Science.gov

Sample records for deliver improved models

  1. Innovative model of delivering quality improvement education for trainees – a pilot project

    PubMed Central

    Ramar, Kannan; Hale, Curt W.; Dankbar, Eugene C.

    2015-01-01

    Background After incorporating quality improvement (QI) education as a required curriculum for our trainees in 2010, a need arose to readdress our didactic sessions as they were too long, difficult to schedule, and resulting in a drop in attendance. A ‘flipped classroom’ (FC) model to deliver QI education was touted to be an effective delivery method as it allows the trainees to view didactic materials on videos, on their own time, and uses the classroom to clarify concepts and employ learned tools on case-based scenarios including workshops. Methods The Mayo Quality Academy prepared 29 videos that incorporated the previously delivered 17 weekly didactic sessions, for a total duration of 135 min. The half-day session clarified questions related to the videos, followed by case examples and a hands-on workshop on how to perform and utilize a few commonly used QI tools and methods. Results Seven trainees participated. There was a significant improvement in knowledge as measured by pre- and post-FC model test results [improvement by 40.34% (SD 16.34), p<0.001]. The survey results were overall positive about the FC model with all trainees strongly agreeing that we should continue with this model to deliver QI education. Conclusions The pilot project of using the FC model to deliver QI education was successful in a small sample of trainees. PMID:26400052

  2. Vagus nerve stimulation delivered during motor rehabilitation improves recovery in a rat model of stroke.

    PubMed

    Khodaparast, Navid; Hays, Seth A; Sloan, Andrew M; Fayyaz, Tabbassum; Hulsey, Daniel R; Rennaker, Robert L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    Neural plasticity is widely believed to support functional recovery following brain damage. Vagus nerve stimulation paired with different forelimb movements causes long-lasting map plasticity in rat primary motor cortex that is specific to the paired movement. We tested the hypothesis that repeatedly pairing vagus nerve stimulation with upper forelimb movements would improve recovery of motor function in a rat model of stroke. Rats were separated into 3 groups: vagus nerve stimulation during rehabilitation (rehab), vagus nerve stimulation after rehab, and rehab alone. Animals underwent 4 training stages: shaping (motor skill learning), prelesion training, postlesion training, and therapeutic training. Rats were given a unilateral ischemic lesion within motor cortex and implanted with a left vagus nerve cuff. Animals were allowed 1 week of recovery before postlesion baseline training. During the therapeutic training stage, rats received vagus nerve stimulation paired with each successful trial. All 17 trained rats demonstrated significant contralateral forelimb impairment when performing a bradykinesia assessment task. Forelimb function was recovered completely to prelesion levels when vagus nerve stimulation was delivered during rehab training. Alternatively, intensive rehab training alone (without stimulation) failed to restore function to prelesion levels. Delivering the same amount of stimulation after rehab training did not yield improvements compared with rehab alone. These results demonstrate that vagus nerve stimulation repeatedly paired with successful forelimb movements can improve recovery after motor cortex ischemia and may be a viable option for stroke rehabilitation. PMID:24553102

  3. Metallofullerene-Nanoplatform-Delivered Interstitial Brachytherapy Improved Survival in a Murine Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John D.; Broaddus, William C.; Dorn, Harry C.; Fatouros, Panos P.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Shultz, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Fullerenes are used across scientific disciplines because of their diverse properties gained by altering encapsulated or surface bound components. In this study, the recently developed theranostic agent based on a radiolabeled functionalized metallofullerene (177Lu-DOTA-f-Gd3N@C80) was synthesized with high radiochemical yield and purity. The efficacy of this agent was demonstrated in two orthotopic xenograft brain tumor models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A dose-dependent improvement in survival was also shown. The in vivo stability of the agent was verified through dual label measurements of biological elimination from the tumor. Overall, these results provide evidence that nanomaterial platforms can be used to deliver effective interstitial brachytherapy. PMID:22881865

  4. Brief Report: Remotely Delivered Video Modeling for Improving Oral Hygiene in Children with ASD: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popple, Ben; Wall, Carla; Flink, Lilli; Powell, Kelly; Discepolo, Keri; Keck, Douglas; Mademtzi, Marilena; Volkmar, Fred; Shic, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Children with autism have heightened risk of developing oral health problems. Interventions targeting at-home oral hygiene habits may be the most effective means of improving oral hygiene outcomes in this population. This randomized control trial examined the effectiveness of a 3-week video-modeling brushing intervention delivered to patients over…

  5. Brief Report: Remotely Delivered Video Modeling for Improving Oral Hygiene in Children with ASD: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Popple, Ben; Wall, Carla; Flink, Lilli; Powell, Kelly; Discepolo, Keri; Keck, Douglas; Mademtzi, Marilena; Volkmar, Fred; Shic, Frederick

    2016-08-01

    Children with autism have heightened risk of developing oral health problems. Interventions targeting at-home oral hygiene habits may be the most effective means of improving oral hygiene outcomes in this population. This randomized control trial examined the effectiveness of a 3-week video-modeling brushing intervention delivered to patients over the internet. Eighteen children with autism were assigned to an Intervention or Control video condition. Links to videos were delivered via email twice daily. Blind clinical examiners provided plaque index ratings at baseline, midpoint, and endpoint. Results show oral hygiene improvements in both groups, with larger effect sizes in the Intervention condition. The findings provide preliminary support for the use of internet-based interventions to improve oral hygiene for children with autism. PMID:27106570

  6. BMP-2 delivered via sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB) improves bone repair in a rat open fracture model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tegan L; Schindeler, Aaron; Little, David G

    2016-07-01

    Human bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are an alternative to bone graft for the treatment of high-energy open fractures. The standard delivery system for BMP-2 is a porous collagen sponge, but we have previously found that the biocompatible, high viscosity carrier, Sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB) is an effective and potentially less invasive alternative. The efficacy of SAIB as a BMP-2 delivery system was examined in an open fracture model featuring a femoral osteotomy with periosteal stripping in 9-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats. SAIB containing BMP-2 (SAIB/BMP-2) was delivered into the fracture site during surgery and an additional group was further co-treated with zoledronic acid and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (SAIB/BMP-2/HA/ZA). These were compared to untreated fractures and SAIB carrier alone (negative controls), and BMP-2 loaded collagen sponge (positive control). The rate of radiographic union and the biomechanical properties of the healed fractures were compared after 6-week. Untreated and SAIB-treated fractures showed poor repair, with 53% and 64%, respectively, not bridged at 6 week. In contrast, collagen/BMP-2, SAIB/BMP-2, and SAIB/BMP-2/HA/ZA showed significantly increased union (100%, 100%, and 94%, respectively, p < 0.05). Four-point bend testing revealed that collagen/BMP-2 and SAIB/BMP-2/HA/ZA restored the strength of fractured femora to that of intact femora by 6 week, whereas untreated and SAIB remained less than intact controls by 60% and 67%, respectively (p < 0.05). Overall, the SAIB/BMP-2/HA/ZA formulation was comparable to BMP-2 infused collagen sponge in terms of promoting open fractures repair, but with the additional potential for less invasive delivery. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1168-1176, 2016. PMID:26679381

  7. Re-refinement from deposited X-ray data can deliver improved models for most PDB entries

    SciTech Connect

    Joosten, Robbie P.; Womack, Thomas; Vriend, Gert; Bricogne, Gérard

    2009-02-01

    An evaluation of validation and real-space intervention possibilities for improving existing automated (re-)refinement methods. The deposition of X-ray data along with the customary structural models defining PDB entries makes it possible to apply large-scale re-refinement protocols to these entries, thus giving users the benefit of improvements in X-ray methods that have occurred since the structure was deposited. Automated gradient refinement is an effective method to achieve this goal, but real-space intervention is most often required in order to adequately address problems detected by structure-validation software. In order to improve the existing protocol, automated re-refinement was combined with structure validation and difference-density peak analysis to produce a catalogue of problems in PDB entries that are amenable to automatic correction. It is shown that re-refinement can be effective in producing improvements, which are often associated with the systematic use of the TLS parameterization of B factors, even for relatively new and high-resolution PDB entries, while the accompanying manual or semi-manual map analysis and fitting steps show good prospects for eventual automation. It is proposed that the potential for simultaneous improvements in methods and in re-refinement results be further encouraged by broadening the scope of depositions to include refinement metadata and ultimately primary rather than reduced X-ray data.

  8. Re-refinement from deposited X-ray data can deliver improved models for most PDB entries.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Robbie P; Womack, Thomas; Vriend, Gert; Bricogne, Gérard

    2009-02-01

    The deposition of X-ray data along with the customary structural models defining PDB entries makes it possible to apply large-scale re-refinement protocols to these entries, thus giving users the benefit of improvements in X-ray methods that have occurred since the structure was deposited. Automated gradient refinement is an effective method to achieve this goal, but real-space intervention is most often required in order to adequately address problems detected by structure-validation software. In order to improve the existing protocol, automated re-refinement was combined with structure validation and difference-density peak analysis to produce a catalogue of problems in PDB entries that are amenable to automatic correction. It is shown that re-refinement can be effective in producing improvements, which are often associated with the systematic use of the TLS parameterization of B factors, even for relatively new and high-resolution PDB entries, while the accompanying manual or semi-manual map analysis and fitting steps show good prospects for eventual automation. It is proposed that the potential for simultaneous improvements in methods and in re-refinement results be further encouraged by broadening the scope of depositions to include refinement metadata and ultimately primary rather than reduced X-ray data. PMID:19171973

  9. Delivering Improved Nutrition: Dairy Ingredients in Food Aid Products.

    PubMed

    Schlossman, Nina

    2016-03-01

    The United States has a long history of food assistance for humanitarian need. The Food for Peace Act of 1954 established the United States' permanent food assistance program which has fed over 3 billion people in 150 countries worldwide through thousands of partner organizations. In 60 years, the program has evolved and will continue to do so. Recently, the program has gone from a focus on quantity of food shipped to quality food assistance from improved products, programs, and processes to effectively meet the needs of different vulnerable groups. The current debate focuses on the appropriateness of using fortified blended foods to prevent and treat malnutrition during the first 1000 days of life. Dairy ingredients have been at the center of this debate; they were included initially in fortified blended, removed in the 1980s, and now reincorporated into fortified therapeutic and supplemental foods. Improved quality food baskets and effective nutrition programming to prevent and treat malnutrition were developed through multisectoral collaboration between government and nongovernment organizations. The US Agency for International Development has focused on improving nutrition through development programs often tied to health, education, and agriculture. The years since 2008 have been a particularly intense period for improvement. The Food Aid Quality Review was established to update current food aid programming products, program implementation, cost-effectiveness, and interagency processes. Trials are underway to harmonize the areas of multisectoral nutrition programming and gather more evidence on the effects of dairy ingredients in food aid products. PMID:27005492

  10. A service model for delivering care closer to home.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Joanna; Taylor, Charlotte Elizabeth; Bunyan, Paul; White, Philippa Mary; Thomas, Siân Myra; Upton, Dominic

    2011-04-01

    Upton Surgery (Worcestershire) has developed a flexible and responsive service model that facilitates multi-agency support for adult patients with complex care needs experiencing an acute health crisis. The purpose of this service is to provide appropriate interventions that avoid unnecessary hospital admissions or, alternatively, provide support to facilitate early discharge from secondary care. Key aspects of this service are the collaborative and proactive identification of patients at risk, rapid creation and deployment of a reactive multi-agency team and follow-up of patients with an appropriate long-term care plan. A small team of dedicated staff (the Complex Care Team) are pivotal to coordinating and delivering this service. Key skills are sophisticated leadership and project management skills, and these have been used sensitively to challenge some traditional roles and boundaries in the interests of providing effective, holistic care for the patient.This is a practical example of early implementation of the principles underlying the Department of Health's (DH) recent Best Practice Guidance, 'Delivering Care Closer to Home' (DH, July 2008) and may provide useful learning points for other general practice surgeries considering implementing similar models. This integrated case management approach has had enthusiastic endorsement from patients and carers. In addition to the enhanced quality of care and experience for the patient, this approach has delivered value for money. Secondary care costs have been reduced by preventing admissions and also by reducing excess bed-days. The savings achieved have justified the ongoing commitment to the service and the staff employed in the Complex Care Team. The success of this service model has been endorsed recently by the 'Customer Care' award by 'Management in Practice'. The Surgery was also awarded the 'Practice of the Year' award for this and a number of other customer-focussed projects. PMID:21457595

  11. Nursing leaders can deliver a new model of care.

    PubMed

    Shalala, Donna E

    2014-01-01

    Millions more insured Americans. Increasing numbers of older patients. Higher rates of chronic illness. Fewer providers. How can our healthcare system not only manage these challenges but also improve performance and access to care while containing costs? The answer lies with our nurses. In some parts of the United States, nurses provide the full spectrum of primary and preventive care. They have successfully improved access and quality in rural areas. In other parts, nurses' hands are tied by antiquated laws and regulations that limit their ability to expand access to care. Our system cannot increase access when we have providers who are not allowed to perform to the top of their education, training, and capability. It is time to rethink how we deliver primary and preventive care and redefine the roles of doctors and nurses. This article examines the history of the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Future of Nursing report (chaired by the author) and the resulting Future of Nursing Campaign for Action, which is working to institute the report's recommendations in all 50 states. The IOM report's recommendations are simple: 1. Remove outdated restrictions on nursing practice. 2. Promote nurse leadership on hospital boards and in all healthcare sectors. 3. Strengthen nurse education and training, and increase the number of nurses with advanced degrees. 4. Increase diversity in the nursing workforce to better reflect the patient population. 5. Improve data reporting and compilation to predict workforce needs. New York, Kentucky, and Minnesota are three recent states to remove barriers pre venting advanced practice registered nurses from practicing at the top of their license. Similar efforts in California, Florida, and Indiana failed initially but are expected to make progress in the near future. The article makes clear how and why the Center to Champion Nursing in America (an initiative of AARP, the AARP Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) is working to

  12. Extracorporeal adsorption therapy: A Method to improve targeted radiation delivered by radiometal-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, Eneida R.; Green, Damian J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Pagal, John M.; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, A. K.; Durack, Lawrence D.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Wilbur, D. S.; Nilsson, Rune; Sandberg, Bengt; Press, Oliver W.

    2008-04-01

    Many investigators have demonstrated the ability to treat hematologic malignancies with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting hematopoietic antigens such as anti-CD20 and anti-CD45. [1-5] Although the remission rates achieved with radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are relatively high, many patients subsequently relapse presumably due to suboptimal delivery of enough radiation to eradicate the malignancy. The dose-response of leukemia and lymphoma to radiation has been proven. Substantial amounts of radiation can be delivered by RIT if followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation to rescue the bone marrow from myeloablation.[ref] However, the maximum dose of RIT that can be used is still limited by toxicity to normal tissues affected by nonspecific delivery of radiation. Efforts to improve RIT focus on improving the therapeutic ratios of radiation in target versus non-target tissues by removing the fraction of radioisotope that fails to bind to target tissues and circulates freely in the bloodstream perfusing non-target tissues. Our group and others have explored several alternatives for removal of unbound circulating antibody. [refs] One such method, extracorporeal adsorption therapy (ECAT) consists of removing unbound antibody by a method similar to plasmapheresis after critical circulation time and distribution of antibody into target tissues have been achieved. Preclinical studies of ECAT in murine xenograft models demonstrated significant improvement in therapeutic ratios of radioactivity. Chen and colleagues demonstrated that a 2-hour ECAT procedure could remove 40 to 70% of the radioactivity from liver, lung and spleen. [ref] Although isotope concentration in the tumor was initially unaffected, a 50% decrease was noted approximately 36 hours after the procedure. This approach was also evaluated in a limited phase I pilot study of patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. [ref] After radiographic confirmation of tumor localization of a test dose of anti-CD20

  13. Improvements in recall and food choices using a graphical method to deliver information of select nutrients.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Nathan S; Ellison, Brenna D; Benjamin, Aaron S; Nakamura, Manabu T

    2016-01-01

    Consumers have difficulty using nutrition information. We hypothesized that graphically delivering information of select nutrients relative to a target would allow individuals to process information in time-constrained settings more effectively than numerical information. Objectives of the study were to determine the efficacy of the graphical method in (1) improving memory of nutrient information and (2) improving consumer purchasing behavior in a restaurant. Values of fiber and protein per calorie were 2-dimensionally plotted alongside a target box. First, a randomized cued recall experiment was conducted (n=63). Recall accuracy of nutrition information improved by up to 43% when shown graphically instead of numerically. Second, the impact of graphical nutrition signposting on diner choices was tested in a cafeteria. Saturated fat and sodium information was also presented using color coding. Nutrient content of meals (n=362) was compared between 3 signposting phases: graphical, nutrition facts panels (NFP), or no nutrition label. Graphical signposting improved nutrient content of purchases in the intended direction, whereas NFP had no effect compared with the baseline. Calories ordered from total meals, entrées, and sides were significantly less during graphical signposting than no-label and NFP periods. For total meal and entrées, protein per calorie purchased was significantly higher and saturated fat significantly lower during graphical signposting than the other phases. Graphical signposting remained a predictor of calories and protein per calorie purchased in regression modeling. These findings demonstrate that graphically presenting nutrition information makes that information more available for decision making and influences behavior change in a realistic setting. PMID:26773780

  14. Government & Private Enterprise--A Model Partnership Delivering Outstanding Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Mick

    2011-01-01

    In the Australian state of Victoria, the State Government is responsible for delivering a public education system for the compulsory school years. It uses the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEECD) as its agency to develop its educational curriculum, engage with local communities, develop and maintain a portfolio of…

  15. Improvement of electroporation to deliver plasmid DNA into dental follicle cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Shaomian; Rana, Samir; Liu, Dawen; Wise, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Electroporation DNA transfer is a simple and versatile approach to deliver genes. To develop an optimal electroporation protocol to deliver DNA into cells, we conducted square wave electroporation experiments with using rat dental follicle cells as follows: 1) the cells were electroporated at different electric field strengths with lac Z plasmid; 2) plasmid concentrations were tested to determine the optimal doses; 3) various concentrations of bovine serum albumin or fetal bovine serum were added to the pulsing buffer; and, 4) the pulsing durations were studied to determine the optimal duration. These experiments indicated that the optimal electroporation electric field strength was 375 V/cm, and that plasmid concentrations greater than 0.18 μg/μl were required to achieve high transfection efficiency. BSA or FBS in the pulsing buffer significantly improved cell survival and increased the number of transfected cells. The optimal pulsing duration was in the range of 45 to 120 milliseconds (ms) at 375 V/cm. Thus, an improved electroporation protocol was established by optimizing the above parameters. In turn, this electroporation protocol can be used to deliver DNA into dental follicle cells to study the roles of candidate genes in regulating tooth eruption. PMID:19830717

  16. Hydrogel dual delivered celecoxib and anti-PD-1 synergistically improve antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongkui; Fang, Min; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Song, Yu; Shi, Jie; Li, Wei; Wu, Gang; Ren, Jinghua; Wang, Zheng; Zou, Weiping; Wang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Two major challenges facing cancer immunotherapy are the relatively low therapeutic efficacy and the potential side effects. New drug delivery system and efficient drug combination are required to overcome these challenges. We utilize an alginate hydrogel system to locally deliver 2 FDA-approved drugs, celecoxib and programmed death 1 (PD-1) monoclonal antibody (mAb), to treat tumor-bearing mice. In two cancer models, B16-F10 melanoma and 4T1 metastatic breast cancer, the alginate hydrogel delivery system significantly improves the antitumor activities of celecoxib (CXB), PD-1 mAb, or both combined. These effects are associated with the sustained high concentrations of the drugs in peripheral circulation and within tumor regions. Strikingly, the simultaneous dual local delivery of celecoxib and PD-1 from this hydrogel system synergistically enhanced the presence of CD4+inteferon (IFN)-γ+ and CD8+IFN-γ+ T cells within the tumor as well as in the immune system. These effects are accompanied with reduced CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the tumor, reflecting a weakened immuosuppressive response. Furthermore, this combinatorial therapy increases the expression of two anti-angiogenic chemokines C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL) 9 and CXCL10, and suppresses the intratumoral production of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and cycloxygenase-2 (COX2), suggesting a dampened pro-tumor angiogenic and inflammatory microenvironment. This alginate-hydrogel-mediated, combinatorial therapy of celecoxib and PD-1 mAb provides a potential valuable regimen for treating human cancer. PMID:27057439

  17. Cost effectiveness of a computer-delivered intervention to improve HIV medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High levels of adherence to medications for HIV infection are essential for optimal clinical outcomes and to reduce viral transmission, but many patients do not achieve required levels. Clinician-delivered interventions can improve patients’ adherence, but usually require substantial effort by trained individuals and may not be widely available. Computer-delivered interventions can address this problem by reducing required staff time for delivery and by making the interventions widely available via the Internet. We previously developed a computer-delivered intervention designed to improve patients’ level of health literacy as a strategy to improve their HIV medication adherence. The intervention was shown to increase patients’ adherence, but it was not clear that the benefits resulting from the increase in adherence could justify the costs of developing and deploying the intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relation of development and deployment costs to the effectiveness of the intervention. Methods Costs of intervention development were drawn from accounting reports for the grant under which its development was supported, adjusted for costs primarily resulting from the project’s research purpose. Effectiveness of the intervention was drawn from results of the parent study. The relation of the intervention’s effects to changes in health status, expressed as utilities, was also evaluated in order to assess the net cost of the intervention in terms of quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Sensitivity analyses evaluated ranges of possible intervention effectiveness and durations of its effects, and costs were evaluated over several deployment scenarios. Results The intervention’s cost effectiveness depends largely on the number of persons using it and the duration of its effectiveness. Even with modest effects for a small number of patients the intervention was associated with net cost savings in some scenarios and for

  18. Delivering interventions to reduce the global burden of stillbirths: improving service supply and community demand

    PubMed Central

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Darmstadt, Gary L; Haws, Rachel A; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Lawn, Joy E

    2009-01-01

    Background Although a number of antenatal and intrapartum interventions have shown some evidence of impact on stillbirth incidence, much confusion surrounds ideal strategies for delivering these interventions within health systems, particularly in low-/middle-income countries where 98% of the world's stillbirths occur. Improving the uptake of quality antenatal and intrapartum care is critical for evidence-based interventions to generate an impact at the population level. This concluding paper of a series of papers reviewing the evidence for stillbirth interventions examines the evidence for community and health systems approaches to improve uptake and quality of antenatal and intrapartum care, and synthesises programme and policy recommendations for how best to deliver evidence-based interventions at community and facility levels, across the continuum of care, to reduce stillbirths. Methods We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Library for abstracts pertaining to community-based and health-systems strategies to increase uptake and quality of antenatal and intrapartum care services. We also sought abstracts which reported impact on stillbirths or perinatal mortality. Searches used multiple combinations of broad and specific search terms and prioritised rigorous randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses where available. Wherever eligible randomised controlled trials were identified after a Cochrane review had been published, we conducted new meta-analyses based on the original Cochrane criteria. Results In low-resource settings, cost, distance and the time needed to access care are major barriers for effective uptake of antenatal and particularly intrapartum services. A number of innovative strategies to surmount cost, distance, and time barriers to accessing care were identified and evaluated; of these, community financial incentives, loan/insurance schemes, and maternity waiting homes seem promising, but few studies have reported or evaluated the

  19. The Usability of Diabetes MAP: A Web-delivered Intervention for Improving Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Lyndsay A; Bethune, Magaela C; Lagotte, Andrea E

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-delivered interventions are a feasible approach to health promotion. However, if a website is poorly designed, difficult to navigate, and has technical bugs, it will not be used as intended. Usability testing prior to evaluating a website’s benefits can identify barriers to user engagement and maximize future use. Objective We developed a Web-delivered intervention called Diabetes Medication Adherence Promotion (Diabetes MAP) and used a mixed-methods approach to test its usability prior to evaluating its efficacy on medication adherence and glycemic control in a randomized controlled trial. Methods We recruited English-speaking adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from an academic medical center who were prescribed diabetes medications. A trained research assistant administered a baseline survey, collected medical record information, and instructed participants on how to access Diabetes MAP. Participants were asked to use the site independently for 2 weeks and to provide survey and/or focus group feedback on their experience. We analyzed survey data descriptively and qualitative data thematically to identify participants’ favorable and unfavorable experiences, characterize usability concerns, and solicit recommendations for improving Diabetes MAP. Results Enrolled participants (N=32) were an average of 51.7 ± 11.8 years old, 66% (21/32) female, 60% (19/32) non-Hispanic White, 88% (28/32) had more than 12 years of education, half had household incomes over $50,000, and 78% (25/32) were privately insured. Average duration of diagnosed diabetes was 7.8 ± 6.3 years, average A1c was 7.4 ± 2.0, and 38% (12/32) were prescribed insulin. Of enrolled participants, 91% (29/32) provided survey and/or focus group feedback about Diabetes MAP. On the survey, participants agreed website information was clear and easy to understand, but in focus groups they reported navigational challenges and difficulty overcoming user errors (eg, entering data in an

  20. Models for Delivering School-Based Dental Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, David A.; McManus, Joseph M.; Mitchell, Dennis A.

    2005-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) often are located in high-need schools and communities. Dental service is frequently an addition to existing comprehensive services, functioning in a variety of models, configurations, and locations. SBHCs are indicated when parents have limited financial resources or inadequate health insurance, limiting…

  1. Improved Speech Following Parent-Delivered Qigong Massage in Young Children with Down Syndrome: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Louisa M. T.; Schalock, Mark; Williams, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Qigong massage is an eastern form of massage that can be delivered by western parents to their children with appropriate training and support. It has been shown to improve developmental measures in young children with autism when given daily for five months. A recent trial evaluating its effect on motor development in young children with Down…

  2. Does Participation in Home-Delivered Meals Programs Improve Outcomes for Older Adults? Results of a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony D; Godfryd, Alice; Buys, David R; Locher, Julie L

    2015-01-01

    Participation in home-delivered meals programs may contribute to the health and independence of older adults living in the community, especially those who are food insecure or those who are making transitions from acute, subacute, and chronic care settings to the home. The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive and systematic review of all studies related to home-delivered meals in order to shed light on the state of the science. A complete review of articles appearing in PubMed using the keyword "Meal" was conducted; and titles, abstracts, and full-texts were screened for relevance. Included in this review are 80 articles. Most studies are descriptive and do not report on outcomes. Frequently reported outcomes included nutritional status based on self-reported dietary intake. Additionally, most studies included in this review are cross-sectional, have a small sample size, and/or are limited to a particular setting or participant population. More rigorous research is needed to (1) gain insight into why so few eligible older adults access home-delivered meals programs, (2) support expansion of home-delivered meals to all eligible older adults, (3) better identify what home-delivered meals models alone and in combination with other services works best and for whom, and (4) better target home-delivered meals programs where and when resources are scarce. PMID:26106985

  3. Does Participation in Home-delivered Meals Programs Improve Outcomes for Older Adults?: Results of a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Anthony D.; Godfryd, Alice; Buys, David R.; Locher, Julie L.

    2015-01-01

    Participation in home-delivered meals programs may contribute to the health and independence of older adults living in the community, especially those who are food insecure or those who are making transitions from acute, subacute, and chronic care settings to the home. The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive and systematic review of ALL studies related to home-delivered meals in order to shed light on the state of the science. A complete review of articles appearing in PubMed using the Keyword “Meal” was conducted; and titles, abstracts, and full-texts were screened for relevance. Included in this review are 80 articles. Most studies are descriptive and do not report on outcomes. Frequently reported outcomes included nutritional status based upon self-reported dietary intake. Additionally, most studies included in this review are cross-sectional, have a small sample size, and/or are limited to a particular setting or participant population. More rigorous research is needed to: 1) gain insight into why so few eligible older adults access home-delivered meals programs, 2) support expansion of home-delivered meals to all eligible older adults, 3) better identify what home-delivered meals models alone and in combination with other services works best and for whom, and 4) better target home-delivered meals programs where and when resources are scarce. PMID:26106985

  4. The Alpha Stem Cell Clinic: a model for evaluating and delivering stem cell-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Trounson, Alan; DeWitt, Natalie D; Feigal, Ellen G

    2012-01-01

    Cellular therapies require the careful preparation, expansion, characterization, and delivery of cells in a clinical environment. There are major challenges associated with the delivery of cell therapies and high costs that will limit the companies available to fully evaluate their merit in clinical trials, and will handicap their application at the present financial environment. Cells will be manufactured in good manufacturing practice or near-equivalent facilities with prerequisite safety practices in place, and cell delivery systems will be specialized and require well-trained medical and nursing staff, technicians or nurses trained to handle cells once delivered, patient counselors, as well as statisticians and database managers who will oversee the monitoring of patients in relatively long-term follow-up studies. The model proposed for Alpha Stem Cell Clinics will initially use the capacities and infrastructure that exist in the most advanced tertiary medical clinics for delivery of established bone marrow stem cell therapies. As the research evolves, they will incorporate improved procedures and cell preparations. This model enables commercialization of medical devices, reagents, and other products required for cell therapies. A carefully constructed cell therapy clinical infrastructure with the requisite scientific, technical, and medical expertise and operational efficiencies will have the capabilities to address three fundamental and critical functions: 1) fostering clinical trials; 2) evaluating and establishing safe and effective therapies, and 3) developing and maintaining the delivery of therapies approved by the Food and Drug Administration, or other regulatory agencies. PMID:23197634

  5. The Alpha Stem Cell Clinic: A Model for Evaluating and Delivering Stem Cell-Based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    DeWitt, Natalie D.; Feigal, Ellen G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cellular therapies require the careful preparation, expansion, characterization, and delivery of cells in a clinical environment. There are major challenges associated with the delivery of cell therapies and high costs that will limit the companies available to fully evaluate their merit in clinical trials, and will handicap their application at the present financial environment. Cells will be manufactured in good manufacturing practice or near-equivalent facilities with prerequisite safety practices in place, and cell delivery systems will be specialized and require well-trained medical and nursing staff, technicians or nurses trained to handle cells once delivered, patient counselors, as well as statisticians and database managers who will oversee the monitoring of patients in relatively long-term follow-up studies. The model proposed for Alpha Stem Cell Clinics will initially use the capacities and infrastructure that exist in the most advanced tertiary medical clinics for delivery of established bone marrow stem cell therapies. As the research evolves, they will incorporate improved procedures and cell preparations. This model enables commercialization of medical devices, reagents, and other products required for cell therapies. A carefully constructed cell therapy clinical infrastructure with the requisite scientific, technical, and medical expertise and operational efficiencies will have the capabilities to address three fundamental and critical functions: 1) fostering clinical trials; 2) evaluating and establishing safe and effective therapies, and 3) developing and maintaining the delivery of therapies approved by the Food and Drug Administration, or other regulatory agencies. PMID:23197634

  6. Qualitative Assessment of Adolescents Views about Improving Exposure to Internet-Delivered Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutzen, Rik; de Nooijer, Jascha; Brouwer, Wendy; Oenema, Anke; Brug, Johannes; de Vries, Nanne K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to gain first insight into factors which might be associated with exposure to internet-delivered interventions. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with five groups of Dutch adolescents (n = 54), aged 12-17 years. Several aspects of exposure: a first visit;…

  7. Brief Report: Predictors of Outcomes in the Early Start Denver Model Delivered in a Group Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivanti, Giacomo; Dissanayake, Cheryl; Zierhut, Cynthia; Rogers, Sally J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies that have looked at factors associated with responsiveness to interventions in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated learning profiles associated with response to the Early Start Denver Model delivered in a group setting. Our preliminary results from 21 preschool children with an ASD aged…

  8. Alternative Models to Deliver Developmental Math: Issues of Use and Student Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosiewicz, Holly; Ngo, Federick; Fong, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Changing how community colleges deliver developmental education has become a key policy lever to increase student achievement. Alternative development education models reduce the amount of time a student spends in remediation, provide students with supplemental instruction and support, and contextualize content to align with student…

  9. Automated Student Model Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.; Stamper, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Student modeling plays a critical role in developing and improving instruction and instructional technologies. We present a technique for automated improvement of student models that leverages the DataShop repository, crowd sourcing, and a version of the Learning Factors Analysis algorithm. We demonstrate this method on eleven educational…

  10. Nanoparticle-based cancer treatment: can delivered dose and biological dose be reliably modeled and quantified?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, P. Jack; Petryk, Alicia A.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Stigliano, Robert V.; D'Angelo, Robert N.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Cassim, Shiraz M.; Foreman, Allan; Bischof, John C.; Pearce, John A.; Ryan, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Essential developments in the reliable and effective use of heat in medicine include: 1) the ability to model energy deposition and the resulting thermal distribution and tissue damage (Arrhenius models) over time in 3D, 2) the development of non-invasive thermometry and imaging for tissue damage monitoring, and 3) the development of clinically relevant algorithms for accurate prediction of the biological effect resulting from a delivered thermal dose in mammalian cells, tissues, and organs. The accuracy and usefulness of this information varies with the type of thermal treatment, sensitivity and accuracy of tissue assessment, and volume, shape, and heterogeneity of the tumor target and normal tissue. That said, without the development of an algorithm that has allowed the comparison and prediction of the effects of hyperthermia in a wide variety of tumor and normal tissues and settings (cumulative equivalent minutes/ CEM), hyperthermia would never have achieved clinical relevance. A new hyperthermia technology, magnetic nanoparticle-based hyperthermia (mNPH), has distinct advantages over the previous techniques: the ability to target the heat to individual cancer cells (with a nontoxic nanoparticle), and to excite the nanoparticles noninvasively with a noninjurious magnetic field, thus sparing associated normal cells and greatly improving the therapeutic ratio. As such, this modality has great potential as a primary and adjuvant cancer therapy. Although the targeted and safe nature of the noninvasive external activation (hysteretic heating) are a tremendous asset, the large number of therapy based variables and the lack of an accurate and useful method for predicting, assessing and quantifying mNP dose and treatment effect is a major obstacle to moving the technology into routine clinical practice. Among other parameters, mNPH will require the accurate determination of specific nanoparticle heating capability, the total nanoparticle content and biodistribution in

  11. Synthetic DNA Vaccines: Improved Vaccine Potency by Electroporation and Co-Delivered Genetic Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Flingai, Seleeke; Czerwonko, Matias; Goodman, Jonathan; Kudchodkar, Sagar B.; Muthumani, Kar; Weiner, David B.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, DNA vaccines have undergone a number of technological advancements that have incited renewed interest and heightened promise in the field. Two such improvements are the use of genetically engineered cytokine adjuvants and plasmid delivery via in vivo electroporation (EP), the latter of which has been shown to increase antigen delivery by nearly 1000-fold compared to naked DNA plasmid delivery alone. Both strategies, either separately or in combination, have been shown to augment cellular and humoral immune responses in not only mice, but also in large animal models. These promising results, coupled with recent clinical trials that have shown enhanced immune responses in humans, highlight the bright prospects for DNA vaccines to address many human diseases. PMID:24204366

  12. Delivering safety

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, N.D.; Spooner, K.G.; Walkden, P.

