellular processes beyond the DDR. PMID:24265825

  17. Deep UV generation and direct DNA photo-interaction by harmonic nanoparticles in labelled samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staedler, Davide; Magouroux, Thibaud; Passemard, Solène; Schwung, Sebastian; Dubled, Marc; Schneiter, Guillaume Stéphane; Rytz, Daniel; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2014-02-01

    A biophotonics approach based on the nonlinear optical process of second harmonic generation is presented and demonstrated on malignant human cell lines labelled by harmonic nanoparticles. The method enables independent imaging and therapeutic action, selecting each modality by simply tuning the excitation laser wavelength from infrared to visible. In particular, the generation of deep ultraviolet radiation at 270 nm allows direct interaction with nuclear DNA in the absence of photosensitizing molecules.

  18. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Ali; U. Hashim; S. Mustafa; Y. B. Che Man; M. H. M. Yusop; M. F. Bari; Kh N. Islam; M. F. Hasan

    2011-01-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530

  19. Detection of Wuchereria bancrofti DNA in paired serum and urine samples using polymerase chain reaction-based systems

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes, Camila; Brandão, Eduardo; Oliveira, Paula; Rocha, Abraham; Rego, Tamisa; Medeiros, Rafael; Aguiar-Santos, Ana; Ferraz, João; Reis, Christian; Araujo, Paulo; Carvalho, Luiz; Melo, Fabio L

    2014-01-01

    The Global Program for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF) aims to eliminate this disease by the year 2020. However, the development of more specific and sensitive tests is important for the success of the GPELF. The present study aimed to standardise polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based systems for the diagnosis of filariasis in serum and urine. Twenty paired biological urine and serum samples from individuals already known to be positive for Wuchereria bancrofti were collected during the day. Conventional PCR and semi-nested PCR assays were optimised. The detection limit of the technique for purified W. bancrofti DNA extracted from adult worms was 10 fg for the internal systems (WbF/Wb2) and 0.1 fg by using semi-nested PCR. The specificity of the primers was confirmed experimentally by amplification of 1 ng of purified genomic DNA from other species of parasites. Evaluation of the paired urine and serum samples by the semi-nested PCR technique indicated only two of the 20 tested individuals were positive, whereas the simple internal PCR system (WbF/Wb2), which has highly promising performance, revealed that all the patients were positive using both samples. This study successfully demonstrated the possibility of using the PCR technique on urine for the diagnosis of W. bancrofti infection. PMID:25424447

  20. Single-tube HotSHOT technique for the collection, preservation and PCR-ready DNA preparation of faecal samples: the threatened Cabrera's vole as a model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samer Alasaad; Antonio Sánchez; Juan L. García-Mudarra; Michael J. Jowers; Jesús M. Pérez; Juan Alberto Marchal; Ismael Romero; José A. Garrido-García; Ramón C. Soriguer

    A cost-effective, reliable and efficient method of obtaining DNA samples is essential in large-scale genetic analyses. This\\u000a study examines the possibility of using a threatened vole species, Microtus cabrerae, as a model for the collection and preservation of faecal samples for subsequent DNA extraction with a protocol based on\\u000a the HotSHOT technique. Through the examination of the probability of multi-copies

  1. Comparison of Methods for DNA Isolation from Food Samples for Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli by Real-Time PCR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Loree C. Heller; Carisa R. Davis; K. Kealy Peak; David Wingfield; Andrew C. Cannons; Philip T. Amuso; Jacqueline Cattani

    2003-01-01

    In this study, food samples were intentionally contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, and then DNA was isolated by using four commercial kits. The isolated DNA samples were compared by using real-time PCR detection of the Shiga toxin genes. The four kits tested worked similarly. Enteric pathogens are classic potential agents of bioterror- ism. For example, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was

  2. 13C NMR and isotopic (?13C) investigations on modern vegetation samples: a tool to understand the soil organic matter degradation dynamics and preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Subhadeep; Sanyal, Prasanta; Vardhan Gaur, Harsh

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon, one of the largest reservoirs of carbon, is a heterogeneous mixture of organic compounds with dominant contribution derived from decomposition of plants in various stages. Although general ideas about the processes and mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM) degradation have been developed, a very few study has linked the SOM with its parent material. In this study we aim to generate reference data set of functional groups from modern vegetation samples (C3 and C4plants) to better understand the degradation dynamics and preferences. The carbon functional groups from modern vegetation samples (eight C3 and nine C4 plants collected from Mohanpur, Nadia, West Bengal, India) were examined by solid state 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Additionally, isotopic investigations (?13C) has also been carried out on the modern vegetation samples to understand the relationship of bulk isotopic values to the concentration of functional groups. The major functional groups (alkyl C, O-alkyl C, aromatic C, carbonyl C and aldehyde/ketone) of modern vegetation samples form 16%, 65%, 5%, 14% and 1% respectively in C3 plants. Considerable differences has been observed for C4 plants with average values of alkyl C, O-alkyl C, aromatic C, carbonyl C and aldehyde/ketone are 8%, 83%, 3%, 5% and 1% respectively. The concentration of functional groups from the modern vegetational samples can be considered as reference scale to compare with the 13C NMR data derived from the different soil horizons to understand the SOM degradation dynamics. The ?13CV PDB values of modern vegetation samples plotted against the individual concentration of functional groups shows significant correlation in C4 plants, whereas a lack in correlation has been observed for C3 plants. We assume this difference in relationship of ?13CV PDB values with functional groups of C3 and C4plants can be due to the differences in photosynthesis pathways, the fractionation of CO2 and accumulation of the products during various stages of photosynthesis. A more detailed investigation is warranted to understand the governing mechanism behind this observation.

  3. Probe-Directed Degradation (PDD) for Flexible Removal of Unwanted cDNA Sequences from RNA-Seq Libraries.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stuart K; Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Preiss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Most applications for RNA-seq require the depletion of abundant transcripts to gain greater coverage of the underlying transcriptome. The sequences to be targeted for depletion depend on application and species and in many cases may not be supported by commercial depletion kits. This unit describes a method for generating RNA-seq libraries that incorporates probe-directed degradation (PDD), which can deplete any unwanted sequence set, with the low-bias split-adapter method of library generation (although many other library generation methods are in principle compatible). The overall strategy is suitable for applications requiring customized sequence depletion or where faithful representation of fragment ends and lack of sequence bias is paramount. We provide guidelines to rapidly design specific probes against the target sequence, and a detailed protocol for library generation using the split-adapter method including several strategies for streamlining the technique and reducing adapter dimer content. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:25827346

  4. The Anaphase Promoting Complex Regulates Yeast Lifespan and rDNA Stability by Targeting Fob1 for Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Johannes; Malo, Mackenzie E.; Chan, Cynthia; Prusinkiewicz, Martin; Arnason, Terra G.; Harkness, Troy A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic stability, stress response, and nutrient signaling all play critical, evolutionarily conserved roles in lifespan determination. However, the molecular mechanisms coordinating these processes with longevity remain unresolved. Here we investigate the involvement of the yeast anaphase promoting complex (APC) in longevity. The APC governs passage through M and G1 via ubiquitin-dependent targeting of substrate proteins and is associated with cancer and premature aging when defective. Our two-hybrid screen utilizing Apc5 as bait recovered the lifespan determinant Fob1 as prey. Fob1 is unstable specifically in G1, cycles throughout the cell cycle in a manner similar to Clb2 (an APC target), and is stabilized in APC (apc5CA) and proteasome (rpn10?) mutants. Deletion of FOB1 increased replicative lifespan (RLS) in wild type (WT), apc5CA, and apc10? cells, and suppressed apc5CA cell cycle progression and rDNA recombination defects. Alternatively, increased FOB1 expression decreased RLS in WT cells, but did not reduce the already short apc5CA RLS, suggesting an epistatic interaction between apc5CA and fob1?. Mutation to a putative L-Box (Fob1E420V), a Destruction Box-like motif, abolished Fob1 modifications, stabilized the protein, and increased rDNA recombination. Our work provides a mechanistic role played by the APC to promote replicative longevity and genomic stability in yeast. PMID:24361936

  5. A pressure-driven column-based technique for the efficient extraction of DNA from respiratory samples.

    PubMed

    Hirama, Takashi; Mogi, Hajime; Egashira, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Eiji; Kukisaki, Shigenari; Hagiwara, Koichi; Takei, Osamu

    2015-05-20

    Currently molecular techniques are a broadly accepted tool for diagnosis and are able to benefit patients in clinical practice. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been especially incorporated into practical applications that are already in widespread use across the globe. With regard to the initial DNA extraction from clinically relevant samples, a number of commercially available kits are commonly used and are also designed to be easy to handle and less labor-intensive. In this study, the pressure system extracting DNA in column-based kit was developed, and its utility was compared with the centrifuge method using sputum from patients who were diagnosed with pneumonia. Also, due to the compact size and rapid processing time, the practical application of the pressure-based system incorporated into an automated pipetting machine was evaluated through clinical study. Our data suggests that DNA extraction by pressure was capable of serving as a substitute for the centrifuge method, and the compact and automatic nature of the pressure system device provided rapid and valuable information for clinical practice. PMID:25824633

  6. Assessment of DNA Encapsulation, a New Room-Temperature DNA Storage Method

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Sylvain; Saker, Safa; Gomard, Maite; Gardais, Eliane; Bizet, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    A new procedure for room-temperature storage of DNA was evaluated whereby DNA samples from human tissue, bacteria, and plants were stored under an anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere in small glass vials fitted in stainless-steel, laser-sealed capsules (DNAshells®). Samples were stored in DNAshells® at room temperature for various periods of time to assess any degradation and compare it to frozen control samples and those stored in GenTegra™ tubes. The study included analysis of the effect of accelerated aging by using a high temperature (76°C) at 50% relative humidity. No detectable DNA degradation was seen in samples stored in DNAshells® at room temperature for 18 months. Polymerase chain reaction experiments, pulsed field gel electrophoresis, and amplified fragment length polymorphism analyses also demonstrated that the protective properties of DNAshells® are not affected by storage under extreme conditions (76°C, 50% humidity) for 30 hours, guaranteeing 100 years without DNA sample degradation. However, after 30 hours of storage at 76°C, it was necessary to include adjustments to the process in order to avoid DNA loss. Successful protection of DNA was obtained for 1 week and even 1 month of storage at high temperature by adding trehalose, which provides a protective matrix. This study demonstrates the many advantages of using DNAshells® for room-temperature storage, particularly in terms of long-term stability, safety, transport, and applications for molecular biology research. PMID:24955733

  7. Assessment of DNA encapsulation, a new room-temperature DNA storage method.

    PubMed

    Clermont, Dominique; Santoni, Sylvain; Saker, Safa; Gomard, Maite; Gardais, Eliane; Bizet, Chantal

    2014-06-01

    A new procedure for room-temperature storage of DNA was evaluated whereby DNA samples from human tissue, bacteria, and plants were stored under an anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere in small glass vials fitted in stainless-steel, laser-sealed capsules (DNAshells(®)). Samples were stored in DNAshells(®) at room temperature for various periods of time to assess any degradation and compare it to frozen control samples and those stored in GenTegra™ tubes. The study included analysis of the effect of accelerated aging by using a high temperature (76°C) at 50% relative humidity. No detectable DNA degradation was seen in samples stored in DNAshells(®) at room temperature for 18 months. Polymerase chain reaction experiments, pulsed field gel electrophoresis, and amplified fragment length polymorphism analyses also demonstrated that the protective properties of DNAshells(®) are not affected by storage under extreme conditions (76°C, 50% humidity) for 30 hours, guaranteeing 100 years without DNA sample degradation. However, after 30 hours of storage at 76°C, it was necessary to include adjustments to the process in order to avoid DNA loss. Successful protection of DNA was obtained for 1 week and even 1 month of storage at high temperature by adding trehalose, which provides a protective matrix. This study demonstrates the many advantages of using DNAshells(®) for room-temperature storage, particularly in terms of long-term stability, safety, transport, and applications for molecular biology research. PMID:24955733

  8. Mre11-dependent degradation of stalled DNA replication forks is prevented by BRCA2 and PARP1.

    PubMed

    Ying, Songmin; Hamdy, Freddie C; Helleday, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    PARP inhibitors are currently being used in clinical trials to treat BRCA1- or BRCA2-defective tumors, based on the synthetic lethal interaction between PARP1 and BRCA1/2-mediated homologous recombination (HR). However, the molecular mechanisms that drive this synthetic lethality remain unclear. Here, we show increased levels of Mre11, a key component of MRN (Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1) complex that plays a role in the restart of stalled replication forks and enhanced resection at stalled replication forks in BRCA2-deficient cells. BRCA2-deficient cells also showed hypersensitivity to the Mre11 inhibitor mirin. Interestingly, PARP1 activity was required to protect stalled forks from Mre11-dependent degradation. Resistance to PARP inhibition in BRCA2-mutant cells led to reduced levels of Mre11 foci and also rescued their sensitivity to mirin. Taken together, our findings not only show that Mre11 activity is required for the survival of BRCA2 mutant cells but also elucidate roles for both the BRCA2 and PARP1 proteins in protecting stalled replication forks, which offers insight into the molecular mechanisms of the synthetic lethality between BRCA2 and PARP1. PMID:22447567

  9. Genomic DNA of Nostoc commune (Cyanobacteria) becomes covalently modified during long-term (decades) desiccation but is protected from oxidative damage and degradation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Breanne Shirkey; Nicole J. McMaster; Sue C. Smith; Deborah J. Wright; Henry Rodriguez; Pawel Jaruga; Mustafa Birincioglu; Richard F. Helm; Malcolm Potts

    2003-01-01

    Genomic DNA of Nostoc commune (Cyanobacteria) became covalently modified during decades of desiccation. Amplification of gene loci from desic- cated cells required pretreatment of DNA with N- phenacylthiazolium bromide, a reagent that cleaves DNA- and protein-linked advanced glycosylation end-products. DNA from 13 year desiccated cells did not show any higher levels of the commonly studied oxidatively modified DNA damage biomar-

  10. DNA barcode based wildlife forensics for resolving the origin of claw samples using a novel primer cocktail.

    PubMed

    Khedkar, Gulab D; Abhayankar, Shil Bapurao; Nalage, Dinesh; Ahmed, Shaikh Nadeem; Khedkar, Chandraprakash D

    2014-12-10

    Abstract Excessive wildlife hunting for commercial purposes can have negative impacts on biodiversity and may result in species extinction. To ensure compliance with legal statutes, forensic identification approaches relying on molecular markers may be used to identify the species of origin of animal material from hairs, claw, blood, bone, or meat. Using this approach, DNA sequences from the COI "barcoding" gene have been used to identify material from a number of domesticated animal species. However, many wild species of carnivores still present great challenges in generating COI barcodes using standard "universal" primer pairs. In the work presented here, the mitochondrial COI gene was successfully amplified using a novel primer cocktail, and the products were sequenced to determine the species of twenty one unknown samples of claw material collected as part of forensic wildlife case investigations. Sixteen of the unknown samples were recognized to have originated from either Panthera leo or P. pardus individuals. The remaining five samples could be identified only to the family level due to the absence of reference animal sequences. This is the first report on the use of COI sequences for the identification of P. pardus and P. leo from claw samples as part of forensic investigations in India. The study also highlights the need for adequate reference material to aid in the resolution of suspected cases of illegal wildlife harvesting. PMID:25492536

  11. Use of FTA elute card impregnated with cervicovaginal sample directly into the amplification reaction increases the detection of human papillomavirus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Carla R.; Franciscatto, Laura G.; Barcellos, Regina B.; Almeida, Sabrina E. M.; Rossetti, Maria Lucia R.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of the FTA elute cardTM impregnated with cervicovaginal sample directly in the PCR amplification for detection of HPV-DNA. The results were compared to a reference technique. This method was more efficient than the protocol indicated by the manufacturer, identifying 91.7% against 54.2% of the positive samples. PMID:24031844

  12. DNA Nanotechnology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-06-10

    In this activity, learners explore deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), a nanoscale structure that occurs in nature. Learners extract a sample of DNA from split peas and put the sample in an Eppendorf tube to take home. Learners discover that nanoscientists study DNA to understand its biological function and use it to make other nanoscale materials and devices.

  13. Rapid Diagnosis of Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis by PCR: Impact of Sample Preparation and DNA Extraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Honore-Bouakline; J. P. Vincensini; V. Giacuzzo; P. H. Lagrange; J. L. Herrmann

    2003-01-01

    In cases of suspected extrapulmonary tuberculosis, rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis is of prime importance, since traditional techniques of detecting acid-fast bacilli have limitations. The major difficulty with mycobacteria is achieving optimal cell lysis. Buffers used in commercial kits do not allow this complete lysis in a number of clinical specimens. A comparison of two sample preparation methods, pretreatment with

  14. A Statistical Approach to Identify Ancient Template DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Agnar Helgason; Snæbjörn Pálsson; Carles Lalueza-Fox; Shyamali Ghosh; Sigrún Sigurðardóttir; Adam Baker; Birgir Hrafnkelsson; Lilja Árnadóttir; Unnur Þorsteinsdóttir; Kári Stefánsson

    2007-01-01

    One of the key problems in the study of ancient DNA is that of authenticating sequences obtained from PCR amplifications of\\u000a highly degraded samples. Contamination of ancient samples and postmortem damage to endogenous DNA templates are the major\\u000a obstacles facing researchers in this task. In particular, the authentication of sequences obtained from ancient human remains\\u000a is thought by many to

  15. Controlled degradation by ClpXP protease tunes the levels of the excision repair protein UvrA to the extent of DNA damage

    E-print Network

    Pruteanu, Mihaela

    UV irradiation damages DNA and activates expression of genes encoding proteins helpful for survival under DNA stress. These proteins are often deleterious in the absence of DNA damage. Here, we investigate mechanisms used ...

  16. Auxin-induced rapid degradation of inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD) induces apoptotic DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, and cell death: a cell suicide module.

    PubMed

    Samejima, Kumiko; Ogawa, Hiromi; Ageichik, Alexander V; Peterson, Kevin L; Kaufmann, Scott H; Kanemaki, Masato T; Earnshaw, William C

    2014-11-01

    Caspase-activated DNase (CAD) is a major apoptotic nuclease, responsible for DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation during apoptosis. CAD is normally activated in apoptosis as a result of caspase cleavage of its inhibitory chaperone ICAD. Other aspects of CAD regulation are poorly understood. In particular, it has been unclear whether direct CAD activation in non-apoptotic living cells can trigger cell death. Taking advantage of the auxin-inducible degron (AID) system, we have developed a suicide system with which ICAD is rapidly degraded in living cells in response to the plant hormone auxin. Our studies demonstrate that rapid ICAD depletion is sufficient to activate CAD and induce cell death in DT40 and yeast cells. In the vertebrate cells, ectopic CAD activation triggered caspase activation and subsequent hallmarks of caspase-dependent apoptotic changes, including phosphatidylserine exposure and nuclear fragmentation. These observations not only suggest that CAD activation drives apoptosis through a positive feedback loop, but also identify a unique suicide system that can be used for controlling gene-modified organisms. PMID:25248749

  17. Auxin-induced Rapid Degradation of Inhibitor of Caspase-activated DNase (ICAD) Induces Apoptotic DNA Fragmentation, Caspase Activation, and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Samejima, Kumiko; Ogawa, Hiromi; Ageichik, Alexander V.; Peterson, Kevin L.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Kanemaki, Masato T.; Earnshaw, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Caspase-activated DNase (CAD) is a major apoptotic nuclease, responsible for DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation during apoptosis. CAD is normally activated in apoptosis as a result of caspase cleavage of its inhibitory chaperone ICAD. Other aspects of CAD regulation are poorly understood. In particular, it has been unclear whether direct CAD activation in non-apoptotic living cells can trigger cell death. Taking advantage of the auxin-inducible degron (AID) system, we have developed a suicide system with which ICAD is rapidly degraded in living cells in response to the plant hormone auxin. Our studies demonstrate that rapid ICAD depletion is sufficient to activate CAD and induce cell death in DT40 and yeast cells. In the vertebrate cells, ectopic CAD activation triggered caspase activation and subsequent hallmarks of caspase-dependent apoptotic changes, including phosphatidylserine exposure and nuclear fragmentation. These observations not only suggest that CAD activation drives apoptosis through a positive feedback loop, but also identify a unique suicide system that can be used for controlling gene-modified organisms. PMID:25248749

  18. Degradation or consumption of exogenous thymidine in absence or presence of exogenous deoxycytidine: Effect on DNA chain elongation and (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation in control and uv-irradiated CHO-K1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, C.N.; Hagler, M.

    1986-04-01

    When CHO-K1 cells monolayers are grown in Ham's F-12 culture medium containing 10% fetal calf serum (medium A) exogenous thymidine (dThd) is degraded to thymine by a putative dThd phosphorylase. Thymine is then poorly incorporated into cellular DNA. When 2 mM deoxycytidine (dCyd) is added to medium A (medium B) no degradation of exogenous dThd occurs; rather dThd is consumed in the synthesis of DNA, presumably via a dThd kinase or other nucleoside salvage pathway. Differences in the kinetics of DNA synthesis, measured by (/sup 3/H)dThd pulse-incorporation or by alkaline sucrose velocity sedimentation, are observed in the two media. In comparison to cells in medium A, DNA chain elongation rates of cells in medium B are faster but total DNA synthesis in these cells, measured by incorporation of (/sup 3/H)dThd, appears to be 2- to 3-fold more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of 10 Jm/sup -2/ uv-radiation. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Evaluation of PCR methods for 5S-rDNA and p30 genes to detect Toxoplasma gondii in blood and other clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Cresti, S; Ciacci, C; Donati, E; Giordano, I; Tordini, G; Barberi, A

    2001-04-01

    During the last few years the direct diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection has taken advantage of PCR. The present work tested the sensitivity and specificity of PCR for rDNA and p30 genes. Using ascitic fluid from infected mice rDNA PCR detected 0.5 tachyzoite/ml, while nested p30 PCR 1 tachyzoite/ml. The rDNA amplification was positive in all clinical samples from a single immuno compromised patient (blood, urine and bronchoalveolar fluid). In the same patient nested p30 PCR was positive only in urine and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. The rDNA and p30 amplicons were never found in any amniotic fluids tested. These results could prove the usefulness of rDNA amplification to detect T. gondii in blood. PMID:11346301

  20. The cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting Epac1-mediated proteasomal degradation of XRCC1 protein in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eun-Ah [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Juhnn, Yong-Sung, E-mail: juhnn@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits DNA damage repair by decreasing XRCC1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system decreases XRCC1 expression by promoting its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The promotion of XRCC1 degradation by cAMP signaling system is mediated by Epac1. -- Abstract: Cyclic AMP is involved in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cellular growth and proliferation. Recently, the cAMP signaling system was found to modulate DNA-damaging agent-induced apoptosis by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibitors of apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the cAMP signaling may modulate DNA repair activity, and we investigated the effects of the cAMP signaling system on {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage repair in lung cancer cells. Transient expression of a constitutively active mutant of stimulatory G protein (G{alpha}sQL) or treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, augmented radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibited repair of the damage in H1299 lung cancer cells. Expression of G{alpha}sQL or treatment with forskolin or isoproterenol inhibited the radiation-induced expression of the XRCC1 protein, and exogenous expression of XRCC1 abolished the DNA repair-inhibiting effect of forskolin. Forskolin treatment promoted the ubiquitin and proteasome-dependent degradation of the XRCC1 protein, resulting in a significant decrease in the half-life of the protein after {gamma}-ray irradiation. The effect of forskolin on XRCC1 expression was not inhibited by PKA inhibitor, but 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analog, increased ubiquitination of XRCC1 protein and decreased XRCC1 expression. Knockdown of Epac1 abolished the effect of 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP and restored XRCC1 protein level following {gamma}-ray irradiation. From these results, we conclude that the cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting the ubiquitin-proteasome dependent degradation of XRCC1 in an Epac-dependent pathway in lung cancer cells.

  1. Noninvasive measurement of aristolochic acid-DNA adducts in urine samples from aristolochic acid-treated rats by liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry: evidence for DNA repair by nucleotide-excision repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Leung, Elvis M K; Chan, Wan

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotoxic aristolochic acids (AAs) form covalently bonded DNA adducts upon metabolic activation. In this work, a non-invasive approach to detect AAs exposure by quantifying urinary excreted DNA-AA adducts is presented. The developed method entails solid-phase extraction (SPE) enrichment of the urine-excreted DNA-AAs adducts, addition of internal standard, and quantification by liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Quantitative analysis revealed 7-(deoxyadenosine-N(6)-yl)-aristolactam II and 7-(deoxyguanosine-N(2)-yl)-aristolactam I that were previously detected as major DNA-AA adducts in different organs of AA-dosed rats, were detected as the major urine excreted adducts. Lower levels of 7-(deoxyadenosine-N(6)-yl)-aristolactam I and 7-(deoxyguanosine-N(2)-yl)-aristolactam II were also detected in the collected urine samples. The identities of the detected urinary DNA-AA adducts were confirmed by comparing chromatographic retention time with synthetic standards, by high-accuracy MS, and MS/MS analyses. LC-MS/MS analysis of the urine samples collected from the AAs-dosed rats demonstrated a time-dependent decrease in the urinary adduct levels, indicating the urinary DNA-AA adduct levels were reflective of the tissue adduct levels. It is expected that the developed approach of detecting urinary DNA-AA adducts will facilitate further carcinogenesis investigations of AAs. PMID:25847264

  2. Small sample multiple testing with application to cDNA microarray data 

    E-print Network

    Hintze, Eric Poole

    2006-10-30

    OF TABLES????????????????????????? ix 1. INTRODUCTION??????????????..?????????. 1 2. TWO SAMPLE TESTS?????????????????????? 4 2.1. Background???????????????????????. 4 2.2. General Comparison of the t-test, Welch?s t...-test, the Bootstrap Within Test, the Bootstrap Across Test, and the Permutation Test?????????????????? 9 2.2.1. Permutation Achieved Significance Levels???????. 10 2.2.2. Bootstrap Achieved Significance Levels????????. 11 2.2.3. Comparison...

  3. Methods for Integrated Air Sampling and DNA Analysis for Detection of Airborne Fungal Spores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROGER H. WILLIAMS; ELAINE WARD; H. ALASTAIR MCCARTNEY

    2001-01-01

    Integrated air sampling and PCR-based methods for detecting airborne fungal spores, using Penicillium roqueforti as a model fungus, are described. P. roqueforti spores were collected directly into Eppendorf tubes using a miniature cyclone-type air sampler. They were then suspended in 0.1% Nonidet P-40, and counted using microscopy. Serial dilutions of the spores were made. Three methods were used to produce

  4. A novel immunity system for bacterial nucleic acid degrading toxins and its recruitment in various eukaryotic and DNA viral systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dapeng; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Aravind, L.

