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Sample records for delirium uma perspectiva

  1. [Delirium].

    PubMed

    Laurila, Jouko

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of delirium is poorly known and scientific evidence of effective forms of treatment is scarce. Detection of triggering factors and their appropriate treatment still constitute the cornerstone of the treatment. If drug therapy is required, an antipsychotic drug is the first-line treatment. Only in the case of the delirium tremens syndrome benzodiazepine is chosen as the first-line treatment. The use of restraint systems should be avoided. The delirium experience is often gravely traumatizing for the patient, and the psychological aftercare of delirium must therefore not be ignored. PMID:22506327

  2. Delirium

    MedlinePlus

    ... stable, and may last for months or years. Delirium tremens is a serious type of alcohol withdrawal syndrome. It usually happens to people who stop drinking after years of alcohol abuse. People with delirium often, though not always, make a full recovery ...

  3. Delirium

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur together. Delirium starts suddenly and can cause hallucinations. The symptoms may get better or worse, and ... hand, dementia develops slowly and does not cause hallucinations. The symptoms are stable, and may last for ...

  4. Delirium (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... being hypoactive and hyperactive. Delirium may come and go during the day. The symptoms of delirium usually ... within hours or days and may come and go. Delirium is often temporary and can be treated. ...

  5. POSTOPERATIVE DELIRIUM

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Elizabeth L.; Vannucci, Andrea; Avidan, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Delirium is an unfortunately common complication seen during the postoperative course. Because of its significant association with physical and cognitive morbidity, clinicians should be aware of evidence-based practices relating to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of postoperative delirium. Here, we review selected recent literature pertaining to the epidemiology and impact of the condition, perioperative risk factors for its development and/or exacerbation, and strategies for management of delirium, with additional attention to the intensive care unit population. PMID:21483389

  6. Unmasking delirium.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Angela J; MacDonald, Brenda

    2006-11-01

    The authors use a case study to illustrate the risks of delirium in older adult patients and discuss ways to prevent, identify and manage its occurrence. An estimated 60 to 80 per cent of hospitalized frail older adults experience at least one preventable episode of delirium, often leading to prolonged hospitalization, functional decline, increased morbidity and eventual nursing home placement or death. Delirium is a medical emergency, characterized by acute onset and a fluctuating course that is demonstrated by abrupt changes in mental status and function. It has three categories: hyperactive, hypoactive and mixed. Although delirium is amenable to expert nursing care, it is unrecognized or misdiagnosed in up to 70 per cent of older patients. Delirium results from the interplay of multiple forces associated with illness in the older adult, including drugs, substance abuse, metabolic disturbances, nutritional deficiencies, fluid disturbances, acute trauma or illness, infection and impaired physical or functional ability A proactive strategy for delirium prevention and treatment targets defined risk factors and the management of physiologic factors that precipitate delirium. It includes assessment, therapeutic environmental modification, standardized protocols for physiological interventions and staff education. PMID:17168095

  7. [Delirium tremens].

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Zarmdini, Rim; Lejoyeux, Michel

    2014-12-01

    Delirium tremens (DT) is a specific type of delirium occurring in patients who are in alcohol withdrawal states. It has a high mortality of about 8%. Hence, it is important for clinicians to be able to predict it. Treatment of DT is best achieved by the use of intravenous diazepam administered at frequent intervals while closely monitoring the patient during the procedure. Refractory DT is defined by a high requirement of intravenous diazepam with poor control of withdrawal symptoms. Once the acute phase medically controlled, the patient should be managed for his addiction to alcohol. PMID:25668827

  8. Excited Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Asia; Ahern, Terence L.; Henderson, Sean O.

    2011-01-01

    Excited (or agitated) delirium is characterized by agitation, aggression, acute distress and sudden death, often in the pre-hospital care setting. It is typically associated with the use of drugs that alter dopamine processing, hyperthermia, and, most notably, sometimes with death of the affected person in the custody of law enforcement. Subjects typically die from cardiopulmonary arrest, although the cause is debated. Unfortunately an adequate treatment plan has yet to be established, in part due to the fact that most patients die before hospital arrival. While there is still much to be discovered about the pathophysiology and treatment, it is hoped that this extensive review will provide both police and medical personnel with the information necessary to recognize and respond appropriately to excited delirium. PMID:21691475

  9. Delirium Research: Where Am I?

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Delirium Research Where Am I? Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of Contents ... to do. Read More "Delirium Research" Articles Where Am I? / Digging Into the Mysteries of Delirium / The ...

  10. Thiamine deficiency and delirium.

    PubMed

    Osiezagha, Kenneth; Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C; Barker, Narviar C; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K

    2013-04-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  11. Delirium Superimposed on Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Nina M.; Fick, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    Delirium remains a significant risk for hospitalized older adults and has been shown to be a persistent risk posthospitalization as well. Dementia is a risk factor for delirium. The prevalence of delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) ranges from 22% to 89% in hospitalized and community-dwelling individuals 65 and older. Individuals with DSD have been found to have accelerated decline in cognitive and functional abilities, greater need for institutionalization, greater rehospitalization risk, and increased mortality. The purpose of this article is to define and describe DSD, outline assessment tools for its identification, and provide appropriate nursing interventions. PMID:21544961

  12. POST TRAUMATIC HYPERACTIVE DELIRIUM

    PubMed Central

    Sabhesan, S.; Natarajan, M.

    1990-01-01

    SUMMMARY Hyperactive delirium following head injury is a common problem during the early recovery phase. Twenty-nine patients who evinced hyperactive delirium were prospectively followed up during; their stay In the hospital. Compared with controls, alcohol dependence was significantly more among these patients. Occurrence of delirium was related to the generalized cerebral disturbances; due to diffuse damage in acceleration injuries and due to metabolic or post-seizure disturbances in contact injuries. Follow-up of these patients showed that psychiatric problems were more common among them. PMID:21927482

  13. Post traumatic hyperactive delirium.

    PubMed

    Sabhesan, S; Natarajan, M

    1990-10-01

    Hyperactive delirium following head injury is a common problem during the early recovery phase. Twenty-nine patients who evinced hyperactive delirium were prospectively followed up during; their stay In the hospital. Compared with controls, alcohol dependence was significantly more among these patients. Occurrence of delirium was related to the generalized cerebral disturbances; due to diffuse damage in acceleration injuries and due to metabolic or post-seizure disturbances in contact injuries. Follow-up of these patients showed that psychiatric problems were more common among them. PMID:21927482

  14. Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Muraleedharan, Anupama; Gangadhar, Reneega; Das, Soumitra

    2015-01-01

    Sodium valproate induced hyperammonaemic delirium with normal liver function tests is a relatively uncommon adverse effect. It may be mistaken for psychosis or worsening of mania leading to wrong diagnosis and improper management. Plasma ammonia levels should be monitored in all patients developing altered mental status after receiving valproate therapy. This is a case series of hyperammonaemic delirium due to valproate reported to the Department of Pharmacology from Department of Psychiatry over a period of one year. PMID:26816916

  15. Thiamine Deficiency and Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C.; Barker, Narviar C.; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K.

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke’s encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  16. Delirium and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Peter W.

    2003-01-01

    Delirium (a state of usually reversible global brain disfunction due to toxic, metabolic, or infectious causes) and epilepsy (a condition of spontaneous, recurrent paroxysmal electrical excitation or dysfunction) are becoming increasingly better understood, and hence easier to diagnose and treat. The clinical features of delirium predominantly involve subacute changes in cognition, awareness, and activity levels, behavioral disturbance, clouding consciousness, and sleep-wake cycle changes. In contrast, epilepsy involves the acute interruption of brain function, often with convulsive activity, falls, and injury. States that may share the clinical features of both, such as nonconvulsive epileptic states, are also important: the cause of brain derangement is one of excessive and abnormal electrical brain activity. In such conditions, the clinical manifestations may resemble states of delirium and confusion, and the absence of convulsive clinical activity is significant. Electroencephalography remains the diagnostic test of choice: it is essential for differentiating these two conditions, enabling the distinctly different treatments and epilepsy. Ongoing research and investigation are essential to better understand the abnormal brat mechanisms underlying delirium, and to develop better tools for objective diagnosis. PMID:22034394

  17. What to Ask: Delirium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can these medications be stopped or lowered? Could alcohol be causing my loved one to be confused? Are there things we can do to keep my loved one safe, now that they have a delirium? © 2016 Health in Aging. All rights reserved. Feedback • Site Map • Privacy Policy • ...

  18. [Delirium and delirium management in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Kersten, A; Reith, S

    2016-02-01

    Delirium in critically ill patients is a common entity in the intensive care unit (ICU) and is an expression of the cerebral organ dysfunction of the patient. The hallmark signs are disturbed consciousness and cognition in combination with inattentiveness and alterations in perception, which are manifested within a time interval of hours to days during treatment on the ICU. Delirium has been shown to have negative effects on patient short-term and long-term outcome parameters and increases morbidity and mortality. Despite its significance in many cases delirium remains inadequately diagnosed during routine treatment by ICU personnel. There are two validated and easily applicable scales for the standardized diagnosis of delirium: the confusion assessment method for the ICU (CAM-ICU) and the intensive care delirium screening checklist (ICDSC). These are simple to apply by medical as well as non-medical personnel. The therapy of delirium is mostly determined by non-pharmacological measures aiming at early identification, reorientation and mobilization of the patient, improving cerebral activity and establishing adequate wake-sleep cycles. There is only sparse evidence for pharmacological treatment of delirium; however, the choice of sedative agent has a proven effect on the incidence and duration of delirium in the ICU. PMID:26795215

  19. Delirium: Issues for Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop a condition of slowly progressive cognitive or mental decline called dementia. Some of the causes of dementia ... institutions. As a person’s cognitive awareness begins to decline they may be ... delirium. To decrease the risk and chances of delirium, try to ...

  20. Delirium at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Buddha

    2002-01-01

    A 35-year-old man on a trek to the Mount Everest region of Nepal presented with a sudden, acute confusional state at an altitude of about 5000 m. Although described at higher altitudes, delirium presenting alone has not been documented at 5000 m or at lower high altitudes. The differential diagnosis which includes acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral edema is discussed. Finally, the importance of travelling with a reliable partner and using proper insurance is emphasized in treks to the Himalayas. PMID:12006167

  1. Delirium from the gliocentric perspective.

    PubMed

    Sfera, Adonis; Osorio, Carolina; Price, Amy I; Gradini, Roberto; Cummings, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is an acute state marked by disturbances in cognition, attention, memory, perception, and sleep-wake cycle which is common in elderly. Others have shown an association between delirium and increased mortality, length of hospitalization, cost, and discharge to extended stay facilities. Until recently it was not known that after an episode of delirium in elderly, there is a 63% probability of developing dementia at 48 months compared to 8% in patients without delirium. Currently there are no preventive therapies for delirium, thus elucidation of cellular and molecular underpinnings of this condition may lead to the development of early interventions and thus prevent permanent cognitive damage. In this article we make the case for the role of glia in the pathophysiology of delirium and describe an astrocyte-dependent central and peripheral cholinergic anti-inflammatory shield which may be disabled by astrocytic pathology, leading to neuroinflammation and delirium. We also touch on the role of glia in information processing and neuroimaging. PMID:26029046

  2. Delirium from the gliocentric perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sfera, Adonis; Osorio, Carolina; Price, Amy I.; Gradini, Roberto; Cummings, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is an acute state marked by disturbances in cognition, attention, memory, perception, and sleep-wake cycle which is common in elderly. Others have shown an association between delirium and increased mortality, length of hospitalization, cost, and discharge to extended stay facilities. Until recently it was not known that after an episode of delirium in elderly, there is a 63% probability of developing dementia at 48 months compared to 8% in patients without delirium. Currently there are no preventive therapies for delirium, thus elucidation of cellular and molecular underpinnings of this condition may lead to the development of early interventions and thus prevent permanent cognitive damage. In this article we make the case for the role of glia in the pathophysiology of delirium and describe an astrocyte-dependent central and peripheral cholinergic anti-inflammatory shield which may be disabled by astrocytic pathology, leading to neuroinflammation and delirium. We also touch on the role of glia in information processing and neuroimaging. PMID:26029046

  3. [Delirium tremens in accident surgery].

    PubMed

    Hofmann-von Bandel, J

    1983-12-01

    The case histories of 49 patients suffering from delirium tremens in a trauma hospital are described. Particular attention is devoted to two questions: 1. Is delirium tremens always coupled with a low serum K+? It was shown that a low serum K+ in this illness is frequent but not obligatory. 2. Is there a danger that a relapse could ensue by another operation carried out within a relatively short interval after delirium tremens? It was found that as a rule there is no relapse. PMID:6142617

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Henry, W. Desmond; Mann, Alan M.

    1965-01-01

    Delirium is not a clinical entity but a symptom-complex of manifold etiology. Its presence signifies acute cerebral insufficiency and often represents a medical and/or psychiatric emergency. Though some forms of delirium have distinctive features, the fundamental phenomena are common to all, with clouding of consciousness the sine qua non. The condition has two major components: (1) the basic “acute brain syndrome” and (2) associated release phenomena. Clinicians must first make the vital differentiation between delirium and “functional” mental disorder, then proceed with the elucidation of the underlying diagnosis and the concurrent organization of symptomatic and etiologic treatment. Proper treatment combines management of the acute brain syndrome with general and specific procedures for control of the underlying condition. Dealing with the symptom-complex itself involves the principles and practice of sedation, hydration, and nutrition, nursing care and supportive measures. Provided the basic organic condition is treatable, the prognosis today is usually good. PMID:5844423

  5. Altered Mental Status and Delirium.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Scott T; Ondrejka, Jason E

    2016-08-01

    Older patients who present to the emergency department frequently have acute or chronic alterations of their mental status, including their level of consciousness and cognition. Recognizing both acute and chronic changes in cognition are important for emergency physicians. Delirium is an acute change in attention, awareness, and cognition. Numerous life-threatening conditions can cause delirium; therefore, prompt recognition and treatment are critical. The authors discuss an organized approach that can lead to a prompt diagnosis within the time constraints of the emergency department. PMID:27475019

  6. Excited delirium: A psychiatric review.

    PubMed

    Lipsedge, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    The term 'excited delirium' (ED) is used to explain sudden and unexpected restraint-related deaths. Since the 1990s, ED has often been identified as the principal cause of death in restrained individuals, rather than the restraint procedure itself. Forensic pathologists and psychiatrists attach different meanings to the term delirium. For psychiatrists, delirium is a specific technical term, which implies a grave and potentially life-threatening underlying physical illness. If a patient dies during a bout of delirium, psychiatrists assume that there will be autopsy evidence to demonstrate the primary underlying organic cause. Conversely, pathologists appear to be using the term ED to refer to restraint-related deaths in either highly disturbed cocaine users or psychiatric patients in a state of extreme agitation. In these cases, there is no underlying physical disorder other than a terminal cardiac arrhythmia. As the term ED has different meanings for psychiatrists and for pathologists, it would be helpful for these two professional groups to develop a mutually agreed terminology. PMID:26055153

  7. Delirium Common in Cancer Patients Seen in ER

    MedlinePlus

    ... had mild delirium and four had moderate delirium. Ten percent of the 99 patients older than 65 ... found evidence of delirium in one of every ten patients with advanced cancer who are treated in ...

  8. Delirium: An Emerging Frontier in Management of Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heidi A.B.; Fuchs, D. Catherine; Pandharipande, Pratik P.; Barr, Frederick E.; Ely, E. Wesley

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Introduce pediatric delirium and provide understanding of acute brain dysfunction with its classification and clinical presentations. Understand how delirium is diagnosed and discuss current modes of delirium diagnosis in the critically ill adult population and translation to pediatrics. Understand the prevalence and prognostic significance of delirium in the adult and pediatric critically ill population. Discuss the pathophysiology of delirium as currently understood. Provide general management guidelines for delirium. PMID:19576533

  9. [New approach to postoperative delirium treatment].

    PubMed

    Pasechnik, I N; Makhlaĭ, A V; Tepliakova, A N; Gubaĭdullin, R R; Sal'nikov, P S; Borisov, A Iu; Berezenko, M N

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of different drugs for sedation was studied in 51 patients after large abdominal operations complicated by postoperative delirium. Diagnosis of postoperative delirium was established according to CAM-ICU criteria. Dexmedetomidine has demonstrated significantly decreased duration of delirium and hospital stay in intensive care unit in comparison with haloperidol. Besides, patients which received dexmedetomidine preserved opportunity for verbal contact. Also these patients interacted better with department's stuff. PMID:26031955

  10. Delirium and hypovitaminosis D: neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Ford, Jennifer; Tisi, Daniel K; Xiong, Glen L

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the frequency of neuroimaging findings of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease in patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D and normal vitamin D levels. Of 32 patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D who were neuroimaged, 91.4% had neuroimaging findings, despite only five cases having a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. Similar frequencies of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease were found in patients with delirium with normal vitamin D levels. Further research with a larger sample size is needed to compare neuroimaging findings between normal patients and patients with hypovitaminosis D with delirium. PMID:25111282

  11. Management of common postoperative complications: delirium.

    PubMed

    Javedan, Houman; Tulebaev, Samir

    2014-05-01

    Delirium is a common postoperative surgical complication associated with poor outcomes. The complexity of delirium demands that each patient be assessed individually and a tailored prevention and treatment regimen be put in place. Nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies are available to achieve this goal. PMID:24721366

  12. Future Directions of Delirium Research and Management

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Christopher G.; Brummel, Nathan E.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Girard, Timothy D.; Pandharipande, Pratik P.

    2013-01-01

    Delirium is a prevalent organ dysfunction in critically ill patients associated with significant morbidity and mortality, requiring advancements in the clinical and research realms to improve patient outcomes. Increased clinical recognition and utilization of delirium assessment tools, along with clarification of specific risk factors and presentations in varying patient populations, will be necessary in the future. To improve predictive models for outcomes, the continued development and implementation of delirium assessment tools and severity scoring systems will be required. The interplay between the pathophysiological pathways implicated in delirium and resulting clinical presentations and outcomes will need to guide the development of appropriate prevention and treatment protocols. Multicenter randomized controlled trials of interventional therapies will then need to be performed to test their ability to improve clinical outcomes. Physical and cognitive rehabilitation measures need to be further examined as additional means of improving outcomes from delirium in the hospital setting. PMID:23040289

  13. Repetitive Myocardial Infarctions Secondary to Delirium Tremens

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzberg, David; Shiroff, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Delirium tremens develops in a minority of patients undergoing acute alcohol withdrawal; however, that minority is vulnerable to significant morbidity and mortality. Historically, benzodiazepines are given intravenously to control withdrawal symptoms, although occasionally a more substantial medication is needed to prevent the devastating effects of delirium tremens, that is, propofol. We report a trauma patient who required propofol sedation for delirium tremens that was refractory to benzodiazepine treatment. Extubed prematurely, he suffered a non-ST segment myocardial infarction followed by an ST segment myocardial infarction requiring multiple interventions by cardiology. We hypothesize that his myocardial ischemia was secondary to an increased myocardial oxygen demand that occurred during his stress-induced catecholamine surge during the time he was undertreated for delirium tremens. This advocates for the use of propofol for refractory benzodiazepine treatment of delirium tremens and adds to the literature on the instability patients experience during withdrawal. PMID:25197580

  14. Repetitive myocardial infarctions secondary to delirium tremens.

    PubMed

    Schwartzberg, David; Shiroff, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Delirium tremens develops in a minority of patients undergoing acute alcohol withdrawal; however, that minority is vulnerable to significant morbidity and mortality. Historically, benzodiazepines are given intravenously to control withdrawal symptoms, although occasionally a more substantial medication is needed to prevent the devastating effects of delirium tremens, that is, propofol. We report a trauma patient who required propofol sedation for delirium tremens that was refractory to benzodiazepine treatment. Extubed prematurely, he suffered a non-ST segment myocardial infarction followed by an ST segment myocardial infarction requiring multiple interventions by cardiology. We hypothesize that his myocardial ischemia was secondary to an increased myocardial oxygen demand that occurred during his stress-induced catecholamine surge during the time he was undertreated for delirium tremens. This advocates for the use of propofol for refractory benzodiazepine treatment of delirium tremens and adds to the literature on the instability patients experience during withdrawal. PMID:25197580

  15. Refractory delirium tremens: a case report and brief review.

    PubMed

    Mattoo, Surendra Kumar; Kate, Natasha; Verma, Anant Kumar

    2012-03-01

    Delirium tremens is a common presentation in tertiary care hospitals. Severe and/or refractory delirium tremens is not as common, is potentially lethal, and requires intensive management. Usually delirium tremens responds to management with standard doses of benzodiazepines. Limited literature is available, however, for the management of refractory delirium tremens. We describe a case of refractory delirium tremens in which the patient was successfully managed with a combination of high doses of lorazapam, midazolam, and phenytoin. PMID:22567606

  16. Postoperative delirium in the elderly surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Frederick E

    2009-09-01

    Delirium is a common complication in the geriatric population following cardiac and noncardiac procedures. Postoperative delirium is a significant financial burden on the United States health care system and is independently associated with prolonged hospital stay, increased risk of early and long term mortality, increased physical dependence, and an increased rate of nursing home placement. The Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) is a bedside rating scale developed to assist nonpsychiatrically trained clinicians in the rapid and accurate diagnosis of delirium. The CAM has been adapted for use in ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients in the form of the CAM-ICU. The onset of delirium involves an interaction between predisposing and precipitating risk factors for delirium. The mainstay of delirium management is prevention. The approach involves control or elimination of modifiable risk factors. It is controversial whether anesthetic technique determines delirium. However, important modifiable risk factors under the anesthesiologist's control include adequate postoperative pain management, careful drug selection, and embracing and participating in a multidisciplinary care model for these complicated patients. PMID:19825486

  17. Delirium in older persons: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Virginia B; Gillham, Joseph E; Unwin, Brian K

    2014-08-01

    Delirium is defined as an acute, fluctuating syndrome of altered attention, awareness, and cognition. It is common in older persons in the hospital and long-term care facilities and may indicate a life-threatening condition. Assessment for and prevention of delirium should occur at admission and continue throughout a hospital stay. Caregivers should be educated on preventive measures, as well as signs and symptoms of delirium and conditions that would indicate the need for immediate evaluation. Certain medications, sensory impairments, cognitive impairment, and various medical conditions are a few of the risk factors associated with delirium. Preventive interventions such as frequent reorientation, early and recurrent mobilization, pain management, adequate nutrition and hydration, reducing sensory impairments, and ensuring proper sleep patterns have all been shown to reduce the incidence of delirium, regardless of the care environment. Treatment of delirium should focus on identifying and managing the causative medical conditions, providing supportive care, preventing complications, and reinforcing preventive interventions. Pharmacologic interventions should be reserved for patients who are a threat to their own safety or the safety of others and those patients nearing death. In older persons, delirium increases the risk of functional decline, institutionalization, and death. PMID:25077720

  18. Delirium: a key challenge for perioperative care.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, N A; Fitzgerald, J; Timmons, S; O'Connell, H; Meagher, D

    2013-01-01

    Delirium is highly prevalent, occurring in 20% of acute hospital inpatients and up to 62% of surgical patients. It is a significant predictor of poor outcomes including mortality and institutionalisation, however it is often viewed as simply a marker of underlying illness and is frequently overlooked in older adults. Although delirium is commonly comorbid with dementia, it represents a more urgent diagnosis, requiring prompt intervention. Delirium presents most commonly with hypoactive features (e.g. withdrawal and reduced spontaneous movement and speech). The common stereotype of hyperactive delirium tremens (e.g. agitation, hallucinations), although more visible, is less common. All presentations share acute disimprovement of cognitive function. Delirium is a highly predictable and preventable occurrence, however a major barrier to improving delirium care and impacting upon outcomes is that it remains poorly detected, particularly in surgical populations and especially in patients with hypoactive presentations. Routine ward-based screening for delirium, particularly in high-risk populations, and improved staff awareness of the significance of the problem can improve detection rates. Preventative strategies, particularly multicomponent approaches, have been most efficacious in improving patient outcomes. Optimising perioperative risk factors can lead to reduced incidence. Appropriate treatment of delirium requires thorough investigation, management of the underlying illness, avoidance of complications and simplification of the care environment. Studies suggest a role for pharmacological prophylaxis, particularly in relation to anaesthetic and sedative agents used intra- and post-operatively. Furthermore, gathering evidence suggests that judicious use of antipsychotic medications may be helpful in delirium prevention and treatment. PMID:23277227

  19. Duration of delirium in the acute stage of stroke.

    PubMed

    Dostović, Zikrija; Smajlović, Dzevdet; Sinanović, Osman; Vidović, Mirjana

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine duration of delirium in patients with acute stroke according to sex, age, type and localization of lesion. We assessed delirium prospectively in a sample of 233 consecutive patients with an acute (< or =4 days) stroke using the Delirium Rating Scale (DRS-R-98) and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV). The average duration of delirium was 4 days in patients with ischemic stroke and 3 days in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. There was no statistically significant difference in delirium duration between these two patient groups. A longer duration of delirium was recorded in women and in patients older than 65. The period of delirium was longer in patients with right hemispheric lesions. Patients did not differ according to delirium duration, sex, age, type and localization of stroke. In two thirds of patients, the symptoms of delirium completely disappeared on medicamentous treatment, while in the remaining one third of patients certain symptoms of delirium persisted at discharge (p=0.003). Mortality rate was significantly higher in patients with delirium in the acute phase of stroke than in those without delirium (p=0.009). In conclusion, delirium is a temporary manifestation in two thirds of patients in the acute phase of stroke. Patient sex and age, and type and stroke localization have no influence on delirium duration. PMID:19623866

  20. Functional interrelationship of brain aging and delirium.

    PubMed

    Rapazzini, Piero

    2016-02-01

    Theories on the development of delirium are complementary rather than competing and they may relate to each other. Here, we highlight that similar alterations in functional brain connectivity underlie both the observed age-related deficits and episodes of delirium. The default mode network (DMN) is a group of brain regions showing a greater level of activity at rest than during attention-based tasks. These regions include the posteromedial-anteromedial cortices and temporoparietal junctions. Evidence suggests that awareness is subserved through higher order neurons associated with the DMN. By using functional MRI disruption of DMN, connectivity and weaker task-induced deactivations of these regions are observed both in age-related cognitive impairment and during episodes of delirium. We can assume that an acute up-regulation of inhibitory tone within the brain acts to further disrupt network connectivity in vulnerable patients, who are predisposed by a reduced baseline connectivity, and triggers the delirium. PMID:25998952

  1. Assessment scales for delirium: A review

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Kate, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Over the years many scales have been designed for screening, diagnosis and assessing the severity of delirium. In this paper we review the various instruments available to screen the patients for delirium, instruments available to diagnose delirium, assess the severity, cognitive functions, motoric subtypes, etiology and associated distress. Among the various screening instruments, NEECHAM confusion scale and delirium observation scale appear to be most suitable screening instrument for patients’ in general medical and surgical wards, depending on the type of rater (physician or nurse). In general, the instruments which are used for diagnosis [i.e., confusion assessment method (CAM), CAM for intensive care unit (CAM-ICU), Delirium Rating Scale-revised version (DRS-R-98), memorial selirium assessment scale, etc.] are based on various Diagnostic and Statistical Manual criteria and have good to excellent reliability and fair to good validity. Among the various diagnostic instruments, CAM is considered to be most useful instrument because of its accuracy, brevity, and ease of use by clinicians and lay interviewers. In contrast, DRS-R-98 appears to be a comprehensive instrument useful for diagnosis, severity rating and is sensitive to change and hence can be used for monitoring patients over a period. In the ICU setting, evidence suggests that CAM-ICU and Nursing Delirium Screening Scale had comparable sensitivities, but CAM-ICU has higher specificity. With regard to assessment of delirium in pediatric age group, certain instruments like Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale and pediatric CAM-ICU has been designed and have been found to be useful. PMID:24175169

  2. [Delirium and intensive care unit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Muhl, E

    2006-05-01

    Delirium and intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome are frequently seen postoperatively, especially in intensive care. Hospital mortality and complication rates are higher in patients with these disorders. Delirium is characterized by disturbance of consciousness and cognition and short development time. Drugs, drug withdrawal, and manifold metabolic syndromes may be causative. Knowledge of differential diagnosis and causality is essential for curative therapy. Drug therapy is recommended for the treatment of psychotic symptoms and vegetative disorders. PMID:16521003

  3. Pediatric delirium: Evaluating the gold standard

    PubMed Central

    SILVER, GABRIELLE; KEARNEY, JULIA; TRAUBE, CHANI; ATKINSON, THOMAS M.; WYKA, KATARZYNA E.; WALKUP, JOHN

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to evaluate interrater reliability for the diagnosis of pediatric delirium by child psychiatrists. Method Critically ill patients (N = 17), 0–21 years old, including 7 infants, 5 children with developmental delay, and 7 intubated children, were assessed for delirium using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual–IV (DSM–IV) (comparable to DSM–V) criteria. Delirium assessments were completed by two psychiatrists, each blinded to the other’s diagnosis, and interrater reliability was measured using Cohen’s κ coefficient along with its 95% confidence interval. Results Interrater reliability for the psychiatric assessment was high (Cohen’s κ = 0.94, CI [0.83, 1.00]). Delirium diagnosis showed excellent interrater reliability regardless of age, developmental delay, or intubation status (Cohen’s κ range 0.81–1.00). Significance of results In our study cohort, the psychiatric interview and exam, long considered the “gold standard” in the diagnosis of delirium, was highly reliable, even in extremely young, critically ill, and developmentally delayed children. A developmental approach to diagnosing delirium in this challenging population is recommended. PMID:24762563

  4. Postoperative Delirium: Acute Change with Long-Term Implications

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, James L.; Marcantonio, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    Delirium is an acute change in cognition and attention, which may include alterations in consciousness and disorganized thinking. While delirium may affect any age group, it is most common in older patients, especially those with preexisting cognitive impairment. Patients with delirium after surgery recover more slowly than those without delirium and, as a result, have increased length of stay and hospital costs. The measured incidence of postoperative delirium varies with the type of surgery, the urgency of surgery, and the type and sensitivity of the delirium assessment. While generally considered a short-term condition, delirium can persist for months and is associated with poor cognitive and functional outcomes beyond the immediate postoperative period. In this article we will provide a guide to assess delirium risk preoperatively, and to prevent, diagnose, and treat this common and morbid condition. Care improvements such as identifying delirium risk preoperatively; training surgeons, anesthesiologists and nurses to screen for delirium; implementing delirium prevention programs; and developing standardized delirium treatment protocols may reduce the risk of delirium and its associated morbidity. PMID:21474660

  5. Delirium

    MedlinePlus

    ... urine tests Chest x-ray Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis (spinal tap) Electroencephalogram (EEG) Head CT scan Head ... Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  6. Delirium

    MedlinePlus

    ... alert at night) Changes in feeling (sensation) and perception Changes in level of consciousness or awareness Changes in movement (for example, may be slow moving or hyperactive) Changes in sleep patterns, drowsiness Confusion (disorientation) about time or place ...

  7. Delirium

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Pregnancy? Health Highlights: Sept. 13, 2016 Smokers' Perceptions May Play Role in Addiction ALL NEWS > Resources ... delusions (false beliefs usually involving a misinterpretation of perceptions or experiences). Personality and mood may change. Some ...

  8. An Unusual Case of Delirium after Restarting Clozapine

    PubMed Central

    Khanra, Sourav; Sethy, Rati Ranjan; Munda, Sanjay Kumar; Khess, Christoday Raja Jayant

    2016-01-01

    Clozapine is a gold standard medication and drug of choice in refractory schizophrenia. Among many of its fatal side effects, delirium is less reported and inconsistently recognized by clinicians. We here present a case of delirium which emerged during retreatment with clozapine in a patient of paranoid schizophrenia. A patient diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, was restarted on clozapine after he left medications and became symptomatic. He was delirious on 22nd day after clozapine was restarted. Clozapine was stopped and the patient was managed with standard treatment for delirium. After one week interval, clozapine was restarted. Delirium was not noted till 6 weeks of his hospital stay. Clozapine induced central anticholinergic toxicity or clozapine induced seizure might cause delirium in index case. Limited literature exist delirium with clozapine. Clinicians must have high index of suspicion to detect delirium during clozapine therapy. More researches should focus to explore the association between delirium and clozapine. PMID:26792049

  9. Delirium in Elderly People: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Sónia; Fernandes, Lia

    2012-01-01

    The present review aims to highlight this intricate syndrome, regarding diagnosis, pathophysiology, etiology, prevention, and management in elderly people. The diagnosis of delirium is based on clinical observations, cognitive assessment, physical, and neurological examination. Clinically, delirium occurs in hyperactive, hypoactive, or mixed forms, based on psychomotor behavior. As an acute confusional state, it is characterized by a rapid onset of symptoms, fluctuating course and an altered level of consciousness, global disturbance of cognition or perceptual abnormalities, and evidence of a physical cause. Although pathophysiological mechanisms of delirium remain unclear, current evidence suggests that disruption of neurotransmission, inflammation, or acute stress responses might all contribute to the development of this ailment. It usually occurs as a result of a complex interaction of multiple risk factors, such as cognitive impairment/dementia and current medical or surgical disorder. Despite all of the above, delirium is frequently under-recognized and often misdiagnosed by health professionals. In particular, this happens due to its fluctuating nature, its overlap with dementia and the scarcity of routine formal cognitive assessment in general hospitals. It is also associated with multiple adverse outcomes that have been well documented, such as increased hospital stay, function/cognitive decline, institutionalization and mortality. In this context, the early identification of delirium is essential. Timely and optimal management of people with delirium should be performed with identification of any possible underlying causes, dealing with a suitable care environment and improving education of health professionals. All these can be important factors, which contribute to a decrease in adverse outcomes associated with delirium. PMID:22723791

  10. [Delirium: Concepts, Etiology, and Clinical Management].