    2007-07-01

    In the United Kingdom there have been significant recent changes to the management of civil nuclear liabilities. With the formation in April 2005 of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), ownership of the civil nuclear licensed sites in the UK, including the Magnox Reactor Stations, passed to this new organisation. The NDAs mission is to seek acceleration of the nuclear clean up programme and deliver increased value for money and, consequently, are driving their contractors to seek more innovative ways of performing work. British Nuclear Group manages the UK Magnox stations under contract to the NDA. This paper summarises the approach being taken within its Reactor Sites business to work with suppliers to enhance working arrangements at sites, improve the delivery of decommissioning programmes and deliver improvements in safety and environmental performance. The UK Magnox stations are 1. generation gas-graphite reactors, constructed in the 1950's and 1960's. Two stations are currently still operating, three are shut-down undergoing defueling and the other five are being decommissioned. Despite the distractions of industry restructuring, an uncompromising policy of demanding improved performance in conjunction with improved safety and environmental standards has been adopted. Over the past 5 years, this policy has resulted in step-changes in performance at Reactor Sites, with increased electrical output and accelerated defueling and decommissioning. The improvements in performance have been mirrored by improvements in safety (DACR of 0 at 5 sites); environmental standards (reductions in energy and water consumption, increased waste recycling) and the overall health of the workforce (20% reduction in sickness absence). These achievements have, in turn, been recognised by external bodies, resulting in several awards, including: the world's first ISRS and IERS level 10 awards (Sizewell, 2006), the NUMEX plant maintenance award (Bradwell, 2006), numerous Ro

  13. Delivering On Accountable Care: Lessons From A Behavioral Health Program To Improve Access And Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Robin M A; Jeffrey, Jessica; Grossman, Mark; Strouse, Thomas; Gitlin, Michael; Skootsky, Samuel A

    2016-08-01

    Patients with behavioral health disorders often have worse health outcomes and have higher health care utilization than patients with medical diseases alone. As such, people with behavioral health conditions are important populations for accountable care organizations (ACOs) seeking to improve the efficiency of their delivery systems. However, ACOs have historically faced numerous barriers in implementing behavioral health population-based programs, including acquiring reimbursement, recruiting providers, and integrating new services. We developed an evidence-based, all-payer collaborative care program called Behavioral Health Associates (BHA), operated as part of UCLA Health, an integrated academic medical center. Building BHA required several innovations, which included using our enterprise electronic medical record for behavioral health referrals and documentation; registering BHA providers with insurance plans' mental health carve-out products; and embedding BHA providers in primary care practices throughout the UCLA Health system. Since 2012 BHA has more than tripled the number of patients receiving behavioral health services through UCLA Health. After receiving BHA treatment, patients had a 13 percent reduction in emergency department use. Our efforts can serve as a model for other ACOs seeking to integrate behavioral health care into routine practice. PMID:27503975

  14. A simplified technique for delivering total body irradiation (TBI) with improved dose homogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Rui; Bernard, Damian; Turian, Julius; Abrams, Ross A.; Sensakovic, William; Fung, Henry C.; Chu, James C. H.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) with megavoltage photon beams has been accepted as an important component of management for a number of hematologic malignancies, generally as part of bone marrow conditioning regimens. The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the authors' TBI technique, which both simplifies the treatment process and improves the treatment quality. Methods: An AP/PA TBI treatment technique to produce uniform dose distributions using sequential collimator reductions during each fraction was implemented, and a sample calculation worksheet is presented. Using this methodology, the dosimetric characteristics of both 6 and 18 MV photon beams, including lung dose under cerrobend blocks was investigated. A method of estimating midplane lung doses based on measured entrance and exit doses was proposed, and the estimated results were compared with measurements. Results: Whole body midplane dose uniformity of {+-}10% was achieved with no more than two collimator-based beam modulations. The proposed model predicted midplane lung doses 5% to 10% higher than the measured doses for 6 and 18 MV beams. The estimated total midplane doses were within {+-}5% of the prescribed midplane dose on average except for the lungs where the doses were 6% to 10% lower than the prescribed dose on average. Conclusions: The proposed TBI technique can achieve dose uniformity within {+-}10%. This technique is easy to implement and does not require complicated dosimetry and/or compensators.

  15. Patient-Centered Integrated Motor Imagery Delivered in the Home With Telerehabilitation to Improve Walking After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Maidan, Inbal; Dickstein, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose This case report describes the clinical reasoning process used to examine a person after stroke and intervene with a novel integrated motor imagery treatment designed for the rehabilitation of walking and delivered in the home through telerehabilitation. The integrated motor imagery treatment consisted of patient-centered goal setting and physical practice combined with motor and motivational imagery. Case Description The patient was a 38-year-old woman who had had a diffuse left subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke 10 years earlier. She lived independently in an assisted living complex and carried a straight cane during long walks or in unfamiliar environments. Examination revealed a slow gait speed, reduced walking endurance, and decreased balance confidence. Although she was in the chronic phase, patient-centered integrated motor imagery was predicted to improve her community mobility. Treatment sessions of 45 to 60 minutes were held 3 times per week for 4 weeks. The practiced tasks included transitioning from sitting to standing, obstacle clearance, and navigation in interior and exterior environments; these tasks were first executed and then imagined at ratios of 1:5. Task execution allowed the creation of a scene based on movement observation. Imagery scenarios were customized to address the patient's goals and observed movement problems. Motivational elements of arousal, problem solving, and reward were embedded in the imagery scenarios. Half of the sessions were provided on site, and the remaining sessions were delivered remotely. Seven sessions were delivered by the clinician in the home, and 5 sessions were delivered using telerehabilitation. Outcomes Improvements in motor imagery ability, gait parameters, and balance were observed after training. Most gains were retained at the 3-month follow-up. Compared with on-site delivery, the telerehabilitation sessions resulted in less therapist travel time and cost, as well as shorter therapy

  16. Delivered growth factor therapy to improve healing after rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Emilie V; Silverio, Luz; Yao, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Background Degenerative rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder pain in the aging population. Rotator cuff repair surgery may be more successful when growth factors are delivered to the repair site. This study was designed to determine the cellular processes involved in normal bone-to-tendon healing and the current approaches used for biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair. Methods This review focuses on animal studies of rotator cuff repair and early human trials. Results Regular bone-to-tendon healing forms a fibrous junction between tendon and bone that is markedly different from the original bone-to-tendon junction. Tendon augmentation with cellular components serves as scaffolding for endogenous fibroblastic cells and a possible source of growth factors and fibroblastic cells. Extracellular matrices provide a scaffold for incoming fibroblastic cells. However, research in extracellular matrices is not conclusive due to intermanufacturer variation and the lack of human subject research. Growth factors and platelet-rich plasma are established in other fields of research and show promise, but have not yet been rigorously tested in rotator cuff repair augmentation. Conclusions Rotator cuff repair can benefit from biologic augmentation. However, research in this field is still young and has not yet demonstrated that the benefits in healing rates are significant enough to merit regular clinical use. Randomized controlled trials will elucidate the use of biologic augmentation in rotator cuff repairs. PMID:24198519

  17. Quality of Care Delivered Before versus After A Quality Improvement Intervention for Acute Geriatric Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Min, Lillian; Cryer, Henry; Chan, Chiao-Li; Roth, Carol; Tillou, Areti

    2014-01-01

    Background Older trauma injury patients had improved recovery after we implemented routine geriatric consultation for patients ≥ age 65 at a level-1 academic trauma center. The intervention aimed to improve quality of geriatric care. However, the specific care processes that improved are unknown. Study Design Prospective observation comparing medical care after (December 2007-November 2009) versus before (December 2006-November 2007) implementation of the geriatric consult-based intervention. To measure quality-of-care (QOC) we used 33 previously-validated care-process quality indicators (QIs) from the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) study, measured by review of medical records for 76 Geriatric Consult [GC] versus 71 control group patients. As pre-specified subgroup analyses, we aggregated QIs by type: geriatric (e.g., delirium screening) versus non-geriatric condition-based care (e.g., thrombosis prophylaxis) and compared QI scores by type of care. Last, we aggregated QI scores into overall, geriatric, and non-geriatric QOC scores for each patient (# QIs passed/# QIs eligible), and compared patient-level QOC for the GC versus control group, adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, comorbidity, and injury severity. Results 63% of the GC versus 11% of the control group patients received a geriatric consultation. We evaluated 2505 QIs overall (1664 geriatric-type and 841 non-geriatric QIs). In general, fewer geriatric-type QIs were passed than non-geriatric QIs (71% vs 81%, p<.001). We provided better overall-QOC to the GC (77%) than control group patients (73%, p<.05). However, the difference was not statistically significant after multivariable adjustment (p=.08). We improved geriatric-QOC for the GC (74%) compared to the control group (68%, p<.01), a difference that was significant after multivariable adjustment (p=.01). Conclusion Geriatricians and surgeons can collaboratively improve geriatric QOC for older trauma patients. PMID:25840534

  18. Delivering therapy to target: improving the odds for successful drug development.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Raghu; Brady, Martin L; Sampson, John H

    2016-07-01

    The direct delivery of drugs and other agents into tissue (in contrast to systemic administration) has been used in clinical trials for brain cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and peripheral tumors. However, continuing evidence suggests that clinical efficacy depends on adequate delivery to a target. Inadequate delivery may have doomed otherwise effective drugs, through failure to distinguish drug inefficacy from poor distribution at the target. Conventional pretreatment clinical images of the patient fail to reveal the complexity and diversity of drug transport pathways in tissue. We discuss the richness of these pathways and argue that development and patient treatment can be sped up and improved by: using quantitative as well as 'real-time' imaging; customized simulations using data from that imaging; and device designs that optimize the drug-device combination. PMID:27403630

  19. 3D delivered dose assessment using a 4DCT-based motion model

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Weixing; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Dhou, Salam; Berbeco, Ross I.; Mishra, Pankaj E-mail: jhlewis@lroc.harvard.edu; Lewis, John H. E-mail: jhlewis@lroc.harvard.edu; Seco, Joao

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically feasible method of calculating actual delivered dose distributions for patients who have significant respiratory motion during the course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: A novel approach was proposed to calculate the actual delivered dose distribution for SBRT lung treatment. This approach can be specified in three steps. (1) At the treatment planning stage, a patient-specific motion model is created from planning 4DCT data. This model assumes that the displacement vector field (DVF) of any respiratory motion deformation can be described as a linear combination of some basis DVFs. (2) During the treatment procedure, 2D time-varying projection images (either kV or MV projections) are acquired, from which time-varying “fluoroscopic” 3D images of the patient are reconstructed using the motion model. The DVF of each timepoint in the time-varying reconstruction is an optimized linear combination of basis DVFs such that the 2D projection of the 3D volume at this timepoint matches the projection image. (3) 3D dose distribution is computed for each timepoint in the set of 3D reconstructed fluoroscopic images, from which the total effective 3D delivered dose is calculated by accumulating deformed dose distributions. This approach was first validated using two modified digital extended cardio-torso (XCAT) phantoms with lung tumors and different respiratory motions. The estimated doses were compared to the dose that would be calculated for routine 4DCT-based planning and to the actual delivered dose that was calculated using “ground truth” XCAT phantoms at all timepoints. The approach was also tested using one set of patient data, which demonstrated the application of our method in a clinical scenario. Results: For the first XCAT phantom that has a mostly regular breathing pattern, the errors in 95% volume dose (D95) are 0.11% and 0.83%, respectively for 3D fluoroscopic images

  20. 3D delivered dose assessment using a 4DCT-based motion model

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weixing; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Dhou, Salam; Berbeco, Ross I.; Seco, Joao; Mishra, Pankaj; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically feasible method of calculating actual delivered dose distributions for patients who have significant respiratory motion during the course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: A novel approach was proposed to calculate the actual delivered dose distribution for SBRT lung treatment. This approach can be specified in three steps. (1) At the treatment planning stage, a patient-specific motion model is created from planning 4DCT data. This model assumes that the displacement vector field (DVF) of any respiratory motion deformation can be described as a linear combination of some basis DVFs. (2) During the treatment procedure, 2D time-varying projection images (either kV or MV projections) are acquired, from which time-varying “fluoroscopic” 3D images of the patient are reconstructed using the motion model. The DVF of each timepoint in the time-varying reconstruction is an optimized linear combination of basis DVFs such that the 2D projection of the 3D volume at this timepoint matches the projection image. (3) 3D dose distribution is computed for each timepoint in the set of 3D reconstructed fluoroscopic images, from which the total effective 3D delivered dose is calculated by accumulating deformed dose distributions. This approach was first validated using two modified digital extended cardio-torso (XCAT) phantoms with lung tumors and different respiratory motions. The estimated doses were compared to the dose that would be calculated for routine 4DCT-based planning and to the actual delivered dose that was calculated using “ground truth” XCAT phantoms at all timepoints. The approach was also tested using one set of patient data, which demonstrated the application of our method in a clinical scenario. Results: For the first XCAT phantom that has a mostly regular breathing pattern, the errors in 95% volume dose (D95) are 0.11% and 0.83%, respectively for 3D fluoroscopic images

  1. Oral vaccination with inhibin DNA delivered using attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis for improving reproductive traits in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Zhen, Yan-Hong; Liang, Ai-Xin; Zhang, Jian; Riaz, Hasan; Xiong, Jia-Jun; Guo, Ai-Zhen; Yang, Li-Guo

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy and safety of a novel inhibin vaccine containing inhibin α (1-32) fragments in mice. A recombinant plasmid pVAX-asd-IS was constructed by inserting recombinant inhibin α (1-32) and the hepatitis B surface antigen S into the plasmid in which the asd gene, rather than the kanamycin gene, was a selection marker. Ninety Kuming mice were divided into six groups consisting of 15 mice each. First group was (C1) injected with 200 µl of PBS, second (C2) received 1 × 10(10) CFU of crp(-) /asd(-) C500/pVAX-asd and served as vector control, third did not receive any treatment (C3), while fourth, fifth, and sixth group received 1 × 10(10) , 1 × 10(9) , 1 × 10(8) CFU of the recombinant inhibin vaccine crp(-) /asd(-) C500/pVAX-asd-IS (group T1, T2, T3), respectively. Western blotting demonstrated that recombinant expressed inhibin protein possessed immune function and that this plasmid could replicate for up to 40 generations stably. Vaccination with this strain at a dose of 1 × 10(10) CFU/200 µl per mouse induced high anti-inhibin antibody levels, significantly increased large-follicle production in T1 group (p < 0.05) and average litter size (p > 0.05) compared with control groups. Integration studies showed no evidence of inhibin fusion gene integrated into mice's genome 2-month after immunization. These results suggest that the vaccine described in the present study may provide a safe method to improve reproductive traits in animals. A trend towards increased litter size and significant increase in large follicle population depict that this vaccine may have direct application in large animal industry. PMID:24123188

  2. Early diagnosis and Early Start Denver Model intervention in autism spectrum disorders delivered in an Italian Public Health System service

    PubMed Central

    Devescovi, Raffaella; Monasta, Lorenzo; Mancini, Alice; Bin, Maura; Vellante, Valerio; Carrozzi, Marco; Colombi, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis combined with an early intervention program, such as the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), can positively influence the early natural history of autism spectrum disorders. This study evaluated the effectiveness of an early ESDM-inspired intervention, in a small group of toddlers, delivered at low intensity by the Italian Public Health System. Methods Twenty-one toddlers at risk for autism spectrum disorders, aged 20–36 months, received 3 hours/wk of one-to-one ESDM-inspired intervention by trained therapists, combined with parents’ and teachers’ active engagement in ecological implementation of treatment. The mean duration of treatment was 15 months. Cognitive and communication skills, as well as severity of autism symptoms, were assessed by using standardized measures at pre-intervention (Time 0 [T0]; mean age =27 months) and post-intervention (Time 1 [T1]; mean age =42 months). Results Children made statistically significant improvements in the language and cognitive domains, as demonstrated by a series of nonparametric Wilcoxon tests for paired data. Regarding severity of autism symptoms, younger age at diagnosis was positively associated with greater improvement at post-assessment. Conclusion Our results are consistent with the literature that underlines the importance of early diagnosis and early intervention, since prompt diagnosis can reduce the severity of autism symptoms and improve cognitive and language skills in younger children. Particularly in toddlers, it seems that an intervention model based on the ESDM principles, involving the active engagement of parents and nursery school teachers, may be effective even when the individual treatment is delivered at low intensity. Furthermore, our study supports the adaptation and the positive impact of the ESDM entirely sustained by the Italian Public Health System. PMID:27366069

  3. Improved immunogenicity of individual influenza vaccine components delivered with a novel dissolving microneedle patch stable at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Vassilieva, Elena V.; Kalluri, Haripriya; McAllister, Devin; Taherbhai, Misha T.; Esser, E. Stein; Pewin, Winston P.; Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A.; Prausnitz, Mark R.; Compans, Richard W.; Skountzou, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of seasonal influenza epidemics and pandemics relies on widespread vaccination coverage to induce protective immunity. In addition to a good antigenic match with the circulating viruses, the effectiveness of individual strains represented in the trivalent vaccines depends on their immunogenicity. In this study we evaluated the immunogenicity of H1N1, H3N2 and B seasonal influenza virus vaccine strains delivered individually with a novel dissolving microneedle patch and the stability of this formulation during storage at 25°C. Our data demonstrate that all strains retained their antigenic activity after incorporation in the dissolving patches as measured by SRID assay and immune responses to vaccination in BALB/c mice. After a single immunization all three antigens delivered with microneedle patches induced superior neutralizing antibody titers compared to intramuscular immunization. Cutaneous antigen delivery was especially beneficial for the less immunogenic B strain. Mice immunized with dissolving microneedle patches encapsulating influenza A/Brisbane/59/07 (H1N1) vaccine were fully protected against lethal challenge by homologous mouse-adapted influenza virus. All vaccine components retained activity during storage at room temperature for at least three months as measured in vitro by SRID assay and in vivo by mouse immunization studies. Our data demonstrate that dissolving microneedle patches are a promising advance for influenza cutaneous vaccination due to improved immune responses using less immunogenic influenza antigens and enhanced stability. PMID:25895053

  4. Improved immunogenicity of individual influenza vaccine components delivered with a novel dissolving microneedle patch stable at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Vassilieva, Elena V; Kalluri, Haripriya; McAllister, Devin; Taherbhai, Misha T; Esser, E Stein; Pewin, Winston P; Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A; Prausnitz, Mark R; Compans, Richard W; Skountzou, Ioanna

    2015-08-01

    Prevention of seasonal influenza epidemics and pandemics relies on widespread vaccination coverage to induce protective immunity. In addition to a good antigenic match with the circulating viruses, the effectiveness of individual strains represented in the trivalent vaccines depends on their immunogenicity. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of H1N1, H3N2, and B seasonal influenza virus vaccine strains delivered individually with a novel dissolving microneedle patch and the stability of this formulation during storage at 25 °C. Our data demonstrate that all strains retained their antigenic activity after incorporation in the dissolving patches as measured by single radial diffusion (SRID) assay and immune responses to vaccination in BALB/c mice. After a single immunization, all three antigens delivered with microneedle patches induced superior neutralizing antibody titers compared to intramuscular immunization. Cutaneous antigen delivery was especially beneficial for the less immunogenic B strain. Mice immunized with dissolving microneedle patches encapsulating influenza A/Brisbane/59/07 (H1N1) vaccine were fully protected against lethal challenge by homologous mouse-adapted influenza virus. All vaccine components retained activity during storage at room temperature for at least 3 months as measured in vitro by SRID assay and in vivo by mouse immunization studies. Our data demonstrate that dissolving microneedle patches are a promising advance for influenza cutaneous vaccination due to improved immune responses using less immunogenic influenza antigens and enhanced stability. PMID:25895053

  5. Adenovirus-delivered wwox inhibited lung cancer growth in vivo in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Shou, F; Zhang, H; You, Q

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most prevalent and deadly malignancy worldwide. This study investigated the possibility of inhibiting lung cancer in vivo with adenovirus-delivered WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (wwox). The lung cancer model was established by inoculating A549 lung cancer cells into the pleural space of nude mice. The control or wwox adenovirus was injected into the pleural space 7 days after cell inoculation and 14 days after first injection. The tumor number and burdens were measured 2 weeks after second virus injection. The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-feto protein (AFP) levels in pleural effusion were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Apoptosis, proliferation and angiogenesis of tumor cells were assessed by terminal deoxinucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick end labeling assay, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and CD31 staining, respectively. Ectopic wwox significantly reduced both the number and size of lung tumors accompanied by substantially lower CEA and AFP levels in pleural effusion. The expression levels of Bcl2, Bcl-xL, vascular endothelial growth factor, PCNA-positive and CD31-positive cells in the tumors were significantly decreased, whereas levels of p21 and p73 and apoptotic cells markedly increased in mice receiving the wwox virus. These data demonstrated that wwox delivered by adenovirus was able to inhibit the growth of lung cancer in vivo, indicating the potential of using wwox as a gene therapy agent for lung cancer. PMID:26516139

  6. Motivational Interviewing Delivered by Diabetes Educators: Does It Improve Blood Glucose Control Among Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Zagarins, Sofija E.; Feinberg, Rebecca G.; Garb, Jane L.

    2010-01-01

    Aims To determine whether glycemic control is improved when Motivational Interviewing (MI), a patient-centered behavior change strategy, is used with Diabetes Self Management Education (DSME) as compared to DSME alone. Methods Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients (n=234) were randomized into 4 groups: MI+DSME or DSME alone, with or without use of a computerized summary of patient self management barriers. We compared HbA1c changes between groups at 6 months and investigated mediators of HbA1c change. Results Study patients attended the majority of intervention visits (mean 3.4/4), but drop-out rate was high at follow-up research visits (35%). Multiple regression showed that groups receiving MI had a mean change in HbA1c that was significantly lower (less improved) than those not receiving MI (t=2.10; p=0.037). Mediators of HbA1c change for the total group were diabetes self-care behaviors and diabetes distress; no between-group differences were found. Conclusions DSME improved blood glucose control, underlining its benefit for T2DM management. However, MI+DSME was less effective than DSME alone. Overall, weak support was found for the clinical utility of MI in the management of T2DM delivered by diabetes educators. PMID:21074887

  7. Improvements in dose accuracy delivered with static-MLC IMRT on an integrated linear accelerator control system

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ji; Wiersma, Rodney D.; Stepaniak, Christopher J.; Farrey, Karl J.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.

    2012-05-15

    Trilogy and the TrueBeam up to 10 MU/segment, at all dose rates greater than 100 MU/min. The linear trend of decreasing dose accuracy as a function of increasing dose rate on the Trilogy is no longer apparent on TrueBeam, even for dose rates as high as 2400 MU/min. Dose inaccuracy averaged over all ten segments in each beam delivery sequence was larger for Trilogy than TrueBeam, with the largest discrepancy (0.2% vs 3%) occurring for 1 MU/segment beams at both 300 and 600 MU/min. Conclusions: Earlier generations of Varian LINACs exhibited large dose variations for small MU segments in SMLC-IMRT delivery. Our results confirmed these findings. The dose delivery accuracy for SMLC-IMRT is significantly improved on TrueBeam compared to Trilogy for every combination of low MU/segment (1-10) and high dose rate (200-600 MU/min), in part due to the faster sampling rate (100 vs 20 Hz) and enhanced electronic integration of the MLC controller with the LINAC. SMLC-IMRT can be implemented on TrueBeam with higher dose accuracy per beam ({+-}0.2% vs {+-}3%) than previous generations of Varian C-series LINACs for 1 MU/segment delivered at 600 MU/min).

  8. Models and Simulations as a Service: Exploring the Use of Galaxy for Delivering Computational Models.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mark A; Madduri, Ravi; Rodriguez, Alex; Greenstein, Joseph L; Winslow, Raimond L

    2016-03-01

    We describe the ways in which Galaxy, a web-based reproducible research platform, can be used for web-based sharing of complex computational models. Galaxy allows users to seamlessly customize and run simulations on cloud computing resources, a concept we refer to as Models and Simulations as a Service (MaSS). To illustrate this application of Galaxy, we have developed a tool suite for simulating a high spatial-resolution model of the cardiac Ca(2+) spark that requires supercomputing resources for execution. We also present tools for simulating models encoded in the SBML and CellML model description languages, thus demonstrating how Galaxy's reproducible research features can be leveraged by existing technologies. Finally, we demonstrate how the Galaxy workflow editor can be used to compose integrative models from constituent submodules. This work represents an important novel approach, to our knowledge, to making computational simulations more accessible to the broader scientific community. PMID:26958881

  9. Cost & efficiency evaluation of a publicly financed & publicly delivered referral transport service model in three districts of Haryana State, India

    PubMed Central

    Prinja, Shankar; Manchanda, Neha; Aggarwal, Arun Kumar; Kaur, Manmeet; Jeet, Gursimer; Kumar, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Various models of referral transport services have been introduced in different States in India with an aim to reduce maternal and infant mortality. Most of the research on referral transport has focussed on coverage, quality and timeliness of the service with not much information on cost and efficiency. This study was undertaken to analyze the cost of a publicly financed and managed referral transport service model in three districts of Haryana State, and to assess its cost and technical efficiency. Methods: Data on all resources spent for delivering referral transport service, during 2010, were collected from three districts of Haryana State. Costs incurred at State level were apportioned using appropriate methods. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) technique was used to assess the technical efficiency of ambulances. To estimate the efficient scale of operation for ambulance service, the average cost was regressed on kilometres travelled for each ambulance station using a quadratic regression equation. Results: The cost of referral transport per year varied from ₹5.2 million in Narnaul to ₹9.8 million in Ambala. Salaries (36-50%) constituted the major cost. Referral transport was found to be operating at an average efficiency level of 76.8 per cent. Operating an ambulance with a patient load of 137 per month was found to reduce unit costs from an average ₹ 15.5 per km to ₹ 9.57 per km. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the publicly delivered referral transport services in Haryana were operating at an efficient level. Increasing the demand for referral transport services among the target population represents an opportunity for further improving the efficiency of the underutilized ambulances. PMID:24521648

  10. D Recording for 2d Delivering - the Employment of 3d Models for Studies and Analyses -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, A.; Baratti, G.; Jiménez, B.; Girardi, S.; Remondino, F.

    2011-09-01

    In the last years, thanks to the advances of surveying sensors and techniques, many heritage sites could be accurately replicated in digital form with very detailed and impressive results. The actual limits are mainly related to hardware capabilities, computation time and low performance of personal computer. Often, the produced models are not visible on a normal computer and the only solution to easily visualized them is offline using rendered videos. This kind of 3D representations is useful for digital conservation, divulgation purposes or virtual tourism where people can visit places otherwise closed for preservation or security reasons. But many more potentialities and possible applications are available using a 3D model. The problem is the ability to handle 3D data as without adequate knowledge this information is reduced to standard 2D data. This article presents some surveying and 3D modeling experiences within the APSAT project ("Ambiente e Paesaggi dei Siti d'Altura Trentini", i.e. Environment and Landscapes of Upland Sites in Trentino). APSAT is a multidisciplinary project funded by the Autonomous Province of Trento (Italy) with the aim documenting, surveying, studying, analysing and preserving mountainous and hill-top heritage sites located in the region. The project focuses on theoretical, methodological and technological aspects of the archaeological investigation of mountain landscape, considered as the product of sequences of settlements, parcelling-outs, communication networks, resources, and symbolic places. The mountain environment preserves better than others the traces of hunting and gathering, breeding, agricultural, metallurgical, symbolic activities characterised by different lengths and environmental impacts, from Prehistory to the Modern Period. Therefore the correct surveying and documentation of this heritage sites and material is very important. Within the project, the 3DOM unit of FBK is delivering all the surveying and 3D material to

  11. The School Resource Progam: Alternative Tutoring Models for Delivering Supportive Services to L.D. Children in Mainstream Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Carole K.

