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  1. Stent

    MedlinePlus

    ... kinds of stents. Most are made of a metal or plastic mesh-like material. However, stent grafts are made of fabric. They are used in larger arteries. An intraluminal coronary artery ... self-expanding, metal mesh tube. It is placed inside a coronary ...

  2. Longitudinal stent deformation during coronary bifurcation stenting.

    PubMed

    Vijayvergiya, Rajesh; Sharma, Prafull; Gupta, Ankush; Goyal, Praveg; Panda, Prashant

    2016-03-01

    A distortion of implanted coronary stent along its longitudinal axis during coronary intervention is known as longitudinal stent deformation (LSD). LSD is frequently seen with newer drug eluting stents (DES), specifically with PROMUS Element stent. It is usually caused by impact of guide catheter tip, or following passage of catheters like balloon catheter, IVUS catheter, guideliner, etc. We hereby report a case of LSD during coronary bifurcation lesion intervention, using two-stents technique. Patient had acute stent thrombosis as a complication of LSD, which was successfully managed. PMID:26811144

  3. Dislodgement of coronary stent due to rupture of stent balloon.

    PubMed

    Ayça, Burak; Okuyan, Ertuğrul; Şahin, İrfan; Dinçkal, Mustafa Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Rare stent complications, including dislodgement of stent, unexpanded stent, stent fracture and stent loss etc. can occur during percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). We present a semi-expanded and dislodged stent due to rupture of stent balloon during primary PCI in this case report. An interventional cardiologist should be aware of the possibility of rare complications, such as in this case, and have enough experience and knowledge to handle them. PMID:25655859

  4. Bioresorbable Stents in PCI.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Daniel; James, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of percutaneous coronary intervention has been considerable. Coronary stents were introduced to avoid vessel recoil and reduce acute and late vessel complications. Later, drug-eluting stents were developed to decrease the neointimal hyperplasia associated with bare metal stents in order to reduce restenosis. However, very late stent thrombosis remains problematic, and the permanent presence of a metal stent could be associated with local inflammation and impaired vascular physiology. Thus, bioresorbable stents have been developed, to prevent recoil initially when this risk is the highest, with subsequent degradation over time, to avoid long-term complications of the presence of stents in the coronary vasculature. Here, we review the current status of bioresorbable stents in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), with focus on the platforms that have been studied the most: ABSORB, DESolve, and DREAMS. In terms of clinical outcomes, bioresorbable stents have not yet shown superiority compared with current generation drug-eluting stents, but rather a signal of increased stent thrombosis. Further development and longer-term studies are needed before the routine implementation of bioresorbable stents in clinical practice. PMID:27312934

  5. Aortic stenting.

    PubMed

    Droc, Ionel; Calinescu, Francisca Blanca; Droc, Gabriela; Blaj, Catalin; Dammrau, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The approach to aortic pathology is nowadays more and more endovascular at both thoracic and abdominal levels. Thoracic stenting has gained worldwide acceptance as first intention to treat pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta. Indications have been extended to aortic arch aneurysms and also to diseases of the ascending aorta. The current devices in use for thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) are Medtronic Valiant, Gore TAG, Cook Tx2 and Jotec. The choice of the endograft depends on the thoracic aortic pathology and the anatomical suitability. The technological evolution of the abdominal aortic endografts was very rapid, arriving now at the fourth generation. We report the results of 55 elective cases of endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) performed in two vascular surgical centers in Romania and Germany. The prostheses used were 16 E-vita Abdominal XT, 12 Excluder, eight Talent, seven PowerLink, three Endurant and nine custom-made, fenestrated or branched from Jotec. The mean follow-up was 18 months with CT-scan, duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The mortality was 2%. EVAR tends to become the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Technological development of the devices with lowest profile introduction systems will permit to extend the anatomical indications to new frontiers. PMID:26200430

  6. Popliteal Artery Stenting Using Flexible Tantalum Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Ernst-Peter K.; Boos, Irene B.L.; Goettmann, Dieter; Vetter, Sylvia; Haase, Wulf

    2001-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stent therapy for the treatment of residual stenoses after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of popliteal stenoses and occlusions.Methods: In a prospective single-center study, flexible tantalum stents were implanted in 32 popliteal arteries for the treatment of residual stenosis greater than 50% after PTA of stenoses (n = 17) or occlusions (n = 15) in the P1 (n = 16), the P2 (n = 13), or both P1 and P2 segment (n = 3). Follow-up patency was assessed by clinical examination, ankle-brachial index, and color Doppler sonography or angiography.Results: Early stent thrombosis (10 days): 1 of 32 arteries (3%). 1-year and 2-year primary patency rate (PPR): 81% {+-} 7.1% and 74% {+-} 9.1%, respectively. 1-year PPRs for subgroups: stented stenoses versus stented occlusions: 88% {+-} 7.8% vs 73% {+-} 12.0%, p = 0.12; good lower limb runoff versus poor: 84.0% {+-} 8.7% vs 76.0% {+-} 12.4; p = 0.09; P1 versus P2: 77.3% {+-} 9.8% vs 85.7% {+-} 9.4%, p = 0.38. Recurrent PTA lesions treated with stents showed higher restenosis rate than de novo lesions.Conclusion: The results of stent therapy of residual popliteal stenosis after PTA are encouraging and warrant further investigation.

  7. Angioplasty and stent placement - heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent the artery from closing up again. A drug-eluting stent has medicine embedded in it that helps prevent ... may be coated with a drug (called a drug-eluting stent). This type of stent may lower the chance ...

  8. An Update to Hepatobiliary Stents

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Brian T.; Birk, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stent placement is a common primary management therapy for benign and malignant biliary strictures. However, continuous use of stents is limited by occlusion and migration. Stent technology has evolved significantly over the past two decades to reduce these problems. The purpose of this article is to review current guidelines in managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions, current endoscopic techniques for stent placement, and emerging stent technology. What began as a simple plastic stent technology has evolved significantly to include uncovered, partially covered, and fully covered self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) as well as magnetic, bioabsorbable, drug-eluting, and antireflux stents.1 PMID:26357636

  9. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  10. Gastrointestinal Stent Update

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of self-expanding metallic stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract, placed under radiologic imaging or endoscopic guidance, is the current treatment of choice for the palliation of malignant gastrointestinal outlet obstructions. Advances in metallic stent design and delivery systems have progressed to the stage where this treatment is now considered a minimally invasive therapy. Metallic stent placement will broaden further into the field of nonsurgical therapy for the gastrointestinal tract. To date, metallic stents placed in the esophagus, gastric outlet, colorectum, and bile ducts are not intended to be curative, but rather to provide a palliative treatment for obstructions. The evolution of metallic stent technology will render such procedures not only palliative but also therapeutic, by enabling local drug delivery, and the use of biodegradable materials will reduce procedure-related complications. PMID:21103290

  11. Tracheomalatia, to stent or not to stent

    PubMed Central

    Perić, Irena; Paladin, Ivan; Vukovac, Emilija Lozo; Vela Ljubić, Jadranka; Gudelj, Ivan; Lozo, Mislav

    2015-01-01

    Benign thyroid disorders such as goiter, especially retrosternal, can cause tracheostenosis by extrinsic tracheal compression, which is due to the lack of specific symptoms often misdiagnosed. Tracheomalatia develops as a result to long term tracheal compression and refers to weakness of the trachea characterized by softness of the tracheal cartilage arches and by loss of regular tracheal structure. Tracheomalatia is characterized by reduction of the endotracheal lumen and may affect the entire trachea or may be localized to one portion of it. We present the case of a 72-year old patient with distinct tracheostenosis and tracheomalatia, caused by long term pressure by the retrosternal goiter. We have been monitoring the patient for last 20 years after the second endotracheal stent had been placed. The first one was placed 34 years ago, in 1981. On both occasions granulation tissue and colonization of bacteria occurred. In the end the placed stents were rejected and migrated to the main carina. Despite the tracheal diameter narrower than 5 mm the patient has been living normally without the stent for 17 years, with the exception of no hard physical labor. He had a few short term antibiotic therapies and bronchial toilets during symptomatic deteriorations. Diagnosing retrosternal goiter and surgical treatment on time is of crucial importance in cases such as this one. Considering the complications caused by the stent, our opinion is that the majority of patients may require conservative treatment with closely monitoring during respiratory infections. PMID:26744681

  12. Spectral Imaging for Intracranial Stents and Stent Lumen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, David Yen-Ting; Chen, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Hui-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Application of computed tomography for monitoring intracranial stents is limited because of stent-related artifacts. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of gemstone spectral imaging on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Materials and Methods In vitro, we scanned Enterprise stent phantom and a stent–cheese complex using the gemstone spectral imaging protocol. Follow-up gemstone spectral images of 15 consecutive patients with placement of Enterprise from January 2013 to September 2014 were also retrospectively reviewed. We used 70-keV, 140-keV, iodine (water), iodine (calcium), and iodine (hydroxyapatite) images to evaluate their effect on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Two regions of interest were individually placed in stent lumen and adjacent brain tissue. Contrast-to-noise ratio was measured to determine image quality. The maximal diameter of stent markers was also measured to evaluate stent-related artifact. Two radiologists independently graded the visibility of the lumen at the maker location by using a 4-point scale. The mean of grading score, contrast/noise ratio and maximal diameter of stent markers were compared among all modes. All results were analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results In vitro, iodine (water) images decreased metallic artifact of stent makers to the greatest degree. The most areas of cheese were observed on iodine (water) images. In vivo, iodine (water) images had the smallest average diameter of stent markers (0.33 ± 0.17mm; P < .05) and showed the highest mean grading score (2.94 ± 0.94; P < .05) and contrast/noise ratio of in-stent lumen (160.03 ±37.79; P < .05) among all the modes. Conclusion Iodine (water) images can help reduce stent-related artifacts of Enterprise and enhance contrast of in-stent lumen. Spectral imaging may be considered a noninvasive modality for following-up patients with in-stent stenosis. PMID:26731534

  13. Process for making electroformed stents

    DOEpatents

    Hines, Richard A.

    2000-02-01

    This invention is directed to an expandable stent useful for implantation into an artery or the like. The stents are made using electroforming techniques in which an electrically-conductive mandrel is coated with a suitable resist material, after which the resist is exposed to an appropriate light pattern and frequency so as to form a stent pattern in the resist. The mandrel is then electroplated with a suitable stent material. The mandrel is etched away once a sufficient layer of stent material is deposited, leaving a completed stent.

  14. Coronary artery stents.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A. J.; Coltart, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of coronary stents to treat the acute complications of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and to reduce the restenosis rate following this procedure is reviewed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8761499

  15. Recurrent coronary stent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Goethals, P; Evrard, S; Dubois, C

    2000-12-01

    A 63-year-old woman with an acute anterior myocardial infarction was treated with primary stent implantation. The absence of coronary artery stenosis and an haematocrit of 58 were indicative of a myeloproliferative disorder and the diagnosis of polycythaemia vera (Vaquez' disease) was confirmed by bone marrow aspiration. The patient had a re-infarction 8 days later. A rescue percutaneous angioplasty was performed for stent thrombosis after unsuccessful thrombolysis. A few hours after sheath removal, a femoral artery thrombosis at the puncture side needed urgent thrombectomy. Finally, a second re-infarction occurred, followed by an irreversible cardiac arrest. Stent thrombosis is a difficult-to-treat complication in patients with polycythaemia vera. If this haematologic disorder is known, primary stent implantation for acute myocardial infarction may not be the first choice in these patients. PMID:11227838

  16. Larynx: implants and stents

    PubMed Central

    Sittel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In the human larynx, implants a primarily used for the correction of glottis insufficiency. In a broader sense laryngeal stents may be considered as implants as well. Laryngeal implants can be differentiated into injectable and solid. The most important representatives of both groups are discussed in detail along with the respective technique of application. Laryngeal stents are primarily used perioperatively. Different types and their use are presented. PMID:22073097

  17. Tracheobronchial stents in children.

    PubMed

    Antón-Pacheco, Juan L

    2016-06-01

    Tracheobronchial obstruction is infrequent in children and still remains a challenging matter of concern. Management alternatives vary from conservative treatment to complex surgical techniques or endoscopic interventional procedures. Airway stenting in children is relatively recent and follows the trail of the experience in adult patients. Nevertheless, there are basic differences between both age groups like the benign nature of most obstructions and the small size of the pediatric airway. These specific features raise the issues of the precise role of tracheobronchial stenting in children and the selection of the most adequate device. Stents fall into four main categories according to the material they are made of: metallic, plastic, hybrid, and biodegradable. Each type has its own advantages and drawbacks so the ideal stent is not yet available. Despite increasing experience with stenting, definite clinical criteria for their use in children are yet to be established. Even so, there seems to be a basic general agreement that stents may play a role in particular clinical settings in which there are no other therapeutic options. PMID:27301605

  18. Drug-eluting stents to prevent stent thrombosis and restenosis.

    PubMed

    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Although first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have significantly reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis, they have also increased the long-term risk of stent thrombosis. This safety concern directly triggered the development of new generation DES, with innovations in stent platforms, polymers, and anti-proliferative drugs. Stent platform materials have evolved from stainless steel to cobalt or platinum-chromium alloys with an improved strut design. Drug-carrying polymers have become biocompatible or biodegradable and even polymer-free DES were introduced. New limus-family drugs (such as everolimus, zotarolimus or biolimus) were adopted to enhance stent performances. As a result, these new DES demonstrated superior vascular healing responses on intracoronary imaging studies and lower stent thrombotic events in actual patients. Recently, fully-bioresorbable stents (scaffolds) have been introduced, and expanding their applications. In this article, the important concepts and clinical results of new generation DES and bioresorbable scaffolds are described. PMID:26567863

  19. Nanomaterial coatings applied on stent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Mahsa; Mohammadi, Marzieh; Steele, Terry Wj; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    The advent of percutaneous coronary intervention and intravascular stents has revolutionized the field of interventional cardiology. Nonetheless, in-stent restenosis, inflammation and late-stent thrombosis are the major obstacles with currently available stents. In order to enhance the hemocompatibility of stents, advances in the field of nanotechnology allow novel designs of nanoparticles and biomaterials toward localized drug/gene carriers or stent scaffolds. The current review focuses on promising polymers used in the fabrication of newer generations of stents with a short synopsis on atherosclerosis and current commercialized stents, nanotechnology's impact on stent development and recent advancements in stent biomaterials is discussed in context. PMID:27111467

  20. Stent fracture and restenosis of a paclitaxel-eluting stent.

    PubMed

    Hamilos, Michalis I; Papafaklis, Michail I; Ligthart, Jurgen M; Serruys, Patrick W; Sianos, Georgios

    2005-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with restenosis six months after stent implantation, at two points where stent fracture had occurred. Fracture is an unusual and probably underestimated cause of restenosis, which acquires special significance in this era of drug-eluting stents. PMID:16422133

  1. Future developments in biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Clark D; Sejpal, Divyesh V

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting. PMID:23837001

  2. Esophageal stents: when and how.

    PubMed

    Kachaamy, Toufic; Pannala, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal stents are devices used to alleviate dysphagia and treat leaks and perforations. Successful esophageal stenting requires definition of the abnormal anatomy such as stricture length or location of the leak, proper stent selection and deployment. This requires detailed knowledge of characteristics of the currently available stents. Self-expanding metal stents whether fully or partially covered have become the mainstay of treatment of esophageal cancer-related dysphagia as they provide quick relief of symptoms and have a favorable safety and efficacy profile, compared to other modalities such as radiation, laser, and argon plasma coagulation. They are also the initial treatment of choice for both malignant and benign fistulae. Stents are also used in benign refractory strictures but long-term stricture resolution rates are low in this setting. Fully covered metal stents are relatively easier to remove compared to partially covered stents; optimal time interval for removal depends on the indication for stenting and the clinical status of the patient. Stent related adverse events include chest pain, reflux, migration, and recurrent obstruction. Serious adverse events occur in less than 5% with procedure-related mortality of less than 2%. Techniques such as placement of hemostatic clips, Over The Scope clips, and endoscopic suturing are being used to decrease the migration risk but the optimal approach has not been defined. Antireflux measures are needed when a stent is placed across the gastroesophageal junction. Stents with antireflux designs do not appear to offer additional benefit compared to the conventional stent designs. Newer stent designs including biodegradable, drug eluting and radioactive stents are currently being investigated. PMID:26824424

  3. Collapse pressures of biodegradable stents.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Subbu; Poh, Tan Lay; Vinalia, Tjong; Mak, Koon Hou; Boey, Freddy

    2003-05-01

    Biodegradable stent prototypes were produced from poly L-lactic acid polymers with different molecular weights. The effects of molecular weight, drug incorporation and stent design on the collapse pressure of the stents were evaluated. While molecular weights did not show a significant effect on the collapse pressure of the stents, drug incorporation at high percentage decreased the collapse pressure of the stents substantially. Cryogenic fracture surfaces showed significant drug agglomeration as the concentration increased. The design of the stent was also found to a have significant effect on the collapse pressure. The stent produced from the same material has a higher collapse pressure when the load bearing surface area is increased. PMID:12628831

  4. Overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Nishihori, Masahiro; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Taiki; Goto, Shunsaku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Izumi, Takashi; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our aim was to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting. The study was conducted between July 2008 and February 2015. A database of consecutive carotid artery stenting procedures was retrospectively assessed to identify the cases of in-stent restenosis that were treated with overlap stenting under proximal or distal protection. The clinical and radiological records of the patients were then reviewed. Of the 155 CAS procedures in 149 patients from the database, 6 patients met the inclusion criteria. All the 6 patients were initially treated with moderate dilatation because of the presence of an unstable plaque. The technical success rate of the overlap stenting was 100%, with no 30-day mortality or morbidity. In addition, there was no further in-stent restenosis during a follow-up period of over 12 months. These results indicated that overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting was both safe and effective in our cohort. PMID:27303101

  5. Carotid endarterectomy or stenting?

    PubMed Central

    Ng, P Y

    2009-01-01

    The relative role of surgical or endovascular treatment in carotid stenosis remains controversial. Results of recent studies add even more confusion to the debate. Major clinical trials so far have shown a wide range of complication rates for carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. Only surgeons or interventionists who can maintain a complication rate of 3% or below should consider treating patients with asymptomatic disease.

  6. Stent-Induced Esophageal Perforation: Treatment by Means of Placing a Second Stent After Removal of the Original Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Gyoo-Sik Park, Sung-Dal; Cho, Young Duk

    2008-05-15

    A case of esophageal perforation caused by a retrievable covered stent is presented. The distal end of the stent was protruding into the mediastinum, which made it impossible to negotiate a guidewire through the stent into the distal esophagus. The stent was successfully removed with use of a stent retrieval set, and esophageal perforation was treated with a second, covered stent with a good result. Fatality associated with this complication might be prevented by virtue of the retrievability of the stent we used. This result points to the effectiveness of a retrievable stent for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal stricture.

  7. Mechanical Characteristics of Composite Knitted Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, Takanori Shomura, Yuzo; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-09-15

    We used metal wires and fibers to fabricate a composite knitted stent and then compare the mechanical characteristics of this stent with those of a pure metallic stent of the same construction in order to develop a stent that offers a comparable degree of expandability as metallic stents but can be used for highly curved lesions that cannot be treated using metallic stents. We fabricated two types of composite knitted stent (N-Z stents), using nitinol wire with a diameter of 0.12 mm and polypara-phenylene-benzobisoxazole (PBO) multifilament fiber (Zyron AS; Toyobo, Osaka, Japan). Stents were knitted into a cylindrical shape using the same textile pattern as a Strecker stent. Two loop lengths (L) of nitinol wire were used in the N-Z stents: L = 1.84 mm (N-Z stent L = 1.84) and L = 2.08 mm (N-Z stent L = 2.08). For the sake of comparison, we fabricated a metallic stent of nitinol using the same textile pattern (N-N stent L = 1.92). We applied a radial compression force diametrically to each stent and applied a bending force diametrically at the free end of a stent with one end fixed in order to evaluate the relationship between stent elasticity and load values. In addition, we macroscopically evaluated the generation of kinks when the stent was bent 180{sup o}. The radial compressive force when the stent diameter was reduced by 53% was 6.44 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 1.84, 6.14 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 4.96 N in the case of N-N stent L = 1.92 mm. The composite stent had a radial compressive force higher than that of a metallic stent. The restoring force to longitudinal direction at a 90{sup o} bending angle was 0.005 N for N-Z stent L = 1.84, 0.003 N for N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 0.034 N for N-N stent L = 1.92. The restoring force of the composite stent was significantly lower. Finally, the composite stent generated no definitive kinks at a bending angle of 180{sup o}, regardless of loop length. However, the N-N stent clearly produced kinks, causing

  8. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection. PMID:27440026

  9. Successive breaks in biliary stents.

    PubMed

    Espinel, Jesús; Pinedo, Eugenia; Ojeda, Vanesa; Guerra, María

    2016-04-01

    A 64 year-old male, was diagnosed with obstructive jaundice due to a well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with liver metastases. The patient underwent endoscopic placement of covered self-expanding biliary stent (10x60 mm, Hanaro) by ERCP. He was admitted with cholangitis one year later. The following ERCP revealed a fractured stent with loss of the distal end (duodenal) and partial migration of the remaining stent to the common bile duct. The fragmented stent was removed from the common bile duct and a new, similar one was inserted. Four months later the patient was admitted with cholangitis. A new ERCP was done and biliary stent was also fragmented. It was removed and an uncovered stent (Wallflex) was inserted. PMID:27065248

  10. [Metallic biomaterials for coronary stents].

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Wieneke, H; Brauer, H; Erbel, R

    2001-04-01

    The introduction of coronary stents is a milestone in interventional cardiology. Two landmark studies have shown that stainless steel stents significantly decrease the restenosis rate as compared to balloon angioplasty. This fact led to a marked increase of stent implantation since the first stent implantation by Jacques Puel in 1986. Although the concept of coronary stenting significantly improved the interventional therapy of coronary artery disease, restenosis remains a major unsolved drawback of this technique. In addition to procedure and disease related factors like implantation pressure and plaque burden, data suggest that the stent as a medical implant plays a crucial role in the process of neointima formation. Since its introduction in cardiology, more than 50 different stents of different configuration and material have been developed. Although recent publications report of promising results using biodegradable materials, almost all coronary stents commercially available at the moment are made of metallic alloys. Whereas first generation stents were made exclusively from stainless steel and only minor interest was focussed on the stent material in the manufacture of coronary stents, recent studies strongly suggest that the metallic alloy used has a direct impact on the extent of neointima formation. Thus, metallic alloys differ not only with respect to mechanical features, but also by their biocompatible properties. These two factors are of major importance in the induction of vessel wall injury, inflammatory processes and cell proliferation. In the first part, the present paper reviews the metallurgic characteristics of metallic materials, which are currently used or under investigation in the production of coronary stents. In the second part, clinical and experimental results are summarized with respect to their biocompatibility and impact on the process of restenosis formation. PMID:11381573

  11. Accidental Stenting Out of Stent: A Lesson from No-Reflow after New Stent Deployment Outside the Prior Stent

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Lee, Wen-Lieng; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Chang, Szu-Ling; Lu, Tse-Min

    2016-01-01

    An operator can be unaware that the guide wire has accidentally advanced into space outside the previous stent, which can result in deformation of the previous stent when a new stent is deployed outside the prior stent. We herein have reported a case of accidental guide wire advancement into a previously dissected lumen of right coronary artery (RCA), resulting in a new stent deploying outside the prior stent, resulting in deformity of the prior stent. Thrombus and friable atheromatous plaques dislodged and migrated to occlude distal RCA when attempting to restore the proximal luminal diameter by balloon inflation, resulting in profound shock with asystole. IVUS was successful in identifying the cause, and the thrombus was removed successfully by manual aspiration. Due to the poor endothelization of a recent stenting, clinicians should be particularly careful of possible wire advancing outside the stent structure, which can result in prominent thrombus or atheromatous debris occluding the distal vessel, and IVUS may be useful in confirming the cause of no-reflow. PMID:27274180

  12. Reducing In-Stent Restenosis

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Robert A.; Halliday, Crawford A.; Miller, Ashley M.; Diver, Louise A.; Dakin, Rachel S.; Montgomery, Jennifer; McBride, Martin W.; Kennedy, Simon; McClure, John D.; Robertson, Keith E.; Douglas, Gillian; Channon, Keith M.; Oldroyd, Keith G.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug-eluting stents reduce the incidence of in-stent restenosis, but they result in delayed arterial healing and are associated with a chronic inflammatory response and hypersensitivity reactions. Identifying novel interventions to enhance wound healing and reduce the inflammatory response may improve long-term clinical outcomes. Micro–ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are noncoding small ribonucleic acids that play a prominent role in the initiation and resolution of inflammation after vascular injury. Objectives This study sought to identify miRNA regulation and function after implantation of bare-metal and drug-eluting stents. Methods Pig, mouse, and in vitro models were used to investigate the role of miRNA in in-stent restenosis. Results We documented a subset of inflammatory miRNAs activated after stenting in pigs, including the miR-21 stem loop miRNAs. Genetic ablation of the miR-21 stem loop attenuated neointimal formation in mice post-stenting. This occurred via enhanced levels of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages coupled with an impaired sensitivity of smooth muscle cells to respond to vascular activation. Conclusions MiR-21 plays a prominent role in promoting vascular inflammation and remodeling after stent injury. MiRNA-mediated modulation of the inflammatory response post-stenting may have therapeutic potential to accelerate wound healing and enhance the clinical efficacy of stenting. PMID:26022821

  13. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  14. Zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost.

