Science.gov

Sample records for degraded wall paintings

  1. Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation Sections - Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp NP-5-C, Barracks No. 5, CCC Camp Historic District at Chapin Mesa, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  2. Pigment Degradation in Oil Paint Induced by Indoor Climate: Comparison of Visual and Computational Backscattered Electron Images.

    PubMed

    Keune, Katrien; Kramer, Rick P; Huijbregts, Zara; Schellen, Henk L; Stappers, Marc H L; van Eikema Hommes, Margriet H

    2016-04-01

    For the first time the degradation of lead white pigment in mature oil paint has been used as an internal marker for the degree of saponification and hence chemical degradation of oil paint. Computational image analysis of the backscattered electron images quantified the degree of the intact lead white pigment versus the nonpigmented and lead-rich areas (degraded lead white) in the paint layers. This new methodology was applied to a series of paint samples taken from four painted wall hangings (dated 1778), which makes it possible to study the influence of indoor climate on chemical degradation of aged oil paintings. The visual interpretation and computational image analysis of the backscattered electron images revealed clear trends. The highest degree of lead white degradation in the room was found in samples from the north wall close to the windows, whereas degradation diminished further away from the window. Lead white from the south wall was less degraded, but showed a similar trend as in the paintings on the north wall. These results imply a strong relationship between chemical degradation of paint and location of the paint in the room. PMID:26891673

  3. Improving FTIR imaging speciation of organic compound residues or their degradation products in wall painting samples, by introducing a new thin section preparation strategy based on cyclododecane pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Papliaka, Zoi Eirini; Vaccari, Lisa; Zanini, Franco; Sotiropoulou, Sophia

    2015-07-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging in transmission mode, employing a bidimensional focal plane array (FPA) detector, was applied for the detection and spatially resolved chemical characterisation of organic compounds or their degradation products within the stratigraphy of a critical group of fragments, originating from prehistoric and roman wall paintings, containing a very low concentration of subsisted organic matter or its alteration products. Past analyses using attenuated total reflection (ATR) or reflection FTIR on polished cross sections failed to provide any evidence of any organic material assignable as binding medium of the original painting. In order to improve the method's performance, in the present study, a new method of sample preparation in thin section was developed. The procedure is based on the use of cyclododecane C12H24 as embedding material and a subsequent double-side polishing of the specimen. Such procedure provides samples to be studied in FTIR transmission mode without losing the information on the spatial distribution of the detected materials in the paint stratigraphy. For comparison purposes, the same samples were also studied after opening their stratigraphy with a diamond anvil cell. Both preparation techniques offered high-quality chemical imaging of the decay products of an organic substance, giving clues to the painting technique. In addition, the thin sections resulting from the cyclododecane pre-treatment offered more layer-specific data, as the layer thickness and order remained unaffected, whereas the samples resulting from compression within the diamond cell were slightly deformed; however, since thinner and more homogenous, they provided higher spectral quality in terms of S/N ratio. In summary, the present study illustrates the appropriateness of FTIR imaging in transmission mode associated with a new thin section preparation strategy to detect and localise very low-concentrated organic matter subjected to

  4. 4. LARGE MEETING ROOM, SOUTH WALL, FIREPLACE AND PAINTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. LARGE MEETING ROOM, SOUTH WALL, FIREPLACE AND PAINTING - Penn School Historic District, Frissell Community House, SC Route 37, 1 mile South of Frogmore, St. Helena Island, Frogmore, Beaufort County, SC

  5. Analytical studies of the Alexandrovo Thracian tomb wall paintings.

    PubMed

    Glavcheva, Z; Yancheva, D; Velcheva, E; Stamboliyska, B; Petrova, N; Petkova, V; Lalev, G; Todorov, V

    2016-01-01

    A profound study of samples obtained from Thracian tomb wall paintings at Alexandrovo, Bulgaria (dating back to the fourth century BC) were carried out by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FTIR), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The current work provides a glimpse of the ingenious construction and painting techniques used in Thracian tomb at Alexandrovo. The results suggest that beeswax was used as a paint binder and also revealed presence of various nano-materials. PMID:25701135

  6. A study of smalt and red lead discolouration in Antiphonitis wall paintings in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sister Daniilia; Minopoulou, Elpida

    2009-08-01

    The present analytical study focuses on the degradation phenomena observed in fifteenth century wall paintings of the Christ Antiphonitis monastery in Cyprus. Examination of ten fragments by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), μRaman and FTIR spectroscopy revealed smalt discolouration and loss, and transformation of red lead from orange Pb3O4 to black PbO2. The chromatic changes have affected the aesthetic effect of the paintings insofar as these pigments were extensively used. The mechanisms of smalt weathering, i.e. leaching of alkali and formation of micro-cracks, are interpreted in relation to its chemical composition and to the aggressive environmental conditions. In addition, it is assumed that red lead degradation may have been induced not only by the effect of temperature, light and humidity but also by the presence of chlorine salts. These phenomena of pigment alteration and loss underline the unsuitability of smalt and minium on wall paintings, regardless of the painting technique ( fresco, fresco-secco, secco).

  7. Sukias House and its wall paintings: Reflection of English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanian, Kouros

    Sukias House is one of the Armenian noble houses located in New Julfa Neighbourhood in Isfahan city in Iran and belongs to the Safavid period (1501-1736 AD). European itineraries who visited Isfahan in 16th and 17th centuries, existed literatures and conservation reports on the Armenian buildings in New Julfa particularly on Sukias house in conjunction with condition survey and in situ examination of the paintings were the main tools to study the Sukias House and its paintings. This indicates a strong connection of the house to Armenian and English people at the time of the paintings and support idea of the involvement of the British ambassador and his Armenian translator in building of Sukias House. The existence of English and Armenian inscriptions indicates a strong connection between Armenian and English people in decorating of the house using wall painting. In addition, the depicting of Queen Elizabeth in a tableau on the external walls increases the likelihood of this house having belonged to the English ambassador in Isfahan during the Safavid period. Alternatively, it may be that English people working in Isfahan for the East India Company lived there.

  8. Analysis of Roman wall paintings found in Verona.

    PubMed

    Mazzocchin, Gian Antonio; Rudello, Danilo; Murgia, Emanuela

    2007-09-01

    The present paper deals with the analysis of roman wall paintings fragments recovered from twelve buildings of Verona, Italy. The analytical techniques used were Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with an EDS microanalysis detector, Xray powder diffraction (XRD) Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy. The wall preparation generally consisted of three layer: the pictorial layer, an intonachino layer of hydrated lime and a plaster one made of slaked lime and sand. The pigments found in the studied domus are different reflecting the taste and culture of Xa Regio of Italy but also the economical possibilities of the dominus and the building period. PMID:17970297

  9. Investigating shoulder muscle loading and exerted forces during wall painting tasks: influence of gender, work height and paint tool design.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Patricia M; Chopp, Jaclyn N; Dickerson, Clark R

    2014-07-01

    The task of wall painting produces considerable risk to the workers, both male and female, primarily in the development of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders. Insufficient information is currently available regarding the potential benefits of using different paint roller designs or the possible adverse effects of painting at different work heights. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of gender, work height, and paint tool design on shoulder muscle activity and exerted forces during wall painting. Ten young adults, five male and five female, were recruited to perform simulated wall painting at three different work heights with three different paint roller designs while upper extremity muscle activity and horizontal push force were recorded. Results demonstrated that for female participants, significantly greater total average (p = 0.007) and integrated (p = 0.047) muscle activity was present while using the conventional and curly flex paint roller designs compared to the proposed design in which the load was distributed between both hands. Additionally, for both genders, the high working height imposed greater muscular demands compared to middle and low heights. These findings suggest that, if possible, avoid painting at extreme heights (low or high) and that for female painters, consider a roller that requires the use of two hands; this will reduce fatigue onset and subsequently mitigate potential musculoskeletal shoulder injury risks. PMID:24636728

  10. Thin Wall Pipe Ultrasonic Inspection through Paint Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi, Mihai Valentin; Petre, Cristian Cătălin

    Classical ultrasonic inspection of welds is currently done for plates thicker than 8 mm. The inspection of but welds in thin walled pipes has considerable implementation difficulties, due to guided waves dominating ultrasonic pulses propagation. Generation of purely symmetric modes, either torsional or longitudinal, requires a circumferential uniform distribution of transducers and dedicated inspection equipment, which are increasing the inspection costs. Moreover, if the surface is paint coated, the received signals are close to the detection level. The present work implies a single transducer, coupled to the painted surface. The proper choice of the guided mode and frequency range, allows the detection of a standard, small diameter through thickness hole. In this way, the inspection of pipe welds can use the same equipment as for thick materials, with only wedge adaptation.

  11. Moisture dynamics in wall paintings monitored by single-sided NMR.

    PubMed

    Oligschläger, D; Waldow, S; Haber, A; Zia, W; Blümich, B

    2015-01-01

    The durability of historic wall paintings is highly dependent on environmental influences such as moisture ingress, salt crystallization and temperature changes. A fundamental understanding of dynamic transport processes in wall paintings is necessary to apply suitable conservation and restoration methods to preserve such objects with high cultural value. Non-invasive, mobile-NMR techniques with single-sided sensors, such as the NMR-MOUSE(®), enable to monitor the moisture content, transport and apparent diffusion constants in wall paintings. We investigated this technique by experiment and modeling to correlate salt crystallization, moisture transport and local diffusion in wall-painting samples. Moreover, the influence of different painting techniques (fresco and secco) and conservation/consolidation methods on moisture transport and diffusion is discussed. The results are compared with results from field measurements on real fresco paintings in Casa del Salone Nero and the Villa of the Papyri, Herculaneum, Italy. PMID:25354262

  12. Characterization of pigments and ligands in a wall painting fragment from Liternum archaeological park (Italy).

    PubMed

    Corso, Gaetano; Gelzo, Monica; Chambery, Angela; Severino, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Lomoriello, Filomena Schiano; D'Apolito, Oceania; Dello Russo, Antonio; Gargiulo, Patrizia; Piccioli, Ciro; Arcari, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    Spectroscopic and MS techniques were used to characterize the pigments and the composition of polar and nonpolar binders of a stray wall painting fragment from Liternum (Italy) archaeological excavation. X-ray fluorescence and diffraction analysis of the decorations indicated mainly the presence of calcite, quartz, hematite, cinnabar, and cuprorivaite. Infrared spectroscopy, GC coupled to flame-ionization detector, and MS analysis of the polar and nonpolar components extracted from paint layers from three different color regions revealed the presence of free amino acids, sugars, and fatty acids. Interestingly, LC-MS shotgun analysis of the red painting region showed the presence of αS1-casein of buffalo origin. Compared to our previous results from Pompeii's wall paintings, even though the Liternum painting mixture contained also binders of animal origin, the data strongly suggest that in both cases a tempera painting technique was utilized. PMID:23002018

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of Waterborne Multi-wall Carbon Nanotube Paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowty, Heather; Wang, Chyi-Shan

    2005-04-01

    The fabrication of water-borne polyurethane nanocomposites containing multi-wall nanotubes has presented a significant technological challenge to those in the polymer community. Such conductive polyurethanes are of great interest to the paint and coatings industry for use in electrical grounding and shielding. Currently, these materials are formed by strong acidic reflux of the nanotubes and subsequent dispersal in the polymer matrix. This treatment can result in significant shortening of the tubes and degradation of the resulting mechanical and electrical transport properties. Here we present an alternate technique in which various conductive and non-conductive water-soluble polymers are physi-adsorbed to the surface of the nanotube. These interactions with the nanotubes result in highly uniform suspensions of water-based urethane coatings and bulk materials. We will examine the polymer chemistry and morphologies of these nanostructured materials and the resulting thermal, electrical and mechanical properties.

  14. Natural Paradigms of Plant Cell Wall Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.; Xu, Q.; Taylor, L. E.; Baker, J. O.; Tucker, M. P.; Ding, S. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Natural processes of recycling carbon from plant cell walls are slow but very efficient, generally involving microbial communities and their secreted enzymes. Efficient combinations of microbial communities and enzymes act in a sequential and synergistic manner to degrade plant cell walls. Recent understanding of plant cell wall ultra-structure, as well as the carbon metabolism, ATP production, and ecology of participating microbial communities, and the biochemical properties of their cellulolytic enzymes have led to new perspectives on saccharification of biomass. Microbial communities are dynamic functions of the chemical and structural compositions of plant cell wall components. The primitive 'multicellularity' exhibited by certain cellulolytic microorganisms may play a role in facilitating cell-cell communication and cell-plant cell wall-substrate interaction.

  15. Pigments with or without organic binder? A survey of wall painting techniques during Antiquity

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, P.

    1996-01-01

    The identification of ancient artistic techniques is based on laboratory studies and, for historical cases, also on literary sources. An analytical approach using the techniques of physical chemistry reveals the technical expertise of the artists, right at the dawn of art. In the case of prehistoric parietal art, we show that the artists prepared their pigments with different ground and mixed minerals. They applied their material onto the wall and the particles remained embedded in the superficial calcite layer. Later, the prehistoric people prepared a real paint with the proper pigment, an extender and an organic binder to fix the paint on the wall. During Antiquity, new techniques appear. The paint is applied to the natural or artificial wall and is executed, either directly or on a previously applied plaster. The aim of this paper is to describe the evolution of the techniques. The underlying chemistry provides some interesting clues on the technical choices. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Radiation Induced Degradation of White Thermal Control Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Zwiener, J. M.; Wertz, G. E.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, M. M.; Meshishnek, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper details a comparison analysis of the zinc-oxide pigmented white thermal control paints Z-93 and Z-93P. Both paints were simultaneously exposed to combined space environmental effects and analyzed using an in-vacuo reflectance technique. The dose applied to the paints was approximately equivalent to 5 yr in a geosynchronous orbit. This comparison analysis showed that Z-93P is an acceptable substitute for Z-93. Irradiated samples of Z-93 and Z-93P were subjected to additional exposures of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and analyzed using the in-vacuo reflectance technique to investigate UV activated reflectance recovery. Both samples showed minimal UV activated reflectance recovery after an additional 190 equivalent Sun hour (ESH) exposure. Reflectance response utilizing nitrogen as a repressurizing gas instead of air was also investigated. This investigation found the rates of reflectance recovery when repressurized with nitrogen are slower than when repressurized with air.

  17. Radiation Induced Degradation of White Thermal Control Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Zwiener, J. M.; Wertz, G. E.; Vaughn, J. A.; Kamenetzky, R. R.; Finckenor, M. M.; Meshishnek, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper details a comparison analysis of the Zinc Oxide pigmented white thermal control paints Z-93 and Z-93P. Both paints were simultaneously exposed to combined space environmental effects and analyzed using an in-vacuum reflectance technique. The dose applied to the paints was approximately equivalent to 5 years in a geosynchronous orbit. This comparison analysis showed that Z-93P is an acceptable substitute for Z-93. Irradiated samples of Z-93 and Z-93P were subjected to additional exposures of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and analyzed using the in-vacuum reflectance technique to investigate UV activated reflectance recovery. Both samples showed minimal UV activated reflectanc6 recovery after an additional 190 Equivalent Sun Hour (ESH) exposure. Reflectance response utilizing nitrogen as a repressurizing gas instead of air was also investigated. This investigation found the rates of reflectance recovery when repressurized with nitrogen are slower than when repressurized with air.

  18. Radiation Induced Degradation of White Thermal Control Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Zwiener, J. M.; Wertz, G. E.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, M. M.; Meshishnek, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper details a comparison analysis of the zinc-oxide pigmented white thermal control paints Z-93 and Z-93P. Both paints were simultaneously exposed to combined space environmental effects and analyzed using an in-vacuo reflectance technique. The dose applied to the paints was approximately equivalent to 5 yr in a geosynchronous orbit. This comparison analysis showed that Z-93P is an acceptable substitute for Z-93. Irradiated samples of Z-93 and Z-93P were subjected to additional exposures of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and analyzed using the in-vacuo reflectance technique to investigate UV activated reflectance recovery. Both samples showed minimal UV activated reflectance recovery after an additional 190 equivalent Sun hour (ESH) exposure. Reflectance response utilizing nitrogen as a repressurizing gas instead of air was also investigated. This investigation found the rates of reflectance recovery when repressurized with nitrogen are slower than when repressurized with air.

  19. Polar and non-polar organic binder characterization in Pompeian wall paintings: comparison to a simulated painting mimicking an "a secco" technique.

    PubMed

    Corso, Gaetano; Gelzo, Monica; Sanges, Carmen; Chambery, Angela; Di Maro, Antimo; Severino, Valeria; Dello Russo, Antonio; Piccioli, Ciro; Arcari, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    The use of Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS) allowed us to characterize the composition of polar and non-polar binders present in sporadic wall paint fragments taken from Pompeii's archaeological excavation. The analyses of the polar and non-polar binder components extracted from paint powder layer showed the presence of amino acids, sugars, and fatty acids but the absence of proteinaceous material. These results are consistent with a water tempera painting mixture composed of pigments, flours, gums, and oils and are in agreement with those obtained from a simulated wall paint sample made for mimicking an ancient "a secco" technique. Notably, for the first time, we report the capability to discriminate by tandem MS the presence of free amino acids in the paint layer. PMID:22302170

  20. Evaluation of Tritium Behavior in the Epoxy Painted Concrete Wall of ITER Hot Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Masataka

    2005-07-15

    Tritium behavior released in the ITER hot cell has been investigated numerically using a combined analytical methods of a tritium transport analysis in the multi-layer wall (concrete and epoxy paint) with the one dimensional diffusion model and a tritium concentration analysis in the hot cell with the complete mixing model by the ventilation. As the results, it is revealed that tritium concentration decay and permeation issues are not serious problem in a viewpoint of safety, since it is expected that tritium concentration in the hot cell decrease rapidly within several days just after removing the tritium release source, and tritium permeation through the epoxy painted concrete wall will be negligible as long as the averaged realistic diffusion coefficient is ensured in the concrete wall. It is also revealed that the epoxy paint on the concrete wall prevents the tritium inventory increase in the concrete wall greatly (two orders of magnitudes), but still, the inventory in the wall is estimated to reach about 0.1 PBq for 20 years operation.

  1. New highlights on degradation process of verdigris from easel paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Carlotta; Zarkout, Karim; Le Hô, Anne-Solenn; Mirambet, François; Gourier, Didier; Binet, Laurent; Pagès-Camagna, Sandrine; Reguer, Solenn; Mirabaud, Sigrid; Le Du, Yann; Griesmar, Pascal; Lubin-Germain, Nadège; Menu, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Verdigris is a green copper organometallic pigment, widely used in paintings during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. With ageing, chromatic modifications like browning or darkening can be observed on those green painted layers. An original but crucial approach has been developed based on the characterization of a reference neutral verdigris pigment—anhydrous copper acetate—and model samples, made of verdigris and linseed oil. Samples have undergone artificial ageing (temperature, light) to reproduce the color change effect. They were analysed before and after accelerated ageing tests by a complementary set of classical techniques: colorimetry, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and UV-visible absorption. Our experiments revealed that the incorporation of the verdigris pigment in linseed oil induces a transformation of the copper acetate bimetallic structure, with the formation of monomeric species. These monomers, however, are not directly responsible for the darkening. The chromatic alteration seems instead linked to the transient formation of Cu(I) in the copper complexes of the pigment/oil system. This formation could be initiated by ambient light absorption through ligand-to-metal charge transfer, which favors the decarboxylation of the copper complexes leading to the reduction of Cu(II) into Cu(I). Moreover, dioxygen can react with partially decarboxylated dimers to form peroxy-Cu dimer complexes that can be responsible for the darkening.

  2. OCT assessment of aortic wall degradation for surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, E.; Val-Bernal, J. F.; Pontón, A.; Calvo Díez, M.; Mayorga, M.; Revuelta, J. M.; López-Higuera, J. M.; Conde, O. M.

    2014-05-01

    The degradation of the wall in large cardiovascular vessels, such as the aorta artery, induces weakness in the vessel that can lead to the formation of aneurysms and the rupture of the vessel. Characterization of the wall integrity is assessed by OCT for future intraoperative assistance in aneurysm graft surgery interventions. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) provides cross sectional images of the wall of the aortic media layer. Wall degradations appear as spatial anomalies in the reflectivity profile through the wall thickness. Wall degradation assessment is proposed by automatic identification and dimensioning of these anomalies within the homogeneous surrounding tissue.

  3. FT-IR and EDXRF analysis of wall paintings of ancient Ainos Hagia Sophia Church

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyuz, S.; Akyuz, T.; Basaran, S.; Kocabas, I.; Gulec, A.; Cesmeli, H.; Ucar, B.

    2009-04-01

    The wall paintings of ancient Ainos Hagia (Saint) Sophia Church were investigated by FT-IR and EDXRF spectroscopy. Calcite, aragonite, gypsum, and quartz were detected in all the samples. Feldspar phases and pigments were inferred from both band component analysis and the second derivative profiles of the IR spectra. The black, dark brown, and red colouration was due to different concentrations of MnO 2, Mn 2O 3, magnetite, and haematite.

  4. Wall paintings studied using Raman spectroscopy: a comparative study between various assays of cross sections and external layers.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rodriguez, Jose Luis; Robador, Maria Dolores; Centeno, Miguel Angel; Siguenza, Belinda; Duran, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a comparative study between in situ applications of portable Raman spectroscopy and direct laboratory measurements using micro-Raman spectroscopy on the surface of small samples and of cross sections. The study was performed using wall paintings from different sites of the Alcazar of Seville. Little information was obtained using a portable Raman spectrometer due to the presence of an acrylic polymer, calcium oxalate, calcite and gypsum that was formed or deposited on the surface. The pigments responsible for different colours, except cinnabar, were not detected by the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of the surface of small samples taken from the wall paintings due to the presence of surface contaminants. The pigments and plaster were characterised using cross sections. The black colour consisted of carbon black. The red layers were formed by cinnabar and white lead or by iron oxides. The green and white colours were composed of green emerald or atacamite and calcite, respectively. Pb3O4 has also been characterised. The white layers (plaster) located under the colour layers consisted of calcite, quartz and feldspars. The fresco technique was used to create the wall paintings. A wall painting located on a gypsum layer was also studied. The Naples yellow in this wall painting was not characterised due to the presence of glue and oils. This study showed the advantage of studying cross sections to completely characterise the pigments and plaster in the studied wall paintings. PMID:24216251

  5. Scientific evaluation of wall paintings from Bunesti Evangelical Church, Brasov county

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baciu, Annamaria; MǎruÅ£oiu, Constantin; Bibire, Cristina; Vornicu, Nicoleta; Dreve, Simina

    2013-11-01

    Evangelical Church in the village Bunesti, Brasov county, is part of the fortified churches built since the XIV century at the south-eastern territory of Transylvania. Developed by addition in several stages during centuries, the church begun as Catholic chapel, then that was amplified in the sixteenth century, when Reform was adopted by the Saxon communities. In that period the building was extended in length and height and the catholic specific iconographic decorations were cancelled by covering with different layers of plaster and paint. The campaign of introducing in touristic circuit of old Saxon fortified churches generated, in terms of maintenance and renovations undertaken, the discovery of significant wall paintings, as treasures to be rescued and put into value. Our present efforts are focused on scientific evaluation of mural paintings found in Evangelical Church from Bunesti, by XRF and specific analysis performed on 10 different samples of mural paintings, completing visual and artistic analysis in order to establish the strategies for their recovering and preservation.

  6. Byzantine wall paintings from Kastoria, northern Greece: spectroscopic study of pigments and efflorescing salts.

    PubMed

    Iordanidis, Andreas; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Strati, Aggeliki; Gkimourtzina, Amalia; Papoulidou, Androniki

    2011-02-01

    This study concerns the investigation of pigments and efflorescence phenomena on the wall paintings of Kastoria, a rural, non-metropolitan Byzantine town. A large number of representative samples were collected from the murals of three churches, dated to post-Byzantine era (14th-17th c. AD). The identified pigments for the red colour were hematite (Fe2O3), cinnabar (HgS) and minium (Pb3O4), while brown and yellow colours were attributed to mixtures of ochres (Fe-oxides and hydroxides) and lime. The utilization of admixtures of iron, lead and mercury compounds was also attested in order to render specific tones on the painted surfaces. Black and dark blue hues were prepared using black carbon and Mn in some cases. Grey colours were assigned to a mixture of black carbon and lime. Green colour is rather attributed to admixtures of Fe-rich minerals and lime and not to the commonly used green earths. Baryte (BaSO4) was also evidenced as a filler or extender. Phosphorous was detected and connected to proteinaceous material and Mo and Sb were traced which are probably affiliated to Fe-oxides. Regarding efflorescing salts, the determined compounds are: calcite, dolomite, gypsum, halite, nitratine, natron and mirabilite, all of which are related to temperature and humidity changes and moisture fluctuations inside the wall paintings. PMID:21216188

  7. D Survey of Pre-Hispanic Wall Painting with High Resolution Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucet, G.

    2013-07-01

    The survey and representation of pre-hispanic wall painting use to be done with traditional photography, we describe the difficulties and limitations found in this approach and we show another solution to improve the quality of this documentation. It relies on the use of photogrammetry and MicMac program. The calculated orthophotos have an accurate geometry, they are high resolution and the three-dimensional models present a high level of detail. We obtain a complete representation which satisfy the requirements of art historians and conservators to study the meanings of the paintings and their conservation state. Furthermore, as this improvement is achieved by following a particular strategy for the photo sessions and the mathematical processing on the images, it doesn't need the acquisition of additional equipment. We explain how we applied the method in the registration of a structure covered with pictorial representations that was discovered in the archaeological site of Las Higueras, México.

  8. The community distribution of bacteria and fungi on ancient wall paintings of the Mogao Grottoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yantian; Zhang, He; Du, Ye; Tian, Tian; Xiang, Ting; Liu, Xiande; Wu, Fasi; An, Lizhe; Wang, Wanfu; Gu, Ji-Dong; Feng, Huyuan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we compared the microbial communities colonising ancient cave wall paintings of the Mogao Grottoes exhibiting signs of biodeterioration. Ten samples were collected from five different caves built during different time periods and analysed using culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. The clone library results revealed high microbial diversity, including the bacterial groups Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Chloroflexi and the fungal groups Euascomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Sordariomycetes, Saccharomycetes, Plectomycetes, Pezizomycetes, Zygomycota, and Basidiomycota. The bacterial community structures differed among the samples, with no consistent temporal or spatial trends. However, the fungal community diversity index correlated with the building time of the caves independent of environmental factors (e.g., temperature or relative humidity). The enrichment cultures revealed that many culturable strains were highly resistant to various stresses and thus may be responsible for the damage to cave paintings in the Mogao Grottoes.

  9. The community distribution of bacteria and fungi on ancient wall paintings of the Mogao Grottoes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yantian; Zhang, He; Du, Ye; Tian, Tian; Xiang, Ting; Liu, Xiande; Wu, Fasi; An, Lizhe; Wang, Wanfu; Gu, Ji-Dong; Feng, Huyuan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we compared the microbial communities colonising ancient cave wall paintings of the Mogao Grottoes exhibiting signs of biodeterioration. Ten samples were collected from five different caves built during different time periods and analysed using culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. The clone library results revealed high microbial diversity, including the bacterial groups Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Chloroflexi and the fungal groups Euascomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Sordariomycetes, Saccharomycetes, Plectomycetes, Pezizomycetes, Zygomycota, and Basidiomycota. The bacterial community structures differed among the samples, with no consistent temporal or spatial trends. However, the fungal community diversity index correlated with the building time of the caves independent of environmental factors (e.g., temperature or relative humidity). The enrichment cultures revealed that many culturable strains were highly resistant to various stresses and thus may be responsible for the damage to cave paintings in the Mogao Grottoes. PMID:25583346

  10. Radiation induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) pollutants in paint scrapings.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Khandal, R K; Singh, Gurdeep

    2009-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are synthetic organic chemicals which have been commercially used worldwide in many specialty applications. In paints, PCBs were used because of their unique properties such as thermal stability, flame-resistance and low volatility. However, due to their adverse effects on human health and environment, the use of PCBs has now been banned. PCBs are today considered widespread pollutants in the global system . PCBs sources still exist in various products and in waste streams such as oil, paints, rubbers etc. Various remedial technologies have been developed in the world to detoxify PCBs. In the present study, radiolysis has been investigated as a safe means to reduce or destroy PCBs. Under this study, detoxification of PCBs in paint scrapings by gamma radiation using Cobalt 60 source has been investigated. The experimental results demonstrate that the gamma radiations can be an alternative environment- friendly technology for destroying PCBs. Gamma radiations also have the potential of being a preferred tool in comparison to the most widely used incineration method for destroying PCBs. The method used was found highly effective and destruction efficiency was as high as 91%. The degradation efficiency of PCBs was dependent on absorbed radiation dose, the type of PCBs and also on the source of paint scrapings. PMID:21114157

  11. Photochemical degradation study of polyvinyl acetate paints used in artworks by Py–GC/MS

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuya; Pintus, Valentina; Schreiner, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Photochemical degradation of commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) homopolymer and PVAc paints mixed with burnt umber, cobalt blue, cadmium red dark, nickel azo yellow and titanium white commonly used for artworks were studied by pyrolysis–gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py–GC/MS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR). Py–GC/MS with single-shot technique was used for the characterization of the thermal degradation of PVAc at different temperatures, while the double-shot technique of Py–GC/MS was used to reveal the differences in the specimens before and after UV ageing, including the changes of detectable amounts of deacetylation product – acetic acid and plasticizers such as diethyl phthalate (DEP). Furthermore, the relative concentration of the pyrolysis products of the paint samples could be measured and compared in the second step of the double-shot Py–GC/MS, which are highly dependent on the presence of pigments and the ageing status of PVAc paints. PMID:23024446

  12. Degradation of Optical Characteristics of a ZnO Organic White Paint by Electron Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Danming; He, Deyan; Xue, Yuxiong; Wang, Ji; Tian, Hai

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, based on an analysis of the mechanisms of electron irradiation of the S781 thermal control white paint (pigment ZnO) and the theories of irradiation dose depth distribution and photon absorption in materials, a model is built using the method of delamination analysis that explains the relationship between the variation of the material's spectrum absorption and electron irradiation energy. The uncertain parameters in the model, with the use of the experimental data, can be calculated by Matlab using the curve fitting by the least squares procedure. The accuracy of the model and the feasibility of the calculating methods have been verified by experiments. The model can be applied to predict the degradation of ZnO white paint's optical characteristics under space radiation environments.

