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  1. [DR ALEKSANDAR DORŠNER THE FIRST HOSPITAL OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGIST IN SPLIT AND DALMATIA].

    PubMed

    Ivanišević, Petar; Poljak, Nikola Kolja; Cikojević, Draško; Doršner, Katarina; Ivanišević, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Dr Aleksandar Doršner (Trebinje, 1892 - Lima, 1967) was the first hospital otorhinolaryngologist in Split and Dalmatia. He graduated from the Faculty of Medicine in Prague in 1919, and specialized otorhinolaryngology in Graz and Vienna. He led and organized otorhinolaryngological service in Split Hospital from 1923 to 1934, and he also had a private practice. Temporarily he also worked outside Split in Dalmatian hinterland and in Šibenik, Zadar and Dubrovnik. Most frequently he performed the following otorhinolaryngological operations: tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies and operations of purulent middle ear inflammations with mastoiditis, nasal polyps, deviated nasal septum, maxillary sinus empyema and otorhinolaryngological trauma. In 1928 he became a member of Otorhinolaryngological section of Croatian Medical Chamber. He participated in the work of the first otorhinolaryngological congress of the former Yugoslavia in 1931, taken place in Zagreb. From 1928 he was a member of Oto-Neuro-Ophthalmological Society. From 1933 to 1937 he was a vice-president of the main board of Free Organization of Dalmatian Physicians in Split. In 1938 he left Split permanently and continued living with his family in Lima (Peru) where he died in 1967. He was an erudite. He lived for his profession which he liked very much and dedicated his life to. He is one of the most meritorious doctors in Split medical history, whom otorhinolaryngology service in Split Hospital started with. PMID:26502677

  2. Revolutionary changes in medicine and ophthalmology--the St. Louis, MO, effect: Homer G. Phillips Hospital and Dr. Howard Phillip venable.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Andrew S.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide information on the revolutionary changes in medicine, particularly on the development of African-Americans in ophthalmology, created by Homer G. Phillips Hospital in St. Louis and the late Dr. Howard Phillip Venable. METHODS: Very little has been written about Homer G. Phillips Hospital and Dr. H. Phillip Venable. Through personal interviews with physicians trained by Dr. Venable and literature review, I was able to obtain information on Homer G. Phillips Hospital and Dr. Venable's influence in breaking the color line in medicine and ophthalmology. RESULTS: Homer G. Phillips Hospital in St. Louis was a major teaching hospital for African-American doctors. Dr. Venable was one of a few African-American ophthalmologists in the 1940s. Dr. Venable then trained approximately 40 African-American ophthalmologists at Homer G. Phillips Hospital between 1943 to 1979, when the hospital closed. CONCLUSION: The ophthalmologists trained by Dr. Venable have gone forward to treat thousands of patients with blinding eye diseases such as glaucoma and diabetes, and to influence others to become ophthalmologists. Although the hospital has closed and Dr. Venable has passed away, their existence has reformed the medical treatment received by African-Americans and other people. Images p484-a PMID:12856914

  3. Dr Walter Henry Anderson (1870-1937) and the mission hospital at Safed, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Gordon S

    2013-02-01

    Walter Henry Anderson, a brewer's clerk in Burton-upon-Trent, became a missionary doctor, supported by a society promoting welfare and evangelism in Jewish communities abroad. His family background was rich in pastoral ministry at home and adventure abroad. Arguably, this background played a part in his decision to serve the Jews of Safed. His life in Palestine entailed much enterprise and hardship as he raised a family, fought disease and set up a mission hospital serving not only the Jewish community but persons of all faiths. His years in Palestine, from 1894 to 1915, were times of peace in the Middle East before the turmoil unleashed by the Great War. Jews from the Diaspora were gaining an increasing foothold in Palestine, their 'Promised Land'. Themes of that era - the rise of Zionism, confrontation between Judaism and evangelical Christianity, conflict between immigrant Jew and Palestinian Arab and the remarkable travels of Lawrence of Arabia were interwoven with the lives of Dr Anderson and his family. PMID:23610230

  4. Decreased Monocyte HLA-DR Expression in Patients After Non-Shockable out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Venet, Fabienne; Cour, Martin; Demaret, Julie; Monneret, Guillaume; Argaud, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) constitutes a major health care problem with the development in immediate survivors of a post-cardiac arrest syndrome including systemic inflammatory response as observed in sepsis. As a decreased monocyte HLA-DR expression (mHLA-DR) has been repeatedly described in septic patients in association with an increased risk of death and nosocomial infections, we tested whether this immune alteration could also be observed after OHCA. Fifty-five non-shockable OHCA patients sampled at Day 0 (D0: within 4 h after OHCA), D1 (the next day), and D3: (after 2 additional days) were included. CD4+ lymphocyte count and mHLA-DR were evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed a marked decrease in mHLA-DR as early as D0 in patients compared with normal values. This decrease persisted till D3 and was associated with a moderate decrease in the number of circulating CD4+ lymphocytes. No correlations were identified between mHLA-DR and usual prognostic markers after OHCA. However, overtime evolution in mHLA-DR values appeared different between survivors and non-survivors with a quasisystematic decrease between D1 and D3 in non-survivors versus an increased expression in survivors. In conclusion, this preliminary pilot study describes the occurrence of OHCA-induced immune alterations as illustrated by a decreased mHLA-DR and CD4+ lymphopenia. Furthermore, we show for the first time the differential overtime evolution in mHLA-DR between survivors and non-survivors without association with usual prognostic markers and multiple organ failure. These initial results should now be confirmed in a larger cohort of OHCA patients. PMID:26796574

  5. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection in Patients at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, A; Farhangi, H; Badiee, Z; Banihashem, A; Mosaddegh, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections in critical care unit are high, and they are serious hospital problems. Infections acquired during the hospital stay are generally called nosocomial infections, initially known as infections arising after 48 h of hospital admission. The mostfrequent nosocomial infections (urinary, respiratory, gastroenteritis and blood stream infection) were common in patients at hospital.The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection among hospitalized children at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods Data were collected from 200 patient's records presented with symptoms of nosocomial infection at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital from March 2014 to September 2014. Descriptive statistics using percentage was calculated. Results Incidence of nosocomial infections inpatients athematology-oncology ward was 31% (62/200). Of which 69.35% (43/62) blood stream infection being the most frequent; followed by 30.64% (19/62) was urinary tract infection (UTI), and the most common blood culture isolate was been Staphylococcus epidermidis 18 (41.86%), andour study showed that large numbers ofnosocomial UTIs causing by Gram‑negative bacteria. Conclusion This study showed blood stream infection and UTI are the common nosocomial infections among patients athematology-oncology ward. Early recognition of infections and short term use of invasive devices along with proper infection control procedures can significantly decrease the incidence of nosocomial infections in patients. PMID:26985350

  6. [Tuberculous meningitis: a 10-year analysis at the "Dr. Federico Gómez" Children's Hospital of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Karam Bechara, J; Sosa, R; Naime Libien, J E; Posada Maldonado, E E

    1991-01-01

    Of all the forms of tuberculous infection in children, the most frequent is the pulmonary, but the tuberculous meningitis is the most severe and mortal, it occurs mainly in children under five years old, and the highest mortality is in children under two. The results of a retrospective study carried out at the Children Hospital of Mexico "Dr. Federico Gómez" about all the patients hospitalized with tuberculous meningitis diagnose during the January 1975 to December 1985 period were presented. One hundred and eighteen cases were studied: the majority (80%) corresponded to children under four years old, a percentage of 79 presented some degree of malnutrition, and 86 per cent showed clinical data of neurological affection. The confirmation of the diagnose was made in the majority of cases through laboratory and cabinet studies. Forty per cent showed no alteration in the chest X-rays, and the isolation of the bacillus was in a very low percentage (15%). All the patients were treated with the antituberculous drugs mentioned, with a better development in the ones associated with steroids. The hospital stay was over 30 days in 15 per cent of the cases. The mortality of the series reviewed was 44.5 per cent. PMID:2047934

  7. Prognosis of tetanus patients in the intensive care unit of Provincial Hospital Jason Sendwe, Lubumbashi, DR Congo

    PubMed Central

    Muteya, Michel Manika; Kabey, Alain Kabey a; Lubanga, Théophile Muyumba; Tshamba, Henri Mundongo; Nkoy, Albert Mwembo Tambwe a

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus is still a public health problem in developing countries including the Democratic Republic of Congo. The objective of this study was to determine the prognosis of patients with tetanus admitted in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Provincial Hospital Jason Sendwe, Lubumbashi, DR Congo. This is a descriptive study which collected information from registers and medical records of patients admitted for tetanus in the ICU of Jason Sendwe Hospital, between January 2005 and December 2009. We calculated the parameters of position, dispersion as well as frequencies. We used the test of independent association of prognosis (death versus survival). Tetanus constituted 2.1% of admissions in the ICU during the 5-year period. The average age of patients was 39.38 ± 17; majority of patients were males (95.5%). The majority of patients lived the townships of Kampemba (27.3%), Kenya (22.7%), and Annexe (18.2%). All patients presented the generalized form of the infection. The door of entry was detectable in 71.5% of cases, localized mainly to the lower limbs (61.9%). The average length of stay was 11.29 ± 11.39 days. Mortality was observed in 52.4% of cases. This mortality was statistically significant in patients aged mrore than 40 years (p=0.029) but not not related to the length of stay (p=0.080) nor the location of point of entry(p=0.28). In our environment the prognosis of tetanus remains severe. This disease is still frequent in the city of Lubumbashi; sensibilisation of population on preventive strategies as well as setting up appropriate structures for better management of cases is required. PMID:23717709

  8. The characteristics of HIV and AIDS patients with deep vein thrombosis at Dr. George Mukhari Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mabuza, Honey L.; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is 10 times more prevalent in HIV and AIDS patients than in the general population and is more common in patients with severe immune suppression (CD4 < 200 cells/mL). Opportunistic infections render HIV and AIDS patients susceptible to a hypercoaguable state, including lower protein S levels. Aim and setting To present the profile of HIV and AIDS patients who developed DVT in the primary care wards of Dr. George Mukhari Academic Hospital (DGMAH), Garankuwa. Methods Cross-sectional study of clinical records of admitted HIV and AIDS patients without DVT to the primary care wards, DGMAH, from 01 February 2010 to 31 January 2011. Results Two hundred and twenty-nine patients were admitted and 17 (7.4%) developed DVT. Of those that developed DVT, eight (47%) had infection with tuberculosis (TB), four (24%) had pneumonia and four (24%) had gastroenteritis. The risk of developing DVT was 8/94 (8.5%) in those with TB, 4/53 (7.5%) in those with gastroenteritis and 4/75 (5.3%) in those with pneumonia. The mean duration of stay was 14.1 days in those with DVT versus 4.0 days in those without. Conclusion HIV (and AIDS) is a hypercoaguable state and the risk of DVT is relatively high in patients with opportunistic infections. HIV and AIDS patients who are admitted to hospital with opportunistic infections may benefit from anti-thrombotic prophylaxis and further studies are needed to evaluate this. PMID:26245588

  9. Association between Severe Dehydration in Rotavirus Diarrhea and Exclusive Breastfeeding among Infants at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Prasetyo, Dwi; Sabaroedin, Iesje Martiza; Ermaya, Yudith Setiati; Soenarto, Yati

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute diarrhea in children. Infants who are exclusively breastfed develop fewer infections and have less severe illnesses. This study aimed to determine association between severe dehydration in rotavirus diarrhea and exclusive breastfeeding. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study in infants ≤ 6 months old with acute diarrhea in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia. Results. From 134 infants ≤ 6 months old with acute diarrhea enrolled from April 2009 to December 2012, there were 88 (65.6%) boys and 46 (34.4%) girls in this study. Rotavirus was detected in 60 (44.8 %), 32 (53.3%) of whom were exclusively breastfed. From rotavirus positive subjects, severe dehydration occurred in 4 (12.6%) exclusively breastfed infants and 6 (21.5%) not exclusively breastfed infants. No significant association was found between severe dehydration and exclusive breastfeeding (p = 0.491) in rotavirus diarrhea. Conclusions. In rotavirus diarrhea, there was no significant association between exclusive breastfeeding and severe dehydration. PMID:26612990

  10. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia from 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Suwarsa, Oki; Dharmadji, Hartati Purbo; Sutedja, Endang

    2016-01-01

    Background Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) with high mortality and have a significant public health impact because of high mortality and morbidity. Objective To describe data the epidemiological features, etiology, and treatment of retrospectively reviewed data of all patients with SJS and TEN. Methods Retrospective study was conducted in patients with SJS and TEN treated from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013 in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia. Results A total of 57 patients were enrolled in the study. Thirty-nine cases of SJS (21 males and 18 females), 7 cases of SJS overlapping TEN (4 males and 3 females), and 11 cases of TEN (5 males and 6 females) were reported. All cases of SJS and TEN were caused by drugs, such as paracetamol (16.56%), carbamazepine (7%), amoxicillin (5.73%), ibuprofen (4.46%), rifampicin (3.18%), and trihexyphenidyl (3.18%). All cases were treated systemically with corticosteroid alone (100%). Seven from 57 patients (12,28%) died; 5 cases developed sepsis and 2 cases developed respiratory failure. The mortality rate was 7.69% in SJS, 0% in SJS/TEN overlap, and 36.36% in TEN. Conclusion The role of systemic corticosteroids in SJS and TEN are still controversial, but with a prompt and earlier treatment reduces mortality and improves outcomes of SJS and TEN patients. PMID:26844219

  11. The protestant medical missions to China: Dr Thomas Richardson Colledge (1796-1879) and the founding of the Macao Ophthalmic Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fu, Louis

    2013-05-01

    A surgeon of the British East India Company, Dr Thomas Richardson Colledge, founded the Macao Ophthalmic Hospital in 1827. This was not only the first Western hospital ever opened in China for the purpose of bringing modern medicine to the Chinese but also the precursor of similar efforts of later medical missions in China. The gratifying results of this institute proved that employing Western medicine was an effective way to introduce Christianity to China and to open her door to the outside world. Though not a missionary himself, Colledge is rightfully regarded as the originator of medical missionaries to China. PMID:24585752

  12. PREVALENCE OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS FROM NOSE AND THROAT OF PATIENTS ON ADMISSION TO MEDICAL WARDS OF DR SOETOMO HOSPITAL, SURABAYA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Kuntaman, K; Hadi, Usman; Setiawan, Firman; Koendori, Eko Budi; Rusli, Musofa; Santosaningsih, Dewi; Severin, Juliette; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in Indonesian hospitals are still scarce. These data are required for health management of infectious diseases in order to control hospital MRSA. The carriage rate of MRSA in nose and throat of patients on admission to Dr Soetomo Hospital Surabaya, Indonesia was 8.1% of 643 patients, 5.4% from throat, 3.9% from nose and 1.2% from both sites. Prevalence of MRSA among patients admitted to surgical and non-surgical ward was not different (8.2% and 8.0%, respectively). Although MRSA prevalence in Indonesian hospitals is low compared to many other countries worldwide, appropriate health strategies will be needed to be implemented if this infection is to be controlled. PMID:27086426

  13. Specificity of 136 patient's antibodies to human red blood cells in Dr. Max Peralta J Hospital Blood Bank 2004-February 2009.

    PubMed

    Cerdas-Quesada, César

    2010-04-01

    The development of alloantibodies and erythrocyte autoantibodies complicates transfusion therapy. The antibodies detection of potential clinical significance in 136 samples of Dr. Max Peralta J Hospital Blood Bank patients, Cartago, Costa Rica between 2004 and February, 2009 were evaluated. Transfusion of phenotypically matched blood for Rh and Kell systems proved to be effective in preventing alloimmunization because it been found in this study that there is good evidence that a high proportion of antibodies produced in response to transfusion are Rh and K specificity. PMID:20100667

  14. Cost of hospital care for HIV/AIDS infected patients in three general reference hospitals in Lubumbashi, DR Congo: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tshamba, Henri Mundongo; a Kaut, Clarence Mukeng; Kyalubile, Nono Mulubwa; Kakambal, Alphonse Kaij; Yav, Grevisse Ditend; Kaj, Françoise Malonga; Vancaillie, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This article analyses the composition of healthcare costs for HIV/AIDS infected patients in a country with limited resources and attempts to identify the factors that influence these costs. The aims are to calculate medical care costs, analysing how they vary depending on patients’ income, and to evaluate the factors explaining healthcare consumption. Methods This is a prospective cohort study focusing on patients who were admitted to hospital for a short stay between January 2010 and June 2011, before their integration into a specialised program. The patients were selected randomly. Free consent was obtained from all participants. Data were analysed using the SPSS 19.0 software. The significance threshold was set at 5% and the CI (Confidence Interval) at 95%. We used Kruskal-Wallis tests, Fisher's exact test and multiple linear regression. Results We monitored 209 patients. Their average age was 36.37 years (SD: 8.72). The sex ratio was 0.58 and the women patients were generally younger than the male ones (p=0.011). The overall cost of healthcare amounted to $US 41,922. The cost of Antiretroviral Therapy represented 21.6% ($US 9,045). The price of para-clinical examinations represented 46% ($US 19,136) of the overall cost. The patient's average monthly income was $US 157.40 whereas the average direct cost per patient was$US 201.45. Both monthly income (t=4.385; p=0.0000) and education level (t=3.703 p=0.0003) were statistically significant predictive factors for healthcare consumption. The medical care costs for patients with opportunistic infections were nine times higher than those for patients who presented none. The presence of opportunistic infections increased healthcare consumption by approximately 31$ US (CI 95%: 15-46.9). Conclusion The average direct cost for patients on each short-term stay was higher than the average monthly income. To be able to access the necessary services, the patients need additional resources, which are derived

  15. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun with Dr. Eberhard Rees and R.W. Cook at a press conference concerning Dr. Von Braun's assignment to NASA headquarters and Dr. Rees' subsequent assignment as Marshall Center director.

  16. Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Dr. Christian Barnard.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Christian Barnard Tours Marshall Space Flight Center. Shown in Dr. Von Braun's office are (left to right): Dr. Ernst Sthulinger, a representative from General Electric, Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Dr. Christian Barnard, and Dr. Eberhard Rees.

  17. CONHECIMENTO DA LEI GERAL DE SAÚDE – RESPEITO ÀS TRANSFUSÕES SANGUÍNEAS EM MÉDICOS E PACIENTES TESTEMUNHAS DE JEOVÁ DO HOSPITAL DR. DARÍO CONTRERAS DA REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

    PubMed Central

    SANTANA, ELSA DÍAZ

    2010-01-01

    Este estudo avalia quanto o corpo médico do Hospital Dr. Darío Contreras de República Dominicana conhece, respeita, informa e aplica a Lei Geral de Saúde em relação aos direitos do paciente Testemunha de Jeová de negar-se a ser transfundido (respeito a sua autonomia); também se os Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem a Lei Geral de Saúde e até que ponto têm se beneficiado diante dessa proposição. O estudo revelou que nem médicos, nem Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem de fato essa lei. PMID:20689657

  18. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  19. ["Del governo tecnico sanitario degli Ospedali" (Italian) ("Hospital governance") by E. Ronzani (1877-1943)- Padua (Italy), 1910].