    2011-01-01

    The use of nucleases as toxins for defense, offense or addiction of selfish elements is widely encountered across all life forms. Using sensitive sequence profile analysis methods, we characterize a novel superfamily (the SUKH superfamily) that unites a diverse group of proteins including Smi1/Knr4, PGs2, FBXO3, SKIP16, Syd, herpesviral US22, IRS1 and TRS1, and their bacterial homologs. Using contextual analysis we present evidence that the bacterial members of this superfamily are potential immunity proteins for a variety of toxin systems that also include the recently characterized contact-dependent inhibition (CDI) systems of proteobacteria. By analyzing the toxin proteins encoded in the neighborhood of the SUKH superfamily we predict that they possess domains belonging to diverse nuclease and nucleic acid deaminase families. These include at least eight distinct types of DNases belonging to HNH/EndoVII- and restriction endonuclease-fold, and RNases of the EndoU-like and colicin E3-like cytotoxic RNases-folds. The N-terminal domains of these toxins indicate that they are extruded by several distinct secretory mechanisms such as the two-partner system (shared with the CDI systems) in proteobacteria, ESAT-6/WXG-like ATP-dependent secretory systems in Gram-positive bacteria and the conventional Sec-dependent system in several bacterial lineages. The hedgehog-intein domain might also release a subset of toxic nuclease domains through auto-proteolytic action. Unlike classical colicin-like nuclease toxins, the overwhelming majority of toxin systems with the SUKH superfamily is chromosomally encoded and appears to have diversified through a recombination process combining different C-terminal nuclease domains to N-terminal secretion-related domains. Across the bacterial superkingdom these systems might participate in discriminating `self’ or kin from `non-self’ or non-kin strains. Using structural analysis we demonstrate that the SUKH domain possesses a versatile scaffold that can be used to bind a wide range of protein partners. In eukaryotes it appears to have been recruited as an adaptor to regulate modification of proteins by ubiquitination or polyglutamylation. Similarly, another widespread immunity protein from these toxin systems, namely the suppressor of fused (SuFu) superfamily has been recruited for comparable roles in eukaryotes. In animal DNA viruses, such as herpesviruses, poxviruses, iridoviruses and adenoviruses, the ability of the SUKH domain to bind diverse targets has been deployed to counter diverse anti-viral responses by interacting with specific host proteins. PMID:21306995

  5. A novel immunity system for bacterial nucleic acid degrading toxins and its recruitment in various eukaryotic and DNA viral systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dapeng; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2011-06-01

    The use of nucleases as toxins for defense, offense or addiction of selfish elements is widely encountered across all life forms. Using sensitive sequence profile analysis methods, we characterize a novel superfamily (the SUKH superfamily) that unites a diverse group of proteins including Smi1/Knr4, PGs2, FBXO3, SKIP16, Syd, herpesviral US22, IRS1 and TRS1, and their bacterial homologs. Using contextual analysis we present evidence that the bacterial members of this superfamily are potential immunity proteins for a variety of toxin systems that also include the recently characterized contact-dependent inhibition (CDI) systems of proteobacteria. By analyzing the toxin proteins encoded in the neighborhood of the SUKH superfamily we predict that they possess domains belonging to diverse nuclease and nucleic acid deaminase families. These include at least eight distinct types of DNases belonging to HNH/EndoVII- and restriction endonuclease-fold, and RNases of the EndoU-like and colicin E3-like cytotoxic RNases-folds. The N-terminal domains of these toxins indicate that they are extruded by several distinct secretory mechanisms such as the two-partner system (shared with the CDI systems) in proteobacteria, ESAT-6/WXG-like ATP-dependent secretory systems in Gram-positive bacteria and the conventional Sec-dependent system in several bacterial lineages. The hedgehog-intein domain might also release a subset of toxic nuclease domains through auto-proteolytic action. Unlike classical colicin-like nuclease toxins, the overwhelming majority of toxin systems with the SUKH superfamily is chromosomally encoded and appears to have diversified through a recombination process combining different C-terminal nuclease domains to N-terminal secretion-related domains. Across the bacterial superkingdom these systems might participate in discriminating `self' or kin from `non-self' or non-kin strains. Using structural analysis we demonstrate that the SUKH domain possesses a versatile scaffold that can be used to bind a wide range of protein partners. In eukaryotes it appears to have been recruited as an adaptor to regulate modification of proteins by ubiquitination or polyglutamylation. Similarly, another widespread immunity protein from these toxin systems, namely the suppressor of fused (SuFu) superfamily has been recruited for comparable roles in eukaryotes. In animal DNA viruses, such as herpesviruses, poxviruses, iridoviruses and adenoviruses, the ability of the SUKH domain to bind diverse targets has been deployed to counter diverse anti-viral responses by interacting with specific host proteins. PMID:21306995

  6. Performance of Identifiler Direct and PowerPlex 16 HS on the Applied Biosystems 3730 DNA Analyzer for processing biological samples archived on FTA cards.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Nancy; DeMoors, Anick; Frégeau, Chantal

    2012-09-01

    Direct amplification of STR loci from biological samples collected on FTA cards without prior DNA purification was evaluated using Identifiler Direct and PowerPlex 16 HS in conjunction with the use of a high throughput Applied Biosystems 3730 DNA Analyzer. In order to reduce the overall sample processing cost, reduced PCR volumes combined with various FTA disk sizes were tested. Optimized STR profiles were obtained using a 0.53 mm disk size in 10 ?L PCR volume for both STR systems. These protocols proved effective in generating high quality profiles on the 3730 DNA Analyzer from both blood and buccal FTA samples. Reproducibility, concordance, robustness, sample stability and profile quality were assessed using a collection of blood and buccal samples on FTA cards from volunteer donors as well as from convicted offenders. The new developed protocols offer enhanced throughput capability and cost effectiveness without compromising the robustness and quality of the STR profiles obtained. These results support the use of these protocols for processing convicted offender samples submitted to the National DNA Data Bank of Canada. Similar protocols could be applied to the processing of casework reference samples or in paternity or family relationship testing. PMID:22405517

  7. Assessing genetic diversity of wild and hatchery samples of the Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus) by the mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiayun; Wu, Bo; Hou, Feixia; Chen, Yongbai; Li, Chong; Song, Zhaobin

    2014-09-22

    Abstract To restore the natural populations of Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus), a hatchery release program has been underway for nearly 10 years. Using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial control region, we assessed the genetic diversity and genetic structure among samples collected from three sites of the wild population as well as from three hatcheries. The haplotype diversity of the wild samples (h?=?0.899-0.975) was significantly higher than that of the hatchery ones (h?=?0.296-0.666), but the nucleotide diversity was almost identical between them (??=?0.0170-0.0280). Relatively high gene flow was detected between the hatchery and wild samples. Analysis of effective population size indicated that M. asiaticus living in the Yangtze River has been expanding following a bottleneck in the recent past. Our results suggest the hatchery release programs for M. asiaticus have not reduced the genetic diversity, but have influenced the genetic structure of the species in the upper Yangtze River. PMID:25242190

  8. Deparaffinization with mineral oil: a simple procedure for extraction of high-quality DNA from archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples.

    PubMed

    Heikal, Nahla; Nussenzveig, Roberto H; Agarwal, Archana M

    2014-09-01

    Extracting DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival samples remains difficult. Successful polymerase chain reactions (PCR) with DNA extracted from FFPE samples is still very low. We extracted DNA from 12 recent and old archival FFPE bone marrow trephine biopsies by use of a simple protocol on the basis of deparaffinization with molecular biology-grade mineral oil followed by DNA extraction with the Qiagen FFPE kit. Comparison of this deparaffinization method with standard protocols, for example, xylene or Hemo-D with subsequent rehydration using graded ethanols, was investigated. The quality and quantity of extracted DNA were tested by a combination of ultraviolet spectroscopy, analysis on a Caliper LabChip GX, and real-time PCR combined with high-resolution melt analysis. Highest quality PCR-amplifiable DNA was obtained by deparaffinization with mineral oil, whereas more variable results were obtained for the other 2 deparaffinization procedures. This result was confirmed by real-time PCR and high-resolution melt analysis. Besides improvements in the quality of extracted DNA, use of mineral oil for deparaffinization has the added benefit of decreased time (20 vs. 75 min) and a significant reduction of hands-on labor (1 step vs. multiple hands-on centrifugation and decanting steps). PMID:24897067

  9. DNA Barcode Authentication of Wood Samples of Threatened and Commercial Timber Trees within the Tropical Dry Evergreen Forest of India

    PubMed Central

    Nithaniyal, Stalin; Newmaster, Steven G.; Ragupathy, Subramanyam; Krishnamoorthy, Devanathan; Vassou, Sophie Lorraine; Parani, Madasamy

    2014-01-01

    Background India is rich with biodiversity, which includes a large number of endemic, rare and threatened plant species. Previous studies have used DNA barcoding to inventory species for applications in biodiversity monitoring, conservation impact assessment, monitoring of illegal trading, authentication of traded medicinal plants etc. This is the first tropical dry evergreen forest (TDEF) barcode study in the World and the first attempt to assemble a reference barcode library for the trees of India as part of a larger project initiated by this research group. Methodology/Principal Findings We sampled 429 trees representing 143 tropical dry evergreen forest (TDEF) species, which included 16 threatened species. DNA barcoding was completed using rbcL and matK markers. The tiered approach (1st tier rbcL; 2nd tier matK) correctly identified 136 out of 143 species (95%). This high level of species resolution was largely due to the fact that the tree species were taxonomically diverse in the TDEF. Ability to resolve taxonomically diverse tree species of TDEF was comparable among the best match method, the phylogenetic method, and the characteristic attribute organization system method. Conclusions We demonstrated the utility of the TDEF reference barcode library to authenticate wood samples from timber operations in the TDEF. This pilot research study will enable more comprehensive surveys of the illegal timber trade of threatened species in the TDEF. This TDEF reference barcode library also contains trees that have medicinal properties, which could be used to monitor unsustainable and indiscriminate collection of plants from the wild for their medicinal value. PMID:25259794

  10. DNA barcoding and metabarcoding of standardized samples reveal patterns of marine benthic diversity.

    PubMed

    Leray, Matthieu; Knowlton, Nancy

    2015-02-17

    Documenting the diversity of marine life is challenging because many species are cryptic, small, and rare, and belong to poorly known groups. New sequencing technologies, especially when combined with standardized sampling, promise to make comprehensive biodiversity assessments and monitoring feasible on a large scale. We used this approach to characterize patterns of diversity on oyster reefs across a range of geographic scales comprising a temperate location [Virginia (VA)] and a subtropical location [Florida (FL)]. Eukaryotic organisms that colonized multilayered settlement surfaces (autonomous reef monitoring structures) over a 6-mo period were identified by cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcoding (>2-mm mobile organisms) and metabarcoding (sessile and smaller mobile organisms). In a total area of ? 15.64 m(2) and volume of ? 0.09 m(3), 2,179 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recorded from 983,056 sequences. However, only 10.9% could be matched to reference barcodes in public databases, with only 8.2% matching barcodes with both genus and species names. Taxonomic coverage was broad, particularly for animals (22 phyla recorded), but 35.6% of OTUs detected via metabarcoding could not be confidently assigned to a taxonomic group. The smallest size fraction (500 to 106 ?m) was the most diverse (more than two-thirds of OTUs). There was little taxonomic overlap between VA and FL, and samples separated by ? 2 m were significantly more similar than samples separated by ? 100 m. Ground-truthing with independent assessments of taxonomic composition indicated that both presence-absence information and relative abundance information are captured by metabarcoding data, suggesting considerable potential for ecological studies and environmental monitoring. PMID:25646458

  11. Evaluation of different real time PCRs for the detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded bronchoalveolar lavage samples.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Bertie H C G M; Voskuil, W Sebastiaan; Maraha, Boulos; van der Zee, Anneke; Westenend, Pieter J; Kusters, Johannes G

    2015-06-01

    The presence of Pneumocystis jirovecii in fresh clinical materials can be detected by PCR with high sensitivity and is thus preferred over microscopic methods. However, fresh materials are not always available, and on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded materials, PCR may result in reduced detection rates. In this study the diagnostic sensitivity of P. jirovecii real time PCR on DNA isolated from fresh bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples versus that from matched FFPE derived DNA is analyzed. Our results indicate that when targeting a small DNA fragment P. jirovecii PCR can be performed on FFPE BAL samples with acceptable sensitivity (up to 83.3%). This is considerably higher than the 33.3% positives observed by classical staining of these samples. PMID:25779023

  12. Effect of fibroblastic growth factor (FGF) or serum on protein degradation, the migration of non-histone proteins (NHP) to the nucleus and DNA in synthesis WI-38 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Polet, H.

    1986-03-01

    WI-38 cells were induced into G/sub 0/-G/sub 1/ by limiting serum in the medium to 1% for 2 days, while proteins were labeled with /sup 3/H-leucine. Subsequent stimulation of cell growth by FGF or fetal calf serum (FCS) caused increased migration of /sup 3/H-NHP to the nucleus and DNA synthesis and a parallel decrease of proteolysis. /sup 3/H-HNP migration and DNA synthesis were not affected by blocking protein synthesis by 91% with cycloheximid. Fractionation of the nuclear /sup 3/H-NHP by IEF pH 2.5-6.5 in gels, showed that protein fractions with the highest rate of degradation in unstimulated cells correspond to the fractions with the highest rate of migration in stimulated cells, suggesting that degradation and migration of NHP are linked. FGF inhibited the cellular accumulation of /sup 3/H-chloroquine, suggesting that FGF inhibits NHP degradation via lysosomes. The lysosomotropic amine eserine had similar effects as FGF. These effects are similar to the ones reported for lectin stimulated lymphocytes. These data suggest that lysosomes play a role in cellular growth control; NHP play an important role in growth control. It is proposed that FGF induces migration of NHP to the nucleus by inhibiting their degradation in lysosomes. FGF also induced migration of /sup 3/H-histones, however its mechanism is unknown.

  13. Pediatric sample inclusion in an opt-out biorepository linking DNA to de-identified medical records: Pediatric BioVU

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Tracy L.; Van Driest, Sara L.; Brothers, Kyle B.; Bowton, Erica A.; Muglia, Louis J.; Roden, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    The Vanderbilt DNA repository, BioVU, links DNA from leftover clinical blood samples to de-identified electronic medical records. After initiating adult sample collection, pediatric extension required consideration of ethical concerns specific to pediatrics and implementation of specialized DNA extraction methods. In the first year of pediatric sample collection, over 11,000 samples were included from individuals younger than 18 years. We compared the pediatric BioVU cohort to the overall Vanderbilt University Medical Center pediatric population and found similar demographic characteristics; however, the BioVU cohort has higher rates of select diseases, medication exposures, and laboratory testing, demonstrating enriched representation of severe or chronic disease. This unbalanced sample accumulation may accelerate research of some cohorts, but also may limit study of relatively benign conditions and the accrual of unaffected and unbiased control samples. BioVU represents a feasible model for pediatric DNA biobanking but involves both ethical and practical considerations specific to the pediatric population. PMID:23281421

  14. Real-time PCR detection and quantification of elephantid DNA: species identification for highly processed samples associated with the ivory trade.

    PubMed

    Wozney, Kristyne Michelle; Wilson, Paul J

    2012-06-10

    The ivory industry is the single most serious threat to global elephant populations. A highly sensitive, species-specific real-time PCR assay has been developed to detect and quantify African elephant (Loxodonta africana), Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) and Woolly Mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) mitochondrial DNA from highly processed samples involved in the international ivory trade. This assay is especially useful for highly processed samples where there are no distinguishing morphological features to identify the species of origin. Using species-specific Taqman(®) probes targeting a region of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, we developed an assay that can be used to positively identify samples containing elephant or Woolly mammoth DNA faster and more cost-effectively than traditional sequencing methods. Furthermore, this assay provides a diagnostic result based on probe hybridization that eliminates ambiguities associated with traditional DNA sequence protocols involving low template DNA. The real-time method is highly sensitive, producing accurate and reproducible results in samples with as few as 100 copies of template DNA. This protocol can be applied to the enforcement of the Convention on the International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES), when positive identification of species from illegally traded products is required by conservation officers in wildlife forensic cases. PMID:22257967

  15. DNA methylation results depend on DNA integrity-role of post mortem interval.

    PubMed

    Rhein, Mathias; Hagemeier, Lars; Klintschar, Michael; Muschler, Marc; Bleich, Stefan; Frieling, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Major questions of neurological and psychiatric mechanisms involve the brain functions on a molecular level and cannot be easily addressed due to limitations in access to tissue samples. Post mortem studies are able to partly bridge the gap between brain tissue research retrieved from animal trials and the information derived from peripheral analysis (e.g., measurements in blood cells) in patients. Here, we wanted to know how fast DNA degradation is progressing under controlled conditions in order to define thresholds for tissue quality to be used in respective trials. Our focus was on the applicability of partly degraded samples for bisulfite sequencing and the determination of simple means to define cut-off values. After opening the brain cavity, we kept two consecutive pig skulls at ambient temperature (19-21°C) and removed cortex tissue up to a post mortem interval (PMI) of 120 h. We calculated the percentage of degradation on DNA gel electrophoresis of brain DNA to estimate quality and relate this estimation spectrum to the quality of human post mortem control samples. Functional DNA quality was investigated by bisulfite sequencing of two functionally relevant genes for either the serotonin receptor 5 (SLC6A4) or aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). Testing our approach in a heterogeneous collective of human blood and brain samples, we demonstrate integrity of measurement quality below the threshold of 72 h PMI. While sequencing technically worked for all timepoints irrespective of conceivable DNA degradation, there is a good correlation between variance of methylation to degradation levels documented in the gel (R (2) = 0.4311, p = 0.0392) for advancing post mortem intervals (PMI). This otherwise elusive phenomenon is an important prerequisite for the interpretation and evaluation of samples prior to in-depth processing via an affordable and easy assay to estimate identical sample quality and thereby comparable methylation measurements. PMID:26042147

  16. DNA methylation results depend on DNA integrity—role of post mortem interval

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, Mathias; Hagemeier, Lars; Klintschar, Michael; Muschler, Marc; Bleich, Stefan; Frieling, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Major questions of neurological and psychiatric mechanisms involve the brain functions on a molecular level and cannot be easily addressed due to limitations in access to tissue samples. Post mortem studies are able to partly bridge the gap between brain tissue research retrieved from animal trials and the information derived from peripheral analysis (e.g., measurements in blood cells) in patients. Here, we wanted to know how fast DNA degradation is progressing under controlled conditions in order to define thresholds for tissue quality to be used in respective trials. Our focus was on the applicability of partly degraded samples for bisulfite sequencing and the determination of simple means to define cut-off values. After opening the brain cavity, we kept two consecutive pig skulls at ambient temperature (19–21°C) and removed cortex tissue up to a post mortem interval (PMI) of 120 h. We calculated the percentage of degradation on DNA gel electrophoresis of brain DNA to estimate quality and relate this estimation spectrum to the quality of human post mortem control samples. Functional DNA quality was investigated by bisulfite sequencing of two functionally relevant genes for either the serotonin receptor 5 (SLC6A4) or aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). Testing our approach in a heterogeneous collective of human blood and brain samples, we demonstrate integrity of measurement quality below the threshold of 72 h PMI. While sequencing technically worked for all timepoints irrespective of conceivable DNA degradation, there is a good correlation between variance of methylation to degradation levels documented in the gel (R2 = 0.4311, p = 0.0392) for advancing post mortem intervals (PMI). This otherwise elusive phenomenon is an important prerequisite for the interpretation and evaluation of samples prior to in-depth processing via an affordable and easy assay to estimate identical sample quality and thereby comparable methylation measurements. PMID:26042147

  17. Direct detection of Theileria annulata in bovine blood samples using standard and isothermal DNA amplification approaches.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jacinto; Inácio, João

    2015-01-01

    Tropical theileriosis is a tick-borne disease responsible for important health problems in cattle, caused by the hemoprotozoan Theileria annulata. Traditionally, detection of Theileria pathogens in infected animals requires the microscopic examination of stained-blood smears and serological methods. Molecular diagnostic assays have been developed for the detection of Theileria parasites, including PCR-based and reverse line blotting approaches, but these methods usually demand qualified personnel, complex instrumentation, and expensive materials. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) can facilitate the design of molecular assays independent of the use of sophisticated equipment. In this chapter we describe the application of two molecular assays for the direct detection of T. annulata in bovine blood samples, based in real-time PCR and LAMP, both targeting the Tams1-encoding gene of this parasite. PMID:25399096

  18. Accuracy and Cost-Effectiveness of Cervical Cancer Screening by High-Risk HPV DNA Testing of Self-Collected Vaginal Samples

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Akhila; Kulasingam, Shalini L.; Baer, Atar; Hughes, James P.; Myers, Evan R.; Mao, Constance; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Estimate the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer screening strategies based on high-risk HPV DNA testing of self-collected vaginal samples. Materials and Methods A subset of 1,665 women (18-50 years of age) participating in a cervical cancer screening study were screened by liquid-based cytology and by high-risk HPV DNA testing of both self-collected vaginal swab samples and clinician-collected cervical samples. Women with positive/abnormal screening test results and a subset of women with negative screening test results were triaged to colposcopy. Based on individual and combined test results, five screening strategies were defined. Estimates of sensitivity and specificity for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse were calculated and a Markov model was used to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for each strategy. Results Compared to cytology-based screening, high-risk HPV DNA testing of self-collected vaginal samples was more sensitive (68%, 95%CI=58%-78% versus 85%, 95%CI=76%-94%) but less specific (89%, 95%CI=86%-91% versus 73%, 95%CI=67%-79%). A strategy of high-risk HPV DNA testing of self-collected vaginal samples followed by cytology triage of HPV positive women, was comparably sensitive (75%, 95%CI=64%-86%) and specific (88%, 95%CI=85%-92%) to cytology-based screening. In-home self-collection for high-risk HPV DNA detection followed by in-clinic cytology triage had a slightly lower lifetime cost and a slightly higher quality-adjusted life expectancy than did cytology-based screening (ICER of triennial screening compared to no screening was $9,871/QALY and $12,878/QALY, respectively). Conclusions Triennial screening by high-risk HPV DNA testing of in-home, self-collected vaginal samples followed by in-clinic cytology triage was cost-effective. PMID:20592553

  19. Interlaboratory evaluation of the ISO standard 11063 “Soil quality — Method to directly extract DNA from soil samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Petric; L. Philippot; C. Abbate; A. Bispo; T. Chesnot; S. Hallin; K. Laval; T. Lebeau; P. Lemanceau; C. Leyval; K. Lindström; P. Pandard; E. Romero; A. Sarr; M. Schloter; P. Simonet; K. Smalla; B.-M. Wilke; F. Martin-Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Extracting DNA directly from micro-organisms living in soil is a crucial step for the molecular analysis of soil microbial communities. However, the use of a plethora of different soil DNA extraction protocols, each with its own bias, makes accurate data comparison difficult. To overcome this problem, a method for soil DNA extraction was proposed to the International Organization for Standardization

  20. A PCR test for progressive external ophthalmoplegia and Kearns-Sayre syndrome on DNA from blood samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. F. M De Coo; T Gussinklo; P. J. W Arts; B. A Van Oost; H. J. M Smeets

    1997-01-01

    Progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) are caused by deletions in mitochondrial DNA. Identification of these deletions is important for diagnosis, prognosis and genetic counselling. As yet, the most frequently used test is Southern blot analysis of DNA isolated from a muscle biopsy. Here, we describe a sensitive PCR-based test for the identification of these deletions in DNA

  1. FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF A MAMMALIAN DNA ALKALINE UNWINDING BIOASSAY WITH POTENTIAL APPLICATION TO HAZARD IDENTIFICATION FOR CONTAMINANTS FROM ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, the authors detailed a DNA alkaline unwinding assay (DAUA) that can be used to rapidly measure chemically induced strand breaks in mammalian cells. Further developments of the assay include: studies on the relationship between DNA adducts and DNA strand breaks; evaluati...

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Diuron-degrading Bacteria from Lotic Surface Water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabelle Batisson; Stéphane Pesce; Pascale Besse-Hoggan; Martine Sancelme; Jacques Bohatier

    2007-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of a diuron-degrading enrichment culture from lotic surface water samples was analyzed and\\u000a the diuron-degrading strains were selected using a series of techniques combining temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis\\u000a (TTGE) of 16 S rDNA gene V1–V3 variable regions, isolation of strains on agar plates, colony hybridization methods, and biodegradation\\u000a assays. The TTGE fingerprints revealed that diuron had

  3. Use of PCR-mediated amplification of Mycobacterium leprae DNA in different types of clinical samples for the diagnosis of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Santos, A R; De Miranda, A B; Sarno, E N; Suffys, P N; Degrave, W M

    1993-10-01

    DNA of Mycobacterium leprae, obtained by a highly efficient nucleic acid extraction procedure, was used for standardisation of the amplification of an M. leprae-specific repetitive sequence by use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). With pure DNA, M. leprae-specific amplification was obtained with as low as 100 ag (1 ag = 10(-18) g) of target DNA, a quantity equal to about one-tenth of the bacterial genome. Optimal processing of different types of clinical samples such as biopsy material, blood and lymph fluid, from multibacillary leprosy patients, was studied. Simple freezing-boiling cycles in the presence of Triton X100, with some additional sample-specific modifications such as pre-treatment with NaOH to eliminate PCR inhibitors, was found to be sufficient to yield amplification of bacterial DNA in samples from paucibacillary patients. Clinical samples from 27 untreated leprosy patients, covering the various clinical forms of the disease, and with a bacterial index ranging from 5+ to 0, were collected and processed for PCR analysis. After hybridisation of the amplified material with a specific sequence, 25 of 27 patients analysed gave positive results for M. leprae in at least one of the samples. The potential of PCR for the diagnosis of leprosy is discussed. PMID:8411091

  4. Detection of Pneumocystis DNA in samples from patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia- a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Dohn, Birthe; Benfield, Thomas L; Lundgren, Bettina

    2002-01-01

    Background Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as P. carinii f.sp. hominis) is an opportunistic fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised individuals. Pneumocystis jiroveci can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To investigate the clinical importance of a positive Pneumocystis-PCR among HIV-uninfected patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted. Methods Respiratory samples from 367 patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia were analysed by PCR amplification of Pneumocystis jiroveci. To compare clinical factors associated with carriage of P. jiroveci, a case-control study was done. For each PCR-positive case, four PCR-negative controls, randomly chosen from the PCR-negative patients, were matched on sex and date of birth. Results Pneumocystis-DNA was detected in 16 (4.4%) of patients. The median age for PCR-positive patients was higher than PCR-negative patients (74 vs. 62 years, p = 0.011). PCR-positive cases had a higher rate of chronic or severe concomitant illness (15 (94%)) than controls (32 (50%)) (p = 0.004). Twelve (75%) of the 16 PCR positive patients had received corticosteroids, compared to 8 (13%) of the 64 PCR-negative controls (p < 0.001). Detection of Pneumocystis-DNA was associated with a worse prognosis: seven (44%) of patients with positive PCR died within one month compared to nine (14%) of the controls (p = 0.01). None of the nine PCR-positive patients who survived had developed PCP at one year of follow-up. Conclusions Our data suggest that carriage of Pneumocystis jiroveci is associated with old age, concurrent disease and steroid treatment. PCR detection of P. jiroveci has low specificity for diagnosing PCP among patients without established immunodeficiency. Whether overt infection is involved in the poorer prognosis or merely reflects sub-clinical carriage is not clear. Further studies of P. jiroveci in patients receiving systemic treatment with corticosteroids are warranted. PMID:12445330

  5. Development and qualification of a high sensitivity, high throughput Q-PCR assay for quantitation of residual host cell DNA in purification process intermediate and drug substance samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Meng; Menesale, Emily; Lu, Tongjun; Magliola, Aeona; Bergelson, Svetlana

    2014-11-01

    Methods of high sensitivity, accuracy and throughput are needed for quantitation of low level residual host cell DNA in purification process intermediates and drug substances of therapeutic proteins. In this study, we designed primer/probe sets targeting repetitive Alu repeats or Alu-equivalent sequences in the human, Chinese hamster and murine genomes. When used in quantitative polymerase chain reactions (Q-PCRs), these primer/probe sets showed high species specificity and gave significantly higher sensitivity compared to those targeting the low copy number GAPDH gene. This allowed for detection of residual host cell DNA of much lower concentrations and, for some samples, eliminated the need for DNA extraction. By combining the high sensitivity Alu Q-PCR with high throughput automated DNA extraction using an automated MagMAX magnetic particle processor, we successfully developed and qualified a highly accurate, specific, sensitive and efficient method for the quantitation of residual host cell DNA in process intermediates and drug substances of multiple therapeutic proteins purified from cells of multiple species. Compared to the previous method using manual DNA extraction and primer/probe sets targeting the GAPDH gene, this new method increased our DNA extraction throughput by over sevenfold, and lowered the lower limit of quantitation by up to eightfold. PMID:25165010

  6. Identification and characterization of nuclease activities in anaerobic environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, T R; Andrews, S; Smith, G B

    2000-08-01

    DNA-degrading activity from anaerobic samples of bovine ruminal fluid, primary anaerobic digestor wastewater, freshwater sediments, and marine sediments was observed in the presence of 5 mM EDTA. Nuclease activity experiments involved exposing salmon chromosomal DNA to the environmental samples in 50 mM pH 7.2 buffer, incubating at 37 degrees C, and subjecting the products to electrophoresis. The same stock and concentration of EDTA used in these assays (5 mM) completely inhibited commercial grade DNase. Nuclease activity in two of the samples, ruminal fluid and wastewater, was further characterized. DNA degradation in the ruminal sample was significantly reduced when EDTA or citrate concentrations were increased to 50 mM or above. DNA degradation activity in ruminal fluid was associated with material that passed through a 0.22-micron filter, but wastewater activity was associated with material retained by a 3-micron filter. Degradation activity in the wastewater was resistant to heat pretreatment, whereas the rumen activity was heat-labile (70 degrees C, 60 min). These results demonstrated the biochemical complexity of these two environments and that high molecular weight DNA has a short half-life in these anaerobic environments. PMID:10941520

  7. Retrospective survey of chronic Q fever in Japan by using PCR to detect Coxiella burnetii DNA in paraffin-embedded clinical samples.