  13. Solvent Extraction of Chemical Attribution Signature Compounds from Painted Wall Board: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Jon H.; Colburn, Heather A.

    2009-10-29

    This report summarizes work that developed a robust solvent extraction procedure for recovery of chemical attribution signature (CAS) compound dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) (as well as diethyl methyl phosphonate (DEMP), diethyl methyl phosphonothioate (DEMPT), and diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP)) from painted wall board (PWB), which was selected previously as the exposed media by the chemical attribution scientific working group (CASWG). An accelerated solvent extraction approach was examined to determine the most effective method of extraction from PWB. Three different solvent systems were examined, which varied in solvent strength and polarity (i.e., 1:1 dichloromethane : acetone,100% methanol, and 1% isopropanol in pentane) with a 1:1 methylene chloride : acetone mixture having the most robust and consistent extraction for four original target organophosphorus compounds. The optimum extraction solvent was determined based on the extraction efficiency of the target analytes from spiked painted wallboard as determined by gas chromatography x gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) analysis of the extract. An average extraction efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained for these four compounds. The extraction approach was further demonstrated by extracting and detecting the chemical impurities present in neat DMMP that was vapor-deposited onto painted wallboard tickets.

  14. Stratigraphic investigation of wall painting fragments from Roman villas of the Sabina area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, Alessandra; Toschi, Francesco; Colosi, Francesca; Rubino, Gianluca; Santoro, Paola

    2015-01-01

    A number of plaster fragments of Roman wall paintings have been investigated through micro-Raman and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in order to characterize the different layers of paint. The samples come from two Roman villas in the Sabina area, a countryside close to Rome. The two sets of painted plasters present different palette of colors, pictorial technique and texture as the villas are dated one in the first century A.D. and the other in the second. Both micro-Raman and LIBS spectroscopies have supplied compositional information by consuming a microscopic amount of sample material and not requiring sophisticated and expansive preparation of the plaster. Depth profile analysis has also been performed by monitoring the intensities ratio of specific emission lines related to some characteristic elements. The spectroscopic results have been integrated with microscopic and profilometric investigation of the samples, allowing to analyze the depth and morphology of the craters produced by the penetration of the laser pulses into the samples.

  15. Micro-Raman spectroscopic investigation of external wall paintings from St. Dumitru's Church, Suceava, Romania.

    PubMed

    Hernanz, A; Bratu, I; Marutoiu, O F; Marutoiu, C; Gavira-Vallejo, J M; Edwards, H G M

    2008-09-01

    The external sixteenth century wall paintings of St. Dumitru's Church in Suceava (Romania) are suffering visually from deterioration. Fragments of these paintings spallated from the external wall have been studied by micro-Raman microscopy in order to elucidate possible causes of this process. Calcite and alpha-quartz are the components of the substratum indicating that the artists used the Roman fresco technique comprising a limewash putty. No organic binders have been detected in the substrate or pigment application. Amorphous carbon and goethite, alpha-FeOOH, have been identified in areas containing residues of grey and yellow pigments, respectively. Small amounts of gypsum have been detected in the grey areas which we attribute to special attention being given to surface preparation and pigment application in these areas. An abundance of sodium nitrate, nitratine, microcrystals have been observed on the surfaces of many fragments which suggests that a biodeterioration process originating from guano deposits could have been operating in these frescoes. PMID:18649075

  16. Multi-analytical study of techniques and palettes of wall paintings of the monastery of Žiča, Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holclajtner-Antunović, Ivanka; Stojanović-Marić, Milica; Bajuk-Bogdanović, Danica; Žikić, Radiša; Uskoković-Marković, Snežana

    2016-03-01

    The present multi-analytical study concentrates on establishing the painting techniques and the identity of the wall painting materials used by the artists from the 13th and 14th centuries to decorate the Žiča monastery, Serbia. For this purpose, we demonstrate that micro-Raman spectroscopy is an efficient, non-destructive method with high spatial resolution which gives molecular and crystal structural information of a wide variety of both inorganic and organic materials. It is shown that elementary composition revealed through scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is necessary in some cases to confirm the identity of pigments and binders identified by micro-Raman spectroscopy. It was found that a fresco technique, in combination with mainly natural earth pigments such as red ochre, yellow ochre and green earth, was used. Expensive natural pigment lapis lazuli was exclusively used for obtaining blue colour while pure vermilion was used by the artists from the first period of decorations at the beginning of the 13th century. A mixture of pigments was used for attaining different colour shades. For the gilding of saint's haloes, thin golden foil was deposited over the tin sheet. In order to get a desirable optical and aesthetical impression, the metallic leaves were deposited over the yellow ochre preparatory layer. Deposits of gypsum on wall paintings as well as traces of weddellite are degradation products formed as a result of exposing wall paintings to environmental conditions.

  17. Multi-analytical study of techniques and palettes of wall paintings of the monastery of Žiča, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Holclajtner-Antunović, Ivanka; Stojanović-Marić, Milica; Bajuk-Bogdanović, Danica; Žikić, Radiša; Uskoković-Marković, Snežana

    2016-03-01

    The present multi-analytical study concentrates on establishing the painting techniques and the identity of the wall painting materials used by the artists from the 13th and 14th centuries to decorate the Žiča monastery, Serbia. For this purpose, we demonstrate that micro-Raman spectroscopy is an efficient, non-destructive method with high spatial resolution which gives molecular and crystal structural information of a wide variety of both inorganic and organic materials. It is shown that elementary composition revealed through scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is necessary in some cases to confirm the identity of pigments and binders identified by micro-Raman spectroscopy. It was found that a fresco technique, in combination with mainly natural earth pigments such as red ochre, yellow ochre and green earth, was used. Expensive natural pigment lapis lazuli was exclusively used for obtaining blue colour while pure vermilion was used by the artists from the first period of decorations at the beginning of the 13th century. A mixture of pigments was used for attaining different colour shades. For the gilding of saint's haloes, thin golden foil was deposited over the tin sheet. In order to get a desirable optical and aesthetical impression, the metallic leaves were deposited over the yellow ochre preparatory layer. Deposits of gypsum on wall paintings as well as traces of weddellite are degradation products formed as a result of exposing wall paintings to environmental conditions. PMID:26654964

  18. Defect detection of wall paintings in the Château de Versailles using TV-holography and IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambard, Jean-Pierre; Roche, Alain

    2007-07-01

    Monuments are continuously submitted to external events like water infiltration or condensation, temperature variation, soil instability, that lead to internal damage of the structure itself as well as of its surfaces. Wall paintings are then submitted to stresses that may cause cracks, internal de-lamination of the plaster or de-bonding between canvas and plaster. In the frame of the restoration of the "galerie des glaces" in the "château de Versailles", TV-Holography and IR Thermography have been used to investigate the wall paintings of the vault. The surfaces to control were either direct paintings on the plaster or paintings on canvas backed on the plaster. IR Thermography for art work and in particular for wall paintings has only recently been used. The technique allows to record transient temperature maps, when slightly heating the surface during a short time. Then, nonhomogeneities in the conductive heat transfer are related to de-bonding or de-lamination. The time parameter gives information on the depth of the defect. A calibration procedure has to be carried out to ensure reliable defect detection. Speckle interferometry is a Non Destructive Testing technique that is currently used in industry. For the wall paintings, we have used TV-Holography associated with a continuous wave laser. The technique allows, 13 metres away from the surface, to detect parts of the paintings that were vibrating due to an acoustic excitation. The control processes based on these two technologies is detailed as well as the results obtained and a comparison with manual investigation is done.

  19. Enhanced delineation of degradation in aortic walls through OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Eusebio; Val-Bernal, José Fernando; Revuelta, José M.; Pontón, Alejandro; Calvo Díez, Marta; Mayorga, Marta; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2015-03-01

    Degradation of the wall of human ascending thoracic aorta has been assessed through Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). OCT images of the media layer of the aortic wall exhibit micro-structure degradation in case of diseased aortas from aneurysmal vessels or in aortas prone to aortic dissections. The degeneration in vessel walls appears as low-reflectivity areas due to the invasive appearance of acidic polysaccharides and mucopolysaccharides within a typical ordered microstructure of parallel lamellae of smooth muscle cells, elastin and collagen fibers. An OCT indicator of wall degradation can be generated upon the spatial quantification of the extension of degraded areas in a similar way as conventional histopathology. This proposed OCT marker offers a real-time clinical insight of the vessel status to help cardiovascular surgeons in vessel repair interventions. However, the delineation of degraded areas on the B-scan image from OCT is sometimes difficult due to presence of speckle noise, variable SNR conditions on the measurement process, etc. Degraded areas could be outlined by basic thresholding techniques taking advantage of disorders evidences in B-scan images, but this delineation is not always optimum and requires complex additional processing stages. This work proposes an optimized delineation of degraded spots in vessel walls, robust to noisy environments, based on the analysis of the second order variation of image intensity of backreflection to determine the type of local structure. Results improve the delineation of wall anomalies providing a deeper physiological perception of the vessel wall conditions. Achievements could be also transferred to other clinical scenarios: carotid arteries, aorto-iliac or ilio-femoral sections, intracranial, etc.

  20. Methods for degrading or converting plant cell wall polysaccharides

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Cherry, Joel

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to methods for converting plant cell wall polysaccharides into one or more products, comprising: treating the plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into the one or more products. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into saccharified material; (b) fermenting the saccharified material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  1. Degradation study of XVIII century graffiti on the walls of Chiaramonte Palace (Palermo, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberghina, M. F.; Barraco, R.; Brai, M.; Casaletto, M. P.; Ingo, G. M.; Marrale, M.; Policarpo, D.; Schillaci, T.; Tranchina, L.

    2010-09-01

    A systematic investigation of the original materials and the degradation phenomena induced by soluble salts on the wall matrix and on the graffiti of the Inquisition jails of Chiaramonte Palace in Palermo (Italy) was carried out. Built in the XIV century, Chiaramonte Palace was used as Inquisition court during the XV-XVI centuries. The ancient graffiti, recently discovered, represent a unique historical witness of the prisoners that lived during that terrible period. In order to study the nature, the amount and the distribution of the salts in the masonry, stone materials sampled at different depth from the wall matrix and saline efflorescences were analysed. Different physical techniques were used, such as X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, X-ray Fluorescence, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction and Ionic Chromatography. Results of the chemical and physical characterisation showed that the main cause of the degradation of graffiti and wall paintings was the presence of soluble salts, such as nitrates, chlorides and sulphates. Traces of oxalates, coming from a previous conservation treatment, were also found. The results obtained by the stratigraphical characterisation of soluble salts in the wall matrix can be used to recommend a procedure based on air humidification at high relative humidity values in order to avoid salt crystallisation and to prevent the crumbling process of the graffiti.

  2. Cinnabar alteration in archaeological wall paintings: an experimental and theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiman, Madeleine Kegelman; Balonis, Magdalena; Kakoulli, Ioanna

    2015-11-01

    The red mineral pigment known as cinnabar (HgS) was commonly employed in Roman fresco wall paintings. Fresco artists of the period favored this pigment for its striking red color. However, upon excavation and exposure to air and light, cinnabar-pigmented surfaces recovered from archaeological contexts often proved to be unstable. Mural paintings colored with cinnabar that have been exposed in the open air frequently demonstrate a disfiguring, irreversible darkening of the surface. Traditionally, scholars have attributed this alteration to a light-induced phase change from red α-cinnabar to black β-cinnabar (meta-cinnabar). While this transformation has not been totally excluded, the prevailing view among conservation scientists is that chlorine plays a key role in the darkening process through the formation of light-sensitive mercury chloride compounds, or as a catalyst in the photochemical redox of Hg(II)S into Hg(0) and S(0). Using laboratory-based experiments and thermodynamic modeling, this paper attempts to further clarify the mechanism(s) and kinetics of cinnabar alteration in fresco applications, especially the role of light, humidity, and chlorine ions. Additionally, it explores possible pathways and preventive as well as remedial conservation treatments during or immediately following excavation, to inhibit or retard darkening of cinnabar-pigmented fresco surfaces.

  3. Aspergillus Enzymes Involved in Degradation of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Ronald P.; Visser, Jaap

    2001-01-01

    Degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides is of major importance in the food and feed, beverage, textile, and paper and pulp industries, as well as in several other industrial production processes. Enzymatic degradation of these polymers has received attention for many years and is becoming a more and more attractive alternative to chemical and mechanical processes. Over the past 15 years, much progress has been made in elucidating the structural characteristics of these polysaccharides and in characterizing the enzymes involved in their degradation and the genes of biotechnologically relevant microorganisms encoding these enzymes. The members of the fungal genus Aspergillus are commonly used for the production of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. This genus produces a wide spectrum of cell wall-degrading enzymes, allowing not only complete degradation of the polysaccharides but also tailored modifications by using specific enzymes purified from these fungi. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the cell wall polysaccharide-degrading enzymes from aspergilli and the genes by which they are encoded. PMID:11729262

  4. Near-crater discoloration of white lead in wall paintings during laser induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, R.; L'Hermite, D.; Semerok, A.; Salmon, L.; Detalle, V.

    2007-12-01

    During Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of white lead pigment (basic lead carbonate, 2PbCO 3·Pb(OH) 2), used in wall paintings of historical interest, a yellow-brown discoloration has been observed around the crater. This phenomenon faded after a few days exposure under ambient atmosphere. It was established that the mechanism of this discoloration consists in lead oxides (PbO) formation. It was verified by further experiments under argon atmosphere that recombination of lead with oxygen in the plasma plume produces the oxides, which settle around the crater and induce this discoloration. The impact of discoloration on the artwork's aesthetic aspect and the role of atmosphere on discoloration attenuation are discussed. The mechanism is studied on three other pigments (malachite, Prussian blue and ultramarine blue) and threshold for discoloration occurrence is estimated.

  5. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques applied to the noninvasive investigation of mural paintings: a feasibility study carried out on a wall painting by Beato Angelico in Florence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucci, Costanza; Picollo, Marcello; Chiarantini, Leandro; Sereni, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays hyperspectral imaging is a well-established methodology for the non-invasive diagnostics of polychrome surfaces, and is increasingly utilized in museums and conservation laboratories for documentation purposes and in support of restoration procedures. However, so far the applications of hyperspectral imaging have been mainly limited to easel paintings or paper-based artifacts. Indeed, specifically designed hyperspectral imagers, are usually used for applications in museum context. These devices work at short-distances from the targets and cover limited size surfaces. Instead, almost still unexplored remain the applications of hyperspectral imaging to the investigations of frescoes and large size mural paintings. For this type of artworks a remote sensing approach, based on sensors capable of acquiring hyperspectral data from distances of the order of tens of meters, is needed. This paper illustrates an application of hyperspectral remote sensing to an important wall-painting by Beato Angelico, located in the San Marco Museum in Florence. Measurements were carried out using a re-adapted version of the Galileo Avionica Multisensor Hyperspectral System (SIM-GA), an avionic hyperspectral imager originally designed for applications from mobile platforms. This system operates in the 400-2500 nm range with over 700 channels, thus guaranteeing acquisition of high resolution hyperspectral data exploitable for materials identification and mapping. In the present application, the SIM-GA device was mounted on a static scanning platform for ground-based applications. The preliminary results obtained on the Angelico's wall-painting are discussed, with highlights on the main technical issues addressed to optimize the SIM-GA system for new applications on cultural assets.

  6. Temperature-related degradation and colour changes of historic paintings containing vivianite.

    PubMed

    Čermáková, Zdeňka; Švarcová, Silvie; Hradilová, Janka; Bezdička, Petr; Lančok, Adriana; Vašutová, Vlasta; Blažek, Jan; Hradil, David

    2015-04-01

    Temperature-related degradation of pure synthetic as well as partly oxidised natural vivianite has been studied by high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) covering the whole extent of the temperature-related stability of its structure. While temperatures around 70°C are already damaging to vivianite, exposition to 160°C results in complete amorphisation of both the vivianite and its oxidation products. As indicated by Mössbauer spectroscopy, temperature-induced oxidation of vivianite starts at 90°C. To study the occurring structural as well as accompanying colour changes in more detail, model vivianite paint layer samples with different historic binders were prepared and subjected to increased temperatures. Exposition to 80°C caused pronounced colour changes of all the samples: ground natural blue vivianite became grey--a colour change which has been described in actual works of art. Regarding the binders, the oil seemed to facilitate the transfer of heat to vivianite's grains. To simulate conditions of conservation treatment under which the painting is exposed to increased temperatures, oil-on-canvas mock-ups with vivianite were prepared and relined in a traditional way using iron. The treatment affected preferentially larger grains of vivianite; the micro-samples documented their change to grey, and their Raman spectra showed the change from vivianite to metavivianite. PMID:25589392

  7. Temperature-related degradation and colour changes of historic paintings containing vivianite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čermáková, Zdeňka; Švarcová, Silvie; Hradilová, Janka; Bezdička, Petr; Lančok, Adriana; Vašutová, Vlasta; Blažek, Jan; Hradil, David

    2015-04-01

    Temperature-related degradation of pure synthetic as well as partly oxidised natural vivianite has been studied by high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) covering the whole extent of the temperature-related stability of its structure. While temperatures around 70 °C are already damaging to vivianite, exposition to 160 °C results in complete amorphisation of both the vivianite and its oxidation products. As indicated by Mössbauer spectroscopy, temperature-induced oxidation of vivianite starts at 90 °C. To study the occurring structural as well as accompanying colour changes in more detail, model vivianite paint layer samples with different historic binders were prepared and subjected to increased temperatures. Exposition to 80 °C caused pronounced colour changes of all the samples: ground natural blue vivianite became grey - a colour change which has been described in actual works of art. Regarding the binders, the oil seemed to facilitate the transfer of heat to vivianite's grains. To simulate conditions of conservation treatment under which the painting is exposed to increased temperatures, oil-on-canvas mock-ups with vivianite were prepared and relined in a traditional way using iron. The treatment affected preferentially larger grains of vivianite; the micro-samples documented their change to grey, and their Raman spectra showed the change from vivianite to metavivianite.

  8. Effect of resin content and substrate on the emission of BTEX and carbonyls from low-VOC water-based wall paint.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Chi-Chi; Cheng, Yu-Lin

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of this work is to explore the effect of resin content and the effect of substrate on the emission of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) and carbonyls from low-VOC water-based wall paint. Four low-volatile organic compound (VOC) paints include paints A (20% acrylic), B (30% acrylic), C (20% polyvinyl acetate), and D (30% polyvinyl acetate) were painted on stainless steel specimen for the study of resin effect. Green calcium silicate, green cement, and stainless steel were painted with paints A and C for the study of substrate effect. Concentrations of the VOCs in the chamber decreased with the elapsed time. Both resin type and resin quantity in paint had effects on VOC emissions. Paints with acrylic resin emitted less BTEX and carbonyls than paints with polyvinyl acetate resin. However, the effects of resin quantity varied with VOCs. Porous substrates were observed to interact more strongly with paints than inert substrates. Both green calcium silicate and green cement substrates have strong power of adsorption of VOCs from wall paints, namely toluene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-butanone, methacrolein, butyraldehyde, and benzaldehyde. Some compounds like toluene, formaldehyde, and butyaldehyde were desorbed very slowly from green calcium silicate and green cement substrates. PMID:26498819

  9. Wall Painting Investigation by Means of Non-invasive Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI): Inspection of Subsurface Structures Buried in Historical Plasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of subsurface features of wall paintings is important in conservation and technical art history as well as in building archaeology and architecture fields. In this study, an area of the apsidal wall painting of Nebbelunde Church (Rødby, Denmark) has been investigated by means of terahertz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI). Subsurface structures have been detected at different depths inside the lime-based plaster of the wall painting until approximately 1 cm from the surface. The surface morphology of the buried structures has been 3D imaged in detail, providing a substantial contribution in their characterization.

  10. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Fornacelli, Cristina; Galeotti, Monica; Gomoiu, Ioana; Lognoli, David; Mohanu, Dan; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm2 to 1 mJ/cm2 and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  11. Laser paint removal on the outside walls of the Church Abbey Saint Adoeno in Bisceglie (BAT), Italy: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurelio, G.; Catalano, I. M.; Bassi, P.

    2010-09-01

    It is the oldest church in the city after the cathedral. It is among the purest examples of Romanesque. It was founded in 1074 and expenses for its construction helped the inhabitants of the agricultural hamlets of the Cirignano, Pacciano and Zappino. The church was dedicated to St. Adoeno Dado, bishop of Rouen, protector of Norman, because , according to tradition, the building also participated Norman soldiers. San Adoeno church has a façade at cusp with a truncated tympanum , crowned by an eagle. In the centre of the façade there is a rose ornament surrounded by four lions and a statue of St. Adoeno ( Figs. A to I ). On the outside walls of this Abbey many graffiti, produced by different coloured spray paints were found. After the usual photographical tests some Laser Paint Removal trials were executed to verify the damage threshold of the calcareous stony substrate as well as the possibility to ablate these paints by a Nd - YAG laser in Q-Switch mode. Even if all the classical four laser paint ablation techniques were employed some paints showed a great difficulty to be removed from the substrate. For these ones it was necessary to increase at maximum both the energy per pulse and the fluence value for obtaining some acceptable result but the substrate looked turned pale. It was decided to remove a small amount of these paints and subject to chemical analysis for determining whether they were acrylic based. At the same time it was investigated on the type of limestone substrate that appeared more porous and less hard on the surface than the common local limestone marble basin, that is, Trani or Bisceglie. So, on the light of these investigations, the possible solution for this hard laser ablation problem was carried out with an acceptable final result.

  12. Extracellular entrapment and degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrera, Consol; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Lazzaretto, Beatrice; Andón, Fernando T.; Hultenby, Kjell; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Star, Alexander; Fadeel, Bengt

    2014-05-01

    Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials.Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Suppl. Fig. 1 - length distribution of SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 2 - characterization of pristine vs. oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 3 - endotoxin evaluation; suppl. Fig. 4 - NET characterization; suppl. Fig. 5 - UV-Vis/NIR analysis of biodegradation of oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 6 - cytotoxicity of partially degraded SWCNTs. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06047k

  13. Romano-British wall paintings: Raman spectroscopic analysis of fragments from two urban sites of early military colonisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Middleton, P. S.; Hargreaves, M. D.

    2009-08-01

    Raman spectroscopic analyses of 1st century AD Romano-British villa wall-painting fragments from two important military and early urban centres at Colchester and Lincoln have demonstrated some interesting contrasts in technique and palette usage. Colchester, the earliest fortified settlement, developed a sophisticated painting and craft industry compared with Lincoln in the assimilation of novel substrate preparation ideas and pigment adoption. The earliest use of the rather rare purple mineral pigment, caput mortuum, hitherto reported in only a few Roman villas elsewhere in mainland Europe, is in evidence in this early phase settlement and the use of gypsum as a special ground preparation agent as an additive to the more common limewash putty to enhance the effect of the use of lazurite as a pigment is worthy of note in this context. Otherwise, the pigments are seen to be those that are quite normally encountered in Roman villas, namely, haematite, goethite, terre verte, and carbon. The results of this study indicate that at Colchester there was a continued development in technique into the colonial phase compared with a stagnation in Lincoln; these scientific results have created a stimulus for further historical research into pigment and techniques development for wall paintings at the fringe of the Roman Empire in the 1st-3rd Centuries AD.

  14. Romano-British wall paintings: Raman spectroscopic analysis of fragments from two urban sites of early military colonisation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, H G M; Middleton, P S; Hargreaves, M D

    2009-08-01

    Raman spectroscopic analyses of 1st century AD Romano-British villa wall-painting fragments from two important military and early urban centres at Colchester and Lincoln have demonstrated some interesting contrasts in technique and palette usage. Colchester, the earliest fortified settlement, developed a sophisticated painting and craft industry compared with Lincoln in the assimilation of novel substrate preparation ideas and pigment adoption. The earliest use of the rather rare purple mineral pigment, caput mortuum, hitherto reported in only a few Roman villas elsewhere in mainland Europe, is in evidence in this early phase settlement and the use of gypsum as a special ground preparation agent as an additive to the more common limewash putty to enhance the effect of the use of lazurite as a pigment is worthy of note in this context. Otherwise, the pigments are seen to be those that are quite normally encountered in Roman villas, namely, haematite, goethite, terre verte, and carbon. The results of this study indicate that at Colchester there was a continued development in technique into the colonial phase compared with a stagnation in Lincoln; these scientific results have created a stimulus for further historical research into pigment and techniques development for wall paintings at the fringe of the Roman Empire in the 1st-3rd Centuries AD. PMID:19070538

  15. Microcharacterization of a natural blue pigment used in wall paintings during the Romanesque period in northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Arantegui, Josefina; Pardos, Carlos; Abad, José-Luis; García, José-Ramón

    2013-12-01

    In Romanesque wall paintings in Aragon (Spain), the pigment used for creating blue was a very characteristic mineral, aerinite, which came from local ores in the southern Pyrenees. Optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, X-ray diffraction, and reflectance spectroscopy were used to make a detailed microcharacterization of this rare blue pigment in order to improve the knowledge of its composition and possible variability, from samples of medieval paintings and some mineral ores. New analytical data on the chemical composition of the blue pigment are reported here, together with the characterization of its microstructure, and the heterogeneity of the natural pigment made by the features of the ore itself. X-ray diffraction pattern and color parameters of the mineral ores are also included. The data obtained by SEM-EDX will assist identification of this pigment by electron microscopy. The natural variability in composition observed in the samples may be used to explain formation of the extracted mineral and to compare several ore sources. Connection of the ore composition with the pigments used in Romanesque wall paintings will help both provenance and attribution studies. PMID:24001355

  16. Identification of bacteria in a biodegraded wall painting by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified gene fragments coding for 16S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Rölleke, S; Muyzer, G; Wawer, C; Wanner, G; Lubitz, W

    1996-01-01

    Medieval wall paintings are often affected by biodecay. An inventory of the existing microorganisms associated with the damage to the paintings is not yet an integral part of the restoration process. This stems from the lack of effective means for such a stocktaking. Nevertheless, fungi and bacteria cause severe damage through mechanical processes from growth into the painting and its grounding and through their metabolism. Detailed information on the bacterial colonization of ancient wall paintings is essential for the protection of the paintings. We used a molecular approach based on the detection and identification of DNA sequences encoding rRNA (rDNA) to identify bacteria present on an ancient wall painting without prior cultivation of the organisms, since it has been shown that most of these bacteria cannot be cultivated under laboratory conditions. To trace the noncultivated fraction of bacteria, total DNA from a biodegraded wall painting sample from a 13th century fresco was extracted and 194-bp fragments of the 16S rDNA were amplified with eubacterial primers. The 16S rDNA fragments of uniform length obtained from the different bacterial species were separated according to their sequence differences by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). By sequencing excised and reamplified individual DNA bands, we characterized the phylogenetic affiliation of the corresponding bacteria. Using this approach, we identified members or close relatives of the genera Halomonas, Clostridium, and Frankia. To our knowledge, these groups of bacteria have not yet been isolated and implicated by conventional microbiological techniques as contributing to the biodegradation of wall paintings. PMID:8787403

  17. Experimental study of unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena on shock-tube wall using fast-response temperature-sensitive paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes an experimental study that used a fast-response temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) to investigate the unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena occurring on a shock-tube wall. To understand these phenomena in detail, a fast-response TSP with high temperature sensitivity developed for transient temperature measurement was applied to the wall. The shock-tube experiment was carried out under the over-tailored condition, with a pressure ratio of 110 for test gases of air in driver/driven tubes. The following aspects were clarified using the TSP: (a) the TSP could be used to visualize the unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena and estimate the quantitative heat flux on the shock-tube wall; (b) an x-t diagram based on the TSP response showed shock-tube wall characteristics that included the incident/reflected shocks, laminar-to-turbulent boundary-layer transition, streaks in the turbulent boundary layer, reflected shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction, and waves reflected from a contact surface; (c) the TSP graphically showed that a transition front from the plate's leading edge and turbulent spots moved with 80% of the free-stream velocity behind the incident shock. In addition, the TSP could track the growth of the turbulent spots on the wall.