    PubMed

    Renzulli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the contents of the first edition of the Italian textbook "Del governo tecnico sanitario degli ospedali" ("Hospital Governance") written by Prof. Enrico Ronzani (1877- 1943) and published in Padua (Italy) in 1910. The textbook contains a a preface by Prof. A. Serafini. Prof. Ronzani, a lecturer in Hygiene and health in 1910, introduced the first university course in "Hygiene and hospital technique" in Italy, in Padua in the academic year 1910-1911. The book focuses principally on the duties and responsibilities inherent in the role of the medical director. PMID:24770366

  20. Afebrile pneumonia (whooping cough) syndrome in infants at Hospital Universitario del Valle, Cali, 2001-2007

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Dolly; Echandía-Villegas, Connie Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, also called infant pneumonitis, pneumonia caused by atypical pathogens or whooping cough syndrome is a major cause of severe lower respiratory infection in young infants, both in developing countries and in developed countries. Objective: To describe children with afebrile pneumonia syndrome. Methods: Through a cross-sectional study, we reviewed the medical records of children diagnosed with afebrile pneumonia treated at Hospital Universitario del Valle, a reference center in southwestern Colombia, between June 2001 and December 2007. We obtained data on maternal age and origin, prenatal care, the childs birth, breastfeeding, vaccination status, symptoms, signs, diagnosis, treatment, and complications. Results: We evaluated 101 children with this entity, noting a stationary presentation: June-August and November- December. A total of 73% of the children were under 4 months of age; the most common symptoms were: cyanotic and spasmodic cough (100%), respiratory distress (70%), and unquantified fever (68%). The most common findings: rales (crackles) (50%), wheezing and expiratory stridor (37%); 66% were classified as mild and of the remaining 33%, half of them required attention in the intensive care unit. In all, there was clinical diagnosis of afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, but no etiologic diagnosis was made and despite this, 94% of the children received macrolides. Conclusions: These data support the hypothesis that most of these patients acquired the disease by airway, possibly caused by viral infection and did not require the indiscriminate use of macrolides. PMID:24893051

  1. Dr. Barnett's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.

    1990-04-01

    In 1986, AstroPower was a tiny R D company located at the University of Delaware. Like many other entrepreneurs in the field at that time, the company's president, Dr. Allen Barnett, had a good idea, a good research staff, and the dream of becoming a successful manufacturer of photovoltaic (PV) cells. If the Newark, Del. company's projections remain on track, Barnett plans to become the third largest PV manufacturer in the United States by the end of next year. Were it not for the company's performance to date, such a claim might well be dismissed as idle dreaming. AstroPower Inc. is pursuing a two-pronged strategy: to rapidly bring a new thin-crystal silicon PV cell to commercialization; and, in the meantime, to gain experience in manufacturing and distributing conventional single-crystal and polycrystal silicon cells. The company sold approximately 200 kilowatts (kWp) of cells last year (about half single-crystal and half polycrystal). Its current production capacity is 360 kWp. The company and its products are described.

  2. [Influence of tobacco smoking on newborn's birth weight--analisys of dates concerning births from Maternity Hospital named. Dr S. Mossor's in Opole City].

    PubMed

    Guzikowski, Wojciech; Pirogowicz, Iwona

    2008-01-01

    Despite wide education, tobacco smoking while being pregnant is very important issue in perinatology. It is important problem because of life style of polish society, including pregnant women. Clinical observation of this issue is pointing on risk of occurring pathology in pregnancy, unfavorable consequences for neonate also many distant pathological effects among children. Purpose of this was getting an answer for question: whether in current social and economic situation there is connection between low birth mass and smoking tobacco during pregnancy. Under analysis were found births between 38th and 40th one hundred successive births (according to book of birth-room from 2860 labors in hospital in Opol, 2007) of mothers are smoking up to 10 cigarettes a day (group I), mothers smoking 11-20 cigarettes a day (group II) and mothers that are not smoking. This works affirms that smoking has negative influence on child birth mass. It is also displayed that higher the number of smoked cigarettes the higher percent of newborns with low birth mass and higher number o fetus with intrauterine growth retardation. Among mothers that are smoking the biggest group were young women (mean. 24, years) and multipara female (58%). PMID:19189515

  3. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Thomas Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, examines an ordinary man's shoe outfitted for use in the Saturn I workshop. Pictured from the left in the Saturn I workshop mockup are William Brooksbank, propulsion and vehicle engineering laboratory; Dr. Paine; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Center director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, Executive Officer in the Office Of The Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, Deputy Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, Technical. the shoe Dr. Paine is holding has a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about on the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desires.

  4. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left) and Fred W. Kelley examine a ST-100 Stellar Instrument Platform in the astrionics lab. Dr. Von Braun, then deputy associate administrator for planning, NASA, was visiting on the anniversary of the establishment of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  5. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Shown viewing the Apollo telescope mockup are, from left to right, Charles Donlan, deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director; William Horton, astrionics lab; Dr. Thomas Paine, NASA deputy administrator; Warner Kuers, director of the ME lab.

  6. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, stands in front of a Saturn IB Launch Vehicle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Dr. Von Braun was Marshall's first Center Director (1960-1970). Under his leadership Marshall was responsible for the development of the Saturn rockets, the Skylab project and getting the United States into Space and landing on the moon with the Apollo missions.

  7. Dr. Daniel Carter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  8. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the astronautics lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics lab.

  9. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the Astronautics Lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics Lab.

  10. Goldie Brangman Remembers the Operation to Save Dr King.

    PubMed

    Koch, Evan; Brangman, Goldie

    2015-12-01

    In September 1958 the Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr was stabbed and nearly assassinated. Surgeons at Harlem Hospital in New York City removed a 17.8-cm (7-in)-long letter opener from Dr King's chest. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Goldie Brangman remembers this event because she participated in Dr King's anesthetic. This article correlates Brangman's memories with published accounts of the event. It also places the event within the context of the modern civil rights movement that Dr King led. PMID:26742331

  11. Dr. Eberhard Rees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Dr. Eberhard Rees served as director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from March 1, 1970 until January 19, 1973 when he retired from NASA. Prior to his appointment as Director, Rees served as the Center's deputy director under Dr. Wernher von Braun, 1960-1970. Rees came to the United States as part of the Dr. Wernher von Braun's German Rocket team following World War II. He transferred to Huntsville, Alabama from Fort Bliss, Texas in 1950 to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal. From 1956 to 1960 he served as deputy director of development operations at the Army Ballistic Missile Agency under von Braun. In 1960 Rees was transferred to NASA's Marshall Center.

  12. Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is looking out from a 10th floor window of building 4200 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). He was the first Center Director and served as the Director from July 1960 through February 1970. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under the Project Paperclip (American acquisition of German rocket experts) to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his German Rocket Team (also called the Peenemuende Team) were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Under Dr. von Braun's leadership, MSFC developed the Saturn V launch vehicle, which placed the first men, two American astronauts, on the Moon. Wernher von Braun's life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  13. Dr Pugh: a poisoner?

    PubMed

    Paull, J D; Morris, G M

    2012-07-01

    On 16 February 1845 the Reverend W. H. Browne, rector of St John's Church in Launceston, Van Diemen's Land, wrote in his journal, "My dear Wife died very suddenly almost immediately after and in consequence of taking a preparation of Hyd. Cyan. Acid prepared & supplied by Dr Pugh". This journal entry raises a number of questions. Was Dr Pugh treating a condition which he thought merited that treatment or was it a ghastly mistake? Was Caroline Browne suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis? Was hydrocyanic acid an accepted treatment at that time? Did Mrs Browne take the wrong dose? Was an incorrect concentration of the drug prepared by Dr Pugh? Did he use the wrong pharmacopoeia in preparing the hydrocyanic acid? Why was there no inquest? Only some of these questions can be answered. PMID:23230685

  14. 1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 (structure no. 735) on left, DR 2 (structure no. 736) in center, and DR 3 (structure no. 737) looking north 30 degrees west, with tracking radar (large radome) and satcom (satellite communication) system in small radome in view between DR 2 and DR 3 antennae. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A camerman catches Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, his son, Peter, and daughter, Martgrit, as they arrive at the employee picnic held to celebrate man's first landing on the moon 6 days earlier. In the foreground is David R. Newby, Director of Administration and Technical Services at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, explains the purpose of a thermal curtain in the mockup of a Saturn I workshop to U.S. Representative Armistead Seldon of Alabama. The Congressman visited the Marshall Center on March 2, 1968 to tour the workshop and to visit Marshall Center facilities.

  17. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    U.S. Representative Armistead Seldon (D.-Al) inspects the food preparation area of the Saturn I workshop mockup during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center. Explaining the operation of the food preparation area to the congressman is Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director.

  18. Ask Dr. Sue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the need for child care providers to be sure children in their care who are between the ages of 15 months and 5 years have had Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine. Urges child care center staff to avoid use of bean bag infant cushions and to inform parents about the hazards posed by the cushions. (DR)

  19. Dr. Goddard Transports Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard tows his rocket to the launching tower behind a Model A Ford truck, 15 miles northwest of Roswell, New Mexico. 1930- 1932. Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the 'Father of American Rocketry' and as one of three pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1882. He was a theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, who died in 1945, was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wright Brothers were for the begining of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. When the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. This great legacy was covered by more than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death.

  20. Dr. Faustus: Theist or Atheist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karim, Shah Mohammad Sanaul; Fathema, Fawzia; Hakim, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Faustus is the greatest but the most controversial of Marlowe's plays. Among the causes of controversy, whether Dr. Faustus is an atheist or theist deserves utmost attention. This paper is intended to deal with the issue. Though at various stages of the development of the action, Dr. Faustus abjures Trinity, resorts to necromancy, becomes…

  1. [Radiological percutaneous gastrostomy (GRP), 17 años de experiencia, serie de casos del hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío].

    PubMed

    Navarro Falcón, Magnolia Del Carmen; Parejo Campos, Juana; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; García Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2015-01-01

    When assessing a patient nutritional support the state of the gastrointestinal tract is the most important point to consider, whenever possible we should choose the enteral nutrition (EN) over parenteral nutrition (PN) and recognized by its various advantages. The percutaneous gastrostomy (GRP) were introduced in clinical practice as an alternative to surgical gastrostomy (GQ). The speed, simplicity, low cost, low morbidity and low mortality of these techniques has allowed its rapid development.The feeding tubes types used were the balloon-retained devices catheter, the pig tail and the ballon-retained with gastropexia (gastropexia). It is a retrospective study of all patients who were placed GPR in the Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, Sevilla, between September 1996 and September 2013, which aims to study is to describe the characteristics of patients and the complications presented for different types of enteral feeding tubes used. GPR 186 were performed in 176 patients (135 males (76.70%), with an average duration of 303.6 days, the most frequent diseases were cancers of the head and neck 49.46%. The types of feeding tubes used were pigtail 118 (63.44%), balloon-retained devices 22 (11.83%), and gastropexia 46 (24.73%). The most common early complications in the pigtail group were early purulent exudate and early bleeding (2.5 and 3.4% respectively), while in the balloon catheter group the initial output of the probe was most frequent early complication (13.7%), none of these complications were observed in the group of gastropexy. The most common late complication was obstruction probe. The GPR is a safe technique with lower mortality of 1%; Low frequently of early and late complications. A better understanding of this technique can reduce the frequency of complications. PMID:25561125

  2. Introduction of Dr. Andrew V Schally

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Valdés, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    I first met Dr. Andrew V Schally (PhD, MDhc (Multi), DSc, Distinguished Medical Research Scientist, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Professor of Pathology and Department of Medicine,
Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA) many years ago, probably around the beginning of the 1990's in one of his visits to Mexico City (Figure 1). He has many friends in my country since some of the investigations that led to the development of the LHRH agonists were made in a couple of Mexican hospitals in collaboration with some outstanding Mexican physicians that I will mention later. In that time, I was the head of the Department of Urology of the Mexican National Cancer Institute and our Director, Dr. Jaime de la Garza, invited him for a meeting. I was surprised by his humbleness, intelligence and easy going personality, in spite of being a Nobel Prize scientist. PMID:26112485

  3. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    On September 8, 1960 President Dwight D. Eisenhower visited Huntsville, Alabama to dedicate a new NASA field center in honor of General George C. Marshall, Eisenhower's wartime colleague and the founder of the famous Marshall Plan for European recover after World War II. The new George C. Marshall Space Flight Center was placed under the control of Dr. Wernher Von Braun shown here talking with President Eisenhower. As parto f his remarks dedicating the center, President Eisenhowe refereed to General Marshall as a 'man of yar, yet a builder of peace'. the Marshall Center's first major assignment including building the huge Saturn V rocket that launched human beings on their first journey to the surface of the moon in 1969.

  4. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. Nadine Foreman, M.D., August 19, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Dr. Nadine Foreman was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). Dr. Foreman was selected for interview because of the position she held at the University of California, San Francisco. Following a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Foreman describes her work with Dr. Mayo Soley using I-131 in treatment of hyperthyroidism, selection criteria for patients in the radioiodine project, work with Dr. Earl Miller, work at Highland Hospital, radioiodine treatment of diffuse toxic goiter (myxedema), the radiophosphorus and radioiodine programs with Dr. Bert Low-Beer, and treatment of polycythemia vera.

  5. Dr. Hugh Dryden Swearing in Dr. George E. Mueller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Dr. George E. Mueller being sworn in, as Associate Administrator for the Office of Manned Space Flight for NASA, by Dr. Hugh L. Dryden NASAs Deputy Administrator. The ceremony took place at NASA HQ in Washington, DC on September 3, 1963. Mueller served as Associate Administrator from 1963 to 1969, where he was responsible for overseeing the completion of Project Apollo and for beginning the development of the Space Shuttle.

  6. 5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 antenna in background. Photograph shows on left side at bottom foundation berm and along right side bottom stanchion concrete foundations at bottom structural steel assembly. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. 42 CFR 415.162 - Determining payment for physician services furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... exceed $30,000. Example No: 2. Dr. Smith received $25,000 from Hospital X for services as a department head in a teaching hospital. Dr. Smith also voluntarily furnished direct medical services to... compensated services ($25,000) exceeds the $30,000 maximum amount allowable for all of Dr. Smith's...

  8. Wally Schirra Greets Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Apollo 7 Commander Walter M. Schirra, Jr., left, greets Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director, Marshall Space Flight Center and Dr. Kurt Debus, Right, KSC Director, during a prelaunch mission briefing held at the Florida Spaceport.

  9. [Prevention of hepatitis B--HLA DR/DQ in HBs Ag nonresponder].

    PubMed

    Ouchi, E; Hoshino, A; Miura, T; Nagahara, N; Kudo, Y; Tamura, M

    1989-11-01

    To evaluate the immunological background in HBs Ag nonresponders against hepatitis B vaccine, the lymphocyte surface marker and HLA-DR/DQ antigen were determined on hospital personnel, 70 males and 256 females, injected hepatitis B vaccine for three times. The vaccine made from the plasma of HBs Ag carriers was injected at the first and second vaccination and recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was injected at the third vaccination. A month after the third vaccination, blood was withdrawn for HBs antigen test by RIA. Border line cases (cut off index 1.0-1.9) are included in nonresponder (cut off index less than 0.9). Both nonresponders and low responders (cut off index 2-49) are more often seen in males than females and high responder (cut off index 50 or more) are seen more often in young females than males. Lymphocyte surface markers were studied by flow cytometry using the following monoclonal antibodies; OKT 3, 4, 8, DR, NK, Ia 1 and B7. No differences between lymphocyte surface markers of nonresponders and responders were noted. HLA-DR/DQ antigens were studied by the cytotoxicity test using Locus DR/DQ, Terasaki Second DR W-60 Tray and using following antibodies; DR 1, DR 2, DRW 15, DR 4, DR 5, DR 7, DR 9, DRW 10, DRW 8, DRW 12, DRW 13, DRW 6, DRW 52, DRW 53, DQW 1, DQW 6, DQW 2, DQW 3, DQW 7 and DQW 4. No significant differences between HLA-DR/DQ of nonresponders and responders were noted. PMID:2601078

  10. Dr. Hugh L. Dryden - portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Dr. Hugh Latimer Dryden, had many titles after his name in his lifetime. In 1949 he became the director of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Dr. Dryden received many accolades and awards both during his life and after his death, but the greatest and most appropriate honor came on March 26, 1976, when NASA renamed the NASA Flight Research Center as the NASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center. At the dedication ceremony NASA Administrator James C. Fletcher stated: 'in 1924, when the fastest racing planes did well to fly at 280 m.p.h., Dryden was already probing the transonic range of . . . flight. Later in the 1920s, he sought to develop methods of accurately measuring . . . turbulence in wind tunnels. In 1938 he was the first American to deliver the Wright Brothers lecture. His 'Turbulence and the Boundary Layer' became a classic summary on the subject. It is most fitting that this Flight Research Center, with its unique and highly specialized capability for solving aerospace problems, should memorialize the genius of Hugh Dryden.' Dr. Dryden was initially an aerodynamicist with the National Bureau of Standards. He did important early work in high-speed aerodynamics. In 1947 he became the director of aeronautical research for the NACA (a predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). Two years later, he became NACA's director, a position he held until 1958 when he became deputy administrator of NASA.

  11. White Dwarfs in SDSS DR9 and DR10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile Fusillo, Nicola Pietro; Gänsicke, Boris; Koester, Detlev

    2015-06-01

    Currently the largest catalogue of spectroscopically identified WDs is based on the 7th Data Release (DR) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and contains over 20000 WDs (Kleinman et al. 2013). However, only a fraction of all WDs in the photometric footprint of SDSS have been spectroscopically followed up. Using DR7 spectroscopy as a training sample, we developed a method to select high confidence photometric WD candidates. The novelty of our selection is that it allows us to assign to any object with multi-colour and proper motion data a well-defined "probability of being a white dwarf" (or a contaminant). Exploiting this selection method we compiled a catalogue (Gentile Fusillo et al. in prep) which currently covers the entire photometric footprint of SDSS, 14555sq deg, with a limiting magnitude of g ≤ 19. The catalogue contains over 20000 high-confidence WDs and WD candidates 11500 of which have not yet been followed up with Sloan spectroscopy. Even though, so far, our catalogue relies only SDSS we plan to extend the sky coverage as additional deep multi-colour large area surveys become available. DR10 includes over 1.4 million spectra taken with the new BOSS spectrograph, which improves over the original SDSS spectograph in both resolution and wavelength coverage, but has so far not been systematically mined for WD science. As part of this project, we also inspected over 8000 BOSS spectra of bright (g ≤ 19) colour selected sources and classified 1765 new WDs. We used this independent, spectroscopically confirmed sample to further validate our selection method. Finally we discuss possible application of our catalogue , focusing on the selection and follow up of 9 new DZs which show strong pollution from elements other than Ca and IR excess emission emission consistent with the presence of debris discs.

  12. [Cutaneous myiasis by Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera Calliphoridae) in Hospital Universidad del Norte, Soledad, Atlántico].

    PubMed

    de la Ossa, Napoleón; Castro, Luis Eduardo; Visbal, Lila; Santos, Ana María; Díaz, Esther; Romero-Vivas, Claudia M E

    2009-03-01

    Human myiasis is the parasitism of human tissues by fly larvae. Diagnoses are based on clinical pattern of tissue damage and presence of insect stages. Herein, a case myiasis is described in a seven-year-old female child. She presented with fever associated with abscessed scalp lesions containing exposed larvae. Severe pediculosis was also observed. The patient was hospitalized and treated with clindamycin, gentamicin (for bacterial secondary infections) and ivermectin (treatment for lice) after which the patient showed clinical improvement and was discharged four days later. Since human myiasis can be caused by a number of different species, larvae were collected from the patient and identified as those of Cochliomyia hominivorax (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Because other cases of coinfestation of flies and lice are on record, health workers are to be alerted about the possible pediculosis-myasis risk. PMID:19753834

  13. [DR. ARIEH LEIB SHIMONI-MEKLER - EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT SPECIALIST].

    PubMed

    Gilbey, Peter; Pikkel, Joseph; Netzer, Aviram; Golz, Avishay

    2016-04-01

    Although the inauguration of the new hospital in Zefat built by Baron Rothschild took place in 1910, the building was not used as a hospital until World War I when it was confiscated by the Turks for patients affected with typhus, and later it was converted into a military hospital. The second inauguration of the renewed hospital was in June 1919, and the medical activity was assigned to the American Zionist Medical Unit for Palestine' (AZMU), later - 'Hadassah Medical Organization'. Among the first doctors that were sent to Zefat by AZMU was Dr. Arieh Leib Shimoni-Mekler - Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat specialist. Dr. Shimoni-Mekler worked in the hospital during the years 1921-2. PMID:27323542

  14. Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  15. 100-DR-1 radiological surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Naiknimbalkar, N.M.

    1994-01-28

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted over the surface of the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 100-DR-1 radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the operable unit-specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the operable unit surface area. The survey methodology was based on utilization of USRADS for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near 6 in. and at 3 ft from the surface soil. The purpose of the survey is to identify the location of unidentified subsurface radioactive material areas and any surface contamination associated with these areas. The radiological surveys were conducted using both a digital count rate meter with a NaI detector reporting in counts per minute (CPM) and a dose rate meter reporting micro-Roentgen per hour (uR) connected to a CHEMRAD Tennessee Corp. Series 2000 USRADS. The count rate meter was set for gross counting, i.e., Window ``out``. The window setting allows detection of low, intermediate, and high energy photons. The USRADS equipment is used to record the detector readings verses the location of the readings, generate a map of the survey area, and save the data on computer storage media.