    PubMed

    Hübscher, A; Isenmann, S

    2016-04-01

    Delirium is a common condition: up to 35 percent of non-ICU- and 80 percent of ICU-patients experience delirium - particularly the elderly suffering from cerebral dysfunction accompanied by acute infection, surgery, or change of medication. Medical staff should be alert for decrease (within hours) of concentration, memory, orientation, and consciousness - especially when agitation appears and symptoms are fluctuating. Vegetative lapses and seizures may complicate the course, in particular in delirium in withdrawal (of alcohol or drugs). Treatment comprises neuroleptic and sedative medication (be careful with benzodiazepines because of their delirogenic potential) as well as alpha-2-agonists for vegetative derangements and anti-epileptics in case of seizures. As usual: start with low doses, and keep the medical treatment as short as possible. Additionally, take care in the · search and solution of delir-causes,. · termination of unnecessary medication (in particular, anticholinergic agents),. · comfort, intimacy and orientation,. · cognitive training and mobilization.. Avoiding a delirium is the best medicine. For that reason, identification of patients at risk, early detection of signs of delirium and prevention are most important. Beside factors 2 to 4, personalized treatment has been proved to be very helpful. PMID:27100850

  11. Preventing delirium in dementia: Managing risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ford, Andrew H

    2016-10-01

    Delirium is a common, disabling medical condition that is associated with numerous adverse outcomes. A number of inter-related factors, including pre-existing cognitive impairment, usually contribute to the development of delirium in a particular susceptible individual. Non-pharmacological approaches to prevention typically target multiple risk factors in a systematic manner (multicomponent interventions). There is generally good evidence that multicomponent interventions reduce the incidence of delirium in hospital populations but there are limited data in people with dementia and those living in the community. It is likely that there is a differential effect of specific interventions in those with cognitive impairment (e.g. people with dementia may respond better to simpler, more pragmatic interventions rather than complex procedures) but this cannot be determined from the existing data. Targeted interventions focussed on hydration, medication rationalization and sleep promotion may also be effective in reducing the incidence of delirium, as well as the active involvement of family members in the care of the elderly hospitalized patient. Hospitalization itself is a potential risk factor for delirium and promising data are emerging of the benefits of home-based care as an alternative to hospitalization but this is restricted to specific sub-populations of patients and is reliant on these services being available. PMID:27621236

  12. [Delirium in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    von Haken, R; Gruss, M; Plaschke, K; Scholz, M; Engelhardt, R; Brobeil, A; Martin, E; Weigand, M A

    2010-03-01

    In recent years delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) has internationally become a matter of rising concern for intensive care physicians. Due to the design of highly sophisticated ventilators the practice of deep sedation is nowadays mostly obsolete. To assess a ventilated ICU patient for delirium easy to handle bedside tests have been developed which permit a psychiatric scoring. The significance of ICU delirium is equivalent to organ failure and has been proven to be an independent prognostic factor for mortality and length of ICU and hospital stay. The pathophysiology and risk factors of ICU delirium are still insufficiently understood in detail. A certain constellation of pre-existing patient-related conditions, the current diagnosis and surgical procedure and administered medication entail a higher risk for the occurrence of ICU delirium. A favored hypothesis is that an imbalance of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine and dopamine serotonin results in an unpredictable neurotransmission. Currently, the administration of neuroleptics, enforced physiotherapy, re-orientation measures and appropriate pain treatment are the basis of the therapeutic approach. PMID:20127059

  13. Bedside coaching to improve nurses' recognition of delirium.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Susan Jean; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Nannini, Angela; Lakatos, Barbara E

    2013-10-01

    Delirium is a widespread complication of hospitalization and is frequently unrecognized by nurses and other healthcare professionals. Patients with neuroscience diagnoses are at increased risk for delirium as compared with other patients. The aims of this quality improvement project were to (1) increase neuroscience nurses' knowledge of delirium, (2) integrate coaching into evidence-based practice, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of this combined approach to improve nurses' recognition of delirium on a neuroscience unit. Institutional review board approval was obtained. A retrospective chart review of randomly selected patients admitted before the intervention was completed. The (modified) Nurse's Knowledge of Delirium Tool was electronically administered to nursing staff (n = 47), followed within 2 weeks by a didactic presentation on delirium. Bedside coaching was performed over a period of 4 weeks. The (modified) Nurses Knowledge of Delirium Tool was electronically readministered to nurses 4 weeks later to determine the change in aggregate knowledge. A postintervention chart review was conducted. SPSS software was used to analyze descriptive statistics with regard to chart reviews, documentation, and change in questionnaire scores. Findings reveal that neuroscience nurses recognize the absence of delirium 94.4% of the time and the presence of delirium 100% of the time after a didactic session and coaching. The postintervention chart review showed a statistically significant increase (p = .000) in the documentation of delirium screening results. Expert coaching at the bedside may be a reliable method for teaching nurses to use evidence-based screening tools to detect delirium in patients with neuroscience diagnoses. PMID:24025468

  14. The major risk factors for delirium in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Harin; Chung, Seockhoon; Joo, Yeon Ho; Lee, Jung Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine the major risk factors for the development of delirium in patients at a single general hospital by comparison with a control group. Subjects and methods We reviewed the medical records of 260 delirium patients and 77 control patients. We investigated age, sex, and risk factors for delirium in the total delirium group (n=260), the delirium medical subgroup (n=142), and the delirium surgical subgroup (n=118). Logistic regression analysis adjusting for age and sex was performed to identify the odds ratio. Results The mean age and the percentage of males were significantly higher in the delirium group compared with the control group (68.9 vs 54.3 years and 70% vs 41.6%, respectively). Risk factors for the delirium group were lower plasma albumin, hypertension, mechanical ventilation, and antipsychotic drug use. Plasma sodium level and hypertension were important risk factors for the delirium medical subgroup. Stroke history, hypertension, ICU care, and medication were important risk factors for the delirium surgical subgroup. Conclusion Lower plasma albumin, hypertension, mechanical ventilation, and antipsychotic drug use are important risk factors for delirium. PMID:27499625

  15. Multicomponent delirium prevention: not as effective as NICE suggest?

    PubMed

    Teale, Elizabeth; Young, John

    2015-11-01

    Multicomponent delirium prevention strategies have been shown in intervention studies consistently to reduce the occurrence of delirium. Based on this convincing evidence base, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has advocated the widespread adoption of multicomponent delirium prevention interventions into the routine inpatient care of older people. However, despite successful reductions in incident delirium of about a third, anticipated reductions in mortality or admissions to long-term care--both clinically important endpoints statistically correlated with the occurrence of delirium--have not been conclusively observed. We hypothesise that the reasons for this disconnection are partly methodological, due to difficulties in delirium detection and blinding of study personnel to the intervention, but predominantly due to the underlying relationship between delirium and the abnormal health state of frailty; the interaction between these two geriatric syndromes is currently poorly understood. PMID:26316509

  16. Cholinergic deficiency hypothesis in delirium: a synthesis of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Hshieh, Tammy T; Fong, Tamara G; Marcantonio, Edward R; Inouye, Sharon K

    2008-07-01

    Deficits in cholinergic function have been postulated to cause delirium and cognitive decline. This review examines current understanding of the cholinergic deficiency hypothesis in delirium by synthesizing evidence on potential pathophysiological pathways. Acetylcholine synthesis involves various precursors, enzymes, and receptors, and dysfunction in these components can lead to delirium. Insults to the brain, like ischemia and immunological stressors, can precipitously alter acetylcholine levels. Imbalances between cholinergic and other neurotransmitter pathways may result in delirium. Furthermore, genetic, enzymatic, and immunological overlaps exist between delirium and dementia related to the cholinergic pathway. Important areas for future research include identifying biomarkers, determining genetic contributions, and evaluating response to cholinergic drugs in delirium. Understanding how the cholinergic pathway relates to delirium may yield innovative approaches in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of this common, costly, and morbid condition. PMID:18693233

  17. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy precipitated by delirium tremens.

    PubMed

    Agu, Chidozie Charles; Bakhit, Ahmed; Basunia, Md; Bhattarai, Bikash; Oke, Vikram; Salhan, Divya; Schmidt, Frances

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with alcohol withdrawal symptoms, which later progressed to delirium tremens. During hospitalization, she developed respiratory distress with acute pulmonary edema. Electrocardiogram (ECG) showed diffuse ST elevation with elevated cardiac enzymes. Echocardiogram showed estimated ejection fraction of 20-25% with characteristic apical ballooning. After several days of supportive care, the patient showed significant clinical improvement with normalization of ECG, cardiac enzymes, and echocardiographic findings. Coronary angiogram revealed no coronary abnormalities. Although Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been associated with diverse forms of physical or emotional stress, only a few cases have been described with delirium tremens in the medical literature. PMID:26653700

  18. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy precipitated by delirium tremens

    PubMed Central

    Agu, Chidozie Charles; Bakhit, Ahmed; Basunia, Md; Bhattarai, Bikash; Oke, Vikram; Salhan, Divya; Schmidt, Frances

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with alcohol withdrawal symptoms, which later progressed to delirium tremens. During hospitalization, she developed respiratory distress with acute pulmonary edema. Electrocardiogram (ECG) showed diffuse ST elevation with elevated cardiac enzymes. Echocardiogram showed estimated ejection fraction of 20–25% with characteristic apical ballooning. After several days of supportive care, the patient showed significant clinical improvement with normalization of ECG, cardiac enzymes, and echocardiographic findings. Coronary angiogram revealed no coronary abnormalities. Although Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been associated with diverse forms of physical or emotional stress, only a few cases have been described with delirium tremens in the medical literature. PMID:26653700

  19. A case of prolonged delirium tremens.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Jerome; Jacob, Rajesh; Kinson, Rochelle

    2013-08-01

    We present a case of delirium tremens lasting for five weeks in an alcohol-dependent individual. The patient required high-dose benzodiazepines, which is atypical and rare. The clinical presentation and management of this patient is discussed. PMID:24005461

  20. Validation of a medical record-based delirium risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, James L.; Harrington, Mary Beth; Lucatorto, Michelle A.; Chester, Jennifer G.; Francis, Joseph; Shay, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To improve identification of patients at high risk for delirium, this study developed a chart abstraction tool for delirium risk and validated the tool against clinical expert diagnosis of delirium Design Prospective Cohort Study Setting Tertiary VA Hospital in New England Participants 100 Veterans admitted to the medical service Measurements While admitted, each participant underwent serial assessments for delirium by a clinical expert. Using the four criteria of a validated delirium prediction rule (e.g. cognitive impairment, sensory deficit, severe illness, and dehydration), chart review terms were selected for each criteria and delirium risk was the sum of criteria present (range 0–4; 4-worst). After discharge, the chart tool was completed by a nurse blinded to the expert’s diagnosis. Results The participants (n=100) were largely older (mean age 81 ±7years) men (94% male) and 23% developed overall delirium (14% incident). The rate of overall delirium in participants with 0, 1–2, and 3–4 risk factors was 11%, 18%, and 50% (p=.01) respectively with a c-statistic of 0.65 (95% Confidence Interval 0.54, 0.76). For incident delirium, the rate was 11%, 13%, and 25% (p=.53) and the c-statistic of 0.56 (95%CI 0.42, 0.74). Discharge to a rehabilitation center or nursing home increased with increasing delirium risk (0%, 18%, 60%, p=.02). Conclusions A chart abstraction tool was effective at identifying overall delirium risk, but not incident delirium risk. While the tool cannot replace clinical assessment and diagnosis of delirium, the use of this tool as an educational, clinical, or quality measurement aid warrants additional study. PMID:22091575

  1. Tryptophan Supplementation and Postoperative Delirium – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Thomas N.; Dunn, Christina L.; Adams, Jill C.; Hawkins, Carrie L.; Tran, Zung V.; Raeburn, Christopher D.; Moss, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Tryptophan deficiency has been associated with increased incidence of postoperative delirium. Therefore, we hypothesized that the post-operative administration of tryptophan would be beneficial for elderly surgical patients who are at higher risk of developing post-operative delirium. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. Setting: Participants A total of 325 individuals aged 60 years and older undergoing major elective operations requiring a postoperative intensive care unit admission. Intervention L-tryptophan, 1 gram orally, three times daily or placebo was started following the operation and continued for up to three days postoperatively. Measurements Delirium and its motor subtypes were measured using the Confusion Assessment Method-ICU and the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale. The primary outcome for between groups comparison was the incidence of excitatory (mixed and hyperactive) postoperative delirium. The secondary outcomes for comparison were the incidence and duration of overall postoperative delirium. Results The overall incidence of postoperative delirium was 39% (116) (95% confidence interval 34% to 44%). The percentages of patients with excitatory delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups were 17% and 9% (p=0.176), and the duration of excitatory delirium was 3.3±1.7 and 3.1±1.9 days (p=0.741). The percentage of patients with overall delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups was 40% and 37% (p=0.597), and the duration of overall delirium was 2.9±1.8 and 2.4±1.6 days (p=0.167). Conclusion Postoperative tryptophan supplementation in older adults undergoing major elective operations requiring postoperative intensive care unit admission demonstrated no efficacy in reducing the incidence of postoperative excitatory delirium or overall delirium, and the duration of excitatory or overall delirium. PMID:25112175

  2. Digging Into the Mysteries of Delirium | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Delirium Research Digging Into the Mysteries of Delirium Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table ... by delirium experience its effects for weeks after the first occurrence. Why is this? That's part of ...

  3. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium. PMID:26511424

  4. Excited delirium: Consideration of selected medical and psychiatric issues

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Edith; Williams, Robert B; Ferrell, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    Excited delirium, sometimes referred to as agitated or excited delirium, is the label assigned to the state of acute behavioral disinhibition manifested in a cluster of behaviors that may include bizarreness, aggressiveness, agitation, ranting, hyperactivity, paranoia, panic, violence, public disturbance, surprising physical strength, profuse sweating due to hyperthermia, respiratory arrest, and death. Excited delirium is reported to result from substance intoxication, psychiatric illness, alcohol withdrawal, head trauma, or a combination of these. This communication reviews the history of the origins of excited delirium, selected research related to its causes, symptoms, management, and the links noted between it and selected medical and psychiatric conditions. Excited delirium involves behavioral and physical symptoms that are also observed in medical and psychiatric conditions such as rhabdomyolysis, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and catatonia. A useful contribution of this communication is that it links the state of excited delirium to conditions for which there are known and effective medical and psychiatric interventions. PMID:19557101

  5. [Pain, delirium and sedation in intensive unit care].

    PubMed

    Mazul-Sunko, Branka; Brozović, Gordana; Goranović, Tatjana

    2012-03-01

    Delirium is a complication of intensive care treatment associated with permanent cognitive decline and increased mortality after hospital discharge. In several studies, postoperative pain was found as a possible precipitating factor. Aggressive pain treatment is part of current multicompartment protocols for delirium prevention after hip fracture. Protocol based sedation, pain and delirium management in intensive care units have been shown to have clinical and economic advantages. PMID:23088085

  6. Delirium detection and improved delirium management in older patients hospitalized for hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Todd, Kristine S; Barry, Jean; Hoppough, Susan; McConnell, Eleanor

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is a common and potentially devastating problem for older patients following hip fracture. Although early detection is recommended, description and evaluation of standardized approaches are scarce. The aims of this quality improvement project were to: (1) implement a clinical algorithm for improving delirium detection and management and (2) assess the impact of the clinical algorithm on length of stay, discharge disposition and patient satisfaction. The pilot study was implemented on an orthopedic unit to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical protocol for delirium detection and management to improve outcomes. Outcomes of 33 elderly post-operative hip fracture patients were compared to historical controls from the same unit. Delirium was detected in 18% of patients. Length of stay was reduced by 22% (P < .001), discharge disposition showed a 13% improvement (P = .17) and patient satisfaction scores showed a 15% (P = .15) improvement post-intervention. Implementation of a clinical algorithm to promote early detection and treatment of delirium in post-operative hip fracture patients is feasible and associated with improved outcomes. PMID:26547684

  7. Association between leptin and delirium in elderly inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Julio C; Ospina, Jenny P; González, Martha I

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone with significant effects on the brain, both at the cellular level and cognitive level. This study aimed to establish the association between leptin levels and delirium in a Colombian elderly population. 115 patients older than 60 years were included. Leptin was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after overnight fasting and Mini-Mental State Examination and Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) tests were employed. Delirium was diagnosed using CAM in 23.48% of patients, being most frequent in men. There were no significant differences in hematology and renal test values between patients with delirium and those without delirium, but cerebrovascular diagnoses were more frequent in patients with delirium. No correlation with any specific medication was found, but patients with delirium had a higher number of comorbidities and medications. Leptin levels were significantly lower in patients with delirium and correlated negatively with the number of diagnoses and medications, but not with age, gender, body mass index, or hematology and renal test results. Leptin levels may have a role in the pathophysiological process of delirium and low leptin could be a useful clinical biomarker to establish risk in elderly patients given the association with delirium. PMID:23717044

  8. PARTICIPATION IN ACTIVITY AND RISK FOR INCIDENT DELIRIUM

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Frances M.; Inouye, Sharon K.; Fearing, Michael A.; Kiely, Dan K.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Jones, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To examine the mediating role of activity participation between educational attainment and risk for incidence delirium; and to examine the contribution of participation in specific activities to the development of delirium. Design and Setting Prospective cohort study. An urban teaching hospital in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Participants Drawn from two prospective cohort studies of 779 newly hospitalized patients aged 70 and older without dementia. Measurements The main outcome was delirium measured by the full Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) algorithm, which consisted of acute onset and fluctuating course, inattention, and either disorganized thinking or altered level of consciousness, as rated by trained clinical interviewers. Results Bivariable results indicated a significant relationship between both education and the development of delirium (odds ratio, 0.92 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88 to 0.97], and between activity and delirium (odds ratio, 0.60 [95% CI, 0.46 to 0.79]. In multivariable analysis, activity mediated the relationship between education and risk for delirium. Considering each activity separately, multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that regular exercise significantly lowered the risk for developing delirium (odds ratio, 0.76 [95% CI, 0.60 to 0.96]. Conclusion Among older persons without dementia, activity participation before hospitalization is a mediator between education and incidence of delirium. Specifically, we found that participation in regular exercise was found to be significantly protective against delirium. PMID:18547359

  9. Olfactory dysfunction is related to postoperative delirium in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Seung; Yoon, Jung Han; Kim, Hyun Jae; Yong, Seok Woo; Hong, Ji Man

    2016-06-01

    Operations often lead to delirium in elderly patients, particularly those with impaired cognition, suggesting that underlying neuropathology may play a role in the development of postoperative delirium. Olfactory dysfunction is a well-known marker of underlying Lewy body pathology in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the prognostic value of olfaction for the development of postoperative delirium in PD remains unclear. 34 PD patients with or without postoperative delirium following surgery under general anesthesia were included in this study (n = 17 for each group). Cross-Cultural Smell Identification scores were lower in PD patients with postoperative delirium (4.4 ± 1.5) relative to the delirium-free controls (6.8 ± 2.4, p < 0.005). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that olfaction and operation time were significant predictors of the development of postoperative delirium. Impaired olfaction is significantly associated with postoperative delirium in PD. Olfaction may be useful for identifying PD patients susceptible to postoperative delirium. PMID:27098668

  10. The Impact of Delirium | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... delirium, especially in older people: Use of pain medication or sedatives, or sedative drug withdrawal Drug or alcohol abuse Dehydration Electrolyte or other body chemical disturbances Infections ...

  11. Neuroinflammation in sepsis: sepsis associated delirium.

    PubMed

    Piva, Simone; McCreadie, Victoria A; Latronico, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis-associated delirium (SAD) is a clinical manifestation of the involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) during sepsis. The purpose of this review is to provide a concise overview of SAD including the epidemiology and current diagnostic criteria for SAD. We present in detail the pathophysiology with regards to blood-brain-barrier breakdown, cytokine activation and neurotransmitter deregulation. Treatment and prognosis for SAD are also briefly discussed. SAD is the most common form of delirium acquired in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit), and is described in about 50% of septic patients. Clinical features include altered level of consciousness, reduced attention, change in cognition and perceptual disturbances. Symptoms can reversible, but prolonged deficits can be observed in older patients. Pathophysiology of SAD is poorly understood, but involves microvascular, metabolic and, not least, inflammatory mechanisms leading to CNS dysfunction. These mechanisms can be different in SAD compared to ICU delirium associated with other conditions. SAD is diagnosed clinically using validated tools such as CAM-ICU (Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Medicine) or ICDSC (The Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist), which have good specificity but low sensitivity. Neuroimaging studies and EEG (Electroencephalography) can be useful complement to clinical evaluation to define the severity of the condition. Prompt diagnosis and eradication of septic foci whenever possible is vital. Preventive measures for SAD in the critically ill patient requiring long-term sedation include maintaining light levels of sedation using non-benzodiazepine sedatives (either propofol or dexmedetomidine). Early mobilization of patients in the ICU is also recommended. Antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol and atypical antipsychotics) are widely used to treat SAD, but firm evidence of their efficacy is lacking. PMID:25567339

  12. Melatonin based therapies for delirium and dementia.

    PubMed

    Alagiakrishnan, Kannayiram

    2016-05-01

    Melatonin levels have been shown to decline with aging. Melatonin and its analogs in addition to their effect on sleep promotion, has been shown to have multiple pleiotropic effects. It can also help with neuroprotection through different mechanisms. Evidence in animal and human studies suggests that low levels of melatonin have been linked to delirium, mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and with certain behavioral problems. Recent clinical trials have showed that both melatonin and its analogs may be useful in the prevention, treatment of delirium, and the management of dementia. These medications seem to have the advantage of less side effects and better safety profile when compared to antipsychotics and sedatives like benzodiazepines. These medications are available over the counter in North America, Europe, and Asia, and some of these medications are approved by FDA. This manuscript will discuss the promising role of these melatonergic medications alone or in combination with other medications for the management of Geriatric Psychiatric diseases like delirium and dementia. PMID:27355332

  13. Review of Postoperative Delirium in Geriatric Patients Undergoing Hip Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Paul; Morris, William; Oladeji, Philip; Huo, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative delirium is a serious complication following hip surgery in elderly patients that can adversely affect outcomes in both hip fracture and arthroplasty surgery. Recently, the incidence of hip fracture in the Medicare population was estimated at approximately 500 000 patients per year, with the majority treated surgically. The annual volume of total hip arthroplasty is nearly 450 000 patients and is projected to increase over the next 15 to 20 years. Subsequently, the incidence of postoperative delirium will rise. The incidence of postoperative delirium after hip surgery in the elderly patients ranges between 4% and 53%, and it is identified as the most common surgical complication of older patients. The most common risk factors include advanced age, hip fracture surgery (vs elective hip surgery), and preoperative delirium/cognitive impairment. Exact pathophysiology has not been fully defined. It is hypothesized that imbalances in cortical neurotransmitters or inflammatory cytokine pathway mechanisms contribute to delirium. Development of postoperative delirium is associated with longer hospital stay, increased medical complications, and poorer short-term functional outcome. Patients who develop postoperative delirium are also at increased risk for cognitive decline beyond the acute phase. Following acute care, postoperative delirium is associated with the need for a higher level of care, an additional cost. Management of postoperative delirium centers on prevention and early recognition. Medical prophylaxis has been demonstrated to have limited utility. Utilization of delirium detection methods contributed to early recognition. The most effective means of prevention involved a multidisciplinary team focused on adequate hydration, optimization of analgesia, reduction in polypharmacy, aggressive physiotherapy, and early recognition of the delirium symptoms. PMID:27239384

  14. Mental Status Change in the Elderly: Recognizing and Treating Delirium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morency, Catherine Reilly

    1990-01-01

    Discusses delirium and how it differs from other types of mental status changes seen in the elderly and what interventions are most appropriate in affected individuals. Presents data from a study regarding nursing assessment of patients with delirium and outlines an educational model. (JOW)

  15. Incidence and risk factors of delirium in patients post pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Tom K; McErlean, Sarah; O'Farrell, Aimee; Hoti, Emir; Maguire, Donal; Traynor, Oscar J; Conlon, Kevin C; Geoghegan, Justin G

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-operative delirium is an important and common complication of major abdominal surgery characterized by acute confusion with fluctuating consciousness. The aim of this study was to establish the incidence of post-operative delirium in patients undergoing a pancreaticoduodenectomy and to determine the risk factors for its development. Methods From a prospectively maintained database, a retrospective cohort analysis was performed of 50 consecutive patients who underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy at the National Surgical Centre for Pancreatic Cancer in St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin and whose entire post-operative stay was in this institution, between July 2011 and December 2012. Two independent medical practitioners assessed all data and delirium was diagnosed according to criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Disorder (DSM), fourth edition. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results Seven patients (14%) developed post-operative delirium. The median onset was on the second post-operative day. Older age was predictive of an increased risk of delirium post-operatively. Those who developed delirium had a significantly increased length of stay (LOS) as well as a significantly increased risk of developing at least a grade 3 complication (Clavien-Dindo classification). Conclusion This study demonstrates that post-operative delirium is associated with a more complicated recovery after a pancreaticoduodenectomy and that older age is independently predictive of its development. Focused screening may allow targeted preventative strategies to be used in the peri-operative period to reduce complications and costs associated with delirium. PMID:24750484

  16. Commentary: The Diagnosis of Delirium in Pediatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martini, D. Richard

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric patients seem to be especially vulnerable to toxic, metabolic, or traumatic CNS insults and are at greater risk of delirium with fever regardless of the etiology. Developmental limitations, in the areas of communication and cognition, prevent a thorough evaluation of the young patient for delirium. Only the most severe cases are…

  17. Delirium in the hospitalized elder and recommendations for practice.

    PubMed

    Rigney, Ted S

    2006-01-01

    Delirium is a mental disorder of acute onset and fluctuating course, characterized by disturbances in consciousness, orientation, memory, thought, perception, and behavior. It occurs in up to 50% of elderly hospital inpatients, many with preexisting dementia, and is associated with significant increases in functional disability, length of hospital stay, rates of death, and health care costs. Despite its clinical importance, delirium often remains undetected or misdiagnosed as dementia or other psychiatric illness. Awareness of the etiologies and risk factors of delirium should enable nurses to focus on patients at risk and to recognize delirium symptoms early. Knowledge of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments for delirium will provide the nurse with an arsenal of potential interventions in the care of the delirious hospitalized elder. PMID:16757386

  18. Early Assessment of Delirium in Elderly Patients after Hip Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Jin; Hwang, Deuk Soo; Wang, Seong Keun; Chee, Ik Seung; Baeg, Sengmi

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study is intended to identify predictive factors of delirium, including risk factors and prodromal symptoms. Methods This study included sixty-five patients aged 65 years or older who had undergone hip surgery. Baseline assessments included age; gender; admission type (acute/elective); reason for surgery (fracture/replacement); C-reactive protein (CRP); Acute Physiology, Age, Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE III); and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The Korean version of the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (K-DRS-98) was used to assess prodromal symptoms daily before the onset of delirium. Results Almost 28% (n=18) of the 65 patients developed delirium after surgery. Delirium in elderly patients after hip surgery was observed more often in older patients and those with acute admission, hip fracture, higher APACHE III score, lower MMSE score, and higher CRP levels within early days after the operation. Sleep-wake cycle disturbances, thought process abnormalities, orientation, and long-term memory in symptom items of K-DRS-98 were showed significant difference on 4 days before delirium, lability of affect on 3 days before, perceptual disturbances and hallucination, and visuo-spatial ability on 2 days before, and delusion, motor agitation, and short-term memory on the day before the occurrence of delirium. CRP levels within 24 hours and 72 hours after hospitalization were significantly higher in the delirium group. Conclusion Medical professionals must pay attention to behavioral, cognitive changes and risk factors in elderly patients undergoing hip surgery and to the prodromal phase of delirium. K-DRS-98 may help in identifying the prodromal symptoms of delirium in elderly patients after hip surgery. PMID:22216044

  19. Delirium in the Nursing Home Emergency Department Patient

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin H.; Morandi, Alessandro; Ely, E. Wesley; Callison, Clay; Zhou, Chuan; Storrow, Alan B.; Dittus, Robert S.; Habermann, Ralf; Schnelle, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Nursing home patients are an important segment of the aging population, but are often neglected in emergency department (ED) delirium studies. We sought to determine if nursing home patients are more likely to present to the ED with delirium compared to non-nursing home patients, and explore how variations in their delirium risk factor profiles contribute to this relationship. Design Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting Tertiary care, academic ED. Participants Three hundred forty one English speaking patients who were 65 years and older. Measurements Delirium status was determined by using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU) administered by trained research assistants. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine if nursing home residence was associated with delirium. Odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were reported. Results Of the 341 patients enrolled, 58 (17%) resided in a nursing home. A total of 38 (11.2%) patients were considered to have delirium in the ED. Twenty two (37.9%) and 16 (5.7%) of nursing home and non-nursing home patients, respectively, had delirium in the ED with an unadjusted OR (95%CI) of 10.2 (4.9 – 21.2). After adjusting for dementia, a Katz ADL < 5, hearing impairment, and the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), nursing home residence was independently associated with delirium in the ED (adjusted OR = 4.2, 95%CI: 1.8 – 9.7). Conclusion In the ED setting, nursing home patients were more likely to present with delirium, and this relationship persisted after adjusting for delirium risk factors. PMID:19484845

  20. Pharmacological and nonpharmacological management of delirium in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hipp, Dustin M; Ely, E Wesley

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is a common yet under-diagnosed syndrome of acute brain dysfunction, which is characterized by inattention, fluctuating mental status, altered level of consciousness, or disorganized thinking. Although our recognition of risk factors for delirium has progressed, our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms remains limited. Improvements in monitoring and assessment for delirium (particularly in the intensive care setting) have resulted in validated and reliable tools such as arousal scales and bedside delirium monitoring instruments. Once delirium is recognized and the modifiable risk factors are addressed, the next step in management (if delirium persists) is often pharmacological intervention. The sedatives, analgesics, and hypnotics most often used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to achieve patient comfort are all too frequently deliriogenic, resulting in a longer duration of ICU and hospital stay, and increased costs. Therefore, identification of safe and efficacious agents to reduce the incidence, duration, and severity of ICU delirium is a hot topic in critical care. Recognizing that there are no medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the prevention or treatment of delirium, we chose anti-psychotics and alpha-2 agonists as the general pharmacological focus of this article because both were subjects of relatively recent data and ongoing clinical trials. Emerging pharmacological strategies for addressing delirium must be combined with nonpharmacological approaches (such as daily spontaneous awakening trials and spontaneous breathing trials) and early mobility (combined with the increasingly popular approach called: Awakening and Breathing Coordination, Delirium Monitoring, Early Mobility, and Exercise [ABCDE] of critical care) to develop evidence-based approaches that will ensure safer and faster recovery of the sickest patients in our healthcare system. PMID:22270810

  1. [Effective Dexmedetomidine Administration for the Prevention of Emergence Agitation and Postoperative Delirium in Patients with a History of Postoperative Delirium].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takanobu; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Kido, Haruki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    We successfully performed intraoperative dexmedetomidine (DEX) administration for the prevention of emergence agitation or postoperative delirium after lung resection in four patients (71.3 ± 5.7 year old, 3 males and 1 female) with a past history of postoperative delirium. DEX was started at 0.35-0.45 μg x kg(-1) x hr(-1) continuously without loading. The average time from DEX initiation to extubation was 141.3 ± 94.4 minutes. No patient had emergence agitation, and DEX administration was continued until the following morning with monitoring in all patients without any symptoms of delirium. Intraoperative DEX administration may be beneficial for the prevention of emergence agitation or postoperative delirium in patients with a past history of postoperative delirium. PMID:27188116

  2. Educational interventions to improve recognition of delirium: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yanamadala, Mamata; Wieland, Darryl; Heflin, Mitchell T

    2013-11-01

    Delirium is a common and serious condition that is underrecognized in older adults in a variety of healthcare settings. It is poorly recognized because of deficiencies in provider knowledge and its atypical presentation. Early recognition of delirium is warranted to better manage the disease and prevent the adverse outcomes associated with it. The purpose of this article is to review the literature concerning educational interventions focusing on recognition of delirium. The Medline and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINHAL) databases were searched for studies with specific educational focus in the recognition of delirium, and 26 studies with various designs were identified. The types of interventions used were classified according to the Predisposing, Reinforcing and Enabling Constructs in Educational Diagnosis and Evaluation (PRECEDE) model, and outcomes were sorted according to Kirkpatrick's hierarchy. Educational strategies combining predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors achieved better results than strategies that included one or two of these components. Studies using predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing strategies together were more often effective in producing changes in staff behavior and participant outcomes. Based on this review, improvements in knowledge and skill alone seem insufficient to favorably influence recognition of delirium. Educational interventions to recognize delirium are most effective when formal teaching is interactive and is combined with strategies including engaging leadership and using clinical pathways and assessment tools. The goal of the current study was to systematically review the published literature to determine the effect of educational interventions on recognition of delirium. PMID:24219200

  3. Pharmacological Risk Factors for Delirium after Cardiac Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Lurdes; Schwarz, Stephan KW; Bowering, John B; Moore, Randell L; Burns, Kyle D; Richford, Carole M; Osborn, Jill A; Barr, Alasdair M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this review is to evaluate the literature on medications associated with delirium after cardiac surgery and potential prophylactic agents for preventing it. Source: Articles were searched in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and EMBASE with the MeSH headings: delirium, cardiac surgical procedures, and risk factors, and the keywords: delirium, cardiac surgery, risk factors, and drugs. Principle inclusion criteria include having patient samples receiving cardiac procedures on cardiopulmonary bypass, and using DSM-IV-TR criteria or a standardized tool for the diagnosis of delirium. Principal Findings: Fifteen studies were reviewed. Two single drugs (intraoperative fentanyl and ketamine), and two classes of drugs (preoperative antipsychotics and postoperative inotropes) were identified in the literature as being independently associated with delirium after cardiac surgery. Another seven classes of drugs (preoperative antihypertensives, anticholinergics, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, opioids, and statins, and postoperative opioids) and three single drugs (intraoperative diazepam, and postoperative dexmedetomidine and rivastigmine) have mixed findings. One drug (risperidone) has been shown to prevent delirium when taken immediately upon awakening from cardiac surgery. None of these findings was replicated in the studies reviewed. Conclusion: These studies have shown that drugs taken perioperatively by cardiac surgery patients need to be considered in delirium risk management strategies. While medications with direct neurological actions are clearly important, this review has shown that specific cardiovascular drugs may also require attention. Future studies that are methodologically consistent are required to further validate these findings and improve their utility. PMID:23449337

