Science.gov

Sample records for dehydration condensation reaction

  1. Prebiotic condensation reactions using cyanamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, E.; Nooner, D. W.; Eichberg, J.; Epps, D. E.; Oro, J.

    1978-01-01

    Condensation reactions in cyanamide, 4-amino-5-imidazole-carboxamide and cyanamide, imidazole systems under dehydrating conditions at moderate temperatures (60 to 100 deg C) were investigated. The cyanamide, imidazole system was used for synthesis of palmitoylglycerols from ammonium palmitate and glycerol. With the addition of deoxythymidine to the former system, P1, P2-dideoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate was obtained; the same cyanamide, 4-amino-5-imidazole-carboxamide system was used to synthesize deoxythymidine oligonucleotides using deoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate and deoxythymidine 5 prime-triphosphate, and peptides using glycine, phenylalanine or isoleucine with adenosine 5 prime-triphosphate. The pH requirements for these reactions make their prebiotic significance questionable; however, it is conceivable that they could occur in stable pockets of low interlayer acidity in a clay such as montmorillonite.

  2. Kinetics of hydration-dehydration reactions considered as solid transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Stanish, M.A.; Perlmutter, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed for the dehydration-rehydration process in solid inorganic salts and model rate equations are derived and applied to the observed behavior of potassium carbonate. Quantitative expressions for the effect of pressure on the reaction rates are derived using basic principles from nucleation and heterogeneous phase transformation theory. Model equation predictions agree with experimental dehydration and rehydration rate data at all but extreme pressures. The basic rate equation is also used to interpret the data of Eckhardt and Flanagan (1964) for the effect of pressure on the dehydration of manganous formate dihydrate. The mechanism on which the model equations are based is also consistent with the observed effects of cycling and of high temperatur pretreatment on the K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ rehydration rate.

  3. Effect of Dehydration Reaction on Serpentinite Deformation in Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinciguerra, S.; Trovato, C.; Meredith, P. G.; Benson, P. M.; Hirose, T.; Bystricky, M.; Stünitz, H.; Kunze, K.

    2003-12-01

    Dehydration of serpentine to olivine, talc and water during deformation is critical for understanding the possible localization of deformation into shear zones and the generation of earthquakes along subduction zones. In order to investigate the effect of the dehydration reaction on the strength and ductility of serpentinite, torsion experiments were performed using a Paterson high PT torsion rig at constant shear strain rates of 10-4 to 10-5 s-1, temperatures of 550 to 750 ° C and a confining pressure of 300 MPa, to local shear strains up to ? = 3. We deformed two types of serpentinite: antigorite from Val Malenco, Italy, a high-temperature phase of serpentine (stable at T <500 ° C), and lizardite from Elba, Italy, a low-temperature phase of serpentine (stable at T <400 ° C). Most of the samples were shaped in dog-bone geometry with a central hole along their axial direction which acted as a fluid conduit, enabling an easy escape for any released fluid during the dehydration reaction. We also deformed solid bone-shaped specimens to compare the mechanical behavior of solid and hollow specimens. In both cases, porous alumina spacers were placed on both end sides of specimen and led to the atmosphere through the pore pressure line. Thus our experiments were performed under drained conditions. Antigorite deformed in the semi-brittle field at the run conditions. Visible faults formed probably due to reaction-induced fracturing, and the stress started to drop just after the initial peak stress ( ˜350 MPa at 650 to 700 ° C and ˜280 MPa at 750 ° C). Highly comminuted grains with various sizes along the faults were identified as partially dehydrated antigorite (H2O ˜6 wt%) at 650 ° C and olivine and talc at >700 ° C. Mechanical behavior after the peak stress is thought to occur by cataclastic flow, possibly assisted by diffusion mass transfer processes of these fine-grained reactant minerals. We have also investigated the effect of pre-heating on the strength of antigorite. The peak strength of a sample pre-heated at 750 ° C for 3 hr and then deformed at 700 ° C is 70 MPa lower than a sample deformed directly at 700 ° C. This stress reduction occurred due to the presence of a mechanically weaker reaction product (talc) rather than elevated pore pressure because the sample was deformed under completely drained conditions. By contrast, a solid sample was weaker than hollow ones by ˜100 MPa, mainly due to low permeability of the serpentinite. Excess fluid pressure in solid specimens leads to a drop in the effective pressure and appears to have enhanced the dehydration reaction along micro-fractures. Our data shows that dehydration weakening of serpentinite is caused not as much because of excess pore pressure but more because of the weaker mineral assemblages from the reaction. In contrast to semi-brittle faulting in antigorite, deformation of lizardite at 550 ° C to a bulk shear strain of 0.9 was widely distributed, showing typical ductile microstructures such as boudinage and S-C fabric. A well developed secondary foliation (C-plane) and strong lattice preferred orientations of lizardite grains were observed close to the localized shear zones. After the initial peak stress, steady stress values of 250 MPa were measured. We intend to focus on how the localized zones evolve and how the mechanical response changes with increasing shear strain during the reaction.

  4. High-resolution models of subduction zones: Implications for mineral dehydration reactions and the transport of water

    E-print Network

    van Keken, Peter

    High-resolution models of subduction zones: Implications for mineral dehydration reactions volcanism is intimately linked to mineral dehydration reactions in the subducting oceanic mantle, crust conflicting estimates of slab temperature in subduction zones that are characterized by rapid subduction

  5. Thermal Consolidation with Chemical Dehydration Reactions: Pore Pressure Generation in the Slow Slip Region of Subduction Zones

    E-print Network

    Rempel, Alan W.

    Thermal Consolidation with Chemical Dehydration Reactions: Pore Pressure Generation in the Slow of fluids must be attributed to chemical dehydration reactions. Here we model the condsolidation of low source of fluids to the plate interface must be attributed to chemical dehydration reactions in the sub

  6. Dehydration of cyclohexanol as a test reaction for zeolite acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Karge, H.G.; Kosters, H.; Wada, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Dehydration of cyclohexanol was investigated using a fixed-bed continuous flow reactor with acidic mordenite-type, clinoptilolite-type, and faujasite-type (Y) zeolites as catalysts. The surface acidity of the catalysts employed was studied by IR using pyridine or 2,6-di-tert. butylpyridine as probe molecules. A correlation between the acidity and the rates of dehydration was clearly shown.

  7. (100) facets of ?-Al2O3: the active surfaces for alcohol dehydration reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Mei, Donghai; Peden, Charles HF; Rousseau, Roger J.; Szanyi, Janos

    2011-05-01

    Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ethanol, and methanol dehydration reaction were studied on ?-Al2O3 in order to identify the catalytic active sites for alcohol dehydration reactions. Two high temperature (> 473 K) desorption features were observed following ethanol adsorption. Samples calcined at T?473 K displayed a desorption feature in the 523-533 K temperature range, while those calcined at T ? 673 K showed a single desorption feature at 498 K. The switch from the high to low temperature ethanol desorption correlated well with the dehydroxylation of the (100) facets of ?-Al2O3 that was predicted at 550 K DFT calculations. Theoretical DFT simulations of the mechanism of dehydration. on clean and hydroxylated ?-Al2O3(100) surfaces, find that a concerted elimination of ethylene from an ethanol molecule chemisorbed at an Al3+ pentacoordinated site is the rate limiting step for catalytic cycle on both surfaces. Furthermore, titration of the pentacoordinate Al3+ sites on the (100) facets of ?-Al2O3 by BaO completely turned off the methanol dehydration reaction activity. These results unambiguously demonstrate that only the (100) facets on ?-Al2O3 are the catalytic active surfaces for alcohol dehydration.

  8. Will water act as a photocatalyst for cluster phase chemical reactions? Vibrational overtone-induced dehydration reaction of methanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Zeb C.; Takahashi, Kaito; Skodje, Rex T.; Vaida, Veronica

    2012-04-28

    The possibility of water catalysis in the vibrational overtone-induced dehydration reaction of methanediol is investigated using ab initio dynamical simulations of small methanediol-water clusters. Quantum chemistry calculations employing clusters with one or two water molecules reveal that the barrier to dehydration is lowered by over 20 kcal/mol because of hydrogen-bonding at the transition state. Nevertheless, the simulations of the reaction dynamics following OH-stretch excitation show little catalytic effect of water and, in some cases, even show an anticatalytic effect. The quantum yield for the dehydration reaction exhibits a delayed threshold effect where reaction does not occur until the photon energy is far above the barrier energy. Unlike thermally induced reactions, it is argued that competition between reaction and the irreversible dissipation of photon energy may be expected to raise the dynamical threshold for the reaction above the transition state energy. It is concluded that quantum chemistry calculations showing barrier lowering are not sufficient to infer water catalysis in photochemical reactions, which instead require dynamical modeling.

  9. The influence of dehydration reactions on the mechanical behavior of antigorite: Implications for understanding strain localization and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, G.; Chernak, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    We conducted a series of deformation experiments to further investigate the role dehydration embrittlement on the frictional behavior and deformation style of serpentintes. Our previous experiments on antigorite show that deformation localizes within its stability field and suggest that syn-deformational antigorite dehydration does not lead directly to stick-slip instabilities (Chernak and Hirth, 2010; 2011), but may promote slow, stable slip events. Motivated by these results, we conducted additional axial compression deformation experiments on antigorite serpentinite at temperatures of 400 to 700°C and pressures of 0.5 to 1.5 GPa to investigate deformation behavior at conditions near the thermal stability of antigorite. All experiments are conducted under un-drained conditions. We find that deformation localizes in all samples except those deformed at 700°C and 1.5 GPa. Distributed behavior may be promoted by (a) the lack of volume change during dehydration and/or (b) an inhibition of grain-scale "over-pressure" due to the high permeability associated with the large extent of reaction that occurs prior to deformation. Sample strength decreases after only ~1% reaction, indicating that initial weakening results from a reduction in effective pressure owing to fluid release at the onset of dehydration. The generation of porosity and fine-grained reaction products result in further weakening after greater extents of reaction. At pressure/temperature conditions near the thermal limit of antigorite stability we observe the onset of dehydration and weakening associated with dilatant crack growth in antigorite. We will discuss the implications of these results for understanding mechanisms of intermediate depth seismicity and the role of dehydration reactions in promoting strain localization.

  10. Energetics of Electron-Transfer Reactions in Soft Condensed

    E-print Network

    Matyushov, Dmitry

    parameters in addition to G0 in order to connect the activation barrier to the reaction Gibbs energyEnergetics of Electron-Transfer Reactions in Soft Condensed Media DMITRY V. MATYUSHOV Department in the non- Arrhenius reaction kinetics. Solvent dynamics make a particularly strong impact on the activation

  11. POLLUTION PREVENTION IN INDUSTRIAL CONDENSATION REACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to develop heterogeneous acid-base catalysts to increase the economic and environmental performance of the current homogeneous catalysts used to make industrially important condensation products. Such products include methyl isobutyl ketone ...

  12. A DFT based equilibrium study on the hydrolysis and the dehydration reactions of MgCl2 hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeets, B.; Iype, E.; Nedea, S. V.; Zondag, H. A.; Rindt, C. C. M.

    2013-09-01

    Magnesium chloride hydrates are characterized as promising energy storage materials in the built-environment. During the dehydration of these materials, there are chances for the release of harmful HCl gas, which can potentially damage the material as well as the equipment. Hydrolysis reactions in magnesium chloride hydrates are subject of study for industrial applications. However, the information about the possibility of hydrolysis reaction, and its preference over dehydration in energy storage systems is still ambiguous at the operating conditions in a seasonal heat storage system. A density functional theory level study is performed to determine molecular structures, charges, and harmonic frequencies in order to identify the formation of HCl at the operating temperatures in an energy storage system. The preference of hydrolysis over dehydration is quantified by applying thermodynamic equilibrium principles by calculating Gibbs free energies of the hydrated magnesium chloride molecules. The molecular structures of the hydrates (n = 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6) of MgCl2 are investigated to understand the stability and symmetry of these molecules. The structures are found to be noncomplex with almost no meta-stable isomers, which may be related to the faster kinetics observed in the hydration of chlorides compared to sulfates. Also, the frequency spectra of these molecules are calculated, which in turn are used to calculate the changes in Gibbs free energy of dehydration and hydrolysis reactions. From these calculations, it is found that the probability for hydrolysis to occur is larger for lower hydrates. Hydrolysis occurring from the hexa-, tetra-, and di-hydrate is only possible when the temperature is increased too fast to a very high value. In the case of the mono-hydrate, hydrolysis may become favorable at high water vapor pressure and at low HCl pressure.

  13. Investigation of condensed and early stage gas phase hypergolic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Jacob Daniel

    Traditional hypergolic propellant combinations, such as those used on the space shuttle orbital maneuvering system first flown in 1981, feature hydrazine based fuels and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) based oxidizers. Despite the long history of hypergolic propellant implementation, the processes that govern hypergolic ignition are not well understood. In order to achieve ignition, condensed phase fuel and oxidizer must undergo simultaneous physical mixing and chemical reaction. This process generates heat, intermediate condensed phase species, and gas phase species, which then may continue to react and generate more heat until ignition is achieved. The process is not well understood because condensed and gas phase reactions occur rapidly, typically in less than 200 ?s, on much faster timescales than traditional diagnostic methods can observe. A detailed understanding of even the gas phase chemistry is lacking, but is critical for model development. Initial research has provided confidence that a study of condensed phase hypergolic reactions is useful and possible. Results obtained using an impinging jet apparatus have shown a critical residence time of 0.3 ms is required for the reaction between monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and red fuming nitric acid (RFNA, ~85% HNO3 + 15% N2O4) to achieve conditions favorable for ignition. This critical residence time spans the time required for liquid phase reactions to occur at the fuel/oxidizer interface and can give some insight into the reaction rates for this propellant combination. Experiments performed in a forced mixing constant volume reactor have demonstrated that the chamber pressurization rate for MMH/RFNA can be significantly reduced by diluting the MMH with deionized water. This result indicates that propellant dilution can slow the chemical reaction rates to occur over observable time scales. The research described in this document consists of two efforts that contribute knowledge to the propulsion community regarding the hypergolic liquid propellant combination of MMH and RFNA or pure nitric acid. The first and most important effort focuses on furthering the understanding of condensed phase reactions between MMH and nitric acid. To accomplish this goal diluted MMH and nitric acid were studied in a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. By tracking the generation or destruction of specific chemical species in the reacting fluid we can measure the reaction progress as a function of reactant concentration and temperature. This work provides the propulsion community with a quantitative global condensed phase reaction rate equation for MMH/nitric acid. The second effort focuses on improving understanding the recently proposed gas phase hypergolic reaction mechanisms using a streak camera based ultraviolet and visible spectrometer. The time resolution on the streak camera system allows for detailed investigation of the pre-ignition and early stage gas phase species present during the reaction between MMH and RFNA.

  14. Insight into the Mechanism of the Pechmann Condensation Reaction Using NMR.

    PubMed

    Tyndall, Stephen; Wong, Koon Fai; VanAlstine-Parris, Melissa A

    2015-09-18

    The mechanism of the Pechmann condensation is still controversial despite the technological and biochemical importance of coumarins. Here, we present NMR evidence for a mechanism featuring the sequence of initial electrophilic aromatic substitution followed by transesterification and a final dehydration. This mechanism has been convincingly defined and supported by the temporal evolution of two key intermediates which could be purified and identified. PMID:26332334

  15. Solvent-dependent reactions for the synthesis of ?-keto-benzo-?-sultone scaffolds via DBU-catalyzed O-sulfonylation/intramolecular Baylis-Hillman/1,3-H shift or dehydration tandem sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghandi, Mehdi; Bozcheloei, Abolfazl Hasani; Nazari, Seyed Hadi; Sadeghzadeh, Masoud

    2011-12-16

    We have developed a solvent-dependent method for the synthesis of novel benzo-?-sultone scaffolds. A variety of benzylbenzo[e][1,2]oxathiin-4(3H)-one-2,2-dioxides were obtained in high yields in DMF using a one-pot, DBU-catalyzed condensation of 2-hydroxybenzaldehydes with a number of (E)-2-phenylethenesulfonyl chlorides. On the other hand, the initially prepared 2-formylphenyl-(E)-2-phenylethenesulfonate derivatives underwent DBU-catalyzed reactions to a series of 3-[methoxy(phenyl)methyl]benzo[e][1,2]oxathiine-2,2-dioxides in moderate to good yields in MeOH. These reactions presumably proceed via DBU-catalyzed O-sulfonylation/intramolecular Baylis-Hillman/1,3-H shift or dehydration tandem sequences, respectively. PMID:22053779

  16. Forward Analyses of Dehydration Reactions in Mafic Rocks Along the P-T Trajectories of the Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwatani, T.; Okamoto, A.; Toriumi, M.

    2005-12-01

    Fluids in the subduction zone play an important role in magmatism, metamorphism, and mechanical processes involving seismic activity. Additionally, recent geophysical researches found low-frequency tremors which may be related to the movement of fluid (Obara, 2002) and a zone of high Poisson_fs ratio which reflects high pore fluid pressure (Kodaira et al.,2004) in the Southwest Japan fore-arc. It is widely accepted that these fluids are supplied by the dehydration of hydrous metamorphic minerals in the subducting oceanic plate. Although many previous studies attempted to estimate the water content of the subducting oceanic crust experimentally and theoretically (e.g., Schmidt and Poli, 1998; Hacker et al., 2003), there have been no studies which quantify the continuous dehydration reactions in detail. The aim of this study is to quantify the progress of the continuous dehydration reactions of mafic rocks in the condition of greenschist facies, corresponding to low-intermediate depth (10-50km) of warm subduction zone. We use the differential thermodynamics (Spear 1993) which include mass balance to predict the continuous metamorphic reaction history of mafic rocks along the P-T trajectory of the subducting slab. With fixed bulk chemical composition the thermodynamic system is divariant, as specified in Duhem_fs theorem. In differential thermodynamics, applying a series of changes in pressure and temperature (?P and ?T, respectively) from initial conditions (P0, T0, X0s, M0s), we can trace ?Xs and ?Ms, that is, the progress (history) of the metamorphic reactions along the arbitrary P-T trajectory (Thermodynamic forward modeling). According to Okamoto and Toriumi, 2001, we modeled the greenschist/ blueschist/ (epidote -) amphibolite assemblage of mafic rocks, which consist of the following phases: Amphibole ± Epidote ± Chlorite + Plagioclase + Quartz + Fluid (H2O), in the system of Na2O - CaO - MgO - FeO - Fe2O3 - Al2O3 - SiO2 - H2O. The reference compositions and modes of minerals were assumed according to the natural sample of greenschist which has MORB-like bulk composition (Hacker et al. 2003). The reference temperature and pressure were set to be 300°C, 0.3GPa. Calculations were performed along the P-T paths of the Southwest Japan (4MPa/°C) and the Cape Mendocino (the North California, 2MPa/°C) predicted by Yamasaki and Seno, 2003. As a result, the water production rates have the peak depths at the boundary between the greenschist facies and the epidote-amphibolite facies in the Southwest Japan, and at the boundary between the greenschist facies and the amphibolite facies in the Cape Mendocino, respectively. Chlorite decomposition is the main dehydration reaction. These peak depths correspond to the zone of low frequency tremors, high Poisson_fs ratio and active seismicity (30-50km) in the Southwest Japan, and active seismicity (10-20km) in the Cape Mendocino, respectively.

  17. Onion dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.; Lienau, P.J.

    1994-07-01

    This article describes the onion dehydration process as generally practiced in the United States. The actual processing steps from harvest to final product, and geothermal applications for power production and energy requirements in the dehydration industry are discussed. A design of a dehydrator converted to geothermal energy usage is included.

  18. Effects of novel supports on the physical and catalytic properties of tungstophosphoric acid for alcohol dehydration reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Jose E.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Jian Zhi; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles HF

    2008-08-17

    The catalytic behavior of tungstophosphoric acid supported on modified mesoporous silica materials for the dehydration of 2-butanol and methanol was studied. Specifically, the supports evaluated here consisted of unmodified MCM-41 and SBA-15 mesoporous silicas, and these materials coated with sub-monolayer quantities of alumina, titania, and zirconia. UV-Vis DRS and 31P-NMR spectroscopy showed that the tungstophosphoric acid species retained their chemical identity in the synthesized supported form, although the spectra were influenced by the specific support material used. In addition, their acidic properties were evaluated using temperature programmed oxidation of isopropyl amine. The differences in reaction rates between the samples reflect both the diversity in the amount of Brønsted acidic sites available for catalysis and dissimilarities in coking resistance. These two characteristics depend, in turn, on the type of support modifier used to prepare the catalyst.

  19. Exponential enhancement of nuclear reactions in a condensed matter environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchiev, M.Yu.; Altshuler, B.L.; Flambaum, V.V.

    2004-10-01

    A mechanism that uses the environment to increase the probability of the nuclear reaction when a beam of accelerated nuclei collides with a target nucleus implanted in condensed matter is suggested. The effect considered is exponentially large for low collision energies. For t+p collision the mechanism becomes effective when the energy of the projectile tritium is below 1 KeV per nucleon. The gain in probability of the nuclear reaction is due to a redistribution of energy and momentum of the projectile in several 'preliminary' elastic collisions with the target nucleus and the environmental nuclei in such a way that the final inelastic projectile-target collision takes place with larger relative velocity, which is accompanied by the corresponding decrease of the center of mass energy. This increase of the relative velocity exponentially increases the penetration through the Coulomb barrier.

  20. Toward Accurate Potentials for Condensed-Phase Chemical Reactions: Electrostatically Embedded Multi-Configuration Molecular Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Truhlar, Donald G

    Toward Accurate Potentials for Condensed-Phase Chemical Reactions: Electrostatically Embedded Multi and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods have provided powerful means for studying chemical reactions be used in QM/MM methods. The result is a key step toward studying chemical reactions in condensed phases

  1. The dynamics of serpentinite dehydration reactions in subduction zones: Constrains from the Cerro del Almirez ultramafic massif (Betic Cordillera, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilissen, Nicole; Garrido, Carlos J.; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Arc volcanism, earthquakes and subduction dynamics are controlled by fluids from downgoing slabs and their effect on the melting and rheology of the overlying mantle wedge. High pressure dehydration of serpentinite in the slab and the subduction channel is considered as one of the main sources of fluids in subduction zones. Even though this metamorphic reaction is essential in subduction activities, the behavior of the fluids, the kinetics and thermodynamics during the breakdown reaction are still poorly understood. The Cerro del Almirez (Nevado-Filábride Complex, Betic Cordillera, SE Spain) uniquely preserves the dehydration front from antigorite serpentinite to chlorite-harzburgite and constitutes a unique natural laboratory to investigate high-pressure dehydration of serpentinite. This reaction occurred in a subduction setting releasing up to 13 wt% of water, contributing significantly to the supply of fluids to the overlying mantle wedge. A key to the understanding of the metamorphic conditions prevailing during serpentinite dehydration is to study the two prominent textures -granofels and spinifex-like chlorite harzburgite- occurring in this reaction product. The detailed texture differences in the Chl-harzburgite can provide insights into diverse kinetic and thermodynamic conditions of this dehydration reaction due to variations in effective pressure and drainage conditions. It has been proposed that difference in overpressure (P') and deviation from growth equilibrium, i.e. overstepping, is responsible for these two types of textures [Padrón-Navarta et al., 2011]. The magnitude and duration of P' is highly dependent on dehydration kinetics [Connolly, 1997]. The fast pressure drop, with spinifex-texture as a product, can be linked to draining events expected after hydrofracturing, which are recorded in grain size reduction zones in this massif. According to this hypothesis, mapping of textural variation in Chl-harzburgite might be used as a proxy to investigate the hydrodynamics of serpentinite dehydration reaction. During an intensive detailed field mapping of a well-exposed area of ca. 0.87 km2 in the W-SW part of the massif, we mapped textural variations of Chl-harzburgite every three to ten meters. Granofels and spinifex lenses occur within scales of decimetres to decametres. These spatial scale constrains can be linked to temporal scales of the reactions and to the spatial and temporal variation of fluid release during dehydration of serpentinite. REFERENCES Connolly, J. A. D. (1997), Devolatilization-generated fluid pressure and deformation-propagated fluid flow during prograde regional metamorphism, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 102(B8), 18149-18173, doi:10.1029/97jb00731. Padrón-Navarta, J. A., V. López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, C. J. Garrido, and M. T. Gómez-Pugnaire (2011), Metamorphic record of high-pressure dehydration of antigorite serpentinite to chlorite harzburgite in a subduction setting (Cerro del Almirez, Nevado-Filábride Complex, southern Spain), Journal of Petrology, 52(10), 2047-2078.

  2. Reactions of pulsed laser produced boron and nitrogen atoms in a condensing argon stream

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jan M.L.

    Reactions of pulsed laser produced boron and nitrogen atoms in a condensing argon stream Lester dilution in argon favored diboron species. At low laser power with minimum radiation, the dominant reaction for argon matrix reactions; instead intense new infrared ab- sorptions, with boron isotopic multiplets, were

  3. Hydrolysis/dehydration/aldol-condensation/hydrogenation of lignocellulosic biomass and biomass-derived carbohydrates in the presence of Pd/WO3-ZrO2 in a single reactor.

    PubMed

    Dedsuksophon, W; Faungnawakij, K; Champreda, V; Laosiripojana, N

    2011-01-01

    Hydrolysis/dehydration/aldol-condensation/hydrogenation of lignocellulosic-biomass (corncobs) and biomass-derived carbohydrates (tapioca flour) to produce water-soluble C5-C15 compounds was developed in a single reactor system. WO3-ZrO2 efficiently catalyzed the hydrolysis/dehydration of these feedstocks to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and furfural, while the impregnation of WO3-ZrO2 with Pd allowed sequential aldolcondensation/hydrogenation of these furans to C5-C15 compounds. The highest C5-C15 yields of 14.8-20.3% were observed at a hydrolysis/dehydration temperature of 573 K for 5 min, an aldol-condensation temperature of 353 K for 30 h, and a hydrogenation temperature of 393 K for 6 h. The C5-C15 yield from tapioca flour was higher than that from corncobs (20.3% compared to 14.8%). Tapioca flour produced more C6/C9/C15, whereas corncobs generated more C5/C8/C13 compounds due to the presence of hemicellulose in the corncobs. These water-soluble organic compounds can be further converted to liquid alkanes with high cetane numbers for replacing diesel fuel in transportation applications. PMID:20934873

  4. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Formal Dehydrative [4 + 2] Cycloaddition of Enamides and Alkynes for the Synthesis of Highly Substituted Pyridines: Reaction Development and Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jicheng; Xu, Wenbo; Yu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Jian

    2015-07-29

    Reported herein is a ruthenium-catalyzed formal dehydrative [4 + 2] cycloaddition of enamides and alkynes, representing a mild and economic protocol for the construction of highly substituted pyridines. Notably, the features of broad substrate scope, high efficiency, good functional group tolerance, and excellent regioselectivities were observed for this reaction. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and experiments have been carried out to understand the mechanism and regiochemistry. DFT calculations suggested that this formal dehydrative [4 + 2] reaction starts with a concerted metalation deprotonation of the enamide by the acetate group in the Ru catalyst, which generates a six-membered ruthenacycle intermediate. Then alkyne inserts into the Ru-C bond of the six-membered ruthenacycle, giving rise to an eight-membered ruthenacycle intermediate. The carbonyl group (which comes originally from the enamide substrate and is coordinated to the Ru center in the eight-membered ruthenacycle intermediate) then inserts into the Ru-C bond to give an intermediate, which produces the final pyridine product through further dehydration. Alkyne insertion step is a regio-determining step and prefers to have the aryl groups of the used alkynes stay away from the catalyst in order to avoid repulsion of aryl group with the enamide moiety in the six-membered ruthenacycle and to keep the conjugation between the aryl group and the triple C-C bond of the alkynes. Consequently, the aryl groups of the used alkynes are in the ?-position of the final pyridines, and the present reaction has high regioselectivity. PMID:26158786

  5. Dicarboxylic acid anhydride condensation with compounds containing active methylene groups. 4: Some 4-nitrophthalic anhydride condensation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oskaja, V.; Rotberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    By 4-nitrophthalic anhydride condensation with acetoacetate in acetic anhydride and triethylamine solution with subsequent breakdown of the intermediate condensation product, 5-nitroindanedione-1,3 was obtained. A 4-nitrophthalic anhydride with acetic anhydride, according to reaction conditions, may yield two products: in the presence of potassium acetate and at high temperatures 4-(or 5-)-nitro-2-acetylbenzoic acid is formed: in the presence of triethylamine and at room temperature 5-( or 6-)-nitrophthalic acetic acid is isolated. A 4-nitrophthalic anhydride and malonic acid in pyridine solution according to temperature yield either 5-( or 6-)-nitrophthalic acetic acid or 4-(or 5-)-nitro-2-acetylbenzoic acid.

  6. A Solvent-Free Claisen Condensation Reaction for the Organic Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteb, John J.; Stockton, Matthew B.

    2003-12-01

    An experiment involving the Claisen condensation reaction for a first-year organic chemistry laboratory is presented. Claisen condensations are routinely covered in organic textbooks but owing to the long reaction times required to reach equilibrium in solution they are seldom explored in the undergraduate teaching laboratory. In this experiment, potassium tert-butoxide and ethyl phenylacetate are heated to 100 °C for 30 minutes under solvent-free conditions to produce 2,4-diphenyl acetoacetate in 80% yield. The solvent-free nature of this procedure greatly reduces the quantity of waste generated by students relative to typical carbonyl condensation experiments.

  7. Theoretical Study of Nuclear Reactions Induced by Bose-Einstein Condensation in Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Ken-Ichi; Okumura, Hiraku

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to give a theoretical explanation for the mechanism of cold fusion. In the beginning, a Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in solid is considered and introduced into our theory because deuterons are highly condensed at defects in some metals. Using the Kim-Zubarev theory, the wave function, the DD fusion rate of condensed deuterons in crystalline solid and critical temperature Tc of BEC are obtained. Furthermore, by solving the equations of thermal conduction, the temperature around the reaction center as a function of position and time is obtained. The calculated results show that temperature falls lower than Tc and leads to the initial temperature earlier than the inverse of the reaction rate. This means that continuous reactions do not produce any explosions.

  8. Onion dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    Onion dehydration consists of a continuous operation, belt conveyor using fairly low-temperature hot air from 38-104{degrees}C (100 to 200{degrees}F). Typical processing plants will handle 4500 kg (10,000 pounds) of raw product per hour (single line), reducing the moisture from around 83 % to 4 % (680 to 820 kg - 1,500 to 1,800 pounds finished product). An example of a geothermal processing plant is Integrate Ingredients at Empire, Nevada, in the San Emidio Desert. A total of 6.3 million kg (14 million pounds) of dry product are produced annually: 60% onion and 40% garlic. A 130{degrees}C (266{degrees}F) well provide the necessary heat for the plant.

  9. A biocompatible condensation reaction for controlled assembly of nanostructures in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Gaolin; Ren, Hongjun; Rao, Jianghong

    2010-01-01

    Through controlled synthesis and molecular assembly, biological systems are able to organize molecules into supramolecular structures that carry out sophisticated processes. Although chemists have reported a few examples of supramolecular assembly in water, the controlled covalent synthesis of large molecules and structures in vivo has remained challenging. Here we report a condensation reaction between 1,2-aminothiol and 2-cyanobenzothiazole that occurs in vitro and in living cells under the control of either pH, disulfide reduction or enzymatic cleavage. In vitro, the size and shape of the condensation products, and the nanostructures subsequently assembled, were different in each case and could thus be controlled by tuning the structure of the monomers. Direct imaging of the products obtained in the cells revealed their locations-near the Golgi bodies under enzymatic cleavage control-demonstrating the feasibility of a controlled and localized reaction in living cells. This intracellular condensation process enabled the imaging of the proteolytic activity of furin.

  10. Probing the Rate-Determining Step of the Claisen-Schmidt Condensation by Competition Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.; Chan, Wing-Fat; Lung, Ka-Ying; Lam, Wai-Yee; Ng, Weng-Cheong; Lee, Siu-Fung

    2007-01-01

    Competition experiments are a useful tool for preliminary study of the linear free energy relationship of organic reactions. This article describes a physical organic experiment for upper-level undergraduates to identify the rate-determining step of the Claisen-Schmidt condensation of benzaldehyde and acetophenone by studying the linear free…

  11. Retardation of Protein Dynamics by Trehalose in Dehydrated Systems of Photosynthetic Reaction Centers. Insights from Electron Transfer and Thermal Denaturation Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Malferrari, Marco; Francia, Francesco; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2015-10-29

    Conformational protein dynamics is known to be hampered in amorphous matrixes upon dehydration, both in the absence and in the presence of glass forming disaccharides, like trehalose, resulting in enhanced protein thermal stability. To shed light on such matrix effects, we have compared the retardation of protein dynamics in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers (RC) dehydrated at controlled relative humidity in the absence (RC films) or in the presence of trehalose (RC-trehalose glasses). Small scale RC dynamics, associated with the relaxation from the dark-adapted to the light-adapted conformation, have been probed up to the second time scale by analyzing the kinetics of electron transfer from the photoreduced quinone acceptor (QA(-)) to the photoxidized primary donor (P(+)) as a function of the duration of photoexcitation from 7 ns (laser pulse) to 20 s. A more severe inhibition of dynamics is found in RC-trehalose glasses than in RC films: only in the latter system does a complete relaxation to the light-adapted conformation occur even at extreme dehydration, although strongly retarded. To gain insight into the large scale RC dynamics up to the time scale of days, the kinetics of thermal denaturation have been studied at 44 °C by spectral analysis of the Qx and Qy bands of the RC bacteriochlorin cofactors, as a function of the sugar/protein molar ratio, m, varied between 0 and 10(4). Upon increasing m, denaturation is slowed progressively, and above m ? 500 the RC is stable at least for several days. The stronger retardation of RC relaxation and dynamics induced by trehalose is discussed in the light of a recent molecular dynamics simulation study performed in matrixes of the model protein lysozyme with and without trehalose. We suggest that the efficiency of trehalose in retarding RC dynamics and preventing thermal denaturation stems mainly from its propensity to form and stabilize extended networks of hydrogen bonds involving sugar, residual water, and surface residues of the RC complex and from its ability of reducing the free volume fraction of protein alone matrixes. PMID:26083980

  12. First Aid: Dehydration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Aid: Dehydration KidsHealth > Parents > First Aid & Safety > Printable Safety Guides > First Aid: Dehydration Print A A A Text Size What's ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC First Aid: Heat Illness Vomiting Summer Safety Sun Safety Dehydration Diarrhea Heat Illness Word! Dehydration ...

  13. Rapid and Efficient Functionalized Ionic Liquid-Catalyzed Aldol Condensation Reactions Associated with Microwave Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chang; Liu, Jing; Leng, Wenguang; Gao, Yanan

    2014-01-01

    Five quaternary ammonium ionic liquid (IL) and two tetrabutylphosphonium ILs were prepared and characterized. An environmentally benign and convenient functionalized ionic liquid catalytic system was thus explored in the aldol condensation reactions of aromatic aldehydes with acetone. The aldol reactions proceeded more efficiently through microwave-assisted heating than through conventional thermal heating. The yield of products obtained under microwave heating for 30 min was approximately 90%, and the ILs can be recovered and reused at least five times without apparent loss of activity. In addition, this catalytic system can be successfully extended to the Henry reactions. PMID:24445262

  14. Radical Reactivity in the Condensed Phase: Intermolecular versus Intramolecular Reactions of Alkoxy Radicals.

    PubMed

    Carrasquillo, Anthony J; Daumit, Kelly E; Kroll, Jesse H

    2015-06-18

    Condensed-phase alkoxy (RO) radicals can undergo unimolecular (e.g., intramolecular H atom abstraction) reactions as well as bimolecular (intermolecular H atom abstraction) reactions, though the competition between these two channels is not well constrained. Here, we examine this branching by generating RO radicals from the photolysis of a large alkyl nitrite (C20H41ONO) in hexanes and nebulizing the mixture into an aerosol mass spectrometer for analysis. Product ions associated with unimolecular (isomerization) reactions were observed to increase upon photolysis. However, no formation of the C20 alcohol (C20H41OH, the expected product from RO + RH reactions) was observed, suggesting that bimolecular reactions are at most a minor channel for this condensed-phase system (involving saturated hydrocarbons). This result, combined with previous studies of liquid-phase RO radicals carried out at higher concentrations, suggests that when 1,5-H atom abstraction reactions are facile (i.e., in which a 1,5-H atom shift from a secondary or tertiary carbon can occur), this channel will dominate over bimolecular reactions. PMID:26266621

  15. Mixtures of Charged Bosons Confined in Harmonic Traps and Bose-Einstein Condensation Mechanism for Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions and Transmutation Processes in Condensed Matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    2006-02-01

    A mixture of two different species of positively charged bosons in harmonic traps is considered in the mean-field approximation. It is shown that depending on the ratio of parameters, the two components may coexist in same regions of space, in spite of the Coulomb repulsion between the two species. Application of this result is discussed for the generalization of the Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) and transmutation processes in condensed matters. For the case of deutron-lithium (d + Li) LENR, the result indicates that (d + 6Li) reactions may dominate over (d + d) reactions in LENR experiments.

  16. Dehydration kinetics of shocked serpentine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental rates of dehydration of shocked and unshocked serpentine were determined using a differential scanning calorimetric technique. Dehydration rates in shocked serpentine are enhanced by orders of magnitude over corresponding rates in unshocked material, even though the impact experiments were carried out under conditions that inhibited direct impact-induced devolatilization. Extrapolation to temperatures of the Martian surface indicates that dehydration of shocked material would occur 20 to 30 orders of magnitude more rapidly than for unshocked serpentine. The results indicate that impacted planetary surfaces and associated atmospheres would reach chemical equilibrium much more quickly than calculations based on unshocked material would indicate, even during the earliest, coldest stages of accretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that chemical weathering of shocked planetary surfaces by solid-gas reactions would be sufficiently rapid that true equilibrium mineral assemblages should form.

  17. Dehydration reactions, mass transfer and rock deformation relationships during subduction of Alpine metabauxites: insights from LIBS compositional profiles between metamorphic veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlaguet, Anne; Brunet, Fabrice; Goffé, Bruno; Menut, Denis; Findling, Nathaniel; Poinssot, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    In subduction zones, the significant amounts of aqueous fluid released in the course of the successive dehydration reactions occurring during prograde metamorphism are expected to strongly influence the rock rheology, as well as kinetics of metamorphic reactions and mass transfer efficiency. Mineralized veins, ubiquitous in metamorphic rocks, can be seen as preserved witnesses of fluid and mass redistribution that partly accommodate the rock deformation (lateral segregation). However, the driving forces and mechanisms of mass transfer towards fluid-filled open spaces remain somewhat unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the vein-forming processes and the modalities of mass transfer during local fluid-rock interactions, and their links with fluid production and rock deformation, with new insights from Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) profiles. This study focuses on karstic pockets (metre scale) of Triassic metabauxites embedded in thick carbonate units, that have been isolated from large-scale fluid flow during HP-LT Alpine metamorphism (W. Vanoise, French Alps). These rocks display several generations of metamorphic veins containing various Al-bearing minerals, which give particular insights into mass transfer processes. It is proposed that the internally-derived fluid (~13 vol% produced by successive dehydration reactions) has promoted the opening of fluid-filled open spaces (euhedral habits of vein minerals) and served as medium for diffusive mass transfer from rock to vein. Based on mineralogical and textural features, two vein types can be distinguished: (1) some veins are filled with newly formed products of either prograde (chloritoid) or retrograde (chlorite) metamorphic reactions; in this case, fluid-filled open spaces seem to offer energetically favourable nucleation/growth sites; (2) the second vein type is filled with cookeite (Li-Al-rich chlorite) or pyrophyllite, that were present in the host rock prior to the vein formation. In this closed chemical system, mass transfer from rock to vein was achieved through the fluid, in a dissolution-transport-precipitation process, possibly stress-assisted. To investigate the modalities of mass transfer towards this second vein type, LIBS profiles were performed in the rock matrix, taking Li concentration as a proxy for cookeite distribution. Cookeite is highly concentrated (40-70 vol%) in regularly spaced veins, and the LIBS profiles show that cookeite is evenly distributed in the rock matrix comprised between two veins. The absence of diffusion profiles suggests that the characteristic diffusion length for Li, Al and Si is greater than or equal to the distance separating two cookeite veins (3-6 cm). This is in agreement with characteristic diffusion lengths calculated from both grain boundary and pore fluid diffusion coefficients, for the estimated duration of the peak of metamorphism. Concerning mass transfer driving forces, phyllosilicates have very different morphologies in the rock matrix (fibers) compared to veins (euhedral crystals): fluid-mineral interfacial energy may be maximal in the small matrix pores, which can maintain higher cookeite solubility than in fluid-filled open spaces. Therefore, as soon as veins open, chemical potential gradients may develop and drive cookeite transfer from rock matrix to veins.

  18. Dehydration reactions, mass transfer and rock deformation relationships during subduction of Alpine metabauxites: insights from LIBS compositional profiles between metamorphic veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlaguet, A.; Brunet, F.; Goffe, B.; Menut, D.; Findling, N.; Poinssot, C.

    2011-12-01

    In subduction zones, the significant amounts of aqueous fluid released in the course of the successive dehydration reactions occurring during prograde metamorphism are expected to strongly influence the rock rheology, as well as kinetics of metamorphic reactions and mass transfer efficiency. Mineralized veins, ubiquitous in metamorphic rocks, can be seen as preserved witnesses of fluid and mass redistribution that partly accommodate the rock deformation (lateral segregation). However, the driving forces and mechanisms of mass transfer towards fluid-filled open spaces remain somewhat unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the modalities of mass transfer during local fluid-rock interactions, and their links with fluid production and rock deformation. This study focuses on karstic pockets (metre scale) of Triassic metabauxites embedded in thick carbonate units, that have been isolated from large-scale fluid flow during HP-LT Alpine metamorphism (W. Vanoise, French Alps). These rocks display several generations of metamorphic veins containing various Al-bearing minerals, which give particular insights into mass transfer processes. It is proposed that the internally-derived fluid (~13 vol% produced by successive dehydration reactions) has promoted the opening of fluid-filled open spaces (euhedral habits of vein minerals) and served as medium for diffusive mass transfer from rock to vein. Based on mineralogical and textural features, two vein types can be distinguished: (1) some veins are filled with newly formed products of either prograde (chloritoid) or retrograde (chlorite) metamorphic reactions; in this case, fluid-filled open spaces seem to offer energetically favourable nucleation/growth sites; (2) the second vein type is filled with cookeite (Li-Al-rich chlorite) or pyrophyllite, that were present in the host rock prior to the vein formation. In this closed chemical system, mass transfer from rock to vein was achieved through the fluid, in a dissolution-transport-precipitation process, possibly stress-assisted. Cookeite is highly concentrated (40-70 vol%) in regularly spaced veins. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy profiles show that cookeite is evenly distributed in the rock matrix comprised between two veins. The absence of diffusion profiles suggests that the characteristic diffusion length for Li, Al and Si is greater than or equal to the distance separating two cookeite veins (3-6 cm). This is in agreement with characteristic diffusion lengths calculated from both grain boundary and pore fluid diffusion coefficients, for the estimated duration of the peak of metamorphism. Phyllosilicates have very different morphologies in the rock matrix (fibers) compared to veins (euhedral crystals): fluid-mineral interfacial energy may be maximal in the small matrix pores, which can maintain higher cookeite solubility than in fluid-filled open spaces. Therefore, as soon as veins open, chemical potential gradients may develop and drive cookeite transfer from rock matrix to veins.

  19. Slab dehydration and fluid-producing metamorphic reactions in early subduction stages: the record of the metamorphic sole of the Mont Albert ophiolite (Quebec, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewison, Ella; Soret, Mathieu; Dubacq, Benoït; Agard, Philippe; Labrousse, Loïc

    2015-04-01

    Metamorphic soles found at the base of obducted ophiolites provide valuable information on the early history of the subduction / obduction system. Metamorphic soles are characterised by rocks originating from the ocean floor (basalts and sediments in variable proportions) metamorphosed up to granulite facies, where the intensity of metamorphism increases to the top of the unit, towards the contact with peridotite. Their mafic and less frequently pelitic lithologies make them sensitive recorders of their pressure-temperature conditions of crystallization and allow radiometric dating. In addition, metamorphic soles have directly witnessed slab dehydration as they underwent similar fluid-producing metamorphic reactions before being accreted to the mantle wedge peridotites (i.e. before "underplating"). The mechanisms of underplating remain uncertain, because of the somewhat obscure link between weakening through fluid production and hardening via garnet crystallization, with direct consequences on the rheology of the plate interface. In this study, we document fluid-producing reactions occurring during the prograde history of the metamorphic sole of the Taconian (ca. 460 Ma) ophiolite from Mont Albert (Quebec, Canada). This metamorphic sole shows variably metamorphosed mafic and pelitic rocks with metamorphic gradients over the scale of 10 metres, with clinopyroxene-garnet-amphibole granulite facies mafic rocks at the contact with the overlying peridotites. Evidences of melting of pelitic lithologies increase towards the contact, and no remains of metapelites have been found within about 20 m from the contact. Fluid channelization and melt migration is evidenced by decimetric dykes and veins. Away from the contact, metamorphism intensity gradually decreases to greenschist facies with abundant hydrated silicates. The aim of the study is to provide constraints (i) on the nature of the fluids produced (aqueous versus melt), (ii) on their composition and (iii) on the pressure-temperature conditions of their production. This will allow a better understanding of the rheological behaviour of subducting slabs in subduction zones and of amphibolites in the lower continental crust.

  20. Direct dehydrative N-Pyridinylation of amides, the interrupted Bischler-Napieralski reaction, and the enantioselective total synthesis and arylative dimerization of aspidosperma alkaloids

    E-print Network

    Medley, Jonathan William

    2013-01-01

    I. Direct Dehydrative N-Pyridinylation of Amides A method for the single-step N-pyridinylation of secondary amides is described. The process involves electrophilic activation of secondary amides with trifluoromethanesulfonic ...

  1. Toward a reaction rate model of condensed-phase RDX decomposition under high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Shock ignition of energetic molecular solids is driven by microstructural heterogeneities, at which even moderate stresses can result in sufficiently high temperatures to initiate material decomposition and chemical energy release. Mesoscale modeling of these ``hot spots'' requires a reaction rate model that describes the energy release with a sub-microsecond resolution and under a wide range of temperatures. No such model is available even for well-studied energetic materials such as RDX. In this presentation, I will describe an ongoing effort to develop a reaction rate model of condensed-phase RDX decomposition under high temperatures using first-principles molecular dynamics, transition-state theory, and reaction network analysis. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, by the Office of Naval Research, and by the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program Software Application Institute for Multiscale Reactive Modeling of Insensitive Munitions.

  2. Toward a reaction rate model of condensed-phase RDX decomposition under high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Igor

    2014-03-01

    Shock ignition of energetic molecular solids is driven by microstructural heterogeneities, at which even moderate stresses can result in sufficiently high temperatures to initiate material decomposition and the release of the chemical energy. Mesoscale modeling of these ``hot spots'' requires a chemical reaction rate model that describes the energy release with a sub-microsecond resolution and under a wide range of temperatures. No such model is available even for well-studied energetic materials such as RDX. In this presentation, I will describe an ongoing effort to develop a reaction rate model of condensed-phase RDX decomposition under high temperatures using first-principles molecular dynamics, transition-state theory, and reaction network analysis. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, by the Office of Naval Research, and by the DOD High Performance Computing Modernization Program Software Application Institute for Multiscale Reactive Modeling of Insensitive Munitions.

  3. Quantum and Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) Monte Carlo Techniques for Modeling Condensed-Phase Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Wiliiam L.

    2014-01-01

    A recent review (Acc. Chem. Res. 2010, 43:142–151) examined our use and development of a combined quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) technique for modelling organic and enzymatic reactions. Advances included the PDDG/PM3 semiempirical QM (SQM) method, computation of multi-dimensional potentials of mean force (PMF), incorporation of on-the-fly QM in Monte Carlo simulations, and a polynomial quadrature method for rapidly treating proton-transfer reactions. The current article serves as a follow up on our progress. Highlights include new reactions, alternative SQM methods, a polarizable OPLS force field, and novel solvent environments, e.g., “on water” and room temperature ionic liquids. The methodology is strikingly accurate across a wide range of condensed-phase and antibody-catalyzed reactions including substitution, decarboxylation, elimination, isomerization, and pericyclic classes. Comparisons are made to systems treated with continuum-based solvents and ab initio or density functional theory (DFT) methods. Overall, the QM/MM methodology provides detailed characterization of reaction paths, proper configurational sampling, several advantages over implicit solvent models, and a reasonable computational cost. PMID:25431625

  4. Alternative Interpretation of Low-Energy Nuclear Reaction Processes with Deuterated Metals Based on the Bose-Einstein Condensation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Passell, Thomas O.

    2006-02-01

    Recently, a generalization of the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) mechanism has been made to a ground-state mixture of two different species of positively charged bosons in harmonic traps. The theory has been used to describe (D + Li) reactions in the low energy nuclear reaction (LENR) processes in condensed matter and predicts that the (D + Li) reaction rates can be larger than (D + D) reaction rates by as much as a factor of ~50, implying that (D + Li) reactions may be occuring in addition to the (D + D) reactions. A survey of the existing data from LENR experiments is carried out to check the validity of the theoretical prediction. We conclude that there is compelling experimental evidence which support the theoretical prediction. New experimental tests of the theoretical prediction are suggested.

  5. Closure of the condensed-phase organic-nitrate reaction USQ at hanford

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-06-24

    A discovery Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) was declared on the underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in May 1996. The USQ was for condensed-phase organic-nitrate reactions (sometimes called organic complexant reactions) in the tanks. This paper outlines the steps taken to close the USQ, and resolve the related safety issue. Several processes were used at the Hanford Site to extract and/or process plutonium. These processes resulted in organic complexants (for chelating multivalent cations) and organic extraction solvents being sent to the underground waste storage tanks. This paper addresses the organic complexant hazard. The organic complexants are in waste matrices that include inert material, diluents, and potential oxidizers. In the presence of oxidizing material, the complexant salts can be made to react exothermically by heating to high temperatures or by applying an external ignition source of sufficient energy. The first organic complexant hazard assessments focused on determining whether a hulk runaway reaction could occur, similar to the 1957 accident at Kyshtm (a reprocessing plant in the former U.S.S.R.). Early analyses (1977 through 1994) examined organic-nitrate reaction onset temperatures and concluded that a bulk runaway reaction could not occur at the Hanford Site because tank temperatures were well below that necessary for bulk runaway. Therefore, it was believed that organic-nitrate reactions were adequately described in the then current Authorization Basis (AB). Subsequent studies examined a different accident scenario, propagation resulting from an external ignition source (e.g., lightning or welding slag) that initiates a combustion front that propagates through the organic waste. A USQ evaluation determined that localized high energy ignition sources were credible, and that point source ignition of organic complexant waste was not adequately addressed i n the then existing AB. Consequently, the USQ was declared on the underground storage tanks in May 1996 for condensed-phase organic-nitrate reactions. At the same time that the operating contractor recommended that the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) declare a USQ. preventative coiitrols were implemented to minimize potential ignition sources and prevent a possible accident.

  6. Technical Note: Analytical Solution for Transient Partitioning and Reaction of a Condensing Vapor Species in a Droplet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Albert T.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2014-03-28

    We present the exact analytical solution of the transient equation of gas-phase diffusion of a condensing vapor to, and diffusion and reaction in, an aqueous droplet. Droplet-phase reaction is represented by first-order chemistry. The solution facilitates study of the dynamic nature of the vapor uptake process as a function of droplet size, Henry’s law coefficient, and first-order reaction rate constant for conversion in the droplet phase.

  7. Dehydration, Dehydrogenation, and Condensation of Alcohols on Supported Oxide Catalysts Based on Cyclic (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Roger J.; Dixon, David A.; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Supported early transition metal oxides have important applications in numerous catalytic reactions. In this article we review preparation and activity of well-defined model WO3 and MoO3 catalysts prepared via deposition of cyclic gas-phase (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 clusters generated by sublimation of WO3 and MoO3 powders. Conversion of small aliphatic alcohols to alkenes, aldehydes/ketons, and ethers is employed to probe the structure-activity relationships on model WO3 and MoO3 catalysts ranging from unsupported (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 clusters embedded in alcohol matrices, to (WO3)3 clusters supported on surfaces of other oxides, and epitaxial and nanoporous WO3 films. Detailed theoretical calculations reveal the underlying reaction mechanisms and provide insight into the origin of the differences in the WO3 and MoO3 reactivity. For the range of interrogated (WO3)3 they further shed light into the role structure and binding of (WO3)3 clusters with the support play in determining their catalytic activity.

  8. Thirst, Drinking Behavior, And Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John

    1996-01-01

    Report describes review of physiological mechanisms of involuntary dehydration. Researchers considered cellular dehydration and effects of sodium on thirst, as well as extracellular dehydration and restoration of vascular volume, effects of renin on thirst, and effects of heat.

  9. Hydrous mineral dehydration around heat-generating nuclear waste in bedded salt formations.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Caporuscio, Florie A; Robinson, Bruce A; Stauffer, Philip H

    2015-06-01

    Heat-generating nuclear waste disposal in bedded salt during the first two years after waste emplacement is explored using numerical simulations tied to experiments of hydrous mineral dehydration. Heating impure salt samples to temperatures of 265 °C can release over 20% by mass of hydrous minerals as water. Three steps in a series of dehydration reactions are measured (65, 110, and 265 °C), and water loss associated with each step is averaged from experimental data into a water source model. Simulations using this dehydration model are used to predict temperature, moisture, and porosity after heating by 750-W waste canisters, assuming hydrous mineral mass fractions from 0 to 10%. The formation of a three-phase heat pipe (with counter-circulation of vapor and brine) occurs as water vapor is driven away from the heat source, condenses, and flows back toward the heat source, leading to changes in porosity, permeability, temperature, saturation, and thermal conductivity of the backfill salt surrounding the waste canisters. Heat pipe formation depends on temperature, moisture availability, and mobility. In certain cases, dehydration of hydrous minerals provides sufficient extra moisture to push the system into a sustained heat pipe, where simulations neglecting this process do not. PMID:25965632

  10. Progress toward Chemical Accuracy in the Computer Simulation of Condensed Phase Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, Paul A.; Ho, L. Lawrence; Mackerell, Alexander D.; Levine, David; Hallstrom, Philip

    1996-04-01

    We describe a procedure for the generation of chemically accurate computer-simulation models to study chemical reactions in the condensed phase. The process involves (i) the use of a coupled semiempirical quantum and classical molecular mechanics method to represent solutes and solvent, respectively; (ii) the optimization of semiempirical quantum mechanics (QM) parameters to produce a computationally efficient and chemically accurate QM model; (iii) the calibration of a quantum/classical microsolvation model using ab initio quantum theory; and (iv) the use of statistical mechanical principles and methods to simulate, on massively parallel computers, the thermodynamic properties of chemical reactions in aqueous solution. The utility of this process is demonstrated by the calculation of the enthalpy of reaction in vacuum and free energy change in aqueous solution for a proton transfer involving methanol, methoxide, imidazole, and imidazolium, which are functional groups involved with proton transfers in many biochemical systems. An optimized semiempirical QM model is produced, which results in the calculation of heats of formation of the above chemical species to within 1.0 kcal/mol (1 kcal = 4.18 kJ) of experimental values. The use of the calibrated QM and microsolvation QM/MM (molecular mechanics) models for the simulation of a proton transfer in aqueous solution gives a calculated free energy that is within 1.0 kcal/mol (12.2 calculated vs. 12.8 experimental) of a value estimated from experimental pKa values of the reacting species.

  11. Progress toward chemcial accuracy in the computer simulation of condensed phase reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bash, P.A.; Levine, D.; Hallstrom, P.; Ho, L.L.; Mackerell, A.D. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    A procedure is described for the generation of chemically accurate computer-simulation models to study chemical reactions in the condensed phase. The process involves (1) the use of a coupled semiempirical quantum and classical molecular mechanics method to represent solutes and solvent, respectively; (2) the optimization of semiempirical quantum mechanics (QM) parameters to produce a computationally efficient and chemically accurate QM model; (3) the calibration of a quantum/classical microsolvation model using ab initio quantum theory; and (4) the use of statistical mechanical principles and methods to simulate, on massively parallel computers, the thermodynamic properties of chemical reactions in aqueous solution. The utility of this process is demonstrated by the calculation of the enthalpy of reaction in vacuum and free energy change in aqueous solution for a proton transfer involving methanol, methoxide, imidazole, and imidazolium, which are functional groups involved with proton transfers in many biochemical systems. An optimized semiempirical QM model is produced, which results in the calculation of heats of formation of the above chemical species to within 1.0 kcal/mol of experimental values. The use of the calibrated QM and microsolvation QM/MM models for the simulation of a proton transfer in aqueous solution gives a calculated free energy that is within 1.0 kcal/mol (12.2 calculated vs. 12.8 experimental) of a value estimated from experimental pKa`s of the reacting species.

  12. The nature of catalytic sites on lanthanum and neodymium oxides for dehydration/dehydrogenation of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Rosynek, M.P.; Koprowski, R.J.; DelliSante, G.N. )

    1990-03-01

    The multi-pathway (dehydration/dehydrogenation) conversion of ethanol has been used to investigate the nature and behavior of catalytically active sites on lanthanum and neodymium sesquioxides. Catalytic reaction data, coupled with infrared spectroscopic characterizations of adsorbed species, indicate that at least two different types of catalytically active sites are generated on activated La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces that are prepared by thermal dehydration of the corresponding trihydroxides. One kind of site (designated Type I) is much less numerous than the other (Type II), but is more strongly basic and has a much higher initial activity for alcohol dehydration, via a probable ethoxide intermediate, at 300-400{degree}C. The parallel alcohol dehydrogenation pathway, on the other hand, occurs only on Type II sites, which also have moderate dehydration activity. The resulting aldehyde products readsorbs exclusively on the more strongly basic Type I sites, where it undergoes a series of secondary condensation reactions that cause a decrease in the overall rate of alcohol dehydration. The comparative behavioral features of the two kinds of sites may be due to differing surface environments, with Type I sites being in structurally more defective and/or more energetic surface locations than are Type II sites. Increases in pretreatment temperature of the oxides cause thermally induced transformations of Type I sites into Type II sites by a surface annealing or restructuring process, with corresponding modifications in the observed catalytic behavior for the two alcohol conversion pathways. 33 refs.