  16. Interview with Dr. Charley Zeanah

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Charles Zeanah is the Mary K. Sellars-Polchow Chair in Psychiatry, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Vice Chair for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans. He is also Executive Director of the Institute for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health at Tulane. He is the recipient of multiple awards including the Irving Phillips Award for Prevention, (AACAP), the Presidential Citation for Distinguished Research and Leadership in Infant Mental Health (American Orthopsychiatric Association), the Sarah Haley Memorial Award for Clinical Excellence (International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies), the Blanche F. Ittelson Award for Research in Child Psychiatry (APA), and the Serge Lebovici Award for International Contributions in Infant Mental Health (World Association for Infant Mental Health). Dr. Zeanah is a Distinguished Fellow of AACAP, a Distinguished Fellow of the APA and a Board Member of Zero to Three. He is the Editor of Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3rd edition) considered as the state of the art textbook and standard reference in the field of Infant Mental Health. PMID:23667354

  17. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Hemophilia at the University Hospital Virgen Del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Raquel M.; Peciña, Ana; Sánchez, Beatriz; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Núñez, Ramiro; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders, with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Reproductive options for the families affected with hemophilia, aiming at the prevention of the birth of children with severe coagulation disorders, include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to hemophilia, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 34 couples have been included in our program since 2005 (30 for hemophilia A and 4 for hemophilia B). Overall, 60 cycles were performed, providing a total of 508 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 81.7% and the live birth rate per cycle ranged from 10.3 to 24.1% depending on the methodological approach applied. Although PGD for hemophilia can be focused on gender selection of female embryos, our results demonstrate that methodological approaches that allow the diagnosis of the hemophilia status of every embryo have notorious advantages. Our PGD Program resulted in the birth of 12 healthy babies for 10 out of the 34 couples (29.4%), constituting a relevant achievement for the Spanish Public Health System within the field of haematological disorders. PMID:26258137

  18. Dr. von Braun, Dr. Mueller, and Dr. Rees at the Firing Room During the SA-6 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This photograph depicts an intense moment during the SA-6 launch at the Firing Room. Dr. von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is at center; to his left is Dr. George Mueller, Associate Director for Marned Space Flight; and far right is Dr. Eberhard Rees, Director for Research and Development, MSFC. The SA-6, the sixth flight of the Saturn 1 vehicle, launched a S-IV stage (a second stage) and an Apollo boilerplate spacecraft.

  19. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, greets vice president Spiro T. Agnew in the Launch Control Center for the Apollo 14 mission. Between Dr. Von Braun and Mr. Agnew are their Royal Highnesses, The Prince and Princess of Spain. The royal visitors greeted the launch control team in th enter after the launch of Apollo 14.

  20. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at a picnic.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, stakes claim to a table for the picnic celebrating man's first lunar landing. With Dr. Von Braun are his wife, Maria (seated, right), and son, Peter (back to camera). His daughter, Margrit, was also present, but is hidden from view by friends in this view.

  1. Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director

    MedlinePlus

    ... that, with Dr. Collins at the helm, the Human Genome Project met its milestones ahead of schedule and under budget. The project concluded successfully in April 2003 with the complete map of the human genome, the instruction book for peoples' DNA. Dr. Collins ...

  2. [Portrait of Dr Milenko Petrović (1884-1950)].

    PubMed

    Kljaić, Leposava; Borota, Radoslav

    2008-01-01

    Dr Milenko Petrović was one of the very distinguished physicians in the history of Sombor city, who significantly contributed to the development of health care in Voivodina. His father Dimitrije was a professor in the High Teacher-training School in Sombor, recognized writer and politician of his epoch. He was born in Sombor in 1884, where he was educated and finished grammar school. For medical studies he moved to Budapest as a boarder of the famous Tekelianum, and graduated in 1908. He started specialisation in surgery, but being a great patriot he voluntarily recruited in the Serbian army to fight in Balkan liberation wars against Turkey. For his excellent work as a war surgeon he obtained many recognitions. After completing specialization in surgery in Debrecin, he returned to his native city Sombor, where he intended to practice as a physician, but because af the outbreak of the first world he was mobilized and sent to the front in Galicia. After the war he again returned to Sombor where he was immediatelly nominated for the main county physician and then begins his fruitful many year's work on the establishment and promotion of the health care in Sombor and broader territory. As the main county phsician he initiated the foundation and construction of the hospital in Sombor, because of high mortality rate among children, and spreading of contagious diseases like tuberculosis and trachoma. The construction of the hospital was completed in 1925 and Dr. Petrović was appointed its first director and this duty he performed for many years till the World War 2 in 1941. Under his management the hospital in Sombor became one of the best quality hospitals in the country and gave a big contribution to the promotion of health of the inhabitants of Voivodina. In spite of his extensive duties in the hospital. Dr. Milenko Petrović was very much engaged in social work, as the president of library "Laza Kosti ć". in the Soko association, Fire brigade, Rotary club, and he

  3. From the Field: Speech Therapy Outcome Measures--Interview with Dr. Pam Enderby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an interview with Dr. Pam Enderby--a speech language therapist and professor at the Institute of General Practice and Primary Care at the University of Sheffield, Community Sciences Centre, Northern General Hospital, in the United Kingdom--conducted by Judy Montgomery, Editor in Chief, of "Communication Disorders…

  4. Dr. Sadik decries early parenthood.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    At the Tenth Anniversary Conference of the Center for Population Options, which was held in Washington on September 24, 1990, Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), spoke concerning the problems created by early parenthood. Childbirth is the greatest health risk young women, after reaching puberty, face in developing countries; their children are less likely to survive than those born to those over 20. Early childbearing means larger families; this, when combined with shorter time spans between generations, leads to rapid population growth and endangers sustainable development in societies with limited natural resources. As a social and economic issue, adolescent fertility limits educational achievement, status, and full participation in the community for women and girls. In many societies, women are second class citizens; they are more likely to die in infancy than boys, they are less likely to attend school, and they leave school earlier. They derive their status from motherhood and spend practically all of their fertile years pregnant and caring for children. They have no other option because their futures are determined by others. PMID:12346165

  5. [Interview with Dr. Ricardo Bressani].

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    In an interview Dr. Ricardo Bressani, a chemical engineer by profession and a consultant of the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP), talks about the search for a product later given the name of Incaparina, which was eventually developed for food supplementation programs by INCAP. Experiments were made with soybeans, cottonseed, and various cereals to arrive at the optimal mixture of 62% cereal and 38% protein for this product. In addition, vitamins and lysine were added. The major demand for this biscuit occurred between 1976 and 1978. Since that time sales have ebbed partly owing to the soaring commodity prices. Incaparina is sold in Guatemala and El Salvador and there are tests going on in Mexico, Colombia, and Cuba to produce it locally. This product is also proof of the benefit of developing leguminous cereal systems. The optimal combination is 70% cereals and 30% legumes, each providing 50% protein. The potential of mixing various other cereals and fruits are also being studied. A large number (up to 60 annually) of nutritional research papers are published on the national level and in Latin America in prestigious scientific journals whose monitoring calls for coordination between different authors. PMID:12295846

  6. Dr Valter Rukavina - amateur painter.

    PubMed

    Glavocic, Daina

    2008-01-01

    In this essay Dr Valter Rukavina (Rijeka 1896-1972), excellent specialist in infectious diseases and professor of the Rijeka University School of Medicine, is presented as successful amateur painter. He had been refining his talent through relentless practice since the school days, complementing it with skills and advice from established painters he associated with. He favoured figurative, realistic and somewhat romantic expression for his themes such as coastal landscapes, marinas, Quarnero sceneries, still life in tempera or oil, and drawings in ink or sepia. Despite partial colour blindness, he successfully used colour. He featured in a number of group exhibitions such as that of amateur painters of Rijeka in 1950, of painters physicians of Yugoslavia (Zagreb, 1956), in the Second International Exhibition of Contemporary Art (Florence, 1964), exhibition of the Rijeka branch of the Croatian Association of Visual Artists (Belgrade, 1966), and the 1969 exhibition in Opatija. His native city hosted two one-man exhibitions, the first retrospective in 1971, while he was still alive, and the second posthumous in 2007, with a good selection of his life's work. PMID:20136338

  7. Letter to Dr. Felix Bronner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Dear Dr. Bronner: I have been reading in The Physiologist the letters from senior physiologists for many years with great interest. It is impressive that many of the respondents are still pursuing scientific endeavours in their 70's and some even in their 80's. The interesting task is to ponder the relative causative proportions of heredity and environment responsible. One wonders whether knowing something about physiology engenders longer and more productive lives? I suspect so because of the accompanying self-discipline. But another factor would seem to be the pervasive joy of working in this profession. I have been fortunate to be able to acquire the joy of physiology during my graduate studies at Illinois, and to have been able to carry it over here at NASA, Ames Research Center for the past 40 years. A truly academic style research environment at a federal research center is rare. The trick to a joyous research career is to overcome those ever-present slings and arrows of outrageous fortune with dignity whenever possible. To that end I have found solace and guidance in reading the history of warfare and its leaders, especially Sun Tsu's The Art of War and Clauswitz's On War. I became eligible for retirement in 1993, but to insure domestic tranquility and also the joy of pursuing my research hobby have continued working in the laboratory on human research. It is troubling to see that funding for individual scientists conducting human research is declining rapidly, along with their new ideas; perhaps the old ones are more comfortable. Hopefully I can provide a similar response when I'm 80! Thanks for your interest. Sincerely, John Greenleaf

  8. Dr. Wernher von Braun in his Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun is in his office, with an artist's concept of a lunar lander in background and models of Mercury-Redstone, Juno, and Saturn I. Dr. Wernher von Braun, the first MSFC Director, led a team of German rocket scientists, called the Rocket Team, to the United States, first to Fort Bliss/White Sands, later being transferred to the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. They were further transferred to the newly established NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama in 1960, and Dr. von Braun became the first Center Director.

  9. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Mass. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  10. [Dr. John Baptiste Edouard Gélineau].

    PubMed

    Janković, S; Susić, V; Sokić, D; Lević, Z

    1996-01-01

    became the "Intern" of the Navy Hospital and next year a "Surgeon of the Third Class". As a Navy surgeon he visited French colonies in the Indian ocean: first the Reunion island and then Mayotte island of the Commores Archipelago. Of this period he wrote "Voyage a i'lle de la Réunion", memoirs published much later, in 1905, in which he described colonial life and abolition of slavery. The story of Elise, a beauteous Creole woman, a concubine of a young naval Commander, who delivered a child that soon died, inexorably points to the autobiographic character of his work. He defended a doctoral thesis "Aperçu Medical de I'lle de Mayotte" at Montpellier University School of Medicine in 1858, using the data collected during his year-and-a-half stay on a Mayotte island; at that time he was a "Navy Surgeon of the Second Class". For his dedication in fighting against epidemics that broke out during the French-German war in 1870 he was nominated for the Legion of Honor, but received it only later. In 1871 Gélineau introduced "Doctor Gélineau's tablets" for the treatment of epilepsy (contained bromide and arsenic). He was a member of the Société de Médicine, Société d' Hypnologie, La-Société Française d' Hygiène, and a few others. After retirement at the age of 72, Gélineau switched to wine production, continuing the family tradition; for the quality of his Bordeaux wines he was awarded gold medals at the Anvers and Paris Exhibitions. Dr. Gélineau died on March 2, 1906, at Argeles Gazost in Pyrnees honored by the titles of Chevalier de la Légion d' Honneur, Officier d'Academie and Commander of Nichan of the Ottoman Empire. PMID:9132972

  11. Frequency of cancer in children residing in Mexico City and treated in the hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (1996–2001)

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-Ocaña, Servando; González-Miranda, Guadalupe; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique; Martínez-García, María del Carmen; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Background The objective of this article is to present the frequency of cancer in Mexican children who were treated in the hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Mexico City (IMSS-MC) in the period 1996–2001. Methods The Registry of Cancer in Children, started in 1996 in the IMSS-MC, is an on-going, prospective register. The data from 1996 through 2001 were analyzed and the different types of cancer were grouped according to the International Classification for Cancer in Children (ICCC). From this analysis, the general and specific frequencies by age and by sex were obtained for the different groups of neoplasms. Also, the frequency of the stage of the disease that had been diagnosed in cases of children with solid tumors was obtained. Results A total of 1,702 new cases of children with cancer were registered, with the male/female ratio at 1.1/1. Leukemias had the highest frequency with 784 cases (46.1%) and, of these, acute lymphoblastic leukemias were the most prevalent with 614 cases (78.3%). Thereafter, in descending order of frequency, were tumors of the central nervous system (CNST) with 197 cases (11.6%), lymphomas with 194 cases (11.4%), germinal cell tumors with 110 cases (6.5%), and bone tumors with 97 cases (5.7%). The highest frequency of cancer was found in the group of one to four year-olds that had 627 cases (36.8%). In all the age groups, leukemias were the most frequent. In the present work, the frequency of Hodgkin's disease (~4%) was found to be lower than that (~10%) in previous studies and the frequency of tumors of the sympathetic nervous system was low (2.3%). Of those cases of solid tumors for which the stage of the disease had been determined, 66.9% were diagnosed as being Stage III or IV. Conclusions The principal cancers in the children treated in the IMSS-MC were leukemias, CNST, and lymphomas, consistent with those reported by developed countries. A 2.5-fold reduction in the frequency of Hodgkin's disease was found

  12. Dr. von Braun With German Rocket Experimenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified as to performance during firing. From left to right are R. Nebel, Dr. Ritter, Mr. Baermueller, Kurt Heinish, Herman Oberth, Klaus Riedel, Wernher von Braun, and an unidentified person.

  13. Dr. von Braun at the Farewell Ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Dr. von Braun was honored with a series of farewell events and ceremonies prior to his reassignment to NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C. Alabama Governor Brewer greets Dr. von Braun following his speech at the front of the Madison County Courthouse in Huntsville, Alabama on February 24, 1970. Behind are Madison County Commissioner James Record, Huntsville Mayor Joe Davis, and U.S. Senator Sparkman.

  14. Childhood Picture of Dr. von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1912-01-01

    This is a childhood picture of Dr. von Braun (center) with his brothers. Dr. Wernher von Braun was born in Wirsitz, Germany, March 23, 1912. His childhood dreams of marned space flight were fulfilled when giant Saturn rockets, developed under his direction at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, boosted the manned Apollo spacecraft to the Moon. His life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  15. [Dr. Moritz Wallach--a century of medicine and tradition in Shaare Zedek].

    PubMed

    Navot, Orit

    2003-06-01

    Dr. Wallach, who founded the Shaare Zedek Hospital and managed the institution for forty-five years, was instrumental in providing modern medical care to Jerusalem residents since his arrival in the city in 1891. He dedicated his life to medicine, to the Jerusalem Jewish community, and to improving the quality of service provided by the existing medical establishment. He was one of the outstanding personalities in a city and community struggling for existence. The Jewish religious character that marks today's Shaare Zedek hospital was determined 100 years ago by Dr. Wallach, who integrated the ancient Jewish moral spirit into a modern medical service tradition. While fulfilling his daily tasks, both as a practicing physician and as the hospital-director, Dr. Wallach became a role model to those who followed him. He mixed freely with the "elite" and his personal relations with local dignitaries, political figures, influential westerners, intellectuals, and important foreign diplomats contributed significantly to the growth, success, and reputation the hospital enjoyed during the last century. On the other hand, he was also personally involved with destitute new immigrants to Eretz Israel and actively engaged in finding jobs, housing, and employment for them. Dr. Wallach became a legend in his own time, both locally and internationally. Due to his professional status and personality, Dr. Wallach became a representative of the Jewish community. He had the ability to speak for the Jews with the Ottoman authorities, and afterwards with the British Mandate authorities. He played a significant role in educating the population in public responsibility, while concurrently leaving his mark on generations of physicians who learned from him the value of precision, loyalty, professional secrecy, and medical responsibility. He was one of the "Giants" of the land (Yishuv) in its critical formative years. PMID:12858837

  16. Stroke Hospitalization Down for Many in U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... percent among blacks. Dr. Paul Wright, chair of neurology at North Shore University Hospital, in Manhasset, N. ... healthier life," said Towfighi, an assistant professor of neurology at USC's Keck School of Medicine. Healthier lifestyle ...

  17. [[The Lactéol's laboratory of Dr Boucard (Laboratoire du Dr Boucard].

    PubMed

    Raynal, Cécile; Lefebvre, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Shortly before 1910, Dr Boucard creates his laboratory in Paris. It manufactures and sells a drug based on lactic ferments the " Lactéol du Dr Boucard" (Dr's Boucard Lactéol) that will make the fortune of the physician. The article explains Dr Boucard's life and his relationship with the arts (painting and photography), and tells the story of his laboratory until the 2000s, referring to the pharmacists who succeeded them, as well as the various buildings where were elaborated Lactéol's variants. PMID:27281930

  18. Mother-baby friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Aragon-choudhury, P

    1996-01-01

    In Manila, the Philippines, the Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital has been a maternity hospital for 75 years. It averages 90 deliveries a day. Its fees are P200-P500 for a normal delivery and P800-P2000 for a cesarean section. Patients pay what they can and pay the balance when they can. The hospital provides a safe motherhood package that encompasses teaching responsible parenthood, prenatal care, labor, delivery, postpartum care, breast feeding, family planning, and child survival. In 1986, the hospital introduced innovative policies and procedures that promote, protect, and support breast feeding. It has a rooming-in policy that has saved the hospital P6.5 million so far. In the prenatal stage, hospital staff inform pregnant women that colostrum protects the newborn against infections, that suckling stimulates milk production, and that there is no basis to the claim of having insufficient breast milk. Sales representatives of milk substitutes are banned from the hospital. Staff confiscate milk bottles or formula. A lactation management team demonstrates breast feeding procedures. Mothers also receive support on the correct way of breast feeding from hospital staff, volunteers from the Catholic Women's League, consumer groups, and women lawyers. The hospital's policy is no breast milk, no discharge. This encourages mothers to motivate each other to express milk immediately after birth. The hospital has received numerous awards for its breast feeding promotion efforts. UNICEF has designated Fabella Hospital as a model of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. The hospital serves as the National Lactation Management Education Training Center. People from other developing countries have received training in lactation management here. The First Lady of the Philippines, the First Lady of the US, and the Queen of Spain have all visited the hospital. The hospital has also integrated its existing services into a women's health care center. PMID:12347466

  19. NASA Sponsors Cancer Research at Children's Hospital

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (left), during a visit at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, discussed how NASA's special lighting technology may soon treat cancer. Goldin talked with Dr.Harry Whelan (right) and Dr. Kerneth Reichert (center left), both pediatric neurologists with the Hospital and professors at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Accompanied by Astronaut Mary Ellen Weber, Goldin was shown this innovative treatment, called Photodynamic Therapy, a method used to destroy the tumor without damaging the delicate brain tissue around it. The treatment uses tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) developed for Space Product Development plant growth experiments.

  20. Geophysical survey of 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4, 100-D Area

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, K.A.

    1993-10-01

    The objective of this Geophysical Survey was to verify the location of the 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4. A surface monument currently marks its location. The crib is 10 feet by 10 feet and 15 feet deep. Ground-Penetrating Radar was the geophysical method selected to conduct the investigation.

  1. The Japanese Hospital in Broome, 1910-1926. A harmony of contrasts.

    PubMed

    Stride, P; Louws, A

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese Hospital in Broome remains the only hospital in Australia's history predominantly staffed, controlled and funded by a linguistically, culturally and geographically alien nation. Initially the proposal, challenging prevailing attitudes, was bitterly opposed by the white community, but the hospital became respected thanks to Dr Tadashi Suzuki, the hospital's first doctor, and his successors' clinical skills and compassion. PMID:26181534

  2. Dr. Wernher von Braun Laid to Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paper Clip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. Dr. von Braun died in Alexandria, Va., on June 16, 1977, seven years after his NASA appointment. This photo was taken at the site where he was laid to rest.