    Described and evaluated are four alternative tutoring models for delivering supportive educational services to elementary grade learning disabled children in regular classes. Discussed are problems of individual programing and models such as the "Cascade of Services" to provide for differing educational needs. It is explained that the alternative…

  12. Interdisciplinary collaboration: the slogan that must be achieved for models of delivering critical care to be successful.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Richard S; Flaherty, Helen M; French, Cynthia T; Cody, Shawn; Chandler, M Willis; Connolly, Ann; Lilly, Craig M

    2012-12-01

    There is wide acceptance of the concept that interdisciplinary collaboration is an essential building block for successful health-care teams. This belief is grounded in our understanding of how teams function to address complex care needs that change with acute illness or injury. This general agreement has been validated in studies that have reported favorable outcomes associated with successfully implementing interdisciplinary models of health-care delivery in non-critical care settings. The very short time frames over which the care needs of critically ill or injured adults change and the team approach taken by nearly all ICUs strongly suggest that interdisciplinary collaboration is also beneficial in this setting. In this commentary, we define interdisciplinary collaboration and share the story of how we successfully redesigned and transformed our system-wide, interdisciplinary collaborative model for delivering critical care in order to share the lessons we learned as the process evolved with those who are about to embark on a similar challenge. We anticipate that those health-care systems that successfully implement interdisciplinary collaboration will be ahead of the curve in providing high-quality care at as low a cost as possible. Such institutions will also potentially be better positioned for improving teaching and providing a better foundation for critical care research in their institutions. PMID:23208334

  13. UCVM: Open Source Software for Understanding and Delivering 3D Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physics-based ground motion simulations can calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through 3D velocity models of the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) framework to help researchers build structured or unstructured velocity meshes from 3D velocity models for use in wave propagation simulations. The UCVM software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Currently, the platform supports multiple California models, including SCEC CVM-S4 and CVM-H 11.9.1, and has been designed to support models from any region on earth. UCVM is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. In this presentation, we describe improvements to the UCVM software. The current version, UCVM 14.3.0, released in March of 2014, supports the newest Southern California velocity model, CVM-S4.26, which was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations using CVM-S4 as the starting model (Lee et al., this meeting), and the Broadband 1D velocity model used in the CyberShake 14.2 study. We have ported UCVM to multiple Linux distributions and OS X. Also included in this release is the ability to add small-scale stochastic heterogeneities to extract Cartesian meshes for use in high-frequency ground motion simulations. This tool was built using the C language open-source FFT library, FFTW. The stochastic parameters (Hurst exponent, correlation length, and the horizontal/vertical aspect ratio) can be customized by the user. UCVM v14.3.0 also provides visualization scripts for constructing cross-sections, horizontal slices, basin depths, and Vs30 maps. The interface allows researchers to visually review velocity models . Also, UCVM v14.3.0 can extract

  14. Using Video Modeling Delivered through iPods to Teach Vocational Tasks to Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ryan O.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using video modeling delivered through a Portable media player (video iPod) as a means of teaching three job-related tasks to four young adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in a community-based employment setting. The videos used in the study were enhanced by adding written…

  15. Evaluation of Publicly Financed and Privately Delivered Model of Emergency Referral Services for Maternal and Child Health Care in India

    PubMed Central

    Prinja, Shankar; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Lakshmi, P. V. M.; Mokashi, Tushar; Aggarwal, Arun Kumar; Kaur, Manmeet; Reddy, K. Rahul; Kumar, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Background Emergency referral services (ERS) are being strengthened in India to improve access for institutional delivery. We evaluated a publicly financed and privately delivered model of ERS in Punjab state, India, to assess its extent and pattern of utilization, impact on institutional delivery, quality and unit cost. Methods Data for almost 0.4 million calls received from April 2012 to March 2013 was analysed to assess the extent and pattern of utilization. Segmented linear regression was used to analyse month-wise data on number of institutional deliveries in public sector health facilities from 2008 to 2013. We inspected ambulances in 2 districts against the Basic Life Support (BLS) standards. Timeliness of ERS was assessed for determining quality. Finally, we computed economic cost of implementing ERS from a health system perspective. Results On an average, an ambulance transported 3–4 patients per day. Poor and those farther away from the health facility had a higher likelihood of using the ambulance. Although the ERS had an abrupt positive effect on increasing the institutional deliveries in the unadjusted model, there was no effect on institutional delivery after adjustment for autocorrelation. Cost of operating the ambulance service was INR 1361 (USD 22.7) per patient transported or INR 21 (USD 0.35) per km travelled. Conclusion Emergency referral services in Punjab did not result in a significant change in public sector institutional deliveries. This could be due to high baseline coverage of institutional delivery and low barriers to physical access. Choice of interventions for reduction in Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) should be context-specific to have high value for resources spent. The ERS in Punjab needs improvement in terms of quality and reduction of cost to health system. PMID:25360798

  16. Role of hemostatic factors in hepatic injury and disease: animal models de-liver.

    PubMed

    Kopec, A K; Joshi, N; Luyendyk, J P

    2016-07-01

    Chronic liver damage is associated with unique changes in the hemostatic system. Patients with liver disease often show a precariously rebalanced hemostatic system, which is easily tipped towards bleeding or thrombotic complications by otherwise benign stimuli. In addition, some clinical studies have shown that hemostatic system components contribute to the progression of liver disease. There is a strong basic science foundation for clinical studies with this particular focus. Chronic and acute liver disease can be modeled in rodents and large animals with a variety of approaches, which span chronic exposure to toxic xenobiotics, diet-induced obesity, and surgical intervention. These experimental approaches have now provided strong evidence that, in addition to perturbations in hemostasis caused by liver disease, elements of the hemostatic system have powerful effects on the progression of experimental liver toxicity and disease. In this review, we cover the basis of the animal models that are most often utilized to assess the impact of the hemostatic system on liver disease, and highlight the role that coagulation proteases and their targets play in experimental liver toxicity and disease, emphasizing key similarities and differences between models. The need to characterize hemostatic changes in existing animal models and to develop novel animal models recapitulating the coagulopathy of chronic liver disease is highlighted. Finally, we emphasize the continued need to translate knowledge derived from highly applicable animal models to improve our understanding of the reciprocal interaction between liver disease and the hemostatic system in patients. PMID:27060337

  17. Recontextualizing and Delivering the Biomedical Model as a Physical Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, David P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the problem of delivering a body of knowledge based on biomedical research as a school physical education discourse. The paper attempts to deconstruct the ideology of healthism upon which the discourse is based in order to show how ascetic practices in school physical education are promoted as a way of combating the hedonistic…

  18. Improved cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamis, N. C.; Woodard, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    We study a class of nonlocal, action-based, and purely gravitational models. These models seek to describe a cosmology in which inflation is driven by a large, bare cosmological constant that is screened by the self-gravitation between the soft gravitons that inflation rips from the vacuum. Inflation ends with the Universe poised on the verge of gravitational collapse, in an oscillating phase of expansion and contraction that should lead to rapid reheating when matter is included. After the attainment of a hot, dense Universe the nonlocal screening terms become constant as the Universe evolves through a conventional phase of radiation domination. The onset of matter domination triggers a much smaller antiscreening effect that could explain the current phase of acceleration.

  19. Coordinated Technology-Delivered Treatment to Prevent Rehospitalization in Schizophrenia: A Novel Model of Care.

    PubMed

    Brunette, Mary F; Rotondi, Armando J; Ben-Zeev, Dror; Gottlieb, Jennifer D; Mueser, Kim T; Robinson, Delbert G; Achtyes, Eric D; Gingerich, Susan; Marcy, Patricia; Schooler, Nina R; Meyer-Kalos, Piper; Kane, John M

    2016-04-01

    Despite advances in schizophrenia treatment, symptom relapses and rehospitalizations impede recovery for many people and are a principal driver of the high cost of care. Technology-delivered or technology-enhanced treatment may be a cost-effective way to provide flexible, personalized evidence-based treatments directly to people in their homes and communities. However, evidence for the safety, acceptability, and efficacy of such interventions is only now being established. The authors of this Open Forum describe a novel, technology-based approach to prevent relapse after a hospitalization for psychosis, the Health Technology Program (HTP), which they developed. HTP provides in-person relapse prevention planning that directs use of tailored, technology-based treatment based on cognitive-behavioral therapy for psychosis, family psychoeducation for schizophrenia, and prescriber decision support through a Web-based program that solicits information from clients at every visit. Technology-based treatments are delivered through smartphones and computers. PMID:26725297

  20. "Delivering as one" UN reform process to improve health partnerships and coordination: old challenges and encouraging lessons from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Bile, K M; Lashari, K A; Shadoul, A F

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT The UN Secretary-General constituted a high-level panel on system-wide coherence in 2005 within the areas of development, humanitarian assistance and the environment. The panel adopted "Delivering as One" as a slogan for its coherence initiative. Pakistan was among eight pilot countries implementing this reform initiative. Five joint programmes were developed, on health and population; agriculture, rural development and poverty reduction; disaster risk management; education; and environment. Fourteen UN agencies supported the health and population joint programme and participatd aripe in its implementation. Although confronted by many challenges, the positive results of the joint programmes confirmed the advantage of Delivering as One over the past scenarios of fragmentation, duplication and incoherent government and UN strategic operations. The paper shares the accomplishments of the health and population sector including its ability to harness the power of intersectoral collaboration and prospectively concentrate human and financial resources around the strategic national priorities. PMID:21495598

  1. Prematurely Delivered Rats Show Improved Motor Coordination During Sensory-evoked Motor Responses Compared to Age-matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Megan E.; Brumley, Michele R.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of postnatal experience for perinatal rats was manipulated by delivering pups one day early (postconception day 21; PC21) by cesarean delivery and comparing their motor behavior to age-matched controls on PC22 (the typical day of birth). On PC22, pups were tested on multiple measures of motor coordination: leg extension response (LER), facial wiping, contact righting, and fore- and hindlimb stepping. The LER and facial wiping provided measures of synchronous hind- and forelimb coordination, respectively, and were sensory-evoked. Contact righting also was sensory-evoked and provided a measure of axial coordination. Stepping provided a measure of alternated forelimb and hindlimb coordination and was induced with the serotonin receptor agonist quipazine. Pups that were delivered prematurely and spent an additional day in the postnatal environment showed more bilateral limb coordination during expression of the LER and facial wiping, as well as a more mature righting strategy, compared to controls. These findings suggest that experience around the time of birth shapes motor coordination and the expression of species-typical behavior in the developing rat. PMID:24680729

  2. From the Tightrope: Designing, Developing, and Delivering an Alternative Teacher Education Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yancey, Patty

    2006-01-01

    In the fall of 2003 a number of factors came together to create a fertile environment for developing an alternative, pre-service teacher education model. The overarching goal of the model is to diversify a rural university's credential program(s) by developing and offering alternative paths toward teacher certification within the constraints of a…

  3. Localized dose delivering by ion beam irradiation for experimental trial of establishing brain necrosis model.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takushi; Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Takashi; Kume, Kyo; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-11-01

    Localized dose delivery techniques to establish a brain radiation necrosis model are described. An irradiation field was designed by using accelerated protons or helium ions with a spread-out Bragg peak. Measurement of the designed field confirmed that a high dose can be confined to a local volume of an animal brain. The irradiation techniques described here are very useful for establishing a necrosis model without existence of extraneous complications. PMID:26454176

  4. Cell-delivered magnetic nanoparticles caused hyperthermia-mediated increased survival in a murine pancreatic cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Basel, Matthew T; Balivada, Sivasai; Wang, Hongwang; Shrestha, Tej B; Seo, Gwi Moon; Pyle, Marla; Abayaweera, Gayani; Dani, Raj; Koper, Olga B; Tamura, Masaaki; Chikan, Viktor; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2012-01-01

    Using magnetic nanoparticles to absorb alternating magnetic field energy as a method of generating localized hyperthermia has been shown to be a potential cancer treatment. This report demonstrates a system that uses tumor homing cells to actively carry iron/iron oxide nanoparticles into tumor tissue for alternating magnetic field treatment. Paramagnetic iron/ iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and loaded into RAW264.7 cells (mouse monocyte/ macrophage-like cells), which have been shown to be tumor homing cells. A murine model of disseminated peritoneal pancreatic cancer was then generated by intraperitoneal injection of Pan02 cells. After tumor development, monocyte/macrophage-like cells loaded with iron/ iron oxide nanoparticles were injected intraperitoneally and allowed to migrate into the tumor. Three days after injection, mice were exposed to an alternating magnetic field for 20 minutes to cause the cell-delivered nanoparticles to generate heat. This treatment regimen was repeated three times. A survival study demonstrated that this system can significantly increase survival in a murine pancreatic cancer model, with an average post-tumor insertion life expectancy increase of 31%. This system has the potential to become a useful method for specifically and actively delivering nanoparticles for local hyperthermia treatment of cancer. PMID:22287840

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Preliminary Safety Study of Pod-Intravaginal Rings Delivering Antiretroviral Combinations for HIV Prophylaxis in a Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Moss, John A.; Srinivasan, Priya; Smith, Thomas J.; Butkyavichene, Irina; Lopez, Gilbert; Brooks, Amanda A.; Martin, Amy; Dinh, Chuong T.; Smith, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis using oral regimens involving the HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC) demonstrated efficacy in three clinical trials. Adherence was determined to be a key parameter for success. Incorporation of the TDF-FTC combination into intravaginal rings (IVRs) for sustained mucosal delivery could increase product adherence and efficacy compared with those of oral and vaginal gel formulations. A novel pod-IVR technology capable of delivering multiple drugs is described; this constitutes the first report of an IVR delivering TDF and FTC, as well as a triple-combination IVR delivering TDF, FTC, and the entry inhibitor maraviroc (MVC). The pharmacokinetics and preliminary local safety of the two combination pod-IVRs were evaluated in the pig-tailed macaque model. The devices exhibited sustained release at controlled rates over the 28-day study period. Median steady-state drug levels in vaginal tissues in the TDF-FTC group were 30 μg g−1 (tenofovir [TFV], in vivo hydrolysis product of TDF) and 500 μg g−1 (FTC) and in the TDF-FTC-MVC group were 10 μg g−1 (TFV), 150 μg g−1 (FTC), and 20 μg g−1 (MVC). No adverse events were observed, and there were no toxicological findings. Mild-to-moderate increases in inflammatory infiltrates were observed in the vaginal tissues of some animals in both the presence and the absence of the IVRs. The IVRs did not disturb the vaginal microbiota, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines remained stable throughout the study. Pod-IVR candidates based on the TDF-FTC combination have potential for the prevention of vaginal HIV acquisition and merit clinical investigation. PMID:24936594

  6. The Psychology of Delivering a Psychological Service: Self-Organised Learning as a Model for Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Steve; Jenner, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The article describes how one Educational Psychology Service in the UK developed a service delivery based on self-organised learning (SOL). This model is linked to the paradigms and discourses within which educational psychology and special educational needs work. The work described here is dedicated to the memory of Brian Roberts, academic, close…

  7. Person Focused Training: A Model for Delivering Positive Behavioural Supports to People with Challenging Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClean, B.; Dench, C.; Grey, I.; Shanahan, S.; Fitzsimons, E.; Hendler, J.; Corrigan, M.

    2005-01-01

    Person Focused Training is introduced as a model of service delivery for people with severe challenging behaviours. It is defined as training and supporting staff to conduct functional assessments and to design and implement positive behavioural support for specific individuals with challenging behaviours. Longitudinal outcome data are presented…

  8. Scotblood 2015: Improving and delivering blood products, novel cellular therapies, and celebrating patients and donor engagement within transfusion services.

    PubMed

    Colligan, David; McGowan, Neil; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2016-08-01

    Blood Transfusion Services are striving to continually improve the efficacy and quality of their blood products whilst also simultaneously diversifying into novel cellular products. For this to be successful the relationships between the various arms of the organisation must be strong and interlinked. As new technologies impact on the products that blood transfusion services supply it should be noted that the interaction between the service and its donor base is also affected by advancing technologies. Social media has fundamentally altered the way in which the public can access information and news, as such blood services must engage and interact appropriately with these new forms of media. As a reflection of these challenges the Scotblood 2015 programme was focussed on service and product improvement, donor engagement and people centred transfusion. This commentary comprises summaries of the presentations, based in part on the abstracts provided by the speakers. PMID:27524267

  9. Identifying future models for delivering genetic services: a nominal group study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Elwyn, Glyn; Edwards, Adrian; Iredale, Rachel; Davies, Peter; Gray, Jonathon

    2005-01-01

    Background To enable primary care medical practitioners to generate a range of possible service delivery models for genetic counselling services and critically assess their suitability. Methods Modified nominal group technique using in primary care professional development workshops. Results 37 general practitioners in Wales, United Kingdom too part in the nominal group process. The practitioners who attended did not believe current systems were sufficient to meet anticipated demand for genetic services. A wide range of different service models was proposed, although no single option emerged as a clear preference. No argument was put forward for genetic assessment and counselling being central to family practice, neither was there a voice for the view that the family doctor should become skilled at advising patients about predictive genetic testing and be able to counsel patients about the wider implications of genetic testing for patients and their family members, even for areas such as common cancers. Nevertheless, all the preferred models put a high priority on providing the service in the community, and often co-located in primary care, by clinicians who had developed expertise. Conclusion There is a need for a wider debate about how healthcare systems address individual concerns about genetic concerns and risk, especially given the increasing commercial marketing of genetic tests. PMID:15831099

  10. Computer-Delivered and Web-Based Interventions to Improve Depression, Anxiety, and Psychological Well-Being of University Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morriss, Richard; Glazebrook, Cris

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are common mental health difficulties experienced by university students and can impair academic and social functioning. Students are limited in seeking help from professionals. As university students are highly connected to digital technologies, Web-based and computer-delivered interventions could be used to improve students’ mental health. The effectiveness of these intervention types requires investigation to identify whether these are viable prevention strategies for university students. Objective The intent of the study was to systematically review and analyze trials of Web-based and computer-delivered interventions to improve depression, anxiety, psychological distress, and stress in university students. Methods Several databases were searched using keywords relating to higher education students, mental health, and eHealth interventions. The eligibility criteria for studies included in the review were: (1) the study aimed to improve symptoms relating to depression, anxiety, psychological distress, and stress, (2) the study involved computer-delivered or Web-based interventions accessed via computer, laptop, or tablet, (3) the study was a randomized controlled trial, and (4) the study was trialed on higher education students. Trials were reviewed and outcome data analyzed through random effects meta-analyses for each outcome and each type of trial arm comparison. Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool was used to assess study quality. Results A total of 17 trials were identified, in which seven were the same three interventions on separate samples; 14 reported sufficient information for meta-analysis. The majority (n=13) were website-delivered and nine interventions were based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). A total of 1795 participants were randomized and 1480 analyzed. Risk of bias was considered moderate, as many publications did not sufficiently report their methods and seven explicitly conducted completers

  11. Modeling of Dose Distribution for a Proton Beam Delivering System with the use of the Multi-Particle Transport Code 'Fluka'

    SciTech Connect

    Mumot, Marta; Agapov, Alexey

    2007-11-26

    We have developed a new delivering system for hadron therapy which uses a multileaf collimator and a range shifter. We simulate our delivering beam system with the multi-particle transport code 'Fluka'. From these simulations we obtained information about the dose distributions, about stars generated in the delivering system elements and also information about the neutron flux. All the informations obtained were analyzed from the point of view of radiation protection, homogeneity of beam delivery to patient body, and also in order to improve some modifiers used.

  12. Orally delivered microencapsulated probiotic formulation favorably impacts polyp formation in APC (Min/+) model of intestinal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Bhathena, Jasmine; Cherif, Sofiane; Prakash, Satya

    2016-01-01

    The development of intestinal polyps in an orthotopic colorectal mouse model, receiving a probiotic yogurt formulation containing microencapsulated live Lactobacillus acidophilus cells was investigated. The expression of various immunohistochemical markers namely CD8, Mac-1, Ki-67, and cleaved caspase-3, was evaluated. Results suggest that the probiotic formulation decreases overall intestinal inflammation. Mice receiving the probiotic formulation were found to develop almost two-fold fewer tumors in the small intestines. In the large intestine, however, there was no significant difference observed among polyp numbers. The formulation appears to have potential application in the prevention of various GI pathological conditions. PMID:25060720

  13. Minimally Disruptive Medicine: A Pragmatically Comprehensive Model for Delivering Care to Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Leppin, Aaron L.; Montori, Victor M.; Gionfriddo, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    An increasing proportion of healthcare resources in the United States are directed toward an expanding group of complex and multimorbid patients. Federal stakeholders have called for new models of care to meet the needs of these patients. Minimally Disruptive Medicine (MDM) is a theory-based, patient-centered, and context-sensitive approach to care that focuses on achieving patient goals for life and health while imposing the smallest possible treatment burden on patients’ lives. The MDM Care Model is designed to be pragmatically comprehensive, meaning that it aims to address any and all factors that impact the implementation and effectiveness of care for patients with multiple chronic conditions. It comprises core activities that map to an underlying and testable theoretical framework. This encourages refinement and future study. Here, we present the conceptual rationale for and a practical approach to minimally disruptive care for patients with multiple chronic conditions. We introduce some of the specific tools and strategies that can be used to identify the right care for these patients and to put it into practice. PMID:27417747

  14. Improvement of the IAU 2000 precession model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, N.; Wallace, P. T.; Chapront, J.

    2005-03-01

    The IAU 2000 precession consists of the IAU 1976 ecliptic precession (Lieske et al. [CITE], A&A, 58, 1) and the precession part of the IAU 2000A equator adopted by IAU 2000 Resolution B1.6 (Mathews et al. [CITE], J. Geophys. Res., 107, B4, 10.1029/2001JB000390). In this paper we provide a range of new expressions as possible replacements for the IAU 2000 precession. The new expressions are based upon the so-called P03 solution of Capitaine et al. ([CITE], A&A, 412, 567) for the equator and the ecliptic. In addition an improved model for the precession of the equator is discussed. This improved solution was obtained in exactly the same way as P03 but using a refined model for the contributions of the non-rigid Earth (Mathews [CITE], private communication) and revised integration constants for the precession rates resulting from fits to the most recent VLBI data. The paper reports on the procedure that was used for improving the P03 solution and on the comparisons of this solution with the MHB 2000, IAU 2000 and P03 solutions. It also discusses the choices for the solution to be put forward as a replacement for IAU 2000. We concluded that the existing VLBI data were insufficient to provide convincing evidence that the improved solutions would deliver better accuracy than the existing P03 solution, and we recommend retaining P03 as the replacement for IAU 2000. P03, which unlike the IAU 2000 precession is dynamically consistent, has the advantage of already having been used experimentally by a number of groups; the model is recalled in Tables [see full text]- [see full text]. Due to the strong dependence of the precession expressions on the precession rates and of the precession in longitude (or equivalently the celestial CIP X coordinate) on the J2 rate model, we also provide a parameterized P04 solution for these quantities as functions of those parameters. The expressions include the quantities to be used in both the equinox-based and CIO-based (i.e. referred to

  15. A novel expression cassette delivers efficient production of exclusively tetrameric human butyrylcholinesterase with improved pharmacokinetics for protection against organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Stanislav; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatiana; Shamborant, Olga; Zenkova, Marina; Chernolovskaya, Elena; Gladkikh, Danil; Murashev, Arkadii; Dyachenko, Igor; Palikov, Viktor; Palikova, Yulia; Knorre, Vera; Belogurov, Alexey; Ponomarenko, Natalie; Blackburn, G Michael; Masson, Patrick; Gabibov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase is a stoichiometric bioscavenger against poisoning by organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. The low level of expression and extremely rapid clearance of monomeric recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE) from bloodstream (t½≈2 min) limits its pharmaceutical application. Recently (Ilyushin at al., PNAS, 2013) we described a long-acting polysialylated recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE-CAO), stable in the bloodstream, that protects mice against 4.2 LD50 of VR. Here we report a set of modifications of the initial rhBChE expression vector to improve stability of the enzyme in the bloodstream and increase its production in CHO cells by introducing in the expression cassette: (i) the sequence of the natural human PRAD-peptide in frame with rhBChE gene via "self-processing" viral F2A peptide under control of an hEF/HTLV promoter, and (ii) previously predicted in silico MAR 1-68 and MAR X-29 sequences. This provides fully tetrameric rhBChE (4rhBChE) at 70 mg/l, that displays improved pharmacokinetics (t½ = 32 ± 1.2 h, MRT = 43 ± 2 h). 3D Fluorescent visualization and distribution of (125)I-labeled enzyme reveals similar low level 4rhBChE and rhBChE-CAO accumulation in muscle, fat, and brain. Administered 4rhBChE was mainly catabolized in the liver and breakdown products were excreted in kidney. Injection of 1.2 LD50 and 1.1 LD50 of paraoxon to BALB/c and knockout BChE-/- mice pre-treated with 4rhBChE (50 mg/kg) resulted in 100% and 78% survival, respectively, without perturbation of long-term behavior. In contrast, 100% mortality of non-pre-treated mice was observed. The high expression level of 4rhBChE in CHO cells permits consideration of this new expression system for manufacturing BChE as a biopharmaceutical. PMID:26239905

  16. Improving physical functional and quality of life in older adults with multiple sclerosis via a DVD-delivered exercise intervention: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Wójcicki, Thomas R; Roberts, Sarah A; Learmonth, Yvonne C; Hubbard, Elizabeth A; Kinnett-Hopkins, Dominque; Motl, Robert W; McAuley, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There is a need to identify innovative, low-cost and broad-reaching strategies for promoting exercise and improving physical function in older adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods and analysis This randomised controlled pilot trial will test the efficacy of a 6-month, DVD-delivered exercise intervention to improve functional performance and quality of life in older adults with MS. Participants will be randomised either into a DVD-delivered exercise condition or an attentional control condition. This novel approach to programme delivery provides participants with detailed exercise instructions which are presented in a progressive manner and includes a variety of modifications to better meet varying levels of physical abilities. The targeted exercises focus on three critical elements of functional fitness: flexibility, strength and balance. It is hypothesised that participants who are randomised to the exercise DVD condition will demonstrate improvements in physical function compared with participants assigned to the attentional control condition. Data analysis will include a 2 (condition)×2 (time) mixed factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) that follows intent-to-treat principles, as well as an examination of effect sizes. Participants will take part in qualitative interviews about perspectives on physical activity and programme participation. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol was approved by a university institutional review board and registered with a federal database. Participants will be asked to read and sign a detailed informed consent document and will be required to provide a physician's approval to participate in the study. The exercise DVDs include an overview of safety-related concerns and recommendations relative to exercise participation, as well as detailed instructions highlighting the proper execution of each exercise presented on screen. Following completion of this trial, data will be immediately analysed and results

  17. The Feasibility of an E-mail–Delivered Intervention to Improve Nutrition and Physical Activity Behaviors in African-American College Students

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Eleanor; Schweitzer, Amy; Hurtado, Maria Eugenia; Hathway, Joanne; DiPietro, Loretta; Lei, Kai Y.; Klein, Catherine J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of an e-mail-delivered program to promote nutrition and physical activity in African-American college students. Participants 47 students (76% female, ages 18-20 y). Methods Students participated in a 24-week randomized controlled trial, receiving either general health information or the intervention focused on diet and physical activity. Results At baseline, 80.9% and 76.0% of participants reported interest in improving diet and physical activity, respectively. Participants evidenced poor nutrition behaviors and 46% were overweight or obese. At 24 weeks, most participants (70% control, 84% intervention) were “somewhat” or “very” satisfied with the program. The program was feasible to administrate, with the exception of measurement of physical activity using accelerometers. Conclusions An innovative e-mail-delivered program promoting positive health behaviors appears to be feasible and acceptable in African-American college students. Further research is needed to evaluate program efficacy in this population, including prevention of excess weight gain. PMID:25611932

  18. Combination Pod-Intravaginal Ring Delivers Antiretroviral Agents for HIV Prophylaxis: Pharmacokinetic Evaluation in an Ovine Model.