  4. Management of delirium in palliative care: a review.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Luigi; Caraceni, Augusto; Mitchell, Alex J; Nanni, Maria Giulia; Berardi, Maria Alejandra; Caruso, Rosangela; Riba, Michelle

    2015-03-01

    Delirium is a complex but common disorder in palliative care with a prevalence between 13 and 88 % but a particular frequency at the end of life (terminal delirium). By reviewing the most relevant studies (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycLit, PsycInfo, Cochrane Library), a correct assessment to make the diagnosis (e.g., DSM-5, delirium assessment tools), the identification of the possible etiological factors, and the application of multicomponent and integrated interventions were reported as the correct steps to effectively manage delirium in palliative care. In terms of medications, both conventional (e.g., haloperidol) and atypical antipsychotics (e.g., olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, aripiprazole) were shown to be equally effective in the treatment of delirium. No recommendation was possible in palliative care regarding the use of other drugs (e.g., α-2 receptors agonists, psychostimulants, cholinesterase inhibitors, melatonergic drugs). Non-pharmacological interventions (e.g., behavioral and educational) were also shown to be important in the management of delirium. More research is necessary to clarify how to more thoroughly manage delirium in palliative care. PMID:25663153

  5. [Delirium in patients with neurological diseases: diagnosis, management and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Hüfner, K; Sperner-Unterweger, B

    2014-04-01

    Delirium is a common acute neuropsychiatric syndrome. It is characterized by concurrent disturbances of consciousness and attention, perception, reasoning, memory, emotionality, the sleep-wake cycle as well as psychomotor symptoms. Delirium caused by alcohol or medication withdrawal is not the subject of the current review. Specific predisposing and precipitating factors have been identified in delirium which converge in a common final pathway of global brain dysfunction. The major predisposing factors are older age, cognitive impairment or dementia, sensory deficits, multimorbidity and polypharmacy. Delirium is always caused by one or more underlying pathologies which need to be identified. In neurology both primary triggers of delirium, such as stroke or epileptic seizures and also secondary triggers, such as metabolic factors or medication side effects play a major role. Nonpharmacological interventions are important in the prevention of delirium and lead to an improvement in prognosis. Delirium is associated with increased mortality and in the long term the development of cognitive deficits and functional impairment. PMID:24668399

  6. Detection of delirium by nurses among long-term care residents with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Voyer, Philippe; Richard, Sylvie; Doucet, Lise; Danjou, Christine; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues

    2008-01-01

    Background Delirium is a prevalent problem in long-term care (LTC) facilities where advanced age and cognitive impairment represent two important risk factors for this condition. Delirium is associated with numerous negative outcomes including increased morbidity and mortality. Despite its clinical importance, delirium often goes unrecognized by nurses. Although rates of nurse-detected delirium have been studied among hospitalized older patients, this issue has been largely neglected among demented older residents in LTC settings. The goals of this study were to determine detection rates of delirium and delirium symptoms by nurses among elderly residents with dementia and to identify factors associated with undetected cases of delirium. Methods In this prospective study (N = 156), nurse ratings of delirium were compared to researcher ratings of delirium. This procedure was repeated for 6 delirium symptoms. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were computed. Logistic regressions were conducted to identify factors associated with delirium that is undetected by nurses. Results Despite a high prevalence of delirium in this cohort (71.5%), nurses were able to detect the delirium in only a minority of cases (13%). Of the 134 residents not identified by nurses as having delirium, only 29.9% of them were correctly classified. Detection rates for the 6 delirium symptoms varied between 39.1% and 58.1%, indicating an overall under-recognition of symptoms of delirium. Only the age of the residents (≥ 85 yrs) was associated with undetected delirium (OR: 4.1; 90% CI: [1.5–11.0]). Conclusion Detection of delirium is a major issue for nurses that clearly needs to be addressed. Strategies to improve recognition of delirium could result in a reduction of adverse outcomes for this very vulnerable population. PMID:18302791

  7. Delirium prevention for cognitive, sensory, and mobility impairments.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sherry; Rich, Catherine; Weitzel, Tina; Vollmer, Charlene; Eden, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a protocol designed to prevent delirium in hospitalized elders with the risk factors of dementia and/or vision, hearing, and/or mobility impairments. A group of 80 patients with risk factors hospitalized before the protocol was implemented was matched with a group of 80 patients admitted after the implementation of the protocol. Records of patients in both groups were reviewed to identify patients with delirium. A significant reduction in delirium, from 37.5% to 13.8%, occurred in the elders receiving the protocol. PMID:18578220

  8. A case of Sheehan's syndrome with delirium.

    PubMed

    Umekawa, T; Yoshida, T; Sakane, N; Kondo, M

    1996-12-01

    A 53 year old woman was brought to a psychiatric clinic because of delirium. Upon immediate examination, severe hyponatremia (105 mEq/L) was detected. She was suspected of having internal diseases and referred to our university hospital. When she reached our hospital she was delirious and showed excitement and agitation. Her electroencephalogram showed low voltage theta waves (20 microV) in all leads. She was hospitalized and diagnosed with acute tonsillar abscess and panhypopituitarism based on various endocrine tests. Her past history suggested that Sheehan's syndrome had developed after child-bearing at age 31, resulting in panhypopituitarism. After administration of antibiotics, the fever and tonsillar abscess gradually recovered, and the correction of electrolytes improved the level of consciousness, suggesting that the hyponatremia had been closely related to the clouding of consciousness. As the subsequent administration of cortisol kept the patient's serum sodium levels within the normal range, a decrease in plasma cortisol seemed to be the major cause of the hyponatremia. Psychological symptoms of panhypopituitarism often included abulia, apathy and occasionally coma. However, it is rare for a patient with panhypopituitarism to be misdiagnosed as having a psychiatric disease with delirium. This rare case is presented. PMID:9014231

  9. Update on Pharmacotherapy for Prevention and Treatment of Post-operative Delirium: A Systematic Evidence Review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Babar A.; Gutteridge, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is highly prevalent among elderly post-operative patients with no pharmacological intervention approved by the Food and Drug Administration for prevention or treatment. We conducted a systematic evidence review to critically appraise literature related to the pharmacotherapy of post-operative delirium. Ten studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria with two interventions for delirium treatment and eight interventions for delirium prevention in post-operative patients. The quality of evidence of delirium treatment studies was poor, whereas the quality of evidence in delirium prevention studies ranges from moderate to high. Delirium treatment studies find similar delirium duration and length-of-stay outcomes between haloperidol and either morphine or ondansetron. Risperidone was found to reduce the conversion of sub-syndromal delirium to delirium in one study compared to placebo. Haloperidol, olanzapine, and ketamine were each found to reduce delirium incidence, whereas rivastigmine had no impact on delirium incidence or duration. Lighter anesthesia as monitored by bi-spectral index led to a decreased delirium incidence. Considering results from studies conducted prior to the dates of this review, the current evidence suggests that certain pharmacologic classes and lighter sedation using BIS monitoring may prevent post-operative delirium, although a conclusive recommendation for clinical practice must await further research. PMID:25729334

  10. Antipsychotics Don't Ease Delirium in Hospitalized Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... a patient with delirium," said lead researcher Dr. Karin Neufeld, clinical director of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins ... obvious, but they are important," he added. SOURCES: Karin Neufeld, M.D., M.P.H., clinical director, ...

  11. Delirium Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... hospital, had a serious fall and sustained multiple hip fractures that required emergency hip replacement surgery to repair. ... Alice and her sister rapidly educated themselves on delirium and became powerful advocates for their father's care— ...

  12. Assessment of characteristics of patient with delirium tremens.

    PubMed

    Singh, P M; Shrestha, D M; Gautam, S C; Swar, S B; Joshi, N

    2012-09-01

    Delirium tremens is the severe form of alcohol withdrawal. It carries a certain degree of mortality and there has been and advancement in the understanding of pathophysiology and risk factors for the development of the condition. This prospective study is carried out to study the characteristic of the patient of delirium tremens in our setting using ICD-10 diagnostic criteria. Thirty seven cases of delirium tremens with majority of males and of all hill origin people were identified. Patients with delirium tremens has been using alcohol for average of 24.8 years with an average intake of around 2.2 litres per day. Most of the patient has seizure and similar episodes in past and using alcohol from morning time. PMID:24047019

  13. [Delirium prevention and treatment in elderly hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Robles, María José; Formiga, Francesc; Vidán, M Teresa

    2014-04-22

    The fracture of the proximal femur or hip fracture in the elderly usually happens after a fall and carries a high morbidity and mortality. One of the most common complications during hospitalization for hip fracture is the onset of delirium or acute confusional state that in elderly patients has a negative impact on the hospital stay, and prognosis, worsening functional ability, cognitive status and mortality. Also the development of delirium during hospitalization increases health care costs. Strategies to prevent and treat delirium during hospitalization for hip fracture have been less studied. In this context, this paper aims to conduct a review of the literature on strategies that exist in the prevention and treatment of delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture. PMID:23790577

  14. Inflammation biomarkers and delirium in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delirium is a common occurrence in critically ill patients and is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality. Septic patients with delirium may differ from a general critically ill population. The aim of this investigation was to study the relationship between systemic inflammation and the development of delirium in septic and non-septic critically ill patients. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study in a 20-bed mixed intensive care unit (ICU) including 78 (delirium = 31; non-delirium = 47) consecutive patients admitted for more than 24 hours. At enrollment, patients were allocated to septic or non-septic groups according to internationally agreed criteria. Delirium was diagnosed using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU) during the first 72 hours of ICU admission. Blood samples were collected within 12 hours of enrollment for determination of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, soluble TNF Receptor (STNFR)-1 and -2, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and adiponectin. Results Out of all analyzed biomarkers, only STNFR1 (P = 0.003), STNFR2 (P = 0.005), adiponectin (P = 0.005) and IL-1β (P < 0.001) levels were higher in delirium patients. Adjusting for sepsis and sedation, these biomarkers were also independently associated with delirium occurrence. However, none of them were significant influenced by sepsis. Conclusions STNFR1, STNFR2, adiponectin and IL-1β were associated with delirium. Sepsis did not modify the relationship between the biomarkers and delirium occurrence. PMID:24886875

  15. Hypovitaminosis D in Delirium: a Retrospective Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Jennifer; Hategan, Ana; Bourgeois, James A.; Tisi, Daniel K.; Xiong, Glen L.

    2013-01-01

    Background As vitamin D may have a neuroprotective effect, the authors studied the association of biomarkers of vitamin D status and delirium to see if low vitamin D status was common in delirium cases. Methods Biochemical measures of vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25-OHD]) and calcium metabolism were used in this retrospective cross-sectional analysis of adult in-patients with delirium, admitted at three Canadian academic hospitals from January 2011 to July 2012. Primary outcome was to determine estimates of the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in this group in whom vitamin D was checked. Results Seventy-one (5.8%) out of 1,232 delirium inpatients had their vitamin D measured. Thirty-nine (55%) showed vitamin D insufficiency (25-OHD of 25-75 nmol/L) and 8 (11%) showed vitamin D deficiency (25-OHD < 25 nmol/L). Mean serum 25-OHD levels were lower in males (57.1±7.7 nmol/L) than in females (78.2±6.1 nmol/L), p = .01, even when controlled for age and season. Men were younger than the women (74.4±2.3 vs. 82.4±1.7, p = .005). Mean age was 78.7±1.5 years, and 33 (47%) were male. Conclusions Although vitamin D is rarely checked during delirium workup and/or management, high rates of hypovitaminosis D were found to be common in the delirium in-patients in whom it was checked. Larger studies would be needed to estimate the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in delirium and whether hypovitaminosis D plays a role in the pathogenesis of delirium. PMID:24278095

  16. Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress after Intensive Care Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Svenningsen, Helle; Egerod, Ingrid; Christensen, Doris; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine; Frydenberg, Morten; Videbech, Poul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Long-term psychological consequences of critical illness are receiving more attention in recent years. The aim of our study was to assess the correlation of ICU-delirium and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) anxiety and depression after ICU-discharge in a Danish cohort. Methods. A prospective observational cohort study assessing the incidence of delirium in the ICU. Psychometrics were screened by validated tools in structured telephone interviews after 2 months (n = 297) and 6 months (n = 248) after ICU-discharge. Results. Delirium was detected in 54% of patients in the ICU and symptoms of PTSD in 8% (2 months) and 6% (6 months) after ICU-discharge. Recall of ICU stay was present in 93%. Associations between ICU-delirium and post-discharge PTSD-symptoms were weak and insignificant. Memories of delusions were significantly associated with anxiety after two months. Remaining associations between types of ICU-memories and prevalence of post-discharge symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and depression were insignificant after adjusting for age. Incidence of ICU-delirium was unaffected by preadmission use of psychotropic drugs. Prevalence of PTSD-symptoms was unaffected by use of antipsychotics and sedation in the ICU. Conclusion. ICU-delirium did not increase the risk of PTSD-symptoms at 2 and 6 months after ICU discharge. PMID:26557708

  17. Biomarkers of postoperative delirium and cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Androsova, Ganna; Krause, Roland; Winterer, Georg; Schneider, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Elderly surgical patients frequently experience postoperative delirium (POD) and the subsequent development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Clinical features include deterioration in cognition, disturbance in attention and reduced awareness of the environment and result in higher morbidity, mortality and greater utilization of social financial assistance. The aging Western societies can expect an increase in the incidence of POD and POCD. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been studied on the molecular level albeit with unsatisfying small research efforts given their societal burden. Here, we review the known physiological and immunological changes and genetic risk factors, identify candidates for further studies and integrate the information into a draft network for exploration on a systems level. The pathogenesis of these postoperative cognitive impairments is multifactorial; application of integrated systems biology has the potential to reconstruct the underlying network of molecular mechanisms and help in the identification of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:26106326

  18. Digging Into the Mysteries of Delirium | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... delirium affect older Americans more often than their younger counterparts? Why? It does. It appears to be ... adults tend to get delirium more often than younger adults—although younger adults are subject to developing ...

  19. A new delirium phenotype with rapid high amplitude onset and nearly as rapid reversal: Central Coast Australia Delirium Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional models for delirium based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders and its 1990 offspring, the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), were not designed to distinguish behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia from rapid cognitive decline. We examined a new diagnostic criterion for delirium plus exclusion of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia and recent inattention with a 25% decline in digit span forward (DSF). Methods This was a prospective, randomized controlled trial comparing management of prevalent delirium in general medical with that in geriatric medical wards in a 370-bed hospital north of Sydney. Inclusion criteria were age ≥65 years and prevalent delirium in the emergency department based on: CAM; proof that CAM elements were not better explained by behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia; proof of recent inattention on DSF; evidence of cognitive decline not due to sedatives or antipsychotics in the emergency department. Measurements included the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL, 22-item), Selective IADL (8-item), Mini-Mental State Examination, DSF daily, Delirium Index daily, and Apathy Evaluation Scale. Pre-delirium scores from past cognitive tests and best scores were imputed after admission. Relative change (RC) was calculated as absolute change/test range and RC/MPC ratio was calculated as RC after admission/maximal possible change. Results A total of 130 subjects were recruited but 14 with subsyndromal delirium were excluded, leaving 116 subjects (mean age 83.6 years). Forty-eight percent had prior dementia. RC from pre-delirium to admission was 42% for the Mini-Mental State Examination, 41% for Selective IADL, 34% for 5-DSF, 54% for 6-DSF, and 37% for the Apathy Evaluation Scale. Improvements after admission (RC and RC/MPC ratios) were 32%/98% for 5-DSF, 54%/82% for 6-DSF, and 45%/80% for the Delirium Index. General medicine and geriatric medicine groups had

  20. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. Patients and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Results: Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Conclusions: Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process. PMID:26290854

  1. Delirium in the elderly: current problems with increasing geriatric age

    PubMed Central

    Kukreja, Deepti; Günther, Ulf; Popp, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is an acute disorder of attention and cognition seen relatively commonly in people aged 65 yr or older. The prevalence is estimated to be between 11 and 42 per cent for elderly patients on medical wards. The prevalence is also high in nursing homes and long term care (LTC) facilities. The consequences of delirium could be significant such as an increase in mortality in the hospital, long-term cognitive decline, loss of autonomy and increased risk to be institutionalized. Despite being a common condition, it remains under-recognised, poorly understood and not adequately managed. Advanced age and dementia are the most important risk factors. Pain, dehydration, infections, stroke and metabolic disturbances, and surgery are the most common triggering factors. Delirium is preventable in a large proportion of cases and therefore, it is also important from a public health perspective for interventions to reduce further complications and the substantial costs associated with these. Since the aetiology is, in most cases, multfactorial, it is important to consider a multi-component approach to management, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Detection and treatment of triggering causes must have high priority in case of delirium. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of delirium in the elderly population, given the increasing numbers of ageing people as well as increasing geriatric age. PMID:26831414

  2. A clinical perspective of sepsis-associated delirium.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Oda, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    The term sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) has been applied to animal models, postmortem studies in patients, and severe cases of sepsis. SAE is considered to include all types of brain dysfunction, including delirium, coma, seizure, and focal neurological signs. Clinical data for sepsis-associated delirium (SAD) have been accumulating since the establishment of definitions of coma or delirium and the introduction of validated screening tools. Some preliminary studies have examined the etiology of SAD. Neuroinflammation, abnormal cerebral perfusion, and neurotransmitter imbalances are the main mechanisms underlying the development of SAD. However, there are still no specific diagnostic blood, electrophysiological, or imaging tests or treatments specific for SAD. The duration of delirium in intensive care patients is associated with long-term functional disability and cognitive impairment, although this syndrome usually reverses after the successful treatment of sepsis. Once the respiratory and hemodynamic states are stabilized, patients with severe sepsis or septic shock should receive rehabilitation as soon as possible because early initiation of rehabilitation can reduce the duration of delirium. We expect to see further pathophysiological data and the development of novel treatments for SAD now that reliable and consistent definitions of SAD have been established. PMID:27011789

  3. Elderly patients with a hip fracture: the risk for delirium.

    PubMed

    Schuurmans, Marieke J; Duursma, Sijmen A; Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie M; Clevers, Gert-Jan; Pel-Littel, Ruth

    2003-05-01

    This prospective study investigated risk factors for delirium in elderly hip fracture patients that could be recognized by nurses. Data were collected on predisposing and precipitating factors for delirium from 92 elderly patients with a hip fracture. Predisposing factors included age, gender, sensory impairments, functional impairment before the hip fracture, residency before admission, pre-existing cognitive impairment, comorbidities, and medication use. Precipitating factors included factors related to surgery and to the postoperative period. Factors related to surgery included time between admission and surgery, type of surgery, type of anesthesia, duration of surgery and anesthesia, and complications during surgery. Factors studied in the postoperative period were slow recovery, malnutrition, dehydration, addition of three or more medications, introduction of bladder catheter, infections, complications and falls, and use of morphine. Eighteen patients developed delirium, as diagnosed by a geriatrician by using the Diagnostic Statistical Manual-IV criteria. Data on delirious patients were compared with the data on non-delirious patients. The findings confirm that elderly hip fracture patients with premorbid ADL dependency, psychiatric comorbidities (including dementia), and a high number of other comorbid problems are at risk for the development of delirium. Based on these findings, it is recommended that nurses should assess patients' pre-fracture functional and cognitive capacities in an early stage of the hospital stay. Nurses should also be alert to postoperative delirium in "healthy elderly" patients. Monitoring of symptoms postoperatively in all elderly patients is advised. PMID:12764718

  4. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Postoperative Delirium after Major Surgery in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raats, Jelle W.; van Eijsden, Wilbert A.; Crolla, Rogier M. P. H.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2015-01-01

    Background Early identification of patients at risk for delirium is important, since adequate well timed interventions could prevent occurrence of delirium and related detrimental outcomes. The aim of this study is to evaluate prognostic factors for delirium, including factors describing frailty, in elderly patients undergoing major surgery. Methods We included patients of 65 years and older, who underwent elective surgery from March 2013 to November 2014. Patients had surgery for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) or colorectal cancer. Delirium was scored prospectively using the Delirium Observation Screening Scale. Pre- and peri-operative predictors of delirium were analyzed using regression analysis. Outcomes after delirium included adverse events, length of hospital stay, discharge destination and mortality. Results We included 232 patients. 51 (22%) underwent surgery for AAA and 181 (78%) for colorectal cancer. Postoperative delirium occurred in 35 patients (15%). Predictors of postoperative delirium included: delirium in medical history (Odds Ratio 12 [95% Confidence Interval 2.7–50]), advancing age (Odds Ratio 2.0 [95% Confidence Interval 1.1–3.8]) per 10 years, and ASA-score ≥3 (Odds Ratio 2.6 [95% Confidence Interval 1.1–5.9]). Occurrence of delirium was related to an increase in adverse events, length of hospital stay and mortality. Conclusion Postoperative delirium is a frequent complication after major surgery in elderly patients and is related to an increase in adverse events, length of hospital stay, and mortality. A delirium in the medical history, advanced age, and ASA-score may assist in defining patients at increased risk for delirium. Further attention to prevention of delirium is essential in elderly patients undergoing major surgery. PMID:26291459

  5. Nonpharmacological interventions to prevent delirium: an evidence-based systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rivosecchi, Ryan M; Smithburger, Pamela L; Svec, Susan; Campbell, Shauna; Kane-Gill, Sandra L

    2015-02-01

    Development of delirium in critical care patients is associated with increased length of stay, hospital costs, and mortality. Delirium occurs across all inpatient settings, although critically ill patients who require mechanical ventilation are at the highest risk. Overall, evidence to support the use of antipsychotics to either prevent or treat delirium is lacking, and these medications can have adverse effects. The pain, agitation, and delirium guidelines of the American College of Critical Care Medicine provide the strongest level of recommendation for the use of nonpharmacological approaches to prevent delirium, but questions remain about which nonpharmacological interventions are beneficial. PMID:25639576

  6. From Antiquity to the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor: A History of Delirium Tremens.

    PubMed

    Porcel, F J Rodriguez; Schutta, H S

    2015-01-01

    Delirium associated with excessive alcohol consumption has been known since antiquity. This condition became more common as the supply of distilled fermented liquors increased. Delirium, including delirium associated with excessive alcohol consumption, was for many centuries regarded as a form of brain inflammation - "phrenitis" - and was treated with depletion. At the end of the eighteenth century treatment by depletion of alcohol-related delirium began to be replaced by sedation and led to significantly better outcomes. Thomas Sutton established that alcohol-related delirium was a disease sui generis, distinct from phrenitis, and he named it delirium tremens. Because historical accounts of this disease are rare, brief, and not easily accessible, we offer this account of events that culminated in the discovery of the molecular basis of delirium tremens. PMID:26444921

  7. Pain Assessment in Hospitalized Older Adults With Dementia and Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Christina May; Monroe, Todd; Mion, Lorraine C.

    2015-01-01

    Pain can have negative effects leading to prolonged hospital stays. Determining the presence of uncontrolled and untreated pain in patients with cognitive impairments such as delirium, dementia, and delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) is challenging. One tool commonly suggested for use in assessment of pain in older adults with cognitive impairment is the Pain Assessment In Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) scale. Proper use of the PAINAD scale as part of a comprehensive pain management plan can help reduce the likelihood of a patient experiencing unrecognized and untreated pain. Using an individual example, this article illustrates best practices in pain assessment and management for a woman experiencing DSD during an acute hospitalization. PMID:24800815

  8. Sepsis associated delirium mimicking postoperative delirium as the initial presenting symptom of urosepsis in a patient who underwent nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Nag, Deb Sanjay; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Singh, Harprit

    2016-05-16

    We report a case of 70 years old male who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy for renal calculi. After an uneventful recovery from anaesthesia, the patient developed delirium which manifested as restlessness, agitation, irritability and combative behavior. All other clinical parameters including arterial blood gas, chest X-ray and core temperature were normal and the patient remained haemodynamically stable. But 45 min later the patient developed florid manifestations of septic shock. He was aggressively managed in a protocolized manner as per the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines in the Critical Care Unit and recovered completely. There are no case reports showing postoperative delirium as the only initial presentation of severe sepsis, with other clinical parameters remaining normal. Both urosepsis and sepsis associated delirium have very high mortality. High index of suspicion and a protocolized approach in the management of sepsis can save lives. PMID:27182528

  9. Sepsis associated delirium mimicking postoperative delirium as the initial presenting symptom of urosepsis in a patient who underwent nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Deb Sanjay; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Singh, Harprit

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of 70 years old male who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy for renal calculi. After an uneventful recovery from anaesthesia, the patient developed delirium which manifested as restlessness, agitation, irritability and combative behavior. All other clinical parameters including arterial blood gas, chest X-ray and core temperature were normal and the patient remained haemodynamically stable. But 45 min later the patient developed florid manifestations of septic shock. He was aggressively managed in a protocolized manner as per the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines in the Critical Care Unit and recovered completely. There are no case reports showing postoperative delirium as the only initial presentation of severe sepsis, with other clinical parameters remaining normal. Both urosepsis and sepsis associated delirium have very high mortality. High index of suspicion and a protocolized approach in the management of sepsis can save lives. PMID:27182528

  10. Risk of Pre-and Post-Operative Delirium and the Delirium Elderly At Risk (DEAR) Tool in Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Freter, Susan; Dunbar, Michael; Koller, Katalin; MacKnight, Chris; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Delirium is common after hip fracture. Previous work has shown that a simple delirium risk factor tool, the Delirium Elderly At Risk instrument (DEAR), has a high inter-rater reliability in this population. Little research has looked at the ability of risk factor screening tools to identify patients at high risk of pre-operative delirium. This study investigates the ability of the DEAR to identify patients at high risk of pre-operative delirium, as well as reporting its performance in a post-operative validation sample. Associations between delirium risk factors and pre-operative delirium are explored. Methods This prospective cohort study took place on an orthopedic in-patient service at a University-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Patients aged 65 and older who were admitted for surgical repair of hip fracture (N = 283) were assessed pre-operatively for 5 delirium risk factors (cognitive impairment, sensory impairment, functional dependence, substance use, age) using the DEAR. Patients were assessed for delirium using the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Confusion Assessment Method pre-operatively and on post-operative days 1, 3 and 5. Characteristics of patients who developed delirium were compared with the characteristics of those who did not. Results Delirium was present in 58% (95% CI = 52–63%) of patients pre-operatively and 42% (95% CI = 36–48%) post-operatively. Individually, sensory impairment (χ2 = 21.7, p = .0001), functional dependence (χ2 = 24.1, p = .0001), cognitive impairment (χ2 = 55.5, p = .0001) and substance use (χ2 = 7.5, p = .007) were significantly associated with pre-operative delirium, as was wait-time for surgery (t = 3.1, p = .003) and length of stay (t = 2.8, p =.03). In multivariate modeling, the strongest association with pre-operative delirium was cognitive impairment. Conclusions The DEAR, a simple, delirium risk factor screening tool, can be used to identify hip fracture patients at risk of

  11. Randomized Trial of a Delirium Abatement Program for Post-acute Skilled Nursing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Marcantonio, Edward R.; Bergmann, Margaret A.; Kiely, Dan K.; Orav, E John; Jones, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a Delirium Abatement Program (DAP) can shorten the duration of delirium among new admissions to post-acute care (PAC). Design Cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting Eight skilled nursing facilities specializing in PAC within a single metropolitan region. Participants Four hundred fifty-seven participants with delirium at PAC admission. Intervention The DAP consisted of four steps: 1) assessment for delirium within 5 days of PAC admission, 2) assessment and correction of common reversible causes of delirium, 3) prevention of complications of delirium, and 4) restoration of function. Measurements Eligible patients were screened by trained researchers. Those with Confusion Assessment Method defined delirium were eligible for participation via proxy consent. Two weeks and one month after enrollment, regardless of location, participants were re-assessed for delirium by researchers blind to intervention status. Results Nurses at DAP sites detected delirium in 41% of participants vs. 12% in usual care (UC) sites (p<.001) and completed DAP documentation in most delirium-detected participants. However, the DAP intervention had no impact on delirium persistence based on two measurements at 2 weeks (DAP 68% vs. UC 66%) and 1 month (DAP 60% vs. UC 51%), adjusted p values ≥ 0.20. Adjusting for baseline differences between DAP and UC participants and restricting analysis to delirium-detected DAP participants did not alter the results. Conclusion Detection of delirium improved at the DAP sites, however, the DAP had no impact on the persistence of delirium. This effectiveness trial demonstrated that a nurse-led DAP intervention was not effective in typical PAC facilities. PMID:20487083

  12. Delirium in Older Emergency Department Patients: Recognition, Risk Factors, and Psychomotor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin H.; Zimmerman, Eli E.; Cutler, Nathan; Schnelle, John; Morandi, Alessandro; Dittus, Robert S.; Storrow, Alan B.; Ely, E. Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Missing delirium in the emergency department (ED) has been described as a medical error, yet this diagnosis is frequently unrecognized by emergency physicians. Identifying a subset of patients at high risk for delirium may improve delirium screening compliance by emergency physicians. We sought 1) to determine how often delirium is missed in the ED and how often these missed cases are detected by admitting hospital physicians at the time of admission, 2) to identify delirium risk factors in older ED patients, and 3) to characterize delirium by psychomotor subtypes in the ED setting. Methods This cross-sectional study was a convenience sample of patients conducted at a tertiary care, academic ED. English speaking patients who were 65 years and older and present in the ED for less than 12 hours at the time of enrollment were included. Patients were excluded if they refused consent, were previously enrolled, had severe dementia, were unarousable to verbal stimuli for all delirium assessments, or had incomplete data. Delirium status was determined by using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU) administered by trained research assistants. Recognition of delirium by emergency and hospital physicians was determined from the medical record, blinded to CAM-ICU status. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent delirium risk factors. The Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale was used to classify delirium by its psychomotor subtypes. Results Inclusion and exclusion criteria were met in 303 patients and 25 (8.3%) presented to the ED with delirium. The vast majority (92.0%, 95%CI: 74.0% - 99.0%) of delirious patients had the hypoactive psychomotor subtype. Of the 25 patients with delirium, 19 (76.0%, 95%CI: 54.9% - 90.6%) were not recognized to be delirious by the emergency physician. Of the 16 admitted delirious patients who were undiagnosed by the emergency physicians, 15 (93.8%, 95%CI: 69.8% - 99.8%) remained

  13. Differential Diagnosis in Older Adults: Dementia, Depression, and Delirium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gintner, Gary G.

    1995-01-01

    Examines three common disorders, dementia, depression, and delirium, which can be particularly difficult to diagnose in older adults. Presents three aspects that are helpful in making a decision: age-related differences, medical issues that need to be ruled out, and assessment methods particularly useful in the diagnostic process. (JPS)

  14. Effect of postoperative delirium on outcome after hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, David M; Aharonoff, Gina B; Karp, Adam; Capla, Edward L; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Koval, Kenneth J

    2004-05-01

    Nine-hundred twenty-one community-dwelling patients 65 years of age or older, who sustained an operatively treated hip fracture from July 1, 1987 to June 30, 1998 were followed up for the development of postoperative delirium. The outcomes examined in the current study were postoperative complication rates, in-hospital mortality, hospital length of stay, hospital discharge status, 1-year mortality rate, place of residence, recovery of ambulatory ability, and activities of daily living 1 year after surgery. Forty-seven (5.1%) patients were diagnosed with postoperative delirium. Patients who had delirium develop were more likely to be male, have a history of mild dementia, and have had surgery under general anesthesia. Patients who had postoperative delirium develop had a significantly longer length of hospitalization. They also had significantly higher rates of mortality at 1 year, were less likely to recover their prefracture level of ambulation, and were more likely to show a decline in level of independence in basic activities of daily living at the 1-year followup. There was no difference in the rate of postoperative complications, in-hospital mortality, discharge residence, and recovery of instrumental activities of daily living at 1 year. PMID:15187857

  15. Proteomic and epigenomic markers of sepsis-induced delirium (SID)

    PubMed Central

    Sfera, Adonis; Price, Amy I.; Gradini, Roberto; Cummings, Michael; Osorio, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    In elderly population sepsis is one of the leading causes of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in the United States. Sepsis-induced delirium (SID) is the most frequent cause of delirium in ICU (Martin et al., 2010). Together delirium and SID represent under-recognized public health problems which place an increasing financial burden on the US health care system, currently estimated at 143–152 billion dollars per year (Leslie et al., 2008). The interest in SID was recently reignited as it was demonstrated that, contrary to prior beliefs, cognitive deficits induced by this condition may be irreversible and lead to dementia (Pandharipande et al., 2013; Brummel et al., 2014). Conversely, it is construed that diagnosing SID early or mitigating its full blown manifestations may preempt geriatric cognitive disorders. Biological markers specific for sepsis and SID would facilitate the development of potential therapies, monitor the disease process and at the same time enable elderly individuals to make better informed decisions regarding surgeries which may pose the risk of complications, including sepsis and delirium. This article proposes a battery of peripheral blood markers to be used for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in sepsis and SID. Though each individual marker may not be specific enough, we believe that together as a battery they may achieve the necessary accuracy to answer two important questions: who may be vulnerable to the development of sepsis, and who may develop SID and irreversible cognitive deficits following sepsis? PMID:26579527

  16. Proteomic and epigenomic markers of sepsis-induced delirium (SID).

    PubMed

    Sfera, Adonis; Price, Amy I; Gradini, Roberto; Cummings, Michael; Osorio, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    In elderly population sepsis is one of the leading causes of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in the United States. Sepsis-induced delirium (SID) is the most frequent cause of delirium in ICU (Martin et al., 2010). Together delirium and SID represent under-recognized public health problems which place an increasing financial burden on the US health care system, currently estimated at 143-152 billion dollars per year (Leslie et al., 2008). The interest in SID was recently reignited as it was demonstrated that, contrary to prior beliefs, cognitive deficits induced by this condition may be irreversible and lead to dementia (Pandharipande et al., 2013; Brummel et al., 2014). Conversely, it is construed that diagnosing SID early or mitigating its full blown manifestations may preempt geriatric cognitive disorders. Biological markers specific for sepsis and SID would facilitate the development of potential therapies, monitor the disease process and at the same time enable elderly individuals to make better informed decisions regarding surgeries which may pose the risk of complications, including sepsis and delirium. This article proposes a battery of peripheral blood markers to be used for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in sepsis and SID. Though each individual marker may not be specific enough, we believe that together as a battery they may achieve the necessary accuracy to answer two important questions: who may be vulnerable to the development of sepsis, and who may develop SID and irreversible cognitive deficits following sepsis? PMID:26579527

  17. [Summary of the Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline 'Delirium in elderly people'].