  3. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  4. Leading Healthcare Change Across the Care Continuum: An Interview With Dr Kenneth Rempher.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz; Joseph, M Lindell

    2016-01-01

    Kenneth Rempher, PhD, MBA, CENP, RN, is the chief nursing officer for the University of Iowa (UI) Hospitals and Clinics. In his 20-year career, he has distinguished himself as a visionary healthcare leader. Colleagues describe Dr Rempher as a strong, transformational leader, guiding the UI enterprise through a time of uncertainty and change. This interview by the CGEAN provides insight to his leadership style, successes, and ideas on the future of care delivery. PMID:27442899

  5. [Establishment and application of DR automatic system based on DICOM3.0 BPE].

    PubMed

    Wang, Longchen; Hu, Shundong; Li, Bin

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a new application of PACS in our hospital. Through the integration of PACS, HIS and RIS, digital transformation is made in every step. The functional modules of Body Parts Examined in DICOM is set and good link between PACS and DR is made. So the equipment can retrieval the inspection area automatically and make adjustment on the parameters correspondingly. It makes the workflow optimized and improves the efficiency greatly. PMID:22571147

  6. An Interview with Dr. Deborah W. Proctor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2007-01-01

    In an interview, Dr. Deborah W. Proctor, eCurriculum Director for Academic Innovations/ Minnesota Online and Co-Chair for the MERLOT International Conference, outlines her academic path that led to her current position and interests. As e-Curriculum Director for Academic Innovations in the Office of the Chancellor she works with system…

  7. Dr. von Braun Visits Huntsville Boys Club

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun, Director of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and chairman of this year's United Givers Fund (UGF) drive at MSFC, takes time out from the problems of sending a man to the Moon to talk baseball with 11-year-old Randy Smith at the Huntsville Boys Club.

  8. ORAC-DR: Astronomy data reduction pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Economou, Frossie; Cavanagh, Brad; Currie, Malcolm J.; Gibb, Andy

    2013-10-01

    ORAC-DR is a generic data reduction pipeline infrastructure; it includes specific data processing recipes for a number of instruments. It is used at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, AAT, and LCOGT. This pipeline runs at the JCMT Science Archive hosted by CADC to generate near-publication quality data products; the code has been in use since 1998.

  9. Dr. Akira Tonomura: Master of Experimental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Akira Tonomura, Hitachi Fellow, passed away on May 2, 2012 at the age of 70. As a classmate at the University of Tokyo and his long-time friend, I would like to describe my personal memory of Tonomura and a brief review of his contributions to fundamental physics.

  10. Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby: The Complete Eugenicist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodwell, Grant

    1997-01-01

    Profiles the work of Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby, a late 19th-century propagandist for eugenics. Eugenics is a science that deals with the transmission of hereditary racial traits, coupled with a desire to use this for the elimination of social ills. Discusses Saleeby's work with the Eugenics Education Society. (MJP)

  11. Dr. Wernher Von Braun presents a certificate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, presents a humorous certificate to Major General Charles W. Eifler, commanding general of Redstone Arsenal, at the close of a farewell luncheon for the general prior to General Eifler moving to a new European duty station.

  12. Dr. Israel Cuellar (1946-2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamarripa, Manuel X.

    2009-01-01

    On September 7th, 2008, the mental health field lost a trailblazing researcher and clinician as he lost his battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Israel Cuellar made significant contributions to the study of acculturation including its importance in delivering appropriate mental health…

  13. Interview [with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey, author of "Reading Educational Research: How to Avoid Getting Statistically Snookered." During the interview, Bracey explains why he considers the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) as a "weapon of mass destruction" and that he sees nothing to suggest that NCLB has improved schools.…

  14. A TRIBUTE TO DR. WILLIAM PENN WATKINSON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. William Penn Watkinson (known to colleagues as "Penn") of EPA¿s health research lab (National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory) of Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, died Wednesday, December 13 after a battle with lung cancer. He was a member of the Pulmonar...

  15. DR and CR: Recent advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Schaefer-Prokop, C M; De Boo, D W; Uffmann, M; Prokop, M

    2009-11-01

    After some initial reluctance, nowadays transition from conventional analogue-to-digital radiographic technique is realized in the vast majority of institutions. The eventual triumph of digital over conventional technique is related to its undoubted advantages with respect to image quality and improved image handling in the context of a picture archiving and communication system. CR represents the older system, which matured over decades and experienced some important recent improvements with respect to dose efficiency and work-flow efficiency that strengthened its position. It represents a very versatile, economically attractive system that is equally suited for integrated systems as well as for cassette-based imaging at the bedside. DR systems offer superb image quality and realistic options for dose reduction based on their high dose efficiency. While for a long time only integrated systems were on the market suited for a large patient throughput, also mobile DR systems became recently available. While for the next years, it is likely that DR and CR systems will coexist, the long term perspective of CR will depend on further innovations with respect to dose efficiency and signal-to-noise characteristics while for DR economical aspects and broader availability of mobile systems will play a role. PMID:19695809

  16. The Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled Renamed The Hospital for Special Surgery 1940; The War Years 1941–1945

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In 1939, the 75th anniversary program marking the founding of the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (R & C), the oldest orthopaedic hospital in the nation, was held at the hospital site in New York City. Dr. Philip D. Wilson, Surgeon-in-Chief since 1935, used this event to mark the return of the hospital to its leadership role in the country. When the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled first opened its doors on May 1, 1863, the name of the hospital was not unusual; it described the type of patients treated. In 1940, the Board of Managers with guidance from Dr. Wilson changed the name to the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). In 1941, with Britain engaged in a European war, Dr. Wilson felt there was a need for the Americans to support the British. He personally organized the American Hospital in Britain, a privately funded voluntary unit, to help care for the wounded. After the United States actually entered World War II in December 1941, HSS quickly organized support at all levels with a significant number of professional and auxiliary staff, eventually enlisting in the military. Even with such staff turnover, the hospital continued to function under Dr. Wilson’s leadership. After the war ended in 1945, Wilson forged ahead to further restore HSS as a leader in musculoskeletal medicine and surgery. PMID:19048348

  17. Dr Charles Thomas Jackson's (1805-80) life after death: the 20th century mythology.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Richard

    2007-08-01

    References to Dr Charles Thomas Jackson in 20th century anaesthesia literature and biographical dictionaries and encyclopedias emphasize his maniacal insanity and its relation to his usurpations of the discoveries of others, including the controversy with William TG Morton concerning the honour of the discovery of surgical anaesthesia. In 1873, seven years before his death, he experienced sudden collapse and paralysis requiring hospitalization. Seminal 19th century brain research before his hospitalization correlated the signs and symptoms of his illness with pathology found at his autopsy. PMID:17641787

  18. Dr. Richard J. Whelan: Seeing the Field of Emotional and Behavior Disorders through the Lens of a Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaff, Marilyn S.; Teagarden, Jim; Zabel, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Richard J. Whelan is a distinguished professor emeritus at the University of Kansas. His earliest professional experiences were at the Children's Hospital (Southard School) of the Menninger Clinic, where he served as a recreational therapist, teacher, and director of education. During his career at the University of Kansas and the KU Medical…

  19. Hospital Utilization for Injection Drug Use-Related Soft Tissue Infections in Urban versus Rural Counties in California

    PubMed Central

    Etzioni, David A.; Hurley, Brian; Holtom, Paul; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Asch, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Drug related-soft tissue infections (DR-STIs) are a significant source of hospital utilization in inner-city urban areas where injection drug use is common but the magnitude of hospital utilization for DR-STIs outside of inner-city urban areas is not known. We described the magnitude and characteristics of hospital utilization for DR-STIs in urban versus rural counties in California. All discharges from all nonfederal hospitals in California in 2000 with ICD-9 codes for a soft tissue infection and for drug dependence/abuse were abstracted from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development discharge database. There were 4,152 DR-STI discharges in 2000 from hospitals in 49 of California's 58 counties. Residents of 12 large metropolitan counties accounted for 3,598 discharges (87% of total). The majority of DR-STI discharges were from urban safety net hospitals with county indigent programs and Medicaid as the expected payment source and opiate related discharge diagnoses. Hospital utilization for DR-STIs in California is highest in large urban metropolitan counties, although DR-STI discharges are widespread. Increased access to harm reduction services and drug treatment may reduce government health care expenditures by preventing unnecessary hospital utilization for DR-STIs. PMID:16736367

  20. [The life of Dr. John William Heron, the second superintendent of Chejungwon].

    PubMed

    Kim, D K; Kim, T S

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to overview the life of John W. Heron, M. D. who was the first appointed medical missionary to Korea by the Presbyterian Church USA. Although he was a competent doctor as well as a devoted missionary, he is not well-known yet, because he died early after 5 years' service in Korea. Dr. Heron was born in Derbyshire, England on June 15, 1856. His father, Rev. E. S. Heron, was a Scotch Minister of Congregational Church. His family emigrated to America in 1870 when he was fourteen years old and settled in Knoxville, Tennessee. In 1881, he was admitted to the University of Tennessee Medical School and graduated with highest honors in 1883. After training in New York University Hospital, he refused the offer of professorship from the University of Tennessee to become a medical missionary to Korea. He arrived in Seoul on June 21, 1885 and began to work in Royal Government Hospital, Chejungwon, the predecessor of Severance Hospital. In 1887, he became the superintendent of the Hospital following Dr. Horace N. Allen. He also worked for the Royal family and sometimes traveled to the rural areas to care for the patients. He started Chejungwon Church which later became Namdaemoon Presbyterian Church. In 1887, Dr. Heron worked as a member of the Bible translation committee and in 1889, he was elected as the chairman of the Public Committee of the Presbyterian Churches. In 1890, he established 'The Korean Religious Tract Society (Chosunsyungkyoseohoi) with Underwood and Ohlinger. The society published and replenished Christian books, periodical magazines and booklets. In the Summer of 1890, Dr. Heron did his best to take care of the sick suffering from an epidemic dysentery and himself got infected because of the terrible overwork. He passed away on July 26th, 1890. On his deathbed, he told his soldier and native friends around him as follow: "Jesus loves you. He gave His life for you. Stand by Him!" The martyrdom of Dr. Heron should be remembered in

  1. Dr. von Braun and Dr. Stuhlinger With a Model of the Nuclear-Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, taken at the Walt Disney Studios in California, Dr. Wernher von Braun and Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger are shown discussing the concepts of nuclear-electric spaceships designed to undertake the mission to the planet Mars. As a part of the Disney 'Tomorrowland' series on the exploration of space, the nuclear-electric vehicles were shown in the last three television films, entitled 'Mars and Beyond,' which first aired in December 1957.

  2. Dr.L: Distributed Recursive (Graph) Layout

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-11-19

    Dr. L provides two-dimensional visualizations of very large abstract graph structures. it can be used for data mining applications including biology, scientific literature, and social network analysis. Dr. L is a graph layout program that uses a multilevel force-directed algorithm. A graph is input and drawn using a force-directed algorithm based on simulated annealing. The resulting layout is clustered using a single link algorithm. This clustering is used to produce a coarsened graph (fewer nodes)more » which is then re-drawn. this process is repeated until a sufficiently small graph is produced. The smallest graph is drawn and then used as a basis for drawing the original graph by refining the series of coarsened graphs that were produced. The layout engine can be run in serial or in parallel.« less

  3. Dr. Wernher von Braun In His Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paperclip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. This photo depicts von Braun in his office at MSFC.

  4. Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr., metallurgist extraordinaire.

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, Floyd Michael

    2010-10-01

    The organizers of the Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr. Memorial Symposium: Deformation and Interfacial Phenomena in Advanced High-Temperature Materials are honoring the memory of Dr. Stephens and his many technical contributions that were accomplished over a relatively brief twenty year career. His research spanned the areas of creep and deformation of metals, dispersion-strengthened alloys and their properties, metal matrix composite materials, processing and properties of refractory metals, joining of ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic systems, active braze alloy development, and mechanical modeling of soldered and brazed assemblies. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight his research and engineering accomplishments, particularly during his professional career at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM.

  5. Centennial Presidential Perspective: Dr. Alfred Blalock

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Claude A.; George, Timothy J.; Conte, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Great men are not a common occurrence. Indeed, they are a rare find. Though respected and lauded in their time, it is only in retrospect that their true contributions can be adequately measured as a surgeon, an educator and a scientist. Such is the case of Dr. Alfred Blalock. Many have considered him the father of modern cardiac surgery. All consider his “blue baby” operation to be one of the landmarks of cardiac surgery and, as the chief of surgery at Johns Hopkins, he trained many who would become the leaders of our discipline. His continual reach for excellence helped him to not only affect, but revolutionize the paradigm of surgical research, an understanding of the physiology of shock and the surgical management of pulmonic stenosis/atresia. Dr. Blalock was the 30th president of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery and his presidential address was given in 1951. PMID:22248679

  6. Dr. von Braun Reviewing Spacecraft Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph was taken after Dr. von Braun moved from his post as Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning at NASA Headquarters. On June 27, 1970, he visited the MSFC again during the center's 10th anniversary to look at a mockup of the spacecraft that would later be known as Skylab. In this photograph, von Braun is talking with George Hardy of the MSFC Astronautics Lab.

  7. Dr. von Braun Reviewing Spacecraft Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph was taken after Dr. von Braun moved from his post as Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning at NASA Headquarters. On June 27, 1970, he visited the MSFC again during the center's 10th anniversary to look at a mockup of the spacecraft that would later be known as Skylab. In this photograph, von Braun (left) and Fred W. Kelley examine an ST-100 stellar instrument platform in MSFC's Astrionics Lab.

  8. Dr. Wernher Von Braun examines a ruby crystal.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, and Dr. Eberhard Rees (left), deputy director, technical, examine a ruby crystal used in laser experiments in the Marshall Center's Space Sciences Laboratory.

  9. Dr. von Braun Surrenders to U.S. Army

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1945-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun surrenders to U.S. Army Counterintelligence persornel of the 44th Infantry Division in Ruette, Bavaria on May 2, 1945. Left to right are Charles Stewart, CIC agent; Dr. Herbert Axster; Dieter Huzel; Dr. von Braun (arm in cast); Magnus von Braun (brother); and Hans Lindenberg.

  10. Dr. Wernher Von Braun talkes with George Hardy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    George Hardy of the Marshall Space Flight center's Astronautics Laboratory, talks with Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), deputy associate administrator for planning. Dr. Von Braun was inspecting the mockup of the Saturn workshop during a visit to the Marshall Center. The visit coincided with the 10th anniversary celebration of the center of which Dr. Von Braun was director until March 1, 1970.

  11. DR JOHN ADAMCZYK AND DR LONNIE REID EXAMINE SOFTWARE FOR THE NEW START-UP SOFTWARE - ELECTRONICS - A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    DR JOHN ADAMCZYK AND DR LONNIE REID EXAMINE SOFTWARE FOR THE NEW START-UP SOFTWARE - ELECTRONICS - AND COMMUNICATIONS - SEC - INCUBATOR OPENED MAY 1 1999 AS PART OF THE LEWIS INCUBATOR FOR TECHNOLOGY - LIFT

  12. [Life and work of Dr. Bozo Pericić (1865-1947), genius of our medicine].

    PubMed

    Perović, Slavko; Sirovica, Stjepan

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the life and work of on of our most distinguished physicians--Dr Bozo Pericić. Togheter with another young physician Dr Nikola Lalić the Sibenik hospital became a sort of Meca for medical people. Dr Pericić succeded to clarify an unknown disease--so called "Skrljevo disease", paved the path of to the knowledge about achinococcus etc. He published also number of valuable medical articles and books and avarded a number af aknowledgements. One of the biggest was his nomination for membership of the Supreme Haelth Council in Wienna. He contributed e lot to the medical journals, especially to the "Physician's Journal". As person of wide culture, famous linguist and polyglot Dr Pericić published the "Medical dictionary of Croatian and German Language". He lay foundation of the craniology, quite a new branch of arheology at the time. His accounts of travels, reviews on famous writers, translation of Hamlet, etc--are valuable literary works. PMID:15918326

  13. A failure management prototype: DR/Rx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammen, David G.; Baker, Carolyn G.; Kelly, Christine M.; Marsh, Christopher A.

    1991-01-01

    This failure management prototype performs failure diagnosis and recovery management of hierarchical, distributed systems. The prototype, which evolved from a series of previous prototypes following a spiral model for development, focuses on two functions: (1) the diagnostic reasoner (DR) performs integrated failure diagnosis in distributed systems; and (2) the recovery expert (Rx) develops plans to recover from the failure. Issues related to expert system prototype design and the previous history of this prototype are discussed. The architecture of the current prototype is described in terms of the knowledge representation and functionality of its components.

  14. Dr. von Braun Reviewing Spacecraft Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph was taken after Dr. von Braun moved from his post as Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning at NASA Headquarters. On June 27, 1970, he visited the MSFC again during the Center's 10th anniversary to look at a mockup of the spacecraft that would later be known as Skylab. Others in the photograph are, from left to right: Karl Heimburg, director of the Astronautics Lab; Hermann K. Weidner, director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics Lab.

  15. Dr. von Braun Reviewing Spacecraft Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph was taken after Dr. von Braun moved from his post as Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning at NASA Headquarters. On June 27, 1970, he visited the MSFC again during the center's 10th anniversary to look at a mockup of the spacecraft that would later be known as Skylab. With von Braun are (left to right): Herman K. Weidner, director of Science and Engineering at MSFC, and James R. Thompson of the center's Astrionics Laboratory.

  16. Dr. von Braun Reviewing Spacecraft Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph was taken after Dr. von Braun moved from his post as Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning at NASA Headquarters. On June 27, 1970, he visited the MSFC again to look at a mockup of the spacecraft that would later be known as Skylab. Others in the photograph are, from left to right, James R. Thompson, David Newby, Karl Heimburg, Hermann Weidner, and Jack Stockes. Years later, Thompson would serve as Director of the MSFC.

  17. Dr. von Braun Reviewing Spacecraft Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph was taken after Dr. von Braun moved from his post as Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning at NASA Headquarters. On June 27, 1970, he visited the MSFC again during the center's 10th anniversary to look at a mockup of the spacecraft that would later be known as Skylab. In this photo, he is examining an experiment in the mockup. With von Braun are (left to right): James R. Thompson, Richard T. Heckman, and Jack Stokes of the Center's Astrionics Laboratory.

  18. White dwarfs identified in LAMOST DR 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jincheng; Zhao, Jingkun; Tziamtzis, Anestis; Liu, Jifeng; Li, Lifang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a catalogue of 1056 spectroscopically identified hydrogen-dominated white dwarfs (DAWDs), 34 helium-dominated white dwarfs (DBWDs) and 276 white dwarf main sequence (WDMS) binaries from the Large sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey data release 2 (DR2). 383 DAWDs, 4 DBWDs and 138 WDMSs are new identifications after cross-match with literature. There are ˜4100 k spectra in total from DR 2. The low ratio of white dwarfs found in LAMOST is attributed to biased selection of LAMOST input catalogue and much brighter targets relative to stars observed in Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In this paper, a new DAWD selection method is adopted as a new attempt and supplement to the traditional methods. The effective temperature, surface gravity, mass, cooling age and distance of high signal-to-noise DAWDs are estimated. The peak of the mass distribution is found to be ˜0.6 M⊙, which is consistent with previous work. The parameters of WDMS binaries are also provided in this paper. As the foundation of our future work, which is to identify more WDs with debris disc, WDs found in LAMOST showed a lot of potential. Interesting infrared-excess WDs will be reported in our forthcoming paper.