    PubMed

    Moss, John A; Butkyavichene, Irina; Churchman, Scott A; Gunawardana, Manjula; Fanter, Rob; Miller, Christine S; Yang, Flora; Easley, Jeremiah T; Marzinke, Mark A; Hendrix, Craig W; Smith, Thomas J; Baum, Marc M

    2016-06-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV using oral regimens based on the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) has been effective to various degrees in multiple clinical trials, and the CCR5 receptor antagonist maraviroc (MVC) holds potential for complementary efficacy. The effectiveness of HIV PrEP is highly dependent on adherence. Incorporation of the TDF-MVC combination into intravaginal rings (IVRs) for sustained mucosal delivery could increase product adherence and efficacy compared with oral and vaginal gel formulations. A novel pod-IVR technology capable of delivering multiple drugs is described. The pharmacokinetics and preliminary local safety characteristics of a novel pod-IVR delivering a combination of TDF and MVC were evaluated in the ovine model. The device exhibited sustained release at controlled rates over the 28-day study and maintained steady-state drug levels in cervicovaginal fluids (CVFs). Dilution of CVFs during lavage sample collection was measured by ion chromatography using an inert tracer, allowing corrected drug concentrations to be measured for the first time. Median, steady-state drug levels in vaginal tissue homogenate were as follows: for tenofovir (TFV; in vivo hydrolysis product of TDF), 7.3 × 10(2) ng g(-1) (interquartile range [IQR], 3.0 × 10(2), 4.0 × 10(3)); for TFV diphosphate (TFV-DP; active metabolite of TFV), 1.8 × 10(4) fmol g(-1) (IQR, 1.5 × 10(4), 4.8 × 10(4)); and for MVC, 8.2 × 10(2) ng g(-1) (IQR, 4.7 × 10(2), 2.0 × 10(3)). No adverse events were observed. These findings, together with previous pod-IVR studies, have allowed several lead candidates to advance into clinical evaluation. PMID:27067321

  19. Delivering bad news to patients.

    PubMed

    Monden, Kimberley R; Gentry, Lonnie; Cox, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    When physicians lack proper training, breaking bad news can lead to negative consequences for patients, families, and physicians. A questionnaire was used to determine whether a didactic program on delivering bad news was needed at our institution. Results revealed that 91% of respondents perceived delivering bad news as a very important skill, but only 40% felt they had the training to effectively deliver such news. We provide a brief review of different approaches to delivering bad news and advocate for training physicians in a comprehensive, structured model. PMID:26722188

  20. Predictors of Hepatitis B Cure Using Gene Therapy to Deliver DNA Cleavage Enzymes: A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, Joshua T.; Swan, Dave A.; Stone, Daniel; Jerome, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic viral infections are managed with small molecule therapies that inhibit replication but are not curative because non-replicating viral forms can persist despite decades of suppressive treatment. There are therefore numerous strategies in development to eradicate all non-replicating viruses from the body. We are currently engineering DNA cleavage enzymes that specifically target hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA (HBV cccDNA), the episomal form of the virus that persists despite potent antiviral therapies. DNA cleavage enzymes, including homing endonucleases or meganucleases, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs), and CRISPR-associated system 9 (Cas9) proteins, can disrupt specific regions of viral DNA. Because DNA repair is error prone, the virus can be neutralized after repeated cleavage events when a target sequence becomes mutated. DNA cleavage enzymes will be delivered as genes within viral vectors that enter hepatocytes. Here we develop mathematical models that describe the delivery and intracellular activity of DNA cleavage enzymes. Model simulations predict that high vector to target cell ratio, limited removal of delivery vectors by humoral immunity, and avid binding between enzyme and its DNA target will promote the highest level of cccDNA disruption. Development of de novo resistance to cleavage enzymes may occur if DNA cleavage and error prone repair does not render the viral episome replication incompetent: our model predicts that concurrent delivery of multiple enzymes which target different vital cccDNA regions, or sequential delivery of different enzymes, are both potentially useful strategies for avoiding multi-enzyme resistance. The underlying dynamics of cccDNA persistence are unlikely to impact the probability of cure provided that antiviral therapy is given concurrently during eradication trials. We conclude by describing experiments that can be used to validate the model, which will in turn

  1. Intra-Arterially Delivered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Not Detected in the Brain Parenchyma in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Na Kyung; Yang, Jehoon; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Jeongmin; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Chang, Jong Wook; Na, Duk L

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a promising role as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Prior studies suggested that intra-arterially administered MSCs are engrafted into the brain in stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) animal models. However, a controversial standpoint exists in terms of the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in transgenic AD mice. The primary goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of delivering human umbilical cord-blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) into the brains of non-transgenic WT (C3H/C57) and transgenic AD (APP/PS1) mice through the intra-arterial (IA) route. Through two experiments, mice were infused with hUCB-MSCs via the right internal carotid artery and were sacrificed at two different time points: 6 hours (experiment 1) or 5 minutes (experiment 2) after infusion. In both experiments, no cells were detected in the brain parenchyma while MSCs were detected in the cerebrovasculature in experiment 2. The results from this study highlight that intra-arterial delivery of MSCs is not the most favorable route to be implemented as a potential therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:27203695

  2. Chronic care model strategies in the United States and Germany deliver patient-centered, high-quality diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Stock, Stephanie; Pitcavage, James M; Simic, Dusan; Altin, Sibel; Graf, Christian; Feng, Wen; Graf, Thomas R

    2014-09-01

    Improving the quality of care for chronic diseases is an important issue for most health care systems in industrialized nations. One widely adopted approach is the Chronic Care Model (CCM), which was first developed in the late 1990s. In this article we present the results from two large surveys in the United States and Germany that report patients' experiences in different models of patient-centered diabetes care, compared to the experiences of patients who received routine diabetes care in the same systems. The study populations were enrolled in either Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania or Barmer, a German sickness fund that provides medical insurance nationwide. Our findings suggest that patients with type 2 diabetes who were enrolled in the care models that exhibited key features of the CCM were more likely to receive care that was patient-centered, high quality, and collaborative, compared to patients who received routine care. This study demonstrates that quality improvement can be realized through the application of the Chronic Care Model, regardless of the setting or distinct characteristics of the program. PMID:25201658

  3. Formative evaluation of a telemedicine model for delivering clinical neurophysiology services part II: The referring clinician and patient perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Feedback from service users will provide insight into opportunities for improvement so that performance can be optimised. In the context of a formative evaluation referring clinician and patient satisfaction with a teleneurophysiology service was examined during a 20 week pilot period. Methods Questionnaire surveys of referring clinicians and patients were conducted. Results Fifteen (58%) clinicians responded to the first part of a postal survey which examined their satisfaction with traditional clinical neurophysiology services. Nine (35%) responded to a second part which assessed their experience with the teleneurophysiology service. Teleneurophysiology improved satisfaction with waiting times, availability of results and impact on patient management. There was unanimous support from the clinicians for the permanent development of a teleneurophysiology service, although 2 cautioned this could delay establishing a neurology service in their region. Eighty-two percent (116/142) of patients responded to a survey of their satisfaction with teleneurophysiology. This was compared to a previous report of 322 patients' experience with traditional CN services in Ireland. Waiting times for appointment were shorter for the former group who supported the telemedicine model recognising that it reduced the travel burden and need for overnight journeys. The two groups were equally anxious about the investigation although the teleneurophysiology patients received more prior information. Conclusion This study illustrates that teleneurophysiology is an acceptable model of service delivery for its primary customers. Their feedback is important in informing appropriate design and governance of such innovative models of health service provision. PMID:20843310

  4. Assessment of the Quality of Delivered Care for Iranian patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis by Using Comprehensive Quality Measurement Model in Health Care (CQMH)

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Saeed; Safiri, Saeid; Bayat, Mahboubeh; Mottaghi, Payman; Shokri, Azad; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Fattahi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Quality of care has become increasingly critical in the evaluation of healthcare and healthcare services. The aim of this study was to assess quality of delivered care among patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a model of Comprehensive Quality Measurement in Health Care (CQMH). Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 172 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who were received care from private clinics of Isfahan University of medical sciences in 2013. CQMH questionnaires were used for assessing the quality of care. Data were analyzed using SPSS for Windows. Results: The mean scores of Quality Index, Service Quality (SQ), Technical Quality (TQ), and Costumer Quality (CQ) were 72.70, 79.09, 68.54 and 70.25 out of 100, respectively. For CQ only 19.8% of participations staying the course of action even under stress and financial constraints, there is a significant gap between what RA care they received with what was recommended in the guideline for TQ. Scores of service quality was low in majority of aspects especially in "availability of support group" section. Conclusion: Study shows paradoxical findings and expresses that quality scores of service delivery for patients with arthritis rheumatoid from patient's perspective is relatively low. Therefore, for fixing this paradoxical problem, improving the participation of patients and their family and empowering them for self-management and decision should be regarded by health systems. PMID:26744728

  5. Model-based software process improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zettervall, Brenda T.

    1994-01-01

    The activities of a field test site for the Software Engineering Institute's software process definition project are discussed. Products tested included the improvement model itself, descriptive modeling techniques, the CMM level 2 framework document, and the use of process definition guidelines and templates. The software process improvement model represents a five stage cyclic approach for organizational process improvement. The cycles consist of the initiating, diagnosing, establishing, acting, and leveraging phases.

  6. Improved model for statistical alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Miklos, I.; Toroczkai, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The statistical approach to molecular sequence evolution involves the stochastic modeling of the substitution, insertion and deletion processes. Substitution has been modeled in a reliable way for more than three decades by using finite Markov-processes. Insertion and deletion, however, seem to be more difficult to model, and thc recent approaches cannot acceptably deal with multiple insertions and deletions. A new method based on a generating function approach is introduced to describe the multiple insertion process. The presented algorithm computes the approximate joint probability of two sequences in 0(13) running time where 1 is the geometric mean of the sequence lengths.

  7. Bone marrow stem cells delivered into the subarachnoid space via cisterna magna improve repair of injured rat spinal cord white matter

    PubMed Central

    Marcol, Wiesław; Slusarczyk, Wojciech; Sieroń, Aleksander L; Koryciak-Komarska, Halina; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The influence of bone marrow stem cells on regeneration of spinal cord in rats was investigated. Young adult male Wistar rats were used (n=22). Focal injury of spinal cord white matter at Th10 level was produced using our original non-laminectomy method by means of high-pressured air stream. Cells from tibial and femoral bone marrow of 1-month old rats (n=3) were cultured, labeled with BrdU/Hoechst and injected into cisterna magna (experimental group) three times: immediately after spinal cord injury and 3 as well as 7 days later. Neurons in brain stem and motor cortex were labeled with FluoroGold (FG) delivered caudally from the injury site a week before the end of experiment. Functional outcome and morphological features of regeneration were analyzed during 12-week follow-up. The lesions were characterized by means of MRI. Maximal distance of expansion of implanted cells in the spinal cord was measured and the number of FG-positive neurons in the brain was counted. Rats treated with stem cells presented significant improvement of locomotor performance and spinal cord morphology when compared to the control group. Distance covered by stem cells was 7 mm from the epicenter of the injury. Number of brain stem and motor cortex FG-positive neurons in experimental group was significantly higher than in control. Obtained data showed that bone marrow stem cells are able to induce the repair of injured spinal cord white matter. The route of cells application via cisterna magna appeared to be useful for their delivery in spinal cord injury therapy. PMID:26628950

  8. Inferior mirages: an improved model.

    PubMed

    Young, Andrew T

    2015-02-01

    A quantitative model of the inferior mirage is presented, based on a realistic temperature profile in the convective boundary layer, using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. The top of the inverted image is determined by the logarithmic part of the profile; the bottom is the apparent horizon, which depends on optical obstruction by roughness elements. These effects of surface roughness are included in the model, which is illustrated with a simulation. The vertical magnification varies throughout the mirage, becoming infinite at Minnaert's ill-named "vanishing line"-which makes green flashes apparent to the naked eye. PMID:25967823

  9. Potential of discrete Gaussian edge feathering method for improving abutment dosimetry in eMLC-delivered segmented-field electron conformal therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Eley, John G.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Matthews, Kenneth L.; Parker, Brent C.; Price, Michael J.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of discrete Gaussian edge feathering of the higher energy electron fields for improving abutment dosimetry in the planning volume when using an electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) to deliver segmented-field electron conformal therapy (ECT). Methods: A discrete (five-step) Gaussian edge spread function was used to match dose penumbras of differing beam energies (6-20 MeV) at a specified depth in a water phantom. Software was developed to define the leaf eMLC positions of an eMLC that most closely fit each electron field shape. The effect of 1D edge feathering of the higher energy field on dose homogeneity was computed and measured for segmented-field ECT treatment plans for three 2D PTVs in a water phantom, i.e., depth from the water surface to the distal PTV surface varied as a function of the x-axis (parallel to leaf motion) and remained constant along the y-axis (perpendicular to leaf motion). Additionally, the effect of 2D edge feathering was computed and measured for one radially symmetric, 3D PTV in a water phantom, i.e., depth from the water surface to the distal PTV surface varied as a function of both axes. For the 3D PTV, the feathering scheme was evaluated for 0.1-1.0-cm leaf widths. Dose calculations were performed using the pencil beam dose algorithm in the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system. Dose verification measurements were made using a prototype eMLC (1-cm leaf width). Results: 1D discrete Gaussian edge feathering reduced the standard deviation of dose in the 2D PTVs by 34, 34, and 39%. In the 3D PTV, the broad leaf width (1 cm) of the eMLC hindered the 2D application of the feathering solution to the 3D PTV, and the standard deviation of dose increased by 10%. However, 2D discrete Gaussian edge feathering with simulated eMLC leaf widths of 0.1-0.5 cm reduced the standard deviation of dose in the 3D PTV by 33-28%, respectively. Conclusions: A five-step discrete Gaussian edge

  10. Implementing a K-12 Train the Trainer Professional Development Model through the School Improvement Grant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollnow, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Effective professional development has been shown to improve instruction and increase student academic achievement. The Train the Trainer professional development model is often chosen by the state Department of Education for its efficiency and cost effectiveness of delivering training to schools and districts widely distributed throughout the…

  11. Improve SSME power balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karr, Gerald R.

    1992-09-01

    Effort was dedicated to development and testing of a formal strategy for reconciling uncertain test data with physically limited computational prediction. Specific weaknesses in the logical structure of the current Power Balance Model (PBM) version are described with emphasis given to the main routing subroutines BAL and DATRED. Selected results from a variational analysis of PBM predictions are compared to Technology Test Bed (TTB) variational study results to assess PBM predictive capability. The motivation for systematic integration of uncertain test data with computational predictions based on limited physical models is provided. The theoretical foundation for the reconciliation strategy developed in this effort is presented, and results of a reconciliation analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel side turbopump subsystem are examined.

  12. Improve SSME power balance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R.

    1992-01-01

    Effort was dedicated to development and testing of a formal strategy for reconciling uncertain test data with physically limited computational prediction. Specific weaknesses in the logical structure of the current Power Balance Model (PBM) version are described with emphasis given to the main routing subroutines BAL and DATRED. Selected results from a variational analysis of PBM predictions are compared to Technology Test Bed (TTB) variational study results to assess PBM predictive capability. The motivation for systematic integration of uncertain test data with computational predictions based on limited physical models is provided. The theoretical foundation for the reconciliation strategy developed in this effort is presented, and results of a reconciliation analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel side turbopump subsystem are examined.

  13. Runway configuration improvement programming model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J. C.; Gibson, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The basic objectives of the study were to subject a set of runway configurations to cost analysis and to develop a dynamic programming model which would enable an airport to economically match the ground capacity to its air traffic demand. Quantitative differences in the capacity of runway configurations result from the various aircraft/aircraft and aircraft/air-system interactions. A problem formulation and solution procedure is presented which is intended to be a meaningful technique for the long-range planning of runway expansion programs.

  14. NEW DIRECTIONS IN SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS. AN ADDRESS DELIVERED TO THE GREAT CITIES SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT WORKSHOP, AUGUST 29, 1960, DETROIT, MICHIGAN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCLUSKY, HOWARD

    IN AN ADDRESS DELIVERED TO A WORKSHOP IN THE GREAT CITIES PROJECT, IT WAS NOTED THAT SCHOOL PERSONNEL SHOULD DO EVERYTHING POSSIBLE TO RESEARCH THE PROBLEM OF IN-MIGRATION. IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT, AS A KEY TO MIGRATION AND CHANGING NEIGHBORHOODS, A CUMULATIVE RECORD FOR THE NEIGHBORHOOD AND SCHOOL DISTRICT BE KEPT. THERE IS A NEED FOR TEACHERS TO…

  15. The Feasibility of an E-Mail-Delivered Intervention to Improve Nutrition and Physical Activity Behaviors in African American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Eleanor; Schweitzer, Amy; Hurtado, Maria Eugenia; Hathway, Joanne; DiPietro, Loretta; Lei, Kai Y.; Klein, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of an e-mail-delivered program to promote nutrition and physical activity in African American college students. Participants: Forty-seven students (76% female, aged 18-20 years). Methods: Students participated in a 24-week randomized controlled trial, receiving either general health…

  16. Using ecosystem experiments to improve vegetation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medlyn, Belinda E.; Zaehle, Sönke; de Kauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael C.; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul K.; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Colin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Ying-Ping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey M.; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J.

    2015-06-01

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model-Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. By identifying and evaluating the main assumptions causing differences among models, the assumption-centred approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. Here, we explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  17. Vermont's Community-Oriented All-Payer Medical Home Model Reduces Expenditures and Utilization While Delivering High-Quality Care

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Craig; Finison, Karl; McGraves-Lloyd, Katharine; Tremblay, Timothy; Tanzman, Beth; Hazard, Miki; Maier, Steven; Samuelson, Jenney

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patient-centered medical home programs using different design and implementation strategies are being tested across the United States, and the impact of these programs on outcomes for a general population remains unclear. Vermont has pursued a statewide all-payer program wherein medical home practices are supported with additional staffing from a locally organized shared resource, the community health team. Using a 6-year, sequential, cross-sectional methodology, this study reviewed annual cost, utilization, and quality outcomes for patients attributed to 123 practices participating in the program as of December 2013 versus a comparison population from each year attributed to nonparticipating practices. Populations are grouped based on their practices' stage of participation in a calendar year (Pre-Year, Implementation Year, Scoring Year, Post-Year 1, Post-Year 2). Annual risk-adjusted total expenditures per capita at Pre-Year for the participant group and comparison group were not significantly different. The difference-in-differences change from Pre-Year to Post-Year 2 indicated that the participant group's expenditures were reduced by −$482 relative to the comparison (95% CI, −$573 to −$391; P < .001). The lower costs were driven primarily by inpatient (−$218; P < .001) and outpatient hospital expenditures (−$154; P < .001), with associated changes in inpatient and outpatient hospital utilization. Medicaid participants also had a relative increase in expenditures for dental, social, and community-based support services ($57; P < .001). Participants maintained higher rates on 9 of 11 effective and preventive care measures. These results suggest that Vermont's community-oriented medical home model is associated with improved outcomes for a general population at lower expenditures and utilization. (Population Health Management 2016;19:196–205) PMID:26348492

  18. Vermont's Community-Oriented All-Payer Medical Home Model Reduces Expenditures and Utilization While Delivering High-Quality Care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Craig; Finison, Karl; McGraves-Lloyd, Katharine; Tremblay, Timothy; Mohlman, Mary Kate; Tanzman, Beth; Hazard, Miki; Maier, Steven; Samuelson, Jenney

    2016-06-01

    Patient-centered medical home programs using different design and implementation strategies are being tested across the United States, and the impact of these programs on outcomes for a general population remains unclear. Vermont has pursued a statewide all-payer program wherein medical home practices are supported with additional staffing from a locally organized shared resource, the community health team. Using a 6-year, sequential, cross-sectional methodology, this study reviewed annual cost, utilization, and quality outcomes for patients attributed to 123 practices participating in the program as of December 2013 versus a comparison population from each year attributed to nonparticipating practices. Populations are grouped based on their practices' stage of participation in a calendar year (Pre-Year, Implementation Year, Scoring Year, Post-Year 1, Post-Year 2). Annual risk-adjusted total expenditures per capita at Pre-Year for the participant group and comparison group were not significantly different. The difference-in-differences change from Pre-Year to Post-Year 2 indicated that the participant group's expenditures were reduced by -$482 relative to the comparison (95% CI, -$573 to -$391; P < .001). The lower costs were driven primarily by inpatient (-$218; P < .001) and outpatient hospital expenditures (-$154; P < .001), with associated changes in inpatient and outpatient hospital utilization. Medicaid participants also had a relative increase in expenditures for dental, social, and community-based support services ($57; P < .001). Participants maintained higher rates on 9 of 11 effective and preventive care measures. These results suggest that Vermont's community-oriented medical home model is associated with improved outcomes for a general population at lower expenditures and utilization. (Population Health Management 2016;19:196-205). PMID:26348492

  19. Improving hydrology models for a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palus, Shannon

    2014-12-01

    Changes over time in the relationship between rainfall and catchment runoff pose a significant challenge for hydrological models, which are often calibrated under the assumption that the future relationship will be consistent with that of the past. In a recent paper, Westra et al. outlined a method for diagnosing, interpreting, and improving the capacity of models to develop predictions under such conditions.

  20. Using the CLER Model in School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotto, Linda S.

    1982-01-01

    The CLER (configurations, linkages, environments, resources) Model for planned change was evaluated to determine whether it could be applied in school settings, using empirical data from two recent national school improvement studies. While the model was applicable, it did not seem sufficiently precise to be, in itself, a powerful tool for school…

  1. Improvements to constitutive material model for fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, Mihai I.

    2011-12-01

    The high strength to weight ratio of woven fabric offers a cost effective solution to be used in a containment system for aircraft propulsion engines. Currently, Kevlar is the only Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved fabric for usage in systems intended to mitigate fan blade-out events. This research builds on an earlier constitutive model of Kevlar 49 fabric developed at Arizona State University (ASU) with the addition of new and improved modeling details. Latest stress strain experiments provided new and valuable data used to modify the material model post peak behavior. These changes reveal an overall improvement of the Finite Element (FE) model's ability to predict experimental results. First, the steel projectile is modeled using Johnson-Cook material model and provides a more realistic behavior in the FE ballistic models. This is particularly noticeable when comparing FE models with laboratory tests where large deformations in projectiles are observed. Second, follow-up analysis of the results obtained through the new picture frame tests conducted at ASU provides new values for the shear moduli and corresponding strains. The new approach for analysis of data from picture frame tests combines digital image analysis and a two-level factorial optimization formulation. Finally, an additional improvement in the material model for Kevlar involves checking the convergence at variation of mesh density of fabrics. The study performed and described herein shows the converging trend, therefore validating the FE model.

  2. Early Intervention with a Parent-Delivered Massage Protocol Directed at Tactile Abnormalities Decreases Severity of Autism and Improves Child-to-Parent Interactions: A Replication Study

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Louisa M. T.; Gabrielsen, Kristen R.; Budden, Sarojini S.; Buenrostro, Martha; Horton, Gretchen

    2015-01-01

    Tactile abnormalities are severe and universal in preschool children with autism. They respond well to treatment with a daily massage protocol directed at tactile abnormalities (QST massage for autism). Treatment is based on a model for autism proposing that tactile impairment poses a barrier to development. Two previous randomized controlled trials evaluating five months of massage treatment reported improvement of behavior, social/communication skills, and tactile and other sensory symptoms. This is the first report from a two-year replication study evaluating the protocol in 103 preschool children with autism. Parents gave daily treatment; trained staff gave weekly treatment and parent support. Five-month outcomes replicated earlier studies and showed normalization of receptive language (18%, P = .03), autistic behavior (32%, P = .006), total sensory abnormalities (38%, P = .0000005), tactile abnormalities (49%, P = .0002), and decreased autism severity (medium to large effect size, P = .008). In addition, parents reported improved child-to-parent interactions, bonding, and decreased parenting stress (44%, P = .00008). Early childhood special education programs are tasked with addressing sensory abnormalities and engaging parents in effective home programs. Until now, they have lacked research-based methods to do so. This program fulfills the need. It is recommended to parents and ECSE programs (ages 3–5) at autism diagnosis. PMID:25878901

  3. Early Intervention with a Parent-Delivered Massage Protocol Directed at Tactile Abnormalities Decreases Severity of Autism and Improves Child-to-Parent Interactions: A Replication Study.

    PubMed

    Silva, Louisa M T; Schalock, Mark; Gabrielsen, Kristen R; Budden, Sarojini S; Buenrostro, Martha; Horton, Gretchen

    2015-01-01

    Tactile abnormalities are severe and universal in preschool children with autism. They respond well to treatment with a daily massage protocol directed at tactile abnormalities (QST massage for autism). Treatment is based on a model for autism proposing that tactile impairment poses a barrier to development. Two previous randomized controlled trials evaluating five months of massage treatment reported improvement of behavior, social/communication skills, and tactile and other sensory symptoms. This is the first report from a two-year replication study evaluating the protocol in 103 preschool children with autism. Parents gave daily treatment; trained staff gave weekly treatment and parent support. Five-month outcomes replicated earlier studies and showed normalization of receptive language (18%, P = .03), autistic behavior (32%, P = .006), total sensory abnormalities (38%, P = .0000005), tactile abnormalities (49%, P = .0002), and decreased autism severity (medium to large effect size, P = .008). In addition, parents reported improved child-to-parent interactions, bonding, and decreased parenting stress (44%, P = .00008). Early childhood special education programs are tasked with addressing sensory abnormalities and engaging parents in effective home programs. Until now, they have lacked research-based methods to do so. This program fulfills the need. It is recommended to parents and ECSE programs (ages 3-5) at autism diagnosis. PMID:25878901

  4. An improved ARIMA model for hydrological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. R.; Wang, C.; Lin, X.; Kang, J.

    2014-04-01

    Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model is often used to calculate time series data formed by inter-annual variations of monthly data. However, the influence brought about by inter-monthly variations within each year is ignored. Based on the monthly data classified by clustering analysis, the characteristics of time series data are extracted. An improved ARIMA model is developed accounting for both the inter-annual and inter-monthly variation. The correlation between characteristic quantity and monthly data within each year is constructed by regression analysis first. The model can be used for predicting characteristic quantity followed by the stationary treatment for characteristic quantity time series by difference. A case study is conducted to predict the precipitation in Lanzhou precipitation station, China, using the model, and the results show that the accuracy of the improved model is significantly higher than the seasonal model, with the mean residual achieving 9.41 mm and the forecast accuracy increasing by 21%.

  5. Improving Hydrology in Land Ice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Stephen; Flowers, Gwenn; Schoof, Christian

    2011-05-01

    Community Earth System Model Land Ice Working Group Meeting; Boulder, Colorado, 13 January 2011 ; Recent observations indicate that mass loss from glaciers and ice sheets (“land ice”) is increasing. The drivers of these changes are not well understood, and modeling the land ice response to them remains challenging. As a result, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change explicitly avoided speculating on 21st-century sea level rise from ice dynamical processes in its fourth assessment report. The mismatch between observations of land ice change and model skill at mimicking those changes is behind recent efforts to develop next-generation land ice models. Necessary improvements to existing models include improved dynamics, coupling to climate models, and better representations of important boundary conditions and physical processes. Basal sliding, the primary control on the rate of land ice delivery to the oceans, is one such boundary condition that is largely controlled by land ice hydrology.

  6. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Collin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Yingping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  7. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; et al

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced amore » clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.« less

  8. Influenza A vaccines using linear expression cassettes delivered via electroporation afford full protection against challenge in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xuefei; Söderholm, Jonas; Lin, Feng; Kobinger, Gary; Bello, Alexander; Gregg, Derek A; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2012-11-01

    Alternative DNA vaccine constructs such as fully synthetic linear expressing cassettes (LECs) offer the advantage of accelerated manufacturing techniques as well as the lack of both antibiotic resistance genes and bacterial contaminants. The speed of manufacture makes LEC technology a possible future vaccination strategy for pandemic influenza outbreaks. Previously, we reported on a novel concept of DNA delivery to dermal tissue by a minimally invasive electroporation (EP) surface device powered using low voltage parameters. This device allows electroporation without penetration of electrodes into the skin. In addition to enhancing the delivery of traditional plasmid DNA vaccines, this device may also offer a safe, tolerable and efficient method to administer LECs. To assess immunogenicity and efficacy of EP-enhanced LEC delivery in mice, we designed and tested two influenza antigens in the form of LEC constructs delivered using the newly developed surface dermal EP device. Strong CTL and antibody responses were induced by the LEC versions of the DNA vaccine. When challenged with A/Canada/AB/RV1532/2009 viruses, mice immunized with LEC encoding the M2 and NP antigens recovered faster than naïve or mice immunized ID without EP. Mice immunized with equal-molar doses of LEC encoding the M2 and NP antigens demonstrated 100% survival following a lethal (100× LD50) challenge of the heterologuos and highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus (A/Vietnam/1203/04). These results suggest that influenza DNA vaccines based on LEC technology combined with the surface delivery platform are capable of fully protecting mice in a lethal challenge and the LEC based DNA constructs may serve as viable vaccine candidates. PMID:22406460

  9. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. PMID:27051507

  10. Bioidentical thyroid replacement therapy in practice: Delivering a physiologic T4:T3 ratio for improved patient outcomes with the Listecki-Snyder protocol.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Scott; Listecki, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Effective thyroid replacement therapy may be elusive to some patients, and compounding pharmacists have an opportunity to deliver more effective therapy. Goodman & Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics 12th edition states that the body usually secretes T4:T3 in an 11:1 ratio but cautions against pursuing combined thyroid replacement due to the short halflife of T3 that necessitates multiple daily dosing; no commercial availability and lack of benefit were shown in trials. Commercial combinations of T4/T3 such as Armour Thyroid and Nature-Throid have a 4.22:1 T4:T3 ratio. Applying the same concept as bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, compounding pharmacists can deliver an 11:1 ratio using a commercial T4 product and taking into account oral bioavailability of each entity. The short half-life of T3 can be remedied by taking the patient's daily T3 dose and dividing it into two slow-release capsules to be dosed every 12 hours. PMID:23072197

  11. Improving weather modeling in South America through IDD-Brasil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagas, G. O.

    2007-05-01

    The IDD-Brasil constitutes of an international collaboration among Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (LPM/UFRJ), Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos (CPTEC/INPE) and the Unidata Program Center (Unidata/UCAR), which connects several universities and research centers across the Americas in a network to share real-time hydro meteorological data. Using this network as a new path to deliver and acquire observational data, IDD-Brazil participants are capable of receiving observational data from GTS (Global Telecommunication System), locally ingested data from several automatic weather stations networks (mesonets) from INPE, the entire array of METAR and SYNOP observations, and several model outputs and satellite imagery. During recent years Numerical Models have been used constantly, especially in mesoscale research, but the lack of a dense observational network in South America leads to several constraints during the data assimilation and model validation. Since the IDD-Brasil offers an improved and simple method to have new datasets readily accessible, it has been used continuously as a new manner to distribute surface observations that are not currently available in GTS, such as several mesonets in Brazil that account for an increase in data density. Through the usage of data ingested in IDD-Brasil as guess fields it is possible to study how the assimilation in several global models frequently used as initial conditions for mesoscale simulations can be affected, since in certain areas in Brazil the density of data nearly doubles if compared to GTS. Therefore it is also possible to better validate the results generated in mesoscale simulations, in view of the fact that the network has an improved spatial distribution. It is expected that the increase of locally held numerical model output from South American institutions in IDD- Brasil leads to an increased awareness of the need to constantly validate these results with observational data, thus

  12. Metallochaperones: bind and deliver

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Metallochaperones deliver metal ions directly to target proteins via specific protein-protein interactions. Recent research has led to a molecular picture of how some metallochaperones bind metal ions, recognize their partner proteins, and accomplish metal ion transfer.

  13. The influence of target concentration, equilibration rate constant (ke0 ) and pharmacokinetic model on the initial propofol dose delivered in effect-site target-controlled infusion.

    PubMed

    Glen, J B; Engbers, F H M

    2016-03-01

    One advantage of effect-site target-controlled infusion is the administration of a larger initial dose of propofol to speed up the induction of anaesthesia. This dose is determined by the combination of the pharmacokinetic model parameters, the target setting and the blood-effect time-constant, ke0 . With the help of computer simulation, we determined the ke0 values required to deliver a range of initial doses with three pharmacokinetic models for propofol. With an effect site target of 4 μg.ml(-1) , in a 35-year-old, 170-cm tall, 70-kg male subject, the ke0 values delivering a dose of 1.75 mg.kg(-1) with the Marsh, Schnider and Eleveld models were 0.59 min(-1) , 0.20 min(-1) and 0.26 min(-1) , respectively. These ke0 values have the attractive feature that, when used to simulate the administration schemes used in two previous studies, predicted effect site concentrations at loss of consciousness were close to those required for maintenance of anaesthesia. PMID:26682512

  14. Improving the EOTDA ocean background model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Charles P.; Badzik, Gregory D.

    1997-09-01

    The Electro-Optical Tactical Decision Aid (EOTDA) is a strike warfare mission planning tool originally developed by the US Air Force. The US Navy has added navy sensors and targets to the EOTDA and installed it into current fleet mission planning and support systems. Fleet experience with the EOTDA and previous studies have noted the need for improvement, especially for scenarios involving ocean backgrounds. In order to test and improve the water background model in the EOTDA, a modified version has been created that replaces the existing semi-empirical model with the SeaRad model that was developed by Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Systems (NRaD). The SeaRad model is a more rigorous solution based on the Cox-Munk wave-slope probabilities. During the April 1996 Electrooptical Propagation Assessment in Coastal Environments (EOPACE) trials, data was collected to evaluate the effects of the SeaRad version of the EOTDA. Data was collected using a calibrated airborne infrared imaging system and operational FUR systems against ship targets. A modified version of MODTRAN also containing the SeaRad model is used to correct the data for the influences of the atmosphere. This report uses these data along with the modified EOTDA to evaluate the effects of the SeaRad model on ocean background predictions under clear and clouded skies. Upon using the more accurate water reflection model, the significance of the sky and cloud radiance contributions become more apparent leading to recommendations for further improvements.

  15. An improved model for prediction of resuspension.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Reed M; Anspaugh, Lynn R

    2011-12-01

    A complete, historical dataset is presented of radionuclide resuspension-factors. These data span six orders of magnitude in time (ranging from 0.1 to 73,000 d), encompass more than 300 individual values, and combine observations from events on three continents. These data were then used to derive improved, empirical models that can be used to predict resuspension of trace materials after their deposit on the ground. Data-fitting techniques were used to derive models of various types and an estimate of uncertainty in model prediction. Two models were found to be suitable: a power law and the modified Anspaugh et al. model, which is a double exponential. Though statistically the power-law model provides the best metrics of fit, the modified Anspaugh model is deemed the more appropriate due to its better fit to data at early times and its ease of implementation in terms of closed analytical integrals. PMID:22048490

  16. An improved model of direct gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh

    1998-09-01

    We present a new, improved model of gauge mediation of dynamical SUSY Breaking: the model does not have gauge messengers or ~10 TeV scalars charged under the Standard Model (SM), thus avoiding the problem of negative (mass)2 for supersymmetric SM (SSM) scalars faced by some earlier models. The gauge mediation is direct, i.e., the messengers which communicate SUSY breaking to the SSM fields carry quantum numbers of the gauge group which breaks SUSY. These messenger fields couple to a modulus field. The model has a very simple particle content: the modulus and the messengers are the only chiral superfields (other than the SSM fields) in the model. The inverted hierarchy mechanism is used to generate a local SUSY breaking minimum for the modulus field in a perturbative regime thus making the model calculable.