    PubMed

    Arat Ozkan, Alev; Sinan, Umit Yasar; Gurmen, Aziz T

    2016-01-01

    Stent fracture is a rare complication of drug-eluting stent implantation with a reported rate of 0.84%-3.2% in various clinical studies with first-generation drug-eluting stents and 29% in autopsy studies. Sirolimus-eluting stents with their closed cell design were reported to be more prone to fracture compared to paclitaxel-eluting stents. Other risk factors for stent fracture are multiple stenting, longer stent length, chronic renal failure, right coronary artery intervention, and a higher maximal inflation pressure. The role of angiography in diagnosing stent fracture is limited, a fact also questioning the reliability of angiographic data. Image enhancement techniques like StentBoost are widely available in new-generation angiography systems and are used to assess stent expansion, overlap size, or to localize the postdilation balloon. Here, we report a case of zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost. PMID:27489714

  15. Zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost

    PubMed Central

    Arat Ozkan, Alev; Sinan, Umit Yasar; Gurmen, Aziz T

    2016-01-01

    Stent fracture is a rare complication of drug-eluting stent implantation with a reported rate of 0.84%–3.2% in various clinical studies with first-generation drug-eluting stents and 29% in autopsy studies. Sirolimus-eluting stents with their closed cell design were reported to be more prone to fracture compared to paclitaxel-eluting stents. Other risk factors for stent fracture are multiple stenting, longer stent length, chronic renal failure, right coronary artery intervention, and a higher maximal inflation pressure. The role of angiography in diagnosing stent fracture is limited, a fact also questioning the reliability of angiographic data. Image enhancement techniques like StentBoost are widely available in new-generation angiography systems and are used to assess stent expansion, overlap size, or to localize the postdilation balloon. Here, we report a case of zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost. PMID:27489714

  16. Multiple Stent Fractures After Everolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation Causing Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun Young; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Tae-Seok; Kim, Chan Joon; Cho, Jung Sun; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stent fracture is an uncommon complication of drug-eluting stent implantation, but it has a clinical significance because of its potential association with adverse cardiac events such as in-stent restenosis, target lesion revascularization, and stent thrombosis. Multiple stent fractures account for a small proportion, but they may lead to more serious complications. Newer generation drug-eluting stents are designed for improved safety and efficacy compared with early generation drug-eluting stents. Multiple stent fractures after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation are a rare case. We report a case of 25-year-old male who presented with acute myocardial infarction caused by multiple stent fractures after everolimus-eluting stents implantation and was treated by balloon angioplasty. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of multiple stent fractures even after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation. PMID:26871806

  17. Early definite stent thrombosis with everolimus-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Ryo; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Okazaki, Shinya; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Stent thrombosis (ST) is a serious complication of percutaneous coronary intervention. Several factors are associated with ST, and combination of these factors increase the risk, even in everolimus-eluting stents, which have low risk of ST. We experienced a case of ST caused by limited coronary flow and resistance to antiplatelet agent. PMID:26509023

  18. iStent® Trabecular Microbypass Stent: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Arthur Fernandes; Patel, Neal Sanjay; Waisbourd, Michael; Katz, L. Jay

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high rates of complications and failure experienced with current glaucoma procedures, there is a continuous search for a safer and more effective glaucoma surgery. A new class of procedures termed minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries (MIGS) aim to fill this void by offering an alternative method of IOP reduction associated with markedly reduced complication rates and shorter recovery times. The iStent, a trabecular microbypass stent, is a MIGS device that has quickly gained popularity. The device allows aqueous humor to directly drain from the anterior chamber into Schlemm's canal by bypassing an obstructed trabecular meshwork. This review examines publications about the iStent, focusing on the device's efficacy, safety, and cost when a single iStent or multiple iStents are implanted in combination with cataract surgery or as a solo procedure. Current data suggest that the iStent is a safe and effective tool in the management of mild-to-moderate glaucoma, notable for its limited complications and absence of serious adverse events following implantation. As valuable experience is gained performing ab interno MIGS, increasing familiarity with angle anatomy and iStent placement, and as newer stent designs are developed, there is promise of continual improvement in the surgical management of glaucoma. PMID:27413541

  19. Carotid stenting and endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon-Kan; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2016-07-01

    Stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic, remains the second commonest cause of death worldwide in the last decade. Etiologies for ischemic stroke (IS) vary widely. Atherothrombotic occlusion is an essential cause to which carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is a major contributor. Administration of anti-platelet agent to patients with CAS has been shown to reduce incidence of long-term IS. In additional, in patients with symptomatic CAS, clinical trials have demonstrated that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is superior to medical therapy for prevention of future CAS-related IS. However, CEA is not suitable for CAS post-radiotherapy or those located at higher level of the internal carotid artery; and major complications of this procedure including cranial nerve injuries have stimulated the interest of using percutaneous transfemoral carotid stenting as an alternative approach. Although transfemoral arterial approach of carotid stenting is not inferior to CEA in improving clinical outcomes, it has been reported to be associated with vascular complication and has its limitations in patients with athero-occlusive disease of abdominal aorta or bilateral iliac arteries, level II or III aortic arch, or bovine type carotid arterial anatomy. Therefore, transradial/transbrachial arterial approach has emerged as a novel method for carotid stenting. This article provides a critical review on interventional approaches for the treatment of CAS. PMID:27061654

  20. In vitro evaluation of stent patency and in-stent stenoses in 10 metallic stents using MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Hamer, O W; Borisch, I; Paetzel, C; Nitz, W R; Seitz, J; Feuerbach, S; Zorger, N

    2006-08-01

    In vitro study to investigate the suitability of contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) for determination of stent patency and grading of in-stent stenoses in 10 metallic stents. The Acculink carotid, DynaLink, Easy Wallstent, JostentSelfX XF, Luminexx, Omnilink, sinus-SuperFlex, SMART, Symphony and ZA stent were separately placed in a vascular phantom. Dedicated stenoses inside the stents generated a concentric lumen narrowing of 50%. CEMRA was performed for each stent. Signal loss inside the stents and artificial lumen narrowing were assessed objectively using the evaluation software of the MR imager. Moreover, three blinded observers determined visibility of stent patency and in-stent stenoses subjectively on a 3-point scale and graded in-stent stenoses. Loss of signal intensity within the stent lumen ranged between 90% (Wallstent) and 5% (ZA), artificial lumen narrowing between 56% (Symphony) and 22% (ZA). For the Symphony and Wallstent, visibility of patency and in-stent stenoses was impaired and the observers' grading exaggerated the degree of stenoses (by 23% and 33%, respectively). For the remainder of stents, patency and stenoses were visible and stenoses were graded accurately (less than 10% discrepancy from reference standard). In this in vitro study, eight of 10 stents presented with MRI characteristics which enabled determination of stent patency and accurate grading of clinically relevant in-stent stenoses. PMID:16641417

  1. Developments in metallic biodegradable stents.

    PubMed

    Hermawan, H; Dubé, D; Mantovani, D

    2010-05-01

    Interest in metallic degradable biomaterials research has been growing in the last decade. Both scientific journals and patent databases record a high increase in publications in this area. Biomedical implants with temporary function, such as coronary stents, are the targeted applications for this novel class of biomaterials. It is expected that stents made of degradable biomaterials, named biodegradable stents, will provide a temporary opening into a narrowed arterial vessel until the vessel remodels and will progressively disappear thereafter. Biodegradable stents made of metal have recently been progressed into preclinical tests in humans after their first introduction in early 2000s. By referring to patents and journal publications, this paper reviews the developments in biodegradable stents, with emphasis on those made of metals, starting from the first design ideas to validation testing. PMID:19815097

  2. Technical overview on the MiStent coronary stent.

    PubMed

    McCLAIN, James B; Carlyle, Wenda C; Donohoe, Dennis J; Ormiston, John A

    2016-10-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) have dramatically improved the long-term efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Over the last decade there have been numerous advances in DES platforms, however, all but one currently approved DES in the United States and many of the approved DES worldwide still have 3 common features: a metal stent platform, an anti-proliferative drug, and a permanent polymer. In this context, the polymer is critical to control drug release, but the polymer serves no purpose after the drug is eluted. While designed to be completely biocompatible, synthetic polymers have the potential to illicit an inflammatory response within the vessel including but not limited to delayed healing and hypersensitivity. Adverse vascular reactions to these polymers have been implicated as a cause of very late stent thrombosis, ongoing intimal hyperplasia and late "catch-up" in addition to neoatherosclerosis. To avoid the long-term risks associated with prolonged polymer exposure, DES with bioabsorbable polymers have been developed. The MiStent® Sirolimus-Eluting Absorbable Polymer Coronary Stent System (MiStent SES) (MiCell Technologies, Durham, NC, USA) combines crystalline sirolimus, a rapidly absorbing polylactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) coating and a thin-strut cobalt chromium alloy stent platform (Genius MAGIC® Stent System, EuroCor GmbH, Germany). MiCell's supercritical fluid technology allows a rigorously controlled, solvent-free drug and polymer coating to be applied to a bare-metal stent. This solvent-free application of drug uniquely allows a crystalline form of sirolimus to be used on the MiStent SES potentially providing improved clinical benefits. It avoids the uncontrolled burst of drug seen with other DES, provides uniform drug delivery around and between the stent struts, and allows the anti-inflammatory and anti-restenotic drug (sirolimus) to be present in the tissue through the entire polymer absorption period and for months after the

  3. Stent fracture in the left brachiocephalic vein.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Masaya; Shiba, Masanori; Tsuji, Takahiro; Iijima, Raisuke; Nakajima, Rintaro; Yoshitama, Takashi; Hara, Hidehiko; Hara, Hisao; Tsunoda, Taro; Nakamura, Masato

    2007-01-01

    A 68-year-old male hemodialysis patient presented with severe congestion in his left arm. Left arm venography showed a completely occluded left brachiocephalic vein. We chose a self-expandable stent for treating this vein. However, restenosis occurred once at 8 months and again after six additional months. The cause of the restenosis was considered to be a stent fracture. On the first restenosis, we performed redilation with a balloon; on the second restenosis, we chose stent-in-stent with a balloon-expandable stent. At least 9 months after the stent-in-stent procedure, there has been no edema in his left arm. Therefore, stent-in-stent is one of the useful strategies for stent fracture in central venous obstruction. PMID:17574169

  4. Bare-metal stent thrombosis two decades after stenting.

    PubMed

    Acibuca, Aynur; Gerede, Demet Menekse; Vurgun, Veysel Kutay

    2015-01-01

    Very late bare-metal stent (BMS) thrombosis is unusual in clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge, the latest that the thrombosis of a BMS has been reported is 14 years after implantation. Here, we describe a case of BMS thrombosis that occurred two decades after stenting. A 68-year-old male patient was admitted with acute anterior myocardial infarction. This patient had a history of BMS implantation in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) 20 years previously. Immediate coronary angiography demonstrated acute thrombotic occlusion of the stent in the LAD. With this case, we are recording the latest reported incidence of BMS thrombosis after implantation. PMID:26407330

  5. Stenting for malignant ureteral obstruction: Tandem, metal or metal-mesh stents.

    PubMed

    Elsamra, Sammy E; Leavitt, David A; Motato, Hector A; Friedlander, Justin I; Siev, Michael; Keheila, Mohamed; Hoenig, David M; Smith, Arthur D; Okeke, Zeph

    2015-07-01

    Extrinsic malignant compression of the ureter is not uncommon, often refractory to decompression with conventional polymeric ureteral stents, and frequently associated with limited survival. Alternative options for decompression include tandem ureteral stents, metallic stents and metal-mesh stents, though the preferred method remains controversial. We reviewed and updated our outcomes with tandem ureteral stents for malignant ureteral obstruction, and carried out a PubMed search using the terms "malignant ureteral obstruction," "tandem ureteral stents," "ipsilateral ureteral stents," "metal ureteral stent," "resonance stent," "silhouette stent" and "metal mesh stent." A comprehensive review of the literature and summary of outcomes is provided. The majority of studies encountered were retrospective with small sample sizes. The evidence is most robust for metal stents, whereas only limited data exists for tandem or metal-mesh stents. Metal and metal-mesh stents are considerably more expensive than tandem stenting, but the potential for less frequent stent exchanges makes them possibly cost-effective over time. Urinary tract infections have been associated with all stent types. A wide range of failure rates has been published for all types of stents, limiting direct comparison. Metal and metal-mesh stents show a high incidence of stent colic, migration and encrustation, whereas tandem stents appear to produce symptoms equivalent to single stents. Comparison is difficult given the limited evidence and heterogeneity of patients with malignant ureteral obstruction. It is clear that prospective, randomized studies are necessary to effectively scrutinize conventional, tandem, metallic ureteral and metal-mesh stents for their use in malignant ureteral obstruction. PMID:25950837

  6. Biodegradable stents in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Moreno-de-Vega, Vicente; Marín, Ingrid; Boix, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable stents (BDSs) are an attractive option to avoid ongoing dilation or surgery in patients with benign stenoses of the small and large intestines. The experience with the currently the only BDS for endoscopic placement, made of Poly-dioxanone, have shown promising results. However some aspects should be improved as are the fact that BDSs lose their radial force over time due to the degradable material, and that can cause stent-induced mucosal or parenchymal injury. This complication rate and modest clinical efficacy has to be carefully considered in individual patients prior to placement of BDSs. Otherwise, the price of these stents therefore it is nowadays an important limitation. PMID:24605020

  7. A New Concept for Carotid Artery Stenting: Coating the Atherosclerotic Plaque by Covered Stent before Bare Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Akgul, Erol

    2016-01-01

    In carotid artery stenting (CAS) procedures, distal embolism, periprocedural stent thrombosis, and 30-day stroke due to the plaque fragmentation and protrusion caused by stent implantation and balloon dilation are frequent complications. In this technical case report, a case is presented of extracranial carotid artery stenosis treated with a covered stent and subsequent implantation of a bare stent. In addition, the possibility is discussed that this new technique prevents the distal microembolic complications, periprocedural stent thrombosis, and 30-day stroke of extracranial CAS. PMID:26949556

  8. Endovascular Stents and Stent-Grafts: Is Heparin Coating Desirable?

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Stephen R.; Souza, Nandita M. de; Allison, David J.

    2000-07-15

    Heparins are glycosaminoglycans that, in addition to their anticoagulant activity, have interactions with growth factors and other glycoproteins. These interactions may stimulate neointimal hyperplasia when heparin is delivered locally on stents and stent-grafts. Modifying the structure of heparin to retain anticoagulant activity while minimizing these stimulatory effects on the vascular endothelium is desirable and may be achieved by understanding the relationships between the structure and function of the various parts of the heparin molecule.

  9. The future of drug eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Anis, R R; Karsch, K R

    2006-01-01

    In‐stent restenosis (ISR) is the major drawback of percutaneous coronary interventions, occurring in 10–40% of patients. Drug eluting stents (DES) are successful in a large majority of patients in preventing restenosis for the first year after implantation. Recently, new stents have emerged that are loaded with anti‐inflammatory, antimigratory, antiproliferative, or pro‐healing drugs. These drugs are supposed to inhibit inflammation and neointimal growth and subsequently ISR. The future of DES lies in the development of better stents with new stent designs, better polymers including biological polymers and biological biodissolvable stent coatings, and new, better drugs. PMID:16216857

  10. Advances in Ureteral Stent Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral stents are commonly used in urolithiasis patients for relief of obstruction or in association with stone treatments such as ureteroscopy and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. There are currently many different bulk materials and coatings available for the manufacture of ureteral stents, however the ideal material has yet to be discovered. All potential biomaterials must undergo rigorous physical and biocompatibility testing before commercialization and use in humans. Despite significant advances in basic science research involving biocompatibility issues and biofilm formation, infection and encrustation remain associated with the use of biomaterials in the urinary tract. There have been many significant advances in the design of ureteral stents in recent years and these will be highlighted along with a discussion of future aspects of biomaterials and use of stents in association with urolithiasis.

  11. Percutaneous cholangioscopy in obstructed biliary metal stents

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, Klaus A.; Mischinger, Hans J.; Karaic, Radenko; Klein, Guenther E.; Kugler, Cristian; Kern, Robert; Uggowitzer, Martin; Szolar, Dieter

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To reevaluate the reasons for the occlusion of self-expanding biliary metal stents, on the basis of cholangioscopic findings. Methods. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) was performed in 15 patients with obstructed biliary Wallstents. The reason for stent insertion was a malignant obstruction in 14 patients; 1 had a benign biliary stricture. Conventional noncovered stents had been inserted in 12 patients; in 3 cases a polyurethane-covered prototype Wallstent had been used. Stent occlusions occurred after 1-55 months. PTCS was performed with a 2.3-mm endoscope through an 11 Fr sheath. Biopsies were taken via the working channel of the endoscope. Results. In all patients with noncovered stents the inner surface of the stent was highly irregular with seaweed-like protrusions (biopsy-proven granulation tissue). Stent incorporation varied from absent (n=1) to subtotal (n=8), but was always incomplete, no matter how long the stent had been in place. Tumor ingrowth was histologically proven in 2 patients. One patient had a large occluding concrement at the proximal end of the stent. In patients with covered stents, the inner surface appeared more regular; however, viable granulation tissue was found inside two stents and tumor ingrowth in one of them. Conclusion. PTCS showed that incorporation of the stent is virtually always incomplete. The factors contributing most to stent occlusion are the buildup of granulation tissue, bile sludge, and tumor overgrowth. Stone formation and tumor ingrowth can also be important, although less common causes of occlusion. A polyurethane stent covering could not prevent tumor ingrowth in one patient and the buildup of viable granulation tissue inside the stent in two further patients; mean stent patency in the three patients with such a stent was 3 months.

  12. Inductively coupled stent antennas in MRI.

    PubMed

    Quick, Harald H; Kuehl, Hilmar; Kaiser, Gernot; Bosk, Silke; Debatin, Jörg F; Ladd, Mark E

    2002-11-01

    The development of intimal hyperplasia following stent deployment can lead to narrowing or even occlusion of the stent lumen. The underlying mechanisms leading to neointimal proliferation within stents remain largely unknown. Long-term evaluation of stent patency requires a noninvasive means for assessing the stent lumen. MR angiography (MRA) has shown potential to provide noninvasive assessment of the vascular system. However, a detailed assessment of the stent lumen with MRI is often hampered by material-dependent susceptibility artifacts, as well as by radiofrequency (RF) eddy currents generated inside the electrically conducting stent mesh. In this study, stent prototypes were designed to act as active resonant structures at the Larmor frequency of the MR system. Employing the principle of inductive coupling, the B(1) fields of the stents were coupled to that of an outside surface coil. The stents thus acted as local RF signal amplifiers. Various stent designs were investigated regarding their coupling to an external coil, signal homogeneity, and suitability for mechanical expansion for implantation purposes. The dependency of flip angle amplification on the quality factor Q of the stents was systematically investigated. Phantom experiments revealed signal amplification in all stent prototypes. Signal enhancement inside and close to the surface of the stents enabled their localization with high contrast in MR images. In vivo imaging experiments in the iliac, renal, and splenic arteries of two pigs confirmed the in vitro findings. Wireless active visualization of stents allows for detailed analysis of the stent lumen with high contrast and spatial resolution. The proposed method could thus provide a powerful diagnostic means for the noninvasive long-term follow-up of stent patency, thereby enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms of restenosis. PMID:12417992

  13. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A

    2016-03-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  14. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  15. Two Cases of Immediate Stent Fracture after Zotarolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pil Hyung; Lee, Seung-Whan; Lee, Jong-Young; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Cheol Whan; Park, Duk-Woo; Park, Seong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation is currently the standard treatment for various types of coronary artery disease. However, previous reports indicate that stent fractures, which usually occur after a period of time from the initial DES implantation, have increased during the DES era; stent fractures can contribute to unfavorable events such as in-stent restenosis and stent thrombosis. In our present report, we describe two cases of zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture: one that was detected six hours after implementation, and the other case that was detected immediately after deployment. Both anatomical and technical risk factors contributed to these unusual cases of immediate stent fracture. PMID:25653706

  16. The Development of Carotid Stent Material

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongsheng; Liu, Wenhua; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular angioplasty with stenting is a promising option for treating carotid artery stenosis. There exist a rapidly increasing number of different stent types with different materials. The bare-metal stent is the most commonly used stent with acceptable results, but it leaves us with the problems of thrombosis and restenosis. The drug-eluting stent is a breakthrough as it has the ability to reduce the restenosis rate, but the problem of late thrombosis still has to be addressed. The biodegradable stent disappears after having served its function. However, restenosis and degradation rates remain to be studied. In this article, we review every stent material with its characteristics, clinical results and complications and point out the standards of an ideal carotid stent. PMID:26019710

  17. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting; CAS; Angioplasty - carotid artery; Carotid artery stenosis - angioplasty; ... Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is done using a small surgical cut. Your surgeon will make a surgical cut in your groin after using some ...

  18. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or to support the vagina and to hold a skin graft after reconstructive surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. Ureteral Stents. New Materials and Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monga, Manoj

    2008-09-01

    Issues of stent migration and challenges of stent placement can be addressed adequately with current stent designs and materials, and an emphasis on precision in technique. Future changes in ureteral stents will need to maintain the current standard that has been set with existing devices in these regards. In contrast, new advances are sorely needed in encrustation and infection associated with ureteral stents. The main target for future development in ureteral stent materials lies in a biodegradable stent that degrades either on demand or degrades reliably within one-month with predictable degradation patterns that do not predispose to urinary obstruction, discomfort or need for secondary procedures. The main target for future development in ureteral stent design is improved patient comfort.

  20. FDA Approves First Fully Dissolvable Stent

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159721.html FDA Approves First Fully Dissolvable Stent Device is absorbed by the body after about ... July 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first coronary stent to be gradually absorbed by the body has ...

  1. Stent thrombosis with an aneurysm 7 years after a drug eluting stent implantation

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pritam; Sethi, Arvind; Kaul, Upendra

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of very late stent thrombosis 7 years post sirolimus eluting stent implantation presenting as ST elevation MI while on dual antiplatelet therapy. Angiography revealed an aneurysm at the proximal end of the stent. The patient was managed successfully by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with adjunct thrombus aspiration and intracoronary abciximab administration followed by deploying a mesh-covered stent MGuard. This very late complication is a rare presentation after a drug illuting stent (DES). PMID:24814120

  2. Impact of Stent Design on In-Stent Stenosis in a Rabbit Iliac Artery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Grenacher, L.; Stampfl, U.; Arnegger, F. U.; Rehnitz, C.; Thierjung, H.; Stampfl, S.; Berger, I.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of stent design on in-stent stenosis in rabbit iliac arteries. Four different types of stent were implanted in rabbit iliac arteries, being different in stent design (crown or wave) and strut thickness (50 or 100 {mu}m). Ten stents of each type were implanted. Each animal received one crown and one wave stent with the same strut thickness. Follow-up was either 12 weeks (n = 10 rabbits) or 24 weeks (n = 10 rabbits). Primary study end points were angiographic and microscopic in-stent stenosis. Secondary study end points were vessel injury, vascular inflammation, and stent endothelialization. Average stent diameter, relative stent overdilation, average and minimal luminal diameter, and relative average and maximum luminal loss were not significantly different. However, a trend to higher relative stent overdilation was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents. A trend toward higher average and minimal luminal diameter and lower relative average and maximum luminal loss was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 100 {mu}m. Neointimal height, relative luminal area stenosis, injury score, inflammation score, and endothelialization score were not significantly different. However, a trend toward higher neointimal height was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 50 {mu}m and a follow-up of 24 weeks. In conclusion, in this study, crown stents seem to trigger neointima. However, the optimized radial force might equalize the theoretically higher tendency for restenosis in crown stents. In this context, also more favorable positive remodeling in crown stents could be important.

  3. Acute stent recoil in the left main coronary artery treated with additional stenting.

    PubMed

    Battikh, Kais; Rihani, Riadh; Lemahieu, Jean Michel

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of acute stent recoil occurring after the stenting of an ostial left main coronary artery lesion. The marked recoil after high-pressure balloon inflation confirmed that the radial force of the first stent was unable to ensure vessel patency. The addition of a second stent provided the necessary support to achieve a good final result. This case illustrates a possible complication of aorto-ostial angioplasty that could be treated with double stenting. PMID:12499528

  4. Fluid mechanics in stented arterial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A.; Bosioc, A.; Crainic, N.; Hudrea, C.; Bernad, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. Strut shape, strut thickness and the distance between consecutive struts have been associated clinically with the with post-intervention clinical outcomes. Hemodynamically favorable designs according to computational modeling can reduced in-stent restenosis after coronary stenting intervention.

  5. Repositioning of Covered Stents: The Grip Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, John Martin; Guo Xiaofeng; Midia, Mehran

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Retrieval and repositioning of a stent deployed beyond its intended target region may be a difficult technical challenge. Materials and Methods: A balloon-mounted snare technique, a variant of the coaxial loop snare technique, is described. Results: The technique is described for the repositioning of a covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent and a covered biliary stent. Conclusion: The balloon-mounted snare technique is a useful technique for retrieval of migrated stents.

  6. Nonsurgical retrieval of embolized coronary stents.

    PubMed

    Eggebrecht, H; Haude, M; von Birgelen, C; Oldenburg, O; Baumgart, D; Herrmann, J; Welge, D; Bartel, T; Dagres, N; Erbel, R

    2000-12-01

    Embolization of coronary stents before deployment is a rare but challenging complication of coronary stenting. Different methods for nonsurgical stent retrieval have been suggested. There were 20 cases (0.90%) of intracoronary stent embolization among 2,211 patients who underwent implantation of 4,066 stents. Twelve of 1,147 manually crimped stents (1.04%) and eight of 2,919 premounted stents were lost (0.27%, P < 0.01) during retraction of the delivery system, because the target lesion could not be either reached or crossed. Percutaneous retrieval was successfully carried out in 10 of 14 patients (71%) in whom retrieval was attempted. In 10 patients, stent retrieval was tried with 1.5-mm low-profile angioplasty balloon catheters (success in 7/10) and in seven cases with myocardial biopsy forceps or a gooseneck snare (success in 3/7). Three patients (15%) underwent urgent coronary artery bypass surgery after failed percutaneous retrieval, but their outcomes were fatal. In two patients, stents were compressed against the vessel wall by another stent, without compromising coronary blood flow. In two patients, a stent was lost to the periphery without clinical side effects; treatment was conservative in these cases. Embolization of stents before deployment is a rare but serious complication of coronary stenting, with hazardous potential for the patient. Manual mounting of stents is associated with a significantly higher risk of stent embolization. Stent retrieval from the coronary circulation with low-profile angioplasty balloon catheters is a readily available and technically familiar approach that has a relatively high success rate. PMID:11108675

  7. Carotid Artery Stenting versus Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C.; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Healthsponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  8. Hemodynamics in coronary arteries with overlapping stents.

    PubMed

    Rikhtegar, Farhad; Wyss, Christophe; Stok, Kathryn S; Poulikakos, Dimos; Müller, Ralph; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-22

    Coronary artery stenosis is commonly treated by stent placement via percutaneous intervention, at times requiring multiple stents that may overlap. Stent overlap is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcome. While changes in local blood flow are suspected to play a role therein, hemodynamics in arteries with overlapping stents remain poorly understood. In this study we analyzed six cases of partially overlapping stents, placed ex vivo in porcine left coronary arteries and compared them to five cases with two non-overlapping stents. The stented vessel geometries were obtained by micro-computed tomography of corrosion casts. Flow and shear stress distribution were calculated using computational fluid dynamics. We observed a significant increase in the relative area exposed to low wall shear stress (WSS<0.5 Pa) in the overlapping stent segments compared both to areas without overlap in the same samples, as well as to non-overlapping stents. We further observed that the configuration of the overlapping stent struts relative to each other influenced the size of the low WSS area: positioning of the struts in the same axial location led to larger areas of low WSS compared to alternating struts. Our results indicate that the overlap geometry is by itself sufficient to cause unfavorable flow conditions that may worsen clinical outcome. While stent overlap cannot always be avoided, improved deployment strategies or stent designs could reduce the low WSS burden. PMID:24275438

  9. Unrecognized stent embolization causing recurrent chest pain.

    PubMed

    Levisay, Justin P; Vaitkus, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Numerous methods have been described for retrieving or addressing stents that have embolized in the coronary arteries. Almost all of these prior reports address the "freshly" embolized stent with retrieval or deployment occurring during the same index procedure during which the embolization occurred. We describe a case of a thrombosed, chronically embolized coronary stent. PMID:16404788

  10. Rotational Atherectomy of Three Overlapping Stent Layers.

    PubMed

    Frisoli, Tiberio M; Friedman, Harold; O'Neill, William W

    2016-09-01

    A patient was referred to us for Canadian Cardiovascular Society class III refractory angina. He was found to have in-stent restenosis within three layers of underexpanded stents implanted in 2004, 2011, and 2014. Rotational atherectomy safely yielded stent strut ablation (reduced to one layer), lesion expansion, and very good angiographic and physiologic results. PMID:27591692

  11. Knotted stents: Case report and outcome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha Na; Hwang, Hokyeong

    2015-01-01

    A knotted ureteral stent is an extremely rare condition, with fewer than 20 cases reported in the literature; however, it is difficult to treat. We report a case in which a folded Terumo guidewire was successfully used to remove a knotted stent percutaneously without anesthesia. We also review the current literature on predisposing factors and management strategies for knotted ureteral stents. PMID:25964843

  12. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  13. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  14. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  15. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  16. Therapies targeting inflammation after stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Since the introduction of coronary vessel scaffold by metallic stent, percutaneous coronary intervention has become widely performed all over the world. Although drug-eluting stent technology has further decrease the incidence of in-stent restenosis, there still remaining issues related to stent implantation. Vessel inflammation is one of the causes that may be related to stent restenosis as well as stent thrombosis. Therefore, systemic therapies targeting inflammation emerged as adjunctive pharmacological intervention to improve outcome. Statins, corticosteroids, antiplatelets, and immunosuppresive or anti-cancer drugs are reported to favorably impact outcome after bare-metal stent implantation. In type 2 diabetic patients, pioglitazone may be the most promising drug that can lower neointimal proliferation and, as a result, lower incidence of restenosis and target lesion revascularization. On the other hand, several new stent platforms that might decrease inflammatory response after drug-eluting stent implantation have been introduced. Because durable polymer used in the first generation drug-eluting stents are recognized to be responsible for unfavorable vessel response, biocompatible or bioabsorbable polymer has been introduce and already used clinically. Furthermore, polymer-free drug-eluting stent and bioresorbable scaffold are under investigation. Although vessel inflammation may be reduced by using these new drug-eluting stents or scaffold, long-term impact needs to be investigated further. PMID:23905635

  17. Geometrical deployment for braided stent.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, Pierre; Brina, Olivier; Ouared, Rafik; Yilmaz, Hasan; Farhat, Mohamed; Erceg, Gorislav; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Kulcsar, Zsolt; Pereira, Vitor Mendes

    2016-05-01

    The prediction of flow diverter stent (FDS) implantation for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is being increasingly required for hemodynamic simulations and procedural planning. In this paper, a deployment model was developed based on geometrical properties of braided stents. The proposed mathematical description is first applied on idealized toroidal vessels demonstrating the stent shortening in curved vessels. It is subsequently generalized to patient specific vasculature predicting the position of the filaments along with the length and local porosity of the stent. In parallel, in-vitro and in-vivo FDS deployments were measured by contrast-enhanced cone beam CT (CBCT) in idealized and patient-specific geometries. These measurements showed a very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the virtual deployments and provided experimental validations of the underlying geometrical assumptions. In particular, they highlighted the importance of the stent radius assessment in the accuracy of the deployment prediction. Thanks to its low computational cost, the proposed model is potentially implementable in clinical practice providing critical information for patient safety and treatment outcome assessment. PMID:26891065

  18. Percutaneous coronary angioscopy and stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuser, Richard R.

    1994-05-01

    With the expanding array of therapies available for coronary intervention, the invasive cardiologist has many choices for treating a specific lesion in an individual patient. Certain types of lesions might respond more effectively with stents, particularly the rigid Palmax- Schatz device. Thrombus and dissection immediately following stent placement are associated with early occlusion, and the interventionist must be able to assess their presence pre- and post-stenting. Angiography is deficient in quantifying minimal disease and in defining lesion architecture and composition, as well as the plaque rupture and thrombosis associated with unstable angina. It is also imprecise in detecting dissection and thrombus. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides high-resolution images that delineate irregularities and other structures inside the lumen and within the vessel wall and surrounding tissues. Like angiography, IVUS has limited specificity for thrombus differentiation. Angioscopy is superior to angiography and IVUS in detecting thrombus and dissection. Angioscopy allows the clinician to assess the appearance of stent struts after deployment and at follow-up. This may aid in reducing acute complications as well as restenosis. Follow-up angioscopy of stents to detect thrombus or exposed struts may guide therapy in a patient who has clinical symptoms of restenosis.