  19. High-risk genotypes HLA-DR3-DQ2/DR3-DQ2 and DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 in co-occurrence of type 1 diabetes and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Smigoc Schweiger, Darja; Mendez, Andrijana; Kunilo Jamnik, Sabina; Bratanic, Nina; Bratina, Natasa; Battelino, Tadej; Brecelj, Jernej; Vidan-Jeras, Blanka

    2016-06-01

    Shared susceptibility alleles in the HLA region contribute to the co-existence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD). The aim of our study was to identify HLA genotype variations that influence co-occurrence of T1D and CD (T1D + CD) and the order of their onset. Totally 244 patients, 67 with T1D, 68 with CD and 69 with T1D + CD, (split into "T1D first" and "CD first"), were analyzed. Control group consisted of 130 healthy unrelated individuals. Two-tailed Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. The genetic background of Slovenian CD patients resembled more northern than southern European populations with DR3-DQ2/DR3-DQ2 (odds ratio [OR] = 19.68) conferring the highest risk. The T1D + CD was associated with DR3-DQ2/DR3-DQ2 (OR = 45.53) and even more with DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 (OR = 93.76). DR3-DQ2/DR7-DQ2 played a neutral role in susceptibility for T1D + CD. The order of the onset of T1D or CD in patients with co-occurring diseases was not influenced by HLA risk genotype profile. DR3-DQ2/DR3-DQ2 was associated with an increased risk for developing CD in patients with T1D, whereas patients with CD carrying DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 were at higher risk for developing T1D. In addition to other genetic factors including HLA class I alleles present on DR3-DQ2 extended haplotype, the second extended haplotype may moderate the risk for T1D + CD conferred by DR3-DQ2. Our results suggested that individuals carrying high-risk genotypes DR3-DQ2/DR3-DQ2 or DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 would more likely develop both T1D and CD than either disease alone. PMID:27138053

  20. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2012-05-07

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  1. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2012-06-28

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  2. The life-work of Prof. MUDr. Zdenek Lojda, Dr.Sc., Dr. Med. et Iur. h.c.

    PubMed

    Hach, P

    2008-01-01

    Professor Zdenek Lojda, MD., Dr.Sc., Dr. Med.h.c., Dr. Jur. h.c., vice-rector emeritus of the Charles University and director emeritus of the Institute of Histology and Embryology of the 1st Medical Faculty of the Charles University in Prague died on the 24th April 2004. Born in Trebíc (in a local maternal hospital on the 7th December 1927) he grew up in Moravské Budejovice where he graduated from a primary and secondary school (he passed out each class as well as the leaving exam at the local gymnasium in 1946 cum laude). He was growing up in an inspiring atmosphere of a family of a professor at gymnasium that helped him to form his fundamental moral attitude and to gain high knowledge of an almost Renaissance comprehension. He was a gifted linguist (he spoke fluently several languages including Latin) and musician (he did community singing among others) and he was interested in natural sciences. In 1946 he enrolled for the medical faculty and coincidentally he was grouped among students that completed histology and embryology at the Institute of Embryology headed by professor Zdenek Frankenberger, MD., who had recognised his interest in this field of study. The young student gave himself and his free time to the work of an unqualified lab-worker and only later he became assistant conducting practical tutorials. He took his degree cum laude in 1952 and he received certificate of competence because of his excellent results. He showed his preoccupation with histology (strongly influenced by the personality of professor Frankenberger) after the graduation when he entered the job of the assistant professor at the Institute of Embryology and he stayed there until 1961. When he was about to decide which problems he should target, professor Frankenberger drew his attention to a very interesting part of histology that was just in advance and that was the use of diazonic salts for formation of colour reaction product demonstrating enzyme activity in tissues. In 1962

  3. [Historical exploration of Acapulco hospitals, Guerrero, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Salcedo-Alvarez, Rey Arturo

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to recount the history of the main hospitals of the port of Acapulco from colonial times until the end of the 20th century. The Augustine friars began hospital care at the end of the first part of the 16th century. Later, Bernardino Alvarez (1514?-1584), with the support of the Spanish crown, founded the first formal hospital in Acapulco called Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Our Lady of Consolation Hospital). During the 16th and 17th centuries, the sick were attended by friars, and by the end of the 19th century there were physicians and surgeons. From the end of the Independence War until the end of the 19th century, the port did not have any true hospital. The first degreed physicians and surgeons arrived and resided in Acapulco in 1920. In 1938, the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital) began providing services. It was replaced by the Hospital General de Acapulco (General Hospital of Acapulco). At the fourth decade of the past century the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) was created. In 1957 the hospital services of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Mexican Institute of Social Security), which was founded in 1963, was inaugurated with the Unidad Medico/Social (Medical and Social Unit) of the IMSS in Acapulco. This began the journey of modernity in Acapulco. In 1992, Hospital Regional Vicente Guerrero (Regional Hospital Vicente Guerrero) of the IMSS, initiated its services. In 1960, medical services for civil workers and their families were housed in the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital). Shortly afterwards, the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE, Security and Social Services Institute for State Employees) had their own hospital. During the 20th century, Acapulco has added other hospital services to care for members of the navy and armed forces, as well as for those persons with financial resources for private care. PMID:17244509

  4. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studies Salmonella Typhimurium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  5. Dr. Goddard and a 1918 version of 'Bazooka'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard loading a 1918 version of the Bazooka of World War II. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  6. Entrevue avec le Dr Charley Zeanah

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Le Dr Charles Zeanah est titulaire de la chaire de psychiatrie Mary K. Sellars-Polchow, professeur de pédiatrie clinique et vice-président de la pédopsychiatrie au département de psychiatrie et des sciences du comportement de la faculté de médecine de l’Université Tulane, à la Nouvelle-Orléans. Il est également directeur général de l’institut de la santé mentale des nourrissons et des jeunes enfants de Tulane. Il est récipiendaire de nombreux prix, notamment le prix de prévention Irving Phillips (AACAP), la mention élogieuse présidentielle pour sa recherche et son leadership exceptionnels en santé mentale des nourrissons (American Orthopsychiatric Association), le prix d’excellence clinique Sarah Haley Memorial (International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies), le prix de recherche en pédopsychiatrie Blanche F. Ittelson (APA), et le prix Serge Lebovici Award soulignant les contributions internationales à la santé mentale des nourrissons (World Association for Infant Mental Health). Le Dr Zeanah est fellow distingué de l’AACAP, fellow distingué de l’APA et membre du conseil d’administration de Zero to Three. Il est l’éditeur scientifique de Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3e édition) qui est considéré comme étant le manuel de pointe et la référence de base du domaine de la santé mentale des nourrissons.

  7. A Crusade Against Scorpion Sting: Life and Works of Dr. Himmatrao Bawaskar

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Ajinkya A.

    2012-01-01

    In the times of rapid advancement of science and technology, advance medical equipment and hi tech hospitals represent the face of medical science. The aspirations and ambitions of medical professionals are also shifting, with growing concerns of deterioration of doctor patient relationship as well as disconnect between services and the community needs. The life of Dr Himmatrao Bawaskar defies several conventions of today's medical practice. His outstanding dedication towards patients and commitment to provide high quality care in resource poor setting makes him an ideal role model for younger generation of physicians in India. PMID:24479002

  8. [Red Cross hospital in Krapina, during the First world war from 1914 to 1918].

    PubMed

    Fures, Rajko; Habek, Dubravko; Kozina, Drago

    2016-08-01

    Red Cross Hospital in Krapina, during the First World War, was active from 1914 to 1918. Hospital led by Dr. Mirko Crkvenac, oriented humanist. The hospital is operated thanks to the help of municipalities and citizens. The hospital staff concern is for civilian and military victims of the First World War. Dr. Crkvenac, with the support of the City of Krapina and Mayor Vilibald Sluga, he succeeds to the organization and operation of the hospital to an enviable level. Across the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Croatian, Hospitals Red Cross, had a significant role in caring for the wounded, injured and sick soldiers and civilians. Red Cross Hospital in Krapina, is an example of a well-organized hospital in the toughest conditions. Such an organization was not simple in its implementation, and left the valuable lessons and experience. PMID:27598958

  9. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID

  10. Adapting the neurology area of the Gustavo Fricke Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankelen, A.; González, S.; Aguirre, L.

    2007-11-01

    Within the framework of the subject Clinical Engineering taught at Hospital Dr. Gustavo Fricke of Viña del Mar Chile, we were assigned to undertake a detailed study on the quality of the electrical power main supply of the Neurology Department, on account of reported malfunctioning of some equipment used in this unit. The study results indicated that the problems occurred only in a device for auditory evoked potentials device and, contrary to what was expected, the problem was unrelated to the quality of the electrical main supply. It was also found that the cause for the problem was electromagnetic interference (EMI) emitted from the system's very own components. To solve the problem, we built a Faraday Cage for the signal-processing unit and increased the separating distance among the various system components. This approach enhanced system performance and significantly improved the recorded signals of patients. The solution adopted from this experience was suggested to others health care centers of our country that had been experiencing similar difficulties with the same type of medical equipment.

  11. Hospital Hints

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... have to spend the night in the hospital. Learning more about what to expect and about people ...

  12. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  13. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest

    2014-02-03

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  14. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest [U.S. Energy Secretary

    2014-08-22

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  15. Resistance movement: the antibiotic crisis in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, D A

    1997-01-01

    The near-miraculous healing power of antibiotic is being undermined by the rapid evolution of drug-resistant bacteria. The costs, in human and economic terms, could be staggering for all caregivers and patients, but especially for institutional providers like hospitals. In an article adapted from the Journal of the American Medical Association, Dr. Goldmann explains why antibiotic resistance is a crisis and how the danger can be mitigated. PMID:10166180

  16. Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.

  17. Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt, a life for astronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaganescu, Nicolae-Florin

    2004-12-01

    Irene Bredt (b.1911 at Bonn) obtained her Doctorate in Physics in 1937; in the same year she became a scientific researcher at the German Research Center for Aviation at Trauen, led by Prof. Dr. Eugen Sänger. Soon, the young but efficient Dr. Irene Bredt became the first assistant of Dr. Sänger, who married her (1951). During 1973-1978, Dr. Bredt was in correspondence with Prof. Dr. Nikolae-Florin Zaganescu and helped him to familiarize the Romanian readers with Prof. Sänger's life and achievements. As for Dr. Bredt's life, she specified three main periods of her activity: 1937-1942, when she was researcher in charge of thermodynamic problems of liquid-fuelled rocket engines at Trauen 1942-1945, when she was Senior Researcher in charge of Ramjet in flight performances at Ainring, and also coauthored the Top Secret Technical report entitled 'A Rocket Engine for a Long-Range Bomber', which was finished in 1941 but edited only in 1944 the post world war II period, when she was Scientific Advisor or Director at various civil and military research institutes, universities, etc. Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt helped her husband to develop many scientific theories like Ramjet thermodynamic theory, and photon rocket theory and also in establishing IAF and IAA. In 1970, Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt was honored with 'Hermann Oberth Gold Medal' for her impressive scientific activity.

  18. Dr. Albert Carr--Science Educator 1930-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The very first issue of "Educational Perspectives" was published in October of 1962. Dr. Albert Carr wrote one of the inaugural essays on the topic of current developments in science education, and he went on to write several other articles for the journal. This article shares why Dr. Albert Carr's colleagues remember him for his…

  19. Dr. Wernher Von Braun near the mobile launcher.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for manned space flight, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, are seen near the mobile launcher carrying a 363 foot tall Saturn V space launch vehicle as the rocket is rolled from the vehicle assembly building at KSC for its three mile trip to the launch pad.

  20. Interview with Smithsonian NASM Spacesuit Curator Dr. Cathleen Lewis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Cathleen; Wright, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Cathleen Lewis was interviewed by Rebecca Wright during the presentation of an "Interview with Smithsonian NASM Spacesuit Curator Dr. Cathleen Lewis" on May 14, 2012. Topics included the care, size, and history of the spacesuit collection at the Smithsonian and the recent move to the state-of-the-art permanent storage facility at the Udvar-Hazy facility in Virginia.

  1. Dr. von Braun with Governor Wallace and NASA Administrator Webb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Governor of Alabama George Wallace (left), NASA Administrator James Webb and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. von Braun during a tour of MSFC on June 8, 1965. Governor Wallace and Dr. Webb were at MSFC to witness the first test firing of a Saturn V Booster, along with members of the Alabama legislature and press reporters.

  2. Dr. von Braun, Governor Wallace and NASA Administrator Webb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    In this photograph are Alabama Governor George Wallace (left), Marshall Space Flight Center Dr. Wernher von Braun (Center) and NASA Administrator James Webb (right). Governor Wallace and Dr. Webb were at MSFC to witness the first test firing of a Saturn V Booster, along with members of the Alabama legislature and press reporters.

  3. Dr. von Braun Touring the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This photograph is dated October 14, 1964, and shows Dr. von Braun, left, during a tour of the NASA Marned Spacecraft Center, now the Johnson Space Center. He is with Dr. J.P. Kuettner, center, from the Marshall Space Flight Center, and Warren J. North from the Manned Spacecraft Center.

  4. Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher 2012 Wilder Silver Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher, Oregon State University, was awarded the 2012 Wilder Medal by the American Pomological Society for his contributions to hazelnut genetics and cultivar development. Dr. Mehlenbacher took over the leadership of the Oregon State University hazelnut breeding program in 1986 aft...

  5. Biotechnology Symposium - In Memoriam, the Late Dr. Allan Zipf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A one-day biotechnology symposium was held at Alabama A&M University (AAMU), Normal, AL on June 4, 2004 in memory of the late Dr. Allan Zipf (Sept 1953-Jan 2004). Dr. Zipf was a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, AAMU, who collaborated extensively with ARS/MS...

  6. Carbon Stars from LAMOST DR2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Cui, Wenyuan; Liu, Chao; Luo, Ali; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the new catalog of carbon stars from the LAMOST DR2 catalog. In total, 894 carbon stars are identified from multiple line indices measured from the stellar spectra. We are able to identify the carbon stars by combining the CN bands in the red end with C2 and other lines. Moreover, we also classify the carbon stars into spectral sub-types of C–H, C–R, and C–N. These sub-types show distinct features in the multi-dimensional line indices, implying that in the future they can be used to identify carbon stars from larger spectroscopic data sets. While the C–N stars are clearly separated from the others in the line index space, we find no clear separation between the C–R and C–H sub-types. The C–R and C–H stars seem to smoothly transition from one to another. This may hint that the C–R and C–H stars may not be different in their origins, instead their spectra look different because of different metallicities. Due to the relatively low spectral resolution and lower signal-to-noise ratio, the ratio of 12C/13C is not measured and thus the C–J stars are not identified.

  7. SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Pecanha, Viviane; Costa, J. E. S.; Koester, D.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, Ching-Wa; Harris, Hugh C.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

    2013-01-15

    We present a new catalog of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent more than a factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalogs based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log g if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.

  8. Portrait of Dr Michael G. Hanna, Jr

    PubMed Central

    Hanna Jr, Michael

    2014-01-01

    While a PhD candidate, doing my thesis at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Biology Division under Dr. Charles Congdon, my introduction to the immune response was studying graft vs. host (GVH) disease as a consequence of bone marrow transplantation in mice. The sequalae of GVH was impressive, and demonstrated the potential of negative clinical consequences of the immune system. The idea of harnessing this immunological phenomena in cancer therapy was appealing even in the late 1960s. The problem was that at the time T-cells as a component of the immune system were identified but not defined. We moved to soluble antigen stimulation in mice and recognized and described the post antigen stimulation changes in lymphatic tissue germinal centers during the first 48 h after the induction of the humoral immune response. We described the extracellular localization of soluble antigens on the surface of dendritic reticular cells of the stroma, directing a response of B-cells to produce antibody against non-self. The ensuing reaction was the rapid proliferation of B-cells toward antibody secreting plasma cells. PMID:25424782

  9. Dr. Otto "Tiger" Freer: inventor and innovator.

    PubMed

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Connor, David E; Nanda, Anil

    2012-08-01

    Every neurosurgeon develops his or her own standard approach to common intracranial pathologies in terms of the order in which different stages are performed and which instruments are used to perform individual tasks. The majority of the basic steps in performing a craniotomy are learned through repetition and practice during residency training. Significant amounts of energy are devoted to mastering technical skills and developing an operative rhythm. What often receives little attention is the historical origin of the instruments that make the work possible. The Freer elevator represents a particularly interesting example. To people unfamiliar with the accomplishments of turn-of-the-century laryngologist Otto "Tiger" Freer, it can be assumed that the name of the instrument in one's hand is simply named for what it can do, that is, to "free" the nasal mucosa from the bony and cartilaginous septum during the transsphenoidal approach. The technique this master surgeon spent his life and career perfecting is now repeated almost daily by skull base neurosurgeons approaching pathologies from the inferior frontal lobe to the foramen magnum. In reviewing his life and work, the authors of this paper discovered an interesting creative process that led to the design of the eponymous instrument. Additionally, they discovered important advances toward the development of the transnasal approach and in our understanding of the anterior skull base. They present a historical perspective on the life and accomplishments of Dr. Freer and the ubiquitous surgical instrument that he invented and popularized. PMID:22853830

  10. Dr. Hall and the work cure.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kathlyn L

    2005-01-01

    Herbert James Hall, MD (1870-1923), was a pioneer in the systematic and organized study of occupation as therapy for persons with nervous and mental disorders that he called the "work cure." He began his work in 1904 during the early years of the Arts and Crafts Movement in the United States. His primary interest was the disorder neurasthenia, a condition with many symptoms including chronic fatigue, stress, and inability to work or perform everyday tasks. The prevailing treatment of the day was absolute bed rest known as the "rest cure." Hall believed that neurasthenia was not caused by overwork but by faulty living habits that could be corrected through an ordered life schedule and selected occupations. He identified several principles of therapy that are still used today including graded activity and energy conservation. Dr. Adolph Meyer credits Hall for organizing the ideas on the therapeutic use of occupation (Meyer, 1922). Hall also provided the name American Occupational Therapy Association for the professional organization and served as the fourth president. For his many contributions to the profession Hall deserves to be recognized as a major contributor to the development and organization of occupational therapy. PMID:23927746

  11. [DR. SHOSHANA SZKOP-FRENKIEL: THE FIRST FEMALE PLASTIC SURGEON IN ISRAEL].

    PubMed

    Shehory-Rubin, Zipora

    2015-11-01

    In the history of Israeli medicine, Dr. Shoshana Szkop-Frenkiel is regarded as the first plastic surgeon in the country and among the founders of the profession of plastic surgery. This article describes the long road she traveled, from her acceptance into medical studies in Vilna--at a time when the entry of any woman to the faculty of medicine was strictly limited and of Jewish women in particular; her emigration to Eretz Israel and her struggles as she underwent training in internal medicine at the "Hadassah" Hospital in Tel-Aviv, when she was denied training as a surgeon; and up to the moment she was accepted by the plastic surgery unit of the Tel Hashomer Hospital and became the first such female practitioner in Israel. Dr. Shoshana Szkop-Frenkiel thus fulfilled a childhood dream to become a surgeon at a time when women were excluded from surgery on the grounds that it called for "male" characteristics. This article is intended to illustrate the character of a female doctor pursuing a career in surgery during the time of the British Mandate, to illuminate her professional travails in Israel, and to emphasize her important contribution in the field. PMID:26821508

  12. Why can Sensitization by a HLA-DR2 Mismatch lead to Antibodies that react also with HLA-DR1?

    PubMed Central

    Marrari, Marilyn; Duquesnoy, Rene J.

    2009-01-01

    HLAMatchmaker is a matching algorithm that can be used to characterize antibodies specific for structurally defined epitopes. Under auspices of the 15th International Histocompatibility Workshop we are conducting a multilaboratory collaborative project to characterize these epitopes and also determine how often they induce specific antibodies in patients with rejected kidney transplants. This report addresses the reactivity of post-allograft nephrectomy sera tested for DRB antibodies with Luminex assays using single alleles. This analysis was done for 19 informative kidney transplant cases contributed by 13 laboratories worldwide. There were 11 cases with a single DR2 mismatch (DR15 or DR16) and 9 of them (82%) showed antibodies with both DR2 and DR1. Although these antigens might share an epitope recognized by these antibodies, this interpretation is incorrect. The HLAMatchmaker analysis offers a clearly different explanation that involves antibodies induced by DR51 which commonly associates with DR2. DR51 has an epitope defined by the 96EV eplet which is also present on DR1 but no other DR antigen. This means that the reactivity with DR51 and DR1 reflects the presence of 96EV-specific antibodies. Conversely, we analyzed eight patients sensitized by a single DR1 mismatch which has no associated DR51. All of them reacted also with DR51 and this could only be explained with antibodies against the shared 96EV eplet. These findings demonstrate that 96EV represents a highly immunogenic epitope that can induce cross-sensitization between antigens encoded by the different DRB loci and also that DR51 is important in determining DRB mismatch acceptability of potential donors. This analysis has also demonstrated that antibody responses are restricted to a few epitopes on these immunizing DR antigens. For DR2 they are 142M3 (unique for DR2), 71QAA (shared with DB5*02) and 96QV (shared with DR10). DR51 mismatches appear to have three immunogenic eplets: 96EV (shared with DR1

  13. [Laennec Hospital].