  13. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-07-01

    The overall objectives of this work are to conduct research that will provide the basis for an improved liquefaction process, and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. Changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying and steam pretreatments will be measured in order to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water enhances coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods for coal drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying a relatively economical and efficient method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include conventional thermal drying, microwave drying, and chemical drying at low temperature. State-of-the-art solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques using combined rotation and multiple pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) and cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) will be employed: (1) to measures changes in coal structure brought about by the different methods of drying and by low temperature oxidation, and (2) to obtain direct measurements of changes in the aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of the solid/semi-solid material formed or remaining during pretreatment and the initial stages of liquefaction. The aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratios are difficult, if not impossible, to measure without the use of solid-state NMR, and as a result this ratio will be used to monitor the retrograde/condensation reactions that take place during coal liquefaction in the presence and absence of steam and various inert gases.

  14. Charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics for simulation of condensed phase electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2009-08-01

    We present a plane-wave basis set implementation of charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics (CDFT-MD) for simulation of electron transfer reactions in condensed phase systems. Following the earlier work of Wu and Van Voorhis [Phys. Rev. A 72, 024502 (2005)], the density functional is minimized under the constraint that the charge difference between donor and acceptor is equal to a given value. The classical ion dynamics is propagated on the Born-Oppenheimer surface of the charge constrained state. We investigate the dependence of the constrained energy and of the energy gap on the definition of the charge and present expressions for the constraint forces. The method is applied to the Ru2+-Ru3+ electron self-exchange reaction in aqueous solution. Sampling the vertical energy gap along CDFT-MD trajectories and correcting for finite size effects, a reorganization free energy of 1.6 eV is obtained. This is 0.1-0.2 eV lower than a previous estimate based on a continuum model for solvation. The smaller value for the reorganization free energy can be explained by the fact that the Ru-O distances of the divalent and trivalent Ru hexahydrates are predicted to be more similar in the electron transfer complex than for the separated aqua ions.

  15. Sports Dehydration Safety Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sports, they could be at risk for dehydration, heat exhaustion or even heatstroke. Bring a Water Bottle ... after play. While at play, children generate more heat than adults, but also sweat less, which makes ...

  16. Electrolyte Concentrates Treat Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Wellness Brands Inc. of Boulder, Colorado, exclusively licensed a unique electrolyte concentrate formula developed by Ames Research Center to treat and prevent dehydration in astronauts returning to Earth. Marketed as The Right Stuff, the company's NASA-derived formula is an ideal measure for athletes looking to combat dehydration and boost performance. Wellness Brands also plans to expand with products that make use of the formula's effective hydration properties to help treat conditions including heat stroke, altitude sickness, jet lag, and disease.

  17. Fe3O4@MOF core-shell magnetic microspheres as excellent catalysts for the Claisen-Schmidt condensation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Fei; Qiu, Ling-Guang; Zhu, Junfa

    2014-01-01

    Separation and recycling of catalysts after catalytic reactions are critically required to reduce the cost of catalysts as well as to avoid the generation of waste in industrial applications. In this work, we present a facile fabrication and characterization of a novel type of MOF-based porous catalyst, namely, Fe3O4@MIL-100(Fe) core-shell magnetic microspheres. It has been shown that these catalysts not only exhibit high catalytic activities for the Claisen-Schmidt condensation reactions under environmentally friendly conditions, but remarkably, they can be easily separated and recycled without significant loss of catalytic efficiency after being used for many times. Therefore, compared to other reported catalysts used in the Claisen-Schmidt condensation reactions, these catalysts are green, cheap and more suitable for large scale industrial applications.Separation and recycling of catalysts after catalytic reactions are critically required to reduce the cost of catalysts as well as to avoid the generation of waste in industrial applications. In this work, we present a facile fabrication and characterization of a novel type of MOF-based porous catalyst, namely, Fe3O4@MIL-100(Fe) core-shell magnetic microspheres. It has been shown that these catalysts not only exhibit high catalytic activities for the Claisen-Schmidt condensation reactions under environmentally friendly conditions, but remarkably, they can be easily separated and recycled without significant loss of catalytic efficiency after being used for many times. Therefore, compared to other reported catalysts used in the Claisen-Schmidt condensation reactions, these catalysts are green, cheap and more suitable for large scale industrial applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM and TEM images, and GC-MS spectra for chalcones. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05051c

  18. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Titov, S. V.; Mitina, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ?0 = ??0/kBT where ?0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (?0 < 1 - 3) and for low (?0 ? 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T ? 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually postulated in the existing theories of the ET. Our alternative dynamic ET model for local modes immersed in the continuum harmonic medium is formulated for both classical and quantum regimes, and accounts explicitly for the mode/medium interaction. The kinetics of the energy exchange between the local ET subsystem and the surrounding environment essentially determine the total ET rate. The efficient computer code for rate computations is elaborated on. The computations are available for a wide range of system parameters, such as the temperature, external field, local mode frequency, and characteristics of mode/medium interaction. The relation of the present approach to the Marcus ET theory and to the quantum-statistical reaction rate theory [V. G. Levich and R. R. Dogonadze, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Fiz. Khim. 124, 213 (1959); J. Ulstrup, Charge Transfer in Condensed Media (Springer, Berlin, 1979); M. Bixon and J. Jortner, Adv. Chem. Phys. 106, 35 (1999)] underlying it is discussed and illustrated by the results of computations for practically important target systems.

  19. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Mitina, E. A.; Odinokov, A. V.; National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” 31, Kashirskoye shosse, Moscow ; Titov, S. V.

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ?{sub 0}=??{sub 0}/k{sub B}T where ?{sub 0} is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (?{sub 0} < 1 ? 3) and for low (?{sub 0}? 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T? 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually postulated in the existing theories of the ET. Our alternative dynamic ET model for local modes immersed in the continuum harmonic medium is formulated for both classical and quantum regimes, and accounts explicitly for the mode/medium interaction. The kinetics of the energy exchange between the local ET subsystem and the surrounding environment essentially determine the total ET rate. The efficient computer code for rate computations is elaborated on. The computations are available for a wide range of system parameters, such as the temperature, external field, local mode frequency, and characteristics of mode/medium interaction. The relation of the present approach to the Marcus ET theory and to the quantum-statistical reaction rate theory [V. G. Levich and R. R. Dogonadze, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Fiz. Khim. 124, 213 (1959); J. Ulstrup, Charge Transfer in Condensed Media (Springer, Berlin, 1979); M. Bixon and J. Jortner, Adv. Chem. Phys. 106, 35 (1999)] underlying it is discussed and illustrated by the results of computations for practically important target systems.

  20. Dual Activity of Quinolinate Synthase: Triose Phosphate Isomerase and Dehydration Activities Play Together To Form Quinolinate.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Debora; Couté, Yohann; Ollagnier de Choudens, Sandrine

    2015-10-27

    Quinolinate synthase (NadA) is an Fe4S4 cluster-containing dehydrating enzyme involved in the synthesis of quinolinic acid (QA), the universal precursor of the essential coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The reaction catalyzed by NadA is not well understood, and two mechanisms have been proposed in the literature that differ in the nature of the molecule (DHAP or G-3P) that condenses with iminoaspartate (IA) to form QA. In this article, using biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that DHAP is the triose that condenses with IA to form QA. The capacity of NadA to use G-3P is due to its previously unknown triose phosphate isomerase activity. PMID:26455817

  1. Catalytic performance of Metal-Organic-Frameworks vs. extra-large pore zeolite UTL in condensation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Shamzhy, Mariya; Opanasenko, Maksym; Shvets, Oleksiy; ?ejka, Ji?í

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic behavior of isomorphously substituted B-, Al-, Ga-, and Fe-containing extra-large pore UTL zeolites was investigated in Knoevenagel condensation involving aldehydes, Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate, and Prins reaction of ?-pinene with formaldehyde and compared with large-pore aluminosilicate zeolite beta and representative Metal-Organic-Frameworks Cu3(BTC)2 and Fe(BTC). The yield of the target product over the investigated catalysts in Knoevenagel condensation increases in the following sequence: (Al)beta < (Al)UTL < (Ga)UTL < (Fe)UTL < Fe(BTC) < (B)UTL < Cu3(BTC)2 being mainly related to the improving selectivity with decreasing strength of active sites of the individual catalysts. The catalytic performance of Fe(BTC), containing the highest concentration of Lewis acid sites of the appropriate strength is superior over large-pore zeolite (Al)beta and B-, Al-, Ga-, Fe-substituted extra-large pore zeolites UTL in Prins reaction of ?-pinene with formaldehyde and Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate. PMID:24790940

  2. One-Pot Synthesis of N-(?-Peroxy)Indole/Carbazole via Chemoselective Three-Component Condensation Reaction in Open Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinbo; Pan, Yupeng; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Lai, Zhiping

    2015-11-20

    A facile one-pot synthesis of N-(?-peroxy)indole and N-(?-peroxy)carbazole has been developed using metal-free, organo-acid-catalyzed three-component condensation reactions of indole/carbazole, aldehyde, and peroxide. Based on the reaction discovered, a new synthetic proposal for Fumitremorgin A and Verruculogen is introduced. Such a protocol could be easily handled and scaled up in an open atmosphere with a wide substrate scope, enabling the construction of a new molecule library. PMID:26541059

  3. Condensation Reactions between 1,3-Butadiene Radical Cation and Acetylene in the Gas Guy Bouchoux,*, Minh Tho Nguyen, and Jean-Yves Salpin,

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    -cation-initiated reactions present two major advantages: they allow addition between "non- reactive" neutral reactantsCondensation Reactions between 1,3-Butadiene Radical Cation and Acetylene in the Gas Phase Guy experimental and theoretical results concerning the reaction of [1,3-butadiene]+· radical cation, 1

  4. Origin of saline, neutral-pH, reduced epithermal waters by reaction of acidic magmatic gas condensates with wall rock

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.H. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartz and sphalerite of epithermal veins containing galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite with silver sulfides and electrum commonly have salinities of 2 to 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Examples include Bohemia, OR, Comstock, NV, and Creede, CO. Salinities in such base metal-rich systems are apparently greater than those in gold-adularia, base metal-poor systems such as Sleeper, NV, Republic, WA, and Hishikare, Kyushu. Saline epithermal fluids are commonly assumed to have been derived from saline magmatic brines, from local host formations, as has been suggested for Creede, or from evaporative concentration (boiling) of more dilute meteoric ground water. Another possibility, which may be the most common origin, is reaction of wall rocks with magmatic gas condensates rich in HCl and sulfuric acid. A mixture of one part Augustine Volcanic gas condensate in 10 parts cold ground water has a pH of 0.7 and the dominant cation is H[sup +] by a factor of 10[sup 4]. Calculated reaction of this condensate mixture with andesite at 300 C to a water/rock ratio (w/r) of 4.6 yields an NaCl-dominated fluid with a total salinity of 2.1 wt %. and pH 3.7. Further reaction, to w/r 0.14 yields a fluid salinity of 2.6 wt % and pH of 5.7; this fluid is in equilibrium with a propylitic alteration assemblage. Aqueous sulfide accumulates during the rock reaction as sulfate is reduced to sulfide when ferrous iron is oxidized to ferric iron. Sulfide concentration in the latter fluid is 32 ppm, far exceeding sulfate concentration. In the overall reaction, hydrogen ion is exchanged for base cations (including base metals) and sulfate is reduced to sulfide.

  5. Structural requirements and reaction pathways in condensation reactions of alcohols on Mg{sub y}AlO{sub x} catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Di Cosimo, J.I.; Apesteguia, C.R.; Gines, M.J.L.; Iglesia, E.

    2000-03-10

    The effect of composition and of surface properties on alcohol-coupling reactions was studied on Mg{sub y}AlO{sub x} catalysts using C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH or {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH/1-{sup 12}C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH mixtures as reactants. Samples with Mg/Al ratios of 0.5--9.0 were obtained by thermal decomposition of precipitated hydrotalcite precursors. The nature, density, and strength of surface basic sites were obtained by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO{sub 2} and by {sup 13}CO{sub 2}/{sup 12}CO isotopic switch methods, whereas the acid site densities were measured by TPD or NH{sub 3}. The catalyst ability for activating H-H bonds was investigated by performing H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} steady-state equilibration reactions. Isotopic tracer studies were carried out in order to probe chain growth pathways in the synthesis of isobutanol. The rates and product selectivity for C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH or CH{sub 3}OH/C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH reactions strongly depended on the chemical composition of Mg{sub y}AlO{sub x} samples. In turn, the chemical composition affected the acid-base properties of Mg{sub y}AlO{sub x} samples by modifying surface acid and base site densities and the distribution of strength for such sites. The rate of alcohol dehydration to ethers and olefins increased with increasing Al content. Al-rich Mg{sub y}AlO{sub x} samples contained a high density of Al{sup 3+}{minus}O{sup 2{minus}} site pairs and of moderate strength basic sites, the combination of which promoted the formation of ethylene or propylene from primary alcohols via E{sub 2} elimination pathways. The competitive dehydration to form ethers involved the adsorption of two alcohol molecules on neighboring active sites offering different acid-base properties.

  6. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.; Netzel, D.A.; Wallace, J.C. Jr.; Butcher, C.H.; Mitzel, J.M.; Turner, T.F.

    1995-02-01

    While great strides have been made in developing the technology of coal liquefaction processes in recent years, many unsolved problems still remain before a viable and economical process can be achieved. The technological problems that still exist can be solved through a more fundamental understanding of the chemistry associated with each stage of the coal liquefaction process, starting with any pretreatment steps that may be carried out on the coal itself. Western Research Institute, under the a contract from the US Department of Energy, has conducted a study of different methods of coal drying as pretreatment steps before liquefaction. The results of that study are the subject of this report. Coals that were dried or partially dried thermally and with microwaves had lower liquefaction conversions than coals containing equilibrium moisture contents. However, chemically dried coals had conversions equal to or greater than the premoisturized coals. The conversion behavior is consistent with changes in the physical structure and cross linking reactions because of drying. Thermal and microwave drying appear to cause a collapse in the pore structure, thus preventing donor solvents such as tetralin from contacting reactive sites inside the coals. Chemical dehydration does not appear to collapse the pore structure. From the study of the kinetics of the chemical dehydration of coals, it was possible to quantify the amount of water on the surface, the amount readily accessible in pores, and the amount more strongly bonded in the internal structure of the coals. The results indicate that high-rank coals have proportionally less surface and easily accessible water than the lower rank coals.

  7. Oxidative condensation reactions of (diethylenetriamine)cobalt(III) complexes with substituted bis(pyridin-2-yl)methane ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangting; Hockless, David C. R.; Willis, Anthony C.; Jackson, W. Gregory

    2005-04-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of Co(III) complexes derived from a condensation reaction with a central or terminal nitrogen of a dien ligand and the ?-carbon of a range of substituted bis(pyridin-2-yl)methane ligands are described. Aerial oxidation of bpm {bis(pyridin-2-yl)methane with Co(II)/dien or direct reaction with Co(dien)Cl 3 provided in low yield a single C-N condensation product 1 (at the primary terminal NH 2) after the pyridyl -CH 2- is formally oxidised to -CH +-. The methyl substituted ligand bpe {1,1-bis(pyridin-2-yl)ethane} behaves likewise, except both terminal (prim) and central (sec) amines condense to yield isomeric products 2 and 3. Two of these three materials have been characterised by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The corresponding reactions for the bis(pyridyl) ligand bpk {bis(pyridin-2-yl)ketone} provided C-N condensation products without the requirement for oxidation at the ?-C center; two carbinolamine complexes in different geometrical configurations resulted, mer-anti-[Co(dienbpc)Cl]ZnCl 4, 5, and unsym- fac-[Co(dienbpc)Cl]ZnCl 4, 6, {dienbpc=[2-(2-aminoethylamino)-ethylamino]-di-pyridin-2-yl-methanol}. In addition, a novel complex, [Co(bpk)(bpd-OH)Cl]ZnCl 4, 4, in which one bidentate N, N-bonded bpk ligand and one tridentate N, O, N-bonded bpd (the diol from bpk+OH -) were coordinated, was obtained via the Co(II)/O 2 synthetic route. When the bpc ligand (bpc=bis(pyridin-2-yl)methanol) was employed directly as a reagent along with dien, no condensation reactions were observed, but rather a single isomeric complex [Co(dien)(bpc)]Cl.ZnCl 4, 7, in which the ligand bpc acted as a N,N,O-bonded tridentate ligand rather than as a N,N-bidentate ligand was isolated. 13C, 1D and 2D 1H NMR studies are reported for all the complexes; they establish the structures unambiguously.

  8. Fruits and vegetables dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ita, A.; Flores, G.; Franco, F.

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration diagrams were determined by means of Differential Thermal Analysis, DTA, and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis, TGA, curves of several simultaneous fruits and vegetables, all under the same conditions. The greater mass loss is associated with water containing in the structure of the investigated materials at low temperature. In poblano chile water is lost in a single step. The banana shows a very sharply two stages, while jicama can be observed although with a little difficulty three stages. The major mass loss occurs in the poblano chile and the lower in banana. The velocity and temperature of dehydration vary within a small range for most materials investigated, except for banana and cactus how are very different.

  9. Purification and Characterization of OleA from Xanthomonas campestris and Demonstration of a Non-decarboxylative Claisen Condensation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Frias, JA; Richman, JE; Erickson, JS; Wackett, LP

    2011-03-25

    OleA catalyzes the condensation of fatty acyl groups in the first step of bacterial long-chain olefin biosynthesis, but the mechanism of the condensation reaction is controversial. In this study, OleA from Xanthomonas campestris was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein was shown to be active with fatty acyl-CoA substrates that ranged from C(8) to C(16) in length. With limiting myristoyl-CoA (C(14)), 1 mol of the free coenzyme A was released/mol of myristoyl-CoA consumed. Using [(14)C] myristoyl-CoA, the other products were identified as myristic acid, 2-myristoylmyristic acid, and 14-heptacosanone. 2-Myristoylmyristic acid was indicated to be the physiologically relevant product of OleA in several ways. First, 2-myristoylmyristic acid was the major condensed product in short incubations, but over time, it decreased with the concomitant increase of 14-heptacosanone. Second, synthetic 2-myristoylmyristic acid showed similar decarboxylation kinetics in the absence of OleA. Third, 2-myristoylmyristic acid was shown to be reactive with purified OleC and OleD to generate the olefin 14-heptacosene, a product seen in previous in vivo studies. The decarboxylation product, 14-heptacosanone, did not react with OleC and OleD to produce any demonstrable product. Substantial hydrolysis of fatty acyl-CoA substrates to the corresponding fatty acids was observed, but it is currently unclear if this occurs in vivo. In total, these data are consistent with OleA catalyzing a non-decarboxylative Claisen condensation reaction in the first step of the olefin biosynthetic pathway previously found to be present in at least 70 different bacterial strains.

  10. Dehydration in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Miller, Hayley J

    2015-09-01

    Dehydration affects 20% to 30% of older adults. It has a greater negative outcome in this population than in younger adults and increases mortality, morbidity, and disability. Dehydration is often caused by water deprivation in older adults, although excess water loss may also be a cause. Traditional markers for dehydration do not take into consideration many of the physiological differences present in older adults. Clinical assessment of dehydration in older adults poses different findings, yet is not always diagnostic. Treatment of dehydration should focus on prevention and early diagnosis before it negatively effects health and gives rise to comorbidities. The current article discusses what has most thoroughly been studied; the best strategies and assessment tools for evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of dehydration in older adults; and what needs to be researched further. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 41(9), 8-13.]. PMID:26375144

  11. Influence of the charge relay effect on the silanol condensation reaction as a model for silica biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Tatsuya; Nonoyama, Takayuki; Hirao, Kiyoshi; Kato, Katsuya

    2011-11-01

    The catalytic effect of various sequential peptides for silica biomineralization has been studied. In peptide sequence design, lysine (K) and histidine (H) were selected as the standard amino acids and aspartic acid (D) was selected to promote the charge relay effects, such as in the enzyme active site. Therefore, homopolypeptides (K(10) and H(10)), block polypeptides (K(5)D(5) and H(5)D(5)), and alternate polypeptides [(KD)(5) and (HD)(5)] were designed, and the dehydration reaction ability of trimethylethoxysilane was investigated as a quantitative model of silica mineralization. The catalytic activity per basic residue of alternate polypeptide was the highest because of the charge relay effects at the surface of the peptide. In silica mineralization using tetraethoxysilane, spherical silica particles were obtained, and their size is related to the catalytic activities of the peptides in the model systems. From these results, the effect of the functional group combination by the peptide sequence design enables the control of the efficiency of mineralization and preparation of specific inorganic materials. PMID:21939278

  12. Dehydration of fermentative 2,3-butanediol into methyl ethyl ketone

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, A.V.; Chambers, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    A solid acid catalyst consisted of sulfonic groups covalently bound to an inorganic matrice was developed to dehydrate 2,3-butanediol into methyl ethyl ketone. Rate constant and apparent activation energy of the dehydration reaction were determined. The decay course of the catalyst was a two-stage curve. The catalyst was deactivated more rapidly in the first stage than in the second stage. The strategy of maintaining constant degree of dehydration was employed to lengthen the lifetime of catalyst. Treatment of the 2,3-butanediol containing fermentation broth with activated carbon greatly facilitated the subsequent dehydration reaction.

  13. Linking the historical and chemical definitions of diabatic states for charge and excitation energy transfer reactions in condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-10-01

    Marcus theory of electron transfer (ET) and Förster theory of excitation energy transfer (EET) rely on the Condon approximation and the theoretical availability of initial and final states of ET and EET reactions, often called diabatic states. Recently [Subotnik et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 234102 (2009), 10.1063/1.3148777], diabatic states for practical calculations of ET and EET reactions were defined in terms of their interactions with the surrounding environment. However, from a purely theoretical standpoint, the definition of diabatic states must arise from the minimization of the dynamic couplings between the trial diabatic states. In this work, we show that if the Condon approximation is valid, then a minimization of the derived dynamic couplings leads to corresponding diabatic states for ET reactions taking place in solution by diagonalization of the dipole moment matrix, which is equivalent to a Boys localization algorithm; while for EET reactions in solution, diabatic states are found through the Edmiston-Ruedenberg localization algorithm. In the derivation, we find interesting expressions for the environmental contribution to the dynamic coupling of the adiabatic states in condensed-phase processes. In one of the cases considered, we find that such a contribution is trivially evaluable as a scalar product of the transition dipole moment with a quantity directly derivable from the geometry arrangement of the nuclei in the molecular environment. Possibly, this has applications in the evaluation of dynamic couplings for large scale simulations.

  14. Kinetics of volatile extraction from carbonaceous chondrites: Dehydration of talc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Ganguly, Jibamitra

    1991-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are believed to be the primary constituents of near-Earth asteroids and Phobos and Deimos, and are potential resources of fuels that may be exploited for future planetary missions. Calculations of equilibrium phase relations suggest that talc (Ta) and antigorite (Ant) are likely to be the major hydrous phases in the C1 and C2 meteorites (Ganguly and Saxena, 1989), which constitute the most volatile rich classes of carbonaceous chondrites. The dehydration kinetics of talc are studied as a function of temperature, grain size, composition and fluid fugacity, as part of a systematic study of the reaction kinetics of the volatile bearing phases that are either known or likely to be present in carbonaceous chondrites. The dehydration kinetics were investigated at 1 bar, 775 to 875 C by monitoring the in-situ weight loss as a function of time of a natural talc. The talc platelets had a dimension of 0.8 to 1 micron. The run durations varied from 233.3 hours at 775 C (48 percent dehydration) to 20.8 hours at 875 C (80 pct. dehydration). The results can be adequately represented by a given rate equation. Theoretical analysis suggests that the reduction in the concentration of H2O in the environment of dehydrating talc, as would be encountered in processing chondritic materials, will have negligible effect on the rate of dehydration, unless there is a change of reaction mechanism owing to the presence of other volatile species.

  15. Dynamic dehydration processes of porous antigorite by impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Toshimori; Kimura, Tomoaki; Mashimo, Tutomu; Kobayashi, Takamichi

    2013-06-01

    Antigorite Hugoniot indicates that it is stable up to a pressure of ~50 GPa. When antigorite is under a circumstance surrounding pores in natural meteorite, the stability may change with local temperature rising effects. Since antigorite acts a potential carrier of water in the solar system, the dynamic dehydration process is a key to understand the ability of carrier. We carried out shock recovery experiments in a pressure range between 5 GPa and 60 GPa. The recovered samples were investigated using XRD, TEM, and TG-DTA. In order to recover samples, it was found that the amount of sample was critical. There seems to be two steps of dehydration processes; limited dehydration below 20 GPa and violent dehydrations above 20 GPa. The violent reaction depends on the porosity of a sample. The TG-DTA results couples with XRD indicate that dehydration products are forsrerite and enstatite without their high-pressure forms and hydrous minerals. The amount of amorous phase was only a trace based on the TEM observations, implying that dehydration reaction may have occurred at high temperatures for the crystals to grow during pressure release.

  16. Survey of quality indicators in commercial dehydrated fruits.

    PubMed

    Megías-Pérez, Roberto; Gamboa-Santos, Juliana; Soria, Ana Cristina; Villamiel, Mar; Montilla, Antonia

    2014-05-01

    Physical and chemical quality parameters (dry matter, aw, protein, carbohydrates, vitamin C, 2-furoylmethyl amino acids, rehydration ratio and leaching loss) have been determined in 30 commercial dehydrated fruits (strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, cranberry, cherry, apple, grapefruit, mango, kiwifruit, pineapple, melon, coconut, banana and papaya). For comparison purposes, strawberry samples processed in the laboratory by freeze-drying and by convective drying were used as control samples. Overall quality of dehydrated fruits seemed to be greatly dependent on processing conditions and, in a cluster analysis, samples which were presumably subjected to osmotic dehydration were separated from the rest of fruits. These samples presented the lowest concentration of vitamin C and the highest evolution of Maillard reaction, as evidenced by its high concentration of 2-furoylmethyl amino acids. This is the first study on the usefulness of this combination of chemical and physical indicators to assess the overall quality of commercial dehydrated fruits. PMID:24360417

  17. The Aldol Addition and Condensation: The Effect of Conditions on Reaction Pathway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouch, R. David; Richardson, Amie; Howard, Jessica L.; Harker, Rebecca L.; Barker, Kathryn H.

    2007-01-01

    The reaction of a ketone and an aldehyde in aqueous Na[subscript 2]CO[subscript 2] is described. This experiment is performed in the absence of strong bases or organic solvents and offers the opportunity for students to observe the critical role that reaction temperature and base strength have in determining the product of the base-mediated…

  18. 7 CFR 993.15 - Dehydrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...PRUNES PRODUCED IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 993.15 Dehydrator. Dehydrator means any person who produces prunes by drying or dehydrating plums by means of sun-drying or artificial...

  19. CATALYTIC INFRARED DEHYDRATION OF ONIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dehydrated onions are commonly dried with convection heating which is inefficient and costly. This study compared the drying and quality characteristics of onion dried with catalytic infrared (CIR) heating and forced air convection (FAC) heating. Sliced high solids onions were dehydrated under nin...

  20. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  1. 7 CFR 989.12 - Dehydrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions...Dehydrator means any person who produces raisins by dehydrating grapes by artificial...

  2. 7 CFR 989.12 - Dehydrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions...Dehydrator means any person who produces raisins by dehydrating grapes by artificial...

  3. 7 CFR 989.12 - Dehydrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions...Dehydrator means any person who produces raisins by dehydrating grapes by artificial...

  4. 7 CFR 989.12 - Dehydrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions...Dehydrator means any person who produces raisins by dehydrating grapes by artificial...

  5. 7 CFR 989.12 - Dehydrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions...Dehydrator means any person who produces raisins by dehydrating grapes by artificial...

  6. Models of glycolysis: Glyceraldehyde as a source of energy and monomers for prebiotic condensation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    All organisms require energy in a chemical form for maintenance and growth. In contemporary life this chemical energy is obtained by the synthesis of the phosphoanhydride bonds of ATP. Among the biological processes that yield ATP, fermentation is generally considered primitive, because it operates under anaerobic conditions by substrate-level phosphorylation which does not require compartmentation by membranes. Fermentation by the glycolytic pathway, which is found in almost every living cell, is an especially attractive energy source for primitive life. Glycolysis not only produces useful chemical energy (ATP), but intermediates of this pathway are also involved in amino acid synthesis and photosynthetic carbon-fixation. It is believed that energy and substrates needed for the origin of life were provided by nonenzymatic chemical reactions that resemble the enzyme-mediated reactions of glycolysis. These nonenzymatic reactions would have provided a starting point for the evolutionary development of glycolysis.

  7. Possible mechanism of structural incorporation of Al into diatomite during the deposition process I. Via a condensation reaction of hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Wenbin; Deng, Liangliang; Yuan, Weiwei; Ma, Lingya; Yuan, Peng; Du, Peixin; He, Hongping

    2016-01-01

    The structural incorporation of aluminium (Al) into diatomite is investigated by preparing several Al-diatomite composites by loading an Al precursor, hydroxyl aluminum polymer (Al13), onto the surface of diatomite and heating at various temperatures. The results indicate that Al was incorporated and implanted into the structure of diatomite by the condensation reaction of the hydroxyl groups of Al13 and diatomite, and the Si-O-Al(OH) groups were formed during the condensation reaction. Al incorporation by the condensation reaction of hydroxyl groups of Al13 with single silanols of diatomite occurred more readily than that with geminal silanols. The Al incorporation increased solid acidity of diatomite after Al incorporation. The acidity improvement was various for different types of acid sites, depending on the preparation temperature of the Al-incorporated diatomite. Both Brønsted and Lewis acid sites increased greatly after heating at 250 and 350°C, but only L acid sites significantly improved after heating at 500°C. These results demonstrate that the structural incorporation of Al(3+) ions into diatomite can occur by the condensation reaction of the hydroxyl groups of the Al precursors and diatomite. Moreover, the rich solid acid sites of Al-incorporated diatomite show its promising application as a solid acid catalyst. PMID:26397911

  8. Experimental and phenomenological comparison between Piezonuclear reactions and Condensed Matter Nuclear Science phenomenology

    E-print Network

    F. Cardone; R. Mignani; A. Petrucci

    2011-03-06

    The purpose of this paper is to place side by side the experimental results of Piezonu- clear reactions, which have been recently unveiled, and those collected during the last twenty years of experiments on low energy nuclear reactions (LENR). We will briefy re- port the results of our campaign of piezonuclear reactions experiments where ultrasounds and cavitation were applied to solutions of stable elements. These outcomes will be shown to be compatible with the results and evidences obtained from low energy nuclear reac- tion experiments. Some theoretical concepts and ideas, on which our experiments are grounded, will be sketched and it will be shown that, in order to trigger our measured effects, it exists an energy threshold, that has to be overcome, and a maximum inter- val of time for this energy to be released to the nuclear system. Eventually, a research hypothesis will be put forward about the chance to raise the level of analogy from the mere comparison of results up to the phenomenological level. Here, among the various evidences collected in LENR experiments, we will search for hints about the overcome of the energy threshold and about the mechanism that releases the loaded energy in a suitable interval of time.

  9. Experimental and phenomenological comparison between Piezonuclear reactions and Condensed Matter Nuclear Science phenomenology

    E-print Network

    Cardone, F; Petrucci, A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to place side by side the experimental results of Piezonu- clear reactions, which have been recently unveiled, and those collected during the last twenty years of experiments on low energy nuclear reactions (LENR). We will briefy re- port the results of our campaign of piezonuclear reactions experiments where ultrasounds and cavitation were applied to solutions of stable elements. These outcomes will be shown to be compatible with the results and evidences obtained from low energy nuclear reac- tion experiments. Some theoretical concepts and ideas, on which our experiments are grounded, will be sketched and it will be shown that, in order to trigger our measured effects, it exists an energy threshold, that has to be overcome, and a maximum inter- val of time for this energy to be released to the nuclear system. Eventually, a research hypothesis will be put forward about the chance to raise the level of analogy from the mere comparison of results up to the phenomenological level. H...

  10. Reaction engineering of co-condensing (methyl)ethoxysilane mixtures: Kinetic characterization and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    RANKIN,STEPHEN E.; MCCORMICK,ALON V.

    2000-01-26

    Molecular homogeneity frequently plays a decisive role in the effective application of organically modified silicate copolymers. However, methods of directly characterizing copolymerization extent in siloxanes generated from mixed alkoxysilanes are not always available or convenient. The authors present an alternative tool for determining kinetic parameters for models of alkoxysilane hydrolytic copolycondensation. Rather than restricting attention to single step batch reactors, they use a semibatch reactor with varying time of injection of one component. They describe the fitting method and show that all necessary kinetic parameters can be determined from a series of ordinary {sup 29}Si NMR data in a straightforward case study: copolymerization of dimethyldiethoxy silane and trimethylethoxysilane. Under conditions providing no direct {sup 29}Si NMR signature of copolymerization, they find kinetic trends consistent with those previously reported. As further validation, the results of a new series of experiments (varying the ratio of mono-functional to difunctional monomer) are predicted by the semibatch copolymerization model and measured parameters. Based on these results, they are able to calculate the molecular homogeneity in the copolymer products investigated. Even for this relatively simple system, the optimal injection time is a complex function of residence time, but early injection of the faster-condensing monomer gives the best homogeneity at long residence times.

  11. Dehydration-driven topotaxy in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Tommasi, Andréa; Garrido, Carlos J.

    2014-05-01

    Mineral replacement reactions play a fundamental role in the chemistry and the strength of the lithosphere. When externally or internally derived fluids are present, interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation is the driving mechanism for such reactions [1]. One of the microstructural features of this process is a 3D arrangement of crystallographic axes across internal interfaces (topotaxy) between reactant and product phases. Dehydration reactions are a special case of mineral replacement reaction that generates a transient fluid-filled porosity. Among others, the dehydration serpentinite is of special relevance in subduction zones because of the amount of fluids involved (potentially up to 13 wt.%). Two topotatic relationships between olivine and antigorite (the serpentine mineral stable at high temperature and pressure) have been reported in partially hydrated mantle wedge xenoliths [2]. Therefore, if precursor antigorite serpentine has a strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) its dehydration might result in prograde peridotite with a strong inherited CPO. However for predicting the importance of topotactic reactions for seismic anisotropy of subduction zones we also need to consider the crystallization orthopyroxene + chlorite in the prograde reaction and, more importantly, the fact that this dehydration reaction produces a transient porosity of ca. 20 % vol. that results in local fluctuations of strain during compaction and fluid migration. We address this issue by a microstructural comparison between the CPO developed in olivine, orthopyroxene and chlorite during high-pressure antigorite dehydration in piston cylinder experiments (at 750ºC and 20 kbar and 1000ºC and 30 kbar, 168 h) and that recorded in natural samples (Cerro del Almirez, Betic Cordillera, Spain). Experimentally developed CPOs are strong. Prograde minerals show a significant inheritance of the former antigorite foliation. Topotactic relations are dominated by (001)atg//(100)ol// (100)opx//(001)chl. The relation [010]atg// [001]ol //[001]opx can also be inferred but it is weaker. Similar topotactic relations are observed in the Cerro del Almirez samples, but the CPOs are weaker and more complex. The complexity arises from constant interfacial angles and systematic low-index interfacial contacts between orthopyroxene-olivine-chlorite (e.g. (001)chl // (100)opx). As a consequence the inheritance from the antigorite serpentinite is partially obliterated. Compaction-related microstructural features are also present including: (1) smooth bending of the former foliation and diffuse olivine veinlets perpendicular to it, (2) gradual crystallographic misorientation (up to 15º) of prismatic enstatite due to buckling, (3) localized orthoenstatite(Pbca)/low clinoenstatite (P21/c) inversion, and (4) brittle fracturing of prismatic enstatite wrapped by plastically deformed chlorite. These observations suggest that topotactic crystrallographic relations are dominant in undrained systems, but that the mechanisms allowing for compaction and fluid draining significantly affect the final texture in drained systems. Because the second case prevails in subduction zones, compaction mechanisms need to be better understood for modelling the development of CPOs after foliated protoliths in the slab and the mantle wedge. [1] Putnis, A., 2009. Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry 70, 87-124. [2] Boudier, F., et al. 2010 J. Petrology 51, 495-512.

  12. Dehydrated fluid and seismic deformation in deep subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    It has been considered that there is a correlation between the double seismic zone and metamorphic dehydration reaction in deep slab. The location of the upper limits of the upper seismic plane correspond to metamorphic facies boundary where H2O contents change in subducting crust; numerous earthquakes from 60 to 110 km depths in the lawsonite-blueschist facies, many earthquakes in the lower crust of the slab from 110 to 150 km depths in the lawsonite-amphibole eclogite facies and few earthquakes in the lawsonite eclogite facies. There is still minor amount of H2O present in the lawsonite eclogite facies. The dehydrated fluid is not the only trigger to cause slab earthquake. Recent petrological researches have revealed that both blueschist and lawsonite eclogite are stable in the same pressure and temperature condition because chemical variation including water content creates both lawsonite-amphibole eclogite and lawsonite eclogite in different portion of subducted crust. It would cause stress localization and hydro-fracturing in the slab in the shallower part (depths ranging from 60 to 110 km) and lawsonite amphibole eclogite in the lower crust in the deeper part (from 110 to 150 km depth) in the upper seismic plane. The lower plane of the double seismic zone, is considered to be related to dehydration reaction in the slab. Metamorphic olivine has been described in vein from serpentinite mylonite. The vein was created by dehydration reaction to decompose antigorite under shear deformation. In the cold slab beneath Tohoku arc, the reaction has a negative slope in P-T space and forms olivine+orthopyroxene+fluid. In the warm slab beneath SW Japan, the reaction has a positive slope in P-T space and forms olivine+talc+fluid. The above these dehydration reactions are well-described in the serpentinite from high P/T metamorphic belt from Spain, and Italy, respectively.

  13. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the impact of various factors on the "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated sulfuric acid including the type of sugar, the degree of fineness of the sugar crystals, and the amount of water added. (JRH)

  14. Alcohol dehydration: Mechanism of ether formation using an alumina catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, B.; Davis, B.H.

    1995-12-01

    Ether formation during the dehydration of secondary alcohols, namely, 2-butanol, 3-pentanol, and 1-cyclopentylethanol, was investigated. Using the proper reaction conditions, the yield of di-2-butyl ether during the dehydration of 2-butanol on alumina can be as high as 40%. That ether is formed by adding an alcohol to the alkene is ruled out by the results from deuterium tracer studies. Results from experiments using S(+)- 2-butanol suggest that the formation of di-2-butyl ether occurs by a S{sub N}2-type mechanism. 33 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. May eclogite dehydration cause slab fracturation ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loury, Chloé; Lanari, Pierre; Rolland, Yann; Guillot, Stéphane; Ganino, Clément

    2015-04-01

    Petrological and geophysical evidences strongly indicate that fluids releases play a fundamental role in subduction zones as in subduction-related seismicity and arc magmatism. It is thus important to assess quantitatively their origin and to try to quantify the amount of such fluids. In HP metamorphism, it is well known that pressure-dependent dehydration reactions occur during the prograde path. Many geophysical models show that the variations in slab physical properties along depth could be linked to these fluid occurrences. However it remains tricky to test such models on natural sample, as it is difficult to assess or model the water content evolution in HP metamorphic rocks. This difficulty is bound to the fact that these rocks are generally heterogeneous, with zoned minerals and preservation of different paragenesis reflecting changing P-T conditions. To decipher the P-T-X(H2O) path of such heterogeneous rocks the concept of local effective bulk (LEB) composition is essential. Here we show how standardized X-ray maps can be used to constrain the scale of the equilibration volume of a garnet porphyroblast and to measure its composition. The composition of this equilibrium volume may be seen as the proportion of the rock likely to react at a given time to reach a thermodynamic equilibrium with the growing garnet. The studied sample is an eclogite coming from the carboniferous South-Tianshan suture (Central Asia) (Loury et al. in press). Compositional maps of a garnet and its surrounding matrix were obtained from standardized X-ray maps processed with the program XMapTools (Lanari et al, 2014). The initial equilibration volume was modeled using LEB compositions combined together with Gibbs free energy minimization. P-T sections were calculated for the next stages of garnet growth taking into account the fractionation of the composition at each stage of garnet growth. The modeled P-T-X(H2O) path indicates that the rock progressively dehydrates during the prograde path, leading to a complete dehydration at the pressure peak conditions, (25 kbar and 510°C). The amount of water released during this stage is about 20 g/dm3. In this example, no hydration event is recorded during the exhumation, explaining the good preservation of the anhydrous eclogite. This study shows that garnet thermobarometry in eclogite may be used as a proxy for progressive oceanic crust dehydration as suggested by the models of Baxter & Caddick (2014). In contrast to such models, the estimations proposed in the present study are based on the measured composition of local domains in rock-samples and not on average bulk rock compositions. Complete dehydration of eclogites around 75 km corresponds to the maximum depth of most exhumed oceanic eclogites except for a few special cases. Moreover the distribution of seismicity along the slab shows that only few earthquakes do occur in the crust beyond this limit as compared to the seismicity above it. Consequently this example from a natural sample strongly suggests that the eclogite dehydration at this depth can cause slab fracturation and consequently enhance eclogite exhumation. Baxter, E.F. & Caddick, M.J. 2013. Garnet growth as a proxy for progressive subduction zone dehydration. Geology, 41, 643-646 Lanari, P., Vidal, O., De Andrade, V., Dubacq, B., Lewin, E., Grosch, E.G. & Schwartz, S. 2014. XMapTools: A MATLAB©-based program for electron microprobe X-ray image processing and geothermobarometry. Computers & Geosciences, 62, 227-240 Loury, C., Rolland, Y., Guillot, S., Mikolaichuk, A., Lanari, P., Bruguier, O. & Bosch, D. in press. Crustal-scale structure of South Tien Shan : implications for subduction polarity and Cenozoic reactivation. Geological Society of London, special publications

  16. Intramolecular condensation reactions of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes. Formation of cyclic disilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Small, J.H.; Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J.

    1996-09-04

    In this paper, we used mass spectrometry and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy to discover that the length of the alkylene-bridging groups had a pronounced effect on the competition between cyclization and polymerization of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes and on the formation of polymeric gels. While the intramolecular reaction clearly slows gelation, the cyclic disilsesquioxanes are still tetrafunctional monomers theoretically capable of forming polymeric gels. If the ring structures, which bear a striking resemblence to carbohydrates, are preserved through the polymerization, the resulting poly(cyclic disilsesquioxane) gels may have structural similarities to branched or cross-linked carbohydrates, such as cellulose or chitosan. Under base-catalyzed sol-gel polymerization conditions, 3 and 4 (six- and seven-membered cyclic disilsesquioxanes, respectively) quickly reacted to give gels with significant ring opening as determined from the {sup 29}Si chemical shifts in solid-state (CP MAS) NMR spectra. However, gels prepared under acidic conditions reveal some or all of the cyclic disilsesquioxane functionality was preserved in the polymers. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Kinetic studies of catalytic dehydration of tert-butanol on zeolite NaH-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.; Makarova, M.A.; Malysheva, L.V.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Talsi, E.P.; Zamaraev, K.I. ); Thomas, J.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Using a combination of FTIR spectroscopy an GC kinetic methods, the authors have studied in detail the adsorption and dehydration reaction of tert-butanol (t-BuOH) on H-ZSM-5. From FTIR studies of the kinetics of t-BuOh adsorption, the authors estimate the diffusion coefficient of t-BuOH in the zeolite channels as 5 x 10{sup {minus}11}cm{sup 2}s{sup {minus}1} at 23{degree}C. The course of the dehydration reaction with time (in the temperature interval 23-60{degree}C) is followed by simultaneous growth of a peak for adsorbed water, changes in the stretching and deformation vibrations for the adsorbed organic, and changes in the nature of the H-bonded species. These changes show that dehydration is accompanied by rapid isomerization and oligomerization of the butene product (the rates of isomerization and oligomerization substantially exceed the rate of dehydration), making it impossible to identify the intermediate for the dehydration reaction (be it carbonium ion or alkoxy species). Under reaction conditions the oligomers (most likely linear C{sub 8} species) remain adsorbed on the active sites inside the zeolite channels, resulting in rapid deactivation of the sites. When the sites within the zeolite pores are completely deactivated, the dehydration reaction proceeds on sites located at the external surface of the zeolite crystallites. The latter sites are deactivated much more slowly than the former ones under these reaction conditions.

  18. Microwave-Assisted Condensation Reactions of Acetophenone Derivatives and Activated Methylene Compounds with Aldehydes Catalyzed by Boric Acid under Solvent-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Brun, Elodie; Safer, Abdelmounaim; Carreaux, François; Bourahla, Khadidja; L'helgoua'ch, Jean-Martial; Bazureau, Jean-Pierre; Villalgordo, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    We here disclosed a new protocol for the condensation of acetophenone derivatives and active methylene compounds with aldehydes in the presence of boric acid under microwave conditions. Implementation of the reaction is simple, healthy and environmentally friendly owing to the use of a non-toxic catalyst coupled to a solvent-free procedure. A large variety of known or novel compounds have thus been prepared, including with substrates bearing acid or base-sensitive functional groups. PMID:26111185

  19. Seed dehydration and the establishment of desiccation tolerance during seed maturation is altered in the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant atem6-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The end of orthodox seed development is typified by a developmentally regulated period of dehydration leading to the loss of bulk water from the entire structure. When dehydration occurs, the cytoplasm condenses and intracellular components become more crowded, providing an environment amenable to ...

  20. A small scale honey dehydrator.

    PubMed

    Gill, R S; Hans, V S; Singh, Sukhmeet; Pal Singh, Parm; Dhaliwal, S S

    2015-10-01

    A small scale honey dehydrator has been designed, developed, and tested to reduce moisture content of honey below 17 %. Experiments have been conducted for honey dehydration by using drying air at ambient temperature, 30 and 40 °C and water at 35, 40 and 45 °C. In this dehydrator, hot water has been circulated in a water jacket around the honey container to heat honey. The heated honey has been pumped through a sieve to form honey streams through which drying air passes for moisture removal. The honey streams help in increasing the exposed surface area of honey in contact with drying air, thus resulting in faster dehydration of honey. The maximum drying rate per square meter area of honey exposed to drying air was found to be 197.0 g/h-m(2) corresponding to the drying air and water temperature of 40 and 45 °C respectively whereas it was found to be minimum (74.8 g/h-m(2)) corresponding to the drying air at ambient temperature (8-17 °C) and water at 35 °C. The energy cost of honey moisture content reduction from 25.2 to 16.4 % was Rs. 6.20 to Rs. 17.36 (US $ 0.10 to US $ 0.28 (One US $ = 62.00 Indian Rupee on February, 2014) per kilogram of honey. PMID:26396418

  1. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.; Netzel, D.A.

    1994-04-01

    The results of coal swelling measurements using 1,4-dioxane as the swelling reagent for premoisturized coals (raw) and coal dried thermally, chemically, and with microwave radiation are presented. An increase in the swelling ratio relative to raw coal indicates a decrease in the amount of cross-linking in the coal. Conversely, a decrease in the ratio indicates an increase in cross-linking. The extent of cross-linking (as measured by 1,4-dioxane) for Texas, Black Thunder, and Eagle Butte Coals are about the same. Illinois {number_sign}6 coal appears to have less cross-linking relative to the other three coals. These results are expected on the basis of coal rank. The increase in cross linking is most pronounced for coals dried thermally and with microwave radiation. A decrease in the swelling ratios for all four coals suggests that cross-linking had occurred possibly due to partial devolatilization process. However, low temperature, chemical dehydration of the coals causes only a small or no change in the internal structure for Texas and Illinois {number_sign}6 coals whereas a significant decrease in the cross-linking structure for the Black Thunder and Eagle Butte coals is observed. It is possible that the solvent (CH{sub 3}OH) and products resulting from the chemical dehydrating (acetone and methanol) occupy the surface sites that water had before the reaction and thus preventing cross-linking to occur. These reagents can also promote swelling of coals and may account for some of the decrease in the cross-linking of the coal structure observed for the chemically dried coals.

  2. Slab dehydration recorded in subducted serpentine sea-mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, K.; Fukumura, S.; Ishimori, C.; Jung, H.

    2014-12-01

    It has been considered that there is a correlation between the double seismic zones and metamorphic dehydration reaction in deep slab. The lower seismic plane of the double seismic zone is considered to be located on the 600 oC isotherm in the subducting lithosphere. Antigorite terminal reaction is highly temperature sensitive around 600 oC. Therefore it has been proposed that the oceanic lithosphere was hydrated forming serpentine prior to subduction, then serpentine was decomposed to release fluid causing dehydration embrittlement in the slab. In order to unravel relation between dehydration and seismic deformation, we have investigated dehydration process of natural metamorphic rocks recording very cold geothermal history in the crust and lithosphere in the slab. Metamorphic olivine after antigorite has been described in Italian Alps and also from the Mt. Shiraga, Japan [1]. However, the olivine was formed with talc and fluid by antigorite breakdown reaction in pressures lower than 1.5 GPa. Spinifex olivine with opx in the Cerro del Almirez [2], is the product at pressures (P > 1.5 GPa) relevant to the lower seismic plane beneath Northeast Japan. It clearly indicates the presence of large amount of water facilitate crystallization of elongated olivine with opx. It is also supported by LPO pattern of olivines determined by EBSD. Fine-grained olivine-rich samples shows that Type-C fabric pattern is dominant, suggesting deformation under water-rich condition [3]. With metamorphic olivines, chlorite was also recrystallized, suggesting that water would be transported farther down to deep. The estimated dehydration reaction has a negative P-T slope at pressures higher than 1.5 GPa. The reaction is volume reducing reaction and the olivine-opx spinifex texture was formed under volume reducing reaction. In the warm slab beneath SW Japan, the reaction has a positive slope in P-T space and forms olivine+talc+fluid. From microstrucral and petrological analysis of the Serpentinite in the Sambagawa high P/T metamorphic rocks, we found that the olivine with talc, is preserved mainly in the vein along the shear crack in mylonitized serpentinite. References: [1] K. Okamoto et al., Geochemistry, 46 205-215 (2013). [2] V. Trommsdorff et al., CMP, 132, 139-148 (1998). [3] Jung H, Karato S., Science 293, 1460-1463 (2001)

  3. The physiological effects of dehydration caused by sweat loss. [athletes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, S.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms of fluid loss in the human body while sweating due to physical exercise are discussed. Trained and untrained persons were examined and compared. Since sweat is hypotonous, a disruption in the hydrosalinic balance occurs; the consequences of this finding, also pertaining to the fluid and electrolytic substitution, are presented. Further explanations on the problem of dehydration refer to reactions of individual organ systems, to alterations in bodily capabilities as well as to questions relating to sex and age.

  4. Slab dehydration and deep water recycling through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, Valentina; Bouilhol, Pierre; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    The fate of water in subduction zones is a key feature that influences the magmatism of the arcs, the rheology of the mantle, and the recycling of volatiles. We investigate the dehydration processes in subduction zones and their implications for the water cycle throughout Earth's history. We use a numerical tool that combines thermo-mechanical models with a thermodynamic database to examine slab dehydration for present-day and early Earth settings and its consequences for the deep water recycling. We investigate the reactions responsible for releasing water from the crust and the hydrated lithospheric mantle and how they change with subduction velocity, slab age, and mantle potential temperature. Our results show that faster slabs dehydrate over a wide area: they start dehydrating shallower and they carry water deeper into the mantle. A hotter mantle (i.e., early Earth setting) drives the onset of crustal dehydration slightly shallower, but, mostly, dehydration reactions are very similar to those occurring in present-day setting. However, for very fast slabs and very hot mantle epidote is involved as a dehydrating crustal phase. Moreover, we provide a scaling law to estimate the amount of water that can be carried deep into the mantle. We generally observe that a 1) 100°C increase in the mantle temperature, or 2) ~15 Myr decrease of plate age, or 3) decrease in subduction velocity of ~2 cm/yr all have the same effect on the amount of water retained in the slab at depth, corresponding to a decrease of ~2.2x105 kg/m2 of H2O. We estimate that for present-day conditions ~26% of the global influx water, or 7x108 Tg/Myr of H2O, is recycled into the mantle. Using a realistic distribution of subduction parameters, we illustrate that deep water recycling might still be possible in early Earth conditions, although its efficiency would generally decrease. Indeed, 0.5-3.7x108 Tg/Myr of H2O could still be recycled in the mantle at 2.8 Ga.

  5. Microfluidic Droplet Dehydration for Concentrating Processes in Biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anna, Shelley

    2014-03-01

    Droplets in microfluidic devices have proven useful as picoliter reactors for biochemical processing operations such as polymerase chain reaction, protein crystallization, and the study of enzyme kinetics. Although droplets are typically considered to be self-contained, constant volume reactors, there can be significant transport between the dispersed and continuous phases depending on solubility and other factors. In the present talk, we show that water droplets trapped within a microfluidic device for tens of hours slowly dehydrate, concentrating the contents encapsulated within. We use this slow dehydration along with control of the initial droplet composition to influence gellation, crystallization, and phase separation processes. By examining these concentrating processes in many trapped drops at once we gain insight into the stochastic nature of the events. In one example, we show that dehydration rate impacts the probability of forming a specific crystal habit in a crystallizing amino acid. In another example, we phase separate a common aqueous two-phase system within droplets and use the ensuing two phases to separate DNA from an initial mixture. We further influence wetting conditions between the two aqueous polymer phases and the continuous oil, promoting complete de-wetting and physical separation of the polymer phases. Thus, controlled dehydration of droplets allows for concentration, separation, and purification of important biomolecules on a chip.

  6. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  7. Direct synthesis of C-glycosides from unprotected 2-N-acyl-aldohexoses via aldol condensation-oxa-Michael reactions with unactivated ketones.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sherida; Tanaka, Fujie

    2016-01-01

    C-glycosides are important compounds as they are used as bioactive molecules and building blocks. We have developed methods to concisely synthesize C-glycosides from unprotected 2-N-acyl-aldohexoses and unactivated ketones; we designed aldol-condensation-oxa-Michael addition reactions catalyzed by amine-based catalysts using additives. Depending on the conditions used, C-glycosides were stereoselectively obtained. Our methods allowed the C-C bond formations at the anomeric centers of unprotected carbohydrates under mild conditions to lead the C-glycosides in atom- and step-economical ways. PMID:26565955

  8. Transport-induced shifts in condensate dew-point and composition in multicomponent systems with chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Partial heterogeneous condensation phenomena in multicomponent reacting systems are analyzed taking into consideration the chemical element transport phenomena. It is demonstrated that the dew-point surface temperature in chemically reactive systems is not a purely thermodynamic quantity, but is influenced by the multicomponent diffusion and Soret-mass diffusion phenomena. Several distinct dew-points are shown to exist in such systems and, as a result of transport constraints, the 'sharp' locus between two chemically distinct condensates is systematically moved to a difference mainstream composition.

  9. Processes forming Gas, Tar, and Coke in Cellulose Gasification from Gas-Phase Reactions of Levoglucosan as Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Asuka; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of levoglucosan (LG), the major intermediate species during cellulose gasification, was studied experimentally over the temperature range of 400-900?°C. Gaseous LG did not produce any dehydration products, which include coke, furans, and aromatic substances, although these are characteristic products of the pyrolysis of molten LG. Alternatively, at >500?°C, gaseous LG produced only fragmentation products, such as noncondensable gases and condensable C1 -C3 fragments, as intermediates during noncondensable gas formation. Therefore, it was determined that secondary reactions of gaseous LG can result in the clean (tar- and coke-free) gasification of cellulose. Cooling of the remaining LG in the gas phase caused coke formation by the transition of the LG to the molten state. The molecular mechanisms that govern the gas- and molten-phase reactions of LG are discussed in terms of the acid catalyst effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding to promote the molten-phase dehydration reactions. PMID:26099988

  10. Dehydration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Get Help IV (Video) Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea Energy Drinks and Food Bars: Power or Hype? Sports Center Caffeine What's a Healthy Alternative to Water? Contact Us Print Additional resources Send ...

  11. Dehydration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... too much, for example, from exercising in hot weather Fever Vomiting or diarrhea Urinating too much (uncontrolled ... when you are well. Drink more when the weather is hot or you are exercising. If anyone ...

  12. A dehydration mechanism for the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielsen, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    Although mean circulations are generally credited with dehydration of the earth's stratosphere, convective instability in the tropics converts mean circulations to small residuals of local convective circulations. The effects of large cumulonimbus which penetrate the stratosphere and form huge anvils in the lower stratosphere are discussed with respect to hydration and dehydration of the stratosphere. Radiative heating at anvil base combined with cooling at anvil top drives a dehydration engine considered essential to explain the dry stratosphere. Seasonal and longitudinal variations in dehydration potentials are examined with maximum potential attributed to Micronesian area during winter and early spring.

  13. NUMERICAL TECHNIQUES TO SOLVE CONDENSATIONAL AND DISSOLUTIONAL GROWTH EQUATIONS WHEN GROWTH IS COUPLED TO REVERSIBLE REACTIONS (R823186)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noniterative, unconditionally stable numerical techniques for solving condensational and
    dissolutional growth equations are given. Growth solutions are compared to Gear-code solutions for
    three cases when growth is coupled to reversible equilibrium chemistry. In all cases, ...