  17. A Comparison of Speech Sound Intervention Delivered by Telepractice and Side-by-Side Service Delivery Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogan-Johnson, Sue; Schmidt, Anna Marie; Schenker, Jason; Alvares, Robin; Rowan, Lynne E.; Taylor, Jacquelyn

    2013-01-01

    Telepractice has the potential to provide greater access to speech-language intervention services for children with communication impairments. Substantiation of this delivery model is necessary for telepractice to become an accepted alternative delivery model. This study investigated the progress made by school-age children with speech sound…

  18. Impact of Different Types of Knowledge on Two Preservice Teachers' Ability to Learn and Deliver the Sport Education Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stran, Margaret; Curtner-Smith, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Background: Teachers' and pupils' responses to the Sport Education (SE) model have been very positive. Pupils clearly enjoy SE and the model created lasting changes in teachers' beliefs and perspectives on teaching. While much research has been done on the impact of SE on teachers and students, there has been relatively little research on how both…

  19. Improving information assimilation by modeling warfighter context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaientz, Jack D.; Wood, Scott D.; Hawkins, Robert L.

    2005-05-01

    In order to wage successful campaigns, the next generation of intelligence analysts and battle commanders will need to assimilate an enormous amount of information that will come from a wide range of heterogeneous data sources. Complicating this problem further is the fact that warfighters need to be able to manage information in an environment of rapidly changing events and priorities. The consequence of not addressing this problem, or not addressing it as effectively as hostile forces do, is a potential loss of assets, personnel, or tactical advantage. To design effective information displays there needs to be an extensible framework that models the warfighters context including characteristics of the information sources being displayed, the current Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance (ISR) picture or Common Operating Picture (COP), the warfighters current state and task, and the state of the information display. BINAH (Battlespace Information and Notification through Adaptive Heuristics) uses an agent-based modeling approach coupled with research into temporal and spatial reasoning, novel display management techniques, and development of a formal high-level language for describing model-based information configuration. The result is an information configuration pipeline designed to provide perceptual and cognitive analysis support to Air Force analysts engaged in Time-Critical Targeting target nomination. It has been integrated with the Air Force Research Laboratory's (AFRL) XML-based Joint Battlespace Infosphere (JBI) combat information management system and combines JBI delivered sensor data with a local user model and display strategies to configure a geospatial information display. The BINAH framework will provide a firm grounding for developing new C4ISR displays that maximize the ability of warfighters to assimilate the information presented.

  20. Improved reference models for middle atmosphere ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M.; Pitts, M. C.; Chen, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the improvements introduced into the original version of ozone reference model of Keating and Young (1985, 1987) which is to be incorporated in the next COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). The ozone reference model will provide information on the global ozone distribution (including the ozone vertical structure as a function of month and latitude from 25 to 90 km) combining data from five recent satellite experiments: the Nimbus 7 LIMS, Nimbus 7 SBUV, AE-2 Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE), Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) UV Spectrometer, and SME 1.27 Micron Airglow. The improved version of the reference model uses reprocessed AE-2 SAGE data (sunset) and extends the use of SAGE data from 1981 to the 1981-1983 time period. Comparisons are presented between the results of this ozone model and various nonsatellite measurements at different levels in the middle atmosphere.

  1. Improved reference models for middle atmosphere ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M.; Pitts, M. C.; Chen, C.

    1989-01-01

    Improvements are provided for the ozone reference model which is to be incorporated in the COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). The ozone reference model will provide considerable information on the global ozone distribution, including ozone vertical structure as a function of month and latitude from approximately 25 to 90 km, combining data from five recent satellite experiments (Nimbus 7 LIMS, Nimbus 7 SBUV, AE-2 SAGE, Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) UVS, and SME IR). The improved models are described and use reprocessed AE-2 SAGE data (sunset) and extend the use of SAGE data from 1981 to the period 1981-1983. Comparisons are shown between the ozone reference model and various nonsatellite measurements at different levels in the middle atmosphere.

  2. An improved ARIMA model for precipitation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. R.; Wang, C.; Lin, X.; Kang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Auto regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models have been widely used to calculate monthly time series data formed by interannual variations of monthly data or inter-monthly variation. However, the influence brought about by inter-monthly variations within each year is often ignored. An improved ARIMA model is developed in this study accounting for both the interannual and inter-monthly variation. In the present approach, clustering analysis is performed first to hydrologic variable time series. The characteristics of each class are then extracted and the correlation between the hydrologic variable quantity to be predicted and characteristic quantities constructed by linear regression analysis. ARIMA models are built for predicting these characteristics of each class and the hydrologic variable monthly values of year of interest are finally predicted using the modeled values of corresponding characteristics from ARIMA model and the linear regression model. A case study is conducted to predict the monthly precipitation at the Lanzhou precipitation station in Lanzhou, China, using the model, and the results show that the accuracy of the improved model is significantly higher than the seasonal model, with the mean residual achieving 9.41 mm and the forecast accuracy increasing by 21%.

  3. Parent-delivered compensatory education for children at risk of educational failure: Improving the academic and self-regulatory skills of a Sure Start preschool sample.

    PubMed

    Ford, Ruth M; McDougall, Sine J P; Evans, Daphne

    2009-11-01

    Thirty preschoolers from low-income families participated in a 12-month intervention programme, funded by Sure Start, which engaged them in scaffolded educational activities delivered at home by their mothers. Immediately following the programme, the intervention group outperformed matched controls in tests of academic knowledge, receptive vocabulary, and inhibitory control, but not short-term memory or theory of mind. Teachers' ratings of children's capabilities upon school entry favoured the intervention group, especially in terms of listening, responding, writing, mathematics, and personal/social skills. Superior inhibitory control, short-term memory, and numerical skills were associated with higher ratings whereas theory of mind made a unique, negative contribution to responding. We discuss the implications of these findings for efforts to nurture the development of cognitive self-regulation and school readiness during early childhood. PMID:19261208

  4. Spray combustion model improvement study, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study involves the development of numerical and physical modeling in spray combustion. These modeling efforts are mainly motivated to improve the physical submodels of turbulence, combustion, atomization, dense spray effects, and group vaporization. The present mathematical formulation can be easily implemented in any time-marching multiple pressure correction methodologies such as MAST code. A sequence of validation cases includes the nonevaporating, evaporating and_burnin dense_sprays.

  5. SU-E-T-205: Improving Quality Assurance of HDR Brachytherapy: Verifying Agreement Between Planned and Delivered Dose Distributions Using DICOM RTDose and Advanced Film Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A L; Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy is undergoing significant development, and quality assurance (QA) checks must keep pace. Current recommendations do not adequately verify delivered against planned dose distributions: This is particularly relevant for new treatment planning system (TPS) calculation algorithms (non TG-43 based), and an era of significant patient-specific plan optimisation. Full system checks are desirable in modern QA recommendations, complementary to device-centric individual tests. We present a QA system incorporating TPS calculation, dose distribution export, HDR unit performance, and dose distribution measurement. Such an approach, more common in external beam radiotherapy, has not previously been reported in the literature for brachytherapy. Methods: Our QA method was tested at 24 UK brachytherapy centres. As a novel approach, we used the TPS DICOM RTDose file export to compare planned dose distribution with that measured using Gafchromic EBT3 films placed around clinical brachytherapy treatment applicators. Gamma analysis was used to compare the dose distributions. Dose difference and distance to agreement were determined at prescription Point A. Accurate film dosimetry was achieved using a glass compression plate at scanning to ensure physically-flat films, simultaneous scanning of known dose films with measurement films, and triple-channel dosimetric analysis. Results: The mean gamma pass rate of RTDose compared to film-measured dose distributions was 98.1% at 3%(local), 2 mm criteria. The mean dose difference, measured to planned, at Point A was -0.5% for plastic treatment applicators and -2.4% for metal applicators, due to shielding not accounted for in TPS. The mean distance to agreement was 0.6 mm. Conclusion: It is recommended to develop brachytherapy QA to include full-system verification of agreement between planned and delivered dose distributions. This is a novel approach for HDR brachytherapy QA. A methodology using advanced film

  6. Improving subsurface hydrology in Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, J. M.; Clark, M. P.; Swenson, S. C.; Lawrence, D. M.; Tyler, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrologic processes that govern storage and transport of soil water and groundwater can have strong dynamic relationships with biogeochemical and atmospheric processes. This understanding has lead to a push to improve subsurface hydrologic parametrization in Earth System Models. Here we present results related to improving the implementation of soil moisture distribution, groundwater recharge/discharge, and subsurface drainage in the Community Land Model (CLM) which is the land surface model in the Community Earth System Model. First we identified geo-climatically different locations around the world to develop test cases. For each case we compare the vertical soil moisture distribution from the different implementations of 1D Richards equation, considering the boundary conditions, the treatment of the groundwater sink term, the vertical discretization, and the time stepping schemes. Generally, large errors in the hydrologic mass balance within the soil column occur when there is a large vertical gradient in soil moisture or when there is a shallow water table within a soil column. We then test the sensitivity of the algorithmic parameters that control temporal discretization and error tolerance of the adaptive time-stepping scheme to help optimize its computational efficiency. In addition, we vary the spatial discretization of soil layers (i.e. quantity of layers and their thicknesses) to better understand the sensitivity of vertical discretization of soil columns on soil moisture variability in ESMs. We present multivariate and multi-scale evaluation for the different model options and suggest ways to move forward with future model improvements.

  7. Improved engineering models for turbulent wall flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Zhen-Su; Chen, Xi; Zou, Hong-Yue; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new approach, called structural ensemble dynamics (SED), involving new concepts to describe the mean quantities in wall-bounded flows, and its application to improving the existing engineering turbulence models, as well as its physical interpretation. First, a revised k - ω model for pipe flows is obtained, which accurately predicts, for the first time, both mean velocity and (streamwise) kinetic energy for a wide range of the Reynolds number (Re), validated by Princeton experimental data. In particular, a multiplicative factor is introduced in the dissipation term to model an anomaly in the energy cascade in a meso-layer, predicting the outer peak of agreeing with data. Secondly, a new one-equation model is obtained for compressible turbulent boundary layers (CTBL), building on a multi-layer formula of the stress length function and a generalized temperature-velocity relation. The former refines the multi-layer description - viscous sublayer, buffer layer, logarithmic layer and a newly defined bulk zone - while the latter characterizes a parabolic relation between the mean velocity and temperature. DNS data show our predictions to have a 99% accuracy for several Mach numbers Ma = 2.25, 4.5, improving, up to 10%, a previous similar one-equation model (Baldwin & Lomax, 1978). Our results promise notable improvements in engineering models.

  8. Reprint of localized dose delivering by ion beam irradiation for experimental trial of establishing brain necrosis model.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takushi; Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Takashi; Kume, Kyo; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Localized dose delivery techniques to establish a brain radiation necrosis model are described. An irradiation field was designed by using accelerated protons or helium ions with a spread-out Bragg peak. Measurement of the designed field confirmed that a high dose can be confined to a local volume of an animal brain. The irradiation techniques described here are very useful for establishing a necrosis model without existence of extraneous complications. PMID:26515136

  9. Human mesenchymal stromal cells could deliver erythropoietin and migrate to the basal layer of hair shaft when subcutaneously implanted in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Mok, P L; Cheong, S K; Leong, C F; Chua, K H; Ainoon, O

    2012-08-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are an attractive cell-targeting vehicle for gene delivery. MIDGE (an acronym for Minimalistic, Immunologically Defined Gene Expression) construct is relatively safer than the viral or plasmid expression system as the detrimental eukaryotic and prokaryotic gene and sequences have been eliminated. The objective of this study was to test the ability of the human MSC (hMSC) to deliver the erythropoietin (EPO) gene in a nude mice model following nucleofection using a MIDGE construct. hMSC nucleofected with MIDGE encoding the EPO gene was injected subcutaneously in Matrigel at the dorsal flank of nude mice. Subcutaneous implantation of nucleofected hMSC resulted in increased hemoglobin level with presence of human EPO in the peripheral blood of the injected nude mice in the first two weeks post-implantation compared with the control groups. The basal layer of the hair shaft in the dermal layer was found to be significantly positive for immunohistochemical staining of a human EPO antibody. However, only a few basal layers of the hair shaft were found to be positively stained for CD105. In conclusion, hMSC harboring MIDGE-EPO could deliver and transiently express the EPO gene in the nude mice model. These cells could be localized to the hair follicle and secreted EPO protein might have possible role in hair regeneration. PMID:22560724

  10. Report Critiques Evidence on School Improvement Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2005-01-01

    Only two of the most popular school improvement models for elementary schools have "moderately strong" evidence to show that they work, according to a consumer-style guide released last week by a Washington-based research group. The federally financed report by the American Institutes for Research rates 22 of the most widely used…

  11. INHALATION EXPOSURE AND INTAKE DOSE MODEL IMPROVEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation highlights recent human exposure model improvements and products developed by the EMRB in coordination with scientists in the OAQPS and provides insight into how these products are used by the OAQPS in its regulatory process. Besides providing a status report of...

  12. Models To Improve Service Delivery. Chapter 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This collection of papers presented at a 1996 conference on children's mental health focuses on models to improve service delivery. Papers have the following titles and authors: (1) "Empirical Evaluation of an Alternative to Hospitalization for Youth Presenting Psychiatric Emergencies" (Scott W. Henggeler); (2) "An Experimental Study of the…

  13. Improving Representational Competence with Concrete Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieff, Mike; Scopelitis, Stephanie; Lira, Matthew E.; DeSutter, Dane

    2016-01-01

    Representational competence is a primary contributor to student learning in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines and an optimal target for instruction at all educational levels. We describe the design and implementation of a learning activity that uses concrete models to improve students' representational competence and…

  14. School Improvement Model to Foster Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rulloda, Rudolfo Barcena

    2011-01-01

    Many classroom teachers are still using the traditional teaching methods. The traditional teaching methods are one-way learning process, where teachers would introduce subject contents such as language arts, English, mathematics, science, and reading separately. However, the school improvement model takes into account that all students have…

  15. Modelers and policymakers : improving the relationships.

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2004-06-01

    On April 22 and 23, 2004, a diverse group of 14 policymakers, modelers, analysts, and scholars met with some 22 members of the Sandia National Laboratories staff to explores ways in which the relationships between modelers and policymakers in the energy and environment fields (with an emphasis on energy) could be made more productive for both. This report is not a transcription of that workshop, but draws very heavily on its proceedings. It first describes the concept of modeling, the varying ways in which models are used to support policymaking, and the institutional context for those uses. It then proposes that the goal of modelers and policymakers should be a relationship of mutual trust, built on a foundation of communication, supported by the twin pillars of policy relevance and technical credibility. The report suggests 20 guidelines to help modelers improve the relationship, followed by 10 guidelines to help policymakers toward the same goal.

  16. Leveraging Spatial Model to Improve Indoor Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Xu, W.; Penard, W.; Zlatanova, S.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we leverage spatial model to process indoor localization results and then improve the track consisting of measured locations. We elaborate different parts of spatial model such as geometry, topology and semantics, and then present how they contribute to the processing of indoor tracks. The initial results of our experiment reveal that spatial model can support us to overcome problems such as tracks intersecting with obstacles and unstable shifts between two location measurements. In the future, we will investigate more exceptions of indoor tracking results and then develop additional spatial methods to reduce errors of indoor tracks.

  17. A comparison of NEWS and SPARROW models to understand sources of nitrogen delivered to US coastal areas

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative contributions of different anthropogenic and natural sources of in-stream nitrogen (N) cannot be directly measured at whole-watershed scales. Hence, source attribution estimates beyond the scale of small catchments must rely on models. Although such estimates have be...

  18. An improved model of equatorial scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secan, J. A.; Bussey, R. M.; Fremouw, E. J.; Basu, Sa.

    1995-05-01

    One of the main limitations of the modeling work that went into the equatorial section of the Wideband ionospheric scintillation model (WBMOD) was that the data set used in the modeling was limited to two stations near the dip equator (Ancon, Peru, and Kwajalein Island, in the North Pacific Ocean) at two fixed local times (nominally 1000 and 2200). Over the past year this section of the WBMOD model has been replaced by a model developed using data from three additional stations (Ascension Island, in the South Atlantic Ocean, Huancayo, Peru, and Manila, Phillipines; data collected under the auspices of the USAF Phillips Laboratory Geophysics Directorate) which provide a greater diversity in both latitude and longitude, as well as cover the entire day. The new model includes variations with latitude, local time, longitude, season, solar epoch, and geomagnetic activity levels. The way in which the irregularity strength parameter CkL is modeled has also been changed. The new model provides the variation of the full probability distribution function (PDF) of log (CkL) rather than simply the average of log (CkL). This permits the user to specify a threshold on scintillation level, and the model will calculate the percent of the time that scintillation will exceed that level in the user-specified scenario. It will also permit calculation of scintillation levels at a user-specified percentile. A final improvement to the WBMOD model is the implementation of a new theory for calculating S4 on a two-way channel.

  19. Double multiple streamtube model with recent improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Delclaux, F.

    1983-05-01

    The objective of the present paper is to show the new capabilities of the double multiple streamtube (DMS) model for predicting the aerodynamic loads and performance of the Darrieus vertical-axis turbine. The original DMS model has been improved (DMSV model) by considering the variation in the upwind and downwind induced velocities as a function of the azimuthal angle for each streamtube. A comparison is made of the rotor performance for several blade geometries (parabola, catenary, troposkien, and Sandia shape). A new formulation is given for an approximate troposkien shape by considering the effect of the gravitational field. The effects of three NACA symmetrical profiles, 0012, 0015 and 0018, on the aerodynamic performance of the turbine are shown. Finally, a semiempirical dynamic-stall model has been incorporated and a better approximation obtained for modeling the local aerodynamic forces and performance for a Darrieus rotor.

  20. Double multiple streamtube model with recent improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Delclaux, F.

    1983-05-01

    The objective is to show the new capabilities of the double multiple streamtube (DMS) model for predicting the aerodynamic loads and performance of the Darrieus vertical-axis turbine. The original DMS model has been improved (DMSV model) by considering the variation in the upwind and downwind induced velocities as a function of the azimuthal angle for each streamtube. A comparison is made of the rotor performance for several blade geometries (parabola, catenary, troposkien, and Sandia shape). A new formulation is given for an approximate troposkien shape by considering the effect of the gravitational field. The effects of three NACA symmetrical profiles, 0012, 0015 and 0018, on the aerodynamic performance of the turbine are shown. Finally, a semiempirical dynamic-stall model has been incorporated and a better approximation obtained for modeling the local aerodynamic forces and performance for a Darrieus rotor.

  1. Improved survival in rats with glioma using MRI-guided focused ultrasound and microbubbles to disrupt the blood-brain barrier and deliver Doxil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Muna; Zhi Zhang, Yong; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Park, Juyoung; Power, Chanikarn; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-02-01

    Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) limits the transportation of most neuropeptides, proteins (enzymes, antibodies), chemotherapeutic agents, and genes that have therapeutic potential for the treatment of brain diseases. Different methods have been used to overcome this limitation, but they are invasive, non-targeted, or require the development of new drugs. We have developed a method that uses MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with circulating microbubbles to temporarily open BBB in and around brain tumors to deliver chemotherapy agents. Here, we tested whether this noninvasive technique could enhance the effectiveness of a chemotherapy agent (Doxil). Using 690 kHz FUS transducer and microbubble (Definity), we induced BBB disruption in intracranially-implanted 9L glioma tumors in rat's brain in three weekly sessions. Animals who received BBB disruption and Doxil had a median survival time of 34.5 days, which was significantly longer than that found in control animals which is 16, 18.5, 21 days who received no treatment, BBB disruption only and Doxil only respectively This work demonstrates that FUS technique has promise in overcoming barriers to drug delivery, which are particularly stark in the brain due to the BBB.

  2. Improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiao; Ben-Zhuo, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of biomolecular systems plays an essential role in understanding biological processes, such as ionic flow across channels, protein modification or interaction, and cell signaling. The continuum model described by the Poisson- Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations has made great contributions towards simulation of these processes. However, the model has shortcomings in its commonly used form and cannot capture (or cannot accurately capture) some important physical properties of the biological systems. Considerable efforts have been made to improve the continuum model to account for discrete particle interactions and to make progress in numerical methods to provide accurate and efficient simulations. This review will summarize recent main improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems, with focus on the size-modified models, the coupling of the classical density functional theory and the PNP equations, the coupling of polar and nonpolar interactions, and numerical progress. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91230106) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences Program for Cross & Cooperative Team of the Science & Technology Innovation.

  3. Improving the translation of analgesic drugs to the clinic: animal models of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Percie du Sert, N; Rice, A S C

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains an area of considerable unmet clinical need. Research based on preclinical animal models has failed to deliver truly novel treatment options, questioning the predictive value of these models. This review addresses the shortcomings of rodent in vivo models commonly used in the field and highlights approaches which could increase their predictivity, including more clinically relevant assays, outcome measures and animal characteristics. The methodological quality of animal studies also needs to be improved. Low internal validity and incomplete reporting lead to a waste of valuable research resources and animal lives, and ultimately prevent an objective assessment of the true predictivity of in vivo models. PMID:24527763

  4. Application of a model for delivering occupational safety and health to smaller businesses: Case studies from the US

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Thomas R.; Sinclair, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Smaller firms are the majority in every industry in the US, and they endure a greater burden of occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities than larger firms. Smaller firms often lack the necessary resources for effective occupational safety and health activities, and many require external assistance with safety and health programming. Based on previous work by researchers in Europe and New Zealand, NIOSH researchers developed for occupational safety and health intervention in small businesses. This model was evaluated with several intermediary organizations. Four case studies which describe efforts to reach small businesses with occupational safety and health assistance include the following: trenching safety training for construction, basic compliance and hazard recognition for general industry, expanded safety and health training for restaurants, and fall prevention and respirator training for boat repair contractors. Successful efforts included participation by the initiator among the intermediaries’ planning activities, alignment of small business needs with intermediary offerings, continued monitoring of intermediary activities by the initiator, and strong leadership for occupational safety and health among intermediaries. Common challenges were a lack of resources among intermediaries, lack of opportunities for in-person meetings between intermediaries and the initiator, and balancing the exchanges in the initiator–intermediary–small business relationships. The model offers some encouragement that initiator organizations can contribute to sustainable OSH assistance for small firms, but they must depend on intermediaries who have compatible interests in smaller businesses and they must work to understand the small business social system. PMID:26300585

  5. Evaluation of Imipenem for Prophylaxis and Therapy of Yersinia pestis Delivered by Aerosol in a Mouse Model of Pneumonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Arnold; Adamovicz, Jeffrey J.; Amemiya, Kei; Fast, Randy L.; Miller, Lynda; Opal, Steven M.; Palardy, John; Parejo, Nicolas A.; Sörgel, Fritz; Kinzig-Schippers, Martina; Drusano, George L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been previously shown that mice subjected to an aerosol exposure to Yersinia pestis and treated with β-lactam antibiotics after a delay of 42 h died at an accelerated rate compared to controls. It was hypothesized that endotoxin release in antibiotic-treated mice accounted for the accelerated death rate in the mice exposed to aerosol Y. pestis. Imipenem, a β-lactam antibiotic, binds to penicillin binding protein 2 with the highest affinity and produces rounded cells. The binding of imipenem causes cells to lyse quickly and thereby to release less free endotoxin. Two imipenem regimens producing fractions of time that the concentration of free, unbound drug was above the MIC (fT>MIC) of approximately 25% (6/24 h) and 40% (9.5/24 h) were evaluated. In the postexposure prophylaxis study, the 40% and 25% regimens produced 90% and 40% survivorship, respectively. In the 42-h treatment study, both regimens demonstrated a 40 to 50% survivorship at therapy cessation and some deaths thereafter, resulting in a 30% survivorship. As this was an improvement over the results with other β-lactams, a comparison of both endotoxin and cytokine levels in mice treated with imipenem and ceftazidime (a β-lactam previously demonstrated to accelerate death in mice during treatment) was performed and supported the original hypotheses; however, the levels observed in animals treated with ciprofloxacin (included as an unrelated antibiotic that is also bactericidal but should cause little lysis due to a different mode of action) were elevated and significantly (7-fold) higher than those with ceftazidime. PMID:24687492

  6. Improved SPICE electrical model of silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marano, D.; Bonanno, G.; Belluso, M.; Billotta, S.; Grillo, A.; Garozzo, S.; Romeo, G.; Catalano, O.; La Rosa, G.; Sottile, G.; Impiombato, D.; Giarrusso, S.

    2013-10-01

    The present work introduces an improved SPICE equivalent electrical model of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) detectors, in order to simulate and predict their transient response to avalanche triggering events. In particular, the developed circuit model provides a careful investigation of the magnitude and timing of the read-out signals and can therefore be exploited to perform reliable circuit-level simulations. The adopted modeling approach is strictly related to the physics of each basic microcell constituting the SiPM device, and allows the avalanche timing as well as the photodiode current and voltage to be accurately simulated. Predictive capabilities of the proposed model are demonstrated by means of experimental measurements on a real SiPM detector. Simulated and measured pulses are found to be in good agreement with the expected results.

  7. Improving residential miscellaneous electrical load modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgett, Joseph M.

    Over the past 30 years, the intensity of all major energy use categories has decreased in the residential market with the exception of miscellaneous electrical loads (MELs). MELs include primarily 120V plug-loads and some hard wired loads. MELs stand alone as the only category in which energy intensity has steadily increased over time. While MELs constitute approximately 15% - 25% of a typical home's total energy use, it is projected to increase to 36% by 2020. Despite the significant percentage of the home's total load, MELs are the least researched energy end use category and most poorly modeled. The Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index is the most widely used residential energy rating system and uses a simple square foot multiplier to model MELs. This study improves upon the HERS model by including occupant characteristics as part of the MEL model. This "new model" was created by regressing and explanatory equation from the Energy Information Agency's Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The RECS has a very large sample size of 12,083 respondents who answered over 90 pages of questions related to home structure, appliances they own and demographical information. The information provided by the respondents was used to calculate a MEL for all the RECS households. A stepwise regression process was used to create a model that included size of the home, household income, number of household members and presence of a home business to predict the MEL. The new model was then tested on 24 actual homes to compare its predictive power with the HERS model. The new model more closely predicted the actual MEL for 17 of the 24 test houses (71%). Additionally, the standard deviation or the "tightness of fit" of the new model was less than half of the HERS model when used on the RECS respondents. What this study found was that using occupant characteristics to supplement a square foot multiplier significantly increased the precision of MEL modeling.

  8. Nanoconjugation of PSMA-Targeting Ligands Enhances Perinuclear Localization and Improves Efficacy of Delivered Alpha-Particle Emitters against Tumor Endothelial Analogues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Charles; Bandekar, Amey; Sempkowski, Michelle; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pomper, Martin G; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sofou, Stavroula

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect on killing efficacy of the intracellular trafficking patterns of α-particle emitters by using different radionuclide carriers in the setting of targeted antivascular α-radiotherapy. Nanocarriers (lipid vesicles) targeted to the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is unique to human neovasculature for a variety of solid tumors, were loaded with the α-particle generator actinium-225 and were compared with a PSMA-targeted radiolabeled antibody. Actinium-225 emits a total of four α-particles per decay, providing highly lethal and localized irradiation of targeted cells with minimal exposure to surrounding healthy tissues. Lipid vesicles were derivatized with two types of PSMA-targeting ligands: a fully human PSMA antibody (mAb) and a urea-based, low-molecular-weight agent. Target selectivity and extent of internalization were evaluated on monolayers of human endothelial cells (HUVEC) induced to express PSMA in static incubation conditions and in a flow field. Both types of radiolabeled PSMA-targeted vesicles exhibit similar killing efficacy, which is greater than the efficacy of the radiolabeled control mAb when compared on the basis of delivered radioactivity per cell. Fluorescence confocal microscopy demonstrates that targeted vesicles localize closer to the nucleus, unlike antibodies which localize near the plasma membrane. In addition, targeted vesicles cause larger numbers of dsDNAs per nucleus of treated cells compared with the radiolabeled mAb. These findings demonstrate that radionuclide carriers, such as PSMA-targeted lipid-nanocarriers, which localize close to the nucleus, increase the probability of α-particle trajectories crossing the nuclei, and, therefore, enhance the killing efficacy of α-particle emitters. PMID:26586724

  9. Improving data transfer for model coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Liu, L.; Yang, G.; Li, R.; Wang, B.

    2015-10-01

    Data transfer, which means transferring data fields between two component models or rearranging data fields among processes of the same component model, is a fundamental operation of a coupler. Most of state-of-the-art coupler versions currently use an implementation based on the point-to-point (P2P) communication of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) (call such an implementation "P2P implementation" for short). In this paper, we reveal the drawbacks of the P2P implementation, including low communication bandwidth due to small message size, variable and big number of MPI messages, and jams during communication. To overcome these drawbacks, we propose a butterfly implementation for data transfer. Although the butterfly implementation can outperform the P2P implementation in many cases, it degrades the performance in some cases because the total message size transferred by the butterfly implementation is larger than that by the P2P implementation. To make the data transfer completely improved, we design and implement an adaptive data transfer library that combines the advantages of both butterfly implementation and P2P implementation. Performance evaluation shows that the adaptive data transfer library significantly improves the performance of data transfer in most cases and does not decrease the performance in any cases. Now the adaptive data transfer library is open to the public and has been imported into a coupler version C-Coupler1 for performance improvement of data transfer. We believe that it can also improve other coupler versions.

  10. An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

  11. Improving Localization Accuracy: Successive Measurements Error Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Abu Ali, Najah; Abu-Elkheir, Mervat

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle self-localization is an essential requirement for many of the safety applications envisioned for vehicular networks. The mathematical models used in current vehicular localization schemes focus on modeling the localization error itself, and overlook the potential correlation between successive localization measurement errors. In this paper, we first investigate the existence of correlation between successive positioning measurements, and then incorporate this correlation into the modeling positioning error. We use the Yule Walker equations to determine the degree of correlation between a vehicle’s future position and its past positions, and then propose a p-order Gauss–Markov model to predict the future position of a vehicle from its past p positions. We investigate the existence of correlation for two datasets representing the mobility traces of two vehicles over a period of time. We prove the existence of correlation between successive measurements in the two datasets, and show that the time correlation between measurements can have a value up to four minutes. Through simulations, we validate the robustness of our model and show that it is possible to use the first-order Gauss–Markov model, which has the least complexity, and still maintain an accurate estimation of a vehicle’s future location over time using only its current position. Our model can assist in providing better modeling of positioning errors and can be used as a prediction tool to improve the performance of classical localization algorithms such as the Kalman filter. PMID:26140345

  12. Thermal Modeling Method Improvements for SAGE III on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liles, Kaitlin; Amundsen, Ruth; Davis, Warren; McLeod, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload, which consists of multiple subsystems, has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Many innovative analysis methods have been used in developing this model; these will be described in the paper. This paper builds on a paper presented at TFAWS 2013, which described some of the initial developments of efficient methods for SAGE III. The current paper describes additional improvements that have been made since that time. To expedite the correlation of the model to thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing, the chambers and GSE for both TVAC chambers at Langley used to test the payload were incorporated within the thermal model. This allowed the runs of TVAC predictions and correlations to be run within the flight model, thus eliminating the need for separate models for TVAC. In one TVAC test, radiant lamps were used which necessitated shooting rays from the lamps, and running in both solar and IR wavebands. A new Dragon model was incorporated which entailed a change in orientation; that change was made using an assembly, so that any potential additional new Dragon orbits could be added in the future without modification of the model. The Earth orbit parameters such as albedo and Earth infrared flux were incorporated as time-varying values that change over the course of the orbit; despite being required in one of the ISS documents, this had not been done before by any previous payload. All parameters such as initial temperature, heater voltage, and location of the payload are defined based on the case definition. For one component, testing was performed in both air and vacuum; incorporating the air convection in a submodel that was

  13. Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Steve

    2013-09-11

    Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

  14. Using data assimilation for systematic model improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Matthew S.; van Leeuwen, Peter Jan; Browne, Phil

    2016-04-01

    In Numerical Weather Prediction parameterisations are used to simulate missing physics in the model. These can be due to a lack of scientific understanding or a lack of computing power available to address all the known physical processes. Parameterisations are sources of large uncertainty in a model as parameter values used in these parameterisations cannot be measured directly and hence are often not well known, and the parameterisations themselves are approximations of the processes present in the true atmosphere. Whilst there are many efficient and effective methods for combined state/parameter estimation in data assimilation, such as state augmentation, these are not effective at estimating the structure of parameterisations. A new method of parameterisation estimation is proposed that uses sequential data assimilation methods to estimate errors in the numerical models at each space-time point for each model equation. These errors are then fitted to predetermined functional forms of missing physics or parameterisations, that are based upon prior information. The method picks out the functional form, or that combination of functional forms, that bests fits the error structure. The prior information typically takes the form of expert knowledge. We applied the method to a one-dimensional advection model with additive model error, and it is shown that the method can accurately estimate parameterisations, with consistent error estimates. It is also demonstrated that state augmentation is not successful. The results indicate that this new method is a powerful tool in systematic model improvement.