  18. Wall paintings facies and their possible genetic correlates in the ancient Pompeii: A bio-anthropologic message from the past?

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Manfredini, Marco; Ruini, Cristel

    2016-09-10

    The figurative arts and precisely the ancient Pompeian wall paintings portraits can provide an additional source of information in supplementing bio-anthropological studies. There are several genetic diseases with a wide spectrum of congenital bone stigmata in association to distinctive facial features. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also named nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by unusual skeletal changes, such as macrocephaly, facial asymmetry, hypertelorism, frontal and parietal bossing caused by germline mutations of the gene PTCH1. The Gorlin syndrome, clinically defined in 1963, existed during Dynastic Egyptian times, as revealed by a spectrum of skeletal findings compatible with the syndrome in mummies dating back to three thousand years ago and, most likely, in the ancient population of Pompeii. In the present research, we discuss the potential relationship between Pompeian wall paintings portrait and the cranio-metric bone changes revealed among the Pompeian skull collections assuming that the ancient portraits can constitute an important tool that should be strictly integrated with osteologic and biomolecular data in order to argue a syndromic diagnosis in ancient population. PMID:27107679

  19. Radiation Induced Degradation of the White Thermal Control Paints Z-93 and Z-93P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Zwiener, J. M.; Wertz, G. E.; Vaughn, J. A.; Kamenetzky, R. R.; Finckenor, M. M.; Meshishnek, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper details a comparison analysis of the zinc oxide pigmented white thermal control paints Z-93 and Z-93P. Both paints were simultaneously exposed to combined space environmental effects and analyzed using an in-vacuo reflectance technique. The dose applied to the paints was approximately equivalent to 5 years in a geosynchronous orbit. This comparison analysis showed that Z-93P is an acceptable substitute for Z-93. Irradiated samples of Z-93 and Z-93P were subjected to additional exposures of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and analyzed using the in-vacuo reflectance technique to investigate UV activated reflectance recovery. Both samples showed minimal UV activated reflectance recovery after an additional 190 equivalent sun hour (ESH) exposure. Reflectance response utilizing nitrogen as a repressurizing gas instead of air was also investigated. This investigation found the rates of reflectance recovery when repressurized with nitrogen are slower than when repressurized with air.

  20. Analytical imaging studies of the migration of degraded orpiment, realgar, and emerald green pigments in historic paintings and related conservation issues

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keune, Katrien; Mass, Jennifer; Mehta, Apurva; Church, Jonathan; Meirer, Florian

    2016-04-21

    Yellow orpiment (As2S3) and red–orange realgar (As4S4) photo-degrade and the nineteenth-century pigment emerald green (Cu(C2H3O2)2·3Cu(AsO2)2) degrades into arsenic oxides. Because of their solubility in water, arsenic oxides readily migrate and are found throughout the multi-layered paint system. The widespread arsenic migration has consequences for conservation, and this paper provides better insight into the extent of the problem. Five paint samples containing orpiment, realgar or emerald green pigments deriving from paintings by De Heem (17th C), Van Gogh (19th C), Rousseau (19th C), an unknown 17th C northern European artist and an Austrian painted cupboard (19th C) were investigated using SEM/EDX,more » imaging ATR-FTIR and arsenic (As) K–edge μ-XANES to obtain the spatial distribution and chemical speciation of arsenic in the paint system. In all of the samples investigated arsenic had migrated throughout the multi-layered paint structure of the art object, from support to varnish. Furthermore, As5+-species were found throughout the entire paint sample. We hypothesize that arsenic trioxide is first formed, dissolves in water, further oxidizes to arsenic pentaoxide, and then reacts with lead, calcium and other ions and is deposited in the paint system as insoluble arsenates. Since the degradation of arsenic pigments such as orpiment, realgar and emerald green occurs through a highly mobile intermediate stage, it not only affects the regions rich in arsenic pigments, but also the entire object, including substrate and top varnish layers. Furthermore, because of this widespread potential for damage, preventing degradation of arsenic pigments should be prioritized and conservators should minimize exposure of objects containing arsenic pigments to strong light, large fluctuations in relative humidity and water-based cleaning agents.« less

  1. Degradation of isolated tomato cell walls by purified polygalacturonase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Themmen, A P; Tucker, G A; Grierson, D

    1982-01-01

    Cell wall preparations from green pericarp of normal and mutant Neverripe (Nr) and ripening inhibitor (rin) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit were all equally degraded in vitro by a cell wall-bound protein extract from ripe normal tomatoes.Similar cell wall-bound protein extracts from ripe Nr fruit were not as effective and those from ripe rin fruit gave no cell wall degradation at all in vitro. This was correlated with the absence of polygalacturonase in rin and low activity of Nr extracts.Purified polygalacturonase was capable of in vitro cell wall degradation and it seems that this enzyme can account for the cell wall degradation observed with the total cell wall-bound protein extracts from ripe fruit. PMID:16662142

  2. Portable Raman, DRIFTS, and XRF Analysis to Diagnose the Conservation State of Two Wall Painting Panels from Pompeii Deposited in the Naples National Archaeological Museum (Italy).

    PubMed

    Madariaga, Juan Manuel; Maguregui, Maite; Castro, Kepa; Knuutinen, Ulla; Martínez-Arkarazo, Irantzu

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a methodology that combines spectroscopic speciation, performed through portable Raman spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (ED-XRF) working in situ, and thermodynamic speciation to diagnose the environmental impacts, induced by past and current events, on two wall painting panels (Nos. 9103 and 9255) extracted more than 150 years ago from the walls of a Pompeian house (Marcus Lucretius House, Regio IX, Insula 3, House 5/24) and deposited in the Naples National Archaeological Museum (MANN). The results show a severe chemical attack of the acid gases that can be explained only by the action of H2S during and just after the eruption of the Vesuvius volcano, that expelled a high concentration of sulfur gases. This fact can be considered as the most important process impacting the wall painting panels deposited in the museum, while the rain-wash processes and the colonization of microorganisms have not been observed in contrast to the impacts shown by the wall paintings left outside in the archaeological site of Pompeii. Moreover, the systematic presence of lead traces and strontium in both wall paintings suggests their presence as impurities of the calcite mortars (intonacco) or calcite binder of these particular fresco Pompeian murals. PMID:26767639

  3. 2D X-ray and FTIR micro-analysis of the degradation of cadmium yellow pigment in paintings of Henri Matisse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouyet, E.; Cotte, M.; Fayard, B.; Salomé, M.; Meirer, F.; Mehta, A.; Uffelman, E. S.; Hull, A.; Vanmeert, F.; Kieffer, J.; Burghammer, M.; Janssens, K.; Sette, F.; Mass, J.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical and physical alterations of cadmium yellow (CdS) paints in Henri Matisse's The Joy of Life (1905-1906, The Barnes Foundation) have been recognized since 2006, when a survey by portable X-ray fluorescence identified this pigment in all altered regions of the monumental painting. This alteration is visible as fading, discoloration, chalking, flaking, and spalling of several regions of light to medium yellow paint. Since that time, synchrotron radiation-based techniques including elemental and spectroscopic imaging, as well as X-ray scattering have been employed to locate and identify the alteration products observed in this and related works by Henri Matisse. This information is necessary to formulate one or multiple mechanisms for degradation of Matisse's paints from this period, and thus ensure proper environmental conditions for the storage and the display of his works. This paper focuses on 2D full-field X-ray Near Edge Structure imaging, 2D micro-X-ray Diffraction, X-ray Fluorescence, and Fourier Transform Infra-red imaging of the altered paint layers to address one of the long-standing questions about cadmium yellow alteration—the roles of cadmium carbonates and cadmium sulphates found in the altered paint layers. These compounds have often been assumed to be photo-oxidation products, but could also be residual starting reagents from an indirect wet process synthesis of CdS. The data presented here allow identifying and mapping the location of cadmium carbonates, cadmium chlorides, cadmium oxalates, cadmium sulphates, and cadmium sulphides in thin sections of altered cadmium yellow paints from The Joy of Life and Matisse's Flower Piece (1906, The Barnes Foundation). Distribution of various cadmium compounds confirms that cadmium carbonates and sulphates are photo-degradation products in The Joy of Life, whereas in Flower Piece, cadmium carbonates appear to have been a [(partially) unreacted] starting reagent for the yellow paint, a role

  4. Consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of plant biomass expressing cell wall degrading enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Raab, R. Michael; Zhang, Dongcheng; Bougri, Oleg

    2016-02-02

    Methods for consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of genetically engineered plants expressing cell wall degrading enzymes are provided. Expression cassettes and vectors for making transgenic plants are described. Plants engineered to express one or more cell wall degrading enzymes using expression cassettes and vectors of the invention are also provided.

  5. Recording Earthen Architecture at the Peruvian Andes: the Case of KUÑO Tambo CHURCH'S Historic Wall Paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, K.; Hanley, C.; Santana Quintero, M.; Fai, S.; Ouimet, C.; Cancino, C.; Rainer, L.; Villacorta-Santamato, L.

    2013-07-01

    According to UNESCO "Earthen architecture is one of the most original and powerful expressions of our ability to create a built environment with readily available resources. It includes a great variety of structures, ranging from mosques, palaces and granaries, to historic city centres, cultural landscapes and archaeological sites" (WHEAP, 2007). This contribution looks at developing effective methods for recording earthen historic structures for their rehabilitation and preservation using the Kuño Tambo church in Peru, which is a Peruvian national historic site that requires serious rehabilitation work, as a case study. This project describes the compilation of an effective metric record of the "state-of-conservation" - "as found" of wall paintings in this important and remote building using a toolbox of different "off-the-shelf" heritage recording techniques. This approach was applied by Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), as part of the Earthen Architecture Initiative of the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI).

  6. Analysis of egg-based model wall paintings by use of an innovative combined dot-ELISA and UPLC-based approach.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Mariangela; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Giambi, Francesca; Rosi, Luca; Papini, Anna Maria; Dei, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The chemical analysis of egg-based wall paintings-the mezzo fresco technique-is an interesting topic in the characterisation of organic binders. A revised procedure for a dot-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA) able to detect protein components of egg-based wall paintings is reported. In the new dot-ELISA procedure we succeeded in maximizing the staining colour by adjusting the temperature during the staining reaction. Quantification of the colour intensity by visible reflectance spectroscopy resulted in a straight line plot of protein concentration against reflectance in the wavelength range 380-780 nm. The modified dot-ELISA procedure is proposed as a semi-quantitative analytical method for characterisation of protein binders in egg-based paintings. To evaluate its performance, the method was first applied to standard samples (ovalbumin, whole egg, egg white), then to model specimens, and finally to real samples (Giotto's wall paintings). Moreover, amino acid analysis performed by innovative ultra-performance liquid chromatography was applied both to standards and to model samples and the results were compared with those from the dot-ELISA tests. In particular, after protein hydrolysis (24 h, 114 °C, 6 mol L(-1) HCl) of the samples, amino acid derivatization by use of 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate enabled reproducible analysis of amino acids. This UPLC amino acid analysis was rapid and reproducible and was applied for the first time to egg-based paintings. Because the painting technique involved the use of egg-based tempera on fresh lime-based mortar, the study enabled investigation of the effect of the alkaline environment on egg-protein detection by both methods. PMID:22614707

  7. Study of the water barrier properties of polyester paints after photo-oxidative degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Deflorian, F.; Fedrizzi, L.; Bonora, P.L.

    1996-10-01

    The capacitance of an organic coating, applied on a metal substrate for protection against corrosion, can undergo a decrease following some deterioration processes due to the interaction with the environment. In particular, the barrier properties of a paint are strongly influenced, for example, by the presence of defects, by photo-oxidative phenomena and by the adhesive properties of the polymer-metal interface. Impedance spectroscopy is a flexible and efficacious instrument for assessing all these phenomena and is useful in supplying information on the mechanisms of deterioration as well as in assessing the physical parameters associated with it. The scope of this work is to study in detail the photosensitive effects of UV radiation on the water barrier properties of industrially produced polyester organic coating. The coefficients of diffusion and the values of permeability and saturation for different UV radiation intervals, have been calculated, starting from the impedance data and using appropriate models. So the relationship between these values and the effective long term properties of protection from corrosion of the paints was evaluated.

  8. Onoufrios, the famous XVI's century iconographer, creator of the ``Berati School'': studying the technique and materials used in wall paintings of inscribed churches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidou, E.; Arapi, M.; Zorba, T.; Anastasiou, M.; Civici, N.; Stamati, F.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.

    2006-06-01

    The study of the materials and techniques employed for wall painting, complementing the information from historical and aesthetic data, contributes to the integrated knowledge of the iconographer and his period. In the 16th century, regarding the iconography in the former Byzantine area, besides the School of Crete and Francos Catelanos and his school, a third artistic personality who also created his own school, Onoufrios, appeared in central Albania and expanded his activity as a painter to northern Greece as well as nearby areas, such as Ohrid. Inscriptions documenting the works of Onoufrios are found in some of the churches that he decorated with wall paintings: “St. Apostles” (1547) Kastoria Greece, “St. Nicolas” Shelcan Albania, “St. Paraskevi” (1554), Valsh Albania, while are attributed to him the church of “St. Theodores” in Berati, Albania (before 1547) and others. He is one of the best icon painters of the whole Balkan region, and the best painter that has ever worked in Albanian territory. Onoufrios managed to combine the local painting tradition with the best tradition of the eastern (Paleologian) and western (Italian) schools, resulting in a realistic and natural depiction. He is the creator of the “Berati School” that expanded to other parts of the peninsula. His individual character can be distinguished in the work of his students: his son Nikolaos (who inherited his style in painting), Onoufrios from Cyprus, etc. Based on careful observations, we extracted number of paint samples from wall paintings of three of the above mentioned churches. Ground and paint layers were examined using micro-FTIR, Optical Microscopy, TXRF and SEM-EDS, to characterize materials and methods used by the artist to create these works. Our findings in each church are discussed and compared with the others in order to understand how and with what material and resources the painter worked and how he developed his technique. The presence of calcium

  9. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta; Zielińska, Dobrochna; Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia; Kijowska, Agnieszka; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th-14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers.

  10. Cell wall degradation is required for normal starch mobilisation in barley endosperm.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, Vasilios M E; Rejzek, Martin; Barclay, Elaine; Rugen, Michael D; Field, Robert A; Smith, Alison M

    2016-01-01

    Starch degradation in barley endosperm provides carbon for early seedling growth, but the control of this process is poorly understood. We investigated whether endosperm cell wall degradation is an important determinant of the rate of starch degradation. We identified iminosugar inhibitors of enzymes that degrade the cell wall component arabinoxylan. The iminosugar 1,4-dideoxy-1, 4-imino-l-arabinitol (LAB) inhibits arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase (AXAH) but does not inhibit the main starch-degrading enzymes α- and β-amylase and limit dextrinase. AXAH activity in the endosperm appears soon after the onset of germination and resides in dimers putatively containing two isoforms, AXAH1 and AXAH2. Upon grain imbibition, mobilisation of arabinoxylan and starch spreads across the endosperm from the aleurone towards the crease. The front of arabinoxylan degradation precedes that of starch degradation. Incubation of grains with LAB decreases the rate of loss of both arabinoxylan and starch, and retards the spread of both degradation processes across the endosperm. We propose that starch degradation in the endosperm is dependent on cell wall degradation, which permeabilises the walls and thus permits rapid diffusion of amylolytic enzymes. AXAH may be of particular importance in this respect. These results provide new insights into the mobilization of endosperm reserves to support early seedling growth. PMID:27622597

  11. Degradation of 14C-labeled streptococcal cell walls by egg white lysozyme and lysosomal enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Gallis, H A; Miller, S E; Wheat, R W

    1976-01-01

    The resistance of native and trypsin-treated [14C] glucose-labeled cell walls to degradation by lysozyme and human lysosomal enzymes was confirmed. In contrast, chemically N-acetylated cell walls undergo significant degradation by these enzymes in the pH range of 4.5 to 5.5 without prior removal of the group-specific carbohydrate. N-acetylation after removal of the group A carbohydrate by formamide extraction renders the cell walls considerably more susceptible to these enzymes than by formamaide extraction alone. It appears, therefore, that unless N-acetylation can occur in vivo, streptococcal cell walls are minimally degraded, if at all, by human peripheral blood leukocytes or lysozyme. Examination of leukocyte extracts from normal subjects and patients with post-streptococcal syndromes revealed no qualitative differences in ability to dissolve streptococcal cell walls. Images PMID:773836

  12. Understanding How the Complex Molecular Architecture of Mannan-degrading Hydrolases Contributes to Plant Cell Wall Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyang; Rogowski, Artur; Zhao, Lei; Hahn, Michael G.; Avci, Utku; Knox, J. Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial degradation of plant cell walls is a central component of the carbon cycle and is of increasing importance in environmentally significant industries. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes have a complex molecular architecture consisting of catalytic modules and, frequently, multiple non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). It is currently unclear whether the specificities of the CBMs or the topology of the catalytic modules are the primary drivers for the specificity of these enzymes against plant cell walls. Here, we have evaluated the relationship between CBM specificity and their capacity to enhance the activity of GH5 and GH26 mannanases and CE2 esterases against intact plant cell walls. The data show that cellulose and mannan binding CBMs have the greatest impact on the removal of mannan from tobacco and Physcomitrella cell walls, respectively. Although the action of the GH5 mannanase was independent of the context of mannan in tobacco cell walls, a significant proportion of the polysaccharide was inaccessible to the GH26 enzyme. The recalcitrant mannan, however, was fully accessible to the GH26 mannanase appended to a cellulose binding CBM. Although CE2 esterases display similar specificities against acetylated substrates in vitro, only CjCE2C was active against acetylated mannan in Physcomitrella. Appending a mannan binding CBM27 to CjCE2C potentiated its activity against Physcomitrella walls, whereas a xylan binding CBM reduced the capacity of esterases to deacetylate xylan in tobacco walls. This work provides insight into the biological significance for the complex array of hydrolytic enzymes expressed by plant cell wall-degrading microorganisms. PMID:24297170

  13. Sub-surface terahertz imaging through uneven surfaces: visualizing Neolithic wall paintings in Çatalhöyük.

    PubMed

    Walker, Gillian C; Bowen, John W; Matthews, Wendy; Roychowdhury, Soumali; Labaune, Julien; Mourou, Gerard; Menu, Michel; Hodder, Ian; Jackson, J Bianca

    2013-04-01

    Pulsed terahertz imaging is being developed as a technique to image obscured mural paintings. Due to significant advances in terahertz technology, portable systems are now capable of operating in unregulated environments and this has prompted their use on archaeological excavations. August 2011 saw the first use of pulsed terahertz imaging at the archaeological site of Çatalhöyük, Turkey, where mural paintings dating from the Neolithic period are continuously being uncovered by archaeologists. In these particular paintings the paint is applied onto an uneven surface, and then covered by an equally uneven surface. Traditional terahertz data analysis has proven unsuccessful at sub-surface imaging of these paintings due to the effect of these uneven surfaces. For the first time, an image processing technique is presented, based around Gaussian beam-mode coupling, which enables the visualization of the obscured painting. PMID:23571902

  14. Moderate Ferulate and Diferulate Levels Do Not Impede Maize Cell Wall Degradation by Human Intestinal Microbiota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The degradation of plant fiber by human gut microbiota could be restricted by xylan substitution and cross-linking by ferulate and diferulates, for example by hindering the association of enzymes like xylanases with their substrates. To test the influence of feruloylation on cell wall degradability ...

  15. Study by micro-Raman spectroscopy of wall paints (external parts and cross-sections) from reales alcazares of Seville (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Rodriguez, José Luis; Centeno, Miguel Angel; Robador, María Dolores; Siguenza, Belinda; Durán, Adrián

    2013-04-01

    The Reales Alcazares of Sevilla was originally builded by the Arabic in the year 913. The Mudejar Palace was built by Christian King Pedro I between 1364 and 1366. At the end of XV century the Catholic Kings, Isabel and Fernando made important transformations especially in the Mudejar Palace. Recently, wall paints from Catholic Kings periods were found during works of conservations in the first floor of the Palace. The study of these paints by non-destructive techniques was considered of great interest in order to determine the technology of manufacture and the originality of the artwork. The main objective of this work was to apply the Raman spectroscopy technique on the surface of the wall and on the different layers of the cross-sections prepared in order to characterize the pigments and the plaster present in these wall paints. Little information was obtained using a portable Raman spectrometer. In this case the dispersive integrated Horiba Jobin-Yvon LabRaman HR800 system was employed. Small samples of black, red, yellow, white and green colour were taken from the artwork. The surface of the samples were directly studed by the Raman spectroscopy instrument using red (785 nm) and green (522 nm) lasers, similarly to non-invasive experimental technique. This technique showed the presence of gypsum (SO4Ca.2H2O) and calcite (CaCO3) in all the studied samples However, the pigments responsible of different colours were not detected. The surface of these wall paints was covered with gypsum and calcite due to contamination. These mineras were also characterized by XRD and SEM-EDX. The presence of these compounds and the heterogeneous surface did not permit the characterization of the pigments responsible of the colour. In order to better characterization of the pigments and plaster used the study was carried out on cross-sections. The black colour was performed using carbon black. Two different red layers were detected one constituted by cinnabar and lead carbonate and

  16. A multi-analytical approach for the study of the pigments used in the wall paintings from a building complex on the Caelian Hill (Rome)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermo, Paola; Piazzalunga, Andrea; de Vos, Mariette; Andreoli, Martina

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, shards from Roman wall paintings (from the end of the first century to the fourth century A.D.) decorating the domus below the Basilica of SS. John and Paul on the Caelian Hill (Rome), were analyzed in order to identify the pigments used. The analytical techniques employed for the characterization of the pigments were the scanning electron microscope coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and infrared spectroscopy (ATR and micro ATR). While SEM-EDS allowed to perform a qualitative analysis of the material, by FT-IR chemical species have been identified. The pigments identified were those mentioned in the literature for the Imperial Roman fresco painting: different types of ochre (yellow and red), mixtures containing lead, green earths and precious pigments such as cinnabar and Egyptian blue. They were often used as mixtures and the use of the most valuable pigments (cinnabar and Egyptian blue) were found in the most ancient rooms.

  17. Enhanced lipid recovery from Nannochloropsis microalgae by treatment with optimized cell wall degrading enzyme mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zuorro, Antonio; Miglietta, Selenia; Familiari, Giuseppe; Lavecchia, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    A statistical mixture design approach was used to investigate the effects of cell wall degrading enzymes on the recovery of lipids from Nannochloropsis sp. A preliminary screening of potentially suitable enzyme preparations, including lysozyme, cellulase and different types of hemicellulases, was carried out. The most effective preparations were then taken as basic components for the formulation of enzyme mixtures. Optimized ternary mixtures consisting of cellulase and two hemicellulases were obtained which allowed the recovery of up to 37.2g of lipids per 100g of dry biomass. SEM and TEM images of the enzymatically treated microalga revealed extensive cell damage, with degradation of the cell wall and release of intracellular material. Overall, the results obtained demonstrate that the mixture design method can be used to prepare cell wall degrading enzyme cocktails that can significantly improve the recovery of lipids or other valuable components from microalgae. PMID:27078205

  18. Identification of polysaccharide hydrolases involved in autolytic degradation of Zea cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Nock, L.P.; Smith, C.J. )

    1987-08-01

    Cell walls of Zea mays (cv L.G.11) seedlings labeled with {sup 14}C were treated with {alpha}-amylase from Bacillus subtilis to remove starch and mixed linkage glucans. These walls released arabinose, xylose, galactose, and galacturonic acid in addition to glucose when they were allowed to autolyze. Methylation analysis was performed on samples of wall which had been incubated autolytically and the results indicated that degradation of the major polymer of the wall, the glucoarabinoxylan, had occurred. A number of glycanases could be dissociated from the wall by use of 3 M LiCL. The proteins which were released were found to contain a number of exoglycosidase activities in addition to being effective in degrading the polysaccharide substrates, araban, xylan, galactan, laminarin, mannan, and polygalacturonic acid. The effects of these enzymes on the wall during autolysis appear to result from endo-activity in addition to exo-activity. The structural changes that occurred in the cell walls during autolysis were found to be related to the changes previously found to occur in cell walls during auxin induced extension.

  19. Use of mid-infrared fiber-optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) to evaluate efficacy of nanostructured systems in wall painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, B.; Carretti, E.; Picollo, M.; Baglioni, P.; Dei, L.

    2006-06-01

    Mid-infrared fiber-optic reflectance spectroscopy (Mid-IR FORS), a sensitive, non-invasive technique for determining chemicals present on a surface, has been used to test efficacy of oil-in-water microemulsions and micellar solutions in cleaning of painted surfaces. The target of the application of these innovative nanostructured systems was the selective removal of an undesired polymeric layer from a fresco surface. The experiments were carried out by first coating frosted glass slides and painted mortar simulating a real fresco with four acrylic and vinyl polymer varnishes commonly used in wall painting restoration. Spectra of the samples were then collected by means of microreflectance single-beam infrared spectroscopy and Mid-IR FORS before and after the application of the aqueous dispersed systems based cleaning agents. Sharp, strong peaks due to the stretching of the estereous C=O bond of the polymers in a wavelength range between 1730 and 1750 cm-1 were used as marker for the presence of these organic materials. Through Mid-IR FORS semiquantitative spectroscopy, the efficiency of the treatment has been clearly demonstrated, indicating that the nanotechnology approach represents a new, safe, and very efficient way of removing aged polymers from fresco surfaces.

  20. Microorganisms and methods for degrading plant cell walls and complex hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Polne-Fuller, M.

    1991-09-24

    This patent describes a biologically pure multinucleated marine amoeba having the identifying characteristics of ATCC 40319. The amoeba being capable of digesting algal cell walls and having the further capacity to degrade paraffin, wax, polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride polyvinylidene di-chloride and mixtures thereof.

  1. Arsenal of plant cell wall degrading enzymes reflects host preference among plant pathogenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Discovery and development of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes is a key step towards more efficient depolymerization of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars for production of liquid transportation biofuels and other bioproducts. The industrial fungus Trichoderma reesei is known to be highly c...

  2. Chemical composition and cell wall polysaccharide degradability of pith and rind tissues from mature maize internodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our study was undertaken to identify tissue-specific biochemical traits that may be targeted in breeding programs for improving forage digestibility. We compared cell wall chemical composition and 24- and 96-h in vitro degradabilities in separated pith and rind tissues from six maize inbred lines. A...

  3. Chemical composition and cell wall polysaccharide degradability of pith and rind tissues from mature maize internodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was undertaken to identify tissue-specific biochemical traits that may be targeted in breeding programs for improving forage digestibility. We compared cell wall chemical composition and 24- and 96-h in vitro degradabilities in separated pith and rind tissues of the fourth above-ground in...