  14. Heat integrated ethanol dehydration flowsheets

    SciTech Connect

    Hutahaean, L.S.; Shen, W.H.; Brunt, V. Van

    1995-04-01

    zA theoretical evaluation of heat-integrated heterogeneous-azeotropic ethanol-water distillation flowsheets is presented. Simulations of two column flowsheets using several different hydrocarbon entrainers reveal a region of potential heat integration and substantial reduction in operating energy. In this paper, methods for comparing hydrocarbon entrainers are shown. Two aspects of entrainers are related to operating and capital costs. The binary azeotropic composition of the entrainer-ethanol mixture is related to the energy requirements of the flowsheet. A temperature difference in the azeotrophic column is related to the size of the column and overall process staging requirements. Although the hydrophobicity of an entrainer is essential for specification of staging in the dehydration column, no substantial increase in operating energy results from an entrainer that has a higher water content. Likewise, liquid-liquid equilibria between several entrainer-ethanol-water mixtures have no substantial effect on either staging or operation. Rather, increasing the alcohol content of the entrainer-ethanol azeotrope limits its recovery in the dehydration column, and increases the recycle and reflux streams. These effects both contribute to increasing the separation energy requirements and reducing the region of potential heat integration. A cost comparison with a multieffect extractive distillation flowsheet reveals that the costs are comparable; however, the extractive distillation flowsheet is more cost effective as operating costs increase.

  15. Intermediate-depth earthquake faulting by dehydration embrittlement with negative volume change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Haemyeong; Green, Harry W., II; Dobrzhinetskaya, Larissa F.

    2004-04-01

    Earthquakes are observed to occur in subduction zones to depths of approximately 680km, even though unassisted brittle failure is inhibited at depths greater than about 50km, owing to the high pressures and temperatures. It is thought that such earthquakes (particularly those at intermediate depths of 50-300km) may instead be triggered by embrittlement accompanying dehydration of hydrous minerals, principally serpentine. A problem with failure by serpentine dehydration is that the volume change accompanying dehydration becomes negative at pressures of 2-4GPa (60-120km depth), above which brittle fracture mechanics predicts that the instability should be quenched. Here we show that dehydration of antigorite serpentinite under stress results in faults delineated by ultrafine-grained solid reaction products formed during dehydration. This phenomenon was observed under all conditions tested (pressures of 1-6GPa temperatures of 650-820°C), independent of the sign of the volume change of reaction. Although this result contradicts expectations from fracture mechanics, it can be explained by separation of fluid from solid residue before and during faulting, a hypothesis supported by our observations. These observations confirm that dehydration embrittlement is a viable mechanism for nucleating earthquakes independent of depth, as long as there are hydrous minerals breaking down under a differential stress.

  16. An efficient synthesis of novel bis-triazole glycoconjugates via a three-component condensation as a key reaction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Gu, Zhenlong; He, Caiyu; Jin, Jie; Wang, Lijun; Li, Guojun; Sun, Bei; Wang, Hui; Bai, Jun

    2015-09-23

    Novel bis-triazole glycoconjugates were designed and prepared successfully via 5 steps from propargyl per-O-acetyl-?-d-glucoside or xyloside (total yield of 48-53%), after utilizing a three-component condensation of propargyl per-O-acetyl-?-d-glycoside, formaldehyde, and sodium azide as a key step to synthesize 2-hydroxymethyl-2H-1,2,3-triazole glycoconjugates. The developed bis-triazole glycoconjugates would be crucial in antivirus pharmacology and chemical biology. PMID:26257377

  17. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...powder). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound, mature, good quality, edible beets. (2) Color additive mixtures made with dehydrated beets may contain as diluents only...

  18. Spectral effects of dehydration on phyllosilicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckenthal, E. A.; Singer, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    Six phyllosilicates were progressively dehydrated under controlled conditions in an effort to study the spectral effects of their dehydration. The spectra obtained at each level of hydration provide information that may be used in future spectroscopic observations of the planets, as well as a data set which compliments the existing body of terrestrial soil knowledge.

  19. Dehydration Accelerates Respiration in Postharvest Sugarbeet Roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots lose water during storage and often become severely dehydrated after prolonged storage and at the outer regions of storage piles which have greater wind and sun exposure. Sucrose loss is known to be elevated in dehydrated roots, although the metabolic processes re...

  20. Bronsted Acid Catalyzed Dehydration of Neat Supercritical tert-Butanol in a Capillary Micro-Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Matthew C.; Yonker, Clement R.

    2006-02-01

    Dehydration of supercritical t-butanol to yield 2-methyl-propene was observed to occur rapidly and in high yield at elevated pressures without addition of a catalyst. A capillary micro-reactor was used to carry out the reaction at pressures up to 3.1 kbar. The products were characterized in-situ using FTIR, GC-MS and NMR. The dehydration reaction is proposed to occur by a self-catalyzed Bronsted acid mechanism. An addition driving force for the reaction was the phase separation of the 2-methyl-propene product. Self-catalyzed dehydration of t-butanol is a limiting factor for operations in supercritical t-butanol, but it implies the t-butanol may be employed as a self-neutralizing catalyst under these conditions.

  1. Bifunctional building blocks in the Ugi-azide condensation reaction: A general strategy toward exploration of new molecular diversity†

    PubMed Central

    Gunawan, Steven; Hulme, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    1,5-disubstituted tetrazoles are an important drug-like scaffold known for their ability to mimic the cis-amide bond conformation. The scaffold is readily accessible via substitution of the carboxylic acid component of the Ugi multi-component reaction (MCR) with TMSN3 in what is herein denoted the Ugi-azide reaction. This full paper presents a concise, novel, general strategy to access a plethora of new heterocylic scaffolds utilizing tethered aldo/keto-acids/esters in the Ugi-azide reaction followed by a ring closing event that generates novel highly complex bis-heterocyclic lactam-tetrazoles. PMID:23912086

  2. Slab crustal dehydration, melting and dynamics through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hunen, Jeroen; Bouilhol, Pierre; Magni, Valentina; Maunder, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Melting subducted mafic crust is commonly assumed to be the main process leading to silicic melts with an adakitic signature, which may form Archaean granitoids and generate early continental crust. Alternatively, melting of the overriding lower mafic crust and near-Moho depth fractional crystallisation of mantle melts can form differentiated magmas with an adakitic signature. Previous work shows how only very young slabs melt through dehydration melting, or depict melting of dry eclogites via water addition from deeper slab dehydration. We quantify subduction dehydration and melting reactions in a warm subduction system using a thermo-mechanical subduction model with a thermodynamic database. We find that even young (hot) slabs dehydrate before reaching their solidus, which suppresses any slab dehydration melting and creates significant amounts of mantle wedge melting irrespective of slab age. Significant slab crust melting is only achieved in young slabs via water present melting if metamorphic fluids from the subducted mantle flux through the dry eclogites. These slab melts, however, are affected by massive mantle wedge melting and unlikely to participate in the overriding plate felsic magmatism, unlike the shallower, primitive mantle wedge melts. Understanding the overall flux of water carried by the descending slab mantle is therefore of prime importance. We thus inverstigated the deeper dehydration processes in subduction zones and implications for the water cycle throughout Earth's history. We estimate that presently ~26% of the global influx water is recycled into the mantle, and that deep water recycling was also significant (although less efficient, 2-13% at 2.8 Ga) in early Earth conditions, which has important implications for mantle dynamics and tectonic processes in the Early Earth. Alternatively, delamination and underplating of the mafic subducted crust would be a suitable mechanism to fit the geological record. We thus explore the conditions for which this may happen, and found that for a wide range of ages, the uppermost part of the subducted slab might delaminate to form compositionally buoyant plumes that rise through the mantle wedge. Thick crust on young slabs (as perhaps representative for a hotter, early Earth) may delaminate entirely and reside in the mantle wedge. Under such conditions, this ponded crust might melts subsequently, forming "adakitic" felsic melts contributing to a significant amount of the overriding plate crustal volumes.

  3. Gypsum dehydration, agent of salt diapirism

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, D.H. )

    1989-09-01

    One to 10% anhydrite is present in Gulf Coast domal salt, probably deposited as primary gypsum. Because the conversion to anhydrite occurs during burial and after the salt has recrystallized enough to become impermeable, the water of dehydration does not escape. This geopressured water will greatly increase the mobility of salt and aid diapirism. The depths and temperatures that cause diapirism may be similar to those that cause gypsum dehydration, but none of the four parameters is well understood. Gypsum dehydration may join differential load, temperature, depth, and thickness as a factor strongly influencing diapirism.

  4. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-07-01

    The overall objectives of this work are to conduct research that will provide the basis for an improved liquefaction process, and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. Changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying and steam pretreatments will be measured in order to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water enhances coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods for coal drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying a relatively economical and efficient method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include conventional thermal drying, microwave drying, and chemical drying at low temperature. State-of-the-art solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques using combined rotation and multiple pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) and cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) will be employed: (1) to measures changes in coal structure brought about by the different methods of drying and by low temperature oxidation, and (2) to obtain direct measurements of changes in the aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of the solid/semi-solid material formed or remaining during pretreatment and the initial stages of liquefaction. The aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratios are difficult, if not impossible, to measure without the use of solid-state NMR, and as a result this ratio will be used to monitor the retrograde/condensation reactions that take place during coal liquefaction in the presence and absence of steam and various inert gases.

  5. Dehydration resistance of liposomes containing trehalose glycolipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyberg, Kendra; Goulding, Morgan; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2010-03-01

    The pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has an unusual outer membrane containing trehalose glycolipids that may contribute to its ability to survive freezing and dehydration. Based on our recent discovery that trehalose glycolipids confer dehydration resistance to supported lipid monolayers (Biophys. J. 94: 4718-4724 (2008); Langmuir 25: 5193-5198, (2009)), we hypothesized that liposomes containing synthetic trehalose glycolipids may be dehydration-resistant as well. To test this, we measured the leakage of encapsulated fluorophores and larger macromolecular cargo from such liposomes subject to freeze drying. Both leakage assays and size measurements show that the liposomes are dehydration-resistant. In addition to demonstrating a possibly technologically useful encapsulation platform, our results corroborate the view that encapsulation in a trehalose-glycolipid-rich membrane is a biophysically viable route to protection of mycobacteria from environmental stresses.

  6. DEHYDRATION OF LOW WATER CONTENT ETHANOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for the dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds from water and organic/organic separations. Development of a membrane system with suitable flux and selectivity characteristics plays a...

  7. Problem: Thirst, Drinking Behavior, and Involuntary Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenon of involuntary dehydration, the delay in full restoration of a body water deficit by drinking, has been described extensively but relatively little is known about its physiological mechanism. It occurs primarily in humans when they are exposed to various stresses including exercise, environmental heat and cold, altitude, water immersion, dehydration, and perhaps microgravity, singly and in various combinations. The level of involuntary dehydration is approximately proportional to the degree of total stress imposed on the body. Involuntary dehydration appears to be controlled by more than one factor including social customs that influence what is consumed, the capacity and rate of fluid absorption from the gastrointestinal system, the level of cellular hydration involving the osmotic-vasopressin interaction with sensitive cells or structures in the central nervous system, and, to a lesser extent, hypovolemic-angiotensin II stimuli. Since humans drink when there is no apparent physiological stimulus, the psychological component should always be considered when investigating the total mechanisms for drinking.

  8. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dehydrated beets (beet powder). 73.40 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.40 Dehydrated beets (beet powder). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating...

  9. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dehydrated beets (beet powder). 73.40 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.40 Dehydrated beets (beet powder). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating...

  10. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dehydrated beets (beet powder). 73.40 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.40 Dehydrated beets (beet powder). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating...

  11. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dehydrated beets (beet powder). 73.40 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.40 Dehydrated beets (beet powder). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating...

  12. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dehydrated beets (beet powder). 73.40 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.40 Dehydrated beets (beet powder). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating...

  13. Linked strategy for the production of fuels via formose reaction

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jin; Pan, Tao; Xu, Qing; Chen, Meng-Yuan; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2013-01-01

    Formose reaction converts formaldehyde to carbohydrates. We found that formose reaction can be used linking the biomass gasification with the aqueous-phase processing (APP) to produce liquid transportation fuel in three steps. First, formaldehyde from syn-gas was converted to triose. This was followed by aldol condensation and dehydration to 4-hydroxymethylfurfural (4-HMF). Finally, 4-HMF was hydrogenated to produce 2,4-dimethylfuran (2,4-DMF) or C9-C15 branched-chain alkanes as liquid transportation fuels. In the linked strategy, high energy-consuming pretreatment as well as expensive and polluting hydrolysis of biomass were omitted, but the high energy recovery of APP was inherited. In addition, the hexoketoses via formose reaction could be converted to HMFs directly without isomerization. A potential platform molecule 4-HMF was formed simultaneously in APP. PMID:23393625

  14. Dehydration processes using membranes with hydrophobic coating

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Yu; Baker, Richard W; Aldajani, Tiem; Ly, Jennifer

    2013-07-30

    Processes for removing water from organic compounds, especially polar compounds such as alcohols. The processes include a membrane-based dehydration step, using a membrane that has a dioxole-based polymer selective layer or the like and a hydrophilic selective layer, and can operate even when the stream to be treated has a high water content, such as 10 wt % or more. The processes are particularly useful for dehydrating ethanol.

  15. Iron Oxide-Supported Copper Oxide Nanoparticles (Nanocat-Fe-CuO): Magnetically Recyclable Catalysts for the Synthesis of Pyrazole Derivatives, 4-Methoxyaniline, and Ullmann-type Condensation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    An efficient and benign protocol is reported for the synthesis of 4-methoxyaniline, medicinally important pyrazole derivatives, and Ullmann-type condensation reaction using magnetically separable and reusable magnetite-supported copper (nanocat-Fe-CuO) nanoparticles under mild co...

  16. Abiotic Condensation Synthesis of Glyceride Lipids and Wax Esters Under Simulated Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2006-04-01

    Precursor compounds for abiotic proto cellular membranes are necessary for the origin of life. Amphipathic compounds such as fatty acids and acyl glycerols are important candidates for micelle/bilayer/vesicle formation. Two sets of experiments were conducted to study dehydration reactions of model lipid precursors in aqueous media to form acyl polyols and wax esters, and to evaluate the stability and reactions of the products at elevated temperatures. In the first set, mixtures of n-nonadecanoic acid and ethylene glycol in water, with and without oxalic acid, were heated at discrete temperatures from 150 ?C to 300 ?C for 72 h. The products were typically alkyl alkanoates, ethylene glycolyl alkanoates, ethylene glycolyl bis-alkanoates and alkanols. The condensation products had maximum yields between 150 ?C and 250 ?C, and were detectable and thus stable under hydrothermal conditions to temperatures < 300 ?C. In the second set of experiments, mixtures of n-heptanoic acid and glycerol were heated using the same experimental conditions, with and without oxalic acid, between 100 ?C and 250 ?C. The main condensation products were two isomers each of monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols at all temperatures, as well as minor amounts of the fatty acid anhydride and methyl ester. The yield of glyceryl monoheptanoates generally increased with increasing temperature and glyceryl diheptanoates decreased noticeably with increasing temperature. The results indicate that condensation reactions and abiotic synthesis of organic lipid compounds under hydrothermal conditions occur easily, provided precursor concentrations are sufficiently high.

  17. Palladium-Catalyzed Decarbonylative Dehydration of Fatty Acids for the Production of Linear Alpha Olefins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiyang; Kim, Kelly E.; Herbert, Myles B.; Fedorov, Alexey; Grubbs, Robert H.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    A highly efficient palladium-catalyzed decarbonylative dehydration reaction of carboxylic acids is reported. This method transforms abundant and renewable even-numbered natural fatty acids into valuable and expensive odd-numbered alpha olefins. Additionally, the chemistry displays a high functional group tolerance. The process employs low loading of palladium catalyst and proceeds under solvent-free and relatively mild conditions. PMID:24772061

  18. Synthesis of pyrazole containing ?-amino acids via a highly regioselective condensation/aza-Michael reaction of ?-aryl ?,?-unsaturated ketones.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, Lynne; Artschwager, Raik; Harkiss, Alexander H; Liskamp, Rob M J; Sutherland, Andrew

    2015-04-21

    A synthetic approach for the preparation of a new class of highly conjugated unnatural ?-amino acids bearing a 5-arylpyrazole side-chain has been developed. Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction of an aspartic acid derived ?-keto phosphonate ester with a range of aromatic aldehydes gave ?-aryl ?,?-unsaturated ketones. Treatment of these with phenyl hydrazine followed by oxidation allowed the regioselective synthesis of pyrazole derived ?-amino acids. As well as evaluating the fluorescent properties of the ?-amino acids, their synthetic utility was also explored with the preparation of a sulfonyl fluoride derivative, a potential probe for serine proteases. PMID:25774874

  19. The thiolase reaction mechanism: the importance of Asn316 and His348 for stabilizing the enolate intermediate of the Claisen condensation.

    PubMed

    Meriläinen, Gitte; Poikela, Visa; Kursula, Petri; Wierenga, Rik K

    2009-11-24

    The biosynthetic thiolase catalyzes a Claisen condensation reaction between acetyl-CoA and the enzyme acetylated at Cys89. Two oxyanion holes facilitate this catalysis: oxyanion hole I stabilizes the enolate intermediate generated from acetyl-CoA, whereas oxyanion hole II stabilizes the tetrahedral intermediate of the acetylated enzyme. The latter intermediate is formed when the alpha-carbanion of acetyl-CoA enolate reacts with the carbonyl carbon of acetyl-Cys89, after which C-C bond formation is completed. Oxyanion hole II is made of two main chain peptide NH groups, whereas oxyanion hole I is formed by a water molecule (Wat82) and NE2(His348). Wat82 is anchored in the active site by an optimal set of hydrogen bonding interactions, including a hydrogen bond to ND2(Asn316). Here, the importance of Asn316 and His348 for catalysis has been studied; in particular, the properties of the N316D, N316A, N316H, H348A, and H348N variants have been determined. For the N316D variant, no activity could be detected. For each of the remaining variants, the k(cat)/K(m) value for the Claisen condensation catalysis is reduced by a factor of several hundred, whereas the thiolytic degradation catalysis is much less affected. The crystal structures of the variants show that the structural changes in the active site are minimal. Our studies confirm that oxyanion hole I is critically important for the condensation catalysis. Removing either one of the hydrogen bond donors causes the loss of at least 3.4 kcal/mol of transition state stabilization. It appears that in the thiolytic degradation direction, oxyanion hole I is not involved in stabilizing the transition state of its rate limiting step. However, His348 has a dual role in the catalytic cycle, contributing to oxyanion hole I and activating Cys89. The analysis of the hydrogen bonding interactions in the very polar catalytic cavity shows the importance of two conserved water molecules, Wat82 and Wat49, for the formation of oxyanion hole I and for influencing the reactivity of the catalytic base, Cys378, respectively. Cys89, Asn316, and His348 form the CNH-catalytic triad of the thiolase superfamily. Our findings are also discussed in the context of the importance of this triad for the catalytic mechanism of other enzymes of the thiolase superfamily. PMID:19842716

  20. Condensed Matter Cluster Reactions in LENR Power Cells for a Radical New Type of Space Power Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaoling; Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz

    2009-03-16

    This paper reviews previous theoretical and experimental study on the possibility of nuclear events in multilayer thin film electrodes (Lipson et al., 2004 and 2005; Miley et al., 2007), including the correlation between excess heat and transmutations (Miley and Shrestha, 2003) and the cluster theory that predicts it. As a result of this added understanding of cluster reactions, a new class of electrodes is under development at the University of Illinois. These electrodes are designed to enhance cluster formation and subsequent reactions. Two approaches are under development. The first employs improved loading-unloading techniques, intending to obtain a higher volumetric density of sites favoring cluster formation. The second is designed to create nanostructures on the electrode where the cluster state is formed by electroless deposition of palladium on nickel micro structures. Power units employing these electrodes should offer unique advantages for space applications. This is a fundamental new nuclear energy source that is environmentally compatible with a minimum of radiation involvement, high specific power, very long lifetime, and scalable from micro power to kilowatts.

  1. Condensed Matter Cluster Reactions in LENR Power Cells for a Radical New Type of Space Power Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoling; Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz

    2009-03-01

    This paper reviews previous theoretical and experimental study on the possibility of nuclear events in multilayer thin film electrodes (Lipson et al., 2004 and 2005; Miley et al., 2007), including the correlation between excess heat and transmutations (Miley and Shrestha, 2003) and the cluster theory that predicts it. As a result of this added understanding of cluster reactions, a new class of electrodes is under development at the University of Illinois. These electrodes are designed to enhance cluster formation and subsequent reactions. Two approaches are under development. The first employs improved loading-unloading techniques, intending to obtain a higher volumetric density of sites favoring cluster formation. The second is designed to create nanostructures on the electrode where the cluster state is formed by electroless deposition of palladium on nickel micro structures. Power units employing these electrodes should offer unique advantages for space applications. This is a fundamental new nuclear energy source that is environmentally compatible with a minimum of radiation involvement, high specific power, very long lifetime, and scalable from micro power to kilowatts.

  2. Dehydration kinetics of talc at 1 bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, J.; Bose, K.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results on the dehydration kinetics of talc, which is likely to be a major potential resource for water and hydrogen in carbonaceous chondrites, is presented. The rate of dehydration of an essentially pure Mg-end member natural talc, (Mg(.99)Fe(.01))3Si4O10(OH)2, was studied by measuring in situ weight change under isothermal condition at 1 bar as a function of time in the temperature range 775 to 985 C. The grain size of the starting material was 0.7 to 1 micron. It was found that the data up to 50 to 60 percent dehydration can be fitted by an equation of the form alpha = exp(-Kt(exp n)), where alpha is the weight fraction of talc remaining, K is a rate constant and n is a numerical constant for a given temperature. For any set of isothermal data, there is a major change in the value of n for larger dehydration. For up to approximately 50 percent dehydration, all rate constants can be described by an Arrheniun relation with an activation energy of 432 (+/- 30) kJ/mol; n has a nearly constant value of 0.54 between 775 and 875 C, but increases almost linearly according to n = -10.77 + 0.012T C at T greater than or equal to 875 C.

  3. Leveraging the micellar effect: gold-catalyzed dehydrative cyclizations in water at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Minkler, Stefan R K; Isley, Nicholas A; Lippincott, Daniel J; Krause, Norbert; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2014-02-01

    The first examples of gold-catalyzed cyclizations of diols and triols to the corresponding hetero- or spirocycles in an aqueous medium are presented. These reactions take place within nanomicelles, where the hydrophobic effect is operating, thereby driving the dehydrations, notwithstanding the surrounding water. By the addition of simple salts such as sodium chloride, reaction times and catalyst loadings can be significantly decreased. PMID:24433154

  4. Leveraging the Micellar Effect: Gold-Catalyzed Dehydrative Cyclizations … in Water at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Minkler, Stefan R. K.; Isley, Nicholas A.; Lippincott, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The first examples of gold-catalyzed cyclizations of diols and triols to the corresponding hetero- or spirocycles in a bulk aqueous medium are presented. These reactions take place within nanomicelles, where the hydrophobic effect is operating, thereby driving the dehydrations, notwithstanding the surrounding water. By the addition of simple salts such as sodium chloride, reaction times and catalyst loadings can be significantly decreased. PMID:24433154

  5. Effect of temperature on the anthocyanin extraction and color evolution during controlled dehydration of Tempranillo grapes.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Ana; Perez-Serratosa, Maria; Varo, M Angeles; Merida, Julieta

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the influence of temperature during the controlled dehydration of Tempranillo red grapes has been studied. Two experiments at fixed temperatures of 30 and 40 °C, and a third experiment alternating temperatures of 40 and 15 °C every 12 h were carried out. The must from grapes dried at 40 °C presented the reddest color, and the highest anthocyanin concentration and antioxidant activity. A possible hypothesis could be that the high temperature induced a continuous water evaporation from the grapes, preventing the oxygen entry. At the same time, the dehydration resulted in broken skins, which facilitated the transfer of colored compounds to the pulp, increasing the red color of the musts. However, when the temperature dropped, oxygen could penetrate through the skin and the browning reactions started. As a result, the must obtained from gra pes dehydrated by alternating high and low temperatures presented the least anthocyanin content and the least red color. PMID:25030077

  6. Geothermal demonstration: Zunil food dehydration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, O. ); Altseimer, J.; Thayer, G.R. ); Cooper, L. ); Caicedo, A. . Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

    1991-08-01

    A food dehydration facility was constructed near the town of Zunil, Guatemala, to demonstrate the use of geothermal energy for industrial applications. The facility, with some modifications to the design, was found to work quite satisfactorily. Tests using five different products were completed during the time geothermal energy was used in the plant. During the time the plant was not able to use geothermal energy, a temporary diesel-fueled boiler provided the energy to test dehydration on seven other crops available in this area. The system demonstrates that geothermal heat can be used successfully for dehydrating food products. Many other industrial applications of geothermal energy could be considered for Zunil since a considerable amount of moderate-temperature heat will become available when the planned geothermal electrical facility is constructed there. 6 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Ethanol dehydration in HZSM-5 studied by density functional theory: evidence for a concerted process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J; Beckham, Gregg T; Paton, Robert S; Nimlos, Mark R

    2015-04-16

    Dehydration over acidic zeolites is an important reaction class for the upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapors to hydrocarbon fuels or to precursors for myriad chemical products. Here, we examine the dehydration of ethanol at a Brønsted acid site, T12, found in HZSM-5 using density functional theory (DFT). The geometries of both cluster and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM:MM) models are prepared from the ZSM-5 crystal structure. Comparisons between these models and different DFT methods are conducted to show similar results among the models and methods used. Inclusion of the full catalyst cavity through a QM:MM approach is found to be important, since activation barriers are computed on average as 7 kcal mol(-1) lower than those obtained with a smaller cluster model. Two different pathways, concerted and stepwise, have been considered when examining dehydration and deprotonation steps. The current study shows that a concerted dehydration process is possible with a lower (4-5 kcal mol(-1)) activation barrier while previous literature studies have focused on a stepwise mechanism. Overall, this work demonstrates that fairly high activation energies (?50 kcal mol(-1)) are required for ethanol dehydration. A concerted mechanism is favored over a stepwise mechanism because charge separation in the transition state is minimized. QM:MM approaches appear to provide superior results to cluster calculations due to a more accurate representation of charges on framework oxygen atoms. PMID:25802969

  8. Dehydration kinetics of talc and 10 Å phase: Consequences for subduction zone seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chollet, Mélanie; Daniel, Isabelle; Koga, Kenneth T.; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Morard, Guillaume

    2009-06-01

    The process of dehydration embrittlement is usually proposed as an explanation for the presence of intermediate-depth earthquakes in subduction zones. It assumes that the release of water by hydrous mineral breakdown is fast enough to provoke brittle failure. We performed high-pressure, high-temperature, dehydration experiments of talc and 10 Å phase coupled with in situ measurement of reaction kinetics using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Newly developed, X-ray transparent, pressure-sealed, titanium capsule ensured a closed thermochemical environment. From isothermal kinetics data fitted to the Avrami's equation and from the texture of reaction products, we conclude that dehydration rates of these minerals are limited by diffusion. Predicted minimum rates of fluid release range from 10 - 4 to 9 × 10 - 6 m 3fluid m - 3 rock s - 1 , and are fast enough to provoke hydraulic rupture since Maxwell relaxation rate of rocks relevant of subduction zones are slower than the rate of fluid release. These rates are comparable between talc, 10 Å phase and antigorite also [Perrillat, J.-P., Daniel, I., Koga, K.T., Reynard, B., Cardon, H., Crichton, W.A., 2005. Kinetics of antigorite dehydration: a real-time X-ray diffraction study. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 236, 899-913]. Consequently, we suggest that the dehydration of hydrous minerals may eventually be fast enough to trigger the intermediate-depth earthquakes, and that the deepest among intermediate-depth earthquakes may actually locate the limits for dehydration of hydrous minerals in the downgoing lithosphere.

  9. Electrical precipitation solves Udang's dehydration problem

    SciTech Connect

    Aulenbacher, M.W.

    1982-06-01

    A tough crude dehydration problem was solved on the Udang a platform offshore Indonesia when Conoco opted to use electric precipitation to remove water from the field's high pour point crude. The platform's 13 wells could produce up to 40,000 bpd of crude, but the system was designed under the assumption that water cuts would increase. Design capacity was set at 50% water, to a maximum of 27,000 bpd of oil and a like amount of water. A dehydration system on a second platform is now handling 60,000 bpd of oil with 5% water.

  10. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound, mature, good quality...additive shall conform to the following specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not...

  11. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound, mature, good quality...additive shall conform to the following specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not...

  12. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound, mature, good quality...additive shall conform to the following specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not...

  13. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound, mature, good quality...additive shall conform to the following specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not...

  14. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS...freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any...

  15. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS...freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any...

  16. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS...freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any...

  17. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS...freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any...

  18. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS...freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any...

  19. Dehydration of incoming sediments at the Japan Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, M.; Kameda, J.; Hamada, Y.; Tanikawa, W.; Kimura, G.

    2014-12-01

    In the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, the seismic fault slip propagated to the trench axis and caused an extremely large tsunami (Ide et al., 2011). Ductile deformation of unconsolidated sediments is commonly prominent in the aseismic shallow parts of the subduction zone. It is unknown how the seismic rupture reached the nearby trench axis. Based on the result of Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 56 at site 436 (reference, 1977), it is expected that the subducting sediments at the Japan Trench mainly consist of vitric diatomaceous and radiolarian ooze with pelagic clay intervals. Opal and smectite in the pelagic sediments transform respectively into quartz and illite. Kinetic modeling demonstrated that these reactions will progress with active dehydration at 50-60 km horizontally away from the trench axis and with a temperature of 100-120°C. This region coincides with the plate-boundary marked by a prominent seismic reflector. It suggests that the main source of highly pressured fluids is the dehydration of pelagic sediments (Kimura et al., 2012). However, detailed dehydration processes are still unclear mainly due to lack of quantitative sediment composition data. Therefore, in this study, we examined whole rock composition including amorphous silica of the core samples recovered at site 436 as well as those from the Japan Trench by the IODP 343 Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST). Analysis of amorphous silica at the drilling site of J-FAST documents that dehydration of the sediments is able to contribute to excess pressure at the shallow part of the megathrust if they underthrust as the same composition. At the drilling site of JFAST, a plate-boundary shear zone was identified around 820 mbsf (Chester et al., 2012). Our analysis showed that the shear zone is characterized by extremely high concentration of smectite (~70 wt%).These results suggest that the abundant smectite may have possibly fostered localized rupture and slip during the earthquake, because smectite has low frictional coefficient. In our presentation, we will also show the results of the permeability and porosity measurements for the core samples recovered at site 436.

  20. Water, water everywhere: dehydration in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Gordon S; Martin, Caren McHenry

    2005-11-01

    Dehydration is a common disorder in the frail elderly patient. Understanding the mechanisms by which fluid and electrolyte abnormalities occur, as well as the implications of specific laboratory values, is key to providing optimal diagnosis and treatment. Management of fluid abnormalities relies on gradual rehydration with the proper fluids to restore both fluid and electrolytes. PMID:16548671

  1. Dehydration in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Jensen, Eric; Podolske, James; Selkirk, Henry; Anderson, Bruce; Avery, Melody; Diskin. Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Recent work has shown that limited amounts of tropospheric air can penetrate as much as 1 km into the middleworld stratosphere during the arctic winter. This, coupled with temperatures that are cold enough to produce saturation mixing ratios of less than 5 ppmv at the tropopause, results in stratospheric cloud formation and upper tropospheric dehydration. Even though these "cold outbreaks" occupy only a small portion of the area in the arctic (1-2%), their importance is magnified by an order of magnitude because of the air flow through them. This is reinforced by evidence of progressive drying through the winter measured during SOLVE-1. The significance of this process lies in its effect on the upper tropospheric water content of the middle and high latitude tropopause region, which plays an important role in regulating the earth's radiative balance. There appears to be significant year-to-year variability in the incidence of the cold outbreaks. This work has two parts. First, we describe case studies of dehydration taken from the SOLVE and SOLVE2 aircraft sampling missions during the Arctic winters of 2000 and 2003 respectively. Trajectory based microphysical modeling is employed to examine the sensitivity of the dehydration to microphysical parameters and the nature of sub-grid scale temperature fluctuations. We then examine the year-to-year variations in potential dehydration using a trajectory climatology.

  2. Acid-catalysed glucose dehydration in the gas phase: a mass spectrometric approach.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Andreina; Di Rienzo, Brunella; Pepi, Federico; Troiani, Anna; Garzoli, Stefania; Giacomello, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding on a molecular level the acid-catalysed decomposition of the sugar monomers from hemicellulose and cellulose (e.g.?glucose, xylose), the main constituent of lignocellulosic biomass is very important to increase selectivity and reaction yields in solution, key steps for the development of a sustainable renewable industry. In this work we reported a gas-phase study performed by electrospray triple quadrupole mass spectrometry on the dehydration mechanism of D-glucose. In the gas phase, reactant ions corresponding to protonated D-glucose were obtained in the ESI source and were allowed to undergo collisionally activated decomposition (CAD) into the quadrupole collision cell. The CAD mass spectrum of protonated D-glucose is characterized by the presence of ionic dehydrated daughter ion (ionic intermediates and products), which were structurally characterized by their fragmentation patterns. In the gas phase D-glucose dehydration does not lead to the formation of protonated 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, but to a mixed population of m/z 127 isomeric ions. To elucidate the D-glucose dehydration mechanism, 3-O-methyl-D-glucose was also submitted to the mass spectrometric study; the results suggest that the C3 hydroxyl group plays a key role in the reaction mechanism. Furthermore, protonated levulinic acid was found to be formed from the monodehydrated D-glucose ionic intermediate, an alternative pathway other than the known route consisting of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde double hydration. PMID:25601697

  3. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false To can, freeze, or dehydrate. 929.11 Section 929.11... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.11 To can, freeze, or dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or...

  4. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false To can, freeze, or dehydrate. 929.11 Section 929.11... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.11 To can, freeze, or dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or...

  5. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false To can, freeze, or dehydrate. 929.11 Section 929.11... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.11 To can, freeze, or dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or...

  6. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false To can, freeze, or dehydrate. 929.11 Section 929.11... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.11 To can, freeze, or dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or...

  7. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false To can, freeze, or dehydrate. 929.11 Section 929.11... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.11 To can, freeze, or dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or...

  8. Amine catalyzed condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S.

    2001-01-01

    The catalysis of the condensation of hydrolyzed metal alkoxides by amines has been mentioned in the literature, but there has been no systematic study of their influence on the rate of the condensation reaction of the alkoxide and the microstructure of the resultant gel.

  9. Dehydration embrittlement of serpentine and its implications for earthquakes at depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L.; Green, H.

    2003-04-01

    Earthquakes at depths greater than ˜50 km cannot occur by unassisted brittle failure but could be triggered by embrittlement accompanying dehydration of hydrous minerals (e.g. Raleigh and Paterson, 1965). However, there is some question whether such embrittlement will occur if the ?V of the dehydration reaction is negative, as occurs with increasing pressure for most low-pressure hydrous minerals. To test this hypothesis, we have chosen an extensively-serpentinized peridotite, in which the serpentine mineral present, antigorite, has a large stability field at elevated pressure and temperature. We conducted triaxial deformation experiments at constant strain rate using a Griggs-type apparatus at P = 1.0-3.4 GPa and T = 550-750 ^oC, and rapid-pumping experiments at comparable temperatures in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus, culminating at P = 6 GPa. Over this pressure range, the ?V of reaction varies from highly positive to significantly negative. At the lowest temperatures, no reaction was observed. In deformation experiments at these conditions, faulting due to brittle failure was produced at low pressure but at high pressure deformation was ductile. At temperatures outside the stability field of antigorite, samples that were only pressurized and annealed did not show faulting. However, specimens subjected to a differential stress during dehydration displayed faults and localized zones of dehydration products consisting of very fine-grained new olivine or talc, +/- enstatite (grain size less than 200 nm). Deformed samples also showed Mode I cracks and fluid inclusions inside large crystals of relict olivine. Extensive fluid reactions were also observed along the grain boundaries between the relict olivine and antigorite. These observations indicate that antigorite dehydration under stress triggers faulting under conditions where the ?V of reaction is negative as well as those where ?V is positive. We do not yet know why this is so. We conclude that dehydration embrittlement is a viable mechanism for triggering earthquakes at depths of at least 250 km, independent of the sign of the ?V of reaction. Raleigh, CB, Paterson, MS, 1965. Experimental deformation of serpentinite and its tectonic implications. J. Geophys. Res. 70:3965-3985

  10. Nonequilibrium Weak Processes in Kaon Condensation II - Kinetics of condensation ---

    E-print Network

    Takumi Muto; Toshitaka Tatsumi; Naoki Iwamoto

    1999-09-18

    The kinetics of negatively charged kaon condensation in the early stages of a newly born neutron star is considered. The thermal kaon process, in which kaons are thermally produced by nucleon-nucleon collisions, is found to be dominant throughout the equilibration process. Temporal changes of the order parameter of the condensate and the number densities of the chemical species are obtained from the rate equations, which include the thermal kaon reactions as well as the kaon-induced Urca and the modified Urca reactions. It is shown that the dynamical evolution of the condensate is characterized by three stages: the first, prior to establishment of a condensate, the second, during the growth and subsequent saturation of the condensate, and the third, near chemical equilibrium. The connection between the existence of a soft kaon mode and the instability of the noncondensed state is discussed. Implications of the nonequilibrium process on the possible delayed collapse of a protoneutron star are also mentioned.

  11. Pulsed ultrasound assisted dehydration of waste oil.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Li, Rui; Lu, Xiaoping

    2015-09-01

    A method to aid the separation of the oil phase from waste oil emulsion of refineries had been developed by using a pulsed ultrasonic irradiation technology. Compared with conventional continuous ultrasonic irradiation, it is found that pulsed ultrasonic irradiation is much better to make water drop coalescence and hence dehydration of waste oil. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation parameters on waste oil dehydration are further discussed. The orthogonal experiment is also designed to investigate the degrees of influence of ultrasonic parameters and the optimal technological conditions. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the water content of waste oil is decreased from 65% to 8%, which thereby satisfies the requirements of refineries on the water content of waste oil after treatment (<10%). PMID:25795000

  12. Chemistry and anelasticity in dehydrated sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, T. W.; Miller, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Preliminary acoustic measurements of a dehydrated sample of Berea sandstone indicated a dramatic change in elastic and anelastic properties near 45C. With an improved temperature control system we have characterized the change, a softening of the modulus and an increase in dissipation, in detail. We have attempted to fit a finite-element model of a silica grain-bond network to the data and discuss ideas for the connection between water content and nonlinearity. Berea is a complex sandstone with several components beyond the silica frame, so in order to simplify the sample, we are working with a very nonlinear Fontainebleau sandstone and we present new data from both Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) and Dynamic Acoustic Elastic Testing on a dehydrated 99.5% silica rock.

  13. Morphokinetic Reaction of Streptococcus faecalis (ATCC 9790) Cells to the Specific Inhibition of Macromolecular Synthesis: Nucleoid Condensation on the Inhibition of Protein Synthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Daneo-Moore, Lolita; Higgins, Michael L.

    1972-01-01

    In glutaraldehyde-prefixed exponential-phase cells of Streptococcus faecalis the nucleoid is “frozen” in a dispersed configuration. Exposure of exponential-phase cells to threonine starvation or to antibiotics inhibiting protein synthesis resulted in progressive condensation of nucleoid fibrils producing an expanding central nucleoid zone or pool. The condensation of the nucleoid was observed to occur at a rate directly proportional to the rate of inhibition of protein synthesis. However, the extent of nucleoid condensation depended on continuing deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis. Significantly less nucleoid condensation occurred when cells were inhibited in deoxyribonucleic acid and protein synthesis than when cells were inhibited in protein synthesis alone. These results suggest a model in which, during nucleoid replication, the chromosome fibrils are normally maintained in a dispersed state by the active agents of transcription-translation, such as ribonucleic acid polymerase molecules and ribosomes. Images PMID:4110925

  14. Biomass energy analysis for crop dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.P.; Haase, S.G.; Quinn, M.W.; Zachritz, W.; Lansford, R.; Swanson, D.

    1995-06-01

    In 1994, an agricultural processing facility began constructing a new spice and herb dehydration facility in southern New Mexico. Because of the considerable energy intensity of the dehydration operation, management of energy costs is of special concern to the facility. Biomass energy conversion offers the potential for firms to reduce annual operating costs-especially firms with access to low-cost resources. Because the selected facility produces a biomass by-product as a result of its dehydration operation, it is appropriate to explore the technical, regulatory, institutional and economic conditions that affect the successful utilization of biomass resources. The facility is characterized as a small-scale installation, relative to other energy users. In this context, small-scale represents less than 100 million Btu per hour of thermal load and less than 1 MWe of electrical load. However, the projected annual energy bill is approximately $1.1 million and represents a significant portion of operational costs for the firm. For this study, the biomass resources in southern New Mexico and western Texas are detailed. Annual supplies of various biomass resources (i.e., wood chips, pecan shells, discarded tires and cotton gin trash) were inventoried. Further, delivered costs are projected for each of the resource forms. A technical assessment for the small-scale gasification and combustion systems is presented.

  15. Dehydration-induced drinking in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The human tendency to experience a delay in rehydration (involuntary dehydration) after fluid loss is considered. The two primary factors contributing to involuntary dehydration are probably upright posture, and extracellular fluid and electrolyte loss by sweating from exercise and heat exposure. First, as the plasma sodium and osmotic concentrations remain virtually unchanged for supine to upright postural changes, the major stimuli for drinking appear to be associated with the hypovolemia and increase in the renin-angiotension system. Second, voluntary drinking during the heat experiments was 146% greater than in cool experiments; drinking increased by 109% with prior dehydration as opposed to normal hydration conditions; and drinking was increased by 41% after exercise as compared with the resting condition. Finally, it is concluded that the rate of sweating and the rate of voluntary fluid intake are highly correlated, and that the dispogenic factors of plasma volume, osmolality, and plasma renin activity are unrelated to sweat rate, but are likely to induce drinking in humans.

  16. Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics-Based Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Polyols in Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Caratzoulas, Stavros; Courtney, Timothy; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2011-01-01

    We use the conversion of protonated glycerol to acrolein for a case study of the mechanism of acid-catalyzed dehydration of polyols in aqueous environments. We employ hybrid Quamtum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Molecular Dynamics (QM/MM MD) simulations with biased sampling and perform free energy calculations for the elementary steps of the reaction. We investigate the effects of solvent dynamics and in particular the role of quantum mechanical water in the dehydration mechanism. We present results supporting a mechanism that proceeds via water-mediated proton transfers and thus through an enol intermediate. We find that the first dehydration may take place by two, low-energy pathways requiring, respectively, 20.9 and 18.8 kcal/mol of activation free energy. The second dehydration requires 19.9 kcal/mol of activation free energy while for the overall reaction we compute a free energy change of -8 kcal/mol.

  17. Synthesis of mesoporous SAPO-34 molecular sieves and their applications in dehydration of butanols and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jong Won; Jeon, Jaewoo; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2013-04-01

    Microporous SAPO-34 molecular sieves were hydrothermally synthesized with microwave irradiation in the presence of tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TEAOH) as a template. SAPO-34 molecular sieves with mesoporosity were also prepared in the presence of carbon black as a hard template. By increasing the content of the carbon black template in the synthesis, the mesopore volume increased. Dehydration of alcohols (butanols and ethanol) was carried out with the synthesized SAPO-34 molecular sieves, and the lifetime of the catalysts for the dehydration reaction increased as the mesoporosity increased. Moreover, the performance of the microporous catalyst synthesized with microwave was better than that of the catalyst obtained with conventional electric heating. The relative performance of the catalytic dehydration may be explained by the mesoporosity and the crystal size. Therefore, it may be concluded that small-sized SAPO-34 molecular sieves with high mesoporosity can be produced efficiently with microwave irradiation in the presence of carbon black template, and the molecular sieves are effective in the stable dehydration of alcohols. PMID:23763160

  18. Dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene in a slurry reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Latshaw, B.E.

    1994-02-01

    The April 1990 Alternative Fuels Proposal to the Department of Energy involved the development of new technology, based on the liquid phase process, for conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, fuel additives, and fuel intermediates. The objective of this work was to develop a slurry reactor based process for the dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene. The isobutene can serve as a feedstock for the high octane oxygenated fuel additive methyl tertiary-butyl either (MTBE). Alumina catalysts were investigated because of their wide use as a dehydration catalyst. Four commercially available alumina catalysts (Catapal B, Versal B, Versal GH, and Al-3996R) were evaluated for both activity and selectivity to the branched olefin. All four catalysts demonstrated conversions greater than 80% at 290 C, while conversions of near 100% could be obtained at 330 C. The reaction favors low pressures and moderate to low space velocities. A yield of 0.90 mole isobutene per mole reacted isobutanol or better was obtained at conversions of 60--70% and higher. From 75 to 98% conversion, the four catalysts all provide isobutene yields ranging from 0.92 to 0.94 with the maximum occurring around 90% conversion. At low conversions, the concentration of diisobutyl ether becomes significant while the concentration of linear butenes is essentially a linear function of isobutanol conversion. Doping the catalyst with up to 0.8 wt % potassium showed a modest increase in isobutene selectivity; however, this increase was more than offset by a reduction in activity. Investigations using a mixed alcohols feed (consistent with isobutanol synthesis from syngas) demonstrated a small increase in the C4 iso-olefin selectivity over that observed for a pure isobutanol feed. 55 refs.

  19. Arctic stratospheric ice nucleation and dehydration within CLaMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritscher, Ines; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) provide the surface for heterogeneous reactions enhancing concentrations of active, ozone destroying chlorine and thereby cause polar ozone loss in late winter and early spring. The understanding of PSC microphysics is therefore essential to simulate polar ozone accurately. The Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) allows growth, evaporation, and gravitational settling of individual cloud particles to be calculated along their trajectories. Particles consisting of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) were the focus of previous work and are known for their potential to denitrify the polar stratosphere by sedimentation. This study goes a step further and deals with the nucleation of ice particles and related dehydration, i.e. irreversible redistribution of water vapor. Homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of ice particles have been considered. Finally, we will also include NAT formation downwind of ice clouds. To start with, we concentrate on the Arctic winter 2009/2010, which is already well characterized because of the RECONCILE campaign and connected work. Unusually low temperatures at stratospheric levels led to the formation of synoptic-scale ice PSCs for a week-long period. We present CLaMS results in comparison to PSC observations from the cloud-aerosol lidar CALIOP. Moreover, we juxtapose CLaMS simulations of water vapor with single balloon-borne measurements as well as with vortex-wide MLS observations. The hemispheric picture allows tracking dehydrated air masses around the vortex. Changes in the denitrification pattern, which might arise due to the implementation of ice particles, will be discussed.

  20. 19: Cyclization and Pericyclic Reactions (Not Posted) Reactions That Make Rings

    E-print Network

    Reed, Christopher A.

    Intermediates Friedel-Crafts Reactions. Carbocation Addition to Alkenes. Carbocation Ring Contraction19: Cyclization and Pericyclic Reactions (Not Posted) Reactions That Make Rings Cyclization Reactions Enolate Ion Intermediates Intramolecular Aldol Reaction. Dieckmann Condensation. Malonic

  1. Influence of Dehydration on Intermittent Sprint Performance.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jon-Kyle; Laurent, C Matt; Allen, Kimberly E; Green, J Matt; Stolworthy, Nicola I; Welch, Taylor R; Nevett, Michael E

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the effects of dehydration on intermittent sprint performance and perceptual responses. Eight male collegiate baseball players completed intermittent sprints either dehydrated (DEHY) by 3% body mass or euhydrated (EU). Body mass was reduced through exercise in the heat with controlled fluid restriction occurring 1 day before the trial. Participants completed twenty-four 30-m sprints divided into 3 bouts of 8 sprints with 45 seconds of rest between each sprint and 3 minutes between each bout. Perceived recovery status (PRS) scale was recorded before the start of each trial. Heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) (0-10 OMNI scale), and perceived readiness (PR) scale were recorded after every sprint, and session RPE (SRPE) was recorded 20 minutes after completing the entire session. A 2 (condition) × 3 (bout of sprints) repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant main effect of condition on mean sprint time (p = 0.03), HR (p < 0.01), RPE (p = 0.01), and PR (p = 0.02). Post hoc tests showed significantly faster mean sprint times for EU vs. DEHY during the second (4.87 ± 0.29 vs. 5.03 ± 0.33 seconds; p = 0.01) and third bouts of sprints (4.91 ± 0.29 vs. 5.12 ± 0.44 seconds; p = 0.02). Heart rate was also significantly lower (p ? 0.05) for EU during the second and third bouts. Post hoc measures also showed significantly impaired (p ? 0.05) feelings of recovery (PRS) before exercise and increased (p ? 0.05) perceptual strain before each bout (PR) during the second and third bouts of repeated sprint work (i.e., RPE and PR) and after the total session (SRPE) in the DEHY condition. Dehydration impaired sprint performance, negatively altered perception of recovery status before exercise, and increased RPE and HR response. PMID:25774626

  2. New experimental data on the antigorite dehydration in silica enriched serpentinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Hermann, Jörg; Garrido, Carlos J.; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Gómez-Pugnaire, María. Teresa

    2010-05-01

    There is a growing body of evidences for complex interaction between highly reactive fluids and ultramafic lithologies. Silica metasomatism, for example, can occur at the basement of slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges and during prograde metamorphism of chaotically intermixing in mélange zones of ultramafic rocks, metasediments and metabasites in subduction settings. The resulting assemblage diagnostic of metaperidotites that experienced silica metasomatism are talc-schist and talc-bearing serpentinite. These lithologies may hence be common in subduction settings and will undergo different dehydration reactions. Antigorite and talc will react at lower temperature than the terminal antigorite dehydration. Although this reaction is not expected to be as important in the transfer of water to mantle depth as the breakdown of antigorite, it represents nevertheless a dehydration event in subduction zones that has not been considered so far. We anticipate that this reaction might be particularly important for the fore-arc mantle wedge. Piston cylinder experiments were performed to constrain the pressure and temperature conditions for two high-pressure antigorite dehydration reactions found in silica-enriched serpentinites from Cerro del Almirez (Nevado-Filábride Complex, Betic Cordillera, southern Spain) [1]. At 630-660°C and pressures greater than 1.6 GPa, antigorite first reacts with talc to form orthopyroxene ± chlorite + fluid. We show that orthopyroxene + antigorite is restricted to high-pressure metamorphism of silica-enriched serpentinite. This uncommon assemblage is helpful in constraining metamorphic conditions in cold subduction environments, where antigorite serpentinites have no diagnostic assemblages over a large range in PT space [2,3]. The second dehydration reaction leads to the breakdown of antigorite to olivine + orthopyroxene + chlorite + fluid. The maximum stability of antigorite is found at 680°C at 1.9 GPa, which also corresponds to the maximum pressure limit for tremolite coexisting with olivine + orthopyroxene [4]. [1] Trommsdorff, López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Gómez-Pugnaire, and Müntener (1998), Contrib Mineral Petr 132 139-148. [2] Hermann, Müntener, and Scambelluri, (2000) Tectonophysics 327, 225-238. [3] Scambelluri, Müntener, Hermann, Piccardo, and Trommsdorff, Geology 23, 459-462. [4] Padrón-Navarta, Hermann, Garrido, López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, and Gómez-Pugnaire (2010), Contrib Mineral Petr 159, 25-42.

  3. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  4. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, Jr., Jerry (Los Alamos, NM); Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Trujillo, Eddie A. (Espanola, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  5. Effects of Dehydration on Fish Muscles at Chilled Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Hidemasa; Seto, Fuminori; Nishimoto, Motomi; Nishimoto, Junichi

    Recently,new method of removing water from fish fillet at low temperature using dehydration sheet have been reported. The present study is concerned with the factors to affect the quality during dehydration of horse mackerel muscle at low temperature. The rate of dehydration at -3 °C was about two times faster than that at 0 °C. The rate of denaturation of fish muscle protein was kept less than about 10 % (ATPase activity) of the undenaturated initial values after removing free water content. Present results suggest the practical possibility of the dehydration at -3 °C for keeping quality of fish flesh.

  6. Methanol and 2-methyl-1-propanol (isobutanol) coupling to ethers and dehydration over Nafion H: Selectivity, kinetics, and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Nunan, J.G.; Klier, K.; Herman, R.G. )

    1993-02-01

    The dehydration of a mixture of methanol and isobutanol has been studied over the sulfonic acid Nafion H catalyst. Dehydration products consisted of dimethyl ether (DME), di-isobutyl ether (DIBE), methyl-isobutyl ether (MIBE), butenes, octenes, and traces of methyl-tertiarybutyl ether (MTBE). At low temperatures and high alcohol pressures (P [ge] 150 kPa), the dehydration product slate was dominated by ether formation with selectivity within the ethers significantly in favor of the mixed ether, MIBE. The rates of ether and butene formation as a function of alcohol pressure could be described by Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics in which competitive adsorption of the two alcohols on the surface -SO[sub 3]H sites was the dominant feature. The kinetics of isobutanol dehydration to isobutene were consistent with a dual-site mechanism involving the cooperative action of a free surface -SO[sub 3]H site and an adjacent adsorbed alcohol molecule. Dehydration to ethers was consistent with the reaction of two adsorbed alcohols, also by a dual-site mechanism. As a consequence, dehydration to symmetric ethers showed saturation-type kinetics as a function of alcohol pressure, while the rate of isobutene formation went through a distinct maximum. Due to the competitive adsorption of methanol and isobutanol, the mixed ether MIBE was formed at a maximum rate with an optimum ratio of partial pressures of the two alcohols. The high selectivity to MIBE was explained by stronger adsorption of isobutanol on the catalyst surface as compared to methanol. The absence of MTBE and the predominance of products such as MIBE and 2,5-dimethylhexene suggests that dehydration to give free carbenium ions that subsequently rearrange to the more stable tertiary intermediate was not occurring. It was proposed that the alcohols react with the -SO[sub 3]H groups to give oxonium ions or esters. These intermediates couple to give the product ethers or octenes. 24 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Biomass energy analysis for crop dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.P.; Haase, S.G.; Quinn, M.W.

    1994-12-31

    In 1994, an agricultural processing facility was constructed in southern New Mexico for spice and herb dehydration. Annual operational costs are dominated by energy costs, due primarily to the energy intensity of dehydration. A feasibility study was performed to determine whether the use of biomass resources as a feedstock for a cogeneration system would be an economical option. The project location allowed access to unusual biomass feedstocks including cotton gin trash, pecan shells and in-house residues. A resource assessment of the immediate project area determined that approximately 120,000 bone dry tons of biomass feedstocks are available annually. Technology characterization for the plant energy requirements indicated gasification systems offer fuel flexibility advantages over combustion systems although vendor support and commercial experience are limited. Regulatory siting considerations introduce a level of uncertainty because of a lack of a precedent in New Mexico for gasification technology and because vendors of commercial gasifiers have little experience operating such a facility nor gathering emission data. A public opinion survey indicated considerable support for renewable energy use and biomass energy utilization. However, the public opinion survey also revealed limited knowledge of biomass technologies and concerns regarding siting of a biomass facility within the geographic area. The economic analysis conducted for the study is based on equipment vendor quotations, and indicates there will be difficulty competing with current prices of natural gas.

  8. Dehydration parameters and standards for laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Bekkevold, Christine M; Robertson, Kimberly L; Reinhard, Mary K; Battles, August H; Rowland, Neil E

    2013-01-01

    Water deprivation and restriction are common features of many physiologic and behavioral studies; however, there are no data-driven humane standards regarding mice on water deprivation or restriction studies to guide IACUC, investigators, and veterinarians. Here we acutely deprived outbred CD1 mice of water for as long as 48 h or restricted them to a 75% or 50% water ration; physical and physiologic indicators of dehydration were measured. With acute water deprivation, the appearance and attitude of mice deteriorated after 24 h, and weight loss exceeded 15%. Plasma osmolality was increased, and plasma volume decreased with each time interval. Plasma corticosterone concentration increased with duration of deprivation. There were no differences in any dehydration measures between mice housed in conventional static cages or ventilated racks. Chronic water restriction induced no significant changes compared with ad libitum availability. We conclude that acute water deprivation of as long as 24 h produces robust physiologic changes; however, deprivation in excess of 24 h is not recommended in light of apparent animal distress. Although clearly thirsty, mice adapt to chronic water restriction of as much as 50% of the ad libitum daily ration that is imposed over an interval of as long as 8 d. PMID:23849404

  9. Dehydration-mediated cluster formation of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sungsook; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-01-01

    Drying procedure is a powerful method to modulate the bottom-up assembly of basic building component. The initially weak attraction between the components screened in a solution strengthens as the solvent evaporates, organizing the components into structures. Drying is process-dependent, irreversible, and nonequilibrated, thus the mechanism and the dynamics are influenced by many factors. Therefore, the interaction of the solvent and the elements during the drying procedure as well as the resulting pattern formations are strongly related. Nonetheless still many things are open in questions in terms of their dynamics. In this study, nanoscale dehydration procedure is experimentally investigated using a nanoparticle (NP) model system. The role of water is verified in a single NP scale and the patterns of collective NP clusters are determined. Stepwise drying procedures are proposed based on the location from which water is removed. Effective water exodus from a unit NP surface enhances the attractive interaction in nanoscale and induces heterogeneous distribution in microscale. This study provides fundamental proof of systematic relation between the dehydration process and the resultant cluster patterns in hierarchical multiscales. PMID:26077841

  10. Dehydration-mediated cluster formation of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-06-01

    Drying procedure is a powerful method to modulate the bottom-up assembly of basic building component. The initially weak attraction between the components screened in a solution strengthens as the solvent evaporates, organizing the components into structures. Drying is process-dependent, irreversible, and nonequilibrated, thus the mechanism and the dynamics are influenced by many factors. Therefore, the interaction of the solvent and the elements during the drying procedure as well as the resulting pattern formations are strongly related. Nonetheless still many things are open in questions in terms of their dynamics. In this study, nanoscale dehydration procedure is experimentally investigated using a nanoparticle (NP) model system. The role of water is verified in a single NP scale and the patterns of collective NP clusters are determined. Stepwise drying procedures are proposed based on the location from which water is removed. Effective water exodus from a unit NP surface enhances the attractive interaction in nanoscale and induces heterogeneous distribution in microscale. This study provides fundamental proof of systematic relation between the dehydration process and the resultant cluster patterns in hierarchical multiscales.