  15. Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J Iacono

    2011-04-07

    This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

  16. Improving Distributed Diagnosis Through Structural Model Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregon, Anibal; Daigle, Matthew John; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

    2011-01-01

    Complex engineering systems require efficient fault diagnosis methodologies, but centralized approaches do not scale well, and this motivates the development of distributed solutions. This work presents an event-based approach for distributed diagnosis of abrupt parametric faults in continuous systems, by using the structural model decomposition capabilities provided by Possible Conflicts. We develop a distributed diagnosis algorithm that uses residuals computed by extending Possible Conflicts to build local event-based diagnosers based on global diagnosability analysis. The proposed approach is applied to a multitank system, and results demonstrate an improvement in the design of local diagnosers. Since local diagnosers use only a subset of the residuals, and use subsystem models to compute residuals (instead of the global system model), the local diagnosers are more efficient than previously developed distributed approaches.

  17. An improved gravity model for Mars: Goddard Mars Model 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Lerch, F. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Zuber, M. T.; Patel, G. B.; Fricke, S. K.; Lemoine, F. G.

    1993-01-01

    Doppler tracking data of three orbiting spacecraft have been reanalyzed to develop a new gravitational field model for the planet Mars, Goddard Mars Model 1 (GMM-1). This model employs nearly all available data, consisting of approximately 1100 days of S band tracking data collected by NASA's Deep Space Network from the Mariner 9 and Viking 1 and Viking 2 spacecraft, in seven different orbits, between 1971 and 1979. GMM-1 is complete to spherical harmonic degree and order 50, which corresponds to a half-wavelength spatial resolution of 200-300 km where the data permit. GMM-1 represents satellite orbits with considerably better accuracy than previous Mars gravity models and shows greater resolution of identifiable geological structures. The notable improvement in GMM-1 over previous models is a consequence of several factors: improved computational capabilities, the use of otpimum weighting and least squares collocation solution techniques which stabilized the behavior of the solution at high degree and order, and the use of longer satellite arcs than employed in previous solutions that were made possible by improved force and measurement models. The inclusion of X band tracking data from the 379-km altitude, nnear-polar orbiting Mars Observer spacecraft should provide a significant improvement over GMM-1, particularly at high latitudes where current data poorly resolve the gravitational signature of the planet.

  18. Improving interannual prediction skill in a changing climate via the identi cation of compensating coupled model errors

    SciTech Connect

    Tziperman, Eli; MacMartin, Douglas

    2013-08-31

    Significant progress can be made through a truly interdisciplinary effort, combining the expertise from climate dynamics and from engineering control. We believe that this novel approach can make a unique and valuable contribution, and help the climate community deliver improved models for the potential response of the Earth's climate to increased greenhouse gas levels.

  19. Improving the physics models in the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Fang, F.; Frazin, R. A.; Gombosi, T. I.; Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Manchester, W. B.; Meng, X.; Pawlowski, D. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Sokolov, I.; van der Holst, B.; Vichare, G.; Yigit, E.; Yu, Y.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. H.; Glocer, A.; Jordanova, V. K.; Welling, D. T.; Zaharia, S. G.

    2010-12-01

    The success of physics based space weather forecasting depends on several factors: we need sufficient amount and quality of timely observational data, we have to understand the physics of the Sun-Earth system well enough, we need sophisticated computational models, and the models have to run faster than real time on the available computational resources. This presentation will focus on a single ingredient, the recent improvements of the mathematical and numerical models in the Space Weather Modeling Framework. We have developed a new physics based CME initiation code using flux emergence from the convection zone solving the equations of radiative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Our new lower corona and solar corona models use electron heat conduction, Alfven wave heating, and boundary conditions based on solar tomography. We can obtain a physically consistent solar wind model from the surface of the Sun all the way to the L1 point without artificially changing the polytropic index. The global magnetosphere model can now solve the multi-ion MHD equations and take into account the oxygen outflow from the polar wind model. We have also added the options of solving for Hall MHD and anisotropic pressure. Several new inner magnetosphere models have been added to the framework: CRCM, HEIDI and RAM-SCB. These new models resolve the pitch angle distribution of the trapped particles. The upper atmosphere model GITM has been improved by including a self-consistent equatorial electrodynamics and the effects of solar flares. This presentation will very briefly describe the developments and highlight some results obtained with the improved and new models.

  20. Improved laser ablation model for asteroid deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Massimiliano; Gibbings, Alison; Watson, Ian; Hopkins, John-Mark

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents an improved laser ablation model and compares the performance - momentum coupling and deflection system mass - of laser ablation against contactless deflection methods based on ion-propulsion. The deflection of an asteroid through laser ablation is achieved by illuminating the surface of the asteroid with high intensity laser light. The absorbed energy induces the sublimation of the surface material and the generation of a plume of gas and ejecta. Similar to a rocket engine, the flow of expelled material produces a continuous and controllable thrust that could be used to modify the trajectory and tumbling motion of the asteroid. Recent results gained from a series of laser ablation experiments were used to improve the sublimation and deflection models. In each experiment a terrestrial olivine sample was ablated, under vacuum, with a 90 W continuous wave laser. The paper presents a model that better fits the outcomes of the experimental campaign, in particular in terms of mass flow rate and spot temperature.

  1. Improving Mass Balance Modeling of Benchmark Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beusekom, A. E.; March, R. S.; O'Neel, S.

    2009-12-01

    The USGS monitors long-term glacier mass balance at three benchmark glaciers in different climate regimes. The coastal and continental glaciers are represented by Wolverine and Gulkana Glaciers in Alaska, respectively. Field measurements began in 1966 and continue. We have reanalyzed the published balance time series with more modern methods and recomputed reference surface and conventional balances. Addition of the most recent data shows a continuing trend of mass loss. We compare the updated balances to the previously accepted balances and discuss differences. Not all balance quantities can be determined from the field measurements. For surface processes, we model missing information with an improved degree-day model. Degree-day models predict ablation from the sum of daily mean temperatures and an empirical degree-day factor. We modernize the traditional degree-day model as well as derive new degree-day factors in an effort to closer match the balance time series and thus better predict the future state of the benchmark glaciers. For subsurface processes, we model the refreezing of meltwater for internal accumulation. We examine the sensitivity of the balance time series to the subsurface process of internal accumulation, with the goal of determining the best way to include internal accumulation into balance estimates.

  2. Improved geometrical model of fringe projection profilometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhengrong; Xi, Jiangtao; Yu, Yanguang; Guo, Qinghua; Song, Limei

    2014-12-29

    The accuracy performance of fringe projection profilometry (FPP) depends on accurate phase-to-height (PTH) mapping and system calibration. The existing PTH mapping is derived based on the condition that the plane formed by axes of camera and projector is perpendicular to the reference plane, and measurement error occurs when the condition is not met. In this paper, a new geometric model for FPP is presented to lift the condition, resulting in a new PTH mapping relationship. The new model involves seven parameters, and a new system calibration method is proposed to determine their values. Experiments are conducted to verify the performance of the proposed technique, showing a noticeable improvement in the accuracy of 3D shape measurement. PMID:25607188

  3. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

  4. Coupled Facility/Payload Vibration Modeling Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.; Kaiser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A major phase of aerospace hardware verification is vibration testing. The standard approach for such testing is to use a shaker to induce loads into the payload. In preparation for vibration testing at NASA/GSFC there is an analysis to assess the responses of the payload. A new method of modeling the test is presented that takes into account dynamic interactions between the facility and the payload. This dynamic interaction has affected testing in the past, but been ignored or adjusted for during testing. By modeling the combination of the facility and test article (payload) it is possible to improve the prediction of hardware responses. Many aerospace test facilities work in similar way to those at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Lessons learned here should be applicable to other test facilities with similar setups.

  5. Coupled Facility-Payload Vibration Modeling Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.; Kaiser, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    A major phase of aerospace hardware verification is vibration testing. The standard approach for such testing is to use a shaker to induce loads into the payload. In preparation for vibration testing at National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center an analysis is performed to assess the responses of the payload. A new method of modeling the test is presented that takes into account dynamic interactions between the facility and the payload. This dynamic interaction has affected testing in the past, but been ignored or adjusted for during testing. By modeling the combined dynamics of the facility and test article (payload) it is possible to improve the prediction of hardware responses. Many aerospace test facilities work in similar way to those at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Lessons learned here should be applicable to other test facilities with similar setups.

  6. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbo-machinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tensor. Penn State will lead the effort to make direct measurements of the momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors in high-speed multistage compressor flow field in the turbomachinery laboratory at Penn State. They will also process the data by both conventional and conditional spectrum analysis to derive momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors due to blade-to-blade periodic and aperiodic components, revolution periodic and aperiodic components arising from various blade rows and non-deterministic (which includes random components) correlations. The modeling results from this program will be publicly available and generally applicable to steady-state Navier-Stokes solvers used for turbomachinery component (compressor or turbine) flow field predictions. These models will lead to improved methodology, including loss and efficiency prediction, for the design of high-efficiency turbomachinery and drastically reduce the time required for the design and development cycle of turbomachinery.

  7. Improving carbon model phenology using data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exrayat, Jean-François; Smallman, T. Luke; Bloom, A. Anthony; Williams, Mathew

    2015-04-01

    drivers. DALEC2-GSI showed a more realistic response to climate variability and fire disturbance than DALEC2. DALEC2-GSI more accurately reproduced the assimilated global LAI time series, particularly in areas with high levels of disturbance. This result is supported by more ecologically consistent trait combinations generated by the DALEC2-GSI calibration. In addition, using DALEC2-GSI we are able to map global information on ecosystem traits such as drought tolerance and adaptation to repeated fire disturbance. This demonstrates that utilizing data assimilation provides a useful means of improving the representation of processes within models.

  8. Residential end use demand modeling: Improvements to the ORNL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, J. E.

    1981-10-01

    The ORNL/LBL Residential Energy Demand Model incorporated major improvements in three areas: efficiency of appliances, current construction practice in new houses, and appliance retirements. The new methodology is more general, and provides energy demand estimates in better agreement with recent data. Key areas for future improvements are indicated, including: quantifying the uncertainty in model simulation, redefining the set of end uses, updating the algorithm, and broadening the model's applicability to different geographic areas. A US Department of Energy survey of appliance manufacturers was used to determine new appliance efficiencies. Similarly, surveys of current housing practices (e.g., ceiling insulation level) were used to estimate changes in heating and cooling energy requirements. Appliances are assumed to retire as a function of their age.

  9. An analytically linearized helicopter model with improved modeling accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Patrick T.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An analytically linearized model for helicopter flight response including rotor blade dynamics and dynamic inflow, that was recently developed, was studied with the objective of increasing the understanding, the ease of use, and the accuracy of the model. The mathematical model is described along with a description of the UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter and flight test used to validate the model. To aid in utilization of the model for sensitivity analysis, a new, faster, and more efficient implementation of the model was developed. It is shown that several errors in the mathematical modeling of the system caused a reduction in accuracy. These errors in rotor force resolution, trim force and moment calculation, and rotor inertia terms were corrected along with improvements to the programming style and documentation. Use of a trim input file to drive the model is examined. Trim file errors in blade twist, control input phase angle, coning and lag angles, main and tail rotor pitch, and uniform induced velocity, were corrected. Finally, through direct comparison of the original and corrected model responses to flight test data, the effect of the corrections on overall model output is shown.

  10. Modeling soil water content for vegetation modeling improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfrani, Carmen; Buri, Aline; Zingg, Barbara; Vittoz, Pascal; Verrecchia, Eric; Guisan, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is known to be important for plants as it affects the physiological processes regulating plant growth. Therefore, SWC controls plant distribution over the Earth surface, ranging from deserts and grassland to rain forests. Unfortunately, only a few data on SWC are available as its measurement is very time consuming and costly and needs specific laboratory tools. The scarcity of SWC measurements in geographic space makes it difficult to model and spatially project SWC over larger areas. In particular, it prevents its inclusion in plant species distribution model (SDMs) as predictor. The aims of this study were, first, to test a new methodology allowing problems of the scarcity of SWC measurements to be overpassed and second, to model and spatially project SWC in order to improve plant SDMs with the inclusion of SWC parameter. The study was developed in four steps. First, SWC was modeled by measuring it at 10 different pressures (expressed in pF and ranging from pF=0 to pF=4.2). The different pF represent different degrees of soil water availability for plants. An ensemble of bivariate models was built to overpass the problem of having only a few SWC measurements (n = 24) but several predictors to include in the model. Soil texture (clay, silt, sand), organic matter (OM), topographic variables (elevation, aspect, convexity), climatic variables (precipitation) and hydrological variables (river distance, NDWI) were used as predictors. Weighted ensemble models were built using only bivariate models with adjusted-R2 > 0.5 for each SWC at different pF. The second step consisted in running plant SDMs including modeled SWC jointly with the conventional topo-climatic variable used for plant SDMs. Third, SDMs were only run using the conventional topo-climatic variables. Finally, comparing the models obtained in the second and third steps allowed assessing the additional predictive power of SWC in plant SDMs. SWC ensemble models remained very good, with

  11. An improved nuclear mass model: FRDM (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, Peter

    2011-10-01

    We have developed an improved nuclear mass model which we plan to finalize in 2012, so we designate it FRDM(2012). Relative to our previous mass table in 1995 we do a full four-dimensional variation of the shape coordinates EPS2, EPS3, EPS4, and EPS6, we consider axial asymmetric shape degrees of freedom and we vary the density symmetry parameter L. Other additional features are also implemented. With respect to the Audi 2003 data base we now have an accuracy of 0.57 MeV. We have carefully tested the extrapolation properties of the new mass table by adjusting model parameters to limited data sets and testing on extended data sets and find it is highly reliable in new regions of nuclei. We discuss what the remaining differences between model calculations and experiment tell us about the limitations of the currently used effective single-particle potential and possible extensions. DOE No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  12. Voxel model in BNCT treatment planning: performance analysis and improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Sara J.; Carando, Daniel G.; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; Zamenhof, Robert G.

    2005-02-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been made to study the performance of treatment planning systems in deriving an accurate dosimetry of the complex radiation fields involved in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The computational model of the patient's anatomy is one of the main factors involved in this subject. This work presents a detailed analysis of the performance of the 1 cm based voxel reconstruction approach. First, a new and improved material assignment algorithm implemented in NCTPlan treatment planning system for BNCT is described. Based on previous works, the performances of the 1 cm based voxel methods used in the MacNCTPlan and NCTPlan treatment planning systems are compared by standard simulation tests. In addition, the NCTPlan voxel model is benchmarked against in-phantom physical dosimetry of the RA-6 reactor of Argentina. This investigation shows the 1 cm resolution to be accurate enough for all reported tests, even in the extreme cases such as a parallelepiped phantom irradiated through one of its sharp edges. This accuracy can be degraded at very shallow depths in which, to improve the estimates, the anatomy images need to be positioned in a suitable way. Rules for this positioning are presented. The skin is considered one of the organs at risk in all BNCT treatments and, in the particular case of cutaneous melanoma of extremities, limits the delivered dose to the patient. Therefore, the performance of the voxel technique is deeply analysed in these shallow regions. A theoretical analysis is carried out to assess the distortion caused by homogenization and material percentage rounding processes. Then, a new strategy for the treatment of surface voxels is proposed and tested using two different irradiation problems. For a parallelepiped phantom perpendicularly irradiated with a 5 keV neutron source, the large thermal neutron fluence deviation present at shallow depths (from 54% at 0 mm depth to 5% at 4 mm depth) is reduced to 2% on average

  13. Therapeutic efficacy of improved α-fetoprotein promoter-mediated tBid delivered by folate-PEI600-cyclodextrin nanopolymer vector in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bao-guang; Liu, Li-ping; Chen, George G; Ye, Cai Guo; Leung, Kevin K C; Ho, Rocky L K; Lin, Marie C; Lai, Paul B S

    2014-06-10

    SNPs in human AFP promoter are associated with serum AFP levels in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), suggesting that AFP promoter variants may generate better transcriptional activities while retaining high specificity to AFP-producing cells. We sequenced human AFP promoters, cloned 15 different genotype promoters and tested their reporter activities in AFP-producing and non-producing cells. Among various AFP variant fragments tested, EA4D exhibited the highest reporter activity and thus was selected for the further study. EA4D was fused with tBid and coupled with nano-particle vector (H1) to form pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1. pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1 could express a high level of tBid while retain the specificity to AFP-producing cells. In a HCC tumor model, application of pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1 significantly inhibited the growth of AFP-producing-implanted tumors with minimal side-effects, but had no effect on non-AFP-producing tumors. Furthermore, pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1 could significantly sensitize HCC cells to sorafenib, an approved anti-HCC agent. Collectively, pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1, a construct with the AFP promoter EA4D and the novel H1 delivery system, can specifically target and effectively suppress the AFP-producing HCC. This new therapeutic tool shows little toxicity in vitro and in vivo and it should thus be safe for further clinical tests. PMID:24726886

  14. Oscillating square wave Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) delivered during slow wave sleep does not improve declarative memory more than sham: A randomized sham controlled crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Sahlem, Gregory L.; Badran, Bashar W.; Halford, Jonathan J.; Williams, Nolan R.; Korte, Jeffrey E.; Leslie, Kimberly; Strachan, Martha; Breedlove, Jesse L.; Runion, Jennifer; Bachman, David L.; Uhde, Thomas W.; Borckardt, Jeffery J.; George, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Background A 2006 trial in healthy medical students found that anodal slow oscillating tDCS delivered bi-frontally during slow wave sleep had an enhancing effect in declarative, but not procedural memory. Although there have been supporting animal studies, and similar findings in pathological groups, this study has not been replicated, or refuted, in the intervening years. We therefore tested these earlier results for replication using similar methods with the exception of current wave form (square in our study, nearly sinusoidal in the original). Objective/Hypothesis Our objective was to test the findings of a 2006 trial suggesting bi-frontal anodal tDCS during slow wave sleep enhances declarative memory. Methods Twelve students (mean age 25, 9 women) free of medical problems underwent two testing conditions (active, sham) in a randomized counterbalanced fashion. Active stimulation consisted of oscillating square wave tDCS delivered during early Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep. The sham condition consisted of setting-up the tDCS device and electrodes, but not turning it on during sleep. tDCS was delivered bi-frontally with anodes placed at F3/F4, and cathodes placed at mastoids. Current density was 0.517mA/CM2, and oscillated between zero and maximal current at a frequency of 0.75Hz. Stimulation occurred during five-five minute blocks with one-minute inter-block intervals (25 minutes total stimulation). The primary outcomes were both declarative memory consolidation measured by a paired word association test (PWA), and non-declarative memory, measured by a non-dominant finger-tapping test (FTT). We also recorded and analyzed sleep EEG. Results There was no difference in the number of paired word associations remembered before compared to after sleep [(active = 3.1±3.0SD more associations) (sham = 3.8±3.1S.D more associations)]. Finger tapping improved, (non-significantly) following active stimulation [(3.6±2.7 S.D. correctly typed sequences) compared to

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of improved α-fetoprotein promoter-mediated tBid delivered by folate-PEI600-cyclodextrin nanopolymer vector in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Bao-guang; Liu, Li-ping; Chen, George G.; Ye, Cai Guo; Leung, Kevin K.C.; Ho, Rocky L.K.; Lin, Marie C.; Lai, Paul B.S.

    2014-06-10

    SNPs in human AFP promoter are associated with serum AFP levels in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), suggesting that AFP promoter variants may generate better transcriptional activities while retaining high specificity to AFP-producing cells. We sequenced human AFP promoters, cloned 15 different genotype promoters and tested their reporter activities in AFP-producing and non-producing cells. Among various AFP variant fragments tested, EA4D exhibited the highest reporter activity and thus was selected for the further study. EA4D was fused with tBid and coupled with nano-particle vector (H1) to form pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1. pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1 could express a high level of tBid while retain the specificity to AFP-producing cells. In a HCC tumor model, application of pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1 significantly inhibited the growth of AFP-producing-implanted tumors with minimal side-effects, but had no effect on non-AFP-producing tumors. Furthermore, pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1 could significantly sensitize HCC cells to sorafenib, an approved anti-HCC agent. Collectively, pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1, a construct with the AFP promoter EA4D and the novel H1 delivery system, can specifically target and effectively suppress the AFP-producing HCC. This new therapeutic tool shows little toxicity in vitro and in vivo and it should thus be safe for further clinical tests. - Highlights: • The nano-particle vector H1 has advantages in mediating gene therapy construct pGL3-EA4D-tBid for HCC treatment. • pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1, a construct with the AFP promoter EA4D, can specifically target the AFP-producing HCC. • pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1effectively suppresses the proliferation and growth of AFP-producing HCC. • This novel pGL3-EA4D-tBid/H1 therapeutic tool shows little toxicity in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Intra-Arterially Delivered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Not Detected in the Brain Parenchyma in an Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na Kyung; Yang, Jehoon; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Jeongmin; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Chang, Jong Wook; Na, Duk L.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a promising role as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Prior studies suggested that intra-arterially administered MSCs are engrafted into the brain in stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) animal models. However, a controversial standpoint exists in terms of the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in transgenic AD mice. The primary goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of delivering human umbilical cord-blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) into the brains of non-transgenic WT (C3H/C57) and transgenic AD (APP/PS1) mice through the intra-arterial (IA) route. Through two experiments, mice were infused with hUCB-MSCs via the right internal carotid artery and were sacrificed at two different time points: 6 hours (experiment 1) or 5 minutes (experiment 2) after infusion. In both experiments, no cells were detected in the brain parenchyma while MSCs were detected in the cerebrovasculature in experiment 2. The results from this study highlight that intra-arterial delivery of MSCs is not the most favorable route to be implemented as a potential therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:27203695

  17. Improved Shell models for screened Coulomb balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, M.; Kaehlert, H.; Henning, C.; Baumgartner, H.; Filinov, A.

    2006-10-01

    Spherical Coulomb crystals in dusty plasmas [1] are well described by an isotropic Yukawa-type pair interaction and an external parabolic confinement as was shown by extensive molecular dynamics simulations [2]. A much simpler description is possible with analytical shell models which have been derived for Yukawas plasmas in [3,4]. Here we analyze improved Yukawa shell models which include correlations along the lines proposed for Coulomb crystals in [5]. The shell configurations are efficiently evaluated using a Monte Carlo procedure. [1] O. Arp, A. Piel and A. Melzer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 165004 (2004). [2] M. Bonitz, D. Block, O. Arp, V. Golunychiy, H. Baumgartner, P. Ludwig, A. Piel and A. Filinov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006). [3] H. Totsuji, C. Totsuji, T. Ogawa, and K. Tsuruta, Phys. Rev. E 71, 045401 (2005). [4] C. Henning, M. Bonitz, A. Piel, P. Ludwig, H. Baumgartner, V. Golubnichiy, and D. Block, submitted to Phys. Rev. E [5] W.D. Kraeft and M. Bonitz, J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 35, 94 (2006).

  18. A comprehensive track model for the improvement of corrugation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J.; Vadillo, E. G.; Santamaría, J.

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents a detailed model of the railway track based on wave propagation, suitable for corrugation studies. The model analyses both the vertical and the transverse dynamics of the track. Using the finite strip method (FSM), only the cross-section of the rail must be meshed, and thus it is not necessary to discretise a whole span in 3D. This model takes into account the discrete nature of the support, introducing concepts pertaining to the theory of periodic structures in the formulation. Wave superposition is enriched taking into account the contribution of residual vectors. In this way, the model obtains accurate results when a finite section of railway track is considered. Results for the infinite track have been compared against those presented by Gry and Müller. Aside from the improvements provided by the model presented in this paper, which Gry's and Müller's models do not contemplate, the results arising from the comparison prove satisfactory. Finally, the calculated receptances are compared against the experimental values obtained by the authors, demonstrating a fair degree of adequacy. Finally, these receptances are used within a linear model of corrugation developed by the authors.

  19. Impact of improved snowmelt modelling in a monthly hydrological model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folton, Nathalie; Garcia, Florine

    2016-04-01

    The quantification and the management of water resources at the regional scale require hydrological models that are both easy to implement and efficient. To be reliable and robust, these models must be calibrated and validated on a large number of catchments that are representative of various hydro-meteorological conditions, physiographic contexts, and specific hydrological behavior (e.g. mountainous catchments). The GRLoiEau monthly model, with its simple structure and its two free parameters, answer our need of such a simple model. It required the development of a snow routine to model catchments with temporarily snow-covered areas. The snow routine developed here does not claim to represent physical snowmelt processes but rather to simulate them globally on the catchment. The snowmelt equation is based on the degree-day method which is widely used by the hydrological community, in particular in engineering studies (Etchevers 2000). A potential snowmelt (Schaefli et al. 2005) was computed, and the parameters of the snow routine were regionalized for each mountain area. The GRLoiEau parsimonious structure requires meteorological data. They come from the distributed mesoscale atmospheric analysis system SAFRAN, which provides estimations of daily solid and liquid precipitations and temperatures on a regular square grid at the spatial resolution of 8*8 km², throughout France. Potential evapotranspiration was estimated using the formula by Oudin et al. (2005). The aim of this study is to improve the quality of monthly simulations for ungauged basins, in particular for all types of mountain catchments, without increasing the number of free parameters of the model. By using daily SAFRAN data, the production store and snowmelt can be run at a daily time scale. The question then arises whether simulating the monthly flows using a production function at a finer time step would improve the results. And by using the SAFRAN distributed climate series, a distributed approach

  20. How can model comparison help improving species distribution models?

    PubMed

    Gritti, Emmanuel Stephan; Gaucherel, Cédric; Crespo-Perez, Maria-Veronica; Chuine, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Today, more than ever, robust projections of potential species range shifts are needed to anticipate and mitigate the impacts of climate change on biodiversity and ecosystem services. Such projections are so far provided almost exclusively by correlative species distribution models (correlative SDMs). However, concerns regarding the reliability of their predictive power are growing and several authors call for the development of process-based SDMs. Still, each of these methods presents strengths and weakness which have to be estimated if they are to be reliably used by decision makers. In this study we compare projections of three different SDMs (STASH, LPJ and PHENOFIT) that lie in the continuum between correlative models and process-based models for the current distribution of three major European tree species, Fagussylvatica L., Quercusrobur L. and Pinussylvestris L. We compare the consistency of the model simulations using an innovative comparison map profile method, integrating local and multi-scale comparisons. The three models simulate relatively accurately the current distribution of the three species. The process-based model performs almost as well as the correlative model, although parameters of the former are not fitted to the observed species distributions. According to our simulations, species range limits are triggered, at the European scale, by establishment and survival through processes primarily related to phenology and resistance to abiotic stress rather than to growth efficiency. The accuracy of projections of the hybrid and process-based model could however be improved by integrating a more realistic representation of the species resistance to water stress for instance, advocating for pursuing efforts to understand and formulate explicitly the impact of climatic conditions and variations on these processes. PMID:23874779

  1. Development of Liposomal Formulation for Delivering Anticancer Drug to Breast Cancer Stem-Cell-Like Cells and its Pharmacokinetics in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ajaz; Mondal, Sujan Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Alkharfy, Khalid M

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to develop a liposomal formulation for delivering anticancer drug to breast cancer stem-cell-like cells, ANV-1, and evaluate its pharmacokinetics in an animal model. The anticancer drug ESC8 was used in dexamethasone (Dex)-associated liposome (DX) to form ESC8-entrapped liposome named DXE. ANV-1 cells showed high-level expression of NRP-1. To enhance tumor regression, we additionally adapted to codeliver the NRP-1 shRNA-encoded plasmid using the established DXE liposome. In vivo efficacy of DXE-NRP-1 was carried out in mice bearing ANV-1 cells as xenograft tumors and the extent of tumor growth inhibition was evaluated by tumor-size measurement. A significant difference in tumor volume started to reveal between DXE-NRP-1 group and DXE-Control group. DXE-NRP-1 group showed ∼4 folds and ∼2.5 folds smaller tumor volume than exhibited by untreated and DXE-Control-treated groups, respectively. DXE disposition was evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats following an intraperitoneal dose (3.67 mg/kg of ESC8 in DXE). The plasma concentrations of ESC8 in the DXE formulation were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using a noncompartmental analysis. ESC8 had a half-life of 11.01 ± 0.29 h, clearance of 2.10 ± 3.63 L/kg/h, and volume of distribution of 33.42 ± 0.83 L/kg. This suggests that the DXE liposome formulation could be administered once or twice daily for therapeutic efficacy. In overall, we developed a potent liposomal formulation with favorable pharmacokinetic and tumor regressing profile that could sensitize and kill highly aggressive and drug-resistive cancer stem-cell-like cells. PMID:26832839

  2. Gravity model improvement investigation. [improved gravity model for determination of ocean geoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siry, J. W.; Kahn, W. D.; Bryan, J. W.; Vonbun, F. F.

    1973-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to improve the gravity model and hence the ocean geoid. A specific objective is the determination of the gravity field and geoid with a space resolution of approximately 5 deg and a height resolution of the order of five meters. The concept of the investigation is to utilize both GEOS-C altimeter and satellite-to-satellite tracking data to achieve the gravity model improvement. It is also planned to determine the geoid in selected regions with a space resolution of about a degree and a height resolution of the order of a meter or two. The short term objectives include the study of the gravity field in the GEOS-C calibration area outlined by Goddard, Bermuda, Antigua, and Cape Kennedy, and also in the eastern Pacific area which is viewed by ATS-F.