    PubMed Central

    Yuasa, Y; Yoshiie, K; Takasaki, T; Yoshida, H; Oda, H

    1996-01-01

    We used PCR to detect Coxiella burnetii DNA in paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from patients with chronic endocarditis in which the etiological agent had been unknown. On the basis of the published nucleotide sequence of the C. burnetii htpB gene, primers were chosen to produce an amplified fragment of 285 bp. A total of 60 samples from 56 patients were tested for the presence of C. burnetii DNA. Five samples from four patients were found to be positive. All of the amplified DNA fragments possessed a TthHB8I restriction site, as predicted from the published sequence of C. burnetii. In one of the four positive patients, rickettsia-like particles were found in sections of tissue stained by Gimenez's method. This is the first report of chronic Q fever in Japan. PMID:8815091

  8. Retrospective survey of chronic Q fever in Japan by using PCR to detect Coxiella burnetii DNA in paraffin-embedded clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Y; Yoshiie, K; Takasaki, T; Yoshida, H; Oda, H

    1996-04-01

    We used PCR to detect Coxiella burnetii DNA in paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from patients with chronic endocarditis in which the etiological agent had been unknown. On the basis of the published nucleotide sequence of the C. burnetii htpB gene, primers were chosen to produce an amplified fragment of 285 bp. A total of 60 samples from 56 patients were tested for the presence of C. burnetii DNA. Five samples from four patients were found to be positive. All of the amplified DNA fragments possessed a TthHB8I restriction site, as predicted from the published sequence of C. burnetii. In one of the four positive patients, rickettsia-like particles were found in sections of tissue stained by Gimenez's method. This is the first report of chronic Q fever in Japan. PMID:8815091

  9. Protocols for dry DNA storage and shipment at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Natalia V; Kuzmina, Masha L

    2013-09-01

    The globalization of DNA barcoding will require core analytical facilities to develop cost-effective, efficient protocols for the shipment and archival storage of DNA extracts and PCR products. We evaluated three dry-state DNA stabilization systems: commercial Biomatrica(®) DNAstable(®) plates, home-made trehalose and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) plates on 96-well panels of insect DNA stored at 56 °C and at room temperature. Controls included unprotected samples that were stored dry at room temperature and at 56 °C, and diluted samples held at 4 °C and at -20 °C. PCR and selective sequencing were performed over a 4-year interval to test the condition of DNA extracts. Biomatrica(®) provided better protection of DNA at 56 °C and at room temperature than trehalose and PVA, especially for diluted samples. PVA was the second best protectant after Biomatrica(®) at room temperature, whereas trehalose was the second best protectant at 56 °C. In spite of lower PCR success, the DNA stored at -20 °C yielded longer sequence reads and stronger signal, indicating that temperature is a crucial factor for DNA quality which has to be considered especially for long-term storage. Although it is premature to advocate a transition to DNA storage at room temperature, dry storage provides an additional layer of security for frozen samples, protecting them from degradation in the event of freezer failure. All three forms of DNA preservation enable shipment of dry DNA and PCR products between barcoding facilities. PMID:23789643

  10. Presence of Donor and Recipient-derived DNA in Cell-free Urine Samples of Renal Transplantation Recipients: Urinary DNA Chimerism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Zhang; Kwok-Lung Tong; Philip K. T. Li; Albert Y. W. Chan; Chung-Kwong Yeung; Calvin C. P. Pang; Teresa Y. H. Wong; Kam-Cheong Lee; Y. M. Dennis Lo

    1999-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have indicated that mi- crochimerism is present in body tissues, peripheral blood, and plasma of recipients after organ transplanta- tion. We hypothesize that donor-derived DNA may also be present in cell-free urine of renal transplant recipi- ents and that the concentrations of urine DNA may be correlated with graft rejection. Methods: Thirty-one female patients who had renal

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Seminested PCR for Detection and Differentiation of Babesia gibsoni (Asian Genotype) and B. canis DNA in Canine Blood Samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam J. Birkenheuer; Michael G. Levy; Edward B. Breitschwerdt

    2003-01-01

    Canine babesiosis has recently been recognized as an emerging infectious disease of dogs in North America. We sought to develop a seminested PCR to detect and differentiate Babesia gibsoni (Asian genotype), B. canis subsp. vogeli, B. canis subsp. canis, and B. canis subsp. rossi DNA in canine blood samples. An outer primer pair was designed to amplify an 340-bp fragment

  12. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection and discrimination of herpes simplex Type I and Type II viruses from PCR amplified real samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pinar Kara; Burcu Meric; Aysin Zeytinoglu; Mehmet Ozsoz

    2004-01-01

    An electrochemical biosensor for the voltammetric detection of DNA sequences related to herpes simplex viruses (HSV) and discrimination of HSV Type I and Type II viruses from polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified real samples were described in this study. The biosensor relies on the covalent immobilization of the 22-mer single stranded oligonucleotides (probe) related to both HSV Type I and

  13. DNA Detectives

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:2.1 FN:Suzanne Black N:Black; Suzanne ORG:Inglemoor High School REV:2005-04-09 END:VCARD

    1995-06-30

    Many of the revolutionary changes that have occurred in biology since 1970 can be attributed directly to the ability to manipulate DNA in defined ways. The principal tools for this recombinant DNA technology are enzymes that can "cut and "paste" DNA. Restriction enzymes are the "chemical scissors" of the molecular biologist; these enzymes cut DNA at specific nucleotide sequences. A sample of someone's DNA, incubated with restriction enzymes, is reduced to millions of DNA fragments of varying sizes. A DNA sample from a different person would have a different nucleotide sequence and would thus be enzymatically "chopped up" into a very different collection of fragments. We have been asked to apply DNA fingerprinting to determine which suspect should be charged with a crime perpetrated in our city.

  14. Nuclear degraded sperm subpopulation is affected by poor chromatin compaction and nuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Maynou, J; García-Peiró, A; Martínez-Heredia, J; Fernández-Encinas, A; Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Navarro, J; Benet, J

    2015-04-01

    There is an interest in the nuclear degraded sperm subpopulation because, although it is present in a low percentage in all semen samples, patient groups such as varicocele and rearranged genome carriers show high levels of these degraded spermatozoa. This study is designed with two objectives in mind: first, incubations of H2 O2 and nuclease on DTT-treated and untreated samples to show the aetiology of this subpopulation and second, assessment of the correlation between the protamine ratio and nuclear degraded spermatozoa. A very high increase in the nuclear degraded subpopulation has been found with nuclease incubation, and it is even higher when it has been merged with nuclear decompaction using DTT. Alternatively, incubation with H2 O2 with and without DTT did not show such a significant increase in nuclear degraded spermatozoa. The protamine ratio correlated with this subpopulation, showing, in patients, that poor nuclear compaction would turn the sperm susceptible to degradation. Then, the assessment of nuclear degraded spermatozoa might not be only a measure of DNA degradation but also an indicator of chromatin compaction in the spermatozoa. Different patient groups would fit this model for sperm nuclear degradation, such as varicocele patients, who show a high percentage of immature spermatozoa and nuclear degraded spermatozoa, and reorganised genome carriers, where reorganisation might also cause poor chromatin compaction on the sperm nucleus. PMID:24606016

  15. Exploitation of FTA cartridges for the sampling, long-term storage, and DNA-based analyses of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Marek, Martin; Zouhar, Miloslav; Douda, Ond?ej; Ma?asová, Marie; Ryšánek, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    The use of DNA-based analyses in molecular plant nematology research has dramatically increased over recent decades. Therefore, the development and adaptation of simple, robust, and cost-effective DNA purification procedures are required to address these contemporary challenges. The solid-phase-based approach developed by Flinders Technology Associates (FTA) has been shown to be a powerful technology for the preparation of DNA from different biological materials, including blood, saliva, plant tissues, and various human and plant microbial pathogens. In this work, we demonstrate, for the first time, that this FTA-based technology is a valuable, low-cost, and time-saving approach for the sampling, long-term archiving, and molecular analysis of plant-parasitic nematodes. Despite the complex structure and anatomical organization of the multicellular bodies of nematodes, we report the successful and reliable DNA-based analysis of nematode high-copy and low-copy genes using the FTA technology. This was achieved by applying nematodes to the FTA cards either in the form of a suspension of individuals, as intact or pestle-crushed nematodes, or by the direct mechanical printing of nematode-infested plant tissues. We further demonstrate that the FTA method is also suitable for the so-called "one-nematode-assay", in which the target DNA is typically analyzed from a single individual nematode. More surprisingly, a time-course experiment showed that nematode DNA can be detected specifically in the FTA-captured samples many years after initial sampling occurs. Collectively, our data clearly demonstrate the applicability and the robustness of this FTA-based approach for molecular research and diagnostics concerning phytonematodes; this research includes economically important species such as the stem nematode (Ditylenchus dipsaci), the sugar beet nematode (Heterodera schachtii), and the Northern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla). PMID:24093923

  16. Discovery and characterization of artifactual mutations in deep coverage targeted capture sequencing data due to oxidative DNA damage during sample preparation

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Maura; Pugh, Trevor J.; Fennell, Timothy J.; Stewart, Chip; Lichtenstein, Lee; Meldrim, James C.; Fostel, Jennifer L.; Friedrich, Dennis C.; Perrin, Danielle; Dionne, Danielle; Kim, Sharon; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Fisher, Sheila; Getz, Gad

    2013-01-01

    As researchers begin probing deep coverage sequencing data for increasingly rare mutations and subclonal events, the fidelity of next generation sequencing (NGS) laboratory methods will become increasingly critical. Although error rates for sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are well documented, the effects that DNA extraction and other library preparation steps could have on downstream sequence integrity have not been thoroughly evaluated. Here, we describe the discovery of novel C > A/G > T transversion artifacts found at low allelic fractions in targeted capture data. Characteristics such as sequencer read orientation and presence in both tumor and normal samples strongly indicated a non-biological mechanism. We identified the source as oxidation of DNA during acoustic shearing in samples containing reactive contaminants from the extraction process. We show generation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesions during DNA shearing, present analysis tools to detect oxidation in sequencing data and suggest methods to reduce DNA oxidation through the introduction of antioxidants. Further, informatics methods are presented to confidently filter these artifacts from sequencing data sets. Though only seen in a low percentage of reads in affected samples, such artifacts could have profoundly deleterious effects on the ability to confidently call rare mutations, and eliminating other possible sources of artifacts should become a priority for the research community. PMID:23303777

  17. Genomic DNA of Nostoc commune (Cyanobacteria) becomes covalently modified during long-term (decades) desiccation but is protected from oxidative damage and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Shirkey, Breanne; McMaster, Nicole J.; Smith, Sue C.; Wright, Deborah J.; Rodriguez, Henry; Jaruga, Pawel; Birincioglu, Mustafa; Helm, Richard F.; Potts, Malcolm

    2003-01-01

    Genomic DNA of Nostoc commune (Cyanobacteria) became covalently modified during decades of desiccation. Amplification of gene loci from desiccated cells required pretreatment of DNA with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide, a reagent that cleaves DNA- and protein-linked advanced glycosylation end-products. DNA from 13 year desiccated cells did not show any higher levels of the commonly studied oxidatively modified DNA damage biomarkers 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine and 5-hydroxyuracil, compared to commercially available calf thymus DNA. Different patterns of amplification products were obtained with DNA from desiccated/rehydrating cells and a liquid culture derived from the dried material, using the same set of primers. In contrast, a reproducible fingerprint was obtained, irrespective of time of rehydration of the DNA, using a primer (5?-GWCWATCGCC-3?) based upon a highly iterated palindromic repeat sequence present in the genome. In vitro, the desiccation of cccDNA led to loss of supercoiling, aggregation, loss of resolution during agarose gel electrophoresis and loss of transformation and transfection efficiency. These changes were minimized when DNA was desiccated and stored in the presence of trehalose, a non-reducing disaccharide present in Nostoc colonies. The response of the N.commune genome to desiccation is different from the response of the genomes of cyanobacteria and Deinococcus radiodurans to ionizing radiation. PMID:12799425

  18. Advances in forensic DNA quantification: a review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steven B; McCord, Bruce; Buel, Eric

    2014-11-01

    This review focuses upon a critical step in forensic biology: detection and quantification of human DNA from biological samples. Determination of the quantity and quality of human DNA extracted from biological evidence is important for several reasons. Firstly, depending on the source and extraction method, the quality (purity and length), and quantity of the resultant DNA extract can vary greatly. This affects the downstream method as the quantity of input DNA and its relative length can determine which genotyping procedure to use-standard short-tandem repeat (STR) typing, mini-STR typing or mitochondrial DNA sequencing. Secondly, because it is important in forensic analysis to preserve as much of the evidence as possible for retesting, it is important to determine the total DNA amount available prior to utilizing any destructive analytical method. Lastly, results from initial quantitative and qualitative evaluations permit a more informed interpretation of downstream analytical results. Newer quantitative techniques involving real-time PCR can reveal the presence of degraded DNA and PCR inhibitors, that provide potential reasons for poor genotyping results and may indicate methods to use for downstream typing success. In general, the more information available, the easier it is to interpret and process the sample resulting in a higher likelihood of successful DNA typing. The history of the development of quantitative methods has involved two main goals-improving precision of the analysis and increasing the information content of the result. This review covers advances in forensic DNA quantification methods and recent developments in RNA quantification. PMID:25088961

  19. Detection and Genotyping of Arcobacter and Campylobacter Isolates from Retail Chicken Samples by Use of DNA Oligonucleotide Arrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To explore the use of DNA microarrays for pathogen detection in food, we have produced DNA oligonucleotide arrays to identify the presence of Arcobacter and Campylobacter in retail chicken. Probes were selected that target housekeeping and virulence-associated genes in both Arcobacter butzleri and ...

  20. Improvement of a polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of Echinococcus multilocularis DNA in faecal samples of foxes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ph. Monnier; F. Cliquet; M. Aubert; S. Bretagne

    1996-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed in order to permit a sensitive and specific identification of Echinococcus multilocularis DNA from fox faecal specimens. In an attempt to overcome problems related to the presence of endogenous PCR inhibitors in faecal extracts, we investigated a DNA extraction technique using an anion binding resin (Gene-Fizz). This simple and rapid procedure was

  1. SOURCES OF HETEROGENEITY BIAS WHEN DNA MARK-RECAPTURE SAMPLING METHODS ARE APPLIED TO GRIZZLY BEAR (URSUS ARCTOS) POPULATIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Boulanger; Gordon Stenhouse; Robin Munro

    2004-01-01

    One of the challenges in estimating grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) population size using DNA methods is heterogeneity of capture probabilities. This study developed general tools to explore heterogeneity variation using data from a DNA mark-recapture project in which a proportion of the bear population had GPS collars. The Huggins closed population mark-recapture model was used to determine if capture probability

  2. Evolutionary and dispersal history of Eurasian house mice Mus musculus clarified by more extensive geographic sampling of mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, H; Nunome, M; Kinoshita, G; Aplin, K P; Vogel, P; Kryukov, A P; Jin, M-L; Han, S-H; Maryanto, I; Tsuchiya, K; Ikeda, H; Shiroishi, T; Yonekawa, H; Moriwaki, K

    2013-01-01

    We examined the sequence variation of mitochondrial DNA control region and cytochrome b gene of the house mouse (Mus musculus sensu lato) drawn from ca. 200 localities, with 286 new samples drawn primarily from previously unsampled portions of their Eurasian distribution and with the objective of further clarifying evolutionary episodes of this species before and after the onset of human-mediated long-distance dispersals. Phylogenetic analysis of the expanded data detected five equally distinct clades, with geographic ranges of northern Eurasia (musculus, MUS), India and Southeast Asia (castaneus, CAS), Nepal (unspecified, NEP), western Europe (domesticus, DOM) and Yemen (gentilulus). Our results confirm previous suggestions of Southwestern Asia as the likely place of origin of M. musculus and the region of Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and northern India, specifically as the ancestral homeland of CAS. The divergence of the subspecies lineages and of internal sublineage differentiation within CAS were estimated to be 0.37–0.47 and 0.14–0.23 million years ago (mya), respectively, assuming a split of M. musculus and Mus spretus at 1.7 mya. Of the four CAS sublineages detected, only one extends to eastern parts of India, Southeast Asia, Indonesia, Philippines, South China, Northeast China, Primorye, Sakhalin and Japan, implying a dramatic range expansion of CAS out of its homeland during an evolutionary short time, perhaps associated with the spread of agricultural practices. Multiple and non-coincident eastward dispersal events of MUS sublineages to distant geographic areas, such as northern China, Russia and Korea, are inferred, with the possibility of several different routes. PMID:23820581

  3. Evolutionary and dispersal history of Eurasian house mice Mus musculus clarified by more extensive geographic sampling of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Nunome, M; Kinoshita, G; Aplin, K P; Vogel, P; Kryukov, A P; Jin, M-L; Han, S-H; Maryanto, I; Tsuchiya, K; Ikeda, H; Shiroishi, T; Yonekawa, H; Moriwaki, K

    2013-11-01

    We examined the sequence variation of mitochondrial DNA control region and cytochrome b gene of the house mouse (Mus musculus sensu lato) drawn from ca. 200 localities, with 286 new samples drawn primarily from previously unsampled portions of their Eurasian distribution and with the objective of further clarifying evolutionary episodes of this species before and after the onset of human-mediated long-distance dispersals. Phylogenetic analysis of the expanded data detected five equally distinct clades, with geographic ranges of northern Eurasia (musculus, MUS), India and Southeast Asia (castaneus, CAS), Nepal (unspecified, NEP), western Europe (domesticus, DOM) and Yemen (gentilulus). Our results confirm previous suggestions of Southwestern Asia as the likely place of origin of M. musculus and the region of Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and northern India, specifically as the ancestral homeland of CAS. The divergence of the subspecies lineages and of internal sublineage differentiation within CAS were estimated to be 0.37-0.47 and 0.14-0.23 million years ago (mya), respectively, assuming a split of M. musculus and Mus spretus at 1.7 mya. Of the four CAS sublineages detected, only one extends to eastern parts of India, Southeast Asia, Indonesia, Philippines, South China, Northeast China, Primorye, Sakhalin and Japan, implying a dramatic range expansion of CAS out of its homeland during an evolutionary short time, perhaps associated with the spread of agricultural practices. Multiple and non-coincident eastward dispersal events of MUS sublineages to distant geographic areas, such as northern China, Russia and Korea, are inferred, with the possibility of several different routes. PMID:23820581

  4. Next-Generation Sequencing of RNA and DNA Isolated from Paired Fresh-Frozen and Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Samples of Human Cancer and Normal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hedegaard, Jakob; Thorsen, Kasper; Lund, Mette Katrine; Hein, Anne-Mette K.; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques; Vang, Søren; Nordentoft, Iver; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Hager, Henrik; Knudsen, Bjarne; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are an invaluable resource for clinical research. However, nucleic acids extracted from FFPE tissues are fragmented and chemically modified making them challenging to use in molecular studies. We analysed 23 fresh-frozen (FF), 35 FFPE and 38 paired FF/FFPE specimens, representing six different human tissue types (bladder, prostate and colon carcinoma; liver and colon normal tissue; reactive tonsil) in order to examine the potential use of FFPE samples in next-generation sequencing (NGS) based retrospective and prospective clinical studies. Two methods for DNA and three methods for RNA extraction from FFPE tissues were compared and were found to affect nucleic acid quantity and quality. DNA and RNA from selected FFPE and paired FF/FFPE specimens were used for exome and transcriptome analysis. Preparations of DNA Exome-Seq libraries was more challenging (29.5% success) than that of RNA-Seq libraries, presumably because of modifications to FFPE tissue-derived DNA. Libraries could still be prepared from RNA isolated from two-decade old FFPE tissues. Data were analysed using the CLC Bio Genomics Workbench and revealed systematic differences between FF and FFPE tissue-derived nucleic acid libraries. In spite of this, pairwise analysis of DNA Exome-Seq data showed concordance for 70–80% of variants in FF and FFPE samples stored for fewer than three years. RNA-Seq data showed high correlation of expression profiles in FF/FFPE pairs (Pearson Correlations of 0.90 +/- 0.05), irrespective of storage time (up to 244 months) and tissue type. A common set of 1,494 genes was identified with expression profiles that were significantly different between paired FF and FFPE samples irrespective of tissue type. Our results are promising and suggest that NGS can be used to study FFPE specimens in both prospective and retrospective archive-based studies in which FF specimens are not available. PMID:24878701

  5. Identification of mammalian species using the short and highly variable regions of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianhui; Zhu, Wei; Zhou, Yueqin; Liu, Zhiping; Chen, Yang; Zhao, Ziqin

    2015-08-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) typing is useful for the species determination of degraded samples and the nucleotide diversity of target fragments across species is crucial for the discrimination. In this study, the short and highly polymorphic regions flanked by two conserved termini were sought by the sequence alignment of mtDNA across species and two target regions located at 12S rRNA gene were characterized. Two universal primer sets were developed that appear to be effective for a wide variety of mammalian species, even for domestic birds. The two target regions could be efficiently amplified using their universal primer sets on degraded samples and provide sufficient information for species determination. Therefore, the two short and highly variable target regions might provide a high discriminative capacity and should be suitable for the species determination of degraded samples. PMID:24438314

  6. Development and clinical significance of a diagnostic assay based on the polymerase chain reaction for detection of human cytomegalovirus DNA in blood samples from immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed Central

    Zipeto, D; Revello, M G; Silini, E; Parea, M; Percivalle, E; Zavattoni, M; Milanesi, G; Gerna, G

    1992-01-01

    The presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA in blood was investigated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 293 blood samples from 86 immunocompromised patients. Of the 86 patients, 23 underwent clinical and virologic follow-up for HCMV infection. In parallel, blood samples were examined for viremia and antigenemia. Concordant results between PCR and assays for viremia and antigenemia were obtained on 124 positive and 110 negative samples, with an overall concordance of 79.8%, while 59 samples (most from patients with HCMV infection) were positive by PCR alone. PCR is a new powerful tool for detection of HCMV infections in blood samples from immunocompromised patients. However, its clinical significance appears to be restricted to the indication of a risk of reactivation of HCMV infection. Images PMID:1311338

  7. Dicarboxylic degradation products of nonylphenol polyethoxylates. Determination and structural elucidation in water samples by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after methylation.

    PubMed

    Hoai, Pham Manh; Tsunoi, Shinji; Ike, Michihiko; Sei, Kazunari; Lu, Xin; Tanaka, Minoru; Fujita, Masanori

    2006-01-20

    A reliable method combining solid-phase extraction, derivatization and gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-CI-MS) was developed for the measurement, in river and sewage effluent water, of four select model compounds of dicarboxylic metabolites (dm-CA(5-8)P1EC) and other dicarboxylic metabolites (CA(5-8)P1ECs) of nonylphenol polyethoxylates. These selected isomers were referred as dm-CA(5-8)P1ECs because they have an alpha,alpha-dimethyl configuration (expressed as "dm"), five to eight C atoms and a carboxyl group in the alkyl chain, and an ethoxy acetic acid group. The derivatization of terminal carboxyl groups was successful with (trimethylsilyl)diazomethane. The best extraction conditions were obtained using an Oasis HLB cartridge as a sorbent bed and 4 ml of MTBE/methanol (9:1, v/v) elution mixture. The method detection limits of 0.03-0.07 microg/l for dm-CA(5-8)P1ECs were attained in 500 ml pure water. The recovery was then evaluated for pure water, river and sewage effluent water samples. The high recoveries of typically >89% for each isomer indicated the high performance of the method. Although dm-CA(5-8)P1ECs were not detected in the collected water samples, 21 isomers of CA(5-8)P1ECs were identified by CI-MS and the tentative structures of six out of them were elucidated, mainly limited to the branch at alpha-C atom, by studying the EI-mass spectra. The relative concentrations of individual CA(5-8)P1EC metabolites were calculated based on dm-CA(5-8)P1ECs. The results showed that the main degradation on the nonyl chain occurred via the elimination of two carbon-units and the concentrations in Japan were much lower than those in Taiwan and Italy. PMID:16364332

  8. High-throughput, Automated Extraction of DNA and RNA from Clinical Samples using TruTip Technology on Common Liquid Handling Robots

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Rebecca C.; Gindlesperger, Alissa; Stokes, Tinsley; Brady, Dane; Thakore, Nitu; Belgrader, Philip; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2013-01-01

    TruTip is a simple nucleic acid extraction technology whereby a porous, monolithic binding matrix is inserted into a pipette tip. The geometry of the monolith can be adapted for specific pipette tips ranging in volume from 1.0 to 5.0 ml. The large porosity of the monolith enables viscous or complex samples to readily pass through it with minimal fluidic backpressure. Bi-directional flow maximizes residence time between the monolith and sample, and enables large sample volumes to be processed within a single TruTip. The fundamental steps, irrespective of sample volume or TruTip geometry, include cell lysis, nucleic acid binding to the inner pores of the TruTip monolith, washing away unbound sample components and lysis buffers, and eluting purified and concentrated nucleic acids into an appropriate buffer. The attributes and adaptability of TruTip are demonstrated in three automated clinical sample processing protocols using an Eppendorf epMotion 5070, Hamilton STAR and STARplus liquid handling robots, including RNA isolation from nasopharyngeal aspirate, genomic DNA isolation from whole blood, and fetal DNA extraction and enrichment from large volumes of maternal plasma (respectively). PMID:23793016

  9. CORRELATION OF DNA METHYLATION WITH MERCURY CONTAMINATION IN MARINE ORGANISMS: A CASE STUDY OF NOAA MUSSEL WATCH TISSUE SAMPLES

    E-print Network

    Brinkmeyer, Robin; Taylor, Robert; Germ, Kaylyn E.

    2011-08-04

    American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) obtained from the NOAA Mussel Watch program were screened for DNA methylation, a type of epigenetic response to stressors. Oysters were collected from sites in the Gulf of Mexico having high mercury...

  10. CORRELATION OF DNA METHYLATION WITH MERCURY CONTAMINATION IN MARINE ORGANISMS: A CASE STUDY OF NOAA MUSSEL WATCH TISSUE SAMPLES 

    E-print Network

    Brinkmeyer, Robin; Taylor, Robert; Germ, Kaylyn E.

    2011-08-04

    American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) obtained from the NOAA Mussel Watch program were screened for DNA methylation, a type of epigenetic response to stressors. Oysters were collected from sites in the Gulf of Mexico having high mercury...