    PubMed

    van der Weele, G M; Olde Rikkert, M G M; Eizenga, W H; Assendelft, W J J

    2003-05-17

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline 'Delirium in elderly people' contains a number of key messages. These are: Consider the diagnosis of delirium in the case of changes in consciousness and attention, incoherent thinking or disorientation, if this picture developed over a short period of time (hours to days) and if the symptoms vary over the 24-hour period. Delirium is provoked by one or more somatic disorders; investigation and treatment of these disorders is an essential part of managing delirium. It is often difficult to distinguish delirium from dementia and depression. Although delirium is generally reversible, the prognosis in the elderly is relatively poor. If delirium is accompanied by fear or agitation, haloperidol is the drug of first choice, but in delirium induced by alcohol withdrawal or benzodiazepine withdrawal, a short-acting benzodiazepine such as lorazepam or oxazepam is indicated. Part of the treatment, but also prevention of delirium is focused on inducing factors that can provoke a delirium, such as medication with an anticholinergic effect, polypharmacy, inadequate nutrition, dehydration, sleep deprivation, immobility and sensory handicaps. PMID:12784530

  18. Symptom profile of postoperative delirium in patients with and without dementia.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Maria; Stenvall, Michael; Olofsson, Birgitta

    2012-09-01

    This study compares the symptom profile of patients with postoperative delirium after femoral neck fracture surgery in those with and without dementia. In this study, 129 patients of age ≥70 years (mean age ±SD, 86±6 yr, 72% women) with postoperative delirium, were included. Delirium and dementia were diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) criteria. Of the 129 patients with delirium, 54 (42%) had a dementia disorder. Patients with delirium superimposed on dementia more often had any hyperactive and pure emotional delirium. Communication difficulties and symptoms such as restlessness/agitation, aggressive behavior, and irritability were more commonly found in the dementia group. In contrast, patients with delirium but without dementia were more often diagnosed with pure hypoactive and any psychotic delirium. The symptom profile of postoperative delirium varies according to whether it occurs in patients with or without dementia. This may indicate that postoperative delirium among patients with hip fracture differs based on the presence or absence of dementia. PMID:23124010

  19. A Family-Focused Delirium Educational Initiative With Practice and Research Implications

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Christina May; Monroe, Todd; Mcdougall, Graham J.; Fick, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is burdensome and psychologically distressing for formal and informal caregivers, yet family caregivers often have very little understanding or knowledge about delirium. As part of a large multisite intervention study, the Early Nurse Detection of Delirium Superimposed on Dementia (END-DSD), the authors identified a need for family educational materials. This educational initiative’s purpose was to develop a delirium admission brochure for family members to aid in the prevention and earlier identification of delirium during hospitalization. A brochure was developed using an iterative approach with an expert panel. Following three iterations, a final brochure was approved. The authors found that an iterative expert consensus approach can be used to develop a brochure for families. Major content areas were helping families understand the difference between delirium and dementia, signs and symptoms of delirium, causes of delirium, and strategies family members can use to prevent delirium. A caregiver-focused educational brochure is one intervention to use in targeting older adults hospitalized with delirium. PMID:26165565

  20. Prevalence of Delirium in Opium Users after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Eizadi-Mood, Nastaran; Aghadavoudi, Omid; Najarzadegan, Mohammad Reza; Fard, Masoud Mozhdehi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction, especially delirium commonly occurs after cardiac surgery. Clinical evidences suggest an increase in delirium in opium abusers after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) surgery. In this study, the prevalence of delirium in addict (opium user) and nonaddict patients after CABG were compared. Methods: In a cross-sectional study after obtaining institutional approval and informed consent, 325 patients candidate for elective CABG were included in the study. All patients with history of opium abuse met the criteria for opioid dependence using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition definitions. Delirium after CABG was assessed in addict (opium user) and nonaddict patients up to a maximum of 5 days after surgery with the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist. Results: A total of 325 patients were evaluated (208 without and 117 with a history of opium abuse). Postoperative delirium occurred within 72 h after surgery in 44.31% of all patients. There was a significant difference in the prevalence of postoperative delirium between the opium users (80.7%) and nonaddict patients (25%) in the intensive care unit (P < 0.001). Opium addiction was a risk factor for postoperative delirium after CABG Surgery. Conclusions: Delirium after CABG surgery is more prevalent in opium users compared with nonaddict patients. Therefore, opium abuse is a possible risk factor for postoperative delirium in cardiac surgical patients. PMID:25105003

  1. [Emergence delirium in children - prophylaxis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Wermelt, Julius Z; Ellerkmann, Richard K

    2016-07-01

    Emergence Delirium in children after general anesthesia is a common and self limitating event. Although it might be seen as being harmless it can cause other serious complications and might leave both parents and other caregivers with a negative impression behind. Although the cause may still not be clear, potential predictors can be named: preschool age, the use of fast acting volatile anesthestics, higher preoperative anxiety levels and postoperative pain.A child-focused approach to reduce preoperative anxiety focusing on distraction methods rather than pharmacological sedation may be the key as well as sufficient postoperative pain control and the use of total intravenous anesthesia. Parenteal presence during induction of anaesthesia (PPIA) may be beneficial to reduce preoperative anxiety levels, but has failed to prove a better outcome regarding ED.The use of age adopted scores/scales to diagnose ED and Pain are mandatory.In the case of an ED event it is most important to protect the child from self injury and the loss of the iv-line. Postoperative pian needs to be ruled out before treating ED. Most cases can be treated by interrupting the situation and putting the child "back to sleep". Short acting drugs as Propofol have been used successfully due to its pharmacodynamics and short acting profile. Alternatively alpha-agonists or ketamin may be preferred by other authors. If potential predictors and a positive history are present, prophylactic treatment should be considered. A TIVA or the use of alpha-2-agonists have proven to be successful in reducing the risk of an ED. Midazolam may reduce preoperative anxiety but not the incidence of ED and should therefore be used carefully and is not a good choice in PACU for the treatment of ED.Parents who witnessed ED in their children should be guided and followed up. Explaining this phenomenon to parents beforehand should be part of the pre anaesthesia clinic talk and written consent.Standard protocols should be in

  2. Developing and implementing an integrated delirium prevention system of care: a theory driven, participatory research study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delirium is a common complication for older people in hospital. Evidence suggests that delirium incidence in hospital may be reduced by about a third through a multi-component intervention targeted at known modifiable risk factors. We describe the research design and conceptual framework underpinning it that informed the development of a novel delirium prevention system of care for acute hospital wards. Particular focus of the study was on developing an implementation process aimed at embedding practice change within routine care delivery. Methods We adopted a participatory action research approach involving staff, volunteers, and patient and carer representatives in three northern NHS Trusts in England. We employed Normalization Process Theory to explore knowledge and ward practices on delirium and delirium prevention. We established a Development Team in each Trust comprising senior and frontline staff from selected wards, and others with a potential role or interest in delirium prevention. Data collection included facilitated workshops, relevant documents/records, qualitative one-to-one interviews and focus groups with multiple stakeholders and observation of ward practices. We used grounded theory strategies in analysing and synthesising data. Results Awareness of delirium was variable among staff with no attention on delirium prevention at any level; delirium prevention was typically neither understood nor perceived as meaningful. The busy, chaotic and challenging ward life rhythm focused primarily on diagnostics, clinical observations and treatment. Ward practices pertinent to delirium prevention were undertaken inconsistently. Staff welcomed the possibility of volunteers being engaged in delirium prevention work, but existing systems for volunteer support were viewed as a barrier. Our evolving conception of an integrated model of delirium prevention presented major implementation challenges flowing from minimal understanding of delirium prevention

  3. Delirium in a 74-year-old man: correct imaging revealed the truth.

    PubMed

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Manjaly, Mussa; Hussain, Waleed Mohd; Fatani, Mohamad Ibrahim; Turkistani, Ahmad; Showkat, Khalid; Maimani, Gassan Al; Qadmani, Ahmad; Akhtar, Mubeena

    2009-01-01

    Delirium is a cognitive disorder. DSM-IV criteria for delirium must include both acute onset and fluctuating symptoms; disturbance of consciousness (including inattention); at least one of the following: disorganised thinking, disorientation, memory impairment or perceptual disturbance; and evidence of a putative causal medical condition. Traditionally, the course has been described as transient in which recovery is likely to be complete if the underlying aetiological factor is promptly corrected or is self-limited. The most common precipitating causes in elderly include sepsis, dehydration and drugs. Work-up for delirium is limited to septic screening, baseline investigations and imaging. Patients with delirium without focal signs and with either evidence for a medical aetiology of delirium or pre-diagnosed dementia are at a very low risk of having focal lesions in their contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. We are presenting an interesting case of delirium with urosepsis whose imaging revealed milliary brain tuberculomas on contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:21847424

  4. Study protocol—investigation of the Delirium Observation Screening Scale (DOSS) for the routine detection of delirium in the care home setting: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Teale, Elizabeth; Young, John; Siddiqi, Najma; Munyombwe, Theresa; Harrison, Jennifer; Schuurmanns, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Delirium is a common and distressing condition associated with frailty, dementia and comorbidity. These are common in long-term care settings. Residents in care homes are therefore at particular risk of delirium. Despite this, methods to detect delirium in care homes are lacking, with existing diagnostic tools taking too long, or requiring specific training to deliver. This limits their feasibility for use for the routine detection of delirium by care home staff. Routine screening for delirium in care homes would allow timely attention to exacerbating factors to attenuate the episode, and facilitate future research into delirium in the care home environment. Methods Residents from 4 large care homes will be asked to consent (or their consultees asked to provide a declaration of agreement) to participate in the study. Care home staff will administer the 25-item Delirium Observation Screening Scale (DOSS)—a delirium screening tool based on observed behaviours—and this will be tested against the research standard Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) administered by trained research assistants performed two times per week for all participating residents. Analysis Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios and a diagnostic OR will be calculated for the detection of delirium with the 25-item DOSS. The feasibility of routine delirium screening and the scaling properties of the 25-item DOSS will also be explored. Ethics and Dissemination For residents lacking capacity to participate, a consultee will be approached for a declaration of agreement for inclusion in the study. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and disseminated in written format to clinical commissioning groups, general practitioners and relevant third parties. Trial registration number ISRCTN14608554. PMID:27324706

  5. Delirium Diagnosis Methodology used in Research: A Survey-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, KJ; Nelliot, A; Inouye, SK; Ely, EW; Bienvenu, OJ; Lee, HB; Needham, DM

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe methodology used to diagnose delirium in research studies evaluating delirium detection tools. Design A survey addressing reference rater methodology for delirium diagnosis, including rater characteristics, sources of patient information and diagnostic process. Setting Survey completed via web or telephone interview according to respondent preference. Participants Authors of 39 studies included in 3 recent systematic reviews of delirium detection instruments in hospitalized patients. Results Authors from 85% (n=33) of the 39 eligible studies responded to the survey. The median (Interquartile Range [IQR]) number of raters per study was 2.5 (2–3); 79% were physicians. The raters’ median (IQR) duration of clinical experience with delirium diagnosis was 7 (4–10) years, with 5% having no prior clinical experience. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated in 70% of studies. Cognitive tests and delirium detection tools were used in the delirium reference rating process in 61% (n=21) and 45% (n=15) of studies, respectively, with 33% (n=11) using both and 27% (n=9) using neither. When patients were too drowsy or declined to participate in delirium evaluation, 70% (n=23) of studies used all available information for delirium diagnosis, while 15% excluded such patients. Conclusions Significant variability exists in reference standard methods for delirium diagnosis in published research. Increasing standardization by documenting inter-rater reliability, using standardized cognitive and delirium detection tools, incorporating diagnostic expert consensus panels and using all available information in patients declining or unable to participate with formal testing may help advance delirium research by increasing consistency of case detection and improving generalizability of research results. PMID:24745562

  6. Delirium risk stratification in consecutive unselected admissions to acute medicine: validation of externally derived risk scores

    PubMed Central

    Pendlebury, Sarah T.; Lovett, Nicola; Smith, Sarah C.; Cornish, Emily; Mehta, Ziyah; Rothwell, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: reliable delirium risk stratification will aid recognition, anticipation and prevention and will facilitate targeting of resources in clinical practice as well as identification of at-risk patients for research. Delirium risk scores have been derived for acute medicine, but none has been prospectively validated in external cohorts. We therefore aimed to determine the reliability of externally derived risk scores in a consecutive cohort of older acute medicine patients. Methods: consecutive patients aged ≥65 over two 8-week periods (2010, 2012) were screened prospectively for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), and delirium was diagnosed using the DSM IV criteria. The reliability of existing delirium risk scores derived in acute medicine cohorts and simplified for use in routine clinical practice (USA, n = 2; Spain, n = 1; Indonesia, n = 1) was determined by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Delirium was defined as prevalent (on admission), incident (occurring during admission) and any (prevalent + incident) delirium. Results: among 308 consecutive patients aged ≥65 (mean age/SD = 81/8 years, 164 (54%) female), existing delirium risk scores had AUCs for delirium similar to those reported in their original internal validations ranging from 0.69 to 0.76 for any delirium and 0.73 to 0.83 for incident delirium. All scores performed better than chance but no one score was clearly superior. Conclusions: externally derived delirium risk scores performed well in our independent acute medicine population with reliability unaffected by simplification and might therefore facilitate targeting of multicomponent interventions in routine clinical practice. PMID:26764396

  7. New aspects of delirium in elderly patients with critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    van Eijsden, Willem A; Raats, Jelle W; Mulder, Paul GH; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2015-01-01

    Objective The primary objective was to identify possible risk factors for delirium in patients with critical limb ischemia undergoing surgery. The secondary objective was to study the effect of delirium on complications, the length of hospital stay, health care costs, and mortality. Methods All patients 65 years or older with critical limb ischemia undergoing surgery from February 2013 to July 2014 at Amphia Hospital, were included and followed up until December 31, 2014. Delirium was scored using the Delirium Observation Screening Scale (DOSS). Perioperative risk factors (age, comorbidity, factors of frailty, operation type, hemoglobulin, and transfusion) were collected and analyzed using logistic regression. Secondary outcomes were the number of complications, total hospital stay, extra health care costs per delirium, and mortality within 3 months and 6 months of surgery. Results We included 92 patients with critical limb ischemia undergoing surgery. Twenty-nine (32%) patients developed a delirium during admission, of whom 17 (59%) developed delirium preoperatively. After multivariable analysis, only diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] =6.23; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11–52.2; P=0.035) and Short Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire for Residential Care (SNAQ-RC) ≥3 (OR =5.55; 95% CI: 1.07–42.0; P=0.039) was significantly associated with the onset of delirium. Delirium was associated with longer hospital stay (P=0.001), increased health care costs, and higher mortality after 6 months (P<0.001). Conclusion Delirium is a common adverse event in patients with critical limb ischemia undergoing surgery with devastating outcome in the long term. Most patients developed delirium preoperatively, which indicates the need for early recognition and preventive strategies in the preoperative period. This study identified undernourishment and diabetes mellitus as independent risk factors for delirium. PMID:26451094

  8. Serial Administration of a Modified Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale for Delirium Screening

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Jennifer Gonik; Harrington, Mary Beth; Rudolph, James

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Because delirium is common and frequently unrecognized, this study sought to design a brief screening tool for a core feature of mental status and to validate the instrument as a serial assessment for delirium. Design Prospective cohort Setting Tertiary VA Hospital in New England Participants 100 Veterans admitted to the medical service Methods A consensus panel developed a modified version of the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (RASS) to capture alterations in consciousness. Upon admission and daily thereafter, patients were screened with the modified RASS and independently, underwent a comprehensive mental status interview by a geriatric expert, who determined if the criteria for delirium were met. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratio (LR) of the modified RASS for delirium are reported. Results As a single assessment, the modified RASS had a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 93% for delirium (LR=9.4). When used to detect change, serial modified RASS assessments had a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 92% (LR=8.9) in both prevalent and incident delirium. When prevalent cases were excluded, any change in the modified RASS had a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 92% for incident delirium (LR=10.2) Conclusion When administered daily, the modified RASS has good sensitivity and specificity for incident delirium. Given the brevity of the instrument (approximately 15 seconds), consideration should be given to incorporating the modified RASS as a daily screening measure for consciousness and delirium. PMID:22173963

  9. Comparison of the risk of adverse events between risperidone and haloperidol in delirium patients.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Shingo; Yamamoto, Kenji; Hoshino, Syunya; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Sakai, Yoshiro; Miyaoka, Hitoshi

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the risk of adverse events for risperidone and haloperidol in delirium patients. The authors conducted a retrospective study with medical records of 266 Japanese delirium inpatients who were referred to them between July 2001 and May 2005. Information on gender, age, delirium, drug therapy, adverse events, death, and other relevant factors was collected and analyzed for each patient. As a primary antipsychotic drug for the treatment of delirium, risperidone was used in 93 patients; oral haloperidol was used in 95; and intravenous or intramuscular haloperidol was used in 61. The incidence of adverse events was 6.5% for risperidone, 31.4% for oral haloperidol, and 32.8% for haloperidol injection. The incidence of death during delirium was 3.2% for risperidone, 2.1% for oral haloperidol, and 13.1% for haloperidol injection. The incidence of death within 1 year after the onset of delirium was 30.1% for risperidone, 29.5% for oral haloperidol, and 45.9% for haloperidol injection. Between risperidone, oral haloperidol, and intravenous or intramuscular haloperidol the incidence of adverse events was significantly lowest for risperidone, and the incidence of death during delirium was significantly highest for intravenous or intramuscular haloperidol. The use of haloperidol as a first-line drug in delirium patients who can receive the drug orally will not contribute to the establishment of drug therapy for delirium based on risk-benefit assessment of the therapy. PMID:17472596

  10. Delirium is associated with poor rehabilitation outcome in elderly patients treated for femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Birgitta; Lundström, Maria; Borssén, Bengt; Nyberg, Lars; Gustafson, Yngve

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe risk factors for delirium and the impact of delirium on the rehabilitation outcome for patients operated for femoral neck fractures. Sixty-one patients, aged 70 years or older, consecutively admitted to the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Umeå University Hospital, Sweden for femoral neck fractures were assessed and interviewed during hospitalization and at follow up 4 months after surgery. Delirium occurred in 38 (62%) patients and those who developed delirium were more often demented and/or depressed. Patients with delirium were longer hospitalized and they were more dependent in their activity of daily living (ADL) on discharge and after 4 months. They had poorer psychological well-being and more medical complications than the nondelirious. A large proportion of the patients who developed delirium did not regain their previous walking ability and could not return to their prefracture living accommodation. Delirium after hip fracture surgery is very common especially among patients with dementia or depression. This study shows that delirium has a serious impact on the rehabilitation outcome from both short- and long-term perspectives. Because delirium can be prevented and treated, it is important to improve the care of elderly patients with hip fractures. PMID:15877637

  11. Impact of surgical approach on postoperative delirium in elderly patients undergoing gastrectomy: laparoscopic versus open approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young-Hee; Jeong, Hee-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative delirium is a frequent complication in elderly patients undergoing major abdominal surgery and is associated with a poor outcome. We compared postoperative delirium in elderly patients following laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG) versus open gastrectomy (OG). Methods In total, 130 patients aged ≥ 65 years with gastric cancer undergoing LG and OG were enrolled prospectively. Postoperative delirium and cognitive status were assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), respectively, for 3 days postoperatively. For CAM-positive patients, delirium severity was then assessed using the Delirium Index (DI). Results In total, 123 subjects (LG, n = 60; OG, n = 63) were included in the analysis. In both groups, the overall incidences of postoperative delirium were similar: 31.6% (19/60) in the LG group and 41.2% (26/63) in the OG group. When considering only those with delirium, the severity, expressed as the highest DI score, was similar between the groups. A decline in cognitive function (reduction in MMSE ≥ 2 points from baseline) during 3 days postoperatively was observed in 23 patients in the LG group (38.3%) and 27 patients in the OG group (42.9%) (P = 0.744). In both groups, postoperative cognitive decline was significantly associated with postoperative delirium (P < 0.001). Conclusions We found that, compared with traditional open gastrectomy, laparoscopic gastrectomy did not reduce either postoperative delirium or cognitive decline in elderly patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26257851

  12. The unfavorable nature of preoperative delirium in elderly hip fractured patients.

    PubMed

    Adunsky, Abraham; Levy, Rami; Heim, Michael; Mizrahi, Eliyahu; Arad, M

    2003-01-01

    The onset of delirium is frequent in elderly patients who sustain hip fractures. The purpose of this study was to characterize different patterns of preoperative and postoperative delirium, to study factors associated with preoperative delirium and to evaluate the possible different outcome of these patients. This retrospective study comprised 281 elderly patients with hip fractures undergoing surgical fixation. Data collection included age, sex, length of stay, type of fracture, cognitive status by mini mental state examination (MMSE), assessment of possible delirium by the confusion assessment method (CAM) and functional outcome assessed by functional independence measure (FIM). A database search was conducted to identify whether delirium onset occurred prior to or following surgery. About 31% of the total sample developed delirium. Delirious patients tended to be more disabled (P = 0.03) and cognitively impaired (P = 0.018), compared with non-delirious patients. Most delirious cases (53%) had their onset in the preoperative period. Patients with preoperative delirium were older (P = 0.03), had a lower prefracture mobility (P < 0.01), impaired cognition (P = 0.04) and showed an adverse functional outcome in terms of FIM score. Regression analysis showed that prefracture dementia, prefracture mobility and low MMSE scores were strongly associated with higher probability of having preoperative delirium, with no additional effect of other variables. It is concluded that preoperative delirium should be viewed as a separate entity with unfavorable nature and adverse outcome. Careful preventive measures and better treating strategies should be employed to avoid this clinical condition. PMID:12849100

  13. Preoperative risk factors of postoperative delirium after transurethral prostatectomy for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Sheng; Xu, Lingfan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Song; Liang, Chaozhao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this observational study was to investigate the occurrence of post operation delirium in the elderly patients undergoing the transurethral prostatectomy and to identify these factors associated with the delirium. 485 patients, undergoing the transurethral prostatectomy, were selected. Demographics, medical, cognitive and functional data, IPSS and NIH-CPSI score were collected as predictors for delirium. After surgery, the patients were divided on the basis of delirium onset within one week observation period, and the delirium was diagnosed by the Confusion Assessment Method. Totally, 21.23% (103) subjects were identified as the delirium and it lasted 2.9 ± 0.8 days. Patients with post operation delirium were significantly older and single, widowed and divorced, had a previous history of prehospitalization, were with the poor International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score, were more impaired in the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and had poor clock drawing test (CDT) and geriatric depression scale (GDS) score. Age, marital status, IPSS and NIH-CPIS score, cognitive and functional status and previous history of hospitalization are the predictors of post operation delirium. Our study has implications in preventing delirium via an early and targeted evaluation. PMID:26064386

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Family Caregiver Delirium Knowledge Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Bull, Margaret J; Avery, Jennifer Sjostedt; Boaz, Lesley; Oswald, Debra

    2015-01-01

    A valid, reliable measure of family caregivers' knowledge about delirium was not located in the literature; such an instrument is essential to assess learning needs and outcomes of education provided. The purpose of the current study was to (a) develop a family Caregiver Delirium Knowledge Questionnaire (CDKQ) based on the Symptom Interpretation Model; and (b) establish validity and reliability of the measure. The 19-item CDKQ was developed and administered to 164 family caregivers for community-dwelling older adults. Descriptive statistics were examined for all variables. Psychometric testing included confirmatory factor analysis, item-to-total correlations, and internal consistency reliability. A three-factor model provided the best fit for the data. The findings support initial validity and reliability of the CDKQ with family caregivers. Although the CDKQ was developed for use with family caregivers, it has potential for use with other caregivers, such as home health aides. PMID:25893726

  15. Excited delirium following use of synthetic cathinones (bath salts).

    PubMed

    Penders, Thomas M; Gestring, Richard E; Vilensky, Dmitry A

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic analogs of the cathinone molecule have seen increasing recreational use as substitutes for cocaine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy) and methamphetamine. Repeated use of these drugs is associated with a paranoid hallucinatory delirium. A subset of patients using these substances develops a syndrome of extreme agitation and violent behavior that has been reported following the use of other stimulant drugs that also produce rapid changes in brain monoamines. This syndrome, characterized as "excited delirium," presents to the acute care setting with a challenging combination of paranoia, severe agitation and violent behavior. These patients frequently suffer from dehydration, skeletal muscle damage and renal failure that may lead to multiorgan failure and death. Management of these individuals requires careful consideration of the consequences of interventions commonly implemented in medical settings to control dangerous aggressive behavior. PMID:22898445

  16. Cocaine-induced agitated delirium: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Plush, Theodore; Shakespeare, Walter; Jacobs, Dorian; Ladi, Larry; Sethi, Sheeba; Gasperino, James

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine use continues to be a major public health problem in the United States. Although many of the initial signs and symptoms of cocaine intoxication result from increased stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system, this condition can present as a spectrum of acuity from hypertension and tachycardia to multiorgan system failure. Classic features of acute intoxication include tachycardia, arterial vasoconstriction, enhanced thrombus formation, mydriasis, psychomotor agitation, and altered level of consciousness. At the extreme end of this toxidrome is a rare condition known as cocaine-induced agitated delirium. This syndrome is characterized by severe cardiopulmonary dysfunction, hyperthermia, and acute neurologic changes frequently leading to death. We report a case of cocaine-induced agitated delirium in a man who presented to our institution in a paradoxical form of circulatory shock. Rapid evaluation, recognition, and proper management enabled our patient not only to survive but also to leave the hospital without neurologic sequelae. PMID:24212597

  17. Delirium in older adults: a chronic cognitive disorder?

    PubMed

    Cole, Martin G; Mccusker, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Delirium is defined as a neurocognitive disorder characterized by sudden onset, fluctuating course, and disturbances in level of consciousness, attention, orientation, memory, thought, perception, and behavior (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). It occurs in hyperactive, hypoactive, or mixed forms in up to 50% of older hospital patients (Inouye et al., 2014) and 70% of older long-term care residents (McCusker et al., 2011), many with pre-existing dementia (Fick et al., 2002). PMID:27246118

  18. Pharmacological management of anticholinergic delirium - theory, evidence and practice.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andrew H; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2016-03-01

    The spectrum of anticholinergic delirium is a common complication following drug overdose. Patients with severe toxicity can have significant distress and behavioural problems that often require pharmacological management. Cholinesterase inhibitors, such as physostigmine, are effective but widespread use has been limited by concerns about safety, optimal dosing and variable supply. Case series support efficacy in reversal of anticholinergic delirium. However doses vary widely and higher doses commonly lead to cholinergic toxicity. Seizures are reported in up to 2.5% of patients and occasional cardiotoxic effects are also recorded. This article reviews the serendipitous path whereby physostigmine evolved into the preferred anticholinesterase antidote largely without any research to indicate the optimal dosing strategy. Adverse events observed in case series should be considered in the context of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of physostigmine which suggest a much longer latency before the maximal increase in brain acetylcholine than had been previously assumed. This would favour protocols that use lower doses and longer re-dosing intervals. We propose based on the evidence reviewed that the use of cholinesterase inhibitors should be considered in anticholinergic delirium that has not responded to non-pharmacological delirium management. The optimal risk/benefit would be with a titrated dose of 0.5 to 1 mg physostigmine (0.01-0.02 mg kg(-1) in children) with a minimum delay of 10-15 min before re-dosing. Slower onset and longer acting agents such as rivastigmine would also be logical but more research is needed to guide the appropriate dose in this setting. PMID:26589572

  19. Delirium transitions in the medical ICU: exploring the role of sleep quality and other factors

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; King, Lauren M.; Neufeld, Karin J.; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Rowden, Annette M.; Collop, Nancy A.; Needham, Dale M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Disrupted sleep is a common and potentially modifiable risk factor for delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU). As part of a quality improvement (QI) project to promote sleep in the ICU, we examined the association of perceived sleep quality ratings and other patient and ICU risk factors with daily transition to delirium. Design Secondary analysis of prospective observational study. Setting Medical ICU (MICU) over a 201-day period. Patients 223 patients with ≥1 night in the MICU in between two consecutive days of delirium assessment. Interventions None Measurements Daily perceived sleep quality ratings were measured using the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ). Delirium was measured twice-daily using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU (CAM-ICU). Other covariates evaluated included: age, sex, race, ICU admission diagnosis, nighttime mechanical ventilation status, prior day’s delirium status, and daily sedation using benzodiazepines and opioids, via both bolus and continuous infusion. Main Results Perceived sleep quality was similar in patients who were ever versus never delirious in the ICU (median [IQR] ratings 58 [35-76] vs. 57 [33-78], respectively p=0.71), and perceived sleep quality was unrelated to delirium transition (adjusted OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.99-1.00). In mechanically ventilated patients, receipt of a continuous benzodiazepine and/or opioid infusion was associated with delirium transition (adjusted OR 4.02, 95% CI 2.19-7.38, p<0.001) and patients reporting use of pharmacological sleep aids at home were less likely to transition to delirium (adjusted OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.20-0.80, p=0.01). Conclusions We found no association between daily perceived sleep quality ratings and transition to delirium. Infusion of benzodiazepine and/or opioid medications was strongly associated with transition to delirium in the ICU in mechanically ventilated patients and is an important, modifiable risk factor for delirium in critically ill

  20. Excited delirium syndrome (ExDS): treatment options and considerations.

    PubMed

    Vilke, Gary M; Bozeman, William P; Dawes, Donald M; Demers, Gerard; Wilson, Michael P

    2012-04-01

    The term Excited Delirium Syndrome (ExDS) has traditionally been used in the forensic literature to describe findings in a subgroup of patients with delirium who suffered lethal consequences from their untreated severe agitation.(1-5) Excited delirium syndrome, also known as agitated delirium, is generally defined as altered mental status and combativeness or aggressiveness. Although the exact signs and symptoms are difficult to define precisely, clinical findings often include many of the following: tolerance to significant pain, rapid breathing, sweating, severe agitation, elevated temperature, delirium, non-compliance or poor awareness to direction from police or medical personnel, lack of fatiguing, unusual or superhuman strength, and inappropriate clothing for the current environment. It has become increasingly recognized that individuals displaying ExDS are at high risk for sudden death, and ExDS therefore represents a true medical emergency. Recently the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) published the findings of a white paper on the topic of ExDS to better find consensus on the issues of definition, diagnosis, and treatment.(6) In so doing, ACEP joined the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) in recognizing ExDS as a medical condition. For both paramedics and physicians, the difficulty in diagnosing the underlying cause of ExDS in an individual patient is that the presenting clinical signs and symptoms of ExDS can be produced by a wide variety of clinical disease processes. For example, agitation, combativeness, and altered mental status can be produced by hypoglycemia, thyroid storm, certain kinds of seizures, and these conditions can be difficult to distinguish from those produced by cocaine or methamphetamine intoxication.(7) Prehospital personnel are generally not expected to differentiate between the multiple possible causes of the patient's presentation, but rather simply to recognize that the patient has a medical emergency

  1. Beyond Grand Rounds: A Comprehensive and Sequential Intervention to Improve Identification of Delirium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Dix, Edward F.; Drew, Janet E.; Diamond, James J.; Inouye, Sharon K.; Roehl, Barbara J. O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Delirium is a widespread concern for hospitalized seniors, yet is often unrecognized. A comprehensive and sequential intervention (CSI) aiming to effect change in clinician behavior by improving knowledge about delirium was tested. Design and Methods: A 2-day CSI program that consisted of progressive 4-part didactic series,…

  2. Delirium in Severely Ill Young Children in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieveld, Jan N. M.; Leentjens, Albert F. G.