  3. Making change last: applying the NHS institute for innovation and improvement sustainability model to healthcare improvement.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Cathal; Howe, Cathy; Woodcock, Thomas; Myron, Rowan; Phekoo, Karen; McNicholas, Chris; Saffer, Jessica; Bell, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of evidence-based treatments to deliver high-quality care is essential to meet the healthcare demands of aging populations. However, the sustainable application of recommended practice is difficult to achieve and variable outcomes well recognised. The NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement Sustainability Model (SM) was designed to help healthcare teams recognise determinants of sustainability and take action to embed new practice in routine care. This article describes a formative evaluation of the application of the SM by the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for Northwest London (CLAHRC NWL). Data from project teams' responses to the SM and formal reviews was used to assess acceptability of the SM and the extent to which it prompted teams to take action. Projects were classified as 'engaged,' 'partially engaged' and 'non-engaged.' Quarterly survey feedback data was used to explore reasons for variation in engagement. Score patterns were compared against formal review data and a 'diversity of opinion' measure was derived to assess response variance over time. Of the 19 teams, six were categorized as 'engaged,' six 'partially engaged,' and seven as 'non-engaged.' Twelve teams found the model acceptable to some extent. Diversity of opinion reduced over time. A minority of teams used the SM consistently to take action to promote sustainability but for the majority SM use was sporadic. Feedback from some team members indicates difficulty in understanding and applying the model and negative views regarding its usefulness. The SM is an important attempt to enable teams to systematically consider determinants of sustainability, provide timely data to assess progress, and prompt action to create conditions for sustained practice. Tools such as these need to be tested in healthcare settings to assess strengths and weaknesses and findings disseminated to aid development. This

  4. Nuevo Amanecer: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Community-Based, Peer-Delivered Stress Management Intervention to Improve Quality of Life in Latinas With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ortíz, Carmen; Santoyo-Olsson, Jasmine; Stewart, Anita L.; Gregorich, Steven; Lee, Howard E.; Durón, Ysabel; McGuire, Peggy; Luce, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated a community-based, translational stress management program to improve health-related quality of life in Spanish-speaking Latinas with breast cancer. Methods. We adapted a cognitive–behavioral stress management program integrating evidence-based and community best practices to address the needs of Latinas with breast cancer. Spanish-speaking Latinas with breast cancer were randomly assigned to an intervention or usual-care control group. Trained peers delivered the 8-week intervention between February 2011 and February 2014. Primary outcomes were breast cancer–specific quality of life and distress, and general symptoms of distress. Results. Of 151 participants, 95% were retained at 6 months (between May 2011 and May 2014). Improvements in quality of life from baseline to 6 months were greater for the intervention than the control group on physical well-being, emotional well-being, breast cancer concerns, and overall quality of life. Decreases from baseline to 6 months were greater for the intervention group on depression and somatization. Conclusions. Results suggest that translation of evidence-based programs can reduce psychosocial health disparities in Latinas with breast cancer. Integration of this program into community-based organizations enhances its dissemination potential. PMID:25905829

  5. A comprehensive model to build improvement capability in a pediatric academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Gerry M; Schoettker, Pamela J; Alessandrini, Evaline A; Luzader, Carolyn; Kotagal, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center developed a comprehensive model to build quality improvement (QI) capability to support its goal to transform its delivery system through a series of training courses. Two online modules orient staff to basic concepts and terminology and prepare them to participate more effectively in QI teams. The basic program (Rapid Cycle Improvement Collaborative, RCIC) is focused on developing the capability to use basic QI tools and complete a narrow-scoped project in approximately 120 days. The Intermediate Improvement Science Series (I(2)S(2)) program is a leadership course focusing on improvement skills and developing a broader and deeper understanding of QI in the context of the organization and external environment. The Advanced Improvement Methods (AIM) course and Quality Scholars Program stimulate the use of more sophisticated methods and prepare Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and external faculty to undertake QI research. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems (AILS) sessions enable interprofessional care delivery system leadership teams to effectively lead a system of care, manage a portfolio of projects, and to deliver on CCHMC's strategic plan. Implementing these programs has shown us that 1) a multilevel curricular approach to building improvement capability is pragmatic and effective, 2) an interprofessional learning environment is critical to shifting mental models, 3) repetition of project experience with coaching and feedback solidifies critical skills, knowledge and behaviors, and 4) focusing first on developing capable interprofessional improvement leaders, versus engaging in broad general QI training across the whole organization, is effective. PMID:24369867

  6. Using Workflow Modeling to Identify Areas to Improve Genetic Test Processes in the University of Maryland Translational Pharmacogenomics Project

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, Elizabeth M.; Overby, Casey L.; Banchero, Meghan; Pollin, Toni; Kelemen, Mark; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Beitelshees, Amber L.

    2015-01-01

    Delivering genetic test results to clinicians is a complex process. It involves many actors and multiple steps, requiring all of these to work together in order to create an optimal course of treatment for the patient. We used information gained from focus groups in order to illustrate the current process of delivering genetic test results to clinicians. We propose a business process model and notation (BPMN) representation of this process for a Translational Pharmacogenomics Project being implemented at the University of Maryland Medical Center, so that personalized medicine program implementers can identify areas to improve genetic testing processes. We found that the current process could be improved to reduce input errors, better inform and notify clinicians about the implications of certain genetic tests, and make results more easily understood. We demonstrate our use of BPMN to improve this important clinical process for CYP2C19 genetic testing in patients undergoing invasive treatment of coronary heart disease. PMID:26958179

  7. An Improved Model for the Turbulent PBL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Y.; Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A. M.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Second order turbulence models of the Mellor and Yamada type have been widely used to simulate the PBL. It is however known that these models have several deficiencies. For example, they all predict a critical Richardson number which is about four times smaller than the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) data, they are unable to match the surface data, and they predict a boundary layer height lower than expected. In the present model, we show that these difficulties are all overcome by a single new physical input: the use of the most complete expression for both the pressure-velocity and the pressure-temperature correlations presently available. Each of the new terms represents a physical process that, was not accounted for by previous models. The new model is presented in three different levels according to Mellor and Yamada's terminology, with new, ready-to-use expressions for the turbulent, moments. We show that the new model reproduces several experimental and LES data better than previous models. As far as the PBL is concerned, we show that the model reproduces both the Kansas data as analyzed by Businger et al. in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for smaller Richardson numbers, as well as the LES and laboratory data up to Richardson numbers of order unity. We also show that the model yields a higher PBL height than the previous models.

  8. Testing the H56 Vaccine Delivered in 4 Different Adjuvants as a BCG-Booster in a Non-Human Primate Model of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Billeskov, Rolf; Tan, Esterlina V.; Cang, Marjorie; Abalos, Rodolfo M.; Burgos, Jasmin; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard; Christensen, Dennis; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The search for new and improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccines has focused on IFN-γ both for selecting antigens and for evaluating vaccine delivery strategies. The essential role of IFN-γ in endogenous host protection is well established, but it is still uncertain whether this also holds true for vaccine protection. Here we evaluate the H56 fusion protein vaccine as a BCG booster in a non-human primate (NHP) model of TB that closely recapitulates human TB pathogenesis. To date, only a handful of novel adjuvants have been tested in the NHP model of TB, and therefore we administered H56 in 3 novel cationic liposome adjuvants of increasing immunogenicity (CAF01, CAF04, CAF05) and compared them to H56 in the IC31® adjuvant previously reported to promote protection in this model. The individual clinical parameters monitored during infection (weight, ESR, X-ray) all correlated with survival, and boosting BCG with H56 in all adjuvants resulted in better survival rates compared to BCG alone. The adjuvants promoted IFN-γ-responses of increasing intensity as measured by ELISPOT in the peripheral blood, but the level of vaccine-specific IFN-γ production did not correlate with or predict disease outcome. This study’s main outcome underscores the importance of the choice of adjuvant for TB subunit vaccines, and secondly it highlights the need for better correlates of protection in preclinical models of TB. PMID:27525651

  9. Testing the H56 Vaccine Delivered in 4 Different Adjuvants as a BCG-Booster in a Non-Human Primate Model of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Billeskov, Rolf; Tan, Esterlina V; Cang, Marjorie; Abalos, Rodolfo M; Burgos, Jasmin; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard; Christensen, Dennis; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The search for new and improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccines has focused on IFN-γ both for selecting antigens and for evaluating vaccine delivery strategies. The essential role of IFN-γ in endogenous host protection is well established, but it is still uncertain whether this also holds true for vaccine protection. Here we evaluate the H56 fusion protein vaccine as a BCG booster in a non-human primate (NHP) model of TB that closely recapitulates human TB pathogenesis. To date, only a handful of novel adjuvants have been tested in the NHP model of TB, and therefore we administered H56 in 3 novel cationic liposome adjuvants of increasing immunogenicity (CAF01, CAF04, CAF05) and compared them to H56 in the IC31® adjuvant previously reported to promote protection in this model. The individual clinical parameters monitored during infection (weight, ESR, X-ray) all correlated with survival, and boosting BCG with H56 in all adjuvants resulted in better survival rates compared to BCG alone. The adjuvants promoted IFN-γ-responses of increasing intensity as measured by ELISPOT in the peripheral blood, but the level of vaccine-specific IFN-γ production did not correlate with or predict disease outcome. This study's main outcome underscores the importance of the choice of adjuvant for TB subunit vaccines, and secondly it highlights the need for better correlates of protection in preclinical models of TB. PMID:27525651

  10. Scaling and root planning, and locally delivered minocycline reduces the load of Prevotella intermedia in an interdependent pattern, correlating with symptomatic improvements of chronic periodontitis: a short-term randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shuli; Wang, Ying; Sun, Wei; Chen, Hui; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the respective or combinatory efficacy of locally delivered 2% minocycline (MO), and scaling and root planning (SRP) by assessing both clinical parameters and the loads of four main periodontal pathogens in treating chronic periodontitis (CP). Methods Seventy adults with CP were randomly assigned to the three treatment groups: 1) SRP alone; 2) MO alone; and 3) combinatory use of SRP and MO (SRP + MO). Before and 7 days after the treatments, we evaluated both clinical parameters (pocket depth [PD] and sulcus bleeding index [SBI]) and the gene load of four main periodontal pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], and Prevotella intermedia [Pi]). Results The bacterial prevalence per patient was: Aa, 31.25%; Fn, 100%; Pg, 95.31%; and Pi, 98.44%. Seven days after treatment, the three treatments significantly reduced both PD and SBI, but not detection frequencies of the four pathogens. For PD, the reduction efficacy of SRP + MO was significantly higher than that of either MO or SRP. Only Pg responded significantly to SRP. Pg and Fn were significantly reduced in the presence of MO. Only SRP + MO showed a significant reduction effect on the gene load of Pi. The reduction of PD significantly correlated with the gene load of Pi (r=0.26; P=0.042) but not of the other bacteria. Conclusion SRP and MO reduced the load of Pi in an interdependent pattern, which correlated with symptomatic improvements of CP. PMID:26676022

  11. ARSENIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR IMPROVED RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project integrates research on the kinetic behavior and metabolism of arsenic at both the cellular and whole organism levels using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling approach. The ultimate goal is development of a robust human PBPK model for arsenic met...

  12. Symbol discriminability models for improved flight displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.; Trujillo San-Martin, Maite; Gille, Jennifer

    2006-02-01

    Aviation display system designers and evaluators need to know how discriminable displayed symbols will be over a wide range of conditions to assess the adequacy and effectiveness of flight display systems. If flight display symbols are to be safely recognized by pilots, it is necessary that they can be easily discriminated from each other. Sometimes psychophysical measurements can answer this question, but computational modeling may be required to assess the numerous conditions and even help design the empirical experiments that may be needed. Here we present an image discrimination model that includes position compensation. The model takes as input the luminance values for the pixels of two symbol images, the effective viewing distance, and gives as output the discriminability in just-noticeable-differences (d') and the x and y offset in pixels needed to minimize the discriminability. The model predictions are shown to be a useful upper bound for human symbol identification performance.

  13. An improved approach for tank purge modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Jacob R.; Chintalapati, Sunil; Gutierrez, Hector M.; Kirk, Daniel R.

    2013-05-01

    Many launch support processes use helium gas to purge rocket propellant tanks and fill lines to rid them of hazardous contaminants. As an example, the purge of the Space Shuttle's External Tank used approximately 1,100 kg of helium. With the rising cost of helium, initiatives are underway to examine methods to reduce helium consumption. Current helium purge processes have not been optimized using physics-based models, but rather use historical 'rules of thumb'. To develop a more accurate and useful model of the tank purge process, computational fluid dynamics simulations of several tank configurations were completed and used as the basis for the development of an algebraic model of the purge process. The computationally efficient algebraic model of the purge process compares well with a detailed transient, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation as well as with experimental data from two external tank purges.

  14. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3 σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26382410

  16. Improving Vortex Models via Optimal Control Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemati, Maziar; Eldredge, Jeff; Speyer, Jason

    2012-11-01

    Flapping wing kinematics, common in biological flight, can allow for agile flight maneuvers. On the other hand, we currently lack sufficiently accurate low-order models that enable such agility in man-made micro air vehicles. Low-order point vortex models have had reasonable success in predicting the qualitative behavior of the aerodynamic forces resulting from such maneuvers. However, these models tend to over-predict the force response when compared to experiments and high-fidelity simulations, in part because they neglect small excursions of separation from the wing's edges. In the present study, we formulate a constrained minimization problem which allows us to relax the usual edge regularity conditions in favor of empirical determination of vortex strengths. The optimal vortex strengths are determined by minimizing the error with respect to empirical force data, while the vortex positions are constrained to evolve according to the impulse matching model developed in previous work. We consider a flat plate undergoing various canonical maneuvers. The optimized model leads to force predictions remarkably close to the empirical data. Additionally, we compare the optimized and original models in an effort to distill appropriate edge conditions for unsteady maneuvers.

  17. Flavor mediation delivers natural SUSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Nathaniel; McCullough, Matthew; Thaler, Jesse

    2012-06-01

    If supersymmetry (SUSY) solves the hierarchy problem, then naturalness considerations coupled with recent LHC bounds require non-trivial superpartner flavor structures. Such "Natural SUSY" models exhibit a large mass hierarchy between scalars of the third and first two generations as well as degeneracy (or alignment) among the first two generations. In this work, we show how this specific beyond the standard model (SM) flavor structure can be tied directly to SM flavor via "Flavor Mediation". The SM contains an anomaly-free SU(3) flavor symmetry, broken only by Yukawa couplings. By gauging this flavor symmetry in addition to SM gauge symmetries, we can mediate SUSY breaking via (Higgsed) gauge mediation. This automatically delivers a natural SUSY spectrum. Third-generation scalar masses are suppressed due to the dominant breaking of the flavor gauge symmetry in the top direction. More subtly, the first-two-generation scalars remain highly degenerate due to a custodial U(2) symmetry, where the SU(2) factor arises because SU(3) is rank two. This custodial symmetry is broken only at order ( m c /m t )2. SUSY gauge coupling unification predictions are preserved, since no new charged matter is introduced, the SM gauge structure is unaltered, and the flavor symmetry treats all matter multiplets equally. Moreover, the uniqueness of the anomaly-free SU(3) flavor group makes possible a number of concrete predictions for the superpartner spectrum.

  18. Improved modeling of GPS selective availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braasch, Michael S.; Fink, Annmarie; Duffus, Keith

    1994-01-01

    Selective Availability (SA) represents the dominant error source for stand-alone users of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Even for DGPS, SA mandates the update rate required for a desired level of accuracy in realtime applications. As was witnessed in the recent literature, the ability to model this error source is crucial to the proper evaluation of GPS-based systems. A variety of SA models were proposed to date; however, each has its own shortcomings. Most of these models were based on limited data sets or data which were corrupted by additional error sources. A comprehensive treatment of the problem is presented. The phenomenon of SA is discussed and a technique is presented whereby both clock and orbit components of SA are identifiable. Extensive SA data sets collected from Block 2 satellites are presented. System Identification theory then is used to derive a robust model of SA from the data. This theory also allows for the statistical analysis of SA. The stationarity of SA over time and across different satellites is analyzed and its impact on the modeling problem is discussed.

  19. Improved Model of a Mercury Ring Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.; Shivarma, Ravishankar

    2009-01-01

    A short document discusses the general problem of mathematical modeling of the three-dimensional rotational dynamics of rigid bodies and of the use of Euler parameters to eliminate the singularities occasioned by the use of Euler angles in such modeling. The document goes on to characterize a Hamiltonian model, developed by the authors, that utilizes the Euler parameters and, hence, is suitable for use in computational simulations that involve arbitrary rotational motion. In this formulation unlike in prior Euler-parameter-based formulations, there are no algebraic constraints. This formulation includes a general potential energy function, incorporates a minimum set of momentum variables, and takes an explicit state-space form convenient for numerical implementation. Practical application of this formulation has been demonstrated by the development of a new and simplified model of the rotational motion of a rigid rotor to which is attached a partially filled mercury ring damper. Models like this one are used in guidance and control of spin-stabilized spacecraft and gyroscope-stabilized seekers in guided missiles.

  20. A School Nurse-Delivered Intervention for Overweight and Obese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pbert, Lori; Druker, Susan; Gapinski, Mary A.; Gellar, Lauren; Magner, Robert; Reed, George; Schneider, Kristin; Osganian, Stavroula

    2013-01-01

    Background: Models are needed for implementing weight management interventions for adolescents through readily accessible venues. This study evaluated the feasibility and ef?cacy of a school nurse-delivered intervention in improving diet and activity and reducing body mass index (BMI) among overweight and obese adolescents. Methods: Six high…

  1. Automated dynamic analytical model improvement for damped structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuh, J. S.; Berman, A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described to improve a linear nonproportionally damped analytical model of a structure. The procedure finds the smallest changes in the analytical model such that the improved model matches the measured modal parameters. Features of the method are: (1) ability to properly treat complex valued modal parameters of a damped system; (2) applicability to realistically large structural models; and (3) computationally efficiency without involving eigensolutions and inversion of a large matrix.

  2. Challenges to deliver therapies.

    PubMed

    Hansén, S O; Wakonen, J

    1998-10-01

    Medical science and pharmaceutical technology have progressed in enormous leaps. The professions have access to knowledge of improved therapies that cover a large selection of diagnoses. This state of affairs is a successful result of the long and purposeful co-operation between science and technology, theory and practice. The therapies have changed but their delivery to the patient remains the same. During the recent international recession and the continuous cost containment programmes the question of availability has risen to the fore. Availability is a question of means. That is usually interpreted as equal to saving and cost cutting. At times of affluence it could mean allowance but that seems far in the past. Availability also concerns the physical distribution of the therapies such as pharmaceuticals. So far, advances in the science have not affected either the distribution or availability of pharmaceutical products. With the rise in patient awareness, pressure is rising to make full use of the research results. This is a natural, albeit unmet, demand and represents an opportunity for the pharmacy institutions with their well trained personnel, modern outlets and the unique as well as traditional position in direct contact with the patients. This role could gain added weight through the progress of the technologies that allow ambulatory therapies instead of cost consuming institutionalisation. It would appear quite natural that the providers of such services would seek the pharmacy outlet networks as their proper points of delivery. There is no doubt that this choice would be taken as a convenient solution by the consumers of the services. This would offer considerable savings to society and efficiency to the patients. PMID:15662746

  3. Quality Improvement on the Acute Inpatient Psychiatry Unit Using the Model for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kuldeep; Sanderson, Joshua; Galarneau, David; Keister, Thomas; Hickman, Dean

    2013-01-01

    Background A need exists for constant evaluation and modification of processes within healthcare systems to achieve quality improvement. One common approach is the Model for Improvement that can be used to clearly define aims, measures, and changes that are then implemented through a plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycle. This approach is a commonly used method for improving quality in a wide range of fields. The Model for Improvement allows for a systematic process that can be revised at set time intervals to achieve a desired result. Methods We used the Model for Improvement in an acute psychiatry unit (APU) to improve the screening incidence of abnormal involuntary movements in eligible patients—those starting or continuing on standing neuroleptics—with the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS). Results After 8 weeks of using the Model for Improvement, both of the participating inpatient services in the APU showed substantial overall improvement in screening for abnormal involuntary movements using the AIMS. Conclusion Crucial aspects of a successful quality improvement initiative based on the Model for Improvement are well-defined goals, process measures, and structured PDSA cycles. Success also requires communication, organization, and participation of the entire team. PMID:24052768

  4. General Equilibrium Models: Improving the Microeconomics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Walter; Westhoff, Frank

    2009-01-01

    General equilibrium models now play important roles in many fields of economics including tax policy, environmental regulation, international trade, and economic development. The intermediate microeconomics classroom has not kept pace with these trends, however. Microeconomics textbooks primarily focus on the insights that can be drawn from the…

  5. Improvements to a model of projectile fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, S.; Chaudhuri, G.; Das Gupta, S.

    2011-11-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.83.044612 83, 044612 (2011)] we proposed a model for calculating cross sections of various reaction products which arise from disintegration of projectile-like fragments resulting from heavy-ion collisions at intermediate or higher energy. The model has three parts: (1) abrasion, (2) disintegration of the hot abraded projectile-like fragment (PLF) into nucleons and primary composites using a model of equilibrium statistical mechanics, and (3) possible evaporation of hot primary composites. It was assumed that the PLF resulting from abrasion has one temperature T. Data suggested that, while just one value of T seemed adequate for most cross-section calculations, a single value failed when dealing with very peripheral collisions. We have now introduced a variable T=T(b) where b is the impact parameter of the collision. We argue that there are data which not only show that T must be a function of b but, in addition, also point to an approximate value of T for a given b. We propose a very simple formula: T(b)=D0+D1[As(b)/A0] where As(b) is the mass of the abraded PLF and A0 is the mass of the projectile; D0 and D1 are constants. Using this model we compute cross sections for several collisions and compare with data.

  6. Hybrid Modeling Improves Health and Performance Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Scientific Monitoring Inc. was awarded a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center to create a new, simplified health-monitoring approach for flight vehicles and flight equipment. The project developed a hybrid physical model concept that provided a structured approach to simplifying complex design models for use in health monitoring, allowing the output or performance of the equipment to be compared to what the design models predicted, so that deterioration or impending failure could be detected before there would be an impact on the equipment's operational capability. Based on the original modeling technology, Scientific Monitoring released I-Trend, a commercial health- and performance-monitoring software product named for its intelligent trending, diagnostics, and prognostics capabilities, as part of the company's complete ICEMS (Intelligent Condition-based Equipment Management System) suite of monitoring and advanced alerting software. I-Trend uses the hybrid physical model to better characterize the nature of health or performance alarms that result in "no fault found" false alarms. Additionally, the use of physical principles helps I-Trend identify problems sooner. I-Trend technology is currently in use in several commercial aviation programs, and the U.S. Air Force recently tapped Scientific Monitoring to develop next-generation engine health-management software for monitoring its fleet of jet engines. Scientific Monitoring has continued the original NASA work, this time under a Phase III SBIR contract with a joint NASA-Pratt & Whitney aviation security program on propulsion-controlled aircraft under missile-damaged aircraft conditions.

  7. Improving phylogenetic regression under complex evolutionary models.

    PubMed

    Mazel, Florent; Davies, T Jonathan; Georges, Damien; Lavergne, Sébastien; Thuiller, Wilfried; Peres-NetoO, Pedro R

    2016-02-01

    Phylogenetic Generalized Least Square (PGLS) is the tool of choice among phylogenetic comparative methods to measure the correlation between species features such as morphological and life-history traits or niche characteristics. In its usual form, it assumes that the residual variation follows a homogenous model of evolution across the branches of the phylogenetic tree. Since a homogenous model of evolution is unlikely to be realistic in nature, we explored the robustness of the phylogenetic regression when this assumption is violated. We did so by simulating a set of traits under various heterogeneous models of evolution, and evaluating the statistical performance (type I error [the percentage of tests based on samples that incorrectly rejected a true null hypothesis] and power [the percentage of tests that correctly rejected a false null hypothesis]) of classical phylogenetic regression. We found that PGLS has good power but unacceptable type I error rates. This finding is important since this method has been increasingly used in comparative analyses over the last decade. To address this issue, we propose a simple solution based on transforming the underlying variance-covariance matrix to adjust for model heterogeneity within PGLS. We suggest that heterogeneous rates of evolution might be particularly prevalent in large phylogenetic trees, while most current approaches assume a homogenous rate of evolution. Our analysis demonstrates that overlooking rate heterogeneity can result in inflated type I errors, thus misleading comparative analyses. We show that it is possible to correct for this bias even when the underlying model of evolution is not known a priori. PMID:27145604

  8. The Development and Testing of a School Improvement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Jantzi, Doris; McElheron-Hopkins, Charryn

    2006-01-01

    This multimethod study generated and tested a "best evidence" model of school improvement processes (SIP) capable of improving student achievement. Initially developed through the review of a comprehensive body of previous empirical research, the model was further refined through a 2, 5-year longitudinal study in 10 schools. A quantitative test of…

  9. Performance Improvement/HPT Model: Guiding the Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessinger, Joan Conway; Moseley, James L.; Van Tiem, Darlene M.

    2012-01-01

    This commentary is part of an ongoing dialogue that began in the October 2011 special issue of "Performance Improvement"--Exploring a Universal Performance Model for HPT: Notes From the Field. The performance improvement/HPT (human performance technology) model represents a unifying process that helps accomplish successful change, create…

  10. Improving Sensitivity in the NNSS COMPASS Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J

    2012-07-15

    The Comprehensive Analysis of Safeguards Strategies model, COMPASS, was initially implemented with the goal of eliminating functions and requirements that did not contribute to the MC&A program at the particular site. The model sub-elements were revised several times through additions and deletions as the process was better understood. Contributions and ratings were developed and implemented. Because of the original intent, the process left the contribution factors closely grouped toward the top of the range. The effect of this is a flat sensitivity; a change in any element and sub-element affected the system effectiveness to the same degree no matter which one changed. This paper describes a method for determining element and sub-element contributions so that changes in element effectiveness are more accurately reflected in the overall system effectiveness.

  11. An Improved MUSIC Model for Gibbsite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Scott C.; Bickmore, Barry R.; Tadanier, Christopher J.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2004-06-01

    Here we use gibbsite as a model system with which to test a recently published, bond-valence method for predicting intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups on oxides. At issue is whether the method is adequate when valence parameters for the functional groups are derived from ab initio structure optimization of surfaces terminated by vacuum. If not, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of solvated surfaces (which are much more computationally expensive) will have to be used. To do this, we had to evaluate extant gibbsite potentiometric titration data that where some estimate of edge and basal surface area was available. Applying BET and recently developed atomic force microscopy methods, we found that most of these data sets were flawed, in that their surface area estimates were probably wrong. Similarly, there may have been problems with many of the titration procedures. However, one data set was adequate on both counts, and we applied our method of surface pKa int prediction to fitting a MUSIC model to this data with considerable success—several features of the titration data were predicted well. However, the model fit was certainly not perfect, and we experienced some difficulties optimizing highly charged, vacuum-terminated surfaces. Therefore, we conclude that we probably need to do AIMD simulations of solvated surfaces to adequately predict intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups.

  12. Improving Flood Damage Assessment Models in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadio, M.; Mysiak, J.; Carrera, L.; Koks, E.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Stage-Damage Curve (SDC) models is prevalent in ex-ante assessments of flood risk. To assess the potential damage of a flood event, SDCs describe a relation between water depth and the associated potential economic damage over land use. This relation is normally developed and calibrated through site-specific analysis based on ex-post damage observations. In some cases (e.g. Italy) SDCs are transferred from other countries, undermining the accuracy and reliability of simulation results. Against this background, we developed a refined SDC model for Northern Italy, underpinned by damage compensation records from a recent flood event. Our analysis considers both damage to physical assets and production losses from business interruptions. While the first is calculated based on land use information, production losses are measured through the spatial distribution of Gross Value Added (GVA). An additional component of the model assesses crop-specific agricultural losses as a function of flood seasonality. Our results show an overestimation of asset damage from non-calibrated SDC values up to a factor of 4.5 for tested land use categories. Furthermore, we estimate that production losses amount to around 6 per cent of the annual GVA. Also, maximum yield losses are less than a half of the amount predicted by the standard SDC methods.

  13. Improved Modeling of Soil Biogeochemistry in Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Jafarov, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Modeling frozen biogeochemistry in permafrost soils is a major challenge because using observed Q10 values from incubation studies results in unrealistically high carbon emissions from permafrost. Incubation studies of frozen soil show a rapid decline in respiration as temperature decreases below freezing. Permafrost soils contain 1700 Gt of carbon, most of it frozen in permafrost below the active layer. Models with permafrost carbon in the frozen soil layers show unrealistic losses during spinup with observed Q10 values. Greatly increasing the frozen Q10 eliminates the unrealistic emissions, but suppresses winter respiration below observed values. We used a more physical approach in the Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (SiBCASA) model by separating the simulated soil carbon into three pools: thawed, thin film, and bulk frozen. Carbon transfers between thawed, thin film, and frozen pools are controlled by a curve fit of observed liquid water content in frozen soils as a function of temperature, eliminating the frozen Q10 function entirely. This restricts respiration only to the thawed pools while the frozen and thin film pools remain inactive. SiBCASA reproduces observed fluxes from incubation studies and observed winter fluxes. This new parameterization eliminated unrealistic fluxes of permafrost carbon during spinup and resulted in global total amount of frozen carbon much closer to observed values.

  14. Improving Acoustic Models by Watching Television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witbrock, Michael J.; Hauptmann, Alexander G.

    1998-01-01

    Obtaining sufficient labelled training data is a persistent difficulty for speech recognition research. Although well transcribed data is expensive to produce, there is a constant stream of challenging speech data and poor transcription broadcast as closed-captioned television. We describe a reliable unsupervised method for identifying accurately transcribed sections of these broadcasts, and show how these segments can be used to train a recognition system. Starting from acoustic models trained on the Wall Street Journal database, a single iteration of our training method reduced the word error rate on an independent broadcast television news test set from 62.2% to 59.5%.

  15. Efficient and Non-Toxic Biological Response Carrier Delivering TNF-α shRNA for Gene Silencing in a Murine Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Song, Jialin; Chen, Yinghui; Jiang, Shichao; Yang, Kejia; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Xiaotian; Ouyang, Yuanming; Fan, Cunyi; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is an effective and specific method for silencing genes. However, an efficient and non-toxic carrier is needed to deliver the siRNA into the target cells. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) plays a central role in the occurrence and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we pre-synthetized a degradable cationic polymer (PDAPEI) from 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehyde and low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine (PEI, Mw = 1.8 kDa) as a gene vector for the delivery of TNF-α shRNA. The PDAPEI/pDNA complex showed a suitable particle size and stable zeta potential for transfection. In vitro study of the PDAPEI/pDNA complex revealed a lower cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency when transfecting TNF-α shRNA to macrophages by significantly down-regulating the expression of TNF-α. Moreover, the complex was extremely efficient in decreasing the severity of arthritis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis. PDAPEI delivered TNF-α shRNA has great potential in the treatment of RA. PMID:27594856

  16. Efficient and Non-Toxic Biological Response Carrier Delivering TNF-α shRNA for Gene Silencing in a Murine Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jialin; Chen, Yinghui; Jiang, Shichao; Yang, Kejia; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Xiaotian; Ouyang, Yuanming; Fan, Cunyi; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is an effective and specific method for silencing genes. However, an efficient and non-toxic carrier is needed to deliver the siRNA into the target cells. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) plays a central role in the occurrence and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we pre-synthetized a degradable cationic polymer (PDAPEI) from 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehyde and low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine (PEI, Mw = 1.8 kDa) as a gene vector for the delivery of TNF-α shRNA. The PDAPEI/pDNA complex showed a suitable particle size and stable zeta potential for transfection. In vitro study of the PDAPEI/pDNA complex revealed a lower cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency when transfecting TNF-α shRNA to macrophages by significantly down-regulating the expression of TNF-α. Moreover, the complex was extremely efficient in decreasing the severity of arthritis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis. PDAPEI delivered TNF-α shRNA has great potential in the treatment of RA. PMID:27594856

  17. Improving lognormal models for cosmological fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Henrique S.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Joachimi, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    It is common practice in cosmology to model large-scale structure observables as lognormal random fields, and this approach has been successfully applied in the past to the matter density and weak lensing convergence fields separately. We argue that this approach has fundamental limitations which prevent its use for jointly modelling these two fields since the lognormal distribution's shape can prevent certain correlations to be attainable. Given the need of ongoing and future large-scale structure surveys for fast joint simulations of clustering and weak lensing, we propose two ways of overcoming these limitations. The first approach slightly distorts the power spectra of the fields using one of two algorithms that minimizes either the absolute or the fractional distortions. The second one is by obtaining more accurate convergence marginal distributions, for which we provide a fitting function, by integrating the lognormal density along the line of sight. The latter approach also provides a way to determine directly from theory the skewness of the convergence distribution and, therefore, the parameters for a lognormal fit. We present the public code Full-sky Lognormal Astro-fields Simulation Kit (FLASK) which can make tomographic realizations on the sphere of an arbitrary number of correlated lognormal or Gaussian random fields by applying either of the two proposed solutions, and show that it can create joint simulations of clustering and lensing with sub-per-cent accuracy over relevant angular scales and redshift ranges.