    PubMed

    Dauphin, A; Mazin-Deslandes, C

    2000-01-01

    When the Laennec Hospital of Paris closed, after 366 years of activities for the patients, the articles about the circumstances of the foundation and the main stapes of the institution which became an very famous university hospital it present the available information of the history of the apothecaries, of the "gagnants-maitrise", pharmacists and the pharmacy's interns who succeeded themselves to create and dispense the medicaments necessary to the patients hospitalized or welcomed in ambulatory. It describes the evolution of the places, of the material, of forms, of the organization, of the medicaments and of the missions of what became the Pharmacy department after the recent individualization of the biological analysis in the biochemistry. PMID:11625687

  14. The decisive decade. Interview: Dr. Nafis Sadik.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The interview with Dr. Nafis Sadik, Director of the UN Family Planning Association (UNFPA), involved questions about the Fund's major achievements, the effect of withdrawal of US funds on UNFPA programs, the role of UNFPA in bridging environmental, population, and development objectives as stated in the Bruntland Commission initiatives, awareness building, the role of UNFPA in dealing with resource deficits in countries with high growth populations, the seriousness of the 1990s decade as critical to the future. and UNFPA's priorities for the next 10 years. The Fund's accomplishments are in getting political systems to recognize as an important part of development, in broadening the concept of population to include quality of life and spatial distribution and growth, and in obtaining funding to continue operating without US funds. The US withdrawal of funds has affected UNFPA's funding in Africa since 1985. UNFPA is actively working to help other agencies integrate FP into conservation strategies, and to consider the education of women and provision for FP information in a variety of programs. Sustainable development must occur at the grass roots level, or from the ground up. Programs must be implemented with an understanding of local needs and desires and with cultural sensitivity. A review of findings over 20 years led to an understanding that many countries had no strategy or plans for population programs even with a lot of development assistance, and programs were transplanted without consideration of local needs. UNFPA is not urging that national development strategies must incorporate population planning, and to target education to young people who will soon be entering reproductive ages during the decade ahead. Governments have begun to recognize that the next 10 years will determine the future, and population does affect the crisis of resources. UNFPA's priorities are to the education of youth, to design special curricula in schools for educating about

  15. Molecular diversity of HLA-DR4 haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, P K; Shen, M; Song, Q L; Merryman, P; Degar, S; Seki, T; Maccari, J; Goldberg, D; Murphy, H; Schwenzer, J

    1986-01-01

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) clones encoding beta chains of the DR and DQ regions and alpha chains of the DQ region were isolated and sequenced from four homozygous DR4 cell lines of different HLA-D types: GM3103(Dw4), FS(Dw10), BIN(Dw14), and KT3(Dw15). When compared with each other and with a previously published sequence from a DR4 (Dw13 cell line), the variability of DR beta 1 gene products is generally restricted to the region around amino acid position 70, with an additional polymorphism at position 86. Many of these differences, including an unusual amino acid substitution at position 57 in the Japanese cell line KT3(Dw15), may be due to gene conversion events from the DR beta 2 or DX beta genes. In contrast, DR beta 2 molecules are identical in Dw15, Dw10, and Dw4 cell lines. DQ beta chains isolated from GM3103(Dw4), FS(Dw10), and BIN40(Dw14) are also identical. However, the DQ beta sequence from cell line KT3(Dw15) differs substantially from all other previously reported DQ beta alleles, consistent with its serological designation, DQ "blank." The first domain sequences of DQ alpha chains were identical in all four cell lines. The data suggest that relatively circumscribed amino acid changes in the DR beta 1 molecule are responsible for the HLA-D typing differences between some haplotypes. PMID:3458223

  16. Evidence for a new HLA class II determinant present on cells from HLA-DR1 and/or -DR4 individuals.

    PubMed

    Lepage, V; Alcalay, D; Douay, C; Mallet, C; Loiseau, P; Degos, L; Colombani, M; Colombani, J

    1985-02-01

    Evidence for a new HLA class II specificity is presented. It is recognized by LE serum, which reacts with most DR1 and/or DR4 individuals (r = 0.86). Its frequency in the French population is 0.33. Absorption-elution experiments showed that the serum reactivity was not due to a mixture of anti-DR1 and anti-DR4 antibodies, but to a single antibody population which could be absorbed on and eluted from both DR1(+) or DR4(+) cells. LE specificity seemed to be expressed on DR but not on DQ molecules since the serum reacted with and could be absorbed by DR+,DQw- cells; it did not react with a DR-,DQw+ mutant cell, but did react with the DR+,DQw+ parental cell. The relationship between LE specificity and MC1 and Te23 specificities remains to be determined. PMID:2581334

  17. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  18. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  19. Glaucoma: Eye-to-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Eye-to-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop Past ... nerves are pale and cupped—signs of advanced glaucoma. Yet the patient wasn't aware of any ...

  20. NES Live Video Chat: Dr. John C. Mather

    NASA Video Gallery

    NES welcomed Nobel Prize winner Dr. John C. Mather for a video webchat on May 17, 2011. He spoke about the James Webb Space Telescope and how it gives us a look into the past to see how galaxies ha...

  1. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  2. 74. ARAII. Dr. William Zinn of combustion engineering company and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. ARA-II. Dr. William Zinn of combustion engineering company and others at controls of SL-1. August 8, 1959. Ineel photo no. 59-4109. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. GOES-R with Dr. Kathy Sullivan and Tim Samaras

    NASA Video Gallery

    This short video features highlights from a live Nationwide broadcast that took place on April 3, 2012, from the studio of NASA Goddard TV. NOAA’s Deputy Administrator and Chief Scientist Dr. Ka...

  4. Dr Pugh and the myth of the illicit still.

    PubMed

    Paull, J D

    2014-07-01

    In her valuable history of the arrival of the news of etherisation in Australia and its implementation by many doctors and dentists, titled One Grand Chain, the late Dr Gwen Wilson asserted that the dentist and the doctor who pioneered etherisation in Australia, "Belisario and Pugh, …were charged by the authorities with possession of an illicit still." This paper examines the evidence for the truth or otherwise of this assertion, in relation to Dr Pugh. PMID:25196958

  5. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at the launch of Apollo 11.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mission officials relax, all smiles, a few moments after the successful launch of the Apollo 11 spacecraft by Saturn V vehicle AS-506. Relieved of the tension of waiting through the countdown are (left to right) Charles W. Matthews, NASA deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center; Dr. George E. Meuller, NASA associate administrator for manned spaceflight, and Lt. General Samuel C. Phillips, director of the Apollo program.

  6. Dr. von Braun at 'Wernher von Braun Day' Celebration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    In 1970 Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. Wernher von Braun (right) was reassigned to NASA Headquarters to serve as Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. Prior to his transfer, Dr. von Braun was honored for his career in Huntsville, Alabama, with the celebration of 'Wernher von Braun Day.' Among those participating were Alabama Governor Albert Brewer (left) and Alabama Senator John Sparkman (center). (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public library)

  7. Dr. Peter Emil Becker and the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Hill, Frank

    2013-08-01

    In 1985 the physician after whom Becker Muscular Dystrophy is named, German neurologist Dr. Peter Emil Becker (1908-2000), published an autobiographical article in the American Journal of Medical Genetics in which he disavowed any association with the Nazi Party. A closer look at the evidence, however, suggests otherwise. Review of war records and related sources raise concern for Dr. Becker's affiliation with the Nazi Party and his contributions to its ideology. PMID:23813666

  8. Dr-FtsA, an Actin Homologue in Deinococcus radiodurans Differentially Affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ Functions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Kruti; Misra, Hari S.

    2014-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes homologues of divisome proteins including FtsZ and FtsA. FtsZ of this bacterium (Dr-FtsZ) has been recently characterized. In this paper, we study FtsA of D. radiodurans (Dr-FtsA) and its involvement in regulation of FtsZ function. Recombinant Dr-FtsA showed neither ATPase nor GTPase activity and its polymerization was ATP dependent. Interestingly, we observed that Dr-FtsA, when compared with E. coli FtsA (Ec-FtsA), has lower affinity for both Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. Also, Dr-FtsA showed differential effects on GTPase activity and sedimentation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. For instance, Dr-FtsA stimulated GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ while GTPase activity of Ec-FtsZ was reduced in the presence of Dr-FtsA. Stimulation of GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ by Dr-FtsA resulted in depolymerization of Dr-FtsZ. Dr-FtsA effects on GTPase activity and polymerization/depolymerisation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ did not change significantly in the presence of ATP. Recombinant E. coli expressing Dr-FtsA showed cell division inhibition in spite of in trans expression of Dr-FtsZ in these cells. These results suggested that Dr-FtsA, although it lacks ATPase activity, is still functional and differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ function in vitro. PMID:25551229

  9. Seoul National University Bundang Hospital's Electronic System for Total Care

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee Hyuck; Lee, Hak Jong; Ha, Kyooseob; Lim, Cheong; Chin, Ho Jun; Yun, Jonghoar; Cho, Eun-Young; Chung, Eunja; Baek, Rong-Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Chul Hee; Lee, Hai-Seok; Byeon, Nam-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, which is the first Stage 7 hospital outside of North America, has adopted and utilized an innovative and emerging information technology system to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care. The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce the major components of the SNUBH information system and to describe our progress toward a next-generation hospital information system (HIS). Methods SNUBH opened in 2003 as a fully digital hospital by successfully launching a new HIS named BESTCare, "Bundang hospital Electronic System for Total Care". Subsequently, the system has been continuously improved with new applications, including close-loop medication administration (CLMA), clinical data warehouse (CDW), health information exchange (HIE), and disaster recovery (DR), which have resulted in the achievement of Stage 7 status. Results The BESTCare system is an integrated system for a university hospital setting. BESTCare is mainly composed of three application domains: the core applications, an information infrastructure, and channel domains. The most critical and unique applications of the system, such as the electronic medical record (EMR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support system (CDSS), CLMA, CDW, HIE, and DR applications, are described in detail. Conclusions Beyond our achievement of Stage 7 hospital status, we are currently developing a next-generation HIS with new goals of implementing infrastructure that is flexible and innovative, implementing a patient-centered system, and strengthening the IT capability to maximize the hospital value. PMID:22844650

  10. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-DR-1, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-035

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Carlson

    2005-09-22

    Radiological characterization, decommissioning and demolition of the 132-DR-1 site, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1987. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  11. Residential therapy. Hospitals take on finding housing for homeless patients, hoping to reduce readmissions, lower costs.

    PubMed

    Evans, Melanie

    2012-09-24

    As they grapple with containing the cost of caring for patients who frequently return to the ER or hospital for care, some hospitals are trying a new route: housing. In San Francisco, plans are under way to house 50 homeless patients. "Hospitalization is a failure of the medical system. It means that the condition has gotten so out of control that someone is at risk of life or limb," says Dr. Kelly Pfeifer, left, of the San Francisco Health Plan. PMID:23163192

  12. One-stop shop for care. Hospital ERs seeing increase in patients, capital.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth; Selvam, Ashok

    2013-05-27

    Hospital emergency room departments are increasingly becoming a portal for patients to get care quickly. And hospitals are responding by transforming their operations. When Dr. Rich Zane, left, arrived last year as chair of the University of Colorado Hospital's emergency medicine department, the Aurora facility's ER was operating under "a process that's predicated on 1960s medicine and we're practicing it in 2013," he says. PMID:23951587

  13. Type 1 Diabetes in the Spanish Population: additional factors to Class II HLA-DR3 and -DR4

    PubMed Central

    Urcelay, Elena; Santiago, José L; de la Calle, Hermenegildo; Martínez, Alfonso; Méndez, Julián; Ibarra, José M; Maluenda, Carlos; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; de la Concha, Emilio G

    2005-01-01

    Background The Major Histocompatibility Complex is the main genetic contributor to susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D); genome-wide scans have consistently mapped increased predisposition to this region. The highest disease risk has been associated with HLA-DR3 and HLA-DR4. In particular, the DR3-positive ancestral haplotype 18.2 was reported as highly diabetogenic. We aimed to corroborate whether this haplotype increases the susceptibility conferred by the DQ2-DR3 alleles in a Mediterranean population. We also searched for additional susceptibility factors to the classic DQ2-DR3 and DQ8-DR4. Results Genetic MHC markers were analysed in a case-control study with 302 T1D patients and 529 ethnically matched controls. DR3-TNFa1b5 carrier rate was significantly higher in DR3-positive heterozygous T1D patients than in DR3-positive heterozygous controls (p = 0.0019; odds ratio OR [95% confidence interval CI] = 2.26 [1.3–3.93]). This data was confirmed analysing the allelic frequency, which includes the information corresponding to the DR3-homozygous individuals (p = 0.001; OR = 2.09) and by using the Arlequin software to check the DR3-positive haplotypes (p = 0.004;OR = 1.93). The present results provide strong evidence of a second susceptibility region in the ancestral haplotype 18.2 in the Spanish population. Moreover, we searched for T1D susceptibility factors in addition to the MHC classical ones, within the DR2-DQ6/DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 negative population. Several genetic markers in both MHC class II (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501 [p = 0.007;OR = 2.81], DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202 [p = 0.03; OR = 2.35]) and III (TNFa2b1 [p = 0.01 OR = 2.74], BAT-2*2 [p = 0.004; OR = 3.19]) were found. These different alleles associated with T1D were not independent and we observed linkage disequilibrium among them leading us to describe two new risk haplotypes (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501-TNFa2b1 and DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202- BAT-2*2). Finally, we studied a T1D susceptibility/protection marker located in

  14. The development of a specialty: an interview with Dr. Mark C. Rogers, a pioneering pediatric intensivist.

    PubMed

    Mai, Christine L; Firth, Paul G; Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Rodriguez, Samuel; Yaster, Myron

    2014-09-01

    Dr. Mark C. Rogers (1942-), Professor of Anesthesiology, Critical Care Medicine, and Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University, was recruited by the Department of Pediatrics at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1977 to become the first director of its pediatric intensive care unit. After the dean of the medical school appointed him to chair the Department of Anesthesia in 1979, Rogers changed the course and culture of the department. He renamed it the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, and developed a long-term strategy of excellence in clinical care, research, and education. However, throughout this period, he never lost his connection to pediatric intensive care. He has made numerous contributions to pediatric critical care medicine through research and his authoritative textbook, Rogers' Textbook of Pediatric Intensive Care. He established a training programme that has produced a plethora of leaders, helped develop the pediatric critical care board examination, and initiated the first World Congress of Pediatric Intensive Care. Based on a series of interviews with Dr. Rogers, this article reviews his influential career and the impact he made on developing pediatric critical care as a specialty. PMID:25065470

  15. DR with a DSLR: Digital Radiography with a Digital Single-Lens Reflex camera

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Helen; Durko, Heather L.; Moore, Stephen K.; Moore, Jared; Miller, Brian W.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Pradhan, Sunil; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2010-01-01

    An inexpensive, portable digital radiography (DR) detector system for use in remote regions has been built and evaluated. The system utilizes a large-format digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera to capture the image from a standard fluorescent screen. The large sensor area allows relatively small demagnification factors and hence minimizes the light loss. The system has been used for initial phantom tests in urban hospitals and Himalayan clinics in Nepal, and it has been evaluated in the laboratory at the University of Arizona by additional phantom studies. Typical phantom images are presented in this paper, and a simplified discussion of the detective quantum efficiency of the detector is given. PMID:21516238

  16. Screening for Depression in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    ESMAEELI, Mohammad-Reza; ERFANI SAYAR, Reza; SAGHEBI, Ali; ELMI, Saghi; RAHMANI, Shagheyegh; ELMI, Sam; RABBANI JAVADI, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Objective In chronically ill children who are hospitalized, many mood changes occur. For example, in children with cancer or renal failure, prolonged hospitalization and chemotherapy can lead to depression. With the improved survival of childhood malignancies, the effect of treatment on child’s psychosocial well-being becomes increasingly relevant. In this study, we examined the prevalence of depression in hospitalized children with chronic and acute conditions in Dr Sheikh Pediatrics Hospital in Mashhad. Materials & Methods After receiving the approval from the Ethics Committee of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, we did this cross-sectional descriptive study, from April to June 2012 in Dr Sheikh Pediatric Hospital in Mashhad. Ninety children, between 8 to 16 years, were screened for depression. The sampling method was census. Children with a history of depressive or other mental disorders were excluded. Three groups of children (children with chronic renal disease, malignancy, and acute disease) were evaluated for depression using standard Children Depression Inventory Questionnaire (CDI). Two specifically trained nurses filled out the questionnaires at patients’ bedside under the supervision of a psychiatrist. Depression scores were then analyzed by SPSS software. Results Of 90 children, 43(47.7%) were male and 47(52.2%) were female. The Children’s mean age was 11±2.3 years, and the mean length of hospitalization was 8±5.3 days. Depression was detected in various degrees in 63% of patients (N=57), and 36.6% of children (N=32) had no symptoms of depression. Severe depression was not seen in any of the patients with acute illness. More than half of patients with cancer and chronic kidney disease had moderate to severe depression. There was a significant statistical relationship between the duration of illness and severity of depression. There was also a significant correlation between severity of depression and frequency of hospitalization. Children

  17. A periodontal case report by Dr. S.L. Clemens.

    PubMed

    Maloney, W J

    2010-07-01

    Mark Twain provides a humorous and insightful look into the origins of periodontal therapy and anesthesia in "Happy Memories of the Dental Chair". The main character of this story is Dr. John Riggs, the father of periodontics. Dr. Horace Wells, a pioneer in the field of anesthesia, also appears in the story. Twain presents his autobiographical experiences with dentistry in his literary work in a form that can be seen to be similar to a case report in a professional dental journal. PMID:20400720

  18. Study of photoluminescence properties of thin films DR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Ulya, Naily

    2015-09-01

    Fabrication of thin films DR1 have been carried out by the EFA-PDF (Electric Field-Assisted Physical Vapor Deposition) method to obtain films with parallel dipole arrangement. Molecular deposition process is performed by applying an electric field that is placed between the substrate ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) and copper mesh. The resulting films were characterized by using a spectrofluorometer. Analysis of the emission spectrum, indicate that DR1 molecules in the film oriented perpendicular to the substrate and arranged in parallel order (H-aggregate). As an effect, the peak of the emission spectrum appears stronger along with the increase of electric field strength.

  19. Study of photoluminescence properties of thin films DR1

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Ulya, Naily

    2015-09-30

    Fabrication of thin films DR1 have been carried out by the EFA-PDF (Electric Field-Assisted Physical Vapor Deposition) method to obtain films with parallel dipole arrangement. Molecular deposition process is performed by applying an electric field that is placed between the substrate ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) and copper mesh. The resulting films were characterized by using a spectrofluorometer. Analysis of the emission spectrum, indicate that DR1 molecules in the film oriented perpendicular to the substrate and arranged in parallel order (H-aggregate). As an effect, the peak of the emission spectrum appears stronger along with the increase of electric field strength.

  20. Social contract of academic medical centres to the community: Dr Howard Atwood Kelly (1858-1943), a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Allen, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Academic medical centres have traditionally been bastions of teaching and research. Outreach to the community at large and involvement in community affairs have sometimes been lacking in the overall mission and activities of academic medical centres. This paper provides an historical perspective first on the numerous achievements of a physician and surgeon and then on the topic of involvement in community affairs by reviewing the many contributions of America's pioneer gynaecological surgeon and one of the four physician founders of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine in 1889 - Dr Howard Atwood Kelly. PMID:24906403

  1. Sequence and evolution of HLA-DR7- and -DRw53-associated. beta. -chain genes

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.A.T.; Wilkinson, D.; Bodmer, W.F.; Trowsdale, J.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones representing products of the DR7 and DRw53 ..beta..-chain genes were isolated from the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line MANN (DR7, DRw53, DQw2, DPw2). The DRw53..beta.. sequence was identical to a DRw53..beta.. sequence derived from cells with a DR4 haplotype. In contrast, the DR7..beta.. sequence was as unrelated to DR4..beta.. sequence as it was to other DR..beta..-related genes, except at the 3'-untranslated region. These results suggest that the DR7 and DR4 haplotypes may have been derived relatively recently from a common ancestral haplotype and that the DR4 and DR7 ..beta..-chain genes have undergone more rapid diversification in the ..beta..1 domains, most probably as a result of natural selection, than have the DRw53..beta..-chain genes. Short tracts of sequence within the DR7 and DRw53 ..beta..1 domains were shared with other DR..beta.. sequences, indicating that exchanges of genetic information between ..beta..1 domains of DR..beta..-related genes have played a part in their evolution. Serological analysis of mouse L-cell transfectants expressing surface HLA-DR7 molecules, confirmed by antibody binding and allelic sequence comparison, identified amino acid residues that may be critical to the binding of a monomorphic DR- and CP-specific monoclonal antibody.