  11. Detection of genomic DNA of the crayfish plague fungus Aphanomyces astaci (Oomycete) in clinical samples by PCR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B Oidtmann; N Schaefers; L Cerenius; K Söderhäll; R. W Hoffmann

    2004-01-01

    A diagnostic procedure, based on a polymerase chain reaction method (PCR) was developed to detect infection of crayfish with the Oomycete Aphanomyces astaci. A set of oligonucleotide primers was designed to specifically amplify A. astaci DNA in the ITS region surrounding the 5.8S rDNA gene. The PCR amplifies a 115bp amplicon. The specificity of the primers was demonstrated by testing

  12. Three job stress models\\/concepts and oxidative DNA damage in a sample of workers in Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akiomi Inoue; Norito Kawakami; Masao Ishizaki; Masaji Tabata; Masao Tsuchiya; Miki Akiyama; Akiko Kitazume; Mitsuyo Kuroda; Akihito Shimazu

    2009-01-01

    ObjectiveThree job stress models\\/concepts (the job demands–control [DC] model, the effort–reward imbalance [ERI] model, and organizational justice) have been linked to coronary heart disease (CHD) at work. In recent years, oxidative DNA damage has been identified as a new risk factor for CHD. However, evidence for the association between these job stressors and oxidative DNA damage is limited. The present

  13. Evaluation of DNAstable for DNA storage at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Susanne E; Castillo, Hilda S; Gioeni, Lora J; Robertson, James M; Donfack, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Preserving DNA is important for validation of prospective and retrospective analyses, requiring many expensive types of equipment (e.g., freezers and back-up generators) and energy. While freezing is the most common method for storing extracted DNA evidence or well-characterized DNA samples for validation studies, DNAstable (Biomatrica), a commercially available medium for room temperature storage of DNA extracts was evaluated in this study. Two groups of samples consisting of different DNA quantities were investigated, one ranging from 20 to 400 ng (group 1) and the other one ranging from 1.4 to 20 ng (group 2). The DNA samples with and without DNAstable were stored at four different temperatures [?25 °C (room temperature), -20 °C, 37 °C or 50 °C]. DNA degradation over several months was monitored by SYBR Green-based qPCR assays and by PCR amplification of the core CODIS STR markers for group 1 and 2 DNA samples, respectively. For the time points tested in this study (up to 365 days), the findings indicate that the -20 °C controls and the DNAstable protected samples at room temperature provided similar DNA recoveries that were higher compared to the unprotected controls kept at RT, 37 °C or 50 °C. These results suggest that DNAstable can protect DNA samples with effectiveness similar to that of the traditional -20 °C freezing method. In addition, extrapolations from accelerated aging experiments conducted at high temperatures support that DNAstable is an effective technology for preserving purified DNA at room temperature with a larger protective impact on DNA samples of low quantity (<20 ng). PMID:24315605

  14. Monitoring of Hematopoietic Chimerism by Real-Time Quantitative PCR of Micro Insertions/Deletions in Samples with Low DNA Quantities

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Christian; Tomova, Elmira; Goldmann, Katja; Weisbach, Volker; Roesler, Wolf; Mackensen, Andreas; Winkler, Julia; Spriewald, Bernd M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Sensitive and accurate methods to detect hematopoietic chimerism after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are essential to evaluate engraftment and to monitor response to therapeutic procedures such as donor lymphocyte infusion. Continuous long-term follow up, however, requires large amounts of pre-HSCT samples limiting the application of many widely used techniques for sensitive chimerism monitoring. Methods DNAs from 42 normal healthy donors and 16 HSCT donor/recipient pairs were employed to validate the use of allele-specific insertion/deletion (indel) quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to quantify chimerism in samples with low amounts of DNA. Consequently, indel-qPCR analyses of samples from 16 HSCT patients were compared to short-tandem repeat (STR) specific PCR analyses. Results Typing with reduced amounts of input DNA (15 vs. 60 ng) allowed for the reliable distinction of positive (mean threshold cycle (ct) 28.05) and negative (ct >36) signals. The high informativity of primer/probe sets, with 12 out of 19 markers exceeding 20% informativity, was confirmed in our cohort (n = 74). Importantly, a fourfold reduction of input DNA compared to published protocols did not alter PCR efficiencies and allowed for a more sensitive detection of chimerism in 7 of 16 HSCT patients compared to results obtained by STR-PCR. Conclusions Our data suggest that indel-qPCR is a more sensitive technique for the detection of hematopoietic chimerism compared to STR-PCR and works efficiently for samples with low amounts of DNA. PMID:25960714

  15. 16S rDNA diversity of cultured and uncultured prokaryotes of a mat sample from Lake Fryxell, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evelyne Brambilla; Hans Hippe; Anja Hagelstein; Brian J. Tindall; Erko Stackebrandt

    2001-01-01

    The prokaryotic diversity of aerobic and anaerobic bacterial isolates and of bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA clones was determined for a microbial mat sample from the moated region of Lake Fryxell, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Among the anaerobic bacteria, members of Clostridium estertheticum and some other psychrotolerant strains dominated whereas methanogens and other Archaea were lacking. Isolates highly related to

  16. Direct and rapid electrochemical biosensing of the human interleukin-2 DNA in unpurified polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified real samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad Hossein Pournaghi-Azar; Esmaeel Alipour; Sepideh Zununi; Haleh Froohandeh; Mohammad Saeid Hejazi

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemical detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified human interleukin-2 (IL-2) coding DNA sample (399bp size) without any purification and pre-treatment is described. To achieve this goal, a sensor was made by immobilization of a 20-mer oligonucleotide (chIL-2) as the probe on the pencil graphite electrode (PGE). This probe is related to the antisense strand of human interleukin-2 gene. The results

  17. Spectral and Eukaryotic DNA degradation studies for Ni(II), Pd(II), Pt(IV), Cu(II) and UO2(2+) complexes derived from thiouracil derivative.

    PubMed

    Abou-Melha, Khlood S

    2013-05-15

    A derivative of thiouracil ligand was prepared. Ni(II), Pd(II), Pt(IV), Cu(II) and UO2(2+) complexes were prepared. The elemental and different spectral tools were used for their characterization. A binegative tetradentate mode is the general coordination behavior of the ligand towards all metal ions used. The structural geometries were varied from square-planer (Pt, Pd(II)), square-pyramidal (Cu(II)) and octahedral (UO2(2+)). The geometry optimization implementing the hyperChem reveals that the Cu(II) complex is the most stable one. The thermogravimetric analysis supports the presence of solvent molecules attached with most complexes. The biological investigation was studied on different microorganisms as gram-positive, gram-negative and fungia. The Ni(II) complex shows the most toxic activity towards most organisms used. The degradation effect of DNA was studied by the use of investigated compounds and reveal that the Ni(II) and Pd(II) complexes are the most effective on the DNA degradation. PMID:23518511

  18. Generation of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine from DNA using rat liver homogenates.

    PubMed

    Shi, Minyi; Takeshita, Haruko; Komatsu, Masaharu; Xu, Baohui; Aoyama, Kohji; Takeuchi, Toru

    2005-01-01

    In relation to carcinogenesis, aging and other pathologic conditions, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG) is widely used as a marker for evaluating the effect of oxidative stress on DNA. Because no reports have described how 8OHdG is generated from DNA in vivo or by biological materials, and how it is excreted into urine, the authors investigated the generation of 8OHdG from DNA, using rat liver homogenate. Oxidatively damaged DNA samples containing different levels of 8OHdG were prepared using ultraviolet irradiation with three different concentrations of riboflavin. Following incubation of damaged DNA samples with rat liver homogenates, the generation of 8OHdG from the DNA was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection after ultrafiltration of the incubation mixtures. The generation of 8OHdG was also tested with an anti-8OHdG antibody. The quantity of 8OHdG generated from the DNA by rat liver homogenates was dependent on the 8OHdG levels in the DNA: almost all 8OHdG in the DNA was released as 8OHdG by rat liver homogenates. Generation of 8OHdG correlated with the degradation of DNA. Interestingly, the generated 8OHdG was stable in the presence of rat liver homogenates, whereas deoxyguanosine (dG) rapidly disappeared in the same conditions. Less than 1/10,000 of dG was converted to 8OHdG when dG was incubated with rat liver homogenate. Incubation of 8-hydroxyguanine with rat liver homogenates did not generate 8OHdG. These findings suggest that most of the 8OHdG in DNA is released as 8OHdG during DNA degradation and that, because of its stability, 8OHdG is excreted into urine, thus providing a convenient measure of oxidative damage to DNA. PMID:15649249

  19. Increased incidence of DNA amplification in follicular than in uterine and blood samples indicates possible tropism of Neospora caninum to the ovarian follicle.

    PubMed

    Silva, Andressa F; Rangel, Lucia; Ortiz, Carlos Garcia; Morales, Elizabeth; Zanella, Eraldo L; Castillo-Velázquez, Uziel; Gutierrez, Carlos G

    2012-08-13

    This study evaluated the presence of Neospora caninum in ovarian follicle aspirates and uterine flushes obtained from N. caninum seropositive dairy cows. Ninety-two cows that aborted within the previous 90 days were sampled to determine the presence of antibodies against N. caninum. Thirteen seropositive cows were chosen for collection of blood leukocytes, uterine flushes (UF; n=12) and follicular aspirates (OPU; n=13). Samples were centrifuged and the cellular sediment from the follicular fluid, uterine flushes and blood leukocytes were used for DNA extraction and PCR. Follicular aspirates had the highest frequency of DNA amplification for N. caninum (p<0.05, 92.3%; 12/13). Whereas uterine (4/12) and blood leukocyte (5/13) samples had similar (p>0.05) rate of positive results. Nonetheless, there was no agreement between blood leukocytes and follicular samples taken from the same animal (Cohen Kappa=-0.16). Similarly, blood leukocytes and uterine results had moderate agreement between them (Cohen Kappa=0.47). This study indicates that N. caninum is present in the ovarian follicle and uterus of seropositive cows, suggesting a possible risk of neosporosis transmission between females during oocyte and embryo collection and transfer. Hence, precautions should be taken to minimize the risk of N. caninum transmission. Furthermore, the high incidence of positive results in follicle samples, that exceeded that of their paired blood leukocytes, suggests a possible tropism of N. caninum for the ovarian follicle. PMID:22440723

  20. HIV-1 Vpr Protein Enhances Proteasomal Degradation of MCM10 DNA Replication Factor through the Cul4-DDB1[VprBP] E3 Ubiquitin Ligase to Induce G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Romani, Bizhan; Shaykh Baygloo, Nima; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Allahbakhshi, Elham

    2015-07-10

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr is an accessory protein that induces G2/M cell cycle arrest. It is well documented that interaction of Vpr with the Cul4-DDB1[VprBP] E3 ubiquitin ligase is essential for the induction of G2/M arrest. In this study, we show that HIV-1 Vpr indirectly binds MCM10, a eukaryotic DNA replication factor, in a Vpr-binding protein (VprBP) (VprBP)-dependent manner. Binding of Vpr to MCM10 enhanced ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of MCM10. G2/M-defective mutants of Vpr were not able to deplete MCM10, and we show that Vpr-induced depletion of MCM10 is related to the ability of Vpr to induce G2/M arrest. Our study demonstrates that MCM10 is the natural substrate of the Cul4-DDB1[VprBP] E3 ubiquitin ligase whose degradation is regulated by VprBP, but Vpr enhances the proteasomal degradation of MCM10 by interacting with VprBP. PMID:26032416

  1. Cloning and comparison of the DNA encoding ammelide aminohydrolase and cyanuric acid amidohydrolase from three s-triazine-degrading bacterial strains.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, R W; Karns, J S

    1991-01-01

    DNA encoding the catabolism of the s-triazines ammelide and cyanuric acid was cloned from Pseudomonas sp. strain NRRLB-12228 and Klebsiella pneumoniae 99 with, as a probe, a 4.6-kb PstI fragment from a third strain, Pseudomonas sp. strain NRRLB-12227, which also encodes these activities. In strains NRRLB-12228 and 99 the ammelide aminohydrolase (trzC) and cyanuric acid amidohydrolase (trzD) genes are located on identical 4.6-kb PstI fragments which are part of a 12.4-kb DNA segment present in both strains. Strain NRRLB-12227 also carries this 12.4-kb DNA segment, except that a DNA segment of 0.8 to 1.85 kb encoding a third enzyme, ammeline aminohydrolase (trzB), has been inserted next to the ammelide aminohydrolase gene with the accompanying deletion of 1.1 to 2.15 kb of DNA. In addition, the s-triazine catabolic genes are flanked in strain NRRLB-12227 by apparently identical 2.2-kb segments that are not present in the other two strains and that seem to cause rearrangements in adjacent DNA. Images PMID:1991731

  2. Vanguard\\/rearguard strategy for the evaluation of the degradation of yoghurt samples based on the direct analysis of the volatiles profile through headspace-gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Carrillo-Carrión; S. Cárdenas; M. Valcárcel

    2007-01-01

    A vanguard\\/rearguard analytical strategy for the monitoring of the degradation of yoghurt samples is proposed. The method is based on the headspace-gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (HS-GC–MS) instrumental coupling. In this combination, the chromatographic column is firstly used as an interface between the HS and the MS (vanguard mode) avoiding separation of the volatile components by maintaining the chromatographic oven at high,

  3. DNA and bone structure preservation in medieval human skeletons.

    PubMed

    Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M; Norton, Andrew L; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Ali, Nadir; Elmrghni, Samir; Gil, Cristiane D; Sasso, Gisela R S; Dixon, Ronald A; Nader, Helena B

    2015-06-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural data from archaeological human bones are scarce, particularly data that have been correlated with information on the preservation of molecules such as DNA. Here we examine the bone structure of macroscopically well-preserved medieval human skeletons by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry, and the quantity and quality of DNA extracted from these skeletons. DNA technology has been increasingly used for analyzing physical evidence in archaeological forensics; however, the isolation of ancient DNA is difficult since it is highly degraded, extraction yields are low and the co-extraction of PCR inhibitors is a problem. We adapted and optimised a method that is frequently used for isolating DNA from modern samples, Chelex(®) 100 (Bio-Rad) extraction, for isolating DNA from archaeological human bones and teeth. The isolated DNA was analysed by real-time PCR using primers targeting the sex determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY) and STR typing using the AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler PCR Amplification kit. Our results clearly show the preservation of bone matrix in medieval bones and the presence of intact osteocytes with well preserved encapsulated nuclei. In addition, we show how effective Chelex(®) 100 is for isolating ancient DNA from archaeological bones and teeth. This optimised method is suitable for STR typing using kits aimed specifically at degraded and difficult DNA templates since amplicons of up to 250bp were successfully amplified. PMID:25912776

  4. Development of a TaqMan based real-time PCR assay for detection of Clonorchis sinensis DNA in human stool samples and fishes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xian-Quan; Yu, Hai-Qiong; Bai, Jian-Shan; Tang, Jian-Dong; Hu, Xu-Chu; Chen, Ding-Hu; Zhang, Ren-Li; Chen, Mu-Xin; Ai, Lin; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-03-01

    Clonorchiasis caused by the oriental liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis is a fish-borne zoonosis endemic in a number of countries. This article describes the development of a TaqMan based real-time PCR assay for detection of C. sinensis DNA in human feces and in fishes. Primers targeting the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) sequence of the fluke were highly specific for C. sinensis, as evidenced by the negative amplification of closely related trematodes in the test with the exception of Opisthorchis viverrini. The detection limit of the assay was 1pg of purified genomic DNA, 5EPG (eggs per gram feces) or one metacercaria per gram fish filet. The assay was evaluated by testing 22 human fecal samples and 37 fish tissues microscopically determined beforehand, and the PCR results were highly in agreement with the microscopic results. This real-time PCR assay provides a useful tool for the sensitive detection of C. sinensis DNA in human stool and aquatic samples in China and other endemic countries where O. viverrini and Opisthorchis felineus are absent. PMID:21729765

  5. Benzo[a]pyrene diol-epoxide DNA adducts and levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in autoptic samples from human lungs.

    PubMed

    Lodovici, M; Akpan, V; Giovannini, L; Migliani, F; Dolara, P

    1998-11-27

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which are present in cigarette smoke, are common air and food genotoxic contaminants and possible human carcinogens. We measured the following PAH levels: benzo[a]anthracene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, BaP, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene as well as (+/-) syn and anti BaP diol-epoxide (BPDE) DNA adducts in autopsy samples from the lungs of non-smokers, ex-smokers and smokers who had lived in Florence, Italy. PAH levels in lung tissue were similar in all groups, with the exception of dibenzo[a,h]anthracene (DBA), which was higher in lung samples from smokers (n = 10, 0.18+/-0.17 ng/g d.w, mean +/- S.D.) compared to non-smokers (n = 15, 0.046+/-0.025 ng/g d.w) (P < 0.05), whereas ex-smokers (n = 5), had intermediate levels (0.07+/-0.03 ng/g d.w). The average level of total BPDE-DNA adducts was 4.46+/-5.76 per 10(8) bases in smokers, 4.04+/-2.37 per 10(8) in ex-smokers and 1.76+/-1.69 per 10(8) in non-smokers. The levels of non-smokers were significantly different (P < 0.05) from the levels of the smokers and ex-smokers combined. Total BPDE-DNA adducts were correlated with BaP levels in the lung samples in which both determinations were obtained (r = 0.63). Our results demonstrate that the biological load of PAHs due to environmental pollution is similar in individuals who smoke and those who do not, but BPDE-DNA adducts are higher in smokers and ex-smokers compared to non-smokers. This study further confirms the usefulness of BPDE-DNA adduct levels determination in the lungs from autopsy samples for monitoring long-term human exposure to BaP, a representative PAH. PMID:9920462

  6. Pressure Cycling Technology Sample Preparation System (PCT SPS) Improves Quantification of Pathogen DNA in Plants and Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot, bare patch, and damping-off of wheat are yield-limiting diseases caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 and R. oryzae. Detection and quantification of Rhizoctonia spp. are essential for evaluating pathogen distribution and management, but extraction of DNA from these pathogens is ha...

  7. DNA identification and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from cecal samples of chickens in Grenada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To speciate Campylobacter strains from the ceca of chickens in Grenada by PCR and to evaluate DNA-based typing methods for the characterization of these isolates. Isolates were speciated with two multiplex PCR assays and were typed with flaA-RFLP, PFGE and MLST. Results confirmed that C. coli strain...

  8. The prevalence of mixed DNA profiles in fingernail samples taken from couples who cohabit using autosomal and Y-STRs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon Malsom; Nicola Flanagan; Colin McAlister; Lindsey Dixon

    2009-01-01

    Physical contact can result in the transfer of DNA from one individual to another. In cases of sexual offence this can often be by means of an aggressive or sexual act. Biological material can accumulate under the fingernail hyponychium of both the victim and\\/or the suspect and has the potential to provide evidence and intelligence information to the police.The incidence

  9. Evaluating the prevalence of DNA mixtures found in fingernail samples from victims and suspects in homicide cases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bublil Nurit; Gast Anat; Shenfeld Michal; Front Lilach; Freund Maya

    2011-01-01

    An important aspect of homicide investigations is the identification of the persons that had the last contact with the victim prior to death. Violent crimes are frequently characterized by a struggle between the victim and the perpetrator where biological material can be expected to be exchanged between them.Forensic DNA typing enables the generation of genetic profiles by extraction and amplification

  10. DNA from keratinous tissue. Part I: hair and nail.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Camilla Friis; Olsen, Maia E; Brandt, Luise Ørsted; Bertelsen, Mads F; Willerslev, Eske; Tobin, Desmond J; Wilson, Andrew S; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2012-01-20

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle - although little systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA appear to be present in almost all hair and nail samples, the quality of DNA, both in quantity and length of amplifiable DNA fragments, vary considerably not just by species, but by individual, and even within individual between hair types. PMID:21530205

  11. Intraspecific Genetic Variation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Dirofilaria immitis Samples from Western China Using Complete ND1 and 16S rDNA Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianyu; Liang, Yinan; Zhong, Xiuqin; Wang, Ning; Hu, Dandan; Zhou, Xuan; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2014-01-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) is the causative agent of an important zoonotic disease that is spread by mosquitoes. In this study, molecular and phylogenetic characterization of D. immitis were performed based on complete ND1 and 16S rDNA gene sequences, which provided the foundation for more advanced molecular diagnosis, prevention, and control of heartworm diseases. The mutation rate and evolutionary divergence in adult heartworm samples from seven dogs in western China were analyzed to obtain information on genetic diversity and variability. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred using both maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayes methods based on the complete gene sequences. The results suggest that D. immitis formed an independent monophyletic group in which the 16S rDNA gene has mutated more rapidly than has ND1. PMID:24639299

  12. Advanced Glycation End Products of DNA: Quantification of N2-(1-carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG) in Biological Samples by LC-ESI-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Synold, Timothy; Xi, Bixin; Wuenschell, Gerald E.; Tamae, Daniel; Figarola, James L.; Rahbar, Samuel; Termini, John

    2011-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) and related alpha-oxoaldehydes react with proteins, lipids and DNA to give rise to covalent adducts known as advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Elevated levels of AGEs have been implicated in the pathological complications of diabetes, uremia, Alzheimers disease, and possibly cancer. There is therefore widespread interest in developing sensitive methods for the in vivo measurement of AGEs as prognostic biomarkers and for treatment monitoring. The two diastereomeric MG-DNA adducts of N2-(1-carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG) are the primary glycation products formed in DNA; however, accurate assessment of their distribution in vivo has not been possible since there is no readily available quantitative method for CEdG determination in biological samples. In order to address these issues we have developed a sensitive and quantitative LC-ESI-MS/MS assay using the stable isotope dilution method with an 15N5-CEdG standard. Methods for CEdG determination in urine or tissue extracted DNA are described. Changes in urinary CEdG in diabetic rats in response to oral administration of the AGE inhibitor LR-90 are used to demonstrate the potential utility of the method for treatment monitoring. Both stereoisomeric CEdG adducts were detected in a human breast tumor and normal adjacent tissue at levels of 3–12 adducts/107 dG, suggesting that this lesion may be widely distributed in vivo. Strategies for dealing with artifactual adduct formation due to oxoaldehyde generation during DNA isolation and enzymatic workup procedures are described. PMID:18808156

  13. Factors influencing detection of eDNA from a stream-dwelling amphibian.

    PubMed

    Pilliod, David S; Goldberg, Caren S; Arkle, Robert S; Waits, Lisette P

    2014-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods for detecting and estimating abundance of aquatic species are emerging rapidly, but little is known about how processes such as secretion rate, environmental degradation, and time since colonization or extirpation from a given site affect eDNA measurements. Using stream-dwelling salamanders and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis, we conducted three experiments to assess eDNA: (i) production rate; (ii) persistence time under different temperature and light conditions; and (iii) detectability and concentration through time following experimental introduction and removal of salamanders into previously unoccupied streams. We found that 44-50 g individuals held in aquaria produced 77 ng eDNA/h for 2 h, after which production either slowed considerably or began to equilibrate with degradation. eDNA in both full-sun and shaded treatments degraded exponentially to <1% of the original concentration after 3 days. eDNA was no longer detectable in full-sun samples after 8 days, whereas eDNA was detected in 20% of shaded samples after 11 days and 100% of refrigerated control samples after 18 days. When translocated into unoccupied streams, salamanders were detectable after 6 h, but only when densities were relatively high (0.2481 individuals/m(2) ) and when samples were collected within 5 m of the animals. Concentrations of eDNA detected were very low and increased steadily from 6-24 h after introduction, reaching 0.0022 ng/L. Within 1 h of removing salamanders from the stream, eDNA was no longer detectable. These results suggest that eDNA detectability and concentration depend on production rates of individuals, environmental conditions, density of animals, and their residence time. PMID:24034561

  14. Application of a DNA-based luminescence switch-on method for the detection of mercury(II) ions in water samples from Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-Zhang; Leung, Ka-Ho; Fu, Wai-Chung; Shiu-Hin Chan, Daniel; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2012-12-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic environmental contaminant that damages the endocrine and central nervous systems. In view of the contamination of Hong Kong territorial waters with anthropogenic pollutants such as trace heavy metals, we have investigated the application of our recently developed DNA-based luminescence methodology for the rapid and sensitive detection of mercury(II) ions in real water samples. The assay was applied to water samples from Shing Mun River, Nam Sang Wai and Lamma Island sea water, representing natural river, wetland and sea water media, respectively. The results showed that the system could function effectively in real water samples under conditions of low turbidity and low metal ion concentrations. However, high turbidity and high metal ion concentrations increased the background signal and reduced the performance of this assay.

  15. Band-broadening suppressed effect in long turned geometry channel and high-sensitive analysis of DNA sample by using floating electrokinetic supercharging on a microchip

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhongqi; Murata, Kenji; Arai, Akihiro; Hirokawa, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    A featured microchip owning three big reservoirs and long turned geometry channel was designed to improve the detection limit of DNA fragments by using floating electrokinetic supercharging (FEKS) method. The novel design matches the FEKS preconcentration needs of a large sample volume introduction with electrokinetic injection (EKI), as well as long duration of isotachophoresis (ITP) process to enrich low concentration sample. In the curved channel [?45.6 mm long between port 1 (P1) and the intersection point of two channels], EKI and ITP were performed while the side port 3 (P3) was electrically floated. The turn-induced band broadening with or without ITP process was investigated by a computer simulation (using CFD-ACE+ software) when the analytes traveling through the U-shaped geometry. It was found that the channel curvature determined the extent of band broadening, however, which could be effectively eliminated by the way of ITP. After the ITP-stacked zones passed the intersection point from P1, they were rapidly destacked for separation and detection from ITP to zone electrophoresis by using leading ions from P3. The FEKS carried on the novel chip successfully contributed to higher sensitivities of DNA fragments in comparison with our previous results realized on either a single channel or a cross microchip. The analysis of low concentration 50 bp DNA step ladders (0.23 ?g?ml after 1500-fold diluted) was achieved with normal UV detection at 260 nm. The obtained limit of detections (LODs) were on average 100 times better than using conventional pinched injection, down to several ng?ml for individual DNA fragment. PMID:20644677

  16. whose fates have been followed since 1971. Tissue sampling for DNA analyses started in 1988. Blood samples were taken from all captured sheep until 1993 and stored in

    E-print Network

    Bergstrom, Carl T.

    extracted from blood with a standard phenol­chloroform method, and from either 20­30 hairs including resumed in 1997, when hair samples were taken from all captured sheep by plucking 50­100 hairs including roots from the back or flank. Hairs were kept either in paper envelopes or plastic bags containing about

  17. Genomic DNA Quality Assessment by an Automated Microchip Electrophoresis Platform

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Tobias; Swenerton, Ryan; Zhu, Kevin; Singh, Rajendra; Fathollahi, Bahram; Ho, Mai

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of the quantity and integrity of genomic DNA (gDNA) is an important step in the preparation of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) libraries. Analysis of these samples prior to downstream NGS applications can prevent wasted time and resources. By implementation of a quality control method degraded gDNA can be excluded from further preparatory steps and from sequencing. A widely used method to assess gDNA quality are agarose gels, but in addition to being labor intensive and not automatable, limited quantitative data is offered. To ease this limit, we have developed a rapid, microfluidic assay for determining the quality of gDNA on the LabChip GX, an analytical platform that is also used for quantifying and sizing DNA and RNA in several other steps of the NGS sample preparation workflow. In this presentation we will describe the use of the assay for quantification and determination of gDNA sample integrity by a quality metric, the gDNA Quality Score (GQS). The GQS ranges from 0 to 5, with 5 representing the highest quality, and can be used to establish acceptance criteria for further analysis of a sample.

  18. Studies of RNA and DNA hairpin interactions with mineral surface: implications for molecules in meteorites and Martian samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amri, S.; Grajcar, L.; Fermandjian, S.; Ghomi, M.; Baron, M. H.; Maurel, M. C.

    2001-08-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that Surface-Enhanced Spectroscopy (SERS) using silver colloids as adsorbent phase allows studying picomoles of DNA or RNA nucleic acids standing at the solid-liquid interface. The most important underlined feature was the use of the adenyl groups as probes of nucleic acid reactivity with minerals. In this report, we present the silver phase as a model for electron-depleted mineral surfaces that may be encountered in terrestrial soils. In a first approach, we focus on the adsorption of adenyl residues included in four species of DNA loops with three residues or in the eight GNRA RNA tetraloops. They could be considered as in vitro models to test nucleic acid adsorption mechanisms and also to enlighten potential structural and reactivity changes that may be entailed. Our study underlines that primary sequences and local structures monitor the reactivity of adenyl residues involved in loops, whether made of DNA or RNA. Such investigations on very small amount of nucleic acid materials could serve in the area of searching living molecules adsorbed on long live terrestrial materials or in extraterrestrial rocks.

