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Sample records for delta frequency bursting

  1. LTP in Hippocampal Area CA1 Is Induced by Burst Stimulation over a Broad Frequency Range Centered around Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Lawrence M.; Kim, Eunyoung; Cooke, Jennifer D.; Holmes, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is typically studied using either continuous high-frequency stimulation or theta burst stimulation. Previous studies emphasized the physiological relevance of theta frequency; however, synchronized hippocampal activity occurs over a broader frequency range. We therefore tested burst stimulation at intervals from 100…

  2. Burst-by-burst laser frequency monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esproles, Carlos (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a system for real-time frequency monitoring and display of an RF burst where the burst frequency is analyzed and displayed on a burst-by-burst basis in order to allow for frequency control. Although the invention was made for monitoring the laser frequency of a LIDAR system, it has other applications where realtime monitoring is required. The novelty of the invention resides in the use of a counter that is reset at the beginning of each unit time of monitoring and then gated for a unit of time. The invention also has an LED bar graph for displaying the measure of frequency at the end of each unit time in either a bar length mode or a moving dot mode. In the latter mode, the operator makes necessary adjustments to maintain the dot at the center of the bar graph.

  3. Digital frequency estimation in burst mode QPSK transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, S.; Molinari, C.; Tartara, G.

    1990-07-01

    In burst digital transmission using PSK modulation with coherent detection, the recovery of the carrier reference phase and the symbol clock is a key aspect. If all users have a common clock synchronization, symbol timing needs not to be recovered in each burst. A digital processor for carrier recovery without preambles, in the presence of frequency offset, is considered. As an example, a 2 Mb/s QPSK transmission system is considered in which Eb/No = 10 dB, and the burst and estimation interval length L = 15. Using the algorithm described and averaging eight successive estimated frequency offsets, in order to eliminate anomalous errors, the bit-error-rate degradation is equal to 0.14 dB when Delta-f = 20 kHz.

  4. CMEs and frequency cutoff of solar bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, Al.; Konovalenko, Al.; Koval, Ar.; Volvach, Y.; Zarka, P.

    2016-05-01

    Radio observations of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff by the radio telescope UTR-2 (near Kharkiv, Ukraine) at 8-33 MHz on 17-19 August 2012 are presented. Such cutoff may be attributed to the emergence of the burst sources behind limb of the Sun with respect to an observer on the Earth. The events are strongly associated with solar eruptions occurred in a new active region. Ray tracing simulations show that the CMEs play a constructive role for the behind-limb bursts to be detected in ground-based observations. Likely, due to tunnel-like cavities with low density in CMEs, the radio emission of behind-limb solar bursts can be directed towards the Earth.

  5. Damped Oscillator with Delta-Kicked Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1996-01-01

    Exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation for quantum damped oscillator subject to frequency delta-kick describing squeezed states are obtained. The cases of strong, intermediate, and weak damping are investigated.

  6. Bursting frequency prediction in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    LIOU,WILLIAM W.; FANG,YICHUNG

    2000-02-01

    The frequencies of the bursting events associated with the streamwise coherent structures of spatially developing incompressible turbulent boundary layers were predicted using global numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld and the vertical vorticity equations of hydrodynamic stability problems. The structures were modeled as wavelike disturbances associated with the turbulent mean flow. The global method developed here involves the use of second and fourth order accurate finite difference formula for the differential equations as well as the boundary conditions. An automated prediction tool, BURFIT, was developed. The predicted resonance frequencies were found to agree very well with previous results using a local shooting technique and measured data.

  7. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Roy D.; Simpson, Michael L; Weinberger, Leor S.; Razooky, B; Cox, Chris D.; McCollum, James M.; Trimeloni, Tom; Singh, A

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts or as a constitutive, Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, building off of theoretical studies that exploit the time-resolved structure of stochastic fluctuations in gene expression, to develop a three-dimensional method for mapping underlying gene-regulatory mechanisms. Over 8,000 individual human genomic loci were analyzed, and at virtually all loci, episodic bursting as opposed to constitutive expression was found to be the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both frequency and size of transcriptional bursts vary equally across the human genome independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, while stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators, such as TNF, generate similar patterns of change in burst frequency and burst size. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus.

  8. Comparative Study of Solar Bursts at Sub-THz Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, L. O. T.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Marun, A.; Pereyra, P.; Raulin, J.-P.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a large set of 17 solar radio bursts observed at sub-THz (0.2 and 0.4 THz) in 2012-2014 together with the new solar patrol radio telescopes (45 and 90 GHz), operated at El Leoncito, in the Argentinean Andes, allowing the derivation of complete burst spectra in this unexplored range of frequencies. We discuss the uncertainties in sub-THz flux estimates caused by calibration techniques and the corrections for atmospheric transmission. The burst spectra were completed with microwave bursts data obtained by the Radio Solar Telescope Network - RSTN. The events selection was based on GOES soft X-rays burst reported for classes stronger then C. Nearly 50 percent of the bursts exhibited a frequency increasing sub-THz spectral component. The results suggest that the THz component might be always present, with the minimum turn-over frequencies shifting to higher frequencies for larger energies of the electrons producing the emissions.

  9. Delta frequency optogenetic stimulation of a thalamic nucleus reuniens is sufficient to produce working memory deficits; relevance to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Aranda R.; Varela, Carmen; Zhang, Yuchun; Shen, Yinghua; Xiong, Lealia; Wilson, Matthew; Lisman, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-frequency (delta/theta) oscillations in the thalamocortical system are elevated in schizophrenia during wakefulness and are also induced in the NMDAR hypofunction rat model. To determine whether abnormal delta oscillations might produce functional deficits, we used optogenetic methods in awake rats. We illuminated channelrhodopsin-2 in the thalamic nucleus reuniens (RE) at delta frequency and measured the effect on working memory performance (the RE is involved in working memory (WM), a process affected in schizophrenia (SZ)). Methods We injected RE with a virus (AAV) to transduce cells with channelrhodopsin-2. An optical fiber was implanted just dorsal to the hippocampus in order to illuminate RE axon terminals. Results During optogenetic delta frequency stimulation, rats displayed a strong WM deficit. On the following day, performance was normal if illumination was omitted. Conclusions The optogenetic experiments showed that delta frequency stimulation of a thalamic nucleus is sufficient to produce deficits in WM. This result supports the hypothesis that delta frequency bursting in particular thalamic nuclei has a causal role producing WM deficits in this SZ. The action potentials in these bursts may jam communication through the thalamus, thereby interfering with behaviors dependent on WM. Studies in thalamic slices using the NMDAR hypofunction model show that delta frequency bursting is dependent on T-type Ca2+ channels, a result that we confirmed here in vivo. These channels, which are strongly implicated in SZ by GWAS studies, may thus be a therapeutic target for treatment of SZ. PMID:25891221

  10. Schumann resonance frequency increase during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, V. C.; Maltsev, Y. P.; Vasiljev, A. N.; Schokotov, A. Y.; Belyajev, G. G.

    2004-01-01

    Variations of the first mode Schumann resonance frequency in the Kola Peninsula and of the first and second mode frequencies in Kamchatka during seven days of March-April 2001, when the intensive solar X-ray bursts occurred, are studied with 5 min averaging. All X-ray bursts were accompanied by ˜0.2 Hz increase in the first mode frequency, at least in one of the magnetic components. Duration of the increases coincided with that of the bursts. For the second mode the increase (in average by ˜0.3 Hz) was registered in most events, when the ELF noise level was not very high.

  11. High-Frequency Cutoff in Type III Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.; Koval, A. A.

    In this article we report about a group of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff, observed on 19 August of 2012 near 8:23 UT, simultaneously by three different radio telescopes: the Ukrainian decameter radio telescope (8-33 MHz), the French Nancay Decametric Array (10-70 MHz) and the Italian San Vito Solar Observatory of RSTN (25-180 MHz). Morphologically the bursts are very similar to the type III bursts. The solar activity is connected with the emergency of a new group of solar spots on the far side of the Sun with respect to observers on Earth. The solar bursts accompany many moderate flares over eastern limb. The refraction of the behind-limb radio bursts towards the Earth is favorable, if CMEs generate low-density cavities in solar corona.

  12. Low-Frequency Radio Bursts and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency radio phenomena are due to the presence of nonthermal electrons in the interplanetary (IP) medium. Understanding these phenomena is important in characterizing the space environment near Earth and other destinations in the solar system. Substantial progress has been made in the past two decades, because of the continuous and uniform data sets available from space-based radio and white-light instrumentation. This paper highlights some recent results obtained on IP radio phenomena. In particular, the source of type IV radio bursts, the behavior of type III storms, shock propagation in the IP medium, and the solar-cycle variation of type II radio bursts are considered. All these phenomena are closely related to solar eruptions and active region evolution. The results presented were obtained by combining data from the Wind and SOHO missions.