  11. Inorganic compounds for passive solar energy storage: Solid-state dehydration materials and high specific heat materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, L. J.; Brown, P. W.

    1986-04-01

    Two classes of hydrated inorganic salts have been studied to assess their potential as materials for passive solar energy storage. The materials are part of the quaternary system CaO-Al2O3-SO3-H2O and related chemical systems, and the two classes are typified by ettringite, a trisubstituted salt, and Friedel's salt, a monosubstituted salt. The trisubstituted salts were studied for their possible application in latent heat storage, utilizing a low-temperature dehydration reaction, and both classes were studies for their application in sensible heat storage. In order to assess their potential for energy storage, the salts have been synthesized, characterized by several analytical techniques, and thermal properties measured. The dehydration data of that the trisubstituted salts vary somewhat with chemical composition, with the temperature of the onset of dehydration ranging from 6(0)C to 33(0)C, and enthalpy changes on dehydration ranging from 60 to 200 cal/g. Heat capacity is less variable with composition; values for the trisubstituted phases are 30 cal/g/(0)C and for the monosubstituted phases between 0.23 and 0.28 cal/g/(0)C. Preliminary experiments indicate that the dehydration is reversible, and suggest that the materials might have additional potential as solar desiccant materials. These thermal data demonstrate the trisubstituted salts have potential as latent heat storage materials, and that both classes of salts have potential as sensible heat storage materials.

  12. Dehydration of xylose to furfural over MCM-41-supported niobium-oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    García-Sancho, Cristina; Sádaba, Irantzu; Moreno-Tost, Ramón; Mérida-Robles, Josefa; Santamaría-González, José; López-Granados, Manuel; Maireles-Torres, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    A series of silica-based MCM-41-supported niobium-oxide catalysts are prepared, characterized by using XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and pyridine adsorption coupled to FTIR spectroscopy, and tested for the dehydration of D-xylose to furfural. Under the operating conditions used all materials are active in the dehydration of xylose to furfural (excluding the MCM-41 silica support). The xylose conversion increases with increasing Nb2 O5 content. At a loading of 16 wt % Nb2 O5 , 74.5 % conversion and a furfural yield of 36.5 % is achieved at 170 °C, after 180 min reaction time. Moreover, xylose conversion and furfural yield increase with the reaction time and temperature, attaining 82.8 and 46.2 %, respectively, at 190 °C and after 100 min reaction time. Notably, the presence of NaCl in the reaction medium further increases the furfural yield (59.9 % at 170 °C after 180 min reaction time). Moreover, catalyst reutilization is demonstrated by performing at least three runs with no loss of catalytic activity and without the requirement for an intermediate regeneration step. No significant niobium leaching is observed, and a relationship between the structure of the catalyst and the activity is proposed. PMID:23512820

  13. Response of Chinese wampee axes and maize embryos to dehydration at different rates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Song, Song-Quan; Wu, Xian-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Survival of wampee (Clausena lansiumSkeels) axes and maize (Zea mays L.) embryos decreased with rapid and slow dehydration. Damage of wampee axes by rapid dehydration was much less than by slow dehydration, and that was contrary to maize embryos. The malondialdehyde contents of wampee axes and maize embryos rapidly increased with dehydration, those of wampee axes were lower during rapid dehydration than during slow dehydration, and those of maize embryos were higher during rapid dehydration than during slow dehydration. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) of wampee axes markedly increased during the early phase of dehydration, and then rapidly decreased, and those of rapidly dehydrated axes were higher than those of slow dehydrated axes when they were dehydrated to low water contents. Activities of SOD and APX of maize embryos notable decreased with dehydration. There were higher SOD activities and lower APX activities of slowly dehydrated maize embryos compared with rapidly dehydrated maize embryos. CAT activities of maize embryos markedly increased during the early phase of dehydration, and then decreased, and those of slowly dehydrated embryos were higher than those of rapidly dehydrated embryos during the late phase of dehydration. PMID:19166496

  14. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively. PMID:22972773

  15. Retention of nutrients in green leafy vegetables on dehydration.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sheetal; Gowri, B S; Lakshmi, A Jyothi; Prakash, Jamuna

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the influence of dehydration on nutrient composition of Amaranthus gangeticus, Chenopodium album, Centella asiatica, Amaranthus tricolor and Trigonella foenum graecum. The green leafy vegetables (GLV) were steam blanched for 5 min after pretreatment and dried in an oven at 60 °C for 10-12 h. The fresh and dehydrated samples were analyzed for selected proximate constituents, vitamins, minerals, antinutrients and dialyzable minerals. Dehydration seems to have little effect on the proximate, mineral and antinutrient content of the GLV. Among the vitamins, retention of ascorbic acid was 1-14%, thiamine 22-71%, total carotene 49-73% and ?-carotene 20-69% respectively, of their initial content. Dialyzable iron and calcium in the fresh vegetables ranged between 0.21-3.5 mg and 15.36-81.33 mg/100 g respectively, which reduced to 0.05-0.53 mg and 6.94-58.15 mg/100 g on dehydration. Dehydration seems to be the simplest convenient technology for preserving these sources of micronutrients, especially when they are abundantly available. Irrespective of the losses of vitamins that take place during dehydration, dehydrated GLV are a concentrated natural source of micronutrients and they can be used in product formulations. Value addition of traditional products with dehydrated GLV can be advocated as a feasible food-based approach to combat micronutrient malnutrition. PMID:24425998

  16. Dehydration accelerates root respiration and impacts sugarbeet raffinose metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarbeet roots lose water during storage and often become severely dehydrated after prolonged storage and at the outer portions of piles which have greater wind and sun exposure. Sucrose loss is known to be elevated in dehydrated roots, although the metabolic processes responsible for this loss ar...

  17. Can overshooting convection dehydrate the tropical tropopause layer?

    E-print Network

    Can overshooting convection dehydrate the tropical tropopause layer? E. J. Jensen,1 A. S. Ackerman dehydration near the tropical tropopause caused by overshooting deep convection. We show that convective updrafts overshooting the cold point tropopause can generate extremely cold, dry air within the updrafts

  18. Satellite observation of dehydration in the Arctic Polar stratosphere

    E-print Network

    Pan, Laura

    Satellite observation of dehydration in the Arctic Polar stratosphere L. L. Pan,1 W. J. Randel,1 H 2002. [1] We report the first space-borne observation of dehydration in the Arctic polar stratosphere Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) events. Furthermore, simultaneous observations of HNO3 and H2O show that the gas phase

  19. Spontaneous luminescence of coal during dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Hessley, R.K.; Coyne, L.M.

    1987-04-01

    Triboluminescene (TL) is the emission of light which occurs when a solid is subjected to some form of ''stress.'' The primary focus of this study, then, was to determine whether TL could be observed in coal when moisture was removed from it, and whether any photon emission observed could be related to the mineral matter content of the coal. As far as is known, this report marks the first discovery that coal, a complex but clearly an amorphous solid, does exhibit pronounced triboluminescence when an aqueous slurry is subjected to dehydration. In addition to studying the effects of mineral matter content on coal TL, this report includes data on the effect of particle size on coal triboluminescence.

  20. Two-stage dehydration of sugars

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Johnathan E. (Kennewick, WA); Hu, Jianli (Kennewick, WA); Wang, Yong (Richland, WA); Werpy, Todd A. (West Richland, WA)

    2009-11-10

    The invention includes methods for producing dianhydrosugar alcohol by providing an acid catalyst within a reactor and passing a starting material through the reactor at a first temperature. At least a portion of the staring material is converted to a monoanhydrosugar isomer during the passing through the column. The monoanhydrosugar is subjected to a second temperature which is greater than the first to produce a dianhydrosugar. The invention includes a method of producing isosorbide. An initial feed stream containing sorbitol is fed into a continuous reactor containing an acid catalyst at a temperature of less than 120.degree. C. The residence time for the reactor is less than or equal to about 30 minutes. Sorbitol converted to 1,4-sorbitan in the continuous reactor is subsequently provided to a second reactor and is dehydrated at a temperature of at least 120.degree. C. to produce isosorbide.

  1. J. Phys. Chem. 1989, 93, 1267-1272 1267 Photoinduced Harpoon Reactions as a Probe of Condensed-Phase Dynamics: IC1 in

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    scheme for liquid-phase rare-gas halide exciplex lasers! The studies of IC1in both liquid and solid xenon-Phase Dynamics: IC1 in Liquid and Solid Xenon F. Okada? L. Wiedeman, and V. A. Apkarian* Department of Chemistry-photon-induced harpoon reactions of IC1 in liquid and solid xenon are reported. The reaction dynamics is followed

  2. Illustrating the Utility of X-Ray Crystallography for Structure Elucidation through a Tandem Aldol Condensation/Diels-Alder Reaction Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Giang T.; Kubo, Tomohiro; Young, Victor G., Jr.; Kautzky, Jacob A.; Wissinger, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Two introductory organic chemistry laboratory experiments are described based on the Diels-Alder reaction of 2,3,4,5-tetraphenylcyclopentadienone, which is synthesized prior to or in a one-pot reaction, with styrene. Students are presented with three possible products, the "endo" and "exo" diastereomers and the decarbonylated…

  3. DMSO induces dehydration near lipid membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H H; Han, Songi

    2015-07-21

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes and their hydration water play important functional roles. Although the effects of DMSO on the membrane structure and the headgroup dehydration have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DMSO invokes its effect on lipid membranes and the direct role of water in this process are unresolved. By directly probing the translational water diffusivity near unconfined lipid vesicle surfaces, the lipid headgroup mobility, and the repeat distances in multilamellar vesicles, we found that DMSO exclusively weakens the surface water network near the lipid membrane at a bulk DMSO mole fraction (XDMSO) of <0.1, regardless of the lipid composition and the lipid phase. Specifically, DMSO was found to effectively destabilize the hydration water structure at the lipid membrane surface at XDMSO <0.1, lower the energetic barrier to dehydrate this surface water, whose displacement otherwise requires a higher activation energy, consequently yielding compressed interbilayer distances in multilamellar vesicles at equilibrium with unaltered bilayer thicknesses. At XDMSO >0.1, DMSO enters the lipid interface and restricts the lipid headgroup motion. We postulate that DMSO acts as an efficient cryoprotectant even at low concentrations by exclusively disrupting the water network near the lipid membrane surface, weakening the cohesion between water and adhesion of water to the lipid headgroups, and so mitigating the stress induced by the volume change of water during freeze-thaw. PMID:26200868

  4. Regeneration of silica-supported silicotungstic acid as a catalyst for the dehydration of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Katryniok, Benjamin; Paul, Sébastien; Capron, Mickaël; Bellière-Baca, Virginie; Rey, Patrick; Dumeignil, Franck

    2012-07-01

    The dehydration reaction of glycerol to acrolein is catalyzed by acid catalysts. These catalysts tend to suffer from the formation of carbonaceous species on their surface (coking), which leads to substantial degradation of their performances (deactivation). To regenerate the as-deactivated catalysts, various techniques have been proposed so far, such as the co-feeding of oxygen, continuous regeneration by using a moving catalytic bed, or alternating between reaction and regeneration. Herein, we study the regeneration of supported heteropolyacid catalysts. We show that the support has a strong impact on the thermal stability of the active phase. In particular, zirconia has been found to stabilize silicotungstic acid, thus enabling the nondestructive regeneration of the catalyst. Furthermore, the addition of steam to the regeneration feed has a positive impact by hindering the degradation reaction by equilibrium displacement. The catalysts are further used in a periodic reaction/regeneration process, whereby the possibility of maintaining long-term catalytic performances is evidenced. PMID:22505057

  5. Pathways for Ethanol Dehydrogenation and Dehydration Catalyzed by Ceria (111) and (100) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2015-01-01

    We have performed computations to better understand how surface structure affects selectivity in dehydrogenation and dehydration reactions of alcohols. Ethanol reactions on the (111) and (100) ceria surfaces were studied starting from the dominant surface species, ethoxy. We used DFT (PBE+U) to explore reaction pathways leading to ethylene and acetaldehyde and calculated estimates of rate constants employing transition state theory. To assess pathway contributions, we carried out kinetic analysis. Our results show that intermediate and transition state structures are stabilized on the (100) surface compared to the (111) surface. Formation of acetaldehyde over ethylene is kinetically and thermodynamically preferred on both surfaces. Our results are consistent with temperature programmed surface reaction and steady-state experiments, where acetaldehyde was found as the main product and evidence was presented that ethylene formation at higher temperature originates from changes in adsorbate and surface structure.

  6. Comparison between dehydration and desolvation kinetics of fluconazole monohydrate and fluconazole ethylacetate solvate using three different methods.

    PubMed

    Alkhamis, Khouloud A; Salem, Mutaz S; Obaidat, Rana M

    2006-04-01

    It was of interest to study the dehydration and the desolvation of fluconazole monohydrate and ethyl acetate solvate respectively and also to determine the kinetics of dehydration and desolvation using thermogravimetry (TGA). Fluconazole monohydrate and ethyl acetate solvate were prepared by crystallization in water and in ethyl acetate solvent respectively. The dehydration and the desolvation processes were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, powder X-ray diffractometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The weight changes of the fluconazole monohydrate and ethyl acetate solvate samples were monitored by isothermal TGA. Kinetic analyses of isothermal TGA data were done using model dependent and model independent methods. Various heating rates were also employed in different TGA samples, in order to apply the Ozawa method to determine the kinetic parameters. Eighteen solid-state reaction models were used to interpret the isothermal TGA experiments. Based on statistics, the three-dimensional phase boundary reaction model provided the best fit of the monohydrate data while the three-dimensional diffusion model provided the best fit for the ethyl acetate solvate data. The activation energy (E(a)) values derived from rate constants of the aforementioned models were 90 +/- 11 and 153 +/- 11 kJ/mol for fluconazole monohydrate and ethyl acetate solvate respectively. Model independent analysis and the Ozawa method were also applied to the experimental results. Based on the results obtained from the model dependent, model independent and the Ozawa method, the mechanisms of the dehydration and the desolvation were determined. PMID:16489604

  7. Condensation polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polyimides belong to a class of polymers known as polyheterocyclics. Unlike most other high temperature polymers, polyimides can be prepared from a variety of inexpensive monomers by several synthetic routes. The glass transition and crystalline melt temperature, thermooxidative stability, toughness, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, chemical stability, mechanical performance, etc. of polyimides can be controlled within certain boundaries. This versatility has permitted the development of various forms of polyimides. These include adhesives, composite matrices, coatings, films, moldings, fibers, foams and membranes. Polyimides are synthesized through both condensation (step-polymerization) and addition (chain growth polymerization) routes. The precursor materials used in addition polyimides or imide oligomers are prepared by condensation method. High molecular weight polyimide made via polycondensation or step-growth polymerization is studied. The various synthetic routes to condensation polyimides, structure/property relationships of condensation polyimides and composite properties of condensation polyimides are all studied. The focus is on the synthesis and chemical structure/property relationships of polyimides with particular emphasis on materials for composite application.

  8. Ethanol Dehydration to Ethylene in a Stratified Autothermal Millisecond Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, MJ; Michor, EL; Fan, W; Tsapatsis, M; Bhan, A; Schmidt, LD

    2011-08-10

    The concurrent decomposition and deoxygenation of ethanol was accomplished in a stratified reactor with 50-80 ms contact times. The stratified reactor comprised an upstream oxidation zone that contained Pt-coated Al(2)O(3) beads and a downstream dehydration zone consisting of H-ZSM-5 zeolite films deposited on Al(2)O(3) monoliths. Ethanol conversion, product selectivity, and reactor temperature profiles were measured for a range of fuel:oxygen ratios for two autothermal reactor configurations using two different sacrificial fuel mixtures: a parallel hydrogen-ethanol feed system and a series methane-ethanol feed system. Increasing the amount of oxygen relative to the fuel resulted in a monotonic increase in ethanol conversion in both reaction zones. The majority of the converted carbon was in the form of ethylene, where the ethanol carbon-carbon bonds stayed intact while the oxygen was removed. Over 90% yield of ethylene was achieved by using methane as a sacrificial fuel. These results demonstrate that noble metals can be successfully paired with zeolites to create a stratified autothermal reactor capable of removing oxygen from biomass model compounds in a compact, continuous flow system that can be configured to have multiple feed inputs, depending on process restrictions.

  9. Dehydration of n-butanol on zeolite H-ZSM-5 and amorphous aluminosilicate: Detailed mechanistic study and the effect of pore confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, M.A.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Zamaraev, K.I.

    1994-09-01

    This study of the catalytic dehydration of n-butanol on zeolite H-ZSM-5 and amorphous aluminosilicate confirms the reaction scheme proposed earlier by the authors for isobutanol dehydration. The rate constant for n-butanol dehydration on H-ZSM-5 (determined from in situ FTIR kinetic studies by monitoring the growth of the water deformation peak at 1640 cm{sup -1}) is shown to be the true dehydration rate constant (1.7 x 10{sup -4}s{sup -1} at 100{degrees}C). On the other hand, the rate constants determined from GC steady-state kinetic studies (temperature interval 105-185{degrees}C) are effective ones, giving activation energies of 22{+-}2 kcal/mol and 33{+-}2 kcal/mol for complete dehydration and dehydration to butene only, respectively. By studying the dehydration reaction under different conditions (flow and static reactors, steady-state and non-steady-state regimes) and on samples with rather similar acid strengths but different porous systems (H-ZSM-5-microporous channels with diameter {approximately}5.5 {angstrom}, and amorphous aluminosilicate-pores of average diameter {approximately}50 {angstrom}), it was shown that depending on the concentration of butanol in the immediate vicinity of the active alkoxide intermediate {exists}-OC{sub 4}H{sub 9}, different reaction paths are utilized. High concentrations of alcohol favor ether formation, whereas low ones favour butene. This also explains the so-called {open_quotes}stop effect{close_quotes} observed in GC experiments, where an increase in the rate of butene formation occurs when the flow of alcohol is stopped and replaced with a flow of pure helium. Here, decreasing the concentration of alcohol in the micropores results in more of the alkoxide intermediate transforming to butene rather than to ether (which was the case at steady state). 28 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Support Effects on Bronsted acid site densities and alcohol dehydration turnover rates on tungsten oxide domains

    SciTech Connect

    Macht, Josef; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; May-Lozano, Marcos; Soled, Stuart L.; Wang, Yong; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Initial activity and acid site density of several WAl, WSi (MCM41) and one WSn sample were determined. Trans/cis 2-butene selectivity is dependent on the support. Presumably, these differences are due to subtle differences in base strengths. 2-Butanol dehydration rates (per W-atom) reached maximum values at intermediate WOx surface densities on WAl, as reported for 2-butanol dehydration reactions on WZr. Titration results indicate that Bronsted acid sites are required for 2-butanol dehydration on WAl, WSi and WSn. UV-visible studies suggest that WAl is much more difficult to reduce than WZr. The detection of reduced centers on WAl, the number of which correlates to Bronsted acid site density and catalyst activity, as well as the temperature dependence of Bronsted acid site density indicate the in-situ formation of these active sites. We infer that this mechanism is common among all supported WOx samples described in this study. Turnover rates are a function of Bronsted acid site density only. High acid site densities lead to high turnover rates. Higher active site densities may cause stronger conjugate bases, as a higher electron density has to be stabilized, and thus weaker acidity, enabling a faster rate of product desorption. The maximum achievable active site density is dependent on the support. WZr reaches a higher active site density than WAl.

  11. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Dehydration of CaTeO3(H2O): An Original Route to Generate New CaTeO3 Polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Poupon, Morgane; Barrier, Nicolas; Petit, Sebastien; Clevers, Simon; Dupray, Valerie

    2015-06-15

    CaTeO3(H2O) was obtained from microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis as a polycrystalline sample material. The dehydration reaction was followed by thermal analysis (thermogravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry) and temperature-dependent powder X-ray diffraction and leads to a new ?-CaTeO3 polymorph. The crystal structures of CaTeO3(H2O) and ?-CaTeO3 were solved ab initio from PXRD data. CaTeO3(H2O) is non-centrosymmetric: P21cn; Z = 8; a = 14.785?49(4) Å; b = 6.791?94(3) Å; c = 8.062?62(3) Å. This layered structure is related to the ones of MTeO3(H2O) (M = Sr, Ba) with layers built of edge-sharing [CaO6(H2O)] polyhedra and are capped of each side by [Te(IV)O3E] units. Adjacent layers are stacked along the a-axis and are held together by H-bonds via the water molecules. The dehydration reaction starts above 120 °C. The transformation of CaTeO3(H2O) into ?-CaTeO3 (P21ca; Z = 8; a = 13.3647(6) Å; b = 6.5330(3) Å; c = 8.1896(3) Å) results from topotactic process with layer condensation along the a-axis and the 1/2b? translation of intermediate layers. Thus, ?-CaTeO3 stays non-centrosymmetric. The characteristic layers of CaTeO3(H2O) are also maintained in ?-CaTeO3 but held together via van der Waals bonds instead of H-bonds through water molecules. Electron localization function and dipole moment calculations were also performed. For both structures and over each unit cell, the dipole moments are aligned antiparallel with net dipole moments of 3.94 and 0.47 D for CaTeO3(H2O) and ?-CaTeO3, respectively. The temperature-resolved second harmonic generation (TR-SHG) measurements, between 30 and 400 °C, show the decreasing of the SHG intensity response from 0.39 to 0.06 × quartz for CaTeO3(H2O) and ?-CaTeO3, respectively. PMID:26035739

  12. Transient dehydration of lungs in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Steskal, J.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    The fluid balance in the lungs of rats exposed to head-down tilt is examined. Six Munich-Wister rats were suspended for 7 days and 10 Sprague-Dawley rats for 14 days using the technique of Morey (1979). The water contents of the lungs of the suspended and a control group are calculated and compared. The data reveal that the two-days suspended rats had dehydrated lungs; however, the lungs of the 14-day suspended and control group rats were similar. It is noted that the dehydration in the 2-day suspended rats is caused by general dehydration not the head-tilt position.

  13. Proposal for New Experimental Tests of the Bose-Einstein Condensation Mechanism for Low-Energy Nuclear Reaction and Transmutation Processes in Deuterium Loaded - and Nano-Scale Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Koltick, David S.; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    2006-02-01

    Most of experimental results of low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) reported so far cannot be reproduced on demand. There have been persistent experimental results indicating that the LENR and transmutation processes in condensed matters (LENRTPCM) are surface phenomena rather than bulk phenomena. Recently proposed Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) mechanism may provide a suitable theoretical description of the surface phenomena. New experiments are proposed and described for testing the BEC mechanism for LENR and transmutation processes in micro- and nano-scale traps. (1) We propose the use of micro- or nano-porous conducting materials as a cathode in electrolysis experiments with heavy water with or without Li in order to stabilize the active surface spots and to enhance the effect for the purpose of improving the reproducibility of excess heat generation and nuclear emission. (2) We propose new experimental tests of the BEC mechanism by measuring the pressure and temperature dependence of LENR events using deuterium gas and these deuterated metals with or without Li. If the LENRTPCM are surface phenomena, the proposed use of micro-/nano-scale porous materials is expected to enhance and scale up the LENRTPCM effects by many order of magnitude, and thus may lead to better reproductivity and theoretical understanding of the phenomena.

  14. Dehydration of Aldoximes Using PhSe(O)OH as the Pre-Catalyst in Air.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Sun, Jingjing; Ding, Yuanhua; Yu, Lei

    2015-12-01

    PhSe(O)OH was found to be a good pre-catalyst for aldoxime dehydrations in open air. Compared with the previously reported (PhSe)2-H2O2 system, it is more stable and milder, affording broader application scopes due to a higher functional group tolerance. The control experiments for mechanism study disclosed that air was the key factor for the reaction to maintain enough concentration of PhSeOH, which should be the real catalytic species. PMID:26574922

  15. Comparison of clinical and biochemical markers of dehydration with the clinical dehydration scale in children: a case comparison trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical dehydration scale (CDS) is a quick, easy-to-use tool with 4 clinical items and a score of 1–8 that serves to classify dehydration in children with gastroenteritis as no, some or moderate/severe dehydration. Studies validating the CDS (Friedman JN) with a comparison group remain elusive. We hypothesized that the CDS correlates with a wide spectrum of established markers of dehydration, making it an appropriate and easy-to-use clinical tool. Methods This study was designed as a prospective double-cohort trial in a single tertiary care center. Children with diarrhea and vomiting, who clinically required intravenous fluids for rehydration, were compared with minor trauma patients who required intravenous needling for conscious sedation. We compared the CDS with clinical and urinary markers (urinary electrolytes, proteins, ratios and fractional excretions) for dehydration in both groups using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the area under the curve (AUC). Results We enrolled 73 children (male?=?36) in the dehydration group and 143 (male?=?105) in the comparison group. Median age was 32 months (range 3–214) in the dehydration and 96 months (range 2.6-214 months, p?dehydration group and 0 in the comparison group (p?dehydrated group: difference in heart rate, diastolic blood pressure, urine sodium/potassium ratio, urine sodium, fractional sodium excretion, serum bicarbonate, and creatinine measurements. The best markers for dehydration were urine Na and serum bicarbonate (ROC AUC?=?0.798 and 0.821, respectively). CDS was most closely correlated with serum bicarbonate (Pearson r?=?-0.3696, p?=?0.002). Conclusion Although serum bicarbonate is not the gold standard for dehydration, this study provides further evidence for the usefulness of the CDS as a dehydration marker in children. Trial registration Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00462527) on April 18, 2007. PMID:24935348

  16. A year in the life of an aluminous metapelite xenolith--The role of heating rates, reaction overstep, H2O retention and melt loss

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Ning

    by continual prograde reaction and loss to the margins of H2O liberated by subsolidus dehydration reactions temperatures, an effect exacerbated by the effects of melt loss. Whereas corundum growth occurred rates are generally slow, H2O produced by dehydration reactions is generally assumed to be lost

  17. Effects of dehydration on performance in man: Annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of studies on the effect of dehydration on human performance and related physiological mechanisms. The annotations are listed in alphabetical order by first author and cover material through June 1973.

  18. NOVEL POLYMERIC MEMBRANE FOR DEHYDRATION OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds and organic/organic separations. Development of a membrane system with suitable flux and selectivity characteristics plays a critical role...

  19. Cardiovascular drift during prolonged exercise and the effects of dehydration.

    PubMed

    Coyle, E F

    1998-06-01

    Reductions in SV are the most striking component of "classic" CV drift as well as "dehydration induced" CV drift. Direct data for the widespread notion that increased skin blood flow causes SV to be reduced during "classic" CV drift is rather scarce. Reductions in SV due to dehydration and concomitant hyperthermia are clearly not due to increases in skin blood flow. Instead, skin blood flow declines as skin and systemic vascular resistance increase as the CV system attempts to cope with the severe challenge of large reductions in cardiac output. Approximately one-half of the reduction in SV is due to reduced blood volume from dehydration during exercise which produces hyperthermia. The remaining reduction in SV with dehydration and hyperthermia appears to be related to additional factors such as hyperthermia and their interaction with factors that further reduce ventricular filling, such as heart rate acceleration. PMID:9694416

  20. Ample Water, Avoiding Dehydration Can Prevent Renal Calculi

    MedlinePLUS

    ... previous story next story A Summer Menace Ample Water, Avoiding Dehydration Can Prevent Renal Calculi By Jan ... should be drinking at least 12 glasses of water each day, especially during the summer.” kidney stones— ...

  1. Experimental apparatus for simultaneous dehydration and sweetening of natural gas 

    E-print Network

    Pace, Christopher Lee

    1997-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed and built for the purpose of studying the feasibility of solvent mixtures for the simultaneous dehydration and sweetening of natural gas. The apparatus is versatile and can be used ...

  2. Hospital Admissions for Malnutrition and Dehydration in Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katherine A; Burson, Rosanne; Gall, Kristyn; Saunders, Mitzi M

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration and malnutrition are commonly experienced by patients with dementia and can result in hospitalizations and decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe retrospectively, the incidence and correlations of variables that may precede hospitalizations for dehydration/malnutrition in the community-dwelling patient with dementia. Data from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) Start of Care (SOC) on 44 patients served by a Michigan home care agency were retrieved for analysis. This study did not reveal any single or collection of variables that would predict risk for hospitalization for dehydration/malnutrition. With the lack of specific predictors of hospitalization related to dehydration and malnutrition, clinicians need to place high priority on risk-lowering strategies and preventive education for patients, family, and caregivers. PMID:26645842

  3. In situ X-ray observation of dehydration and EoS of chlorite under high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Suenami, H.; Kikegawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    Water in hydrous minerals has been transported to deep Earth's interior by subducting slab, which dehydrate at certain pressure and temperature. The existence of deep Earth's water affects the physical properties of Earth's mantle minerals. Therefore it is important to study the effect of water for the subducting slab materials. Serpentine ((Mg,Fe)6Si4O10(OH)8) is major hydrous mineral in subducting slab, and chlorite ((Mg,Fe,Al)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH)8) should be also important hydrous mineral in the subducting slab because Al is included in slab materials. In this study, the dehydration reactions and P-V-T EoS of chlorite were determined by time-resolved X-ray diffraction analysis under high pressure and temperature using MAX80, PF-AR, KEK. We found that chlorite was quickly dehydrated to forsterite + pyrope + fluid within 1 hour at 3 - 7 GPa when across the phase equilibrium boundary. On the other hand, the kinetic boundary was observed above 7 GPa because of low temperature phase equilibrium boundary, and the dehydration product was Mg-sursassite + unknown + fluid. In the EoS study, we observed compressibility change, i.e. elastic softening behavior in chlorite at around 4 GPa. This behavior is consistent with the case of antigorite (serpentine) (e.g. Yang et al., 2014). The details of P-V-T results will be presented.

  4. Polariton condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Snoke, David; Littlewood, Peter

    2010-08-15

    Most students of physics know about the special properties of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) as demonstrated in the two best-known examples: superfluid helium-4, first reported in 1938, and condensates of trapped atomic gases, first observed in 1995. (See the article by Wolfgang Ketterle in PHYSICS TODAY, December 1999, page 30.) Many also know that superfluid {sup 3}He and superconducting metals contain BECs of fermion pairs. An underlying principle of all those condensed-matter systems, known as quantum fluids, is that an even number of fermions with half-integer spin can be combined to make a composite boson with integer spin. Such composite bosons, like all bosons, have the property that below some critical temperature--roughly the temperature at which the thermal de Broglie wavelength becomes comparable to the distance between the bosons--the total free energy is minimized by having a macroscopic number of bosons enter a single quantum state and form a macroscopic, coherent matter wave. Remarkably, the effect of interparticle repulsion is to lead to quantum mechanical exchange interactions that make that state robust, since the exchange interactions add coherently.

  5. Catalysis by heteropoly compunds. 20. An NMR study of ethanol dehydration in the pseudoliquid phase of 12-tungstophosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kwan Young; Arai, Takeo; Nakata, Shin-ichi, Nakata; Asaoka, Sachio; Okuhara, Toshio; Misono, Makoto

    1992-04-08

    Dehydration of ethanol in the psuedoliquid phase of 12-tungestophosphoric acid, H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} was studied by means of solid-state NMR combined with IR, thermal desorption, and transient-response method. It was confirmed by the transient-response method using isotopically labeled ethanol that a large amount of ethanol was absorbed in the lattice of the catalyst bulk (psuedoliquid phase) under the reaction conditions, and the reaction proceeded in the bulk phase. Probable reaction intermediates of the ethanol dehydration such as protonated ethanol dimer ((C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH){sub 2}H{sup +}) and monomer (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH{sub 2}{sup +}) were directly identified in this phase by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The assignments were supported by FIR spectroscopy and stoichiometry of ethanol absorption. By comparison of the NMR data with the results of thermal desorption of ethanol, the dimer and monomer species are very likely the intermediates for diethyl ether and ethylene formation, respectively. The unusual pressure dependence observed for the dehydration of ethanol was reasonably explained by charges in the concentration of these intermediates in the psuedoliquid phase. 46 refs., 11 fig., 3 tab.

  6. Timing of epimerization and condensation reactions in nonribosomal peptide assembly lines: kinetic analysis of phenylalanine activating elongation modules of tyrocidine synthetase B.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lusong; Kohli, Rahul M; Onishi, Megumi; Linne, Uwe; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Walsh, Christopher T

    2002-07-23

    The cyclic decapeptide antibiotic tyrocidine has D-Phe residues at positions 1 and 4, produced during peptide chain growth from L-Phe residues by 50 kDa epimerase (E) domains embedded, respectively, in the initiation module (TycA) and the TycB3 module of the three-subunit (TycABC), 10-module nonribosomal peptide synthetase. While the initiation module clearly epimerizes the aminoacyl thioester Phe1-S-TycA intermediate, the timing of epimerization versus peptide bond condensation at internal E domains has been less well characterized in nonribosomal peptide synthetases. In this study, we use rapid quench techniques to evaluate a three-domain (ATE) and a four-domain version (CATE) of the TycB3 module and a six-domain fragment (ATCATE) of the TycB2(-3) bimodule to measure the ability of the E domain in the TycB3 module to epimerize the aminoacyl thioester Phe-S-TycB3 and the dipeptidyl-S-enzyme (L-Phe-L-Phe-S-TycB3 if L-Phe-D-Phe-S-TycB3). The chiralities of the Phe-S-enzyme and Phe-Phe-S-enzyme species over time were determined by hydrolysis and chiral TLC separations, allowing for the clear conclusion that epimerization in the internal TycB3 module occurs preferentially on the peptidyl-S-enzyme rather than the aminoacyl-S-enzyme, by a factor of about 3000/1. In turn, this imposes constraints on the chiral selectivity of the condensation (C) domains immediately upstream and downstream of E domains. The stereoselectivity of the upstream C domain was shown to be L-selective at both donor and acceptor sites ((L)C(L)) by site-directed mutagenesis studies of an E domain active site residue and using the small-molecule surrogate D-Phe-Pro-L-Phe-N-acetylcysteamine thioester (D-Phe-Pro-L-Phe-SNAC) and D-Phe-Pro-D-Phe-SNAC as donor probes. PMID:12119033

  7. Enantioselective dehydration of butan-2-ol using zeolite Y modified with dithiane oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Feast, S.; Siddiqui, H.; Bethell, D.

    1997-04-15

    Modification of zeolite H-Y by dithiane oxides (2-R-1,3-dithiane 1-oxide; R = H, CH{sub 3}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) is shown to enhance significantly its activity for the acid catalyzed gas phase dehydration of butan-2-ol. The rate enhancement is observed for catalysts that are prepared by adding the dithiane oxide to the zeolite synthesis gel or by adsorption of the dithiane oxide onto commercial samples of zeolite H-Y. The origin of the rate enhancement is considered to result from a specific interaction between the dithiane oxide modifier with both the extra-framework and framework aluminum in the zeolite. Modification of zeolite H-Y with (R)-1,3-dithiane 1-oxide enhances the conversion of (S)-butan-2-ol compared to (R)-butan-2-ol in the temperature range 110-150{degrees}C when the two enantiomers are reacted separately. Modification with (S)-2-phenyl-1,3-dithiane 1-oxide gives a catalyst for which (R)-butan-2-ol is the most reactive of the two enantiomers. Reaction of racemic butan-2-ol over these chirally modified H-Y zeolites demonstrates that this modification procedure makes the zeolite enantiomerically discriminating and one enantiomer preferentially reacts, although both are present in the micropores under the reaction conditions. This effect is considered to be due to enantioselective rate enhancement, since, although the rate of dehydration of both enantiomers is enhanced in the chiral environment, the dehydration rate of one enantiomer is accelerated relative to the other. It is suggested that the effect is due to preferential adsorption at the chiral active site. 34 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Dehydration of Methylcyclohexanol Isomers in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory and Product Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clennan, Malgorzata M.; Clennan, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrations of "cis"- and "trans"-2-methylcyclohexanol mixtures were carried out with 60% sulfuric acid at 78-80 [degrees]C as a function of time and the products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. The compounds identified in the reaction mixtures include alkenes, 1-, 3-, and 4-methylcyclohexenes and…

  9. Thermogravimetric study of the dehydration and reduction of red mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplov, O. A.; Korenovskii, N. L.; Lainer, Yu. A.

    2015-01-01

    The processes of drying and reduction of red mud in the pure state and with coal additions in vacuum or in gaseous media (helium, hydrogen) have been experimentally studied by thermogravimetry using a Setaram TAG24 thermogravimetric analyzer. The minimum total weight loss (˜20%) is observed for red mud samples without additives in forevacuum, and the maximum loss (˜38%) is detected in samples with coal. It is demonstrated that, for this type of red mud with iron oxide Fe2O3, water molecules are bonded in the form of iron hydroxide Fe2O3 · 3H2O rather than goethite FeOOH. The peak of magnetite formation is observed in differential thermogravimetry (DTG) curve in the range 270-400°C. The simulation of the magnetite dehydration and formation rates under experimental conditions in the relevant temperature ranges agrees with the experimental data. A peak of wustite formation in hydrogen above ˜600°C is recorded in a DTG curve, and the removal of one-third of sodium oxide, which is likely not to be fixed into strong sodium alumosilicate, is observed in the range 800-1000°C. The peak detected in the DTG curve of the mud with charcoal in helium in the range 350-450°C is similar to the peak of hematite reduction in magnetite in a hydrogen atmosphere. The most probable source of hydrogen-containing gases in this temperature range consists of the residual hydrocarbons of charcoal. The reduction reactions of disperse iron oxides with coal proceed only at temperatures above 600°C. These processes occur in the same temperature range (600-900°C) both in forevacuum and in a helium atmosphere. It is experimentally demonstrated that sintering process occurs in the mud in the temperature range 450-850°C.

  10. Ice Cloud Formation and Dehydration in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor is important not only for its greenhouse forcing, but also because it plays a significant role in stratospheric chemistry. Several recent studies have focused on the potential for dehydration due to ice cloud formation in air rising slowly through the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Holton and Gettelman showed that temperature variations associated with horizontal transport of air in the TTL can drive ice cloud formation and dehydration, and Gettelman et al. recently examined the cloud formation and dehydration along kinematic trajectories using simple assumptions about the cloud properties. In this study, a Lagrangian, one-dimensional cloud model has been used to further investigate cloud formation and dehydration as air is transported horizontally and vertically through the TTL. Time-height curtains of temperature are extracted from meteorological analyses. The model tracks the growth, advection, and sedimentation of individual cloud particles. The regional distribution of clouds simulated in the model is comparable to the subvisible cirrus distribution indicated by SAGE II. The simulated cloud properties and cloud frequencies depend strongly on the assumed supersaturation threshold for ice nucleation. The clouds typically do not dehydrate the air along trajectories down to the temperature minimum saturation mixing ratio. Rather the water vapor mixing ratio crossing the tropopause along trajectories is 10-50% larger than the saturation mixing ratio. I will also discuss the impacts of Kelvin waves and gravity waves on cloud properties and dehydration efficiency. These simulations can be used to determine whether observed lower stratospheric water vapor mixing ratios can be explained by dehydration associated with in situ TTL cloud formation alone.

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of tetrahydrofuran synthesis via 1,4-butanediol dehydration in high-temperature water.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Shawn E; Ehrenberger, Carolyn E; Savage, Phillip E

    2006-08-01

    We conducted an experimental investigation into the kinetics and mechanism of tetrahydrofuran synthesis from 1,4-butanediol via dehydration in high-temperature liquid water (HTW) without added catalyst at 200-350 degrees C. The reaction was reversible, with tetrahydrofuran being produced at an equilibrium yield of 84% (at 200 degrees C) to 94% (at 350 degrees C). The addition of CO2 to the reaction mixture increased the reaction rate by a factor of 1.9-2.9, because of the increase in acidity resulting from the formation and dissociation of carbonic acid. This increase was much less than that expected (factor of 37-60) from a previously suggested acid-catalyzed mechanism. This disagreement prompted experiments with added acid (HCl) and base (NaOH) to investigate the influence of pH on the reaction rate. These experiments revealed three distinct regions of pH dependence. At high and low pH, the dehydration rate increased with increasing acidity. At near-neutral pH, however, the rate was essentially insensitive to changes in pH. This behavior is consistent with a mechanism where H2O, in addition to H+, serves as a proton donor. This work indicates that the relatively high native concentration of + (large KW), which has commonly been thought to lead to the occurrence of acid-catalyzed reactions in HTW without added catalyst, does not explain the dehydration of 1,4-butanediol in HTW without catalyst. Rather, H2O serves directly as the proton donor for the reaction. PMID:16872209

  12. Modeling the effects of geological heterogeneity and metamorphic dehydration on slow slip and shallow deformation in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, Robert M.

    Slow slip and tectonic tremor in subduction zones take place at depths (˜20 - 50 km) where there is abundant evidence for distributed shear over broad zones (˜10 - 103 m) composed of rocks with marked differences in mechanical properties and for near lithostatic pore pressures along the plate interface where the main source of fluids must be attributed to chemical dehydration reactions. In Chapter II, I model quasi-dynamic rupture along faults composed of material mixtures characterized by different rate-and-state-dependent frictional properties to determine the parameter regime capable of producing slow slip in an idealized subduction zone setting. Keeping other parameters fixed, the relative proportions of velocity-weakening (VW) and velocity-strengthening (VS) materials control the sliding character (stable, slow, or dynamic) along the fault. The stability boundary between slow and dynamic is accurately described by linear analysis of a double spring-slider system with VW and VS blocks. In Chapter III, I model viscoelastic compaction of material subducting through the slow slip and tremor zone in the presence of pressure and temperature-dependent dehydration reactions. A dehydration fluid source is included using 1) a generalized basalt dehydration reaction in subducting oceanic crust or 2) a general nonlinear kinetic reaction rate law parameterized for an antigorite dehydration reaction. Pore pressures in excess of lithostatic values are a robust feature of simulations that employ parameters consistent with the geometry of the Cascadia subduction margin. Simulations that include viscous deformation uniformly generate traveling porosity waves that transport increased fluid pressures within the slow slip region. Slow slip and tremor also occur in shallow (< 10 km depth) accretionary prism sections of subduction zones. In Chapter IV, I examine how geologic heterogeneities affect the mechanics of accretionary prisms in subduction zones by showing how spatial variations in pore pressure, porosity, and internal friction coefficient affect predictions of basal shear stress, taper angle, and internal slip surface geometry. My results suggest that assuming average porosity throughout the prism may be a good approximation in many cases, but assuming an average value for the pore pressure can cause significant errors. This dissertation includes previously published and unpublished coauthored material.

  13. Condensed imidazo-1,2,4-azines. 15. Reaction of 1,2-diaminobenzimidazole with 5-phenyl-2,3-dihydrofuran-2,3-dione

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglenko, V.P.; Gnidets, V.P.; Klyuev, N.A.; Povstyanoi, M.V.

    1987-10-01

    The reaction of 1,2-diaminobenzimidazole with 5-phenyl-2,3-dihydrofuran-2,3-dione in acetic acid gave a mixture of 2-benzoylmethyl-1,2,4-triazino (2,3-..cap alpha..)-benzimidazol-4H-3-one and 3-benzoylmethyl-1,2,4-triazino(2,3-..cap alpha..)benzimidazol-1H-2-one, the intramolecular cyclization of which gave isomeric 2-phenylfuro-(5,4-e)- and 2-phenylfuro(4,5-e)-1,2,4-triazino(2,3-..cap alpha..)benzimidazoles. Only the corresponding furo(4,5-e)-1,2,4-triazino(2,3-..cap alpha..)benzimidazole was isolated when the reaction was carried out in sulfuric acid. The IR spectra of KBr pellets of the compounds were recorded with a UR-20 spectrometer. The electronic absorption spectra of solutions in dioxane were obtained with a Specord UV-vis spectrophotometer. The mass spectra were recorded with a Varian MAT-311a spectrometer. The quantum-chemical calculations were made by the Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) method with the standard parametrization.

  14. Dehydration and the Dynamic Dimensional Changes within Dentin and Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, D.; Mao, S.; Lu, C.; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to quantify the dimensional changes in dentin and enamel during dehydration, and to determine if there are differences between the responses of these tissues from young and old patients. Methods Microscopic Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was used to evaluate deformation of dentin and enamel as a function of water loss resulting from free convection in air. Dimensional changes within both tissues were quantified for two patient age groups (i.e. young 18?age?30 and old 50?age) and in two orthogonal directions (i.e. parallel and perpendicular to the prevailing structural feature (dentin tubules or enamel prisms)). The deformation histories were used to estimate effective dehydration coefficients that can be used in quantifying the strains induced by dehydration. Results Both dentin and enamel underwent contraction with water loss, regardless of the patient age. There was no significant difference between responses of the two age groups or the two orthogonal directions. Over one hour of free convection, the average water loss in dentin was 6% and resulted in approximately 0.5 % shrinkage. In the same time period the average water loss in the enamel was approximately 1% and resulted in 0.03% shrinkage. The estimated effective dehydration coefficients were -810 µm/m/(% weight loss) and -50 µm/m/(% weight loss) for dentin and enamel, respectively. Significance The degree of deformation shrinkage resulting from dehydration is over a factor of magnitude larger in dentin than enamel. PMID:19246085

  15. On topotaxy and compaction during antigorite and chlorite dehydration: an experimental and natural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Tommasi, Andréa; Garrido, Carlos J.; Mainprice, David

    2015-04-01

    Dehydration reactions result in minerals' replacement and a transient fluid-filled porosity. These reactions involve interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation and might therefore lead to fixed crystallographic orientation relations between reactant (protolith) and product phases (i.e. topotaxy). We investigate these two phenomena in the dehydration of a foliated antigorite (atg) serpentinite by comparing the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) developed by olivine (ol), orthopyroxene (opx) and chlorite (chl) during high-pressure antigorite and chlorite dehydration in piston-cylinder experiments and in natural samples recording the dehydration of antigorite (Cerro del Almirez, Betic Cordillera, Spain). Experiments were performed under undrained conditions resulting in fluid-filled porosity and in strong CPO of the prograde minerals, controlled by the pre-existing antigorite CPO in the reactant foliated serpentinite. The orientation of a ol,opx and is parallel to from the protolith. The Cerro del Almirez samples show similar, locally well-developed topotactic relations between orthopyroxene, chlorite and antigorite, but the product CPOs are weaker and more complex at the thin section scale. In contrast to the experiments, olivine from natural samples shows a weak correlation between b ol and the former . We relate the strengthening of local topotactic relations and the weakening of the inherited CPO at a larger scale in natural samples to compaction and associated fluid migration. Microstructural features that might be related to compaction in the natural samples include: (1) smooth bending of the former foliation, (2) gradual crystallographic misorientation (up to 16°) of prismatic orthopyroxene due to buckling by dislocation creep, (3) inversion of enstatite to low clinoenstatite (P21/c) along lamellae and (4) brittle fracturing of prismatic orthopyroxene enclosed by plastically deformed chlorite. The coexistence of orthopyroxene buckling and clinoenstatite lamellae enables estimating the local strain rates and shear stresses generated during compaction. An lower bound for the strain rates in the order of 10-12 to 10-13 s-1 and shear stresses of 60-70 MPa are estimated based on creep data. Lower shear stresses (20-40 MPa) are retrieved using a theoretical approach. These data point to slow compaction (and fluid extraction) in nature if the system is not perturbed by external forces, with rates only marginally higher than the viscoplastic deformation of the solid matrix.

  16. Luminescence induced by dehydration of kaolin - Association with electron-spin-active centers and with surface activity for dehydration-polymerization of glycine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L.; Hovatter, W.; Sweeney, M.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data concerning emission of light upon dehydration as a function of preheating and pre-gamma-irradiation are correlated with reported studies of electron-spin resonance (ESR) activity after similar pretreatments. The effect of these pretreatments on the kaolin-promoted incorporation of glycine into peptide oligomers in a wet/cold, hot/dry fluctuating environment is compared to their effect on the ESR and luminescent signals. The existence of spectroscopically active centers appears to be loosely anticorrelated with reaction yield; these yields are increased by increasing the overall energy content of the material. It is concluded that some part of the chemical yield is produced by a mechanism involving intrinsic, excited electronic states of the clay crystal lattice. These states may be derived from thermally, interfacially, and/or mechanically induced charge reorganization within interspersed energy levels in the band structure of the material.

  17. Characterization and Thermal Dehydration Kinetics of Highly Crystalline Mcallisterite, Synthesized at Low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Senberber, Fatma Tugce

    2014-01-01

    The hydrothermal synthesis of a mcallisterite (Mg2(B6O7(OH)6)2·9(H2O)) mineral at low temperatures was characterized. For this purpose, several reaction temperatures (0–70°C) and reaction times (30–240?min) were studied. Synthesized minerals were subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopies and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additionally, experimental analyses of boron trioxide (B2O3) content and reaction yields were performed. Furthermore, thermal gravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) were used for the determination of thermal dehydration kinetics. According to the XRD results, mcallisterite, which has a powder diffraction file (pdf) number of “01-070-1902,” was formed under certain reaction parameters. Pure crystalline mcallisterite had diagnostic FT-IR and Raman vibration peaks and according to the SEM analysis, for the minerals which were synthesized at 60°C and 30?min of reaction time, particle size was between 398.30 and 700.06?nm. Its B2O3 content and reaction yield were 50.80 ± 1.12% and 85.80 ± 0.61%, respectively. Finally, average activation energies (conversion values (?) that were selected between 0.1 and 0.6) were calculated as 100.40?kJ/mol and 98.31?kJ/mol according to Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) methods, respectively. PMID:24719585

  18. Isothermal dehydration of thin films of water and sugar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyd, R.; Rampino, A.; Bellich, B.; Elisei, E.; Cesàro, A.; Saboungi, M.-L.

    2014-03-01

    The process of quasi-isothermal dehydration of thin films of pure water and aqueous sugar solutions is investigated with a dual experimental and theoretical approach. A nanoporous paper disk with a homogeneous internal structure was used as a substrate. This experimental set-up makes it possible to gather thermodynamic data under well-defined conditions, develop a numerical model, and extract needed information about the dehydration process, in particular the water activity. It is found that the temperature evolution of the pure water film is not strictly isothermal during the drying process, possibly due to the influence of water diffusion through the cellulose web of the substrate. The role of sugar is clearly detectable and its influence on the dehydration process can be identified. At the end of the drying process, trehalose molecules slow down the diffusion of water molecules through the substrate in a more pronounced way than do the glucose molecules.

  19. Isothermal dehydration of thin films of water and sugar solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Heyd, R.; Rampino, A.; Laboratory of Physical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Trieste, Via Giorgieri 1, 34127 Trieste ; Bellich, B.; Elisei, E.; Cesàro, A.; Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, I-34149 Trieste ; Saboungi, M.-L.; Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux, et de Cosmochimie , Sorbonne Univ-UPMC, Univ Paris 06, UMR CNRS 7590, Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle, IRD UMR 206, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris

    2014-03-28

    The process of quasi-isothermal dehydration of thin films of pure water and aqueous sugar solutions is investigated with a dual experimental and theoretical approach. A nanoporous paper disk with a homogeneous internal structure was used as a substrate. This experimental set-up makes it possible to gather thermodynamic data under well-defined conditions, develop a numerical model, and extract needed information about the dehydration process, in particular the water activity. It is found that the temperature evolution of the pure water film is not strictly isothermal during the drying process, possibly due to the influence of water diffusion through the cellulose web of the substrate. The role of sugar is clearly detectable and its influence on the dehydration process can be identified. At the end of the drying process, trehalose molecules slow down the diffusion of water molecules through the substrate in a more pronounced way than do the glucose molecules.

  20. Geothermal vegetable dehydration at Brady`s Hot Springs, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1994-07-01

    This article describes the utilization of the Brady`s Springs geothermal resource for heat generation used in the food dehydration process. This geothermal system is located in the Forty-Mile Desert area of Nevada. Geothermal Food Processors, Inc. of Reno, Nevada started construction of the geothermal vegetable dehydration plant in 1978, and the plant started operations in 1979. The industrial process of vegetable dehydration at the plant is described. In July of 1992, the Brady`s Springs geothermal system began being used for power generation by the Brady`s Hot Springs geothermal power plant, operated by Oxbow Power Services, Inc. As a result, the water levels in the food processing plant wells have dropped below usable levels and the geothermal brine is now being supplied by the Oxbow power plant.

  1. Ice Cloud Formation and Dehydration in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Pfister, Leonhard; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor is important not only for its greenhouse forcing, but also because it plays a significant role in stratospheric chemistry. several recent studies have focused on the potential for dehydration due to ice cloud formation in air rising slowly through the tropical tropopause layer. Holton and Gettelman showed that temperature variations associated with horizontal transport of air in the tropopause layer can drive ice cloud formation and dehydration, and Gettelman et al. recently examined the cloud formation and dehydration along kinematic trajectories using simple assumptions about the cloud properties. In this study, we use a Lagrangian, one-dimensional cloud model to further investigate cloud formation and dehydration as air is transported horizontally and vertically through the tropical tropopause layer. Time-height curtains of temperature are extracted from meteorological analyses. The model tracks the growth and sedimentation of individual cloud particles. The regional distribution of clouds simulated in the model is comparable to the subvisible cirrus distribution indicated by SAGE II. The simulated cloud properties depend strongly on the assumed ice supersaturation threshold for ice nucleation. with effective nuclei present (low supersaturation threshold), ice number densities are high (0.1--10 cm(circumflex)-3), and ice crystals do not grow large enough to fall very far, resulting in limited dehydration. With higher supersaturation thresholds, ice number densities are much lower (less than 0.01 cm(circumflex)-3), and ice crystals grow large enough to fall substantially; however, supersaturated air often crosses the tropopause without cloud formation. The clouds typically do not dehydrate the air along trajectories down to the temperature minimum saturation mixing ratio. Rather the water vapor mixing ratio crossing the tropopause along trajectories is typically 10-50% larger than the saturation mixing ratio.

  2. Vapor Phase Dehydration of Glycerol to Acrolein Over SBA-15 Supported Vanadium Substituted Phosphomolybdic Acid Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Viswanadham, Balaga; Srikanth, Amirineni; Kumar, Vanama Pavan; Chary, Komandur V R

    2015-07-01

    Vapor phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was investigated over heteropolyacid (HPA) catalysts containing vanadium substituted phosphomolybdic acid (H4PMo11VO40) supported on mesoporous SBA-15. A series of HPA catalysts with HPA loadings varying from 10-50 wt% were prepared by impregnation method on SBA-15 support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, temperature-programmed desorption of NH3, pyridine adsorbed FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, pore size distribution and specific surface area measurements. The nature of acidic sites was examined by pyridine adsorbed FT-IR spectroscopy. XRD results suggest that the active phase containing HPA was highly dispersed at lower loadings on the support. FT-IR and Raman spectra results confirm that the presence of primary Keggin ion structure of HPA on the support and it was not affected during the preparation of catalysts. Pore size distribution results reveal that all the samples show unimodel pore size distribution with well depicted mesoporous structure. NH3-TPD results suggest that the acidity of catalysts increased with increase of HPA loading. The findings of acidity measurements by FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption reveals that the catalysts consist both the Brønsted and Lewis acidic sites and the amount of Brønsted acidic sites are increasing with HPA loading. SBA-15 supported vanadium substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalysts are found to be highly active during the dehydration reaction and exhibited 100% conversion of glycerol (10 wt% of glycerol) and the acrolein selectivity was appreciably changed with HPA active phase loading. The catalytic functionalities during glycerol dehydration are well correlated with surface acidity of the catalysts. PMID:26373149

  3. Ductile Deformation of Dehydrating Serpentinite Evidenced by Acoustic Signal Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasc, J.; Hilairet, N.; Wang, Y.; Schubnel, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentinite dehydration is believed to be responsible for triggering earthquakes at intermediate depths (i.e., 60-300 km) in subduction zones. Based on experimental results, some authors have proposed mechanisms that explain how brittle deformation can occur despite high pressure and temperature conditions [1]. However, reproducing microseismicity in the laboratory associated with the deformation of dehydrating serpentinite remains challenging. A recent study showed that, even for fast dehydration kinetics, ductile deformation could take place rather than brittle faulting in the sample [2]. This latter study was conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus without the ability to control differential stress during dehydration. We have since conducted controlled deformation experiments in the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) on natural serpentinite samples at sector 13 (GSECARS) of the APS. Monochromatic radiation was used with both a 2D MAR-CCD detector and a CCD camera to determine the stress and the strain of the sample during the deformation process [3]. In addition, an Acoustic Emission (AE) recording setup was used to monitor the microseismicity from the sample, using piezo-ceramic transducers glued on the basal truncation of the anvils. The use of six independent transducers allows locating the AEs and calculating the corresponding focal mechanisms. The samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-5-10-4 s-1 under confining pressures of 3-5 GPa. Dehydration was triggered during the deformation by heating the samples at rates ranging from 5 to 60 K/min. Before the onset of the dehydration, X-ray diffraction data showed that the serpentinite sustained ~1 GPa of stress which plummeted when dehydration occurred. Although AEs were recorded during the compression and decompression stages, no AEs ever accompanied this stress drop, suggesting ductile deformation of the samples. Hence, unlike many previous studies, no evidence for fluid embrittlement and anticrack generation was found in our experiments. These results suggest that dehydration of serpentinite alone cannot be responsible for intermediate earthquakes. The recovered samples microstructures are currently studied in the SEM and further experiments are planned on partially hydrated samples (i.e., containing olivine), capable of sustaining higher stress levels. 1. Jung, H. and H.W. Green, International Geology Review, 2004. 46(12): p. 1089-1102. 2. Gasc, J., et al., Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 2011. 189(3-4): p. 121-133. 3. Wang, Y.B., et al., Review of Scientific Instruments, 2003. 74(6): p. 3002-3011.