  19. Update on Pancreatobiliary Stents: Stent Placement in Advanced Hilar Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ill

    2015-01-01

    Palliative drainage is the main treatment option for inoperable hilar cholangiocarcinoma to improve symptoms, which include cholangitis, pruritus, high-grade jaundice, and abdominal pain. Although there is no consensus on the optimal method for biliary drainage due to the paucity of large-scale randomized control studies, several important aspects of any optimal method have been studied. In this review article, we discuss the liver volume to be drained, stent type, techniques to insert self-expanding metal stents, and approaches for proper and effective biliary drainage based on previous studies and personal experience. PMID:26064819

  20. [Decreasing incidence of stent thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Lemesle, G; Delhaye, C

    2011-12-01

    Stent thrombosis (ST) remains a major pitfall of stent implantation in contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) leading to high rates of death and non-fatal myocardial infarction. Many predictors of ST have been reported worldwide but the strongest have to be highlighted regarding the catastrophic prognosis of such an event. Because platelet aggregation has a pivotal role in ST pathogenesis, the new antiplatelet regimens combining aspirin and P2Y12 receptor inhibitors have led to a remarkable decrease in the ST incidence, especially in the setting of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In this article, our purpose is to review the evolution of ST incidence since first stent use in PCI. We will also overview the main predictors of ST focusing on ACS and clopidogrel low response. PMID:22054519

  1. Inductive antenna stent: design, fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi Mohammadi, Abdolreza; Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; Lappin, Derry; Schlosser, Colin; Takahata, Kenichi

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and electromechanical characteristics of inductive stents developed for intelligent stent applications. The stents, fabricated out of 316L stainless-steel tubes using laser machining, are patterned to have zigzag loops without bridge struts, and when expanded, become a helix-like structure. Highly conductive metals such as copper and gold are coated on the stents to improve their inductive/antenna function. The Q-factor of the stent is shown to increase by a factor of 7 at 150 MHz with copper coating. The expansion of the stent from 2 to 4 mm diameter results in a 3.2× increase in the inductance, obtaining ˜1 µH at a similar frequency. The stent passivated by Parylene-C film is used to characterize its resonance in different media including saline. The copper-coated inductive stent exhibits a 2.4× radial stiffness for 1 mm strain as well as a 16× bending compliance compared with a commercial stent, each of which is potentially beneficial in preventing/mitigating stent failures such as recoil as well as enabling easier navigation through intricate blood vessels. The mechanical stiffness may be tailored by adjusting stent-wire thickness while maintaining necessary coating thickness to achieve particular mechanical requirements and high inductive performance simultaneously.

  2. [Absorbable coronary stents. New promising technology].

    PubMed

    Erbel, Raimund; Böse, Dirk; Haude, Michael; Kordish, Igor; Churzidze, Sofia; Malyar, Nasser; Konorza, Thomas; Sack, Stefan

    2007-06-01

    Coronary stent implantation started in Germany 20 years ago. In the beginning, the progress was very slow and accelerated 10 years later. Meanwhile, coronary stent implantation is a standard procedure in interventional cardiology. From the beginning of permanent stent implantation, research started to provide temporary stenting of coronary arteries, first with catheter-based systems, later with stent-alone technology. Stents were produced from polymers or metal. The first polymer stent implantation failed except the Igaki-Tamai stent in Japan. Newly developed absorbable polymer stents seem to be very promising, as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography have demonstrated. Temporary metal stents were developed based on iron and magnesium. Currently, the iron stent is tested in peripheral arteries. The absorbable magnesium stent (Biotronik, Berlin, Germany) was tested in peripheral arteries below the knee and meanwhile in the multicenter international PROGRESS-AMS (Clinical Performance and Angiographic Results of Coronary Stenting with Absorbable Metal Stents) study. The first magnesium stent implantation was performed on July 30, 2004 after extended experimental testing in Essen. The magnesium stent behaved like a bare-metal stent with low recoil of 5-7%. The stent struts were absorbed when tested with IVUS. Stent struts were not visible by fluoroscopy or computed tomography (CT) as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). That means, that the magnesium stent is invisible and therefore CT and MRI can be used for imaging of interventions. Only using micro-CT the stent struts were visible. The absorption process could be demonstrated in a patient 18 days after implantation due to suspected acute coronary syndrome, which was excluded. IVUS showed a nice open lumen. Stent struts were no longer visible, but replaced by tissue indicating the previous stent location. Coronary angiography after 4 months showed an ischemia-driven target lesion

  3. Current Status of Biliary Metal Stents.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyeong Seok; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2016-03-01

    Many advances have been achieved in biliary stenting over the past 30 years. Endoscopic stent placement has become the primary management therapy to relieve obstruction in patients with benign or malignant biliary tract diseases. Compared with plastic stents, a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) has been used for management in patients with malignant strictures because of a larger lumen and longer stent patency. Recently, SEMS has been used for various benign biliary strictures and leaks. In this article, we briefly review the characteristics of SEMS as well as complications of stent placement. We review the current guidelines for managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions. Recent developments in biliary stenting are also discussed. PMID:26911896

  4. Current Status of Biliary Metal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyeong Seok; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Many advances have been achieved in biliary stenting over the past 30 years. Endoscopic stent placement has become the primary management therapy to relieve obstruction in patients with benign or malignant biliary tract diseases. Compared with plastic stents, a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) has been used for management in patients with malignant strictures because of a larger lumen and longer stent patency. Recently, SEMS has been used for various benign biliary strictures and leaks. In this article, we briefly review the characteristics of SEMS as well as complications of stent placement. We review the current guidelines for managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions. Recent developments in biliary stenting are also discussed. PMID:26911896

  5. Recent advances of biliary stent management.

    PubMed

    Kida, Mitsuhiro; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Ikeda, Hiroko; Takezawa, Miyoko; Kikuchi, Hidehiko; Watanabe, Maya; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in chemotherapy has prolonged the survival of patients with malignant biliary strictures, leading to increased rates of stent occlusion. Even we employed metallic stents which contributed to higher rates and longer durations of patency, and occlusion of covered metallic stents now occurs in about half of all patients during their survival. We investigated the complication and patency rate for the removal of covered metallic stents, and found that the durations were similar for initial stent placement and re-intervention. In order to preserve patient quality of life, we currently recommend the use of covered metallic stents for patients with malignant biliary obstruction because of their removability and longest patency duration, even though uncovered metallic stents have similar patency durations. PMID:22563289

  6. Risks of noncardiac surgery after coronary stenting.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Proddutur R; Vaitkus, Paul T

    2005-03-15

    An increased risk of major complications for noncardiac surgery after coronary stenting has been suggested. We retrospectively reviewed all cases of coronary stents from 1999 to 2003 with subsequent surgery to assess major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs), including myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, major bleeding, and death. Among the 56 patients identified, 8 developed MACEs; 38% underwent surgery < or =14 days after stenting, and 62% underwent surgery 15 to 42 days after stenting. No patient developed MACEs if surgery occurred >42 days after stenting. Among patients who developed MACEs, 77% of surgeries were elective, 19% were urgent, and only 4% were emergency. Noncardiac surgery 6 weeks after coronary stenting is associated with a high risk of MACEs. PMID:15757604

  7. Ureteral Stent Coatings: What's Here and What's Coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razvi, Hassan

    2008-09-01

    Ureteral stents have become an indispensable tool to the urologist in the management of various disorders afflicting the urinary tract. While the ideal stent remains elusive, novel technical advances in stent coating technology offer the potential of enhancing stent biocompatibility and clinical application. Currently available stent coatings as well as new and emerging devices will be reviewed.

  8. Stenting in Malignant Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Almadi, Majid A; Barkun, Jeffrey S; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-10-01

    Decompression of the biliary system in patients with malignant biliary obstruction has been widely accepted and implemented as part of the care. Despite a wealth of literature, there remains a significant amount of uncertainty as to which approach would be most appropriate in different clinical settings. This review covers stenting of the biliary system in cases of resectable or palliative malignant biliary obstruction, potential candidates for biliary drainage, technical aspects of the procedure, as well as management of biliary stent dysfunction. Furthermore, periprocedural considerations including proper mapping of the location of obstruction and the use of antibiotics are addressed. PMID:26431598

  9. Drug eluting biliary stents to decrease stent failure rates: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shatzel, Joseph; Kim, Jisoo; Sampath, Kartik; Syed, Sharjeel; Saad, Jennifer; Hussain, Zilla H; Mody, Kabir; Pipas, J Marc; Gordon, Stuart; Gardner, Timothy; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting is clinically effective in relieving both malignant and non-malignant obstructions. However, there are high failure rates associated with tumor ingrowth and epithelial overgrowth as well as internally from biofilm development and subsequent clogging. Within the last decade, the use of prophylactic drug eluting stents as a means to reduce stent failure has been investigated. In this review we provide an overview of the current research on drug eluting biliary stents. While there is limited human trial data regarding the clinical benefit of drug eluting biliary stents in preventing stent obstruction, recent research suggests promise regarding their safety and potential efficacy. PMID:26839648

  10. Drug eluting biliary stents to decrease stent failure rates: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shatzel, Joseph; Kim, Jisoo; Sampath, Kartik; Syed, Sharjeel; Saad, Jennifer; Hussain, Zilla H; Mody, Kabir; Pipas, J Marc; Gordon, Stuart; Gardner, Timothy; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-01-25

    Biliary stenting is clinically effective in relieving both malignant and non-malignant obstructions. However, there are high failure rates associated with tumor ingrowth and epithelial overgrowth as well as internally from biofilm development and subsequent clogging. Within the last decade, the use of prophylactic drug eluting stents as a means to reduce stent failure has been investigated. In this review we provide an overview of the current research on drug eluting biliary stents. While there is limited human trial data regarding the clinical benefit of drug eluting biliary stents in preventing stent obstruction, recent research suggests promise regarding their safety and potential efficacy. PMID:26839648

  11. Stent strut fracture-induced restenosis in a bifurcation lesion treated with the crush stenting technique.

    PubMed

    Surmely, Jean-Francois; Kinoshita, Yoshihisa; Dash, Debabrata; Matsubara, Tetsuo; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Ehara, Mariko; Ito, Tatsuya; Nasu, Kenya; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Takahiko; Katoh, Osamu

    2006-07-01

    Percutaneous treatment of a bifurcation lesion still shows a significant complication rate, mainly because of restenosis at the ostial site of the side branch vessel. Different techniques, such as V-stenting, culottes-stenting or crush stenting, allow full ostial coverage and may therefore achieve uniform drug distribution within the lesion. The crush technique results in a strong mechanical constraint on the side branch stent. A case of stent strut fracture-induced restenosis in a bifurcation lesion treated with the crush stenting technique is described. PMID:16799252

  12. Comparison of a New Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Metallic Stent to a Noncovered Stent in Canine Ureters

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hwan-Hoon Lee, Seung Hwa; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Hong Suk; Kim, Young Sik; Kang, Byung Chul; Frisoli, Joan K.; Razavi, Mahmood K.

    2008-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a newly designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered metallic stent in the ureter by comparing its effectiveness with that of the noncovered stent in a canine model. We placed 14 stents in the ureters of seven mongrel dogs that weighed 30-40 kg each. The covered and noncovered stents were deployed in the right and left ureters, respectively, of six dogs. In the seventh dog, a covered stent and a double-J catheter were inserted in the right ureter, and a covered stent only was inserted in the left ureter. The first six dogs were sacrificed at 5, 10, and 15 weeks after deployment of the stents (two for each follow-up period), and the seventh dog was sacrificed at 30 weeks. There was no migration or poor expansion of any of the stents observed on plain radiography. On intravenous pyelogram and retrograde pyelogram, all of the covered stents at each follow-up period had patent lumens at the stented segments without hydronephrosis, and the passage of contrast material through it was well preserved. The noncovered stents in the dogs sacrificed at 5 and 10 weeks and one of the two dogs sacrificed at 15 weeks showed near-complete occlusion of the stent lumen due to ingrowth of the soft tissue, and severe hydronephrosis was also noted. The noncovered stent in the other dog sacrificed at 15 weeks showed the passage of contrast material without hydronephrosis, but the lumen of the stent was still nearly occluded by the soft tissue. There was no evidence of hydronephrosis or passage disturbance of the contrast material in both ureters of the dog sacrificed at 30 weeks. We conclude that the newly designed PTFE-covered stent effectively prevented the luminal occlusion caused by urothelial hyperplasia compared to the near-total occlusion of the noncovered stents, and no migration of the covered stents was noted.

  13. MR Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Stents: In Vitro Evaluation of 22 Different Stent Types

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Matthias C.; Bunck, Alexander C.; Seifarth, Harald; Buerke, Boris; Kugel, Harald; Hesselmann, Volker; Köhler, Michael; Heindel, Walter; Maintz, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate stent lumen visibility of a large sample of different peripheral arterial (iliac, renal, carotid) stents using magnetic resonance angiography in vitro. Materials and Methods. 21 different stents and one stentgraft (10 nitinol, 7 316L, 2 tantalum, 1 cobalt superalloy, 1 PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1 platinum alloy) were examined in a vessel phantom (vessel diameters ranging from 5 to 13 mm) filled with a solution of Gd-DTPA. Stents were imaged at 1.5 Tesla using a T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Image analysis was performed measuring three categories: Signal intensity in the stent lumen, lumen visibility of the stented lumen, and homogeneity of the stented lumen. The results were classified using a 3-point scale (good, intermediate, and poor results). Results. 7 stents showed good MR lumen visibility (4x nitinol, 2x tantalum, and 1x cobalt superalloy). 9 stents showed intermediate results (5x nitinol, 2x 316L, 1x PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1x platinum alloy) and 6 stents showed poor results (1x nitinol, and 5x 316L). Conclusion. Stent lumen visibility varies depending on the stent material and type. Some products show good lumen visibility which may allow the detection of stenoses inside the lumen, while other products cause artifacts which prevent reliable evaluation of the stent lumen with this technique. PMID:22091380

  14. Indications for stenting during thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Bækgaard, N; Broholm, R; Just, S

    2013-03-01

    The most important vein segment to thrombolyse after deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is the outflow tract meaning the iliofemoral vein. Iliofemoral DVT is defined as DVT in the iliac vein and the common femoral vein. Spontaneous recanalization is less than 50%, particularly on the left side. The compression from adjacent structures, predominantly on the left side is known as the iliac vein compression syndrome. Therefore, it is essential that supplementary endovenous procedures have to be performed in case of persistent obstructive lesions following catheter-directed thrombolysis. Insertion of a stent in this position is the treatment of choice facilitating the venous flow into an unobstructed outflow tract either from the femoral vein or the deep femoral vein or both. The stent, made of stainless steel or nitinol, has to be self-expandable and flexible with radial force to overcome the challenges in this low-pressure system. The characteristics of the anatomy with external compression and often a curved vein segment with diameter difference make stent placement necessary. Ballooning alone has no place in this area. The proportion of inserted stents varies in the published materials with catheter-directed thrombolysis of iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis. PMID:23482545

  15. Percutaneous endovascular stents: an experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wright, K C; Wallace, S; Charnsangavej, C; Carrasco, C H; Gianturco, C

    1985-07-01

    Percutaneous, expanding, endovascular stents were constructed of stainless steel wire formed in a zig-zag pattern. Stents were placed for varying periods of time in the jugular vein, vena cava, and abdominal aorta in each of five adult dogs. The dilating force of the stents could be controlled by different wire size, number and angle of wire bends, and stent length. In addition, multiple stents could be placed one inside the other or one after the other, depending on the circumstance. The stents distended the vessels and increased their diameter. No flow defects, luminal narrowing, or occlusion were noted in any of the stented vessels, even after 6 months. Side branches bridged by the stents remained patent and showed no indication of narrowing. Stent wires became encased by a proliferation of the tunica intima where they contacted the vessel wall. Encasement was slower and less extensive in the abdominal aorta. No vascular erosion or clot formation was found to be associated with any of the stents. PMID:4001423

  16. Endoscopic stenting for malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lai, E C; Lo, C M; Liu, C L

    2001-10-01

    Use of endoscopic stents to manage patients with malignant obstructive jaundice is a well accepted measure. Interpretation of the results of endoscopic stenting must be made with reference to the level of the bile duct obstruction. Results were generally unsatisfactory for hilar lesions, especially when the intrahepatic ducts were segregated into multiple isolated systems. After deployment, stent dysfunction due to clogging by biliary sludge is apparently an inevitable process for the conventional plastic stent. Considerable efforts had been made to prolong the stent patency by changing its physical configuration, coating the inner lumen, and the choice of material but with little success. The development of a self-expandable metal stent is a major advance, but the benefits derived from a larger stent lumen are compromised by the initial expense and the tumor ingrowth through the wires for all models available commercially. Current data failed to substantiate the value of routine preoperative biliary decompression, as there is no reduction in the morbidity and mortality rates after surgery. Although biased patient selection may have resulted in the negative observations made, repeated clinical trials should probably focus on patients with distal bile duct tumors who are preparing for a major pancreatic resection. As a definitive palliative measure, endoscopic stenting is a more cost-effective option than surgery for patients with limited life expectancy based on data regarding plastic stents. The recommendations are evolving however, as there is progressive refinement of laparoscopic surgery techniques and designs of endoscopic stents. PMID:11596892

  17. [A case of recurrent stent thrombosis in a drug-eluting stent following antiplateled therapy discontinuation].

    PubMed

    Wożakowska Kapłon, Beata; Jaskulska Niedziela, Elżbieta; Niedziela, Justyna; Gutkowski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Stent thrombosis is one of the major complications that occur in percutaneous coronary interventions with stents. Various factors have been attributed to the development of stent thrombosis and several strategies have been recommended for its management. We report a case of 45 year-old patient with recurrent subacute and late stent thrombosis following antiplateled therapy discontinuation on the 6th day and 11th month after he discharging from hospital. PMID:21678309

  18. New Stenting Technique to Achieve Favorable Jailing Configuration on Side Branch Ostium: Bent Stent Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    According to data from stent-enhanced three-dimensional optical coherence tomography, incomplete stent apposition after side branch dilation in coronary bifurcation stenting can be reduced by the free carina type (no links bridged from a carina) and by distal cell rewiring. This is the first report to describe a bent stent technique that was devised to achieve the free carina type (no links bridged from a carina), as a favorable jailing configuration. PMID:27088016

  19. Influence of strut cross-section of stents on local hemodynamics in stented arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yongfei; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Wanhua

    2016-05-01

    Stenting is a very effective treatment for stenotic vascular diseases, but vascular geometries altered by stent implantation may lead to flow disturbances which play an important role in the initiation and progression of restenosis, especially in the near wall in stented arterial regions. So stent designs have become one of the indispensable factors needed to be considered for reducing the flow disturbances. In this paper, the structural designs of strut cross-section are considered as an aspect of stent designs to be studied in details. Six virtual stents with different strut cross-section are designed for deployments in the same ideal arterial model. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are performed to study how the shape and the aspect ratio (AR) of strut cross-section modified the local hemodynamics in the stented segments. The results indicate that stents with different strut cross-sections have different influence on the hemodynamics. Stents with streamlined cross-sectional struts for circular arc or elliptical arc can significantly enhance wall shear stress (WSS) in the stented segments, and reduce the flow disturbances around stent struts. The performances of stents with streamlined cross-sectional struts are better than that of stents with non-streamlined cross-sectional struts for rectangle. The results also show that stents with a larger AR cross-section are more conductive to improve the blood flow. The present study provides an understanding of the flow physics in the vicinity of stent struts and indicates that the shape and AR of strut cross-section ought to be considered as important factors to minimize flow disturbance in stent designs.

  20. Influence of strut cross-section of stents on local hemodynamics in stented arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yongfei; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Wanhua

    2016-04-01

    Stenting is a very effective treatment for stenotic vascular diseases, but vascular geometries altered by stent implantation may lead to flow disturbances which play an important role in the initiation and progression of restenosis, especially in the near wall in stented arterial regions. So stent designs have become one of the indispensable factors needed to be considered for reducing the flow disturbances. In this paper, the structural designs of strut cross-section are considered as an aspect of stent designs to be studied in details. Six virtual stents with different strut cross-section are designed for deployments in the same ideal arterial model. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are performed to study how the shape and the aspect ratio (AR) of strut cross-section modified the local hemodynamics in the stented segments. The results indicate that stents with different strut cross-sections have different influence on the hemodynamics. Stents with streamlined cross-sectional struts for circular arc or elliptical arc can significantly enhance wall shear stress (WSS) in the stented segments, and reduce the flow disturbances around stent struts. The performances of stents with streamlined cross-sectional struts are better than that of stents with non-streamlined cross-sectional struts for rectangle. The results also show that stents with a larger AR cross-section are more conductive to improve the blood flow. The present study provides an understanding of the flow physics in the vicinity of stent struts and indicates that the shape and AR of strut cross-section ought to be considered as important factors to minimize flow disturbance in stent designs.

  1. [Drug-eluting stents: long-term safety].

    PubMed

    Karpov, Iu A; Samko, A N; Buza, V V

    2009-01-01

    The review concerns the problem of late thromboses of drug-eluting stents and their influence on late prognosis of the patients; presents long-term results of the trial of sirolimus-eluting stents implanted to patients with coronary heart disease; analyses mechanisms of development of late stent thrombosis, data from different meta-analyses and registers comparing long-term outcomes in patients with implanted sirolimus-eluting stents and metallic stents; suggests risk factors of late thromboses of drug-eluting stents; presents original evidence on 3.5-year follow-up of patients with implanted sirolimus-eluting stents and metallic stents. PMID:19537584

  2. Bare metal stenting of the iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tanner I; Schneider, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    A significant subset of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) has iliac artery involvement that requires treatment. The development of bare metal stents has improved the short- and long-term outcomes of endovascular repair and has become first line therapy. Open surgical bypass has been reserved for extremely complex anatomic morphologies or endovascular failures. It is unclear whether primary stenting is superior to angioplasty with provisional stenting but if angioplasty is used alone, it is likely only appropriate for the most focal lesions. Self-expanding and balloon-expandable stents have unique characteristics that are suitable to different lesion morphologies. Both stent-types have demonstrated similar outcomes. Herein, we review the practice and results of bare metal stents in the iliac arteries. PMID:27035892

  3. Rapid virtual stenting for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-03-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient.

  4. Rapid Virtual Stenting for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient. PMID:27346910

  5. Prevention of stent thrombosis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Reejhsinghani, Risheen; Lotfi, Amir S

    2015-01-01

    Stent thrombosis is an uncommon but serious complication which carries with it significant mortality and morbidity. This review analyzes the entity of stent thrombosis from a historical and clinical perspective, and chronicles the evolution of this condition through the various generations of stent development, from bare metal to first-generation, second-generation, and third-generation drug-eluting stents. It also delineates the specific risk factors associated with stent thrombosis and comprehensively examines the literature related to each of these risks. Finally, it highlights the preventative strategies that can be garnered from the existing data, and concludes that a multifactorial approach is necessary to combat the occurrence of stent thrombosis, with higher risk groups, such as patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, meriting further research. PMID:25657588

  6. Mechanical behavior of peripheral stents and stent-vessel interaction: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dottori, Serena; Flamini, Vittoria; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    In this paper stents employed to treat peripheral artery disease are analyzed through a three-dimensional finite-element approach, based on a large-strain and large-displacement formulation. Aiming to evaluate the influence of some stent design parameters on stent mechanics and on the biomechanical interaction between stent and arterial wall, quasi-static and dynamic numerical analyses are carried out by referring to computational models of commercially and noncommercially available versions of both braided self-expandable stents and balloon-expandable stents. Addressing isolated device models, opening mechanisms and flexibility of both opened and closed stent configurations are numerically experienced. Moreover, stent deployment into a stenotic peripheral artery and possible postdilatation angioplasty (the latter for the self-expandable device only) are simulated by considering different idealized vessel geometries and accounting for the presence of a stenotic plaque. Proposed results highlight important differences in the mechanical response of the two types of stents, as well as a significant influence of the vessel shape on the stress distributions arising upon the artery-plaque system. Finally, computational results are used to assess both the stent mechanical performance and the effectiveness of the stenting treatment, allowing also to identify possible critical conditions affecting the risk of stent fracture, tissue damage, and/or pathological tissue response.

  7. Photodynamic therapy for occluded biliary metal stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Joseph V. E.; Krasner, Neville; Sturgess, R.

    1999-02-01

    In this abstract we describe the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to recanalize occluded biliary metal stents. In patients with jaundice secondary to obstructed metal stents PDT was carried out 72 hours after the administration of m THPC. Red laser light at 652 nm was delivered endoscopically at an energy intensity of 50 J/cm. A week later endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram showed complete recanalization of the metal stent.

  8. Very Late Bare Metal Stent Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Soto Herrera, Mariana; Restrepo, José A.; Felipe Buitrago, Andrés; Gómez Mejía, Mabel; Díaz, Jesús H.

    2013-01-01

    Very late stent thrombosis is a rare and not-well-understood complication after bare metal stent implantation. It usually presents as an ST elevation acute coronary syndrome and it is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Pathophysiologic mechanisms are not well defined; nevertheless, recent studies have proposed a neoatherosclerotic process as the triggering mechanism. We present the case of a patient with bare metal very late stent thrombosis 12 years after implantation. PMID:24829831

  9. Stent implantation influence wall shear stress evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Bosioc, A. I.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. The impact of flow alterations around struts vary as the strut geometrical parameters change. Our results provide data regarding the hemodynamic parameters for the blood flow in both stenosed and stented coronary artery under physiological conditions, namely wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  10. Peripheral Stent Placement in Hemodialysis Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Kariya, Shuji Tanigawa, Noboru; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Shiraishi, Tomokuni; Kawanaka, Toshiaki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of peripheral stent placement after failed balloon angioplasty in patients with grafts who are on hemodialysis. We examined 30 Wallstents that were placed in 26 patients because balloon angioplasty failed or early restenosis (<3 months) occurred within 3 months. We retrospectively reviewed 267 consecutive balloon angioplasties performed in 71 patients with graft access between August 2000 and March 2007. Stent placements accounted for 30 (11.2%) of the 267 balloon angioplasties. The clinical success rate of stent placement was 93.3% (28 of 30 stent placements). The 3-, 6-, and 12-month primary patency rates were 73.3%, 39.3%, and 17.7%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year secondary patency rates were 90.2%, 83.8%, and 83.8%, respectively. Primary patency was significantly prolonged by stent placement after early restenosis compared with previous balloon angioplasty alone (P = 0.0059). Primary patency after stent placement was significantly lower than after successful balloon angioplasty without indications for stent placement (P = 0.0279). Secondary patency rates did not significantly differ between stent placement and balloon angioplasty alone. The mean number of reinterventions required to maintain secondary patency after stent placement was significantly larger than that after balloon angioplasty alone (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.0419). We concluded that peripheral stent placement for graft access is effective for salvaging vascular access after failed balloon angioplasty and for prolonging patency in early restenosis after balloon angioplasty. However, reinterventions are required to maintain secondary patency after stent placement. Furthermore, peripheral stent placement for graft access cannot achieve the same primary patency as balloon angioplasty alone.