  4. PAINT SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, NORTHEAST CORNER OFFICE INTERIOR, LOOKING WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PAINT SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, NORTHEAST CORNER OFFICE INTERIOR, LOOKING WEST. PROJECTING WALLS WITH INFILLED ARCHES WERE PART OF ONE PAINTING BOOTH IN ORIGINAL STRUCTURE. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Paint Shop, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  5. Identification of vessel wall degradation in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms with OCT

    PubMed Central

    Real, Eusebio; Val-Bernal, José Fernando; Revuelta, José M.; Pontón, Alejandro; Díez, Marta Calvo; Mayorga, Marta; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of the wall of human ascending thoracic aorta has been assessed through Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). OCT images of the media layer of the aortic wall exhibit micro-structure degradation in case of diseased aortas from aneurysmal vessels. The OCT indicator of degradation depends on the dimension of areas of the media layer where backscattered reflectivity becomes smaller due to a disorder on the morphology of elastin, collagen and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Efficient pre-processing of the OCT images is required to accurately extract the dimension of degraded areas after an optimized thresholding procedure. OCT results have been validated against conventional histological analysis. The OCT qualitative assessment has achieved a pair sensitivity-specificity of 100%-91.6% in low-high degradation discrimination when a threshold of 4965.88µm2 is selected. This threshold suggests to have physiological meaning. The OCT quantitative evaluation of degradation achieves a correlation of 0.736 between the OCT indicator and the histological score. This in-vitro study can be transferred to the clinical scenario to provide an intraoperative assessment tool to guide cardiovascular surgeons in open repair interventions. PMID:25426332

  6. Optical coherence tomography assessment of vessel wall degradation in thoracic aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Eusebio; Eguizabal, Alma; Pontón, Alejandro; Díez, Marta Calvo; Fernando Val-Bernal, José; Mayorga, Marta; Revuelta, José M.; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography images of human thoracic aorta from aneurysms reveal elastin disorders and smooth muscle cell alterations when visualizing the media layer of the aortic wall. These disorders can be employed as indicators for wall degradation and, therefore, become a hallmark for diagnosis of risk of aneurysm under intraoperative conditions. Two approaches are followed to evaluate this risk: the analysis of the reflectivity decay along the penetration depth and the textural analysis of a two-dimensional spatial distribution of the aortic wall backscattering. Both techniques require preprocessing stages for the identification of the air-sample interface and for the segmentation of the media layer. Results show that the alterations in the media layer of the aortic wall are better highlighted when the textural approach is considered and also agree with a semiquantitative histopathological grading that assesses the degree of wall degradation. The correlation of the co-occurrence matrix attains a sensitivity of 0.906 and specificity of 0.864 when aneurysm automatic diagnosis is evaluated with a receiver operating characteristic curve.

  7. Enzymatic cell wall degradation of Chlorella vulgaris and other microalgae for biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Gerken, Henri G; Donohoe, Bryon; Knoshaug, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    Cell walls of microalgae consist of a polysaccharide and glycoprotein matrix providing the cells with a formidable defense against its environment. We characterized enzymes that can digest the cell wall and weaken this defense for the purpose of protoplasting or lipid extraction. A growth inhibition screen demonstrated that chitinase, lysozyme, pectinase, sulfatase, β-glucuronidase, and laminarinase had the broadest effect across the various Chlorella strains tested and also inhibited Nannochloropsis and Nannochloris strains. Chlorella is typically most sensitive to chitinases and lysozymes, both enzymes that degrade polymers containing N-acetylglucosamine. Using a fluorescent DNA stain, we developed rapid methodology to quantify changes in permeability in response to enzyme digestion and found that treatment with lysozyme in conjunction with other enzymes has a drastic effect on cell permeability. Transmission electron microscopy of enzymatically treated Chlorella vulgaris indicates that lysozyme degrades the outer surface of the cell wall and removes hair-like fibers protruding from the surface, which differs from the activity of chitinase. This action on the outer surface of the cell causes visible protuberances on the cell surface and presumably leads to the increased settling rate when cells are treated with lysozyme. We demonstrate radical ultrastructural changes to the cell wall in response to treatment with various enzyme combinations which, in some cases, causes a greater than twofold increase in the thickness of the cell wall. The enzymes characterized in this study should prove useful in the engineering and extraction of oils from microalgae. PMID:23011569

  8. Time-Resolved Visualization of Görtler Vortices in a Pulsed Convex Wall Jet using Fast Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, James; Danon, Ron; Greenblatt, David

    2015-11-01

    The time-resolved formation and structure of Görtler vortices in a pulsed convex wall jet are studied in this work. While the presence of Görtler vortices in laminar boundary layers on concave surfaces can be clearly observed, their presence in wall jets flowing over convex surfaces is difficult to discern due to transition to turbulence in the outer part of the jet. This work employed fast-response pressure-sensitive paint (PSP), which has a documented flat frequency response greater than 5 kHz, to visualize the time-resolved formation of the wall jet and the details of the Görtler vortices. The radius of curvature of the wall jet was 8 cm, and the Reynolds number (based on slot height and jet exit velocity) was varied between 5 ×102 and 4 ×104 . The characteristic spanwise wavelength of the vortices was studied as a function of jet Reynolds number. Furthermore, as the Reynolds number was increased, various secondary instabilities were observed that led to laminar-turbulent transition. Funding provided by the U.S. Fulbright Scholar Program.

  9. Abiotic and enzymatic degradation of wheat straw cell wall: a biochemical and ultrastructural investigation.

    PubMed

    Lequart, C; Ruel, K; Lapierre, C; Pollet, B; Kurek, B

    2000-07-14

    The action of an abiotic lignin oxidant and a diffusible xylanase on wheat straw was studied and characterized at the levels of the molecular structures by chemical analysis and of the cell wall ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy. While distinct chemical changes in the target polymers were observed when each system was used separately, a combination of the two types of catalysts did not significantly increase either lignin oxidation or hemicellulose hydrolysis. Microscopic observations however revealed that the supramolecular organization of the cell wall polymers was significantly altered. This suggests that the abiotic Mn-oxalate complex and the xylanase cooperate in modifying the cell wall architecture, without noticeably enhancing the degradation of the constitutive polymers. PMID:10949315

  10. Proteasomal Degradation of Nod2 Protein Mediates Tolerance to Bacterial Cell Wall Components*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Biswas, Amlan; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system serves as the first line of defense by detecting microbes and initiating inflammatory responses. Although both Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins are important for this process, their excessive activation is hazardous to hosts; thus, tight regulation is required. Endotoxin tolerance is refractory to repeated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and serves as a host defense mechanism against septic shock caused by an excessive TLR4 response during Gram-negative bacterial infection. Gram-positive bacteria as well as their cell wall components also induce shock. However, the mechanism underlying tolerance is not understood. Here, we show that activation of Nod2 by its ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in the bacterial cell wall, induces rapid degradation of Nod2, which confers MDP tolerance in vitro and in vivo. Nod2 is constitutively associated with a chaperone protein, Hsp90, which is required for Nod2 stability and protects Nod2 from degradation. Upon MDP stimulation, Hsp90 rapidly dissociates from Nod2, which subsequently undergoes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The SOCS-3 protein induced by Nod2 activation further facilitates this degradation process. Therefore, Nod2 protein stability is a key factor in determining responsiveness to MDP stimulation. This indicates that TLRs and NLRs induce a tolerant state through distinct molecular mechanisms that protect the host from septic shock. PMID:23019338

  11. Recovering data from noisy fringe patterns from a portable digital speckle pattern interferometer for in-situ inspection of painting hanging on the wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, P.; Arena, G.; Paturzo, M.; Fatigati, G.; Grilli, M.; Pezzati, L.; Ferraro, Pietro

    2015-03-01

    We report on a method for recovering data from a simple portable Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometer intended for utilization outside of laboratory conditions, without anti-vibration devices. We used the system for monitoring the structural behavior of a painting on wood, hanging on a wall. In such a situation, fringes, produced by the object displacements, were affected by random distortions caused by environment noise. However a satisfactory number of undistorted, or barely distorted, fringe patterns were found and utilized for processing. We performed fast continuous acquisitions of consecutive interferograms, picking usable fringe patterns out of a large amount of recorded frames. This is the crucial task in the measurement procedure. For this purpose we developed a software routine, based on jointly analysis of both spectral content and fringe image sharpne ss, as selection rule. From the selected frames, by using a simple approach based on Hilbert Transform and Phase Unwrapping, via MAx-flow (PUMA) algorithm, we were able to evaluate the painting whole structure deformations, caused by environmental thermo-hygrometric fluctuations.

  12. Ochre-differentiation through micro-Raman and micro-FTIR spectroscopies: application on wall paintings at Meteora and Mount Athos, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikiaris, D.; Daniilia, Sister; Sotiropoulou, S.; Katsimbiri, O.; Pavlidou, E.; Moutsatsou, A. P.; Chryssoulakis, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The most widely-used inorganic pigments of Byzantine and post-Byzantine hagiography are earth pigments called ochres such as, red and yellow ochres, limonite, goethite, raw and burnt sienna, caput mortuum and hematite. The present experimental work proposes a technique of differentiation that allows one to distinguish among all the different kinds of iron oxides, thereby providing a better understanding of the painting technique used on portable icons and wall paintings. The ratios between the main spectroscopic peaks, attributable to the major components usually present in ochres, were calculated and compared, one against the another, from the spectra obtained through micro-Raman spectroscopy. Elementary composition is also revealed through a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The possibility for detailed study on a particular Byzantine ochre palette can thus be performed based on the small differences in its nature and composition. These differences can first be observed and then measured among all of the natural earth pigments, through μRaman and μFTIR spectroscopies.

  13. Ochre-differentiation through micro-Raman and micro-FTIR spectroscopies: application on wall paintings at Meteora and Mount Athos, Greece.

    PubMed

    Bikiaris, D; Daniilia Sister; Sotiropoulou, S; Katsimbiri, O; Pavlidou, E; Moutsatsou, A P; Chryssoulakis, Y

    2000-01-01

    The most widely-used inorganic pigments of Byzantine and post-Byzantine hagiography are earth pigments called ochres such as, red and yellow ochres, limonite, goethite, raw and burnt sienna, caput mortuum and hematite. The present experimental work proposes a technique of differentiation that allows one to distinguish among all the different kinds of iron oxides, thereby providing a better understanding of the painting technique used on portable icons and wall paintings. The ratios between the main spectroscopic peaks, attributable to the major components usually present in ochres, were calculated and compared, one against the another, from the spectra obtained through micro-Raman spectroscopy. Elementary composition is also revealed through a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The possibility for detailed study on a particular Byzantine ochre palette can thus be performed based on the small differences in its nature and composition. These differences can first be observed and then measured among all of the natural earth pigments, through microRaman and microFTIR spectroscopies. PMID:10728852

  14. Microscopy and Microanalysis of an Extreme Case of Salt and Biodegradation in 17th Century Wall Paintings.

    PubMed

    Gil, Milene; Martins, Maria Rosário; Carvalho, Maria Luisa; Souto, Cátia; Longelin, Stephane; Cardoso, Ana; Mirão, José; Candeias, António Estevão

    2015-06-01

    The present study characterizes the main deterioration mechanisms affecting the early 17th frescoes of Casa de Fresco, the only known example in Portugal of a semi-underground leisure room richly decorated with a balcony over a water well. Frescoes from the vault are at risk due to salt weathering and biodeterioration. The aim of the research was identification of the deterioration materials, determination of their origin, and their effect on the frescoes before future intervention. Scanning electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (SEM-EDS) was used to determine salt morphology and microanalysis. The mineralogical characterization was performed by X-ray powder diffraction, complemented with µ-Raman and µ-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Biological assessment was evaluated with optical microscopy and SEM-EDS. Bacterial and fungal isolation and identification were performed using standard culture media and methods according to Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology and from the Compendium of Soil Fungi. The results show that Ca and Ca-Mg carbonates from the paint renderings are the predominant salt species affecting the site. Bacterial strains from the genera Bacillus and Pseudomonas and fungal strains from the Cladosporium spp. and Penicillium spp. were isolated in the salt formations, within and between the mortar layers. Azurite, malachite, and smalt paint layers are the most affected by the weathering conditions. PMID:26149345

  15. Recognition and Degradation of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides by Two Human Gut Symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Herbert; Pudlo, Nicholas A.; Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P.; Abbott, D. Wade; Henrissat, Bernard; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2011-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria inhabiting the human gut have evolved under intense pressure to utilize complex carbohydrates, primarily plant cell wall glycans in our diets. These polysaccharides are not digested by human enzymes, but are processed to absorbable short chain fatty acids by gut bacteria. The Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant bacterial phyla in the adult gut, possess broad glycan-degrading abilities. These species use a series of membrane protein complexes, termed Sus-like systems, for catabolism of many complex carbohydrates. However, the role of these systems in degrading the chemically diverse repertoire of plant cell wall glycans remains unknown. Here we show that two closely related human gut Bacteroides, B. thetaiotaomicron and B. ovatus, are capable of utilizing nearly all of the major plant and host glycans, including rhamnogalacturonan II, a highly complex polymer thought to be recalcitrant to microbial degradation. Transcriptional profiling and gene inactivation experiments revealed the identity and specificity of the polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) that encode individual Sus-like systems that target various plant polysaccharides. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that B. ovatus possesses several unique PULs that enable degradation of hemicellulosic polysaccharides, a phenotype absent from B. thetaiotaomicron. In contrast, the B. thetaiotaomicron genome has been shaped by increased numbers of PULs involved in metabolism of host mucin O-glycans, a phenotype that is undetectable in B. ovatus. Binding studies of the purified sensor domains of PUL-associated hybrid two-component systems in conjunction with transcriptional analyses demonstrate that complex oligosaccharides provide the regulatory cues that induce PUL activation and that each PUL is highly specific for a defined cell wall polymer. These results provide a view of how these species have diverged into different carbohydrate niches by evolving genes that target unique suites of

  16. Effect of venous wall immobilization on the thermal degradation of collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat'eva, N. Yu.; Zakharkina, O. L.; Lunin, V. V.; Sergeeva, E. A.; Mazaishvili, K. V.; Maksimov, S. V.

    2013-11-01

    The results from a comparative study of the thermal denaturation of collagen in the venous walls of reference samples and samples with varicose disease are presented. Changes in the organization of collagen network of the tissue matrix are detected via thermal analysis and multiphoton microscopy with recording of the second harmonic generation (SHG). It is established that the collagen network of venous walls degrades in varicose disease. It is shown that the disordering of the tertiary structure of collagen molecules is reflected in a 40% drop in the enthalpy of protein denaturation compared to reference (Δ H D = 12.4 ± 4.9 J/g dry residue). The disorganization of fiber structures is recorded on SHG images. It is shown that upon the hydrothermal heating of sequestered samples of venous walls, the complete degradation of the tissue network occurs at 75°C. However, it is noted that upon the mechanical immobilization of samples of both types, the stability of collagen increases and complete denaturation is observed at temperatures above 84°C. It is suggested that the number of available conformations of polypeptide chains in the random coil state falls under tension, lowering Δ S D and raising the temperature of the denaturation of protein.

  17. Building and degradation of secondary cell walls: are there common patterns of lamellar assembly of cellulose microfibrils and cell wall delamination?

    PubMed

    De Micco, Veronica; Ruel, Katia; Joseleau, Jean-Paul; Aronne, Giovanna

    2010-08-01

    During cell wall formation and degradation, it is possible to detect cellulose microfibrils assembled into thicker and thinner lamellar structures, respectively, following inverse parallel patterns. The aim of this study was to analyse such patterns of microfibril aggregation and cell wall delamination. The thickness of microfibrils and lamellae was measured on digital images of both growing and degrading cell walls viewed by means of transmission electron microscopy. To objectively detect, measure and classify microfibrils and lamellae into thickness classes, a method based on the application of computerized image analysis combined with graphical and statistical methods was developed. The method allowed common classes of microfibrils and lamellae in cell walls to be identified from different origins. During both the formation and degradation of cell walls, a preferential formation of structures with specific thickness was evidenced. The results obtained with the developed method allowed objective analysis of patterns of microfibril aggregation and evidenced a trend of doubling/halving lamellar structures, during cell wall formation/degradation in materials from different origin and which have undergone different treatments. PMID:20532796

  18. Optical coherence tomography assessment of vessel wall degradation in aneurysmatic thoracic aortas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Eusebio; Eguizabal, Alma; Pontón, Alejandro; Val-Bernal, J. Fernando; Mayorga, Marta; Revuelta, José M.; López-Higuera, José; Conde, Olga M.

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomographic images of ascending thoracic human aortas from aneurysms exhibit disorders on the smooth muscle cell structure of the media layer of the aortic vessel as well as elastin degradation. Ex-vivo measurements of human samples provide results that correlate with pathologist diagnosis in aneurysmatic and control aortas. The observed disorders are studied as possible hallmarks for aneurysm diagnosis. To this end, the backscattering profile along the vessel thickness has been evaluated by fitting its decay against two different models, a third order polynomial fitting and an exponential fitting. The discontinuities present on the vessel wall on aneurysmatic aortas are slightly better identified with the exponential approach. Aneurysmatic aortic walls present uneven reflectivity decay when compared with healthy vessels. The fitting error has revealed as the most favorable indicator for aneurysm diagnosis as it provides a measure of how uniform is the decay along the vessel thickness.

  19. Comparison of corn stover cell wall polysaccharide degradability by rumen microbes and a cellulosic ethanol conversion process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Release of fermentable cell wall sugars in the cellulosic ethanol conversion process is assumed similar to rumen degradability; however, available literature has only reported surrogate rumen degradation measures (dry matter, neutral detergent fiber, and fermentation gases). We determined 72-h in vi...

  20. Effect of calcium on cell-wall degrading enzymes of Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Sasanuma, Izumi; Suzuki, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Effective anti-Botrytis strategies leading to reduce pesticides on strawberries are examined to provide the protection that is harmless to humans, higher animals and plants. Calcium treatments significantly inhibited the spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea. The intracellular polygalacturonase and CMCase showed low activities in B. cinerea cultivated by medium containing calcium. On the other hand, calcium-stimulated β-glucosidases production occurred. Our findings suggest that the calcium treatments keep CMCase activity low and cause low activities of cell-wall degrading enzymes of B. cinerea in the late stage of growth. PMID:26998660

  1. Paint-Overspray Catcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus to catch paint overspray has been proposed. Overspray is an unavoidable parasitic component of spray that occurs because the flow of air or other gas in the spray must turn at the sprayed surface. Very small droplets are carried away in this turning flow, and some land on adjacent surfaces not meant to be painted. The basic principle of the paint-spray catcher is to divert the overspray into a suction system at the boundary of the area to be painted. The paint-spray catcher (see figure) would include a toroidal plenum connected through narrow throat to a nozzle that would face toward the center of the torus, which would be positioned over the center of the area to be spray-painted. The plenum would be supported by four tubes that would also serve as suction exhaust ducts. The downstream ends of the tubes (not shown in the figure) would be connected to a filter on a suction pump. The pump would be rated to provide a suction mass flow somewhat greater than that of the directed spray gas stream, so that the nozzle would take in a small excess of surrounding gas and catch nearly all of the overspray. A small raised lip at the bottom edge of the nozzle would catch paint that landed inside the nozzle. Even if the paint is directly piston pumped, the droplets entrain an air flow by time they approach the wall, so there is always a gas stream to carry the excess droplets to the side. For long-duration spraying operations, it could be desirable to include a suction-drain apparatus to prevent overflowing and dripping of paint from inside the lip. A version without an external contraction and with the throat angled downward would be a more compact version of catcher, although it might be slightly less efficient.

  2. Painting "mania".

    PubMed

    Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2011-02-01

    Bipolar mood disorder (manic-depressive illness) has many artistic references, especially in the painting domain, depicting moods and associated features. The title of some paintings directly refers to the psychopathological state of the disorder. There are a great number of painting masterpieces showing the depressive pole of manic-depressive illness. In some paintings bearing the title Melancholia, some admixture of the opposite manic pole can be traced, the phenomenon named today as "mixed depressive state". On the other hand, a painting depicting a pure manic pole, as an element of bipolar mood disorder is very difficult to find. However, it seems that such criteria could be met by the painting presented on the next page entitled "Mania" whose author is Florencio Yllana, a contemporary artist of Philippine origin (born 1977), studying in USA and presently living in Brazil. The painting was done in 2001 following the acute manic episode in the course of bipolar mood disorder in the artist. PMID:20692707

  3. Paint Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Lewis Research Center (LEW) has assisted The Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA) in analyzing the museum's paintings. Because of the many layers of paint that are often involved, this is a complex process. The cross-section of a paint chip must be scanned with a microscope to determine whether a paint layer is original or a restoration. The paint samples, however, are rarely flat enough for high magnification viewing and are frequently scratched. LEW devised an automated method that produces intact, flat, polished paint cross-sections. A sophisticated microprocessor-controlled grinding and polishing machine was manually employed in preparation of exotic samples for aerospace research was a readily adaptable technique. It produced perfectly flat samples with clearly defined layers. The process has been used successfully on a number of paintings, and LEW and CMA are considering additional applications.

  4. Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZymes across the entire fungal kingdom has not been reported. Results In this study, we systemically identified glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases (PLs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs), and glycosyltransferases (GTs) as well as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in the predicted proteomes of 103 representative fungi from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. Comparative analysis of these CAZymes that play major roles in plant polysaccharide degradation revealed that fungi exhibit tremendous diversity in the number and variety of CAZymes. Among them, some families of GHs and CEs are the most prevalent CAZymes that are distributed in all of the fungi analyzed. Importantly, cellulases of some GH families are present in fungi that are not known to have cellulose-degrading ability. In addition, our results also showed that in general, plant pathogenic fungi have the highest number of CAZymes. Biotrophic fungi tend to have fewer CAZymes than necrotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi. Pathogens of dicots often contain more pectinases than fungi infecting monocots. Interestingly, besides yeasts, many saprophytic fungi that are highly active in degrading plant biomass contain fewer CAZymes than plant pathogenic fungi. Furthermore, analysis of the gene expression profile of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum revealed that most of the CAZyme genes related to cell wall degradation were up-regulated during plant infection. Phylogenetic analysis also

  5. Improved thermal paint formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, D. W.; Roger, F. O.; Zerlaut, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Potassium silicate-treated zinc oxide paint stabilizes pigment against ultraviolet-induced, bleachable degradation in infrared region, and permits use of ZnO as pigment in ultraviolet-stable coatings based upon polymethyl siloxane elastomers and resins. Material has low absorptance/emittance ratio.

  6. Characterization of Wall Teichoic Acid Degradation by the Bacteriophage ϕ29 Appendage Protein GP12 Using Synthetic Substrate Analogs.

    PubMed

    Myers, Cullen L; Ireland, Ronald G; Garrett, Teresa A; Brown, Eric D

    2015-07-31

    The genetics and enzymology of the biosynthesis of wall teichoic acid have been the extensively studied, however, comparatively little is known regarding the enzymatic degradation of this biological polymer. The GP12 protein from the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage ϕ29 has been implicated as a wall teichoic acid hydrolase. We have studied the wall teichoic acid hydrolase activity of pure, recombinant GP12 using chemically defined wall teichoic acid analogs. The GP12 protein had potent wall teichoic acid hydrolytic activity in vitro and demonstrated ∼13-fold kinetic preference for glycosylated poly(glycerol phosphate) teichoic acid compared with non-glycosylated. Product distribution patterns suggested that the degradation of glycosylated polymers proceeded from the hydroxyl terminus of the polymer, whereas hydrolysis occurred at random sites in the non-glycosylated polymer. In addition, we present evidence that the GP12 protein possesses both phosphodiesterase and phosphomonoesterase activities. PMID:26085106

  7. Diversity of beetle genes encoding novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pauchet, Yannick; Wilkinson, Paul; Chauhan, Ritika; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H

    2010-01-01

    Plant cell walls are a heterogeneous mixture of polysaccharides and proteins that require a range of different enzymes to degrade them. Plant cell walls are also the primary source of cellulose, the most abundant and useful biopolymer on the planet. Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are therefore important in a wide range of biotechnological processes from the production of biofuels and food to waste processing. However, despite the fact that the last common ancestor of all deuterostomes was inferred to be able to digest, or even synthesize, cellulose using endogenous genes, all model insects whose complete genomes have been sequenced lack genes encoding such enzymes. To establish if the apparent "disappearance" of PCWDEs from insects is simply a sampling problem, we used 454 mediated pyrosequencing to scan the gut transcriptomes of beetles that feed on a variety of plant derived diets. By sequencing the transcriptome of five beetles, and surveying publicly available ESTs, we describe 167 new beetle PCWDEs belonging to eight different enzyme families. This survey proves that these enzymes are not only present in non-model insects but that the multigene families that encode them are apparently undergoing complex birth-death dynamics. This reinforces the observation that insects themselves, and not just their microbial symbionts, are a rich source of PCWDEs. Further it emphasises that the apparent absence of genes encoding PCWDEs from model organisms is indeed simply a sampling artefact. Given the huge diversity of beetles alive today, and the diversity of their lifestyles and diets, we predict that beetle guts will emerge as an important new source of enzymes for use in biotechnology. PMID:21179425

  8. Deposition of lithium on a plasma edge probe in TFTR -- Behavior of lithium-painted walls interacting with edge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Y.; Ashida, K.; Kugel, H.

    1998-05-01

    Recent observations have indicated that lithium pellet injection wall conditioning plays an important role in achieving the enhanced supershot regime in TFTR. However, little is understood about the behavior of lithium-coated limiter walls, interacting with edge plasmas. In the final campaign of TFTR, a cylindrical carbon fiber composite probe was inserted into the boundary plasma region and exposed to ohmically-heated deuterium discharges with lithium pellet injection. The ion-drift side probe surface exhibits a sign of codeposition of lithium, carbon, oxygen, and deuterium, whereas the electron side essentially indicates high-temperature erosion. It is found that lithium is incorporated in these codeposits in the form of oxide at the concentration of a few percent. In the electron side, lithium has been found to penetrate deeply into the probe material, presumably via rapid diffusion through interplane spaces in the graphite crystalline. Though it is not conclusive, materials mixing in the carbon and lithium system appears to be a key process in successful lithium wall conditioning.

  9. Enzyme degradation and proinflammatory activity in arthritogenic and nonarthritogenic Eubacterium aerofaciens cell walls.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Rimpiläinen, M; Simelyte, E; Toivanen, P

    2001-12-01

    Two almost-identical strains of Eubacterium aerofaciens isolated from the normal human gut flora were used. The cell wall (CW) of one strain with a peptidoglycan (PG) type A4alpha induces chronic arthritis in the rat after a single intraperitoneal injection, whereas CW of the other with PG type A4beta induces only a transient acute arthritis. The CW of the arthritogenic E. aerofaciens was a twofold-more-potent stimulator of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) than the nonarthritogenic CW. After degradation with mutanolysin, the capacity of the arthritogenic PG to stimulate production of TNF-alpha and MCP-1 was significantly increased, whereas that of the nonarthritogenic PG was significantly decreased. In other words, after enzyme degradation the arthritogenic PG had a four- to fivefold-stronger stimulatory capacity than that of the enzyme-treated nonarthritogenic PG. These findings indicate that the arthritogenicity of CW or a PG is not dependent on the enzyme resistance alone but also on how the PG fragments released by enzyme degradation stimulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:11705898

  10. Metatranscriptomic Analyses of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Degradation by Microorganisms in the Cow Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xin; Tian, Yan; Li, Jinting; Su, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xuewei; Zhao, Shengguo; Liu, Li; Luo, Yingfeng; Liu, Di; Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Jiaqi; Dong, Zhiyang

    2014-01-01

    The bovine rumen represents a highly specialized bioreactor where plant cell wall polysaccharides (PCWPs) are efficiently deconstructed via numerous enzymes produced by resident microorganisms. Although a large number of fibrolytic genes from rumen microorganisms have been identified, it remains unclear how they are expressed in a coordinated manner to efficiently degrade PCWPs. In this study, we performed a metatranscriptomic analysis of the rumen microbiomes of adult Holstein cows fed a fiber diet and obtained a total of 1,107,083 high-quality non-rRNA reads with an average length of 483 nucleotides. Transcripts encoding glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) accounted for ∼1% and ∼0.1% of the total non-rRNAs, respectively. The majority (∼98%) of the putative cellulases belonged to four GH families (i.e., GH5, GH9, GH45, and GH48) and were primarily synthesized by Ruminococcus and Fibrobacter. Notably, transcripts for GH48 cellobiohydrolases were relatively abundant compared to the abundance of transcripts for other cellulases. Two-thirds of the putative hemicellulases were of the GH10, GH11, and GH26 types and were produced by members of the genera Ruminococcus, Prevotella, and Fibrobacter. Most (∼82%) predicted oligosaccharide-degrading enzymes were GH1, GH2, GH3, and GH43 proteins and were from a diverse group of microorganisms. Transcripts for CBM10 and dockerin, key components of the cellulosome, were also relatively abundant. Our results provide metatranscriptomic evidence in support of the notion that members of the genera Ruminococcus, Fibrobacter, and Prevotella are predominant PCWP degraders and point to the significant contribution of GH48 cellobiohydrolases and cellulosome-like structures to efficient PCWP degradation in the cow rumen. PMID:25501482

  11. Phylogenetic diversity of bacteria associated with Paleolithic paintings and surrounding rock walls in two Spanish caves (Llonín and La Garma).