  13. Advanced waveforms and frequency with spinal cord stimulation: burst and high-frequency energy delivery.

    PubMed

    Pope, Jason E; Falowski, Steven; Deer, Tim R

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, software development has been key to the next generation of neuromodulation devices. In this review, we will describe the new strategies for electrical waveform delivery for spinal cord stimulation. A systematic literature review was performed using bibliographic databases, limited to the English language and human data, between 2010 and 2014. The literature search yielded three articles on burst stimulation and four articles on high-frequency stimulation. High-frequency and burst stimulation may offer advantages over tonic stimulation, as data suggest improved patient tolerance, comparable increase in function and possible success with a subset of patients refractory to tonic spinal cord stimulation. High-frequency and burst stimulation are new ways to deliver energy to the spinal cord that may offer advantages over tonic stimulation. These may offer new salvage strategies to mitigate spinal cord stimulation failure and improve cost-effectiveness by reducing explant rate. PMID:25846152

  14. Solar U- and J- Bursts at the Frequencies 10-30MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Abranin, E. P.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.

    2006-08-01

    In the present report we discuss the results of observations of solar U- and J- bursts over the frequency range 10-30MHz, which have been obtained within the framework of an international observational campaign in June - August, 2004 at the radio telescope UTR-2 (Kharkov, Ukraine). We succeed to observe these types of bursts for the first time at such a low frequencies due to combination of large effective area of the radio telescope and high sensitivity of the new back-end. During June - August, 2004 about 30 U- and J- bursts were registered, and only 5 of them were confidently identified as U-bursts that may speak about the relative sparsity of the latter at mentioned frequencies. Both the isolated bursts and their sequences were observed. On average the turning frequencies lay in the range 10-22 MHz that corresponds to the arches heliocentric heights of 1.6-2.2 solar radii. In some sequences the bursts turning frequency was stable that may indicate the arch stability, while in others the turning frequency had tendency to vary from burst to burst. Durations of U- and J- bursts did not differ from those of usual Type III bursts (3-7s), while the drift rates of an ascending arm (on the average -1MHz/ s) was a little bit lower, than those of ordinary Type III bursts in this range. The harmonic structure of U- and J- bursts, and also Jb-J pairs (analogous to IIIb-III pairs) were registered. Also L-shaped bursts (Leblanc and Hoyos, 1985) were recorded. A specific feature of L-shaped bursts is prolonged zero-drift region on their dynamic spectra. The sizes and configurations of the arches were estimated on the base of obtained data. Possible explanations of the observed properties of U- and J- bursts are discussed.

  15. Observation of solar radio bursts using swept-frequency radiospectrograph in 20-40 MHz Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Takashi; Oya, Hiroshi

    A new station for the observation of solar decametric radio bursts has been developed at Miyagi Vocational Training College in Tsukidate, Miyagi, Japan. Using the swept frequency radiospectrograph covering a frequency range from 20 MHz to 40 MHz within 200 msec, with bandwidth of 30 KHz, the radio outbursts from the sun have been currently monitored with colored dynamic spectrum display. After July 1982, successful observations provide the data which include all types of solar radio bursts such as type I, II, III, IV and V in the decametric wavelength range. In addition to these typical radio bursts, rising tone bursts with fast drift rate followed by strong type III bursts and a series of bursts repeating rising and falling tone bursts with slow drift rate have been observed.

  16. Low-Frequency Type III Bursts and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Makela, Pertti

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type 11 radio bursts associated with a set of six low frequency (<14 MHz) extended type III bursts from active region 10588. The durations were measured at 1 and 14 MHz using high resolution data from Wind/WAVES and were within the range (>15 min) normally used to define these bursts. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type 11 burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type 11 burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 min) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event.

  17. LONG-DURATION LOW-FREQUENCY TYPE III BURSTS AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Maekelae, Pertti

    2010-09-20

    We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type II radio bursts associated with a set of three complex, long-duration, low-frequency (<14 MHz) type III bursts from active region 10588 in 2004 April. The durations were measured at 1 and 14 MHz using data from Wind/WAVES and were well above the threshold value (>15 minutes) normally used to define these bursts. One of the three type III bursts was not associated with a type II burst, which also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1 MHz duration of the type III burst (28 minutes) for this event was near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement events. Yet, there was no sign of an SEP event. On the other hand, the other two type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but were accompanied by WAVES type II bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. The CMEs for the three events had similar speeds, and the flares also had similar size and duration. This study suggests that the occurrence of a complex, long-duration, low-frequency type III burst is not a good indicator of an SEP event.

  18. The transmission of low frequency medical data using delta modulation techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Dawson, C. T.

    1972-01-01

    The transmission of low-frequency medical data using delta modulation techniques is described. The delta modulators are used to distribute the low-frequency data into the passband of the telephone lines. Both adaptive and linear delta modulators are considered. Optimum bit rates to minimize distortion and intersymbol interference are discussed. Vibrocardiographic waves are analyzed as a function of bit rate and delta modulator configuration to determine their reproducibility for medical evaluation.

  19. Narrowband frequency-drift structures in solar type IV bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Yukio; Ono, Takayuki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Misawa, Hiroaki; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Katoh, Yuto; Masuda, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2013-12-01

    We have established the Zao Solar Radiospectrograph (ZSR), a new solar radio observation system, at the Zao observatory of Tohoku University, Japan. We observed narrowband fine structures with type IV bursts with ZSR on 2 and 3 November 2008. The observed fine structures are similar to fiber bursts in terms of the drift rates and the existence of emission and absorption stripes. Statistical analysis of the drift rates, however, shows that the observed fine structures are different from the ordinary fiber bursts as regards the sense and the magnitude of their drift rates. First, the observed drift rates include both positive and negative rates, whereas ordinary fiber bursts are usually characterized by negative drift rates. Second, the absolute values of the observed drift rates are tens of MHz s-1, whereas the typical drift rate of fiber bursts at 325 MHz is approximately -9 MHz s-1. In addition, all fine structures analyzed have narrow emission bands of less than 17 MHz. We also show that the observed narrowband emission features with drift rates of approximately 40 MHz s-1 can be interpreted as the propagation of whistler-mode waves, which is the same process as that underlying fiber bursts.

  20. Spatial-temporal variation of low-frequency earthquake bursts near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chunquan; Guyer, Robert; Shelly, David; Trugman, Daniel; Frank, William; Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Tectonic tremor (TT) and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) have been found in the deeper crust of various tectonic environments globally in the last decade. The spatial-temporal behaviour of LFEs provides insight into deep fault zone processes. In this study, we examine recurrence times from a 12-yr catalogue of 88 LFE families with ˜730 000 LFEs in the vicinity of the Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) in central California. We apply an automatic burst detection algorithm to the LFE recurrence times to identify the clustering behaviour of LFEs (LFE bursts) in each family. We find that the burst behaviours in the northern and southern LFE groups differ. Generally, the northern group has longer burst duration but fewer LFEs per burst, while the southern group has shorter burst duration but more LFEs per burst. The southern group LFE bursts are generally more correlated than the northern group, suggesting more coherent deep fault slip and relatively simpler deep fault structure beneath the locked section of SAF. We also found that the 2004 Parkfield earthquake clearly increased the number of LFEs per burst and average burst duration for both the northern and the southern groups, with a relatively larger effect on the northern group. This could be due to the weakness of northern part of the fault, or the northwesterly rupture direction of the Parkfield earthquake.

  1. On the Directivity of Low-Frequency Type IV Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Makela, P.; Yashiro, S.; Cairns, I. H.

    2016-01-01

    An intense type IV radio burst was observed by the STEREO Behind (STB) spacecraft located about 144 deg. behind Earth. The burst was associated with a large solar eruption that occurred on the backside of the Sun (N05E151) close to the disk center in the STB view. The eruption was also observed by the STEREO Ahead (STA) spacecraft (located at 149 deg. ahead of Earth) as an eruption close to the west limb (N05W60) in that view. The type IV burst was complete in STB observations in that the envelope reached the lowest frequency and then receded to higher frequencies. The burst was partial viewed from STA, revealing only the edge coming down to the lowest frequency. The type IV burst was not observed at all near Earth because the source was 61 deg. behind the east limb. The eruption was associated with a low-frequency type II burst observed in all three views, although it was not very intense. Solar energetic particles were also observed at both STEREOs and at SOHO, suggesting that the shock was much extended, consistent with the very high speed of the CME (2048 km/s). These observations suggest that the type IV emission is directed along a narrow cone above the flare site. We confirm this result statistically using the type IV bursts of solar cycle 23.