  11. In stent restenosis: bane of the stent era.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A K; Agrawal, D K

    2006-03-01

    The long term outcome of stent implantation is affected by a process called in stent restenosis (ISR). Multiple contributory factors have been identified, but clear understanding of the overall underlying mechanism remains an enigma. ISR progresses through several different phases and involves numerous cellular and molecular constituents. Platelets and macrophages play a central role via vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation in the intima to produce neointimal hyperplasia, which is pathognomic of ISR. Increased extracellular matrix formation appears to form the bulk of the neointimal hyperplasia tissue. Emerging evidence of the role of inflammatory cytokines and suppressors of cytokine signalling make this an exciting and novel field of antirestenosis research. Activation of Akt pathway triggered by mechanical stretch may also be a contributory factor to ISR formation. Prevention of ISR appears to be a multipronged attack as no therapeutic "magic bullet" exists to block all the processes in one go. PMID:16505271

  12. Auxetic oesophageal stents: structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Ali, Murtaza Najabat; Busfield, James J C; Rehman, Ihtesham U

    2014-02-01

    Oesophageal cancer is the ninth leading cause of malignant cancer death and its prognosis remains poor, ranking as the sixth most frequent cause of death in the world. This research work aims to adopt an Auxetic (rotating-squares) geometry device, that had previously been examined theoretically and analysed by Grima and Evans (J Mater Sci Lett 19(17):1563-1565, 2000), to produce a novel Auxetic oesophageal stent and stent-grafts relevant to the palliative treatment of oesophageal cancer and also for the prevention of dysphagia. This paper discusses the manufacture of a small diameter Auxetic oesophageal stent and stent-graft. The oral deployment of such an Auxetic stent would be simplest if a commercial balloon dilatational catheter was used as this obviates the need for an expensive dedicated delivery system. A novel manufacturing route was employed in this research to develop both Auxetic films and Auxetic oesophageal stents, which ranged from conventional subtractive techniques to a new additive manufacturing method. Polyurethane was selected as a material for the fabrication of Auxetic films and Auxetic oesophageal stents because of its good biocompatibility and non-toxicological properties. The Auxetic films were later used for the fabrication of seamed Auxetic oesophageal stents. The flexible polyurethane tubular grafts were also attached to the inner luminal side of the seamless Auxetic oesophageal stents, in order to prevent tumour in-growth. Scanning electron microscopy was used to conduct surface morphology study by using different Auxetic specimens developed from different conventional and new additive manufacturing techniques. Tensile testing of the Auxetic films was performed to characterise their mechanical properties. The stent expansion tests of the Auxetic stents were done to analyse the longitudinal extension and radial expansion of the Auxetic stent at a range of radial pressures applied by the balloon catheter, and to also identify the pressure

  13. The importance of annealing 316 LVM stents.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Kobbe, C; Hinrichs, B H

    2003-01-01

    The annealing process is an important key step in the manufacture of high quality and reliable 316 LVM stents. [figure: see text] The methods commonly applied for verifying the outcome of the annealing process such as microhardness testing are inappropriate and should not be used. The tension testing of tubes, processed together with stents, provides reliable results of the final material properties of stents. During the course of the investigation the grain size was reduced significantly and the break elongation improved. The surface of the strain-tested material shows substantial improvements. All results are particularly important for thin-wall stents with filigree struts. PMID:12974121

  14. Neointimal Hyperplasia in Low-Profile Nitinol Stents, Palmaz Stents, and Wallstents: A Comparative Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schuermann, Karl; Vorwerk, Dierk; Kulisch, Arthur; Stroehmer-Kulisch, Eva; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Stopinski, Tadeusz; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1996-04-15

    Purpose: To compare neointima formation following insertion of low-profile Nitinol stents, Palmaz stents, and Wallstents. Methods: Nitinol stents, Palmaz stents, and Wallstents similar in size were transfemorally inserted into the iliac arteries of 12 sheep. Four stents per sheep were deployed; the position of the stents was varied so that each type of stent was placed in each position (right or left, proximal or distal) with equal frequency. Stent patency was followed by angiography. Six sheep were euthanized after 1 month, and the remaining six after 6 months. Iliac arteries were removed en bloc and prepared for histological examination. Neointimal and medial thickness were measured by light microscopy, and measurements were analyzed statistically. Results: Mean neointimal thickness both over (NO) and between (NB) the stent struts was greater in Wallstents (NO = 0.341 mm, NB = 0.368 mm) than in the Nitinol (NO = 0.260 mm, NB = 0.220 mm) and Palmaz stents (NO = 0.199 mm, NB = 0.204 mm), but differences were not significant (p> 0.05). Medial atrophy in the area between the stent struts was greater in Wallstents compared with Nitinol and Palmaz stents (p < 0.007 and p < 0.02, respectively); in the area under the stent struts there was a significant difference only between Palmaz stents and Wallstents (p < 0.02). Conclusion: Under defined experimental conditions, none of the three types of stent appears to be preferable to the others regarding neointima formation in the short- to mid-term follow-up period.

  15. Predictive Factors of In-Stent Restenosis in Renal Artery Stenting: A Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vignali, Claudio Bargellini, Irene; Lazzereschi, Michele; Cioni, Roberto; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Caramella, Davide; Pinto, Stefania; Napoli, Vinicio; Zampa, Virna; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To retrospectively evaluate the role of clinical and procedural factors in predicting in-stent restenosis in patients with renovascular disease treated by renal artery stenting. Methods. From 1995 to 2002, 147 patients underwent renal artery stenting for the treatment of significant ostial atherosclerotic stenosis. Patients underwent strict clinical and color-coded duplex ultrasound follow-up. Ninety-nine patients (111 stents), with over 6 months of continuous follow-up (mean 22{+-}12 months, range 6-60 months), were selected and classified according to the presence (group A, 30 patients, 32 lesions) or absence (group B, 69 patients, 79 lesions) of significant in-stent restenosis. A statistical analysis was performed to identify possible preprocedural and procedural predictors of restenosis considering the following data: sex, age, smoking habit, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, serum creatinine, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, renal artery stenosis grade, and stent type, length and diameter. Results. Comparing group A and B patients ({chi}{sup 2} test), a statistically significant relation was demonstrated between stent diameter and length and restenosis: the risk of in-stent restenosis decreased when the stent was {>=}6 mm in diameter and between 15 and 20 mm in length. This finding was confirmed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Stent diameter and length were proved to be significantly related to in-stent restenosis also when evaluating only patients treated by Palmaz stent (71 stents). Conclusion. Although it is based on a retrospective analysis, the present study confirms the importance of correct stent selection in increasing long-term patency, using stents of at least 6 mm in diameter and with a length of approximately 15-20 mm.

  16. Unsuccessful treatment of a collapsed thoracic stent graft by Palmaz stent.

    PubMed

    Pirotte, Manuel; Lacroix, Valerie; Astarci, Parla; Nardella, Jane; Funken, Jean-Christophe; El Khoury, Gebrine; Noirhomme, Philippe; Verhelst, Robert

    2010-11-01

    A Gore TAG Excluder stent graft was deployed in a 35-year-old woman for an isthmic saccular aneurysm. At 12-hour follow-up, we diagnosed a proximal collapse. A Palmaz stent was used to reopen the proximal segment. Two months later, she presented with a transient ischemic attack (embolic process) related to a suboptimal apposition of the Palmaz stent in the distal aortic arch. This led to open surgical replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic arch with reimplantation of the supraaortic branches. Reopening of a stent graft collapse with a Palmaz stent might be a short-term solution; however, its presence can lead to embolic complications. PMID:21035713

  17. Evaluation of the compressive mechanical properties of endoluminal metal stents.

    PubMed

    Schrader, S C; Beyar, R

    1998-06-01

    The mechanical properties of metal stents are important parameters in the consideration of stent design, matched to resist arterial recoil and vascular spasm. The purpose of this study was to develop a system for a standardized quantitative evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of various coronary stents. Several types of stents were compressed by external hydrostatic pressure. The stent diameter was assessed by placing a pair of small ultrasonic sono-crystals on the stent. From pressure-strain diagrams the ultimate strength and radial stiffness for each stent were determined. For all stents, except the MICRO-II and the Wiktor stent, the diameter decreased homogeneously until an ultimate compressive strength was exceeded, causing an abrupt collapse. Expanded to 3 mm, the mechanical behavior of the beStent, the Crown and the Palmaz-Schatz stent (PS153-series) were comparable. The spiral articulated Palmaz-Schatz stent showed twice the strength (1.26 atm) of the PS-153 (0.65 atm). The NIR stent yielded a maximum strength of 1.05 atm. The MICRO-II and the Wiktor stent did not collapse abruptly but rather showed a continuous decline of diameter with increasing external pressure. The Cardiocoil stent behaved in a fully elastic manner and showed the largest radial stiffness. Difference in mechanical properties between stents were documented using a new device specifically developed for that purpose. These mechanical stent parameters may have important clinical implications. PMID:9637441

  18. Dual stent migration to the heart and pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniyam, Nivas; Garg, Jalaj; Rawat, Naveen; Chugh, Savneek; Mittal, Varun; Baby, Banessaa; Aronow, Wilbert S; Lehrman, Stuart G

    2014-01-01

    The practice of intravascular stenting largely grew out of the concept of stenting the coronaries in acute myocardial infarction. According to the recent United States Renal Data System data registry, there has been a significant increase in endovascular intervention (1.8-fold increase-from 52,380 to 98,148) with a 2.2-fold increase in stent deployment in hemodialysis access (3792-8514). With the increasing use of endovascular stents in the management of dialysis access stenosis, the incidence of stent-related complications has increased significantly. Stent-related complications include stent restenosis, thrombosis (narrowing of the vessel lumen and being a nidus for thombus formation), stent shortening, stent fracture, stent infection, and stent migration. Physiologic variation in the diameter of veins due to respiration, which along with the geometry of the stent, can lead to a shortening lengthening of the stent-resulting in poor wall contact or high-speed impact of shock; in the case of trauma, mechanical bucking can result in tortuous blood vessels thereby resulting in stent migration (however proving this association was not the aim of this article). We report a case of a 44-year-old female with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis, with stent placement to treat a compromised arteriovenous graft. There have been many cases of stent migration in the past; however, this is the first case of dual stent migration to the heart and pulmonary artery from an unusual (lower extremity) arteriovenous graft location. PMID:23567791

  19. Drug-eluting stents: role of stent design, delivery vehicle, and drug selection.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Campbell D K

    2002-01-01

    Increasing focus has recently been directed toward the different parameters of drug-eluting stents-stent design, delivery-vehicle materials, and drug properties-and the manner in which each of these elements may affect the function of the stents. Several specific characteristics of design may affect restenosis, although design optimization often presents a choice between acute procedural success and long-term biological stability. The influence of design parameters such as strut thickness and cell configuration is described. Polymer material has frequently been used to coat drug-eluting stents, although some agents, such as paclitaxel, can be attached directly to the stent's surface, obviating the need for a polymer layer. The properties of agents used in drug-eluting stents and how those properties affect delivery and long-term outcome are discussed, as is the influence of the disease state of the target vessel on stent safety and efficacy. PMID:12478230

  20. Iliocaval Confluence Stenting for Chronic Venous Obstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Graaf, Rick de; Wolf, Mark de; Sailer, Anna M.; Laanen, Jorinde van Wittens, Cees; Jalaie, Houman

    2015-10-15

    PurposeDifferent techniques have been described for stenting of venous obstructions. We report our experience with two different confluence stenting techniques to treat chronic bi-iliocaval obstructions.Materials and MethodsBetween 11/2009 and 08/2014 we treated 40 patients for chronic total bi-iliocaval obstructions. Pre-operative magnetic resonance venography showed bilateral extensive post-thrombotic scarring in common and external iliac veins as well as obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Stenting of the IVC was performed with large self-expandable stents down to the level of the iliocaval confluence. To bridge the confluence, either self-expandable stents were placed inside the IVC stent (24 patients, SECS group) or high radial force balloon-expandable stents were placed at the same level (16 patients, BECS group). In both cases, bilateral iliac extensions were performed using nitinol stents.ResultsRecanalization was achieved for all patients. In 15 (38 %) patients, a hybrid procedure with endophlebectomy and arteriovenous fistula creation needed to be performed because of significant involvement of inflow vessels below the inguinal ligament. Mean follow-up was 443 ± 438 days (range 7–1683 days). For all patients, primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency rate at 36 months were 70, 73, and 78 %, respectively. Twelve-month patency rates in the SECS group were 85, 85, and 95 % for primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency. In the BECS group, primary patency was 100 % during a mean follow-up period of 134 ± 118 (range 29–337) days.ConclusionStenting of chronic bi-iliocaval obstruction shows relatively high patency rates at medium follow-up. Short-term patency seems to favor confluence stenting with balloon-expandable stents.

  1. Carotid artery stenting: current and emerging options

    PubMed Central

    Morr, Simon; Lin, Ning; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2014-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting technologies are rapidly evolving. Options for endovascular surgeons and interventionists who treat occlusive carotid disease continue to expand. We here present an update and overview of carotid stenting devices. Evidence supporting carotid stenting includes randomized controlled trials that compare endovascular stenting to open surgical endarterectomy. Carotid technologies addressed include the carotid stents themselves as well as adjunct neuroprotective devices. Aspects of stent technology include bare-metal versus covered stents, stent tapering, and free-cell area. Drug-eluting and cutting balloon indications are described. Embolization protection options and new direct carotid access strategies are reviewed. Adjunct technologies, such as intravascular ultrasound imaging and risk stratification algorithms, are discussed. Bare-metal and covered stents provide unique advantages and disadvantages. Stent tapering may allow for a more fitted contour to the caliber decrement between the common carotid and internal carotid arteries but also introduces new technical challenges. Studies regarding free-cell area are conflicting with respect to benefits and associated risk; clinical relevance of associated adverse effects associated with either type is unclear. Embolization protection strategies include distal filter protection and flow reversal. Though flow reversal was initially met with some skepticism, it has gained wider acceptance and may provide the advantage of not crossing the carotid lesion before protection is established. New direct carotid access techniques address difficult anatomy and incorporate sophisticated flow-reversal embolization protection techniques. Carotid stenting is a new and exciting field with rapidly advancing technologies. Embolization protection, low-risk deployment, and lesion assessment and stratification are active areas of research. Ample room remains for further innovations and developments. PMID:25349483

  2. Initial Experience with the Resonance Metallic Stent for Antegrade Ureteric Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Tze M. Irving, Henry C.; Cartledge, Jon

    2007-07-15

    Background and purpose. We describe our initial experience with a new metallic ureteric stent which has been designed to provide long-term urinary drainage in patients with malignant ureteric strictures. The aim is to achieve longer primary patency rates than conventional polyurethane ureteric stents, where encrustation and compression by malignant masses limit primary patency. The Resonance metallic double-pigtail ureteric stent (Cook, Ireland) is constructed from coiled wire spirals of a corrosion-resistant alloy designed to minimize tissue in-growth and resist encrustation, and the manufacturer recommends interval stent change at 12 months. Methods. Seventeen Resonance stents were inserted via an antegrade approach into 15 patients between December 2004 and March 2006. The causes of ureteric obstruction were malignancies of the bladder (n = 4), colon (n = 3), gynecologic (n = 5), and others (n = 3). Results. One patient had the stent changed after 12 months, and 3 patients had their stents changed at 6 months. These stents were draining adequately with minimal encrustation. Four patients are still alive with functioning stents in situ for 2-10 months. Seven patients died with functioning stents in place (follow-up periods of 1 week to 8 months). Three stents failed from the outset due to bulky pelvic malignancy resulting in high intravesical pressure, as occurs with conventional plastic stents. Conclusion. Our initial experience with the Resonance metallic ureteric stent indicates that it may provide adequate long-term urinary drainage (up to 12 months) in patients with malignant ureteric obstruction but without significantly bulky pelvic disease. This obviates the need for regular stent changes and would offer significant benefit for these patients with limited life expectancy.

  3. Rescue coronary stenting in acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Enrico; Meneghetti, Paolo; Molinari, Gionata; Zardini, Piero

    1996-01-01

    Failed rescue coronary angioplasty is a high risk situation because of high mortality. Coronary stent has given us the chance of improving and maintaining the patency of the artery. We report our preliminary experience of rescue stenting after unsuccessful coronary angioplasty.

  4. Primary Stenting of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Straube, T. Stingele, Robert; Jansen, Olav

    2005-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and safety of stenting intracranial atherosclerotic stenoses.Methods: In 12 patients the results of primary intracranial stenting were evaluated retrospectively. Patient ages ranged from 49 to 79 years (mean 64 years). Six patients presented with stenoses in the anterior circulation, and six had stenosis in the posterior circulation. One patient presented with extra- and intracranial tandem stenosis of the left internal carotid artery. Three patients presented with acute basilar thrombosis, caused by high-grade basilar stenoses.Results: Intracranial stenoses were successfully stented in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient the stent could not be advanced over the carotid siphon to reach the stenosis of the ophthalmic internal carotid artery. Follow-up digital subtraction angiographic studies were obtained in two patients who had presented with new neurologic signs or symptoms. In both cases the angiogram did not show any relevant stenotic endothelial hyperplasia. In one patient, after local thrombolysis the stenosis turned out to be so narrow that balloon angioplasty had to be performed before stent deployment. All three patients treated for stenosis-related basilar thrombosis died due to brainstem infarction that had ensued before the intervention.Conclusions: Prophylactic primary stenting of intracranial stenoses of the anterior or posterior cerebral circulation can be performed with a low complication rate; technical problems such as stent flexibility must still be solved. Local thrombolysis followed by stenting in stenosis-related thrombotic occlusion is technically possible.

  5. Microfabrication and Nanotechnology in Stent Design

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Adam W.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2012-01-01

    Intravascular stents were first introduced in the 1980s as an adjunct to primary angioplasty for management of early complications, including arterial dissection, or treatment of an inadequate technical outcome due to early elastic recoil of the atherosclerotic lesion. Despite the beneficial effects of stenting, persistent high rates of restenosis motivated the design of drug eluting stents for delivery of agents to limit the proliferative and other inflammatory responses within the vascular wall that contribute to the development of a restenotic lesion. These strategies have yielded a significant reduction in the incidence of restenosis, but challenges remain, including incomplete repair of the endothelium at the site of vascular wall injury that may be associated with a late risk of thrombosis. A failure of vessel wall healing has been attributed to primarily to the use of polymeric stent coatings, but the effects of the eluted drug and other material properties or design features of the stent cannot be excluded. Improvements in stent microfabrication, as well as the introduction of alternative materials may help to address those limitations that inhibit stent performance. This review describes the application of novel microfabrication processes and the evolution of new nanotechnologies that hold significant promise in eliminating existing shortcomings of current stent platforms. PMID:21462356

  6. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  7. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  8. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  9. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  10. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  11. Popliteal pseudoaneurysm caused by stent fracture.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yoshihiko; Kitano, Ikuro; Iida, Osamu; Kajita, Satoru; Sawada, Katsuhiro; Nanto, Shinsuke

    2011-08-01

    Stent fracture with pseudoaneurysm formation in the femoropopliteal artery has uncommonly been reported. We present the case of a 72-year-old man with a fracture of self-expanding nitinol stent and a pseudoaneurysm formation in the suprageniculate popliteal artery. The popliteal artery was successfully reconstructed with a small saphenous vein graft interposition. PMID:21620667

  12. Improved image guidance of coronary stent deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Robert A.; Abbey, Craig K.; Whiting, James S.

    2000-04-01

    Accurate placement and expansion of coronary stents is hindered by the fact that most stents are only slightly radiopaque, and hence difficult to see in a typical coronary x-rays. We propose a new technique for improved image guidance of multiple coronary stents deployment using layer decomposition of cine x-ray images of stented coronary arteries. Layer decomposition models the cone-beam x-ray projections through the chest as a set of superposed layers moving with translation, rotation, and scaling. Radiopaque markers affixed to the guidewire or delivery balloon provide a trackable feature so that the correct vessel motion can be measured for layer decomposition. In addition to the time- averaged layer image, we also derive a background-subtracted image sequence which removes moving background structures. Layer decomposition of contrast-free vessels can be used to guide placement of multiple stents and to assess uniformity of stent expansion. Layer decomposition of contrast-filled vessels can be used to measure residual stenosis to determine the adequacy of stent expansion. We demonstrate that layer decomposition of a clinical cine x-ray image sequence greatly improves the visibility of a previously deployed stent. We show that layer decomposition of contrast-filled vessels removes background structures and reduces noise.

  13. "Skirt" technique for coronary artery bifurcation stenting.

    PubMed

    Alberti, A; Missiroli, B; Nannini, C

    2000-12-01

    Stent implantation in the treatment of coronary artery bifurcation lesions frequently impairs blood flow and gives the coronary tree a new, metallic configuration. The new technique we describe uses a single short stent in a "skirt" shape which produces no "jailing" effects and can be used in the treatment of true coronary Y-shaped bifurcation lesions. PMID:11103033

  14. Basic Knowledge about Metal Stent Development.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seok

    2016-03-01

    Biliary self-expandable metal stents (SEMS), a group of non-vascular stents, have been used in the palliative management of biliary obstruction around the world. However, there are still unmet needs in the clinical application of biliary SEMS. Comprehensive understanding of the SEMS is required to resolve the drawbacks and difficulties of metal stent development. The basic structure of SEMS, including the materials and knitting methods of metal wires, covering materials, and radiopaque markers, are discussed in this review. What we know about the physical and mechanical properties of the SEMS is very important. With an understanding of the basic knowledge of metal stents, hurdles such as stent occlusion, migration, and kinking can be overcome to develop more ideal SEMS. PMID:27000423

  15. Basic Knowledge about Metal Stent Development

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seok

    2016-01-01

    Biliary self-expandable metal stents (SEMS), a group of non-vascular stents, have been used in the palliative management of biliary obstruction around the world. However, there are still unmet needs in the clinical application of biliary SEMS. Comprehensive understanding of the SEMS is required to resolve the drawbacks and difficulties of metal stent development. The basic structure of SEMS, including the materials and knitting methods of metal wires, covering materials, and radiopaque markers, are discussed in this review. What we know about the physical and mechanical properties of the SEMS is very important. With an understanding of the basic knowledge of metal stents, hurdles such as stent occlusion, migration, and kinking can be overcome to develop more ideal SEMS. PMID:27000423

  16. Call for standards in technical documentation of intracoronary stents.

    PubMed

    Lanzer, Peter; Gijsen, Frank J H; Topoleski, L D Timmie; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2010-01-01

    At present, the product information of intracoronary stents provided by the industry contains only limited technical data restricting judgments on the in vivo performance of individual products. Available experimental and clinical evidence suggests that interventional target sites display highly heterogeneous biomechanical behavior needed to be matched by specific stent and stent delivery system characteristics. To allow individualized stent-lesion matching, both, understanding of biomechanical properties of the atherosclerotic coronary artery lesions and expert knowledge of the intracoronary stent systems, are required. Here, the authors review some of the initial data on mechanical properties of coronary artery lesions potentially relevant to stenting and suggest standards for technical documentation of intracoronary stents. PMID:20140786

  17. Longitudinal plaque redistribution during stent expansion.

    PubMed

    Maehara, A; Takagi, A; Okura, H; Hassan, A H; Bonneau, H N; Honda, Y; Yock, P G; Fitzgerald, P J

    2000-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the 3-dimensional behavior of plaque during coronary stent expansion. Serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) studies, preintervention, and poststenting were evaluated in 32 patients treated with a single-balloon expandable tubular stent. External elastic membrane (EEM), lumen, stent, and plaque + media cross-sectional area were measured at 1-mm intervals through the entire stent as well as proximal and distal reference segments 5 mm from the stent edge. Volumetric calculations were based on Simpson's rule. Overall, the plaque + media volume through the entire lesion did not change during stent expansion (218 +/- 51 vs 217 +/- 47 mm3, p = 0.69). However, EEM and lumen volume increased significantly (EEM volume, 391 +/- 84 vs 448 +/- 87 mm3 [p < 0.0001]; lumen volume, 173 +/- 52 vs 231 +/- 54 mm3 [p < 0.0001]). The change in lumen volume correlated strongly with the change in EEM volume (r = 0.85, p < 0.0001), but poorly with the change in plaque + media volume (r = 0.37, p = 0.03). Plaque + media volume decreased in the midstent zone (59 +/- 14 vs 53 +/- 11 mm3, p = 0.0005), and increased in the distal stent zone (40 +/- 11 vs 44 +/- 9 mm3, p = 0.003), but did not change in either the proximal stent zone or reference segments. The mechanism of stent expansion is a combination of vessel stretch and plaque redistribution, translating disease accumulation from the midstent zone to the distal stent zone. PMID:11074201

  18. Hybrid stent device of flow-diverting effect and stent-assisted coil embolization formed by fractal structure.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masahiro; Irie, Keiko; Masunaga, Kouhei; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Nakajima, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Masaru; Fukuda, Toshio; Arai, Fumihito; Negoro, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a novel hybrid medical stent device. This hybrid stent device formed by fractal mesh structures provides a flow-diverting effect and stent-assisted coil embolization. Flow-diverter stents decrease blood flow into an aneurysm to prevent its rupture. In general, the mesh size of a flow-diverter stent needs to be small enough to prevent blood flow into the aneurysm. Conventional flow-diverter stents are not available for stent-assisted coil embolization, which is an effective method for aneurysm occlusion, because the mesh size is too small to insert a micro-catheter for coil embolization. The proposed hybrid stent device is capable of stent-assisted coil embolization while simultaneously providing a flow-diverting effect. The fractal stent device is composed of mesh structures with fine and rough mesh areas. The rough mesh area can be used to insert a micro-catheter for stent-assisted coil embolization. Flow-diverting effects of two fractal stent designs were composed to three commercially available stent designs. Flow-diverting effects were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment. Based on the CFD and PIV results, the fractal stent devices reduce the flow velocity inside an aneurism just as much as the commercially available flow-diverting stents while allowing stent-assisted coil embolization. PMID:26438390

  19. Late Stent Expansion and Neointimal Proliferation of Oversized Nitinol Stents in Peripheral Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hugh Q. Nikanorov, Alexander; Virmani, Renu; Jones, Russell; Pacheco, Erica; Schwartz, Lewis B.

    2009-07-15

    For peripheral endovascular intervention, self-expanding (SE) stents are commonly oversized in relation to target arteries to assure optimal wall apposition and prevent migration. However, the consequences of oversizing have not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of SE stent oversizing (OS) with respect to the kinetics of late stent expansion and the long-term histological effects of OS. Pairs of overlapped 8 x 28-mm Nitinol SE stents were implanted into the iliofemoral arteries of 14 Yucatan swine. Due to variations in target artery size, the stent-to-artery ratio ranged from 1.2:1 to 1.9:1. Lumen and stent diameters were assessed by quantitative angiography at the time of implantation. Following angiographic assessment at 6 months, stented arteries were perfusion-fixed, sectioned, and stained for histological analysis. Immediately following implantation, the stents were found to be expanded to a range of 4.7-7.1 mm, largely conforming to the diameter of the recipient target artery. The stents continued to expand over time, however, and all stents had enlarged to nearly their 8-mm nominal diameter by 6 months. The histological effects of OS were profound, with marked increases in injury and luminal area stenosis, including a statistically significant linear correlation between stent-to-artery ratio and area stenosis. In this experimental model of peripheral endovascular intervention, oversized Nitinol SE stents are constrained by their target artery diameter upon implantation but expand to their nominal diameter within 6 months. Severe OS (stent-to-artery ratio >1.4:1) results in a profound long-term histological response including exuberant neointimal proliferation and luminal stenosis.