  4. A bulge-induced dehydration failure mode of nanocomposite hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingda; Yu, Zejun; Sun, Youyi; Pei, Yongmao; Fang, Daining

    2013-10-01

    Since hydrogels are very soft and usually weak in swollen state, they pose unique challenges to traditional mechanical experiments. The mechanical property of nanocomposite poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel was characterized by the bulge test in this investigation. A dehydration failure phenomenon of the hydrogel was found and the failure mechanism was presented. A criterion is proposed that when strain reaches the threshold, water molecules migrate out of the polymer networks and the dehydration failure occurs. The critical strain keeps constant for orifices with different diameters. This failure mode can be applied in the controllable release of drugs.

  5. Effect of freezing and dehydration on ion and cryoprotectant distribution and hemolymph volume in the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    Effect of freezing and dehydration on ion and cryoprotectant distribution and hemolymph volume water loss we examined the effect of extracellular freezing and dehydration on hemolymph volume dehydration stress can occur through several mechanisms including the polymerization of amino acids

  6. Evolution of nanostructure and specific surface area during thermally driven dehydration of Mg(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimminger, H.; Habler, G.; Freiberger, N.; Abart, R.

    2015-09-01

    The thermally induced dehydration of micrometer-sized particles of Mg(OH)2 was investigated experimentally at ambient pressure and temperatures ranging from 350 to 1300 °C. Reaction progress is correlated with the evolution of the specific surface area and of the particle internal nanostructure. The maximum specific surface area of about 320 m2/g corresponding to a 70-fold increase relative to the starting material is obtained after heat treatment at 350 °C for about 2 h. This is due to the formation of a highly porous, particle-internal nanostructure comprised of newly crystallized strictly aligned, cube-shaped and nanometer-sized crystals of MgO and about 50 vol% porosity. Associated with the dehydration, intensive fracturing and defoliation occurs parallel to the (0001) plane of the original Mg(OH)2 or (111) of the topotaxially grown MgO. After heat treatment at increasingly higher temperatures, enhanced coarsening and sintering of the MgO crystals and healing of cracks leads to a successive decrease of the specific surface area. After heat treatment at 1300 °C for 2.5 h, the specific surface area has decreased to 5 m2/g close to the value typical for the original Mg(OH)2.

  7. Mantle wedge infiltrated with saline fluids from dehydration and decarbonation of subducting slab

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Yoshikawa, Masako; Kumagai, Yoshitaka; Mirabueno, Ma. Hannah T.; Okuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Slab-derived fluids play an important role in heat and material transfer in subduction zones. Dehydration and decarbonation reactions of minerals in the subducting slab have been investigated using phase equilibria and modeling of fluid flow. Nevertheless, direct observations of the fluid chemistry and pressure–temperature conditions of fluids are few. This report describes CO2-bearing saline fluid inclusions in spinel-harzburgite xenoliths collected from the 1991 Pinatubo pumice deposits. The fluid inclusions are filled with saline solutions with 5.1 ± 1.0% (wt) NaCl-equivalent magnesite crystals, CO2-bearing vapor bubbles, and a talc and/or chrysotile layer on the walls. The xenoliths contain tremolite amphibole, which is stable in temperatures lower than 830 °C at the uppermost mantle. The Pinatubo volcano is located at the volcanic front of the Luzon arc associated with subduction of warm oceanic plate. The present observation suggests hydration of forearc mantle and the uppermost mantle by slab-derived CO2-bearing saline fluids. Dehydration and decarbonation take place, and seawater-like saline fluids migrate from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge. The presence of saline fluids is important because they can dissolve more metals than pure H2O and affect the chemical evolution of the mantle wedge. PMID:23716664

  8. Mantle wedge infiltrated with saline fluids from dehydration and decarbonation of subducting slab.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Yoshikawa, Masako; Kumagai, Yoshitaka; Mirabueno, Ma Hannah T; Okuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2013-06-11

    Slab-derived fluids play an important role in heat and material transfer in subduction zones. Dehydration and decarbonation reactions of minerals in the subducting slab have been investigated using phase equilibria and modeling of fluid flow. Nevertheless, direct observations of the fluid chemistry and pressure-temperature conditions of fluids are few. This report describes CO2-bearing saline fluid inclusions in spinel-harzburgite xenoliths collected from the 1991 Pinatubo pumice deposits. The fluid inclusions are filled with saline solutions with 5.1 ± 1.0% (wt) NaCl-equivalent magnesite crystals, CO2-bearing vapor bubbles, and a talc and/or chrysotile layer on the walls. The xenoliths contain tremolite amphibole, which is stable in temperatures lower than 830 °C at the uppermost mantle. The Pinatubo volcano is located at the volcanic front of the Luzon arc associated with subduction of warm oceanic plate. The present observation suggests hydration of forearc mantle and the uppermost mantle by slab-derived CO2-bearing saline fluids. Dehydration and decarbonation take place, and seawater-like saline fluids migrate from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge. The presence of saline fluids is important because they can dissolve more metals than pure H2O and affect the chemical evolution of the mantle wedge. PMID:23716664

  9. Nonconventional hydrolytic dehalogenation of 1-chlorobutane by dehydrated bacteria in a continuous solid-gas biofilter.

    PubMed

    Erable, Benjamin; Goubet, Isabelle; Lamare, Sylvain; Seltana, Amira; Legoy, Marie Dominique; Maugard, Thierry

    2005-08-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis NCIMB 13064 and Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 are able to catalyze the conversion of halogenated hydrocarbons to their corresponding alcohols. These strains are attractive biocatalysts for gas phase remediation of polluted gaseous effluents because of their complementary specificity for short or medium and for mono-, di-, or trisubstituted halogenated hydrocarbons (C2-C8 for Rhodococcus erythropolis and C1-C4 for Xanthobacter autotrophicus). After dehydration, these bacteria can catalyze the hydrolytic dehalogenation of 1-chlorobutane in a nonconventional gas phase system under a controlled water thermodynamic activity (a(w)). This process makes it possible to avoid the problems of solubility and bacterial development due to the presence of water in the traditional biofilters. In the aqueous phase, the dehalogenase activity of Rhodococcus erythropolis is less sensitive to thermal denaturation and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constants at 30 degrees C were 0.4 mM and 2.40 micromol min(-1) g(-1) for Km and Vmax, respectively. For Xanthobacter autotrophicus they were 2.8 mM and 0.35 micromol min(-1) g(-1). In the gas phase, the behavior of dehydrated Xanthobacter autotrophicus cells is different from that observed with Rhododcoccus erythropolis cells. The stability of the dehalogenase activity is markedly lower. It is shown that the HCl produced during the reaction is responsible for this low stability. Contrary to Rhodococcus erythropolis cells, disruption of cell walls does not increase the stability of the dehalogenase activity. The activity and stability of lyophilized Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 cells are dependant on various parameters. Optimal dehalogenase activity was determined for water thermodynamic activity (a(w)) of 0.85. A temperature of 30 degrees C offers the best compromise between activity and stability. The pH control before dehydration plays a role in the ionization state of the dehalogenase in the cells. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants Km and Vmax for the dehydrated Xanthobacter autotrophicus cells were 0.07 (1-chlorobutane thermodynamic activity) and 0.08 micromol min(-1) g(-1) of cells, respectively. A maximal transformation capacity of 1.4 g of 1-chlorobutane per day was finally obtained using 1g of lyophilized Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 cells. PMID:15929125

  10. Condensation model for the ESBWR passive condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S. T.; Zhou, W.; Wolf, B.; Oh, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the General Electric's Economic simplified boiling water reactor (GE-ESBWR) the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) plays a major role in containment pressure control in case of an loss of coolant accident. The PCCS condenser must be able to remove sufficient energy from the reactor containment to prevent containment from exceeding its design pressure following a design basis accident. There are three PCCS condensation modes depending on the containment pressurization due to coolant discharge; complete condensation, cyclic venting and flow through mode. The present work reviews the models and presents model predictive capability along with comparison with existing data from separate effects test. The condensation models in thermal hydraulics code RELAP5 are also assessed to examine its application to various flow modes of condensation. The default model in the code predicts complete condensation well, and basically is Nusselt solution. The UCB model predicts through flow well. None of condensation model in RELAP5 predict complete condensation, cyclic venting, and through flow condensation consistently. New condensation correlations are given that accurately predict all three modes of PCCS condensation. (authors)

  11. X-ray studies of crystal transformation in dehydrating trehalose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilburn, Duncan; Sokol, Paul

    2008-03-01

    The disaccharide trehalose is known to assist in stabilizing dehydrated biological cellular structure. It is present in relatively large quantities in certain organisms whose bodies remain viable for significant periods of time under conditions of extreme drought. Whilst trehalose may not be unique among the sugars in this function, there have been several studies investigating the influence of water on trehalose structure in the hope of determining the mechanism responsible for the properties noted above. We report real-time wide angle X-ray diffraction studies as the commonly occurring crystalline dihydrate form of trehalose is dehydrated at a range of temperatures (in the range 40-70 C) and forms the `alpha' crystalline form of anhydrous trehalose. We find that there is evidence of a two-step process: the dehydration, followed by a crystalline-crystalline transition. The speed of the latter transition is surprising because the dehydrated amorphous form of trehalose has a glass transition temperature of roughly 120 C.

  12. Leaf Shrinkage with Dehydration: Coordination with Hydraulic Vulnerability and Drought

    E-print Network

    Sack, Lawren

    Leaf Shrinkage with Dehydration: Coordination with Hydraulic Vulnerability and Drought Tolerance1[C and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (C.S., C.V., S.D., L extreme during drought. However, little has been known of its correlation with physiology. Computer

  13. Science Study Aids 1: Dehydration for Food Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeschen, John; And Others

    This publication is the first of a series of seven supplementary investigative materials for use in secondary science classes providing up-to-date research-related investigations. This unit is structured for grades 9 through 12. It is concerned with the osmatic dehydration of fruits. The guide provides students with information about food…

  14. [Oral rehydration in newborns with dehydration caused by diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F; Rillman-Pinagel, M L; Velásquez-Jones, L

    1990-08-01

    The clinical experience obtained while treating 43 dehydrated newborns due to diarrhea with oral rehydration solution (ORS) using the formula recommended by the World Health Organization is reported. Of the 43 patients, 26 were severely dehydrated (greater than equal to 10% of weight recovery once rehydrated). The averaged time need to correct the dehydration was 4.7 +/- 2.7 hours, with a average intake of ORS of 26.5 +/- 7.5 mL/kg/hour. Children who were being breastfed continued so during the rehydration period. Two of the patients were hospitalized for intravenous treatment, one was due to persistent vomiting during rehydration and probably due to sepsis, and the other due to necrosing enterocolitis. The oral rehydration therapy was successful in 95% of the newborns included in the study, which proved the method to be safe and adequate for the correction of dehydration due to diarrhea among these patients. Similar experiences are reported in Mexico as well as from other countries, which also suggest the use of this therapeutic procedure in children of this age. PMID:2257093

  15. Radial migration and dehydration of phyllosilicates in the solar nebula

    E-print Network

    Radial migration and dehydration of phyllosilicates in the solar nebula Fred Cieslaa,T, Dante planetary embryos which formed in the outer asteroid belt region of the solar nebula. Others have argued aspects of its geochemistry and therefore, must have formed locally, implying that the nebula must have

  16. Recycled dehydrated lithosphere observed in plume-influenced

    E-print Network

    Langmuir, Charles H.

    Recycled dehydrated lithosphere observed in plume-influenced mid-ocean-ridge basalt Jacqueline Eaby the deep mantle through the subduction and recycling of hydrated oceanic lithosphere. Here we address the question of recycling of water into the deep mantle by characterizing the volatile contents of different

  17. Increased efficiency using the encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabidopsis thaliana shoot tips were successfully cryopreserved using encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation methods. Between one and seven shoot tips were encapsulated within 4 mm calcium-alginate beads. Beads were formed in the presence of 2 M glycerol+0.4M sucrose. The time required to mak...

  18. POULTRY EXCRETA DEHYDRATION AND UTILIZATION: SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A manure handling and drying system involving caged layers with daily manure collection, air drying, and dehydration in a flash-type dryer has been studied. Objectives of the study were to: (1) Develop a complete manure handling system to maximize pollution control; (2) determine...

  19. Diagnosis of Pneumonia in Children with Dehydrating Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Ronan, Anne; Khan, Wasif Ali; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia are based on the history of cough or difficult breathing and age-adjusted respiration rates. Metabolic acidosis associated with dehydrating diarrhoea also influences the respiration rate. Two hundred and four children, aged 2 to 59 months, with dehydrating diarrhoea and a history of cough and/or fast breathing, were enrolled in a prospective study. Pneumonia diagnoses were made on enrollment and again 6 hours post-enrollment (after initial rehydration), using the WHO guidelines. These were compared with investigators’ clinical diagnosis based on history and findings of physical examination and a chest x-ray at the same time points. Using the WHO guidelines, 149/152 (98%) infants in the 2-11 months age-group and 38/40 (95%) children in the 12-59 months age-group were diagnosed to have pneumonia on enrollment, which dropped to 107 (70%) and 30 (75%) respectively at 6 hours post-enrollment. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia was very low (6.9%) at enrollment but increased to 65.5% at 6 hours post-enrollment, after initial rehydration. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia in young children is significantly reduced in dehydrating diarrhoea. For young children with dehydrating diarrhoea, rehydration, clinical and radiological assessments are useful in identifying those with true pneumonia. PMID:24847588

  20. DEHYDRATION OF ALCOHOLS VIA PREVAPORATION USING A NOVEL HYDROPHILIC MEMBRANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for the dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds from water and organic/organic separations. Development of a suitable membrane system with high flux and high selectivity plays a criti...

  1. DEHYDRATION OF ALCOHOLS VIA PERVAPORATION USING A NOVEL HYDROHILIC MEMBRANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for the dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds from water and organic/organic separations. Development of a suitable membrane system with high flux and high selectivity plays a criti...

  2. Condensed phase preparation of 2,3-pentanedione

    DOEpatents

    Miller, D.J.; Perry, S.M.; Fanson, P.T.; Jackson, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    A condensed phase process for the preparation of purified 2,3-pentanedione from lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate is described. The process uses elevated temperatures between about 200 to 360 C for heating a reaction mixture of lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate to produce the 2,3-pentanedione in a reaction vessel. The 2,3-pentanedione produced is vaporized from the reaction vessel and condensed with water. 5 figs.

  3. Condensed phase preparation of 2,3-pentanedione

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Dennis J. (Okemos, MI); Perry, Scott M. (Beaumont, TX); Fanson, Paul T. (Stockbridge, MI); Jackson, James E. (Haslett, MI)

    1998-01-01

    A condensed phase process for the preparation of purified 2,3-pentanedione from lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate is described. The process uses elevated temperatures between about 200.degree. to 360.degree. C. for heating a reaction mixture of lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate to produce the 2,3-pentanedione in a reaction vessel. The 2,3-pentanedione produced is vaporized from the reaction vessel and condensed with water.

  4. Slab dehydration in the Earth's mantle transition zone Guillaume Richard , David Bercovici, Shun-Ichiro Karato

    E-print Network

    Slab dehydration in the Earth's mantle transition zone Guillaume Richard , David Bercovici, Shun. One such mechanism could be linked to the dehydration of the slab. Studies of slab dehydration mainly from the slab), the water concentration profile adjusts to reduce the adverse effects of temperature

  5. 40 CFR 407.50 - Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dehydrated potato products subcategory. 407.50 Section 407.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dehydrated Potato Products Subcategory § 407.50 Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  6. 40 CFR 407.50 - Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dehydrated potato products subcategory. 407.50 Section 407.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dehydrated Potato Products Subcategory § 407.50 Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  7. 40 CFR 407.50 - Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dehydrated potato products subcategory. 407.50 Section 407.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dehydrated Potato Products Subcategory § 407.50 Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  8. 40 CFR 407.50 - Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dehydrated potato products subcategory. 407.50 Section 407.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dehydrated Potato Products Subcategory § 407.50 Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  9. 40 CFR 407.50 - Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dehydrated potato products subcategory. 407.50 Section 407.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dehydrated Potato Products Subcategory § 407.50 Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  10. Kinetic, Spectroscopic, and Theoretical Assessment of Associative and Dissociative Methanol Dehydration Routes in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Andrew J.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-11-03

    Mechanistic interpretations of rates and in situ IR spectra combined with density functionals that account for van der Waals interactions of intermediates and transition states within confining voids show that associative routes mediate the formation of dimethyl ether from methanol on zeolitic acids at the temperatures and pressures of practical dehydration catalysis. Methoxy-mediated dissociative routes become prevalent at higher temperatures and lower pressures, because they involve smaller transition states with higher enthalpy, but also higher entropy, than those in associative routes. These enthalpy–entropy trade-offs merely reflect the intervening role of temperature in activation free energies and the prevalence of more complex transition states at low temperatures and high pressures. This work provides a foundation for further inquiry into the contributions of H-bonded methanol and methoxy species in homologation and hydrocarbon synthesis reactions from methanol.

  11. Competitive hydration and dehydration at olivine-quartz boundary revealed by hydrothermal experiments: Implications for silica metasomatism at the crust-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyanagi, Ryosuke; Okamoto, Atsushi; Hirano, Nobuo; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Serpentinization occurs via interactions between mantle peridotite and water that commonly passes through the crust. Given that such a fluid has a high silica activity compared with mantle peridotite, it is thought that serpentinization and silica metasomatism occur simultaneously at the crust-mantle boundary. In this study, we conducted hydrothermal experiments in the olivine (Ol)-quartz (Qtz)-H2O system at 250 °C and vapor-saturated pressure under highly alkaline conditions (NaOHaq, pH = 13.8 at 25 °C) to clarify the mechanism of silica metasomatism at the crust-mantle boundary. Composite powders consisting of a Qtz layer and an Ol layer were set in tube-in-tube vessels. After the experiments, the extents of serpentinization and metasomatic reactions were evaluated as a function of distance from the Ol-Qtz boundary. The mineralogy of the reaction products in the Ol-hosted region changed with increasing distance from the Ol-Qtz boundary, from smectite + serpentine (Smc zone) to serpentine + brucite + magnetite (Brc zone). Olivine hydration proceeded in both zones, but the total H2O content in the products was greater in the Brc zone than in the Smc zone. Mass balance calculations revealed that olivine hydration occurred without any supply of silica in the brucite zone. In contrast, the Smc zone was formed by silica metasomatism via competitive hydration and dehydration reactions. In the Smc zone, smectite formed via the simultaneous progress of olivine hydration and serpentine dehydration, and around the boundary of the Smc and Brc zones, serpentine formation occurred by olivine hydration and brucite dehydration. The relative extent of hydration and dehydration reactions controlled the along-tube variation in the rate of H2O production/consumption and the rate of volume increase. Our findings suggest that the competitive progress of serpentinization and silica metasomatic reactions would cause fluctuations in pore fluid pressure, possibly affecting the mechanical behavior of the crust-mantle boundary.

  12. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Allan; Snoke, D. W.; Stringari, S.

    1996-08-01

    1. Introduction: Unifying themes of Bose-Einstein condensation; Part I. Review Papers: 2. Some comments on Bose-Einstein condensation; 3. Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity; 4. Bose-Einstein condensation in liquid helium; 5. Sum rules and Bose-Einstein condensation; 6. Dilute degenerate gases; 7. Prospects for Bose-Einstein condensation in magnetically trapped atomic hydrogen; 8. Spin-polarized hydrogen: Prospects for Bose-Einstein condensation and two-dimensional superfluidity; 9. Laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms; 10. Kinetics of Bose-Einstein condensation in an interacting Bose gas; 11. Condensate formation in a Bose gas; 12. Bose-Einstein condensation of excitonic particles in semiconductors; 13. Macroscopic coherent states of excitons in semiconductors; 14. Bose-Einstein condensation in a nearly ideal gas: excitons in Cu2O; 15. Crossover from BCS theory to Bose-Einstein condensation; 16. Bose-Einstein condensation of bipolarons in high-Tc superconductors; 17. Kaon condensation in dense matter; 18. The bosonization method in nuclear physics; 19. Broken gauge symmetry in a Bose condensate; Part II. Brief Reports: 20. Bose-Einstein condensation in ultra-cold cesium: collisional constraints; 21. Bose-Einstein condensation and relaxation explosion in magnetically trapped atomic hydrogen; 22. Quest for Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in two-dimensional atomic hydrogen; 23. Bose-Einstein condensation of biexcitons in CuCl; 24. The influence of polariton effects on the Bose-Einstein condensation of biexcitons; 25. Light-induced Bose-Einstein condensation of excitons and biexcitons; 26. Decay of a non-equilibrium polariton condensate and the distribution functions of interacting polaritons in semiconductors; 27. Possibilities for Bose-Einstein condensation in positronium; 28. Excitonic superfluidity in Cu2O; 29. On the Bose-Einstein condensation of excitons - finite-lifetime composite bosons; 30. Charged bosons in quantum heterostructures; 31. The dynamic structure function of Bose liquids in the deep inelastic regime; 32. Evidence for bipolaronic Bose-liquid and Bose-Einstein condensation in high-Tc oxides; 33. Bose-Einstein condensation and spin waves; 34. Universal behaviour within the Nozières and Schmitt-Rink theory; 35. Bound states and superfluidity in strongly coupled fermion systems; 36. Onset of superfluidity in nuclear matter.

  13. Improvements in the order, isotropy and electron density of glypican-1 crystals by controlled dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, Wael; Svensson Birkedal, Gabriel; Thunnissen, Marjolein M. G. M.; Mani, Katrin; Logan, Derek T.

    2013-12-01

    The anisotropy of crystals of glypican-1 was significantly reduced by controlled dehydration using the HC1 device, allowing the building of previously disordered parts of the structure. The use of controlled dehydration for improvement of protein crystal diffraction quality is increasing in popularity, although there are still relatively few documented examples of success. A study has been carried out to establish whether controlled dehydration could be used to improve the anisotropy of crystals of the core protein of the human proteoglycan glypican-1. Crystals were subjected to controlled dehydration using the HC1 device. The optimal protocol for dehydration was developed by careful investigation of the following parameters: dehydration rate, final relative humidity and total incubation time T{sub inc}. Of these, the most important was shown to be T{sub inc}. After dehydration using the optimal protocol the crystals showed significantly reduced anisotropy and improved electron density, allowing the building of previously disordered parts of the structure.

  14. Pore formation during dehydration of a polycrystalline gypsum sample observed and quantified in a time-series synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusseis, F.; Schrank, C.; Liu, J.; Karrech, A.; Llana-Fúnez, S.; Xiao, X.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2012-03-01

    We conducted an in-situ X-ray micro-computed tomography heating experiment at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) to dehydrate an unconfined 2.3 mm diameter cylinder of Volterra Gypsum. We used a purpose-built X-ray transparent furnace to heat the sample to 388 K for a total of 310 min to acquire a three-dimensional time-series tomography dataset comprising nine time steps. The voxel size of 2.2 ?m3 proved sufficient to pinpoint reaction initiation and the organization of drainage architecture in space and time. We observed that dehydration commences across a narrow front, which propagates from the margins to the centre of the sample in more than four hours. The advance of this front can be fitted with a square-root function, implying that the initiation of the reaction in the sample can be described as a diffusion process. Novel parallelized computer codes allow quantifying the geometry of the porosity and the drainage architecture from the very large tomographic datasets (20483 voxels) in unprecedented detail. We determined position, volume, shape and orientation of each resolvable pore and tracked these properties over the duration of the experiment. We found that the pore-size distribution follows a power law. Pores tend to be anisotropic but rarely crack-shaped and have a preferred orientation, likely controlled by a pre-existing fabric in the sample. With on-going dehydration, pores coalesce into a single interconnected pore cluster that is connected to the surface of the sample cylinder and provides an effective drainage pathway. Our observations can be summarized in a model in which gypsum is stabilized by thermal expansion stresses and locally increased pore fluid pressures until the dehydration front approaches to within about 100 ?m. Then, the internal stresses are released and dehydration happens efficiently, resulting in new pore space. Pressure release, the production of pores and the advance of the front are coupled in a feedback loop.

  15. Hydrothermal Dehydration of Aqueous Fructose Solutions in a Closed System

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Chunhua; Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Li Q.; Windisch, Charles F.; Samuels, William D.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Risen Jr., William M.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2007-10-25

    The synthesis of materials with targeted size and shape has attracted much attention. Specifically, colloidal spheres with targeted and uniform sizes have opened the door for a variety of applications associated with drug delivery, and manipulation of light (photonic band-gap crystals). Surface modification is a key to realizing many of these applications owing to the inherent inert surface.The remarkable transformation of carbohydrate molecules including sugars to homogeneous carbon spheres is found to readily occur by a dehydration mechanism and subsequent sequestering in aqueous solutions that are heated at 160-180oC in a pressurized vessel. Under such conditions, these molecules actually dehydrate even though they are dissolved in water. Size-tunable metal and metal oxides with uniform shells have also been prepared by using carbon spheres as templates.

  16. Methods for dehydration of sugars and sugar alcohols

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Johnathan E [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Kennewick, WA; Zhang, Xinjie [Burlington, MA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2010-08-10

    The invention includes a method of dehydration of a sugar using a dehydration catalyst and a co-catalyst within a reactor. A sugar is introduced and H.sub.2 is flowed through the reactor at a pressure of less than or equal to about 300 psig to convert at least some of the sugar into an anhydrosugar product. The invention includes a process for producing isosorbide. A starting material comprising sorbitol is flowed into a reactor. H.sub.2 is counter flowed through the reactor. The starting material is exposed to a catalyst in the presence of a co-catalyst which comprises at least one metal. The exposing is conducted at a hydrogen pressure of less than or equal to 300 psig within the reactor and the hydrogen removes at least some of any water present during the exposing and inhibits formation of colored byproducts.

  17. 30. BUILDING NO. 527, DEHYDRATING PRESSES, LOOKING SOUTH. ALUMINUM NARROWGUAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. BUILDING NO. 527, DEHYDRATING PRESSES, LOOKING SOUTH. ALUMINUM NARROW-GUAGE GONDOLA CAR IN LEFT BACKGROUND BROUGHT MOISTENED GUN COTTON FROM REST HOUSE (BUILDING NO. 320-B) IN CANS. (ONE OF THESE CANS IS ON UNLOADING PLATFORM RUNNING BESIDE PRESSES). CONTENTS OF CANS WERE UNLOADED INTO PRESSES BY HAND. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  18. Inhibition of plasma vasopressin after drinking in dehydrated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, G.; Keil, L. C.; Kravik, S. E.; Wade, C. E.; Thrasher, T. N.; Barnes, P. R.; Pyka, G.; Nesvig, C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of nonosmotic and nonvolumetric factors on vasopressin secretion in dehydrated humans has been investigated experimentally, before and after drinking. The subjects of the experiment were five adult men and three adult women weighing 69-77 kg. In order to determine the influence of nonosmotic and nonvolumetric factors on vasopressin secretion, measurements were obtained of the following blood hematological indices: serum Na(+) content; serum K(+) content; osmolality; and hemoglobin. Measurements of hematocrit, plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP), aldosterone, and renin activity were also obtained. It is found that dehydration increased mean serum Na(+) content, osmolality,and AVP. No significant changes were observed in renin activity, hemoglobin, hematocrit, or plasma volume, while plasma aldosterone increased from 11.1 ng/dl after dehydration to 15.6 ng/dl between 30 and 60 min after drinking. A rapid fall of AVP content following rehydration occurred in the absence of changes in the primary regulators of AVP osmolality and plasma volume, with no change in blood pressure. On the basis of the experimental results, it is suggested that oropharyngeal factors may be the mechanism, for the observed decrease in AVP following rehydration.

  19. Reference chart for relative weight change to detect hypernatraemic dehydration

    PubMed Central

    van Dommelen, Paula; van Wouwe, Jacobus P; Breuning?Boers, Jacqueline M; van Buuren, Stef; Verkerk, Paul H

    2007-01-01

    Objective The validity of the rule of thumb that infants may have a weight loss of 10% in the first days after birth is unknown. We assessed the validity of this and other rules to detect breast?fed infants with hypernatraemic dehydration. Design A reference chart for relative weight change was constructed by the LMS method. The reference group was obtained by a retrospective cohort study. Participants 1544 healthy, exclusively breast?fed infants with 3075 weight measurements born in the Netherlands and 83 cases of breast?fed infants with hypernatraemic dehydration obtained from literature. Results The rule of thumb had a sensitivity of 90.4%, a specificity of 98.3% and a positive predictive value of 3.7%. Referring infants if their weight change is below ?2.5?SDS (0.6th centile) in the reference chart in the first week of life and using the rule of thumb in the second week had a sensitivity of 85.5%, a specificity of 99.4% and a positive predictive value of 9.2%. Conclusions The rule of thumb is likely to produce too many false positive results, assuming that for screening purposes the specificity needs to be high. A chart for relative weight change can be helpful to detect infants with hypernatraemic dehydration. PMID:16880225

  20. Dehydration Influences Mood and Cognition: A Plausible Hypothesis?

    PubMed Central

    Benton, David

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis was considered that a low fluid intake disrupts cognition and mood. Most research has been carried out on young fit adults, who typically have exercised, often in heat. The results of these studies are inconsistent, preventing any conclusion. Even if the findings had been consistent, confounding variables such as fatigue and increased temperature make it unwise to extrapolate these findings. Thus in young adults there is little evidence that under normal living conditions dehydration disrupts cognition, although this may simply reflect a lack of relevant evidence. There remains the possibility that particular populations are at high risk of dehydration. It is known that renal function declines in many older individuals and thirst mechanisms become less effective. Although there are a few reports that more dehydrated older adults perform cognitive tasks less well, the body of information is limited and there have been little attempt to improve functioning by increasing hydration status. Although children are another potentially vulnerable group that have also been subject to little study, they are the group that has produced the only consistent findings in this area. Four intervention studies have found improved performance in children aged 7 to 9 years. In these studies children, eating and drinking as normal, have been tested on occasions when they have and not have consumed a drink. After a drink both memory and attention have been found to be improved. PMID:22254111

  1. Inhibition of chloroplastic respiration by osmotic dehydration. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Willeford, K.O.; Ahluwalia, K.J.K.; Gibbs, M. )

    1989-04-01

    The respiratory capacity of isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts, measured as the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved from the oxidative pentose phosphate cycle in darkened chloroplasts exogenously supplied with ({sup 14}C)glucose, was progressively diminished by escalating osmotic dehydration with betaine or sorbitol. Comparing the inhibitions of CO{sub 2} evolution generated by osmotic dehydration in chloroplasts given C-1 and C-6 labeled glucose, 54% and 84%, respectively, indicates that osmotic dehydration effects to a greater extent the recycling of the oxidative pentose phosphate intermediates, fructose-6P and glyceraldehyde-3P. Respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast could be alleviated by addition of NH{sub 4}Cl (a stromal alkylating agent), iodoacetamide (an inhibitor of glyceraldehyde-3P dehydrogenase), or glycolate-2P (an inhibitor of phosphofructokinase). It is concluded that the site which primarily mediates respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast occurs at the fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase/phosphofructokinase junction.

  2. Glucose and fructose decomposition in subcritical and supercritical water: Detailed reaction pathway, mechanisms, and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kabyemela, B.M.; Adschiri, T.; Malaluan, R.M.; Arai, K.

    1999-08-01

    The authors are developing a new catalyst-free process of cellulose decomposition in supercritical water. In their initial study on the cellulose decomposition in supercritical water, the main products of cellulose decomposition were found to be oligomers of glucose (cellobiose, cellotriose, etc.) and glucose at short residence times (400 C, 25 MPa, 0.05 s). The kinetics of glucose at these conditions can be useful in understanding the reaction pathways of cellulose. Experiments were performed on the products of glucose decomposition at short residence times to elucidate the reaction pathways and evaluate kinetics of glucose and fructose decomposition in sub- and supercritical water. The conditions were a temperature of 300--400 C and pressure of 25--40 MPa for extremely short residence times between 0.02 and 2 s. The products of glucose decomposition were fructose, a product of isomerization, 1,6-anhydroglucose, a product of dehydration, and erythrose and glyceraldehyde, products of C-C bond cleavage. Fructose underwent reactions similar to glucose except that it did not form 1,6-anhydroglucose and isomerization to glucose is negligible. The mechanism for the products formed from C-C bond cleavage could be explained by reverse aldol condensation and the double-bond rule of the respective enediols formed during the Lobry de Bruyn Alberda van Ekenstein transformation. The differential equations resulting from the proposed pathways were fit to experimental results to obtain the kinetic rate constants.

  3. Analysis of Dehydration and Strength in Elite Badminton Players

    PubMed Central

    Abián-Vicén, Javier; Del Coso, Juan; González-Millán, Cristina; Salinero, Juan José; Abián, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Background The negative effects of dehydration on aerobic activities are well established. However, it is unknown how dehydration affects intermittent sports performance. The purpose of this study was to identify the level of dehydration in elite badminton players and its relation to muscle strength and power production. Methodology Seventy matches from the National Spanish badminton championship were analyzed (46 men’s singles and 24 women’s singles). Before and after each match, jump height and power production were determined during a countermovement jump on a force platform. Participants’ body weight and a urine sample were also obtained before and after each match. The amount of liquid that the players drank during the match was also calculated by weighing their individual drinking bottles. Results and Discussion Sweat rate during the game was 1.14±0.46 l/h in men and 1.02±0.64 l/h in women. The players rehydrated at a rate of 1.10±0.55 l/h and 1.01±0.44 l/h in the male and female groups respectively. Thus, the dehydration attained during the game was only 0.37±0.50% in men and 0.32±0.83% in women. No differences were found in any of the parameters analyzed during the vertical jump (men: from 31.82±5.29 to 32.90±4.49 W/kg; p>0.05, women: from 26.36±4.73 to 27.25±4.44 W/kg; p>0.05). Post-exercise urine samples revealed proteinuria (60.9% of cases in men and 66.7% in women), leukocyturia (men?=?43.5% and women?=?50.0%) and erythrocyturia (men?=?50.0% and women?=?21.7%). Conclusions Despite a moderate sweat rate, badminton players adequately hydrated during a game and thus the dehydration attained was low. The badminton match did not cause muscle fatigue but it significantly increased the prevalence of proteinuria, leukocyturia and erythrocyturia. PMID:22666396

  4. Gunion - Nevada`s most innovative geothermal food dehydration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Trexler, D.T.; Taylan, G.; Stewart, M.B.; Baker, S.

    1995-12-31

    The Gunion (garlic and onion) dehydration plant, owned and operated by Integrated Ingredients, a Division of Burns Philp Food, Incorporated, uses geothermal fluids at a temperature of 306{degrees}F to dehydrate 50 to 70-thousand pounds per day of garlic and onions. The geothermal fluids are provided by Empire Farms, who has the rights for development of the resource and is the lease holder of fee land known as the Kosmos Lease. The San Emidio KGRA is located in northern Washoe County, 90 miles north-northeast of Reno, Nevada and 20 miles south of Gerlach, Nevada. Geothermal fluids exit the plant at 242{degrees}F and are piped to an injection well located 3,000 feet south-southwest of the plant. The plant location was selected not only for the geothermal resource, but also for the area`s low relative humidity. Currently, 1100-1200 gpm of geothermal fluids, at an inlet temperature of 302{degrees}F, are sufficient to provide the dryer line with ample BTU`s. Three geothermal wells drilled to depths ranging from 493 to 1817 feet produce fluids ranging in temperature from 266 to 306{degrees}F. One well can easily provide the heat required by the dryer line and will be capable of providing heat for a planned three-fold expansion of the facility. The remaining two wells are used as backup, or may be used for other applications such as soil sterilization. The fluid exiting the plant at 242{degrees}F may be cascaded and used for greenhouses and soil warming in the future. Geothermal heat is also used to dehumidify onions placed in the cold storage facility. The dehydration process takes 5-6 hours to dry the product to a 4.5% moisture content. The dried product is then milled to various sizes from powder to granules. The dehydration plant operates 24 hours/day 7 days a week. Currently 80 people are employed full-time at the plant. The dehydrated onion and garlic are used in condiments, soups, sauces and salad dressing.

  5. Effects of dehydration and rehydration on thermoregulatory sweating in goats.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M A

    1989-01-01

    1. Measurement of rectal temperature (Tr), sweat rate, respiratory frequency (f) and respiratory evaporation (Eresp) were made in one Nubian and four Alpine-Toggenberg goats while they stood for 90 min in a climate chamber at 40 degrees C ambient temperature (Ta). The animals were studied when they were hydrated, when they had been dehydrated by 48 h water deprivation, and when they were rehydrated by voluntary drinking of water or saline or by intraruminal water administration. Plasma osmolality (Posm), plasma protein concentration (PP) and haematocrit (Hct) were measured before every experiment and before and after voluntary drinking. 2. Hydrated animals increased evaporation by panting and sweating during heat exposure and Tr rose about 1 degree C. The rate of sweating was as high or higher than Eresp. Dehydrated animals had lower sweat rates and higher Tr than hydrated animals, but f and Eresp were the same in hydrated and dehydrated animals. 3. When dehydrated goats were allowed to drink after 60 min of heat exposure, sweating began abruptly within 3 min of the start of drinking in every animal whether water or saline was drunk. Sweat rate returned to hydrated levels or higher before any change occurred in Posm, PP or Hct. Respiratory frequency was higher after drinking than in dehydrated animals which were not allowed to drink. 4. When water was administered by rumen tube after 60 min of heat exposure, sweating in the Nubian occurred with a short latency, similar to the onset after drinking. In the other four animals, sweating onset occurred on average at 13 min 42 s after intraruminal water administration. 5. It is concluded that sweating is a significant avenue of evaporative heat loss in these goats when they are hydrated and exposed to high Ta. Sweat rate is markedly reduced after water deprivation but returns to hydrated levels within 3 min after the start of drinking. The rapid recovery of sweating after voluntary drinking is not initiated by changes in Posm or in blood volume and does not appear to depend upon osmoreceptors in the mouth or gastrointestinal tract since it occurs after drinking either water or saline. The arrival of water in the rumen may be sufficient to initiate immediate sweating in some goats, but the act of drinking is necessary in others. PMID:2621603

  6. Chemical reaction equilibrium in nanoporous materials: NO dimerization reaction in carbon slit nanopores

    E-print Network

    Lisal, Martin

    Chemical reaction equilibrium in nanoporous materials: NO dimerization reaction in carbon slit of confinement on chemical reaction equilibrium in nanoporous materials. We use the reaction ensemble Monte Carlo condensation on the nitric oxide dimerization reaction in a model carbon slit nanopore in equilibrium

  7. Impact of Zeolite Aging in Hot Liquid Water on Activity for Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Derewinski, Miroslaw A; Fulton, John L; Camaioni, Donald M; Lercher, Johannes A

    2015-08-19

    The location and stability of Brønsted acid sites catalytically active in zeolites during aqueous phase dehydration of alcohols were studied on the example of cyclohexanol. The catalytically active hydronium ions originate from Brønsted acid sites (BAS) of the zeolite that are formed by framework tetrahedral Si atom substitution by Al. Al K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and (27)Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to determine the distribution of tetrahedral Al sites (Al T-sites) both qualitatively and quantitatively for both parent and HBEA catalysts aged in water prior to catalytic testing. The aging procedure leads to partial degradation of the zeolite framework evidenced from the decrease of material crystallinity (XRD) as well as sorption capacity (BET). With the exception of one commercial zeolite sample, which had the highest concentration of framework silanol-defects, there is no evidence of Al coordination modification after aging in water. The catalyst weight-normalized dehydration rate correlated best with the sum of strong and weak Brønsted acidic protons both able to generate the hydrated hydronium ions. All hydronium ions were equally active for the acid-catalyzed reactions in water. Zeolite aging in hot water prior to catalysis decreased the weight normalized dehydration reaction rate compared to that of the parent HBEA, which is attributed to the reduced concentration of accessible Brønsted acid sites. Sites are hypothesized to be blocked due to reprecipitation of silica dissolved during framework hydrolysis in the aging procedure. PMID:26237038

  8. Combined effect of storage temperature and water activity on the antiglycoxidative properties and color of dehydrated apples.

    PubMed

    Lavelli, Vera

    2009-12-23

    Phytochemical contents, color, and inhibition efficacy toward oxidative and glycoxidative reactions were studied in dehydrated apples following storage in the water activity range from 0.1 to 0.7 at 20, 30, and 40 degrees C, which can be considered as room conditions. Hunter colorimetric parameters were analyzed at different temperatures and time intervals, and nonenzymatic browning was modeled according to pseudo-zero-order kinetics. The effect of temperature on the browning rate followed the Arrhenius equation, with an activation energy of 64000 J/mol, which was not affected by the water activity level. The phytochemical contents, inhibition efficacy of protein glycation, and antioxidant properties were then analyzed in the products stored under selected "equivalent" conditions in terms of browning effects, namely, 120 days/20 degrees C, 50 days/30 degrees C, and 22 days/40 degrees C. After storage for 120 days/20 degrees C, the retention percentages of hydroxycinnamic acids, phloridzin, and epicatechin were >86%, but ascorbic acid, catechin, and procyanidins were less stable; concurrently dehydrated apples retained about 80% of the radical scavenging activity and 70% of the ability to inhibit protein glycation. Following storage at higher temperatures the expected browning effect occurred in a shorter time scale; however, the patterns of product degradation were different. A sharp increase in the degradation rates of all antioxidants, relative to browning rate, was observed at temperatures >or=30 degrees C, and this trend was accelerated with concurrent increase in water activity at >0.3 levels. The application of low-temperature/long-time conditions for storage of dehydrated apples corresponded to maximum retention of their efficacy to counteract oxidative and glycoxidative reactions, which have been linked to human chronic diseases. PMID:19911808

  9. Experimental study of the dehydration of 10-Å phase, with implications for its H2O content and stability in subducted lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawley, Alison R.; Chinnery, Nicholas J.; Clark, Simon M.; Walter, Michael J.

    2011-12-01

    The 10-Å phase (TAP) is a hydrous magnesium silicate that forms from the reaction of talc with H2O at high pressures. Its high-pressure, low-temperature stability means that it could be a storage site for H2O in subduction zones. We have determined the position of the TAP dehydration reaction, TAP = enstatite + coesite + H2O, in phase-equilibrium experiments from 5.0 to 7.1 GPa. Because previous studies had suggested that the composition of TAP is a function of synthesis duration, we used a TAP sample that was synthesised for 392 h. Over the pressure interval of our experiments, the dehydration reaction is isothermal, occurring at a temperature of ~690°C. It is coincident, within experimental uncertainty, with the position of the dehydration reaction of TAP synthesised in short experiments (up to 46 h). Above 7.5 GPa, TAP breaks down to enstatite + stishovite + H2O. This reaction has a negative d P/d T and terminates at an invariant point involving the 3.65-Å phase at ~9.5 GPa, 500°C. The zero volume change implied by the isothermal reaction TAP = enstatite + coesite + H2O was used to calculate the interlayer H2O content of TAP along the reaction. A best-fit H2O content of 1 H2O pfu was obtained. This H2O content is independent of TAP synthesis conditions, suggesting that variations in previously measured H2O contents of TAP occur during quenching and decompression of the samples. The stability of TAP in the Earth is probably limited to cold subduction zones, but in these, it could persist to 300 km depth.

  10. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    1. General. A tribute to gene Mallove - the "Genie" reactor / K. Wallace and R. Stringham. An update of LENR for ICCF-11 (short course, 10/31/04) / E. Storms. New physical effects in metal deuterides / P. L. Hagelstein ... [et al.]. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments / D. J. Nagel -- 2. Experiments. Electrochemistry. Evidence of electromagnetic radiation from Ni-H systems / S. Focardi ... [et al.]. Superwave reality / I. Dardik. Excess heat in electrolysis experiments at energetics technologies / I. Dardik ... [et al.]. "Excess heat" during electrolysis in platinum/K[symbol]CO[symbol]/nickel light water system / J. Tian ... [et al.]. Innovative procedure for the, in situ, measurement of the resistive thermal coefficient of H(D)/Pd during electrolysis; cross-comparison of new elements detected in the Th-Hg-Pd-D(H) electrolytic cells / F. Celani ... [et al.]. Emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen cycled Pd compounds as an evidence for superstoihiometric H/D sites / A. Lipson ... [et al.]. Plasma electrolysis. Calorimetry of energy-efficient glow discharge - apparatus design and calibration / T. B. Benson and T. O. Passell. Generation of heat and products during plasma electrolysis / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Glow discharge. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions / A. B. Karabut. Beam experiments. Accelerator experiments and theoretical models for the electron screening effect in metallic environments / A. Huke, K. Czerski, and P. Heide. Evidence for a target-material dependence of the neutron-proton branching ratio in d+d reactions for deuteron energies below 20keV / A. Huke ... [et al.]. Experiments on condensed matter nuclear events in Kobe University / T. Minari ... [et al.]. Electron screening constraints for the cold fusion / K. Czerski, P. Heide, and A. Huke. Cavitation. Low mass 1.6 MHz sonofusion reactor / R. Stringham. Particle detection. Research into characteristics of X-ray emission laser beams from solidstate cathode medium of high-current glow discharge / A. B. Karabut. Charged particles from Ti and Pd foils / L. Kowalski ... [et al.]. Cr-39 track detectors in cold fusion experiments: review and perspectives / A. S. Roussetski. Energetic particle shower in the vapor from electrolysis / R. A. Oriani and J. C. Fisher. Nuclear reactions produced in an operating electrolysis cell / R. A. Oriani and J. C. Fisher. Evidence of microscopic ball lightning in cold fusion experiments / E. H. Lewis. Neutron emission from D[symbol] gas in magnetic fields under low temperature / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Energetic charged particle emission from hydrogen-loaded Pd and Ti cathodes and its enhancement by He-4 implantation / A. G. Lipson ... [et al.]. H-D permeation. Observation of nuclear transmutation reactions induced by D[symbol] gas permeation through Pd complexes / Y. Iwamura ... [et al.]. Deuterium (hydrogen) flux permeating through palladium and condensed matter nuclear science / Q. M. Wei ... [et al.]. Triggering. Precursors and the fusion reactions in polarized Pd/D-D[symbol]O system: effect of an external electric field / S. Szpak, P. A. Mosier-Boss, and F. E. Gordon. Calorimetric and neutron diagnostics of liquids during laser irradiation / Yu. N. Bazhutov ... [et al.]. Anomalous neutron capture and plastic deformation of Cu and Pd cathodes during electrolysis in a weak thermalized neutron field: evidence of nuclei-lattice exchange / A. G. Lipson and G. H. Miley. H-D loading. An overview of experimental studies on H/Pd over-loading with thin Pd wires and different electrolytic solutions / A. Spallone ... [et al.] -- 3. Transmutations. Photon and particle emission, heat production, and surface transformation in Ni-H system / E. Campari ... [et al.]. Surface analysis of hydrogen-loaded nickel alloys / E. Campari ... [et al.]. Low-energy nuclear reactions and the leptonic monopole / G. Lochak and L. Urutskoev. Results of analysis of Ti foil after glow discharge with deuterium / I. B. Savvat

  11. Temperature- and pH-dependent aqueous-phase kinetics of the reactions of glyoxal and methylglyoxal with atmospheric amines and ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedehi, Nahzaneen; Takano, Hiromi; Blasic, Vanessa A.; Sullivan, Kristin A.; De Haan, David O.

    2013-10-01

    Reactions of glyoxal (Glx) and methylglyoxal (MG) with primary amines and ammonium salts may produce brown carbon and N-containing oligomers in aqueous aerosol. 1H NMR monitoring of reactant losses and product appearance in bulk aqueous reactions were used to derive rate constants and quantify competing reaction pathways as a function of pH and temperature. Glx + ammonium sulfate (AS) and amine reactions generate products containing C-N bonds, with rates depending directly on pH: rate = (70 ± 60) M-1 s-1fAld [Glx]totfAm [Am]tot, where fAld is the fraction of aldehyde with a dehydrated aldehyde functional group, and fAm is the fraction of amine or ammonia that is deprotonated at a given pH. MG + amine reactions generate mostly aldol condensation products and exhibit less pH dependence: rate = 10[(0.36 ± 0.06) × pH - (3.6 ± 0.3)] M-1 s-1fAld [MG]tot [Am]tot. Aldehyde + AS reactions are less temperature-dependent (Ea = 18 ± 8 kJ mol-1) than corresponding amine reactions (Ea = 50 ± 11 kJ mol-1). Using aerosol concentrations of [OH] = 10-12 M, [amine]tot = [AS] = 0.1 M, fGlx = 0.046 and fMG = 0.09, we estimate that OH radical reactions are normally the major aerosol-phase sink for both dicarbonyl compounds. However, reactions with AS and amines together can account for up to 12 and 45% of daytime aerosol-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal reactivity, respectively, in marine aerosol at pH 5.5. Reactions with AS and amines become less important in acidic or non-marine aerosol, but may still be significant atmospheric sources of brown carbon, imidazoles, and nitrogen-containing oligomers.

  12. Dehydration of methyl {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyrate catalyzed by zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Khanmamedova, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    The catalytic dehydration of methyl {alpha}-hyroxyisobutyrate over various zeolites in a flow reactor is described. Both NaY and NaX are effective catalysts for the selective conversion of MOB to methyl methacrylate. Modification with K{sup +} and Cs{sup +} enhances the activity and selectivity of NaY but renders NaX a less effective catalyst. Acidic zeolites (HY, Beta, GdNaX, SmNaY, fluorinated SmNaY) were shown to be quite active but poorly selective with catalyst deactivation resulting from coke formation. 26 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Dehydration of Ions by Cumulation in Liquid Microlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khentov, V. Ya.; Gasanov, V. M.; Vlasov, Yu. V.

    2014-03-01

    It has been established that bubble collapse on a liquid surface is accompanied by cumulation with droplet formation. The cumulation process, which is, nonstationary, has been investigated experimentally. It has been shown that the liquid of cumulative droplets is characterized by a lower value of the surface tension as compared to the bulk liquid. Consequently, the surface layer of droplets is enriched with electrolyte to a greater extent than the surface layer of the bulk liquid. This process is explained by the partial dehydration of ions by cumulation.

  14. Gluon Condensation at Finite Temperature via AdS/CFT

    E-print Network

    Youngman Kim; Bum-Hoon Lee; Chanyong Park; Sang-Jin Sin

    2007-09-19

    We consider gluon condensation (GC) at finite temperature using AdS/CFT. We first show that in the presence of regular horizon, the GC is forbidden in high temperature. Then we consider gravity back-reaction to dilaton coupling and show that the back-reaction develops an singularity, and non-vanishing value of gluon condensation is allowed. We also study thermodynamic quantities and the trace anomaly in the presence of the GC. We discuss how to define a temperature in the presence of the singularity which forbids Hawking temperature. Finally we describe the thermodynamics of the gluon condensation including the effect of the Hawking-Page transition.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic studies in the hydrolysis and condensation of chlorotrimethylsilane.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Sing; Le, Kim

    2004-03-01

    Raman and infrared spectroscopy were used to study the hydrolysis and condensation of chlorotrimethylsilane (CTMC) in aqueous organic solvents. From the recorded spectra and their intensity variation with time, we were able to identify trimethylsilanol as the reaction intermediate or the hydrolysis product as well as hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS) as the final condensation product. The measured Raman intensity of CTMS at different time revealed that hydrolysis of CTMS is first order in terms of the CTMS concentration. From the Raman spectra collected under different conditions, it was noted that condensation reaction rates is faster in neutral condition than in acidic condition. PMID:15036105

  16. Osmotic dehydration of fruits and vegetables: a review.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Satya Vir

    2014-09-01

    The main cause of perishability of fruits and vegetables are their high water content. To increase the shelf life of these fruits and vegetables many methods or combination of methods had been tried. Osmotic dehydration is one of the best and suitable method to increase the shelf life of fruits and vegetables. This process is preferred over others due to their vitamin and minerals, color, flavor and taste retention property. In this review different methods, treatments, optimization and effects of osmotic dehydration have been reviewed. Studied showed that combination of different osmotic agents were more effective than sucrose alone due to combination of properties of solutes. During the experiments it was found that optimum osmosis was found at approximately 40 °C, 40 °B of osmotic agent and in near about 132 min. Pretreatments also leads to increase the osmotic process in fruits and vegetables. Mass transfer kinetics study is an important parameter to study osmosis. Solids diffusivity were found in wide range (5.09-32.77 kl/mol) studied by Fick's laws of diffusion. These values vary depending upon types of fruits and vegetables and osmotic agents. PMID:25190823

  17. Dehydration of isopropanol by pervaporation using aromatic polyetherimide membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.Y.M.; Feng, X. )

    1993-08-01

    Aromatic polyetherimide membranes were prepared by the phase inversion method and tested for the pervaporation separation of water from isopropanol with emphasis on the breaking of azcotropic composition and the dehydration of high concentrations of isopropanol. It was found that the membrane selectivity was enhanced by partial evaporation of the solvent in the cast polymer films prior to the gelation step during membrane formation. The membrane performance was shown to be dependent on the feed concentration and the operating temperature. At a feed temperature of 25[degree]C and a permeate pressure of 133 Pa, separation factors of 173 and 384 were achieved for the dehydration of isopropanol solutions at 0.68 (azeotropic composition) and 0.96 mole fractions isopropanol, respectively, with reasonably high permeation rates. The utility of the membranes for the proposed separation was demonstrated; however, these membranes were not prepared under optimized conditions and thus a continuous study is required to rationalize the effects of membrane preparation parameters on membrane performance. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Role of pore fluid pressure on transient strength changes and fabric development during serpentine dehydration at mantle conditions: Implications for subduction-zone seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Brooks; Hirth, Greg

    2015-07-01

    To further investigate the dehydration embrittlement hypothesis and its possible link to subduction-zone seismicity, we conducted deformation experiments on antigorite serpentinite in a Griggs-type apparatus at conditions below and above antigorite stability. Temperature ramps (crossing the antigorite thermal stability) were used in conjunction with a new experimental method that allows fluid produced during dehydration reactions to be drained, partially drained or undrained. During temperature ramps, weakening coupled with transient slip initiated at ˜ 650 °C, coincident with the predicted phase transition of antigorite to olivine and talc at ˜ 1 GPa. The weakening-rate and steady-state strength were dependent on drainage conditions; undrained samples weakened over a few minutes and supported the lowest shear stress (˜ 50 MPa), while drained samples weakened over a few hours and supported the highest shear stress (˜ 210 MPa). The coefficient of friction (shear stress over normal stress) in drained samples decreased from ˜0.4 to ˜0.16 after the temperature ramp. The strengths of samples that were first annealed at 700 °C for ˜ 12 h, then deformed, were similar to those observed in the temperature ramp experiments. Strain localization along fractures occurred in all samples during temperature ramping, regardless of the drainage conditions. However, microstructural observations indicate deformation by ductile mechanisms at higher strain under both undrained and drained conditions. The rheology and microstructures suggest dehydrating serpentinite deforms via semibrittle flow with grain-scale ductile deformation more active at high pore fluid pressures. Our results suggest that earthquakes in serpentinized mantle do not nucleate as a direct result of unstable frictional sliding along fractures generated at the onset of dehydration reactions.

  19. Quality of frozen fruit bars manufactured through infrared pre-dehydration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, frozen restructured whole apple and strawberry bars were manufactured by partial dehydration, using infrared (IR) heating, followed by restructuring and freezing. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of IR partial dehydration on the quality of restructured f...

  20. HIGH PERMEABILITY MEMBRANES FOR THE DEHYDRATION OF LOW WATER CONTENT ETHANOL BY PERVAPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy efficient dehydration of low water content ethanol is a challenge for the sustainable production of fuel-grade ethanol. Pervaporative membrane dehydration using a recently developed hydrophilic polymer membrane formulation consisting of a cross-linked mixture of poly(allyl...

  1. Effects of Hydration and Dehydration on the Structure of Silica-Supported Vanadia Species

    E-print Network

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Effects of Hydration and Dehydration on the Structure of Silica-Supported Vanadia Species Shuibo, California 94720-1462 Received March 6, 2000. In Final Form: June 1, 2000 The effects of hydration and dehydration of silica-supported vanadia have been investigated with the aim of understanding how

  2. 40 CFR 63.765 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Glycol dehydration unit process vent... Facilities § 63.765 Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards. (a) This section applies to each glycol... unit process vent emissions equal to or greater than 0.90 megagrams per year, that must be...

  3. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... vegetable oils are to be used in the oil mix. (f) The label of any dehydrated forage crops treated with the... and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated forage crops in an oil mixture containing only suitable animal or suitable vegetable oil, prior to grinding and mixing. (d) The...

  4. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... vegetable oils are to be used in the oil mix. (f) The label of any dehydrated forage crops treated with the... and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated forage crops in an oil mixture containing only suitable animal or suitable vegetable oil, prior to grinding and mixing. (d) The...

  5. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... vegetable oils are to be used in the oil mix. (f) The label of any dehydrated forage crops treated with the... and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated forage crops in an oil mixture containing only suitable animal or suitable vegetable oil, prior to grinding and mixing. (d) The...

  6. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... vegetable oils are to be used in the oil mix. (f) The label of any dehydrated forage crops treated with the... and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated forage crops in an oil mixture containing only suitable animal or suitable vegetable oil, prior to grinding and mixing. (d) The...