    PubMed

    Schabereiter-Gurtner, Claudia; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Piñar, Guadalupe; Lubitz, Werner; Rölleke, Sabine

    2004-02-01

    Bacterial diversity in caves is still rarely investigated using culture-independent techniques. In the present study, bacterial communities on Paleolithic paintings and surrounding rock walls in two Spanish caves (Llonín and La Garma) were analyzed, using 16S rDNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis community fingerprinting and phylogenetic analyses without prior cultivation. Results revealed complex bacterial communities consisting of a high number of novel 16S rDNA sequence types and indicated a high biodiversity of lithotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. Identified bacteria were related to already cultured bacteria (39 clones) and to environmental 16S rDNA clones (46 clones). The nearest phylogenetic relatives were members of the Proteobacteria (41.1%), of the Acidobacterium division (16.5%), Actinobacteria (20%), Firmicutes (10.6%), of the Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroides division (5.9%), Nitrospira group (3.5%), green non-sulfur bacteria (1.2%), and candidate WS3 division (1.2%). Thirteen of these clones were most closely related to those obtained from the previous studies on Tito Bustillo Cave. The comparison of the present data with the data obtained previously from Altamira and Tito Bustillo Caves revealed similarities in the bacterial community components, especially in the high abundance of the Acidobacteria and Rhizobiaceae, and in the presence of bacteria related to ammonia and sulfur oxidizers. PMID:19712338

  12. Light emission and degradation of single-walled carbon nanotube filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. G.; Li, F.; Liu, C.; Cheng, H. M.

    2005-08-01

    Household light bulbs were fabricated using macroscopically long and aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes as filaments. It was found that the SWNT filament could emit bright light when an electric current was passed through it. The light spectrum from the SWNT filament showed a nonblackbody characteristic of the thermal emission, and its infrared emission was almost completely suppressed possibly due to the "photonic band-gap" effect that originates in the loose fibrous bundle structure of the SWNT filament. The electrical resistance of the SWNT filament was found to first increase, and then continually decrease during light emission. It was also found that an electric current could cause degradation and burnout of the SWNT filament and result in complete amorphization, and that an interesting mushroomlike carbon structure was formed due to the carbon evaporation of the nanotube filament during light emission.

  13. Face Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Diana

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of face painting as a technique for making the endangered species issue tangible for children while addressing the complexity of the issue. Children are "given" an animal of their own and are educated about the animal while having their faces painted to resemble the animal. (LZ)

  14. Painted Pickup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Kimberly

    2001-01-01

    Discusses a six week art class project for elementary school children that lasted for six weeks. Explains that the students painted sunflowers in the style of Vincent van Gogh over the rust spots of a pickup truck. Reports that the painting served as great publicity for the art classes. (CMK)

  15. Monster Paintings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggler, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a unit on monsters wherein students were charged with painting an imaginary character and, in so doing, demonstrated mastery of expression, organization of space, control of paint media, and application of the elements of art. Students discovered how color and line could be used to convey expression. The media…

  16. Heterologous Expression of Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes for Effective Production of Cellulosic Biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; Parisutham, Vinuselvi; Jeong, Seong Hun; Lee, Sung Kuk

    2012-01-01

    A major technical challenge in the cost-effective production of cellulosic biofuel is the need to lower the cost of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCDE), which is required for the production of sugars from biomass. Several competitive, low-cost technologies have been developed to produce PCDE in different host organisms such as Escherichia coli, Zymomonas mobilis, and plant. Selection of an ideal host organism is very important, because each host organism has its own unique features. Synthetic biology-aided tools enable heterologous expression of PCDE in recombinant E. coli or Z. mobilis and allow successful consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) in these microorganisms. In-planta expression provides an opportunity to simplify the process of enzyme production and plant biomass processing and leads to self-deconstruction of plant cell walls. Although the future of currently available technologies is difficult to predict, a complete and viable platform will most likely be available through the integration of the existing approaches with the development of breakthrough technologies. PMID:22911272

  17. How endogenous plant cell-wall degradation mechanisms can help achieve higher efficiency in saccharification of biomass.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eveline Q P; De Souza, Amanda P; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2015-07-01

    Cell-wall recalcitrance to hydrolysis still represents one of the major bottlenecks for second-generation bioethanol production. This occurs despite the development of pre-treatments, the prospect of new enzymes, and the production of transgenic plants with less-recalcitrant cell walls. Recalcitrance, which is the intrinsic resistance to breakdown imposed by polymer assembly, is the result of inherent limitations in its three domains. These consist of: (i) porosity, associated with a pectin matrix impairing trafficking through the wall; (ii) the glycomic code, which refers to the fine-structural emergent complexity of cell-wall polymers that are unique to cells, tissues, and species; and (iii) cellulose crystallinity, which refers to the organization in micro- and/or macrofibrils. One way to circumvent recalcitrance could be by following cell-wall hydrolysis strategies underlying plant endogenous mechanisms that are optimized to precisely modify cell walls in planta. Thus, the cell-wall degradation that occurs during fruit ripening, abscission, storage cell-wall mobilization, and aerenchyma formation are reviewed in order to highlight how plants deal with recalcitrance and which are the routes to couple prospective enzymes and cocktail designs with cell-wall features. The manipulation of key enzyme levels in planta can help achieving biologically pre-treated walls (i.e. less recalcitrant) before plants are harvested for bioethanol production. This may be helpful in decreasing the costs associated with producing bioethanol from biomass. PMID:25922489

  18. Correction: Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    . Importantly, cellulases of some GH families are present in fungi that are not known to have cellulose-degrading ability. In addition, our results also showed that in general, plant pathogenic fungi have the highest number of CAZymes. Biotrophic fungi tend to have fewer CAZymes than necrotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi. Pathogens of dicots often contain more pectinases than fungi infecting monocots. Interestingly, besides yeasts, many saprophytic fungi that are highly active in degrading plant biomass contain fewer CAZymes than plant pathogenic fungi. Furthermore, analysis of the gene expression profile of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum revealed that most of the CAZyme genes related to cell wall degradation were up-regulated during plant infection. Phylogenetic analysis also revealed a complex history of lineage-specific expansions and attritions for the PL1 family. Conclusions Our study provides insights into the variety and expansion of fungal CAZyme classes and revealed the relationship of CAZyme size and diversity with their nutritional strategy and host specificity. PMID:24422981

  19. Genomic characterization of plant cell wall degrading enzymes and in silico analysis of xylanses and polygalacturonases of Fusarium virguliforme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are important effectors for plant pathogens to invade plants. In this study, the composition of PCWDEs in Fusarium virguliforme that were grown for 5-days and 20 days in liquid medium was determined by RNA-Seq. Differential expression analysis showed more P...

  20. Tempera Painting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albenda, Pauline

    1973-01-01

    Through his experiences with tempera painting, the youthful person will become aware that art expression involves a combining of factors of the original ingredients into new modes of expression. (Author)

  1. Structure, physicochemical properties and in vitro fermentation of enzymatically degraded cell wall materials from apples.

    PubMed

    Förster, S; Dongowski, G; Kunzek, H

    2002-06-01

    Cell wall materials (CWM) prepared from apple parenchyma tissue by treatment with commercial enzymes for maceration, mash fermentation and liquefaction were characterised with regard to their composition and structure as well as their physicochemical and physiological properties. Increasing enzymatic degradation of the CWM resulted in growing loss of the pectin matrix, decreasing porosity as well as increasing particle aggregation. Due to these structural alterations the water binding, the viscoelastic properties of the CWM-water-suspensions and the in vitro fermentation, forming short chain fatty acids, were reduced. The investigations showed that interrelations exist between enzymatic treatment and changes of (i) structure and state of matrices (evaluated by means of thermal analysis), (ii) physicochemical properties and (iii) physiological properties. So the application of liquefying enzymes can lead to a complete removal of the pectin matrix, causing an essentially improved thermal stability of the CWM preparation, but strongly reduced water binding and reduced structure-forming properties into the CWM-water-suspensions. The formation of short-chain fatty acids during in vitro fermentation of the CWM preparations by fresh human faeces flora depended on the portion and the state of the pectin matrix and the cellulose network, respectively. PMID:12108214

  2. Coevolution and Life Cycle Specialization of Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes in a Hemibiotrophic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Patrick C.; Torriani, Stefano F.F.; Croll, Daniel; Stukenbrock, Eva H.; McDonald, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Zymoseptoria tritici is an important fungal pathogen on wheat that originated in the Fertile Crescent. Its closely related sister species Z. pseudotritici and Z. ardabiliae infect wild grasses in the same region. This recently emerged host–pathogen system provides a rare opportunity to investigate the evolutionary processes shaping the genome of an emerging pathogen. Here, we investigate genetic signatures in plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) that are likely affected by or driving coevolution in plant-pathogen systems. We hypothesize four main evolutionary scenarios and combine comparative genomics, transcriptomics, and selection analyses to assign the majority of PCWDEs in Z. tritici to one of these scenarios. We found widespread differential transcription among different members of the same gene family, challenging the idea of functional redundancy and suggesting instead that specialized enzymatic activity occurs during different stages of the pathogen life cycle. We also find that natural selection has significantly affected at least 19 of the 48 identified PCWDEs. The majority of genes showed signatures of purifying selection, typical for the scenario of conserved substrate optimization. However, six genes showed diversifying selection that could be attributed to either host adaptation or host evasion. This study provides a powerful framework to better understand the roles played by different members of multigene families and to determine which genes are the most appropriate targets for wet laboratory experimentation, for example, to elucidate enzymatic function during relevant phases of a pathogen’s life cycle. PMID:23515261

  3. Paint and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... are many other mixtures of paints used for industry, the arts, and hobbies. Years ago, lead and mercury were used in paint. How would I be exposed to the chemicals in paint? Exposure to paint can happen by: ...

  4. Perspective Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Joni

    2002-01-01

    One fourth grade class studied Van Gogh by investigating his art and life on the computer, painting still lifes, then learning to draw in perspective, creating colorful images of their own bedrooms using Van Gogh's bedroom as a model. Students extended their learning by examining relevant literature and completing timelines, biographical reports,…

  5. Dye Painting!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Ann

    This resource provides practical instructions for applying color and design directly to fabric. Basic information about the dye painting process is given. The guide addresses the technical aspects of fabric dye and color use and offers suggestions for fabric manipulation and dye application in order to achieve various design effects. This…

  6. Assessment of dry-stone terrace wall degradation with a 3D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuma, Hakan; Camera, Corrado; Faka, Marina; Bruggeman, Adriana; Hermon, Sorin

    2016-04-01

    In the Mediterranean basin, terracing is a common element of agricultural lands. Terraces retained by dry-stone walls are used to conserve arable soil, delay erosion processes and retain rainfall runoff. Currently, agricultural land abandonment is widespread in the Mediterranean region leading to terrace wall failure due to lack of maintenance and consequently an increase in soil erosion. The objective of this study is to test the applicability of digital 3D documentation on mountainous agricultural areas for assessing changes in terrace wall geometry, including terrace wall failures and associated soil erosion. The study area is located at 800-1100 m above sea level, in the Ophiolite complex of the Troodos Mountains in Cyprus. Average annual precipitation is 750 mm. Two sites with dry-stone terraces were selected for this study. The first site had a sequence of three terrace walls that were surveyed. The uppermost terrace wall was collapsed at several locations; the middle at few locations; and the lowest was still intact. Three fieldwork campaigns were conducted at this site: during the dry season (initial conditions), the middle and end of the wet season. The second site had one terrace wall that was almost completely collapsed. This terrace was restored during a communal terrace rehabilitation event. Two fieldwork campaigns were conducted for this terrace: before and after the terrace wall restoration. Terrace walls were documented with a set of digital images, and transformed into a 3D point cloud (using web-based services and commercial software - Autodesk 123D catch and Menci Software uMap, respectively). A set of points, registered with the total station and geo-referenced with a GPS, enabled the scaling of the 3D model and aligning the terrace walls within the same reference system. The density (distance between each point) of the reconstructed point clouds is 0.005 m by Umap and 0.025 m by 123D Catch. On the first site, the model analysis identified wall

  7. Peroxidase-induced degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes: hypochlorite is a major oxidant capable of in vivo degradation of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, I. I.; Vakhrusheva, T. V.; Sokolov, A. V.; Kostevich, V. A.; Ragimov, A. A.

    2011-04-01

    Due to their extraordinary properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have a tremendous potential for medical applications such as clinical diagnostics, targeted drug (or gene) delivery and cancer therapy. Hence, effects of SWNTs on living systems as well as mechanisms for biodegradation of SWTNs are of great importance and must be studied before starting to explore SWNTs for medical use. This study was undertaken to compare the potential of different peroxidases in degrading carboxylated SWNT (c-SWNT) and to elucidate the role of peroxidase-generated reactive products in this process. A detailed study showed that neither reactive intermediate products nor free radicals generated via peroxidase cycle can considerably oxidize c-SWNT. Biodegradation of c-SWNT in model system can be induced by free radicals generated as a result of heme degradation. The latter explains why hemoglobin, which is a pseudo-peroxidase possessing low peroxidase activity, is able to oxidize carbon nanotubes with a higher efficiency than horseradish peroxidase. However, c-SWNT in the presence of blood plasma (15 vol %) demonstrated no degradation even at high concentrations of hemoglobin and H2O2. The comparison of the ability of various peroxidases to degrade SWNTs in vitro revealed that MPO, due to its ability to produce hypochlorite, and lactoperoxidase, due to its ability to produce hypobromite, are extremely efficient in degrading carbon nanotubes. Since neutrophils are a main source of human MPO, we tested the effect of SWNTs on these cells. SWNTs were unable to stimulate neutrophils. On the other hand, they dose-dependently enhanced opsonized zymosan-induced cell stimulation as detected by measuring the amount of hypochlorite produced. This finding may be relevant to the in vivo situation, for example, at inflammatory sites. In order to imitate conditions characteristic of phagosomes and inflammatory sites, we titrated the suspension of c-SWNT in the presence of diluted blood

  8. Coniferyl Ferulate Incorporation into Lignin Enhances the Alkaline Delignification and Enzymatic Degradation of Cell Walls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incorporating ester interunit linkages into lignin could facilitate fiber delignification and utilization. In model studies with maize cell walls, we examined how partial substitution of coniferyl alcohol (a normal monolignol) with coniferyl ferulate (an ester conjugate from lignan biosynthesis) alt...

  9. Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes in Pythium and Their Role in Plant Cell Wall and Storage Polysaccharide Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Zerillo, Marcelo M.; Adhikari, Bishwo N.; Hamilton, John P.; Buell, C. Robin; Lévesque, C. André; Tisserat, Ned

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) are involved in the metabolism of glycoconjugates, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides and, in the case of plant pathogens, in the degradation of the host cell wall and storage compounds. We performed an in silico analysis of CAZymes predicted from the genomes of seven Pythium species (Py. aphanidermatum, Py. arrhenomanes, Py. irregulare, Py. iwayamai, Py. ultimum var. ultimum, Py. ultimum var. sporangiiferum and Py. vexans) using the “CAZymes Analysis Toolkit” and “Database for Automated Carbohydrate-active Enzyme Annotation” and compared them to previously published oomycete genomes. Growth of Pythium spp. was assessed in a minimal medium containing selected carbon sources that are usually present in plants. The in silico analyses, coupled with our in vitro growth assays, suggest that most of the predicted CAZymes are involved in the metabolism of the oomycete cell wall with starch and sucrose serving as the main carbohydrate sources for growth of these plant pathogens. The genomes of Pythium spp. also encode pectinases and cellulases that facilitate degradation of the plant cell wall and are important in hyphal penetration; however, the species examined in this study lack the requisite genes for the complete saccharification of these carbohydrates for use as a carbon source. Genes encoding for xylan, xyloglucan, (galacto)(gluco)mannan and cutin degradation were absent or infrequent in Pythium spp.. Comparative analyses of predicted CAZymes in oomycetes indicated distinct evolutionary histories. Furthermore, CAZyme gene families among Pythium spp. were not uniformly distributed in the genomes, suggesting independent gene loss events, reflective of the polyphyletic relationships among some of the species. PMID:24069150

  10. Functional and modular analyses of diverse endoglucanases from Ruminococcus albus 8, a specialist plant cell wall degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Iakiviak, Michael; Devendran, Saravanan; Skorupski, Anna; Moon, Young Hwan; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 8 is a specialist plant cell wall degrading ruminal bacterium capable of utilizing hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose degradation requires a suite of enzymes including endoglucanases, exoglucanases, and β-glucosidases. The enzymes employed by R. albus 8 in degrading cellulose are yet to be completely elucidated. Through bioinformatic analysis of a draft genome sequence of R. albus 8, seventeen putatively cellulolytic genes were identified. The genes were heterologously expressed in E. coli, and purified to near homogeneity. On biochemical analysis with cellulosic substrates, seven of the gene products (Ra0185, Ra0259, Ra0325, Ra0903, Ra1831, Ra2461, and Ra2535) were identified as endoglucanases, releasing predominantly cellobiose and cellotriose. Each of the R. albus 8 endoglucanases, except for Ra0259 and Ra0325, bound to the model crystalline cellulose Avicel, confirming functional carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). The polypeptides for Ra1831 and Ra2535 were found to contain distantly related homologs of CBM65. Mutational analysis of residues within the CBM65 of Ra1831 identified key residues required for binding. Phylogenetic analysis of the endoglucanases revealed three distinct subfamilies of glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5). Our results demonstrate that this fibrolytic bacterium uses diverse GH5 catalytic domains appended with different CBMs, including novel forms of CBM65, to degrade cellulose. PMID:27439730

  11. Functional and modular analyses of diverse endoglucanases from Ruminococcus albus 8, a specialist plant cell wall degrading bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Iakiviak, Michael; Devendran, Saravanan; Skorupski, Anna; Moon, Young Hwan; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 8 is a specialist plant cell wall degrading ruminal bacterium capable of utilizing hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose degradation requires a suite of enzymes including endoglucanases, exoglucanases, and β-glucosidases. The enzymes employed by R. albus 8 in degrading cellulose are yet to be completely elucidated. Through bioinformatic analysis of a draft genome sequence of R. albus 8, seventeen putatively cellulolytic genes were identified. The genes were heterologously expressed in E. coli, and purified to near homogeneity. On biochemical analysis with cellulosic substrates, seven of the gene products (Ra0185, Ra0259, Ra0325, Ra0903, Ra1831, Ra2461, and Ra2535) were identified as endoglucanases, releasing predominantly cellobiose and cellotriose. Each of the R. albus 8 endoglucanases, except for Ra0259 and Ra0325, bound to the model crystalline cellulose Avicel, confirming functional carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). The polypeptides for Ra1831 and Ra2535 were found to contain distantly related homologs of CBM65. Mutational analysis of residues within the CBM65 of Ra1831 identified key residues required for binding. Phylogenetic analysis of the endoglucanases revealed three distinct subfamilies of glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5). Our results demonstrate that this fibrolytic bacterium uses diverse GH5 catalytic domains appended with different CBMs, including novel forms of CBM65, to degrade cellulose. PMID:27439730

  12. Wall thinning acceptance criteria for degraded carbon steel piping systems using FAD methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.S.; Gupta, N.K.

    1995-02-01

    As part of the structural integrity assessment for Savannah River Site (SRS) piping systems, an acceptance criteria methodology for minimum pipe wall thickness has been developed for carbon steel piping. If a measured pipe thickness during inspection cannot meet the 87.5% of the nominal wall thickness specified in the ASME Code Case N-480, the acceptance criteria must be invoked. For a particular pipe, the larger of the two minimum thickness values obtained from the code stress check and the CEGB-R6 Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD) methodology is the minimum wall thickness for the acceptance criteria. The code stress check is based on the ASME/ANSI B31.1 Code, ASME Code Case N-480, and the SRS reactor restart criteria. The pipe wall thickness is calculated from the code equations and the applied loads. In fracture analysis, three types of axial and circumferential flaws are assumed to exist in the pipes based on the weld defects found in service history. For each flaw configuration, the stress intensity factors and the limit load solutions are calculated. These quantities are input to FAD to solve for the corresponding wall thickness required for the pipe to sustain the postulated flaws and to meet ASME safety margins under the applied loads.

  13. Painting models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, F.; Donchyts, G.; van Dam, A.; Plieger, M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of interactive art has blurred the line between electronic, computer graphics and art. Here we apply this art form to numerical models. Here we show how the transformation of a numerical model into an interactive painting can both provide insights and solve real world problems. The cases that are used as an example include forensic reconstructions, dredging optimization, barrier design. The system can be fed using any source of time varying vector fields, such as hydrodynamic models. The cases used here, the Indian Ocean (HYCOM), the Wadden Sea (Delft3D Curvilinear), San Francisco Bay (3Di subgrid and Delft3D Flexible Mesh), show that the method used is suitable for different time and spatial scales. High resolution numerical models become interactive paintings by exchanging their velocity fields with a high resolution (>=1M cells) image based flow visualization that runs in a html5 compatible web browser. The image based flow visualization combines three images into a new image: the current image, a drawing, and a uv + mask field. The advection scheme that computes the resultant image is executed in the graphics card using WebGL, allowing for 1M grid cells at 60Hz performance on mediocre graphic cards. The software is provided as open source software. By using different sources for a drawing one can gain insight into several aspects of the velocity fields. These aspects include not only the commonly represented magnitude and direction, but also divergence, topology and turbulence .

  14. Plumbonacrite identified by X-ray powder diffraction tomography as a missing link during degradation of red lead in a Van Gogh painting.

    PubMed

    Vanmeert, Frederik; Van der Snickt, Geert; Janssens, Koen

    2015-03-16

    Red lead, a semiconductor pigment used by artists since antiquity, is known to undergo several discoloration phenomena. These transformations are either described as darkening of the pigment caused by the formation of either plattnerite (β-PbO2) or galena (PbS) or as whitening by which red lead is converted into anglesite (PbSO4) or (hydro)cerussite (2 PbCO3⋅Pb(OH)2; PbCO3). X-ray powder diffraction tomography, a powerful analytical method that allows visualization of the internal distribution of different crystalline compounds in complex samples, was used to investigate a microscopic paint sample from a Van Gogh painting. A very rare lead mineral, plumbonacrite (3 PbCO3⋅Pb(OH)2⋅PbO), was revealed to be present. This is the first reported occurrence of this compound in a painting dating from before the mid 20th century. It constitutes the missing link between on the one hand the photoinduced reduction of red lead and on the other hand (hydro)cerussite, and thus sheds new light on the whitening of red lead. PMID:25703204

  15. Discovery of LPMO activity on hemicelluloses shows the importance of oxidative processes in plant cell wall degradation

    PubMed Central

    Agger, Jane W.; Isaksen, Trine; Várnai, Anikó; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Willats, William G. T.; Ludwig, Roland; Horn, Svein J.; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Westereng, Bjørge

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are known to carry out oxidative cleavage of glycoside bonds in chitin and cellulose, thus boosting the activity of well-known hydrolytic depolymerizing enzymes. Because biomass-degrading microorganisms tend to produce a plethora of LPMOs, and considering the complexity and copolymeric nature of the plant cell wall, it has been speculated that some LPMOs may act on other substrates, in particular the hemicelluloses that tether to cellulose microfibrils. We demonstrate that an LPMO from Neurospora crassa, NcLPMO9C, indeed degrades various hemicelluloses, in particular xyloglucan. This activity was discovered using a glycan microarray-based screening method for detection of substrate specificities of carbohydrate-active enzymes, and further explored using defined oligomeric hemicelluloses, isolated polymeric hemicelluloses and cell walls. Products generated by NcLPMO9C were analyzed using high performance anion exchange chromatography and multidimensional mass spectrometry. We show that NcLPMO9C generates oxidized products from a variety of substrates and that its product profile differs from those of hydrolytic enzymes acting on the same substrates. The enzyme particularly acts on the glucose backbone of xyloglucan, accepting various substitutions (xylose, galactose) in almost all positions. Because the attachment of xyloglucan to cellulose hampers depolymerization of the latter, it is possible that the beneficial effect of the LPMOs that are present in current commercial cellulase mixtures in part is due to hitherto undetected LPMO activities on recalcitrant hemicellulose structures. PMID:24733907

  16. Discovery of LPMO activity on hemicelluloses shows the importance of oxidative processes in plant cell wall degradation.

    PubMed

    Agger, Jane W; Isaksen, Trine; Várnai, Anikó; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Willats, William G T; Ludwig, Roland; Horn, Svein J; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Westereng, Bjørge

    2014-04-29

    The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are known to carry out oxidative cleavage of glycoside bonds in chitin and cellulose, thus boosting the activity of well-known hydrolytic depolymerizing enzymes. Because biomass-degrading microorganisms tend to produce a plethora of LPMOs, and considering the complexity and copolymeric nature of the plant cell wall, it has been speculated that some LPMOs may act on other substrates, in particular the hemicelluloses that tether to cellulose microfibrils. We demonstrate that an LPMO from Neurospora crassa, NcLPMO9C, indeed degrades various hemicelluloses, in particular xyloglucan. This activity was discovered using a glycan microarray-based screening method for detection of substrate specificities of carbohydrate-active enzymes, and further explored using defined oligomeric hemicelluloses, isolated polymeric hemicelluloses and cell walls. Products generated by NcLPMO9C were analyzed using high performance anion exchange chromatography and multidimensional mass spectrometry. We show that NcLPMO9C generates oxidized products from a variety of substrates and that its product profile differs from those of hydrolytic enzymes acting on the same substrates. The enzyme particularly acts on the glucose backbone of xyloglucan, accepting various substitutions (xylose, galactose) in almost all positions. Because the attachment of xyloglucan to cellulose hampers depolymerization of the latter, it is possible that the beneficial effect of the LPMOs that are present in current commercial cellulase mixtures in part is due to hitherto undetected LPMO activities on recalcitrant hemicellulose structures. PMID:24733907

  17. Combining proteomics and transcriptome sequencing to identify active plant-cell-wall-degrading enzymes in a leaf beetle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The primary plant cell wall is a complex mixture of polysaccharides and proteins encasing living plant cells. Among these polysaccharides, cellulose is the most abundant and useful biopolymer present on earth. These polysaccharides also represent a rich source of energy for organisms which have evolved the ability to degrade them. A growing body of evidence suggests that phytophagous beetles, mainly species from the superfamilies Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea, possess endogenous genes encoding complex and diverse families of so-called plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs). The presence of these genes in phytophagous beetles may have been a key element in their success as herbivores. Here, we combined a proteomics approach and transcriptome sequencing to identify PCWDEs present in larval gut contents of the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae. Results Using a two-dimensional proteomics approach, we recovered 11 protein bands, isolated using activity assays targeting cellulose-, pectin- and xylan-degrading enzymes. After mass spectrometry analyses, a total of 13 proteins putatively responsible for degrading plant cell wall polysaccharides were identified; these proteins belong to three glycoside hydrolase (GH) families: GH11 (xylanases), GH28 (polygalacturonases or pectinases), and GH45 (β-1,4-glucanases or cellulases). Additionally, highly stable and proteolysis-resistant host plant-derived proteins from various pathogenesis-related protein (PRs) families as well as polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) were also identified from the gut contents proteome. In parallel, transcriptome sequencing revealed the presence of at least 19 putative PCWDE transcripts encoded by the P. cochleariae genome. All of these were specifically expressed in the insect gut rather than the rest of the body, and in adults as well as larvae. The discrepancy observed in the number of putative PCWDEs between transcriptome and proteome analyses could be

  18. Sonochemical Degradation of Reactive Black 5 with a Composite Catalyst of TiO2/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eunju; Choi, Jongbok; Lee, Yonghyeon; Park, Jeong Min; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2013-07-01

    In the sonocatalytic process, composites of TiO2-carbon were used because carbon provides more adsorption sites and acts like an electron sink to prevent the recombination of an electron/hole. Therefore, in the present study, the characteristics of a TiO2/single-walled carbon nanotubes catalyst (TiO2/SWCNTs) have been investigated, and the optimal weight ratio of SWCNTs and the dose for degradation of reactive black 5 (RB5) were also evaluated. TiO2/SWCNT composite was characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction microanalysis and spectra, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The degradation rate constants of RB5 with the ratio of SWCNTs were found to depend on the adsorption phenomenon of a surface catalyst, light absorbance, and the recombination of electrons and holes. As a result, the optimal ratio of carbon in the sono-TiO2/SWCNTs process for degradation of RB5 was TiO2:SWCNTs= 200:1. Additionally, the optimal dose of the catalyst was 0.5 g/L.

  19. In vivo degradation of bacterial cell wall by the muralytic enzyme mutanolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Janusz, M J; Esser, R E; Schwab, J H

    1986-01-01

    The muralytic enzyme mutanolysin can act in vivo to eliminate chronic erosive arthritis induced in rats by polymers of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide isolated from group A streptococci (PG-APS). The amounts of PG-APS in the livers and spleens of rats treated with mutanolysin were significantly reduced compared with the amounts in control rats treated with phosphate-buffered saline. However, the amounts of PG-APS in the limbs of mutanolysin- and phosphate-buffered saline-treated rats were comparable. PG-APS polymers extracted from the livers, spleens, and limbs of mutanolysin-treated rats were extensively degraded, whereas PG-APS extracted from phosphate-buffered saline-treated rats had a high molecular weight. We propose that mutanolysin abrogates arthritis in rats by degrading PG-APS polymers to a size which is no longer able to induce chronic erosive arthritis, even though the polymers are still present in the limbs. PMID:3516873

  20. Assessing performance of painted carbon and weathering steels in an industrial atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.H.; Shih, H.C.; Wei, F.I.