  20. Stents for colorectal obstruction: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eui Joo; Kim, Yoon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of uncovered self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) in the 1990s, endoscopic stents have evolved dramatically. Application of new materials and new designs has expanded the indications for enteral SEMS. At present, enteral stents are considered the first-line modality for palliative care, and numerous types of enteral stents are under development for extended clinical usage, beyond a merely palliative purpose. Herein, we will discuss the current status and the future development of lower enteral stents. PMID:26811630

  1. Longitudinal stent fracture and migration of a stent fragment complicating treatment of hepatic vein stenosis after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Goelitz, Brian W; Darcy, Michael

    2007-09-01

    We report a case of inferior vena cava (IVC) stent placement complicated by longitudinal stent fracture and migration of a stent fragment to the right pulmonary artery 2 years after initial placement. During attempted stenting of a hepatic venous anastomotic stenosis following orthotopic liver transplantation, a Palmaz P308 stent (Cordis International, Miami, FL) migrated and was redeployed into the IVC. Two years later, the patient had recurrent ascites and liver failure. Chest radiograph showed the Palmaz P308 stent had fractured longitudinally with a fragment in the right interlobular pulmonary artery. Half of the stent remained in the IVC. Mild stenosis was noted in the IVC where the stent was deployed. Overdilation of stents may be associated with stent fracture and should be performed with caution. PMID:21326480

  2. The Supralimus sirolimus-eluting stent.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Pedro A; Bienert, Igor

    2013-05-01

    The use of biodegradable polymeric coatings has emerged as a potential bioengineering target to improve the vascular compatibility of coronary drug-eluting stents (DESs). This review summarizes the main features and scientific facts about the Supralimus sirolimus-eluting stent (Sahajanand Medical Technologies Ltd, Surat, India), which is a biodegradable polymer-based, sirolimus-eluting metallic stent that was recently introduced for routine use in Europe. The novel stent is built on a stainless steel platform, coated with a blend of biodegradable polymers (poly-l-lactide, poly-dl-lactide-co-glycolide and polyvinyl pyrrolidone; coating thickness is 4-5 µm). The active agent is the antiproliferative sirolimus in a dose load of 1.4 µg/mm(2), which is released within 48 days. The Supralimus stent was initially evaluated in the single-arm SERIES-I study, which showed binary angiographic restenosis rates of 0% (in-stent) and 1.7% (in-segment) and an in-stent late lumen loss of 0.09 ± 0.28 mm. The multicenter randomized PAINT trial compared two DESs with identical metallic platforms and biodegradable polymer carriers, but different agents (Infinnium [Sahajanand Medical Technologies Pvt Ltd] paclitaxel-eluting stent or Supralimus sirolimus-eluting stent) against bare stents. After 3 years, the pooled DES population had similar rates of cardiac death or myocardial infarction (9 vs 7.1%; p = 0.6), but a lower risk of repeat interventions (10 vs 29.9%; p < 0.01) than controls with bare stents. The incidence of definite or probable stent thrombosis in the pooled DES group was 2.3% (1st year: 1.8%; 2nd year: 0.4% and 3rd year: 0%). These results demonstrate that the novel Supralimus stents are effective in reducing reintervention, while potentially improving the safety profile by decreasing the risk of late-term thrombosis, even though further studies would be necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:23597097

  3. Degradation Model of Bioabsorbable Cardiovascular Stents

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiyi; Liu, Xiangkun; Li, Zhonghua; Huang, Chubo; Zhang, Wen; Meng, Juan; Chang, Zhaohua; Hua, Zezhao

    2014-01-01

    This study established a numerical model to investigate the degradation mechanism and behavior of bioabsorbable cardiovascular stents. In order to generate the constitutive degradation material model, the degradation characteristics were characterized with user-defined field variables. The radial strength bench test and analysis were used to verify the material model. In order to validate the numerical degradation model, in vitro bench test and in vivo implantation studies were conducted under physiological and normal conditions. The results showed that six months of degradation had not influenced the thermodynamic properties and mechanical integrity of the stent while the molecular weight of the stents implanted in the in vivo and in vitro models had decreased to 61.8% and 68.5% respectively after six month's implantation. It was also found that the degradation rate, critical locations and changes in diameter of the stents in the numerical model were in good consistency in both in vivo and in vitro studies. It implies that the numerical degradation model could provide useful physical insights and prediction of the stent degradation behavior and evaluate, to some extent, the in-vivo performance of the stent. This model could eventually be used for design and optimization of bioabsorbable stent. PMID:25365310

  4. Stent Placement on Fresh Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schuermann, Karl

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To report on the efficacy of fixing fresh venous thrombus to the venous wall by stent placement. Methods: Seven patients underwent stenting to treat acute venous thrombosis. In two patients, the hemodialysis fistula was thrombosed with the thrombus extending into the brachial veins. In three patients, the hemodialysis fistula was patent but massive swelling of the ipsilateral arm was caused by proximal venous thrombosis. Two patients presented with iliac venous thrombosis within stented pelvic veins. Stent placement was preceded by other mechanical thrombectomy methods in all cases. Results: Attachment of thrombus to the venous wall was successful in all cases treated. Acute rethrombosis did not occur. Follow-up patency in dialysis patients was 7.2 {+-} 2.1 months. One patient had rethrombosis of the dialysis graft 3 months after primary treatment. Three patients developed restenosis within a mean period of 7.7 months. One shunt remained patent for 10 months with no event of reobstruction during follow-up. In both patients with iliac stent placement, the vein remained patent over a follow-up period of 8 and 12 months respectively. Conclusion: Stenting fresh venous thrombus can achieve immediate venous patency. It may be used as an alternative approach when all other percutaneous methods fail. Frequent restenosis within stented veins limits its use to very selected cases.

  5. Targeting In-Stent-Stenosis with RGD- and CXCL1-Coated Mini-Stents in Mice.

    PubMed

    Simsekyilmaz, Sakine; Liehn, Elisa A; Weinandy, Stefan; Schreiber, Fabian; Megens, Remco T A; Theelen, Wendy; Smeets, Ralf; Jockenhövel, Stefan; Gries, Thomas; Möller, Martin; Klee, Doris; Weber, Christian; Zernecke, Alma

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions that critically narrow the artery can necessitate an angioplasty and stent implantation. Long-term therapeutic effects, however, are limited by excessive arterial remodeling. We here employed a miniaturized nitinol-stent coated with star-shaped polyethylenglycole (star-PEG), and evaluated its bio-functionalization with RGD and CXCL1 for improving in-stent stenosis after implantation into carotid arteries of mice. Nitinol foils or stents (bare metal) were coated with star-PEG, and bio-functionalized with RGD, or RGD/CXCL1. Cell adhesion to star-PEG-coated nitinol foils was unaltered or reduced, whereas bio-functionalization with RGD but foremost RGD/CXCL1 increased adhesion of early angiogenic outgrowth cells (EOCs) and endothelial cells but not smooth muscle cells when compared with bare metal foils. Stimulation of cells with RGD/CXCL1 furthermore increased the proliferation of EOCs. In vivo, bio-functionalization with RGD/CXCL1 significantly reduced neointima formation and thrombus formation, and increased re-endothelialization in apoE-/- carotid arteries compared with bare-metal nitinol stents, star-PEG-coated stents, and stents bio-functionalized with RGD only. Bio-functionalization of star-PEG-coated nitinol-stents with RGD/CXCL1 reduced in-stent neointima formation. By supporting the adhesion and proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells, RGD/CXCL1 coating of stents may help to accelerate endothelial repair after stent implantation, and thus may harbor the potential to limit the complication of in-stent restenosis in clinical approaches. PMID:27192172

  6. Targeting In-Stent-Stenosis with RGD- and CXCL1-Coated Mini-Stents in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Weinandy, Stefan; Schreiber, Fabian; Megens, Remco T. A.; Theelen, Wendy; Smeets, Ralf; Jockenhövel, Stefan; Gries, Thomas; Möller, Martin; Klee, Doris; Weber, Christian; Zernecke, Alma

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions that critically narrow the artery can necessitate an angioplasty and stent implantation. Long-term therapeutic effects, however, are limited by excessive arterial remodeling. We here employed a miniaturized nitinol-stent coated with star-shaped polyethylenglycole (star-PEG), and evaluated its bio-functionalization with RGD and CXCL1 for improving in-stent stenosis after implantation into carotid arteries of mice. Nitinol foils or stents (bare metal) were coated with star-PEG, and bio-functionalized with RGD, or RGD/CXCL1. Cell adhesion to star-PEG-coated nitinol foils was unaltered or reduced, whereas bio-functionalization with RGD but foremost RGD/CXCL1 increased adhesion of early angiogenic outgrowth cells (EOCs) and endothelial cells but not smooth muscle cells when compared with bare metal foils. Stimulation of cells with RGD/CXCL1 furthermore increased the proliferation of EOCs. In vivo, bio-functionalization with RGD/CXCL1 significantly reduced neointima formation and thrombus formation, and increased re-endothelialization in apoE-/- carotid arteries compared with bare-metal nitinol stents, star-PEG-coated stents, and stents bio-functionalized with RGD only. Bio-functionalization of star-PEG-coated nitinol-stents with RGD/CXCL1 reduced in-stent neointima formation. By supporting the adhesion and proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells, RGD/CXCL1 coating of stents may help to accelerate endothelial repair after stent implantation, and thus may harbor the potential to limit the complication of in-stent restenosis in clinical approaches. PMID:27192172

  7. Neo-atherosclerosis in very late stent thrombosis of drug eluting stent

    PubMed Central

    Al Mamary, Ahmed; Dariol, Gilberto; Napodano, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have described neo-atherosclerosis, developing inside the stent, as cause of very late stent thrombosis. Case report A 59-year-old man, with family history of coronary artery disease, presented to our Department because of anterior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Two years before he had underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with multiple drug-eluting stents (DES) implantation on proximal-mid left anterior descending artery (LAD), and mid-right coronary artery (RCA), respectively. The angiogram revealed stent thrombosis with total occlusion of proximal LAD. Multiple passages with manual thrombus-aspiration catheter were successfully performed with improvement in TIMI flow. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging revealed fully expanded stents without areas of inappropriate apposition to vessel wall; and mild to moderate intimal hyperplasia throughout the stented segment, with full covered stent struts; areas of ulcerated and ruptured plaque within the proximal struts of stented segment was depicted with intraluminal protruding material. Thus, an additional bare metal stent (BMS) was deployed inside and overlapping the previous in order to seal this plaque. OCT post procedure revealed optimal stent expansion and apposition, without residual protruding material. At 9-month follow-up patient was alive and free from symptoms. Coronary angiogram revealed patency of implanted stents without significant restenosis. Conclusions Neo-atherosclerosis with thrombosis on top of ruptured necrotic plaque core may play a role in the pathophysiology of very late stent thrombosis in both BMS and DES. Our report highlights the role OCT to assess the mechanism of VLST. PMID:25278726

  8. Are Carotid Stent Fractures Clinically Significant?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Toca, Manuel; Rodriguez, Heron E.; Naughton, Peter A.; Keeling, Aiofee; Phade, Sachin V.; Morasch, Mark D.; Kibbe, Melina R.; Eskandari, Mark K.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Late stent fatigue is a known complication after carotid artery stenting (CAS) for cervical carotid occlusive disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical significance of carotid stent fractures. Materials and Methods: A single-center retrospective review of 253 carotid bifurcation lesions treated with CAS and mechanical embolic protection from April 2001 to December 2009 was performed. Stent integrity was analyzed by two independent observers using multiplanar cervical plain radiographs with fractures classified into the following types: type I = single strut fracture; type II = multiple strut fractures; type III = transverse fracture; and type IV = transverse fracture with dislocation. Mean follow-up was 32 months. Results: Follow-up imaging was completed on 106 self-expanding nitinol stents (26 closed-cell and 80 open-cell stents). Eight fractures (7.5%) were detected (type I n = 1, type II n = 6, and type III n = 1). Seven fractures were found in open-cell stents (Precise n = 3, ViVEXX n = 2, and Acculink n = 2), and 1 fracture was found in a closed-cell stent (Xact n = 1) (p = 0.67). Only a previous history of external beam neck irradiation was associated with fractures (p = 0.048). No associated clinical sequelae were observed among the patients with fractures, and only 1 patient had an associated significant restenosis ({>=}80%) requiring reintervention. Conclusions: Late stent fatigue after CAS is an uncommon event and rarely clinically relevant. Although cell design does not appear to influence the occurrence of fractures, lesion characteristics may be associated risk factors.

  9. Endovascular Techniques in Limb Salvage: Stents

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Hosam F.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with critical limb ischemia, the first-line approach for limb salvage has shifted over the past decade from bypass surgery to endovascular intervention. Stenting for the treatment of lower-extremity arterial occlusive disease is an important tool and continues to evolve, with new stent designs and technologies that have been developed to provide superior patency rates and limb salvage. In this article, we discuss the role of peripheral stenting in the treatment of patients with critical limb ischemia, including a review of the relevant current literature and the future directions of such interventions. PMID:23805339

  10. Frequency and risk of in-stent stenosis following pulmonary artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Hallbergson, Anna; Lock, James E; Marshall, Audrey C

    2014-02-01

    Peripheral and central pulmonary artery (PA) stenoses can result in right ventricular hypertension, dysfunction, and death. Percutaneous PA angioplasty and stent placement relieve obstruction acutely, but patients frequently require reintervention. Within a heterogeneous patient population with PA stents referred for catheterization because of noninvasive signs of PA obstruction, we have observed that in-stent stenosis (ISS) occurs commonly in some groups, challenging previous reports that this phenomenon occurs infrequently. We set out to evaluate the incidence and demographics of patients with previous PA stent placement who develop ISS. Consecutive patients with previously placed stents presenting for catheterization and undergoing PA angiography were reviewed (104 patients, 124 cases). We defined ISS angiographically, as a 25% narrowing of the contrast-filled lumen relative to the fluoroscopically apparent stent diameter at any site along the length of the stent. For inclusion, we required that the stenotic segment be narrower or equal in size to the distal vessel. ISS was diagnosed in 24% of patients, with the highest incidence among patients with tetralogy of Fallot and multiple aortopulmonary collaterals, Williams syndrome, or Alagille syndrome. In conclusion, ISS after PA stent placement is a more frequent problem than previously reported, and patients with inherently abnormal PAs are disproportionately affected. Increased clinical surveillance after stent placement and investigation of innovative preventive strategies may be indicated. PMID:24433604

  11. Very Late Stent Thrombosis 11 Years after Implantation of a Drug-Eluting Stent

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Very late stent thrombosis is an infrequent yet potentially fatal complication associated with drug-eluting stents. We report the case of an 88-year-old man who sustained an ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction 11 years after initial sirolimus-eluting stent implantation. Optical coherence tomograms of the lesion showed that the focal incomplete endothelialization of the stent struts was the likely cause; neointimal formation, neoatherosclerosis, and late stent malapposition might also have contributed. To our knowledge, this is the longest reported intervening period between stent insertion and the development of an acute coronary event secondary to very late stent thrombosis. The associated prognostic and therapeutic implications are considerable, because they illuminate the uncertainties surrounding the optimal duration of antiplatelet therapy in patients who have drug-eluting stents. Clinicians face challenges in treating these patients, particularly when competing medical demands necessitate the discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy. In addition to the patient's case, we discuss factors that can contribute to very late stent thrombosis. PMID:26504449

  12. Self-expanding stents in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: experience with nitinol Strecker stents.

    PubMed

    Rossi, P; Bezzi, M; Salvatori, F M; Broglia, L; Maccioni, F; Pizzi, G; Abbondanza, S; Bonomo, G

    1996-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the performance and efficacy of a new self-expanding stent (nitinol Strecker stent) in the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. We have successfully placed 64 nitinol Strecker stents in 48 patients. The average portosystemic gradient decreased from 22 to 11 mm Hg. Balloon dilatation was necessary in 12 of 35 angiographically controlled cases at 5 days (34%), because of incomplete stent expansion, small thrombi within the stent or obstruction. At 1-6 months stent malfunctions occurred in 8 of 23 patients who underwent control angiography (34%) and at 6-24 months in 6 of 7 patients (85%). Rebleeding occurred in 2 of 39 patients (follow-up > 1 month) (5%) and temporary crises of de novo encephalopathy were observed in 11 of 48 patients (23%). Refractory ascites completely resolved in 4 of 6 patients (66%) and improved in the remaining 2 cases. Compared with other self-expanding stents, nitinol Strecker stents seem to be equally effective in TIPS; no increase in complication rate was observed, either clinical or stent-related. PMID:8934143

  13. Stent overlapping and geometric curvature influence the structural integrity and surface characteristics of coronary nitinol stents.

    PubMed

    Kapnisis, Konstantinos K; Halwani, Dina O; Brott, Brigitta C; Anderson, Peter G; Lemons, Jack E; Anayiotos, Andreas S

    2013-04-01

    Preliminary studies have revealed that some stents undergo corrosion and fatigue-induced fracture in vivo, with significant release of metallic ions into surrounding tissues. A direct link between corrosion and in-stent restenosis has not been clearly established; nonetheless in vitro studies have shown that relatively high concentrations of heavy metal ions can stimulate both inflammatory and fibrotic reactions, which are the main steps in the process of restenosis. To isolate the mechanical effects from the local biochemical effects, accelerated biomechanical testing was performed on single and overlapping Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) stents subjected to various degrees of curvature. Post testing, stents were evaluated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to identify the type of surface alterations. Fretting wear was observed in overlapping cases, in both straight and curved configurations. Stent strut fractures occurred in the presence of geometric curvature. Fretting wear and fatigue fractures observed on stents following mechanical simulation were similar to those from previously reported human stent explants. It has been shown that biomechanical factors such as arterial curvature combined with stent overlapping enhance the incidence and degree of wear and fatigue fracture when compared to single stents in a straight tube configuration. PMID:23313643

  14. Degradation behavior of biodegradable Fe35Mn alloy stents.

    PubMed

    Sing, N B; Mostavan, A; Hamzah, E; Mantovani, D; Hermawan, H

    2015-04-01

    This article reports a degradation study that was done on stent prototypes made of biodegradable Fe35Mn alloy in a simulated human coronary arterial condition. The stent degradation was observed for a short-term period from 0.5 to 168 h, which simulates the early period of stenting procedure. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to quantify degradation rate and surface property of the stents. Results showed that signs of degradation were visible on both crimped and expanded stents after 1 h of test, mostly located on the stent's curvatures. The degradation rate of stent was higher compared to that of the original alloy, indicating the surface altering effect of stent fabrication processing to degradation. A single oxide layer was formed and detected as a porous structure with capacitive behavior. Expanded stents exhibited lower polarization resistance compared to the nonexpanded ones, indicating the cold work effect of expansion procedure to degradation. PMID:24954069

  15. Stent Fracture and Reocclusion After Placement of a Single Self-Expanding Stent in the Common Iliac Artery and Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiura, Wataru Sakaguchi, Shoji; Morimoto, Kengo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2008-09-15

    We present a case of fracture of a single self-expanding stent placed in the common iliac artery (CIA). An 80-year-old woman underwent placement of a self-expanding stent for CIA occlusion. Stent fracture and reocclusion were detected after 18 months. Successful revascularization was achieved using a stent-in-stent maneuver. The possibility of stent fracture with reocclusion should be considered following treatment with a single self-expanding stent for CIA occlusion.

  16. Open-cell Stent Deployment across the Wide Neck of a Large Middle Cerebral Aneurysm Using the Stent Anchor Technique

    PubMed Central

    Shibukawa, Masaaki; Tani, Itaru; Oki, Shuichi; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of successful open-cell stent deployment across the wide neck of a large middle cerebral artery aneurysm using the stent anchor technique. A microcatheter was looped through the aneurysm and navigated into a distal vessel across the aneurysm neck. Although the loop of the microcatheter in the aneurysm straightened as it was gently withdrawn, the microcatheter again protruded into the aneurysm by open-cell stent navigation. The stent was partially deployed in a vessel distal to the aneurysm neck, withdrawn slowly to straighten the loop of the microcatheter in the aneurysm, and completely deployed across the aneurysm neck. After successful stent deployment, stent-assisted coil embolization was performed without complications. The stent anchor technique was successfully used to deploy an open-cell stent across the aneurysm neck in this case of microcatheter protrusion into the aneurysm during stent navigation. PMID:27114965

  17. Stent underexpansion in angiographic guided percutaneous coronary intervention, despite adjunctive balloon post-dilatation, in drug eluting stent era

    PubMed Central

    Taherioun, Mehrdad; Namazi, Mohammad Hassan; Safi, Morteza; Saadat, Habibolah; Vakili, Hossein; Alipour-Parsa, Saeed; Rajabi-Moghadam, Hasan; Pedari, Shamsedin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Stent underexpansion is the most powerful predictor of long-term stent patency and clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence and predictors of stent underexpansion despite adjunctive post-dilatation with non-compliant balloon. METHODS After elective coronary stent implantation and adjunctive post-dilatation with non-compliant balloon and optimal angiographic result confirmed by the operator, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed for all the treated lesions. If the treated lesions fulfilled the IVUS criteria, they are considered as the optimal stent group; if not, they are considered as the suboptimal group. RESULTS From 50 patients enrolled in this study 39 (78%) had optimal stent deployment and 11 (22%) had suboptimal stent deployment. In the suboptimal group 7 (14%) had underexpansion, 2 (4%) malposition, and 2 (4%) had asymmetry. There were no stent edge dissections detected by IVUS. We did not find any correlation between lesion calcification, ostial lesions, stent length, and stent underexpansion. Stent diameter ≤ 2.75 mm had a strong correlation with stent underexpansion. CONCLUSION Despite adjunctive post-dilatation with noncompliant balloon, using a relatively small stent diameter was a strong predictor for underexpansion. IVUS guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may be considered for drug eluting stent (DES) implantation in relatively small vessels. PMID:24963308

  18. Causes of early reintervention after successful coronary artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Assali, A R; Sdringola, S; Ghani, M; Moustapha, A; Anderson, H V; Schroth, G; Fujise, K; Smalling, R W; Rosales, O

    2000-11-01

    Acute reintervention was performed in 26 of 1,620 patients after coronary stenting (1.6%). Half of the patients had stent thrombosis and the other half residual anatomic problems. The mean time for reintervention was shorter in patients with stent thrombosis. All patients with stent thrombosis had a sudden recurrence of chest pain. Electrocardiographic changes were more common with stent thrombosis. Composite end point occurred in 10 patients (77%) with stent thrombosis versus 5 (39%) in the other group (p = 0.04). PMID:11053719

  19. Coronary angioscopy before and after stent deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardo, Scott J.; Schatz, Richard A.; Rocha-Singh, Krishna J.; Wong, S. Chiu; Morris, Nancy A.; Strumpf, Robert K.; Heuser, Richard R.; Teirstein, Paul

    1993-09-01

    Coronary angioscopy was used in an attempt to visualize the internal architecture of cardiac vessels before and after deployment of Palmaz-Schatz stents in 50 patients. The vessel was successfully visualized in 48 (96%) of these patients. In 24 patients, angioscopy was performed both after preliminary balloon angioplasty and then again after stent deployment. In all 24 patients the diameter of the lumen appeared larger after stent deployment as compared to after balloon angioplasty. In 16 of these 24 patients a dissection was documented by angioscopy after balloon angioplasty. The dissection was absent after stent deployment in all 16 patients. In seven patients, thrombus that was not apparent by angiography was visualized by angioscopy. Moreover, in four patients, thrombus that was suggested by angiography could not be confirmed by angioscopy.

  20. Nasolacrimal Polyurethane Stent: Complications with CT Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Isabel T.; Paul, Laura; Grande, Carlos

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate initial results in patients with epiphora secondary to obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct treated by placement of a polyurethane stent, and to discuss the technical problems and complications arising during the procedure, with visualization of the anatomy of the drainage apparatus using computed tomography (CT). Methods: We inserted 20 polyurethane Song stents under fluoroscopic guidance after dacryocystography in 19 patients with grade 3-4 epiphora caused by idiopathic obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct. CT scans were obtained following stent placement in all patients. Results: We focus on the technical problems and complications that arose during these procedures. During negotiation of the guidewire past the obstruction at the level of the junction of the duct with the lacrimal sac, the guidewire created a false passage in a posterior suborbital direction in two cases and towards the posterior midline in another. In all cases the guidewire was withdrawn and reinserted through the proper anatomic route without further difficulty or complications. In two cases the stent was improperly positioned wholly or partially outside the nasolacrimal system (one medially, one posteriorly). In one case the stent was removed and reinserted; in the other it remains in place and functional. CT was performed in all these cases to ensure proper anatomic alignment and determine what had gone wrong. The epiphora was completely resolved in 13 cases and partially relieved in four; there were three cases of stent obstruction. Epistaxis of short duration (1 hr) occurred in seven patients and headache in one. Conclusions: Treatment of epiphora with polyurethane stents is a technique that is well tolerated by patients and achieves a high success rate, yet problems in placement may be encountered. Though no major consequences for patients are involved, cognizance of such difficulties is important to avoid incorrect positioning of stents.

  1. Management of nephrostomy drains and ureteral stents.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Robert; Saad, Wael E A; Brown, Daniel B

    2009-09-01

    Nephroureteral and double J stents are routinely placed by interventional radiologists but quality literature on placement and management of these devices is limited. The purpose of this review is to detail indications for ureteral stent placement, review the types of antegrade and retrograde devices that are placed including technical tips, and discuss management of common complications that occur in this patient population. An algorithm for placement and management is included. PMID:19945660

  2. Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Jowad; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2008-07-15

    Management of critical limb ischemia of acute onset includes surgical embolectomy, bypass grafting, aspiration thrombectomy, thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy followed by treatment of the underlying cause. We present our experience with the use of stents to treat acute embolic/thrombotic occlusions in one iliac and three femoropopliteal arteries. Although this is a small case series, excellent immediate and midterm results suggest that stenting of acute occlusions of the iliac, superficial femoral, and popliteal arteries is a safe and effective treatment option.

  3. Intracoronary stents: clinical and angiographic results.

    PubMed

    Popma, J J; Ellis, S G

    1990-10-01

    Limitations of current forms of coronary angioplasty including abrupt vessel closure and delayed restenosis have led to the development of alternative nonsurgical methods of coronary revascularization. By scaffolding the arterial dissection and smoothing the endoluminal surface, intracoronary stenting may obviate the need for emergency coronary bypass surgery in patients who develop abrupt vessel closure following coronary angioplasty. As primary therapy, its use may prevent or delay restenosis in high-risk patients; however, due to potential patient selection bias, controlled studies are needed. Currently available intracoronary stents are limited by varying degrees of inflexibility, radiolucency, and thrombogenicity. These limitations have resulted in the development of innovative stent designs using radioopaque tantalum filaments and aggressive pharmacologic treatment with antiplatelet and anti-thrombotic therapy following stent deployment. Current experimental investigation into the feasibility of intracoronary stent coating with genetically engineered endothelial cells or slow release antiproliferative agents, such as colchicine or methotrexate, may further serve to lessen the frequency of late restenosis. The optimal patient selection criteria for the use of the intracoronary stent is currently the subject of intense clinical investigation. PMID:2227766

  4. Recent Advances in Drug Eluting Stents

    PubMed Central

    Puranik, Amey S.; Dawson, Eileen R.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common medical interventions to reopen an occluded vessel is the implantation of a coronary stent. While this method of treatment is effective initially, restenosis, or the re-narrowing of the artery frequently occurs largely due to neointimal hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells. Drug eluting stents were developed in order to provide local, site-specific, controlled release of drugs that can inhibit neointima formation. By implementing a controlled release delivery system it may be possible to control the time release of the pharmacological factors and thus be able to bypass some of the critical events associated with stent hyperplasia and prevent the need for subsequent intervention. However, since the advent of first-generation drug eluting stents, long-term adverse effects have raised concerns regarding their safety. These limitations in safety and efficacy have triggered considerable research in developing biodegradable stents and more potent drug delivery systems. In this review, we shed light on the current state-of-the-art in drug eluting stents, problems related to them and highlight some of the ongoing research in this area. PMID:23117022

  5. [Imaging of coronary stents using multislice computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Seifarth, H; Heindel, W; Maintz, D

    2010-06-01

    Coronary artery stenting has become the most important form of coronary revascularization. With the introduction of drug-eluting stents (DES) the rate of restenosis has declined but due to the delayed formation of intimal tissue the incidence of late (>30 days after stent placement) and very late thrombosis of the stents is higher for DES. Visualization of the stent lumen is possible with multislice computed tomography (MSCT) but blooming artifacts hamper the delineation of the stent lumen. The severity of these artifacts and thus the width of the visible stent lumen depends on several factors, such as the thickness of the stent struts, the design of the stent and the underlying material itself. The most important factor influencing the extent of blooming artifacts is the convolution kernel selected for image reconstruction. Dedicated, edge-enhancing kernels offer superior lumen visualization compared to the soft or medium kernels used for coronary artery imaging. The trade-off using edge-enhancing kernels is an increase in image noise.Despite all efforts undertaken to enhance stent lumen visualization, stent imaging is still a challenge in MSCT. In the majority of stents currently used, sufficient lumen visualization is only possible in stents with a diameter larger than 3 mm. A position of the stent in the proximal segments of the coronary artery tree facilitates delineation of the stent lumen not only because of the relatively little motion but also because of the lesser extent of blooming artifacts obscuring the stent lumen if the stent is oriented perpendicular to the z-axis of the scanner. PMID:20521021

  6. Nitinol Esophageal Stents: New Designs and Clinical Indications

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Ernst-Peter; Boos, Irene; Vetter, Sylvia; Strohm, Michael; Domschke, Sigurd

    1996-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical use of covered and noncovered, knitted nitinol stents in patients presenting new stent indications. Methods: Self-expandable, knitted nitinol stents were implanted in four patients for treatment of dysphagia. In two patients who had malignant strictures and had esophago-respiratory fistulae and in one patient with an esophagocutaneous fistula, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents were implanted. One patient received a noncovered stent, but a retrograde approach through a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) fistula had to be chosen for recanalization of an esophageal occlusion. Two patients received stents for treatment of benign strictures. Results: Recanalization of the stricture and stent implantation were performed under fluoroscopic control without any procedure-related morbidity or mortality. Dysphagia improved in all patients and the esophageal fistulae could be sealed off by covered stents. During a maximum follow-up of 18 months, there was no stent migration or esophageal perforation. Complications observed were stent stenosis due to food impaction (1/4) and benign stent stenosis (2/2). Most complications could be treated by the interventional radiologist. Conclusion: Self-expandable, covered Nitinol stents provide an option for the treatment of dysphagia combined with esophageal fistulae. In combination with interventional radiology techniques, even complex strictures are accessible. For benign strictures, the value of stent treatment has not yet been proven.