  7. Dehydration of 2-Methyl-1-Cyclohexanol: New Findings from a Popular Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, J. Brent; Schretzman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The mineral acid-catalyzed dehydration of 2-methyl-1-cyclohexanol has been a popular laboratory exercise in second-year organic chemistry for several decades. The dehydration experiment is often performed by organic chemistry students to illustrate Zaitsev's rule. However, sensitive analytical techniques reveal that the results do not entirely…

  8. Exercise-induced hemolysis in xerocytosis. Erythrocyte dehydration and shear sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Platt, O S; Lux, S E; Nathan, D G

    1981-01-01

    A patient with xerocytosis was found to have swimming-induced intravascular hemolysis and shortening of erythrocyte life-span. In a microviscometer, xerocytes were more susceptible than normal erythrocytes to hemolysis by shear stress. Fractionation of normal and abnormal cells on discontinuous Stractan density gradients revealed that increasingly dehydrated cells were increasingly more shear sensitive. This sensitivity was partially corrected by rehydrating xerocytic erythrocytes by means of the cation-ionophore nystatin in a high potassium buffer. Conversely, normal erythrocytes were rendered shear sensitive by dehydrating them with nystatin in a low potassium buffer. This effect of dehydration was entirely reversible if normal cells were dehydrated for less than 4 h but was only partially reversed after more prolonged dehydration. It is likely that dehydration of erythrocytes results in shear sensitivity primarily because of concentration of cell contents and reduced cellular deformability. With prolonged dehydration, secondary membrane changes may potentiate the primary effect. This increased shear sensitivity of dehydrated cells may explain atraumatic exercise-induced hemolysis in xerocytosis as cardiac output is shifted to vessels of exercising muscles with small diameters and high shear rates. PMID:7276163

  9. 40 CFR 63.765 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (1) For each glycol dehydration unit process vent, the owner or operator shall control air emissions... (3) of this section. (1) The owner or operator shall control air emissions by connecting the process... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Glycol dehydration unit process...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1275 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... each glycol dehydration unit process vent, the owner or operator shall control air emissions by either... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards. 63.1275 Section 63.1275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1275 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... each glycol dehydration unit process vent, the owner or operator shall control air emissions by either... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards. 63.1275 Section 63.1275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  12. 40 CFR 63.765 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (1) For each glycol dehydration unit process vent, the owner or operator shall control air emissions... (3) of this section. (1) The owner or operator shall control air emissions by connecting the process... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Glycol dehydration unit process...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1275 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... each glycol dehydration unit process vent, the owner or operator shall control air emissions by either... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards. 63.1275 Section 63.1275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  14. Formation processes of high-dimensional Mo?O frameworks in tetrakis(2-hydroxypropane-1,3-diaminium) hexatriacontamolybdate hydrate (C3H12N2O)4[Mo36O112(H2O)16-m]·nH2O crystals: Solid-phase structural conversions under restricted dehydration conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Kazuo; Koduka, Tatsuya; Iriki, Yuichi; Stanley Whittingham, M.

    2013-03-01

    We found that the hexatriacontamolybdate [Mo36O112(H2O)16]8- (?{Mo36}) compound of 1,3-diamino-2-propanol (?OHC3-DA) forms seven structural phases with the formula (?OHC3-DA)4{Mo36}·nH2O. They showed a range of dimensionality: three zero-dimensional (0D), two 1D, and two 2D Mo?O framework structures consisting of {Mo36} anions. Two of the phases have 0D framework structures crystallized in the mother solution. The remaining five phases were obtained when the crystals of these two 0D phases were aged in resin. The dense 2D framework ({Mo36}-nanosheet) of the title compound was formed via solid-phase condensation reactions under restricted dehydration conditions such as in resin-coated crystals, unlike the loose {Mo36}-nanosheet of the (C3?DA)4{Mo36}·nH2O. The formation processes of the related high-dimensional Mo?O frameworks were guided by hydrogen-bonding contacts initially formed between {Mo36} anions in the crystal. There were two different conversion routes: the one starting from the phase consisting of {Mo36} hydrogen-bonded at their head/foot parts lead to the dense 2D nanosheet, while the other originating from the phase consisting of {Mo36} hydrogen-bonded at their trunk parts, to 1D {Mo36}-nanochain with rare triple oxygen bridges. These routes had neither branching nor intercrossing.

  15. Calorimetric studies of freeze-induced dehydration of phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bronshteyn, V L; Steponkus, P L

    1993-11-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to determine the amount of water that freezes in an aqueous suspension of multilamellar dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes. The studies were performed with dehydrated suspensions (12-20 wt% water) and suspensions containing an excess of water (30-70 wt% water). For suspensions that contained > or = 18 wt% water, two ice-formation events were observed during cooling. The first was attributed to heterogeneous nucleation of extraliposomal ice; the second was attributed to homogeneous nucleation of ice within the liposomes. In suspensions with an initial water concentration between 13 and 16 wt%, ice formation occurred only after homogeneous nucleation at temperatures below -40 degrees C. In suspensions containing < 13 wt% water, ice formation during cooling was undetectable by DSC, however, an endotherm resulting from ice melting during warming was observed in suspensions containing > or = 12 wt% water. In suspensions containing < 12 wt% water, an endotherm corresponding to the melting of ice was not observed during warming. The amount of ice that formed in the suspensions was determined by using an improved procedure to calculate the partial area of the endotherm resulting from the melting of ice during warming. The results show that a substantial proportion of water associated with the polar headgroup of phosphatidylcholine can be removed by freeze-induced dehydration, but the amount of ice depends on the thermal history of the samples. For example, after cooling to -100 degrees C at rates > or = 10 degrees C/min, a portion of water in the suspension remains supercooled because of a decrease in the diffusion rate of water with decreasing temperature. A portion of this supercooled water can be frozen during subsequent freeze-induced dehydration of the liposomes under isothermal conditions at subfreezing storage temperature Ts. During isothermal storage at Ts > or = -40 degrees C, the amount of unfrozen water decreased with decreasing Ts and increasing time of storage. After 30 min of storage at Ts = -40 degrees C and subsequent cooling to -100 degrees C, the amount of water associated with the polar headgroups was < 0.1 g/g of DPPC. At temperatures > -50 degrees C, the amount of unfrozen water associated with the polar headgroups of DPPC decreased with decreasing temperature in a manner predicted from the desorption isotherm of DPPC. However, at lower temperatures, the amount of unfrozen water remained constant, in large part, because the unfrozen water underwent a liquid-to-glass transformation at a temperature between -50 degrees and -140 degrees C. PMID:8298015

  16. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: influence of calcium and magnesium ions on yeast resistance to dehydration-rehydration.

    PubMed

    Trofimova, Yuliya; Walker, Graeme; Rapoport, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    The influence of calcium and magnesium ions on resistance to dehydration in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was investigated. Magnesium ion availability directly influenced yeast cells' resistance to dehydration and, when additionally supplemented with calcium ions, this provided further significant increase of yeast resistance to dehydration. Gradual rehydration of dry yeast cells in water vapour indicated that both magnesium and calcium may be important for the stabilization of yeast cell membranes. In particular, calcium ions were shown for the first time to increase the resistance of yeast cells to dehydration in stress-sensitive cultures from exponential growth phases. It is concluded that magnesium and calcium ion supplementations in nutrient media may increase the dehydration stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae cells significantly, and this finding is important for the production of active dry yeast preparations for food and fermentation industries. PMID:20487021

  17. ROLE OF PRESSURE IN SMECTITE DEHYDRATION - EFFECTS ON GEOPRESSURE AND SMECTITE-TO-ILLITE TRANSFORMATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colten-Bradley, Virginia, A.

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of pressure on the temperature of interlayer water loss (dehydration) by smectites under diagenetic conditions indicates that smectites are stable as hydrated phases in the deep subsurface. Hydraulic and differential pressure conditions affect dehydration differently. The temperature of dehydration increase with pore fluid pressure and interlayer water density. The temperatures of dehydration increase with pore fluid pressure and interlayer water density. The temperatures of dehydration under differential-presssure conditions are inversely related to pressure and interlayer water density. The model presented assumes the effects of pore fluid composition and 2:1 layer reactivity to be negligible. Agreement between theoretical and experimental results validate this assumption. Additional aspects of the subject are discussed.

  18. Pyropia yezoensis can utilize CO2 in the air during moderate dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; He, Linwen; Yang, Fang; Lin, Apeng; Zhang, Baoyu; Niu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guangce

    2014-03-01

    Pyropia yezoensis, an intertidal seaweed, experiences regular dehydration and rehydration with the tides. In this study, the responses of P. yezoensis to dehydration and rehydration under high and low CO2 concentrations ((600-700)×10-6 and (40-80)×10-6, named Group I and Group II respectively) were investigated. The thalli of Group I had a significantly higher effective photosystem II quantum yield than the thalli of Group II at 71% absolute water content (AWC). There was little difference between thalli morphology, total Rubisco activity and total protein content at 100% and 71% AWC, which might be the basis for the normal performance of photosynthesis during moderate dehydration. A higher effective photosystem I quantum yield was observed in the thalli subjected to a low CO2 concentration during moderate dehydration, which might be caused by the enhancement of cyclic electron flow. These results suggested that P. yezoensis can directly utilize CO2 in ambient air during moderate dehydration.

  19. Scaffold Assisted Chromosome Condensation

    E-print Network

    Poonen, Bjorn

    resembling the X-shape of the chromosome #12;Great Thanks to: PRIMES Prof. Leonid Mirny Geoffrey FudenbergScaffold Assisted Chromosome Condensation: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Dong-Gil Shin MIT PRIMES May 21, 2011 #12;Mitosis and Chromosome Condensation Interphase Prophase Metaphase Anaphase Telophase

  20. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  1. Dehydrated Carbon Coupled with Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometry (LIBS) for the Determination of Heavy Metals in Solutions.

    PubMed

    Niu, Guanghui; Shi, Qi; Xu, Mingjun; Lai, Hongjun; Lin, Qingyu; Liu, Kunping; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-10-01

    In this article, a novel and alternative method of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis for liquid sample is proposed, which involves the removal of metal ions from a liquid to a solid substrate using a cost-efficient adsorbent, dehydrated carbon, obtained using a dehydration reaction. Using this new technique, researchers can detect trace metal ions in solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, and the drawbacks of performing liquid analysis using LIBS can be avoided because the analysis is performed on a solid surface. To achieve better performance using this technique, we considered parameters potentially influencing both adsorption performance and LIBS analysis. The calibration curves were evaluated, and the limits of detection obtained for Cu(2+), Pb(2+), and Cr(3+) were 0.77, 0.065, and 0.46 mg/L, respectively, which are better than those in the previous studies. In addition, compared to other absorbents, the adsorbent used in this technique is much cheaper in cost, easier to obtain, and has fewer or no other elements other than C, H, and O that could result in spectral interference during analysis. We also used the recommended method to analyze spiked samples, obtaining satisfactory results. Thus, this new technique is helpful and promising for use in wastewater analysis and management. PMID:26449813

  2. A critical evaluation of crustal dehydration as the cause of an overpressured and weak San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, P.M.; Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    Many plate boundary faults, including the San Andreas Fault, appear to slip at unexpectedly low shear stress. One long-standing explanation for a "weak" San Andreas Fault is that fluid release by dehydration reactions during regional metamorphism generates elevated fluid pressures that are localized within the fault, reducing the effective normal stress. We evaluate this hypothesis by calculating realistic fluid production rates for the San Andreas Fault system, and incorporating them into 2-D fluid flow models. Our results show that for a wide range of permeability distributions, fluid sources from crustal dehydration are too small and short-lived to generate, sustain, or localize fluid pressures in the fault sufficient to explain its apparent mechanical weakness. This suggests that alternative mechanisms, possibly acting locally within the fault zone, such as shear compaction or thermal pressurization, may be necessary to explain a weak San Andreas Fault. More generally, our results demonstrate the difficulty of localizing large fluid pressures generated by regional processes within near-vertical fault zones. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Clay hydration/dehydration in dry to water-saturated supercritical CO2: Implications for caprock integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Loring, John S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Miller, Quin R.; Chen, Jeffrey; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Martin, Paul F.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) for the geologic storage of carbon dioxide will displace formation water, and the pore space adjacent to overlying caprocks could eventually be dominated by dry to water-saturated scCO2. Wet scCO2 is highly reactive and capable of carbonating and hydrating certain minerals, whereas anhydrous scCO2 can dehydrate water-containing minerals. Because these geochemical processes affect solid volume and thus porosity and permeability, they have the potential to affect the long-term integrity of the caprock seal. In this study, we investigate the swelling and shrinkage of an expandable clay found in caprock formations, montmorillonite (Ca-STx-1), when exposed to variable water-content scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar using a combination of in situ probes, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), in situ magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), and in situ attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). We show that the extent of montmorillonite clay swelling/shrinkage is dependent not only on water hydration/dehydration, but also on CO2 intercalation reactions. Our results also suggest a competition between water and CO2 for interlayer residency where increasing concentrations of intercalated water lead to decreasing concentrations of intercalated CO2. Overall, this paper demonstrates the types of measurements required to develop fundamental knowledge that will enhance modeling efforts and reduce risks associated with subsurface storage of CO2.

  4. An organ-specific role for ethylene in rose petal expansion during dehydration and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daofeng; Liu, Xiaojing; Meng, Yonglu; Sun, Cuihui; Tang, Hongshu; Jiang, Yudong; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Xue, Jingqi; Ma, Nan; Gao, Junping

    2013-05-01

    Dehydration is a major factor resulting in huge loss from cut flowers during transportation. In the present study, dehydration inhibited petal cell expansion and resulted in irregular flowers in cut roses, mimicking ethylene-treated flowers. Among the five floral organs, dehydration substantially elevated ethylene production in the sepals, whilst rehydration caused rapid and elevated ethylene levels in the gynoecia and sepals. Among the five ethylene biosynthetic enzyme genes (RhACS1-5), expression of RhACS1 and RhACS2 was induced by dehydration and rehydration in the two floral organs. Silencing both RhACS1 and RhACS2 significantly suppressed dehydration- and rehydration-induced ethylene in the sepals and gynoecia. This weakened the inhibitory effect of dehydration on petal cell expansion. ?-glucuronidase activity driven by both the RhACS1 and RhACS2 promoters was dramatically induced in the sepals, pistil, and stamens, but not in the petals of transgenic Arabidopsis. This further supports the organ-specific induction of these two genes. Among the five rose ethylene receptor genes (RhETR1-5), expression of RhETR3 was predominantly induced by dehydration and rehydration in the petals. RhETR3 silencing clearly aggravated the inhibitory effect of dehydration on petal cell expansion. However, no significant difference in the effect between RhETR3-silenced flowers and RhETR-genes-silenced flowers was observed. Furthermore, RhETR-genes silencing extensively altered the expression of 21 cell expansion-related downstream genes in response to ethylene. These results suggest that induction of ethylene biosynthesis by dehydration proceeds in an organ-specific manner, indicating that ethylene can function as a mediator in dehydration-caused inhibition of cell expansion in rose petals. PMID:23599274

  5. Hypernatraemic dehydration and breast feeding: a population study

    PubMed Central

    Oddie, S; Richmond, S; Coulthard, M

    2001-01-01

    As part of a population based regional review of all neonatal readmissions, the incidence of dehydration with hypernatraemia in exclusively breast fed infants was estimated. All readmissions to hospital in the first month of life during 1998 from a population of 32 015 live births were reviewed. Eight of 907 readmissions met the case definition, giving an incidence of at least 2.5 per 10 000 live births. Serum sodium at readmission varied from 150to 175 mmol/l. One infant had convulsions. The sole explanation for hypernatraemia was unsuccessful breast feeding in all cases. The eight cases are compared with the 65 cases published in the literature since 1979. Presentation, incidence, risk factors, pathophysiology, treatment, and prevention are discussed.?? PMID:11567942

  6. Characterization of dehydration-induced luminescence of kaolinite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahav, N.; Coyne, L.; Lawless, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    The dehydration-induced luminescence of a colloidal kaolinite is investigated experimentally, with particular attention given to the effect of various treatments on the luminescence characteristics. It is found that the total photon count of the emitted light is linearly related to the film thickness up to a thickness of 30 microns; mechanical stress in the form of grinding increases the photon output and produces extensive changes in the emission kinetics. A direct check of the emission wavelength dependence (by using color filters) indicates that roughly 75 percent of the emission occurs in the wavelength range below 410 nm. It is also found that incorporation of fluorescent molecules into the kaolinite paste increases the photon output and may indicate the transfer of ultraviolet photons to the fluorescent probe.

  7. Biomembrane Structure and Dynamics Controlled by Dehydration and Osmotic Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnun, Jacob; Mallikarjunaiah, K. J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Petrache, Horia; Brown, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Membrane deformation and dynamics and their effects on membrane protein function remain mysterious. With osmolytes and dehydration we observe deformation of DMPC-d54 lipid membranes via solid-state ^2H NMR spectroscopy. A unified theoretical framework predicts that membrane osmotic pressure depends inversely on the number waters per lipid. Through temperature variation we find osmotic pressure is generated by membrane undulations and lipid protrusions. We extend this thermodynamic framework via a mean-torque model to analyze the compressibility of the lipids. Under pressure, the area per lipid decreases and hydrocarbon thickness increases as described by a compressibility modulus. Changes in membrane thickness result in hydrophobic mismatch which affect protein-lipid interactions. Our findings show how altering membrane structure and dynamics affect membrane protein function.

  8. Freeze-Tolerant Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Christopher J.; Elkouhk, Nabil

    2004-01-01

    Two condensers designed for use in dissipating heat carried by working fluids feature two-phase, self-adjusting configurations such that their working lengths automatically vary to suit their input power levels and/or heat-sink temperatures. A key advantage of these condensers is that they can function even if the temperatures of their heat sinks fall below the freezing temperatures of their working fluids and the fluids freeze. The condensers can even be restarted from the frozen condition. The top part of the figure depicts the layout of the first condenser. A two-phase (liquid and vapor) condenser/vapor tube is thermally connected to a heat sink typically, a radiatively or convectively cooled metal panel. A single-phase (liquid) condensate-return tube (return artery) is also thermally connected to the heat sink. At intervals along their lengths, the condenser/vapor tube and the return artery are interconnected through porous plugs. This condenser configuration affords tolerance of freezing, variable effective thermal conductance (such that the return temperature remains nearly constant, independently of the ultimate sink temperature), and overall pressure drop smaller than it would be without the porous interconnections. An additional benefit of this configuration is that the condenser can be made to recover from the completely frozen condition either without using heaters, or else with the help of heaters much smaller than would otherwise be needed. The second condenser affords the same advantages and is based on a similar principle, but it has a different configuration that affords improved flow of working fluid, simplified construction, reduced weight, and faster recovery from a frozen condition.

  9. The Biginelli Reaction Is a Urea-Catalyzed Organocatalytic Multicomponent Reaction.

    PubMed

    Puripat, Maneeporn; Ramozzi, Romain; Hatanaka, Miho; Parasuk, Waraporn; Parasuk, Vudhichai; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-07-17

    The recently developed artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method was applied to search systematically all possible multicomponent pathways for the Biginelli reaction mechanism. The most favorable pathway starts with the condensation of the urea and benzaldehyde, followed by the addition of ethyl acetoacetate. Remarkably, a second urea molecule catalyzes nearly every step of the reaction. Thus, the Biginelli reaction is a urea-catalyzed multicomponent reaction. The reaction mechanism was found to be identical in both protic and aprotic solvents. PMID:26066623

  10. Advancing microwave technology for dehydration processing of biologics.

    PubMed

    Cellemme, Stephanie L; Van Vorst, Matthew; Paramore, Elisha; Elliott, Gloria D

    2013-10-01

    Our prior work has shown that microwave processing can be effective as a method for dehydrating cell-based suspensions in preparation for anhydrous storage, yielding homogenous samples with predictable and reproducible drying times. In the current work an optimized microwave-based drying process was developed that expands upon this previous proof-of-concept. Utilization of a commercial microwave (CEM SAM 255, Matthews, NC) enabled continuous drying at variable low power settings. A new turntable was manufactured from Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMW-PE; Grainger, Lake Forest, IL) to provide for drying of up to 12 samples at a time. The new process enabled rapid and simultaneous drying of multiple samples in containment devices suitable for long-term storage and aseptic rehydration of the sample. To determine sample repeatability and consistency of drying within the microwave cavity, a concentration series of aqueous trehalose solutions were dried for specific intervals and water content assessed using Karl Fischer Titration at the end of each processing period. Samples were dried on Whatman S-14 conjugate release filters (Whatman, Maidestone, UK), a glass fiber membrane used currently in clinical laboratories. The filters were cut to size for use in a 13 mm Swinnex(®) syringe filter holder (Millipore(™), Billerica, MA). Samples of 40 ?L volume could be dehydrated to the equilibrium moisture content by continuous processing at 20% with excellent sample-to-sample repeatability. The microwave-assisted procedure enabled high throughput, repeatable drying of multiple samples, in a manner easily adaptable for drying a wide array of biological samples. Depending on the tolerance for sample heating, the drying time can be altered by changing the power level of the microwave unit. PMID:24835259

  11. Recovery of human mesenchymal stem cells following dehydration and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S L; Oppenheimer, S R; Mackay, A M; Brunnabend, J; Puhlev, I; Levine, F

    2001-09-01

    As cell therapies advance from research laboratories to clinical application, there is the need to transport cells and tissues across long distances while maintaining cell viability and function. Currently cells are successfully stored and shipped under liquid nitrogen vapor. The ability to store these cells in the desiccated state at ambient temperature would provide tremendous economic and practical advantage. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have broad potential uses in tissue engineering and regeneration since they can differentiate along multiple lineages and support hematopoeisis. The current research applied recent technological advances in the dehydration and storage of human fibroblasts to hMSCs. Three conditions were tested: air-dried, air-dried and stored under vacuum (vacuum only), and incubated with 50 mM trehalose + 3% glycerol and then air-dried and stored under vacuum (vacuum + trehalose). Plates containing dehydrated hMSCs were shipped from San Diego to Baltimore overnight in separate FedEx cardboard boxes. The hMSCs were rehydrated with 3 ml of hMSC medium and were able to regain their spindle-shaped morphology and adhesive capability. In addition, they maintained high viability and proliferation capacity. Rehydrated and passaged cells continued to express the characteristic hMSC surface antigen panel. Additionally, cells showed constitutive levels of mRNA for a stromal factor and, when exposed to reagents known to induce differentiation, demonstrated upregulation of two tissue-specific messages indicative of differentiation potential for fat and bone. While our preliminary findings are encouraging, we still need to address consistency and duration of storage by considering factors such as cell water content, oxygen concentration, and the presence of free radicals. PMID:11846472

  12. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akito; Ota, Ken-Ichiro; Iwamura, Yashuhiro

    Preface -- 1. General. Progress in condensed matter nuclear science / A. Takahashi. Summary of ICCF-12 / X. Z. Li. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions / G. H. Miley and P. J. Shrestha -- 2. Excess heat and He detection. Development of "DS-reactor" as the practical reactor of "cold fusion" based on the "DS-cell" with "DS-cathode" / Y. Arata and Y.-C. Zhang. Progress in excess of power experiments with electrochemical loading of deuterium in palladium / V. Violante ... [et al.]. Anomalous energy generation during conventional electrolysis / T. Mizuno and Y. Toriyabe. "Excess heat" induced by deuterium flux in palladium film / B. Liu ... [et al.]. Abnormal excess heat observed during Mizuno-type experiments / J.-F. Fauvarque, P. P. Clauzon and G. J.-M. Lallevé. Seebeck envelope calorimetry with a Pd|D[symbol]O + H[symbol]SO[symbol] electrolytic cell / W.-S. Zhang, J. Dash and Q. Wang. Observation and investigation of nuclear fusion and self-induced electric discharges in liquids / A. I. Koldamasov ... [et al.]. Description of a sensitive seebeck calorimeter used for cold fusion studies / E. Storms. Some recent results at ENEA / M. Apicella ... [et al.]. Heat measurement during plasma electrolysis / K. Iizumi ... [et al.]. Effect of an additive on thermal output during electrolysis of heavy water with a palladium cathode / Q. Wang and J. Dash. Thermal analysis of calorimetric systems / L. D'Aulerio ... [et al.]. Surface plasmons and low-energy nuclear reactions triggering / E. Castagna ... [et al.]. Production method for violent TCB jet plasma from cavity / F. Amini. New results and an ongoing excess heat controversy / L. Kowalski ... [et al.] -- 3. Transmutation. Observation of surface distribution of products by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry during D[symbol] gas permeation through Pd Complexes / Y. Iwamura ... [et al.]. Discharge experiment using Pd/CaO/Pd multi-layered cathode / S. Narita ... [et al.]. Producing transmutation element on multi-layered Pd sample by deuterium permeation / H. Yamada ... [et al.]. Experimental observation and combined investigation of high-performance fusion of iron-region isotopes in optimal growing microbiological associations / V. I. Vysotskii ... [et al.]. Research into low-energy nuclear reactions in cathode sample solid with production of excess heat, stable and radioactive impurity nuclides / A. B. Karabut. Influence of parameters of the glow discharge on change of structure and the isotope composition of the cathode materials / I. B. Savvatimova and D. V. Gavritenkov. Elemental analysis of palladium electrodes after Pd/Pd light water critical electrolysis / Y. Toriyabe ... [et al.]. Progress on the study of isotopic composition in metallic thin films undergone to electrochemical loading of hydrogen / M. Apicella ... [et al.]. In situ accelerator analyses of palladium complex under deuterium permeation / A. Kitamura ... [et al.]. High-resolution mass spectrum for deuterium (hydrogen) gas permeating palladium film / Q. M. Wei ... [et al.]. ICP-MS analysis of electrodes and electrolytes after HNO[symbol]/H[symbol]O electrolysis / S. Taniguchi ... [et al.]. The Italy-Japan project - fundamental research on cold transmutation process for treatment of nuclear wastes / A. Takahashi, F. Celani and Y. Iwamura -- 4. Nuclear physics approach. Reproducible nuclear emissions from Pd/PdO:Dx heterostructure during controlled exothermic deuterium desorption / A. G. Lipson ... [et al.]. Correct identification of energetic alpha and proton tracks in experiments on CR-39 charged particle detection during hydrogen desorption from Pd/PdO:H[symbol] heterostructure / A. S. Roussetski ... [et al.]. Intense non-linear soft X-ray emission from a hydride target during pulsed D bombardment / G. H. Miley ... [et al.]. Enhancement of first wall damage in ITER type TOKAMAK due to LENR effects / A. G. Lipson, G. H. Miley and H. Momota. Generation of DD-reactions in a ferroelectric KD[symbol]PO[symbol] single crystal during transition

  13. Effect of Dehydration on Sulfate Coordination and Speciation at the Fe-(Hydr)oxide-Water Interface: A

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Effect of Dehydration on Sulfate Coordination and Speciation at the Fe-(Hydr)oxide-Water Interface, Pennsylvania 16802 Received March 9, 2005. In Final Form: September 7, 2005 The effect of dehydration and metal cation adsorption capacity.4 The effect of dehydration (and subsequent proton accumula- tion

  14. Journal of Biomechanics 40 (2007) 32233229 Dehydration rates of meniscus and articular cartilage in vitro using a

    E-print Network

    Hull, Maury

    2007-01-01

    are susceptible to dehydration and its effects, such as changes in size and shape as well as changes in structural and material properties. To quantify the effect of dehydration on the meniscus and articular cartilage or articular cartilage, it is important to understand the effects of dehydration on the tissues. Due

  15. Intrinsic kinetics of lower alcohols: C2, C3 dehydration over Lewis acidic ordered mesoporous silicate: Zr-KIT-6

    E-print Network

    Pan, Qing

    2013-12-31

    dehydration to propylene (selectivity 98.5%). While, ethylene formed with the selectivity of 70%-80% when dehydrating EtOH at 300-380 °C range. 30 h continuous run revealed slight catalyst deactivation for IPA dehydration; and the catalyst started...

  16. Protection of the Photosynthetic Apparatus from Extreme Dehydration and Oxidative Stress in Seedlings of Transgenic Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Personat, José-María; Tejedor-Cano, Javier; Lindahl, Marika; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio; Jordano, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A genetic program that in sunflower seeds is activated by Heat Shock transcription Factor A9 (HaHSFA9) has been analyzed in transgenic tobacco seedlings. The ectopic overexpression of the HSFA9 program protected photosynthetic membranes, which resisted extreme dehydration and oxidative stress conditions. In contrast, heat acclimation of seedlings induced thermotolerance but not resistance to the harsh stress conditions employed. The HSFA9 program was found to include the expression of plastidial small Heat Shock Proteins that accumulate only at lower abundance in heat-stressed vegetative organs. Photosystem II (PSII) maximum quantum yield was higher for transgenic seedlings than for non-transgenic seedlings, after either stress treatment. Furthermore, protection of both PSII and Photosystem I (PSI) membrane protein complexes was observed in the transgenic seedlings, leading to their survival after the stress treatments. It was also shown that the plastidial D1 protein, a labile component of the PSII reaction center, and the PSI core protein PsaB were shielded from oxidative damage and degradation. We infer that natural expression of the HSFA9 program during embryogenesis may protect seed pro-plastids from developmental desiccation. PMID:23227265

  17. Catalytic dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural over Nb2O5 catalyst in organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenfen; Wu, Hai-Zhen; Liu, Chun-Ling; Yang, Rong-Zhen; Dong, Wen-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    The catalytic dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in DMSO was performed over Nb2O5 derived from calcination of niobic acid at various temperatures (300-700 °C). The catalysts were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, N2 physical adsorption, temperature-programed desorption of NH3, n-butylamine titration using Hammett indicators, infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that both catalytic activity and surface acid sites decrease with increasing calcination temperatures. The Nb2O5 derived from calcination of niobic acid at 400 °C reveals the maximum yield of HMF among all the catalysts, although the amount of acid sites on the catalyst is lower than that on the sample calcined at 300 °C. The results suggest that the presence of larger amounts of strong acid sites on the surface of the Nb2O5 calcined at 300 °C may promote side reactions. The Nb2O5 prepared at 400 °C shows 100% fructose conversion with 86.2% HMF yield in DMSO at 120 °C after 2 h. The activity of the catalyst decreases gradually during recycle because of coke deposition; however, it can be fully recovered by calcination at 400 °C for 2 h, suggesting that this catalyst is of significance for practical applications. PMID:23348242

  18. Effects of dehydration on organ metabolism in the frog Pseudacris crucifer: hyperglycemic responses to dehydration mimic freezing-induced cryoprotectant production.

    PubMed

    Churchill, T A; Storey, K B

    1994-01-01

    The metabolic effects of evaporative water loss at 5 degrees C were assessed for both fall- and spring-collected spring peepers Pseudacris crucifer. Frogs readily endured the loss of 50% of total body water. During dehydration organ water content was defined with no change in water content in skeletal muscle, gut, and kidney of 50% dehydrated frogs and reduced water content in liver, brain and heart. Dehydration stimulated a rapid and massive increase in liver glucose production. In fall-collected frogs liver glucose rose by 120-fold to 2690 +/- 400 nmol.mg protein-1 or 220 mumol.g ww-1 in 50% dehydrated frogs and glucose in other organs increased by 2.6- to 60-fold. Spring-collected frogs showed the same qualitative response to dehydration although absolute glucose levels were lower, rising maximally by 8.4-fold in liver. Glucose synthesis was supported by glycogenolysis in liver and changes in the levels of glycolytic intermediates in liver indicated that an inhibitory block at the phosphofructokinase locus during desiccation helped to divert hexose phosphates into the production of glucose. Liver energy status (ATP, total adenylates, energy charge) was maintained even after the loss of 35% of total body water but at 50% dehydration all parameters showed a sharp decline; for example, energy charge fell from about 0.85 to 0.42. Severe dehydration also led to an accumulation of lactate in four organs, probably hypoxia-induced due to impaired circulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7860806

  19. SLAC synchronous condenser

    SciTech Connect

    Corvin, C.

    1995-06-01

    A synchronous condenser is a synchronous machine that generates reactive power that leads real power by 90{degrees} in phase. The leading reactive power generated by the condenser offsets or cancels the normal lagging reactive power consumed by inductive and nonlinear loads at the accelerator complex. The quality of SLAC`s utility power is improved with the addition of the condenser. The inertia of the condenser`s 35,000 pound rotor damps and smoothes voltage excursions on two 12 kilovolt master substation buses, improving voltage regulation site wide. The condenser absorbs high frequency transients and noise in effect ``scrubbing`` the electric system power at its primary distribution source. In addition, the condenser produces a substantial savings in power costs. Federal and investor owned utilities that supply electric power to SLAC levy a monthly penalty for lagging reactive power delivered to the site. For the 1993 fiscal year this totaled over $285,000 in added costs for the year. By generating leading reactive power on site, thereby reducing total lagging reactive power requirements, a substantial savings in electric utility bills is achieved. Actual savings of $150,000 or more a year are possible depending on experimental operations.

  20. A root-specific condensing enzyme from Lesquerella fendleri that elongates very-long-chain saturated fatty acids

    E-print Network

    Kunst, Ljerka

    results in the synthesis of two novel very-long-chain fatty acids identified as C28:0 and C30:0. LfKCS45 (condensing enzyme or KCS); reduction of the 3-ketoacyl-CoA to 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA; dehydration to an enoyl- Co to the maize gene Glossy8 required for the synthesis of cuticular waxes (Xu et al., 2002). Based on its

  1. MICROWAVE-ACCELERATED MULTICOMPONENT REACTIONS UNDER SOLVENT-FREE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of microwave-accelerated solventless synthetic protocols in multicomponent (MCC) reactions will be exemplified by several condensation and cyclization reactions including the rapid one-pot assembly of valuable heterocyclic compounds from in situ generated intermed...

  2. Genome size and chromatin condensation in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander E

    2005-02-01

    Cell membrane-dependent chromatin condensation was studied by flow cytometry in erythrocytes of 36 species from six classes of vertebrates. A positive relationship was found between the degree of condensation and genome size. The distribution of variances among taxonomic levels is similar for both parameters. However, chromatin condensation varied relatively more at the lower taxonomic levels, which suggests that the degree of DNA packaging might serve for fine-tuning the 'skeletal' and/or 'buffering' function of noncoding DNA (although the range of this fine-tuning is smaller than the range of genome size changes). For two closely related amphibian species differing in genome size, change in chromatin condensation under the action of elevated extracellular salinity was investigated. Condensation was steadier and its reaction to changes in solvent composition was more inertial in the species with a larger genome, which is in agreement with the buffering function postulated for redundant DNA. The uppermost genome size in vertebrates (and in living beings in general) was updated using flow cytometry and was found to be about 80 pg (78,400 Mb). The widespread opinion that the largest genome occurs in unicellular organisms is rejected as being based on artifacts. PMID:15647899

  3. PVC waterproofing membranes and alkali-aggregated reaction in dams

    SciTech Connect

    Scuero, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    A waterproofing polyvinylchloride (PVC) based geocomposite was installed on two dams subject to alkali-aggregate reaction, to eliminate water intrusion and to protect the facing from further deterioration. The installation system allows drainage of the infiltrated water, thus accomplishing dehydration of the dam body. On one dam, the membrane also provided protection for future slot cutting.

  4. The thermodynamics of arsenates, selenites, and sulfates in the oxidation zone of sulfide ores: VIII. Field of thermal stability of synthetic analog of chalcomenite, its dehydration and dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokina, E. L.; Klimova, E. V.; Charykova, M. V.; Krivovichev, V. G.; Platonova, N. V.; Semenova, V. V.; Depmeier, W.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the thermal stability of the synthetic analog of chalcomenite, CuSeO3 · 2H2O, and its dehydration and dissociation, in an experimental context. The study has been carried out by a comprehensive application of thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and high-temperature X-ray diffraction at a temperature range of 25-600°C. It has been established that CuSeO3 · 2H2O dehydrates at 202-264°C in three stages corresponding to the formation of intermediate CuSeO3 · 2H2O and CuSeO3 · 1/3H2O hydrate phases. At 480-595°C anhydrous CuSeO3 breaks down into CuO and SeO2 via the formation of a Cu4O(SeO3)3 phase. Enthalpies of the reactions at each stage of the CuSeO3 · 2H2O dehydration and CuSeO3 dissociation have been determined and their kinetic analysis has been carried out.

  5. Steam Condensation Induced Waterhammer 

    E-print Network

    Kirsner, W.

    2000-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-00-04-29.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 33804 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-00-04-29.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Steam Condensation... mer-- i.e. fast moving steam picking up a slug of condensate and hurling it downstream against an elbow or a valve. Condensation Induced Waterham mer can be 100 times more powerful than this type of waterhammer. Because it does not require flowing...

  6. Wet fractionation of forage to reduce energy requirements of dehydration. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The Valley Dehydrating Company of Atwood, Colorado, was founded in 1952 to dehydrate alfalfa. Subsequently, it was realized that the rapidly escalating cost of natural gas, burned to provide heat for the dehydration of the alfalfa, would make the traditional process of direct dehydration uneconomical. As an alternative, the use of green crop fractionation in combination with waste heat recovery from the main dryer was investigated. In the wet, or green crop fractionation process, freshly cut alfalfa is brought to the processing site where it is first macerated to rupture the plant cells and then is pressed to remove as much juice as possible. The fiber fraction from the pressing contains only about half as much moisture as the original alfalfa; and thus, can be dehydrated at a much lower cost. The juice which contains plant proteins and lipids as well as a variety of soluble components, is heated to above 80/sup 0/C in order to coagulate the protein. When this material is separated from the residual liquid and dried a high protein, high xanthophyll product (Pro-Xan) results. The remaining solubles are concentrated, using the waste heat from the main dryer to yield a molasses-like product. Instead of the one product, (dehydrated alfalfa) produced by the traditional process, green crop fractionation produces three: dehydrated pressed alfalfa, leaf nutrient concentrate, and molasses.

  7. Ozone fumigation for safety and quality of wine grapes in postharvest dehydration.

    PubMed

    Botondi, Rinaldo; De Sanctis, Federica; Moscatelli, Niccolò; Vettraino, Anna Maria; Catelli, Cesare; Mencarelli, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes postharvest ozone fumigation (as a method) to control microorganisms and evaluate the effect on polyphenols, anthocyanins, carotenoids and cell wall enzymes during the grape dehydration for wine production. Pignola grapes were ozone-treated (1.5 g/h) for 18 h (A=shock treatment), then dehydrated or ozone-treated (1.5 g/h) for 18 h and at 0.5 g/h for 4 h each day (B=long-term treatment) during dehydration. Treatment and dehydration were performed at 10 °C. No significant difference was found for total carotenoid, total phenolic and total anthocyanin contents after 18 h of O3 treatment. A significant decrease in phenolic and anthocyanin contents occurred during treatment B. Also carotenoids were affected by B ozone treatment. Pectin methylesterase (PME) and polygalacturonase (PG) activities were higher in A-treated grapes during dehydration. Finally, ozone reduced fungi and yeasts by 50%. Shock ozone fumigation (A treatment) before dehydration can be used to reduce the microbial count during dehydration without affecting polyphenol and carotenoid contents. PMID:26041242

  8. Dehydration Induced Faulting in Eclogite at High Pressure: A Mechanism for Intermediate-Focus Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Green, H. W.; Bozhilov, K. N.; Jin, Z.

    2002-12-01

    Embrittlement induced by fluid release during dehydration reactions has been proposed to explain both intermediate focus (70-300 km) earthquakes and deep-focus (>300 km) earthquakes in subduction zones. In addition to dehydration of hydrous phases (e.g. lawsonite, phengite, antigorite), in principle hydroxyl-bearing nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, garnet) within the subducting lithosphere also can provide a source for fluid release in subducting slabs. We have performed deformation experiments at 3 GPa pressure on a reconstituted natural eclogite that contains a significant OH concentration in both pyroxene and garnet. Fluid-free samples of this material exhibit exsolution of H2O and grain-boundary melting at temperatures between the H2O-saturated and dry solidi. Deformation of these samples leads to brittle failure under conditions where the total fluid present is very small and the material is strong. At higher temperatures, where the flow stress is significantly reduced by larger amounts of melt, faulting does not occur. At temperatures below the wet solidus, no fluid is produced and faulting does not occur, even though specimens are very strong under such conditions. Within the faulting regime, the failure strength of the eclogite is not temperature sensitive. Microstructural observation of faulted specimens revealed ultra-thin glass films along grain boundaries and within abundant Mode I microcracks. Fault gouge contains small amounts of glass and angular fragments of garnet and pyroxene that appear to have a fractal size distribution. Addition of water to deformation experiments performed is generated by the added H2O to reduce the flow stress to below the fracture stress. At moderate temperatures in subduction zones, phengite remains stable to very high pressures. Thus, small amounts of phengite stable at lower pressures could provide a source of H2O that could progressively dissolve into pyroxene and garnet with increasing pressure and thereby be carried to greater depths where it could exsolve and trigger earthquakes or where it could be incorporated into the circulating mantle.

  9. In-stack condensible particulate matter measurement and permitting issues

    SciTech Connect

    Corio, L.A.; Sherwell, J.

    1997-12-31

    Based on the results of recent epidemiological studies and assessments of the causes of visibility degradation, EPA is proposing to regulate PM2.5 emissions. PM can be classified as either filterable or condensible PM. Condensible PM includes sulfates, such as sulfuric acid. Sulfates typically account for at least half of the total dry fine PM mass in the atmosphere. Power plant SO{sub x}-based emissions make a significant contribution to ambient fine PM levels in the eastern US. Although much of this mass is derived from secondary chemical reactions in the atmosphere, a portion of this sulfate is emitted directly from stacks as condensible PM. The potential condensible PM fraction associated with coal-burning boiler emissions is somewhat uncertain. The characterization of PM emissions from these sources has been, until recently, based on in-stack filterable PM measurements only. To determine the relative magnitude of condensible PM emissions and better understand condensible PM measurement issues, a review and analysis of actual EPA Method 202 results and state-developed hybrid condensible PM methods were conducted. A review of available Method 202 results for several coal-burning boilers showed that the condensible PM, on average, comprises 60% of the total PM10. A review of recent results for state-developed measurement methods for condensible PM for numerous coal-burning boilers indicated that condensible PM accounted for, on average, approximately 49% of total PM. Caution should be exercised in the use of these results because of the seemingly unresolved issue of artifact formation, which may bias the Method 202 and state-developed methods results on the high side. Condensible PM10 measurement results and issues, and potential ramifications of including condensible PM10 emissions in the PSD permit review process are discussed. Selected power plants in Maryland are discussed as examples.

  10. Different effects of light irradiation on the photosynthetic electron transport chain during apple tree leaf dehydration.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengmin; Ma, Fengwang

    2012-06-01

    Effects of light irradiation on the photosynthetic electron transport chain between P680 and P700 in apple tree leaves was probed with chlorophyll a fluorescence transient and 820 nm transmission measurements during dehydration under different light intensities. The results showed that light accelerated the leaf water-loss rate during dehydration. Leaf dehydration lowered the maximum quantum yield of PSII and the far-red light induced maximal transmission change at 820 nm, but increased the relative variable fluorescence intensity at J-step, especially under increasing irradiation conditions. During leaf dehydration, irradiation lowered the relative variable fluorescence intensity at I-step. At the beginning of leaf dehydration, moderate light accelerated the leaf water-loss rate and then lowered the maximal light-trapping efficiency of P???. Upon further dehydration under moderate light or dehydration under high light, light accelerated the water-loss rate and also directly decreased the maximal light-trapping efficiency of P680. The more significant decrease in the exchange capacity of plastoquinones at the Q(B) site was mainly attributed to the faster water-loss rate under moderate light than in the dark. Under high light, irradiation also directly lowered the capacity. The reoxidation of PQH? in the dehydrated leaves was enhanced by the light irradiation. The rapidly decreased contents of P700 + plastocyanin were mainly attributed to the faster water-loss rate under light conditions in contrast with that in the dark. The different effects of light irradiations on the photosynthetic electron transport chain might be involved in the acclimation of apple tree leaves to dehydration. PMID:22484842

  11. Characterization of full-length enriched expressed sequence tags of dehydration-treated white fibrous roots of sweetpotato.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Hyung; Song, Wan-Keun; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kwon, Suk-Yun; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Lee, In-Chul; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2009-05-31

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L). Lam.) is relatively tolerant to unfavorable growth conditions such as drought, yet has not been exploited to provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of drought stress tolerance. We obtained 983 high-quality expressed sequence tags of 100 bp or longer (average length of 700 bp) from cDNA libraries of detached white fibrous root tissues by subjecting them to dehydration for 6 h. The 431 cDNAs were each assigned a function by alignment using the BLASTX algorithm. Among them, three genes associated with various abiotic stresses and nine genes not previously associated with drought stress were selected for expression pattern analysis through detailed reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The direct and indirect relationships of the 12 genes with drought tolerance mechanisms were ascertained at different developmental stages and under various stress conditions. PMID:19470240

  12. Movement of water, protein and crystalloids between vascular and extravascular compartments in heat-exposed men during dehydration and following limited relief of dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Senay, L. C.

    1970-01-01

    1. Five male subjects were exposed to a hot environment (43-44° C dry bulb, 28-29° C wet bulb) and allowed to dehydrate for 4 hr. Water was then provided ad libitum for drinking during a 20-min period; thereafter the subjects continued at rest in the hot room for an additional 140 min. 2. Through periodic samples of venous blood, water and protein movement into or out of the intravascular compartment were assessed during dehydration and during and following water ingestion that partially relieved dehydration. 3. Consideration of changes in blood osmolarity, plasma protein content and haematocrit values led to the conclusion that protein was added to plasma during heat exposure and that plasma, as previously supposed, did not lose water at rates greater than that of the whole body under such conditions. 4. Haemodilution occurred when dehydration was partially relieved by drinking water and this dilution was maintained even when sweat loss exceeded the amount of water ingested. 5. For similar levels of bodily dehydration before and after water ingestion, body temperatures were lower when haemodilution was present. 6. A hypothesis that relates changes in plasma volume and constituents with levels of exercise is presented. PMID:5532905

  13. Mechanism of dehydration of tert-butyl alcohol in phosphoric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Obraztsov, P.A.; Vinnik, M.I.

    1987-04-01

    The kinetic regularities of dehydration of tert-butyl alcohol on deposited phosphoric acid catalyst were studied by the pulsed gas-chromatographic method. Dehydration rate constants at 70/sup 0/C were determined in the range of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ concentrations of 50-80.4 wt. %. A dehydration mechanism was proposed from the dependence of this constant on the acidity of the medium. This includes the formation of a reactive complex consisting of a molecule of an unprotonated alcohol, a molecule of undissociated H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ and a molecule of water.

  14. Re-Condensation 

    E-print Network

    Bhatia, P.; Kozman, T.

    2004-01-01

    return lines from trap discharges based totally on water is a gross error and causes lines to be drastically undersized for the flash steam. This causes condensate lines to become pressurized, not atmospheric, which in turn causes a backpressure...

  15. Mechanism of dropwise condensation

    E-print Network

    Umur, Aydin

    1963-01-01

    From a study of surface phenomena, information is obtained about conditions under which net condensation can occur. An experimental examination of the surface, using an optical method capable of detecting thin films of ...

  16. Beware of condenser fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.

    1995-04-01

    Many chemical process plants generate steam for power production and process use. Recovering this steam as condensate, and returning it to the boiler, is an economical way to recycle heat. This is usually done in a watercooled, steam-surface condenser located at the exhaust of a turbine. Poor performance of such a condenser -- which is really a large heat exchanger -- can significantly decrease a plant`s heat-recycling efficiency. The most-common causes of condenser inefficiency are: microbiological growth on the water side, scale formation on the water side, tube pluggage by debris and air in-leakage on the steam side. These problems can cost a plant dearly. Well-planned treatment programs to combat these causes, however, pay for themselves many times over. The paper discusses these four types of fouling and solutions to their mitigation.

  17. Ghost condensate busting

    SciTech Connect

    Bilic, Neven; Tupper, Gary B; Viollier, Raoul D E-mail: gary.tupper@uct.ac.za

    2008-09-15

    Applying the Thomas-Fermi approximation to renormalizable field theories, we construct ghost condensation models that are free of the instabilities associated with violations of the null-energy condition.

  18. Ghost Condensate Busting

    E-print Network

    Neven Bili?; Gary B. Tupper; Raoul D. Viollier

    2008-08-06

    Applying the Thomas-Fermi approximation to renormalizable field theories, we construct ghost condensation models that are free of the instabilities associated with violations of the null-energy condition.

  19. Pore formation during dehydration of polycrystalline gypsum observed and quantified in a time-series synchrotron radiation based X-ray micro-tomography experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusseis, F.; Schrank, C.; Liu, J.; Karrech, A.; Llana-Fúnez, S.; Xiao, X.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2011-10-01

    We conducted an in-situ X-ray micro-computed tomography heating experiment at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) to dehydrate an unconfined 2.3 mm diameter cylinder of Volterra Gypsum. We used a purpose-built X-ray transparent furnace to heat the sample to 388 K for a total of 310 min to acquire a three-dimensional time-series tomography dataset comprising nine time steps. The voxel size of 2.2 ?m3 proved sufficient to pinpoint reaction initiation and the organization of drainage architecture in space and time. We observed that dehydration commences across a narrow front, which propagates from the margins to the centre of the sample in more than four hours. The advance of this front can be fitted with a square-root function, implying that the initiation of the reaction in the sample can be described as a diffusion process. Novel parallelized computer codes allow quantifying the geometry of the porosity and the drainage architecture from the very large tomographic datasets (6.4 × 109 voxel each) in unprecedented detail. We determined position, volume, shape and orientation of each resolvable pore and tracked these properties over the duration of the experiment. We found that the pore-size distribution follows a power law. Pores tend to be anisotropic but rarely crack-shaped and have a preferred orientation, likely controlled by a pre-existing fabric in the sample. With on-going dehydration, pores coalesce into a single interconnected pore cluster that is connected to the surface of the sample cylinder and provides an effective drainage pathway. Our observations can be summarized in a model in which gypsum is stabilized by thermal expansion stresses and locally increased pore fluid pressures until the dehydration front approaches to within about 100 ?m. Then, the internal stresses are released and dehydration happens efficiently, resulting in new pore space. Pressure release, the production of pores and the advance of the front are coupled in a feedback loop. We discuss our findings in the context of previous studies.

  20. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  1. Transient nucleation in condensed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Greer, A. L.; Thompson, C. V.

    1983-01-01

    Using classical nucleation theory we consider transient nucleation occurring in a one-component, condensed system under isothermal conditions. We obtain an exact closed-form expression for the time dependent cluster populations. In addition, a more versatile approach is developed: a numerical simulation technique which models directly the reactions by which clusters are produced. This simulation demonstrates the evolution of cluster populations and nucleation rate in the transient regime. Results from the simulation are verified by comparison with exact analytical solutions for the steady state. Experimental methods for measuring transient nucleation are assessed, and it is demonstrated that the observed behavior depends on the method used. The effect of preexisting cluster distributions is studied. Previous analytical and numerical treatments of transient nucleation are compared to the solutions obtained from the simulation. The simple expressions of Kashchiev are shown to give good descriptions of the nucleation behavior.

  2. Dehydration at the Tropical Tropopause Over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohs, S.; Beuermann, J.; Gensch, I.; Kraemer, M.; MacKenzie, R.; Schiller, C.; Yushkov, V. A.

    2004-05-01

    During the APE-THESEO campaign in February/March 1999 high-resolution in-situ measurements were carried out onboard the Russian M-55 Geophysica high altitude aircraft, based on the Seychelles (-4.7° N, 55.3° E) in the western Indian Ocean. In the potential temperature range from 340 - 430 K, 36 individual (quasi)-vertical profiles of temperature, the gas-phase and total water cloud particles, and ozone were obtained. The height of the tropopause and the hygropause were highly variable for the investigated period. We attribute this to short and local perturbations to the seasonal cycle. The cold point tropopause was located at a potential temperature range from 365 - 403 K. Minimum temperatures were very low (183 - 194 K), leading to saturation mixing ratios at the tropopause of 1.1 - 8.4 ppmv. The hygropause was located on average 4 K above the tropopause with water vapour mixing ratios of 1.2 - 4.1 ppmv. These very low mixing ratios are comparable to those found in previous studies in the 'fountain region' over Micronesia. For 70 % of the vertical profiles, ice saturation was found in a wide range around the tropopause. Predominantly the saturation was corroborated by concurrently detected clouds up to the altitude of the cold point, providing evidence of active dehydration. We identify three common types of vertical profiles: coincident hygropause and cold point at relatively low potential temperatures, associated with a cirrus deck; coincident hygropause and cold point at relatively high potential temperatures, associated with thin subvisible cirrus; and unsaturated, cloud-free, profiles without a pronounced relationship between hygropause and cold point. Characteristics such as extension, number density, frequency distribution of relative humidity over ice of the cirrus clouds were different for these categories which allows to infer their different origin. The low water vapour ratios and the existence of saturation support the hypothesis that the Tropical Tropopause layer (TTL) over the western Indian Ocean is a region where air masses are dehydrated to very low values during their transport into the stratosphere.

  3. Bonding by Hydroxide-Catalyzed Hydration and Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung

    2008-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive method for bonding solid objects exploits hydroxide-catalyzed hydration and dehydration to form silicate-like networks in thin surface and interfacial layers between the objects. The method can be practiced at room temperature or over a wide range of temperatures. The method was developed especially to enable the formation of precise, reliable bonds between precise optical components. The bonds thus formed exhibit the precision and transparency of bonds formed by the conventional optical-contact method and the strength and reliability of high-temperature frit bonds. The method also lends itself to numerous non-optical applications in which there are requirements for precise bonds and/or requirements for bonds, whether precise or imprecise, that can reliably withstand severe environmental conditions. Categories of such non-optical applications include forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. The method is applicable to materials that either (1) can form silicate-like networks in the sense that they have silicate-like molecular structures that are extensible into silicate-like networks or (2) can be chemically linked to silicate-like networks by means of hydroxide-catalyzed hydration and dehydration. When hydrated, a material of either type features surface hydroxyl (-OH) groups. In this method, a silicate-like network that bonds two substrates can be formed either by a bonding material alone or by the bonding material together with material from either or both of the substrates. Typically, an aqueous hydroxide bonding solution is dispensed and allowed to flow between the mating surfaces by capillary action. If the surface figures of the substrates do not match precisely, bonding could be improved by including a filling material in the bonding solution. Preferably, the filling material should include at least one ingredient that can be hydrated to have exposed hydroxyl groups and that can be chemically linked, by hydroxide catalysis, to a silicate-like network. The silicate-like network could be generated in situ from the filling material and/or substrate material, or could be originally present in the bonding material.

  4. Protoplast dehydration correlated with heat resistance of bacterial spores.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashio, S; Gerhardt, P

    1985-01-01

    Water content of the protoplast in situ within the fully hydrated dormant bacterial spore was quantified by use of a spore in which the complex of coat and outer (pericortex) membrane was genetically defective or chemically removed, as evidenced by susceptibility of the cortex to lysozyme and by permeability of the periprotoplast integument to glucose. Water content was determined by equilibrium permeability measurement with 3H-labeled water (confirmed by gravimetric measurement) for the entire spore, with 14C-labeled glucose for the integument outside the inner (pericytoplasm) membrane, and by the difference for the protoplast. The method was applied to lysozyme-sensitive spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus, B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. megaterium (four types). Comparable lysozyme-resistant spores, in which the outer membrane functioned as the primary permeability barrier to glucose, were employed as controls. Heat resistances were expressed as D100 values. Protoplast water content of the lysozyme-sensitive spore types correlated with heat resistance exponentially in two distinct clusters, with the four B. megaterium types in one alignment, and with the four other species types in another. Protoplast water contents of the B. megaterium spore types were sufficiently low (26 to 29%, based on wet protoplast weight) to account almost entirely for their lesser heat resistance. Corresponding values of the other species types were similar or higher (30 to 55%), indicating that these spores depended on factors additional to protoplast dehydration for their much greater heat resistance. PMID:3988704

  5. Freeze avoidance: a dehydrating moss gathers no ice.

    PubMed

    Lenné, Thomas; Bryant, Gary; Hocart, Charles H; Huang, Cheng X; Ball, Marilyn C

    2010-10-01

    Using cryo-SEM with EDX fundamental structural and mechanical properties of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. were studied in relation to tolerance of freezing temperatures. In contrast to more complex plants, no ice accumulated within the moss during the freezing event. External ice induced desiccation with the response being a function of cell type; water-filled hydroid cells cavitated and were embolized at -4 °C while parenchyma cells of the inner cortex exhibited cytorrhysis, decreasing to ? 20% of their original volume at a nadir temperature of -20 °C. Chlorophyll fluorescence showed that these winter acclimated mosses displayed no evidence of damage after thawing from -20 °C while GCMS showed that sugar concentrations were not sufficient to confer this level of freezing tolerance. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry showed internal ice nucleation occurred in hydrated moss at ?-12 °C while desiccated moss showed no evidence of freezing with lowering of nadir temperature to -20 °C. Therefore the rapid dehydration of the moss provides an elegantly simple solution to the problem of freezing; remove that which freezes. PMID:20525002

  6. Onion and garlic dehydration in the San Emidio Desert, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.; Lienau, P.J.

    1994-07-01

    Integrated Ingredients dedicated their new onion and garlic processing plant on May 25th. {open_quotes}Grunion{close_quotes} as the new community of 72 employees has been labeled, is located just south of Empire and Gerlach and about 100 miles north of Reno, Nevada. The plant, run by Integrated Ingredients (based in Alameda, CA), is a division of Burns Philp Food, Inc., which owns brands such as Spice Islands, Durkee-French and Fleischmann`s. This plant gives the company the ability to produce its own products for industrial and consumer markets instead of purchasing them. The plant was located in the San Emidio Desert at the edge of the vast Black Rock Desert and the Great Basin to take advantage of the high temperature geothermal resource (approximately 270{degrees}F). The resource is also used by the OESI/AMOR II 3.6 MW binary plant about a mile south of the dehydration plant and a gold heap leaching operation just to the north of the plant (Wind Mt. mine operated by AMAX). In addition to the geothermal energy, the high desert is an ideal location for onion and garlic processing because the cold winters kill damaging microbes. Dry winters and summers also help.