  2. Interaction between pulsed discharge and radio frequency discharge burst at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Ying; Shi, Yuncheng; Zhang, Jing; Shi, J. J.

    2015-08-01

    The atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) with dual excitations in terms of pulsed voltage and pulse-modulation radio frequency (rf) power are studied experimentally between two parallel plates electrodes. Pulse-modulation applied in rf APGD temporally separates the discharge into repetitive discharge bursts, between which the high voltage pulses are introduced to ignite sub-microsecond pulsed discharge. The discharge characteristics and spatio-temporal evolution are investigated by means of current voltage characteristics and time resolved imaging, which suggests that the introduced pulsed discharge assists the ignition of rf discharge burst and reduces the maintain voltage of rf discharge burst. Furtherly, the time instant of pulsed discharge between rf discharge bursts is manipulated to study the ignition dynamics of rf discharge burst.

  3. Interaction between pulsed discharge and radio frequency discharge burst at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Ying; Shi, Yuncheng; Zhang, Jing; Shi, J. J.

    2015-08-15

    The atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) with dual excitations in terms of pulsed voltage and pulse-modulation radio frequency (rf) power are studied experimentally between two parallel plates electrodes. Pulse-modulation applied in rf APGD temporally separates the discharge into repetitive discharge bursts, between which the high voltage pulses are introduced to ignite sub-microsecond pulsed discharge. The discharge characteristics and spatio-temporal evolution are investigated by means of current voltage characteristics and time resolved imaging, which suggests that the introduced pulsed discharge assists the ignition of rf discharge burst and reduces the maintain voltage of rf discharge burst. Furtherly, the time instant of pulsed discharge between rf discharge bursts is manipulated to study the ignition dynamics of rf discharge burst.

  4. Experimental tests of the generation mechanism of auroral medium frequency burst radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N. L.; Labelle, J.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Hughes, J. M.; Lummerzheim, D.

    2009-09-01

    Medium frequency (MF) burst is an impulsive auroral radio emission at 1.3-4.5 MHz commonly detected by ground-based instruments for a few minutes at substorm onsets. It is thought to arise from mode conversion radiation. The Dartmouth College MF radio interferometer at Toolik Field Station, Alaska (68.51° invariant latitude), measured spectra, amplitudes, and directions of arrival (DOA) of 47 MF burst events during 2006-2007 and 49 events during 2007-2008. Statistical analysis of these events shows that they come predominantly from the south and east of Toolik, as expected because propagation conditions are more favorable poleward and westward of the active auroral arcs than equatorward or eastward during premidnight (westward moving) substorm onset activity. Case studies of a selected MF burst event on 20 November 2007 show that motions of the radio emissions qualitatively track the motions of auroral arcs simultaneously observed with all-sky camera. Case studies of DOA data of selected MF burst events on 31 January and 20 November 2007 show that higher-frequency components of MF burst arrive at higher elevation angles than lower-frequency components. Statistical studies confirm this trend. Ray-tracing analysis shows that this trend implies that sources of the higher-frequency components of the MF burst are at higher altitudes than those of the lower-frequency components. The analysis also shows that the MF burst comes from the bottomside F region ionosphere. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of MF burst emission whereby the emissions originate from mode conversion of Langmuir or upper hybrid waves excited over a range of altitudes in the bottomside F region.

  5. Dual frequency observations of solar microwave bursts using the VLA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevgaonkar, R. K.; Kundu, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous VLA observations of microwave bursts at 6 and 2 cm in a solar active region are presented and discussed. Using the full-day synthesis, I and V maps of the active region are produced. The radiation mechanisms at these wavelengths are discussed and the upper and lower bounds on the magnetic field of the active region are derived. The magnetic fields in the microwave burst source are estimated from the brightness temperature and the degree of circular polarization. It is concluded that the 6 cm radiation originates from the bulk heated plasma, whereas the 2 cm radiation is due to the nonthermal particles generated in the energy-release process. The delay between the peaks of emission at the two wavelengths is interpreted using a dc electric field model of flares. Depending on the strength of the electric field and the density in the flaring region, delays in either sense can be observed.

  6. Theoretical development and critical analysis of burst frequency equations for passive valves on centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Soroori, Salar; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Soin, Norhayati; Kulinsky, Lawrence; Madou, Marc

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a theoretical development and critical analysis of the burst frequency equations for capillary valves on a microfluidic compact disc (CD) platform. This analysis includes background on passive capillary valves and the governing models/equations that have been developed to date. The implicit assumptions and limitations of these models are discussed. The fluid meniscus dynamics before bursting is broken up into a multi-stage model and a more accurate version of the burst frequency equation for the capillary valves is proposed. The modified equations are used to evaluate the effects of various CD design parameters such as the hydraulic diameter, the height to width aspect ratio, and the opening wedge angle of the channel on the burst pressure. PMID:23292292

  7. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C.; Swift, G.W. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  8. On-off control of burst high frequency electrical stimulation to suppress 4-AP induced seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Chu; Lin, Chou-Ching K.; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2013-06-01

    Objective. The goal of this study was to investigate, using model simulations and animal experiments, the efficiency and the side effects of burst high frequency stimulation combined with on-off control in seizure suppression. Approach. A modified mathematical hippocampal seizure model was created to provide evidence of the eligibility of this approach. In the experimental setup, two recording electrodes were inserted into bilateral septal CA1 of the hippocampus, and a stimulation electrode was placed on the ventral hippocampal commissure of a rat. After seizures had been induced by 4-aminopyridine treatment, on-off control stimulation was used to suppress the seizures at 20 s intervals. The stimulation time, cumulative charge and post-stimulation suppression were used to assess the effects of burst duration. Main results. The results showed that burst stimulation could suppress the seizures during the control period and burst stimulation of a shorter duration could keep the seizure suppressed with less effort. By decreasing the burst duration, the cumulative stimulation time became shorter, the delivered cumulative charge became lower, and the cumulative time of post-stimulation suppression became longer. Significance. The on-off control stimulation not only prolonged the duration of suppression but also avoided the side effects of the conversion of seizure patterns. In particular, decreasing the specified burst duration increased the efficiency of the burst stimulation.

  9. Decameter Type III Bursts with Changing Frequency Drift-Rate Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Briand, C.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Zarka, P.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Panchenko, M.; Denis, L.; Zaqarashvili, T.; Shergelashvili, B.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss properties of type III bursts that change the sign of their drift rate from negative to positive and vice versa. Moreover, these bursts may change the sign of their drift rates more than once. These particular type III bursts were observed simultaneously by the radio telescopes UTR-2 ( Ukrainian T-shaped Radio telescope, Kharkov, Ukraine), URAN-2 ( Ukrainian Radio telescope of the Academy of Sciences, Poltava, Ukraine), and by the NDA ( Nançay Decametric Array, Nancay, France) in the frequency range 8 - 41 MHz. The negative drift rates of these bursts are similar to those of previously reported decameter type III bursts and vary from -0.7 MHz s-1 to -1.7 MHz s-1, but their positive drift rates vary in a wider range from 0.44 MHz s-1 to 6 MHz s-1. Unlike inverted U-bursts, the tracks of these type III bursts have C- or inverted C-shapes.

  10. Dynamic spectra of radio frequency bursts associated with edge-localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatipamula, Shekar G.; Yun, G. S.; Leem, J.; Park, H. K.; Kim, K. W.; Akiyama, T.; Lee, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetic emissions in the radio frequency (RF) range are detected in the high-confinement-mode (H-mode) plasma using a fast RF spectrometer on the KSTAR tokamak. The emissions at the crash events of edge-localized modes (ELMs) are found to occur as strong RF bursts with dynamic features in intensity and spectrum. The RF burst spectra (obtained with frequency resolution better than 10 MHz) exhibit diverse spectral features and evolve in multiple steps before the onset and through the ELM crash: (1) a narrow-band spectral line around 200 MHz persistent for extended duration in the pre-ELM crash times, (2) harmonic spectral lines with spacing comparable to deuterium or hydrogen ion cyclotron frequency at the pedestal, (3) rapid onset (faster than ~1 μs) of intense RF burst with wide-band continuum in frequency which coincides with the onset of ELM crash, and (4) a few additional intense RF bursts with chirping-down narrow-band spectrum during the crash. These observations indicate plasma waves are excited in the pedestal region and strongly correlated with the ELM dynamics such as the onset of the explosive crash. Thus the investigation of RF burst occurrence and their dynamic spectral features potentially offers the possibility of exploring H-mode physics in great detail.