  7. Computational Study of Axial Fatigue for Peripheral Nitinol Stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meoli, Alessio; Dordoni, Elena; Petrini, Lorenza; Migliavacca, Francesco; Dubini, Gabriele; Pennati, Giancarlo

    2014-07-01

    Despite their success as primary treatment for vascular diseases, Nitinol peripheral stents are still affected by complications related to fatigue failure. Hip and knee movements during daily activities produce large and cyclic deformations of the superficial femoral artery, that concomitant to the effects of pulsatile blood pressure, may cause fatigue failure in the stent. Fatigue failure typically occurs in cases of very extended lesions, which often require the use of two or more overlapping stents. In this study, finite element models were used to study the fatigue behavior of Nitinol stents when subjected to cyclic axial compression in different conditions. A specific commercial Nitinol stent was chosen for the analysis and subjected to cyclic axial compression typical of the femoral vascular region. Three different configurations were investigated: stent alone, stent deployed in a tube, and two overlapping stents deployed in a tube. Results confirm that stent oversizing has an influence in determining both the mean and amplitude strains induced in the stent and plays an important role in determining the fatigue response of Nitinol stents. In case of overlapping stents, numerical results suggest higher amplitude strains concentrate in the region close to the overlapping portion where the abrupt change in stiffness causes higher cyclic compression. These findings help to explain the high incidence of stent fractures observed in various clinical trials located close to the overlapping portion.

  8. Transradial bilateral common iliac ostial stenting using simultaneous hugging stent (SHS) technique.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tejas; Shah, Sanjay; Pancholy, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Current literature has limited reports of iliac artery interventions performed via transradial approach (TRA). We report four successive cases of bilateral common iliac ostial stenting using simultaneous hugging stent (SHS) technique through bilateral TRA. This technique allows the patient and the operator to exploit the benefits of TRA while treating this complex substrate. PMID:26804292

  9. Image-based mechanical analysis of stent deformation: concept and exemplary implementation for aortic valve stents.

    PubMed

    Gessat, Michael; Hopf, Raoul; Pollok, Thomas; Russ, Christoph; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Sündermann, Simon Harald; Hirsch, Sven; Mazza, Edoardo; Székely, Gábor; Falk, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    An approach for extracting the radial force load on an implanted stent from medical images is proposed. To exemplify the approach, a system is presented which computes a radial force estimation from computer tomography images acquired from patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The deformed shape of the implanted valve prosthesis' Nitinol frame is extracted from the images. A set of displacement vectors is computed that parameterizes the observed deformation. An iterative relaxation algorithm is employed to adapt the information extracted from the images to a finite-element model of the stent, and the radial components of the interaction forces between the stent and the tissue are extracted. For the evaluation of the method, tests were run using the clinical data from 21 patients. Stent modeling and extraction of the radial forces were successful in 18 cases. Synthetic test cases were generated, in addition, for assessing the sensitivity to the measurement errors. In a sensitivity analysis, the geometric error of the stent reconstruction was below 0.3 mm, which is below the image resolution. The distribution of the radial forces was qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable. An uncertainty remains in the quantitative evaluation of the radial forces due to the uncertainty in defining a radial direction on the deformed stent. With our approach, the mechanical situation of TAVI stents after the implantation can be studied in vivo, which may help to understand the mechanisms that lead to the complications and improve stent design. PMID:24626769

  10. Impact of Neointimal Calcifications on Acute Stent Performance during the Treatment of In-Stent Restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mehanna, Emile; Attizzani, Guilherme Ferragut; Nakamura, Daisuke; Nishino, Setsu; Fares, Anas; Aoun, Reem; Costa, Marco Aurelio; Bezerra, Hiram Grando

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become the invasive imaging modality of choice for coronary stent assessment due to its unmatched spatial resolution. Neointimal calcification (NC) is a rare finding, observed in 5-10% of in-stent restenosis (ISR) neointima. The impact of NC on percutaneous coronary intervention of ISR is unknown. We therefore present the outcome of six unique cases of ISR and NC in which OCT was used to evaluate the impact of NC on the quality of stent-in-stent deployment for the treatment of ISR. This series demonstrates for the first time the impact of NC on stent expansion, a finding which might help guiding percutaneous coronary intervention for ISR with NC. PMID:27305286

  11. A review of the iStent® trabecular micro-bypass stent: safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wellik, Sarah R; Dale, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant demand for procedures that can effectively treat glaucoma with low risk and good visual outcomes. To fill this void, procedures termed “minimally invasive glaucoma surgery”, are gaining in popularity. This review will focus on the safety and efficacy of one such minimally invasive glaucoma surgery procedure, the trabecular micro-bypass stent. This stent is intended to lower intraocular pressure by directly cannulating Schlemm’s canal and thereby enhancing aqueous outflow. Recent randomized controlled trials and case series have demonstrated the micro-bypass stent to be a relatively safe procedure, with limited complications and no serious adverse sequelae. The most common complication across all studies was stent obstruction or malposition, which generally did not result in any adverse outcome in vision or pressure control. In addition, increased rates of hypotony, choroidal hemorrhage, or infection were not seen with the micro-bypass stent in comparison to cataract surgery alone. PMID:25931808

  12. Treatment of Secondary Stent-Graft Collapse After Endovascular Stent-Grafting for Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Clevert, D.-A. Stickel, M.; Steitz, H.-O.; Kopp, R.; Strautz, T.; Flach, P.; Johnson, T.; Jung, E.M.; Jauch, K.W.; Reiser, M.

    2007-02-15

    We report the case of a patient who developed an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm in the left external iliac artery after transplant nephrectomy. The pseudoaneurysm most probably arose as a suture aneurysm from the external iliac artery after removal of the graft renal artery. Obviously we can not exclude the possibility it was a true aneurysm, although this seems much less likely. The pseudoaneurysm was detected during a routine CT scan and was treated interventionally with a stent-graft. One month later the asymptomatic patient underwent a vascular ultrasound examination including color Doppler, power Doppler, and B-flow as a routine control. An endoleak with collapse of the stent-graft was diagnosed. There was no evidence of stent infection. At a reintervention, the pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated using two uncovered Palmaz stents at the proximal and distal edge of the stent graft. Peri- and post-interventional ultrasound and CT angiography confirmed the exclusion of the aneurysm without an endoleak.

  13. Stent-in-Stent Technique for the Treatment of Proximal Bronchial Restenosis after Insertion of Metallic Stents: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bondue, Benjamin; Schlossmacher, Pascal; Knoop, Christiane; Etienne, Isabelle; Luce, Sylvie; Sokolow, Youri; Leduc, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic treatment of a bronchial restenosis previously treated by insertion of a partially covered self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) can be difficult. Classically, after recanalization of the bronchus, the stent is removed and replaced by a more adapted one. We report on two cases of proximal bronchial restenosis treated by insertion of an additional stent inside the lumen of the previously inserted stent using the stent-in-stent (SIS) technique. The indications for the initial stent were malignancy in Patient 1 and posttransplant bronchial stenosis in Patient 2. Restenosis occurred at the proximal end of the stent within months in both cases. Stent removal and insertion of a new stent were considered, but this option was discarded because of an excessive risk of bronchial perforation and preference towards an alternative approach. In both cases, a second customized SEMS was placed using the SIS technique after ablation of the proximal end stenosis of the stent by argon plasma coagulation and/or dilation with a balloon. Recanalization of the bronchus was achieved in both cases without complications. The SIS technique is a valuable alternative to removal of SEMS in case of proximal bronchial restenosis. PMID:27110422

  14. Percutaneous Endoluminal Stent and Stent-Graft Placement for the Treatment of Femoropopliteal Aneurysms: Early Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Link, Johann; Schwarzenberg, Helmut; Walluscheck, Knut P.; Heller, Martin

    1999-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of percutaneous endoluminal stents and stent-grafts for the treatment of isolated femoropopliteal aneurysms. Methods: Seven men (age 51-69 years) with femoropopliteal occlusions (n= 6) related to aneurysms and a patent femoropopliteal aneurysm (n= 1) were treated percutaneously. In two patients uncovered Wallstents and in five patients polyester-covered nitinol stents were implanted. Assessment was performed with Doppler ultrasound and duplex ultrasonography 24 hr, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. Additionally, intraarterial angiography was performed at 6 months. Results: Stent placement succeeded in all cases. No immediate adjunctive surgical treatment was necessary. Ankle-brachial index (ABI) improved from 0.29 {+-} 0.29 (SD) before to 0.78 {+-} 0.23 (SD) 24 hr after the intervention. One patient was lost to follow-up. Stent-graft occlusion occurred in four patients: after 2 days (n1), 1 month (n= 2), and 3 months (n= 1). One of the patients, whose stent occluded at 1 month, underwent successful recanalization with local fibrinolysis therapy. Three of the seven, all with three-vessel run-off, demonstrated patency of the stent, which was assessed by duplex ultrasonography at 29, 31, and 34 months. Breaking of the stent struts or significant stent migration was not observed. Conclusions: These results in a small number of patients warrant further investigation to evaluate the role of percutaneous stents in femoropopliteal aneurysms. Until further data of clinical studies are available, this method cannot be recommended, and it cannot replace surgical treatment.

  15. Hybrid Y Stenting with the Waffle-Cone

    PubMed Central

    Limbucci, Nicola; Nappini, Sergio; Renieri, Leonardo; Consoli, Arturo; Rosi, Andrea; Grillea, Giovanni; Bartolo, Marcello; Mangiafico, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Summary Endovascular treatment of wide-neck bifurcation aneurysms is challenging and often requires adjunctive techniques and devices. We report our experience with the hybrid Y stenting with the waffle-cone technique, combining Y stent-assisted coiling and waffle-cone stenting techniques. This approach has been described only in a single case report using a combination of open and closed cell stents. We describe four cases treated by hybrid Y stenting with the waffle-cone procedure with a variation from the originally reported technique, consisting in deploying two closed cell stents. All patients were successfully treated without complications. We propose hybrid Y stenting with the waffle-cone for the treatment of wide-neck bifurcation aneurysms as a bailout technique after failure of Y stent-assisted coiling. PMID:25496677

  16. Role of stent design and coatings on restenosis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hidehiko; Nakamura, Masato; Palmaz, Julio C; Schwartz, Robert S

    2006-06-01

    More than 15 years have passed since stent technology was introduced by Sigwart et al. [U. Sigwart, J. Puel, V. Mirkovitch, F. Joffe, et al. Intravascular stents to prevent occlusion and restenosis after transluminal angioplasty. N. Engl. J. Med. 316 (1987) 701-706.] among interventional cardiologists. Recently drug eluting stents have assumed dominance in the interventional world as positive trial results revealed their efficacy for preventing restenosis. Stent design, delivery-vehicle materials, and drug properties affect the function of these stents. Stainless steel stents with tubular and multicellular design have proven superior to coil or hybrid stent models. This chapter describes stents which have subtle influences of modular design, metal coverage, strut thickness, strut shape, surface smoothness, and coating materials like an alloy composition. PMID:16650911

  17. Trimming a Metallic Biliary Stent Using an Argon Plasma Coagulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rerknimitr, Rungsun Naprasert, Pisit; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2007-06-15

    Background. Distal migration is one of the common complications after insertion of a covered metallic stent. Stent repositioning or removal is not always possible in every patient. Therefore, trimming using an argon plasma coagulator (APC) may be a good alternative method to solve this problem. Methods. Metallic stent trimming by APC was performed in 2 patients with biliary Wallstent migration and in another patient with esophageal Ultraflex stent migration. The power setting was 60-100 watts with an argon flow of 0.8 l/min. Observations. The procedure was successfully performed and all distal parts of the stents were removed. No significant collateral damage to the nearby mucosa was observed. Conclusions. In a patient with a distally migrated metallic stent, trimming of the stent is possible by means of an APC. This new method may be applicable to other sites of metallic stent migration.

  18. What Are the Risks of Having a Stent?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Risks of Having a Stent? Risks Related to Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Percutaneous coronary ... growing and blocking the artery. Restenosis of a Stent-Widened Coronary Artery Figure A shows the coronary ...

  19. Successful Expansion of an Underexpanded Stent by Rotational Atherectomy

    PubMed Central

    Vales, Lori; Coppola, John; Kwan, Tak

    2013-01-01

    The current routine use of intracoronary stents in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has significantly reduced rates of restenosis, compared with balloon angioplasty alone. On the contrary, small post-stenting luminal dimensions due to undilatable, heavily calcified plaques have repeatedly been shown to significantly increase the rates of in-stent restenosis. Rotational atherectomy of lesions is an alternative method to facilitate PCI and prevent underexpansion of stents, when balloon angioplasty fails to successfully dilate a lesion. Stentablation, using rotational atherectomy to expand underexpanded stents deployed in heavily calcified plaques, has also been reported. We report a case via the transradial approach of rotational-atherectomy–facilitated PCI of in-stent restenosis of a severely underexpanded stent due to a heavily calcified plaque. We review the literature and suggest rotational atherectomy may have a role in treating a refractory, severely underexpanded stent caused by a heavily calcified plaque through various proposed mechanisms. PMID:24436587

  20. Two Fatal Complications after Parallel Tracheal-Esophageal Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Petersen, Bryan D.

    2002-03-15

    Two patients with malignant obstructions of both the trachea and esophagus underwent parallel stent placement with Gianturco-Roesch Z (GRZ) stents for palliation of symptoms. Fatal hemorrhage occurred in both patients 2 and 3 weeks after stent placement respectively. An autopsy performed on one of these patients demonstrated esophageal tissue necrosis and erosion with perforation of both the tracheal and esophageal walls at sites where the stent struts were in direct opposition, leading to bleeding from the esophageal venous plexus. GRZ stents have been successful in the treatment of both solitary tracheal and esophageal stenoses. However, parallel tracheal-esophageal stenting with GRZ stents places patients at high risk for complications due to the high radial force exerted by this particular stent and the minimal amount of intervening tissue between the two structures.

  1. A case of early drug-eluting stent fracture.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Costantino; Bacà, Marco; Niccoli, Giampaolo

    2010-10-01

    Although stent fracture following femoro-popliteal intervention is well recognized, coronary stent fracture represents an underrecognized entity. Its incidence is low but it represents an important clinical entity as it may complicate with stent thrombosis causing acute coronary syndromes, or may predispose to instent restenosis. Although coronary stent fracture may involve both bare metal stents (BMS) and drug-eluting stents (DES), a recent analysis of the literature indicates that reports of stent fracture have increased since DES was introduced. Furthermore, chronic stretch at specific vessel sites as bends may lead to late occurrence of fracture. We present the case of a patient with a non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome caused by the early fracture of an everolimus-eluting stent (Xience®) implanted only three days before. PMID:20944195

  2. Stent

    MedlinePlus

    ... of coronary artery disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  3. Stents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Aneurysm Carotid Artery Disease Coronary Heart Disease Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Peripheral Artery Disease Send a link to NHLBI ... an artery as part of a procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as coronary angioplasty. PCI restores ...

  4. A Migrated Aortic Stent Graft Causing Erosive Spondylopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Gestrich, Christopher Probst, Chris; Wilhelm, Kai; Schiller, Wolfgang

    2013-12-15

    We report about a patient presenting with back pain 4 months after an uneventful endovascular implantation of an aortic stent graft. Computed tomography scan revealed a migration of the stent with consecutive endoleakage, kink formation, and movement of the stent toward the spine, which caused destruction of the aortic wall as well as vertebral necrosis. Explantation of the stent and replacement of the native aorta relieved the patient of his symptoms.

  5. Treatment of Vertebro-Basilar Dissecting Aneurysms Using Intravascular Stents

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Kawano, Y.; Yoshimura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Hara, M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Endovascular surgery is an established primary therapeutic modality for dissecting aneurysms at vertebro-basilar arteries. Intravascular stents can be used to treat the dissecting aneurysms for which simple obliteration procedures cannot be used. In such cases, stent implantation alone or a combination of stents and coils need to be selected properly by taking into consideration the site and shape of dissections. In this report, three patterns of stent application are described and their method of selection is discussed. PMID:20569619

  6. Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-06-15

    Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

  7. Metallic Stents for Tracheobronchial Pathology Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Carolina; Laborda, Alicia; Lozano, Juan M.; Caballero, Hugo; Sebastian, Antonio; Lopera, Jorge; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present the 7-year experience of the treatment of benign and malignant tracheobronchial stenoses using metallic stents. Patients and Methods: One hundred twenty-three stents were inserted in 86 patients (74 benign and 12 malignant stenoses). Ninety-seven stents were placed in the trachea and 26 in the bronchi. The procedures were performed under fluoroscopic and flexible bronchoscopic guidance with the patient under light sedation. In cases of severe stenotic lesions or obstructions, laser resection was performed before stent placement. Clinical and functional pulmonary data were recorded before and 3 months after the procedure. Follow-up involved clinical data and radiographic techniques at 48 h and at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-month intervals. Results: The technical success was 100 %. Dyspnea disappearance, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and pulmonary functional data improvement was observed in all patients (p < 0.001). Complications were detected in 23 patients (26.7 %). Mean follow-up time was 6.3 {+-} 1.2 months in patients with malignant lesions and 76.2 {+-} 2.3 months patients with in benign lesions. By the end of the study, 100 % of patients with malignant pathology and 6.7 % of patients with benign lesions had died. Conclusion: Endoluminal treatment of tracheobronchial stenosis with metallic stents is a therapeutic alternative in patients who are poor candidates for surgery. In unresectable malignant lesions, the benefit of metallic stenting is unquestionable. In benign lesions, the results are satisfactory, but sometimes other interventions are required to treat complications. New stent technology may improve these results.

  8. Intraluminal tracheal stent fracture in a Yorkshire terrier.

    PubMed

    Woo, Heung-Myong; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Lee, Seung-Gon; Nam, Hyun-Sook; Kwak, Ho-Hyun; Lee, Joon-Seok; Park, In-Chul; Hyun, Changbaig

    2007-10-01

    An 8-year-old Yorkshire terrier was presented with tracheal collapse. Two intraluminal nitinol stents were implanted. The implanted stents were found to be fractured 4 weeks after implantation. The fractured stents were removed. To restore the collapsed trachea, ring prostheses were applied. However, the dog was euthanized because of a bad outcome following surgery. PMID:17987968

  9. Coronary vasomotion dysfunction after everolimus-eluting stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Pietro; Attisano, Tiziana; Di Maio, Marco; Bellino, Elisabetta M; Polito, Maria V; Baldi, Cesare; Vigorito, Francesco; Di Muro, Michele R; Tomasello, Salvatore D; Galassi, Alfredo R; Piscione, Federico

    2014-12-01

    First generation drug-eluting stent can cause a paradoxical "in-segment" coronary vasoconstriction. This phenomenon was seen with sirolimus, paclitaxel, and, more recently, also with zotarolimus-eluting stent. For the first time, we describe a case of coronary-induced vasoconstriction by everolimus-eluting stents (EES). PMID:25598992

  10. Intense Inflammatory Reaction to Heparin Polymer Coated Intravascular Palmaz Stents in Porcine Arteries Compared to Uncoated Palmaz Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Scott C.; Yoon, Hyo-Chun; Chen, Gary; Abdel-Sayed, Peter; Costantino, Mary M.; Bonilla, Sheila M.; Nishimura, Earl

    2003-04-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of heparin-polymer-coated intravascular stents in the reduction of vessel stenosis. Three types of coatings for Palmaz stents were tested: 1) heparin covalently bound to a polyethylene oxide(Hp-PEO) tether; 2) heparin copolymerized with ethylene vinyl acetate(Hp-Elvax) and 3) Elvax alone. Polymer-coated stents and uncoated controls were deployed in the external iliac arteries following endothelial injury in 18 swine. The animals were maintained on anatherogenic diet and examined by angiography at 6 and 12 weeks. The stented segments were then harvested for histopathologic analysis. Both types of heparin-coated stents resulted in increased luminal narrowing as compared to the contralateral uncoated stents. At 6 weeks, average luminal stenosis was 48% for Hp-PEO stents vs 35% for uncoated stents (p < 0.05). At 12 weeks, average luminal stenosis was 36% for Hp-PEO stents vs 26% for uncoated stents(p = NS). For Hp-Elvax stents, the average stenosis was 58% vs 33% for uncoated controls (p <0.05) at 6 weeks and 47% vs 19% for uncoated controls(p < 0.05) at 12 weeks. There was no significant difference between Hp-Elvax stents and Elvax stents(p = NS). Increased luminal narrowing in coated stents was primarily secondary to a marked inflammatory response.Heparin-polyethylene oxide and heparin-ethylene vinyl acetate-coated stents resulted in increased luminal narrowing as compared with uncoated stents, due to a marked inflammatory response.

  11. iStent trabecular micro-bypass stent for open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Le, Kim; Saheb, Hady

    2014-01-01

    Trabecular micro-bypass stents, commonly known as iStents, are micro-invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) devices used to treat open-angle glaucoma. Like other MIGS procedures that enhance trabecular outflow, the iStent lowers intraocular pressure (IOP) by creating a direct channel between the anterior chamber and Schlemm’s canal. iStents are typically implanted at the time of phacoemulsification for patients with open-angle glaucoma and visually significant cataracts. This review summarizes the published data regarding the efficacy, safety, and cost considerations of trabecular micro-bypass stents. Most studies found statistically significant reductions in mean IOP and ocular medication use after combined phacoemulsification with single or double iStent implantation. The devices were found to be very safe, with a safety profile similar to that of cataract surgery. Complications were infrequent, with the most common complications being temporary stent obstruction or malposition, which resolved with observation or secondary procedures. Future studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and expanded indications. PMID:25284980

  12. Primary Stenting in Infrarenal Aortic Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, Ulf; Uher, Petr; Lindh, Mats; Lindblad, Bengt; Ivancev, Krasnodar

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of primary stenting in aortic occlusive disease.Methods: Thirty patients underwent primary stenting of focal concentric (n = 2) and complex aortic stenoses (n = 19), and aortic or aorto-iliac occlusions (n = 9). Sixteen patients underwent endovascular outflow procedures, three of whom also had distal open surgical reconstructions. Median follow-up was 16 months (range 1-60 months).Results: Guidewire crossing of two aorto-biiliac occlusions failed, resulting in a 93% (28/30) technical success. Major complications included one access hematoma, one myocardial infarction, one death (recurrent thromboembolism) in a patient with widespread malignancy, and one fatal hemorrhage during thrombolysis of distal emboli from a recanalized occluded iliac artery. One patient did not improve his symptoms, resulting in a 1-month clinical success of 83% (25/30). Following restenting the 26 stented survivors changed their clinical limb status to +3 (n = 17) and +2 (n = 9). During follow-up one symptomatic aortic restenosis occurred and was successfully restented.Conclusions: Primary stenting of complex aortic stenoses and short occlusions is an attractive alternative to conventional surgery. Larger studies with longer follow-up and stratification of lesion morphology are warranted to define its role relative to balloon angioplasty. Stenting of aorto-biiliac occlusions is feasible but its role relative to bypass grafting remains to be defined.

  13. Stent hypersensitivity and infection in sinus cavities

    PubMed Central

    Soufras, George D.; Hahalis, George

    2013-01-01

    Persistent mucosal inflammation, granulation tissue formation, hypersensitivity, and multifactorial infection are newly described complications of retained drug-eluting stents from endoscopic sinus surgery for refractory rhinosinusitis. In an important report published in Allergy and Rhinology, a 45-year-old male patient suffering from recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery and was found, for the first time, to have steroid-eluting catheters that were inadvertently left in the ethmoid and frontal sinuses. The retained catheters had caused persistent mucosal inflammation and formation of granulation tissue denoting hypersensitivity reaction. These consequences had induced perpetuation of symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Meticulous removal of the retained stents with the nitinol wings from inflamed tissues of the frontal, ethmoidal, and sphenoethmoidal recesses in which they were completely imbedded was successfully performed without polypoid regrowth. Cultures of specimens taken from both left and right stents showed heavy growth of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and moderate growth of Klebsiella oxytoca, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, and beta-hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus. Fungal infection was not detected. The current knowledge and experience regarding stent hypersensitivity and infection in relation with the use of stents in sinus cavities is reviewed. PMID:24498522

  14. A Rare Case of Complete Stent Fracture, Coronary Arterial Transection, and Pseudoaneurysm Formation Induced by Repeated Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Fumiaki; Kanemoto, Masashi; Yamada, Jutaro; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Tsuboi, Hidetoshi; Fujii, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a rare asymptomatic case of complete stent fracture, coronary arterial transection, and pseudoaneurysm formation in response to repeated stenting. The proximal and distal ends of transected coronary artery were closed, and distal bypass was performed. Coronary arterial transection can occur in patients with repeated stenting as a long-term adverse event. PMID:26543650

  15. Intraluminal Radioactive Stent Compared with Covered Stent Alone for the Treatment of Malignant Esophageal Stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhongmin; Huang Xunbo; Cao Jun; Huang Gang; Chen Kemin LIu Yu; Liu Fenju

    2012-04-15

    Objective: This study was designed to compare the clinical effectiveness of intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation versus covered stent alone insertion in patients with malignant esophageal stricture. Methods: We studied two groups of patients with malignant esophageal stricture. Group A comprised 28 patients (19 men and 9 women) who underwent intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation and were followed prospectively. Group B comprised 30 patients (18 men and 12 women) who had previously received covered stent alone insertion; these patients were evaluated retrospectively. There was no crossover between the two groups during follow-up. Informed consent was obtained from each patient, and our institutional review board approved the study. The dysphagia score, overall survival rates, complication rates, and reintervention rates were compared in the two groups. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Stent placement was technically successful and well tolerated in all patients. The dysphagia score was improved in both groups after stent placement. The median survival was significantly longer in group A than in group B: 11 versus 4.9 months, respectively (P < 0.001). The complications of chest pain, esophageal reflux, and stent migration was more frequent in group B, but this difference did not reach statistical significance. There was no statistical difference in reintervention between two groups. Conclusions: Intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation was a feasible and practical management in treating malignant esophageal stricture and was superior to covered stent alone insertion, as measured by survival.