  7. Dehydrating and Sterilizing Wastes Using Supercritical CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ian J.

    2006-01-01

    A relatively low-temperature process for dehydrating and sterilizing biohazardous wastes in an enclosed life-support system exploits (1) the superior mass-transport properties of supercritical fluids in general and (2) the demonstrated sterilizing property of supercritical CO2 in particular. The wastes to be treated are placed in a chamber. Liquid CO2, drawn from storage at a pressure of 850 psi (approx.=5.9 MPa) and temperature of 0 C, is compressed to pressure of 2 kpsi (approx.=14 MPa) and made to flow into the chamber. The compression raises the temperature to 10 C. The chamber and its contents are then further heated to 40 C, putting the CO2 into a supercritical state, in which it kills microorganisms in the chamber. Carrying dissolved water, the CO2 leaves the chamber through a back-pressure regulator, through which it is expanded back to the storage pressure. The expanded CO2 is refrigerated to extract the dissolved water as ice, and is then returned to the storage tank at 0 C

  8. Dehydration and Denitrification in the Arctic Polar Vortex During the 1995-1996 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintsa, E. J.; Newman, P. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Lait, L. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Wamsley, P. R.; Dutton, G. S.; Bui, T. P.; Kohn, D. W.; Anderson, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Dehydration of more than 0.5 ppmv water was observed between 18 and 19 km (theta about 450-465 K) at the edge of the Arctic polar vortex on February 1, 1996. More than half the reactive nitrogen (NO(sub y)) had also been removed, with layers of enhanced (sub y) at lower altitudes. Back trajectory calculations show that air parcels sampled inside the vortex had experienced temperatures as low as 188 K within the previous 12 days, consistent with a small amount of dehydration. The depth of the dehydrated layer (about 1 km) and the fact that trajectories passed through the region of ice saturation in one day imply selective growth of a small fraction of particles to sizes large enough (>10 micron) to be irreversibly removed on this timescale. Over 25% of the Arctic vortex in a 20-30 K range of theta is estimated to have been dehydrated in this event.

  9. Dehydration and Denitrification in the Arctic Polar Vortex During the 1995-1996 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintsa, E. J.; Newman, P. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Lait, L. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Wamsley, P. R.; Dutton, G. S.; Bui, T. P.; Kohn, D. W.; Anderson, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Dehydration of more than 0.5 ppmv water was observed between 18 and 19 km (theta approximately 450-465 K) at the edge of the Arctic polar vortex on February 1, 1996. More than half the reactive nitrogen (NO(y)) had also been removed, with layers of enhanced NO(y) at lower altitudes. Back trajectory calculations show that air parcels sampled inside the vortex had experienced temperatures as low as 188 K within the previous 12 days, consistent with a small amount of dehydration. The depth of the dehydrated layer (approximately 1 km) and the fact that trajectories passed through the region of ice saturation in one day imply selective growth of a small fraction of particles to sizes large enough (>10 micrometers) to be irreversibly removed on this timescale. Over 25% of the Arctic vortex in a 20-30 K range Transport of theta is estimated to have been dehydrated in this event.

  10. Dehydration and Denitrification in the Arctic Polar Vortex During the 1995-1996 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintsa, E. J.; Newman, P. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Lait, L. R.; Schoerberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Wamsley, P. R.

    1998-01-01

    Dehydration of more than 0.5 ppmv water was observed between 18 and 19 km (theta = 450-465 K) at the edge of the Arctic polar vortex on February 1, 1996. More than half the reactive nitrogen (NOy) had also been removed, with layers of enhanced NOy at lower altitudes. Back trajectory calculations show that air parcels sampled inside the vortex had experienced temperatures as low as 188 K within the previous 12 days, consistent with a small amount of dehydration. The depth of the dehydrated layer (approx. 1 km) and the fact that trajectories passed through the region of ice saturation in one day imply selective growth of a small fraction of particles to sizes large enough (>10 micrometers) to be irreversibly removed on this timescale. Over 25% of the Arctic vortex in a 20-30 K range of theta is estimated to have been dehydrated in this event.

  11. Dehydration and Denitrification in the Arctic Polar Vortex During the 1995-1996 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintsa, E. J.; Newman, P. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Lait, L. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Wamsley, P. R.; Dutton, G. S.; Bui, T. P.; Kohn, D. W.; Anderson, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Dehydration of more than 0.5 ppmv water was observed between 18 and 19 km (0-450-465 K) at the edge of the Arctic polar vortex on February 1, 1996. More than half the reactive nitrogen (NO(y)) had also been removed, with layers of enhanced NO(y) at lower altitudes. Back trajectory calculations show that air parcels sampled inside the vortex had experienced temperatures as low as 188 K within the previous 12 days, consistent with a small amount of dehydration. The depth of the dehydrated layer (approximately 1 km) and the fact that trajectories passed through the region of ice saturation in one day imply selective growth of a small fraction of particles to sizes large enough (>10 microns) to be irreversibly removed on this timescale. Over 25% of the Arctic vortex in a 20-30 K range of 0 is estimated to have been dehydrated in this event.

  12. Mixed Matrix Silicone and Fluorosilicone/Zeolite 4A Membranes for Ethanol Dehydration by Pervaporation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of homogeneous and mixed matrix membranes prepared using standard silicone rubber, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), and fluorosilicone rubber, poly(trifluoropropylmethylsiloxane) (PTFPMS), to dehydrate ethanol by pervaporation was evaluated. Although PDMS is generally c...

  13. Simultaneous sweetening and dehydration of natural gas using a mixed solvent solution 

    E-print Network

    Garza, Jaime Javier

    1997-01-01

    Mixed solvent solutions of Solvent X in TEG at various concentrations were developed to simultaneously sweeten and dehydrate a wet, sour natural gas stream. An experimental apparatus consisting of a high pressure gas circulation loop and a low...

  14. Liquid-phase and vapor-phase dehydration of organic/water solutions

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Ly, Jennifer (San Jose, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2011-08-23

    Processes for dehydrating an organic/water solution by pervaporation or vapor separation using fluorinated membranes. The processes are particularly useful for treating mixtures containing light organic components, such as ethanol, isopropanol or acetic acid.

  15. Alternative overwintering strategies in an Antarctic midge: freezing vs. cryoprotective dehydration

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    Alternative overwintering strategies in an Antarctic midge: freezing vs. cryoprotective dehydration understanding of freeze avoidance strategies employed by polar invertebrates. Although the underlying cellular processes associated with this strategy are similar to those of freeze tolerance, little is known about

  16. Bisulfate Dehydration at Air/Solution Interfaces Probed by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Bisulfate Dehydration at Air/Solution Interfaces Probed by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation,16-19 Aerosol reactivity and growth are vital to understand as the climate forcing effects of aerosols on Earth

  17. Stomatal Closure during Leaf Dehydration, Correlation with Other Leaf Physiological Traits1

    E-print Network

    Holbrook, N. Michele

    Stomatal Closure during Leaf Dehydration, Correlation with Other Leaf Physiological Traits1 Tim J). This complexity is evi- denced by the variable effects of leaf water potential ( l) and vapor pressure deficit

  18. Membrane-based recovery and dehydration of alcohols from fermentation broths - of materials and modules

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distillation combined with molecular sieve dehydration is the current state of the art for fuel grade ethanol production from fermentation broths. As the liquid biofuels industry transitions to lignocellulosic feedstocks, expands the end product portfolio to include other alcoho...

  19. Energy Efficient Hybrid Vapor Stripping-Vapor Permeation Process for Ethanol Recovery ad Dehydration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distillation combined with molecular sieve dehydration is the current state of the art for fuel grade ethanol production from fermentation broths. To improve the sustainability of bioethanol production, energy efficient separation alternatives are needed, particularly for lower f...

  20. Parents' and Coaches' Guide to Dehydration and Other Heat Illnesses in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    Parents’ and Coaches’ Guide to Dehydration and Other Heat Illnesses in Children These guidelines were developed to ... in hot weather can be at risk for heat illnesses. The good news is heat illnesses can ...

  1. Energy efficient recovery and dehydration of ethanol from fermentation broths by Membrane Assisted Vapor Stripping technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distillation combined with molecular sieve dehydration is the current state of the art for fuel grade ethanol production from fermentation broths. To improve the sustainability of bioethanol production, energy efficient separation alternatives are needed, particularly for lower ...

  2. 76 FR 4284 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Tulkoff Food Products, Inc. (Dehydrated Garlic), Baltimore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ...Tulkoff Food Products, Inc. (Dehydrated Garlic), Baltimore, MD Pursuant to its authority...establish a special-purpose subzone at the garlic products manufacturing facility of Tulkoff...activity related to the manufacture of garlic products at the Tulkoff Food...

  3. A NOVEL HYDROPHILIC POLYMER MEMBRANE FOR THE DEHYDRATION OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel hydrophilic polymer membranes based on polyallylamine ydrochloride- polyvinylalcohol are developed. The high selectivity and flux characteristics of these membranes for the dehydration of organic solvents are evaluated using pervaporation technology and are found to be ver...

  4. Conversion of isoamyl alcohol over acid catalysts: Reaction dependence on nature of active centers

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, G.P.; Murthy, R.S.; Krishnan, V.

    1997-02-01

    Acid catalysts are known to catalyze the dehydration of alcohols. In addition some oxide catalysts with basic properties have also been shown to play an important role in such dehydration reactions. The dehydration of aliphatic alcohols to olefins has been studied in detail using alumina silica-alumina and zeolite catalysts. The olefin products further undergo isomerization in presence of acidic sites. The reaction of isoamyl alcohol on catalytic surfaces has not been investigated in greater detail. The dehydration of isoamyl alcohol is of considerable interest in fine chemicals. Isoamyl alcohol may also undergo dehydrogenation as observed in the case of n-butanol. The scope of the present work is to identify the nature of the active sites selective for dehydration and dehydrogenation of isoamyl alcohol and to modify the active sites to promote isomerization of dehydrated products. Four catalytic surfaces on which the acidic strength can be varied, as well as selectively suppressed, are chosen for this study. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Coseismic dehydration from illite-rich faults and its implications on the slip-weakening, frictional heating, and earthquake enegetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirono, T.; Tanikawa, W.

    2010-12-01

    Transient frictional heating during earthquake slip induces dehydroxylation of phyllosilicate minerals. As this reaction is endothermic and releases H2O, it may affect dynamic fault weakening and energetics during earthquakes. To elucidate this question, we tested illite-dominant shale as one of the representative components in the crustal active faults and subduction-boundary faults. We first measured the specific heat capacity and thermal diffusivity along with the temperature dependencies of these parameters, and determined weight loss and enthalpy of the dehydroxylation reaction to be 5.22 wt% and 0.2895 kJ g-1, respectively. We applied the Friedman analysis for the weight loss data of four heating experiments of 5, 10, 15 and 20 °C min-1, and found that the dehydroxylation was well fitted as two steps reaction of n-dimensional nucleation mechanism according to Avrami-Erofeev with n=0.5 (first step) and two-dimensional diffusion (second step). On the basis of these experimental results, we performed numerical analyses of dynamic fault weakening, taking into account the dehydroxylation reaction of illite. We clarify that released fluids assist in the pressurization of pore fluid and subsequently induce a decrease in effective normal stress on faults, and that the dehydroxylation reaction takes up heat from the energy released on the fault during earthquake slip. This effect, which inhibits the rise in temperature in the fault, is significant at depths of >2 km, and fraction of energy used for the reaction against the total given work on the fault reaches 18% at the depths. Thus, the coseismic dehydration from phyllosilicate minerals may significantly affect on the slip-weakening, frictional heating, and energetics in clay-rich faults such as crustal active faults and subduction boundary faults.

  6. A Study on the Condensation Reaction of 4-Amino-3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazole with Benzaldehydes: Structure and Spectroscopic Properties of Some New Stable Hemiaminals.

    PubMed

    Wajda-Hermanowicz, Katarzyna; Pieni??czak, Damian; Zatajska, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Robert; Drabent, Krzysztof; Ciunik, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the stable hemiaminals and Schiff bases formation in the reaction of substituted benzaldehydes with primary 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazole 4-amine were carried out under neutral conditions. These products were investigated by IR, Raman, MS, ¹H- and (13)C-NMR spectra as well as by X-ray crystallography. The effect of reaction conditions: temperature, polarity of the solvents utilized, substrate concentration and the ortho and para benzaldehyde substituents on the yield of products was also examined. PMID:26393552

  7. Proteome analysis of Physcomitrella patens exposed to progressive dehydration and rehydration

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Suxia; Hu, Jia; Guo, Shilei; Wang, Jie; Cheng, Yali; Dang, Xinxing; Wu, Lili; He, Yikun

    2012-01-01

    Physcomitrella patens is an extremely dehydration-tolerant moss. However, the molecular basis of its responses to loss of cellular water remains unclear. A comprehensive proteomic analysis of dehydration- and rehydration-responsive proteins has been conducted using quantitative two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and traditional 2-D gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with MALDI TOF/TOF MS. Of the 216 differentially-expressed protein spots, 112 and 104 were dehydration- and rehydration-responsive proteins, respectively. The functional categories of the most differentially-expressed proteins were seed maturation, defence, protein synthesis and quality control, and energy production. Strikingly, most of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins were expressed at a basal level under control conditions and their synthesis was strongly enhanced by dehydration, a pattern that was confirmed by RT-PCR. Actinoporins, phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein, arabinogalactan protein, and phospholipase are the likely dominant players in the defence system. In addition, 24 proteins of unknown function were identified as novel dehydration- or rehydration-responsive proteins. Our data indicate that Physcomitrella adopts a rapid protein response mechanism to cope with dehydration in its leafy-shoot and basal expression levels of desiccation-tolerant proteins are rapidly upgraded at high levels under stress. This mechanism appears similar to that seen in angiosperm seeds. PMID:21994173

  8. Repeated bouts of dehydration deplete nutrient reserves and reduce egg production in the mosquito Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Joshua B.; Patrick, Kevin R.; Desai, Karina; Hardesty, Jeffrey J.; Krause, Tyler B.; Denlinger, David L.

    2010-01-01

    In this study of the mosquito, Culex pipiens, we examined the impact of multiple bouts of dehydration and rehydration on survival, depletion of metabolic reserves and egg production in both non-diapausing and diapausing females. Mosquitoes provided with access to sugar during rehydration survived longer than those allowed to rehydrate without sugar, and their survival was similar to that of mosquitoes of the same age that were not dehydrated. Among mosquitoes not provided with sugar, each dehydration bout reduced the mosquito's dry mass – an effect likely to be due to the utilization of carbohydrates and lipid reserves. The toll on glycogen and lipid reserves is likely to be especially costly for diapausing mosquitoes that are dependent on these stored reserves for winter survival. Egg production in both non-diapausing and post-diapausing C. pipiens was also reduced in response to multiple bouts of dehydration. Although egg quality was not compromised, the number of eggs produced was reduced. Both non-diapausing and diapausing females can compensate for the nutrient loss due to dehydration by sugar feeding but the opportunity to feed on sugar is likely to be rarely available in the overwintering habitat of diapausing females, thus the impact of dehydration may be especially pronounced in overwintering populations of C. pipiens. PMID:20675546

  9. ATG18 and FAB1 Are Involved in Dehydration Stress Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    López-Martínez, Gema; Margalef-Català, Mar; Salinas, Francisco; Liti, Gianni; Cordero-Otero, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, different dehydration-based technologies have been evaluated for the purpose of cell and tissue preservation. Although some early results have been promising, they have not satisfied the requirements for large-scale applications. The long experience of using quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be a good model organism for studying the link between complex phenotypes and DNA variations. Here, we use QTL analysis as a tool for identifying the specific yeast traits involved in dehydration stress tolerance. Three hybrids obtained from stable haploids and sequenced in the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project showed intermediate dehydration tolerance in most cases. The dehydration resistance trait of 96 segregants from each hybrid was quantified. A smooth, continuous distribution of the anhydrobiosis tolerance trait was found, suggesting that this trait is determined by multiple QTLs. Therefore, we carried out a QTL analysis to identify the determinants of this dehydration tolerance trait at the genomic level. Among the genes identified after reciprocal hemizygosity assays, RSM22, ATG18 and DBR1 had not been referenced in previous studies. We report new phenotypes for these genes using a previously validated test. Finally, our data illustrates the power of this approach in the investigation of the complex cell dehydration phenotype. PMID:25803831

  10. Reevaluation of the phenol-sulfuric acid reaction for the estimation of hexoses and pentoses.

    PubMed

    Rao, P; Pattabiraman, T N

    1989-08-15

    Evidence is provided to show that in the conventional phenol-sulfuric acid reaction procedure, phenol underwent sulfonation in situ and the phenolsulfonic acid formed decreased the color intensity for hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF), furfural, and many hexoses and pentoses tested. A modified method is described to overcome this problem in which phenol was added after the dehydration of carbohydrates by sulfuric acid and after cooling the system. The color intensity around 475-485 nm for different compounds was fairly proportional to the amount of furfural derivatives (absorption at 310-320 nm) formed from the sugars in the modified method unlike in the conventional procedure. The studies also show that for condensation of HMF derivatives with phenol, heat is not necessary. The color intensity in the modified method also increased compared to that in the conventional method. The increase in the modified method compared to that in the conventional method was 6.0-fold for furfural, 9.1-fold for hydroxymethyl furfural, 3.7-fold for fructose, 2.3-fold for xylose, and 2.0-fold for glucose and arabinose. The possible reasons for this differential increase are discussed. PMID:2817377

  11. Oxidation, Reduction, and Condensation of Alcohols over (MO3)3 (M=Mo, W) Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zongtang; Li, Zhenjun; Kelley, Matthew S.; Kay, Bruce D.; Li, Shenggang; Hennigan, Jamie M.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dixon, David A.

    2014-10-02

    The reactions of deuterated methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, 2-butanol and t-butanol over cyclic (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) clusters were studied experimentally with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and theoretically with coupled cluster CCSD(T) theory and density functional theory. The reactions of two alcohols per M3O9 cluster are required to provide agreement with experiment for D2O release, dehydrogenation and dehydration. The reaction begins with the elimination of water by proton transfers and forms an intermediate dialkoxy species which can undergo further reaction. Dehydration proceeds by a ? hydrogen transfer to a terminal M=O. Dehydrogenation takes place via an ? hydrogen transfer to an adjacent MoVI = O atom or a WVI metal center with redox involved for M = Mo and no redox for M = W. The two channels have comparable activation energies. H/D exchange to produce alcohols can take place after olefin is released or via the dialkoxy species depending on the alcohol and the cluster. The Lewis acidity of the metal center with WVI being larger than MoVI results in the increased reactivity of W3O9 over Mo3O9 for dehydrogenation and dehydration.

  12. Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation pump, Jennings vacuum heating pump, and misc. pipes and valves. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  13. Selective Brain Cooling Reduces Water Turnover in Dehydrated Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, W. Maartin; Hetem, Robyn S.; Mitchell, Duncan; Maloney, Shane K.; Meyer, Leith C. R.; Fuller, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In artiodactyls, arterial blood destined for the brain can be cooled through counter-current heat exchange within the cavernous sinus via a process called selective brain cooling. We test the hypothesis that selective brain cooling, which results in lowered hypothalamic temperature, contributes to water conservation in sheep. Nine Dorper sheep, instrumented to provide measurements of carotid blood and brain temperature, were dosed with deuterium oxide (D2O), exposed to heat for 8 days (40?C for 6-h per day) and deprived of water for the last five days (days 3 to 8). Plasma osmolality increased and the body water fraction decreased over the five days of water deprivation, with the sheep losing 16.7% of their body mass. Following water deprivation, both the mean 24h carotid blood temperature and the mean 24h brain temperature increased, but carotid blood temperature increased more than did brain temperature resulting in increased selective brain cooling. There was considerable inter-individual variation in the degree to which individual sheep used selective brain cooling. In general, sheep spent more time using selective brain cooling, and it was of greater magnitude, when dehydrated compared to when they were euhydrated. We found a significant positive correlation between selective brain cooling magnitude and osmolality (an index of hydration state). Both the magnitude of selective brain cooling and the proportion of time that sheep spent selective brain cooling were negatively correlated with water turnover. Sheep that used selective brain cooling more frequently, and with greater magnitude, lost less water than did conspecifics using selective brain cooling less efficiently. Our results show that a 50kg sheep can save 2.6L of water per day (~60% of daily water intake) when it employs selective brain cooling for 50% of the day during heat exposure. We conclude that selective brain cooling has a water conservation function in artiodactyls. PMID:25675092

  14. Economical Condensing Turbines? 

    E-print Network

    Dean, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Turbines? by J.E.Dean, P.E. Steam turbines have long been used at utilities and in industry to generate power. There are three basic types of steam turbines: condensing, letdown 1 and extraction/condensing. ? Letdown turbines reduce the pressure... of the incoming steam to one or more pressures and generate power very efficiently, assuming that all the letdown steam has a use. Two caveats: ? Letdown turbines produce power based upon steam requirements and not based upon power requirements, and ? If all...

  15. Continuous freezing condenser for phthalic anhydride. [Patented

    SciTech Connect

    Korobchanskii, V.I.; Grebenyuk, A.F.; Korobchanskii, Yu.V.; Il'in, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    The increasing outputs of plastics and polymer materials necessitate correspondingly larger outputs of various organic monomers. Phthalic anhydride is one of the source products for organic synthesis. Phthalic anhydride is made in the coking industry by the catalytic vapor-phase oxidation of naphthalene. The product is difficult to isolate from the reaction mixture leaving the static-bed catalytic reactors, since the volume of gases and vapors to be cooled is very large and the phthalic anhydride concentration in the mixture is very low. Continuous freezing condensers have been developed, in which the gas stream is cooled by counterflow contact with a stream of solid granular material on which the phthalic anhydride is condensed. One serious drawback is the need to expend large amounts of heat to remelt the phthalic anhydride crystals. The low strength of the granulated solid substrate leads to dust formation in operation, and the dust contaminates the product. We have developed a condenser in which the freezing and remelting stages take place on metal balls in the same unit and the heat is derived from the incoming reaction mixture. Accordingly, units of large capacity can be constructed giving a higher product yield and lowering the heat consumption in the remelting stage.

  16. One-step ring condensation of hydrazine derivatives and cyclic anhydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrusiak, Anna; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxypyridazinone and pyrroledione rings condensation in the reactions of hydrazine hydrate with citraconic, 2,3-dimethylmaleic, succinic and cis-cyclohexanedicarboxylic anhydrides have been conducted in the HCl aqueous solution. The pyridazine-ring condensation yields products unexpected for these conditions. They have been identified by 1H/13C NMR and X-ray diffraction. The course of the reaction toward the five- and six-membered ring condensation strongly depends on methyl and other substituents in the anhydrides and in hydrazine. The obtained products indicate that the ring condensation is controlled by the molecular strains and steric hindrances between the substituents in anhydrides and pyridazinone products. The condensation of cyclic anhydrides with hydrazines has been reduced to one-step reaction and its yield significantly increased.

  17. Correlation of rock dehydration and dynamic micro state-rate friction law to coseismic fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Shi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the relationship between the coseismic fault rock dehydration and micro state-rate friction law have been explored at multi temporal scales level by using hybrid hypersingular integral equation & Lattice Boltzmann method (HHIE-LBM) under parallel CPU and GPU platform. First, seven standard rock specimens from Continental Scientific Drilling Project in China were studied. Based on the micro tomography technology, digital restructure technology and first principle, molecular scale (10nm) virtual modules, micro crystal scale (30~50nm) and meso crystals scale (2um~10um) were established, respectively. The mechanism of structural OH and molecular H2O translate through internal crystal structure, the mechanism of molecular H2O translate through crystal spaces and the supercritical water through crystal spaces and dislocations were explored and the relatively critical temperature and pressure to these specimens were obtained. The simulation results show that the diffusion, transport and dehydration energy of structural OH is two orders of magnitude than molecular H2O, and the diffusion, transport and dehydration energy of molecular H2O is one order of magnitude than supercritical water. Second, the diffusion, transport and dehydration process of structural OH, molecular H2O and supercritical water on the coseismic fault is studied and the relationship between micro dynamics friction coefficient, dehydration process and ultra temperature and pressure is presentation. The classical state and rate friction law is revised and extended micro state and rate friction law which consider the effect of fault interface rock dehydration and thermal diffusion is obtained, and these formulation will helpful understand the earthquake triggering mechanism and provide theoretical suggestion for earthquake early warning system. Key words Structural HO, molecular H2O and supercritical water, Diffusion transport and dehydration; Ultra high temperature and pressure; Developed micro state and ration friction Law; Parallel CPU and GPU; Multi temporal scale

  18. Dehydration reduces left ventricular filling at rest and during exercise independent of twist mechanics.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Eric J; González-Alonso, José; Pearson, James; Low, David A; Ali, Leena; Barker, Horace; Shave, Rob

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the reduction in stroke volume (SV), previously shown to occur with dehydration and increases in internal body temperatures during prolonged exercise, is caused by a reduction in left ventricular (LV) function, as indicated by LV volumes, strain, and twist ("LV mechanics"). Eight healthy men [age: 20 ± 2, maximal oxygen uptake (VO?max): 58 ± 7 ml·kg?¹·min?¹] completed two, 1-h bouts of cycling in the heat (35°C, 50% peak power) without fluid replacement, resulting in 2% and 3.5% dehydration, respectively. Conventional and two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography was used to determine LV volumes, strain, and twist at rest and during one-legged knee-extensor exercise at baseline, both levels of dehydration, and following rehydration. Progressive dehydration caused a significant reduction in end-diastolic volume (EDV) and SV at rest and during one-legged knee-extensor exercise (rest: ?-33 ± 14 and ?-21 ± 14 ml, respectively; exercise: ?-30 ± 10 and ?-22 ± 9 ml, respectively, during 3.5% dehydration). In contrast to the marked decline in EDV and SV, systolic and diastolic LV mechanics were either maintained or even enhanced with dehydration at rest and during knee-extensor exercise. We conclude that dehydration-induced reductions in SV at rest and during exercise are the result of reduced LV filling, as reflected by the decline in EDV. The concomitant maintenance of LV mechanics suggests that the decrease in LV filling, and consequently ejection, is likely caused by the reduction in blood volume and/or diminished filling time rather than impaired LV function. PMID:21700893

  19. Dehydration triggers differential microRNA expression in Xenopus laevis brain.

    PubMed

    Luu, Bryan E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-11-15

    African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis, although primarily aquatic, have a high tolerance for dehydration, being capable of withstanding the loss of up to 32-35% of total water body water. Recent studies have shown that microRNAs play a role in the response to dehydration by the liver, kidney and ventral skin of X. laevis. MicroRNAs act by modulating the expression of mRNA transcripts, thereby affecting diverse biochemical pathways. In this study, 43 microRNAs were assessed in frog brains comparing control and dehydrated (31.2±0.83% of total body water lost) conditions. MicroRNAs of interest were measured using a modified protocol which employs polyadenylation of microRNAs prior to reverse transcription and qPCR. Twelve microRNAs that showed a significant decrease in expression (to 41-77% of control levels) in brains from dehydrated frogs (xla-miR-15a, -150, -181a, -191, -211, -218, -219b, -30c, -30e, -31, -34a, and -34b) were identified. Genomic analysis showed that the sequences of these dehydration-responsive microRNAs were highly conserved as compared with the comparable microRNAs of mice (91-100%). Suppression of these microRNAs implies that translation of the mRNA transcripts under their control could be enhanced in response to dehydration. Bioinformatic analysis using the DIANA miRPath program (v.2.0) predicted the top two KEGG pathways that these microRNAs collectively regulate: 1. Axon guidance, and 2. Long-term potentiation. Previous studies indicated that suppression of these microRNAs promotes neuroprotective pathways by increasing the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and activating anti-apoptotic pathways. This suggests that similar actions may be triggered in X. laevis brains as a protective response to dehydration. PMID:26169019

  20. Treatment of gas condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Breidenbach, D.; Dellmann, W.; Mosebach, W.

    1985-01-22

    The invention makes possible a coking operation largely or completely eliminating waste water by converting the gas condensates obtained from the coking plant by a reverse osmosis process into a permeate which can be recycled to the coking operation, and a concentrated lye.

  1. The Color Glass Condensate

    E-print Network

    F. Gelis; E. Iancu; J. Jalilian-Marian; R. Venugopalan

    2010-02-01

    We provide a broad overview of the theoretical status and phenomenological applications of the Color Glass Condensate effective field theory describing universal properties of saturated gluons in hadron wavefunctions that are extracted from deeply inelastic scattering and hadron-hadron collision experiments at high energies.

  2. Inflation from gravitino condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2015-07-01

    We review work on the formation of gravitino condensates via the super-Higgs effect in the early Universe. This is a scenario for both inflating the early universe and breaking local supersymmetry(supergravity), entirely independent of any coupling to external matter. The goldstino mode associated with the breaking of (global) supersymmetry is “eaten” by the gravitino field, which becomes massive (via its own vacuum condensation) and breaks supergravity dynamically. The most natural association of gravitino condensates with inflation proceeds in an indirect way, via a Starobinsky-type inflation, in the massive gravitino phase. This inflationary phase is associated with scalar modes hidden in the higher order curvature corrections of the effective action arising from integrating out massive gravitino degrees of freedom. The scenario is in agreement with Planck data phenomenology in a natural and phenomenologically-relevant range of parameters, namely Grand-Unified-Theory values for the supersymmetry breaking energy scale and dynamically-induced gravitino mass. A hill-top inflation, on the other hand, which could also occur in the model, whereby the role of the inflaton field is played by the gravitino condensate itself, would require significant fine tuning in the inflaton's wave function renormalisation and thus may be discarded on naturalness grounds.

  3. Aspergillus parasiticus Cyclase Catalyzes Two Dehydration Steps in Aflatoxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sakuno, Emi; Wen, Ying; Hatabayashi, Hidemi; Arai, Hatsue; Aoki, Chiemi; Yabe, Kimiko; Nakajima, Hiromitsu

    2005-01-01

    In the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway, 5?-oxoaverantin (OAVN) cyclase, the cytosolic enzyme, catalyzes the reaction from OAVN to (2?S,5?S)-averufin (AVR) (E. Sakuno, K. Yabe, and H. Nakajima, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:6418-6426, 2003). Interestingly, the N-terminal 25-amino-acid sequence of OAVN cyclase completely matched an internal sequence of the versiconal (VHOH) cyclase that was deduced from its gene (vbs). The purified OAVN cyclase also catalyzed the reaction from VHOH to versicolorin B (VB). In a competition experiment using the cytosol fraction of Aspergillus parasiticus, a high concentration of VHOH inhibited the enzyme reaction from OAVN to AVR, and instead VB was newly formed. The recombinant Vbs protein, which was expressed in Pichia pastoris, showed OAVN cyclase activity, as well as VHOH cyclase activity. A mutant of A. parasiticus SYS-4 (= NRRL 2999) with vbs deleted accumulated large amounts of OAVN, 5?-hydroxyaverantin, averantin, AVR, and averufanin in the mycelium. These results indicated that the cyclase encoded by the vbs gene is also involved in the reaction from OAVN to AVR in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Small amounts of VHOH, VB, and aflatoxins also accumulated in the same mutant, and this accumulation may have been due to an unknown enzyme(s) not involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. This is the first report of one enzyme catalyzing two different reactions in a pathway of secondary metabolism. PMID:15932995

  4. Temperature dependent elasticity and damping in dehydrated sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, T. W.; Struble, W.

    2013-12-01

    Work reported previously at this conference, outlining our observation of anomalously large elastic softening and damping in dehydrated Berea sandstone at elevated temperatures, has been analysed to study shear and compressional effects separately. Modeling of the sample using COMSOL software was necessary to identify modes, as the vibration spectrum of the sample is poorly approximated by a uniform isotropic solid. The first torsional mode of our evacuated, dry, core softens at nearly twice the rate of Young's modulus modes (bending and compressional) and is also damped nearly twice as strongly as temperature increases. We consider two possible models for explaining this behavior, based on the assumption that the mechanical properties of the sandstone are dominated by the framework of quartz grains and polycrystalline cementation, neglecting initially the effects of clay and feldspar inclusions. The 20cm x 2.54cm diameter core is dry such that the pressure of water vapor in the experiment chamber is below 1e-6 Torr at 70C, suggesting that surface water beyond a small number of monolayers is negligible. Our models consider (1) enhanced sliding of grain boundaries in the cementation at elevated temperature and reduced internal water content, and (2) strain microcracking of the cementatioin at low water content due to anisotropic expansion in the quartz grains. In model (1) interfaces parallel to polyhedral grain surfaces were placed in the cement bonds and assigned frictional properties. Model (2) has not yet been implemented. The overall elasticity of a 3-D several-grain model network was determined by modeling quasistatic loading and measuring displacements. Initial results with a small number of grains/bonds suggests that only the first model provides softening and damping for all the modes, however the details of the effects of defect motioin at individual interfaces as the source for the frictional properties is still being evaluated. Nonlinear effects are experimentally observed at lower temperatures but damping at higher temperatures reduces the strain amplitude so that nonlinearity is not apparent, but may still be present. This work is supported by grant #DE-FG02-11ER16218 from the Geosciences Division of the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  5. Characterization of dehydration behavior of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate powders.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yukoh; Shiraishi, Sumihiro; Otsuka, Makoto

    2004-06-01

    Creatine, which is well known as an important substance for muscular activity, is synthesized from amino acids such as glycine, arginine and ornithine in liver and kidney. It then accumulates in skeletal muscle as creatine phosphoric acid. The aim of this study was to understand the dehydration behavior of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate at various temperatures. The removal of crystal water was investigated by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The X-ray diffraction pattern of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate agreed with reported data for creatine monohydrate. However, the diffraction peaks of the (100), (200) and (300) planes of pulverized creatine monohydrate were much stronger than those of untreated creatine monohydrate. On the other hand, the diffraction peaks of the (012) and (013) planes of untreated creatine monohydrate were much stronger than those of pulverized creatine monohydrate. The dehydration of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate was investigated at various storage temperatures, and the results indicated that untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate were transformed into the anhydrate at more than 30 degrees C. After dehydration, the particles of untreated and pulverized creatine anhydrate had many cracks. The dehydration kinetics of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate were analyzed by the Hancock-Sharp equation on the basis of the isothermal DSC data. The dehydrations of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate both followed a zero-order mechanism (Polany-Winger equation). However, the transition rate constant, calculated from the slope of the straight line, was about 2.2-7.7 times higher for pulverized creatine monohydrate than for untreated creatine monohydrate. The Arrhenius plots (natural logarithm of the dehydration rate constant versus the reciprocal of absolute temperature) of the isothermal DSC data for untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate were linear. The activation energies of dehydration in the 40-60 degrees C range for untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate were 15.02 and 10.1 kJ/mol, respectively. Dehydration of untreated creatine monohydrate had a pronounced effect on the particle size of the powder. Compared with pulverized creatine monohydrate, the particle size of untreated creatine monohydrate was significantly decreased by dehydration. PMID:15261030

  6. Anomalous dehydration of the TTL during January 2013: evidence from balloon, aircraft and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaykin, Sergey; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Hauchecorne, Alain; Rivière, Emmanuel; Amarouche, Nadir; Ghysel, Melanie; Wienhold, Frank; Held, Gerard; Evan, Stephanie; Thornberry, Troy; Rollins, Andrew; Fahey, David; Vömel, Holger; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Rosenlof, Karen

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study is to comprehensively document an anomalous dehydration of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) related to a major Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) in January 2013. The analysis involves the data of balloon soundings of water vapour at various tropical locations using FLASH-B, Pico-SDLA and CFH hygrometers as well as NOAA Water instrument flown onboard high-altitude Global Hawk aircraft. Simultaneous water vapour and backscatter measurements by FLASH-B and COBALD sondes provide information on tropopause clouds formation process. Satellite observations of water vapour by Aura MLS are used to derive the deviation from climatological values. Trajectory modeling is applied for locating the dehydration source spots. Spatiotemporal evolution of dehydration at different scales is characterized after combining the consistent in situ and satellite water vapour observations. All data sets provide evidence of rapid and severe dehydration of the TTL throughout the tropical belt shortly after the onset of SSW. In situ measurements around the Cold Point Tropopause (CPT) show up to 2 ppmv of negative deviation from MLS 10-year climatology with extreme water mixing ratios below 1 ppmv in the Western Pacific region. The TTL dehydration case of 2013 is compared with previous similar occurrences and the role of extra-tropical dynamics in setting the global stratospheric water budget through thermal response in the TTL is pointed out

  7. Differential proteomics of dehydration and rehydration in bryophytes: evidence towards a common desiccation tolerance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cruz DE Carvalho, Ricardo; Bernardes DA Silva, Anabela; Soares, Renata; Almeida, André M; Coelho, Ana Varela; Marques DA Silva, Jorge; Branquinho, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    All bryophytes evolved desiccation tolerance (DT) mechanisms during the invasion of terrestrial habitats by early land plants. Are these DT mechanisms still present in bryophytes that colonize aquatic habitats? The aquatic bryophyte Fontinalis antipyretica?Hedw. was subjected to two drying regimes and alterations in protein profiles and sucrose accumulation during dehydration and rehydration were investigated. Results show that during fast dehydration, there is very little variation in protein profiles, and upon rehydration proteins are leaked. On the other hand, slow dehydration induces changes in both dehydration and rehydration protein profiles, being similar to the protein profiles displayed by the terrestrial bryophytes Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) Bruch and Schimp. and, to what is comparable with Syntrichia ruralis (Hedw.) F. Weber and D. Mohr. During dehydration there was a reduction in proteins associated with photosynthesis and the cytoskeleton, and an associated accumulation of proteins involved in sugar metabolism and plant defence mechanisms. Upon rehydration, protein accumulation patterns return to control values for both photosynthesis and cytoskeleton whereas proteins associated with sugar metabolism and defence proteins remain high. The current results suggest that bryophytes from different ecological adaptations may share common DT mechanisms. PMID:24393025

  8. Impact induced dehydration of serpentine and the evolution of planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, M.A.; Ahrens, T.J.

    1982-11-15

    Shock recovery experiments in the 25 to 45 GPa range on antigorite serpentine determine the amount of shock-induced loss of structural water as a function of shock pressure. Infrared absorption spectra of shock recovered samples demonstrate systematic changes in the amount of structural water and molecular, surface adsorbed water. These yield qualitative estimates of shock-induced water loss and demonstrate that a portion of the shock release structural water is readsorbed on interfacial grain surfaces. Determination of the post-shock water content of the shocked samples relates shock-induced water loss and shock pressure. Based on the present results and theoretical predictions, we conclude that shock pressures of from 20 to approx.60 GPa induce incipient to complete water loss, respectively. This result agrees closely with theoretical estimates for total dehydration. The dehydration interval and the activation energies for dehydration in shocked samples decrease systematically with increasing shock pressure as experienced by the sample. We believe the present experiments are applicable to describing dehydration processes of serpentine-like minerals in the accretional environment of the terrestrial planets. We conclude that complete loss of structural water in serpentine could have occurred from accretional impacts of approx.3 km/sec when earth and Venus have grown to about 50% of their final size. Accreting planetesimals, impacting Mars, never reached velocities sufficient for complete dehydration of serpentine. Our results support a model in which an impact generated atmosphere/hydrosphere forms while the earth is accreting.

  9. Tracking the dehydration process of raw honey by synchronous two-dimensional near infrared correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guiyun; Sun, Xin; Huang, Yuping; Chen, Kunjie

    2014-11-01

    Though much attention is paid to honey quality assessment, few reports on characteristic of manually dehydrated honey have been found. The aim of this investigation is to track the dehydration process of raw honey using synchronous two-dimensional (2D) near infrared correlation spectroscopy. To minimize the impact of dehydration to honey quality, seventy-two honey samples from six different dehydration stages were obtained using drum wind drying method with temperature controlled at 40 °C. Their dynamic short-wave NIR spectra from 600 to 1100 nm were collected in the transmission mode from 10 to 50 °C with an increment of 5 °C and were analyzed using synchronous two-dimensional correlation method. Short-wave NIR spectral data has been exploited less than other NIR region for its weaker signal especially for water absorption's interference with useful information. The investigation enlarged the signal at this band using synchronous 2D correlation analysis, revealing the fingerprinting feature of rape honey and chaste honey during the artificial dehydration process. The results have shown that, with the help of 2D correlation analysis, this band can detect the variation of the second overtone of O-H and N-H groups vibration upon their H-bonds forming or collapsing resulted from the interactions between water and solute. The results have also shown that 2D-NIRS method is able to convert the tiny changes in honey constituents into the detectable fingerprinting difference, which provides a new method for assessing honey quality.

  10. A New Freezing Method Using Pre-Dehydration by Microwave-Vacuum Drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Takaharu; Hamidi, Nurkholis

    Partial dehydration by microwave-vacuum drying has been applied to tuna and strawberry in order to reduce cell-damages caused by the formation of large ice-crystals during freezing. The samples were subjected to microwave vacuum drying at pressure of 5 kPa and temperature less than 27°C to remove small amount of water prior to freezing. The tuna were cooled by using the freezing chamber at temperature -50°C or -150°C, while the strawberries were frozen at temperature -30°C or -80°C, respectively. The temperature transients in tuna showed that removing some water before freezing made the freezing time shorter. The observations of ice crystal clearly indicated that rapid cooling and pre-dehydration prior to freezing were effective in minimizing the size of ice crystal. It is also understood that the formation of large ice crystals has a close relation to the cell damages. After thawing, the observation of microstructure was done on the tuna and strawberry halves. The pre-dehydrated samples showed a better structure than the un-dehydrated one. It is concluded that the pre-dehydration by microwave-vacuum drying is one promising method for the cryo-preservation of foods.

  11. Simulation of mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apple: a power law approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi Souraki, B.; Tondro, H.; Ghavami, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, unsteady one-dimensional mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apple was modeled using an approximate mathematical model. The mathematical model has been developed based on a power law profile approximation for moisture and solute concentrations in the spatial direction. The proposed model was validated by the experimental water loss and solute gain data, obtained from osmotic dehydration of infinite slab and cylindrical shape samples of apple in sucrose solutions (30, 40 and 50 % w/w), at different temperatures (30, 40 and 50 °C). The proposed model's predictions were also compared with the exact analytical and also a parabolic approximation model's predictions. The values of mean relative errors respect to the experimental data were estimated between 4.5 and 8.1 %, 6.5 and 10.2 %, and 15.0 and 19.1 %, for exact analytical, power law and parabolic approximation methods, respectively. Although the parabolic approximation leads to simpler relations, the power law approximation method results in higher accuracy of average concentrations over the whole domain of dehydration time. Considering both simplicity and precision of the mathematical models, the power law model for short dehydration times and the simplified exact analytical model for long dehydration times could be used for explanation of the variations of the average water loss and solute gain in the whole domain of dimensionless times.

  12. Integrated Rig for the Production of Boron Nitride Nanotubes via the Pressurized Vapor-Condenser Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

  13. Integrated rig for the production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor-condenser method

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C

    2014-03-25

    An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

  14. Synthesis of butenes through 2-butanol dehydration over mesoporous materials produced from ferrierite

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Soyeon; Kim, Hyeonjoo; Bae, Jung A.; Kim, Do Heui; Peden, Charles HF; Park, Young-Kwon; Jeon, Jong Ki

    2012-05-20

    Mesoporous materials synthesized from commercial ferrierite (MMZ-FER) were applied to butanol dehydration. The MMZ-FER was produced by disassembling ferrierite into unit structures in the presence of an alkali solution, adding a surfactant as a templating material, followed by hydrothermal treatment. The effect of the alkali/(Si+Al) ratio in the disassembling step on the characteristics of the catalyst and butanol dehydration performance were investigated. The MMZ-FER materials, synthesized in a condition in which the NaOH/(Si + Al) mole ratio in the disassembling step was 0.67 and 1.0, demonstrated similar textural properties to those of MCM-41. Many weak acid sites developed on the MMZ-FER(0.67) and MMZ-FER(1.0) samples, which is attributed to the creation of ferrierite-induced acid sites. The MMZ-FER materials showed excellent catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability during the dehydration of 2-butanol.

  15. Research on the change of complex refractive index of porcine muscle during natural dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhichao; Wang, Jin; Liu, Yuanze; Ye, Qing; Sun, Tengqian; Zhou, Wenyuan; Mei, Jianchun; Zhang, Chunping; Tian, Jianguo

    2015-04-01

    The physical changes of tissue are complicated to evaluate during optical clearing (OC) treatment. Monitoring the changes of optical parameters, including the complex refractive index (CRI), helps people better understand the OC process. From the imaginary part of CRI, we can deduce the extinction coefficient of tissue. Based on the total internal reflection method, the time-dependent CRI of porcine muscle during natural dehydration is well determined. Results show that the real RI increases continuously with the increase of dehydration time, whereas the extinction coefficient initially increases and then decreases. Finally, the extinction coefficient becomes much smaller than the initial value, which demonstrates that better tissue optical clarity is obtained. The change tendency of the extinction coefficient of tissue is used to qualitatively explain the dynamic change of transmittance of a natural dehydrated tissue. Consequently, CRI, especially its imaginary part, is a very useful optical parameter by which to evaluate the OC effect.

  16. Severe hypernatremic dehydration and metabolic acidosis due to neonatal intestinal microvillus inclusion disease.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Shaneela; Fraser, Douglas D; Driman, David K; Bax, Kevin C

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal microvillus inclusion disease (MID) is a congenital secretory diarrhea diagnosed by morphological enterocyte abnormalities on histology. The secretory diarrhea associated with MID occurs within the first few hours of birth and is exacerbated by enteral feeding. Affected newborns will die of dehydration and acid-base disturbances if MID is not rapidly recognized and treated with massive intravenous fluid replacement and gut rest. We report a case of a 4-day-old neonate presenting with 18% weight loss, hypernatremic dehydration and metabolic acidosis. Despite aggressive fluid resuscitation (206 ml/kg for the first 24 h), the dehydration and metabolic acidosis were only minimally improved. The diapers were found soaked with clear, non-odorous fluid on repeated examinations. Persistent secretory diarrhea was suspected. Stool electrolytes analyses showed a high NaCl content typical of secretory diarrhea and intestinal biopsy with electron microscopy was diagnostic of MID. PMID:21968248

  17. Improvement of Freezing Quality of Food by Pre-dehydration with Microwave-Vacuum Drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Nurkholis; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    Partial dehydration by microwave vacuum drying has been applied to tuna, oyster and mackerel prior to freezing in order to reduce quality damages due to freezing and thawing. Samples were dehydrated at pressure of 4kPa and temperature lower than 25°C. Two cooling conditions were tested in the experiment by using the freezing chamber of temperatures -20°C and -80°C. The experimental results showed that decreasing the water content in tuna could lower the freezing point temperature and made the freezing time shorter. It was also found that removing some water was effective to reduce the size of ice crystal and the drip loss in mackerel. After thawing, the pre-dehydrated mackerel showed better microstructure than that frozen without pre-treatment. Furthermore, the sensory tests have been done by a group of panelist for the evaluation on aroma, flavor, and general acceptability of mackerels.

  18. Gravity triggered neutrino condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2010-11-01

    In this work we use the Schwinger-Dyson equations to study the possibility that an enhanced gravitational attraction triggers the formation of a right-handed neutrino condensate, inducing dynamical symmetry breaking and generating a Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrino at a scale appropriate for the seesaw mechanism. The composite field formed by the condensate phase could drive an early epoch of inflation. We find that to the lowest order, the theory does not allow dynamical symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, thanks to the large number of matter fields in the model, the suppression by additional powers in G of higher order terms can be compensated, boosting them up to their lowest order counterparts. This way chiral symmetry can be broken dynamically and the infrared mass generated turns out to be in the expected range for a successful seesaw scenario.

  19. Gravitational vacuum condensate stars

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Pawel O.; Mottola, Emil

    2004-01-01

    A new final state of gravitational collapse is proposed. By extending the concept of Bose–Einstein condensation to gravitational systems, a cold, dark, compact object with an interior de Sitter condensate pv = -?v and an exterior Schwarzschild geometry of arbitrary total mass M is constructed. These regions are separated by a shell with a small but finite proper thickness ? of fluid with equation of state p = +?, replacing both the Schwarzschild and de Sitter classical horizons. The new solution has no singularities, no event horizons, and a global time. Its entropy is maximized under small fluctuations and is given by the standard hydrodynamic entropy of the thin shell, which is of the order kB?Mc/, instead of the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy formula, SBH = 4?kBGM2/c. Hence, unlike black holes, the new solution is thermodynamically stable and has no information paradox. PMID:15210982

  20. Multilayer graphene condenser microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovi?, Dejan; Matkovi?, Aleksandar; Mili?evi?, Marijana; Jovanovi?, Djordje; Gaji?, Radoš; Salom, Iva; Spasenovi?, Marko

    2015-12-01

    Vibrating membranes are the cornerstone of acoustic technology, forming the backbone of modern loudspeakers and microphones. Acoustic performance of a condenser microphone is derived mainly from the membrane’s size, surface mass and achievable static tension. The widely studied and available nickel has been a dominant membrane material for professional microphones for several decades. In this paper we introduce multilayer graphene as a membrane material for condenser microphones. The graphene device outperforms a high end commercial nickel-based microphone over a significant part of the audio spectrum, with a larger than 10 dB enhancement of sensitivity. Our experimental results are supported with numerical simulations, which also show that a 300 layer thick graphene membrane under maximum tension would offer excellent extension of the frequency range, up to 1 MHz.

  1. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2005-03-17

    This article gives a brief review of Bose-Einstein condensation. It is an exotic quantum phenomenon that was observed in dilute atomic gases for the first time in 1995. It exhibits a new state of matter in which a group of atoms behaves as a single particle. Experiments on this form of matter are relevant to many different areas of physics- from atomic clocks and quantum computing to super fluidity, superconductivity and quantum phase transition.

  2. Potentially Prebiotic Syntheses of Condensed Phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, Anthony D.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1996-01-01

    In view of the importance of a prebiotic source of high energy phosphates, we have investigated a number of potentially prebiotic processes to produce condensed phosphates from orthophosphate and cyclic trimetaphosphate from tripolyphosphate. The reagents investigated include polymerizing nitriles, acid anhydrides, lactones, hexamethylene tetramine and carbon suboxide. A number of these processes give substantial yields of pyrophosphate from orthophosphate and trimetaphosphate from tripolyphosphate. Although these reactions may have been applicable in local areas, they are not sufficiently robust to have been of importance in the prebiotic open ocean.

  3. Effect of Overpressure Caused By Clay Dehydration on the Triggering of Fault Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, W. S.; Liu, C. W.; Chang, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Many investigations currently show that the pore fluid pressure has been observed to influence the thrust fault strength and slip behavior and updip limit of the seismogenic zone. Clay dehydration is one key control on overpressure generation under undrained condition in thermal pressurization processes. Increasing pressure and temperature with depth depending on the local geological setting and conditions can cause clay dehydration which has been proposed as an explanation for the generation of overpressure. However, study about the effect of excess pore pressure caused by clay dehydration on the triggering of earthquake is seldom addressed in Taiwan. The fault zones in Taiwan like the Chelungpu Fault, clay minerals are abundant in the fault gouge. Therefore, to quantify the effect of overpressure caused by clay dehydration on the triggering of earthquake under undrained condition, we adopt the chemical kinetic model to calculate the amount of water expelled from clay dehydration; derive the three-dimensional governing equation of groundwater flow with clay dehydration varied with pressure and temperature, and simplify a one-dimensional analytical solution of overpressure in fault zones; follow the Coulomb-Mohr frictional failure model of earthquake occurrence to evaluate the influence of the pore pressure on the change of effective Coulomb stress. The results show that the overpressure is greater than the value of 0.01 MPa in fault zones derived from one-dimensional analytical solution. However, Coulomb stress increases of ?0.01 MPa have been shown to be associated with seismicity rate increase and in many cases triggering earthquakes. Therefore the result denotes that the triggering of earthquake will be progressed. The result could prove to be a feasible examining tool for evaluation of overpressure influence on triggering of earthquake, especially when considering faults with abundant clay minerals of smectite.

  4. Dehydration kinetics and thermochemistry of selected hydrous phases, and simulated gas release pattern in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Ganguly, J.

    1992-01-01

    As part of our continued program of study on the volatile bearing phases and volatile resource potential of carbonaceous chondrite, results of our experimental studies on the dehydration kinetics of talc as a function of temperature and grain size (50 to 0.5 microns), equilibrium dehydration boundary of talc to 40 kbars, calorimetric study of enthalpy of formation of both natural and synthetic talc as a function of grain size, and preliminary results on the dehydration kinetics of epsomite are reported. In addition, theoretical calculations on the gas release pattern of Murchison meteorite, which is a C2(CM) carbonaceous chondrite, were performed. The kinetic study of talc leads to a dehydration rate constant for 40-50 microns size fraction of k = (3.23 x 10(exp 4))exp(-Q/RT)/min with the activation energy Q = 376 (plus or minus 20) kJ/mole. The dehydration rate was found to increase somewhat with decreasing grain size. The enthalpy of formation of talc from elements was measured to be -5896(10) kJ/mol. There was no measurable effect of grain size on the enthalpy beyond the limits of precision of the calorimetric studies. Also the calorimetric enthalpy of both synthetic and natural talc was found to be essentially the same, within the precision of measurements, although the natural talc had a slightly larger field of stability in our phase equilibrium studies. The high pressure experimental data the dehydration equilibrium of talc (talc = enstatite + coesite + H2O) is in strong disagreement with that calculated from the available thermochemical data, which were constrained to fit the low pressure experimental results. The calculated gas release pattern of Murchison meteorite were in reasonable agreement with that determined by stepwise heating in a gas chromatograph.

  5. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    E-print Network

    Aguirre, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate can be very light, $10^{-22}\\,{\\rm eV} \\lesssim m \\lesssim 10^2\\,{\\rm eV}$; the lower limit arises from constraints on small-scale structure formation, while the upper bound ensures that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of deco...

  6. Crustal Recycling, Mantle Dehydration and the Thermal Evolution of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morschhauser, A.; Grott, M.; Breuer, D.

    2010-12-01

    We have reinvestigated the coupled thermal and crustal evolution of Mars using 1D parametrized thermal evolution models [1] and taking new data concerning the content and distribution of heat producing elements [2] as well as new laboratory data concerning the flow behavior of iron-rich olivine [3] into account. The high enrichment of radioactive elements in the crust leads to a less efficient heat transport from the lithospheric base, resulting in a thinning of the stagnant lid. If the stagnant lid becomes thinner than the crust, crustal material can be recycled back into the mantle by the vigourous convective motion. However, crustal recycling appears to be incompatible with an early separation of geochemical reservoirs [4] and valid models are required to show no episodes of crustal recycling. Furthermore, admissible models have to reproduce the Martian crust formation history and to allow the formation of partial melt under present-day mantle conditions. Taking dehydration stiffening of the mantle into account, we find that admissible models have low initial upper mantle temperatures between 1600 and 1700 K, a primordial crustal thickness of 30 km, and an initially wet mantle rheology. The crust formation process on Mars would then have been driven by the extraction of a primordial crust after core formation which was cooling the mantle to temperatures close to the peridotite solidus. The second stage of global crust formation took place over a more extended period of time, waning at around 1300-1700 Myr, and was driven by heat produced by the decay of radioactive elements. Finally, present-day volcanism is explained by convective mantle plumes and thermal insulation under regions of locally thickened crust. Water extraction from the mantle was found to be relatively efficient and close to 50 percent of the total inventory is lost from the mantle in most models. Assuming an initial mantle water content of 100 ppm and that 10% of the extracted water is supplied to the surface by extrusive volcanism, this amount is equivalent to a 20 m thick global surface layer, suggesting that volcanic outgassing of H2O could have significantly influenced the early Martian climate and increased the planet's habitability. To further investigate the potential for an early wet and warm Mars, we self-consistently calculate the amount of volcanically outgassed CO2. This is done by directly coupling thermodynamic models of CO2 solubility in basaltic melt [5] to the thermal evolution models. Using the range of admissible models, we find that an equivalent of 1 bar of CO2 can be outgassed if the redox state of the mantle is assumed to be at the upper limit of the plausible range (IW+1). This is probably sufficient to raise the mean global surface temperature above the triple point of water [6]. However, erosive processes could have been very strong under an active young sun, thus leading to considerable atmospheric loss within the Noachian period [7]. [1] Breuer, D and Spohn, T, PSS, 54, 153, 2006. [2] Taylor, GJ et al., JGR, 111, E03S10, 2006. [3] Zhao, YH et. al., EPSL, 287, 229, 2009. [4] Jagoutz, E, SSR, 56, 13, 1991. [5] Hirschmann, MM and Withers, AC, EPSL, 270, 147, 2008. [6] Forget, F and Pierrehumbert, RT, Sci., 278, 1273-1276, 1997. [7] Tian, F et. al., GRL, 36, L02205, 2009.

  7. Alcohol Dehydration on Monooxo W=O and Dioxo O=W=O Species

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhenjun; Smid, Bretislav; Kim, Yu Kwon; Matolin, Vladimir; Kay, Bruce D.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2012-08-16

    The dehydration of 1-propanol on nanoporous WO3 films prepared via ballistic deposition at ~20 K has been investigated using temperature programmed desorption, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory. The as deposited films are extremely efficient in 1-propanol dehydration to propene. This activity is correlated with the presence of dioxo O=W=O groups while monooxo W=O species are shown to be inactive. Annealing of the film induces densification that results in the loss of catalytic activity due to annihilation O=W=O species.