  11. Experimental tests of a topside generation mechanism for auroral medium frequency burst radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, M.; Labelle, J. W.; Roberg-Clark, G. T.; McCready, M. A.; Bunch, N. L.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2011-12-01

    The auroral zone is the source of multiple kinds of radio emissions that can be observed on the ground. The study of radio emissions offers a way to remotely sense space plasma processes and, in the case of auroral emissions, to use the auroral ionosphere as a large-scale plasma physics laboratory. Medium frequency (MF) burst is an impulsive radio emission at 1.5-4.5 MHz observed on the ground. Its generation mechanism is unknown, and it is often associated with the onset of substorms. Using continuous wave measurements, Bunch and LaBelle [2009] reported that MF burst is made up of both structured and unstructured features. The most commonly observed structured feature appears as a "backwards seven" on a time-frequency spectrogram. Recently, LaBelle [2011] proposed that MF bursts originate as Langmuir waves on the topside of the ionosphere that subsequently mode-convert into electromagnetic waves that are observed on the ground. We report two experimental tests of this theory. First, the theory predicts that the maximum frequency of MF burst must lie below the maximum ionospheric plasma frequency along the source magnetic field line. We have identified eleven instances where MF bursts were observed during operations of the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. A preliminary analysis of these data suggests that for all or nearly all eleven cases the maximum frequency of the MF burst lies below the maximum F-region plasma frequency inferred from the radar data. The second prediction of the theory concerns the "backwards seven" fine structures. The theory predicts that the lower frequency of a "backwards seven" fine structure must lie above the L-mode cutoff along the wave propagation path. Assuming a slab ionosphere, LaBelle [2011] found that this prediction held for the six fine structures reported by Bunch and LaBelle [2009]. In 2010, continuous wave measurements were made at South Pole Station, yielding over one hundred observations

  12. Potential Impacts of Tsangpo Lake-Burst Megafloods and Their Preservation in the Bengal Basin and Delta System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, M. S.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Palamenghi, L.; Hossain, S.; Pickering, J.; Sincavage, R.; Spiess, V.; Williams, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Large, glacially-dammed lakes formed via the impoundment of the Tsangpo River in Tibet led to lake-burst floods during the late Pleistocene and at least two intervals in the early and late Holocene. We present the first critical examination of the potential effects that the Holocene lake drainages had on the downstream Bengal delta and their preservation in the geologic record. Based on stratigraphic evidence from cores drilled across the delta, digital elevation models, seismic data, and hydraulic flow calculations, we propose that lake-burst floods could be responsible for (a) triggering short-lived avulsion events of the Brahmaputra River into the Sylhet basin, (b) the formation of two apparent overflow channels on the Madhupur Terrace, and (c) the deposition of a large, mass transport deposit in the submarine Swatch of No Ground canyon system. Comparing the early and late Holocene events, we expect the distribution of the floodwaters and their deposits in the two intervals to differ sharply owing to major differences in flood volume and the paleotopography of the delta. Despite much higher discharge, the early Holocene floods were largely accommodated within the vast lowstand valley of the Brahmaputra, with some spillover into the Sylhet basin. In contrast, the late Holocene floods likely spread over a larger area due to the relatively even, low-gradient topography. Offshore, a 40 m thick chaotic, semi-transparent seismic facies observed in the canyon corresponds temporally with the early Holocene floods and is tentatively interpreted as a subaqueous debris flow generated by the flood pulse directed to the canyon via the lowstand river valley. We examine the theoretical preservation potential of rare flood events in light of signal shredding mechanisms to help explain why evidence of the larger, early Holocene floods is preserved whereas we have found no clear signal from the younger floods.

  13. A wide range sigma—delta fractional-N frequency synthesizer with adaptive frequency calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianjun, Wei; Hanjun, Jiang; Lingwei, Zhang; Jingjing, Dong; Fule, Li; Zhihua, Wang; Chun, Zhang

    2013-06-01

    A wide range fractional-N frequency synthesizer in 0.18 μm RF CMOS technology is implemented. A switched-capacitors bank LC-tank VCO and an adaptive frequency calibration technique are used to expand the frequency range. A 16-bit third-order sigma—delta modulator with dither is used to randomize the fractional spur. The active area is 0.6 mm2. The experimental results show the proposed frequency synthesizer consumes 4.3 mA from a single 1.8 V supply voltage except for buffers. The frequency range is 1.44-2.11 GHz and the frequency resolution is less than 0.4 kHz. The phase noise is -94 dBc/Hz @ 100 kHz and -121 dBc/Hz @ 1 MHz at the output of the prescaler with a loop bandwidth of approximately 120 kHz. The performance meets the requirements for the multi-band and multi-mode transceiver applications.

  14. Satellite observations of type 3 solar radio bursts at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Type III solar radio bursts were observed from 10 MHz to 10 KHz by satellite experiments above the terrestrial plasmasphere. Solar radio emission in this frequency range results from excitation of the interplanetary plasma by energetic particles propagating outward along open field lines over distances from 5 solar radii to at least 1 AU from the sun. This review summarizes the morphology, characteristics and analysis of individual as well as storms of bursts. Burst rise times are interpreted in terms of exciter length and dispersion while decay times refer to the radiation damping process. The combination of radio observations at the lower frequencies and in-situ measurements on nonrelativistic electrons at 1 AU provide data on the energy range and efficiency of the wave-particle interactions responsible for the radio emission.

  15. Temporal Intraspeech Masking of Plosive Bursts: Effects of Hearing Loss and Frequency Shaping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackersie, Carol L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes were (a) to compare masking of consonant bursts by adjacent vowels for listeners with and without hearing loss and (b) to determine the extent to which the temporal intraspeech masking can be reduced by a simulated hearing-aid frequency-response shaping. Method: Fourteen adults with sensorineural hearing loss and 10 with…

  16. Auroral Radio Emission Direction of Arrival Studies of Simultaneous Medium Frequency Burst and Auroral Hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, M.; Labelle, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The auroral zone is the source of multiple kinds of radio emissions that can be observed on the ground. The study of radio emissions offers a way to remotely sense space plasma processes and, in the case of auroral emissions, to use the auroral ionosphere as a large-scale plasma physics laboratory. Medium frequency (MF) burst is an impulsive radio emission at 1.5-4.5 MHz observed on the ground. Its generation mechanism is unknown, and it is often associated with the onset of substorms. Auroral hiss is an impulsive emission observed on the ground at frequencies up to 1 MHz and is also associated with substorm onset. LaBelle et al. [1997] reported a temporal relationship between MF burst and auroral hiss. Multiple impulses of both MF burst and auroral hiss occurred simultaneously over a time period that in certain cases lasted tens of minutes. While the temporal relationship on the timescale of seconds is well established, the spatial relationship between MF burst and auroral hiss has yet to be investigated. Dartmouth College currently operates a broadband (0-5 MHz) four-element radio interferometer at Toolik Field Station in Alaska (68° 38' N, 149° 36' W, 68.5° magnetic latitude) in order to study the direction of arrival (DOA) of radio emissions. Since the antenna spacing is 50 meters, the interferometer is optimized for DOA measurements of MF bursts. However, in certain cases, it can provide the DOA for the high-frequency portion of impulsive auroral hiss. We present two case studies that represent the first simultaneous DOA measurements of impulsive auroral hiss and MF burst. On March 4, 2010, the DOA of MF burst was predominantly from 30 degrees south of east, an observation consistent with the statistical work performed by Bunch et al. [2009]. Simultaneous DOA measurements of the high-frequency portion of auroral hiss also showed the DOA as approximately 30 degrees south of east but with greater scatter in the data. The second case study, which involved an

  17. FIRST VERY LOW FREQUENCY DETECTION OF SHORT REPEATED BURSTS FROM MAGNETAR SGR J1550-5418

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Takahashi, T.; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Bertoni, Fernando C. P.; Fagundes, P. R.; Chau, J.; Schuch, N. J.; Hayakawa, M.; Hobara, Y.; Terasawa, T.

    2010-09-20

    We report on the first detection of ionospheric disturbances caused by short repeated gamma-ray bursts from the magnetar SGR J1550-5418. Very low frequency (VLF) radio wave data obtained in South America clearly show sudden amplitude and phase changes at the corresponding times of eight soft gamma-ray repeater bursts. Maximum amplitude and phase changes of the VLF signals appear to be correlated with the gamma-ray fluence. On the other hand, VLF recovery timescales do not show any significant correlation with the fluence, possibly suggesting that the bursts' spectra are not similar to each other. In summary, Earth's ionosphere can be used as a very large gamma-ray detector and the VLF observations provide us with a new method to monitor high-energy astrophysical phenomena without interruption such as Earth occultation.