    1997-03-01

    Protective properties and electrochemical impedance characteristics of four painted steels were investigated after outdoor exposure for 6 years and laboratory-based immersion tests. Results were compared to evaluate performance of the two paint systems for different steel substrates. The silicate-type primer/epoxy-based micaceous iron oxide (MIO) paint/polyurethane topcoat system showed better performance than the epoxy-type primer/epoxy-based MIO paint/polyvinyl chloride (PVC) topcoat system. The former paint system showed better topcoat protection and more effective cathodic protection (CP) provided by the zinc-rich primer. Two forms of paint degradation, blistering and pore attack, were observed. Paint degradation was correlated with changes in paint resistance and the breakpoint frequency of impedance data. Based upon visual observation and changes in impedance characteristics, two impedance models were proposed to explain the paint degradation.

  1. Degradation of wheat straw cell wall by white rot fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jijiao

    The main aim of this dissertation research was to understand the natural microbial degradation process of lignocellulosic materials in order to develop a new, green and more effective pretreatment technology for bio-fuel production. The biodegradation of wheat straw by white rot fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium was investigated. The addition of nutrients significantly improved the performance of P.chrysosporium on wheat straw degradation. The proteomic analysis indicated that this fungus produced various pepetides related to cellulose and lignin degradation while grown on the biomass. The structural analysis of lignin further showed that P.chrysosporium preferentially degraded hydroxycinnamtes in order to access cellulose. In details, the effects of carbon resource and metabolic pathway regulating compounds on manganeses peroxidase (MnP) were studied. The results indicated that MnP activity of 4.7 +/- 0.31 U mL-1 was obtained using mannose as a carbon source. The enzyme productivity further reached 7.36 +/- 0.05 U mL-1 and 8.77 +/- 0.23 U mL -1 when the mannose medium was supplemented with cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) respectively, revealing highest MnP productivity obtained by optimizing the carbon sources and supplementation with small molecules. In addition, the effects of nutrient additives for improving biological pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass were studied. The pretreatment of wheat straw supplemented with inorganic salts (salts group) and tween 80 was examined. The extra nutrient significantly improved the ligninase expression leading to improve digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass. Among the solid state fermentation groups, salts group resulted in a substantial degradation of wheat straw within one week, along with the highest lignin loss (25 %) and ˜ 250% higher efficiency for the total sugar release through enzymatic hydrolysis. The results were correlated with pyrolysis GC-MS (Py

  2. PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes activate neutrophils to increase production of hypochlorous acid, the oxidant capable of degrading nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasova, Irina I.; Vakhrusheva, Tatyana V.; Sokolov, Alexey V.; Kostevich, Valeria A.; Gusev, Alexandr A.; Gusev, Sergey A.; Melnikova, Viktoriya I.; Lobach, Anatolii S.

    2012-10-01

    Perspectives for the use of carbon nanotubes in biomedical applications depend largely on their ability to degrade in the body into products that can be easily cleared out. Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWCNTs) were shown to be degraded by oxidants generated by peroxidases in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In the present study we demonstrated that conjugation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to c-SWCNTs does not interfere with their degradation by peroxidase/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system or by hypochlorite. Comparison of different heme-containing proteins for their ability to degrade PEG-SWCNTs has led us to conclude that the myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is the major oxidant that may be responsible for biodegradation of PEG-SWCNTs in vivo. MPO is secreted mainly by neutrophils upon activation. We hypothesize that SWCNTs may enhance neutrophil activation and therefore stimulate their own biodegradation due to MPO-generated HOCl. PEG-SWCNTs at concentrations similar to those commonly used in in vivo studies were found to activate isolated human neutrophils to produce HOCl. Both PEG-SWCNTs and c-SWCNTs enhanced HOCl generation from isolated neutrophils upon serum-opsonized zymosan stimulation. Both types of nanotubes were also found to activate neutrophils in whole blood samples. Intraperitoneal injection of a low dose of PEG-SWCNTs into mice induced an increase in percentage of circulating neutrophils and activation of neutrophils and macrophages in the peritoneal cavity, suggesting the evolution of an inflammatory response. Activated neutrophils can produce high local concentrations of HOCl, thereby creating the conditions favorable for degradation of the nanotubes. -- Highlights: ► Myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid is able to degrade CNTs. ► PEGylated SWCNTs stimulate isolated neutrophils to produce hypochlorous acid. ► SWCNTs are capable of activating neutrophils in blood samples. ► Activation of

  3. Response Mechanisms of Bacterial Degraders to Environmental Contaminants on the Level of Cell Walls and Cytoplasmic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial strains living in the environment must cope with the toxic compounds originating from humans production. Surface bacterial structures, cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, surround each bacterial cell and create selective barriers between the cell interior and the outside world. They are a first site of contact between the cell and toxic compounds. Organic pollutants are able to penetrate into cytoplasmic membrane and affect membrane physiological functions. Bacteria had to evolve adaptation mechanisms to counteract the damage originated from toxic contaminants and to prevent their accumulation in cell. This review deals with various adaptation mechanisms of bacterial cell concerning primarily the changes in cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall. Cell adaptation maintains the membrane fluidity status and ratio between bilayer/nonbilayer phospholipids as well as the efflux of toxic compounds, protein repair mechanisms, and degradation of contaminants. Low energy consumption of cell adaptation is required to provide other physiological functions. Bacteria able to survive in toxic environment could help us to clean contaminated areas when they are used in bioremediation technologies. PMID:25057269

  4. Fungal plant cell wall-degrading enzyme database: a platform for comparative and evolutionary genomics in fungi and Oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) play significant roles throughout the fungal life including acquisition of nutrients and decomposition of plant cell walls. In addition, many of PCWDEs are also utilized by biofuel and pulp industries. In order to develop a comparative genomics platform focused in fungal PCWDEs and provide a resource for evolutionary studies, Fungal PCWDE Database (FPDB) is constructed (http://pcwde.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/). Results In order to archive fungal PCWDEs, 22 sequence profiles were constructed and searched on 328 genomes of fungi, Oomycetes, plants and animals. A total of 6,682 putative genes encoding PCWDEs were predicted, showing differential distribution by their life styles, host ranges and taxonomy. Genes known to be involved in fungal pathogenicity, including polygalacturonase (PG) and pectin lyase, were enriched in plant pathogens. Furthermore, crop pathogens had more PCWDEs than those of rot fungi, implying that the PCWDEs analysed in this study are more needed for invading plant hosts than wood-decaying processes. Evolutionary analysis of PGs in 34 selected genomes revealed that gene duplication and loss events were mainly driven by taxonomic divergence and partly contributed by those events in species-level, especially in plant pathogens. Conclusions The FPDB would provide a fungi-specialized genomics platform, a resource for evolutionary studies of PCWDE gene families and extended analysis option by implementing Favorite, which is a data exchange and analysis hub built in Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform (CFGP 2.0; http://cfgp.snu.ac.kr/). PMID:24564786

  5. Crystal and cryoEM structural studies of a cell wall degrading enzyme in the bacteriophage [psi]29 tail

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Morais, Marc C.; Cohen, Daniel N.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-08-28

    The small bacteriophage {phi}29 must penetrate the {approx}250-{angstrom} thick external peptidoglycan cell wall and cell membrane of the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, before ejecting its dsDNA genome through its tail into the bacterial cytoplasm. The tail of bacteriophage {phi}29 is noncontractile and {approx}380 {angstrom} long. A 1.8-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of gene product 13 (gp13) shows that this tail protein has spatially well separated N- and C-terminal domains, whose structures resemble lysozyme-like enzymes and metallo-endopeptidases, respectively. CryoEM reconstructions of the WT bacteriophage and mutant bacteriophages missing some or most of gp13 shows that this enzyme is located at the distal end of the {phi}29 tail knob. This finding suggests that gp13 functions as a tail-associated, peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme able to cleave both the polysaccharide backbone and peptide cross-links of the peptidoglycan cell wall. Comparisons of the gp13{sup -} mutants with the {phi}29 mature and emptied phage structures suggest the sequence of events that occur during the penetration of the tail through the peptidoglycan layer.

  6. Sonocatalytical degradation enhancement for ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole in the presence of glass beads and single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamadani, Yasir A J; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Flora, Joseph R V; Kim, Do-Hyung; Jang, Min; Sohn, Jinsik; Joo, Wanho; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-09-01

    Sonocatalytic degradation experiments were carried out to determine the effects of glass beads (GBs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on ibuprofen (IBP) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) removal using low and high ultrasonic frequencies (28 and 1000kHz). In the absence of catalysts, the sonochemical degradation at pH 7, optimum power of 0.18WmL(-1), and a temperature of 15°C was higher (79% and 72%) at 1000kHz than at 28kHz (45% and 33%) for IBP and SMX, respectively. At the low frequency (28kHz) H2O2 production increased significantly, from 10μM (no GBs) to 86μM in the presence of GBs (0.1mm, 10gL(-1)); however, no enhancement was achieved at 1000kHz. In contrast, the H2O2 production increased from 10μM (no SWNTs) to 31μM at 28kHz and from 82μM (no SWNTs) to 111μM at 1000kHz in the presence of SWNTs (45mgL(-1)). Thus, maximum removals of IBP and SMX were obtained in the presence of a combination of GBs and SWNTs at the low frequency (94% and 88%) for 60min contact time; however, >99% and 97% removals were achieved for 40 and 60min contact times at the high frequency for IBP and SMX, respectively. The results indicate that both IBP and SMX degradation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Additionally, the enhanced removal of IBP and SMX in the presence of catalysts was because GBs and SWNTs increased the number of free OH radicals due to ultrasonic irradiation and the adsorption capacity increase with SWNT dispersion. PMID:27150790

  7. Diversity and Strain Specificity of Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes Revealed by the Draft Genome of Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1

    PubMed Central

    Berg Miller, Margret E.; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Rincon, Marco T.; Band, Mark; Bari, Albert; Akraiko, Tatsiana; Hernandez, Alvaro; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Borovok, Ilya; Jindou, Sadanari; Lamed, Raphael; Flint, Harry J.; Bayer, Edward A.; White, Bryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Ruminococcus flavefaciens is a predominant cellulolytic rumen bacterium, which forms a multi-enzyme cellulosome complex that could play an integral role in the ability of this bacterium to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides. Identifying the major enzyme types involved in plant cell wall degradation is essential for gaining a better understanding of the cellulolytic capabilities of this organism as well as highlighting potential enzymes for application in improvement of livestock nutrition and for conversion of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuels. Methodology/Principal Findings The R. flavefaciens FD-1 genome was sequenced to 29x-coverage, based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis estimates (4.4 Mb), and assembled into 119 contigs providing 4,576,399 bp of unique sequence. As much as 87.1% of the genome encodes ORFs, tRNA, rRNAs, or repeats. The GC content was calculated at 45%. A total of 4,339 ORFs was detected with an average gene length of 918 bp. The cellulosome model for R. flavefaciens was further refined by sequence analysis, with at least 225 dockerin-containing ORFs, including previously characterized cohesin-containing scaffoldin molecules. These dockerin-containing ORFs encode a variety of catalytic modules including glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases, and carbohydrate esterases. Additionally, 56 ORFs encode proteins that contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). Functional microarray analysis of the genome revealed that 56 of the cellulosome-associated ORFs were up-regulated, 14 were down-regulated, 135 were unaffected, when R. flavefaciens FD-1 was grown on cellulose versus cellobiose. Three multi-modular xylanases (ORF01222, ORF03896, and ORF01315) exhibited the highest levels of up-regulation. Conclusions/Significance The genomic evidence indicates that R. flavefaciens FD-1 has the largest known number of fiber-degrading enzymes likely to be arranged in a cellulosome architecture. Functional analysis of the genome has

  8. Leaf-cutting ant fungi produce cell wall degrading pectinase complexes reminiscent of phytopathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Leaf-cutting (attine) ants use their own fecal material to manure fungus gardens, which consist of leaf material overgrown by hyphal threads of the basidiomycete fungus Leucocoprinus gongylophorus that lives in symbiosis with the ants. Previous studies have suggested that the fecal droplets contain proteins that are produced by the fungal symbiont to pass unharmed through the digestive system of the ants, so they can enhance new fungus garden growth. Results We tested this hypothesis by using proteomics methods to determine the gene sequences of fecal proteins in Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutting ants. Seven (21%) of the 33 identified proteins were pectinolytic enzymes that originated from the fungal symbiont and which were still active in the fecal droplets produced by the ants. We show that these enzymes are found in the fecal material only when the ants had access to fungus garden food, and we used quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis to show that the expression of six of these enzyme genes was substantially upregulated in the fungal gongylidia. These unique structures serve as food for the ants and are produced only by the evolutionarily advanced garden symbionts of higher attine ants, but not by the fungi reared by the basal lineages of this ant clade. Conclusions Pectinolytic enzymes produced in the gongylidia of the fungal symbiont are ingested but not digested by Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants so that they end up in the fecal fluid and become mixed with new garden substrate. Substantial quantities of pectinolytic enzymes are typically found in pathogenic fungi that attack live plant tissue, where they are known to breach the cell walls to allow the fungal mycelium access to the cell contents. As the leaf-cutting ant symbionts are derived from fungal clades that decompose dead plant material, our results suggest that their pectinolytic enzymes represent secondarily evolved adaptations that are convergent to those normally found in

  9. Pressure Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Bencic, T.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews new advances and applications of pressure sensitive paints in aerodynamic testing. Emphasis is placed on important technical aspects of pressure sensitive paint including instrumentation, data processing, and uncertainty analysis.

  10. I Can Paint!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Kate; Bower, Robin, Ed.

    This book gives detailed information concerning the use of tools and media of paint. It aims at developing skills and knowledge that will allow young students to express themselves by painting. The book is organized into five sections with subheadings, including: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Exploring Paint As We Use..." with subheadings: "Hands";…

  11. Paints and Preservatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Larry E.; Miller, Larry E.

    The publication contains an outline for use by agriculture teachers in developing a teaching plan for a unit on paints and preservatives. The topics included are (1) recognizing, solving, and preventing paint problems and (2) operating and using power spray painting equipment. Items presented for each topic are: the situation, (intended to inform…

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF EMISSIONS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM INTERIOR ALKYD PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alkyd paint continues to be used indoors for application to wood trim, cabinet surfaces, and some kitchen and bathroom walls. Paint may represent a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) indoors depending on the frequency of use and amount of surface paint. The U...

  13. 178. PAINT SHOP, LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARD CENTER OF ROOM. OPENING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    178. PAINT SHOP, LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARD CENTER OF ROOM. OPENING IN BACKGROUND IS SLIDING WALL. - Gruber Wagon Works, Pennsylvania Route 183 & State Hill Road at Red Bridge Park, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  14. 8. Second floor front apartment showing ornately painted pressed metal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Second floor front apartment showing ornately painted pressed metal ceiling, as well as modern partitions and wall treatments. View looking north. - Franklin Grocery Company Building, 1 South Main Street, Franklin, Merrimack County, NH

  15. Photodynamic inactivation of biofilm building microorganisms by photoactive facade paints.

    PubMed

    Preuß, Annegret; Bornhütter, Tobias; Färber, Alexander; Schaller, Christian; Röder, Beate

    2016-07-01

    This study was performed as a proof of concept for singlet oxygen generating facade paint as an alternative to conventional biocide containing facade paint for the prevention of biofilm growth on outdoor walls. Biofilms on outdoor walls cause esthetic problems and economic damage. Therefore facade paints often contain biocides. However commercially available biocides may have a series of adverse effects on living organisms as well as harmful environmental effects. Furthermore, biocides are increasingly designed to be more effective and are environmentally persistent. Thus, an eco-friendly and non-harmful to human health alternative to conventional biocides in wall color is strongly recommended. The well-known photosensitizer 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine (TMPyP) was used as an additive in a commercially available facade paint. The generation of singlet molecular oxygen was shown using time resolved 2D measurements of the singlet oxygen luminescence. The photodynamic activity of the photosensitizer in the facade paint was demonstrated by phototoxicity tests with defined mold fungi and a mixture of microorganisms harvested from native outdoor biofilms as model organisms. It was proven in general that it is possible to inhibit the growth of biofilm forming microorganisms growing on solid wall paint surfaces by the cationic photosensitizer TMPyP added to the facade paint using daylight conditions for illumination in 12h light and dark cycles. PMID:27101275

  16. Cell wall-degrading enzymes of Didymella bryoniae in relation to fungal growth and virulence in cantaloupe fruit

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Bruton, B. D.; Biles, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    Didymella bryoniae is an important pathogen of cucurbits worldwide. Virulence factors of D. bryoniae were investigated in regard to fungal growth and the production of cell wall-degrading enzymes, polygalacturonase (PG), pectate lyase (PL), pectin lyase (PNL), β-galactosidase (β-Gal) and cellulase (Cx). Virulence levels of five D. bryoniae isolates were determined by the severity of inoculated cantaloupe fruit decay. The highly virulent isolates had more mycelial growth than the moderately virulent isolates in different media. PG activities produced by the highly virulent isolates in shake cultures and in decayed fruit were greater than those of the moderately virulent isolates. PNL, but not PL, in decayed fruit was higher with the highly virulent isolates compared to the moderately virulent ones. The highly virulent isolates showed higher Cx activity than the moderately virulent ones in decayed fruit and in fruit tissue shake culture. β-Gal activities of the highly virulent isolates in pectin shake culture and in decayed fruit were greater than those of the two moderately virulent isolates although fruit also produced β-Gal. Protein analysis showed two fungal β-Gal isozymes in decayed fruit compared to those of healthy fruit. Correlation analysis indicated that the activities of PG, PNL, β-Gal and Cx in cultures and in decayed fruit positively correlated with fungal growth and fruit decay severity. The results of this study suggest that PG, PNL, β-Gal, and Cx appear to be virulence factors of D. bryoniae in cantaloupe decay with PG and β-Gal as the most predominant fruit decay enzymes. PMID:25364138

  17. Process for Non-Contact Removal of Organic Coatings from the Surface of Paintings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Rutledge, Sharon K. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention discloses a method of removing organic protective coatings from a painting. In the present invention degraded protective coatings such as lacquers, acrylics, natural resins, carbons, soot, and polyurethane are safely removed from the surface of a painting without contact to the surface of the painting. This method can be used for restoration of paintings when they have been damaged, through age, fire, etc.

  18. Process for non-contact removal of organic coatings from the surface of paintings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Rutledge, Sharon K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention discloses a method of removing organic protective coatings from a painting. In the present invention degraded protective coatings such as lacquers, acrylics, natural resins, carbons, soot, and polyurethane are safely removed from the surface of a painting without contact to the surface of the painting. This method can be used for restoration of paintings when they have been damaged, through age, fire, etc.

  19. BnMs3 is required for tapetal differentiation and degradation, microspore separation, and pollen-wall biosynthesis in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhengfu; Dun, Xiaoling; Xia, Shengqian; Shi, Dianyi; Qin, Maomao; Yi, Bin; Wen, Jing; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2012-01-01

    7365AB, a recessive genetic male sterility system, is controlled by BnMs3 in Brassica napus, which encodes a Tic40 protein required for tapetum development. However, the role of BnMs3 in rapeseed anther development is still largely unclear. In this research, cytological analysis revealed that anther development of a Bnms3 mutant has defects in the transition of the tapetum to the secretory type, callose degradation, and pollen-wall formation. A total of 76 down-regulated unigenes in the Bnms3 mutant, several of which are associated with tapetum development, callose degeneration, and pollen development, were isolated by suppression subtractive hybridization combined with a macroarray analysis. Reverse genetics was applied by means of Arabidopsis insertional mutant lines to characterize the function of these unigenes and revealed that MSR02 is only required for transport of sporopollenin precursors through the plasma membrane of the tapetum. The real-time PCR data have further verified that BnMs3 plays a primary role in tapetal differentiation by affecting the expression of a few key transcription factors, participates in tapetal degradation by modulating the expression of cysteine protease genes, and influences microspore separation by manipulating the expression of BnA6 and BnMSR66 related to callose degradation and of BnQRT1 and BnQRT3 required for the primary cell-wall degradation of the pollen mother cell. Moreover, BnMs3 takes part in pollen-wall formation by affecting the expression of a series of genes involved in biosynthesis and transport of sporopollenin precursors. All of the above results suggest that BnMs3 participates in tapetum development, microspore release, and pollen-wall formation in B. napus. PMID:22174440

  20. BnMs3 is required for tapetal differentiation and degradation, microspore separation, and pollen-wall biosynthesis in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengfu; Dun, Xiaoling; Xia, Shengqian; Shi, Dianyi; Qin, Maomao; Yi, Bin; Wen, Jing; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2012-03-01

    7365AB, a recessive genetic male sterility system, is controlled by BnMs3 in Brassica napus, which encodes a Tic40 protein required for tapetum development. However, the role of BnMs3 in rapeseed anther development is still largely unclear. In this research, cytological analysis revealed that anther development of a Bnms3 mutant has defects in the transition of the tapetum to the secretory type, callose degradation, and pollen-wall formation. A total of 76 down-regulated unigenes in the Bnms3 mutant, several of which are associated with tapetum development, callose degeneration, and pollen development, were isolated by suppression subtractive hybridization combined with a macroarray analysis. Reverse genetics was applied by means of Arabidopsis insertional mutant lines to characterize the function of these unigenes and revealed that MSR02 is only required for transport of sporopollenin precursors through the plasma membrane of the tapetum. The real-time PCR data have further verified that BnMs3 plays a primary role in tapetal differentiation by affecting the expression of a few key transcription factors, participates in tapetal degradation by modulating the expression of cysteine protease genes, and influences microspore separation by manipulating the expression of BnA6 and BnMSR66 related to callose degradation and of BnQRT1 and BnQRT3 required for the primary cell-wall degradation of the pollen mother cell. Moreover, BnMs3 takes part in pollen-wall formation by affecting the expression of a series of genes involved in biosynthesis and transport of sporopollenin precursors. All of the above results suggest that BnMs3 participates in tapetum development, microspore release, and pollen-wall formation in B. napus. PMID:22174440

  1. Spot Paint Sprayer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifsen, J. Arthur

    1987-01-01

    Proposed atomizing system applies paint to small areas or objects - typically nuts, bolts, or other fasteners on flat surfaces. System used in electronic and mechanical assemblies, where small parts coated but not reached by normal spraying techniques. Coverage expected more complete than that obtained by hand brushing. Paint applicator contains two chambers in which flow of air and atomized paint controlled to ensure complete coating of fastener. In electrostatic version, inner tube serves as one electrode, while object coated serves as other electrode.

  2. 107. TOWER STAIRHALL, SECOND FLOOR LANDING, SOUTH WALL, ENTABLATURE SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. TOWER STAIRHALL, SECOND FLOOR LANDING, SOUTH WALL, ENTABLATURE SHOWING SECTION WITH ALL PAINT REMOVED RANGING FROM TWENTY-FIVE TO FIFTY COATS OF PAINT ON SECTIONS - Independence Hall Complex, Independence Hall, 500 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. Interior building details of Building C, Room C113: historic painted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building C, Room C-113: historic painted plaster lath partition wall, painted plaster east wall and four light over two light double-hung window; southerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  4. Oil-based paint poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Paint - oil based - poisoning ... Hydrocarbons are the primary poisonous ingredient in oil paints. Some oil paints have heavy metals such as lead, mercury, cobalt, and barium added as pigment. These heavy metals can cause additional ...

  5. Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Spectroscopy and Imaging: New Approaches to the Analysis of Cultural Heritage and Its Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Austin; Cesaratto, Anna; Bellei, Sara; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Toniolo, Lucia; Valentini, Gianluca; Comelli, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Applications of time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to the analysis of cultural heritage are presented. Examples range from historic wall paintings and stone sculptures to 20th century iconic design objects. A detailed description of the instrumentation developed and employed for analysis in the laboratory or in situ is given. Both instruments rely on a pulsed laser source coupled to a gated detection system, but differ in the type of information they provide. Applications of FLIM to the analysis of model samples and for the in-situ monitoring of works of art range from the analysis of organic materials and pigments in wall paintings, the detection of trace organic substances on stone sculptures, to the mapping of luminescence in late 19th century paintings. TRPL and FLIM are employed as sensors for the detection of the degradation of design objects made in plastic. Applications and avenues for future research are suggested. PMID:24699285

  6. Watercolor paints - swallowing

    MedlinePlus

    ... If the person swallowed the paint, give them water or milk right away, unless a provider tells you not to. DO NOT give anything to drink if the person has symptoms that make it ... Use soap and water to wash any paint off skin and clothes.

  7. Jasper Johns' Painted Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinger, Esther

    1989-01-01

    States that the painted words in Jasper Johns' art act in two different capacities: concealed words partake in the artist's interrogation of visual perception; and visible painted words question classical representation. Argues that words are Johns' means of critiquing modernism. (RS)

  8. Paint-Stirrer Submarine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn; Hardy, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a unique and challenging laboratory exercise called, the paint-stir-stick submarine, that keeps the students enthralled. The paint-stir-stick submarine fits beautifully with the National Science Education Standards Physical Science Content Standard B, and with the California state science standards for physical…

  9. Pollock without Paint?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the author exposes her students to the world of Jackson Pollock, the artist who brings to mind dripping, meandering, splashing puddles of paint. Pollock's action paintings of the late 1940s-'50s call out for unfettered movement, fluidity, and freedom of application. Is it even possible to capture the action, rhythm and…

  10. Forensic aspects of the weathering and ageing of spray paints.

    PubMed

    Jost, Cédric; Muehlethaler, Cyril; Massonnet, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on the degradation of spray paint samples, illustrated by Optical, FTIR and Raman measurements. As opposed to automotive paints which are specifically designed for improved outdoor exposure and protected using hindered amine light absorbers (HALS) and ultra-violet absorbers (UVA), the spray paints on their side are much simpler in composition and very likely to suffer more from joint effects of solar radiation, temperature and humidity. Six different spray paint were exposed to outdoor UV-radiation for a total period of three months and both FTIR and Raman measurements were taken systematically during this time. These results were later compared to an artificial degradation using a climate chamber. For infrared spectroscopy, degradation curves were plotted using the photo-oxidation index (POI), and could be successfully approximated with a logarithmic fitting (R(2)>0.8). The degradation can appear after the first few days of exposure and be important until 2 months, where it stabilizes and follow a more linear trend afterwards. One advantage is that the degradation products appeared almost exclusively at the far end (∼3000cm(-1)) of mid-infrared spectra, and that the fingerprint region of the spectra remained stable over the studied period of time. Raman results suggest that the pigments on the other side, are much more stable and have not shown any sign of degradation over the time of this study. Considering the forensic implications of this environmental degradation, care should be taken when comparing samples if weathering is an option (e.g. an exposed graffiti compared to the paint from a fresh spray paint can). Degradation issues should be kept in mind as they may induce significant differences between paint samples of common origin. PMID:26646736

  11. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    PubMed Central

    Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry. PMID:26137472

  12. Cell Wall-Degrading Enzymes Enlarge the Pore Size of Intervessel Pit Membranes in Healthy and Xylella fastidiosa-Infected Grapevines1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Donoso, Alonso G.; Sun, Qiang; Roper, M. Caroline; Greve, L. Carl; Kirkpatrick, Bruce; Labavitch, John M.