  2. Genomic evaluation of HLA-DR3+ haplotypes associated with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Kaur, Gurvinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Kanga, Uma; Mehra, Narinder K

    2013-04-01

    We have defined three sets of HLA-DR3(+) haplotypes that provide maximum risk of type 1 disease development in Indians: (1) a diverse array of B8-DR3 haplotypes, (2) A33-B58-DR3 haplotype, and (3) A2-B50-DR3 occurring most predominantly in this population. Further analysis has revealed extensive diversity in B8-DR3 haplotypes, particularly at the HLA-A locus, in contrast to the single fixed HLA-A1-B8-DR3 haplotype (generally referred to as AH8.1) reported in Caucasians. However, the classical AH8.1 haplotype was rare and differed from the Caucasian counterpart at multiple loci. In our study, HLA-A26-B8-DR3 (AH8.2) was the most common B8-DR3 haplotype constituting >50% of the total B8-DR3 haplotypes. Further, A2-B8-DR3 contributed the maximum risk (RR = 48.7) of type 1 diabetes, followed by A2-B50-DR3 (RR = 9.4), A33-B58-DR3 (RR = 6.6), A24-B8-DR3 (RR = 4.5), and A26-B8-DR3 (RR = 4.2). Despite several differences, the disease-associated haplotypes in Indian and Caucasian populations share a frozen DR3-DQ2 block, suggesting a common ancestor from which multiple haplotypes evolved independently. PMID:23387390

  3. Hospitals for sale.

    PubMed

    Costello, Michael M; West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    The pace of hospital merger and acquisition activity reflects the economic theory of supply and demand: Publicly traded hospital companies, private equity funds, and large nonprofit hospital systems are investing capital to purchase and operate freestanding community hospitals at a time when many of those hospitals find themselves short of capital reserves and certain forms of management expertise. But the sale of those community hospitals also raises questions about the impact of absentee ownership on the communities which those hospitals serve. PMID:21864058

  4. STATISTICAL STUDY OF 2XMMi-DR3/SDSS-DR8 CROSS-CORRELATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanxia; Zhou Xinlin; Zhao Yongheng; Wu Xuebing

    2013-02-01

    Cross-correlating the XMM-Newton 2XMMi-DR3 catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8, we obtain one of the largest X-ray/optical catalogs and explore the distribution of various classes of X-ray emitters in the multidimensional photometric parameter space. Quasars and galaxies occupy different zones while stars scatter in them. However, X-ray active stars have a certain distributing rule according to spectral types. The earlier the type of stars, the stronger its X-ray emitting. X-ray active stars have a similar distribution to most stars in the g - r versus r - i diagram. Based on the identified samples with SDSS spectral classification, a random forest algorithm for automatic classification is performed. The result shows that the classification accuracy of quasars and galaxies adds up to more than 93.0% while that of X-ray emitting stars only amounts to 45.3%. In other words, it is easy to separate quasars and galaxies, but it is difficult to discriminate X-ray active stars from quasars and galaxies. If we want to improve the accuracy of automatic classification, it is necessary to increase the number of X-ray emitting stars, since the majority of X-ray emitting sources are quasars and galaxies. The results obtained here will be used for the optical spectral survey performed by the Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also named the Guo Shou Jing Telescope), which is a Chinese national scientific research facility operated by the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  6. Group Achievement Award: The SCUBA team; George Darwin Lecturer: Dr Neil Gehrels; Harold Jeffreys Lecturer: Dr Emma Bunce; Honorary Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    The Group Achievement Award goes to the SCUBA team of W K Gear, W S Holland, E I Robson, C R Cunningham, J F Lightfoot, T Jenness, R J Ivison, J A Stevens, P A R Ade, M J Griffin, W D Duncan, J A Murphy and D A Naylor. The 2009 George Darwin Lecturer is Dr Neil Gehrels, Chief of the Astroparticle Physics Laboratory at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The 2009 Harold Jeffreys Lecturer is Dr Emma Bunce of the University of Leicester.

  7. Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Congressman Gerald R. fod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in April, 1964, Congressman Gerald R. Ford, Jr. Republican of Michigan, was warmly greeted by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director. Ford, along with two other congressmen, visited the center for a briefing on the Saturn program and for a tour of the facilities.

  8. Dr. Seuss's Sound Words: Playing with Phonics and Spelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    Boom! Br-r-ring! Cluck! Moo!--exciting sounds are everywhere. Whether visiting online sites that play sounds or taking a "sound hike," ask your students to notice the sounds they hear, then write their own book, using sound words, based on Dr. Seuss's "Mr. Brown Can MOO! Can You?" During the three 45-minute sessions, grade K-2 students will:…

  9. Trial by Newspaper: The Strange Case of Dr. Karl Muck.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sheldon S.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the case of Dr. Karl Muck, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra who was accused of espionage in 1917. Suggests that the espionage charge was a fiction created by newspapers, beginning with "The Providence Journal." Concludes that Muck admitted to being a spy rather than reveal the name of the woman with whom he had an extramarital…

  10. Dr. Chad E. Finn, 2013 Wilder Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Chad Finn took over the leadership of the USDA-ARS small fruit breeding program in Corvallis, Oregon in 1993 after three years working as an extension horticulturist in the Department of Horticulture at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since taking over this program he has developed what is...

  11. A Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Curriculum: Playing the Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Sydney Gurewitz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses curriculum for young children centered around the beliefs and teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. His works are interpreted in a human rights context in which children find their voice in the peaceable resolution of everyday conflicts. Describes the Child of the Day program. (Author/RWB)

  12. The life and legacy of Dr. Lee Baldwin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper outlines the life and legacy of the late Dr. Ransom L. Baldwin, V. The purpose was to highlight the impact his teaching and research had on the international energy and protein metabolism communities at their fourth international conference. The paper will be presented at the outset of ...

  13. Another Use for Dr. Seuss: Reading for Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Janice J.; Baker, Pamela Hudson

    2012-01-01

    Time is limited. Teachers often struggle to address the diverse needs of learners in their classrooms, especially when faced with academic and social skills concerns. Finding effective ways to teach social skills in the context of academic instruction makes sense. Books by Dr. Seuss provide a variety of high-interest stories that can be used to…

  14. Bullying Among Teenage Girls: An Interview with Dr. Harriet Mosatche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevention Researcher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Harriet Mosatche is an advice columnist on a web site for teen girls, as well as the Senior Director of Research and Programs at the Girl Scouts of the USA. Because of these dual roles, she has a unique perspective on the bullying issue. In this interview she answers a number of questions about bullying among teenage girls, including how boys…

  15. 28. View of data test area for DR data take ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. View of data test area for DR data take off set operators panel and cabinet at second floor of transmitter building no. 102 in MIP area. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  16. Focus on Fitness: Q&A with Dr. Greene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Greene answers the following question in this brief article focusing on fitness: Everyone knows that children need plenty of exercise to stay healthy--But what does "fitness" really involve for young children? Following this discussion, the topics presented include: snack of the month; nutrition fact; and activities, "Move to the Music" and…

  17. Dr. von Braun, Mayor Searcy, and General Medaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, talks to Huntsville Mayor R. B. 'Speck' Searcy, center, and Army Ordnance Missile Command (ARMC) Major General John B. Medaris, right, during 'Moon Day' celebrations in downtown Huntsville, Alabama. (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  18. Dr Skateboard's Action Science: Teaching Physics in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to create student interest and promote new connections to the understanding of fundamental physics concepts, there is a need for new approaches and methods that are both contemporary and relevant. Dr Skateboard's Action Science, a curriculum supplement comprising video instruction and classroom activities, is an example that focuses on…

  19. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  20. 39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, TR chains, and special checkout target control located in CSMR in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  1. 7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete showing embedment anchors, foundation steel base plate, vertical member with small diameter turnbuckles, antenna assembly in background, and story board for scale. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  2. 3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  3. 2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 degrees west and and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. Oxygen and Metastasis: A Conversation with Dr. Nick Restifo

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Nick Restifo, a senior investigator in NCI’s Center for Cancer Research, discusses his recently published study finding that Oxygen, a molecule necessary for life, paradoxically aids cancer metastasis to the lung by impairing cancer-killing immune cells.

  5. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large

  6. Can hospitals compete on quality? Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples. PMID:25711185

  7. Functional polymorphism of each of the two HLA-DR beta chain loci demonstrated with antigen-specific DR3- and DRw52-restricted T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    HLA-DR3- and HLA-DRw52-associated functional polymorphism was investigated with selected tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific T cell clones. We have shown earlier that HLA-DR antigens are encoded by two distinct loci, DR beta I and DR beta III. The alloantigenic determinant(s) defined by the serological HLA-DR3 specificity map to the former, while the supratypic HLA-DRw52 determinants map to DR beta III. Furthermore, we have recently recognized by DNA sequencing three alleles of HLA- DRw52 at locus DR beta III, referred to as 52 a, b, and c. Our objective was to correlate the pattern of T cell restriction with the gene products of individual DR beta chain loci and with the three newly described alleles of locus DR beta III. Among the selected T cell clones, 5 reacted exclusively when TT was presented by HLA-DR3+ APCs (TT-DR3-APC). In contrast, two T cell clones were stimulated by TT- DRw52-APC. More specifically, these two T cell clones (Clones 10 and 16) were stimulated by different subsets of TT-DRw52-APC. Clone 16 responded to some DR3 and TT-DRw6-APC, while clone 10 was stimulated by other TT-DR3 and TT-DRw6, and all TT-DR5-APC. This same pattern of DRw52 restriction was found in panel, as well as in family studies. Because this suggested a correlation with the pattern of DRw52 polymorphism observed earlier by DNA sequencing and oligonucleotide hybridization, the APC used in these experiments were typed for the 52 a, b, and c alleles of locus DR beta III by allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. This distribution overlapped exactly with the stimulation pattern defined by the T cell clones. Clone 16 responded to TT-52a-APC, clone 10 to TT-52b-APC, and both clones to a TT-52c-APC. The response of the T cell clones was inhibited differentially by mAbs to DR. Raising TT concentration, or increasing HLA-class II expression with INF-gamma both affected the magnitude of response of the TT- specific clones but did not modify their specificities. These results demonstrate that

  8. 78 FR 29781 - Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... COMMISSION Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr... and Written Limited Appearance Statements) May 15, 2013. Pursuant to 10 CFR 2.312, the Atomic Safety... submitted to: Mail: Administrative Judge Ronald M. Spritzer, Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel,...

  9. Billing delays cause hassles, but hospitals still have to pay for services provided.

    PubMed

    Decker, R

    1988-06-01

    A hospital has a contract with the manufacturer to maintain and service copying machines owned by the hospital. The contract calls for the hospital to pay a set minimum monthly fee plus a per-copy charge for all copies made over a set amount. The supplier doesn't furnish any paper products. Recently the hospital received an invoice for 17 months' service. When contacted about this large bill, the supplier told the hospital that it had inadvertently dropped the hospital from its billing computer and had failed to bill the hospital each month. The hospital protested the pressure that this billing practice put upon its budget and asked for an adjustment. The supplier refused to make any adjustment in the amount but did agree to accept the arrears in monthly payments over a year with no interest charges. In this dialogue below, Dr. Decker discusses the legal issues involved in this situation. PMID:10287890

  10. Influence of Patient and Hospital Characteristics on the Performance of Direct Reconstruction after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hartrampf, J.; Ansmann, L.; Wesselmann, S.; Beckmann, M. W.; Pfaff, H.; Kowalski, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: International studies have shown that the performance of a direct (or immediate) reconstruction (DR) after mastectomy is associated with patient (e.g., socio-economic status, insurance status, age) and hospital (number of cases, teaching status) characteristics. The present article addresses the question if such relationships also exist in Germany. Material and Methods: The results of a nationwide questionnaire to the patients of certified breast cancer centres were coupled with the clinical features of the patients and the characteristics of the hospital. Predictors for receiving a DR (vs. delayed or no reconstruction) were estimated by means of a logistic multilevel model for a sample of 1165 patients from 105 certified locations. Results: Substantial differences between the treating hospitals were found (intraclass correlation coefficient null model: 0.195) which can in part be explained by the total model (total model: 0.169). Patients with the following features are more likely to receive a DR: younger age, private health insurance, secondary school leaving certificate (vs. primary school leaving certificate), lower stage and acquisition of more information about reconstruction. ASA and partnership status are not statistically significantly related with DR. DR is more likely to be performed in hospitals with higher caseload of patients with primary breast cancer. Teaching status, operations per surgeon and urbanity of the location are not related to receiving a DR. Conclusions: Non-clinical features of the patients and the primary case number are associated with the performance of a DR, this poses questions concerning reasons and the equality of health care. PMID:25568467

  11. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  12. Type 1 diabetes risk for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3 haplotypes depends on genotypic context: association of DPB1 and HLA class I loci among DR3- and DR4-matched Italian patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Noble, Janelle A; Martin, Adelle; Valdes, Ana M; Lane, Julie A; Galgani, Andrea; Petrone, Antonio; Lorini, Renata; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Erlich, Henry A

    2008-01-01

    Patients with high-risk human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-DQ genotypes for type 1 diabetes (T1D) were compared with HLA-matched controls to evaluate T1D risk for other HLA loci, including HLA-A, -B, -Cw, and DPB1. Patients (n = 133) with high-risk genotypes (DR3/DR3, DR3/DR4, DR4/DR4) were selected from the Lazio (Rome) region of Italy. Screening of more than 9000 patients from the Lazio region and northern Italy yielded 162 controls with high-T1D-risk haplotypes. Although the overall distributions did not differ significantly, allele frequency differences were discovered between the controls from Lazio and controls from northern Italy for some alleles previously determined to affect T1D risk, such as A*3002, DPB1*0301, and DPB1*0402. Therefore, Lazio patient data were compared both with the Lazio subset of controls (n = 53) and with the entire group of controls for association analyses. Significant allele frequency differences between patients and DR-DQ-matched controls existed for specific alleles at all loci. Data for the DR3/DR3 subset of patients and controls demonstrated an increase of Cw*0702 in patients. Compared with controls, reduced patient frequencies were seen for several alleles, including A*0101, B*0801, and Cw*0701, all on the highly conserved, extended DR3 haplotype known as 8.1 in DR3/DR3, but not DR3/DR4, subgroup. DPB1*0101, often reported on 8.1 haplotypes, was also less frequent in DR3/DR3 patients than controls. Analysis of family-based data from the HBDI repository was consistent with the observed results from the Italian patients, indicating the presence of a T1D-protective locus at or near A*0101 and a second T1D-protective locus at or near DPB1*0101. These data indicate that T1D risk conferred by the 8.1 haplotype is genotype dependent. PMID:18486765

  13. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Mommen, Geert P. M.; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4+ T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides, i.e. the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4+ T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease. PMID:26764012

  14. Strong association between microsatellites and an HLA-B, DR haplotype (B18-DR3): Implication for microsatellite evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Crouau-Roy, B.; Bouzekri, N.; Clayton, J.

    1996-09-01

    The HLA haplotype B18-DR3 has a widespread geographical distribution, but has its greatest frequencies in Southern Europe, probably vestigial of the earliest populations of this region, particularly in the Pays Basque and Sardinia. This haplotype is of medical significance, being that most implicated as a factor of risk in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this study, the closely linked microsatellite markers (TNFa,b,c) in the region of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) genes have been used in an attempt to subtype this haplotype in the two populations and/or in healthy and diabetic populations. A total of 79 HLA-B18-DR3 haplotypes were analyzed: 54 in Basques (12 from healthy individuals and 42 from diabetics or their first-degree relatives) and 25 in Sardinians (13 from healthy and 13 from diabetic individuals). The TNF haplotype a1-b5-c2 is completely associated with B18-DR3 in both populations. The homogeneity of the B18-DR3 haplotype in two ethnically pure populations implies stability in evolution, which suggest that the mutation rate of these microsatellite markers must be less than is usually assumed (i.e., {approximately} 5x10{sup {minus}6} per site per generation). Such markers should be powerful tools for studying genetic drift and admixture of populations, but it remains to be established whether this stability is a rule for all microsatellites in HLA haplotypes or whether or whether it is restricted to some microsatellites and/or some HLA haplotypes. The population genetics of those microsatellites associated with HLA B18-DR3 was also studied in a random sample of the Basque population. 44 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Star Formation in the DR21 Region (B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is an exceptionally bright source of radio emission called DR21. Visible light images reveal no trace of what is happening in this region because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    The upper image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars

  16. Gestosis and fetal rejection: immunopathogenetic role of HLA-DR.

    PubMed

    De Luca Brunori, I; Battini, L; Mariotti, M L; Pecori, F; Urbano, M; Filippeschi, M; Scida, P; Simonelli, M

    1994-01-01

    In this study we faced the problem of etiopathogenesis of EPH Gestosis, focusing our attention on the role of immunitary aspects in determining its onset. We typed HLA-DR in 20 couples with gestosic patient and in 20 control couples. Blood samples were taken into heparin-treated test tubes, from all the couples and HLA typed through standard lymphotoxicity technique in accordance with Terasaky (1). Our results in couples with a gestosic patient, showed homozygosis in 65% of patients and in 70% of partners; in 35% of cases homozygosis was present in both partners, and these were the most severe cases. It is also worth mentioning that in all the couples with gestosic patient, at least one of the partners resulted homozygotic. Homozygosis would therefore represent a predisposing factor in the etiopathogenesis of gestosis, and pre-conception HLA-DR typing of the couple could prove to be a valid alarm signal for gestosis risk. PMID:7994872

  17. Dr. John Stack and other NASA Langley Research Center Visitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Front Row, left to right: Mrs. Elsa Hoare and Major Philip L. Teed - staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England: Dr. Barnes Wallis - Chief of Aeronautical Research, Vicers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge, England. Back Row, left to right: Norman W. Boorer and Cecil W. Hayes - Staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England; John R. Christie - Ministry of Supply, London, England; Philip A. Hufton - Chief Supt., Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedford, England; Lindsey I. Turner, Jr. - Langley Research Center. Photographed November 13, 1958.

  18. ORAC-DR: A generic data reduction pipeline infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Economou, Frossie

    2015-03-01

    ORAC-DR is a general purpose data reduction pipeline system designed to be instrument and observatory agnostic. The pipeline works with instruments as varied as infrared integral field units, imaging arrays and spectrographs, and sub-millimeter heterodyne arrays and continuum cameras. This paper describes the architecture of the pipeline system and the implementation of the core infrastructure. We finish by discussing the lessons learned since the initial deployment of the pipeline system in the late 1990s.