  19. SOIL DEGRADATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil degradation can be defined as loss in the quality or productivity of soil, and is often the result of human activities, such as agriculture, deforestation, mining, waste disposal, or chemical spills. Degradation is attributed to changes in soil nutrient status, biota, loss of organic matter, d...

  20. Direct sampling of cystic fibrosis lungs indicates that DNA-based analyses of upper-airway specimens can misrepresent lung microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Amanda F.; Staudinger, Benjamin J.; Dowd, Scot E.; Joshi-Datar, Amruta; Wolcott, Randall D.; Aitken, Moira L.; Fligner, Corinne L.; Singh, Pradeep K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work using culture-independent methods suggests that the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients harbor a vast array of bacteria not conventionally implicated in CF lung disease. However, sampling lung secretions in living subjects requires that expectorated specimens or collection devices pass through the oropharynx. Thus, contamination could confound results. Here, we compared culture-independent analyses of throat and sputum specimens to samples directly obtained from the lungs at the time of transplantation. We found that CF lungs with advanced disease contained relatively homogenous populations of typical CF pathogens. In contrast, upper-airway specimens from the same subjects contained higher levels of microbial diversity and organisms not typically considered CF pathogens. Furthermore, sputum exhibited day-to-day variation in the abundance of nontypical organisms, even in the absence of clinical changes. These findings suggest that oropharyngeal contamination could limit the accuracy of DNA-based measurements on upper-airway specimens. This work highlights the importance of sampling procedures for microbiome studies and suggests that methods that account for contamination are needed when DNA-based methods are used on clinical specimens. PMID:22872870

  1. One Hundred Twenty-One Dystrophin Point Mutations Detected from Stored DNA Samples by Combinatorial Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Annalaura; Trimarco, Amelia; Del Vecchio Blanco, Francesca; Cuomo, Anna; Aurino, Stefania; Piluso, Giulio; Minetti, Carlo; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by a large number of different mutations in the dystrophin gene. Outside of the deletion/duplication “hot spots,” small mutations occur at unpredictable positions. These account for about 15 to 20% of cases, with the major group being premature stop codons. When the affected male is deceased, carrier testing for family members and prenatal diagnosis become difficult and expensive. We tailored a cost-effective and reliable strategy to discover point mutations from stored DNA samples in the absence of a muscle biopsy. Samples were amplified in combinatorial pools and tested by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. An anomalous elution profile belonging to two different pools univocally addressed the allelic variation to an unambiguous sample. Mutations were then detected by sequencing. We identified 121 mutations of 99 different types. Fifty-six patients show stop codons that represent the 46.3% of all cases. Three non-obvious single amino acid mutations were considered as causative. Our data support combinatorial denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis as a clear-cut strategy for time and cost-effective identification of small mutations when only DNA is available. PMID:19959795

  2. Rsp5 Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Mediates DNA Damage-Induced Degradation of the Large Subunit of RNA Polymerase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SYLVIE L. BEAUDENON; MARIA R. HUACANI; GUANGLI WANG; DONALD P. MCDONNELL; JON M. HUIBREGTSE

    1999-01-01

    Rsp5 is an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that belongs to the hect domain family of E3 proteins. We have previously shown that Rsp5 binds and ubiquitinates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, Rpb1, in vitro. We show here that Rpb1 ubiquitination and degradation are induced in vivo by UV irradiation and by the UV-mimetic compound 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO)

  3. A plant cyclin B2 is degraded early in mitosis and its ectopic expression shortens G2-phase and alleviates the DNA-damage checkpoint

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Magdalena Weingartner; Helvia R. Pelayo; Pavla Binarova; Karin Zwerger; Balázs Melikant; Consuelo de la Torre; Erwin Heberle-Bors; László Bögre

    2003-01-01

    Mitotic progression is timely regulated by the accumulation and degradation of A- and B-type cyclins. In plants, there are three classes of A-, and two classes of B-type cyclins, but their specific roles are not known. We have generated transgenic tobacco plants in which the ectopic expression of a plant cyclin B2 gene is under the control of a tetracycline-inducible

  4. Relationship of spermatoscopy, prostatic acid phosphatase activity and prostate-specific antigen (p30) assays with further DNA typing in forensic samples from rape cases.

    PubMed

    Romero-Montoya, Lydia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Hugo; Pérez, Miguel Antonio; Argüello-García, Raúl

    2011-03-20

    In the forensic laboratory the biological analyses for rape investigation commonly include vaginal swabs as sample material combined to biochemical tests including sperm cytology (SC) and detection of acid phosphatase activity (AP) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA, p30) for the conclusive identification of semen components. Most reports comparing these tests relied on analysis of semen samples or donor swabs taken under controlled conditions; however their individual or combined efficacy under real live sampling conditions in different laboratories is largely unknown. We carried out SC, APA and PSA analyses in vaginal swabs collected from casework rapes submitted to Mexican Forensic Laboratories at Texcoco and Toluca. On the basis of positive and negative results from each assay and sample, data were classified into eight categories (I-VIII) and compared with those obtained in the two only similar studies reported in Toronto, Canada and Hong Kong, China. SC and APA assays had the higher overall positivity in Toluca and Texcoco samples respectively and otherwise PSA had a lower but very similar positivity between these two laboratories. When compared to the previous studies some similarities were found, namely similar frequencies (at a ratio of approximately 1 out of 3) of samples being positive or negative by all techniques (Categories I and VI respectively) and a comparable overall positivity of APA and SC but higher than that of PSA. Indeed the combined results of using SC, APA and PSA tests was considered as conclusive for semen detection from approximately 1 out of 3 cases (Category I) to approximately 1 out of 2 cases in a scenario where at least SC is positive, strongly presumptive in 2 out of 3 cases (with at least one test positive) and the remainder 1 out of 3 cases (Category VI) suggested absence of semen. By determining Y-STR polymorphisms (12-loci) in additional samples obtained at Toluca laboratory, complete DNA profiles were determined from all Category I samples, none marker was detected from all Category VI samples and mostly partial profiles were obtained from samples of other categories. These observations give an overview on the variability in efficacy of each test performed at different laboratories and provide a general notion about the in praxis contribution of SC, APA and PSA tests for further DNA typing in the forensic analysis of rape. PMID:20692115

  5. Factors influencing detection of eDNA from a stream-dwelling amphibian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilliod, David S.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Arkle, Robert S.; Waits, Lisette P.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods for detecting and estimating abundance of aquatic species are emerging rapidly, but little is known about how processes such as secretion rate, environmental degradation, and time since colonization or extirpation from a given site affect eDNA measurements. Using stream-dwelling salamanders and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis, we conducted three experiments to assess eDNA: (i) production rate; (ii) persistence time under different temperature and light conditions; and (iii) detectability and concentration through time following experimental introduction and removal of salamanders into previously unoccupied streams. We found that 44–50 g individuals held in aquaria produced 77 ng eDNA/h for 2 h, after which production either slowed considerably or began to equilibrate with degradation. eDNA in both full-sun and shaded treatments degraded exponentially to 2) and when samples were collected within 5 m of the animals. Concentrations of eDNA detected were very low and increased steadily from 6–24 h after introduction, reaching 0.0022 ng/L. Within 1 h of removing salamanders from the stream, eDNA was no longer detectable. These results suggest that eDNA detectability and concentration depend on production rates of individuals, environmental conditions, density of animals, and their residence time.

  6. Benzo[ a]pyrene diol-epoxide DNA adducts and levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in autoptic samples from human lungs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maura Lodovici; Victor Akpan; Luca Giovannini; Francesca Migliani; Piero Dolara

    1998-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which are present in cigarette smoke, are common air and food genotoxic contaminants and possible human carcinogens. We measured the following PAH levels: benzo[a]anthracene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, BaP, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene as well as (±) syn and anti BaP diol-epoxide (BPDE) DNA adducts in autopsy samples from the lungs of non-smokers, ex-smokers and smokers

  7. Cross-Institute Evaluations of Inhibitor-Resistant PCR Reagents for Direct Testing of Aerosol and Blood Samples Containing Biological Warfare Agent DNA

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, Timothy D.; Rachwal, Phillip A.; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples—which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR. PMID:24334660

  8. A novel nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for differential detection of Entamoeba histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar DNA in stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Krishna; Parija, Subhash C

    2007-01-01

    Background E. histolytica, a pathogenic amoeba, is indistinguishable in its cyst and trophozoite stages from those of non-pathogenic E. moshkovskii and E. dispar by light microscopy. We have developed a nested multiplex PCR targeting a 16S-like rRNA gene for differential detection of all the three morphologically similar forms of E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar simultaneously in stool samples. Results The species specific product size for E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar was 439, 553 and 174 bp respectively, which was clearly different for all the three Entamoeba species. The nested multiplex PCR showed a sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 100% for the demonstration of E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar DNA in stool samples. The PCR was positive for E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar in a total of 190 out of 202 stool specimens (94% sensitive) that were positive for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by examination of stool by microscopy and/or culture. All the 35 negative control stool samples that were negative for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by microscopy and culture were also found negative by the nested multiplex PCR (100% specific). The result from the study shows that only 34.6% of the patient stool samples that were positive for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by examination of stool by microscopy and/or culture, were actually positive for pathogenic E. histolytica and the remaining majority of the stool samples were positive for non-pathogenic E. dispar or E. moshkovskii as demonstrated by the use of nested multiplex PCR. Conclusion The present study reports a new nested multiplex PCR strategy for species specific detection and differentiation of E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii DNA in stool specimens. The test is highly specific, sensitive and also rapid, providing the results within 12 hours of receiving stool specimens. PMID:17524135

  9. Classification and phylogeny of sika deer (Cervus nippon) subspecies based on the mitochondrial control region DNA sequence using an extended sample set.

    PubMed

    Ba, Hengxing; Yang, Fuhe; Xing, Xiumei; Li, Chunyi

    2015-06-01

    To further refine the classification and phylogeny of sika deer subspecies, the well-annotated sequences of the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of 13 sika deer subspecies from GenBank were downloaded, aligned and analyzed in this study. By reconstructing the phylogenetic tree with an extended sample set, the results revealed a split between Northern and Southern Mainland Asia/Taiwan lineages, and moreover, two subspecies, C.n.mantchuricus and C.n.hortulorum, were existed in Northern Mainland Asia. Unexpectedly, Dybowskii's sika deer that was thought to originate from Northern Mainland Asia joins the Southern Mainland Asia/Taiwan lineage. The genetic divergences were ranged from 2.1% to 4.7% between Dybowskii's sika deer and all the other established subspecies at the mtDNA sequence level, which suggests that the maternal lineage of uncertain sika subspecies in Europe had been maintained until today. This study also provides a better understanding for the classification, phylogeny and phylogeographic history of sika deer subspecies. PMID:24063645

  10. [Detection of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA in samples from eggs and caterpillars at different stages of the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.) population dynamics].

    PubMed

    Bakhvalov, S A; Martem'ianov, V V; Bakhvalova, V N; Morozova, O V

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) DNA was detected in samples from eggs and caterpillars of the gypsy moth collected in natural populations of the Western Siberia and Ural by means of PCR with primers corresponding to the polyhedrin gene. According to censuring data, the gypsy moth populations of Western Siberia were at the depression stage. The NPV DNA detection frequencies in eggs (8.6 +/- 4.8% - 13.6 +/- 5.2%) and caterpillars (21.0 +/- 6.3% - 22.2 +/- 6.7%) were not significantly differed. In the Urals, collection of the insects was performed in their gradation focus at the phase of maximal abundance. The DNA detection rate in eggs (11.4 +/- 5.0%) was confidently (p < 0.001) lower than in caterpillars (59.8 +/- 5.6%). Consequently, variations of the NPV infection prevalence during ontogenesis of Lymantria dispar (L.) was associated with the gradation cycle of the insect population dynamics. PMID:23012983

  11. Environmental conditions influence eDNA persistence in aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Matthew A; Turner, Cameron R; Jerde, Christopher L; Renshaw, Mark A; Chadderton, W Lindsay; Lodge, David M

    2014-02-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) surveillance holds great promise for improving species conservation and management. However, few studies have investigated eDNA dynamics under natural conditions, and interpretations of eDNA surveillance results are clouded by uncertainties about eDNA degradation. We conducted a literature review to assess current understanding of eDNA degradation in aquatic systems and an experiment exploring how environmental conditions can influence eDNA degradation. Previous studies have reported macrobial eDNA persistence ranging from less than 1 day to over 2 weeks, with no attempts to quantify factors affecting degradation. Using a SYBR Green quantitative PCR assay to observe Common Carp ( Cyprinus carpio ) eDNA degradation in laboratory mesocosms, our rate of Common Carp eDNA detection decreased over time. Common Carp eDNA concentration followed a pattern of exponential decay, and observed decay rates exceeded previously published values for aquatic macrobial eDNA. Contrary to our expectations, eDNA degradation rate declined as biochemical oxygen demand, chlorophyll, and total eDNA (i.e., from any organism) concentration increased. Our results help explain the widely divergent, previously published estimates for eDNA degradation. Measurements of local environmental conditions, consideration of environmental influence on eDNA detection, and quantification of local eDNA degradation rates will help interpret future eDNA surveillance results. PMID:24422450

  12. [The level of DNA damage and DNA reparation rate in cells of earthworms sampled from natural populations for numerous generations inhabited territories with anthropogenically enhanced levels of radionuclides in soil].

    PubMed

    Kaneva, A V; Belykh, E S; Maystrenko, T A; Shadrin, D M; Pylina, Ya I; Velegzhaninov, I O

    2015-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation and chemical toxic agent effects on biological systems on different organization levels have been studied by numerous researchers. But there is a clear lack of experimental data that allow one to reveal molecular and cellular adaptations of plants and animals from natural populations to adverse effects of environmental factors. The present study was aimed to assess genotoxic effects in earthworms Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny and Lumbricus rubellus Hoffmeister sampled from the populations that during numerous generations inhabited the territories with a technogeneously enhanced content of natural origin radionuclides and heavy metals in soil. The levels ofthe DNA damage detected with alkaline and neutral versions of Comet-assay in invertebrates from contaminated territories were established not to differ from the spontaneous level found in the animals from the reference population. At the same time the rate of the DNA damage reparation induced in A. caliginosa sampled from the contaminated sites with additional acute ?-irradiation (4 Gy) was found to be considerably higher as compared with earthworms from the reference population. PMID:25962273

  13. Evaluation of inhibition and cross-reaction effects on real-time PCR applied to the total DNA of wastewater samples for the quantification of bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and taxon-specific targets.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Holger; Schwartz, Thomas; Kirchen, Silke; Stofer, Carmen; Obst, Ursula

    2007-04-01

    In order to evaluate the applicability of six primer and probe sets for TaqMan real-time RCR on DNA of wastewater samples, effects of the sample matrix and DNA background on target quantification were studied with respect to differences between functional genes and taxonomically used rDNA targets. Primer/probe assays for real-time PCR (TaqMan) designed to quantitatively detect the antibiotic resistance genes bla(VIM), vanA, ampC, mecA, and taxon-specific 23S rDNA sequences for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecium/faecalis were tested for their sensitivity and amplification robustness. The amplification of their gene targets in DNA extracts of wastewater ("wastewater DNA") and reference strains ("reference DNA") was compared with their amplification in "model DNA" which was composed of wastewater DNA and reference DNA. Target detection was quantifiable along up to seven decimal orders of magnitude. For the detection of the resistance genes bla(VIM), vanA, ampC, and mecA as well as the enterococci directed PCR only weak or no inhibition due to the impurities or wastewater DNA matrix were demonstrated for the applied target concentrations. The taxonomically applied detection system for the quantification of P. aeruginosa showed a limited performance. For the analysis of the amplification dynamics of possibly similar nucleotide sequences of organisms related to P. aeruginosa a SYBR Green assay was employed. Competitive amplification of similar sequences was identified to be a major mechanism of reduced sensitivity. Hence, the primers were modified for an optimised detection. With the resulting reduction of cross reactions an increased sensitivity was achieved for the detection and quantification of P. aeruginosa in wastewater DNA. PMID:17056226

  14. Rapid multiplex PCR based species identification of wild tigers using non-invasive samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nibedita Mukherjee; Samrat Mondol; Anish Andheria; Uma Ramakrishnan

    2007-01-01

    Conservation and management of rare and elusive species requires accurate data on presence or absence. In such cases, molecular\\u000a genetics based species identification approaches can prove invaluable, especially in conjuncture with non-invasive DNA sampling.\\u000a However, non-invasive sources yield DNA in low concentration that is degraded, which could result in false negatives for species\\u000a identification. In this paper, we developed a

  15. Estimation of the minimum uncertainty of DNA concentration in a genetically modified maize sample candidate certified reference material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Prokisch; R. Zeleny; S. Trapmann; L. Le Guern; H. Schimmel; G. N. Kramer; J. Pauwels

    2001-01-01

    Homogeneity testing and the determination of minimum sample mass are an important part of the certification of reference\\u000a materials. The smallest theoretically achievable uncertainty of certified concentration values is limited by the concentration\\u000a distribution of analyte in the different particle size fractions of powdered biological samples. This might be of special\\u000a importance if the reference material is prepared by dry

  16. Short communication: Evaluation of the microbiota of kefir samples using metagenetic analysis targeting the 16S and 26S ribosomal DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Leclercq, M; Nezer, C; Crevecoeur, S; Ferauche, C; Detry, E; Delcenserie, V; Daube, G

    2015-06-01

    Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products) using a targeted metagenetic approach. Of the 5 kefir grains analyzed, 1 was purchased in a supermarket, 2 were provided by the Ministry of Agriculture (Namur, Belgium), and 2 were provided by individuals. The metagenetic approach targeted the V1-V3 fragment of the 16S ribosomal (r)DNA for the grains and the resulting beverages at 2 levels of grain incorporation (5 and 10%) to identify the bacterial species population. In contrast, the 26S rDNA pyrosequencing was performed only on kefir grains with the aim of assessing the yeast populations. In parallel, pH measurements were performed on the kefir obtained from the kefir grains using 2 incorporation rates. Regarding the bacterial population, 16S pyrosequencing revealed the presence of 20 main bacterial species, with a dominance of the following: Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Gluconobacter frateurii, Lactobacillus kefiri, Acetobacter orientalis, and Acetobacter lovaniensis. An important difference was noticed between the kefir samples: kefir grain purchased from a supermarket (sample E) harbored a much higher proportion of several operational taxonomic units of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This sample of grain was macroscopically different from the others in terms of size, apparent cohesion of the grains, structure, and texture, probably associated with a lower level of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The kefir (at an incorporation rate of 5%) produced from this sample of grain was characterized by a lower pH value (4.5) than the others. The other 4 samples of kefir (5%) had pH values above 5. Comparing the kefir grain and the kefir, an increase in the population of Gluconobacter in grain sample B was observed. This was also the case for Acetobacter orientalis in sample D. In relation to 26S pyrosequencing, our study revealed the presence of 3 main yeast species: Naumovozyma spp., Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Kazachastania khefir. For Naumovozyma, further studies are needed to assess the isolation of new species. In conclusion, this study has proved that it is possible to establish the patterns of bacterial and yeast composition of kefir and kefir grain. This was only achieved with the use of high-throughput sequencing techniques. PMID:25828663

  17. Sample preparation for avian and porcine influenza virus cDNA amplification simplified: Boiling vs. conventional RNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, Sasan R; Starick, Elke; Ziller, Mario; Harder, Timm C; Unger, Hermann; Hamilton, Keith; Globig, Anja

    2015-09-01

    RNA extraction and purification is a fundamental step that allows for highly sensitive amplification of specific RNA targets in PCR applications. However, commercial extraction kits that are broadly used because of their robustness and high yield of purified RNA are expensive and labor-intensive. In this study, boiling in distilled water or a commercial lysis buffer of different sample matrices containing avian or porcine influenza viruses was tested as an alternative. Real-time PCR (RTqPCR) for nucleoprotein gene fragment was used as read out. Results were compared with freshly extracted RNA by use of a commercial extraction kit. Different batches of virus containing materials, including diluted virus positive allantoic fluid or cell culture supernatant, and avian faecal, cloacal or oropharyngeal swab samples were used in this study. Simple boiling of samples without any additional purification steps can be used as an alternative RNA preparation method to detect influenza A virus nucleoprotein RNA in oropharyngeal swab samples, allantoic fluid or cell-culture supernatant. The boiling method is not applicable for sample matrices containing faecal material. PMID:25929989

  18. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in assays in which we looked both at (1) preferential degradation of damaged or mismatched DNA after addition of a chimeric protein, and (2) preferential binding of the chimeric proteins to damaged or mismatched DNA. In our experiments, we used various samples containing damage or mismatches and a control sample containing no damage or mismatches. When a chimeric protein was added to the DNA samples, the damage- or mismatch-recognition portion of the chimeric protein bound the samples containing the DNA damage or mismatch, allowing the nuclease portion to degrade the DNA. Thus, we measured both the preferential binding to the damaged or mismatched DNA and the preferential degradation of these same samples. We showed this in gel-based assays as well as in multiplex flow-cytometry assays. This year, we also focused on a thermophilic protein, MutS, which in nature functions to detect mistakes in DNA replication by its mismatch-detection capability in an organism that lives under extreme thermal conditions (75 C). Because of its thermophilic stability, this protein has great potential as a SNP detection tool. However, the results of our multiplex experiments were unclear-potentially because of interference between samples on different beads. In summary, our results using chimeric proteins and MutS suggest that the proteins and methods developed in this project have application for detecting SNPs and DNA damage as well as for genetic testing.

  19. Automated PCR setup for forensic casework samples using the Normalization Wizard and PCR Setup robotic methods.

    PubMed

    Greenspoon, S A; Sykes, K L V; Ban, J D; Pollard, A; Baisden, M; Farr, M; Graham, N; Collins, B L; Green, M M; Christenson, C C

    2006-12-20

    Human genome, pharmaceutical and research laboratories have long enjoyed the application of robotics to performing repetitive laboratory tasks. However, the utilization of robotics in forensic laboratories for processing casework samples is relatively new and poses particular challenges. Since the quantity and quality (a mixture versus a single source sample, the level of degradation, the presence of PCR inhibitors) of the DNA contained within a casework sample is unknown, particular attention must be paid to procedural susceptibility to contamination, as well as DNA yield, especially as it pertains to samples with little biological material. The Virginia Department of Forensic Science (VDFS) has successfully automated forensic casework DNA extraction utilizing the DNA IQ(trade mark) System in conjunction with the Biomek 2000 Automation Workstation. Human DNA quantitation is also performed in a near complete automated fashion utilizing the AluQuant Human DNA Quantitation System and the Biomek 2000 Automation Workstation. Recently, the PCR setup for casework samples has been automated, employing the Biomek 2000 Automation Workstation and Normalization Wizard, Genetic Identity version, which utilizes the quantitation data, imported into the software, to create a customized automated method for DNA dilution, unique to that plate of DNA samples. The PCR Setup software method, used in conjunction with the Normalization Wizard method and written for the Biomek 2000, functions to mix the diluted DNA samples, transfer the PCR master mix, and transfer the diluted DNA samples to PCR amplification tubes. Once the process is complete, the DNA extracts, still on the deck of the robot in PCR amplification strip tubes, are transferred to pre-labeled 1.5 mL tubes for long-term storage using an automated method. The automation of these steps in the process of forensic DNA casework analysis has been accomplished by performing extensive optimization, validation and testing of the software methods. PMID:16542806

  20. Squirrelpox Virus: Assessing Prevalence, Transmission and Environmental Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tosh, David G.; McInnes, Colin; Everest, David; Montgomery, W. Ian; Scantlebury, Mike; Marks, Nikki; Dick, Jaimie T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) declined in Great Britain and Ireland during the last century, due to habitat loss and the introduction of grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), which competitively exclude the red squirrel and act as a reservoir for squirrelpox virus (SQPV). The disease is generally fatal to red squirrels and their ecological replacement by grey squirrels is up to 25 times faster where the virus is present. We aimed to determine: (1) the seropositivity and prevalence of SQPV DNA in the invasive and native species at a regional scale; (2) possible SQPV transmission routes; and, (3) virus degradation rates under differing environmental conditions. Grey (n?=?208) and red (n?=?40) squirrel blood and tissues were sampled. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) techniques established seropositivity and viral DNA presence, respectively. Overall 8% of squirrels sampled (both species combined) had evidence of SQPV DNA in their tissues and 22% were in possession of antibodies. SQPV prevalence in sampled red squirrels was 2.5%. Viral loads were typically low in grey squirrels by comparison to red squirrels. There was a trend for a greater number of positive samples in spring and summer than in winter. Possible transmission routes were identified through the presence of viral DNA in faeces (red squirrels only), urine and ectoparasites (both species). Virus degradation analyses suggested that, after 30 days of exposure to six combinations of environments, there were more intact virus particles in scabs kept in warm (25°C) and dry conditions than in cooler (5 and 15°C) or wet conditions. We conclude that SQPV is present at low prevalence in invasive grey squirrel populations with a lower prevalence in native red squirrels. Virus transmission could occur through urine especially during warm dry summer conditions but, more notably, via ectoparasites, which are shared by both species. PMID:24586845

  1. Squirrelpox virus: assessing prevalence, transmission and environmental degradation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lisa M; Warnock, Neil D; Tosh, David G; McInnes, Colin; Everest, David; Montgomery, W Ian; Scantlebury, Mike; Marks, Nikki; Dick, Jaimie T A; Reid, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) declined in Great Britain and Ireland during the last century, due to habitat loss and the introduction of grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), which competitively exclude the red squirrel and act as a reservoir for squirrelpox virus (SQPV). The disease is generally fatal to red squirrels and their ecological replacement by grey squirrels is up to 25 times faster where the virus is present. We aimed to determine: (1) the seropositivity and prevalence of SQPV DNA in the invasive and native species at a regional scale; (2) possible SQPV transmission routes; and, (3) virus degradation rates under differing environmental conditions. Grey (n = 208) and red (n = 40) squirrel blood and tissues were sampled. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) techniques established seropositivity and viral DNA presence, respectively. Overall 8% of squirrels sampled (both species combined) had evidence of SQPV DNA in their tissues and 22% were in possession of antibodies. SQPV prevalence in sampled red squirrels was 2.5%. Viral loads were typically low in grey squirrels by comparison to red squirrels. There was a trend for a greater number of positive samples in spring and summer than in winter. Possible transmission routes were identified through the presence of viral DNA in faeces (red squirrels only), urine and ectoparasites (both species). Virus degradation analyses suggested that, after 30 days of exposure to six combinations of environments, there were more intact virus particles in scabs kept in warm (25 °C) and dry conditions than in cooler (5 and 15 °C) or wet conditions. We conclude that SQPV is present at low prevalence in invasive grey squirrel populations with a lower prevalence in native red squirrels. Virus transmission could occur through urine especially during warm dry summer conditions but, more notably, via ectoparasites, which are shared by both species. PMID:24586845

  2. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  3. Isolation and identification of a novel alginate-degrading bacterium, Ochrobactrum sp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mao-hong Zhou; Fang-fang Han; Jun Li; Xiao-wei Zhao

    2008-01-01

    An alginate-degrading bacterium, identified as Ochrobactrum sp. on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequencing, was isolated from brown algal samples collected from the waters in close vicinity to the Dongtou Isles in the East China Sea. The strain, designated WZUH09-1, is a short rod, gram-negative, obligatory aerobic, grows under the following conditions: 5-40oC, pH 3-9, and 0-2 times of

  4. Detection of Pneumocystis DNA in samples from patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia- a case-control study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jannik Helweg-Larsen; Jørgen Skov Jensen; Birthe Dohn; Thomas L Benfield; Bettina Lundgren

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as P. carinii f.sp. hominis) is an opportunistic fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised individuals. Pneumocystis jiroveci can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To investigate the clinical importance of a positive Pneumocystis-PCR among HIV-uninfected patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted. METHODS: Respiratory samples from 367

  5. Detection and differentiation of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in broiler chicken samples using a PCR/DNA probe membrane based colorimetric detection assay.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, N A; Fallon, R; Carroll, C; Smith, T; Maher, M