    2010-01-01

    The pit membrane (PM) is a primary cell wall barrier that separates adjacent xylem water conduits, limiting the spread of xylem-localized pathogens and air embolisms from one conduit to the next. This paper provides a characterization of the size of the pores in the PMs of grapevine (Vitis vinifera). The PM porosity (PMP) of stems infected with the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was compared with the PMP of healthy stems. Stems were infused with pressurized water and flow rates were determined; gold particles of known size were introduced with the water to assist in determining the size of PM pores. The effect of introducing trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (CDTA), oligogalacturonides, and polygalacturonic acid into stems on water flux via the xylem was also measured. The possibility that cell wall-degrading enzymes could alter the pore sizes, thus facilitating the ability of X. fastidiosa to cross the PMs, was tested. Two cell wall-degrading enzymes likely to be produced by X. fastidiosa (polygalactuoronase and endo-1,4- β -glucanase) were infused into stems, and particle passage tests were performed to check for changes in PMP. Scanning electron microscopy of control and enzyme-infused stem segments revealed that the combination of enzymes opened holes in PMs, probably explaining enzyme impacts on PMP and how a small X. fastidiosa population, introduced into grapevines by insect vectors, can multiply and spread throughout the vine and cause Pierce's disease. PMID:20107028

  13. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry. PMID:26137472

  14. Production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes by monoculture and co-culture of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus under SSF of banana peels

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Shazia; Aslam, Hina; Ahmad, Aqeel; Khan, Shakeel Ahmed; Sohail, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are considered to be the most important group of microorganisms for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE), in solid state fermentations. In this study, two fungal strains Aspergillus niger MS23 and Aspergillus terreus MS105 were screened for plant CWDE such as amylase, pectinase, xylanase and cellulases (β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and filterpaperase) using a novel substrate, Banana Peels (BP) for SSF process. This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to use BP as SSF substrate for plant CWDE production by co-culture of fungal strains. The titers of pectinase were significantly improved in co-culture compared to mono-culture. Furthermore, the enzyme preparations obtained from monoculture and co-culture were used to study the hydrolysis of BP along with some crude and purified substrates. It was observed that the enzymatic hydrolysis of different crude and purified substrates accomplished after 26 h of incubation, where pectin was maximally hydrolyzed by the enzyme preparations of mono and co-culture. Along with purified substrates, crude materials were also proved to be efficiently degraded by the cocktail of the CWDE. These results demonstrated that banana peels may be a potential substrate in solid-state fermentation for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes to be used for improving various biotechnological and industrial processes. PMID:25763058

  15. Studying the organization of genes encoding plant cell wall degrading enzymes in Chrysomela tremula provides insights into a leaf beetle genome.

    PubMed

    Pauchet, Y; Saski, C A; Feltus, F A; Luyten, I; Quesneville, H; Heckel, D G

    2014-06-01

    The ability of herbivorous beetles from the superfamilies Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides has only recently begun to be appreciated. The presence of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) in the beetle's digestive tract makes this degradation possible. Sequences encoding these beetle-derived PCWDEs were originally identified from transcriptomes and strikingly resemble those of saprophytic and phytopathogenic microorganisms, raising questions about their origin; e.g. are they insect- or microorganism-derived? To demonstrate unambiguously that the genes encoding PCWDEs found in beetle transcriptomes are indeed of insect origin, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome library from the genome of the leaf beetle Chrysomela tremula, containing 18 432 clones with an average size of 143 kb. After hybridizing this library with probes derived from 12 C. tremula PCWDE-encoding genes and sequencing the positive clones, we demonstrated that the latter genes are encoded by the insect's genome and are surrounded by genes possessing orthologues in the genome of Tribolium castaneum as well as in three other beetle genomes. Our analyses showed that although the level of overall synteny between C. tremula and T. castaneum seems high, the degree of microsynteny between both species is relatively low, in contrast to the more closely related Colorado potato beetle. PMID:24456018

  16. Multiscale effect of paint pulverization orientation on appearance after painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezghani, S.; Zahouani, H.; Piezanowski, J.

    2011-08-01

    The perceived quality of a vehicle is strongly affected by paint appearance that shares major part of the outer car body panels. The painting process modifies the surface topography in a wide range of roughness and waviness scales, and consequently modifies the functionality of the surface in terms of appearance. Since painting process is a multistage process leading to stratified surfaces, a multiscale surface topography characterization approach is suited. In this paper, 2D multiscale signature of the painting process was introduced and applied to track the effect of the painting process working variable on painted surface topography in a wide range of wavelength. To this aim, experimental painting tests were performed using three painting orientation modes (horizontal, oblique and vertical) on random and deterministic metal sheet surface textures. Results show that the painting orientation mode affect only the wavelength band greater than 500 μm and optimal painting orientation depends strongly on the texture of the initial sheet surface.

  17. Is nanotechnology revolutionizing the paint and lacquer industry? A critical opinion.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Zuin, Stefano; Wick, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Many paints for indoor and outdoor applications contain biocides and additives for protection against microbial, physical and chemical deterioration. The biocides should remain active as long as they are incorporated in the paint. Protection against microbial colonization should last at least a decade. Once the biocides are released they should degrade within a short time so that no accumulation in the environment can occur. The paint industry is not only focusing their research in producing better paint formulations with degradable biocides: they also consider using nanomaterials, such as nanosilver, nanocopper, nanozinc oxide, photocatalytic-active nanotitanium dioxide and nanosilica dioxide as additives for the protection of paints, against microbial degradation and physical and chemical deterioration. In the future nanomaterials should replace biodegradable biocides and improve the paint properties as well as impede colonization by microorganisms. At the time there is no guarantee that the nanomaterials in paints and façades will fulfill their task in the long run, since there are no long term studies available. From nanosilver doped paints it is known that silver is easily washed out by rain. Photocatalytic active nanotitanium dioxide adsorbs ultra violet light (UV-light) and generates hydroxyl radicals, which not only inhibit microbial growth but can also initiate or accelerate the photocatalytic degradation of the paint matrix. Thus at this time it is still unknown if it makes sense to incorporate nanomaterials into paints. Intensive research and development are still needed in order to find the answers. PMID:23178832

  18. Comets in Bushman Paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, B.

    2007-07-01

    About ten years ago I was asked to give a talk on African astronomical folklore and spent many hours reading up on the subject. My queries eventually led me to Bert Woodhouse, a member of the archaeological society and well-known recorder of Bushman paintings. He has published seven books on Bushman paintings and has a collection of over 30 000 slides covering all aspects of the subject. One section of his collection is labeled "comets" and he kindly made copies of these slides for me to use in that talk. This paper highlights those slides and discusses the objects depicted in the paintings.

  19. Mycoparasitism of endophytic fungi isolated from reed on soilborne phytopathogenic fungi and production of cell wall-degrading enzymes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ronghua; Liu, Xiaoguang; Gao, Kexiang; Mendgen, Kurt; Kang, Zhensheng; Gao, Jianfeng; Dai, Yang; Wang, Xue

    2009-12-01

    Antagonism of three endophytic fungi isolated from common reed (Phragmites australis) against eight soilborne pathogenic fungi was investigated on potato dextrose agar by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Inhibitory zones were not observed. The microscopical studies suggested that the endophytes inhibit growth of soilborne pathogens by means of coiling around hyphae and, after penetration, the degradation of hyphal cytoplasm. Since penetration of hyphae seems to play a major role in parasitism, we studied the production of cell wall degrading enzymes by the three endophytes. Choiromyces aboriginum produced higher activities of beta-1,3-glucanases compared to Stachybotrys elegans and Cylindrocarpon sp. For C. aboriginum and S. elegans, colloidal chitin was the best substrate for the induction of beta-1,3-glucanases and chitinases, respectively. This result suggests that mycoparasitism by endophytes on soilborne plant pathogens can be explained by their mycoparasitic activity. PMID:19705202

  20. Contemporary Poetry about Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Carl R. V.

    1992-01-01

    Asserts that teachers of contemporary literature should enjoy the advantages of poetry written in response to, or interpreting, paintings or other works of art. Illustrates the advantages of such poetry with two examples. (PRA)

  1. Chromate Dermatitis from Paint

    PubMed Central

    Engel, H. O.; Calnan, C. D.

    1963-01-01

    Among 250 workers engaged on wet sandpapering of primer paint on car bodies 65 developed a contact dermatitis. The average latent period before dermatitis developed was 4·6 months: only 60% of the patients made a completely satisfactory recovery. The average duration of dermatitis was 5·3 months. Two thirds of the men used one of two barrier creams supplied, while one third used none. Routine patch testing showed that the majority was allergic to chromate. It was found that a primer paint contained zinc chromate, which had been introduced into the paint by the manufacturers shortly before the first cases occurred. Removal of chromate from the paint resulted in a prompt cessation of new cases of dermatitis. Images PMID:14046155

  2. Artists Paint ... Landscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This article features the painting "View of Toledo," based on Toledo, a very old city located on a high plateau in Spain. By the time the artist El Greco painted the picture, he had lived there for 31 years. When one looks at the picture, one will see a storm approaching and will see the city as if it were lit by a flash of lightning. What main…

  3. Investigation on the hazing of a Brazilian contemporary painting.

    PubMed

    Puglieri, Thiago S; Lavezzo, Ariane S; dos Santos, Isabela F S; de Faria, Dalva L A

    2016-04-15

    A whitish crystalline-like coating was observed on the surface of the painting "Incêndio", 1990, produced by Emmanuel Nassar and awarded at the 6th Biennial of Cuenca. This work belongs to the Contemporary Art Museum of the University of São Paulo (MAC-USP) and such coating modified the artwork characteristics, causing an unpleasant effect and compromising its exhibition. The choice of the proper conservation and restoration strategies involves the understanding of the degradation process, demanding the identification of the chemical compounds formed on the painting surface, as well as of the other components in the painting. The results here obtained from Raman and optical microscopies, FTIR-ATR, SEM-EDS and GC-MS, revealed that the efflorescence chemical composition is almost only palmitic acid, with minor contents of stearic acid and their methyl esters, and that the paints are composed by chrome yellow, amorphous carbon and toluidine red pigment; an aluminum silicate filler in the black paint applied on the aluminum ground was also detected. Hierarchical Cluster Analyses (HCA) of the Raman spectra also revealed that the concentration of the efflorescence minor components depends on the paint composition. It was suggested, therefore, that the degradation process resulted from segregation and migration of mainly palmitic acid from the dried paints. Restoration methodologies used in similar cases, as well as factors that contribute to this process, were discussed. PMID:26836452

  4. Investigation on the hazing of a Brazilian contemporary painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglieri, Thiago S.; Lavezzo, Ariane S.; Santos, Isabela F. S. dos; de Faria, Dalva L. A.

    2016-04-01

    A whitish crystalline-like coating was observed on the surface of the painting "Incêndio", 1990, produced by Emmanuel Nassar and awarded at the 6th Biennial of Cuenca. This work belongs to the Contemporary Art Museum of the University of São Paulo (MAC-USP) and such coating modified the artwork characteristics, causing an unpleasant effect and compromising its exhibition. The choice of the proper conservation and restoration strategies involves the understanding of the degradation process, demanding the identification of the chemical compounds formed on the painting surface, as well as of the other components in the painting. The results here obtained from Raman and optical microscopies, FTIR-ATR, SEM-EDS and GC-MS, revealed that the efflorescence chemical composition is almost only palmitic acid, with minor contents of stearic acid and their methyl esters, and that the paints are composed by chrome yellow, amorphous carbon and toluidine red pigment; an aluminum silicate filler in the black paint applied on the aluminum ground was also detected. Hierarchical Cluster Analyses (HCA) of the Raman spectra also revealed that the concentration of the efflorescence minor components depends on the paint composition. It was suggested, therefore, that the degradation process resulted from segregation and migration of mainly palmitic acid from the dried paints. Restoration methodologies used in similar cases, as well as factors that contribute to this process, were discussed.

  5. International forensic automotive paint database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishea, Gregory A.; Buckle, Joe L.; Ryland, Scott G.

    1999-02-01

    The Technical Working Group for Materials Analysis (TWGMAT) is supporting an international forensic automotive paint database. The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) are collaborating on this effort through TWGMAT. This paper outlines the support and further development of the RCMP's Automotive Paint Database, `Paint Data Query'. This cooperative agreement augments and supports a current, validated, searchable, automotive paint database that is used to identify make(s), model(s), and year(s) of questioned paint samples in hit-and-run fatalities and other associated investigations involving automotive paint.

  6. Reading Through Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Two-dimensional data matrix symbols, which contain encoded letters and numbers, are permanently etched on items for identification. They can store up to 100 times more information than traditional bar codes. While the symbols provide several advantages over bar codes, once they are covered by paint they can no longer be read by optical scanners. Since most products are painted eventually, this presents a problem for industries relying on the symbols for identification and tracking. In 1987, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center began studying direct parts marking with matrix symbols in order to track millions of Space Shuttle parts. Advances in the technology proved that by incorporating magnetic properties into the paints, inks, and pastes used to apply the matrix symbols, the codes could be read by a magnetic scanner even after being covered with paint or other coatings. NASA received a patent for such a scanner in 1998, but the system it used for development was not portable and was too costly. A prototype was needed as a lead-in to a production model. In the summer of 2000, NASA began seeking companies to build a hand-held scanner that would detect the Read Through Paint data matrix identification marks containing magnetic materials through coatings.

  7. 1. Photocopy of painting (original painting in possesion of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of painting (original painting in possesion of the family of Judge Jasper Brinton, Cairo, Egypt) Thomas Eakins, Artist 1878 SIDE AND FRONT ELEVATIONS - Brinton 1704 House, Oakland Road (Birmingham Township), Dilworthtown, Chester County, PA

  8. 37. INTERIOR VIEW, PAINTING AREA SHOWING PAINT VAT AND CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. INTERIOR VIEW, PAINTING AREA SHOWING PAINT VAT AND CONVEYOR LINE WITH THE TOOLS HANGING FROM HOOKS TO DRY; NOTE PINCH POINT CROW BARS (CENTER) - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  9. Monet's painting under the microscope.

    PubMed

    Dredge, Paula; Wuhrer, Richard; Phillips, Matthew R

    2003-04-01

    An oil painting by Claude Monet, Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile 1887 (collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales), was examined to determine both the identity of the pigments used by the artist in this painting and his technique of mixing colors and laying paint on the canvas. The extremely complex construction of the painting was revealed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS), and X-ray mapping (XRM) analysis of cross sections of paint flakes excised from damaged regions of Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile. Nine different pigments were found on the painting. Many of the identified colors were modern pigments that became available only late in the 19th century as a result of scientific advances in pigment chemistry. Although similar colors were available in a natural mineral form, they lacked the vivid color of their manufactured counterparts. The use of these new synthetic metallic oxide colors by Monet accounts for the brilliance of his paintings. In addition, a separation between successive paint layers was observed in some areas of paint chip cross sections, indicating that oil-based paint was applied to paint that had dried, and consequently, Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile was painted over a long period of time. This observation is contrary to the general perception of Monet's technique of painting freely and quickly. PMID:12639239

  10. Monet's Painting under the Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dredge, Paula; Wuhrer, Richard; Phillips, Matthew R.

    2003-04-01

    An oil painting by Claude Monet, Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile 1887 (collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales), was examined to determine both the identity of the pigments used by the artist in this painting and his technique of mixing colors and laying paint on the canvas. The extremely complex construction of the painting was revealed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS), and X-ray mapping (XRM) analysis of cross sections of paint flakes excised from damaged regions of Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile. Nine different pigments were found on the painting. Many of the identified colors were modern pigments that became available only late in the 19th century as a result of scientific advances in pigment chemistry. Although similar colors were available in a natural mineral form, they lacked the vivid color of their manufactured counterparts. The use of these new synthetic metallic oxide colors by Monet accounts for the brilliance of his paintings. In addition, a separation between successive paint layers was observed in some areas of paint chip cross sections, indicating that oil-based paint was applied to paint that had dried, and consequently, Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile was painted over a long period of time. This observation is contrary to the general perception of Monet's technique of painting freely and quickly.

  11. Paint removal using lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Katherine; Garmire, Elsa

    1995-07-01

    Experiments to investigate the potential for practical laser graffiti-removal systems are reported. A universal engineering curve for the time needed for removal of paint from nonconductive substrates that was valid over a range of 107 in intensity was measured with a variety of lasers. Comparable times were measured for conductive substrates, when pulses shorter than the thermal conduction times were used. Analysis suggests that Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers may be the most efficient means for removing graffiti and other unwanted paint. An 1-m2 area of paint 14 mu m thick can be removed in approximately 10 min with a 50-Hz laser system of 15-W average power.

  12. Paint removal using lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Garmire, E

    1995-07-20

    Experiments to investigate the potential for practical laser graffiti-removal systems are reported. A universal engineering curve for the time needed for removal of paint from nonconductive substrates that was valid over a range of 10(7) in intensity was measured with a variety of lasers. Comparable times were measured for conductive substrates, when pulses shorter than the thermal conduction times were used. Analysis suggests that Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers may be the most efficient means for removing graffiti and other unwanted paint. An 1-m(2) area of paint 14 µm thick can be removed in approximately 10 min with a 50-Hz laser system of 15-W average power. PMID:21052275

  13. Preliminary Results of the Er:YAG Laser Cleaning of Mural Paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreotti, A.; Colombini, M. P.; Felici, A.; deCruz, A.; Lanterna, G.; Lanfranchi, M.; Nakahara, K.; Penaglia, F.

    The conservation of mural paintings requires a deep knowledge of the alterations caused by natural ageing, environmental agents and previous restoration treatments. All the operations concerning cleaning and consolidation of wall paintings must assure the safety of the paint layers. This is especially true the more fragile the painting technique. For example, "a secco" paintings, executed with organic binders such as tempera, oil, glue, when altered and damaged, present a very weak adhesion to the mortar underneath, and provoke detachment of paint fragments. In this circumstance it is necessary to find a feasible alternative to the usual cleaning methods (wet and mechanical ones) and a valid way to operate. Moreover, the removal of scialbo layers (a thick, pure lime layer applied on the wall painting) presents difficulties in order to preserve the integrity of the painting layers. Previous experiments carried out in Opificio with Er:YAG laser on easel painting cleaning, lead us to extend the experiments on the cleaning of mural paintings.

  14. Miniature spray-painting booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fee, K. W.

    1970-01-01

    Transparent spray booth provides method for quality painting and repair of surfaces in clean room or other specialized environments. Overspray and virtually all contaminating vapor and odor can be eliminated. Touch-up painting is achieved with spray gun.

  15. Oil-based paint poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrocarbons are the primary poisonous ingredient in oil paints. Some oil paints have heavy metals such as ... Gummin DD. Hydrocarbons. In: Nelson LS, Lewin NA, Howland MA, et al., eds. Goldfrank's Toxicologic Emergencies . 9th ed. New York, NY: ...

  16. Process Waste Assessment - Paint Shop

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, N.M.

    1993-06-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate hazardous wastes generated in the Paint Shop, Building 913, Room 130. Special attention is given to waste streams generated by the spray painting process because it requires a number of steps for preparing, priming, and painting an object. Also, the spray paint booth covers the largest area in R-130. The largest and most costly waste stream to dispose of is {open_quote}Paint Shop waste{close_quotes} -- a combination of paint cans, rags, sticks, filters, and paper containers. These items are compacted in 55-gallon drums and disposed of as solid hazardous waste. Recommendations are made for minimizing waste in the Paint Shop. Paint Shop personnel are very aware of the need to minimize hazardous wastes and are continuously looking for opportunities to do so.

  17. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Expression of Genes Encoding Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes during Infection of Lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) by Phytophthora parasitica

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, Leila M.; Cullerne, Darren P.; Torreña, Pernelyn; Taylor, Jen; Hardham, Adrienne R.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq analysis has shown that over 60% (12,962) of the predicted transcripts in the Phytophthora parasitica genome are expressed during the first 60 h of lupin root infection. The infection transcriptomes included 278 of the 431 genes encoding P. parasitica cell wall degrading enzymes. The transcriptome data provide strong evidence of global transcriptional cascades of genes whose encoded proteins target the main categories of plant cell wall components. A major cohort of pectinases is predominantly expressed early but as infection progresses, the transcriptome becomes increasingly dominated by transcripts encoding cellulases, hemicellulases, β-1,3-glucanases and glycoproteins. The most highly expressed P. parasitica carbohydrate active enzyme gene contains two CBM1 cellulose binding modules and no catalytic domains. The top 200 differentially expressed genes include β-1,4-glucosidases, β-1,4-glucanases, β-1,4-galactanases, a β-1,3-glucanase, an α-1,4-polygalacturonase, a pectin deacetylase and a pectin methylesterase. Detailed analysis of gene expression profiles provides clues as to the order in which linkages within the complex carbohydrates may come under attack. The gene expression profiles suggest that (i) demethylation of pectic homogalacturonan occurs before its deacetylation; (ii) cleavage of the backbone of pectic rhamnogalacturonan I precedes digestion of its side chains; (iii) early attack on cellulose microfibrils by non-catalytic cellulose-binding proteins and enzymes with auxiliary activities may facilitate subsequent attack by glycosyl hydrolases and enzymes containing CBM1 cellulose-binding modules; (iv) terminal hemicellulose backbone residues are targeted after extensive internal backbone cleavage has occurred; and (v) the carbohydrate chains on glycoproteins are degraded late in infection. A notable feature of the P. parasitica infection transcriptome is the high level of transcription of genes encoding enzymes that degrade β-1

  18. Worried about leaks Don't paint before hydrotesting

    SciTech Connect

    Batey, J.E. )

    1993-09-01

    Occasionally, painting before hydrostatic pressure testing is required in petrochemical and other industrial plants. Because some process fluids may be solvents to paint, in-service leakage could occur if the paint masks leakage during hydrotesting. To eliminate unplanned releases, it is important to know whether painting before hydrotesting could really mask leaks at the test pressures typically used in hydrotesting. Unfortunately, very little guidance is provided by national standards or codes, and empirical data are not readily available to support an answer. ASTME 1003-84, Standard Method for Hydrostatic Leak Testing, states that new systems should be tested prior to painting, where practical. However, Sections 1 and 8 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and B31.1 and B31.3 of the ASME Code for Pressure Piping are silent on this issue. To help resolve this issue, tests were done to determine the effect of paint on leak-tightness during hydrotesting. Pipe samples with through-wall pinholes were fabricated, painted, and then hydrotested.

  19. MEASUREMENTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AND PARTICLES DURING APPLICATION OF LATEX PAINT WITH AN AIRLESS SPRAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses experiments, conducted at EPA's Indoor Air Quality Research House, to measure airborne concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particles during and following the spray-application of latex wall paint. (NOTE: Paint may be applied indoors by a v...

  20. Assessment of the impact of degraded shear wall stiffnesses on seismic plant risk and seismic design loads

    SciTech Connect

    Klamerus, E.W.; Bohn, M.P.; Johnson, J.J.; Asfura, A.P.; Doyle, D.J.

    1994-02-01

    Test results sponsored by the USNRC have shown that reinforced shear wall (Seismic Category I) structures exhibit stiffnesses and natural frequencies which are smaller than those calculated in the design process. The USNRC has sponsored Sandia National Labs to perform an evaluation of the effects of the reduced frequencies on several existing seismic PRAs in order to determine the seismic risk implications inherent in these test results. This report presents the results for the re-evaluation of the seismic risk for three nuclear power plants: the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, the Zion Nuclear Power Plant, and Arkansas Nuclear One -- Unit 1 (ANO-1). Increases in core damage frequencies for seismic initiated events at Peach Bottom were 25 to 30 percent (depending on whether LLNL or EPRI hazard curves were used). At the ANO-1 site, the corresponding increases in plant risk were 10 percent (for each set of hazard curves). Finally, at Zion, there was essentially no change in the computed core damage frequency when the reduction in shear wall stiffness was included. In addition, an evaluation of deterministic ``design-like`` structural dynamic calculations with and without the shear stiffness reductions was made. Deterministic loads calculated for these two cases typically increased on the order of 10 to 20 percent for the affected structures.

  1. Tanjore: Mystical Painting of India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    Tanjore (or Thanjavur or Thanlavoor) paintings are one of the most popular traditional art forms in Southern India. These ornate religious paintings involve Hindu mythology. The paintings are noted for their adornment of gold and semiprecious stones such as rubies, emeralds, and pearls. Currently, the semiprecious stones are often substituted…

  2. Static-Suppressing Optical Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, M. M.; Metzler, E. C.; Cleland, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    Electrically conductive flat black paint adheres well to magnesium, aluminum, fiberglass, and other materials. Paint absorbs stray light in optical instruments while preventing buildup of electrostatic fields and arcing. Paint consists of primer and topcoat, both containing electricallyconductive carbon-black powder. Primer two-part epoxy base, and topcoat polyurethane base.

  3. Proteomic Investigation of Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 Identifies Secretome and Mycelial Proteins with Roles in Plant Cell Wall Degradation and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, Dilip K; Roberts, Daniel P; Garrett, Wesley M; Natarajan, Savithiry S; Darwish, Omar; Alkharouf, Nadim; Pain, Arnab; Khan, Farooq; Jambhulkar, Prashant P; Mitra, Amitava

    2016-04-20

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 is a soilborne necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen that causes economically important diseases on agronomic crops worldwide. This study used a proteomics approach to characterize both intracellular proteins and the secretome of R. solani AG 4 isolate Rs23A under several growth conditions, the secretome being highly important in pathogenesis. From over 500 total secretome and soluble intracellular protein spots from 2-D gels, 457 protein spots were analyzed and 318 proteins positively matched with fungal proteins of known function by comparison with available R. solani genome databases specific for anastomosis groups 1-IA, 1-IB, and 3. These proteins were categorized to possible cellular locations and functional groups and for some proteins their putative roles in plant cell wall degradation and virulence. The majority of the secreted proteins were grouped to extracellular regions and contain hydrolase activity. PMID:27019116

  4. Artists Paint ... Fantasy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    When he painted a portrait of Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II (1552-1612), Giuseppe Arcimboldo used his imagination, and portrayed him as "Vertumnus," the Roman god of vegetation and the seasons. It's fun to find the different fruits, vegetables and flowers he used: pea-pod eyelids, a gourd for the forehead. Court painters of the time usually…

  5. Stylized Silk Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an art activity inspired by a workshop "Surrounded by Silk" given by Susan Skvoe in which the students create silk paintings. Explains that the students first sketch their floral design on paper, trace the design on the silk's surface, and apply liquid dye for color. Provides an easier activity for younger students. (CMK)

  6. Paint by Numbers Revived!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Nic

    2012-01-01

    Remember paint by numbers? This revived trend was a perfect solution to teaching geometric shapes to the author's first-grade students. Geometric shapes are identified and used in early elementary art classrooms, but this lesson gives students a deeper understanding of shape, encourages problem-solving, and makes a strong correlation between math…

  7. Cultural Collage Paintings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a cultural collage painting project. Three things served as the impetus for this project: (1) a desire for students to explore the theme of "culture"; (2) an appreciation for the photo-montaged, layered images one sees in print media; and (3) noticing that projects from core subject areas hanging on the walls…

  8. Adhesion of malignant mammary tumor cells MDA-MB-231 to microvessel wall increases microvascular permeability via degradation of endothelial surface glycocalyx

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of tumor cell adhesion on microvascular permeability (P) in intact microvessels, we measured the adhesion rate of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231, the hydraulic conductivity (Lp), the P, and reflection coefficient (σ) to albumin of the microvessels at the initial tumor cell adhesion and after ∼45 min cell perfusion in the postcapillary venules of rat mesentery in vivo. Rats (Sprague-Dawley, 250–300 g) were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium given subcutaneously. A midline incision was made in the abdominal wall, and the mesentery was gently taken out and arranged on the surface of a glass coverslip for the measurement. An individual postcapillary venule was perfused with cells at a rate of ∼1 mm/s, which is the mean blood flow velocity in this type of microvessels. At the initial tumor cell adhesion, which was defined as one adherent cell in ∼100- to 145-μm vessel segment, Lp was 1.5-fold and P was 2.3-fold of their controls, and σ decreased from 0.92 to 0.64; after ∼45-min perfusion, the adhesion increased to ∼5 adherent cells in ∼100- to 145-μm vessel segment, while Lp increased to 2.8-fold, P to 5.7-fold of their controls, and σ decreased from 0.92 to 0.42. Combining these measured data with the predictions from a mathematical model for the interendothelial transport suggests that tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall degrades the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) layer. This suggestion was confirmed by immunostaining of heparan sulfate of the ESG on the microvessel wall. Preserving of the ESG by a plasma glycoprotein orosomucoid decreased the P to albumin and reduced the tumor cell adhesion. PMID:22858626

  9. Polyelectrolyte functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as strong anion-exchange material for the extraction of acidic degradation products of nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Kanaujia, Pankaj K; Pardasani, Deepak; Purohit, Ajay K; Tak, Vijay; Dubey, D K

    2011-12-30

    Extraction, enrichment and gas chromatography mass spectrometric analysis of degradation products of nerve agents from water is of significant importance for verification of Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and gathering forensic evidence of use of nerve agents. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were non-covalently functionalized with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) to afford the cationic functionalized nano-tubes, which were used as solid-phase anionic-exchanger sorbents to extract the acidic degradation products of nerve agents from water. Extraction efficiencies of MWCNTs-PDDA were compared with those of mixed mode anion-exchange (HLB) and silica based strong anion-exchange (Si-SAX) cartridges. Optimized extraction parameters included MWCNTs-PDDA 12 mg, washing solvent 5 mL water and eluting solvent 3 mL of 0.1M aqueous HCl followed by 3 mL methanol. At 1 ng mL(-1) spiking concentration of mono- and di-basic phosphonic acids, MWCNTs-PDDA exhibited higher extraction efficiencies in comparison to Si-SAX and HLB. The limits of detection were achieved down to 0.05 and 0.11 ng mL(-1) in selected ion and full scan monitoring mode respectively; and limits of quantification in selected ion monitoring mode were achieved down to 0.21 ng mL(-1). PMID:22119612

  10. Interior building details of Building A, Room A101: painted wood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, Room A-101: painted wood staircase, wood handrails with metal brackets, plastered finished brick walls; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  11. Behaviour of painted mirrors during exposure tests to salt spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, E.; Berger, F.; Barillon, R.; Audebert, P.; Chambaudet, A.