  18. On the propagation and mode conversion of auroral medium frequency bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, M. C.; LaBelle, J.; Kim, E.-H.; Yoon, P. H.; Johnson, J. R.; Cairns, I. H.

    2016-02-01

    Auroral medium frequency (MF) bursts are broadband, impulsive radio emissions associated with local substorm onsets. MF bursts consist of a characteristic fine structure whereby the higher frequencies arrive 10-100 ms before the lower frequencies. LaBelle (2011a) proposed that MF bursts originate as Langmuir/Z mode waves on the topside of the ionosphere that mode-convert to LO mode waves and propagate to ground level, with the fine structure resulting by propagation delays due to the topside ionospheric density profile. We investigate three aspects of this mechanism. First, full-wave calculations are used to simulate the MF burst fine structure using a realistic ionospheric density profile. The delay between the highest and lowest frequencies is 21 ms. This value is smaller than the experimentally determined delays of ˜100 ms presented in Bunch and LaBelle (2009), but differences between the topside electron number density profile used in the simulations and the number density profile during disturbed conditions make comparisons only approximate. Second, the Landau damping of Langmuir/Z mode waves on the topside ionosphere is calculated, assuming the electron distribution function consists of a cold background population (ne0) and a warm secondary population (nse). The Landau damping is small when nse/ne0 = 0.04% (consistent with Maggs and Lotko (1981)) but is significant when nse/ne0 > 0.4%. Finally, full-wave calculations are used to determine the mode conversion efficiency from Langmuir/Z mode waves to LO mode waves. These imply that waves would suffer an attenuation of wave energy density of approximately 5-10% if they are generated with their wave vectors in a narrow cone centered around the local magnetic field. Taken together, these calculations suggest that for small values of nse/ne0 <0.4%, the mechanism proposed by LaBelle (2011a) is a plausible explanation for the origin of MF bursts.

  19. Observations of Low Frequency Solar Radio Bursts from the Rosse Solar-Terrestrial Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, P.; Carley, E. P.; McCauley, J.; Gallagher, P. T.; Monstein, C.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2012-10-01

    The Rosse Solar-Terrestrial Observatory (RSTO; http://www.rosseobservatory.ie) was established at Birr Castle, Co. Offaly, Ireland (53°05'38.9″, 7°55'12.7″) in 2010 to study solar radio bursts and the response of the Earth's ionosphere and geomagnetic field. To date, three Compound Astronomical Low-cost Low-frequency Instrument for Spectroscopy in Transportable Observatory (CALLISTO) spectrometers have been installed, with the capability of observing in the frequency range of 10 - 870 MHz. The receivers are fed simultaneously by biconical and log-periodic antennas. Nominally, frequency spectra in the range of 10 - 400 MHz are obtained with four sweeps per second over 600 channels. Here, we describe the RSTO solar radio spectrometer set-up, and present dynamic spectra of samples of type II, III and IV radio bursts. In particular, we describe the fine-scale structure observed in type II bursts, including band splitting and rapidly varying herringbone features.

  20. Indication of radio frequency interference (RFI) sources for solar burst monitoring in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Z. S.; Abidin, Z. Z.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Shariff, N. N. M.

    2012-06-01

    Apart of monitoring the Sun project, the Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) surveying in the region of (1-1200) MHz has been conducted. The main objective of this surveying is to test and qualify the potential of monitoring a continuous radio emission of Solar in Malaysia. This work is also an initiative of International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) project where Malaysia is one of the country that participate a e-Callisto Spectrometer network in order to study the behavior of Solar radio burst in frequency of (45-800) MHz region which will be install in this October. Detail results will indicate the potential of monitoring a solar in Malaysia.

  1. Jamming effects on code synchronization of burst-mode frequency-hop spread-spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grouw, Mike G.; Wicker, Mark A.

    The authors characterize the performance of a multiple-dwell FHSS (frequency-hopping spread-spectrum) code synchronization scheme in the presence of channel dynamics. Random hop jamming is assumed. The coarse acquisition system uses both passive and active correlation to implement a serial search of the code-uncertainty region. The in-lock monitoring is accomplished using a two-dwell active correlator with a relatively long integration time. Both burst- and continuous-mode communications links are considered. Appropriate performance parameters are developed, and design considerations are discussed. Performance curves are given for the various cases considered. Although a fixed-threshold multiple-dwell synchronization scheme adequately mitigates the effects of dynamic jamming in a continuous-mode communications link, it is shown to be inadequate for a burst-mode communications link.

  2. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-01-01

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  3. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-11-30

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  4. Direction of Arrival Studies of Medium Frequency Burst Radio Emissions at Toolik Lake, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N.; Labelle, J.; Weatherwax, A.; Lummerzheim, D.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.

    2008-05-01

    MF burst is an impulsive radio emission of auroral origin, which can be detected by ground-based instruments at frequencies between 1,300 and 4,500kHz. MF burst has been shown to be associated with substorm onset, but its exact generation mechanism remains unknown, although it is thought to arise from mode conversion radiation [see review by LaBelle and Treumann, 2002] . In search of the generation mechanism of this emission, Dartmouth College has deployed radio interferometers in Alaska, Northern Canada, Greenland, and Antarctica, including a three-element interferometer deployed to Toolik Field Station in Alaska during the summer of 2006. This instrument measured spectra, amplitudes and directions of arrival (DOA's) of over 47 MF burst events between November 30, 2006 and May 26, 2007. These data represent the first DOA measurements of impulsive MF burst, of which selected case studies were presented at the Fall 2007 AGU conference. Here we present a statistical survey of all 47 events as well as detailed analysis of three events occurring on: Mar 5, Mar 23, and Nov 20, 2007. For the statistical survey, we present distributions of DOA as a function of local time and frequency. In each case study we analyze the direction of arrival of the emissions as a function of both time and frequency within each event. The time variations will be compared with the time variations of optical auroral forms simultaneously measured with all-sky cameras. The dependence of the arrival direction on frequency enables a significant test of the generation mechanism whereby the waves are emitted at the local plasma or upper hybrid frequency in the topside ionosphere, predicting that higher frequencies should originate at lower altitudes. These three events have been selected because All-Sky camera data are available at these times from Toolik Lake and Fort Yukon, Alaska. These are critical both for identifying which optical features are associated with the radio emissions as well as for

  5. Relationship between low and high frequencies in the \\delta Scuti star KIC 9764965

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostopchina, A.; Breger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Two years of Kepler spacecraft data of the \\delta Sct/\\gamma Dor star KIC 9764965 revealed 67 statistically significant frequencies from 0.45 to 59.17 c d-1 (0.005 to 0.685 mHz). The 19 low frequencies do not show equidistant period spacing predicted for gravity modes of successive radial order. We note a favored frequency spacing of 2.053 c d-1 that appears in both the low-frequency (gravity mode) region and high-frequency (pressure mode) regions. The value of this frequency spacing also occurs as a dominant low frequency and in a high-frequency triplet. A peak at exactly twice the value of the 2.053 c d-1 mode is shown not to be a Fourier harmonic of the low-frequency peak due to a different amplitude variability. This behavior is also seen in other \\delta Sct stars. The test for resonant mode coupling between low and high frequencies could not be carried out due to the small amplitudes of the peaks, making it difficult to separate the parent and child modes.

  6. 5-HT3 receptor-dependent modulation of respiratory burst frequency, regularity, and episodicity in isolated adult turtle brainstems

    PubMed Central

    Bartman, Michelle E.; Wilkerson, Julia E.R.; Johnson, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the role of central serotonin 5-HT3 receptors in respiratory motor control, respiratory motor bursts were recorded from hypoglossal (XII) nerve rootlets on isolated adult turtle brainstems during bath-application of 5-HT3 receptor agonists and antagonists. mCPBG and PBG (5-HT3 receptor agonists) acutely increased XII burst frequency and regularity, and decreased bursts/episode. Tropisetron and MDL72222 (5-HT3 antagonists) increased bursts/episode, suggesting endogenous 5-HT3 receptor activation modulates burst timing in vitro. Tropisetron blocked all mCPBG effects, and the PBG-induced reduction in bursts/episode. Tropisetron application following mCPBG application did not reverse the long-lasting (2 h) mCPBG-induced decrease in bursts/episode. We conclude that endogenous 5-HT3 receptor activation regulates respiratory frequency, regularity, and episodicity in turtles and may induce a form of respiratory plasticity with the long-lasting changes in respiratory regularity. PMID:20399913

  7. Energetic electrons from solar flares and associated type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    Distinct Kev electron events as observed by satellites near the earth are, in general, associated with solar flares which are accompained by the emission of both metric and hectometric type 3 radio bursts. The positions of these flares are mainly on the western hemisphere of the sun. These results show that Kev electrons propagate under the control of the magnetic field in the interplanetary space and that, while propagating through this space, these electrons excite type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies. Emission characteristics of hectometric type 3 bursts are briefly considered in relation to the positions of associated flares.