    2000-02-01

    Campylobacter enteritis in humans has been linked to consumption of poultry meat. Surveys show that 30-100% of poultry harbour Campylobacter as normal flora of the digestive tract which indicates a need to identify prevalent organism types in flocks and trace their epidemiology. In this study we describe a Campylobacter genus specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, amplifying the 16 S-23 S rRNA intergenic spacer region with an internal Campylobacter genus specific DNA probe and species specific probes for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli designed for confirmation of the amplified PCR products by Southern blot and colorimetric reverse hybridization assays. The specificity of this assay was established by testing a range of food pathogens. Broiler chicken samples were tested following presumptive positive identification by the Malthus System V analyser (Malthus Instruments, UK). The combined PCR and colorimetric reverse hybridization assay is easy to perform and faster than conventional methods for confirmation and identification of Campylobacter species. PMID:10725058

  6. Analytical Performance of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay Using TaqMan Probes for Quantification of Trypanosoma cruzi Satellite DNA in Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Teresa; Cayo, Nelly M.; Parrado, Rudy; Bello, Zoraida Diaz; Velazquez, Elsa; Muñoz-Calderon, Arturo; Juiz, Natalia A.; Basile, Joaquín; Garcia, Lineth; Riarte, Adelina; Nasser, Julio R.; Ocampo, Susana B.; Yadon, Zaida E.; Torrico, Faustino; de Noya, Belkisyole Alarcón; Ribeiro, Isabela; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The analytical validation of sensitive, accurate and standardized Real-Time PCR methods for Trypanosoma cruzi quantification is crucial to provide a reliable laboratory tool for diagnosis of recent infections as well as for monitoring treatment efficacy. Methods/Principal Findings We have standardized and validated a multiplex Real-Time quantitative PCR assay (qPCR) based on TaqMan technology, aiming to quantify T. cruzi satellite DNA as well as an internal amplification control (IAC) in a single-tube reaction. IAC amplification allows rule out false negative PCR results due to inhibitory substances or loss of DNA during sample processing. The assay has a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.70 parasite equivalents/mL and a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 1.53 parasite equivalents/mL starting from non-boiled Guanidine EDTA blood spiked with T. cruzi CL-Brener stock. The method was evaluated with blood samples collected from Chagas disease patients experiencing different clinical stages and epidemiological scenarios: 1- Sixteen Venezuelan patients from an outbreak of oral transmission, 2- Sixty three Bolivian patients suffering chronic Chagas disease, 3- Thirty four Argentinean cases with chronic Chagas disease, 4- Twenty seven newborns to seropositive mothers, 5- A seronegative receptor who got infected after transplantation with a cadaveric kidney explanted from an infected subject. Conclusions/Significance The performing parameters of this assay encourage its application to early assessment of T. cruzi infection in cases in which serological methods are not informative, such as recent infections by oral contamination or congenital transmission or after transplantation with organs from seropositive donors, as well as for monitoring Chagas disease patients under etiological treatment. PMID:23350002

  7. Evidence for different mechanisms of ‘unhooking’ for melphalan and cisplatin-induced DNA interstrand cross-links in vitro and in clinical acquired resistant tumour samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are critical lesions produced by several cancer chemotherapy agents including platinum drugs and nitrogen mustards. We have previously shown in haematological (multiple myeloma) and solid tumours (ovarian cancer) that clinical sensitivity to such agents can result from a defect in DNA ICL processing leading to their persistence. Conversely, enhanced repair can result in clinical acquired resistance following chemotherapy. The repair of ICLs is complex but it is assumed that the ‘unhooking’ step is common to all ICLs. Methods Using a modification of the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay we measured the formation and unhooking of melphalan and cisplatin-induced ICLs in cell lines and clinical samples. DNA damage response in the form of ?-H2AX foci formation and the formation of RAD51 foci as a marker of homologous recombination were also determined. Real-time PCR of 84 genes involved in DNA damage signalling pathways was also examined pre- and post-treatment. Results Plasma cells from multiple myeloma patients known to be clinically resistant to melphalan showed significant unhooking of melphalan-induced ICLs at 48 hours, but did not unhook cisplatin-induced ICLs. In ovarian cancer cells obtained from patients following platinum-based chemotherapy, unhooking of cisplatin-induced ICLs was observed at 48 hours, but no unhooking of melphalan-induced ICLs. In vitro, A549 cells were proficient at unhooking both melphalan and cisplatin-induced ICLs. ?-H2AX foci formation closely followed the formation of ICLs for both drugs, and rapidly declined following the peak of formation. RPMI8226 cells unhooked melphalan, but not cisplatin-induced ICLs. In these cells, although cross-links form with cisplatin, the ?-H2AX response is weak. In A549 cells, addition of 3nM gemcitabine resulted in complete inhibition of cisplatin-induced ICL unhooking but no effect on repair of melphalan ICLs. The RAD51 foci response was both drug and cell line specific. Real time PCR studies highlighted differences in the damage response to melphalan and cisplatin following equi-ICL forming doses. Conclusions These data suggest that the mechanisms by which melphalan and cisplatin-induced ICLs are ‘unhooked’ in vitro are distinct, and the mechanisms of clinical acquired resistance involving repair of ICLs, are drug specific. PMID:23020514

  8. Thermal degradation of glucosinolates in red cabbage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirsten Oerlemans; Diane M. Barrett; Carme Bosch Suades; Ruud Verkerk; Matthijs Dekker

    2006-01-01

    Thermal degradation of individual glucosinolates within the plant matrix was studied. Red cabbage samples were heated at different temperatures for various times. To rule out the influence of enzymatic breakdown and to focus entirely on the thermal degradation of glucosinolates, myrosinase was inactivated prior to the thermal treatments. All identified glucosinolates degradation when heated at temperatures above 100°C. The indole

  9. New naphthalene-degrading marine Pseudomonas strains

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Valdes, E.; Cozar, E.; Rotger, R. Lalucat, J. (Univ. de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)); Ursing, J. (Univ. of Lund, Malmo (Sweden))

    1988-10-01

    Over 100 strains that utilized naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source were isolated from samples of marine sediments taken from a heavily polluted area. The isolates were characterized taxonomically and physiologically. Most of these strains belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, and seven of them did not fit any previous taxonomic description. They differed from type strains in a few biochemical characteristics and in the utilization of aromatic compounds. None had catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase was responsible for the aromatic ring cleavage. DNA hybridizations demonstrated a close relationship between two isolates and the Pseudomonas stutzeri type strain, and between five isolates and the Pseudomonas testosteroni type strain. On the basis of nutritional and enzymatic characteristics, it was assumed that the seven isolates represent new biovars belonging to the species P. testosteroni and P. stutzeri that are able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons.

  10. Detecting DNA viruses in oral fluids: evaluation of collection and storage methods.

    PubMed

    Speicher, David J; Wanzala, Peter; D'Lima, Melvin; Johnson, Karen E; Johnson, Newell W

    2015-06-01

    Storing saliva for nucleic acid diagnostics is problematic in resource-constrained settings. DNA Genotek's OMNIgene™·DISCOVER kit aims to stabilise microbial DNA at room temperature. We evaluate this for long-term storage, determining DNA quantity/purity and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) load as indicator. Viral loads and DNA degradation were assayed over 14months in HHV-8-negative saliva spiked with cell-associated and cell-free virus and saliva collected fresh frozen and into kits from 10 HIV-positive patients. Viral loads remained constant for 6-9months, yielding high quantities of DNA: subsequent losses were ?48%. Patient samples, frozen or kit stored, produced pure DNA of comparable concentration. Higher HHV-8 detection in frozen saliva resulted from losses during ethanol precipitation using kits. After 14months, DNA degradation was significant in frozen saliva, but that in kits had integrity similar to fresh samples. Storing frozen saliva is detrimental. This kit is well suited for collection, long-term storage, and assay of viral DNA in resource-constrained settings. PMID:25801777

  11. [Determination of AB0 blood group system from degraded blood stains on serological and molecular genetic level].

    PubMed

    Zachová, M; Zelený, M; Pexa, T; Mazura, I; Hirt, M

    2004-07-01

    The AB0 blood group system typing remains one of the basic laboratory tasks in a forensic practice. However, problems arise when the analysed samples are seriously degraded. We took blood samples from six volunteers (three men, three women) and made blood stains on pieces of sterile cotton cloth. Blood stains were incubated at three different temperatures (22 degrees C, 37 degrees C, 56 degrees C) for various periods of time (1 day, 1 week, 14 days, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year). For blood stains degraded at 22 degrees C we also analysed the samples after 3.5 hours of incubation. Moreover, we tried to determine the AB0 blood group system after thermal degradation at high temperature, accurately at 200 degrees C for 10 min. For the AB0 blood group system typing a Polymerase Chain Reaction method was used to amplify glycosyltransferase gene, when DNA had been isolated from artificially created blood stains, followed by their subsequent artificial thermal degradation. For serological AB0 typing the mixed agglutination and the Therkelsen method were used. The DNA analysis seemed to solve problems with seriously degraded blood stains but we found out that classical serological methods were even better in some cases. PMID:15493711

  12. Non-invasive genetic sampling for molecular sexing and microsatellite genotyping of hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus).

    PubMed

    Presti, Flavia T; Meyer, Janaína; Antas, Paulo T Z; Guedes, Neiva M R; Miyaki, Cristina Y

    2013-03-01

    Molted feather sampling is a useful tool for genetic analyses of endangered species, but it is often very laborious due to the low quality and quantity of the DNA obtained. In the present study we show the parts of feathers that resulted in better yield of DNA. In descending order these were: blood clot outside the umbilicus, umbilicus (without blood clot), tip, inner membrane, and small calamus. Compared to DNA extracted from blood samples, DNA extracted from feathers produced microsatellite alleles of poorer quality and had to be processed immediately after extraction. As expected due to the level of DNA degradation, molecular sexing protocols that result in shorter PCR products were more efficient. PMID:23569419

  13. Non-invasive genetic sampling for molecular sexing and microsatellite genotyping of hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus)

    PubMed Central

    Presti, Flavia T.; Meyer, Janaína; Antas, Paulo T.Z.; Guedes, Neiva M.R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.

    2013-01-01

    Molted feather sampling is a useful tool for genetic analyses of endangered species, but it is often very laborious due to the low quality and quantity of the DNA obtained. In the present study we show the parts of feathers that resulted in better yield of DNA. In descending order these were: blood clot outside the umbilicus, umbilicus (without blood clot), tip, inner membrane, and small calamus. Compared to DNA extracted from blood samples, DNA extracted from feathers produced microsatellite alleles of poorer quality and had to be processed immediately after extraction. As expected due to the level of DNA degradation, molecular sexing protocols that result in shorter PCR products were more efficient. PMID:23569419

  14. THE BIOLOGICAL, IMMUNOLOGICAL, AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A TRANSMISSIBLE AGENT CAPABLE OF INDUCING DNA AND THYMINE DEGRADATION IN CULTURED HUMAN CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Chang, R. Shihman; Humes, Maryellen

    1962-01-01

    Experiments designed to characterize an unidentified transmissible agent brought forth the following findings: The cytopathology consisted of the formation of intranuclear globules, collapse of the involved nuclei, and the extrusion of nuclear materials. The relatively dormant primary human amnion cells were less susceptible than the rapidly growing cell lines. Similarly, the slowly multiplying ribose variants were less susceptible than their corresponding parent cell lines. Interferon-like activity was released from infected cells. Infectivity was readily demonstrated following storage at 0–4°C for at least 8 months or at 37°C for at least 2 weeks. Freeze-thawing, however, markedly reduced or completely destroyed its infectivity. Infectivity was destroyed completely by ether and chloroform; partially by desoxycholate, and not affected by trypsin, papain, RNAse, DNAse, hyaluronidase, lysozyme, lecithinase, or pancreatic lipase. The rate of inactivation by 0.025 per cent formalin was much slower than that of vaccinia and herpes viruses. Its synthesis was suppressed by 5-fluorodeoxyuridine. This suppression was not reversed by thymidine and/or uracil. Heat-stable neutralizing antibody could not be demonstrated in 379 human and animal serums, in human gamma globulins, or in serums from animals "immunized" with this agent. Heat-labile inhibitors (lipoprotein-like) capable of inhibiting the infectivity of this agent were demonstrated in 154 of the 157 serums tested. Experimental evidence indicated the non-identity of this ubiquitous inhibitor and the properdin system. The non-infectious complex between this agent and the ubiquitous serum inhibitor may be dissociated (hence, become infectious) by simple dilution. Repeated attempts to reisolate a similar agent have not been successful. We have hypothesized that this agent is a virus consisting of DNA wrapped in a surface coat rich in lipid, and suggest that this virus be referred to tentatively as a lipovirus. PMID:13878102

  15. Cross-species amplification of microsatellite markers in Mycteria leucocephala Pennant 1769: molted feathers as successful DNA source.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bharat Bhushan; Mustafa, Mohd; Sharma, Tusha; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Urfi, Abdul Jamil

    2014-10-01

    DNA from molted feathers is being increasingly used for genetic studies on birds. However, the DNA obtained from such non-invasive sources is often not of enough quantity and quality for isolation of new microsatellite markers. The present study examined the potential of shed feathers of near threatened Painted Stork as a source of its DNA for cross-species amplification of microsatellites. Thirty-one shed feathers of varying conditions ('good' and 'deteriorated') and sizes ('large', 'intermediate' and 'small') collected in a north Indian population were used to isolate DNA by a standard isopropanol method and 11 microsatellite markers already developed in the Wood Stork were screened for amplification. Nine plucked feathers from two dead Painted Storks were also used to compare the DNA yield and amplification success. The DNA yield of feathers varied significantly in relation to the calamus size and condition. Among molted feathers, 'good' and 'large' samples provided more DNA than 'deteriorated' and 'small' ones, respectively. 'Large' plucked feathers yielded more DNA than 'large' molted feathers. DNA was almost degraded in all the samples and ratio of absorbance at 260/280 nm varied from 1.0 to 1.8, indicating impurity in many samples. Independent of DNA yields, all microsatellites were cross-amplified in all kinds of feathers, with > 80% success in different feather categories. It is concluded that the shed feathers can be successfully used to isolate DNA in the Painted Stork and for cross-species amplification of microsatellites. PMID:25345251

  16. Unveiling of the Diversity of Prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) in Marine Samples by Using High-Throughput Sequencing Analyses of PCR-Amplified DNA Polymerase and Major Capsid Protein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Clerissi, Camille; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Hingamp, Pascal; Poulain, Julie; Desdevises, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Viruses strongly influence the ecology and evolution of their eukaryotic hosts in the marine environment, but little is known about their diversity and distribution. Prasinoviruses infect an abundant and widespread class of phytoplankton, the Mamiellophyceae, and thereby exert a specific and important role in microbial ecosystems. However, molecular tools to specifically identify this viral genus in environmental samples are still lacking. We developed two primer sets, designed for use with polymerase chain reactions and 454 pyrosequencing technologies, to target two conserved genes, encoding the DNA polymerase (PolB gene) and the major capsid protein (MCP gene). While only one copy of the PolB gene is present in Prasinovirus genomes, there are at least seven paralogs for MCP, the copy we named number 6 being shared with other eukaryotic alga-infecting viruses. Primer sets for PolB and MCP6 were thus designed and tested on 6 samples from the Tara Oceans project. The results suggest that the MCP6 amplicons show greater richness but that PolB gave a wider coverage of Prasinovirus diversity. As a consequence, we recommend use of the PolB primer set, which will certainly reveal exciting new insights about the diversity and distribution of prasinoviruses at the community scale. PMID:24632251

  17. Inferring ethnicity from mitochondrial DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The assignment of DNA samples to coarse population groups can be a useful but difficult task. One such example is the inference of coarse ethnic groupings for forensic applications. Ethnicity plays an important role in forensic investigation and can be inferred with the help of genetic markers. Being maternally inherited, of high copy number, and robust persistence in degraded samples, mitochondrial DNA may be useful for inferring coarse ethnicity. In this study, we compare the performance of methods for inferring ethnicity from the sequence of the hypervariable region of the mitochondrial genome. Results We present the results of comprehensive experiments conducted on datasets extracted from the mtDNA population database, showing that ethnicity inference based on support vector machines (SVM) achieves an overall accuracy of 80-90%, consistently outperforming nearest neighbor and discriminant analysis methods previously proposed in the literature. We also evaluate methods of handling missing data and characterize the most informative segments of the hypervariable region of the mitochondrial genome. Conclusions Support vector machines can be used to infer coarse ethnicity from a small region of mitochondrial DNA sequence with surprisingly high accuracy. In the presence of missing data, utilizing only the regions common to the training sequences and a test sequence proves to be the best strategy. Given these results, SVM algorithms are likely to also be useful in other DNA sequence classification applications. PMID:21554759

  18. Growth phase dependency of chromatin cleavage and degradation by bleomycin.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C W; Jones, C S; Wall, L A

    1989-01-01

    Preferential cleavage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes in internucleosomal (linker) regions and nonspecific degradation of chromatin by an anticancer antibiotic which degrades DNA were investigated and found to increase in consecutive stages of growth. Cleavage of DNA in internucleosomal regions and intensities and multiplicities of nucleosomal bands were dependent on drug concentration, growth phase of the cells, and length of incubation. Cellular DNA was least degraded during logarithmic phase. After cells progressed only one generation in logarithmic phase, low concentrations (6.7 x 10(-7) to 3.4 x 10(-6) M) of bleomycin produced approximately three to seven times more DNA breaks. Internucleosomal cleavage was highest, and the most extended oligonucleosomal series and extensive chromatin degradation were observed during stationary phase. It is concluded that the growth phase of cells is critical in determining amounts of the highly preferential cleavage in internucleosomal regions and overall breakage and degradation of DNA. Mononucleosomal bands were most intense, indicating the greatest accumulation of DNA of this size. Mean mononucleosomal lengths were 165.9 +/- 3.9 base pairs, in agreement with yeast mononucleosomal lengths. As high-molecular-weight chromatin was digested by bleomycin, oligonucleosomes and, eventually, mononucleosomes became digested. Therefore, it is also concluded that bleomycin degradation of oligonucleosomes and trimming of DNA linker regions proceed to degradation of the monosomes (core plus linker DNA). Images PMID:2479336

  19. Correlation between Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA in intestinal mucosal samples and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies in serum of patients with IBD

    PubMed Central

    Mallant-Hent, RC; Mooij, M; von Blomberg, BME; Linskens, RK; van Bodegraven, AA; Savelkoul, PHM

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between ASCA and presence of mucosal S. cerevisiae DNA in a population of CD, ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and controls. METHODS: S. cerevisiae-specific primers and a fluorescent probe were designed for a 5’ exonuclease real time PCR (TaqManTM) assay, which is a homogenous system using a fluorescent-labelled probe for the detection of PCR product in real time. We analyzed the relation of the PCR results with the ASCA findings in a group of 76 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients (31 CD, 45 UC) and 22 healthy controls (HC). RESULTS: ASCA (IgA or IgG) were positive in 19 (61%) patients with CD, 12 (27%) with UC and none of the HC. PCR amplification was inhibited and excluded from the final results in 10 (22%) UC patients, 7 (22%) CD patients, and 6 (30%) HC. In only 15 of the mucosal samples, S. cerevisiae DNA was detected by real time PCR, including 7 (29%) in CD, 7 (19%) in UC, 1 (6%) in HC. In 4 CD and in 4 UC patients, ASCA and mucosal S. cerevisiae were positive. Mucosal S. cerevisiae was present in combination with negative ASCA IgA and IgG in 3 UC, and 3 CD patients. CONCLUSION: We conclude that since the presence of S. cerevisiae in colonic mucosal biopsy specimens is very rare, ASCA is unlikely to be explained by continuous exposure to S. cerevisiae in the mucosa. Therefore, ASCA formation must occur earlier in life and levels remain relatively stable thereafter in immunological susceptible persons. PMID:16482632

  20. Remote inhibition of polymer degradation.

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Roger Lee; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2005-08-01

    Polymer degradation has been explored on the basis of synergistic infectious and inhibitive interaction between separate materials. A dual stage chemiluminescence detection system with individually controlled hot stages was applied to probe for interaction effects during polymer degradation in an oxidizing environment. Experimental confirmation was obtained that volatile antioxidants can be transferred over a relatively large distance. The thermal degradation of a polypropylene (PP) sample receiving traces of inhibitive antioxidants from a remote source is delayed. Similarly, volatiles from two stabilized elastomers were also capable of retarding a degradation process remotely. This observation demonstrates inhibitive cross-talk as a novel interactive phenomenon between different polymers and is consequential for understanding general polymer interactions, fundamental degradation processes and long-term aging effects of multiple materials in a single environment.

  1. Degradation of the cytostatic etoposide in chlorinated water by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry: identification and quantification of by-products in real water samples.

    PubMed

    Negreira, Noelia; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià

    2015-02-15

    Once discharged into the sewage system, many pharmaceuticals may undergo degradation reactions in the presence of chemical disinfectants, generating by-products that may possess enhanced toxicity relative to the parent compounds. For this reason, the stability of the widely used cytostatic etoposide in chlorinated water has been investigated for the first time in the present work. Taking advantage of the high-resolution/accurate-mass capabilities of the hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer Q Exactive, two new oxidation by-products of etoposide were reliably identified. The time course of etoposide and its by-products was followed at different pH values, free chlorine concentrations and water matrices. Finally, the occurrence of etoposide and its major identified by-product (3'-O-desmethyl etoposide) was investigated in real water samples by on-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a 4000QTRAP hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The etoposide by-product was found in various river and wastewater samples at levels between 14 and 33 ng L(-1), whereas etoposide was not detected in any sample. PMID:25460937

  2. Multidimensional gas chromatography of oxidative degradation products in algae-derived fuel oil samples using narrow heartcuts and rapid cycle times.

    PubMed

    Mitrevski, Blagoj; Webster, Renée L; Rawson, Paul; Evans, David J; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Marriott, Philip J

    2012-02-10

    To characterize a fuel's thermal and storage stability an understanding of the process of oxidation and oxidation pathways is essential. Oxidation pathways commence with hydroperoxides which quickly decompose to form a range of alcohols, acids and other oxygen-containing species. In the presence of significant levels of hydrocarbon-based matrix, analysis of these heteroatomic species is difficult. Applying multidimensional gas chromatography with very narrow heart-cut windows (0.20 min) minimizes the number of compounds transferred to the second dimension (2D) column during each heart-cut. Successive heart-cuts every 2.00 min are taken throughout the analytical run, since each heart-cut has a maximum retention on 2D of <2.00 min on the fast elution 2D column. Subsequent analyses involve incrementing or offsetting the heart-cut windows by 0.20 min, so after 10 analyses, a complete coverage of the sample components can be obtained. On the polar 1D and non-polar 2D phase column arrangement, non-polar matrix compounds elute last on the 2D column, and this determines the largest (2t)R; i.e., (2t)R < P(M) to ensure retained components on 2D will not overlap with subsequent heart-cuts. Heartcutting is supported by cryotrapping at the start of the 2D column in order to provide significantly better resolution. Good quality MS library match data generally demonstrate the high resolution separation of oxygenates achieved. Whilst 1D GC-MS was unsuccessful in identifying any of the oxygen-containing compounds reported here, good correlation of MS data (with average MS library similarity data) for acids (903), alcohols (909), ketones (941) and aldehydes (938) in the sample is obtained. The method requires ten sequential runs, and this can be accomplished automatically once the events table is set up. However if fewer target compounds are to be transferred, a reduced number of sequential runs can be implemented. PMID:22226457

  3. Monitoring of DNA damage in haemocytes of freshwater mussel Sinanodonta woodiana sampled from the Velika Morava River in Serbia with the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Kolarevi?, Stoimir; Kneževi?-Vuk?evi?, Jelena; Paunovi?, Momir; Kra?un, Margareta; Vasiljevi?, Božica; Tomovi?, Jelena; Vukovi?-Ga?i?, Branka; Ga?i?, Zoran

    2013-09-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the potential of the freshwater mussel Sinanodonta woodiana for detection of genotoxic pollution of the environment. Study was performed at two sites in the Velika Morava River, from May 2010 to February 2011. The alkaline comet assay on haemocytes was used, and the olive tail moment (OTM) was chosen as a measure of DNA damage. The specimens held on acclimation under controlled laboratory conditions for 10d were used as a control. Chemical analysis revealed the presence of phosphates and increased concentrations of zinc, copper and nickel at both sites during the entire sampling period. The values of OTM in mussels collected from the environment, significantly correlated with the concentration of zinc (r=0.6248), temperature (r=0.7006) and dissolved oxygen (r=0.7738). Seasonal variations in genotoxic response were observed, with the highest OTM values obtained during summer months. Preliminary results of the in vitro study indicated the effect of water temperature on genotoxic response to zinc and cadmium in S. woodiana suggesting that the presence of genotoxic pollutants during months with lower temperature could be under-estimated. Obtained results indicate that S. woodiana could be a valuable tool for active biomonitoring of aquatic environments and emphasizes the importance of seasonal genotoxic monitoring with this organism. PMID:23722166

  4. Extraction and analysis of human nuclear and mitochondrial DNA from electron beam irradiated envelopes.

    PubMed

    Withrow, Angela G; Sikorsky, Jan; Downs, J C Upshaw; Fenger, Terry

    2003-11-01

    The United States Postal Service is considering methods such as electron beam irradiation to neutralize biological agents sent through the mail. While this is proven to reduce/eliminate pathogenic organisms, it may also degrade human genomic DNA and therefore hinder the ability to garner forensically informative genetic profiles. To determine the effects of electron beam irradiation on DNA typing, 16 white, standard letter-sized envelopes were licked. Half of the envelopes served as nonirradiated controls while the other half underwent irradiation at dosages sufficient to kill anthrax spores (29.3 and 51.6 kGy). Total cellular DNA was extracted from all envelopes; nuclear short tandem repeat loci, as well as the hypervariable region I from mitochondrial DNA, were amplified by means of the polymerase chain reaction. Short tandem repeat profiles and mitochondrial DNA sequence haplotypes were acquired on an ABI Prism 310 Genetic Analyzer platform. Analysis of data from irradiated samples revealed evidence of DNA degradation; however, the ability to construct full genetic profiles from both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA remained largely unaffected. The use of the polymerase chain reaction, coupled with florescent fragment analysis and mitochondrial DNA sequencing, should be considered to profile biological material from evidence enduring irradiation to inactivate infectious agents. PMID:14640275

  5. Cultivation-independent assessment of the bathypelagic archaeal diversity of Tyrrhenian Sea: Comparative study of rDNA and rRNA-derived libraries and influence of sample decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cono, Violetta; Tamburini, Christian; Genovese, Lucrezia; Spada, Gina La; Denaro, Renata; Yakimov, Michail M.

    2009-05-01

    Two samples of the same bathypelagic bacterioplankton community (Tyrrhenian Sea at the depth of 3000 m) were collected during single cast by both traditional sampling with Niskin bottle and using a high pressure-maintaining HPSS sampler. Total RNA was isolated, reverse transcribed, amplified with Archaea-specific primers and cloned. Riboclones were sequenced, 117 riboclones from decompressed library and 104 rRNA-based riboclones retrieved from HPSS sampler. Both RNA libraries were additionally compared with 115 riboclones based on DNA obtained from the decompressed sample (16S rRNA genes). In terms of repetitive riboclones, obtained in all three libraries, the bathypelagic community was dominated by Crenarchaeota Marine Group I (52-64%). The combined analysis led to a characterization of sampling-specific phylotypes otherwise uncharacterized if only one type of library had been analyzed alone. Of the DNA riboclones, 22% were found only in this library and no close relatives of Euryarchaeota Marine Group II were detected in both RNA-based libraries, suggesting the dormant state of these organisms in deep-sea environment. For clones from the RNA libraries, one Crenarchaeota MG I phylotype did not indicate close relatives in the DNA library. In general, among 10 archaeal phylotypes recovered in total, 8, 7 and 6 of them were faced in DNA, RNA_HPSS and RNA decompressed libraries, respectively. Based on comparisons between all three libraries, our data indicate that (i) the short-term decompression of seawater samples during cast recovery and following treatments caused only slight changes in the total rRNA diversity and (ii) rRNA-based analysis is likely affected the characterization of phylotypes, present in deep-sea environment as the dormant cells, detected only on the DNA level.