    1997-11-01

    The multilayer structure of commercially made mirrors can be subject to degradation under normal conditions, leading to alterations of the mirror's reflective properties. A protective coat of paint, containing an anticorrosive compound, is applied to the copper surface to reduce the oxidation of the thin metallic films. The objective of this study is to analyse the behaviour of the multilayer stack during salt spray tests (neutral salt spray and CASS-test). We followed the morphological and chemical evolution of the interfacial area (glass-silver-copper-paint) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe for micro analysis (EPMA). Studies of the surface of the coatings were performed with attenuated total reflexion infrared spectroscopy (IRTF-ATR) and SEM-EPMA. The observations revealed that a glass-silver decohesion occurs starting at the edges of the material during the tests. The EPMA analyses of the exposed edges of the mirrors indicated first that concentration of the anticorrosive pigment of the paint (lead-based compound) decreased, especially at the copper-paint interface, and second that the copper in the paint may diffuse to the surface of the coating. Finally, IRTF-ATR spectroscopy and SEM-EPMA analyses of surfaces showed that the CASS-test leads to an acid attack of some pigments and extenders of the paint (particularly CaCO 3) and leads to chemical modifications of the binder. These phenomena result in an increase in the porosity and a weakening of the paint film. The results obtained with these surface analytical technics will allow us to propose some degradation mechanisms of painted mirrors during salt spray tests.

  12. Degradation of flumequine in aqueous solution by persulfate activated with common methods and polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes catalysts.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Qu, Ruijuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Sun, Ping; Sui, Yunxia; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-11-15

    In recent years, flumequine (FLU) has been ubiquitously detected in surface waters and municipal wastewaters. In light of its potential negative impacts to aquatic species, growing concern has been arisen for the removal of this antibiotic from natural waters. In this study, the kinetics, degradation mechanisms and pathways of aqueous FLU by persulfate (PS) oxidation were systematically determined. Three common activation methods, including heat, Fe(2+) and Cu(2+), and a novel heterogeneous catalyst, namely, polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ), were investigated to activate PS for FLU removal. It was found that these three common activators enhanced FLU degradation obviously, while several influencing factors, such as solution pH, inorganic ions (especially HCO3(-) at 5 mmol/L) and dissolved organic matter extracts, exerted their different effects on FLU removal. The catalysts were characterized, and an efficient catalytic degradation performance, high stability and excellent reusability were observed. The measured total organic carbon levels suggested that FLU can be effectively mineralized by using the catalysts. Radical mechanism was studied by combination of the quenching tests and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis. It was assumed that sulfate radicals predominated in the activation of PS with Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ for FLU removal, while hydroxyl radicals also contributed to the catalytic oxidation process. In addition, a total of fifteen reaction intermediates of FLU were identified, from which two possible pathways were proposed involving hydroxylation, decarbonylation and ring opening. Overall, this study represented a systematical evaluation regarding the transformation process of FLU by PS, and showed that the heterogeneous catalysts can efficiently activate PS for FLU removal from the water environment. PMID:26281959

  13. 38. Detail of a sign painted on the side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Detail of a sign painted on the side of a building. The structure has a timber lintle and a piece of wood attached to the wall above the windows, giving the impression of a string course. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  14. 18. LAUNCH CONTROL SUPPORT BUILDING. 'MISSILE ART' MURAL PAINTED ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. LAUNCH CONTROL SUPPORT BUILDING. 'MISSILE ART' MURAL PAINTED ON INTERIOR WALL OF ELEVATOR SHAFT. VIEW TO EAST. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  15. Holonic Manufacturing Paint Shop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Morten; Roulet-Dubonnet, Olivier; Nyen, Per Åge; Gellein, Lars Tore; Lien, Terje; Skavhaug, Amund

    In pursuit of flexibility and agility within discrete manufacturing, the surrounding logistics and handling processes of a paint shop is under construction as a laboratory prototype application. Holonic Manufacturing seems to be a promising strategic paradigm and architecture to use for a system characterised by production logistics and control. This paper describes the physical devices to be used; the desired functionality; and the basic logic control designed. Additionally, the ideas for holonification based on the already designed logic control is presented.

  16. Reducer Selection When Doing Overall Paint Jobs Using Enamel Paints. Lesson Plan No. 1 of Auto Repair and Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyau, Layton M.

    This lesson, which is part of a high school course in auto body repair and painting, deals with selecting a reducer when doing overall paint jobs using enamel paints. Students are taught the general properties of different types of enamel paints and selection of the proper reducer for each type of paint, depending on the weather and the specific…

  17. 46 CFR 72.05-45 - Paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Paint. 72.05-45 Section 72.05-45 Shipping COAST GUARD... Protection § 72.05-45 Paint. (a) An excessive number of coats of paint will be discouraged unless noncombustible paint is used. (b) Nitrocellulose or other highly flammable or noxious fume-producing paints...

  18. 46 CFR 72.05-45 - Paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Paint. 72.05-45 Section 72.05-45 Shipping COAST GUARD... Protection § 72.05-45 Paint. (a) An excessive number of coats of paint will be discouraged unless noncombustible paint is used. (b) Nitrocellulose or other highly flammable or noxious fume-producing paints...

  19. 46 CFR 72.05-45 - Paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Paint. 72.05-45 Section 72.05-45 Shipping COAST GUARD... Protection § 72.05-45 Paint. (a) An excessive number of coats of paint will be discouraged unless noncombustible paint is used. (b) Nitrocellulose or other highly flammable or noxious fume-producing paints...

  20. 46 CFR 72.05-45 - Paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Paint. 72.05-45 Section 72.05-45 Shipping COAST GUARD... Protection § 72.05-45 Paint. (a) An excessive number of coats of paint will be discouraged unless noncombustible paint is used. (b) Nitrocellulose or other highly flammable or noxious fume-producing paints...

  1. 46 CFR 72.05-45 - Paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Paint. 72.05-45 Section 72.05-45 Shipping COAST GUARD... Protection § 72.05-45 Paint. (a) An excessive number of coats of paint will be discouraged unless noncombustible paint is used. (b) Nitrocellulose or other highly flammable or noxious fume-producing paints...

  2. VdSNF1, the sucrose nonfermenting protein kinase gene of Verticillium dahliae, is required for virulence and expression of genes involved in cell-wall degradation.

    PubMed

    Tzima, Aliki K; Paplomatas, Epaminondas J; Rauyaree, Payungsak; Ospina-Giraldo, Manuel D; Kang, Seogchan

    2011-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae is a soilborne fungus causing vascular wilt in a diverse array of plant species. Its virulence has been attributed, among other factors, to the activity of hydrolytic cell wall-degrading enzymes (CWDE). The sucrose nonfermenting 1 gene (VdSNF1), which regulates catabolic repression, was disrupted in V. dahliae tomato race 1. Expression of CWDE in the resulting mutants was not induced in inductive medium and in simulated xylem fluid medium. Growth of the mutants was significantly reduced when grown with pectin or galactose as a carbon source whereas, with glucose, sucrose, and xylose, they grew similarly to wild-type and ectopic transformants. The mutants were severely impaired in virulence on tomato and eggplant (final disease severity reduced by an average of 87%). Microscopic observation of the infection behavior of a green fluorescent protein (gfp)-labeled VdSNF1 mutant (70ΔSF-gfp1) showed that it was defective in initial colonization of roots. Cross sections of tomato stem at the cotyledonary level showed that 70ΔSF-gfp1 colonized xylem vessels considerably less than the wild-type strain. The wild-type strain heavily colonized xylem vessels and adjacent parenchyma cells. Quantification of fungal biomass in plant tissues further confirmed reduced colonization of roots, stems, and cotyledons by 70ΔSF-gfp1 relative to that by the wild-type strain. PMID:20839958

  3. The use of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes from newly isolated Penicillium ochrochloron Biourge for viscosity reduction in ethanol production with fresh sweet potato tubers as feedstock.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuhong; Jin, Yanling; Shen, Weiliang; Fang, Yang; Zhang, Guohua; Zhao, Hai

    2013-12-12

    Penicillium ochrochloron Biourge, which was isolated from rotten sweet potato, can produce plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) with high viscosity reducing capability for ethanol production using fresh sweet potato tubers as feedstock. The enzyme preparation was characterized by a broad enzyme spectrum including 13 kinds of enzymes with the activity to hydrolyze cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, starch, and protein. The maximum viscosity-reducing capability was observed when the enzyme preparation was obtained after 5 days of fermentation using 20 g/L corncob as a sole carbon source, 4.5 g/L NH4 NO3 as a sole nitrogen source, and an initial medium pH of 6.5. The sweet potato mash treated with the enzyme preparation exhibited much higher fermentation efficiency (92.58%) compared with commercial cellulase (88.06%) and control (83.5%). The enzyme production was then scaled up to 0.5, 5, and 100 L, and the viscosity-reducing rates were found to be 85%, 90%, and 91%, respectively. Thus, P. ochrochloron Biourge displays potential viscosity-reducing capability for ethanol production. PMID:24329940

  4. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron; Küffner, Markus; Scherrer, Nadim C.; Ferreira, Ester S. B.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. 14C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the 14C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated.

  5. Laser assisted graffiti paints removing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, B. Y.; Chikalev, Y. V.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2010-07-01

    It's hard to imagine a modern city view without some drawings and inscriptions, usually called "graffiti". Traditional cleaning methods do not suit modern requirements. Investigation of possibilities of laser assisted paints removing is described in this article. The conditions for removing different paints from different surfaces were defined.

  6. Laser assisted graffiti paints removing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, B. Y.; Chikalev, Y. V.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2011-02-01

    It's hard to imagine a modern city view without some drawings and inscriptions, usually called "graffiti". Traditional cleaning methods do not suit modern requirements. Investigation of possibilities of laser assisted paints removing is described in this article. The conditions for removing different paints from different surfaces were defined.

  7. Delving Deeper: Painting the Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kribs-Zaleta, Christopher M.

    2006-01-01

    Painting the Cube is commonly used in middle and high school mathematical courses as a mathematically rich problem, wherein the exposed faces of the large cubes are painted after being assembled from small unit cubes. The problem perfectly combines algebraic as well as geometrical aspects and helps students to study and understand various linear,…

  8. Additive Transforms Paint into Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tech Traders Inc. sought assistance developing low-cost, highly effective coatings and paints that created useful thermal reflectance and were safe and non-toxic. In cooperation with a group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center., Tech Traders created Insuladd, a powder additive made up of microscopic, inert gas-filled, ceramic microspheres that can be mixed into ordinary interior or exterior paint, allowing the paint to act like a layer of insulation. When the paint dries, this forms a radiant heat barrier, turning the ordinary house paint into heat-reflecting thermal paint. According to Tech Traders, the product works with all types of paints and coatings and will not change the coverage rate, application, or adhesion of the paint. Other useful applications include feed storage silos to help prevent feed spoilage, poultry hatcheries to reduce the summer heat and winter cold effects, and on military vehicles and ships. Tech Traders has continued its connection to the aerospace community by recently providing Lockheed Martin Corporation with one of its thermal products for use on the F-22 Raptor.

  9. Death by paint thinner.

    PubMed

    Collison, Ines; Moorehead, Wayne

    2002-10-01

    A 38-year-old Caucasian male, reportedly missing for four days, was found dead 40 feet down a steep ravine, apparently after jumping down the cliff. Two rectangular cans of paint thinner, 1-qt and 1-gal sizes, were found in his vehicle at the top of the cliff. The autopsy report indicated that the decedent was normal except for the heart and myocardium, the lung parenchyma, and the gastric and esophageal mucosa. The stomach contents revealed a brownish liquid with a nearly clear, thick, oily film, and the small and large bowels showed oily liquid with a strong odor of a petroleum distillate. Toxicological analysis was negative for ethanol and common drugs of abuse. Valproic acid, diphenhydramine, and norsertraline where found in therapeutic concentrations, and sertraline, diazepam, and nordiazepam were found in subtherapeutic levels. Bupropion metabolites were also detected. Static adsorption-elution, commonly used in fire debris analysis, was used to examine the brain, liver, lung, blood, and urine. A liquid-liquid extraction was performed on the vitreous humor. The stomach contents and samples from the paint thinner cans were diluted with carbon disulfide. All but the blood and vitreous contained a medium petroleum distillate. The stomach content was consistent with the liquid from the one-gallon can. Chromatograms suggest differential metabolism and/or distribution among the different organs. PMID:12423013

  10. Studying pigments on painted plaster in Minoan, Roman and early Byzantine Crete. A multi-analytical technique approach.

    PubMed

    Westlake, Polly; Siozos, Panayiotis; Philippidis, Aggelos; Apostolaki, Chryssa; Derham, Brendan; Terlixi, Agni; Perdikatsis, Vasilios; Jones, Richard; Anglos, Demetrios

    2012-02-01

    Wall paintings spanning two millennia of Cretan painting history and technology were analysed in an effort to determine similarities and evolutions of painting materials and technology. A multi-technique approach was employed that combined the use of (a) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman microspectroscopy, based on mobile instrumentation, appropriate for rapid, routine-level object characterization, and (b) non-destructive X-ray diffractometry (XRD), performed directly on the wall painting fragment, which provides detailed information on the minerals constituting the paint. Elemental analysis data obtained through LIBS were compared with molecular and crystal structure information from Raman spectroscopy and XRD. Cross-sections from selected samples were also investigated by means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled to micro-probe analysis and X-ray mapping that enabled identification of several mineral components of the paint confirming the results of the XRD analysis. In parallel, replica wall paintings, created with known pigments and binding media for reference purposes, were examined with optical microscopy and stain tested for organic materials. The overall study shows that the LIBS and Raman techniques offer key advantages, such as instrument mobility and speed of data collection and interpretation that are particularly important when dealing with on-site investigations. Thus, they are capable of providing important compositional information in an effective manner that enables quick surveying of wall paintings and permit targeted sample selection for further analysis by advanced laboratory techniques. PMID:21845529

  11. A comparative analysis of glove permeation resistance to paint stripping formulations.

    PubMed

    Stull, Jeffrey O; Thomas, Richard W; James, Lawrence E

    2002-01-01

    Although there is a wide variety of work gloves available to users of commercial paint stripping products, there are no published studies examining which type of gloves provide the best protection. To address this need, a multiphase study was undertaken to evaluate how several types of gloves resist multichemical-based paint stripping formulations. Due to the wide range of commercial paint stripping formulations available, seven categories of surrogate paint stripper formulations were created to evaluate glove performance initially. Twenty different glove types were identified for initial evaluation. Degradation resistance screening was carried out for each glove style and paint stripping formulation. Screening results were used to identify those glove styles least affected by the surrogate paint strippers. Those gloves were then evaluated for their resistance to permeation using continuous contact testing based on ASTM Test Method F 739. Glove styles showing extensive permeation with early breakthrough were then evaluated to see how they performed with only intermittent contact with the surrogate paint strippers using a modified form of ASTM Test Method F 1383. These results were used to select glove styles to be tested using commercially available paint stripping products. Gloves made of plastic laminate and butyl rubber were the most effective against the majority of paint strippers. More glove styles resisted permeation by N-methylpyrrolidone and dibasic ester-based paint strippers than conventional solvent products such as methylene chloride, methanol, isopropanol, acetone, and toluene. The study also found that decreased contact time caused relatively little change in permeation resistance and that the surrogate paint stripper data did not always accurately predict resistance to the commercial paint stripper formulations. PMID:11843429

  12. Interior building details of Building A, Room A002: plastered painted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, Room A-002: plastered painted west brick wall, four light double-hung wood window with brick arch lintel, east plastered wall (could be granite), wood ceiling; northerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  13. Application of Pressure Sensitive Paint in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Carbonaro, Mario; Zemsch, Stephan

    1995-01-01

    It is well known in the aerodynamic field that pressure distribution measurement over the surface of an aircraft model is a problem in experimental aerodynamics. For one thing, a continuous pressure map can not be obtained with the current experimental methods since they are discrete. Therefore, interpolation or CFD methods must be used for a more complete picture of the phenomenon under study. For this study, a new technique was investigated which would provide a continuous pressure distribution over the surface under consideration. The new method is pressure sensitive paint. When pressure sensitive paint is applied to an aerodynamic surface and placed in an operating wind-tunnel under appropriate lighting, the molecules luminesce as a function of the local pressure of oxygen over the surface of interest during aerodynamic flow. The resulting image will be brightest in the areas of low pressure (low oxygen concentration), and less intense in the areas of high pressure (where oxygen is most abundant on the surface). The objective of this investigation was to use pressure sensitive paint samples from McDonnell Douglas (MDD) for calibration purpose in order to assess the response of the paint under appropriate lighting and to use the samples over a flat plate/conical fin mounted at 75 degrees from the center of the plate in order to study the shock/boundary layer interaction at Mach 6 in the Von Karman wind-tunnel. From the result obtained it was concluded that temperature significantly affects the response of the paint and should be given the uppermost attention in the case of hypersonic flows. Also, it was found that past a certain temperature threshold, the paint intensity degradation became irreversible. The comparison between the pressure tap measurement and the pressure sensitive paint showed the right trend. However, there exists a shift when it comes to the actual value. Therefore, further investigation is under way to find the cause of the shift.

  14. Electrically Conductive Paints for Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.; Wolf, R. E.; Ray, C.

    1977-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop and test electrically conductive paint coatings for spacecraft. A wide variety of organic and inorganic coatings were formulated using conductive binders, conductive pigments, and similar approaches. Z-93, IITRI's standard specification inorganic thermal control coating, exhibits good electrical properties and is a very space-stable coating system. Several coatings based on a conductive pigment (antimony-doped tin oxide) in silicone and silicate binders offer considerable promise. Paint systems using commercially available conductive polymers also appear to be of interest, but will require substantial development. Evaluations were made based on electrical conductivity, paint physical properties, and the stability of spectral reflectance in space environment testing.

  15. 7 CFR 3201.106 - Paint removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Paint removers. 3201.106 Section 3201.106 Agriculture... Items § 3201.106 Paint removers. (a) Definition. Products formulated to loosen and remove paint from painted surfaces. (b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have...

  16. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When..., paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins must be packaged as follows: (1) As prescribed...

  17. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When..., paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins must be packaged as follows: (1) As prescribed...

  18. Fluidized bed paint stripping and sludge burning

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, J.; Staffin, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    High volume automated painting, as encountered in the painting of automobiles and appliances, requires that the item being painted be positioned in a conveying frame or fixture so that the painting machine or robot achieves a reproducible, high quality paint job. These conveying frames or fixtures are extensive fabrications carefully designed to position and support the item being painted. In the case of automotive painting, they are rather large and involve substantial weights, because they must be capable of supporting and positioning auto bodies and large sub-assemblies.

  19. KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A volunteer for Days of Caring '99 prepares a light fixture before painting the walls in the hallway at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  20. Acute effect of indoor exposure to paint containing bis(tributyltin) oxide--Wisconsin, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-03

    In January 1991, a woman in Wisconsin contacted her local public health department to report that she and her two children had become ill after her landlord painted the walls and ceilings of two rooms of her apartment. Reported symptoms included a burning sensation in the nose and forehead, headache, nose bleed, cough, loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. The woman, who was in the third trimester of pregnancy, also complained of a persistent odor from the paint and provided an empty bottle of a paint additive used for mildew control. The label indicated that this product contained 25% bis(tributyltin) oxide (TBTO) as its only active ingredient.

  1. Studying Landforms through Landscape Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, William H.

    1981-01-01

    Using three specific works of art, the author demonstrates how a study of selected landscape paintings can be integrated into units on landforms in secondary school earth science and general science courses. (Author/SJL)

  2. Farmers' paintings promote family planning.

    PubMed

    1996-06-01

    Longyan Prefecture in West Fujian has a long and noble tradition of folk painting. The local authorities have made use of all forms of art, including folk painting, to promote the implementation of the family planning program. Folk painters in Longyan Prefecture have fully displayed their talent in producing numerous paintings to increase the population awareness of the public, depict people's keenness to respond to calls by the government for practicing family planning, and show the progress they have made in integrating family planning with economic development in rural areas. Most painters are farmers, while some are grassroots government officials working in towns and townships. They applied this ancient form of art to serving the great cause of controlling population growth and improving the quality of life in the country. Selected paintings were exhibited first in Fujian Province and then in Beijing, and have won several awards. Some of them were shown in Britain, America, Denmark, and the Philippines. PMID:12291692

  3. Thermal characterization of intumescent fire retardant paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, L.; Bozzoli, F.; Bochicchio, G.; Tessadri, B.; Rainieri, S.; Pagliarini, G.

    2014-11-01

    Intumescent coatings are now the dominant passive fire protection materials used in industrial and commercial buildings. The coatings, which usually are composed of inorganic components contained in a polymer matrix, are inert at low temperatures and at higher temperatures, they expand and degrade to provide a charred layer of low conductivity materials. The charred layer, which acts as thermal barrier, will prevent heat transfer to underlying substrate. The thermal properties of intumescent paints are often unknown and difficult to be estimated since they vary significantly during the expansion process; for this reason the fire resistance validation of a commercial coatings is based on expensive, large-scale methods where each commercial coating-beam configuration has to be tested one by one. Adopting, instead, approaches based on a thermal modelling of the intumescent paint coating could provide an helpful tool to make easier the test procedure and to support the design of fire resistant structures as well. The present investigation is focused on the assessment of a methodology intended to the restoration of the equivalent thermal conductivity of the intumescent layer produced under the action of a cone calorimetric apparatus. The estimation procedure is based on the inverse heat conduction problem approach, where the temperature values measured at some locations inside the layer during the expansion process are used as input known data. The results point out that the equivalent thermal conductivity reached by the intumescent material at the end of the expansion process significantly depends on the temperature while the initial thickness of the paint does not seem to have much effect.

  4. Casting Light on the Darkening of Colors in Historical Paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Pieve, F.; Hogan, C.; Lamoen, D.; Verbeeck, J.; Vanmeert, F.; Radepont, M.; Cotte, M.; Janssens, K.; Gonze, X.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    2013-11-01

    The degradation of colors in historical paintings affects our cultural heritage in both museums and archeological sites. Despite intensive experimental studies, the origin of darkening of one of the most ancient pigments known to humankind, vermilion (α-HgS), remains unexplained. Here, by combining many-body theoretical spectroscopy and high-resolution microscopic x-ray diffraction, we clarify the composition of the damaged paint work and demonstrate possible physicochemical processes, induced by illumination and exposure to humidity and air, that cause photoactivation of the original pigment and the degradation of the secondary minerals. The results suggest a new path for the darkening process which was never considered by previous studies and prompt a critical examination of their findings.

  5. Single and multiplexed immunoassays for the chemiluminescent imaging detection of animal glues in historical paint cross-sections.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, G; Dolci, L S; Guardigli, M; Zangheri, M; Prati, S; Mazzeo, R; Roda, A

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of the organic components in a complex, multilayered paint structure is fundamental for studying painting techniques and for authentication and restoration purposes. Proteinaceous materials, such as animal glue, are of particular importance since they are widely used as binders, adhesives and for gilding. Even though proteins are usually detected by chromatographic and proteomic techniques, immunological methods represent an alternative powerful approach to protein analysis thanks to the high specificity of antigen-antibody reactions. Our previous studies demonstrated that ovalbumin and casein could be localized in paint cross-sections with high sensitivity and good spatial resolution (i.e. within the single painting layers) by using chemiluminescent (CL) immunochemical microscope imaging. In the present research work, we describe for the first time the immunolocalization of collagen (the main protein of animal glue) in paint cross-sections by CL imaging microscopy. Two different analytical protocols have been developed, allowing either the detection of collagen or the simultaneous detection of collagen and ovalbumin in the same paint sample. The assays were used to detect collagen and ovalbumin in cross-sections from model samples and historical paintings (a wall painting dated to 1773-1774 and a painted wood panel of the Renaissance period) in order to achieve information on paint techniques and past restoration interventions. PMID:23064674

  6. Painted supported lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Florin, E.-L.; Gaub, H. E.

    1993-01-01

    We report herein measurements on a novel type of supported lipid films, which we call painted supported membranes (PSM). These membranes are formed in a self-assembly process on alkylated gold films from an organic solution. The formation process was investigated with surface plasmon resonance microscopy. The optical and electrical properties of the films were determined for various types of lipids and as a function of temperature by means of cyclic voltammetry and potential relaxation after charge injection. We could show that these films exhibit an extraordinarily high specific resistivity which, depending on the lipid, may be as high as 109 ohm/cm2. We could also show that due to this low conductivity, an electrical polarization across the PSM relaxes with characteristic time constants of up to 20 min. The electrical properties together with their high mechanical stability and accessibility to surface sensitive techniques make these films well suitable model membranes for optical and electrical investigations. Examples for such applications are given in the subsequent article by Seifert et al. ImagesFIGURE 3FIGURE 4 PMID:19431873

  7. Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Robert L.; Cavallo, James

    1997-09-25

    Existing Housing - Much of the older multifamily housing stock in the United States includes units in structures with uninsulated masonry walls. Included in this stock are two- and three-story walk-up apartments, larger apartment complexes, and public housing (both high- rise and townhouse). This older multifamily housing has seen years of heavy use that may have left the plaster wall marred or damaged. Long- term building settlement or movement may have cracked the plaster, sometimes severely. Moisture from invented kitchens and baths may have caused condensation on uninsulated exterior walls. At best this condensation has left stains on the paint or wallpaper. At worst it has supported mold and mildew growth, fouling the air and creating unhealthy living conditions. Deteriorating plaster and flaking paint also result from wet walls. The presence of flaking, lead-based paint in older (pre-1978) housing is a major public health concern. Children can suffer permanent mental handicaps and psychological disorders if they are subjected to elevated levels of lead, while adults can suffer hypertension and other maladies. Studies have found that, in some urban communities with older housing stocks, over 35% of children tested have elevated blood lead levels (Hastings, et al.: 1997). Nationally, nearly 22% of black, non-hispanic children living in pre-1946 housing were found to have elevated levels of lead in their blood (MWWR Article: February 21,1997). The deterioration of many of these walls is to the point that lead can freely enter the living space.

  8. [Spectral analysis of green pigments of painting and colored drawing in northern Chinese ancient architectures].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Qin; Yan, Jing; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Tao

    2010-02-01

    It is important to identify pigments of painting and colored drawing in ancient architectures in order to restore and conserve them. The components of green pigments were detected with X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX). Twenty-seven samples were collected from painting and colored drawing in northern Chinese ancient architectures in Beijing, Shanxi province and Gansu province. The experiment results showed that emerald green [CuCH3COO]2 x Cu(AsO2)2], a complex of copper aceto-arsenite pigment, had been used as the colored component in fifteen samples, whereas organic materials synthesized in the rest. However, in all samples there were no malachite and atacamite, green pigments commonly used in ancient time a long time ago. These two pigments have been found in Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army and the wall paintings at Mogao Grettoes, Dunhuang, and some other famous wall paintings and color pottery figurines. However, emerald green was used many years later. It was reported that emerald green was synthesized by Germany in 1814 and had been widely used in China as watercolor on pith paper works and on scroll paintings since the 1850s. Because painting and colored drawing in ancient architectures stands outside, under sunlight and rain, it must be repaired and repainted in less than fifty years. Therefore, it is not surprising that emerald green was used in them. In recent years, artificial organic materials are increasingly used in painting and colored drawing in ancient architectures. From experiments it was also showed that in the same recolored painting and colored drawing, organic materials are usually in the later layers, but emerald green is in the earlier layers. This work supplies a lot of data for the purpose of selecting restoration materials and identifying painting and colored drawing in ancient architectures with a new method. PMID:20384144

  9. 14. INTERIOR DETAIL, FIRST FLOOR OF ADDITION AT SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR DETAIL, FIRST FLOOR OF ADDITION AT SOUTH WALL OF TOILET ROOM, SHOWING ORNATE PAINTED RADIATOR AND TONGUE AND GROOVE WAINSCOTING. - Mills Hall, Mills College, 5000 MacArthur Boulevard, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  10. Ultraviolet-Induced Mirror Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T. T.; Cleland, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent tests of second-surface mirrors show that ultraviolet radiation penetrates glass and metalized zone and impinges upon backing paint. According to report, many backing materials are degraded by ultraviolet radiation. Mirror corrosion is a serious problem in solar-energy collection systems. Effects of UV on polymeric materials have been studied, and in general, all are degraded by UV. Polymers most resistant to UV radiation are polyimides.