    2005-01-01

    Delirium is a serious neuropsychiatric disorder frequently seen in severely ill adult and geriatric patients. The clinical picture in adults is well known, as are the negative prognostic implications of delirium on length of hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality (American Psychiatric Association, 1999); however, it is less appreciated that…

  3. A Preoperative, Nurse-Led Intervention Program Reduces Acute Postoperative Delirium.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Fan, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a preoperative, multidisciplinary intervention program for the prevention of acute postoperative delirium on the incidence and severity in patients who were treated in the intensive care unit after surgery. We studied 122 patients who had been transferred into intensive care unit after surgery at a teaching general hospital in China. The intervention consisted of standardized protocols for the management of risk factors for delirium: education of nursing staff, systematic cognitive caring, maintaining a safe environment, social support, and improving sleep quality. All patients were monitored for signs of delirium after surgery, as measured by the Delirium Detection Score. The Delirium Detection Scores of patients in the intervention cohort after surgery on different time points were less than the scores of patients in the control group on the same point-in-time (p < .01). The severity degree of delirium for patients was less (p < .01) in the intervention group within 24 hours than that in the usual care cohort. This study showed the beneficial effects of a preoperative intervention program focusing on early prevention of delirium in patients before surgery. Systematic and comprehensive interventions could reduce the incidence and severity of delirium. PMID:27224685

  4. Risk Factors for Delirium in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Weckmann, Michelle T.; Gingrich, Roger; Mills, James A.; Hook, Larry; Beglinger, Leigh J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delirium is common following hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment have been shown to improve long term outcomes. We sought to investigate the relationship between potential risk-factors and the development of delirium following HSCT. Methods Fifty-four inpatients admitted for HSCT were assessed prospectively for delirium every 2-3 days through their inpatient stay using standardized delirium and neuropsychological measures. Patient’s self-reports of medical history, medical records, and neurocognitive and psychiatric assessments were used to identify risk factors. Both pre- and post-HSCT risk factors were examined. Results Delirium incidence was 35% and occurred with highest frequency in the 2 weeks following transplant. The only pre-transplantation risk factors was lower oxygen saturation (p=0.003). Post-transplantation risk factors for delirium included higher creatinine (p<0.0001), higher blood urea nitrogen levels (p=0.005), lower creatinine clearance (p=0.0006), lower oxygen saturation (p=0.001), lower hemoglobin (p=0.04) and lower albumin (p=0.03). There was no observed association with level of cognitive performance, transplant type, disease severity, medical co-morbidity index, age or conditioning regimen. Conclusion Routine laboratory values can assist in the identification of high risk patients before delirium onset to improve early detection and treatment of delirium following HSCT. PMID:22860240

  5. Alcohol withdrawal delirium manifested by manic symptoms in an elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hung-Yu; Lee, Kuan-I

    2015-03-01

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is a commonly seen problem in psychiatric practice. Alcohol withdrawal delirium is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Withdrawal symptoms usually include tremulousness, psychotic and perceptual symptoms, seizures, and consciousness disturbance. Herein, we report a case involving a 63-year-old man who had alcohol withdrawal delirium that was manifested mainly by manic symptoms. PMID:25515164

  6. Clinical profile of delirium in patients treated for femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Edlund, A; Lundström, M; Lundström, G; Hedqvist, B; Gustafson, Y

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of delirium, its predisposing factors, clinical profile, associated symptoms and consequences were investigated in 54 consecutive patients, 19 men and 35 women, mean age 77.1 years, admitted to an 'ortho-geriatric unit' with femoral neck fractures. The incidence of postoperative delirium was 15/54 (27.8%) and a logistic regression model found that dementia and a prolonged waiting time for the operation increased the risk of postoperative delirium. Delirium during the night was most common but in 5 patients the delirium was worst in the morning. Patients with delirium suffered more anxiety, depressed mood, emotionalism, delusions and hallucinations. A larger proportion of patients with delirium could not return to their previous dwelling, and a larger proportion of delirious patients were either dead, wheelchair-bound or bedridden at the 6-month follow-up (p < 0.005). The conclusion is that delirium is common and has a serious impact on the outcome after hip fracture surgery. PMID:10473932

  7. Case Study: Delirium in an Adolescent Girl with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharko, Alexander M.; Baker, Eva H.; Kothari, Priti; Khattak, Hina; Lancaster, Duniya

    2006-01-01

    Delirium and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated dementia are well recognized neuropsychiatric consequences of HIV infection in adults. Almost nothing is known regarding the management of delirium in HIV-infected children and adolescents. HIV-related progressive encephalopathy is thought to represent the pediatric form of HIV-associated…

  8. Emergence delirium in a child given oral midazolam for conscious sedation.

    PubMed

    Doyle, W L; Perrin, L

    1994-12-01

    We report a case of emergence delirium in a 26-month-old girl after she received oral midazolam to achieve conscious sedation. This patient's clinical course is discussed. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of emergence delirium related to use of oral midazolam. PMID:7978604

  9. Baseline acetylcholinesterase activity and serotonin plasma levels are not associated with delirium in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Cristiane Damiani; Salluh, Jorge; Soares, Márcio; Vuolo, Francieli; Zanatta, Francieli; Constantino, Larissa de Souza; Zugno, Alexandra Ioppi; Ritter, Cristiane; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether plasma serotonin levels or acetylcholinesterase activities determined upon intensive care unit admission could predict the occurrence of acute brain dysfunction in intensive care unit patients. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted with a sample of 77 non-consecutive patients observed between May 2009 and September 2010. Delirium was determined using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit tool, and the acetylcholinesterase and serotonin measurements were determined from blood samples collected up to a maximum of 24 h after the admission of the patient to the intensive care unit. Results In the present study, 38 (49.6%) patients developed delirium during their intensive care unit stays. Neither serum acetylcholinesterase activity nor serotonin level was independently associated with delirium. No significant correlations of acetylcholinesterase activity or serotonin level with delirium/coma-free days were observed, but in the patients who developed delirium, there was a strong negative correlation between the acetylcholinesterase level and the number of delirium/coma-free days, indicating that higher acetylcholinesterase levels are associated with fewer days alive without delirium or coma. No associations were found between the biomarkers and mortality. Conclusions Neither serum acetylcholinesterase activity nor serotonin level was associated with delirium or acute brain dysfunction in critically ill patients. Sepsis did not modify these relationships. PMID:26340158

  10. Detection and Management of Delirium in the Neonatal Unit: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Groves, Alan; Traube, Chani; Silver, Gabrielle

    2016-03-01

    Delirium is increasingly recognized as a common syndrome in critically ill children, but in our experience, it is rarely considered in the NICU. Delirium is independently associated with prolonged length of stay and adverse long-term outcomes in children. We report the cases of 3 infants cared for in our NICU at corrected gestational ages of 4, 11, and 17 weeks who presented with classic symptoms of delirium. All 3 children had complex medical problems and were receiving multiple analgesic and sedative medications. All 3 children exhibited agitation that was unresponsive to increasing doses of medications, and they all appeared to improve after treatment with quetiapine, allowing weaning of other medications. It is possible that with increased vigilance, delirium will be increasingly recognized in newborns, thus allowing tailored intervention. Further research is needed to investigate the prevalence and associated risk factors for developing delirium in the NICU and to explore possible treatment options. PMID:26908706

  11. Delirium and dementia with Lewy bodies: distinct diagnoses or part of the same spectrum?

    PubMed

    Gore, Rachel L; Vardy, Emma R L C; O'Brien, John T

    2015-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is recognised as the second most common form of dementia in older people. Delirium is a condition of acute brain dysfunction for which a pre-existing diagnosis of dementia is a risk factor. Conversely delirium is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. The reasons for this bidirectional relationship are not well understood. Our aim was to review possible similarities in the clinical presentation and pathophysiology between delirium and DLB, and explore possible links between these diagnoses. A systematic search using Medline, Embase and Psychinfo was performed. References were scanned for relevant articles, supplemented by articles identified from reference lists and those known to the authors. 94 articles were selected for inclusion in the review. Delirium and DLB share a number of clinical similarities, including global impairment of cognition, fluctuations in attention and perceptual abnormalities. Delirium is a frequent presenting feature of DLB. In terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, cholinergic dysfunction and genetics may provide a common link. Neuroimaging studies suggest a brain vulnerability in delirium which may also occur in dementia. The basal ganglia, which play a key role in DLB, have also been implicated in delirium. The role of Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum biomarkers for both diagnoses is an interesting area although some results are conflicting and further work in this area is needed. Delirium and DLB share a number of features and we hypothesise that delirium may, in some cases, represent early or 'prodromal' DLB. Further research is needed to test the novel hypothesis that delirium may be an early marker for future DLB, which would aid early diagnosis of DLB and identify those at high risk. PMID:24860139

  12. The development of an automated ward independent delirium risk prediction model.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Hugo A J M; Winkens, Bjorn; Mestres Gonzalvo, Carlota; Hurkens, Kim P G M; Mulder, Wubbo J; Janknegt, Rob; Verhey, Frans R; van der Kuy, Paul-Hugo M; Schols, Jos M G A

    2016-08-01

    Background A delirium is common in hospital settings resulting in increased mortality and costs. Prevention of a delirium is clearly preferred over treatment. A delirium risk prediction model can be helpful to identify patients at risk of a delirium, allowing the start of preventive treatment. Current risk prediction models rely on manual calculation of the individual patient risk. Objective The aim of this study was to develop an automated ward independent delirium riskprediction model. To show that such a model can be constructed exclusively from electronically available risk factors and thereby implemented into a clinical decision support system (CDSS) to optimally support the physician to initiate preventive treatment. Setting A Dutch teaching hospital. Methods A retrospective cohort study in which patients, 60 years or older, were selected when admitted to the hospital, with no delirium diagnosis when presenting, or during the first day of admission. We used logistic regression analysis to develop a delirium predictive model out of the electronically available predictive variables. Main outcome measure A delirium risk prediction model. Results A delirium risk prediction model was developed using predictive variables that were significant in the univariable regression analyses. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of the "medication model" model was 0.76 after internal validation. Conclusions CDSSs can be used to automatically predict the risk of a delirium in individual hospitalised patients' by exclusively using electronically available predictive variables. To increase the use and improve the quality of predictive models, clinical risk factors should be documented ready for automated use. PMID:27177868

  13. Delirium in the geriatric unit: proton-pump inhibitors and other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Otremba, Iwona; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium remains a major nosocomial complication of hospitalized elderly. Predictive models for delirium may be useful for identification of high-risk patients for implementation of preventive strategies. Objective Evaluate specific factors for development of delirium in a geriatric ward setting. Methods Prospective cross-sectional study comprised 675 consecutive patients aged 79.2±7.7 years (66% women and 34% men), admitted to the subacute geriatric ward of a multiprofile university hospital after exclusion of 113 patients treated with antipsychotic medication because of behavioral disorders before admission. Comprehensive geriatric assessments including a structured interview, physical examination, geriatric functional assessment, blood sampling, ECG, abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray, Confusion Assessment Method for diagnosis of delirium, Delirium-O-Meter to assess delirium severity, Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale to assess sedation or agitation, visual analog scale and Doloplus-2 scale to assess pain level were performed. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed five independent factors associated with development of delirium in geriatric inpatients: transfer between hospital wards (odds ratio [OR] =2.78; confidence interval [CI] =1.54–5.01; P=0.001), preexisting dementia (OR =2.29; CI =1.44–3.65; P<0.001), previous delirium incidents (OR =2.23; CI =1.47–3.38; P<0.001), previous fall incidents (OR =1.76; CI =1.17–2.64; P=0.006), and use of proton-pump inhibitors (OR =1.67; CI =1.11–2.53; P=0.014). Conclusion Transfer between hospital wards, preexisting dementia, previous delirium incidents, previous fall incidents, and use of proton-pump inhibitors are predictive of development of delirium in the geriatric inpatient setting. PMID:27103793

  14. Melatonin treatment in the prevention of postoperative delirium in cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Artemiou, Panagiotis; Bilecova-Rabajdova, Miroslava; Sabol, Frantisek; Torok, Pavol; Kolarcik, Peter; Kolesar, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Post-cardiac surgery delirium is a severe complication. The circadian rhythm of melatonin secretion has been shown to be altered postoperatively. Aim of the study It was hypothesized that restoring normal sleeping patterns with a substance that is capable of resynchronizing circadian rhythm such as exogenous administration of melatonin may possibly reduce the incidence of postoperative delirium. Material and methods This paper represents a prospective clinical observational study. Two consecutive groups of 250 consecutive patients took part in the study. Group A was the control group and group B was the melatonin group. In group B, the patients received prophylactic melatonin treatment. The main objectives were to observe the incidence of delirium, to identify any predictors of delirium, and to compare the two groups based on the delirium incidence. Results The incidence of delirium was 8.4% in the melatonin group vs. 20.8% in the control group (p = 0.001). Predictors of delirium in the melatonin group were age (p = 0.001) and higher EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, age and EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.014) were predictors of postoperative delirium. Comparing the groups, the main predictors of delirium were age (p = 0.001), EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.001), cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) time (p = 0.001), aortic cross-clamping (ACC) time (p = 0.008), sufentanil dose (p = 0.001) and mechanical ventilation (p = 0.033). Conclusions Administration of melatonin significantly decreases the incidence of postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery. Prophylactic treatment with melatonin should be considered in every patient scheduled for cardiac surgery. PMID:26336494

  15. Serum anticholinergic activity and cerebral cholinergic dysfunction: An EEG study in frail elderly with and without delirium

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Christine; Hestermann, Ute; Kopitz, Juergen; Plaschke, Konstanze; Oster, Peter; Driessen, Martin; Mundt, Christoph; Weisbrod, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Background Delirium increases morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs especially in the elderly. Serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) is a suggested biomarker for anticholinergic burden and delirium risk, but the association with cerebral cholinergic function remains unclear. To clarify this relationship, we prospectively assessed the correlation of SAA with quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) power, delirium occurrence, functional and cognitive measures in a cross-sectional sample of acutely hospitalized elderly (> 80 y) with high dementia and delirium prevalence. Methods 61 consecutively admitted patients over 80 years underwent an extensive clinical and neuropsychological evaluation. SAA was determined by using radio receptor assay as developed by Tune, and standard as well as quantitative EEGs were obtained. Results 15 patients had dementia with additional delirium (DD) according to expert consensus using DSM-IV criteria, 31 suffered from dementia without delirium (D), 15 were cognitively unimpaired (CU). SAA was clearly detectable in all patients but one (mean 10.9 ± 7.1 pmol/ml), but was not associated with expert-panel approved delirium diagnosis or cognitive functions. Delirium-associated EEG abnormalities included occipital slowing, peak power and alpha decrease, delta and theta power increase and slow wave ratio increase during active delirious states. EEG measures correlated significantly with cognitive performance and delirium severity, but not with SAA levels. Conclusion In elderly with acute disease, EEG parameters reliable indicate delirium, but SAA does not seem to reflect cerebral cholinergic function as measured by EEG and is not related to delirium diagnosis. PMID:18793418

  16. Emerging Role of Melatonin and Melatonin Receptor Agonists in Sleep and Delirium in Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yoonsun; Scheer, Corey E; Abdallah, George T

    2016-08-01

    Delirium, an acute state of mental confusion, can lead to many adverse sequelae in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Although the etiology of ICU delirium is often multifactorial, and at times not fully understood, sleep deprivation is considered to be a major contributing factor to its development. It has been postulated that administration of exogenous melatonin and melatonin receptor agonists such as ramelteon may prevent delirium by promoting nocturnal sleep in ICU patients. The purpose of this review is to summarize the pharmacology of melatonin and melatonin receptor agonists and investigate their potential roles in sleep promotion and delirium prevention in ICU patients. Although few studies evaluating the impact of melatonergic agents on sleep and delirium in the ICU have been completed, some data suggest their potential positive effects on sleep and delirium. However, large-scale randomized controlled trials are warranted to determine the optimal role of melatonergic agents in the prevention of ICU delirium. PMID:26092575

  17. Pre- and Post-Transplantation Risk Factors for Delirium Onset and Severity in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fann, Jesse R.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Roth-Roemer, Sari; Katon, Wayne J.; Syrjala, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine pre- and post-transplantation risk factors for delirium onset and severity during the acute phase of myeloablative hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Patients and Methods Ninety adult patients with malignancies admitted to the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center for their first HSCT were assessed prospectively from 1 week before transplantation to 30 days after transplantation. Delirium was assessed three times per week using the Delirium Rating Scale and the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale. Potential risk factors were assessed by patient self-report, charts, and computerized records. Multivariable analysis of time to onset of a delirium episode was undertaken using Cox proportional hazards regression with time-varying covariates. Analysis for delirium severity was carried out using a linear mixed effects model. Validation and sensitivity analyses were performed on the final models. Results Forty-five patients (50%) experienced a delirium episode. Pretransplantation risk factors for onset and higher severity of delirium were higher mean alkaline phosphatase and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. Poorer pretransplantation executive functioning was also associated with higher delirium severity. Higher doses of opioid medications were the only post-transplantation risk factor for delirium onset (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.08). Higher opioid doses, current and prior pain, and higher BUN levels were post-transplantation risk factors for greater delirium severity (all P < .01). Conclusion Pre- and post-transplantation factors can assist in identifying patients who are at risk for delirium during myeloablative HSCT and may enable clinical interventions to prevent delirium onset or decrease delirium symptoms. PMID:21263081

  18. Delirium superimposed on dementia is associated with prolonged length of stay and poor outcomes in hospitalized older adults”

    PubMed Central

    Fick, Donna M.; Steis, Melinda R.; Waller, Jennifer L.; Inouye, Sharon K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current literature does not identify the significance of underlying cognitive impairment and delirium on older adults during and 30 days following acute care hospitalization. Objective Describe the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes associated with incident delirium superimposed on dementia. Design 24-month prospective cohort study Setting community hospital Patients 139 older adults (>65 years) with dementia Methods This prospective study followed patients daily during hospitalization and one month post-hospital. Main measures included dementia (Modified Blessed Dementia Rating Score, IQ CODE), daily mental status change, dementia stage/severity (Clinical Dementia Rating, Global Deterioration Scale), delirium (Confusion Assessment Method), and delirium severity (Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98). All statistical analysis was performed using SAS 9.3 and significance with an alpha level of 0.05. Logistic regression, analysis of covariance or linear regression was performed controlling for age, gender and dementia stage. Results The overall incidence of new delirium was 32% (44/140). Those with delirium had a 25% short term mortality rate, increased length of stay and poorer function at discharge. At one month follow-up, subjects with delirium had greater functional decline. Males were more likely to develop delirium and for every one unit increase in dementia severity (Global Deterioration Scale), subjects were 1.5 times more likely to develop delirium. Conclusions Delirium prolongs hospitalization for persons with dementia. Thus, interventions to increase early detection of delirium have the potential to decrease the severity and duration of delirium and to prevent unnecessary suffering and costs from the complications of delirium and unnecessary readmissions to the hospital. PMID:23955965

  19. Application of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pain, Agitation, and Delirium.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Anna; Balas, Michele C

    2016-06-01

    Critically ill patients experience several severe, distressing, and often life-altering symptoms during their intensive care unit stay. A clinical practice guideline released by the American College of Critical Care Medicine provides a template for improving the care and outcomes of the critically ill through evidence-based pain, agitation, and delirium assessment, prevention, and management. Key strategies include the use of valid and reliable assessment tools, setting a desired sedation level target, a focus on light sedation, choosing appropriate sedative medications, the use of nonpharmacologic symptom management strategies, and engaging and empowering patients and their family to play an active role in their intensive care unit care. PMID:27215361

  20. Defining the Role of Dexmedetomidine in the Prevention of Delirium in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, S.; Muzyk, A. J.; Bucklin, M. H.; Brudney, S.; Gagliardi, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective α2 agonist used as a sedative agent. It also provides anxiolysis and sympatholysis without significant respiratory compromise or delirium. We conducted a systematic review to examine whether sedation of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) with dexmedetomidine was associated with a lower incidence of delirium as compared to other nondexmedetomidine sedation strategies. A search of PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews yielded only three trials from 1966 through April 2015 that met our predefined inclusion criteria and assessed dexmedetomidine and outcomes of delirium as their primary endpoint. The studies varied in regard to population, comparator sedation regimen, delirium outcome measure, and dexmedetomidine dosing. All trials are limited by design issues that limit our ability definitively to conclude that dexmedetomidine prevents delirium. Evidence does suggest that dexmedetomidine may allow for avoidance of deep sedation and use of benzodiazepines, factors both observed to increase the risk for developing delirium. Our assessment of currently published literature highlights the need for ongoing research to better delineate the role of dexmedetomidine for delirium prevention. PMID:26576429

  1. Severe, Persistent and Fatal Delirium in Psychogeriatric Patients Admitted to a Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jans, Ingrid S.; Oudewortel, Letty; Brandt, Paulien M.; van Gool, Willem A.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Although delirium is generally regarded as a transient syndrome, persistence of delirium in patients with cognitive impairment – even with fatal outcome – has been reported as well. This study aims to describe the clinical features and neuropathological correlates of this type of delirium. Methods Inclusion criteria for this case series were: (1) severe persistent delirium until death, (2) history of cognitive decline and (3) consent for brain autopsy. Medical records were examined in combination with collected clinical data and neuropathological findings. Result In 15 patients, all living at home before admission, episodes with delirium lasted for 4.2 months on average. No distinct medical causes of persistent delirium could be identified. Pathological diagnoses included Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies as well as single cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. Conclusion Severe, persistent and fatal delirium in patients with cognitive impairment can occur relatively early in the disease trajectory and is associated with diverse neuropathologies. PMID:26195981

  2. Association between frailty and delirium in older adult patients discharged from hospital

    PubMed Central

    Verloo, Henk; Goulet, Céline; Morin, Diane; von Gunten, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium and frailty – both potentially reversible geriatric syndromes – are seldom studied together, although they often occur jointly in older patients discharged from hospitals. This study aimed to explore the relationship between delirium and frailty in older adults discharged from hospitals. Methods Of the 221 patients aged >65 years, who were invited to participate, only 114 gave their consent to participate in this study. Delirium was assessed using the confusion assessment method, in which patients were classified dichotomously as delirious or nondelirious according to its algorithm. Frailty was assessed using the Edmonton Frailty Scale, which classifies patients dichotomously as frail or nonfrail. In addition to the sociodemographic characteristics, covariates such as scores from the Mini-Mental State Examination, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics and details regarding polymedication were collected. A multidimensional linear regression model was used for analysis. Results Almost 20% of participants had delirium (n=22), and 76.3% were classified as frail (n=87); 31.5% of the variance in the delirium score was explained by frailty (R2=0.315). Age; polymedication; scores of the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), instrumental activities of daily living, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics; and frailty increased the predictability of the variance of delirium by 32% to 64% (R2=0.64). Conclusion Frailty is strongly related to delirium in older patients after discharge from the hospital. PMID:26848261

  3. Identifying pediatric emergence delirium by using the PAED Scale: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Matthew J; Hawks, Sharon J; Taicher, Brad M; Bonta, Juliet; Brandon, Debra H

    2014-04-01

    Pediatric emergence delirium is a postoperative phenomenon characterized by aberrant cognitive and psychomotor behavior, which can place the patient and health care personnel at risk for injury. A common tool for identifying emergence delirium is the Level of Consciousness-Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (LOC-RASS), although it has not been validated for use in the pediatric population. The Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale (PAED) is a newly validated tool to measure emergence delirium in children. We chose to implement and evaluate the effectiveness and fidelity of using the PAED Scale to identify pediatric emergence delirium in one eight-bed postanesthesia care unit in comparison with the traditional LOC-RASS. The overall incidence of pediatric emergence delirium found by using the LOC-RASS with a retrospective chart review (3%) was significantly lower than the incidence found by using the LOC-RASS (7.5%) and PAED Scale (11.5%) during the implementation period. Our findings suggest that the PAED Scale may be a more sensitive measure of pediatric emergence delirium, and, in the future, we recommend that health care personnel at our facility use the PAED Scale rather than the LOC-RASS. PMID:24674794

  4. Improving early recognition of delirium using SQiD (Single Question to identify Delirium): a hospital based quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    McCleary, Elaine; Cumming, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is a serious condition associated with poor outcomes which can be prevented and treated if recognised early. Older people and people with dementia or severe illness are more at risk of delirium. SQiD is a simple prompt question which asks, "Is this patient more confused than before?" Focusing specifically on patients aged 75 and over, this project aimed to increase awareness and usage of SQiD to help improve early recognition of delirium, in accordance with the Healthcare Improvement Scotland national initiative. This project was carried out by two student nurses during an eight week clinical placement in the acute surgical receiving unit (ASRU) of Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, Scotland. Qualitative and quantitative methodology was used to establish baseline data which revealed that only 35% of the multidisciplinary team (MDT) were aware of SQiD, with only 15% using SQiD. Initial activities involved raising awareness of SQiD by means of information cards and posters. Once awareness was raised, the usage of the SQiD question by nurses was tested. Finally, the SQiD question was incorporated into the nursing care round forms and usage recorded. Following these awareness raising activities we noted an increase of 83% awareness and 20% use of SQiD. Incorporating the SQiD question into the hourly care round forms increased awareness to 100% and usage to 50%. Although this small scale project could be viewed as a success, the requirements for sustainability depend upon further implementation and spreading of the change. Sustained improvement is also dependent upon the implementation of the care rounds. As nursing students, undertaking this improvement project has provided valuable lessons in both quality improvement science and personal learning. The improved knowledge and understanding of effective communication and the intricacies of team working is transferrable and can be applied to future nursing practice. PMID:26734378

  5. Geriatric Assessment as a Predictor of Delirium and Other Outcomes in Elderly Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz; Sun, Sung W.; Zhou, Qin; Iasonos, Alexia; Lu, Bryan; Root, James C.; Downey, Robert J.; Tew, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe the implementation of preoperative geriatric assessment (GA) in patients undergoing major cancer surgery and to determine predictors of postoperative delirium. Summary Background Data Geriatric surgical patients have unique vulnerabilities and are at increased risk of developing postoperative delirium. Methods Geriatricians at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center risk-stratify surgical patients with solid tumors, aged ≥ 75 years using preoperative GA, which includes basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADLs, IADLs), cognition (Mini-Cog Test), history of falls, nutritional state, and comorbidities (Charlson Comorbidity Index [CCI]). The Geriatrics Service evaluates patients for postoperative delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). A retrospective review was performed. The associations between GA and postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Univariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the predictive value of GA for postoperative delirium, and a multivariate model was built. Results In total, 416 patients who received preoperative evaluation by the Geriatrics Service between September 1, 2010, and December 31, 2011, were included. Delirium occurred in 19% of patients. Patients with delirium had longer length of hospital stay (P<0.001) and greater likelihood of discharge to a rehabilitation facility (P<0.001). CCI score, history of falls, dependent on IADL, and abnormal Mini-Cog Test results predicted postoperative delirium on univariate analysis. Developed using a stepwise selection method, a multivariate model to predict delirium is presented including CCI score (P=0.032), dependence IADLs (P=0.011) and falls history (P=0.056). Conclusions Preoperative GA is feasible and may achieve a better understanding of older patients’ perioperative risks, including delirium. PMID:24887981

  6. Associations of Markers of Inflammation and Coagulation with Delirium during Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Timothy D; Ware, Lorraine B; Bernard, Gordon R; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Thompson, Jennifer L; Shintani, Ayumi K; Jackson, James C; Dittus, Robert S; Ely, E Wesley

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the associations between a priori-selected markers of inflammation and coagulation and delirium during critical illness. Methods In this prospective cohort study, we collected blood from mechanically ventilated medical intensive care unit (ICU) patients and measured nine plasma markers of inflammation and coagulation. We assessed patients daily for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU and used multivariable regression to analyze the associations between plasma markers and subsequent delirium, after adjusting for age, severity of illness, and sepsis. Results Among the 138 patients studied, with a median age of 66 years and median APACHE II of 27, 107 (78%) were delirious at some point during the study. Two markers of inflammation and one of coagulation were significantly associated with delirium. After adjusting for covariates, lower plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and protein C were associated with an increased probability of delirium (p=0.04 and 0.01, respectively), and higher concentrations of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (sTNFR1) were associated with an increased probability of delirium (p<0.01). Concentrations of C-reactive protein (p=0.82), myeloperoxidase (p=0.11), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (p=0.70), D-dimer (p=0.83), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (p=0.98), and Von Willebrand Factor antigen (p=0.65) were not associated with delirium. Conclusions In this study, MMP-9, protein C, and sTNFR1 were independently associated with subsequent ICU delirium. These results suggest that specific aspects of inflammation and coagulation may play a role in the evolution of delirium during critical illness and that these markers should be examined in larger studies of ICU patients. PMID:22903241

  7. Preoperative risk assessment for delirium after noncardiac surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Monidipa; Dumbrell, Andrea C

    2006-10-01

    Delirium is a common postoperative complication in older adults associated with adverse events including functional decline, longer lengths of stay, and risk of institutionalization. The purpose of this article is to systematically review preoperative risk factors associated with delirium following noncardiac surgery. A medical literature search was conducted using several bibliographic databases (PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane, PsychInfo), supplemented by a manual search of the references of retrieved articles. Studies were retained for review after meeting strict inclusion criteria that included only operative patients with incident postoperative delirium diagnosed prospectively using criteria derived from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Third or Fourth Edition. Quantitative analyses included significance testing, homogeneity testing, and effect-size pooling. Twenty-five articles were included for review. The incidence of delirium ranged from 5.1% to 52.2%, with greater rates after hip fracture and aortic surgeries. This review found two scales, a clinical prediction rule, and a delirium risk classification system that were validated in other operative settings. Individual risk factor analysis suggested that cognitive impairment, older age, functional impairment, sensory impairment, depression, preoperative psychotropic drug use, psychopathological symptoms, institutional residence, and greater comorbidity were associated with postoperative delirium. Of the risk factors examined, evidence was most robust for an association between delirium and cognitive impairment or psychotropic drug use, with moderate effect sizes for both. Missing data and measurement differences did not allow for inferences to be made about other risk factors. Effect-size pooling supports the concept that delirium is a heterogeneous disorder with multiple risk factors. More research is needed to better identify patients at risk for postoperative delirium and to develop

  8. Neural substrates of vulnerability to postsurgical delirium as revealed by presurgical diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Michele; Dai, Weiying; Guttmann, Charles R G; Meier, Dominik S; Ngo, Long H; Hshieh, Tammy T; Callahan, Amy E; Fong, Tamara G; Schmitt, Eva; Dickerson, Bradford C; Press, Daniel Z; Marcantonio, Edward R; Jones, Richard N; Inouye, Sharon K; Alsop, David C

    2016-04-01

    Despite the significant impact of postoperative delirium on surgical outcomes and the long-term prognosis of older patients, its neural basis has not yet been clarified. In this study we investigated the impact of premorbid brain microstructural integrity, as measured by diffusion tensor imaging before surgery, on postoperative delirium incidence and severity, as well as the relationship among presurgical cognitive performance, diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities and postoperative delirium. Presurgical diffusion tensor imaging scans of 136 older (≥70 years), dementia-free subjects from the prospective Successful Aging after Elective Surgery study were analysed blind to the clinical data and delirium status. Primary outcomes were postoperative delirium incidence and severity during the hospital stay, as assessed by the Confusion Assessment Method. We measured cognition before surgery using general cognitive performance, a composite score based on a battery of neuropsychological tests. We investigated the association between presurgical diffusion tensor imaging parameters of brain microstructural integrity (i.e. fractional anisotropy, axial, mean and radial diffusivity) with postoperative delirium incidence and severity. Analyses were adjusted for the following potential confounders: age, gender, vascular comorbidity status, and general cognitive performance. Postoperative delirium occurred in 29 of 136 subjects (21%) during hospitalization. Presurgical diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities of the cerebellum, cingulum, corpus callosum, internal capsule, thalamus, basal forebrain, occipital, parietal and temporal lobes, including the hippocampus, were associated with delirium incidence and severity, after controlling for age, gender and vascular comorbidities. After further controlling for general cognitive performance, diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities of the cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and basal forebrain still remained associated with delirium

  9. Remission of Methamphetamine-Induced Withdrawal Delirium and Craving After Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Ekramzadeh, Sara; Pridmore, Saxby

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to describe the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the treatment of methamphetamine-induced withdrawal delirium and craving in a single case. Case Presentation: A 44-year-old male presented to the hospital in Fars province, Iran, with Methamphetamine-Induced Withdrawal Delirium who responded to ECT. Conclusions: The electroconvulsive therapy can be a suitable option for the treatment of methamphetamine withdrawal delirium and craving. Also, it can be usefully employed in these very serious conditions which may represent a risk to life. PMID:26834801

  10. Emergence delirium with transient associative agnosia and expressive aphasia reversed by flumazenil in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Drobish, Julie K; Kelz, Max B; DiPuppo, Patricia M; Cook-Sather, Scott D

    2015-06-01

    Multiple factors may contribute to the development of emergence delirium in a child. We present the case of a healthy 12-year-old girl who received preoperative midazolam with the desired anxiolytic effect, underwent a brief general anesthetic, and then exhibited postoperative delirium, consisting of a transient associative agnosia and expressive aphasia. Administration of flumazenil led to immediate and lasting resolution of her symptoms. We hypothesize that γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor-mediated effects, most likely related to an atypical offset of midazolam, are an important subset of emergence delirium that is amenable to pharmacologic therapy with flumazenil. PMID:26035220

  11. Preventing intensive care unit delirium: a patient-centered approach to reducing sleep disruption.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Amy; Clark, Mary Jo; Connelly, Cynthia D

    2011-01-01

    Delirium in the intensive care unit is a disorder with multifactorial causes and is associated with poor outcomes. Sleep-wake disturbance is a common experience for patients with delirium. Care processes that disrupt sleep can lead to sleep deprivation, contributing to delirium. Patient-centered care is a concept that considers what is best for each individual. How can clinicians use a patient-centered approach to alter processes to decrease patient disruptions and improve sleep and rest? Could timing of blood draws and soothing music work to promote sleep? PMID:21983504

  12. Emergence Delirium with Transient Associative Agnosia and Expressive Aphasia Reversed by Flumazenil in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Drobish, Julie K.; Kelz, Max B.; DiPuppo, Patricia M.; Cook-Sather, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple factors may contribute to the development of emergence delirium in a child. We present the case of a healthy 12-year-old girl who received preoperative midazolam with the desired anxiolytic effect, underwent a brief general anesthetic, and then exhibited postoperative delirium, consisting of a transient associative agnosia and expressive aphasia. Administration of flumazenil led to immediate and lasting resolution of her symptoms. We hypothesize that γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor-mediated effects, most likely related to an atypical offset of midazolam, are an important subset of emergence delirium that is amenable to pharmacologic therapy with flumazenil. PMID:26035220

  13. Battery of behavioral tests in mice to study postoperative delirium.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mian; Zhang, Ce; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Yiying; Nakazawa, Harumasa; Kaneki, Masao; Zheng, Hui; Shen, Yuan; Marcantonio, Edward R; Xie, Zhongcong

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative delirium is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and cost. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely unknown, partially owing to lack of animal model(s). We therefore set out to employ a battery of behavior tests, including natural and learned behavior, in mice to determine the effects of laparotomy under isoflurane anesthesia (Anesthesia/Surgery) on these behaviors. The mice were tested at 24 hours before and at 6, 9 and 24 hours after the Anesthesia/Surgery. Composite Z scores were calculated. Cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of mitochondria permeability transient pore, was used to determine potential mitochondria-associated mechanisms of these behavioral changes. Anesthesia/Surgery selectively impaired behaviors, including latency to eat food in buried food test, freezing time and time spent in the center in open field test, and entries and duration in the novel arm of Y maze test, with acute onset and various timecourse. The composite Z scores quantitatively demonstrated the Anesthesia/Surgery-induced behavior impairment in mice. Cyclosporine A selectively ameliorated the Anesthesia/Surgery-induced reduction in ATP levels, the increases in latency to eat food, and the decreases in entries in the novel arm. These findings suggest that we could use a battery of behavior tests to establish a mouse model to study postoperative delirium. PMID:27435513

  14. Recent Insights on Prevalence and Corelations of Hypoactive Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Peritogiannis, Vaios; Bolosi, Maria; Lixouriotis, Charalampos; Rizos, Dimitrios V.