  16. Air cholangiography in endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of metallic stents for malignant hilar biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Lee, Sang Hyub; Jang, Dong Kee; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Park, Jin Myung; Paik, Woo Hyun; Lee, Jun Kyu; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent (SIS) placement of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) is one of the major palliative treatments for unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction, post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) cholangitis can occur frequently due to inadequate drainage, especially after contrast injection into the biliary tree. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of air cholangiography-assisted stenting. Methods: This study included 47 patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic bilateral SEMS placement using the SIS technique. They were divided into two groups, air (n = 23) or iodine contrast (n = 24) cholangiography. We retrospectively compared comprehensive clinical and laboratory data of both groups. Results: There were no significant differences found between the two groups with respect to technical success (87% versus 87.5%, air versus contrast group, respectively), functional success (95% versus 95.2%), 30-day mortality (8.3% versus 8.7%) and stent patency. Post-ERCP adverse events occurred in 5 (21.7%) of the patients in the air group and 8 (33.3%) of the patients in the contrast group. Among these, the rate of cholangitis was significantly lower in the air group (4.8% versus 29.2%, p = 0.048). In multivariate analysis, air cholangiography, technical success and a shorter procedure time were significantly associated with a lower incidence of post-ERCP cholangitis. Conclusions: Air cholangiography-assisted stenting can be a safe and effective method for endoscopic bilateral SIS placement of SEMS in patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. PMID:26929781

  17. Measurement and Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Nitinol Stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, Josef; Zahora, Jiri

    2005-01-01

    The self expandable Nitinol stents or stentgrafts are typically used for miniinvasive treatment of stenosis and aneurysms in the cardiovascular system. The minimal traumatisation of the patient, shorter time of hospitalization are typical advantages of these methods. More than ten years of experience has yielded also important information about the performance of stents in interaction with biological system and the possible problems related with it. The leakage or the shift of stent are some typical disadvantages, that can be related among other in the construction of the stent. The problem is that the mechanical properties, dimensions and the dynamical properties of the stent do not exactly correspond to the properties of the vessel or generally of tissue where this stent is introduced. The measurement, the description and the comparison of the relations between the mechanical properties of stents and tissues can be one of the possible ways to minimize these disadvantages. The developed original computer controlled measuring system allows the measurement of mechanical properties of stents, the measurement of strain-stress curves or simulation of interaction of the stent and vessel for exactly defined hemodynamic conditions. We measured and compared the mechanical parameters of different selfexpandable Nitinol stents, which differed in geometry (radius and length), in the type of construction (number of branches and rising of winding) and in the diameter of used wire. The results of measurements confirmed the theoretical assumptions that just the diameter of the Nitinol wire significantly influences the rigidity and the level of compressibility of the stent as well. A compromise must be found between the required rigidity of the stent and the minimal size of the delivery system. The exact description of the relation between the mechanical properties and geometry and construction of the stents enables to design the stent to fit the patient and it is expected that

  18. [Placement of intraluminal stents for treating tracheal collapse in dogs].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T M; Matos, J M; Baloi, P; Wenger, M

    2011-11-01

    Tracheal collapse is a progressive disease particularly of small breed dogs. In the terminal stage, when dyspnea becomes the dominating sign and is no longer manageable with medical treatment, a surgical procedure is necessary. With increasing frequency intraluminal tracheal stents are implanted minimal-invasively. In individual animals this is a lifesaving procedure, leading to immediate elimination of dyspnea. In most dogs cough for some time has to be anticipated as the stent acts as a foreign body, but severe complications like excessive formation of granulation tissue, stent migration or stent fracture are rare. Stents represent an attractive treatment modality for tracheal collapse in dogs with dyspnea. PMID:22045455

  19. Stent Application for the Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Joon; Kim, Dong Ik

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and striking development in both the techniques and devices make it possible to treat most of cerebral aneurysms endovascularly. Stent has become one of the most important tools in treating difficult aneurysms not feasible for simple coiling. The physical features, the dimensions, and the functional characteristics of the stents show considerable differences. There are also several strategies and tips to treat difficult aneurysms by using stent and coiling. Nevertheless, they require much experience in clinical practice as well as knowledge of the stents to treat cerebral aneurysms safely and effectively. In this report, a brief review of properties of the currently available stents and strategies of their application is presented. PMID:22125751

  20. Expandable metal stents in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Charnley, RM

    2003-01-01

    Background Biliary obstruction in chronic pancreatitis may be relieved by the insertion of a biliary endoprosthesis. Stenting is usually achieved with a plastic device, but self-expandable metal stents may also be used. Case outlines Two patients are described with severe chronic pancreatitis complicated by biliary obstruction and portal vein thrombosis, who underwent insertion of metallic biliary endoprostheses. In both patients the endoprostheses became occluded, at 12 and 7 months respectively, which necessitated open operation. Both patients experienced surgical complications and one patient died postoperatively. Discussion The use of metal endoprostheses in chronic pancreatitis may result in occlusion, necessitating open operation. Such stents should be used with caution in these patients, who are likely to be high-risk surgical candidates. PMID:18332959

  1. [Recent developments of drug eluting stent coatings].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-ping; Zhan, Hong-bing

    2011-11-01

    Drug eluting stents (DESs) have revolutionized the interventional cardiology over the past decade since the first DES became commercially available in Europe in 2002. Compared to bare metal stents that are deployed to keep the vessel open by mechanical force, DESs have an additional function of reducing restenosis by the action of the drug on the target site. Coatings on the stent surface which ensure the maximum delivery of therapeutic agents to the target site with minimal systematic toxicity, also play an important role in adjusting the drug release profile. Coating material and technology not only affect the surface biocompatibility and the integrity maintenance during the implanting process, but also decide the way of drug delivering and transmitting from the coating. This paper reviews the basic principles of DES coating design, the categories of DES coatings, the commonly used clinical DES coatings and their efficiency in reducing restenosis, and finally provides the future perspectives for DES coatings. PMID:22260019

  2. Developments in coronary artery stenting: primum non nocere.

    PubMed

    Simsek, C; Serruys, P W

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of restenosis and acute vessel closure postballoon angioplasty was the driving force for the introduction of coronary artery stenting in the 1980s. Although the first generation of coronary artery stents were highly valuable and efficient in scaffolding (non-)threatened coronary vessels, they proved to be associated with iatrogenic side effects such as in-stent neointimal hyperplasia. The efforts to tackle these side-effects eventually lead to the most significant progress within the field of interventional cardiology in the past decennium, namely drug-eluting stents (DES). Analysts estimate that the total amount of DES implantations worldwide will be more than 5 million this year. Although this worldwide increase in percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) is impressive, some pitfalls such as the incidence of neointimal hyperplasia, stent fracture and a local hypersensitivity reaction against the polymer coating are worrisome. According to critics, the possible causal relationship with higher rates of very-late stent thrombosis could be a ticking time bomb. These concerns paved the way for the development of novel stents, ranging from DES with biodegradable polymer coating to completely biodegradable stents. Like all progress in medical interventions, it is essential to not harm the patient throughout this complex evolvement process of coronary stents. The current review not only discusses the benefits and safety issues associated with currently utilized coronary stents but in particular highlights novel coronary stents that are being investigated in (pre-)clinical trials at this moment. PMID:21346701

  3. A new polymer-free drug-eluting stent with nanocarriers eluting sirolimus from stent-plus-balloon compared with bare-metal stent and with biolimus A9 eluting stent in porcine coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Galon, Micheli Z.; Gutierrez, Paulo S.; Sojitra, Prakash; Vyas, Ashwin; Doshi, Manish; Lemos, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Permanent polymers in first generation drug-eluting stent (DES) have been imputed to be a possible cause of persistent inflammation, remodeling, malapposition and late stent thrombosis. We aim to describe the in vivo experimental result of a new polymer-free DES eluting sirolimus from stent-plus-balloon (Focus np stent, Envision Scientific) compared with a bare-metal stent (BMS) (Amazonia CroCo, Minvasys) and with a biolimus A9 eluting stent (Biomatrix, Biosensors). Methods In 10 juvenile pigs, 23 coronary stents were implanted in the coronary arteries (8 Amazonia CroCo, 8 Focus np, and 7 Biomatrix). At 28-day follow-up, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and histology were used to evaluate neointimal hyperplasia and healing response. Results According to OCT analysis, Focus np stents had a greater lumen area and less neointimal hyperplasia response than BMS and Biomatrix had. Histomorphometry results showed less neointimal hyperplasia in Focus np than in BMS. Histology showed a higher fibrin deposition in Biomatrix stent compared to Focus np and BMS. Conclusions The new polymer-free DES with sirolimus eluted from stent-plus-balloon demonstrated safety and reduced neointimal proliferation compared with the BMS and Biomatrix stents at 28-day follow-up in this porcine coronary model. This new polymer-free DES is promising and warrants further clinical studies. PMID:25984451

  4. Fast Virtual Stenting with Active Contour Models in Intracranical Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jingru; Long, Yunling; Yan, Huagang; Meng, Qianqian; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Xinjian; Li, Haiyun

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial stents are becoming increasingly a useful option in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Image simulation of the releasing stent configuration together with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation prior to intervention will help surgeons optimize intervention scheme. This paper proposed a fast virtual stenting of IAs based on active contour model (ACM) which was able to virtually release stents within any patient-specific shaped vessel and aneurysm models built on real medical image data. In this method, an initial stent mesh was generated along the centerline of the parent artery without the need for registration between the stent contour and the vessel. Additionally, the diameter of the initial stent volumetric mesh was set to the maximum inscribed sphere diameter of the parent artery to improve the stenting accuracy and save computational cost. At last, a novel criterion for terminating virtual stent expanding that was based on the collision detection of the axis aligned bounding boxes was applied, making the stent expansion free of edge effect. The experiment results of the virtual stenting and the corresponding CFD simulations exhibited the efficacy and accuracy of the ACM based method, which are valuable to intervention scheme selection and therapy plan confirmation. PMID:26876026

  5. Elastic recoil of coronary stents: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Barragan, P; Rieu, R; Garitey, V; Roquebert, P O; Sainsous, J; Silvestri, M; Bayet, G

    2000-05-01

    Minimum elastic recoil (ER) has became an essential feature of new coronary stents when deployed in artheromatous lesions of various morphologies. The ER of coronary stent might be an important component of 6-month restenosis rate by minimizing the luminal loss. We evaluated the intrinsic ER of 23 coronary stents with a mechanical test bench. The amount of ER for one size of stent (3.0 mm) was quantified using a 3D optical contactless machine (Smartscope MVP, Rochester, NY). The stents were expanded on their own balloon for the precrimped stents; the uncrimped stents were expended using identical 3.0-mm balloons. Two types of measurements were done without exterior stress and with a 0.2-bar exterior stress, directly on the stent at the end of balloon expansion, immediately after balloon deflation, and then 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min after. ER ranged from 1.54%+/-0.81% (Bestent BES 15) to 16.51%+/-2.89% (Paragon stent) without stress (P<0.01) and from 2.35%+/-1.14% (Bestent BES 15) to 18.34%+/-2.41% (Cook GR2) under 0.2-bar pressure (P<0.0001). Furthermore, there was a significant reduction between the mean result of tubular stents (TS) and coil stents (CS). The results of in vitro mechanical tests may confirm strongly the interest of a minimum ER in the prevention of the 6-month restenosis. PMID:10816295

  6. Evaluation of cover effects on bare stent mechanical response.

    PubMed

    McGrath, D J; O'Brien, B; Bruzzi, M; Kelly, N; Clauser, J; Steinseifer, U; McHugh, P E

    2016-08-01

    Covered tracheobronchial stents are used to prevent tumour growth from reoccluding the airways. In the present work a combination of experimental and computational methods are used to present the mechanical effects that adhered covers can have on stent performance. A prototype tracheobronchial stent is characterised in bare and covered configurations using radial force, flat plate and a novel non-uniform radial force test, while computational modelling is performed in parallel to extensively inform the physical testing. Results of the study show that cover configuration can have a significant structural effect on stent performance, and that stent response (bare or covered) is especially loading specific, highlighting that the loading configuration that a stent is about to be subjected to should be considered before stent implantation. PMID:27140523

  7. Spontaneous Solitaire™ AB Thrombectomy Stent Detachment During Stroke Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Suha Yilmaz, Guliz

    2015-04-15

    Spontaneous Solitaire™ stent retriever detachment is a rarely defined entity seen during stroke treatment, which can result in a disastrous clinical outcome if it cannot be solved within a critical stroke treatment time window. Two solutions to this problem are presented in the literature. The first is to leave the stent in place and apply angioplasty to the detached stent, while the second involves surgically removing the stent from the location at which it detached. Here, we present a case of inadvertent stent detachment during stroke treatment for a middle cerebral artery M1 occlusion resulting in progressive thrombosis. The detached stent was removed endovascularly by another Solitaire stent, resulting in the recanalization of the occluded middle cerebral artery.

  8. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  9. A Case of Late Femoral Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Stent Disconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele Tozzi, Matteo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2010-10-15

    We present the case of a late superficial femoral artery stent disconnection causing an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm successfully treated with a stent-graft. A 67-year-old female was referred to our department for evaluation of claudication of the left lower limb and was diagnosed to have a total occlusion of the superficial femoral artery. Three nitinol stents were used to revascularize this artery. At 48 months, duplex-ultrasonography control revealed the presence of a 45-mm saccular femoral dilatation; X-rays and CT angiography showed fractures of the proximal stents and the presence of a pseudoaneurysm at the site of the distal stents disconnection. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded using two stent-grafts. We conclude that patients and surgeons should be aware of structural complications with all stents. Rigorous follow-up controls should be mandatory. Endovascular repair proved to be feasible and durable to manage a previous endovascular procedure.

  10. Surface conditioning of 316LVM slotted tube cardiovascular stents.

    PubMed

    Raval, Ankur; Choubey, Animesh; Engineer, Chhaya; Kothwala, Devesh

    2005-01-01

    The surface quality of coronary stents has a significant influence on its biocompatibility. Therefore, surface polishing is of paramount importance in the production and application of stents. In the present study, electropolishing is performed on 316LVM steel slotted tube coronary stents. Additionally, acid pickling, as a pretreatment of electropolishing, is also conducted. Gravimetric analysis of the stents (weight loss and strut width change) in the process of acid pickling and electropolishing are done. Qualitative roughness measurements are made to evaluate the stent surface. Electropolished stents are passivated causing chromium enrichment on the surface of the material, thereby enhancing its corrosion resistance. Passivated and electropolished samples are examined using energy dispersive spectrometry. Balloon expanded and crimped profiles of the passivated stents are qualitatively analyzed. PMID:15613380

  11. Endovascular stent migration to the right ventricle causing myocardial injury.

    PubMed

    Bani-Hani, Samer; Showkat, Arif; Wall, Barry M; Das, Prnab; Huang, Liwei; Al-Absi, Ahmed I

    2012-01-01

    Central stenosis of the subclavian and internal jugular veins is common in end stage renal disease. Treatment of these stenoses is difficult as these veins respond poorly to angioplasty alone and often require metallic stents to ensure patency. These stents are not without complications. Reports of stent fracture, thrombosis and vessel rupture abound in the literature. Stent migration can occur when used in large central veins leading to severe consequences such as pulmonary infarction, tricuspid regurgitation and right sided heart failure. In this report, we report a case of a subclavian vein stent which migrated into the right heart and caused subendocardial injury. As the use of vascular stents is becoming a common treatment option for central venous stenosis, the occurrences of serious complications associated with the stents are likely to rise. PMID:22348654

  12. Treatment of a malignant esophageal fistula with a Gore-Tex-covered flexible nitinol stent

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Kazushi; Takeuchi, Taizo; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kimura, Masashi; Kita, Keisuke; Sato, Morio; Terada, Masaki

    1997-01-15

    In order to treat fistulated esophageal cancer using a flexible stent, a covered flexible stent was constructed by wrapping a nitinol stent with a thin sheet of Gore-Tex, preserving the stents original advantages of flexibility and a low-profile introducer system. This stent was used to perform standard radiotherapy in a case of fistulated esophageal cancer.

  13. A novel mouse model of in situ stenting

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Janet; Wheatcroft, Mark; Arnold, Nadine; Lupton, Henry; Crossman, David C.; Gunn, Julian; Francis, Sheila

    2010-01-01

    Aims Animal models of stenting are mostly limited to larger animals or involve substantial abdominal surgery in rodents. We aimed to develop a simple, direct model of murine stenting. Methods and results We designed a miniature, self-expanding, nitinol wire coil stent that was pre-loaded into a metal stent sheath. This was advanced into the abdominal aorta of the mouse, via femoral access, and the stent deployed. In-stent restenosis was investigated at 1, 3, 7, and 28 days post-stenting. The model was validated by investigation of neointima formation in mice deficient in signalling via the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R1), compared with other injury models. Ninety-two per cent of mice undergoing the procedure were successfully stented. All stented vessels were patent. Inflammatory cells were seen in the adventitia and around the stent strut up to 3 days post-stenting. At 3 days, an early neointima was present, building to a mature neointima at 28 days. In mice lacking IL-1R1, the neointima was 64% smaller than that in wild-type controls at the 28-day timepoint, in agreement with other models. Conclusion This is the first description of a successful model of murine in situ stenting, using a stent specifically tailored for use in small thin-walled arteries. The procedure can be undertaken by a single operator without the need for an advanced level of microsurgical skill and is reliable and reproducible. The utility of this model is demonstrated by a reduction in in-stent restenosis in IL-1R1-deficient mice. PMID:19633315

  14. Coronary Stent Thrombosis: Current Insights into New Drug-Eluting Stent Designs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Kuk

    2012-01-01

    The advances of interventional cardiology have been achieved by new device development, finding appropriate drug regimes, and understanding of pathomechanism. Drug-eluting stents (DES) implantation with dual anti-platelet therapy reduced revascularization without increasing mortality or myocardial infarction compared with bare-metal stenting. However, late-term stent thrombosis (ST) and restenosis limited its value and raised the safety concern. Main mechanisms of this phenomenon are impaired endothelialization and hypersensitivity reaction with polymer. The second generation DES further improved safety and/or efficacy by using thinner stent strut and biocompatible polymer. Recently, new concept DES with biodegradable polymer, polymer-free and bioabsorbable scaffold are under investigation in the quest to minimize the risk of ST. PMID:23323218

  15. Carotid stent infection: a rare but potentially fatal complication of carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Son, Seungnam; Choi, Nack-Cheon; Choi, Dae Seob; Cho, Oh Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Infections involving endovascular devices are rare and, to our knowledge, only three cases of infection with an inserted carotid stent have ever been reported. A 68-year-old man underwent carotid artery stenting (CAS) of the left proximal internal carotid artery. Two days after CAS the patient developed a high fever and investigation showed that the inserted carotid stent was infected. The infection could not be controlled despite adequate antibiotic therapy. Eventually a rupture of the carotid artery occurred and the patient underwent emergency resection of the left carotid bifurcation in addition to stent removal and reconstruction with a saphenous vein interposition graft. The patient recovered fully without any neurological sequelae. PMID:24688061

  16. Performance of self-expanding nitinol stent in a curved artery: impact of stent length and deployment orientation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shijia; Gu, Linxia; Froemming, Stacey R

    2012-07-01

    The primary aim of this work was to investigate the performance of self-expanding Nitinol stents in a curved artery through finite element analysis. The interaction between a PROTÉGÉ™ GPS™ self-expanding Nitinol stent and a stenosed artery, as well as a sheath, was characterized in terms of acute lumen gain, stent underexpansion, incomplete stent apposition, and tissue prolapse. The clinical implications of these parameters were discussed. The impact of stent deployment orientation and the stent length on the arterial wall stress distribution were evaluated. It was found that the maximum principal stress increased by 17.46%, when the deployment orientation of stent was varied at a 5 deg angle. A longer stent led to an increased contact pressure between stent and underlying tissue, which might alleviate the stent migration. However, it also caused a severe hinge effect and arterial stress concentration correspondingly, which might aggravate neointimal hyperplasia. The fundamental understanding of the behavior of a self-expanding stent and its clinical implications will facilitate a better device design. PMID:24763629

  17. Use of flow-diverting stents as salvage treatment following failed stent-assisted embolization of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heiferman, Daniel M; Billingsley, Joshua T; Kasliwal, Manish K; Johnson, Andrew K; Keigher, Kiffon M; Frudit, Michel E; Moftakhar, Roham; Lopes, Demetrius K

    2016-07-01

    Flow-diverting stents, including the Pipeline embolization device (PED) and Silk, have been beneficial in the treatment of aneurysms previously unable to be approached via endovascular techniques. Recurrent aneurysms for which stent-assisted embolization has failed are a therapeutic challenge, given the existing intraluminal construct with continued blood flow into the aneurysm. We report our experience using flow-diverting stents in the repair of 25 aneurysms for which stent-assisted embolization had failed. Nineteen (76%) of these aneurysms at the 12-month follow-up showed improved Raymond class occlusion, with 38% being completely occluded, and all aneurysms demonstrated decreased filling. One patient developed a moderate permanent neurologic deficit. Appropriate stent sizing, proximal and distal construct coverage, and preventing flow diverter deployment between the previously deployed stent struts are important considerations to ensure wall apposition and prevention of endoleak. Flow diverters are shown to be a reasonable option for treating previously stented recurrent cerebral aneurysms. PMID:26041098

  18. Past, Present, and Future of Gastrointestinal Stents: New Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Metal Stents and Future Developments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Innovations in stent technology and technological advances in endoscopic ultrasonography have led to rapid expansion of their use in the field of gastrointestinal diseases. In particular, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stent insertion has been used for the management of pancreatic fluid collection, bile duct drainage, gallbladder decompression, and gastric bypass. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided drainage of intra-abdominal fluid collections using a plastic or metal stent is well established. Because of the various limitations—such as stent migration, injury and bleeding in the lumen—recently developed, fully covered self-expanding metal stents or lumen-apposing metal stents have been introduced for those fluids management. This article reviews the recent literature on newly developed endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stents and the efficacy thereof. PMID:27000424

  19. Past, Present, and Future of Gastrointestinal Stents: New Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Metal Stents and Future Developments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae

    2016-03-01

    Innovations in stent technology and technological advances in endoscopic ultrasonography have led to rapid expansion of their use in the field of gastrointestinal diseases. In particular, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stent insertion has been used for the management of pancreatic fluid collection, bile duct drainage, gallbladder decompression, and gastric bypass. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided drainage of intra-abdominal fluid collections using a plastic or metal stent is well established. Because of the various limitations-such as stent migration, injury and bleeding in the lumen-recently developed, fully covered self-expanding metal stents or lumen-apposing metal stents have been introduced for those fluids management. This article reviews the recent literature on newly developed endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stents and the efficacy thereof. PMID:27000424

  20. Preprocedural Albumin Levels and Risk of In-Stent Restenosis After Coronary Stenting With Bare-Metal Stent.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ibrahim Etem; Yarlioglues, Mikail; Kurtul, Alparslan; Duran, Mustafa; Koseoglu, Cemal; Oksuz, Fatih; Aksoy, Ozlem; Murat, Sani Namik

    2016-05-01

    In-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a significant clinical problem in patients with coronary artery disease treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Decreased serum albumin (SA) level is related to an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of the present study was to assess whether SA levels at admission are an independent predictor of ISR in patients undergoing bare-metal stent (BMS) implantation. A total of 341 patients (aged 61 ± 11, 65.4% men) with a history of BMS implantation and a further control coronary angiography due to stable angina pectoris (SAP) were included. The study population was classified into 2 groups: patients with and without ISR. The ISR was observed in 140 (41.1%) patients. We found significantly lower SA levels in patients who developed ISR than in those who did not (3.69 ± 0.41 vs 4.07 ± 0.35 mg/dL,P< .001). Multivariate analysis revealed that SA level (odds ratio 0.109, 95% confidence interval 0.017-0.700,P= .020), stent diameter, reason for stent implantation, and body mass index were independent risk factors for the development of ISR. The SA level at admission is inversely associated with ISR in patients with SAP. PMID:26243483

  1. Computational simulation of platelet interactions in the initiation of stent thrombosis due to stent malapposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-02-01

    Coronary stenting is one of the most commonly used approaches to open coronary arteries blocked due to atherosclerosis. Stent malapposition can induce thrombosis but the microscopic process is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the platelet-level process by which different extents of stent malapposition affect the initiation of stent thrombosis. We utilized a discrete element model to computationally simulate the transport, adhesion, and activation of thousands of individual platelets and red blood cells during thrombus initiation in stented coronary arteries. Simulated arteries contained a malapposed stent with a specified gap distance (0, 10, 25, 50, or 200 μm) between the struts and endothelium. Platelet-level details of thrombus formation near the proximal-most strut were measured during the simulations. The relationship between gap distance and amount of thrombus in the artery varied depending on different conditions (e.g., amount of dysfunctional endothelium, shear-induced activation of platelets, and thrombogenicity of the strut). Without considering shear-induced platelet activation, the largest gap distance (200 μm) produced no recirculation and less thrombus than the smallest two gap distances (0 and 10 μm) that created recirculation downstream of the strut. However, with the occurrence of shear-induced platelet activation, the largest gap distance produced more thrombus than the two smallest gap distances, but less thrombus than an intermediate gap distance (25 μm). A large gap distance was not necessarily the most thrombogenic, in contrast to implications of some computational fluid dynamics studies. The severity of stent malapposition affected initial stent thrombosis differently depending on various factors related to fluid recirculation, platelet trajectories, shear stress, and endothelial condition.

  2. Inflammation and In-Stent Restenosis: The Role of Serum Markers and Stent Characteristics in Carotid Artery Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Wasser, Katrin; Schnaudigel, Sonja; Wohlfahrt, Janin; Psychogios, Marios-Nikos; Knauth, Michael; Gröschel, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Background Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) may currently be recommended especially in younger patients with a high-grade carotid artery stenosis. However, evidence is accumulating that in-stent restenosis (ISR) could be an important factor endangering the long-term efficacy of CAS. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of inflammatory serum markers and procedure-related factors on ISR as diagnosed with duplex sonography. Methods We analyzed 210 CAS procedures in 194 patients which were done at a single university hospital between May 2003 and June 2010. Periprocedural C-reactive protein (CRP) and leukocyte count as well as stent design and geometry, and other periprocedural factors were analyzed with respect to the occurrence of an ISR as diagnosed with serial carotid duplex ultrasound investigations during clinical long-term follow-up. Results Over a median of 33.4 months follow-up (IQR: 14.9–53.7) of 210 procedures (mean age of 67.9±9.7 years, 71.9% male, 71.0% symptomatic) an ISR of ≥70% was detected in 5.7% after a median of 8.6 months (IQR: 3.4–17.3). After multiple regression analysis, leukocyte count after CAS-intervention (odds ratio (OR): 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–1.69; p = 0.036), as well as stent length and width were associated with the development of an ISR during follow-up (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.05–1.65, p = 0.022 and OR: 0.28, 95% CI: 0.09–0.84, p = 0.010). Conclusions The majority of ISR during long-term follow-up after CAS occur within the first year. ISR is associated with periinterventional inflammation markers and influenced by certain stent characteristics such as stent length and width. Our findings support the assumption that stent geometry leading to vessel injury as well as periprocedural inflammation during CAS plays a pivotal role in the development of carotid artery ISR. PMID:21829478

  3. Topic controversies in the endoscopic management of malignant hilar strictures using metal stent: side-by-side versus stent-in-stent techniques.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong Ho; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Kogure, Hirofumi; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Endoscopic management of unresectable hilar malignant biliary stricture (MBS) is currently challenging, and the best approach is still controversial. Liver volume is the key to adequate biliary drainage in hilar MBS and multiple stenting is mandatory to drain over 50% of liver volume in most cases. The self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) has shown superior patency to plastic stents in recent reports. There are two methods of multiple stenting for hilar MBS: stent-in-stent (SIS) and side-by-side (SBS). Advantages of SIS include multiple SEMS placement in one stent caliber at the common bile duct (CBD), which is considered physiologically ideal. The through-the-mesh (TTM) technique with guidewires and the SEMS delivery system can be technically difficult in SIS, although the recent development of dedicated SEMSs having a loose portion facilitating the TTM technique makes SIS technically feasible both at stent deployment and re-interventions. Conversely, the SBS technique, if placed across the papilla, is technically simple at initial placement and re-intervention at stent occlusion. However, SBS has potential disadvantages of overexpansion of the CBD because of parallel placement of multiple SEMS, which can lead to portal vein thrombosis. Given the limited evidence available, a well-designed randomized controlled trial comparing these two techniques is warranted. PMID:26136361

  4. Serum free indoxyl sulfate associated with in-stent restenosis after coronary artery stentings.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Lung; Hsieh, I-Chang; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Chen, Chun-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Uremic toxins, including P-cresyl sulfate (PCS) and indoxyl sulfate (IS), have been found to participate in the process of atherosclerosis and patient mortality. We aim to discover if uremic toxins are related to in-stent restenosis in patients with coronary artery disease after stent implantation. We enrolled 214 patients who received coronary angioplasty with stenting and follow-up angiography between November 1995 and June 2011 with a total of 293 lesions divided into bare metal stent (BMS) or drug-eluting stent (DES) groups. Patients' basic information and total and free form IS and PCS were used to correlate with the late loss (LL) and loss index (LI). Significantly higher LL and LI in the BMS group compared with the DES group (1.10 vs. 0.45 mm, p < 0.001, and 0.46 vs. 0.19, p < 0.001, respectively). The unadjusted correlation revealed a positive relationship between log-normalized free IS and LL, LI in the DES group (p = 0.001). After adjustment for multiple variables, the log-normalized free IS still presented as an independent predictor for the LL and LI (p = 0.012 and p = 0.031). Free IS is an independent predictor for coronary restenosis in patients receiving DES implantations. However, among patients undergoing BMS stentings, uremic toxin is not a predictor of the intracoronary restenosis. PMID:25539627

  5. Stent thrombosis with drug-eluting stents: is the paradigm shifting?

    PubMed

    Palmerini, Tullio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Della Riva, Diego; Mariani, Andrea; Genereux, Philippe; Branzi, Angelo; Stone, Gregg W

    2013-11-19

    First-generation drug-eluting stents (DES), which impart the controlled release of sirolimus or paclitaxel from durable polymers to the vessel wall, have been consistently shown to reduce the risk of restenosis and target vessel revascularization compared with bare metal stents (BMS). However, stent thrombosis (ST) emerged as a major safety concern with first-generation DES early after their adoption in clinical practice, requiring prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy. Pathological studies have shown that first-generation DES are associated with delayed arterial healing and polymer hypersensitivity reactions resulting in chronic inflammation, predisposing to late and very late ST. Second-generation DES have been developed to overcome these issues with improved stent designs and construction and the use of biocompatible and bioabsorbable polymers. Meta-analyses have shown that the thin-strut, fluoropolymer-coated cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stent (CoCr-EES) may be associated with lower rates of definite ST than other DES and, unexpectedly, even lower than BMS. The thin-strut structure of the stent platform, the thromboresistant properties of the fluoropolymer, and the reduced polymer and drug load may contribute to the low rate of ST with CoCr-EES. The notion of DES being safer than BMS represents a paradigm shift in the evolution of percutaneous coronary intervention. The relative safety and efficacy of fluoropolymer-coated CoCr-EES, DES with bioabsorbable polymers, and fully bioresorbable scaffolds are the subject of numerous ongoing large-scale trials. PMID:24036025

  6. Magnetic Resonance Angiography of Nonferromagnetic Iliac Artery Stents and Stent-Grafts: A Comparative Study in Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Schuermann, Karl; Vorwerk, Dierk; Buecker, Arno; Neuerburg, Joerg; Grosskortenhaus, Stefanie; Haage, Patrick; Piroth, Werner; Hunter, David W.; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1999-09-15

    Purpose: To compare nonferromagnetic iliac artery prostheses in their suitability for patency monitoring with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) using conventional angiography as a reference. Methods: In experiment 1, three Memotherm stents were inserted into the iliac arteries of each of six sheep: two 'tandem' stents on one side and a single stent on the other side. In experiment 2, four prostheses (normal and low-porosity Corvita stent-grafts, Memotherm, ZA-stent) were inserted in each of 11 sheep. Patency was monitored before and 1, 3, and 6 months after insertion with 3D phase-contrast and two 2D time-of-flight sequences (TOF-1: TR/TE = 18/6.9, TOF-2: 13/2.5) with and without contrast at 1.5 T. On 206 coronal MIP images (72 pre-, 134 post-stenting), three readers analyzed 824 iliac segments (206 x 4) for patency and artifacts. Results: There was no difference in the number of artifacts between tandem and single iliac Memotherm stents. The ZA-stent induced significantly fewer artifacts than the other prostheses (p < 0.00001). With MRA, patency of the ZA-stent was correctly diagnosed in 88% of cases, which was almost comparable to nonstented iliac segments (95%), patency of the Memotherm stent in 59%, and of the Corvita stent-grafts in 57% and 55%. The TOF-2 sequence with contrast yielded the best images. Conclusion: MRA compatibility of nonferromagnetic prostheses depends strongly on the design of the device. MRA may be used to monitor the patency of iliac ZA-stents, whereas iliac Memotherm stents and Corvita stent-grafts appear to be less suited for follow-up with MRA.