  18. Improving pregnancy outcome during imprisonment: a model residential care program.

    PubMed

    Siefert, K; Pimlott, S

    2001-04-01

    The female prison population has increased dramatically in recent years. Most women prisoners are involved with drugs, and as many as 25 percent are pregnant or have delivered within the past year. Reproductive health and drug treatment services for women in prison are inadequate, if they are available at all, and although illicit drugs are readily available in prison, drug-involved pregnant women often are incarcerated to protect fetal health. Studies of pregnancy outcome among women prisoners have demonstrated high rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity. This article examines issues related to pregnancy among women prisoners and describes an innovative residential program designed for pregnant, drug-dependent women in a state adult corrections system. Social workers can play an important role in promoting policy reform and improved services for this underserved population. PMID:11329642

  19. An improved model for fragment-based lead generation at AstraZeneca.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Nathan; Spadola, Loredana; Cowen, Scott; Patel, Joe; Schönherr, Heike; Cao, Qing; McKenzie, Andrew; Edfeldt, Fredrik; Rabow, Al; Goodnow, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Modest success rates in fragment-based lead generation (FBLG) projects at AstraZeneca (AZ) prompted operational changes to improve performance. In this review, we summarize these changes, emphasizing the construction and composition of the AZ fragment library, screening practices and working model. We describe the profiles of the screening method for specific fragment subsets and statistically assess our ability to follow up on fragment hits through near-neighbor selection. Performance analysis of our second-generation fragment library (FL2) in screening campaigns illustrates the complementary nature of flat and 3D fragments in exploring protein-binding pockets and highlights our ability to deliver fragment hits using multiple screening techniques for various target classes. The new model has had profound impact on the successful delivery of lead series to drug discovery projects. PMID:27179986

  20. Employing ISRU Models to Improve Hardware Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linne, Diane L.

    2010-01-01

    An analytical model for hydrogen reduction of regolith was used to investigate the effects of several key variables on the energy and mass performance of reactors for a lunar in-situ resource utilization oxygen production plant. Reactor geometry, reaction time, number of reactors, heat recuperation, heat loss, and operating pressure were all studied to guide hardware designers who are developing future prototype reactors. The effects of heat recuperation where the incoming regolith is pre-heated by the hot spent regolith before transfer was also investigated for the first time. In general, longer reaction times per batch provide a lower overall energy, but also result in larger and heavier reactors. Three reactors with long heat-up times results in similar energy requirements as a two-reactor system with all other parameters the same. Three reactors with heat recuperation results in energy reductions of 20 to 40 percent compared to a three-reactor system with no heat recuperation. Increasing operating pressure can provide similar energy reductions as heat recuperation for the same reaction times.

  1. Improved solar array power point model with SPICE realization

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, M.C.

    1996-12-31

    An improved and simplified formulation is given for a solar array current-voltage model. This model curve matches a specified maximum power point (i,v) specification, in addition to the open-circuit and short-circuit specifications. The improved model has a simplified numerical solution, which is practical for SPICE simulation of orbital-scale electrical power systems. This paper presents the mathematical development of the solar array model solution, and the form of the necessary Newton/Raphson equations. The iterative nonlinear solution is then realized in a SPICE model of the solar array, which is then demonstrated in an orbital-time-scale satellite power system simulation.

  2. Enhancing family physician capacity to deliver quality palliative home care

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Denise; Howell, Doris; Brazil, Kevin; Howard, Michelle; Taniguchi, Alan

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Family physicians face innumerable challenges to delivering quality palliative home care to meet the complex needs of end-of-life patients and their families. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To implement a model of shared care to enhance family physicians’ ability to deliver quality palliative home care, particularly in a community-based setting. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Family physicians in 3 group practices (N = 21) in Ontario’s Niagara West region collaborated with an interprofessional palliative care team (including a palliative care advanced practice nurse, a palliative medicine physician, a bereavement counselor, a psychosocial-spiritual advisor, and a case manager) in a shared-care partnership to provide comprehensive palliative home care. Key features of the program included systematic and timely identification of end-of-life patients, needs assessments, symptom and psychosocial support interventions, regular communication between team members, and coordinated care guided by outcome-based assessment in the home. In addition, educational initiatives were provided to enhance family physicians’ knowledge and skills. CONCLUSION Because of the program, participants reported improved communication, effective interprofessional collaboration, and the capacity to deliver palliative home care, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to end-of-life patients in the community. PMID:19074714

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED URBAN AIRSHED MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A research and development effort to improve certain physical processes simulated in the Urban Airshed Model (UAM) processor and model programs, and to update the computer software is described. he UAM is an Eulerian photochemical grid model designed to simulate the relevant phys...

  4. Business Models for Training and Performance Improvement Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carliner, Saul

    2004-01-01

    Although typically applied to entire enterprises, the concept of business models applies to training and performance improvement groups. Business models are "the method by which firm[s] build and use [their] resources to offer.. value." Business models affect the types of projects, services offered, skills required, business processes, and type of…

  5. Improved Solar-Radiation-Pressure Models for GPS Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Kuang, Da

    2006-01-01

    A report describes a series of computational models conceived as an improvement over prior models for determining effects of solar-radiation pressure on orbits of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. These models are based on fitting coefficients of Fourier functions of Sun-spacecraft- Earth angles to observed spacecraft orbital motions.

  6. Estuarine modeling: Does a higher grid resolution improve model performance?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological models are useful tools to explore cause effect relationships, test hypothesis and perform management scenarios. A mathematical model, the Gulf of Mexico Dissolved Oxygen Model (GoMDOM), has been developed and applied to the Louisiana continental shelf of the northern ...

  7. Improvement of a parsimonious model for streamflow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Charles; Michel, Claude; Andréassian, Vazken

    2003-08-01

    Hydrologists have been struggling over the past decades to improve rainfall-runoff models. As a consequence, models proposed 20-30 years ago still keep evolving as progress is made in the understanding of catchment hydrological behaviour. Here we present the GR4J model, a daily lumped rainfall-runoff model which is the result of a continuous improvement process over the last 15 years. The article provides the mathematical formulation of a new four-parameter version of the model. Model performance is assessed on a large sample of catchments: compared to other rainfall-runoff models, the GR4J performance is among the best ones. It also gives better results than the previous three-parameter model version, especially in the simulation of low flows. The tests indicate that a four-parameter structure corresponds to the maximum level of complexity that could be afforded in the model. Adding more free parameters did not bring significant improvements. The gain in model robustness with this new version should enhance the confidence in the practical use of this simple model for water engineering and resource management. The discussion underlines the potential limits introduced in the modelling process when one relies on a priori concepts in building a model structure and it stresses the value of large catchment samples to assess models.

  8. Primary care access improvement: an empowerment-interaction model.

    PubMed

    Ledlow, G R; Bradshaw, D M; Shockley, C

    2000-05-01

    Improving community primary care access is a difficult and dynamic undertaking. Realizing a need to improve appointment availability, a systematic approach based on measurement, empowerment, and interaction was developed. The model fostered exchange of information and problem solving between interdependent staff sections within a managed care system. Measuring appointments demanded but not available proved to be a credible customer-focused approach to benchmark against set goals. Changing the organizational culture to become more sensitive to changing beneficiary needs was a paramount consideration. Dependent-group t tests were performed to compare the pretreatment and posttreatment effect. The empowerment-interaction model significantly improved the availability of routine and wellness-type appointments. The availability of urgent appointments improved but not significantly; a better prospective model needs to be developed. In aggregate, appointments demanded but not available (empowerment-interaction model) were more than 10% before the treatment and less than 3% with the treatment. PMID:10826388

  9. Assimilation of Spatio-Temporal Cosmic-Ray Neutron Data to Improve Hydrological Model Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaniego, L. E.; Schrön, M.; Kumar, R.; Zink, M.; Rosolem, R.; Rakovec, O.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.; Reinstorf, F.; Zacharias, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale hydrological models like mHM (Samaniego et al., 2010, WRR) are usually evaluated with observed discharge, which is a spatially integrated signal of the watershed. However, an accurate prediction of spatially distributed soil water content often is of higher interest for hydrologic prediction. For hydrologic models operating at intermediate to regional scales, Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors provide unrivaled soil moisture data which are much more representative than point data and of higher spatio-temporal resolution than most remote-sensing products. We are aiming to improve soil moisture calibration and evaluation in mHM with the support of the intermediate-scale data from cosmic-ray neutrons. The relationship between soil moisture profiles in the footprint and the corresponding cosmic-ray neutron counts is non-linear and not unique. Therefore we assimilate cosmic-ray neutron data directly by employing the nested forward model COSMIC (Shuttleworth et al. 2013, HESS), which calculates neutron counts from the modeled soil moisture. In optimization mode, mHM is able to calibrate parameters of both, the hydrological system and/or the neutron prediction model itself. Model performance is evaluated with independent measurements of soil moisture patterns from several catchment-wide TDR campaigns, time series of a Wireless Sensor Network and discharge in the small catchment "Schäfertal" (1.6 km2) in central Germany. One of the major challenges is to improve soil moisture and discharge performance simultaneously in the hydrologic model. This work is an important step towards the assimilation of continuous spatial data from mobile Cosmic Ray Sensing. The so-called TERENO:Rover delivers highly-resolved spatial patterns of water content in a whole catchment, which has a great potential to improve spatial performance of hydrological models.

  10. Thermal expansion of noble metals using improved lattice dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Priyank; Bhatt, N. K.; Vyas, P. R.; Gohel, V. B.

    2013-06-01

    Isothermal bulk modulus and volume thermal expansion for noble metals have been studied on the basis of improved lattice dynamical model proposed by Pandya et al [Physica B 307, 138-149 (2001)]. The present study shows that for all three noble metals the approach gives satisfactory results, when they are compared with experimental findings. The present study thus confirms the use of improved model to study anharmonic property, and can be extended to study temperature dependent properties in high temperature range.

  11. Enhanced Efficacy of a Codon-Optimized DNA Vaccine Encoding the Glycoprotein Precursor Gene of Lassa Virus in a Guinea Pig Disease Model When Delivered by Dermal Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, Kathleen A.; Broderick, Kate E.; Wilkinson, Eric R.; Shaia, Carl I.; Bell, Todd M.; Shurtleff, Amy C.; Spik, Kristin W.; Badger, Catherine V.; Guttieri, Mary C.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa. Presently, there are no FDA-licensed medical countermeasures for this disease. In a pilot study, we constructed a DNA vaccine (pLASV-GPC) that expressed the LASV glycoprotein precursor gene (GPC). This plasmid was used to vaccinate guinea pigs (GPs) using intramuscular electroporation as the delivery platform. Vaccinated GPs were protected from lethal infection (5/6) with LASV compared to the controls. However, vaccinated GPs experienced transient viremia after challenge, although lower than the mock-vaccinated controls. In a follow-on study, we developed a new device that allowed for both the vaccine and electroporation pulse to be delivered to the dermis. We also codon-optimized the GPC sequence of the vaccine to enhance expression in GPs. Together, these innovations resulted in enhanced efficacy of the vaccine. Unlike the pilot study where neutralizing titers were not detected until after virus challenge, modest neutralizing titers were detected in guinea pigs before challenge, with escalating titers detected after challenge. The vaccinated GPs were never ill and were not viremic at any timepoint. The combination of the codon-optimized vaccine and dermal electroporation delivery is a worthy candidate for further development. PMID:26344112

  12. Enhanced Efficacy of a Codon-Optimized DNA Vaccine Encoding the Glycoprotein Precursor Gene of Lassa Virus in a Guinea Pig Disease Model When Delivered by Dermal Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kathleen A; Broderick, Kate E; Wilkinson, Eric R; Shaia, Carl I; Bell, Todd M; Shurtleff, Amy C; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine V; Guttieri, Mary C; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa. Presently, there are no FDA-licensed medical countermeasures for this disease. In a pilot study, we constructed a DNA vaccine (pLASV-GPC) that expressed the LASV glycoprotein precursor gene (GPC). This plasmid was used to vaccinate guinea pigs (GPs) using intramuscular electroporation as the delivery platform. Vaccinated GPs were protected from lethal infection (5/6) with LASV compared to the controls. However, vaccinated GPs experienced transient viremia after challenge, although lower than the mock-vaccinated controls. In a follow-on study, we developed a new device that allowed for both the vaccine and electroporation pulse to be delivered to the dermis. We also codon-optimized the GPC sequence of the vaccine to enhance expression in GPs. Together, these innovations resulted in enhanced efficacy of the vaccine. Unlike the pilot study where neutralizing titers were not detected until after virus challenge, modest neutralizing titers were detected in guinea pigs before challenge, with escalating titers detected after challenge. The vaccinated GPs were never ill and were not viremic at any timepoint. The combination of the codon-optimized vaccine and dermal electroporation delivery is a worthy candidate for further development. PMID:26344112

  13. Improved analytical model for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxu; Li, Bin; Xiong, Liangshan

    2014-09-01

    The analytical model of residual stress in orthogonal cutting proposed by Jiann is an important tool for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting. In application of the model, a problem of low precision of the surface residual stress prediction is found. By theoretical analysis, several shortages of Jiann's model are picked out, including: inappropriate boundary conditions, unreasonable calculation method of thermal stress, ignorance of stress constraint and cyclic loading algorithm. These shortages may directly lead to the low precision of the surface residual stress prediction. To eliminate these shortages and make the prediction more accurate, an improved model is proposed. In this model, a new contact boundary condition between tool and workpiece is used to make it in accord with the real cutting process; an improved calculation method of thermal stress is adopted; a stress constraint is added according to the volumeconstancy of plastic deformation; and the accumulative effect of the stresses during cyclic loading is considered. At last, an experiment for measuring residual stress in cutting AISI 1045 steel is conducted. Also, Jiann's model and the improved model are simulated under the same conditions with cutting experiment. The comparisons show that the surface residual stresses predicted by the improved model is closer to the experimental results than the results predicted by Jiann's model.

  14. Improved analytical model for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxu; Li, Bin; Xiong, Liangshan

    2014-09-01

    The analytical model of residual stress in orthogonal cutting proposed by Jiann is an important tool for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting. In application of the model, a problem of low precision of the surface residual stress prediction is found. By theoretical analysis, several shortages of Jiann's model are picked out, including: inappropriate boundary conditions, unreasonable calculation method of thermal stress, ignorance of stress constraint and cyclic loading algorithm. These shortages may directly lead to the low precision of the surface residual stress prediction. To eliminate these shortages and make the prediction more accurate, an improved model is proposed. In this model, a new contact boundary condition between tool and workpiece is used to make it in accord with the real cutting process; an improved calculation method of thermal stress is adopted; a stress constraint is added according to the volume-constancy of plastic deformation; and the accumulative effect of the stresses during cyclic loading is considered. At last, an experiment for measuring residual stress in cutting AISI 1045 steel is conducted. Also, Jiann's model and the improved model are simulated under the same conditions with cutting experiment. The comparisons show that the surface residual stresses predicted by the improved model is closer to the experimental results than the results predicted by Jiann's model.

  15. In vivo genome editing improves muscle function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher E; Hakim, Chady H; Ousterout, David G; Thakore, Pratiksha I; Moreb, Eirik A; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M; Madhavan, Sarina; Pan, Xiufang; Ran, F Ann; Yan, Winston X; Asokan, Aravind; Zhang, Feng; Duan, Dongsheng; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease affecting about 1 out of 5000 male births and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Genome editing has the potential to restore expression of a modified dystrophin gene from the native locus to modulate disease progression. In this study, adeno-associated virus was used to deliver the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system to the mdx mouse model of DMD to remove the mutated exon 23 from the dystrophin gene. This includes local and systemic delivery to adult mice and systemic delivery to neonatal mice. Exon 23 deletion by CRISPR-Cas9 resulted in expression of the modified dystrophin gene, partial recovery of functional dystrophin protein in skeletal myofibers and cardiac muscle, improvement of muscle biochemistry, and significant enhancement of muscle force. This work establishes CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing as a potential therapy to treat DMD. PMID:26721684

  16. A model of continuous quality improvement for health service organisations.

    PubMed

    Thornber, M

    1992-01-01

    Continuous Quality Improvement (or Total Quality Management) is an approach to management originally used in manufacturing and now being applied in the health services. This article describes a model of Continuous Quality Improvement which has been used in NSW public and private hospitals. The model consists of Ten Key Elements. The first driving force of this model is 'defining quality in terms of customer expectations' of quality. The second driving force emphasises that 'quality improvement is a leadership issue'. Leaders are required to: coordinate staff participation in work process analysis; train staff in the customer service orientation; lead effective meetings and negotiate with both internal and external service partners. Increased staff motivation, quality improvement and reduction in running costs are seen to be the benefits of CQI for health service organisations. PMID:10117452

  17. Improved Atmospheric Refraction Correction Models in Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn

    2004-03-01

    The primary source of unmodeled error in space geodetic techniques such as VLBI, GPS and SLR is atmospheric refraction. SLR uses lasers (532 nm) to measure very precise ranges from ground tracking stations to spaceborne geodetic satellites with accuracies at the millimeter level. Improved refraction modeling is essential in reducing errors in SLR measurements that study variations in the Earth's gravitational field and vertical crustal motion as well as monitoring sea-level rise, post-glacial rebound and earthquake predictions. The Marini and Murray model developed in the 1970's has primarily been used for data analysis, but recent work by Mendes et al., 2002 provides significant improvement in modeling the elevation dependency of the zenith atmospheric delay. The elevation dependency is modeled by what are known as mapping functions. Improvements in modeling the zenith delay itself where achieved by computing the group refractivity using a procedure described by Ciddor [1996] and by including the non-hydrostatic (wet) zenith delay. Two color SLR can also be used to determine the zenith delay by measuring the dispersive delay of two laser pulses each at a different wavelength. By comparing the Mendes and Marini Murray models to this experimental technique, one is able to evaluate the accuracy of the two models. We have found errors between the two models when compared to two color SLR at the centimeter level, which increases significantly at 355 nm, indicating the need for an improvement of existing dispersion formulae.

  18. Scientific Publishing: Adding Value, Delivering Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, Beth

    2015-08-01

    Publishers are developing new services and applying new technologies to improve publication and reading experiences for the scholarly community. This needs to be implemented with care to avoid adding technology-driven complexity. Our publishing processes need to be widely accessible to both authors and readers and to maintain the scientific record. Beth Mayes will outline new developments at IOP Publishing delivering (1) improvements to the presentation of articles and their commitment to formats that go beyond the PDF, improving the understanding of research. (2) How IOP Publishing is responding to the growing calls for metadata and linking that involve being central to the shared information ecosystem for astronomy. (3) After publication, discuss how publishers invest in metrics and new initiatives for discovery that improve the impact of published research.

  19. Titan I propulsion system modeling and possible performance improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Oreste

    This thesis features the Titan I propulsion systems and offers data-supported suggestions for improvements to increase performance. The original propulsion systems were modeled both graphically in CAD and via equations. Due to the limited availability of published information, it was necessary to create a more detailed, secondary set of models. Various engineering equations---pertinent to rocket engine design---were implemented in order to generate the desired extra detail. This study describes how these new models were then imported into the ESI CFD Suite. Various parameters are applied to these imported models as inputs that include, for example, bi-propellant combinations, pressure, temperatures, and mass flow rates. The results were then processed with ESI VIEW, which is visualization software. The output files were analyzed for forces in the nozzle, and various results were generated, including sea level thrust and ISP. Experimental data are provided to compare the original engine configuration models to the derivative suggested improvement models.

  20. DNA Targeting Sequence Improves Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Plasmid DNA Transfection Efficiency in Model Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Matthew M.; Dean, David A.; Dobson, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Efficient non-viral plasmid DNA transfection of most stem cells, progenitor cells and primary cell lines currently presents an obstacle for many applications within gene therapy research. From a standpoint of efficiency and cell viability, magnetic nanoparticle-based DNA transfection is a promising gene vectoring technique because it has demonstrated rapid and improved transfection outcomes when compared to alternative non-viral methods. Recently, our research group introduced oscillating magnet arrays that resulted in further improvements to this novel plasmid DNA (pDNA) vectoring technology. Continued improvements to nanomagnetic transfection techniques have focused primarily on magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) functionalization and transfection parameter optimization: cell confluence, growth media, serum starvation, magnet oscillation parameters, etc. Noting that none of these parameters can assist in the nuclear translocation of delivered pDNA following MNP-pDNA complex dissociation in the cell’s cytoplasm, inclusion of a cassette feature for pDNA nuclear translocation is theoretically justified. In this study incorporation of a DNA targeting sequence (DTS) feature in the transfecting plasmid improved transfection efficiency in model neurons, presumably from increased nuclear translocation. This observation became most apparent when comparing the response of the dividing SH-SY5Y precursor cell to the non-dividing and differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. PMID:26287182

  1. Process Correlation Analysis Model for Process Improvement Identification

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sooyong

    2014-01-01

    Software process improvement aims at improving the development process of software systems. It is initiated by process assessment identifying strengths and weaknesses and based on the findings, improvement plans are developed. In general, a process reference model (e.g., CMMI) is used throughout the process of software process improvement as the base. CMMI defines a set of process areas involved in software development and what to be carried out in process areas in terms of goals and practices. Process areas and their elements (goals and practices) are often correlated due to the iterative nature of software development process. However, in the current practice, correlations of process elements are often overlooked in the development of an improvement plan, which diminishes the efficiency of the plan. This is mainly attributed to significant efforts and the lack of required expertise. In this paper, we present a process correlation analysis model that helps identify correlations of process elements from the results of process assessment. This model is defined based on CMMI and empirical data of improvement practices. We evaluate the model using industrial data. PMID:24977170

  2. Improved Systematic Pointing Error Model for the DSN Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Withington, Philip M.; Richter, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    New pointing models have been developed for large reflector antennas whose construction is founded on elevation over azimuth mount. At JPL, the new models were applied to the Deep Space Network (DSN) 34-meter antenna s subnet for corrections of their systematic pointing errors; it achieved significant improvement in performance at Ka-band (32-GHz) and X-band (8.4-GHz). The new models provide pointing improvements relative to the traditional models by a factor of two to three, which translate to approximately 3-dB performance improvement at Ka-band. For radio science experiments where blind pointing performance is critical, the new innovation provides a new enabling technology. The model extends the traditional physical models with higher-order mathematical terms, thereby increasing the resolution of the model for a better fit to the underlying systematic imperfections that are the cause of antenna pointing errors. The philosophy of the traditional model was that all mathematical terms in the model must be traced to a physical phenomenon causing antenna pointing errors. The traditional physical terms are: antenna axis tilts, gravitational flexure, azimuth collimation, azimuth encoder fixed offset, azimuth and elevation skew, elevation encoder fixed offset, residual refraction, azimuth encoder scale error, and antenna pointing de-rotation terms for beam waveguide (BWG) antennas. Besides the addition of spherical harmonics terms, the new models differ from the traditional ones in that the coefficients for the cross-elevation and elevation corrections are completely independent and may be different, while in the traditional model, some of the terms are identical. In addition, the new software allows for all-sky or mission-specific model development, and can utilize the previously used model as an a priori estimate for the development of the updated models.

  3. Benchmarking and improving microbial-explicit soil biogeochemistry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, W. R.; Bonan, G. B.; Hartman, M. D.; Sulman, B. N.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Earth system models that are designed to project future carbon (C) cycle - climate feedbacks exhibit notably poor representation of soil biogeochemical processes and generate highly uncertain projections about the fate of the largest terrestrial C pool on Earth. Given these shortcomings there has been intense interest in soil biogeochemical model development, but parallel efforts to create the analytical tools to characterize, improve and benchmark these models have thus far lagged behind. A long-term goal of this work is to develop a framework to compare, evaluate and improve the process-level representation of soil biogeochemical models that could be applied in global land surface models. Here, we present a newly developed global model test bed that is built on the Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach model (CASA-CNP) that can rapidly integrate different soil biogeochemical models that are forced with consistent driver datasets. We focus on evaluation of two microbial explicit soil biogeochemical models that function at global scales: the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization model (MIMICS) and Carbon, Organisms, Rhizosphere, and Protection in the Soil Environment (CORPSE) model. Using the global model test bed coupled to MIMICS and CORPSE we quantify the uncertainty in potential C cycle - climate feedbacks that may be expected with these microbial explicit models, compared with a conventional first-order, linear model. By removing confounding variation of climate and vegetation drivers, our model test bed allows us to isolate key differences among different soil model structure and parameterizations that can be evaluated with further study. Specifically, the global test bed also identifies key parameters that can be estimated using cross-site observations. In global simulations model results are evaluated with steady state litter, microbial biomass, and soil C pools and benchmarked against independent globally gridded data products.

  4. Spectral analysis of walking improvement utilizing AR modeling.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Masako; Tsuruoka, Yuriko

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzes the walking improvement based on 1/f fluctuations and impulse responses utilizing Auto-Regressive (AR) modeling. Once subjects were aware of the correct posture, the fluctuation of subject's both sides of the hip while walking was improved more rhythmic. The analysis of impulse response utilizing AR modeling provided clear results for the evaluation of improvement to walking stability. After the subjects understood their own walking condition, based on 1/f fluctuation, and had received suitable rehabilitation and shoes, their walking stability improved satisfactorily. This study provides a useful method of medical evaluation in rehabilitation and physical fitness, and a means for subjects to maintain a state of well being. PMID:19163860

  5. An improved human display model for occupant crash simulation programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willmert, K. D.; Potter, T. E.

    1975-01-01

    An improved three-dimensional display model of a human being which can be used to display the results of three-dimensional simulation programs that predict the positions of an occupant during impact of a vehicle was presented. The model allows the user to view the occupant from any orientation in any position during the crash. The display model assumes the usual break up of the body into rigid segments which is normal for occupant crash simulation programs, but the shape of the segments in the display model are not necessarily the same as those used in the crash simulation. The display model is proportioned so as to produce a realistic drawing of the human body in any position. Joints connecting the segments are also drawn to improve realism.

  6. Improving nonlinear modeling capabilities of functional link adaptive filters.

    PubMed

    Comminiello, Danilo; Scarpiniti, Michele; Scardapane, Simone; Parisi, Raffaele; Uncini, Aurelio

    2015-09-01

    The functional link adaptive filter (FLAF) represents an effective solution for online nonlinear modeling problems. In this paper, we take into account a FLAF-based architecture, which separates the adaptation of linear and nonlinear elements, and we focus on the nonlinear branch to improve the modeling performance. In particular, we propose a new model that involves an adaptive combination of filters downstream of the nonlinear expansion. Such combination leads to a cooperative behavior of the whole architecture, thus yielding a performance improvement, particularly in the presence of strong nonlinearities. An advanced architecture is also proposed involving the adaptive combination of multiple filters on the nonlinear branch. The proposed models are assessed in different nonlinear modeling problems, in which their effectiveness and capabilities are shown. PMID:26057613

  7. Demonstrating the improvement of predictive maturity of a computational model

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M; Unal, Cetin; Atamturktur, Huriye S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an improvement of predictive capability brought to a non-linear material model using a combination of test data, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty quantification, and calibration. A model that captures increasingly complicated phenomena, such as plasticity, temperature and strain rate effects, is analyzed. Predictive maturity is defined, here, as the accuracy of the model to predict multiple Hopkinson bar experiments. A statistical discrepancy quantifies the systematic disagreement (bias) between measurements and predictions. Our hypothesis is that improving the predictive capability of a model should translate into better agreement between measurements and predictions. This agreement, in turn, should lead to a smaller discrepancy. We have recently proposed to use discrepancy and coverage, that is, the extent to which the physical experiments used for calibration populate the regime of applicability of the model, as basis to define a Predictive Maturity Index (PMI). It was shown that predictive maturity could be improved when additional physical tests are made available to increase coverage of the regime of applicability. This contribution illustrates how the PMI changes as 'better' physics are implemented in the model. The application is the non-linear Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) strength model applied to Beryllium metal. We demonstrate that our framework tracks the evolution of maturity of the PTW model. Robustness of the PMI with respect to the selection of coefficients needed in its definition is also studied.

  8. Evaluation of Improved Spacecraft Models for GLONASS Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J. P.; Sibthorpe, A.; Harvey, N.; Bar-Sever, Y.; Kuang, D.

    2010-12-01

    High-fidelity spacecraft models become more important as orbit determination strategies achieve greater levels of precision and accuracy. In this presentation, we assess the impacts of new solar radiation pressure and attitude models on precise orbit determination (POD) for GLONASS spacecraft within JPLs GIPSY-OASIS software. A new solar radiation pressure model is developed by empirically fitting a Fourier expansion to solar pressure forces acting on the spacecraft X, Y, Z components using one year of recent orbit data. Compared to a basic “box-wing” solar pressure model, the median 24-hour orbit prediction accuracy for one month of independent test data improves by 43%. We additionally implement an updated yaw attitude model during eclipse periods. We evaluate the impacts of both models on post-processed POD solutions spanning 6-months. We consider a number of metrics such as internal orbit and clock overlaps as well as comparisons to independent solutions. Improved yaw attitude modeling reduces the dependence of these metrics on the “solar elevation” angle. The updated solar pressure model improves orbit overlap statistics by several mm in the median sense and centimeters in the max sense (1D). Orbit differences relative to the IGS combined solution are at or below the 5 cm level (1D RMS).

  9. Improving the representation of hydrologic processes in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Martyn P.; Fan, Ying; Lawrence, David M.; Adam, Jennifer C.; Bolster, Diogo; Gochis, David J.; Hooper, Richard P.; Kumar, Mukesh; Leung, L. Ruby; Mackay, D. Scott; Maxwell, Reed M.; Shen, Chaopeng; Swenson, Sean C.; Zeng, Xubin

    2015-08-21

    Many of the scientific and societal challenges in understanding and preparing for global environmental change rest upon our ability to understand and predict the water cycle change at large river basin, continent, and global scales. However, current large-scale models, such as the land components of Earth System Models (ESMs), do not yet represent the terrestrial water cycle in a fully integrated manner or resolve the finer-scale processes that can dominate large-scale water budgets. This paper reviews the current representation of hydrologic processes in ESMs and identifies the key opportunities for improvement. This review suggests that (1) the development of ESMs has not kept pace with modeling advances in hydrology, both through neglecting key processes (e.g., groundwater) and neglecting key aspects of spatial variability and hydrologic connectivity; and (2) many modeling advances in hydrology can readily be incorporated into ESMs and substantially improve predictions of the water cycle. Accelerating modeling advances in ESMs requires comprehensive hydrologic benchmarking activities, in order to systematically evaluate competing modeling alternatives, understand model weaknesses, and prioritize model development needs. This demands stronger collaboration, both through greater engagement of hydrologists in ESM development and through more detailed evaluation of ESM processes in research watersheds. Advances in the representation of hydrologic process in ESMs can substantially improve energy, carbon and nutrient cycle prediction capabilities through the fundamental role the water cycle plays in regulating these cycles.

  10. An improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shaowei; Shi, Zhongke

    2016-07-01

    To explore and evaluate the impacts of relative velocity fluctuation on the dynamic characteristics and fuel consumptions of traffic flow, we present an improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation based on the full velocity difference model, then we carry out several numerical simulations to determine the optimal time window length and to explore how relative velocity fluctuation affects cars' velocity and its fluctuation as well as fuel consumptions. It can be found that the improved car-following model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion, and that taking relative velocity fluctuation into account in designing the advanced adaptive cruise control strategy can improve the traffic flow stability and reduce fuel consumptions.