  6. Ancient DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dabney, Jesse; Meyer, Matthias; Pääbo, Svante

    2013-01-01

    Under favorable conditions DNA can survive for thousands of years in the remains of dead organisms. The DNA extracted from such remains is invariably degraded to a small average size by processes that at least partly involve depurination. It also contains large amounts of deaminated cytosine residues that are accumulated toward the ends of the molecules, as well as several other lesions that are less well characterized. PMID:23729639

  7. Developmental validation of the HIrisPlex system: DNA-based eye and hair colour prediction for forensic and anthropological usage.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Susan; Chaitanya, Lakshmi; Clarisse, Lindy; Wirken, Laura; Draus-Barini, Jolanta; Kovatsi, Leda; Maeda, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Sijen, Titia; de Knijff, Peter; Branicki, Wojciech; Liu, Fan; Kayser, Manfred

    2014-03-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping or 'DNA intelligence' tools are expected to aid police investigations and find unknown individuals by providing information on externally visible characteristics of unknown suspects, perpetrators and missing persons from biological samples. This is especially useful in cases where conventional DNA profiling or other means remain non-informative. Recently, we introduced the HIrisPlex system, capable of predicting both eye and hair colour from DNA. In the present developmental validation study, we demonstrate that the HIrisPlex assay performs in full agreement with the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) guidelines providing an essential prerequisite for future HIrisPlex applications to forensic casework. The HIrisPlex assay produces complete profiles down to only 63 pg of DNA. Species testing revealed human specificity for a complete HIrisPlex profile, while only non-human primates showed the closest full profile at 20 out of the 24 DNA markers, in all animals tested. Rigorous testing of simulated forensic casework samples such as blood, semen, saliva stains, hairs with roots as well as extremely low quantity touch (trace) DNA samples, produced complete profiles in 88% of cases. Concordance testing performed between five independent forensic laboratories displayed consistent reproducible results on varying types of DNA samples. Due to its design, the assay caters for degraded samples, underlined here by results from artificially degraded DNA and from simulated casework samples of degraded DNA. This aspect was also demonstrated previously on DNA samples from human remains up to several hundreds of years old. With this paper, we also introduce enhanced eye and hair colour prediction models based on enlarged underlying databases of HIrisPlex genotypes and eye/hair colour phenotypes (eye colour: N = 9188 and hair colour: N = 1601). Furthermore, we present an online web-based system for individual eye and hair colour prediction from full and partial HIrisPlex DNA profiles. By demonstrating that the HIrisPlex assay is fully compatible with the SWGDAM guidelines, we provide the first forensically validated DNA test system for parallel eye and hair colour prediction now available to forensic laboratories for immediate casework application, including missing person cases. Given the robustness and sensitivity described here and in previous work, the HIrisPlex system is also suitable for analysing old and ancient DNA in anthropological and evolutionary studies. PMID:24528593

  8. Phytologia (December 2011) 93(3) 351 DNA FROM HERBARIUM SPECIMENS: II. CORRELATION

    E-print Network

    Adams, Robert P.

    the degradation of DNA in herbarium specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS Plant specimen utilized: Juniperus virginiana DEGRADATION WITH HUMIDITY Robert P. Adams Biology Department, Baylor University, Box 97388, Waco, TX 76798 was observed in the 100, 75 and 70% humidity tests that resulted in the degradation of the juniper DNA. The DNA

  9. Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing and Development of Genetic Markers for the Detection of DNA of Invasive Bighead and Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis and H. molitrix) in Environmental Water Samples from the United States

    PubMed Central

    Farrington, Heather L.; Edwards, Christine E.; Guan, Xin; Carr, Matthew R.; Baerwaldt, Kelly; Lance, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive Asian bighead and silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis and H. molitrix) pose a substantial threat to North American aquatic ecosystems. Recently, environmental DNA (eDNA), genetic material shed by organisms into their environment that can be detected by non-invasive sampling strategies and genetic assays, has gained recognition as a tool for tracking the invasion front of these species toward the Great Lakes. The goal of this study was to develop new species-specific conventional PCR (cPCR) and quantitative (qPCR) markers for detection of these species in North American surface waters. We first generated complete mitochondrial genome sequences from 33 bighead and 29 silver carp individuals collected throughout their introduced range. These sequences were aligned with those from other common and closely related fish species from the Illinois River watershed to identify and design new species-specific markers for the detection of bighead and silver carp DNA in environmental water samples. We then tested these genetic markers in the laboratory for species-specificity and sensitivity. Newly developed markers performed well in field trials, did not have any false positive detections, and many markers had much higher detection rates and sensitivity compared to the markers currently used in eDNA surveillance programs. We also explored the use of multiple genetic markers to determine whether it would improve detection rates, results of which showed that using multiple highly sensitive markers should maximize detection rates in environmental samples. The new markers developed in this study greatly expand the number of species-specific genetic markers available to track the invasion front of bighead and silver carp and will improve the resolution of these assays. Additionally, the use of the qPCR markers developed in this study may reduce sample processing time and cost of eDNA monitoring for these species. PMID:25706532

  10. Residential environmental exposures and other characteristics associated with detectable PAH-DNA adducts in peripheral mononuclear cells in a population-based sample of adult females

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sumitra Shantakumar; MARILIE D. GAMMON; SYBIL M. ENG; SHARON K. SAGIV; MIA M. GAUDET; SUSAN L. TEITELBAUM; JULIE A. BRITTON; Mary Beth Terry; Andrea Paykin; Tie Lan Young; Lian Wen Wang; Qiao Wang; STEVEN D. STELLMAN; Jan Beyea; Maureen Hatch; David Camann; Bogdan Prokopczyk; GEOFFREY C. KABAT; Bruce Levin; ALFRED I. NEUGUTd; REGINA M. SANTELLAf

    2005-01-01

    The detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts in human lymphocytes may be useful as a surrogate end point for individual cancer risk prediction. In this study, we examined the relationship between environmental sources of residential PAH, as well as other potential factors that may confound their association with cancer risk, and the detection of PAH-DNA adducts in a large

  11. Electronic Anthrax DNA Biosensor Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tim Damrow; Brent Hagemeyer; Hassan Ismail; Ryan Oldham

    We introduce preliminary design specifications for an electronic anthrax deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biosensor using the principle of DNA displacement. Upon hybridization, the sample DNA displaces a ferrocene-marked signal probe, which induces an increased redox current that is amperometrically measured and relayed. I. INTRODUCTION The purpose of this article is to propose a design of a Lab- On-Chip DNA biosensor that

  12. Prognostic Evaluation of DNA Index in HIV-HPV Co-Infected Women Cervical Samples Attending in Reference Centers for HIV-AIDS in Recife

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Albert Eduardo Silva; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Garcia, Renan Gomes; Welkovic, Stefan; Barbosa, Aureliana; Menezes, Maria Luiza Bezerra; Tenório, Terezinha; Maruza, Magda; Ximenes, Ricardo A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Persistence of cervical infection caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) types with high oncogenic risk may lead to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether, in HIV-positive women, the presence of aneuploidy in cervical cell samples is associated with presence and evolution of CIN. Methods The present study had two stages. In the first stage, comprising a cross-sectional study, the association between the presence of aneuploidy seen via flow cytometry and sociodemographic characteristics, habits and characteristics relating to HPV and HIV infection was analyzed. In the second stage, comprising a cohort study, it was investigated whether aneuploidy was predictive of CIN evolution. Results No association was observed between the presence of aneuploidy and HPV infection, or between its presence and alterations seen in oncotic cytological analysis. On the other hand, aneuploidy was associated with the presence of CIN (p?=?0.030) in histological analysis and with nonuse of antiretroviral therapy (p?=?0.001). Most of the HIV-positive women (234/272) presented normal CD4+ T lymphocyte counts (greater than 350 cells/mm3) and showed a greater aneuploidy regression rate (77.5%) than a progression rate (23.9%) over a follow-up of up to two years. Conclusion Although there was an association between the presence of cervical tissue lesions and the DNA index, the latter was not predictive of progression of the cervical lesion. This suggests that progression of the cervical lesion to cancer in HIV-positive women may also be changed through improvement of the immunological state enabled by using antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25144309

  13. High-Throughput Analysis With 96-Capillary Array Electrophoresis and Integrated Sample Preparation for DNA Sequencing Based on Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gang Xue

    2001-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to improve the fluorescence detection for the multiplexed capillary array electrophoresis, extend its use beyond the genomic analysis, and to develop an integrated micro-sample preparation system for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The authors first demonstrated multiplexed capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separations in a 96-capillary array system with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Migration times of four kinds of fluoresceins and six polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are normalized to one of the capillaries using two internal standards. The relative standard deviations (RSD) after normalization are 0.6-1.4% for the fluoresceins and 0.1-1.5% for the PAHs. Quantitative calibration of the separations based on peak areas is also performed, again with substantial improvement over the raw data. This opens up the possibility of performing massively parallel separations for high-throughput chemical analysis for process monitoring, combinatorial synthesis, and clinical diagnosis. The authors further improved the fluorescence detection by step laser scanning. A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluorescein is 3 x 10{sup -11} M (S/N = 3) for 5-mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  14. Effects of storage time on Cytomegalovirus DNA stability in plasma determined by quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Liang, Xiao-Nan; Deng, Yan; Wang, Jian; He, Yu; Li, Tai-Jie; Huang, Shan; Qin, Xue; Li, Shan

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) assays are faster, more precise, and more sensitive quantitative laboratory methods for monitoring serial CMV DNA viral load in patients undergoing organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Clinical laboratories often face practical concerns about the storage of specimens from these patients to ensure the accuracy and reproducibility of CMV viral load test results. Different studies that have assessed CMV DNA stability have shown mixed results. Therefore, we analyzed CMV DNA stability of 30 EDTA plasma samples in samples containing between 300 and 100,000copies/ml over a 21 day period. The concentration of CMV DNA in all samples stored at 4°C for 21 days did not differ significantly from the baseline viral load (t=0.242, p=0.810), and no trend was evident to indicate continued degradation over a 2 week period. PMID:25019168

  15. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D. [Univ. of Tasmania (Australia)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  16. Terahertz spectroscopy of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurkan, M. V.; Balbekin, N. S.; Sobakinskaya, E. A.; Panin, A. N.; Vaks, V. L.

    2013-06-01

    The spectra of the degraded DNA of herring are studied using two methods of THz spectroscopy that employ a femtosecond laser and a frequency synthesizer based on a BWO and a high-Q cavity. An interpretation of the experimental results is presented.

  17. A pilot study of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G in a sample of Croatian patients having type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Martin-Kleiner, I; Pape-Medvidovi?, E; Pavli?-Renar, I; Metelko, Z; Kusec, R; Gabrilovac, J; Borani?, M

    2004-12-01

    In this work, patients having type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic mothers were tested for the presence of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G. This mutation is associated with the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes), diabetes and deafness. Twenty-two diabetic persons were screened. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes and from swabs of oral mucosa. The mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G was detected using PCR-RFLP test. The mutation was detected in oral mucosal DNA of two patients (but not from lymphocyte DNA). One patient was a man with hearing and visual impairments and proteinuria; the other was a woman having proteinuria but no hearing impairment. The mutation was not detectable in oral mucosal DNA from the control persons: 20 diabetic patients having diabetic fathers and 22 healthy, nondiabetic volunteers. The incidence of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G in this study of Croatian diabetic patients is in line with data in the literature. PMID:15660201

  18. Environmental Degradation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2008-09-30

    Overview: This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Resources and Human Impact SciPack. It explores how human activities, such as reducing the amount of forest cover, increasing the amount and variety of chemicals that enter the atmosphere, intensive farming and fishing, and consuming fossil fuels have changed Earth's land, oceans, and atmosphere. Although the land, atmosphere, and the oceans have a limited capacity to absorb wastes and recycle materials naturally, humans have disrupted these natural cycles. Fresh water, limited in supply, is essential for life and most industrial processes. Overuse and pollution of rivers, lakes, oceans, and groundwater reduces the availability and suitability of these resources for all organisms. Technology used in the extraction and consumption of fossil fuels needed to meet the growing human demand has increased the depletion of nonrenewable energy resources such as fossil fuels, and degraded or altered the environment, both locally and globally. Learning Outcomes: Compare and contrast ways in which different technologies have impacted the environmental system. Differentiate between examples of renewable resources and non-renewable (finite) resources. Summarize how the burning of fossil fuels is affecting the environment. Assess both local and global environmental impacts when given examples of human resource use. Identify ways in which one human-based environmental change can have a domino-effect on the rest of the ecosystem (when given a scenario).

  19. HAZARDOUS WASTE DEGRADATION BY WOOD DEGRADING FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The persistence and toxicity of many hazardous waste constituents indicates that the environment has limited capacity to degrade such materials. he competence and presence of degrading organisms significantly effects our ability to treat and detoxify these hazardous waste chemica...

  20. CORRELATION OF MICROBIAL DEGRADATION RATES WITH CHEMICAL STRUCTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure-reactivity relationships are established for the microbial degradation of selected organic compounds. Second-order microbial degradation rate constants determined in natural water samples for six compounds correlate with the second-order alkaline hydrolysis rate constan...

  1. Improving FTIR imaging speciation of organic compound residues or their degradation products in wall painting samples, by introducing a new thin section preparation strategy based on cyclododecane pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Papliaka, Zoi Eirini; Vaccari, Lisa; Zanini, Franco; Sotiropoulou, Sophia

    2015-07-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging in transmission mode, employing a bidimensional focal plane array (FPA) detector, was applied for the detection and spatially resolved chemical characterisation of organic compounds or their degradation products within the stratigraphy of a critical group of fragments, originating from prehistoric and roman wall paintings, containing a very low concentration of subsisted organic matter or its alteration products. Past analyses using attenuated total reflection (ATR) or reflection FTIR on polished cross sections failed to provide any evidence of any organic material assignable as binding medium of the original painting. In order to improve the method's performance, in the present study, a new method of sample preparation in thin section was developed. The procedure is based on the use of cyclododecane C12H24 as embedding material and a subsequent double-side polishing of the specimen. Such procedure provides samples to be studied in FTIR transmission mode without losing the information on the spatial distribution of the detected materials in the paint stratigraphy. For comparison purposes, the same samples were also studied after opening their stratigraphy with a diamond anvil cell. Both preparation techniques offered high-quality chemical imaging of the decay products of an organic substance, giving clues to the painting technique. In addition, the thin sections resulting from the cyclododecane pre-treatment offered more layer-specific data, as the layer thickness and order remained unaffected, whereas the samples resulting from compression within the diamond cell were slightly deformed; however, since thinner and more homogenous, they provided higher spectral quality in terms of S/N ratio. In summary, the present study illustrates the appropriateness of FTIR imaging in transmission mode associated with a new thin section preparation strategy to detect and localise very low-concentrated organic matter subjected to deterioration processes, when the application of FTIR in reflection mode or FTIR-ATR fails to give any relevant information. Graphical Abstract Visible image of a thin section, C12H24 pre-treated, originating from prehistoric wall paintings at Akrotiri, Thera (Greece). FTIR images representing the spatial distribution of the consolidant, the minerals: wollastonite, riebeckite, and a proteinaceous binder. The size of the FTIR images is 170?×?340 ?m(2). PMID:25925858

  2. Degradation monitoring using probabilistic inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpay, Bulent

    In order to increase safety and improve economy and performance in a nuclear power plant (NPP), the source and extent of component degradations should be identified before failures and breakdowns occur. It is also crucial for the next generation of NPPs, which are designed to have a long core life and high fuel burnup to have a degradation monitoring system in order to keep the reactor in a safe state, to meet the designed reactor core lifetime and to optimize the scheduled maintenance. Model-based methods are based on determining the inconsistencies between the actual and expected behavior of the plant, and use these inconsistencies for detection and diagnostics of degradations. By defining degradation as a random abrupt change from the nominal to a constant degraded state of a component, we employed nonlinear filtering techniques based on state/parameter estimation. We utilized a Bayesian recursive estimation formulation in the sequential probabilistic inference framework and constructed a hidden Markov model to represent a general physical system. By addressing the problem of a filter's inability to estimate an abrupt change, which is called the oblivious filter problem in nonlinear extensions of Kalman filtering, and the sample impoverishment problem in particle filtering, we developed techniques to modify filtering algorithms by utilizing additional data sources to improve the filter's response to this problem. We utilized a reliability degradation database that can be constructed from plant specific operational experience and test and maintenance reports to generate proposal densities for probable degradation modes. These are used in a multiple hypothesis testing algorithm. We then test samples drawn from these proposal densities with the particle filtering estimates based on the Bayesian recursive estimation formulation with the Metropolis Hastings algorithm, which is a well-known Markov chain Monte Carlo method (MCMC). This multiple hypothesis testing algorithm using MCMC in particle filtering helps the filter to explore the state space more effectively in the direction of the degradations. We extended this algorithm for degradation detection and isolation to complete the degradation monitoring framework. We successfully tested our algorithms in degradation monitoring of balance of plant of a boiling water reactor.

  3. Degradation mechanisms in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinde, S. L.; Olson, D. A.; Dejonghe, L. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The degradation mechanism in thermal barrier coating systems subjected to prolonged heating in air as well as to thermal cycling was studied. Bond coat oxidation was found to be the most important reason for degradation. The oxidation produced NiO as well as Al?O? in one set of samples, but the variation in initial coating structure made it difficult to resolve systematic differences between isothermally heated and thermally cycled samples. However, the contribution to degradation from changes in substrate composition seemed less in the cycled sample.

  4. Degradation mechanisms in thermal-barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinde, S. L.; Olson, D. A.; De Jonghe, L. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The degradation mechanism in a thermal barrier-coating system subjected to prolonged heating in air as well as to thermal cycling was studied. Bond-coat oxidation was found to be the most important reason for degradation. The oxidation produced NiO as well as Al2O3 in one set of samples, but the variation in initial coating structure made it difficult to resolve systematic differences between isothermally heated and thermally cycled samples. However, the contribution to degradation from changes in substrate composition seemed less in the cycled sample.

  5. DNA banking and DNA databanking by academic and commercial laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, J.E. [Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, Waltham, MA (United States)]|[Boston College Law School, Newton, MA (United States); Reilly, P.R. [Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, Waltham, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The advent of DNA-based testing is giving rise to DNA banking (the long-term storage of cells, transformed cell lines, or extracted DNA for subsequent retrieval and analysis) and DNA data banking (the indefinite storage of information derived from DNA analysis). Large scale acquisition and storage of DNA and DNA data has important implications for the privacy rights of individuals. A survey of 148 academically based and commercial DNA diagnostic laboratories was conducted to determine: (1) the extent of their DNA banking activities; (2) their policies and experiences regarding access to DNA samples and data; (3) the quality assurance measures they employ; and (4) whether they have written policies and/or depositor`s agreements addressing specific issues. These issues include: (1) who may have access to DNA samples and data; (2) whether scientists may have access to anonymous samples or data for research use; (3) whether they have plans to contact depositors or retest samples if improved tests for a disorder become available; (4) disposition of samples at the end of the contract period if the laboratory ceases operations, if storage fees are unpaid, or after a death or divorce; (5) the consequence of unauthorized release, loss, or accidental destruction of samples; and (6) whether depositors may share in profits from the commercialization of tests or treatments developed in part from studies of stored DNA. The results suggest that many laboratories are banking DNA, that many have already amassed a large number of samples, and that a significant number plan to further develop DNA banking as a laboratory service over the next two years. Few laboratories have developed written policies governing DNA banking, and fewer still have drafted documents that define the rights and obligations of the parties. There may be a need for increased regulation of DNA banking and DNA data banking and for better defined policies with respect to protecting individual privacy.

  6. Exploring DNA

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Flitton

    2008-08-13

    Get ready to learn an explore DNA, genes and proteins. By moving through the different topics, you will hopefully gain greater understanding of how DNA, genes, and proteins are all related. DNA to Protein Module You will zoom into the human body to see and read more about DNA. The Journey Into DNA DNA Workshop Activity- You try it! More DNA and Protein Synthesis ...

  7. Degradation of biodiesel under different storage conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Y. C. Leung; B. C. P. Koo; Y. Guo

    2006-01-01

    This paper aimed to investigate the biodiesel degradation characteristics under different storage conditions. The qualities of twelve biodiesel samples, which were divided into 3 groups and stored at different temperatures and environments, were monitored at regular interval over a period of 52 weeks. Experimental results demonstrated that the biodiesel under test degraded less than 10% within 52 weeks for those

  8. DNA nano-circuit for electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Naoya

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes preparations of nano-scale patterned electric circuit based on high purity DNA molecules which are obtained from Salmon roe. The patterning on silicon substrate was carried out by an ink-jet method of aqueous solution of DNA. However, the Salmon-based DNA has a so huge molecular weight of over billions that even only 1wt% aqueous solution of DNA becomes gel without any fluidity. So, it is necessary to reduce molecular weights of DNA to increase fluidity of the aqueous solution of DNA, keeping the characteristic feature of double helical structures of DNA molecules to form metal-chlating complexes with various metal cations such as silver or copper cations. Several methods to reduce the molecular weight of DNA, including hydrolytic , enzymatic degradations and ultra-sonification. It was found that the best method to reduce the molecular weights (MW) of DNA was an enzymatic degradation of DNA to increase fluidity, thus being able to apply an ink-jet method for nano-scale patterning on a silicon wafer to form DNA circuit, followed by ion-crosslinking of DNA by dipping the patterned DNA circuit into aqueous solution of copper chloride. The DNA-CuCl2 patterned circuit was reduced to copper nano-lines for electric circuit, by using hydrazine as a reducing agent. Thus, all DNA devices can be prepared by the combination of DNA transistor and circuit.

  9. Moving environmental DNA methods from concept to practice for monitoring aquatic macroorganisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, Caren S.; Strickler, Katherine M.; Pilliod, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery that macroorganisms can be detected from their environmental DNA (eDNA) in aquatic systems has immense potential for the conservation of biological diversity. This special issue contains 11 papers that review and advance the field of eDNA detection of vertebrates and other macroorganisms, including studies of eDNA production, transport, and degradation; sample collection and processing to maximize detection rates; and applications of eDNA for conservation using citizen scientists. This body of work is an important contribution to the ongoing efforts to take eDNA detection of macroorganisms from technical breakthrough to established, reliable method that can be used in survey, monitoring, and research applications worldwide. While the rapid advances in this field are remarkable, important challenges remain, including consensus on best practices for collection and analysis, understanding of eDNA diffusion and transport, and avoidance of inhibition in sample collection and processing. Nonetheless, as demonstrated in this special issue, eDNA techniques for research and monitoring are beginning to realize their potential for contributing to the conservation of biodiversity globally.

  10. Higher Order Chromatin Degradation: Implications for Neurodegeneration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory W. Konat

    2002-01-01

    Higher order chromatin degradation (HOCD) is a hallmark of programmed cell death. HOCD is mediated by enzymatic digestion of the DNA backbone at matrix attachment regions, and ultimately results in the excision of chromatin loops and their oligomers from chromosomes. We have recently demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the major mediator of oxidative stress, rapidly induces HOCD. This demonstration allowed

  11. Dynamics of the functional gene copy number and overall bacterial community during microcystin-LR degradation by a biological treatment facility in a drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieming; Shimizu, Kazuya; Utsumi, Motoo; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Sakharkar, Meena Kishore; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio

    2011-06-01

    Information is limited on the potential for microcystins (MCs) degradation by carrier-attached biofilms obtained in winter that were not exposed to detectable levels of MCs in the preceding months. Under controlled laboratory conditions, we confirmed that microcystin-LR (MCLR) was effectively biodegraded within 5.5 days in cultures of the biofilm sampled in winter. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays revealed that seasonal variations in the MCLR-degradation potential of the biofilm were closely related to the initial MCLR-degrader population in the biofilm. Indigenous MCLR-degraders in the biofilm could accumulate by exposure to natural MCLR in the water column, accelerating MCLR-degradation. The qPCR assay suggested that MCLR may be a primary substrate for the degraders in the presence of another labile organic carbon associated with the biofilm under the present study conditions. qPCR and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) for 16S rDNA demonstrated that the overall bacterial population from the winter biofilm rapidly increased with the MCLR-degrader population and remained stable after day 3.5, while the overall bacterial community structure shifted throughout the entire biodegradation period. This study is important to the in-depth understanding of microbial degradation of MCs and could facilitate the bioremediation of MCs in polluted habitats. PMID:21402490

  12. Forensic trace DNA: a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    DNA analysis is frequently used to acquire information from biological material to aid enquiries associated with criminal offences, disaster victim identification and missing persons investigations. As the relevance and value of DNA profiling to forensic investigations has increased, so too has the desire to generate this information from smaller amounts of DNA. Trace DNA samples may be defined as any sample which falls below recommended thresholds at any stage of the analysis, from sample detection through to profile interpretation, and can not be defined by a precise picogram amount. Here we review aspects associated with the collection, DNA extraction, amplification, profiling and interpretation of trace DNA samples. Contamination and transfer issues are also briefly discussed within the context of trace DNA analysis. Whilst several methodological changes have facilitated profiling from trace samples in recent years it is also clear that many opportunities exist for further improvements. PMID:21122102

  13. Nanotechnology with DNA DNA Nanodevices

    E-print Network

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    Nanotechnology with DNA DNA Nanodevices Friedrich C. Simmel* and Wendy U. Dittmer A DNA actuator. Introduction.............285 2. Overview: DNA Nanotechnology.......285 3. Prototypes of Nanomechanical DNA overview of DNA nanotechnology as a whole is given. The most important properties of DNA molecules

  14. Polyamine-nucleic acid interactions and the effects on structure in oriented DNA fibers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorens van Dam; Nikolay Korolev; Lars Nordenskiöld

    2002-01-01

    Fibrous oriented calf thymus DNA containing the natural polyamines spermidine (Spd) and putrescine (Put), and the degradation polyamines cadaverine (Cad) and 1,3-diaminopropane (DAP), have been investigated at different water contents using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, fiber X-ray diffraction and gravimetric measurements. When judged by X-ray only the DAP and Spd samples seem to undergo a B-A-form transition at reduced

  15. Evaluation of DNA extraction methods suitable for PCR-based detection and genotyping of Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Auricchio, Bruna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fiore, Alfonsina; Skiby, Jeffrey E; De Medici, Dario

    2013-09-01

    Sufficient quality and quantity of extracted DNA is critical to detecting and performing genotyping of Clostridium botulinum by means of PCR-based methods. An ideal extraction method has to optimize DNA yield, minimize DNA degradation, allow multiple samples to be extracted, and be efficient in terms of cost, time, labor, and supplies. Eleven botulinum toxin-producing clostridia strains and 25 samples (10 food, 13 clinical, and 2 environmental samples) naturally contaminated with botulinum toxin-producing clostridia were used to compare 4 DNA extraction procedures: Chelex(®) 100 matrix, Phenol-Cloroform-Isoamyl alcohol, NucliSENS(®) magnetic extraction kit, and DNeasy(®) Blood & Tissue kit. Integrity, purity, and amount of amplifiable DNA were evaluated. The results show that the DNeasy(®) Blood & Tissue kit is the best extraction method evaluated because it provided the most pure, intact, and amplifiable DNA. However, Chelex(®) 100 matrix seems to be suitable for PCR-based methods intended for laboratory diagnosis of suspected outbreaks of botulism, because it is faster and cheaper compared to DNeasy(®) Blood & Tissue kit, and for samples in which the mean of Ct values obtained are statistically different (P>0.05) with respect to the best method, no lack of PCR amplification was shown. In addition, molecular methods for laboratory diagnosis currently are based on a microbial enrichment step prior to PCR, and so the differences in amplification seem to not influence the analytical results. PMID:23971807

  16. Degradation rates of alkyl methylphosphonates in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kingery, A.F.; Allen, H.E. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Alkyl methylphosphonates have long been used as indicators of the presence or former presence of organophosphonate chemical warfare (nerve) agents (CWA) in environmental media. However, the quality of this inference is uncertain. An understanding of the kinetics of degradation can provide a necessary link between historical records and field sampling results. Alternatively, field sampling data could provide time of deposition information. Organophosphonate CWAs hydrolyze quickly to methylphosphonate monoalkyl esters which can further degrade to methylphosphonate, which is resistant to chemical degradation. All compounds are susceptible to biodegradation to phosphate. The degradation rates are evaluated for each compound on a series of soils. The degradation rate constants are related to the soil physical and chemical properties. The derived relationships provide information which will be useful in selecting an experimental protocol for future mechanistic studies. a preliminary environmental fate model is developed.