  8. Bursting frequency versus phase synchronization in time-delayed neuron networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordenfelt, Anders; Used, Javier; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the dependence of the average bursting frequency on time delay for neuron networks with randomly distributed time-delayed chemical synapses. The result is compared with the corresponding curve for the phase synchronization and it turns out that, in some intervals, these have a very similar shape and appear as almost mirror images of each other. We have analyzed both the map-based chaotic Rulkov model and the continuous Hindmarsh-Rose model, yielding the same conclusions. In order to gain further insight, we also analyzed time-delayed Kuramoto models displaying an overall behavior similar to that observed on the neuron network models. For the Kuramoto models, we were able to derive analytical formulas providing an implicit functional relationship between the mean frequency and the phase synchronization. These formulas suggest a strong dependence between those two measures, which could explain the similarities in shape between the curves.

  9. Two-component dual-scatter laser Doppler velocimeter with frequency burst signal readout.

    PubMed

    Brayton, D B; Kalb, H T; Crosswy, F L

    1973-06-01

    A dual-scatter laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system designed for measuring wind tunnel flow velocity is described. The system simultaneously measures two orthogonal velocity components of a flowing fluid at a common point in the flow. Essential single-velocity component dual-scatter concepts are presented to simplify the description of the more sophisticated two-component system. To implement the two-component system three laser beams with a 0 degrees , 45 degrees , and 90 degrees polarization plane relationship are focused to a common point in the flow by the system-transmitting optics. The beams interfere to form two perpendicular sets of interference fringe planes that are orthogonally polarized. The system-receiving optics collect and separate the orthogonally polarized components of laser radiation scattered from micron-size particles moving with the flowing fluid through the ringes. The system requires no artificial seeding, since intrinsic test section aerosols are utilized for radiation scattering. The passage of each scatter particle through the interference fringes simultaneously produces two frequency-burst-type photodetected signals, the frequencies of which are directly proportional to two perpendicular components of particle velocity. The system photodetection, signal-conditioning, and data acquisition instrumentation is specifically designed to process the frequency burst information in the time domain as opposed to spectrum analysis or frequency domain processing. The system was initially evaluated in an AEDC wind tunnel operating over a Mach number range from 0.6 to 1.5. The LDV and calculated wind tunnel mean velocity data agreed to within 1.25%; flow direction deviations of a few milliradians were resolved. PMID:20125494

  10. The empty delta sign: frequency and significance in 76 cases of dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Virapongse, C; Cazenave, C; Quisling, R; Sarwar, M; Hunter, S

    1987-03-01

    The presence of the empty delta sign on contrast material-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scans of the brain is considered pathognomonic of sagittal sinus thrombosis (SST); however, a valid explanation for its appearance is lacking, despite several hypotheses. To determine the frequency of the sign and its prognostic significance, 76 reported cases (112 CT manifestations) of SST and SST-related intracranial sinovenous occlusive disease were reviewed. Ten CT signs related to both disease processes were reported; the empty delta sign was the most frequently reported sign (28.6%) of SST. Patients with hemorrhagic infarction and/or the empty delta sign on CT scans had the poorest prognosis. A case illustrative of the empty delta sign is described in which there was engorgement of endothelial- and nonendothelial-lined spaces in the dura mater with hemorrhagic rupture into the dural leaf. The empty delta sign can probably be explained on the basis of the rich dural venous collateral circulation, consisting primarily of lateral lacunae, a vascular mesh (dural cavernous spaces), and meningeal venous tributaries. PMID:3809494

  11. Ion Acoustic Wave Frequencies and Onset Times During Type 3 Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Conflicting interpretations exist for the low-frequency ion acoustic (S) waves often observed by ISEE 3 in association with intense Langmuir (L) waves in the source regions of type III solar radio bursts near 1 AU. Two indirect lines of observational evidence, as well as plasma theory, suggest they are produced by the electrostatic (ES) decay L yields L(PRIME) + S. However, contrary to theoretical predictions, an existing analysis of the wave frequencies instead favors the electromagnetic (EM) decays L yields T + S, where T denotes an EM wave near the plasma frequency. This conflict is addressed here by comparing the observed wave frequencies and onset times with theoretical predictions for the ES and EM decays, calculated using the time-variable electron beam and magnetic field orientation data, rather than the nominal values used previously. Field orientation effects and beam speed variations are shown analytically to produce factor-of-three effects, greater than the difference in wave frequencies predicted for the ES and EM decays; effects of similar magnitude occur in the events analyzed here. The S-wave signals are extracted by hand from a sawtooth noise background, greatly improving the association between S waves and intense L waves. Very good agreement exists between the time-varying predictions for the ES decay and the frequencies of most (but not all) wave bursts. The waves occur only after the ES decay becomes kinematically allowed, which is consistent with the ES decay proceeding and producing most of the observed signals. Good agreement exists between the EM decay's predictions and a significant fraction of the S-wave observations while the EM decay is kinematically allowed. The wave data are not consistent, however, with the EM decay being the dominant nonlinear process. Often the observed waves are sufficiently broadband to overlap simultaneously the frequency ranges predicted for the ES and EM decays. Coupling the dominance of the ES decay with this

  12. Low-frequency analog signal distribution on digital photonic networks by optical delta-sigma modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2013-12-01

    We propose a delta-sigma modulation scheme for low- and medium-frequency signal transmission in a digital photonic network system. A 10-Gb/s-class optical transceiver with a delta-sigma modulator utilized as a high-speed analog-to-digital converter (ADC) provides a binary optical signal. On the signal reception side, a low-cost and slow-speed photonic receiver directly converts the binary signal into an analog signal at frequencies from several hundreds of kilohertz several tens of megahertz. Further, by using a clock and data recovery circuit at the receiver to reduce jitters, the single-sideband phase noise of the generated signals can be significantly reduced.

  13. Frequency Dependence of Polarization of Zebra Pattern in Type-IV Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Kazutaka; Misawa, H.; Iwai, K.; Tsuchiya, F.; Obara, T.

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the polarization characteristics of a zebra pattern (ZP) in a type-IV solar radio burst observed with AMATERAS on 2011 June 21 for the purpose of evaluating the generation processes of ZPs. Analyzing highly resolved spectral and polarization data revealed the frequency dependence of the degree of circular polarization and the delay between two polarized components for the first time. The degree of circular polarization was 50%-70% right-handed and it varied little as a function of frequency. Cross-correlation analysis determined that the left-handed circularly polarized component was delayed by 50-70 ms relative to the right-handed component over the entire frequency range of the ZP and this delay increased with the frequency. We examined the obtained polarization characteristics by using pre-existing ZP models and concluded that the ZP was generated by the double-plasma-resonance process. Our results suggest that the ZP emission was originally generated in a completely polarized state in the O-mode and was partly converted into the X-mode near the source. Subsequently, the difference between the group velocities of the O-mode and X-mode caused the temporal delay.