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome which is common in all medical settings. It often goes unrecognized due to difficulties in the detection of its hypoactive variant. This review aims to provide an up-to-date account on recent research on hypoactive delirium (HD). Thirty-eight studies, which were conducted in various clinical settings, including the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), were included in this review. Those studies involved recent research that has been published during the last 6 years. Prevalence of HD was found to vary considerably among different settings. HD seems to be more common in critically ill patients and less common in patients examined by consultation-liaison psychiatric services and in mixed patient populations. The presence of HD in ICU patients was associated with higher short- and long-term mortality and other adverse outcomes, but no such association was reported in other settings. Research on other possible associations of HD with clinical variables and on symptom presentation yielded inconclusive results, although there is some evidence for a possible association of HD with benzodiazepine use. There are several methodological issues that need to be addressed by future research. Future studies should examine HD in the primary care setting; treatment interventions should also be the objective of future research. PMID:26347584

  15. Battery of behavioral tests in mice to study postoperative delirium

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Mian; Zhang, Ce; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Yiying; Nakazawa, Harumasa; Kaneki, Masao; Zheng, Hui; Shen, Yuan; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Xie, Zhongcong

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative delirium is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and cost. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely unknown, partially owing to lack of animal model(s). We therefore set out to employ a battery of behavior tests, including natural and learned behavior, in mice to determine the effects of laparotomy under isoflurane anesthesia (Anesthesia/Surgery) on these behaviors. The mice were tested at 24 hours before and at 6, 9 and 24 hours after the Anesthesia/Surgery. Composite Z scores were calculated. Cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of mitochondria permeability transient pore, was used to determine potential mitochondria-associated mechanisms of these behavioral changes. Anesthesia/Surgery selectively impaired behaviors, including latency to eat food in buried food test, freezing time and time spent in the center in open field test, and entries and duration in the novel arm of Y maze test, with acute onset and various timecourse. The composite Z scores quantitatively demonstrated the Anesthesia/Surgery-induced behavior impairment in mice. Cyclosporine A selectively ameliorated the Anesthesia/Surgery-induced reduction in ATP levels, the increases in latency to eat food, and the decreases in entries in the novel arm. These findings suggest that we could use a battery of behavior tests to establish a mouse model to study postoperative delirium. PMID:27435513

  16. The 3 D's of geriatric psychiatry: depression, delirium, and dementia.

    PubMed

    Dharia, Sheetal; Verilla, Kailen; Breden, Ericka L

    2011-08-01

    A Caucasian female octogenarian with multiple medical problems was admitted to the inpatient geriatric psychiatry unit with intermittent altered mental status and decline in memory. She had been hospitalized four times in the previous three months. She was admitted on more than 10 medications and received more than 20 different medications in this time period. It was determined that she had delirium concurrent with dementia and/or depression. During her hospital stay a urinary tract infection (UTI) was treated, her anticholinergic medications were minimized, and her digoxin dose was adjusted. As her mental status cleared, a workup was completed to differentiate between dementia and depression. She was initially treated with memantine, but as time progressed it became more evident she was experiencing depression and a "pseudodementia," which was treated with sertraline. Her Mini-Mental State Examination returned to 29/30 (her score previously was 26/29). This case demonstrates the complexity of treating an elder individual and the importance of differentiating among delirium, depression, and dementia. The pharmacy team played an active role in medication reconciliation. Additionally, they worked with the medical team to minimize her potentially harmful medications and optimize the treatment of her UTI and depression. PMID:21840820

  17. Prevalence of delirium in geriatric rehabilitation in Israel and its influence on rehabilitation outcomes in patients with hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Neomi; Nili, Frances; Shahory, Ron; Seleznev, Irena; Ben Natan, Merav

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of delirium among geriatric patients with hip fractures and to examine the influence of delirium on rehabilitation outcomes. A prospective study was carried out among 95 hip fracture patients admitted to an orthopedic geriatric rehabilitation ward. At admission, the following data were gathered: sociodemographic data, prefracture Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Mini-Mental State Examination, comorbidities, and medication. Delirium was assessed using the Confusion Assessment Method. The severity of delirium among patients with a positive score on the Confusion Assessment Method was assessed using the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R-98). Rehabilitation outcomes were evaluated by comparing FIM and ADL at admission and at discharge. The research findings showed that the prevalence of delirium among patients was 30%. In addition, a significant difference was found between patients who developed delirium and those who did not. Patients who developed delirium were mostly Jewish, with lower ADL levels at admission, more significant renal failure, lower levels of FIM, and lower Mini-Mental State Examination scores. Furthermore, FIM at discharge and delta FIM were lower among patients who developed delirium than among those who did not. The research conclusions indicated that the functional recovery of patients with delirium is slower. Therefore, it is important to adjust the therapeutic approach to these patients. PMID:26154303

  18. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward: Clinical risk factors and prediction by bedside cognitive tests.

    PubMed

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Koerner, Ejnar Alex; Schultz, Helga Holm; Arnfred, Sidse Marie

    2016-08-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent psychiatric complication to cancer, but rarely recognized by oncologists. Aims 1. To estimate the prevalence of delirium among inpatients admitted at an oncological cancer ward 2. To investigate whether simple clinical factors predict delirium 3. To examine the value of cognitive testing in the assessment of delirium. Methods On five different days, we interviewed and assessed patients admitted to a Danish cancer ward. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases Version 10, WHO ICD-10 Diagnostic System and the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious participants were CAM positive. Poor performance on the cognitive tests was associated with delirium. Medical records describing CNS metastases, benzodiazepine or morphine treatment were associated with delirium. Conclusions Delirium is prevalent among cancer inpatients. The Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test can be used as screening tools for delirium among inpatients with cancer, but even in synergy, they lack specificity. Combining cognitive testing and attention to nurses' records might improve detection, yet further studies are needed to create a more detailed patient profile for the detection of delirium. PMID:26882016

  19. Strategies for prevention of postoperative delirium: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The ideal measures to prevent postoperative delirium remain unestablished. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify the significance of potential interventions. Methods The PRISMA statement guidelines were followed. Two researchers searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English before August 2012. Additional sources included reference lists from reviews and related articles from 'Google Scholar'. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on interventions seeking to prevent postoperative delirium in adult patients were included. Data extraction and methodological quality assessment were performed using predefined data fields and scoring system. Meta-analysis was accomplished for studies that used similar strategies. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of postoperative delirium. We further tested whether interventions effective in preventing postoperative delirium shortened the length of hospital stay. Results We identified 38 RCTs with interventions ranging from perioperative managements to pharmacological, psychological or multicomponent interventions. Meta-analysis showed dexmedetomidine sedation was associated with less delirium compared to sedation produced by other drugs (two RCTs with 415 patients, pooled risk ratio (RR) = 0.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.16 to 0.95). Both typical (three RCTs with 965 patients, RR = 0.71; 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.93) and atypical antipsychotics (three RCTs with 627 patients, RR = 0.36; 95% CI = 0.26 to 0.50) decreased delirium occurrence when compared to placebos. Multicomponent interventions (two RCTs with 325 patients, RR = 0.71; 95% CI = 0.58 to 0.86) were effective in preventing delirium. No difference in the incidences of delirium was found between: neuraxial and general anesthesia (four RCTs with 511 patients, RR = 0.99; 95% CI = 0.65 to 1.50); epidural and intravenous analgesia (three RCTs with 167 patients, RR = 0.93; 95% CI = 0.61 to 1

  20. Adverse Outcomes After Hospitalization and Delirium in Persons With Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Tamara G.; Jones, Richard N.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Tommet, Douglas; Gross, Alden L.; Habtemariam, Daniel; Schmitt, Eva; Yap, Liang; Inouye, Sharon K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospitalization, frequently complicated by delirium, can be a life-changing event for patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Objective To determine risks for institutionalization, cognitive decline, or death associated with hospitalization and delirium in patients with AD. Design Prospective cohort enrolled between 1991 and 2006 into the Massachusetts Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (MADRC) patient registry. Setting Community-based. Participants 771 persons aged 65 years or older with a clinical diagnosis of AD. Measurements Hospitalization, delirium, death, and institutionalization were identified through administrative databases. Cognitive decline was defined as a decrease of 4 or more points on the Blessed Information-Memory-Concentration test score. Multivariate analysis was used to calculate adjusted relative risks (RRs). Results Of 771 participants with AD, 367 (48%) were hospitalized and 194 (25%) developed delirium. Hospitalized patients who did not have delirium had an increased risk for death (adjusted RR, 4.7 [95% CI, 1.9 to 11.6]) and institutionalization (adjusted RR, 6.9 [CI, 4.0 to 11.7]). With delirium, risk for death (adjusted RR, 5.4 [CI, 2.3 to 12.5]) and institutionalization (adjusted RR, 9.3 [CI, 5.5 to 15.7]) increased further. With hospitalization and delirium, the adjusted RR for cognitive decline for patients with AD was 1.6 (CI, 1.2 to 2.3). Among hospitalized patients with AD, 21% of the incidences of cognitive decline, 15% of institutionalization, and 6% of deaths were associated with delirium. Limitations Cognitive outcome was missing in 291 patients. Sensitivity analysis was performed to test the effect of missing data, and a composite outcome was used to decrease the effect of missing data. Conclusion Approximately 1 in 8 hospitalized patients with AD who develop delirium will have at least 1 adverse outcome, including death, institutionalization, or cognitive decline, associated with delirium. Delirium prevention may

  1. Preliminary Development of an Ultrabrief Two-Item Bedside Test for Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Fick, Donna M.; Inouye, Sharon K.; Guess, Jamey; Ngo, Long H.; Jones, Richard N.; Saczynski, Jane S.; Marcantonio, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Delirium is common, morbid, and costly, yet is greatly under-recognized among hospitalized older adults. Objective To identify the best single and pair of mental status test items that predict the presence of delirium. Design, Setting Diagnostic test evaluation study that enrolled medicine inpatients aged 75 years or older at an academic medical center. Methods Patients underwent a clinical reference standard assessment involving a patient interview, medical record review, and interviews with family members and nurses to determine the presence or absence of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition defined delirium. Participants also underwent the three-dimensional Confusion Assessment Method (3D-CAM), a brief, validated assessment for delirium. Individual items and pairs of items from the 3D-CAM were evaluated to determine sensitivity and specificity relative to the reference standard delirium diagnosis. Results Of the 201 participants (mean age 84 years, 62% female), 42 (21%) had delirium based on the clinical reference standard. The single item with the best test characteristics was “months of the year backwards” with a sensitivity of 83% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 69%-93%) and specificity of 69% (95% CI: 61%-76%). The best 2-item screen was the combination of “months of the year backwards” and “what is the day of the week?” with a sensitivity of 93% (95% CI: 81%-99%) and specificity of 64% (95% CI: 56%-70%). Conclusions We identified a single item with >80% and pair of items with >90% sensitivity for delirium. If validated prospectively, these items will serve as an initial innovative screening step for delirium identification in hospitalized older adults. PMID:26369992

  2. Antipsychotics for delirium in the general hospital setting in consecutive 2453 inpatients: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Kotaro; Kishi, Yasuhiro; Wada, Ken; Odawara, Toshinari; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shiganami, Takafumi; Tsuchida, Kazuo; Oshima, Yoshio; Uchimura, Naohisa; Akaho, Rie; Watanabe, Akira; Taira, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Katsuji; Hashimoto, Naoko; Usui, Chie; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective Attention to risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium has been paid. A clinical question was whether risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium would exceed efficacy of those even in the general hospital setting. Methods A prospective observational study proceeded over a 1-year period at 33 general hospitals, where at least one psychiatrist worked full time. Subjects were patients who developed delirium during their admission due to acute somatic diseases or surgery, and who received antipsychotics for delirium. The primary outcome was rates and kinds of serious adverse events. Results Among 2834 patients who developed delirium, 2453 patients received antipsychotics, such as risperidone (34%), quetiapine (32%), and parenteral haloperidol (20%), for delirium. Out of 2453 patients, 22 serious adverse events (0.9%) were reported. Aspiration pneumonia was the most frequent (17 patients, 0.7%), followed by cardiovascular events (4 patients, 0.2%) and venous thromboembolism (1 patient, 0.0%). There was no patient with a fracture or intracranial injury due to a fall. No one died because of antipsychotic side effects. The mean Clinical Global Impressions—Improvement Scale score was 2.02 (SD 1.09). Delirium was resolved within 1 week in more than half of the patients (54%). Conclusions In the general hospital setting under management including fine dosage adjustment and early detection of side effects, risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium might be low, in contrast to antipsychotics for dementia in the nursing home or outpatient settings. A point may be not how to avoid using antipsychotics but how to monitor their risk. PMID:23801358

  3. Neuropathogenesis of delirium: review of current etiologic theories and common pathways.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, José R

    2013-12-01

    Delirium is a neurobehavioral syndrome caused by dysregulation of neuronal activity secondary to systemic disturbances. Over time, a number of theories have been proposed in an attempt to explain the processes leading to the development of delirium. Each proposed theory has focused on a specific mechanism or pathologic process (e.g., dopamine excess or acetylcholine deficiency theories), observational and experiential evidence (e.g., sleep deprivation, aging), or empirical data (e.g., specific pharmacologic agents' association with postoperative delirium, intraoperative hypoxia). This article represents a review of published literature and summarizes the top seven proposed theories and their interrelation. This review includes the "neuroinflammatory," "neuronal aging," "oxidative stress," "neurotransmitter deficiency," "neuroendocrine," "diurnal dysregulation," and "network disconnectivity" hypotheses. Most of these theories are complementary, rather than competing, with many areas of intersection and reciprocal influence. The literature suggests that many factors or mechanisms included in these theories lead to a final common outcome associated with an alteration in neurotransmitter synthesis, function, and/or availability that mediates the complex behavioral and cognitive changes observed in delirium. In general, the most commonly described neurotransmitter changes associated with delirium include deficiencies in acetylcholine and/or melatonin availability; excess in dopamine, norepinephrine, and/or glutamate release; and variable alterations (e.g., either a decreased or increased activity, depending on delirium presentation and cause) in serotonin, histamine, and/or γ-aminobutyric acid. In the end, it is unlikely that any one of these theories is fully capable of explaining the etiology or phenomenologic manifestations of delirium but rather that two or more of these, if not all, act together to lead to the biochemical derangement and, ultimately, to the

  4. Current approach to diagnosis and treatment of delirium after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Adam S.; Weiner, Menachem M.; Arora, Rakesh C.; Chung, Insung; Deshpande, Ranjit; Varghese, Robin; Augoustides, John; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Delirium after cardiac surgery remains a common occurrence that results in significant short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. It continues to be underdiagnosed given its complex presentation and multifactorial etiology; however, its prevalence is increasing given the aging cardiac surgical population. This review highlights the perioperative risk factors, tools to assist in diagnosing delirium, and current pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapy options. PMID:27052077

  5. Exogenous Melatonin for Delirium Prevention: a Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Shi, LiGen; Liang, Feng; Xu, Liang; Desislava, Doycheva; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Jianmin

    2016-08-01

    Recently, two high-quality clinical randomized controlled trials (RCTs) regarding the preventive effect of exogenous melatonin on delirium drew inconsistent conclusions. We therefore performed a systemic review to explore whether melatonin had a benefit on delirium prevention. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library were searched from January 1980 to April 2015 for English language studies. After strict selection and evaluation, the data were extracted from the included four RCTs. The primary outcome of this meta-analysis was the incidence of delirium. The secondary outcome was the improvement of sleep-wake rhythm. A total of four RCTs with 669 elderly patients were included in the present study. Melatonin group showed a tendency to decrease the incidence of delirium (relative risk [RR] 0.41, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.15 to 1.13; P = 0.08) compared with control group. In subgroup analysis of the elderly patients in medical wards, melatonin supplementation decreased the incidence of delirium by 75 % (RR 0.25, 95 % CI 0.07 to 0.88; P = 0.03), but not in sleep-wake disturbance (RR 1.24, 95 % CI 0.51 to 3.00; P = 0.64). No differences were found in the incidence of delirium between the two groups in the elderly patients that were presented to surgical wards. In conclusion, melatonin supplementation had a significant preventive effect in decreasing the incidence of delirium in elderly patients that were presented to medical wards. Further studies should provide sufficient evidence about the effect of melatonin on delirium in a large sample size. PMID:26189834

  6. Cortisol, Interleukins and S100B in Delirium in the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Munster, Barbara C.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Endert, Erik; Wiersinga, W. Joost; van Oosten, Hannah E.; Goslings, J. Carel; de Rooij, Sophia E. J. A.

    2010-01-01

    In independent studies delirium was associated with higher levels of cortisol, interleukin(IL)s, and S100B. The aim of this study was to simultaneously compare cortisol, IL-6, IL-8, and S100B levels in patients aged 65 years and older admitted for hip fracture surgery with and without delirium. Cortisol, IL-6, IL-8, and S100B were assayed in…

  7. Intraoperative Tight Glucose Control Using Hyperinsulinemic Normoglycemia Increases Delirium After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saager, Leif; Duncan, Andra E.; Yared, Jean-Pierre; Hesler, Brian D.; You, Jing; Deogaonkar, Anupa; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kurz, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative delirium is common in patients recovering from cardiac surgery. Tight glucose control has been shown to reduce mortality and morbidity. We therefore sought to determine the effect of tight intraoperative glucose control using a hyper-insulinemic normoglycemic clamp approach on postoperative delirium in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods We enrolled 198 adult patients having cardiac surgery in this randomized, double-blinded single-center trial. Patients were randomly assigned to either tight intraoperative glucose control with a hyperinsulinemic-normoglycemic clamp (target blood glucose: 80–110 mg/dL) or standard therapy (conventional insulin administration with blood glucose target < 150 mg/dL). Delirium was assessed using a comprehensive delirium battery. We considered patients to have experienced postoperative delirium when Confusion Assessment Method testing was positive at any assessment. A positive Confusion Assessment Method test was defined by the presence of features 1 (acute onset and fluctuating course) and 2 (inattention), and either 3 (disorganized thinking) or 4 (altered consciousness). Results Patients randomized to tight glucose control were more likely to be diagnosed as being delirious than those assigned to routine glucose control (26/93 vs. 15/105; Relative Risk (RR), 95% CI: 1.89, 1.06–3.37; P = 0.03), after adjusting for preoperative usage of calcium channel blocker and American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) physical status. Delirium severity, among patients with delirium, was comparable with each glucose management strategy. Conclusions Intraoperative hyperinsulinemic-normoglycemia augments the risk of delirium after cardiac surgery, but not its severity. PMID:25992877

  8. The impact of delirium on the circadian distribution of breakthrough analgesia in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, B; Lawlor, P G; Mancini, I L; Pereira, J L; Hanson, J; Bruera, E D

    2001-10-01

    Most cancer patients will experience pain requiring opioid therapy during their illness. Standard opioid therapy includes fixed scheduled doses and so-called "rescue" doses for breakthrough pain. Circadian rhythms seem to influence the expression of pain and the responsiveness to analgesic medication. Delirium is a common complication in advanced cancer patients and it also may modify the expression of pain and the use of analgesic medication. We reviewed the circadian distribution of breakthrough analgesia (BTA) doses in 104 advanced cancer patients who were part of a prospective study of the occurrence of delirium. We found that the circadian distribution of BTA is significantly different from a random distribution in the case of patients with and without delirium. Patients without delirium tended to use more BTA (P < 0.001) in the morning, whereas patients with delirium tended to use more BTA in the evening and at night (P = 0.02). We conclude that delirium is associated with changes in the circadian distribution of BTA, which is possibly related to reversal of the normal circadian rhythm. PMID:11576799

  9. Treatment and prevention of postoperative complications in hip fracture patients: infections and delirium.

    PubMed

    Dovjak, Peter; Iglseder, Bernhard; Mikosch, Peter; Gosch, Markus; Müller, Ernst; Pinter, Georg; Pils, Katharina; Gerstofer, Inge; Thaler, Heinrich; Zmaritz, Michaela; Weissenberger-Leduc, Monique; Müller, Walter

    2013-10-01

    The course of older patients with hip fractures is often complicated by infections and delirium. Accurate care and high suspicion for these complications are essential, since these conditions are associated with an increase in mortality, length of hospital stay and nursing home placement, poorer mobility, and functional decline. Because of immunosenescence and higher infection rates, older patients need specific care, immediate diagnosis, and treatment of infections. Numerous guidelines of various medical societies outline the management of nosocomial infections, but there is a need of an individualized treatment plan because of comorbidities and polypharmacy. Hygiene measures have first priority to reduce the rate of infections. Treatment of geriatric syndromes like malnutrition, exsiccosis, gait disorders, falls, delirium, urine incontinence, and organ insufficiency are as important as immunization against pneumococci and influenza. Advanced age, cognitive impairment, hearing loss, peripheral vascular disease, prior delirium episodes, sight disorders, and polypharmacy are established risk factors for delirium; thus, older people with several chronic diseases are prone to delirium. A multifactorial approach, comprising standardized screening, oxygen support, intravenous fluid administration and augmented nutrition, monitoring of vital signs, pain treatment, optimized medication, and modification in perioperative management, significantly reduces delirium incidence during hospitalization for hip fracture. An interdisciplinary approach between surgeons and geriatricians may warrant optimized satisfaction of patients' needs. PMID:23949565

  10. The Prevention and Treatment of Delirium in Elderly Patients Following Hip Fracture Surgery.

    PubMed

    Martocchia, Antonio; Curto, Martina; Comite, Fabrizia; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Girardi, Paolo; Ferracuti, Stefano; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Falaschi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporotic hip fracture needs a specific approach and treatment, since elderly patients are at high risk for adverse outcomes after surgery. In particular, delirium often occurs in the peri-operative period, and it is associated with death, hospital-acquired complications, persistent cognitive impairments, poor functional recovery after surgery and increased healthcare costs. The pre-operative assessment of the risk factors for delirium improves the preventive measures. The delirium diagnostic tools should be included in the standard of orthogeriatric cure for hip fracture. Given the increasing complexity of the clinical pictures, we present a review of the available treatment options for delirium in patients with hip fracture. The metabolic pre-operative disorders and the management of co-morbid diseases are specific targets of treatment in order to optimize the outcomes after surgery. In particular, elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease are highly vulnerable to hip fracture and delirium, and they are severely frail with reduced physiologic reserves. An integrated approach combining environmental and pharmacological strategies is useful in the delirium treatment, with a close collaboration between the orthopedic and geriatric team. PMID:25687439

  11. Different MMSE Score Is Associated with Postoperative Delirium in Young-Old and Old-Old Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meijuan; Zhu, Yingbo; Li, Cheng; Li, Guodong; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Xie, Zhongcong; Shen, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative delirium is one of the most common postoperative complications in geriatric patients. Mini-mental state examination (MMSE) assesses cognitive function in patients and is associated with postoperative delirium. However, whether there is an age-dependent relationship between preoperative MMSE score and postoperative delirium remains unknown. Methods We therefore set out to investigate the association between preoperative MMSE score and postoperative delirium in young-old (≤80 year-old, 75.46±4.69 years, 27.0% male, n = 63) and old-old (>80 year-old, 84.51±3.46 years, 20.9% male, n = 67) participants, who had repairs of hip fractures under general anesthesia. The Confusion Assessment Method and Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale were administrated before surgery, and on the first, second and fourth days after surgery, to assess the incidence and severity of the delirium, respectively. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to calculate the optimal cutoff score of MMSE in predicting postoperative delirium. Results Thirty-four (26.2%) of 130 patients (80.12±6.12 years, 23.8% male) developed postoperative delirium. Preoperative MMSE scores were negatively associated with higher incidences and greater severity of postoperative delirium. The optimal cutoff scores of MMSE associated with postoperative delirium for young-old and old-old participants were 18.4 and 21.4, with a sensitivity of 60% and 83.8%, and a specificity of 92.5% and 62.8%, respectively. Conclusion The data demonstrated the optimal cutoff score of MMSE associated with postoperative delirium in young-old adults might be lower than that in old-old adults. Pending further investigation, these findings suggest that the association between preoperative MMSE score and postoperative delirium is age-dependent. PMID:26460750

  12. Postinjection Delirium/Sedation Syndrome with Olanzapine Depot Injection

    PubMed Central

    Sarangula, Sadhvi Mythili; Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Sanjay, Y.; Reddy, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    After 1 year of introduction of olanzapine long-acting injectable (LAI) in India, many psychiatrists believe that it is a very affordable, well-tolerated, and effective second generation long-acting antipsychotic depot compared to not well tolerated but cheap first generation antipsychotic depots and to other second generation depots which are costly. However, reports of its possible adverse events in clinical settings are not yet published. We report what probably might be the first case of postinjection delirium/sedation syndrome (PDSS) in India. Although the occurrence is uncommon, incorrect understanding of this event may hinder the future use of the potentially useful olanzapine LAI. We review the available literature on the proposed diagnostic guidelines, mechanism of this event, precautions, and management of PDSS. PMID:27570354

  13. Postinjection Delirium/Sedation Syndrome with Olanzapine Depot Injection.

    PubMed

    Sarangula, Sadhvi Mythili; Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Sanjay, Y; Reddy, M S

    2016-01-01

    After 1 year of introduction of olanzapine long-acting injectable (LAI) in India, many psychiatrists believe that it is a very affordable, well-tolerated, and effective second generation long-acting antipsychotic depot compared to not well tolerated but cheap first generation antipsychotic depots and to other second generation depots which are costly. However, reports of its possible adverse events in clinical settings are not yet published. We report what probably might be the first case of postinjection delirium/sedation syndrome (PDSS) in India. Although the occurrence is uncommon, incorrect understanding of this event may hinder the future use of the potentially useful olanzapine LAI. We review the available literature on the proposed diagnostic guidelines, mechanism of this event, precautions, and management of PDSS. PMID:27570354

  14. [Risk factors for delirium tremens: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Thiercelin, N; Rabiah Lechevallier, Z; Rusch, E; Plat, A

    2012-01-01

    Delirium tremens (DT) is the most severe complication from alcohol withdrawal. Risk factors for DT (before the withdrawal begins) and early predictive factors for the development of the withdrawal syndrome towards DT (once withdrawal has started) are not clearly established. We reviewed the literature from PubMed/Medline database to identify risk factors for DT. Twenty-one studies were been selected. Three only were prospective. The most commonly identified risk factors included personal history of DT, seizures, presence of acute somatic comorbidity especially infectious, presence of early withdrawal symptoms, and genetic predisposition. Most of these risk factors are still debated and prospective studies might appear useful considering the DT prevalence and the absence of consensual both diagnostic and therapeutic protocols. PMID:21920639

  15. Effectiveness of multi-component non-pharmacologic delirium interventions: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hshieh, Tammy T.; Yue, Jirong; Oh, Esther; Puelle, Margaret; Dowal, Sarah; Travison, Thomas; Inouye, Sharon K.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Delirium, an acute disorder with high morbidity and mortality, is often preventable through multi-component non-pharmacologic strategies. The efficacy of these strategies for preventing subsequent adverse outcomes has been limited to small studies. Objective Evaluate available evidence on multi-component non-pharmacologic delirium interventions in reducing incident delirium and preventing poor outcomes associated with delirium. Data Sources PubMed, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from January 1, 1999–December 31, 2013. Study Selection Studies examining the following outcomes were included: delirium incidence, falls, length of stay, rate of discharge to a long-term care institution, change in functional or cognitive status. Data Extraction and Synthesis Two experienced physician reviewers independently and blindly abstracted data on outcome measures using a standardized approach. The reviewers conducted quality ratings based on the Cochrane Risk of Bias criteria for each study. Main Outcomes and Measures We identified 14 interventional studies. Results for outcomes of delirium, falls, length of stay and institutionalization data were pooled for meta-analysis but heterogeneity limited meta-analysis of results for outcomes of functional and cognitive decline. Overall, eleven studies demonstrated significant reductions in delirium incidence (Odds Ratio 0.47, 95% Confidence Interval 0.38–0.58). The four randomized or matched (RMT) studies reduced delirium incidence by 44% (95% CI 0.42–0.76). Rate of falls decreased significantly among intervention patients in four studies (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.25–0.60); in the two RMTs, the fall rate was reduced by 64% (95% CI 0.22–0.61). Lengths of stay and institutionalization rates also trended towards decreases in the intervention groups, mean difference −0.16 days shorter (95% CI −0.97–0.64) and odds of institutionalization 5% lower (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.71–1

  16. Worsening Cognitive Impairment and Neurodegenerative Pathology Progressively Increase Risk for Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Daniel H.J.; Skelly, Donal T.; Murray, Carol; Hennessy, Edel; Bowen, Jordan; Norton, Samuel; Brayne, Carol; Rahkonen, Terhi; Sulkava, Raimo; Sanderson, David J.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas; Bannerman, David M.; MacLullich, Alasdair M.J.; Cunningham, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Background Delirium is a profound neuropsychiatric disturbance precipitated by acute illness. Although dementia is the major risk factor this has typically been considered a binary quantity (i.e., cognitively impaired versus cognitively normal) with respect to delirium risk. We used humans and mice to address the hypothesis that the severity of underlying neurodegenerative changes and/or cognitive impairment progressively alters delirium risk. Methods Humans in a population-based longitudinal study, Vantaa 85+, were followed for incident delirium. Odds for reporting delirium at follow-up (outcome) were modeled using random-effects logistic regression, where prior cognitive impairment measured by Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) (exposure) was considered. To address whether underlying neurodegenerative pathology increased susceptibility to acute cognitive change, mice at three stages of neurodegenerative disease progression (ME7 model of neurodegeneration: controls, 12 weeks, and 16 weeks) were assessed for acute cognitive dysfunction upon systemic inflammation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg). Synaptic and axonal correlates of susceptibility to acute dysfunction were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results In the Vantaa cohort, 465 persons (88.4 ± 2.8 years) completed MMSE at baseline. For every MMSE point lost, risk of incident delirium increased by 5% (p = 0.02). LPS precipitated severe and fluctuating cognitive deficits in 16-week ME7 mice but lower incidence or no deficits in 12-week ME7 and controls, respectively. This was associated with progressive thalamic synaptic loss and axonal pathology. Conclusion A human population-based cohort with graded severity of existing cognitive impairment and a mouse model with progressing neurodegeneration both indicate that the risk of delirium increases with greater severity of pre-existing cognitive impairment and neuropathology. PMID:25239680

  17. A review of recent clinical trials and guidelines on the prevention and management of delirium in hospitalized older patients.