  7. Carotid Artery Stenting Using a Novel Self-Expanding Braided Nickel-Titanium Stent: Feasibility and Safety Porcine Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlhelm, Frank Kaufmann, Ralf; Ahlhelm, Dirk Ong, Mai Fang; Roth, Christian Reith, Wolfgang

    2009-09-15

    We studied the deliverability and safety of a braided, self-expanding, closed-cell nickel-titanium (NiTi) stent (E-volution, Jotec GmbH, Hechingen, Germany) especially designed for the endovascular treatment of carotid artery bifurcation stenosis with special regard to in-stent stenosis and thrombosis compared with a laser-cut reference nitinol stent in a porcine model of percutaneous vascular interventions. We aimed to assess histopathologic response in minipig carotid and subclavian arteries. Eight minipigs received a total of 42 stents: 14 reference stents and 28 E-volution stents. Eleven of the E-volution stents were additionally coated with heparin. Control angiography was obtained immediately before and after vascular intervention as well as 4 weeks after the procedure. Primary endpoints were 28 days of angiographic analyses as well as histomorphometric analysis, including injury score, inflammation score, luminal diameter, vessel diameter, maximal neointimal thickness, and area of in-stent stenosis. Secondary end points were procedural success, 28-day mortality, and stent thrombosis. All stents could be delivered successfully without procedural complications, morbidity, or mortality during our observation time. As confirmed by histology, no in-stent thrombosis was observed. Compared with common carotid arteries, subclavian arteries are significantly more vulnerable to developing in-stent stenosis caused by neointima proliferation (p < 0.05). Compared with the use of 1 single stent/artery, serial application of two stents leads to a more excessive but not significantly different neointimal proliferation (p > 0.05). The E-volution stent, especially when heparin coated, is in line with the comparison to the laser-cut reference stent displaying similar results of angiographic, histologic, and histomorphometric analyses (p > 0.05). Compared with the reference laser-cut stent, the self-expanding nitinol stent (E-volution) with its advanced braiding technology is

  8. Malignant Ureteral Obstruction: Functional Duration of Metallic versus Polymeric Ureteral Stents

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Po-Ming; Chiang, I-Ni; Chen, Chia-Yen; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Jui-Shan; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lee, Yuan-Ju; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ureteral obstruction caused by extrinsic compression is often associated with intra-abdominal cancers. Internal drainage with ureteral stents is typically the first-line therapy to relieve such obstructions. Novel designs of ureteral stents made of different materials have been invented to achieve better drainage. In this study, we described the functional outcomes of a Resonance metallic ureteral stent (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, USA) in patients with malignant ureteral obstruction and compare the functional duration of Resonance stents with regular polymeric stents in the same cohort. Methods Cancer patients who received polymeric stents and subsequent Resonance stents for ureteral obstruction between July 2009 and November 2012 were included in a chart review. Stent failure was detected by clinical symptoms, imaging studies, and renal function tests. The functional durations of each stent were calculated, and possible factors affecting stent patency were investigated. Results A total of 50 stents were successfully inserted into 50 ureteral units in 42 patients with malignant ureteral obstruction. There were 7 antegrade stents and 43 retrograde stents. There were no major complications. Stent-related symptoms were similar in both kinds of stents. After polymeric stents were replaced with Resonance metallic stents, hydronephrosis subsided or remained stable in 90% (45/50) of the ureteral units. Serum creatinine decreased or remained stable in 90% (38/42) of these patients. The Resonance stent exhibited a mean increase in functional duration of 4 months compared with the polymeric stents (p<0.0001), and 50% (25/50) of the Resonance stents exhibited a significant increase in functional duration (more than 3 months). Pre-operative serum creatinine < 2 was associated with a substantial increase in stent duration. Conclusions Resonance stents are effective and safe in relieving malignant ureteral obstructions after polymeric stents failure

  9. Endovascular stents: market vigilance and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Grigioni, M; Daniele, C; Abbate, M; D'Avenio, G; Morbiducci, U; Del Gaudio, C; Barbaro, V

    2004-01-01

    With the aim of enhancing the safety and reliability level of coronary stents, we analyzed data collected from accident reports drawn from the MAUDE database (Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience Database) of the FDA from 1996 to 2000. This analysis allowed us to highlight problems related to the use of coronary stents by means of the analysis of these reports at different levels, beginning from the causes that can lead to a certain type of accident up to the possible complication related to that event. Moreover we analyzed the procedure outcomes in terms of stent position inside the patient's body and the possible therapies adopted to solve the problems. The results showed that the most probable event that can lead to an accident is the stent separation from the balloon which, alone, turns up in a number of cases equal to the sum of all the others. This result highlights the importance of the technical skill of the operators accomplished by special training and of the importance of clarity and completeness in the instructions for the use of the device. Another critical point is the reliability of the device which must guarantee an adequate safety level when it is used according to the instructions. PMID:14984183

  10. Angioplasty and Stenting for Intracranial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    IZUMI, Takashi; IMAMURA, Hirotoshi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; MIYACHI, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Of the patients enrolled in the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET), a surveillance study in Japanese, 1133 patients who underwent intracranial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA)/stenting for intracranial stenosis during the period from 2005 to 2009 were investigated. A technical success was achieved in 98.3% of the patients, and 70.5% and 7.5% had a residual stenosis of < 30% and ≥ 50%, respectively. The incidence of ischemic complications and hemorrhagic complications was as low as 7.7% and 2.5%, respectively, but tended to increase in patients who underwent stenting. While a significant correlation with ischemic complications was observed in previously untreated patients and patients who underwent stenting followed by post-dilatation, a significant correlation with hemorrhagic complications was observed in patients who received emergency treatment and those treated between 24 hours and 14 days of the onset. Flexible intracranial stents are expected to contribute to improvement in the treatment outcome. PMID:24390191

  11. Carotid artery stenting in recently symptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; de Donato, G; Setacci, F; Sirignano, P; Galzerano, G; Borrelli, M P; Cappelli, A

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is time-dependent, with the best outcomes resulting from the earliest interventions. However, for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to a high-grade stenosis of the internal carotid artery, despite maximal medical treatment, an effective intervention to improve their neurologic symptoms and clinical outcome has not yet been established. There are two major concerns: first, cerebral revascularization in the acute stage remains challenging because of the possibility that hemorrhagic infarction or hyperperfusion syndrome will occur after revascularization; second, alarms about carotid artery stenting in patients with acute symptoms are related to the fact that, while with carotid endarterectomy the plaque is completely removed, after stenting it is only remodelled and its stabilization is essential to avoid embolic events during the procedure and in the post-operative period. Although level 1 evidence seems clearly in favor of carotid endarterectomy in symptomatic patients, carotid stenting has been proposed as a possible alternative in selected cases if the procedure is performed in high-volume center with documented low perioperative stroke and death rates. This review summarizes indications and results for carotid artery stenting in recently symptomatic patients. PMID:23296417

  12. A simplified stent for placement of miniscrews.

    PubMed

    Hattarki, Rohan

    2012-01-01

    Recently miniscrews have been successfully used in the dentoalveolar area as a source of anchorage for affecting various kinds of tooth movement. However, it is essential to place the miniscrew in the interdental bone, preventing contact with the roots of the adjacent teeth. The present article describes fabrication of a simple stent for the placement of orthodontic miniscrews. PMID:23413640

  13. Stenting of Extracranial Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshimae, N.; Morimoto, T.; Nagata, K.

    2003-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study is to evaluate our cases of cervical internal carotid artery stenosis for safty stenting. We investigate the preoperative internal carotid artery stenosis using by integrated backscatter (IBS) method of ultra sonography, comparing with the thirty five surgical specimens as to their nature, histological structure, thickness of fibrous cap. We choose the protection method according to plaque structure, and placed Easy-Wall stent or Smart stent after prePTA. We added post PTA according to the extent of expansion and IVUS findings. Calibrated IBS = IBS value (ROI) /intinal IBS value of ‘bleeding’, ‘lipiď, ‘thrombus’, fiber, ‘hyalinization’ were -27.5, -22.5, -15.2, -11.1, +2.1. That of the thin fibrous cap were -10.9*, that of thic fibrous cap were -2.4 (*p < 0.001). There was a good coleration between the extent of expansion and expected histological findings. All conplications were two cases of small cerebral infarction and a case of bleeding from the complicated lung cancer. The protection at prePTA lead to no complications in case of acute cerebral infarctions. It is very important to check the histological specimen carefully for safty stenting. PMID:20591243

  14. Colonic stenting in malignant large bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Rajadurai, Vinita A; Levitt, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In patients who are surgical candidates, colonic stenting is beneficial for preoperative decompression in large bowel obstruction, as it can convert a surgical procedure from an emergent two-step approach into an elective one-step resection with a primary anastomosis. PMID:27398210

  15. Intracranial Stenting in the Treatment of Wide-Necked Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, M.; Dall'olio, M.; Cenni, P.; Raffi, L.; Simonetti, L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We positioned the following self-expanding stents certified for intracranial application: 16 Neuro form (Boston Scientific), three INX (Medtronic), one Leo (Balt). 6F calibre femoral introducers and guiding catheters were used for stent placement changing to 5F calibre introducers and guiding catheters (Envoy, Cordis) for the Neuroform 2 and 3 stents. All procedures were carried out under general anaesthesia and heparinization. Our pharmacological protocol consisted of adjunctive treatment with anti-aggregants during the interventional procedure and for the following six months, without premedication. From November 2000 to August 2006 we treated 28 patients (27 F/1M) with giant wide-necked aneurysms and one dissecting basilar artery aneurysm requiring the placement of 29 stents. We successfully positioned 20 stents: 11 stents combined with coils (8 immediate; 3 late) with complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation in seven cases and subtotal exclusion in four; nine stents not followed by embolization with complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation in six cases and subtotal exclusion in three. Stenting was not possible in nine cases due to extreme vessel tortuosity and the poor flexibility of release systems for the first stents. No late stent occlusion or subarachnoid haemorrhage were encountered after treatment. PMID:20566126

  16. Thin film nitinol covered stents: design and animal testing.

    PubMed

    Levi, Daniel S; Williams, Ryan J; Liu, Jasen; Danon, Saar; Stepan, Lenka L; Panduranga, Mohanchandra K; Fishbein, Michael C; Carman, Greg P

    2008-01-01

    Interventionalists in many specialties have the need for improved, low profile covered stents. Thin films of nitinol (<5-10 microns) could be used to improve current covered stent technology. A "hot target" sputter deposition technique was used to create thin films of nitinol for this study. Covered stents were created from commercially available balloon-inflatable and self-expanding stents. Stents were deployed in a laboratory flow loop and in four swine. Uncovered stent portions served as controls. Postmortem examinations were performed 2-6 weeks after implantation. In short-term testing, thin film nitinol covered stents deployed in the arterial circulation showed no intimal proliferation and were easily removed from the arterial wall postmortem. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thin layer of endothelial cells on the thin film, which covered the entire film by 3 weeks. By contrast, significant neointimal hyperplasia occurred on the luminal side of stents deployed in the venous circulation. Extremely low-profile covered stents can be manufactured using thin films of nitinol. Although long-term studies are needed, thin film nitinol may allow for the development of low-profile, nonthrombogenic covered stents. PMID:18496269

  17. Y-Stent embolization technique for intracranial bifurcation aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heller, Robert S; Rahal, Jason P; Malek, Adel M

    2014-08-01

    Wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms often require the use of the technically complex Y-stent technique, which has recently been shown to narrow bifurcation angle in a hemodynamically favorable manner. We sought to evaluate the single center efficacy and safety of Y-stent supported aneurysm coil embolization. All patients undergoing Y-stent supported coiling between September 2006 and December 2012 were identified; records were analyzed for procedural results and complications, with follow-up evaluated for occlusion rate and neurological adverse events. Twenty consecutive patients underwent technically successful Y-stent supported coiling, with complete aneurysm occlusion achieved in 19/20 cases (95%). There were no peri-procedural clinically evident neurological complications following Y-stenting. Clinical follow-up was available for a mean of 20.0months and radiographic follow-up was available for a mean of 18.5months. During the follow-up period, three patients (15%) required re-treatment with through-stent coiling for recanalization. At latest follow-up, Raymond grade I occlusion was achieved in 16 patients (80%), Raymond grade II occlusion achieved in four patients (20%) and Raymond grade III occlusion in zero patients. Y-stenting for complex intracranial aneurysms appears effective in achieving durable aneurysm occlusion with an acceptable safety profile. Though the procedure is technically more complex than single-stent procedures, the Y-stent configuration should be considered when single-stent supported coiling is not feasible or sufficient. PMID:24798907

  18. CT Imaging of Coronary Stents: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Coronary stenting became a mainstay in coronary revascularization therapy. Despite tremendous advances in therapy, in-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a key problem after coronary stenting. Coronary CT angiography evolved as a valuable tool in the diagnostic workup of patients after coronary revascularization therapy. It has a negative predictive value in the range of 98% for ruling out significant ISR. As CT imaging of coronary stents depends on patient and stent characteristics, patient selection is crucial for success. Ideal candidates have stents with a diameter of 3 mm and more. Nevertheless, even with most recent CT scanners, about 8% of stents are not accessible mostly due to blooming or motion artifacts. While the diagnosis of ISR is currently based on the visual assessment of the stent lumen, functional information on the hemodynamic significance of in-stent stenosis became available with the most recent generation of dual source CT scanners. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on previous developments, current techniques, and clinical evidence for cardiac CT in patients with coronary artery stents. PMID:22997590

  19. Ferromagnetic Bare Metal Stent for Endothelial Cell Capture and Retention.

    PubMed

    Uthamaraj, Susheil; Tefft, Brandon J; Hlinomaz, Ota; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Rapid endothelialization of cardiovascular stents is needed to reduce stent thrombosis and to avoid anti-platelet therapy which can reduce bleeding risk. The feasibility of using magnetic forces to capture and retain endothelial outgrowth cells (EOC) labeled with super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) has been shown previously. But this technique requires the development of a mechanically functional stent from a magnetic and biocompatible material followed by in-vitro and in-vivo testing to prove rapid endothelialization. We developed a weakly ferromagnetic stent from 2205 duplex stainless steel using computer aided design (CAD) and its design was further refined using finite element analysis (FEA). The final design of the stent exhibited a principal strain below the fracture limit of the material during mechanical crimping and expansion. One hundred stents were manufactured and a subset of them was used for mechanical testing, retained magnetic field measurements, in-vitro cell capture studies, and in-vivo implantation studies. Ten stents were tested for deployment to verify if they sustained crimping and expansion cycle without failure. Another 10 stents were magnetized using a strong neodymium magnet and their retained magnetic field was measured. The stents showed that the retained magnetism was sufficient to capture SPION-labeled EOC in our in-vitro studies. SPION-labeled EOC capture and retention was verified in large animal models by implanting 1 magnetized stent and 1 non-magnetized control stent in each of 4 pigs. The stented arteries were explanted after 7 days and analyzed histologically. The weakly magnetic stents developed in this study were capable of attracting and retaining SPION-labeled endothelial cells which can promote rapid healing. PMID:26436434

  20. Discolored Ureteral Stents: Findings in Urinalysis and Urine Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takashi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Discolored ureteral stents are sometimes encountered in daily clinical practice; however, the mechanism(s) underlying the development of discolored ureteral stents remain unknown. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the characteristics of discolored ureteral stents based on the results of a urinalysis and urine culture. Materials & Methods We identified a total of 26 patients with discolored ureteral stents and compared the findings in the urinalyses and urine culture in 21 discolored versus 45 non-colored ureteral stents. Results The median and mean (±SD) duration of stenting time was 78.0 and 81.3 (± 21.3) days for the discolored ureteral stents and 69.0 and 74.9 (± 19.8) days for the non-colored ureteral stents, respectively (P = 0.25). The discolored ureteral stents were associated with a higher mean urine pH than the non-colored ureteral stents (mean: 6.4 vs 6.0, P< 0.05). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the RBC (P = 0.51) and WBC (P = 0.35) counts in the urinalyses. In addition, the rate of a positive culture in the patients with discolored stents [20 of 21 (95.2%)] was significantly (P <0.01) higher than that observed in the patients with non-colored ureteral stents [33 of 45 (73.3%)]. Conclusions In this study, the subjects with discolored ureteral stents showed a significantly higher likelihood of having a positive urine culture and also demonstrated higher pH values in the urinalyses. However, no clear cut-off point to predict discoloration was indicated. PMID:25849790

  1. Overaggressive stent expansion without intravascular imaging: impact on restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Yohan; Chan, Richard; Haladyn, J Kimberly; Lim, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aggressive stent expansion is required for optimal strut apposition, but risk of stent deformation, fracture and subsequent restenosis is potentially greater when performed without intravascular imaging guidance. We investigated how frequently stents are ‘overexpanded’ and whether this correlates with restenosis. Design and setting Single-centre prospective database study at a high-volume tertiary university hospital. Patients 243 patients undergoing single-vessel stenting for de novo stenosis in 277 lesions. Exclusion criteria were bifurcational, graft or left main disease and intravascular imaging use. All had ischaemia-driven repeat coronary angiography up to 48 months later. Degree of stent overexpansion was the difference between nominal and final stent size. Results Stents were expanded above nominal in 99% of cases and above rated burst pressure in 52%. Stents were expanded >20% above nominal in 12% of cases. Stents overexpanded by >20% were smaller (2.87 vs 3.19 mm), longer (24 vs 19 mm) and more often drug-eluting (53% vs 27%). Angiographic restenosis was observed in 80 lesions (29%). There was no correlation between degree of overexpansion and per cent angiographic restenosis across the whole group (R2=−0.01; p=0.09), in those with stent overexpansion >20% (p=0.31) or small stents <3 mm (p=0.71). Indeed, in the group with stent overexpansion >25%, the greater the overexpansion, the less the per cent angiographic restenosis (p=0.02). Conclusions In this real-world population undergoing non-complex percutaneous coronary intervention without intravascular imaging, any tendency to overaggressive stent expansion did not predispose at all to restenosis.

  2. Stent-Protected Carotid Angioplasty Using a Membrane Stent: A Comparative Cadaver Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan Guehne, Albrecht; Tsokos, Michael; Huesler, Erhard J.; Schaffner, Silvio R.; Paulsen, Friedrich; Hedderich, Juergen; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the performance of a prototype membrane stent, MembraX, in the prevention of acute and late embolization and to quantify particle embolization during carotid stent placement in human carotid explants in a proof of concept study. Methods. Thirty human carotid cadaveric explants (mild stenoses 0-29%, n = 23; moderate stenoses 30-69%, n = 3; severe stenoses 70-99%, n = 2) that included the common, internal and external carotid arteries were integrated into a pulsatile-flow model. Three groups were formed according to the age of the donors (mean 58.8 years; sample SD 15.99 years) and randomized to three test groups: (I) MembraX, n 9; (II) Xpert bare stent, n = 10; (III) Xpert bare stent with Emboshield protection device, n = 9. Emboli liberated during stent deployment (step A), post-dilatation (step B), and late embolization (step C) were measured in 100 {mu}m effluent filters. When the Emboshield was used, embolus penetration was measured during placement (step D) and retrieval (step E). Late embolization was simulated by compressing the area of the stented vessel five times. Results. Absolute numbers of particles (median; >100 {mu}m) caught in the effluent filter were: (I) MembraX: A = 7, B = 9, C = 3; (II) bare stent: A 6.5, B = 6, C = 4.5; (III) bare stent and Emboshield: A = 7, B = 7, C.=.5, D = 8, E = 10. The data showed no statistical differences according to whether embolic load was analyzed by weight or mean particle size. When summing all procedural steps, the Emboshield caused the greatest load by weight (p 0.011) and the largest number (p = 0.054) of particles. Conclusions. On the basis of these limited data neither a membrane stent nor a protection device showed significant advantages during ex vivo carotid angioplasty. However, the membrane stent seems to have the potential for reducing the emboli responsible for supposed late embolization, whereas more emboli were observed when using a protection device. Further studies are necessary

  3. Stent Compression in Iliac Vein Compression Syndrome Associated with Acute Ilio-Femoral Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hun; Kim, Jin Woo; Hong, You Sun; Lim, Sang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate stent compression in iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS) and to identify its association with stent patency. Materials and Methods Between May 2005 and June 2014, after stent placement for the treatment of IVCS with acute ilio-femoral deep vein thrombosis, follow-up CT venography was performed in 48 patients (35 women, 13 men; age range 23-87 years; median age 56 years). Using follow-up CT venography, the degree of the stent compression was calculated and used to divide patients into two groups. Possible factors associated with stent compression and patency were evaluated. The cumulative degree of stent compression and patency rate were analyzed. Results All of the stents used were laser-cut nitinol stents. The proportion of limbs showing significant stent compression was 33%. Fifty-six percent of limbs in the significant stent compression group developed stent occlusion. On the other hand, only 9% of limbs in the insignificant stent compression group developed stent occlusion. Significant stent compression was inversely correlated with stent patency (p < 0.001). The median patency period evaluated with Kaplan-Meier analysis was 20.0 months for patients with significant stent compression. Other factors including gender, age, and type of stent were not correlated with stent patency. Significant stent compression occurred most frequently (87.5%) at the upper end of the stent (ilio-caval junction). Conclusion Significant compression of nitinol stents placed in IVCS highly affects stent patency. Therefore, in order to prevent stent compression in IVCS, nitinol stents with higher radial resistive force may be required. PMID:26175570

  4. A novel strategy to overcome resistance in stent placement at lesion site after adequate predilatation.

    PubMed

    Jain, D; Tolg, R; Katus, H A; Richardt, G

    2000-12-01

    Resistance was encountered in passing a 3 x 18 mm stent across a lesion in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. Successive changes in stent with repeated balloon dilatations did not succeed. Finally, a 9 mm stent was passed across the lesion and deployed at the site of maximal resistance. The 18 mm stent was then placed through this stent. A novel strategy to overcome resistance in the stent passage through the lesion after an adequate balloon predilatation is reported. PMID:11103034

  5. Subintimal Double-Barrel Restenting of an Occluded Primary Stented Superficial Femoral Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Duterloo, Dirk Lohle, Paul N.M.; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2007-06-15

    In-stent re-stenosis is a frequent complication of endovascular stents, especially in the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Endovascular re-intervention of in- or peri-stent occlusive disease consists of recanilization through the occluded stent. In our case report, we describe the endovascular treatment of a previously placed stent in the SFA. We unintentionally passed the affected stent subintimally, in a double barrel fashion next to the first stent. The procedure was without any complications and with a successful angiographic result. At one year follow-up the patient still has no complaints and the stent is still patent.

  6. Sirolimus-eluting stent fracture detection by three-dimensional optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Takayuki; Matsuzaki, Masunori

    2012-03-01

    Stent fracture has emerged as a complication of drug-eluting stent and is now recognized as contributing to in-stent restenosis and possibly stent thrombosis. Although optical coherence tomography (OCT) can detect stent fractures in the absence of circumference struts, it is challenging to visualize stent fractures with only cross-sectional OCT images. We describe two cases of restenosis with stent fracture detected by a novel three-dimensional OCT image reconstruction technique. This technique allows identification of a single stent fracture even in the absence of angiographic signs. PMID:21805594

  7. Optical coherence tomography to evaluate coronary stent implantation and complications.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Umair; Thondapu, Vikas; Ul Haq, Muhammad Asrar; Foin, Nicolas; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Barlis, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Coronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) is now an established imaging technique in many catheterization laboratories worldwide. With its near-histological view of the vessel wall and lumen interface, it offers unprecedented imaging quality to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, plaque vulnerability, and vascular biology. Not only is OCT used to accurately detect atherosclerotic plaque and optimize stent position, but it can further characterize plaque composition, quantify stent apposition, and assess stent tissue coverage. Given that its resolution of 15 μm is well above that of angiography and intravascular ultrasound, OCT has become the invasive imaging method of choice to examine the interaction between stents and the vessel wall. This review focuses on the application of OCT to examine coronary stents, the mechanisms of stent complications, and future directions of OCT-guided intervention. PMID:26247272

  8. Current Status of the Application of Intracranial Venous Sinus Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kan; Yu, Tiecheng; Yuan, Yongjie; Yu, Jinlu

    2015-01-01

    The intracranial venous sinus is an important component of vascular disease. Many diseases involve the venous sinus and are accompanied by venous sinus stenosis (VSS), which leads to increased venous pressure and high intracranial pressure. Recent research has focused on stenting as a treatment for VSS related to these diseases. However, a systematic understanding of venous sinus stenting (VS-Stenting) is lacking. Herein, the literature on idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), venous pulsatile tinnitus, sinus thrombosis, high draining venous pressure in dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and tumor-caused VSS was reviewed and analyzed to summarize experiences with VS-Stenting as a treatment. The literature review showed that satisfactory therapeutic effects can be achieved through stent angioplasty. Thus, the present study suggests that selective stent release in the venous sinus can effectively treat these diseases and provide new possibilities for treating intracranial vascular disease. PMID:26516306

  9. Drug-eluting stents to prevent reblockage of coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Schwertz, Dorie W; Vaitkus, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Restenosis limits the success of percutaneous transluminal coronary interventions. Coronary artery stenting decreases restenosis, improves outcomes, and is currently the most commonly used percutaneous coronary intervention in the United States. However, in-stent restenosis continues to occur at an unacceptable rate. In-stent restenosis is a neointimal hyperplastic response resulting primarily from vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Treatment with anti-proliferative agents presents a logical approach to eradicating restenosis, however, these drugs are highly toxic. Coating stents with anti-proliferative agents allows local delivery of high doses and avoids systemic side effects. In 2001, the results of two clinical trials, RAVEL and ELUTES, using sirolimus- and paclitaxil-coated stents demonstrated nearly complete elimination of in-stent restenosis. These dramatic results represent a tremendous advance in the treatment of coronary heart disease. PMID:12537084

  10. Current status and extended applications of intravascular stents.

    PubMed

    Hallisey, M J; Parker, B C; van Breda, A

    1992-08-01

    The introduction of several novel techniques and mechanical devices to interventional radiology has expanded the range of therapies for a variety of medical disorders. Intravascular metallic stents have received widespread acclaim and may possess the most potential of all the newest devices available to the interventionist. The addition of metallic stents to the percutaneous therapeutic arsenal provides the interventionist with a device that can resist the elastic recoil of a stenotic vessel or support a newly created vascular tract. Peripheral artery metallic stent placement holds great promise for the treatment of selected patients; other applications of stents, including transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunts are likely to have a great impact in patient management. We review the techniques, appropriate indications, and recent clinical results of vascular stents for percutaneous intervention and therapy. PMID:1627454