  14. Mitigation of impedance changes due to electroporation therapy using bursts of high-frequency bipolar pulses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background For electroporation-based therapies, accurate modeling of the electric field distribution within the target tissue is important for predicting the treatment volume. In response to conventional, unipolar pulses, the electrical impedance of a tissue varies as a function of the local electric field, leading to a redistribution of the field. These dynamic impedance changes, which depend on the tissue type and the applied electric field, need to be quantified a priori, making mathematical modeling complicated. Here, it is shown that the impedance changes during high-frequency, bipolar electroporation therapy are reduced, and the electric field distribution can be approximated using the analytical solution to Laplace's equation that is valid for a homogeneous medium of constant conductivity. Methods Two methods were used to examine the agreement between the analytical solution to Laplace's equation and the electric fields generated by 100 µs unipolar pulses and bursts of 1 µs bipolar pulses. First, pulses were applied to potato tuber tissue while an infrared camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution in real-time as a corollary to the electric field distribution. The analytical solution was overlaid on the thermal images for a qualitative assessment of the electric fields. Second, potato ablations were performed and the lesion size was measured along the x- and y-axes. These values were compared to the analytical solution to quantify its ability to predict treatment outcomes. To analyze the dynamic impedance changes due to electroporation at different frequencies, electrical impedance measurements (1 Hz to 1 MHz) were made before and after the treatment of potato tissue. Results For high-frequency bipolar burst treatment, the thermal images closely mirrored the constant electric field contours. The potato tissue lesions differed from the analytical solution by 39.7 ± 1.3 % (x-axis) and 6.87 ± 6.26 % (y-axis) for conventional unipolar pulses

  15. Improved dichotomous search frequency offset estimator for burst-mode continuous phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Wen-Chao; Li, Zan; Si, Jiang-Bo; Bai, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A data-aided technique for carrier frequency offset estimation with continuous phase modulation (CPM) in burst-mode transmission is presented. The proposed technique first exploits a special pilot sequence, or training sequence, to form a sinusoidal waveform. Then, an improved dichotomous search frequency offset estimator is introduced to determine the frequency offset using the sinusoid. Theoretical analysis and simulation results indicate that our estimator is noteworthy in the following aspects. First, the estimator can operate independently of timing recovery. Second, it has relatively low outlier, i.e., the minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to guarantee estimation accuracy. Finally, the most important property is that our estimator is complexity-reduced compared to the existing dichotomous search methods: it eliminates the need for fast Fourier transform (FFT) and modulation removal, and exhibits faster convergence rate without accuracy degradation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61301179), the Doctorial Programs Foundation of the Ministry of Education, China (Grant No. 20110203110011), and the Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities, China (Grant No. B08038).

  16. Multi-mJ bursts of green light obtained by frequency doubling the output of a fiber based MOPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowen, Eitan E.; Shalev, Nir; Tal, Eran; Lasri, Kobi; Inbar, Eran

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a fiber laser that generates bursts of 70-300 pulses at a frequency of 2-8 MHz with over 4 mJ of energy per burst at a wavelength of 532 nm. The output of an Yb-doped fiber amplifier chain is doubled in a single pass through an LBO crystal with efficiency of above 65%. A seed-diode generates the pulse train, which is amplified to a peak power that allows efficient SHG. Such a solution may have many industrial and other applications, where fiber-based solutions have many advantages, but suffer a disadvantage of relatively low pulse energy.

  17. Two-frequency /Delta k/ microwave scatterometer measurements of ocean wave spectra from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Jones, W. L.; Weissman, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for remotely sensing the large-scale gravity wave spectrum on the ocean surface using a two frequency (Delta k) microwave scatterometer has been demonstrated from stationary platforms and proposed from moving platforms. This measurement takes advantage of Bragg type resonance matching between the electromagnetic wavelength at the difference frequency and the length of the large-scale surface waves. A prominent resonance appears in the cross product power spectral density (PSD) of the two backscattered signals. Ku-Band aircraft scatterometer measurements were conducted by NASA in the North Sea during the 1979 Maritime Remote Sensing (MARSEN) experiment. Typical examples of cross product PSD's computed from the MARSEN data are presented. They demonstrate strong resonances whose frequency and bandwidth agree with the surface characteristics and the theory. Directional modulation spectra of the surface reflectivity are compared to the gravity wave spectrum derived from surface truth measurements.

  18. Delta-sarcoglycan gene polymorphism frequency in Amerindian and Mestizo populations of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez-Razo, Rosa María; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Peñaloza, Rosenda; Minauro-Sanmiguel, Fernando; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Canto, Patricia; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio

    2010-04-01

    Mutations on the delta-sarcoglycan gene have been associated with the development of both hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy. Recently, the polymorphism c.-94C>G was associated with HCM in Japanese patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of c.-94C>G polymorphism in Mexican-Amerindian and Mexican-Mestizo populations. We analyzed the frequency of this polymorphism in 165 Mexican-Amerindian individuals (23 Triquis, 25 Zapotecos, 24 Mayas, 41 Nahuas, and 52 Mixtecos) and 100 unrelated Mexican-Mestizos. Allele frequencies were similar in all Amerindian groups (0.33 Triquis, 0.54 Zapotecos, 0.54 Mayas, 0.46 Nahuas, and 0.49 Mixtecos). When compared with Mexican-Mestizos, only Triquis were different (p = 0.00742). However, when comparing the total sample of the Amerindian population with the Mestizos, the difference was not significant (p = 0.12225). Allele frequencies of Mexican populations were higher than in Asians and less than African and European populations (p < 0.05). These data show that the distribution of the C allele is higher in Mexican populations studied and consequently it is necessary to define if this may be associated with genetic susceptibility for HCM in the Mexican patients. PMID:20384457

  19. Magnetothermoacoustics from magnetic nanoparticles by short bursting or frequency chirped alternating magnetic field: A theoretical feasibility analysis

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Daqing; Towner, Rheal A.; Smith, Nataliya; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To propose an alternative method of thermoacoustic wave generation based on heating of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using alternating magnetic field (AMF). Methods: The feasibility of thermoacoustic wave generation from MNPs by applying a short-burst of AMF or a frequency-modulated AMF is theoretically analyzed. As the relaxation of MNPs is strongly dependent upon the amplitude and frequency of AMF, either an amplitude modulated, fixed frequency AMF (termed time-domain AMF) or a frequency modulated, constant amplitude AMF (termed frequency-domain AMF) will result in time-varying heat dissipation from MNPs, which has the potential to generate thermoacoustic waves. Following Rosensweig's model of specific power loss of MNPs in a steady-state AMF, the time-resolved heat dissipations of MNPs of superparamagnetic size when exposed to a short bursting of AMF and/or to a linearly frequency chirped AMF are derived, and the resulted acoustic propagation is presented. Based on experimentally measured temperature-rise characteristics of a superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticle (SPION) matrix in a steady-state AMF of various frequencies, the heat dissipations of the SPION under time-domain and frequency-domain AMF configurations that could have practical utility for thermoacoustic wave generation are estimated. Results: The initial rates of the temperature-rise of the SPION matrix were measured at an iron-weight concentration of 0.8 mg/ml and an AMF frequency of 88.8 kHz to 1.105 MHz. The measured initial rates of temperature-rise were modeled by Rosensweig's theory, and projected to 10 MHz AMF frequency, at which a 1 μs bursting corresponding to a 1.55 mm axial resolution of acoustic detection could contain 10 complete cycles of AMF oscillation and the power dissipation is approximately 84 times of that at 1 MHz. Exposing the SPION matrix to a 1 μs bursting of AMF at 10 MHz frequency and 100 Oe field intensity would produce a volumetric heat dissipation of 7

  20. A HIGH-FREQUENCY TYPE II SOLAR RADIO BURST ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2011 FEBRUARY 13 CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, K.-S.; Kim, R.-S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kwon, R.-Y.; Yashiro, S.

    2013-03-10

    We examine the relationship between the high-frequency (425 MHz) type II radio burst and the associated white-light coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 February 13. The radio burst had a drift rate of 2.5 MHz s{sup -1}, indicating a relatively high shock speed. From SDO/AIA observations we find that a loop-like erupting front sweeps across high-density coronal loops near the start time of the burst (17:34:17 UT). The deduced distance of shock formation (0.06 Rs) from the flare center and speed of the shock (1100 km s{sup -1}) using the measured density from SDO/AIA observations are comparable to the height (0.05 Rs, from the solar surface) and speed (700 km s{sup -1}) of the CME leading edge observed by STEREO/EUVI. We conclude that the type II burst originates even in the low corona (<59 Mm or 0.08 Rs, above the solar surface) due to the fast CME shock passing through high-density loops.

  1. The low-high-low trend of type III radio burst starting frequencies and solar flare hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Hamish A. S.; Vilmer, Nicole; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: Using simultaneous X-ray and radio observations from solar flares, we investigate the link between the type III radio burst starting frequency and hard X-ray spectral index. For a proportion of events the relation derived between the starting height (frequency) of type III radio bursts and the electron beam velocity spectral index (deduced from X-rays) is used to infer the spatial properties (height and size) of the electron beam acceleration region. Both quantities can be related to the distance travelled before an electron beam becomes unstable to Langmuir waves. Methods: To obtain a list of suitable events we considered the RHESSI catalogue of X-ray flares and the Phoenix 2 catalogue of type III radio bursts. From the 200 events that showed both type III and X-ray signatures, we selected 30 events which had simultaneous emission in both wavelengths, good signal to noise in the X-ray domain and >20 s duration. Results: We find that >50% of the selected events show a good correlation between the starting frequencies of the groups of type III bursts and the hard X-ray spectral indices. A low-high-low trend for the starting frequency of type III bursts is frequently observed. Assuming a background electron density model and the thick target approximation for X-ray observations, this leads to a correlation between starting heights of the type III emission and the beam electron spectral index. Using this correlation we infer the altitude and vertical extents of the flare acceleration regions. We find heights from 183 Mm down to 25 Mm while the sizes range from 13 Mm to 2 Mm. These values agree with previous work that places an extended flare acceleration region high in the corona. We also analyse the assumptions that are required to obtain our estimates and explore possible extensions to our assumed model. We discuss these results with respect to the acceleration heights and sizes derived from X-ray observations alone. Appendices are available in electronic form

  2. Light Echos in Kerr Geometry: A Source of High Frequency QPOs from Random X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumura, K.; Kazanas, D.