    PubMed

    Rathier, Margaret O; Baker, William L

    2011-10-01

    Treatment of acute illness in older adults is frequently complicated by the presence of delirium. Delirium is characterized by the development of an altered mental status over the course of hours to days, and can have a fluctuating course. Patients with delirium have difficulty paying attention to their environment, have disorganized thinking, and usually have an altered level of consciousness. While scientists continue to elucidate the pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with delirium, clinicians can identify patients at risk for delirium and diagnose it using valid instruments, such as the Confusion Assessment Method and Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit. Delirium is an independent risk factor for death, institutionalization, and dementia, and resolves in many patients by the time of hospital discharge. For patients admitted to medical units, optimal management of delirium includes reassessment of medications, pain, sleep, nutrition, mobility, need for physical restraints, and bowel and bladder function. The use of antipsychotic medication to sedate delirious patients should be restricted to patients in danger of harming themselves or others and should be used when nonpharmacologic means fail. Multicomponent interventions performed by the hospital care team that address risk factors can prevent delirium in patients in medical units and those undergoing hip fracture repair. This includes attention to the depth of sedation during spinal anesthesia and the addition of regional nerve blocks to patient-controlled analgesia in orthopedic patients, both of which may reduce postoperative delirium. Perioperative use of antipsychotics may further reduce the incidence of delirium, although hospital length of stay has not been routinely reduced. Appropriate management of analgesia, sedation, and delirium in the intensive care unit is also associated with reduced duration of mechanical ventilation, as well as intensive care unit and hospital length of

  18. Preoperative protein profiles in cerebrospinal fluid in elderly hip fracture patients at risk for delirium: A proteomics and validation study

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, Dunja; Witlox, Joost; van Aalst, Corneli; Scholtens, Rikie M.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; van Munster, Barbara C.; de Jonghe, Jos F.M.; Houdijk, Alexander P.J.; Eikelenboom, Piet; van Westerloo, David J.; van de Beek, Diederik; van Gool, Willem A.; Koenderman, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Background A neuroinflammatory response is suggested to play an important role in delirium, a common complication in older hospitalized patients. We examined whether hip fracture patients who develop postoperative delirium have a different proteome in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) prior to surgery. Methods Patients (≥ 75 years) were admitted for hip fracture surgery. CSF was collected during spinal anaesthesia; proteins were separated using gel electrophoresis and identified with mass spectrometry. We compared the proteome of patients with and without postoperative delirium. Findings were validated in an independent, comparable cohort using immuno-assays. Results In the derivation cohort 53 patients were included, 35.8% developed postoperative delirium. We identified differences in levels of eight CSF proteins between patients with and without subsequent delirium: complement factor C3, contactin-1, fibulin-1 and I-beta-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase were significantly lower in patients with postoperative delirium, while neural cell adhesion molecule-2, fibrinogen, zinc-α-2-glycoprotein and haptoglobin levels were significantly higher. In the validation cohort 21.2% of 52 patients developed postoperative delirium. Immuno-assays confirmed contactin-1 results although not statistically significant. Complement factor C3 was significantly higher in patients with postoperative delirium. Conclusion Our results show the complexity of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in delirium and emphasizes the need of independent validation of findings. General significance This study highlights the challenges and inconsistent findings in studies of delirium, a serious complication in older patients. We analysed proteins in CSF, the most proximal fluid to the brain. All patients were free from delirium at the time of sampling. PMID:26675981

  19. Delirium in Hospitalized Patients: Implications of Current Evidence on Clinical Practice and Future Avenues for Research—A Systematic Evidence Review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Babar A.; Zawahiri, Mohammed; Campbell, Noll L.; Fox, George C.; Weinstein, Eric J.; Nazir, Arif; Farber, Mark O.; Buckley, John D.; MacLullich, Alasdair; (UK), MRCP; Boustani, Malaz A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite the significant burden of delirium among hospitalized adults, critical appraisal of systematic data on delirium diagnosis, pathophysiology, treatment, prevention, and outcomes is lacking. PURPOSE To provide evidence-based recommendations for delirium care to practitioners, and identify gaps in delirium research. DATA SOURCES Medline, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) information systems fromJanuary 1966 to April 2011. STUDY SELECTION All published systematic evidence reviews (SERs) on delirium were evaluated. DATA EXTRACTION Three reviewers independently extracted the data regarding delirium risk factors, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and outcomes, and critically appraised each SER as good, fair, or poor using the United States Preventive Services Task Force criteria. DATA SYNTHESIS Twenty-two SERs graded as good or fair provided the data. Age, cognitive impairment, depression, anticholinergic drugs, and lorazepam use were associated with an increased risk for developing delirium. The Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) is reliable for delirium diagnosis outside of the intensive care unit. Multicomponent nonpharmacological interventions are effective in reducing delirium incidence in elderly medical patients. Low-dose haloperidol has similar efficacy as atypical antipsychotics for treating delirium. Delirium is associated with poor outcomes independent of age, severity of illness, or dementia. CONCLUSION Delirium is an acute, preventable medical condition with short- and long-term negative effects on a patient’s cognitive and functional states. PMID:22684893

  20. Outcome of delirium in critically ill patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salluh, Jorge I F; Wang, Han; Schneider, Eric B; Nagaraja, Neeraja; Yenokyan, Gayane; Damluji, Abdulla; Serafim, Rodrigo B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the relation between delirium in critically ill patients and their outcomes in the short term (in the intensive care unit and in hospital) and after discharge from hospital. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies. Data sources PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and PsychINFO, with no language restrictions, up to 1 January 2015. Eligibility criteria for selection studies Reports were eligible for inclusion if they were prospective observational cohorts or clinical trials of adults in intensive care units who were assessed with a validated delirium screening or rating system, and if the association was measured between delirium and at least one of four clinical endpoints (death during admission, length of stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, and any outcome after hospital discharge). Studies were excluded if they primarily enrolled patients with a neurological disorder or patients admitted to intensive care after cardiac surgery or organ/tissue transplantation, or centered on sedation management or alcohol or substance withdrawal. Data were extracted on characteristics of studies, populations sampled, identification of delirium, and outcomes. Random effects models and meta-regression analyses were used to pool data from individual studies. Results Delirium was identified in 5280 of 16 595 (31.8%) critically ill patients reported in 42 studies. When compared with control patients without delirium, patients with delirium had significantly higher mortality during admission (risk ratio 2.19, 94% confidence interval 1.78 to 2.70; P<0.001) as well as longer durations of mechanical ventilation and lengths of stay in the intensive care unit and in hospital (standard mean differences 1.79 (95% confidence interval 0.31 to 3.27; P<0.001), 1.38 (0.99 to 1.77; P<0.001), and 0.97 (0.61 to 1.33; P<0.001), respectively). Available studies indicated an association between delirium and cognitive impairment after discharge

  1. Pellagrous encephalopathy presenting as alcohol withdrawal delirium: A case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alcohol withdrawal delirium (AWD) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Pellagra (niacin deficiency) can be a cause of delirium during alcohol withdrawal that may often be overlooked. Objectives We present a three-patient case series of pellagrous encephalopathy (delirium due to pellagra) presenting as AWD. Methods We provide a brief review of pellagra’s history, data on pellagra’s epidemiology, and discuss pellagra’s various manifestations, particularly as related to alcohol withdrawal. We conclude by providing a review of existing guidelines on the management of alcohol withdrawal, highlighting that they do not include pellagrous encephalopathy in the differential diagnosis for AWD. Results Though pellagra has been historically described as the triad of dementia, dermatitis, and diarrhea, it seldom presents with all three findings. The neurocognitive disturbance associated with pellagra is better characterized by delirium rather than dementia, and pellagra may present as an isolated delirium without any other aspects of the triad. Discussion Although endemic pellagra is virtually eradicated in Western countries, it continues to present as pellagrous encephalopathy in patients with risk factors for malnutrition such as chronic alcohol intake, homelessness, or AIDS. It may often be mistaken for AWD. Whenever pellagra is suspected, treatment with oral nicotinamide (100 mg three times daily for 3–4 weeks) prior to laboratory confirmation is recommended as an inexpensive, safe, and potentially life-saving intervention. PMID:23186222

  2. Pathophysiologic changes due to TASER® devices versus excited delirium: potential relevance to deaths-in-custody?

    PubMed

    Jauchem, James R

    2011-05-01

    The syndrome of excited delirium has been implicated in some deaths-in-custody which also involved the use of electronic control devices (ECDs) (including those manufactured by TASER International) on subjects. This review is an update on recent studies of pathophysiologic changes related to these two separate but parallel topics: a) first, the use of ECDs during law-enforcement activities; and b) second, the occurrence of excited delirium during such activities. This is a narrative review of elements that may be of use in generating hypotheses relating to potential similarities or differences between the two topics. Differences between changes in most factors due to excited delirium versus those of ECD applications were not readily apparent in most cases. These factors include: direct and indirect effects on the cardiovascular system, respiration, rhabdomyolysis and muscle enzymes, hyperkalemia, acidosis, hyperglycemia, and increased hematocrit. One factor that may exhibit consistent differences, however, is increased body temperature, which is often evident during excited delirium (versus a lack of increase temperature during ECD exposures). Thus, on the basis of this review, a more detailed delineation of this factor could be a major focus for future forensic investigations of deaths-in-custody involving either excited delirium or ECD exposures. PMID:21550562

  3. Does Haloperidol Prophylaxis Reduce Ketamine-Induced Emergence Delirium in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Amr, Mostafa A. M.; Shams, Tarek; Al-Wadani, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Ketamine is a non-barbiturate agent with rapid action onset that induces profound sedation; however, some emergency physicians tend not to use ketamine because of the risk of emergence delirium (ED). This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of haloperidol prophylaxis in postoperative ketamine delirium in children. Methods: Prospective data relating to any emergence dreams, delirium, hallucinations, agitation, crying, altered perceptions, and necessary interventions were recorded in consecutive cases of ketamine delirium in patients attending Mansoura University Hospital, Egypt, from June 2010 to May 2011. Results: A total of 537 records were available for analysis. Of those, 267 received prophylactic haloperidol (49.7%). There were significant differences between the two groups regarding post-anaesthetic care unit behaviour. The ketamine-haloperidol groups included more patients who were sleepy, calm (P ≤0.01) and less irritable (P ≤0.01), with a lower incidence of crying (P ≤0.01) and disorientation (P ≤0.01). Conclusion: We found that preoperative administration of haloperidol decreases the incidence of postoperative delirium in a sample of Egyptian children undergoing minor surgery. This is congruent with earlier work conducted in adults. This work carries great hope to decrease and even prevent ED in hospitalised, non-surgical patients. PMID:23862031

  4. Sleep disorders and acute nocturnal delirium in the elderly: a comorbidity not to be overlooked.

    PubMed

    Terzaghi, Michele; Sartori, Ivana; Rustioni, Valter; Manni, Raffaele

    2014-04-01

    Delirium is a disturbance of consciousness and cognition that results in a confusional state. It tends to fluctuate in intensity and is often observed in older patients. Sleep is a window of vulnerability for the occurrence of delirium and sleep disorders can play a role in its appearance. In particular, delirious episodes have been associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, which is reported to be frequent in the elderly. Hereby, we present a case-report documenting the sudden onset of a confusional state triggered by obstructive sleep apnoea-induced arousal, together with a review of the literature on the topic. We emphasise that, among the many pathogenic factors implicated in delirium, it is worth considering the possible link between nocturnal delirium and the occurrence of impaired arousals. Indeed, the complex confusional manifestations of delirium could be due, in part, to persistence of dysfunctional sleep activity resulting in an inability to sustain full arousal during behavioural wakefulness. Arousals can be triggered by sleep disturbances or other medical conditions. Clinicians should be aware that older patients may present disordered sleep patterns, and make investigation of sleep patterns and disorders potentially affecting sleep continuity a key part of their clinical workup, especially in the presence of cognitive comorbidities. Correct diagnosis and optimal treatment of sleep disorders and disrupted sleep can have a significant impact in the elderly, improving sleep quality and reducing the occurrence of abnormal sleep-related behaviours. PMID:24636782

  5. Mahalanobis-Taguchi System to Identify Preindicators of Delirium in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Buenviaje, Bernardo; Bischoff, John E; Roncace, Robert A; Willy, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    This paper was designed to determine if the Mahalanobis-Taguchi System (MTS) applied to the delirium-evidence-based bundle could detect medical patterns in retrospective datasets. The methodology defined the evidence-based bundle as a multidimensional system that conformed to a parameter diagram. The Mahalanobis distance (MD) was calculated for the retrospective healthy observations and the retrospective unhealthy observations. Signal-to-noise ratios were calculated to determine the relative strength of detection of 23 delirium preindicators. This study discovered that the sufficient variation in the CAM-ICU assessment, the standard for delirium assessment, would benefit from knowledge of how different the MD is from the healthy average. The sensitivity of the detection system was 0.89 with a 95% confidence interval of between 0.84 and 0.92. The specificity of the detection system was 0.93 with a 95% confidence interval between 0.90 and 0.95. The MTS applied to the delirium-evidence-based bundle could detect medical patterns in retrospective datasets. The implication of this paper to a biomedical research is an automated decision support tool for the delirium-evidence-based bundle providing an early detection capability needed today. PMID:26011872

  6. Comparison of cognitive and neuropsychiatric profiles in hospitalised elderly medical patients with delirium, dementia and comorbid delirium–dementia

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Maeve; McInerney, Shane; McFarland, John; Condon, Candice; Awan, Fahad; O'Connor, Margaret; Reynolds, Paul; Meaney, Anna Maria; Adamis, Dimitrios; Dunne, Colum; Cullen, Walter; Trzepacz, Paula T; Meagher, David J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Differentiation of delirium and dementia is a key diagnostic challenge but there has been limited study of features that distinguish these conditions. We examined neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological symptoms in elderly medical inpatients to identify features that distinguish major neurocognitive disorders. Setting University teaching hospital in Ireland. Participants and measures 176 consecutive elderly medical inpatients (mean age 80.6±7.0 years (range 60–96); 85 males (48%)) referred to a psychiatry for later life consultation-liaison service with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) IV delirium, dementia, comorbid delirium–dementia and cognitively intact controls. Participants were assessed cross-sectionally with comparison of scores (including individual items) for the Revised Delirium Rating Scale (DRS-R98), Cognitive Test for Delirium (CTD) and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-Q). Results The frequency of neurocognitive diagnoses was delirium (n=50), dementia (n=32), comorbid delirium–dementia (n=62) and cognitively intact patients (n=32). Both delirium and comorbid delirium–dementia groups scored higher than the dementia group for DRS-R98 and CTD total scores, but all three neurocognitively impaired groups scored similarly in respect of total NPI-Q scores. For individual DRS-R98 items, delirium groups were distinguished from dementia groups by a range of non-cognitive symptoms, but only for impaired attention of the cognitive items. For the CTD, attention (p=0.002) and vigilance (p=0.01) distinguished between delirium and dementia. No individual CTD item distinguished between comorbid delirium–dementia and delirium. For the NPI-Q, there were no differences between the three neurocognitively impaired groups for any individual item severity. Conclusions The neurocognitive profile of delirium is similar with or without comorbid dementia and differs from dementia without delirium. Simple tests of attention and

  7. Managing verbal agitation in people with dementia and delirium.

    PubMed

    Inkley, Francesca; Goldberg, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Patients with dementia and delirium in acute hospitals can exhibit verbal agitation, but there is no research on rate of occurrence or how ward staff manage such behaviour. This service evaluation aimed to measure rate of occurrence of verbal agitation in confused older inpatients and understand the management strategies used by staff. An agitation inventory was completed daily by the nursing team for all verbally agitated patients on eight older person wards over two weeks. Six semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff and three hours of non-participant observations were undertaken. A mean 6% (13/223) of patients were verbally agitated each day. Management strategies included trial and error, distraction and engagement, reassurance, communication and familiarity. Staff did not adopt a systematic approach to care planning due to lack of training and support on the ward, as well as scarce resources in terms of staff, space and activities. Research is needed to develop and evaluate interventions that support staff to care for these patients. PMID:26917188

  8. A new approach to the prevention and treatment of delirium in elderly patients in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Andrew B.; Sittambalam, Charmian D.

    2015-01-01

    The pronounced prevalence of delirium in geriatric patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and its increased morbidity and mortality is a well-established phenomenon. The purpose of this review is to explore the potential use of dexmedetomidine in preventing or managing ICU delirium in older patients. Articles used were identified and selected through multiple search engines, including Google Scholar, PubMed, and MEDLINE. Keywords such as dexmedetomidine, delirium, geriatric, ICU delirium, delirium in elderly, and palliative were used to obtain the specific articles used for this paper and restricted to articles published in 1990 or later. Articles specifically looking at the use of dexmedetomidine as compared to a study drug and its potential for use in ICU patients, as opposed to overall reviews of dexmedetomidine, were compared. When compared to benzodiazepines for the prevention or treatment of ICU delirium in the elderly, dexmedetomidine was associated with a reduction in delirium, as well as decreased morbidity and mortality. Dexmedetomidine has also been shown to be effective in limiting risk factors associated with ICU delirium such as length and depth of sedation. As opposed to benzodiazepines or opiates, dexmedetomidine provides effective analgesia, sympatholysis, and anxiolysis without causing respiratory depression and allows a patient to more effectively interact with practitioners. The review of these nine articles indicates that these favorable attributes and overall decreased duration and incidence of delirium make dexmedetomidine a viable option in preventing or reducing ICU delirium in high-risk geriatric patients and as a palliative adjunct to help control symptoms and stressors. PMID:26333857

  9. How do doctors and nurses manage delirium in intensive care units? A qualitative study using focus groups

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Cachón-Pérez, José Miguel; Martínez-Piedrola, Rosa; Gueita-Rodriguez, Javier; Perez-de-Heredia, Marta; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of doctors and nurses caring for patients with delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) and to describe the process of delirium management. Setting This study was performed in 5 ICUs located within 4 hospitals in Madrid (Spain). Participants Purposeful sampling was performed which included (1) doctors and nurses working in ICUs, (2) with >1 year experience in the ICU and (3) clinical experience with delirium. 38 professionals participated (19 doctors, 19 nurses), including 22 women and 16 men. The total mean age was 39 years. Design A qualitative study using focus groups. Methods 7 focus groups were held to collect data: 3 nurse focus groups, 3 doctor focus groups and 1 mixed focus group. Each group comprised 6–10 participants. A semistructured questions guide was used. Thematic analysis methods were used to analyse the data. Results 3 themes were identified: (1) the professional perspective on delirium; (2) implementing pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment for delirium and (3) work organisation in the ICU. The professionals regarded patients with delirium with uncertainty, and felt they were often underdiagnosed and poorly managed. Doctors displayed discrepancies regarding pharmacological prescriptions and decision-making. The choice of medication was determined by experience. Nurses felt that, for many doctors, delirium was not considered a matter of urgency in the ICU. Nurses encountered difficulties when applying verbal restraint, managing sleep disorders and providing early mobilisation. The lack of a delirium protocol generates conflicts regarding what type of care management to apply, especially during the night shift. A degree of group pressure exists which, in turn, influences the decision-making process and patient care. Conclusions Patients with delirium represent complex cases, requiring the implementation of specific protocols. These results serve to improve the process

  10. Human herpesvirus 6B reactivation and delirium are frequent and associated events after cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, J A; Boeckh, M; Leisenring, W M; Xie, H; Adler, A L; Huang, M-L; Fann, J R; Delaney, C; Zerr, D M

    2015-10-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) frequently reactivates after cord blood transplantation (CBT). We previously reported an association between HHV-6B reactivation and delirium after hematopoietic cell transplantation. In this prospective study, 35 CBT recipients underwent twice-weekly plasma PCR testing for HHV-6 and thrice-weekly delirium assessment until day 84. There was a quantitative association between HHV-6B reactivation and delirium in univariable (odds ratio, 2.88; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97-8.59) and bivariable models. In addition, intensified prophylaxis with high-dose valacyclovir mitigated HHV-6B reactivation (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.14-1.08). Larger trials are needed to explore the utility of HHV-6B prophylaxis after CBT. PMID:26121112

  11. [A 80-year-old woman with delirium after intertrochanteric fracture of femur].

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Karolina; Klich-Raczka, Alicja

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present a case of delirium -the state occurring frequently in elderly patients. A 80-year-old woman was hospitalized in the department of internal diseases for internal medical examinations before scheduled operation of femoral osteosynthesis. In ward, she was given analgesic medicines from the group of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), paracetamole and opioids influencing central nervous system. On the second day after modifying the painkilling treatment (single doses of paracetamole were increased and oral opioid medication was introduced) a quickly progressing (within a few hours) delirium was observed. Its occurrence was ascribed to the application of strong medicines influencing central nervous system. Treatment was modified then; the opioid medicine was replaced with NSAID, which had already been used before, applied intravenously. Subsidence of delirium clinical symptoms and cognitive functions' improvement was observed. PMID:21387774

  12. Human herpesvirus 6 reactivation and delirium are frequent and associated events after cord blood transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Joshua A; Boeckh, Michael; Leisenring, Wendy M; Xie, Hu; Adler, Amanda L; Huang, Meei-Li; Fann, Jesse R; Delaney, Colleen; Zerr, Danielle M

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) frequently reactivates after cord blood transplantation (CBT). We previously reported an association between HHV-6B reactivation and delirium after hematopoietic cell transplantation. In this prospective study, 35 CBT recipients underwent twice-weekly plasma PCR testing for HHV-6 and thrice-weekly delirium assessment until day 84. There was a quantitative association between HHV-6 reactivation and delirium in univariable (odds ratio, 2.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97–8.59) and bivariable models. In addition, intensified prophylaxis with high-dose valacyclovir mitigated HHV-6 reactivation (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.14–1.08). Larger trials are needed to explore the utility of HHV-6 prophylaxis after CBT. PMID:26121112

  13. Preoperative discussion with patients about delirium risk: are we doing enough?

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Judith H; Partridge, Judith S L

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative delirium is a common complication in the older surgical population, occurring in 10-50 % of cases. It is thought to be more common if an individual is identified as frail. Postoperative delirium is associated with poor outcome including higher mortality rates, prolonged length of hospital stay, increased care needs on discharge and longer term post-traumatic stress disorder. Guidelines from the American Geriatric Society and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence highlight the importance of risk assessment at the time of the preoperative visit. This enables the perioperative team to plan a care pathway that minimises the risk of delirium occurring postoperatively. Risk assessment also informs a discussion with patient and family regarding their risk, as part of a process of informed patient consent. This is an essential step in conforming to current legal and General Medical Council guidance on the process of consent. PMID:27594990

  14. Preoperative plasma leptin levels predict delirium in elderly patients after hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue-Wu; Shi, Jun-Wu; Yang, Ping-Shan; Wu, Zhu-Qi

    2014-07-01

    Leptin is considered to be a modulator of the immune response. Hypoleptinemia increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The present study aimed to investigate the ability of plasma leptin level to predict delirium in elderly patients after hip fracture surgery. Postoperative delirium (pod) was evaluated using the Confusion Assessment Method. Prolonged postoperative delirium (ppod) was defined as delirium lasting more than 4 weeks. Plasma leptin levels of 186 elderly patients and 186 elderly controls were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma leptin level was substantially lower in patients than in controls (4.6±2.2ng/ml vs. 7.5±1.8ng/ml, P<0.001). It was identified as an independent predictor for pod [odds ratio, 0.385; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.286-0.517; P<0.001] and ppod (odds ratio, 0.283; 95% CI, 0.152-0.527; P<0.001) using a multivariate analysis, and had high area under receiver operating characteristic curve for pod [area under curve (AUC), 0.850; 95% CI, 0.790-0.898] and ppod (AUC, 0.890; 95% CI, 0.836-0.931). The predictive value of leptin was markedly bigger than that of age for pod (AUC, 0.705; 95% CI, 0.634-0.770; P=0.002) and ppod (AUC, 0.713; 95% CI, 0.642-0.777; P=0.019). In a combined logistic-regression model, leptin improved the AUC of age to 0.890 (95% CI, 0.836-0.931) (P<0.001) for pod and 0.910 (95% CI, 0.860-0.947) (P=0.005) for ppod. Thus, preoperative plasma leptin level may be a useful, complementary tool to predict delirium and also prolonged delirium in elderly patients after hip fracture surgery. PMID:24787655

  15. Impaired Olfaction and Risk for Delirium or Cognitive Decline After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Charles H.; Morrissey, Candice; Ono, Masahiro; Yenokyan, Gayane; Selnes, Ola A.; Walston, Jeremy; Max, Laura; LaFlam, Andrew; Neufeld, Karin; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Hogue, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Statement Impaired olfaction, identified in 33% of patients undergoing cardiac surgery, was associated with the adjusted risk for postoperative delirium but not cognitive decline. Objectives The prevalence and significance of impaired olfaction is not well characterized in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Because impaired olfaction has been associated with underlying neurologic disease, impaired olfaction may identify patients who are vulnerable to poor neurological outcomes in the perioperative period. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of impaired olfaction among patients presenting for cardiac surgery and the independent association of impaired olfaction with postoperative delirium and cognitive decline. Design Nested prospective cohort study Setting Academic hospital Participants 165 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass and/or valve surgery Measurements Olfaction was measured using the Brief Smell Identification Test, with impaired olfaction defined as an olfactory score < 5th percentile of normative data. Delirium was assessed using a validated chart-review method. Cognitive performance was assessed using a neuropsychological testing battery at baseline and 4–6 weeks after surgery. Results Impaired olfaction was identified in 54 of 165 patients (33%) prior to surgery. Impaired olfaction was associated with increased adjusted risk for postoperative delirium (relative risk [RR] 1.90, 95% CI 1.17–3.09; P=0.009). There was no association between impaired olfaction and change in composite cognitive score in the overall study population. Conclusion Impaired olfaction is prevalent in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and is associated with increased adjusted risk for postoperative delirium, but not cognitive decline. Impaired olfaction may identify unrecognized vulnerability for postoperative delirium among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:25597555

  16. Low Hemoglobin Level Is Associated with the Development of Delirium after Hepatectomy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-Li; Lin, Hui-Chuan; Lin, Kuo-Hua; Lin, Li-Si; Hsieh, Chia-En; Ko, Chih-Jan; Hung, Yu-Ju; Lin, Ping-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and liver resection is the only potential curative treatment option for those patients. Postoperative complications specific to elderly surgical patients such as delirium will be increasingly relevant in the coming decades. Herein, we aimed to investigate the risk factors for postoperative delirium in patients who have received hepatectomy for HCC. Methods This is a single medical center observational study and the study subjects comprised 401 individuals who underwent liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma during January 2009 to October 2013. Multivariate analysis was used to examine whether preoperative, intra-operative, or postoperative variables were associated with the development of delirium. Results Of the 401 patients who underwent hepatectomy, 34 developed postoperative delirium (8.4%). In the majority of those patients, symptoms and signs of the syndrome occurred on postoperative day 2 and the mean duration of symptoms was 3.61 ± 3.71 days. Multivariate analysis revealed that advanced age (>71 years) [odds ratio (OR) = 1.133, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.071–1.200, p<0.001], prolonged operative time (>190 minutes) (OR = 1.009, 95% CI: 1.000–1.017, p = 0.038), a decreased postoperative hemoglobin level (< 10.16 g/dL) (OR = 0.777, 95% CI: 0.613–0.983, p = 0.036), and history of hypnotic drug use (OR = 3.074, 95% CI: 1.045–9.039, p = 0.041) were independent risk factors for the development of postoperative delirium after hepatectomy. Conclusions Although the mechanism of postoperative delirium is not well understood, numbers of studies have shown that patients with postoperative delirium tend to have prolonged hospital stay, worse postoperative outcome and an increased risk of short- and long-term mortality. In this study, we found that advanced age, prolonged operative time, postoperative low hemoglobin level and history of hypnotic drug use are

  17. The Role of Sitters in Delirium: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Frances M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The concept behind constant observation is not new. Whilst traditionally performed by nursing staff, it is now commonly performed by sitters. Details surrounding the usage, job description, training, clinical and cost effectiveness of sitters are not known; hence the reason for this review. Methods A literature search was performed in MEDLINE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed from the years 1960 to October 2011. The definition for sitter used in the articles was accepted for this review. Results From this review, it is evident that sitters are being employed in a variety of settings. The question of which type of person would provide the most benefit in the sitter role is still not clear; whilst sitters have typically included family and volunteers, it may be trained volunteers who may offer the most cost-effective solution. The paucity of information available regarding the training and assessments of sitters and the lack of formal guidelines regulating sitters’ use results in a lack of information available regarding these sitters, and current available evidence is conflicting regarding the benefits in terms of cost and clinical outcome. The only strong evidence relating to clinical benefit comes from the use of fully-trained sitters as part of a multi-interventional program (i.e., HELP) Conclusions Current evidence supports a role for the sitter as part of the management of patients with delirium. The most cost-effective sitter role appears to be trained volunteers. Further research is needed to determine the specific type of training required for the sitter role. The creation of a national set of regulations or guidelines would provide safeguards in the industry to ensure safe and effective patient care. PMID:23440038

  18. "Excited delirium syndrome": is it a cause of death?

    PubMed

    Kodikara, Sarathchandra; Cunningham, Kristopher; Pollanen, Michael S

    2012-09-01

    Excited delirium syndrome (EDS) has become a controversial and vexing forensic issue due to its association with restraint and sudden unexpected death. Although some authorities and jurisdictions recognised EDS as a cause of death there is no consensus among the medical community in this regard. The overlapping nature of the spectrum of antemortem behaviours and signs with many natural disease processes complicates this issue further. We describe two deaths which initially presented as EDS-like behaviour during restraint. In the first case, the deceased was travelling on a long distance flight when he died while in the custody of air cabin crew. The autopsy revealed the cause of death as air travel-related pulmonary thromboembolism. Acute alcoholic intoxication, nicotine withdrawal, hypoxia due to acute pulmonary thromboembolism, and hypobaric environment in the air plane cabin appeared as the potential reasons for EDS-like behaviour. In the second case, the deceased died while in the custody of immigration officials. At autopsy the cause of death turned out to be tense pericardial effusion due to fibrinous pericarditis. In this case, hypoperfusion of the brain following systemic hypotension as a result of cardiac tamponade associated with pericardial effusion likely led to the EDS-like behaviour. Clinicopathologic correlation in these two cases would strongly suggest EDS as the cause of death, had the decedents not had fatal anatomical causes of death. This alerts the forensic pathologist that not all the individuals dying with signs and symptoms of EDS during restraint are accounted for EDS as the immediate cause of death. PMID:22622258

  19. Slow Gait Speed and Rapid Renal Function Decline Are Risk Factors for Postoperative Delirium after Urological Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tendo; Okamoto, Teppei; Yamamoto, Hayato; Hosogoe, Shogo; Tobisawa, Yuki; Yoneyama, Tohru; Hashiba, Eiji; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koie, Takuya; Hirota, Kazuyoshi; Ohyama, Chikara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with postoperative delirium in patients undergoing urological surgery. Methods We prospectively evaluated pre- and postoperative risk factors for postoperative delirium in consecutive 215 patients who received urological surgery between August 2013 and November 2014. Preoperative factors included patient demographics, comorbidities, and frailty assessment. Frailty was measured by handgrip strength, fatigue scale of depression, fall risk assessment, and gait speed (the timed Get-up and Go test). Postoperative factors included types of anesthesia, surgical procedure, renal function and serum albumin decline, blood loss, surgery time, highest body temperature, and complications. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess pre- and postoperative predictors for the development of postoperative delirium. Results Median age of this cohort was 67 years. Ten patients (4.7%) experienced postoperative delirium. These patients were significantly older, had weak handgrip strength, a higher fall risk assessment score, slow gait speed, and greater renal function decline compared with patients without delirium. Multivariate analysis revealed slow gait speed (>13.0 s) and rapid renal function decline (>30%) were independent risk factors for postoperative delirium. Conclusions Slow gait speed and rapid renal function decline after urological surgery are significant factors for postoperative delirium. These data will be helpful for perioperative patient management. This study was registered as a clinical trial: UMIN: R000018809. PMID:27145178

  20. Reliability of delirium rating scale (DRS) and delirium rating scale-revised-98 (DRS-R98) using variance-based multivariate modelling.

    PubMed

    Adamis, Dimitrios; Slor, Chantal J; Leonard, Maeve; Witlox, Joost; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Macdonald, Alastair J D; Trzepacz, Paula; Meagher, David

    2013-07-01

    Delirium's characteristic fluctuation in symptom severity complicates the assessment of test-retest reliability of scales using classical analyses, but application of modelling to longitudinal data offers a new approach. We evaluated test-retest reliability of the delirium rating scale (DRS) and delirium rating scale-revised-98 (DRS-R98), two widely used instruments with high validity and inter-rater reliability. Two existing longitudinal datasets for each scale included DSM-IV criteria for delirium diagnosis and repeated measurements using the DRS or DRS-R98. To estimate the reliability coefficients RT and RΛ for each scale we used a macros provided by Dr. Laenen at http://www.ibiostat.be/software/measurement.asp. For each dataset a linear mixed-effects model was fitted to estimate the variance-covariance parameters. A total of 531 cases with between 4 and 9 measurement points across studies including both delirious and non-delirious patients. Comorbid dementia in the datasets varied from 27% to 55%. Overall RT for the DRS were 0.71 and 0.50 and for DRS-R98 0.75 and 0.84. RΛ values for DRS were 0.99 and 0.98 and for DRS-R98 were 0.92 and 0.96. Individual RT measures for DRS-R98 and DRS across visits within studies showed more range than overall values. Our models found high overall reliability for both scales. Multiple factors impact a scale's reliability values including sample size, repeated measurements, patient population, etc in addition to rater variability. PMID:23522935

  1. Delirium and other clinical factors with Clostridium difficile infection that predict mortality in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Archbald-Pannone, Laurie R.; McMurry, Timothy L.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Warren, Cirle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) severity has increased, especially among hospitalized elderly. We evaluated clinical factors to predict mortality following CDI. Methods We collected data from inpatients diagnosed with CDI at US academic medical center (HSR-IRB# 13630). We evaluated age, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), admission from a long-term care facility (LTCF), intensive care unit (ICU) at time of diagnosis, white blood cell count (WBC), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), low body mass index (BMI), and delirium as possible predictors. A parsimonious predictive model was chosen using Akaike information criterion (AIC) and a best subsets model selection algorithm. Area under the ROC curve was used to assess the model’s comparative; with AIC as selection criterion for all subsets to measure fit and control for over-fitting. Results From 362 subjects, the selected model included CCI, WBC, BUN, ICU, and delirium. The logistic regression coefficients were converted to a points scale and calibrated so that each unit on the CCI contributed 2 points, ICU contributed 5, unit of WBC (natural log scale) contributed 3, unit of BUN contributed 5, and delirium contributed 11. Discussion Our model shows substantial ability to predict short term mortality in patients hospitalized with CDI. Conclusion Patients who were diagnosed in the ICU and developed delirium are at highest risk for dying within 30 days of CDI diagnosis. PMID:25920706

  2. Hazards of Hospitalization: Hospitalists and Geriatricians Educating Medical Students about Delirium and Falls in Geriatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Valerie J.; Clark, Nancy S.; Medina-Walpole, Annette; McCann, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Geriatric patients are at increased risk for complications from delirium or falls during hospitalization. Medical education, however, generally places little emphasis on the hazards of hospitalization for older inpatients. Geriatricians conducted a faculty development workshop for hospitalists about the hazards of hospitalization for geriatric…

  3. Delirium after transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the femoral or apical route.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V; Katznelson, R; Horlick, E; Osten, M; Styra, R; Cusimano, R J; Carroll, J; Djaiani, G

    2016-08-01

    We thought that delirium might be less frequent after transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the femoral artery compared with via the cardiac apex. We reviewed 210 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation between January 2009 and October 2014. The proportion (95% CI) of patients who suffered delirium in the 3 days after valve implantation were: 10 (3-16%) in 105 patients who had transfemoral implantation; and 35 (25-45%) in 105 patients who had transapical implantation, p = 0.0001. The variables that independently associated with postoperative delirium were age, male sex and the transapical approach. The median (IQR [range]) hospital stay was 7 (5-13 [2-41]) days and 10 (7-15 [2-64]) days, respectively, p = 0.004. Future trials should focus on different peri-operative management strategies to reduce delirium rates after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, particularly in older men having implantations via the cardiac apex. PMID:27353560

  4. Bringing delirium into the 21st century: will physicians get the app out?

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    Invited commentary for International Psychogeriatrics on Tieges Z, Stíobhairt A, Scott K, Suchorab K, Weir A, Parks S, Shenkin S and MacLullich A. Development of a smartphone application for the objective detection of attentional deficits in delirium. International Psychogeriatrics. 2015 Mar 6:1-12. PMID:26149226

  5. Pre- and Intraoperative Predictors of Delirium after Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Akio; Narita, Hiroshi; Banno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Komori, Kimihiro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We reviewed our series of patients who underwent open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and constructed a prediction model for postoperative delirium. Methods: 397 patients who underwent open AAA repair at our institution between April 2005 and June 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative delirium was diagnosed from the patients’ medical records according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria. Mental alterations resulting from postoperative cerebrovascular events or preexisting mental disorders were excluded. Parameters with significant differences on univariate analysis were subjected to a logistic regression analysis. Results: There were 46 patients (11.5%) diagnosed with postoperative delirium. The following parameters were significant in the univariate analysis: age, history of stroke, hyperlipidemia, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), percent vital capacity (%VC), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level. A logistic regression analysis revealed that an age ≥70 years (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 3.342 [1.437–7.774]), blood loss ≥1517 mL (2.707 [1.359–5.391]), and the absence of hyperlipidemia (2.154 [1.060–4.374]) were significant risk factors. Conclusions: Older patients with substantial intraoperative blood loss require highly vigilant postoperative care. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the relationship between cholesterol and delirium. PMID:26421070