  17. Molecular Cell CDC-48/p97 Coordinates CDT-1 Degradation

    E-print Network

    Gartner, Anton

    reassembly of pre-RCs and thus reinitia- tion of DNA replication within the same cell cycle, CDT-1 is tar-like ATPase CDC-48 in DNA replication that is linked to cell-cycle progression (Deichsel et al., 2009Molecular Cell Article CDC-48/p97 Coordinates CDT-1 Degradation with GINS Chromatin Dissociation

  18. DNA microarray (spot) .

    E-print Network

    1. DNA microarray DNA (spot) . DNA probe , probe (hybridization) . DNA microarray cDNA oligonucleotide oligonucleotide cDNA probe . oligonucleotide microarray , DNA , probe . oligonucleotide microarray probe

  19. Genetic Exchange in Soil between Introduced Chlorobenzoate Degraders and Indigenous Biphenyl Degraders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DENNIS D. FOCHT; DENISE B. SEARLES; ANDSUNG-CHEOL KOH

    1996-01-01

    PseudomonasaeruginosaJB2,achlorobenzoatedegrader,wasinoculatedintosoilhavingindigenousbiphenyl degraders but no identifiable 2-chlorobenzoate (2CBa) or 2,5-dichlorobenzoate (2,5DCBa) degraders. The absence of any indigenous chlorobenzoate degraders was noted by the failure to obtain enrichment cultures withtheadditionof2CBa,3CBa,or2,5DCBaandbythefailureofsoilDNAtohybridizetothetfdCgene,which encodes orthofission of chlorocatechols. In contrast, DNA extracted from inoculated soils hybridized to this probe. Bacteria able to utilize both biphenyl and 2CBa as growth substrates were absent in uninoculated soil, but

  20. In situ electrochemical evaluation of anticancer drug temozolomide and its metabolites-DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ilanna C; Oliveira, S Carlos B; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2013-04-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is an antineoplastic alkylating agent with activity against serious and aggressive types of brain tumours. It has been postulated that TMZ exerts its antitumor activity via its spontaneous degradation at physiological pH. The in vitro evaluation of the interaction of TMZ and its final metabolites, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (AIC) and methyldiazonium ion, with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was studied using differential pulse voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. The DNA damage was electrochemically detected following the changes in the oxidation peaks of guanosine and adenosine residues. The results obtained revealed the decrease of the dsDNA oxidation peaks with incubation time, showing that TMZ and AIC/methyldiazonium ion interact with dsDNA causing its condensation. Furthermore, the experiments of the in situ TMZ and AIC/methyldiazonium ion-dsDNA interaction using the multilayer dsDNA-electrochemical biosensor confirmed the condensation of dsDNA caused by these species and showed evidence for a specific interaction between the guanosine residues and TMZ metabolites, since free guanine oxidation peak was detected. The oxidative damage caused to DNA bases by TMZ metabolites was also detected electrochemically by monitoring the appearance of the 8-oxoguanine/2,8-dyhydroxyadenine oxidation peaks. Nondenaturing agarose gel electrophoresis of AIC/methyldiazonium ion-dsDNA samples confirmed the occurrence of dsDNA condensation and oxidative damage observed in the electrochemical results. The importance of the dsDNA-electrochemical biosensor in the in situ evaluation of TMZ-dsDNA interactions is clearly demonstrated. PMID:23150052

  1. DNA conformations in mismatch repair probed in solution by X-ray scattering from gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hura, Greg L; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Claridge, Shelley A; Mendillo, Marc L; Smith, Jessica M; Williams, Gareth J; Mastroianni, Alexander J; Alivisatos, A Paul; Putnam, Christopher D; Kolodner, Richard D; Tainer, John A

    2013-10-22

    DNA metabolism and processing frequently require transient or metastable DNA conformations that are biologically important but challenging to characterize. We use gold nanocrystal labels combined with small angle X-ray scattering to develop, test, and apply a method to follow DNA conformations acting in the Escherichia coli mismatch repair (MMR) system in solution. We developed a neutral PEG linker that allowed gold-labeled DNAs to be flash-cooled and stored without degradation in sample quality. The 1,000-fold increased gold nanocrystal scattering vs. DNA enabled investigations at much lower concentrations than otherwise possible to avoid concentration-dependent tetramerization of the MMR initiation enzyme MutS. We analyzed the correlation scattering functions for the nanocrystals to provide higher resolution interparticle distributions not convoluted by the intraparticle distribution. We determined that mispair-containing DNAs were bent more by MutS than complementary sequence DNA (csDNA), did not promote tetramer formation, and allowed MutS conversion to a sliding clamp conformation that eliminated the DNA bends. Addition of second protein responder MutL did not stabilize the MutS-bent forms of DNA. Thus, DNA distortion is only involved at the earliest mispair recognition steps of MMR: MutL does not trap bent DNA conformations, suggesting migrating MutL or MutS/MutL complexes as a conserved feature of MMR. The results promote a mechanism of mismatch DNA bending followed by straightening in initial MutS and MutL responses in MMR. We demonstrate that small angle X-ray scattering with gold labels is an enabling method to examine protein-induced DNA distortions key to the DNA repair, replication, transcription, and packaging. PMID:24101514

  2. Fungal degradation of polyvinyl acetate.

    PubMed

    García Trejo, A

    1988-08-01

    Certain Aspergillus and Penicillium strains isolated from soil grow well and degrade a commercial sample of polyvinyl acetate (PVA, 4.5 g liter-1) when it is used as the only carbon source. These strains showed an increase in dry weight after 11 days of incubation, along with a depletion of carbohydrates, protein, and deoxyribonucleic acid. This was interpreted as an active turnover of the above metabolites during the degradation. This effect was greatly enhanced by equilibrating the carbon:nitrogen ratio by addition of yeast extract in the original culture. The increase in esterase activity and the loss of viscosity were also considered evidence of the fungal degradation. Isolation of the enzyme was attempted, but unsuccessful. PMID:3181066

  3. Characterization of DNA in cell culture supernatant by fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lihan; Yeo, Veronica; Yang, Yuansheng; Gagnon, Pete

    2015-05-01

    A fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) method was developed to characterize DNA in cell culture supernatant. Samples stained with Picogreen were fractionated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and monitored simultaneously by UV absorbance and fluorescence. SEC provided a size-characterization capability absent from bulk fluorescent assays, and was also free from interference from other fluorescent and UV-absorbing small-molecule cell culture components. FSEC revealed that DNA in mammalian cell culture supernatant exists mostly in the form of nucleosomal arrays. FSEC combined with agarose electrophoresis revealed spontaneous degradation of DNA in mammalian cell culture supernatant over a 30 day period at 4 °C: from arrays containing up to ~40 nucleosomes, down to arrays containing three or fewer nucleosomes. It also detected nucleosomal DNA in wheat, soy, and yeast hydrolysates commonly used to enhance cell culture productivity. PMID:25821116

  4. Thermal degradation chemistry of poly[bis(phenoxy)phosphazene

    E-print Network

    Maynard, Shawn Joseph

    1989-01-01

    , '400, and 440 'C . 22 40-MHz P MAS NMR spectra of trimer samples isothermally degraded at 360, 400, and 440 C . . . 25 81-MHz P solution-state NMR spectra of tetramer samples isothermally degraded at 280, 320, 360, and 400 oC 26 40-MHz P MAS NMR... Figure LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Page 13 14 81-MHz P solution-state NMR spectra of PBPP-O. OO samples isothermally degraded at 280, 320, 360, and 440 C . 40-MHz P MAS NMR spectra of PBPP-O. OO samples isothermally degraded at 320, 360, 400...

  5. Analysis of DNA size, content and cell cycle in leaves of Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum.).

    PubMed

    Taylor, M G; Vasil, I K

    1987-10-01

    Mesophyll cell nuclei isolated from leaves of Pennisetum purpureum were analysed by flow cytometry to determine the nuclear DNA content and the percentage of cells in different phases of the cell cycle. Samples taken from base, middle and tip regions of leaves 2 to 8 (leaf 1, which was adjacent to the meristem, was too small to sample) showed no significant differences in the amount of DNA per G1 nucleus due to either age or position. The average amount of DNA per G1 nucleus was 5.78 pg. Although the majority of cells for each sample were in G1, samples taken from older leaves had higher percentages of cells in G2 and S phases. More specifically, base and middle regions of older leaves had a higher percentage of cells in G2 than all three positions in younger leaves. Electrophoretic analysis of nuclear DNA from leaves 2 to 7 showed no evidence of degradation or difference in fragment size for any sample or position. This study was compared to previous work on the relationship between leaf age and embryogenic competence in Pennisetum purpureum. The results suggest that changes in the cell cycle, and/or a loss or fragmentation of the nuclear DNA, are not responsible for loss of embryogenic competence in mature leaf tissue. PMID:24240324

  6. Mechanisms of humic substances degradation by fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Hadar, Y.; Grinhut, T.

    2012-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) are formed by secondary synthesis reactions (humification) during the decay process and transformation of biomolecules originating from plants and other dead organisms. In nature, HS are extremely resistant to biological degradation. Thus, these substances are major components in the C cycle and in the biosphere and therefore, the understanding of the process leading to their formation and transformation and degradation is vital. Fungi active in the decomposition process of HS include mainly ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that are common in the upper layer of forest and grassland soils. Many basidiomycetes belong to the white-rot fungi (WRF) and litter-decomposing fungi (LDF). These fungi are considered to be the most efficient lignin degraders due to their nonspecific oxidizing enzymes: manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and laccase. Although bacteria dominate compost and participate in the turnover of HS, their ability to degrade stable macromolecules such as lignin and HS is limited. The overall objectives of this research were to corroborate biodegradation processes of HS by WRF. The specific objectives were: (i) To isolate, identify and characterize HS degrading WRF from biosolids (BS) compost; (ii) To study the biodegradation process of three types of HS, which differ in their structure, by WRF isolated from BS compost; and (iii) To investigate the mechanisms of HA degradation by WRF using two main approaches: (a) Study the physical and chemical analyses of the organic compounds obtained from direct fungal degradation of HA as well as elucidation of the relevant enzymatic reactions; and (b) Study the enzymatic and biochemical mechanisms involved during HA degradation. In order to study the capability of fungi to degrade HS, seventy fungal strains were isolated from biosolids (BS) compost. Two of the most active fungal species were identified based on rDNA sequences and designated Trametes sp. M23 and Phanerochaetesp., Y6. These strains were used throughout this study. This research shows that WRF are able to degrade different HA and under different culture conditions. We found that significant degradation occurred in high C/N media - conditions which are commonly present in the natural habitats of WRF. We suggest that in addition to lignin, these fungi play a crucial role during HS degradation in the environment. This work raises additional questions that are worth investigating in the future: what is the role of these fungi in dissolved organic matter degradation and its relationship to HA degradation? What is the detailed mechanism of iron reduction in Trametes sp. M23 as well as in other WRF? What is the exact involvement of hydroxyl radicals during degradation and what are the mechanisms of H2O2 production in Trametes sp. M23?

  7. Cellulose-degrading potentials and phylogenetic classification of carboxymethyl-cellulose decomposing bacteria isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Stephan; Ulrich, Andreas

    2002-12-01

    In a previous study, culturable carboxymethyl-cellulose (CMC) decomposing soil bacteria isolated from different sampling positions across an agricultural encatchment have been classified into 31 pattern groups by digestion of amplified 16S rDNA using a single restriction enzyme (Ulrich and Wirth: Microb. Ecol. 37, 238-247, 1999). In order to reveal relationships between phylogenetic diversity and phenotypic functions, a further differentiation of two selected site-specific pattern groups (I and H) was performed, resulting in a sub-classification of four and three ARDRA groups, respectively. Based on sequencing a representative isolate of each ARDRA group, the isolates were assigned to the genus Streptomyces. The ARDRA groups were dispersed across various clades of the genus with a direct affiliation to species known for cellulolytic activity in one group, only. The isolates differed in potentials to degrade colloidal, native or highly crystalline cellulose derivatives. Out of 39 isolates, 11 were capable of degrading all substrates, 17 were restricted to degrade CMC only, and 11 were active decomposers of exclusively both CMC and colloidal cellulose. In most cases, the genetic classification of the isolates corresponded with groupings based on cellulose degrading capabilities. Thus, isolates of four ARDRA groups were restricted to the degradation of CMC, while two further isolates which efficiently degraded all cellulose derivatives formed two separate ARDRA groups. The major ARDRA group, however; displayed a high variability of degradation capabilities. The study of additional phenotypic features revealed a broad potential to decompose a set of various carbon substrates, which matched the phylogenetic classification in several cases. PMID:12583719

  8. Isolation and characterization of carbendazim-degrading Rhodococcus erythropolis djl-11.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinjian; Huang, Yujie; Harvey, Paul R; Li, Hongmei; Ren, Yan; Li, Jishun; Wang, Jianing; Yang, Hetong

    2013-01-01

    Carbendazim (methyl 1H-benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate) is one of the most widely used fungicides in agriculture worldwide, but has been reported to have adverse effects on animal health and ecosystem function. A highly efficient carbendazim-degrading bacterium (strain dj1-11) was isolated from carbendazim-contaminated soil samples via enrichment culture. Strain dj1-11 was identified as Rhodococcus erythropolis based on morphological, physiological and biochemical characters, including sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. In vitro degradation of carbendazim (1000 mg·L(-1)) by dj1-11 in minimal salts medium (MSM) was highly efficient, and with an average degradation rate of 333.33 mg·L(-1)·d(-1) at 28°C. The optimal temperature range for carbendazim degradation by dj1-11 in MSM was 25-30°C. Whilst strain dj1-11 was capable of metabolizing cabendazim as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, degradation was significantly (P<0.05) increased by addition of 12.5 mM NH4NO3. Changes in MSM pH (4-9), substitution of NH4NO3 with organic substrates as N and C sources or replacing Mg(2+) with Mn(2+), Zn(2+) or Fe(2+) did not significantly affect carbendazim degradation by dj1-11. During the degradation process, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) detected the metabolites 2-aminobenzimidazole and 2-hydroxybenzimidazole. A putative carbendazim-hydrolyzing esterase gene was cloned from chromosomal DNA of djl-11 and showed 99% sequence homology to the mheI carbendazim-hydrolyzing esterase gene from Nocardioides sp. SG-4G. PMID:24098350

  9. Alprazolam intercalates into DNA.

    PubMed

    Saha, Biswarup; Mukherjee, Ananda; Santra, Chitta Ranjan; Chattopadhyay, Atiskumar; Ghosh, Amar Nath; Choudhuri, Utpal; Karmakar, Parimal

    2009-02-01

    In vitro interaction of a benzodiazepine group of drugs Alprazolam (Alp), a hypnotic and tranquilizer, with DNA was studied by various methods. Absorption spectrophotometric study showed that Alp binds strongly with supercoiled pUC 19 DNA and the calculated binding constant is 8.245x10(3) M(-1) in 10 mM Tris-Cl buffer, pH 7.4. Spectrofluorometric study showed that ethidium bromide induced DNA fluorescence intensity was reduced completely after addition of Alp. But Alp did not interfere with the interaction of Hoechst 33258, a DNA minor groove binder, with plasmid DNA. Circular dichroic spectroscopic study showed that with the gradual increase in Alp concentrations, both the positive and the negative peaks of DNA were gradually decreased and at higher concentrations of Alp (60 microM and 80 microM), the negative peaks became positive indicating the intercalation and the conformational change in the DNA. Binding of Alp with DNA increased the thermal stability of DNA by 6 degrees C with respect to the mock treated sample. Gel electrophoresis study of supercoiled pUC 19 DNA showed more compact structure as a result of Alp binding. Transmission electron microscopic observations also confirmed this compactness. Thus, our observations suggest the strong interaction of Alp with DNA, which may raise serious questions about the random uses of Alprazolam. PMID:19108581

  10. Automating DNA processing

    E-print Network

    Wienen, Michael Jan

    1994-01-01

    and resources must be spent in laboratory research to determine the genetic structure of the relevant organisms. DNA processing is riddled with time intensive laboratory techniques that must be improved or replaced if genotyping large numbers of samples...

  11. Accuracy and sensitivity of residual DNA detection by QPCR is not predicted by target copy number.

    PubMed

    Verardo, Megan L; Carvalho, Juliane G; Delgado, Dora N; Kuhns, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    A major issue in the use of mammalian cell culture in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is the removal of process related impurities, such as residual host cell DNA, during the product purification process. To ensure that sufficient DNA removal is achieved during purification, it is essential to have an accurate and sensitive assay for host cell DNA. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) is widely used for this purpose; however, the extent to which the choice of QPCR gene target can have an impact on final results requires further understanding. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the genomic copy number of eight different Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) gene targets and the sensitivity and accuracy afforded by those targets in a residual host cell DNA QPCR assay. We also evaluated the use of each gene target for accurate measurement of residual DNA clearance using in-process purification samples from two CHO production cell lines. Our results revealed a correlation between gene target abundance and the potential sensitivity for use in a QPCR assay. However, we found that higher copy number gene targets do not provide the highest measurement or reveal the largest clearance of residual host cell DNA from purification samples. These findings suggest that different DNA sequences may clear or degrade at differential rates and highlight unexpected considerations that must be made in the choice of QPCR gene target when designing QPCR assays. PMID:22095674

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of degraded forensic body fluids.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Han; Jones, Daniel F; Fleming, Rachel

    2015-07-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) has facilitated a significant increase in transcriptomic studies in all biological disciplines. However, the analysis of degraded RNA remains a genuine challenge in practice. In forensic science the biological samples encountered are often extensively degraded and of low abundance. RNA from these compromised samples is used for body fluid identification through the detection of body fluid-specific transcripts. Here we demonstrate the sequencing of four forensically relevant body fluids: oral mucosa/saliva (buccal), circulatory blood, menstrual blood and vaginal fluid. RNA was extracted from fresh, two and six week aged samples. Despite the extensive degradation of most body fluids, significant high quality sequencing output (>80% sequence above Q30) was generated. An average of over 80% of reads from all but one sample aligned successfully to the reference human genome. Furthermore, FPKMs (fragments per kilobase of exon per million fragments mapped) generated indicate the accurate detection of known body fluid markers in respective body fluids. Assessment of global gene expression levels over degradation time enabled the characterisation of differential RNA degradation in different body fluids. This study demonstrates the practical application of MPS technology for the accurate analysis of degraded RNA from minimal samples. PMID:25797141

  13. Evaluation of Real-Time and Conventional PCR Targeting Complex 85 Genes for Detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA in Skin Biopsy Samples from Patients Diagnosed with Leprosy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alejandra N. Martinez; Constanca F. P. C. Britto; C. Nery; Elizabeth P. Sampaio; Marcia R. Jardim; Euzenir N. Sarno; Milton O. Moraes

    2006-01-01

    In spite of the decrease in the number of registered leprosy patients, the number of new cases diagnosed each year (400,000) has remained essentially unchanged. Leprosy diagnosis is difficult due to the low sensitivity of current methodologies to identify new cases. In this study, conventional and TaqMan real-time PCR assays for detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA were compared to current

  14. Drug-induced DNA repair: X-ray structure of a DNA-ditercalinium complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Qi; Williams, L.D.; Egli, M.; Rabinovich, D.; Rich, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States)); Chen, Shunle; Quigley, G.J. (Hunter College, New York, NY (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Ditercalinium is a synthetic anticancer drug that binds to DNA by bis-intercalation and activates DNA repair processes. In prokaryotes, noncovalent DNA-ditercalinium complexes are incorrectly recognized by the uvrABC repair system as covalent lesions on DNA. In eukaryotes, mitochondrial DNA is degraded by excess and futile DNA repair. Using x-ray crystallography, the authors have determined, to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, the three-dimensional structure of a complex of ditercalinium bound to the double-stranded DNA fragment (d(CGCG)){sub 2}. The DNA in the complex with ditercalinium is kinked (by 15{degrees}) and severely unsound (by 36{degrees}) with exceptionally wide major and minor grooves. Recognition of the DNA-ditercalinium complex by uvrABC in prokaryotes, and by mitochondrial DNA repair systems in eukaryotes, might be related to drug-induced distortion of the DNA helix.

  15. Detection of Cytosine Methylation in Ancient DNA from Five Native American Populations Using Bisulfite Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rick W. A.; Monroe, Cara; Bolnick, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    While cytosine methylation has been widely studied in extant populations, relatively few studies have analyzed methylation in ancient DNA. Most existing studies of epigenetic marks in ancient DNA have inferred patterns of methylation in highly degraded samples using post-mortem damage to cytosines as a proxy for cytosine methylation levels. However, this approach limits the inference of methylation compared with direct bisulfite sequencing, the current gold standard for analyzing cytosine methylation at single nucleotide resolution. In this study, we used direct bisulfite sequencing to assess cytosine methylation in ancient DNA from the skeletal remains of 30 Native Americans ranging in age from approximately 230 to 4500 years before present. Unmethylated cytosines were converted to uracils by treatment with sodium bisulfite, bisulfite products of a CpG-rich retrotransposon were pyrosequenced, and C-to-T ratios were quantified for a single CpG position. We found that cytosine methylation is readily recoverable from most samples, given adequate preservation of endogenous nuclear DNA. In addition, our results indicate that the precision of cytosine methylation estimates is inversely correlated with aDNA preservation, such that samples of low DNA concentration show higher variability in measures of percent methylation than samples of high DNA concentration. In particular, samples in this study with a DNA concentration above 0.015 ng/?L generated the most consistent measures of cytosine methylation. This study presents evidence of cytosine methylation in a large collection of ancient human remains, and indicates that it is possible to analyze epigenetic patterns in ancient populations using direct bisulfite sequencing approaches. PMID:26016479

  16. Detection of Cytosine methylation in ancient DNA from five native american populations using bisulfite sequencing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rick W A; Monroe, Cara; Bolnick, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    While cytosine methylation has been widely studied in extant populations, relatively few studies have analyzed methylation in ancient DNA. Most existing studies of epigenetic marks in ancient DNA have inferred patterns of methylation in highly degraded samples using post-mortem damage to cytosines as a proxy for cytosine methylation levels. However, this approach limits the inference of methylation compared with direct bisulfite sequencing, the current gold standard for analyzing cytosine methylation at single nucleotide resolution. In this study, we used direct bisulfite sequencing to assess cytosine methylation in ancient DNA from the skeletal remains of 30 Native Americans ranging in age from approximately 230 to 4500 years before present. Unmethylated cytosines were converted to uracils by treatment with sodium bisulfite, bisulfite products of a CpG-rich retrotransposon were pyrosequenced, and C-to-T ratios were quantified for a single CpG position. We found that cytosine methylation is readily recoverable from most samples, given adequate preservation of endogenous nuclear DNA. In addition, our results indicate that the precision of cytosine methylation estimates is inversely correlated with aDNA preservation, such that samples of low DNA concentration show higher variability in measures of percent methylation than samples of high DNA concentration. In particular, samples in this study with a DNA concentration above 0.015 ng/?L generated the most consistent measures of cytosine methylation. This study presents evidence of cytosine methylation in a large collection of ancient human remains, and indicates that it is possible to analyze epigenetic patterns in ancient populations using direct bisulfite sequencing approaches. PMID:26016479

  17. Isolation, characterization, and distribution of denitrifying toluene degraders from a variety of habitats.

    PubMed Central

    Fries, M R; Zhou, J; Chee-Sanford, J; Tiedje, J M

    1994-01-01

    Enrichments capable of toluene degradation under O2-free denitrifying conditions were established with diverse inocula including agricultural soils, compost, aquifer material, and contaminated soil samples from different geographic regions of the world. Successful enrichment was strongly dependent on the initial use of relatively low toluene concentrations, typically 5 ppm. From the enrichments showing positive activity for toluene degradation, 10 bacterial isolates were obtained. Fingerprints generated by PCR-amplified DNA, with repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence primers, showed that eight of these isolates were different. Under aerobic conditions, all eight isolates degraded toluene, five degraded ethylbenzene, three consumed benzene, and one degraded chlorobenzene, meta-Xylene was the only other substrate used anaerobically and was used by only one isolate. All isolates were motile gram-negative rods, produced N2 from denitrification, and did not hydrolyze starch. All strains but one fixed nitrogen as judged by ethylene production from acetylene, but only four strains hybridized to the nifHDK genes. All strains appeared to have heme nitrite reductase since their DNA hybridized to the heme (nirS) but not to the Cu (nirU) genes. Five strains hybridized to a toluene ortho-hydroxylase catabolic probe, and two of those also hybridized to a toluene meta-hydroxylase probe. Partial sequences of the 16S rRNA genes of all isolates showed substantial similarity to 16S rRNA sequences of Azoarcus sp. Physiological, morphological, fatty acid, and 16S rRNA analyses indicated that these strains were closely related to each other and that they belong to the genus Azoarcus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8085824

  18. Ionizing radiation induced degradation of tetrachlorobiphenyl in transformer oil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahnaz Chaychian; Joseph Silverman; Mohamad Al-Sheikhly; Dianne L. Poster; Pedatsur Neta

    1999-01-01

    Complete degradation of 2,2[prime],6,6[prime]-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB-54) in transformer oil is achieved by ionizing radiation without degradation of the oil. [gamma]-irradiation of transformer oil containing PCB-54 with a dose of 200 kGy results in complete destruction of the PCB. Analysis of samples irradiated with various doses demonstrated gradual degradation of PCB-54 and successive formation and degradation of trichloro-, dichloro-, and monochlorobiphenyl. The

  19. Effects of arsenic exposure on DNA methylation in cord blood samples from newborn babies and in a human lymphoblast cell line

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence indicates that in utero exposure to arsenic is associated with congenital defects and long-term disease consequences including cancers. Recent studies suggest that arsenic carcinogenesis results from epigenetic changes, particularly in DNA methylation. This study aimed to investigate DNA methylation changes as a result of arsenic exposure in utero and in vitro. Methods For the exposure in utero study, a total of seventy-one newborns (fifty-five arsenic-exposed and sixteen unexposed newborns) were recruited. Arsenic concentrations in the drinking water were measured, and exposure in newborns was assessed by measurement of arsenic concentrations in cord blood, nails and hair by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). In the in vitro study, human lymphoblasts were treated with arsenite at 0-100 ?M for two, four and eight hours (short-term) and at 0, 0.5 and 1.0 ?M for eight-weeks period (long-term). DNA methylation was analyzed in cord blood lymphocytes and lymphoblasts treated with arsenite in vitro. Global DNA methylation was determined as LINE-1 methylation using combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA) and total 5-methyldeoxycytidine (5MedC) content which was determined by HPLC-MS/MS. Methylation of p53 was determined at the promoter region using methylation-specific restriction endonuclease digestion with MspI and HpaII. Results Results showed that arsenic-exposed newborns had significantly higher levels of arsenic in cord blood, fingernails, toenails and hair than those of the unexposed subjects and a slight increase in promoter methylation of p53 in cord blood lymphocytes which significantly correlated with arsenic accumulation in nails (p < 0.05) was observed, while LINE-1 methylation was unchanged. Short-term in vitro arsenite treatment in lymphoblastoid cells clearly demonstrated a significant global hypomethylation, determined as reduction in LINE-1 methylation and total 5-MedC content, and p53 hypermethylation (p < 0.05). However, a slight LINE-1 hypomethylation and transient p53 promoter hypermethylation were observed following long-term in vitro treatment. Conclusions This study provides an important finding that in utero arsenic exposure affects DNA methylation, particularly at the p53 promoter region, which may be linked to the mechanism of arsenic carcinogenesis and the observed increased incidence of cancer later in life. PMID:22551203