  8. Overpressure Caused by the Smectite Dehydration Influences on the triggering of fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Chang, Han-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Overpressure, which is pore fluid pressure higher than hydrostatic pressure, is observed in numerous mechanical processes along major faults. Many investigations currently show that the pore fluid pressure has been observed to influence the thrust fault strength and slip behavior and updip limit of the seismogenic zone. Clay dehydration is one key control on overpressure generation under undrained condition in thermal pressurization processes. Increasing pressure and temperature with depth depending on the local geological setting and conditions can cause clay dehydration which has been proposed as an explanation for the generation of overpressure. However, study about the effect of excess pore pressure caused by clay dehydration on the triggering of earthquake is seldom addressed in Taiwan. In fault zones like the Chelungpu Fault, clay minerals are abundant in the fault gouge. Therefore, to quantify the effect of overpressure caused by clay dehydration on the triggering of earthquake under undrained condition, we adopt the chemical thermodynamic model and chemical kinetic model to calculate the amount of water expelled from clay dehydration; derive the three-dimensional governing equation of groundwater flow with clay dehydration varied with pressure and temperature; follow the Coulomb-Mohr frictional failure model of earthquake occurrence to evaluate the influence of the pore pressure on the change of effective Coulomb stress. Finally, development of numerical model to simulate the effect of excess pore pressure caused by clay dehydration on the coulomb failure stress coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical has been performed. Moreover, field application with numerical model to quantify analysis of the effect of overpressure caused by clay dehydration on the triggering of earthquake has been progressed. Coulomb stress increases of ?0.01 MPa have been shown to be associated with seismicity rate increase and in many cases triggering earthquakes. The results have shown the safety analysis of earthquake slip in the clay-rich gouge of fault zones. In addition, the study has been proven to be a feasible examining tool for evaluation of overpressure influence on triggering of earthquake, especially when considering faults with abundant clay minerals of smectite.

  9. Effect of spontaneous condensation on condensation heat transfer in the presence of non-condensable gases

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, J.; Hein, D.

    1999-07-01

    The presence of non condensable gases like nitrogen or air reduces the condensation heat transfer during condensation of binary steam mixtures. The non condensable gas accumulates in the vapor phase boundary layer and causes a high heat transfer resistance. Especially with high pressures and low water temperatures spontaneous condensation reduces heat transfer additionally. Fog forms within the steam-nitrogen boundary layer and the steam condenses on the water droplets of the fog layer. The convective mass transfer to the cooling water interface diminishes. Raman spectroscopy and film theory are used to quantify this effect locally. The calculation of overall condensation rates in large steam nitrogen systems requires to use three dimensional CFD codes. The paper presents equations to predict fog formation in the boundary layer which can be implemented in CFD codes.

  10. Control of VOCs emissions by condenser pre-treatment in a semiconductor fab.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chih; Chang, Feng-Tang; Bai, Hsunling; Pei, Bau-Shei

    2005-04-11

    The performance of a modified design of local condensers to pre-treat a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the stripping process of a semiconductor fab was tested in this study. The reaction temperature of the condensers was controlled at around 10 degrees C, it is relatively higher than the traditional condenser reaction temperature. Both VOCs and water vapors were condensed and formed liquid films. This resulted in an enhancement of the VOCs removals, especially for VOCs of high boiling points or solubility. This can help to prevent the follow up zeolite concentrator from damage. The performance of the integrated system of condenser/zeolite concentrator could, therefore, remain highly efficient for a longer operation time. Its annualized cost would also be lower than installing the zeolite concentrator only. PMID:15811658

  11. Dehydration-induced cross tolerance of Belgica antarctica larvae to cold and heat is facilitated by trehalose accumulation

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    Dehydration-induced cross tolerance of Belgica antarctica larvae to cold and heat is facilitated Antarctica Midge Larvae of the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica (Diptera: Chironomidae), are frequently that changes in temperature tolerance in B. antarctica are linked to the rate and severity of dehydration

  12. From Solution to the Gas Phase: Stepwise Dehydration and Kinetic Trapping of Substance P Reveals the Origin of Peptide

    E-print Network

    Clemmer, David E.

    From Solution to the Gas Phase: Stepwise Dehydration and Kinetic Trapping of Substance P Reveals+ , the results demonstrate that a compact dehydrated conformer population can be kinetically trapped on the time intramolecular interactions in the absence of complicating solvation effects.4-7 However, a potential concern

  13. GLYCOL DEHYDRATOR BTEX AND VOC EMISSIONS TESTING RESULTS AT TWO UNITS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA VOL. II: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the collection of emissions test data st two triethylene glycol units to provide data for the comparison to GRI-GLYCalc, a computer program developed to estimate emissions from glycol dehydrators. [NOTE: Glycol dehydrators are used in the natural gas i...

  14. GLYCOL DEHYDRATOR BTEX AND VOC EMISSIONS TESTING RESULTS AT TWO UNITS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA VOL. I: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the collection of emissions tests data at two triethylene glycol units to provide data for comparison to GRI-GLYCalc, a computer program developed to estimate emissions from glycol dehydrators. (NOTE: Glycol dehydrators are used in the natural gas indu...

  15. GLYCOL DEHYDRATOR BTEX AND VOC EMISSIONS TESTING RESULTS AT TWO UNITS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA - VOLUME I. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the collection of emissions tests data at two triethylene glycol (TEG) units to provide data for comparison to GRI-GLYCalc, a computer program developed to estimate emissions from glycol dehydrators. (NOTE: Glycol dehydrators are used in the natural ga...

  16. GLYCOL DEHYDRATOR BTEX AND VOC EMISSIONS TESTING RESULTS AT TWO UNITS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA - VOLUME II. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the collection of emissions tests data at two triethylene glycol (TEG) units to provide data for comparison to GRI-GLYCalc, a computer program developed to estimate emissions from glycol dehydrators. (NOTE: Glycol dehydrators are used in the natural ga...

  17. Heat and Mass Transfer Modeling of Apple Slice under Simultaneous Infrared Dry-Blanching and Dehydration Process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop a new simultaneous infrared dry blanching and dehydration process for producing high-quality blanched and partially dehydrated products, apple slices with three different thicknesses, 5, 9, and 13 mm, were heated using infrared for up to 10 min at 4000W/m2 IR intensity. The surface and ce...

  18. A refractory Ca-SiO-H 2-O 2 vapor condensation experiment with implications for calciosilica dust transforming to silicate and carbonate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Pun, Aurora; Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A.

    2008-05-01

    Condensates produced in a laboratory condensation experiment of a refractory Ca-SiO-H 2-O 2 vapor define four specific and predictable deep metastable eutectic calciosilica compositions. The condensed nanograins are amorphous solids, including those with the stoichiometric CaSiO 3 pyroxene composition. In evolving dust-condensing astronomical environments they will be highly suitable precursors for thermally supported, dust-aging reactions whereby the condensates form more complex refractory silicates, e.g., diopside and wollastonite, and calcite and dolomite carbonates. This kinetically controlled condensation experiment shows how the aging of amorphous refractory condensates could produce the same minerals that are thought to require high-temperature equilibrium condensation. We submit that evidence for this thermal annealing of dust will be the astronomical detection of silica (amorphous or crystalline) that is the common, predicted, by-product of most of these reactions.

  19. Spinor condensates and light scattering from Bose-Einstein condensates

    E-print Network

    Dan M. Stamper-Kurn; Wolfgang Ketterle

    2000-04-29

    These notes discuss two aspects of the physics of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates: optical properties and spinor condensates. The first topic includes light scattering experiments which probe the excitations of a condensate in both the free-particle and phonon regime. At higher light intensity, a new form of superradiance and phase-coherent matter wave amplification were observed. We also discuss properties of spinor condensates and describe studies of ground--state spin domain structures and dynamical studies which revealed metastable excited states and quantum tunneling.

  20. Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... allergic reaction is actually a result of a chain reaction that begins in your genes and is expressed ... Tips • Allergy symptoms are the result of a chain reaction that starts in your immune system. • If you ...

  1. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions?

    E-print Network

    CERN. Geneva; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    After an introduction to the controversial problem of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) catalyzed by neutrons on metallic hydride surfaces we present the results of an experiment, made in collaboration with ENEA Labs in Frascati, to search neutrons from plasma discharges in electrolytic cells. The negative outcome of our experiment goes in the direction of ruling out those theoretical models expecting LENR to occur in condensed matter systems under specific conditions. Our criticism on the theoretical foundations of such models will also be presented.

  2. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  3. Thermochemical modeling of thermite-type reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.G.; Hansen, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose of this work was to use thermodynamic modeling to study the chemistry associated with the synthesis of TiB/sub 2/, SiC, and TiC by thermite-type reactions. Side reactions (including vaporization reactions) compete with the primary reaction and thus decrease the yield of a desired product. The relative importance of side reactions is governed in part by the thermodynamic stabilities of byproducts relative to the stabilities of the major products. The computer program SOLGASMIX was used to compute condensed phase stability diagrams for the four chemical systems.

  4. Pion condensation in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Dylan; Erlich, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We study pion condensation at zero temperature in a hard-wall holographic model of hadrons with isospin chemical potential. We find that the transition from the hadronic phase to the pion condensate phase is first order except in a certain limit of model parameters. Our analysis suggests that immediately across the phase boundary the condensate acts as a stiff medium approaching the Zel'dovich limit of equal energy density and pressure.

  5. Comparing the Accuracy of the Three Dehydration Scales in Children with Acute Diarrhea in a Developing Country of Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Hoxha, Teuta; Xhelili, Luan; Azemi, Mehmedali; Avdiu, Muharrem; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Efendija-Beqa, Urata; Grajcevci-Uka, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although diarrhea is a preventable disease, it remains the second leading cause of death (after pneumonia) among children aged under five years worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) scale, the Gorelick scale, and the Clinical Dehydration Scale (CDS) were created to estimate dehydration status using clinical signs. The purpose of this study is to determine whether these clinical scales can accurately assess dehydration status of children in a developing country of Kosovo. Methodology. Children aged 1 month to 5 years with a history of acute diarrhea were enrolled in the study. After recording the data about the patients historical features the treating physician recorded the physical examination findings consistent with each clinical score. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to evaluate the performance of the three scales, compared to the gold standard, percent weight change with rehydration. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios were calculated using the best cut-off points of the ROC curves. Results. We enrolled 230 children, and 200 children met eligibility criteria. The WHO scale for predicting significant dehydration (?5 percent weight change) had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.71 (95% : CI= 0.65-0.77). The Gorelick scales 4- and 10-point for predicting significant dehydration, had an area under the curve of 0.71 (95% : CI=0.63- 0.78) and 0.74 (95% : CI= 0.68-0.81) respectively. Only the CDS for predicting the significant dehydration above ?6% percent weight change, did not have an area under the curve statistically different from the reference line with an AUC of 0.54 (95% CI = 0.45- 0.63). Conclusion. The WHO dehydration scale and Gorelick scales were fair predictors of dehydration in children with diarrhea. Only the Clinical Dehydration Scale was found not to be a helpful predictor of dehydration in our study cohort. PMID:26244042

  6. Insights into the Mechanism of Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases from Structures of Reaction Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-02-27

    The biosynthetic shikimate pathway consists of seven enzymes that catalyze sequential reactions to generate chorismate, a critical branch point in the synthesis of the aromatic amino acids. The third enzyme in the pathway, dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD), catalyzes the dehydration of 3-dehydroquinate to 3-dehydroshikimate. We present three crystal structures of the type I DHQD from the intestinal pathogens Clostridium difficile and Salmonella enterica. Structures of the enzyme with substrate and covalent pre- and post-dehydration reaction intermediates provide snapshots of successive steps along the type I DHQD-catalyzed reaction coordinate. These structures reveal that the position of the substrate within the active site does not appreciably change upon Schiff base formation. The intermediate state structures reveal a reaction state-dependent behavior of His-143 in which the residue adopts a conformation proximal to the site of catalytic dehydration only when the leaving group is present. We speculate that His-143 is likely to assume differing catalytic roles in each of its observed conformations. One conformation of His-143 positions the residue for the formation/hydrolysis of the covalent Schiff base intermediates, whereas the other conformation positions the residue for a role in the catalytic dehydration event. The fact that the shikimate pathway is absent from humans makes the enzymes of the pathway potential targets for the development of non-toxic antimicrobials. The structures and mechanistic insight presented here may inform the design of type I DHQD enzyme inhibitors.

  7. Condensed Plasmas under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Konopka, U.; Rothermel, H.; Zuzic, M.; Ivlev, A.; Goree, J.; Rogers, Rick (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Experiments under microgravity conditions were carried out to study 'condensed' (liquid and crystalline) states of a colloidal plasma (ions, electrons, and charged microspheres). Systems with approximately 10(exp 6) microspheres were produced. The observed systems represent new forms of matter--quasineutral, self-organized plasmas--the properties of which are largely unexplored. In contrast to laboratory measurements, the systems under microgravity are clearly three dimensional (as expected); they exhibit stable vortex flows, sometimes adjacent to crystalline regions, and a central 'void,' free of microspheres.

  8. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  9. Chinese Chemical Letters Vol. 15, No. 8, pp 911-914, 2004 http://www.imm.ac.cn/journal/ccl.html

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jianbo

    : Diazo compounds, dehydration, synthesis. The organic synthesis based on the reaction of ­diazo carbonyl/Et3N is found to be a mild and efficient dehydration condition for -hydroxy--diazo compounds. Keywords approach is the condensation of acyldiazomethanes to aldehyde, followed by dehydration (3 to 2, Scheme 1) 5

  10. LOW-COST ZEOLITE MEMBRANE MODULES FOR SOLVENT DEHYDRATION - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of very high-volume liquid chemicals form azeotropes with water and can be dehydrated to required purity levels only through the use of entrainers or drying agents. The handling and disposal of these additional chemicals present significant environmental risk...

  11. Pervaporation process and use in treating waste stream from glycol dehydrator

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Campbell, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Pervaporation processes and apparatus with few moving parts. Ideally, only one pump is used to provide essentially all of the motive power and driving force needed. The process is particularly useful for handling small streams with flow rates less than about 700 gpd. Specifically, the process can be used to treat waste streams from glycol dehydrator regeneration units.

  12. Overcoming recalcitrance in Porphyridium aerugineum Geitler employing encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation methods.

    PubMed

    Amaral, R; Santos, M F; Santos, L M A

    2009-01-01

    Cultures of the recalcitrant microalga Porphyridium aerugineum were cryopreserved. A two-step, uncontrolled rapid freezing protocol, using methanol as cryoprotectant resulted in 23.8 percent viable cells. Cultures in the exponential growth phase, grown under low light intensity to prevent vacuole formation in cells, cryopreserved using a passive freezer, showed 22.4 percent viability. This value was enhanced to 31.5 percent when a controlled-rate freezer was employed. Optimized cultures in the exponential growth phase, cultivated in medium supplemented or not with vitamin B12, were then tested for freezing using the encapsulation-dehydration protocol. High cell loss was observed early during the sorbitol dehydration steps, but 63.6 percent of the remaining encapsulated cells were viable after thawing. This study confirmed the potential of encapsulation-dehydration as a method allowing to improve the low viability obtained with two-step freezing protocols. It also showed the importance of monitoring the response of algal cells to bead osmotic and evaporative dehydration pretreatments before freezing. PMID:20309503

  13. Polymeric blend nanocomposite membranes for ethanol dehydration-effect of morphology and membrane-solvent interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanocomposite membranes (NCMs) of sodium alginate/poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) blend polymers incorporated with varying concentrations of phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40) (PWA) nanoparticles have been prepared and used in ethanol dehydration by the pervaporation (PV) technique. Effe...

  14. Effect of smectite dehydration on pore water geochemistry in the shallow subduction zone: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüpers, A.; Kopf, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    The diagenetic smectite to illite transition is widely accepted to cause ubiquitous pore water freshening at convergent margins. However, experimental consolidation tests show that smectite also dehydrates partially with increasing effective stress. To shed light on this process three hydrothermal consolidation tests on a silty smectite-rich claystone were conducted with stresses (P) up to 70 MPa and at constant temperatures (T) of 20°C, 60°C and 100°C. Fluids expelled during the tests were analyzed for major and trace elements to evaluate dehydration and fluid-rock interaction with increasing PT conditions. The results document that fluid freshening starts when the effective stress exceeds 1.3 MPa. The smectite interlayer water content decreases from 27 wt-% to ˜20 wt-% during the experiments, which is equivalent to an interlayer collapse from 18.5 to ˜15.4 Å. The released interlayer H20 accounts for up to 17% of the total fluid volume released from the consolidating sediment. Major and volatile element geochemistry is influenced by temperature and smectite interlayer collapse. The interlayer collapse is characterized by K and Ca uptake while is B released from smectite. Application of experimental results to the Barbados accretionary margin shows that stress dependent smectite dehydration is an important fluid source mechanism and accounts for substantial fluid freshening. Modeled smectite dehydration suggests a decrease of smectite interlayer water content from 27 wt-% at the surface down to ˜22 wt-% at 2 km depth. This leads to chlorinity values as low as 460 mM.

  15. Volume Depletion versus Dehydration: How Understanding the Difference Can Guide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Gautam; Neilson, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Using a case of hyperglycemic hypertonic nonketosis we examine the changing composition of body fluid spaces to explore the distinction between dehydration with hypertonicity and volume depletion. These terms have specific meaning and their proper use guides therapy when pathophysiology disturbs the composition of various body fluid compartments. PMID:21705120

  16. Development and quality evaluation of dehydrated chicken meat rings using spent hen meat and different extenders.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Bidyut Prava; Chauhan, Geeta; Mendiratta, S K; Sharma, B D; Desai, B A; Rath, P K

    2015-04-01

    It is recommended that for effective utilization of spent hen meat, it should be converted into value added or shelf stable meat products. Since we are lacking in cold chain facilities, therefore there is imperative need to develop shelf stable meat products. The present study was envisaged with the objective to develop dehydrated chicken meat rings utilizing spent hen meat with different extenders. A basic formulation and processing conditions were standardized for dehydrated chicken meat rings. Extenders such as rice flour, barnyard millet flour and texturized soy granule powder at 5, 10 and 15 % levels were incorporated separately replacing the lean meat in pre standardized dehydrated chicken meat ring formulation. On the basis of physico-chemical properties and sensory scores optimum level of incorporation was adjudged as 10 %, 10 % and 5 % for rice flour, barnyard millet flour and texturized soy granule powder respectively. Products with optimum level of extenders were analysed for physico-chemical and sensory attributes. It was found that a good quality dehydrated chicken meat rings can be prepared by utilizing spent hen meat at 90 % level, potato starch 3 % and refined wheat flour 7 % along with spices, condiments, common salt and STPP. Addition of an optimum level of different extenders such as rice flour (10 %), barnyard millet flour (10 %) and TSGP (5 %) separately replacing lean meat in the formulation can give acceptable quality of the product. Rice flour was found to be the best among the three extenders studied as per the sensory evaluation. PMID:25829592

  17. Combined impacts of irradiance and dehydration on leaf hydraulic conductance: insights into vulnerability and

    E-print Network

    Sack, Lawren

    , the leaf hydraulic conduc- tance (Kleaf) is of key importance in determining stomatal conductance (gs to prevent the tissue water potential from declining enough to trigger a decline in stomatal conductance (gsCombined impacts of irradiance and dehydration on leaf hydraulic conductance: insights

  18. Dehydration Effects on Imbibitional Leakage from Desiccation-Sensitive Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Becwar, Michael R.; Stanwood, Phillip C.; Roos, Eric E.

    1982-01-01

    Changes in electrolyte leakage and viability in response to dehydration stress were examined in two species of seeds that do not survive desiccation. Leakage from silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.) seeds increased markedly as seed moisture contents decreased from 45 to 35% (fresh weight basis) and germination decreased from 97 to 5%, coincidentally. Time course curves of imbibitional leakage from areca palm (Chrysalido-carpus lutescens [Bory] Wendl.) embryos showed an increase in both initial leakage and steady-state leakage rates in response to dehydration from an original moisture content of 84 to as low as 53%. Absorbance at 530 nanometers of extracts from triphenyl tetrazolium chloride stained embryos of areca palm was used as a measure of viability. Absorbance decreased significantly in response to dehydration as embryo moisture content decreased from 80 to 30%. Collectively, the data suggest that membranes in the desiccation-sensitive seed tissues studied are damaged by dehydration below a critical moisture content, 40% in silver maple seed and 55% in areca palm embryos, and that the membrane damage contributes to loss of viability. PMID:16662357

  19. Energetic consequences of repeated and prolonged dehydration in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    antarctica Nicholas M. Teets a, , Yuta Kawarasaki b , Richard E. Lee Jr. b , David L. Denlinger a of the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica, routinely face periods of limited water availability in their natural environments on the Antarctic Peninsula. As a result, B. antarctica is one of the most dehydration

  20. Dehydration of the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere by Subvisible Cirrus Clouds Near the Tropical Tropopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.

    1996-01-01

    The extreme dryness of the lower stratosphere is believed to be caused by freeze-drying of air as it enters the stratosphere through the cold tropical tropopause. Previous investigations have been focused on dehydration occurring at the tops of deep convective cloud systems, However, recent observations of a ubiquitous stratiform cirrus cloud layer near the tropical tropopause suggest the possibility of dehydration as air is slowly lifted by large-scale motions, In this study, we have evaluated this possibility using a detailed ice cloud model. Simulations of ice cloud formation in the temperature minima of gravity waves (wave periods of 1 - 2 hours) indicate that large numbers of ice crystals will likely form due to the low temperatures and rapid cooling. As a result, the crystals do not grow larger than about 10 microns, fallspeeds are no greater than a few cm/s, and little or no precipitation or dehydration occurs. However, ice cloud's formed by large-scale vertical motions (with lifetimes of a day or more) should have,fever crystals and more time for crystal sedimentation to occur, resulting in water vapor depletions as large as 1 ppmv near the tropopause. We suggest that gradual lifting near the tropical tropopause, accompanied by formation of thin cirrus, may account for the dehydration.

  1. Dehydration of the upper troposhere and lower stratosphere by subdivisible cirrus clouds near the tropical tropopause

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.; Toon, O.B.; Pfister, L.; Selkirk, H.B.

    1996-04-15

    The extreme dryness of the lower stratosphere is believed to be caused by freeze-drying air as it enters the stratosphere through the cold tropical troposphere. Previous investigations have been focused on dehydration occurring at the tops of deep convective cloud systems. However, recent observations of a ubiquitous stratiform cirrus cloud layer near the tropical tropopause suggest the possibility of dehydration as air is slowly lifted by large-scale motions. In this study, the authors have evaluated this possibility using a detailed ice cloud model. Simulations of ice cloud (wave periods of 1-2 hours) indicate that large numbers of ice crystals will likely form due to the low temperatures and rapid cooling. As a result, the crystals do not grow larger about 10{mu}m, fallspeeds are no greater than a few cm-s{sup {minus}1}, and little or no precipitation or dehydration occurs. However, ice clouds formed by large-scale vertical motions (with lifetimes of a day or more) should have fewer crystals and more time for crystal sedimentation to occur, resulting in water vapor depletions as large as 1 ppmv near the tropopause. The authors suggest that gradual lifting near the tropical tropopause, accompanied by formation of thin cirrus, may account for the dehydration. 15 refs., 4 fig.

  2. Acid-Promoted Cross-Dehydrative Aromatization for the Synthesis of Tetraaryl-Substituted Pyrroles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xudong; Li, Ke; Wang, Siyuan; Liu, Chao; Lei, Aiwen

    2016-01-01

    Tetraaryl-substituted pyrroles are one important class of luminophores. In this work, an acid-promoted cross-dehydrative aromatization between benzoin and deoxybenzion was developed. This transformation provides an efficient and straightforward path for the synthesis of various aryl group substituted tetraarylpyrroles. Good to excellent yields were obtained through the easy operation with acetic acid and ammonium acetate. PMID:26683651

  3. Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii of dehydrated infant formula by gamma-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju-Woon; Oh, Sang-Hee; Byun, Eui-Baek; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Jang-Ho; Woon, Jae-Ho; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2007-11-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii has been implicated as a causal organism in a severe form of neonatal meningitis, with reported mortality rates of 20%. The population at greatest risk is immunocompromised infants of any age. Dried infant formula has been identified as a potential source of the organism in both outbreaks and sporadic cases. The objective of this study was to investigate theirradiation effect of the inactivation on E. sakazakii (ATCC 29544) of a dehydrated infant formula. The D10-values were 0.22-0.27 and 0.76 kGy for broth and dehydrated infant formula, respectively. The irradiation at 5.0 kGy was able to completely eliminate the E. sakazakii inoculated at 8.0 to 9.0 log CFU g -1 onto a dehydrated infant formula. There was no regrowth for all samples during the time they were stored at 10 °C for 6 h after rehydration. The present results indicated that a gamma-irradiation could potentially be used to inactivate E. sakazakii in a dehydrated powdered infant formula.

  4. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops. 573.400 Section 573.400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing §...

  5. Spectroscopic study of the dehydration and/or dehydroxylation of phyllosilicate and zeolite minerals

    E-print Network

    Glotch, Timothy D.

    Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (MRO/CRISM) visible and near infrared imaging spec- trometers have shown] Phyllosilicates on Mars mapped by infrared spectroscopic techniques could have been affected by dehydration and and SCa3) with partial Mg2+ forAl3+ substitution all have new spectral feature developed at 900 cm-1 upon

  6. Earth Planets Space, 53, 861871, 2001 Dehydration of serpentinized slab mantle: Seismic evidence from southwest Japan

    E-print Network

    Seno, Tetsuzo

    Earth Planets Space, 53, 861­871, 2001 Dehydration of serpentinized slab mantle: Seismic evidence) in the mantle part. Here the serpentinized mantle wedge of the Izu-Bonin fore-arc is subducting, and the double hydrated, which may have resulted from subduction of the serpentine stable in the Izu-Bonin back-arc area

  7. Dehydration, rehydration and overhydration alter patterns of gene expression in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated molecular responses elicited by three types of dehydration (fast, slow and cryoprotective), rehydration and overhydration in larvae of the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica. The larvae spend most the year encased in ice but during the austral summer are vulnerable to summer storms,...

  8. Multivariate analysis of the sensory changes in the dehydrated cowpea leaves.

    PubMed

    Nyambaka, Hudson; Ryley, Janice

    2004-09-01

    Processing of foods, especially dehydration is known to result in alteration of sensory and nutritional qualities. Cowpea leaves is one of the common leafy vegetables consumed in Kenya that contain high levels of pro-vitamin A compounds and has good carotene retention during processing. A tasting panel was trained using a quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA) test that was developed and used to characterize the sensory properties of dehydrated cowpea leaves. The panel identified sensory attributes in dehydrated cowpea leaves that were important in discriminating the dehydrated samples from the fresh material. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the QDA scores. The first principal component (PC1) which accounted for 85% of the variance was an index of the interrelationship among variables in differentiating the samples while PC2, which accounted for the remaining variance measured the attributes influence in discriminating samples. The results of the sensory attributes mean scores showed that aroma, texture and appearance had high influence in discriminating between the fresh, the sun-dried and the solar-dried samples. The solar dried products were close to the fresh material, which was characterized, as soft and tender with an appealing dark green color, than the sun dried product. The sun dried products differed from the other products more on appearance. PMID:18969564

  9. Arctic stratospheric dehydration - Part 1: Unprecedented observation of vertical redistribution of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaykin, S. M.; Engel, I.; Vömel, H.; Formanyuk, I. M.; Kivi, R.; Korshunov, L. I.; Krämer, M.; Lykov, A. D.; Meier, S.; Naebert, T.; Pitts, M. C.; Santee, M. L.; Spelten, N.; Wienhold, F. G.; Yushkov, V. A.; Peter, T.

    2013-05-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of water vapour, aerosols and clouds in the Arctic stratosphere in January and February 2010 carried out by in-situ instrumentation on balloon-sondes and high-altitude aircraft combined with satellite observations. The measurements provide unparalleled evidence of dehydration and rehydration due to gravitational settling of ice particles. An extreme cooling of the Arctic stratospheric vortex during the second half of January 2010 resulted in a rare synoptic-scale outbreak of ice PSCs (polar stratospheric clouds) detected remotely by the lidar aboard the CALIPSO satellite. The widespread occurrence of ice clouds was followed by sedimentation and consequent sublimation of ice particles, leading to vertical redistribution of water inside the vortex. A sequence of balloon and aircraft soundings with chilled mirror and Lyman-? hygrometers (CFH, FISH, FLASH) and backscatter sondes (COBALD) conducted in January 2010 within the LAPBIAT and RECONCILE campaigns captured various phases of this phenomenon: ice formation, irreversible dehydration and rehydration. Consistent observations of water vapour by these independent measurement techniques show clear signatures of irreversible dehydration of the vortex air by up to 1.6 ppmv in the 20-24 km altitude range and rehydration by up to 0.9 ppmv in a 1 km-thick layer below. Comparison with space-borne Aura MLS water vapour observations allow the spatiotemporal evolution of dehydrated air masses within the Arctic vortex to be derived and upscaled.

  10. Water vapor transport and dehydration above convective outflow during Asian monsoon

    E-print Network

    Legras, Bernard

    Water vapor transport and dehydration above convective outflow during Asian monsoon R. James,1 M-scale transport and convection in determining the water vapor maximum at 100 hPa in the Asian monsoon region of overshoots. A good agreement between reconstructed water vapor and observations is obtained over Asia

  11. A Triple Iron Triathlon Leads to a Decrease in Total Body Mass but Not to Dehydration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Oliver, Senn

    2010-01-01

    A loss in total body mass during an ultraendurance performance is usually attributed to dehydration. We identified the changes in total body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, and selected markers of hydration status in 31 male nonprofessional ultratriathletes participating in a Triple Iron triathlon involving 11.4 km swimming, 540 km cycling…

  12. 40 CFR 63.765 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) The owner or operator shall control air emissions by connecting the process vent to a process natural... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards. 63.765 Section 63.765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1275 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards. 63.1275 Section 63.1275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  14. 40 CFR 63.765 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The owner or operator shall control air emissions by connecting the process vent to a process natural... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards. 63.765 Section 63.765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1275 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards. 63.1275 Section 63.1275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  16. Recent development in osmotic dehydration of fruit and vegetables: a review.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Suresh; Kumari, Durvesh

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic dehydration of fruits and vegetables is achieved by placing the solid/semi solid, whole or in pieces, in a hypertonic solution (sugar and/or salt) with a simultaneous counter diffusion of solutes from the osmotic solution into the tissues. Osmotic dehydration is recommended as a processing method to obtain better quality of food products. Partial dehydration allows structural, nutritional, sensory, and other functional properties of the raw material to be modified. However, the food industry uptake of osmotic dehydration of foods has not been extensive as expected due to the poor understanding of the counter current flow phenomena associated with it. However, these flows are in a dynamic equilibrium with each other and significantly influence the final product in terms of preservation, nutrition, and organoleptic properties. The demand of healthy, natural, nutritious, and tasty processed food products continuously increases, not only for finished products, but also for ingredient to be included in complex foods such as ice cream, cereals, dairy, confectionaries, and bakery products. PMID:24915357

  17. Intermediate magnetite formation during dehydration of O zden O zdemir *, David J. Dunlop

    E-print Network

    Dunlop, David J.

    on well-characterized acicular crystals. Fresh samples were heated in air to temperatures between 155³C) lattice of oxygen ions, with ferric iron ions in octahedral interstices. Hydroxyl bonds form zig- zag chains between the oxygen planes. When heated, goethite dehydrates to hematite by remov- ing hydroxyl

  18. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...retarding oxidative destruction of naturally occurring carotenes and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated...Ethoxyquin added to retard the oxidative destruction of carotene and vitamin E.” (2) The statement “For use in animal feed...

  19. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...retarding oxidative destruction of naturally occurring carotenes and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated...Ethoxyquin added to retard the oxidative destruction of carotene and vitamin E.” (2) The statement “For use in animal feed...

  20. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...retarding oxidative destruction of naturally occurring carotenes and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated...Ethoxyquin added to retard the oxidative destruction of carotene and vitamin E.” (2) The statement “For use in animal feed...

  1. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...retarding oxidative destruction of naturally occurring carotenes and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated...Ethoxyquin added to retard the oxidative destruction of carotene and vitamin E.” (2) The statement “For use in animal feed...

  2. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...retarding oxidative destruction of naturally occurring carotenes and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated...Ethoxyquin added to retard the oxidative destruction of carotene and vitamin E.” (2) The statement “For use in animal feed...

  3. Effects of dehydration and blockade of angiotensin II AT1 receptor on stress hormones and anti-oxidants in the one-humped camel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to provide for the first time data on plasma catecholamines, cortisol, glutathione and malondialdehyde after long term dehydration (20 days) in the presence and absence of angiotensin II (Ang II) AT1 receptor blocker (losartan) versus levels in time-matched, non-dehydrated control camels and to record the responses of glutathione and malondialdehyde activity in liver and kidney homogenates in control, dehydrated-losartan treated and dehydrated camels. Eighteen male camels were studied, six hydrated (control group), six dehydrated and treated with losartan (treated group) and six dehydrated not treated (dehydrated). Results Plasma levels of norepinephrine and dopamine were significantly increased (P?dehydrated groups compared to time matched control, whereas Plasma epinephrine level showed significant decrease (P?dehydrated groups compared to control. Plasma cortisol also showed significant increase (P?dehydrated groups compared to control. Glutathione levels in plasma, liver and kidney homogenates for both treated and dehydrated groups reveled significant increase (P?dehydrated groups. Conclusion In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrated that dehydration substantially increased the circulating levels of norepinephrine, dopamine and cortisol but decreased plasma epinephrine. Similarly, losartan showed similar effects to that of dehydration. In addition, this investigation showed dehydration alone or in combination with losartan induced significant increments in glutathione and malondialdehyde activities in plasma, liver and kidney homogenates, presumably in order to counteract the potentially damaging effects of free radicals. Blockade of angiotensin II AT1 receptors did not alter significantly the response of dehydration in any of these indices. PMID:24252635

  4. Dehydration and vernalization treatments identify overlapping molecular networks impacting endodormancy maintenance in leafy spurge crown buds.

    PubMed

    Do?ramac?, Münevver; Horvath, David P; Christoffers, Michael J; Anderson, James V

    2011-12-01

    Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) is a herbaceous perennial weed that reproduces vegetatively from an abundance of underground adventitious buds (UABs), which undergo well-defined phases of seasonal dormancy (para-, endo-, and ecodormancy). In this study, the effects of dehydration stress on vegetative growth and flowering potential from endodormant UABs of leafy spurge was monitored. Further, microarray analysis was used to identify critical signaling pathways of transcriptome profiles associated with endodormancy maintenance in UABs. Surprisingly, only 3-day of dehydration stress is required to break the endodormant phase in UABs; however, the dehydration-stress treatment did not induce flowering. Previous studies have shown that prolonged cold treatment of UABs breaks endodormancy and induces a vernalization response leading to flowering. Thus, in this study, comparing transcriptome data from UABs exposed to short-term dehydration and vernalization provided a unique approach to identify overlapping molecular mechanisms involved in endodormancy maintenance and floral competence. Analysis of transcriptome data associated with breaking endodormancy by both environmental treatments identified LEC1, PHOTOSYSTEM I RC, and brassinosteroids as common central hubs of upregulated genes, while DREB1A, CBF2, GPA1, MYC2, bHLH, BZIP, and flavonoids were identified as common central hubs of downregulated genes. The majority of over-represented gene sets common to breaking endodormancy by dehydration stress and vernalization were downregulated and included pathways involved in hormone signaling, chromatin modification, and circadian rhythm. Additionally, the over-represented gene sets highlighted pathways involved in starch and sugar degradation and biogenesis of carbon skeletons, suggesting a high metabolic activity is necessary during the endodormant phase. The data presented in this study helped to refine our previous model for dormancy regulation. PMID:21789635

  5. Dehydration effects from contrails in a coupled contrail-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.; Penner, J. E.; Chen, Yibin; Zhou, Cheng; Graf, K.

    2015-10-01

    The uptake of water by contrails in ice-supersaturated air and the release of water after ice particle advection and sedimentation dehydrates the atmosphere at flight levels and redistributes humidity mainly to lower levels. The dehydration is investigated by coupling a plume-scale contrail model with a global aerosol-climate model. The contrail model simulates all the individual contrails forming from global air traffic for meteorological conditions as defined by the climate model. The computed contrail cirrus properties compare reasonably with theoretical concepts and observations. The mass of water in aged contrails may exceed 106 times the mass of water emitted from aircraft. Many of the ice particles sediment and release water in the troposphere, on average 700 m below the mean flight levels. Simulations with and without coupling are compared. The drying at contrail levels causes thinner and longer-lived contrails with about 15 % reduced contrail radiative forcing (RF). The reduced RF from contrails is on the order of 0.06 W m-2, slightly larger than estimated earlier because of higher soot emissions. For normal traffic, the RF from dehydration is small compared to interannual variability. A case with emissions increased by 100 times is used to overcome statistical uncertainty. The contrails impact the entire hydrological cycle in the atmosphere by reducing the total water column and the cover by high- and low-level clouds. For normal traffic, the dehydration changes contrail RF by positive shortwave and negative longwave contributions on the order of 0.04 W m-2, with a small negative net RF. The total net RF from contrails and dehydration remains within the range of previous estimates.

  6. Leaf shrinkage with dehydration: coordination with hydraulic vulnerability and drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Scoffoni, Christine; Vuong, Christine; Diep, Steven; Cochard, Hervé; Sack, Lawren

    2014-04-01

    Leaf shrinkage with dehydration has attracted attention for over 100 years, especially as it becomes visibly extreme during drought. However, little has been known of its correlation with physiology. Computer simulations of the leaf hydraulic system showed that a reduction of hydraulic conductance of the mesophyll pathways outside the xylem would cause a strong decline of leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf)). For 14 diverse species, we tested the hypothesis that shrinkage during dehydration (i.e. in whole leaf, cell and airspace thickness, and leaf area) is associated with reduction in K(leaf) at declining leaf water potential (?(leaf)). We tested hypotheses for the linkage of leaf shrinkage with structural and physiological water relations parameters, including modulus of elasticity, osmotic pressure at full turgor, turgor loss point (TLP), and cuticular conductance. Species originating from moist habitats showed substantial shrinkage during dehydration before reaching TLP, in contrast with species originating from dry habitats. Across species, the decline of K(leaf) with mild dehydration (i.e. the initial slope of the K(leaf) versus ?(leaf) curve) correlated with the decline of leaf thickness (the slope of the leaf thickness versus ?(leaf) curve), as expected based on predictions from computer simulations. Leaf thickness shrinkage before TLP correlated across species with lower modulus of elasticity and with less negative osmotic pressure at full turgor, as did leaf area shrinkage between full turgor and oven desiccation. These findings point to a role for leaf shrinkage in hydraulic decline during mild dehydration, with potential impacts on drought adaptation for cells and leaves, influencing plant ecological distributions. PMID:24306532

  7. Dehydration effects from contrails in a coupled contrail-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.; Penner, J. E.; Chen, Y.; Zhou, C.; Graf, K.

    2015-07-01

    Uptake of water by contrails in ice-supersaturated air and release of water after ice particle advection and sedimentation dehydrates the atmosphere at flight levels and redistributes humidity mainly to lower levels. The dehydration is investigated by coupling a plume-scale contrail model with a global aerosol-climate model. The contrail model simulates all the individual contrails forming from global air traffic for meteorological conditions as defined by the climate model. The computed contrail-cirrus properties compare reasonably with theoretical concepts and observations. The mass of water in aged contrails may exceed 106 times the mass of water emitted from aircraft. Many of the ice particles sediment and release water in the troposphere, on average 700 m below the mean flight levels. Simulations with and without coupling are compared. The drying at contrail levels causes thinner and longer lived contrails with about 15 % reduced contrail radiative forcing (RF). The reduced RF from contrails is of the order 0.06 W m-2, slightly larger than estimated earlier because of higher soot emissions. For normal traffic, the RF from dehydration is small compared to interannual variability. A case with 100 times increased emissions is used to overcome statistical uncertainty. The contrails impact the entire hydrological cycle in the atmosphere by reducing the total water column and the cover of high and low-level clouds. For normal traffic, the dehydration changes contrail RF by positive shortwave and negative longwave contributions of order 0.04 W m-2, with a small negative net RF. The total net RF from contrails and dehydration remains within the range of previous estimates.

  8. The effect of dehydration on muscle metabolism and time trial performance during prolonged cycling in males.

    PubMed

    Logan-Sprenger, Heather M; Heigenhauser, George J F; Jones, Graham L; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2015-08-01

    This study combined overnight fluid restriction with lack of fluid intake during prolonged cycling to determine the effects of dehydration on substrate oxidation, skeletal muscle metabolism, heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) response, and time trial (TT) performance. Nine males cycled at ~65% VO2peak for 90 min followed by a TT (6 kJ/kg BM) either with fluid (HYD) or without fluid (DEH). Blood samples were taken every 20 min and muscle biopsies were taken at 0, 45, and 90 min of exercise and after the TT. DEH subjects started the trial with a -0.6% BM from overnight fluid restriction and were dehydrated by 1.4% after 45 min, 2.3% after 90 min of exercise, and 3.1% BM after the TT. There were no significant differences in oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, or total sweat loss between the trials. However, physiological parameters (heart rate [HR], rate of perceived exertion, core temperature [Tc], plasma osmolality [Posm], plasma volume [Pvol] loss, and Hsp72), and carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation and muscle glycogen use were greater during 90 min of moderate cycling when subjects progressed from 0.6% to 2.3% dehydration. TT performance was 13% slower when subjects began 2.3% and ended 3.1% dehydrated. Throughout the TT, Tc, Posm, blood and muscle lactate [La], and serum Hsp72 were higher, even while working at a lower power output (PO). The accelerated muscle glycogen use during 90 min of moderate intensity exercise with DEH did not affect subsequent TT performance, rather augmented Tc, RPE and the additional physiological factors were more important in slowing performance when dehydrated. PMID:26296770

  9. Supine exercise restores arterial blood pressure and skin blood flow despite dehydration and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, J; Mora-Rodríguez, R; Coyle, E F

    1999-08-01

    We determined whether the deleterious effects of dehydration and hyperthermia on cardiovascular function during upright exercise were attenuated by elevating central blood volume with supine exercise. Seven trained men [maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2 max)) 4.7 +/- 0. 4 l/min (mean +/- SE)] cycled for 30 min in the heat (35 degrees C) in the upright and in the supine positions (VO(2) 2.93 +/- 0.27 l/min) while maintaining euhydration by fluid ingestion or while being dehydrated by 5% of body weight after 2 h of upright exercise. When subjects were euhydrated, esophageal temperature (T(es)) was 37. 8-38.0 degrees C in both body postures. Dehydration caused equal hyperthermia during both upright and supine exercise (T(es) = 38. 7-38.8 degrees C). During upright exercise, dehydration lowered stroke volume (SV), cardiac output, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cutaneous vascular conductance and increased heart rate and plasma catecholamines [30 +/- 6 ml, 3.0 +/- 0.7 l/min, 6 +/- 2 mmHg, 22 +/- 8%, 14 +/- 2 beats/min, and 50-96%, respectively; all P < 0. 05]. In contrast, during supine exercise, dehydration did not cause significant alterations in MAP, cutaneous vascular conductance, or plasma catecholamines. Furthermore, supine versus upright exercise attenuated the increases in heart rate (7 +/- 2 vs. 9 +/- 1%) and the reductions in SV (13 +/- 4 vs. 21 +/- 3%) and cardiac output (8 +/- 3 vs. 14 +/- 3%) (all P < 0.05). These results suggest that the decline in cutaneous vascular conductance and the increase in plasma norepinephrine concentration, independent of hyperthermia, are associated with a reduction in central blood volume and a lower arterial blood pressure. PMID:10444482

  10. Leaf Shrinkage with Dehydration: Coordination with Hydraulic Vulnerability and Drought Tolerance1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Scoffoni, Christine; Vuong, Christine; Diep, Steven; Cochard, Hervé; Sack, Lawren

    2014-01-01

    Leaf shrinkage with dehydration has attracted attention for over 100 years, especially as it becomes visibly extreme during drought. However, little has been known of its correlation with physiology. Computer simulations of the leaf hydraulic system showed that a reduction of hydraulic conductance of the mesophyll pathways outside the xylem would cause a strong decline of leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf). For 14 diverse species, we tested the hypothesis that shrinkage during dehydration (i.e. in whole leaf, cell and airspace thickness, and leaf area) is associated with reduction in Kleaf at declining leaf water potential (?leaf). We tested hypotheses for the linkage of leaf shrinkage with structural and physiological water relations parameters, including modulus of elasticity, osmotic pressure at full turgor, turgor loss point (TLP), and cuticular conductance. Species originating from moist habitats showed substantial shrinkage during dehydration before reaching TLP, in contrast with species originating from dry habitats. Across species, the decline of Kleaf with mild dehydration (i.e. the initial slope of the Kleaf versus ?leaf curve) correlated with the decline of leaf thickness (the slope of the leaf thickness versus ?leaf curve), as expected based on predictions from computer simulations. Leaf thickness shrinkage before TLP correlated across species with lower modulus of elasticity and with less negative osmotic pressure at full turgor, as did leaf area shrinkage between full turgor and oven desiccation. These findings point to a role for leaf shrinkage in hydraulic decline during mild dehydration, with potential impacts on drought adaptation for cells and leaves, influencing plant ecological distributions. PMID:24306532

  11. The effect of dehydration on muscle metabolism and time trial performance during prolonged cycling in males

    PubMed Central

    Logan-Sprenger, Heather M; Heigenhauser, George JF; Jones, Graham L; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2015-01-01

    This study combined overnight fluid restriction with lack of fluid intake during prolonged cycling to determine the effects of dehydration on substrate oxidation, skeletal muscle metabolism, heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) response, and time trial (TT) performance. Nine males cycled at ?65% VO2peak for 90 min followed by a TT (6 kJ/kg BM) either with fluid (HYD) or without fluid (DEH). Blood samples were taken every 20 min and muscle biopsies were taken at 0, 45, and 90 min of exercise and after the TT. DEH subjects started the trial with a ?0.6% BM from overnight fluid restriction and were dehydrated by 1.4% after 45 min, 2.3% after 90 min of exercise, and 3.1% BM after the TT. There were no significant differences in oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, or total sweat loss between the trials. However, physiological parameters (heart rate [HR], rate of perceived exertion, core temperature [Tc], plasma osmolality [Posm], plasma volume [Pvol] loss, and Hsp72), and carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation and muscle glycogen use were greater during 90 min of moderate cycling when subjects progressed from 0.6% to 2.3% dehydration. TT performance was 13% slower when subjects began 2.3% and ended 3.1% dehydrated. Throughout the TT, Tc, Posm, blood and muscle lactate [La], and serum Hsp72 were higher, even while working at a lower power output (PO). The accelerated muscle glycogen use during 90 min of moderate intensity exercise with DEH did not affect subsequent TT performance, rather augmented Tc, RPE and the additional physiological factors were more important in slowing performance when dehydrated. PMID:26296770

  12. Gravitational vacuum condensate stars.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Pawel O; Mottola, Emil

    2004-06-29

    A new final state of gravitational collapse is proposed. By extending the concept of Bose-Einstein condensation to gravitational systems, a cold, dark, compact object with an interior de Sitter condensate p(v) = -rho(v) and an exterior Schwarzschild geometry of arbitrary total mass M is constructed. These regions are separated by a shell with a small but finite proper thickness l of fluid with equation of state p = +rho, replacing both the Schwarzschild and de Sitter classical horizons. The new solution has no singularities, no event horizons, and a global time. Its entropy is maximized under small fluctuations and is given by the standard hydrodynamic entropy of the thin shell, which is of the order k(B)lMc/Planck's over 2 pi, instead of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula, S(BH) = 4 pi k(B)GM(2)/Planck's over 2 pi c. Hence, unlike black holes, the new solution is thermodynamically stable and has no information paradox. PMID:15210982

  13. Cosmic curvature and condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, Martin

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the universe may consist of a patchwork of domains with different Riemann curvature constants k = 0, +/-1. Features of a phase transition in which flat space breaks up in a transition 2k0 - k(-) + k(+) with initial scale factors R(-) = R(+) are postulated and explored. It is shown that such a transition is energetically permitted, has the equivalent of a Curie temperature, and can lead in a natural way to the formation of voids and galaxies. It is predicted that, if the ambient universe on average is well fitted by a purely k(-) space, with only occasional domains of k(+) containing galaxies, a density parameter of (A(z sub c + 1)) super -1 should be expected, where z sub c represents the redshift of the earliest objects to have condensed, and A takes on values ranging from about 5 to 3. Present observations of quasars would suggest a density of about 0.03 or 0.05, respectively, but it could be lower if earlier condensation took place.

  14. Method of performing sugar dehydration and catalyst treatment

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jianli [Kennewick, WA; Holladay, Johnathan E [Kennewick, WA; Zhang, Xinjie [Burlington, MA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2010-06-01

    The invention includes a method of treating a solid acid catalyst. After exposing the catalyst to a mixture containing a sugar alcohol, the catalyst is washed with an organic solvent and is then exposed to a second reaction mixture. The invention includes a process for production of anhydrosugar alcohol. A solid acid catalyst is provided to convert sugar alcohol in a first sample to an anhydrosugar alcohol. The catalyst is then washed with an organic solvent and is subsequently utilized to expose a second sample. The invention includes a method for selective production of an anhydrosugar. A solid acid catalyst is provided within a reactor and anhydrosugar alcohol is formed by flowing a starting sugar alcohol into the reactor. The acid catalyst is then exposed to an organic solvent which allows a greater amount of additional anhydrosugar to be produced than would occur without exposing the acid catalyst to the organic solvent.

  15. Condensation of anhydrides or dicarboxylic acids with compounds containing active methylene groups. Part 19: Condensation of phthalic and substituted phthalic anhydrides with benzoylacetic ester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotberg, Y. T.; Oshkaya, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    Phthalylbenzoylacetic ester and its nitro and halogen derivatives were prepared through condensation of phthalic anhydride, nitrophthalic anhydride, and phthalic halide anhydride with benzoylacetic ester in a solution of acetic anhydride and triethylamine. The condensation of hemipinic acid anhydride proceeds similarly, but under more drastic conditions. Derivatives of indan-1,3-dione are also formed, with a small yield, in the reaction of nitrophthalic anhydrides with benzoylacetic ester in the presence of increased quantities of triethylamine.

  16. Effect of cation on HTO / H{sub 2}O separation and dehydration characteristics of Y-type zeolite adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Y.; Uzawa, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2008-07-15

    Several types of adsorbers have been studied as they are considered for the first stage of water detritiation systems processing more than 100 kg/h of high-level tritiated water generated in a future fusion plant. Zeolite is a suitable adsorbent since it is an inorganic material having a large water capacity. Rapid dehydration characteristics as well as a large HTO/H{sub 2}O separation factor is necessary for the adsorber to minimize its size. Present experiments were focused on the effect of cations on HTO /H{sub 2}O separation and dehydration characteristics of Y-type zeolites. The selected cations are Na, K and Ca. The framework SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio of the zeolites is fixed to 5.0 in the present experiments. It was found that the isotope separation factors are around 1.1-1.2 under static conditions. As for dehydration, operating temperature fixes the capacity of movable water from the zeolites. The capacity at room temperature is NaY > CaY > KY. HTO dehydration characteristics depend on the accumulated purge gas amount, while the purge gas rate is less influential. Effect of temperature on HTO dehydration is also less influential especially in the early stage of dehydration. Pressure swing is an effective method for HTO dehydration. (authors)

  17. Detecting Acoustic Emissions With/Without Dehydration of Serpentine Outside P-T Field of Conventional Brittle Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Fei, Y.; Silver, P. G.; Green, H. W.

    2005-12-01

    It is currently thought that earthquakes cannot be triggered at depths greater than ~60 km by unassisted brittle failure or frictional sliding, but could be triggered by dehydration embrittlement of hydrous minerals (Raleigh and Paterson, 1965; Green and Houston, 1995; Kirby, 1995; Jung et al., 2004). Using a new multianvil-based system for detecting acoustic emissions with four channels at high pressure and high temperature that was recently developed (Jung et al., 2005), we tested this hypothesis by deforming samples of serpentine. We found that acoustic emissions were detected not only during/after the dehydration of serpentine, but even in the absence of dehydration. These emissions occurred at high pressure and high temperature, and thus outside pressure-temperature field of conventional brittle failure. Backscattered-electron images of microstructures of the post-run specimen revealed fault slip at elevated pressure, with offsets of up to ~500 ?m, even without dehydration. Analysis of P-wave travel times from the four sensors confirmed that the acoustic emissions originated from within the specimen during fault slip. These observations suggest that earthquakes can be triggered by slip along a fault containing serpentine at significantly higher pressure and temperature conditions than that previously thought, even without dehydration. They are thus consistent with faulting mechanisms that appeal to dehydration embrittlement, as well as those that rely solely on the rheology of non-dehydrated serpentine.

  18. A- to B-Type Olivine Fabric Transitions Associated with Hydration, Dehydration and Shear Above the Farallon Flat Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, W. M.; Smith, D.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate mantle rocks associated with hydration, dehydration and shear above the Farallon flat-slab at its contact with the base of North America. The rocks we focus on are ultramafic inclusions hosted within serpentinized ultramafic microbreccia diatremes of the Navajo Volcanic Field (New Mexico) that erupted to the surface at the waning stages of the Laramide orogeny. A large number of petrological and geochronological studies have pinpointed the origin of these rocks to the hydrated mantle wedge above the Farallon slab as well as tectonically eroded and entrained fragments of the plate interface. We combine petrological observations and EBSD measurements of olivine grainsize and LPO to examine the effects of hydration on olivine fabric development in different parts of the supra-subduction zone mantle. The rocks examined include weakly deformed to strongly foliated tectonites we interpret to represent partially hydrated fragments of the upper plate mantle; and mylonites and ultramylonites we interpret to represent deformed fragments of the plate interface. The rocks deformed at temperatures ranging from 500-900°C based on thermometry, and olivine compositions in some record heating just before incorporation in the diatreme mix. We observe the following: Tectonites exhibit A-type bulk olivine LPOs, but show transitions to B-type LPO in local, fine-grained, dynamically recrystallized regions associated with hydrous minerals. Mylonites and ultramylonites with stable chlorite and/or antigorite and recrystallized grainsizes of less than 10?m show strong B-type olivine LPOs. A single mylonite with recrystallized grainsizes of ~35?m shows evidence for prograde metamorphism and dehydration through the chlorite breakdown reaction at temperatures above ~770°C. It contains no hydrous minerals and shows a strong A-type olivine LPO. Together these rocks demonstrate a strong correlation between hydration under high stress conditions, and B-type olivine LPO, consistent with experimental studies that indicate this fabric forms at high water contents and high stress. If interpreted in terms of supra-subduction zone seismic anisotropy, these rocks are consistent with a transition from trench-parallel fast directions close to the trench to trench-perpendicular fast directions away from the trench.

  19. Illuminating the hydration and dehydration of a subducting oceanic plate with marine controlled-source EM and magnetotelluric data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naif, S.; Key, K.; Constable, S.; Evans, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Fluids and mineral bound volatiles within the oceanic crust and upper mantle are capable of decreasing the bulk electrical resistivity by a few orders of magnitude, making electromagnetic (EM) methods an ideal tool for detecting and quantifying fluids along convergent margins. Given that fluids in subduction zones may have 1st order effects on seismicity, in addition to driving arc volcanism, constraining their fluxes is vital to our understanding of subduction processes. The incoming oceanic plate is likely to be severely damaged at crustal and uppermost mantle depths, as active seismic studies have revealed outer rise bending faults that penetrate tens of kilometers into the slab. Such faults may provide porous pathways for the input of fluids into the crust and upper mantle. Some volume of this fluid is stored in various forms of hydrated minerals that are subducted and subsequently undergo dehydration reactions at depth, releasing free-water. In this work we examine data from 50 electromagnetic receivers deployed along a 280 km profile that spans the offshore component of the Nicaraguan convergent margin at the Middle American Trench. Two-dimensional joint inversions of controlled source electromagnetic and magnetotelluric data reveal a significant input of fluids into the crust with the onset of plate bending faults at the outer rise, where the resistivity drops by as much as an order of magnitude. In the forearc, our data reveal that the 400 m thick sedimentary layer of the oceanic plate is efficiently subducted, as evidenced by a thin low resistivity zone along the plate interface that remains intact more than 10 km landward of the trench axis. Further down-dip at 25 km landward of the trench axis, an anomalous low resistivity body exists along the plate interface at a depth of 8 km, where the expected pressure and temperatures are consistent with free-water being released by the dehydration of smectite. This is further evidenced by several previously detected seeps at the seafloor directly above this feature, where geochemical studies suggest a slab sediment derived origin for the emitted fluids. Low resistivity channels permeate from the anomalous body upwards through the overlying forearc crust to the seafloor, which we infer to be porous fluid pathways that link the seafloor seeps to the plate interface.

  20. Intriguing aspects of meson condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammarella, Andrea; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    We analyze various aspects of pion and kaon condensation in the framework of chiral perturbation theory. Considering a system at vanishing temperature and varying the isospin chemical potential and the strange quark chemical potential we reproduce known results about the phase transition to the pion condensation phase and to the kaon condensation phase. However, we obtain mesonic mixings and masses in the condensed phases that are in disagreement with the results reported in previous works. Our findings are obtained both by a theory group analysis and by direct calculation by means of the same low-energy effective Lagrangian used in previous works. We also study the leptonic decay channels in the normal phase and in the pion condensed phase, finding that some of these channels have a peculiar nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the isospin chemical potential. Regarding the semileptonic decays, we find that they are feeding processes for the stable charged pion state.