  6. Deconstructing Dementia and Delirium Hospital Practice: Using Cultural Historical Activity Theory to Inform Education Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teodorczuk, Andrew; Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta; Corbett, Sally; Welfare, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Older patients with dementia and delirium receive suboptimal hospital care. Policy calls for more effective education to address this though there is little consensus on what this entails. The purpose of this clarification study is to explore how practice gaps are constructed in relation to managing the confused hospitalised older patient. The…

  7. Sedation and delirium in the intensive care unit: an Australian and New Zealand perspective.

    PubMed

    Shehabi, Y; Botha, J A; Boyle, M S; Ernest, D; Freebairn, R C; Jenkins, I R; Roberts, B L; Seppelt, I M

    2008-07-01

    A survey was conducted to determine sedation and delirium practices in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units. The survey was in two parts, comprising an online survey of reported sedation and delirium management (unit survey) and a collection of de-identified data about each patient in a unit at a given time on a specified day (patient snapshot survey). All intensive care units throughout Australia and New Zealand were invited by email to participate in the survey. Twenty-three predominantly metropolitan, level III Australian and New Zealand intensive care units treating adult patients participated. Written sedation policies were in place in 48% of units, while an additional 44% of units reported having informal sedation policies. Seventy percent of units routinely used a sedation scale. In contrast, only 9% of units routinely used a delirium scale. Continuous intravenous infusion is the primary means of patient sedation (74% of units). While 30% of units reported routinely interrupting sedation, only 10% of sedated patients in the snapshot survey had had their sedation interrupted in the preceding 12 hours. Oversedation appears to be common (46% of patients with completed sedation scales). Use of neuromuscular blockade is low (10%) compared to other published studies. Midazolam and propofol were the most frequently used sedatives. The proportion of patients developing delirium was 21% of assessable patients. Failed and self-extubation rates were low: 3.2% and 0.5% respectively. In Australian and New Zealand intensive care units, routine use of sedation scales is common but not universal, while routine delirium assessment is rare. The use of a sedation protocol is valuable and should be encouraged. PMID:18714628

  8. The Overlap Syndrome of Depression and Delirium in Older Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Givens, Jane L.; Jones, Richard N.; Inouye, Sharon K.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To measure the prevalence, predictors and post-hospitalization outcomes associated with the overlap syndrome of coexisting depression and incident delirium in older hospitalized patients. Design Secondary analysis of prospective cohort data from the control group of the Delirium Prevention Trial. Setting General medical service of an academic medical center. Follow-up interviews at one month and one year post-hospital discharge. Participants Four hundred and fifty nine patients aged 70 and over who were not delirious at hospital admission. Measurements Depressive symptoms assessed at hospital admission using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (cutoff score of 6 used to define depression), daily assessments of incident delirium from admission to discharge using the Confusion Assessment Method. Activities of daily living at admission and one month post-discharge. New nursing home placement and mortality determined at one year. Results Of 459 participants, 23 (5%) had the overlap syndrome, 39 (9%) delirium alone, 121 (26%) depression alone and 276 (60%) neither condition. In adjusted analysis, patients with the overlap syndrome had higher odds of new nursing home placement or death at one year (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 5.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.57– 18.38) and one month functional decline (AOR 3.30, 95% CI = 1.14–9.56) compared to patients with neither condition. Conclusion The overlap syndrome of depression and delirium is associated with significant risk of functional decline, institutionalization and death. Efforts to identify, prevent and treat this condition may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes in older hospitalized patients. PMID:19558475

  9. The Development and Evaluation of Delirium Assessment and Nursing Care Decision-Making Assistant Mobile Application for Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fangyu; Ji, Meihua; Ding, Shu; Wu, Ying; Chang, Polun; Lin, Chiawei; Yang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Delirium is a common complication among patients in ICU settings. Although it has been repeatedly confirmed that Confusion Assessment Model for Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU), one of the most commonly used ICU delirium assessment tool, is highly accurate in validation studies, it's sensitivity and specificity is relatively low during routine practice among bedside nurses. The aim of this study is to develop a mobile application (app) to detect delirium and to test its reliability and validity both by research nurses and among ICU bedside nurses. The app was programmed with Java and installed on a mobile device with Android system. After completion of reliability and validity testing, the app will be integrated into the existing Hospital Information System in order to automatically retrieve essential information for risk factor identification and formulation of care plan accordingly to prevent or manage ICU delirium. PMID:27332299

  10. Delirium Outcomes in a Randomized Trial of Blood Transfusion Thresholds Among Hospitalized Older Patients with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Marcantonio, Edward; Orwig, Denise; Magaziner, Jay; Terrin, Michael; Barr, Erik; Brown, Jessica Pelletier; Paris, Barbara; Zagorin, Aleksandra; Roffey, Darren M.; Zakriya, Khwaja; Blute, Mary-Rita; Hebel, J. Richard; Carson, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine if a higher blood transfusion threshold would prevent new or worsening delirium symptoms in the hospital after hip fracture surgery. Design Ancillary study to a randomized clinical trial. Setting Thirteen hospitals in United States and Canada. Participants One-hundred-thirty-nine hospitalized hip fracture patients, age ≥50, with cardiovascular disease or risk factors, and hemoglobin<10 g/dL within 3 days of surgery, recruited in an ancillary study of “Transfusion Trigger Trial for Functional Outcomes in Cardiovascular Patients Undergoing Surgical Hip Fracture Repair (FOCUS) trial.” Intervention Treatment groups: 1) Liberal: received one unit of packed red blood cells and as much blood as needed to maintain hemoglobin >10 g/dL; 2) Restrictive: received transfusions if developed symptoms of anemia or hemoglobin fell below 8 g/dL. Measurements Delirium assessments performed pre-randomization and up to three times post-randomization. Primary outcome: Severity of delirium using Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS) scale. Secondary outcome: presence or absence of delirium defined by Confusion Assessment Method Diagnostic Algorithm (CAM). Results Mean age was 81.5 (SD=9.1). Liberal group received a median 2 units and Restrictive group 0 units of blood. Hemoglobin concentration on day 1 post randomization was 1.4 g/dL higher in the Liberal group. Treatment groups did not significantly differ at any time point or over time on either MDAS delirium severity (p=0.28) or CAM delirium presence (p=0.83). Conclusion Blood transfusion to maintain hemoglobin >10 g/dL alone is unlikely to influence delirium severity or rate in postoperative hip fracture patients with hemoglobin concentration <10 g/dL. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00071032 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00071032 PMID:23898894

  11. Effect of melatonin on incidence of delirium among patients with hip fracture: a multicentre, double-blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    de Jonghe, Annemarieke; van Munster, Barbara C.; Goslings, J. Carel; Kloen, Peter; van Rees, Carolien; Wolvius, Reinder; van Velde, Romuald; Levi, Marcel; de Haan, Rob J.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disturbance of the sleep–wake cycle is a characteristic of delirium. In addition, changes in melatonin rhythm influence the circadian rhythm and are associated with delirium. We compared the effect of melatonin and placebo on the incidence and duration of delirium. Methods: We performed this multicentre, double-blind, randomized controlled trial between November 2008 and May 2012 in 1 academic and 2 nonacademic hospitals. Patients aged 65 years or older who were scheduled for acute hip surgery were eligible for inclusion. Patients received melatonin 3 mg or placebo in the evening for 5 consecutive days, starting within 24 hours after admission. The primary outcome was incidence of delirium within 8 days of admission. We also monitored the duration of delirium. Results: A total of 452 patients were randomly assigned to the 2 study groups. We subsequently excluded 74 patients for whom the primary end point could not be measured or who had delirium before the second day of the study. After these postrandomization exclusions, data for 378 patients were included in the main analysis. The overall mean age was 84 years, 238 (63.0%) of the patients lived at home before admission, and 210 (55.6%) had cognitive impairment. We observed no effect of melatonin on the incidence of delirium: 55/186 (29.6%) in the melatonin group v. 49/192 (25.5%) in the placebo group; difference 4.1 (95% confidence interval −0.05 to 13.1) percentage points. There were no between-group differences in mortality or in cognitive or functional outcomes at 3-month follow-up. Interpretation: In this older population with hip fracture, treatment with melatonin did not reduce the incidence of delirium. Trial registration: Netherlands Trial Registry, NTR1576: MAPLE (Melatonin Against PLacebo in Elderly patients) study; www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=1576 PMID:25183726

  12. Assessment and Management of Delirium in Older Adults in the Emergency Department: Literature Review to Inform Development of a Novel Clinical Protocol.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Tony; Connors, Scott; Clark, Sunday; Halpern, Alexis; Stern, Michael E; DeWald, Jennifer; Lachs, Mark S; Flomenbaum, Neal

    2015-01-01

    Delirium occurs frequently in older patients in the emergency department (ED), is underrecognized, and has potentially serious consequences. Despite its seriousness, delirium is frequently missed by emergency providers, and patients with unrecognized delirium are often discharged from the ED. Even when it is appropriately recognized, managing delirium in older adults poses a significant challenge for ED providers. Geriatric delirium is typically caused by the interaction of multiple factors, including several that are commonly missed: pain, urinary retention, constipation, dehydration, and polypharmacy. Appropriate management includes nonpharmacological management with medication intervention reserved for emergencies. We have developed a new, comprehensive, evidence-based protocol for diagnosis/recognition, management, and disposition of geriatric delirium patients in the ED with a focus on identifying and treating commonly missed contributing causes. PMID:26218485

  13. The effect of range of motion exercises on delirium prevention among patients aged 65 and over in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Karadas, Canan; Ozdemir, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of range of motion exercises on preventing delirium and shortening the duration of delirium among patients in the intensive care unit who are aged 65 and over. The study was conducted in the intensive care unit on patients with non-invasive mechanical ventilation. The sample size included 47 patients from the intervention group and 47 from the control group. The incidence of delirium was 8.5% in the intervention group and 21.3% in the control group. The duration of delirium was 15 h for patients in the intervention group and 38 h for those in the control group. Although delirium incidence and duration decreased by 2.5-fold in the intervention group compared to the control group; there was no significant relationship between the intervention and control groups. In conclusion, as the decreases in delirium occurrence and duration were not statistically significant, the effect of range of motion exercises was limited. PMID:26763172

  14. Treating an Established Episode of Delirium in Palliative Care: Expert Opinion and Review of the Current Evidence Base With Recommendations for Future Development

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, José L.; Davis, Daniel H.J.; Currow, David C.; Meagher, David; Rabheru, Kiran; Wright, David; Bruera, Eduardo; Hartwick, Michael; Gagnon, Pierre R.; Gagnon, Bruno; Breitbart, William; Regnier, Laura; Lawlor, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Context Delirium is a highly prevalent complication in patients in palliative care settings, especially in the end-of-life context. Objectives To review the current evidence base for treating episodes of delirium in palliative care settings and propose a framework for future development. Methods We combined multidisciplinary input from delirium researchers and other purposely selected stakeholders at an international delirium study planning meeting. This was supplemented by a literature search of multiple databases and relevant reference lists to identify studies regarding therapeutic interventions for delirium. Results The context of delirium management in palliative care is highly variable. The standard management of a delirium episode includes the investigation of precipitating and aggravating factors followed by symptomatic treatment with drug therapy. However, the intensity of this management depends on illness trajectory and goals of care in addition to the local availability of both investigative modalities and therapeutic interventions. Pharmacologically, haloperidol remains the practice standard by consensus for symptomatic control. Dosing schedules are derived from expert opinion and various clinical practice guidelines as evidence-based data from palliative care settings are limited. The commonly used pharmacologic interventions for delirium in this population warrant evaluation in clinical trials to examine dosing and titration regimens, different routes of administration, and safety and efficacy compared with placebo. Conclusion Delirium treatment is multidimensional and includes the identification of precipitating and aggravating factors. For symptomatic management, haloperidol remains the practice standard. Further high-quality collaborative research investigating the appropriate treatment of this complex syndrome is needed. PMID:24480529

  15. Development of Delirium in the Intensive Care Unit in Patients after Endovascular Aortic Repair: A Retrospective Evaluation of the Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is an acute form of nervous system dysfunction often observed in patients in the intensive care unit. Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) is considered a minimally invasive surgical treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Although the operation method is widely used, there are few investigations of the rate and risk factors of delirium development after the operation. In this study, we retrospectively examined the rate of delirium development in the intensive care unit (ICU) after EVAR, as well as the associated preoperative risk factors and effects on the lengths of ICU and hospital stays. We examined the 81 consecutive patients who underwent elective EVAR between November 2013 and August 2014. The Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist was used to diagnose delirium. Twenty patients (24.7%) were diagnosed with delirium in this study. The ICU and hospital length of stays of patients with delirium were 3.3 ± 2.4 days and 14.5 ± 11.9 days, respectively, the latter of which was significantly longer than that of patients without delirium (p = 0.019). Additionally, renal dysfunction, preoperative benzodiazepine use, and intraoperative transfusion were found to be risk factors for the development of delirium after elective EVAR. PMID:26421186

  16. A Lilliputian army under the floorboards: persistent delirium with complete though prolonged recovery

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, Dominique; Thompson, Louise; Bruce, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of an 83-year-old man who presented with a history of fluctuating delirium of insidious onset, secondary to an amoebic liver abscess more than 30 years after acute exposure. We describe a 2-year clinical journey that started with a fall and was additionally complicated by severe weight loss and acute kidney injury (AKI). The likely prognosis for such a combination of comorbidities in an older person is for lasting morbidity, institutionalisation and significant mortality. However, the case demonstrates that with timely assessment and care complete recovery is possible though it may take many months. It reminds us of the catalytic implications of falls for older persons and to maintain a differential diagnostic approach to delirium of insidious onset avoiding misdiagnosis as dementia with which it may be associated. Our case report includes extracts from the patient's own account providing added insight into such experiences. PMID:24792019

  17. Alcoholic delirium tremens with hollow viscus perforation scheduled for emergency laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Talikoti, Anand T; Sindhu, Bs; Kavyashree, Sp; Kumar, Ks Kishore

    2012-03-01

    Alcohol is a drug consumed at some time in life by up to 80% of the population according to western statistics. Wide differences in socioeconomic status in India contribute to various degrees and severity of alcoholism and its associated complications. The symptoms of alcohol withdrawal range from such minor ones as insomnia and tremulousness to severe complications such as withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens. Although alcohol withdrawal syndrome has been reported in the literature in post-operative periods and in Intensive Care Unit, there is paucity of information on treatment and preparation of a patient with alcohol withdrawal syndrome coming for emergency surgical procedures. The surgical stress and deranged liver function in such cases poses an additional challenge to the anaesthesiologist. Here, we report the successful management of a case of acute alcoholic delirium tremens who presented with hollow viscous perforation for emergency exploratory laparotomy. PMID:22701216

  18. The psychiatrist in the surgical intensive care unit. I. Postoperative delirium.

    PubMed

    Nadelson, T

    1976-02-01

    Delirium has been defined as a condition of cerebral insufficiency consisting of impairment of cognitive processes, with a characteristic slowing of the electroencephalographic pattern. Present also is a global "clouding" of consciousness, resulting from a potentially reversible impairment of ability to maintain attention. In these states there is usually a simultaneous diminution of the ability to think, perceive, and remember. Although drowsiness may be a part of this state, patients can be awake and yet delirious, with diminished consciousness of their surroundings. Postoperative delirium is seen more often in patients over 50 years of age, in those who are "vigilant" or overalert, and in those undergoing more complex surgery. Adverse influences in the postoperative period are certain drugs and the psychological stresses engendered by the ICU environment. Appropriate management obtains from attention to the impact of the strange enviornment on the patient. PMID:1252115

  19. Pain, Delirium and Physical Function in Skilled Nursing Home Patients with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kolanowski, Ann; Mogle, Jacqueline; Fick, Donna M.; Hill, Nikki; Mulhall, Paula; Nadler, Jamie; Colancecco, Elise; Behrens, Liza

    2014-01-01

    Objective Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) are major sites of post-acute care for patients with dementia. A recent Office of the Inspector General report indicated that outcomes in SNFs are sub-optimal due to poor-quality treatment, including the failure to provide needed care. Pain is frequently un-recognized and un-treated in patients with dementia. The aim of this exploratory study was to examine the effect daily pain has on delirium and physical function in patients with dementia in SNFs. The association of daily pain with discharge disposition was also examined. Design Secondary analysis of data from an on-going randomized clinical trial. Setting Eight SNFs located in central and northeast Pennsylvania. Participants One hundred and three SNF patients with adjudicated dementia and delirium diagnoses and a mean age of 86 (±6.8) years; most were female (66%) and Caucasian (98%). Measurements Measures of pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia), delirium (Confusion Assessment Method), and physical function (Barthel Index) were taken daily for 30 days or until discharge. Results On days when participants experienced greater than their average level of pain they also experienced more delirium symptoms (p < .001) and lower physical function (p < .001). Participants with higher levels of average daily pain were more likely to die (OR = 6.306, 95% CI: 1.914–20.771, p = .003) or be placed in a nursing home (OR= 4.77, 95% CI:1.7–13.2, p=.003) compared to returning to the community at 3-month follow-up. Conclusion Greater attention to pain in patients with dementia may be a potential solution to some of the quality problems and high costs of care in SNFs PMID:25239018

  20. Detection and documentation of dementia and delirium in acute geriatric wards.

    PubMed

    Laurila, Jouko V; Pitkala, Kaisu H; Strandberg, Timo E; Tilvis, Reijo S

    2004-01-01

    Detection of cognitive impairment among hospitalized older individuals has shown to be insufficient. A point prevalence study in two geriatric hospitals in Helsinki, Finland, was performed among 219 acutely ill individuals over 70 years to assess the detection of dementia and delirium. Documentation of dementia and delirium in medical records, and recordings of confusional symptoms in nurses' notes were compared with the researchers' diagnosis made after a detailed assessment of cognitive status. The cognitive decline was mentioned in medical records in 70/88 (79.5%) of the cases. Cognitive testing was performed on 42/88 (47.7%) of the dementia patients, and the diagnosis of dementia was recorded in 47/88 (53.4%) of them. A specific etiological diagnosis was recorded in only 4/88 (4.5%) cases. Cognitive impairment in at least one of these four means was recorded in 80/88 (90.9%) of cases (sensitivity 0.93). Eight patients had a false-positive diagnosis of dementia (specificity 0.94). Delirium was diagnosed in 77 (35.2%) patients by the researchers, but it was recorded in only 31/77 (40.3%) in medical records. In 64/77 (83.1%) cases signs of confusion were recorded in nurses' notes. Poor detection and documentation may lead to undertreatment of both disorders. PMID:14757300

  1. Prolonged Delirium With Catatonia Following Orthotopic Liver Transplant Responsive to Memantine.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gregory D; Muzyk, Andrew J; Preud'homme, Xavier A

    2016-03-01

    A 59-year-old man with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis cirrhosis underwent an orthotopic liver transplant and experienced a complicated postoperative course, including a prolonged delirium. After discharge to rehabilitation, he had 2 subsequent admissions for delirium. On the first readmission, the transplant team started the patient on risperidone and resumed treatment with sertraline. On his second readmission, neurology and psychiatry were consulted. On evaluation, the patient demonstrated signs of catatonia. On the basis of recommendations from psychiatry, the risperidone and sertraline were stopped, and the patient was started on mirtazapine. He failed to demonstrate improvement within the next 48 hours. Extensive work-up demonstrated a multifactorial etiology for his delirium, including calcineurin-related neuropsychiatric toxicity from tacrolimus leading to possible posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. However, after the initiation of memantine on hospital day 3-before the cessation of tacrolimus-the patient demonstrated marked improvement in mental status and motor symptoms. His magnetic resonance imaging, in addition to findings that raised concerns about posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, had demonstrated bilateral basal ganglia abnormalities on T1 imaging of uncertain origin. It is postulated that these findings served as predisposing factors for the patient's catatonic symptoms. Although it has been described in case reports following liver transplant, catatonia remains an underrecognized neuropsychiatric complication following liver transplant. This case demonstrates the effectiveness of memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonist that decreases glutamine excitotoxicity, as a potential treatment for catatonia in postliver transplant patients. PMID:27138082

  2. Systemic inflammation induces acute working memory deficits in the primed brain: relevance for delirium

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Carol; Sanderson, David J.; Barkus, Chris; Deacon, Robert M.J.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas P.; Bannerman, David M.; Cunningham, Colm

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is an acute, severe neuropsychiatric syndrome, characterized by cognitive deficits, that is highly prevalent in aging and dementia and is frequently precipitated by peripheral infections. Delirium is poorly understood and the lack of biologically relevant animal models has limited basic research. Here we hypothesized that synaptic loss and accompanying microglial priming during chronic neurodegeneration in the ME7 mouse model of prion disease predisposes these animals to acute dysfunction in the region of prior pathology upon systemic inflammatory activation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) induced acute and transient working memory deficits in ME7 animals on a novel T-maze task, but did not do so in normal animals. LPS-treated ME7 animals showed heightened and prolonged transcription of inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system (CNS), compared with LPS-treated normal animals, despite having equivalent levels of circulating cytokines. The demonstration that prior synaptic loss and microglial priming are predisposing factors for acute cognitive impairments induced by systemic inflammation suggests an important animal model with which to study aspects of delirium during dementia. PMID:20471138

  3. Delirium, Sedation and Analgesia in the Intensive Care Unit: A Multinational, Two-Part Survey among Intensivists

    PubMed Central

    Radtke, Finn M.; Jones, Christina; Citerio, Giuseppe; Walder, Bernhard; Weiss, Bjoern; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Spies, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Analgesia, sedation and delirium management are important parts of intensive care treatment as they are relevant for patients' clinical and functional long-term outcome. Previous surveys showed that despite this fact implementation rates are still low. The primary aim of the prospective, observational multicenter study was to investigate the implementation rate of delirium monitoring among intensivists. Secondly, current practice concerning analgesia and sedation monitoring as well as treatment strategies for patients with delirium were assesed. In addition, this study compares perceived and actual practice regarding delirium, sedation and analgesia management. Data were obtained with a two-part, anonymous survey, containing general data from intensive care units in a first part and data referring to individual patients in a second part. Questionnaires from 101 hospitals (part 1) and 868 patients (part 2) were included in data analysis. Fifty-six percent of the intensive care units reported to monitor for delirium in clinical routine. Fourty-four percent reported the use of a validated delirium score. In this respect, the survey suggests an increasing use of delirium assessment tools compared to previous surveys. Nevertheless, part two of the survey revealed that in actual practice 73% of included patients were not monitored with a validated score. Furthermore, we observed a trend towards moderate or deep sedation which is contradicting to guideline-recommendations. Every fifth patient was suffering from pain. The implementation rate of adequate pain-assessment tools for mechanically ventilated and sedated patients was low (30%). In conclusion, further efforts are necessary to implement guideline recommendations into clinical practice. The study was registered (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01278524) and approved by the ethical committee. PMID:25398099

  4. Performance And Agreement Of Risk Stratification Instruments For Postoperative Delirium In Persons Aged 50 Years Or Older

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Carolien J.; Absalom, Anthony R.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.; Izaks, Gerbrand J.

    2014-01-01

    Several risk stratification instruments for postoperative delirium in older people have been developed because early interventions may prevent delirium. We investigated the performance and agreement of nine commonly used risk stratification instruments in an independent validation cohort of consecutive elective and emergency surgical patients aged ≥50 years with ≥1 risk factor for postoperative delirium. Data was collected prospectively. Delirium was diagnosed according to DSM-IV-TR criteria. The observed incidence of postoperative delirium was calculated per risk score per risk stratification instrument. In addition, the risk stratification instruments were compared in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), and positive and negative predictive value. Finally, the positive agreement between the risk stratification instruments was calculated. When data required for an exact implementation of the original risk stratification instruments was not available, we used alternative data that was comparable. The study population included 292 patients: 60% men; mean age (SD), 66 (8) years; 90% elective surgery. The incidence of postoperative delirium was 9%. The maximum observed incidence per risk score was 50% (95%CI, 15–85%); for eight risk stratification instruments, the maximum observed incidence per risk score was ≤25%. The AUC (95%CI) for the risk stratification instruments varied between 0.50 (0.36–0.64) and 0.66 (0.48–0.83). No AUC was statistically significant from 0.50 (p≥0.11). Positive predictive values of the risk stratification instruments varied between 0–25%, negative predictive values between 89–95%. Positive agreement varied between 0–66%. No risk stratification instrument showed clearly superior performance. In conclusion, in this independent validation cohort, the performance and agreement of commonly used risk stratification instruments for postoperative delirium was poor. Although some caution is

  5. Association of Cumulative Dose of Haloperidol with Next Day Delirium in Older Medical Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Margaret A.; Araujo, Katy L.B.; Murphy, Terrence E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between cumulative dose of haloperidol and next day diagnosis of delirium in a cohort of older MICU patients, with adjustment for its time dependent confounding with fentanyl and intubation. Design Prospective, observational study. Setting MICU at an urban, academic medical center Patients Age 60 and older admitted to the MICU who received at least one dose of haloperidol (N=93). Of these, 72 were intubated at some point in their MICU stay whereas 21 were never intubated. Interventions None Measurements Detailed data were collected concerning time, dosage, and route of administration of all medications, as well as for important clinical covariates, and daily status of intubation and delirium using the CAM-ICU and a chart-based algorithm. Main Results Among non-intubated patients, and after adjustment for time dependent confounding and important covariates, each additional cumulative milligram of haloperidol was associated with 5% higher odds of next day delirium with OR (CI) : 1.05 (1.02 – 1.09).After adjustment for time dependent confounding and covariates, intubation was associated with a five-fold increase in odds of next day delirium with OR (CI): 5.66 (2.70 – 12.02). Cumulative dose of haloperidol among intubated patients did not change their already high likelihood of next day delirium. After adjustment for time dependent confounding the positive associations between indicators of intubation and of cognitive impairment and next day delirium became stronger. Conclusions These results emphasize the need for more studies regarding the efficacy of haloperidol for treatment of delirium among older MICU patients and demonstrate the value of assessing non-intubated patients. PMID:25746748

  6. How nurses understand and care for older people with delirium in the acute hospital: a Critical Discourse Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Irene; Tolson, Debbie; Fleming, Valerie

    2012-06-01

    Delirium is a common presentation of deteriorating health in older people. It is potentially deleterious in terms of patient experience and clinical outcomes. Much of what is known about delirium is through positivist research, which forms the evidence base for disease-based classification systems and clinical guidelines. There is little systematic study of nurses' day-to-day practice of nursing patients with delirium. The aim was to uncover the kinds of knowledge that informs nurses' care and to explicate the basis of that knowledge. Critical Discourse Analysis is underpinned by the premise that powerful interests within society mediate how social practices are constructed. Links were made between the grammatical and lexical features of nurses' language about care in interviews and naturalistic settings, and the healthcare context. Care focused on the continuous surveillance of patients with delirium by nurses themselves or vicariously through other patients, and containment. Nurses influenced by major discourses of risk reduction and safety, constructed patients with delirium as risk objects. The philosophy of person-centred and dignified care advocated in nursing literature and government policy is an emerging discourse, though little evident in the data. The current dominant discourses on safety must give space to discourses of dignity and compassion. PMID:22530864

  7. Preliminary Data: An Adapted Hospital Elder Life Program to Prevent Delirium and Reduce Complications of Acute Illness in Long-Term Care Delivered by Certified Nursing Assistants.

    PubMed

    Boockvar, Kenneth S; Teresi, Jeanne A; Inouye, Sharon K

    2016-05-01

    Nursing home (NH) residents have a high prevalence of delirium risk factors, experience two to four acute medical conditions (e.g., infections) each year, and have an incidence of delirium during these conditions similar to that of hospitalized older adults. Many NH residents with delirium do not return to their prior level of cognitive function. They are more likely to die, be hospitalized, and less likely to be discharged home than those without delirium. Research on the prevention or treatment of delirium in NHs is limited. This article describes the development and pilot testing of a multicomponent delirium prevention intervention in the NH setting adapted from the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP-LTC). Activities to reduce the risk of delirium that were appropriate for functionally impaired NH residents were developed and delivered during treatment for and recovery from acute illness, a novel resident-targeting approach. Expertly trained certified nursing assistants (CNAs - a total of 1.4 full-time equivalent (FTE) positions-) visited residents throughout the facility and delivered the activities. The current study reports on incident delirium, delirium remission, cognitive and physical function change, hospitalization, and death associated with acute medical conditions as ascertained by a program coordinator. The integration and acceptance of the CNAs' activities by residents and staff are also reported on. Hospitalization and death were ascertained in a nonintervention comparison group. Findings support a test of the intervention in a controlled trial. The potential effect is great; there are approximately 1.4 million NH residents in the United States and an estimated 1 million with dementia or cognitive impairment, an important delirium risk factor. An intervention would be broadly adoptable if a reduction in healthcare costs through prevention of hospitalization offset the cost of the program's CNAs. PMID:27160212

  8. Analysis of multi-dimensional contemporaneous EHR data to refine delirium assessments.

    PubMed

    Corradi, John P; Chhabra, Jyoti; Mather, Jeffrey F; Waszynski, Christine M; Dicks, Robert S

    2016-08-01

    Delirium is a potentially lethal condition of altered mental status, attention, and level of consciousness with an acute onset and fluctuating course. Its causes are multi-factorial, and its pathophysiology is not well understood; therefore clinical focus has been on prevention strategies and early detection. One patient evaluation technique in routine use is the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM): a relatively simple test resulting in 'positive', 'negative' or 'unable-to-assess' (UTA) ratings. Hartford Hospital nursing staff use the CAM regularly on all non-critical care units, and a high frequency of UTA was observed after reviewing several years of records. In addition, patients with UTA ratings displayed poor outcomes such as in-hospital mortality, longer lengths of stay, and discharge to acute and long term care facilities. We sought to better understand the use of UTA, especially outside of critical care environments, in order to improve delirium detection throughout the hospital. An unsupervised clustering approach was used with additional, concurrent assessment data available in the EHR to categorize patient visits with UTA CAMs. The results yielded insights into the most common situations in which the UTA rating was used (e.g. impaired verbal communication, dementia), suggesting potentially inappropriate ratings that could be refined with further evaluation and remedied with updated clinical training. Analysis of the patient clusters also suggested that unrecognized delirium may contribute to the poor outcomes associated with the use of UTA. This method of using temporally related high dimensional EHR data to illuminate a dynamic medical condition could have wider applicability. PMID:27340924

  9. Prevention of delirium in trauma patients: Are we giving thiamine prophylaxis a fair chance?

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, Christopher; Ouellet, Jean-Francois; Niven, Daniel; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Ball, Chad G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Delirium is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in injured patients. Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is delirium linked to malnutrition and chronic alcoholism. It is prevented with administration of thiamine. Our primary goal was to evaluate current blood alcohol level (BAL) testing and thiamine prophylaxis in severely injured patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 1000 consecutive severely injured patients admitted to hospital between Mar. 1, 2009, and Dec. 31, 2009. We used the patients’ medical records and the Alberta Trauma Registry. Results Among 1000 patients (mean age 48 yr, male sex 70%, mean injury severity score 23, mortality 10%), 627 underwent BAL testing at admission; 221 (35%) had a BAL greater than 0 mmol/L, and 189 (30%) had a BAL above the legal limit of 17.4 mmol/L. The mean positive BAL was 41.9 mmol/L. More than 4% had a known history of alcohol abuse. More patients were assaulted (20% v. 9%) or hit by motor vehicles (10% v. 6%) when intoxicated (both p < 0.05). Most injuries occurred after falls (37%) and motor vehicle collisions (33%). Overall, 17% of patients received thiamine prophylaxis. Of the 221 patients with elevated BAL, 44% received thiamine prophylaxis. Of those with a history of alcohol abuse, 77% received thiamine prophylaxis. Conclusion Despite the strong link between alcohol abuse, trauma and WE, more than one-third of patients were not screened for alcohol use. Furthermore, a minority of intoxicated patients received adequate prophylaxis against WE. Given the low risk and cost of BAL testing and thiamine prophylaxis and the high cost of delirium, standard protocols for prophylaxis are essential. PMID:24666443

  10. Rethinking Critical Care: Decreasing Sedation, Increasing Delirium Monitoring, and Increasing Patient Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Rick; Adams, Kelly McCutcheon; Danesh, Valerie; Groat, Patricia M.; Haugen, Angie; Kiewel, Angi; Small, Cora; Van-Leuven, Mark; Venus, Sam; Ely, E. Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Background/Methods Sedation management, delirium monitoring, and mobility programs are key features of recent evidence-based critical care guidelines and care bundles, yet implementation in the intensive care unit (ICU) remains highly variable. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s Rethinking Critical Care (IHI-RCC) program was established to reduce harm of critically ill patients by decreasing sedation, increasing monitoring and management of delirium, and increasing patient mobility. It involved one live case study and five iterations of an in-person seminar over 33 months (March 2011 to November 2013) that emphasized interdisciplinary teamwork and culture change. IHI-RCC has involved over 650 participants from 215 organizations. This report describes a convenience sample of five participating organizations chosen in advance of knowing their clinical outcomes. Results Qualitative descriptions of the changes tested at each of the five case study sites are provided, demonstrating the necessary teamwork, improved processes, and increased reliability of daily work. These sites all worked to implement the Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) and Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU (CAM-ICU) within the context of a bundled interventional care plan; they then tracked length of stay in the ICU and duration of mechanical ventilation, which are reported. Discussion Changing critical care practices requires an interdisciplinary approach addressing cultural, psychological, and practical issues. The IHI-RCC program is based on testing changes on a small scale, building highly effective interdisciplinary rounds, frequent data feedback to the frontline, and use of in-person demonstrations. Key lessons are emerging about effectively caring for critically ill patients in light of data about the harm of over-sedation, unrecognized and unaddressed delirium, and immobility. PMID:25976892