  19. Of brain and bone: the unusual case of Dr. A.

    PubMed

    Narvid, J; Gorno-Tempini, M L; Slavotinek, A; Dearmond, S J; Cha, Y H; Miller, B L; Rankin, K

    2009-06-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome characterized by progressive decline in social conduct and a focal pattern of frontal and temporal lobe damage. Its biological basis is still poorly understood but the focality of the brain degeneration provides a powerful model to study the cognitive and anatomical basis of social cognition. Here, we present Dr. A, a patient with a rare hereditary bone disease (hereditary multiple exostoses) and FTD (pathologically characterized as Pick's disease), who presented with a profound behavioral disturbance characterized by acquired sociopathy. We conducted a detailed genetic, pathological, neuroimaging and cognitive study, including a battery of tests designed to investigate Dr. A's abilities to understand emotional cues and to infer mental states and intentions to others (theory of mind). Dr. A's genetic profile suggests the possibility that a mutation causing hereditary multiple exostoses, Ext2, may play a role in the pattern of neurodegeneration in frontotemporal dementia since knockout mice deficient in the Ext gene family member, Ext1, show severe CNS defects including loss of olfactory bulbs and abnormally small cerebral cortex. Dr. A showed significant impairment in emotion comprehension, second order theory of mind, attribution of intentions, and empathy despite preserved general cognitive abilities. Voxel-based morphometry on structural MRI images showed significant atrophy in the medial and right orbital frontal and anterior temporal regions with sparing of dorsolateral frontal cortex. This case demonstrates that social and emotional dysfunction in FTD can be dissociated from preserved performance on classic executive functioning tasks. The specific pattern of anatomical damage shown by VBM emphasizes the importance of the network including the superior medial frontal gyrus as well as temporal polar areas, in regulation of social cognition and theory of mind. This case provides new evidence regarding the

  20. Of Brain and Bone: The Unusual Case of Dr. A

    PubMed Central

    Narvid, J; Gorno-Tempini, ML; Slavotinek, A; DeArmond, SJ; Cha, YH; Miller, BL; Rankin, K.P

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome characterized by progressive decline in social conduct and a focal pattern of frontal and temporal lobe damage. Its biological basis is still poorly understood but the focality of the brain degeneration provides a powerful model to study the cognitive and anatomical basis of social cognition. Here, we present Dr. A, a patient with a rare hereditary bone disease (hereditary multiple exostoses) and FTD (pathologically characterized as Pick’s disease), who presented with a profound behavioral disturbance characterized by acquired sociopathy. We conducted a detailed genetic, pathological, neuroimaging and cognitive study, including a battery of tests designed to investigate Dr. A’s abilities to understand emotional cues and to infer mental states and intentions to others (theory of mind). Dr. A’s genetic profile suggests the possibility that a mutation causing hereditary multiple exostoses, Ext2, may play a role in the pattern of neurodegeneration in frontotemporal dementia since knockout mice deficient in the Ext gene family member, Ext1, show severe CNS defects including loss of olfactory bulbs and abnormally small cerebral cortex. Dr. A showed significant impairment in emotion comprehension, second order theory of mind, attribution of intentions, and empathy despite preserved general cognitive abilities. Voxel-based morphometry on structural MRI images showed significant atrophy in the medial and right orbital frontal and anterior temporal regions with sparing of dorsolateral frontal cortex. This case demonstrates that social and emotional dysfunction in FTD can dissociate from preserved performance on classic executive functioning tasks. The specific pattern of anatomical damage shown by VBM emphasizes the importance of the network including the superior medial frontal gyrus as well as temporal polar areas, in regulation of social cognition and theory of mind. This case provides new evidence regarding the

  1. 21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his newly completed building at the northeast corner of Central Avenue and the alley north of Washington Street in about 1900 or 1901. In 1901, the building seen here was enlarged by the construction of an addition of similar design immediately to the north (left). Virtually the entire west elevation of the initial building is depicted in this view. Credit ADLAPR. - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING [VAB] & TOPPING OFF CEREMONIES SPEAKER DR. DEBUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. Kurt H. Debus, KSC's first director, was a major speaker at the ceremonies ''topping off'' the Vehicle Assembly Building on April 14, 1965. A crawler-transporter is at the right. At the time of its completion, the 129 million cubic foot structure was the largest building in the world. Originally designed and built to accommodate the Saturn V/Apollo used in Project Apollo, the VAB was later modified for its role in the Space Shuttle program.

  3. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  4. Dr. von Braun in the Gemini Simulator at MSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    In this 1964 photograph, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. Wernher von Braun (in commander's seat, background) tries out the Gemini Simulator at the Marned Spacecraft Center (now Johnson Space Center). Looking on from the pilot's seat is J.P. Kuettner, deputy director of MSFC Saturn Apollo Systems Office, and standing at left, Warren J. North, chief of Manned Spacecraft Center's (MSC) Flight Crew Support Division.

  5. 8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, third from left vertical member at first level above foundation level, showing small diameter turnbuckle stays, vertical member with flange connection, and various struts and connectors with antenna assembly in background. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. 4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 106 east face through antenna and partial view of satcom communication dome (attached to radar transmitter building 102) in left side of photograph. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. Dr. Wernher Von Braun leads a tour of the S-IC checkout area.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Eberhard Rees, Charles Schultze, James Webb, Elmer Staats, Comptroller General of the United States, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun tour the S-IC checkout area in the Marshall Space Flight Center quality lab.

  8. 75 FR 68603 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Office of Education Dr. Nancy Foster...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Education Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration... successful scholarship candidates, generating internal NOAA reports and articles to demonstrate the success of its program. The Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship Program is available to graduate students...

  9. For Dr. Nancy Snyderman's Parents, Staying Close to Family Is Key

    MedlinePlus

    ... As Chief Medical Editor for NBC News and host of the popular MSNBC show, Dr. Nancy , Dr. ... to overuse either. Communication is important in any relationship, and with family, it's vital. I am so ...

  10. Dr. Lindberg's Legacy : Charting A New Course | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... more. Don also created the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). NCBI has been a focal point ... with Dr. Lindberg (right) and National Center for Biotechnology Information Director Dr. David Lipman (center) at a ...

  11. Dr. Lytle Adams' incendiary "bat bomb" of World War II.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2004-11-01

    On December 7, 1941, a 60-year old dentist from Irwin, Pennsylvania, Dr. Lytle S. Adams, was driving home from a vacation at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Hours earlier, he had been gripped with amazement as he witnessed millions of bats exiting the caves of Carlsbad. Listening to his car radio on his return trip, he was shocked to hear that Japan had just attacked Pearl Harbor. Dr. Adams, outraged over this travesty, began to mentally construct a plan for U.S. retaliation. As his thoughts returned to the countless bats that had awed him, he formed a tentative plan: millions of these small, flying mammals could be connected to tiny, time-fused incendiary bombs, and then released to land on the flimsily constructed structures which dotted the cities of Japan. Within a few minutes, the bombs would explode and enflame the entire urban areas. He postulated that these immeasurable numbers of fires, spreading their devastation over such vast areas within Japanese cities would result in the enemy's speedy surrender. This article documents the futile efforts of Dr. Adams, his team and the U.S. government to develop and employ an effective, incendiary bat bomb. The recently developed atom bomb, a far more deadly weapon was used in its place. PMID:15666497

  12. Dr.LiTHO: a development and research lithography simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fühner, Tim; Schnattinger, Thomas; Ardelean, Gheorghe; Erdmann, Andreas

    2007-03-01

    This paper introduces Dr.LiTHO, a research and development oriented lithography simulation environment developed at Fraunhofer IISB to flexibly integrate our simulation models into one coherent platform. We propose a light-weight approach to a lithography simulation environment: The use of a scripting (batch) language as an integration platform. Out of the great variety of different scripting languages, Python proved superior in many ways: It exhibits a good-natured learning-curve, it is efficient, available on virtually any platform, and provides sophisticated integration mechanisms for existing programs. In this paper, we will describe the steps, required to provide Python bindings for existing programs and to finally generate an integrated simulation environment. In addition, we will give a short introduction into selected software design demands associated with the development of such a framework. We will especially focus on testing and (both technical and user-oriented) documentation issues. Dr.LiTHO Python files contain not only all simulation parameter settings but also the simulation flow, providing maximum flexibility. In addition to relatively simple batch jobs, repetitive tasks can be pooled in libraries. And as Python is a full-blown programming language, users can add virtually any functionality, which is especially useful in the scope of simulation studies or optimization tasks, that often require masses of evaluations. Furthermore, we will give a short overview of the numerous existing Python packages. Several examples demonstrate the feasibility and productiveness of integrating Python packages into custom Dr.LiTHO scripts.

  13. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  14. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature. PMID:10283019

  15. Hospital Library Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    The objectives of a hospital are to improve patient care, while the objectives of a hospital library are to improve services to the staff which will support their efforts. This handbook dealing with hospital administration is designed to aid the librarian in either implementing a hospital library, or improving services in an existing medical…

  16. Identification of death receptors DR4 and DR5 in HTB-12 astrocytoma cell lines and determination of TRAIL sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Riddick, Elenia; Evans, Shavonda; Rousch, Jeffrey; Gwebu, Ephraim; Banerjee, Hirendra Nath

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytomas are tumors which arise from astrocytes, cells that form the blood-brain barrier. There are very few drugs that successfully treat brain tumors. In this study, the cytotoxic effects on the HTB-12 astrocytoma cell line by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) were studied. The presence of the TRAIL receptors, Death receptor 4 (DR4) and Death receptor 5 (DR5), were detected in HTB-12 cells by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Cytotoxicity assay by Trypan Blue Exclusion Method showed effective cell killing by TRAIL treatment. Thus, the presence of death receptors and TRAIL efficacy raises the therapeutic potential for this type of brain tumor. PMID:25364476

  17. RG7386, a Novel Tetravalent FAP-DR5 Antibody, Effectively Triggers FAP-Dependent, Avidity-Driven DR5 Hyperclustering and Tumor Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Brünker, Peter; Wartha, Katharina; Friess, Thomas; Grau-Richards, Sandra; Waldhauer, Inja; Koller, Claudia Ferrara; Weiser, Barbara; Majety, Meher; Runza, Valeria; Niu, Huifeng; Packman, Kathryn; Feng, Ningping; Daouti, Sherif; Hosse, Ralf J; Mössner, Ekkehard; Weber, Thomas G; Herting, Frank; Scheuer, Werner; Sade, Hadassah; Shao, Cuiying; Liu, Bin; Wang, Peng; Xu, Gary; Vega-Harring, Suzana; Klein, Christian; Bosslet, Klaus; Umaña, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Dysregulated cellular apoptosis and resistance to cell death are hallmarks of neoplastic initiation and disease progression. Therefore, the development of agents that overcome apoptosis dysregulation in tumor cells is an attractive therapeutic approach. Activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway is strongly dependent on death receptor (DR) hyperclustering on the cell surface. However, strategies to activate DR5 or DR4 through agonistic antibodies have had only limited clinical success. To pursue an alternative approach for tumor-targeted induction of apoptosis, we engineered a bispecific antibody (BsAb), which simultaneously targets fibroblast-activation protein (FAP) on cancer-associated fibroblasts in tumor stroma and DR5 on tumor cells. We hypothesized that bivalent binding to both FAP and DR5 leads to avidity-driven hyperclustering of DR5 and subsequently strong induction of apoptosis in tumor cells but not in normal cells. Here, we show that RG7386, an optimized FAP-DR5 BsAb, triggers potent tumor cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo in preclinical tumor models with FAP-positive stroma. RG7386 antitumor efficacy was strictly FAP dependent, was independent of FcR cross-linking, and was superior to conventional DR5 antibodies. In combination with irinotecan or doxorubicin, FAP-DR5 treatment resulted in substantial tumor regression in patient-derived xenograft models. FAP-DR5 also demonstrated single-agent activity against FAP-expressing malignant cells, due to cross-binding of FAP and DR5 across tumor cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate that RG7386, a novel and potent antitumor agent in both mono- and combination therapies, overcomes limitations of previous DR5 antibodies and represents a promising approach to conquer tumor-associated resistance to apoptosis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 946-57. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27037412

  18. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries at the Redstone Arsenal airfield.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George E. Mueller, center, associate administrator for manned space flight, is flanked by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, and Dr. Eberhard Rees at the Redstone Arsenal airstrip. the associate adminstrator was making his annual staff visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  19. Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccote, Sila; Wikler, Greg; Chiu, Albert; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Hennage, Dan; Thomas, Chuck

    2007-12-18

    This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with well-designed incentives and DR programs such as Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP), Auto-DR is opening up the opportunity for many different types of buildings to effectively participate in DR programs. We present the results of Auto-DR implementation efforts by the three California investor-owned utilities for the Summer of 2007. The presentation emphasizes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) Auto-DR efforts, which represents the largest in the state. PG&E's goal was to recruit, install, test and operate 15 megawatts of Auto-DR system capability. We describe the unique delivery approaches, including optimizing the utility incentive structures designed to foster an Auto-DR service provider community. We also show how PG&E's Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP) options were called and executed under the automation platform. Finally, we show the results of the Auto-DR systems installed and operational during 2007, which surpassed PG&E's Auto-DR goals. Auto-DR is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team including the California Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), energy consultants, energy management control system vendors, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the California Energy Commission (CEC).

  20. [The fate of the old Jejoong Won following the establishment of the new Jejoong Won (Severance Hospital)].

    PubMed

    Yeo, I S; Park, Y J; Lee, K l; Park, H W

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Allen, the first Protestant missionary in Korea, had an opportunity of saving the life of the queen's nephew shortly after his arrival in Korea in 1884. In gratitude the King established the Royal Korean Hospital (Jejoong Won), the first hospital in Korea, and appointed Dr. Allen in charge of the medical affairs of the hospital. After Dr. Allen's resignation from the mission, the work was successively carried on by Drs. JW Heron, RA Hardie, CC Vinton and OR Avison, the last of whom arrived in 1893. In 1894 the connection of the Hospital with the Korean Government was severed and the work taken over by the Northern Presbyterian Mission. Since then, it has been a distinctly mission institute. In 1900, while attending the Ecumenical Conference of Foreign Missions in Carnegie Hall, New York, Dr. Avison made the acquaintance of a philanthropist LH Severance, who made a gift of $10,000 for a new hospital. This building, the first modern hospital in Korea, was opened and dedicated in 1904. It was named the Severance Hospital. As the new hospital was built, the old hospital building was to be returned to the Korean Government according to the agreement made in 1894. On retaking the old hospital, the Korean Government paid $30,289.99 won for the renovation of the original building and new buildings established in the site during the period of Avison's entire charge of Jejoong Won. The old hospital building was used as an official residence for a diplomatic adviser Stevens, who was assassinated for his pro-Japan activities, and as a social club for Japanese officials. PMID:11624251

  1. Financial management of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Speranzo, A J

    1984-05-01

    The effect of hospital reimbursement systems on the financial management of hospitals is briefly discussed, and the organization of hospital financial operations is reviewed. The implementation of Medicare prospective pricing will change the way in which hospital finances are managed. Health-care managers will be concerned with the profitability of product lines, or diagnosis-related groups, in future strategic planning efforts. The hospital's finance department consists of several traditional areas that exist in almost all financial organizations. The functions and interactions of these various areas are discussed in light of previous and current hospital reimbursement strategies. Staffing of the finance department and the duties of the hospital's chief financial officer are also described. The prospective pricing system of hospital reimbursement and increasing pressure from the business community to stem the rising costs of health care will produce changes in the medical and financial operations of the hospital industry over the next decade. PMID:6375357

  2. [DR. Hanka Weinberg-Heruti: the pediatrician from Merchavia--the first woman-doctor 'Kibbutznik' in the Kibbutz Ha'artzi].

    PubMed

    Shehory-Rubin, Zipora

    2015-07-01

    Dr. Hanka Weinberg-Heruti, a pediatrician at the Ha'Emek Hospital and a member of Kibbutz Merchavia is regarded in the history of medicine in Eretz Israel as the first female physician in the Kibbutz Ha'Artzi movement-Hashomer Hatsa'ir, and one of the founders of children's medicine in the country. Dr. Weinberg-Heruti was able to break the accepted norms of the period and prove "you could be both a hospital doctor and a loyal kibbutz member". This was far from simple for there was an iron rule in that kibbutz movement: "Every member must perform physical labour to build the kibbutz and to work in its framework. This principle is inviolable nor can one deviate from the norm". Dr. Weinberg-Heruti dared to break that rule and prove that a successful combination of both her purposes in life was possible. Thus, the aim of the article is twofold: to survey her unique position as hospital doctor and faithful 'kibbutznik', who dared to break the "holy" principle at the ideological roots of kibbutz life--that it was unthinkable for a member to refrain from physical labour. Secondly, to illuminate her medical career as pediatrician in Ha'Emek Hospital, and describe the innovations she introduced to the children's ward, survey her groundbreaking research, that examined the influence of the Beit Shean Valley climate on infant development. Her conclusions dramatically affected the treatment and upbringing of children in that climate, and were adopted not only in local kibbutzim but throughout the country. PMID:26380468

  3. GENESI-DR Portal: a scientific gateway to distributed repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, Pedro; Brito, Fabrice; D'Andria, Fabio; Cossu, Roberto; Fusco, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories) is a European Commission (EC)-funded project, kicked-off early 2008 lead by ESA; partners include Space Agencies (DLR, ASI, CNES), both space and no-space data providers such as ENEA (I), Infoterra (UK), K-SAT (N), NILU (N), JRC (EU) and industry as Elsag Datamat (I), CS (F) and TERRADUE (I). GENESI-DR intends to meet the challenge of facilitating "time to science" from different Earth Science disciplines in discovery, access and use (combining, integrating, processing, …) of historical and recent Earth-related data from space, airborne and in-situ sensors, which are archived in large distributed repositories. "Discovering" which data are available on a "geospatial web" is one of the main challenges ES scientists have to face today. Some well- known data sets are referred to in many places, available from many sources. For core information with a common purpose many copies are distributed, e.g., VMap0, Landsat, and SRTM. Other data sets in low or local demand may only be found in a few places and niche communities. Relevant services, results of analysis, applications and tools are accessible in a very scattered and uncoordinated way, often through individual initiatives from Earth Observation mission operators, scientific institutes dealing with ground measurements, service companies or data catalogues. In the discourse of Spatial Data Infrastructures, there are "catalogue services" - directories containing information on where spatial data and services can be found. For metadata "records" describing spatial data and services, there are "registries". The Geospatial industry coins specifications for search interfaces, where it might do better to reach out to other information retrieval and Internet communities. These considerations are the basis for the GENESI-DR scientific portal, which adopts a simple model allowing the geo-spatial classification and discovery of

  4. DR Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services in the West (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.; Kiliccote, S.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility however, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado "test system". We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating reserves: frequency regulation, contingency reserve, and flexibility (or ramping) reserve. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves.

  5. Hospital demand for physicians.

    PubMed

    Morrisey, M A; Jensen, G A

    1990-01-01

    This article develops a derived demand for physicians that is general enough to encompass physician control, simple profit maximization and hospital utility maximization models of the hospital. The analysis focuses on three special aspects of physician affiliations: the price of adding a physician to the staff is unobserved; the physician holds appointments at multiple hospitals, and physicians are not homogeneous. Using 1983 American Hospital Association data, a system of specialty-specific demand equations is estimated. The results are consistent with the model and suggest that physicians should be concerned about reduced access to hospitals, particularly as the stock of hospitals declines. PMID:10104050

  6. Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

  7. Progress in inflammatory neuropathy -the legacy of Dr Jack Griffin.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Eva L; Hughes, Richard A C; Willison, Hugh J

    2015-11-01

    The past quarter of a century has brought incredible advances in our understanding of inflammatory neuropathies, and the insights into Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) began in the 1990s with the seminal work of Dr Jack Griffin and his colleagues. In this essay, we provide a tribute to Jack, and review the recent progress in a field that he termed his personal favourite. In particular, we discuss the new developments in our understanding and diagnosis of inflammatory neuropathies, the recent emergence of the node of Ranvier and the paranode as sites of intensive investigation, and the mechanistic evidence that is providing a platform for therapeutic development studies. PMID:26458287

  8. Dr. Christopher Kraft looks over packaged 'parasol' in bldg 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Christopher C. Kraft J. (left), JSC Director, and George A Post, JSC Crew Systems Division, look over the packaged 'parasol' during fabrication and checkout of the umbrella-like mechanical device in the Technical Services shop in bldg 10 at JSC. The 'parasol' is designed to fit into the T027 experiment photometer canister. The canopy portion of the 'parasol' measures 24 feet by 22 feet. The 'parasol' is one of several sunscreen possibilities being considered for use in shading the overheated Skylab 1 Orbital Workshop.

  9. STS-72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Looking elated at the prospect of his upcoming spaceflight, STS- 72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. The trip into space will be the first for Barry, a medical doctor who also has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He and five fellow crew members will soon depart for Launch Pad 39, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during an approximately 49-minute window opening at about 4:18 am EST, January 11.

  10. STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker is assisted by a suit technician as she dons her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. Her third spaceflight will be an historic one for Baker, a medical doctor, as she oversees the series of scientific investigations that will be conducted during the first docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. Baker and six fellow crew members -- four Americans and two Russian cosmonauts -- will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff during a 10- minute launch window opening at 3:32 p.m. EDT.