    2008-01-01

    We propose that high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) can be produced from randomly-formed X-ray bursts (flashes) by plasma interior to the ergosphere of a rapidly-rotating black hole. We show by direct computation of their orbits that the photons comprising the observed X-ray light curves, if due to a multitude of such flashes, are affected significantly by the black hole's dragging of inertial frames; the photons of each such burst arrive to an observer at infinity in multiple (double or triple), distinct 'bunches' separated by a roughly constant time lag of t/M approximately equal to 14, regardless of the bursts' azimuthal position. We argue that every other such 'bunch' represents photons that follow trajectories with an additional orbit around the black hole at the photon circular orbit radius (a photon 'echo'). The presence of this constant lag in the response function of the system leads to a QPO feature in its power density spectra, even though the corresponding light curve consists of a totally stochastic signal. This effect is by and large due to the black hole spin and is shown to gradually diminish as the spin parameter a decreases or the radial position of the burst moves outside the static limit surface (ergosphere). Our calculations indicate that for a black hole with Kerr parameter of a/M=0.99 and mass of M=10*Msun the QPO is expected at a frequency of approximately 1.3-1.4 kHz. We discuss the plausibility and observational implications of our model/results as well as its limitations.

  3. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 allele in Brazilian populations: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Carvalho, Wlisses Henrique Veloso; de Moura, Ronald Rodrigues; Coelho, Antonio Victor Campos; Crovella, Sergio; Guimarães, Rafael Lima

    2016-09-01

    The CCR5 is a chemokine receptor widely expressed by several immune cells that are engaged in inflammatory responses. Some populations have individuals exhibiting a 32bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) that produces a truncated non-functional protein not expressed on the cell surface. This polymorphism, known to be associated with susceptibility to infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as osteomyelitis, pre-eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematous, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and HIV/AIDS, is more commonly found in European populations with average frequency of 10%. However, it is also possible to observe a significant frequency in other world populations, such as the Brazilian one. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of CCR5-delta32 genetic association studies in Brazilian populations throughout the country to estimate the frequency of this polymorphism. We also compared CCR5-delta32 frequencies across Brazilian regions. The systematic literature reviewed studies involving delta32 allele in Brazilian populations published from 1995 to 2015. Among the reviewed literature, 25 studies including 30 Brazilian populations distributed between the North, Northeast, South and Southeast regions were included in our meta-analysis. We observed an overall allelic frequency of 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), that was considered moderate and, notably, higher than some European populations, such as Cyprus (2.8%), Italy (3%) and Greece (2.4%). Regarding the regional frequency comparisons between North-Northeast (N-NE) and South-Southeast (S-SE) regions, we observed an allelic frequency of 3% (95%-CI, 0.02-0.04) and 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), respectively. The populations from S-SE regions had a slightly higher CCR5-delta32 frequency than N-NE regions (OR=1.41, p=0.002). Although there are several studies about the CCR5-delta32 polymorphism and its effect on the immune response of some infectious diseases, this report is the first meta

  4. Evidence for Harmonic Content and Frequency Evolution of Oscillations During the Rising Phase of X-ray Bursts From 4U 1636-536

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bgattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, E.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a study of the evolution of burst oscillation properties during the rising phase of X-ray bursts from 4U 1636-536 observed with the proportional counter array (PCA) on board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) . We present evidence for significant harmonic structure of burst oscillation pulses during the early rising phases of bursts. This is the first such detection in burst rise oscillations, and is very important for constraining neutron star structure parameters and the equation of state models of matter at the core of a neutron star. The detection of harmonic content only during the initial portions of the burst rise is consistent with the theoretical expectation that with time the thermonuclear burning region becomes larger, and hence the fundamental and harmonic amplitudes both diminish. We also find, for the first time from this source, strong evidence of oscillation frequency increase during the burst rise. The timing behavior of harmonic content, amplitude, and frequency of burst rise oscillations may be important in understanding the spreading of thermonuclear flames under the extreme physical conditions on neutron star surfaces.

  5. Eating patterns of children in the Delta: Developing a child food frequency questionnaire for this rural impoverished population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epidemic of obesity and health risks for children currently present challenges in estimating food intakes and developing appropriate interventions. Obtaining eating patterns is important. No child food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) are specific to the Delta. Food intake data collected previous...

  6. A combined quality-control methodology in Ebro Delta (NE Spain) high frequency radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, P.; Piedracoba, S.; Soto-Navarro, J.; Alvarez-Fanjul, E.

    2015-08-01

    Ebro River Delta is a relevant marine protected area in the western Mediterranean. In order to promote the conservation of its ecosystem and support operational decision making in this sensitive area, a three site standard-range (13.5 MHz) CODAR SeaSonde High Frequency (HF) radar was deployed in 2013. Since there is a growing demand for reliable HF radar surface current measurements, the main goal of this work is to present a combined quality control methodology. Firstly, one year-long (2014) real-time web monitoring of nonvelocity-based diagnostic parameters is conducted in order to infer both radar site status and HF radar system performance. Signal-to-noise ratio at the monopole exhibited a consistent monthly evolution although some abrupt decreases (below 10 dB), occasionally detected in June for one of the radar sites, impacted negatively on the spatiotemporal coverage of total current vectors. It seemed to be a sporadic episode since radar site overall performance was found to be robust during 2014. Secondly, a validation of HF radar data with independent in situ observations from a moored current meter was attempted for May-October 2014. The accuracy assessment of radial and total vectors revealed a consistently high agreement. The directional accuracy of the HF radar was rated at better than 8°. The correlation coefficient and RMSE values emerged in the ranges 0.58-0.83 and 4.02-18.31 cm s-1, respectively. The analysis of the monthly averaged current maps for 2014 showed that the HF radar properly represented basic oceanographic features previously reported, namely: the predominant southwestward flow, the coastal clockwise eddy confined south of Ebro Delta mouth or the Ebro River impulsive-type freshwater discharge. Future works should include the use of verified HF radar data for the rigorous skill assessment of operational ocean circulation systems currently running in Ebro estuarine region like MyOcean IBI.

  7. Direction of Arrival Measurements of Auroral Medium Frequency Burst Radio Emissions at Toolik Lake, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N. L.; Labelle, J. W.; Hughes, J. M.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Ye, S.; Lummerzheim, D.

    2007-12-01

    MF burst is an impulsive radio emission of auroral origin detected by ground-based instruments approximately between 1,300 and 3,700 kHz, and associated with substorm onsets. Its exact generation mechanism is unknown, though it has been speculated that it arises from mode conversion radiation. To discover the generation mechanism and the relation of MF burst to auroral processes, Dartmouth has deployed radio interferometers in Alaska, Northern Canada, Greenland, and Antarctica, including a three-element interferometer deployed at Toolik Lake Field Station in Alaska in 2006. This instrument measured spectra, amplitudes, and directions of arrival (DOA's) of over 47 MF burst events occurring between November 30, 2006 and May 26, 2007. These represent the first DOA measurements ever reported for the impulsive MF burst phenomenon. Preliminary analysis shows that the events originated from a wide range of directions in the sky, with all azimuths represented in the distribution of DOA's. The DOA of each individual event is well-defined, however. Many events show apparent motion, with southward motions more common than northward among the subset of events analyzed so far. Some of the events were detected simultaneously on an interferometer deployed at Kaktovik, Alaska, 400 km away. The all-sky imager at Toolik Lake was also operational for some events. Further analysis of these data promises to reveal first information about the locations and motions of MF burst sources, a first step towards discovering the generation mechanism of this mysterious radio emission and its relation to auroral processes.

  8. Large separations or regular technical patterns? Could data sampling mimic the frequency range of pulsating Delta Scuti stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparo, Margit; Benko, Jozsef M.; Hareter, Markus; Guzik, Joyce A.

    2015-08-01

    Asteroseismology allows unique information on the inner structure of stars. The large separation between the consecutive radial orders and the small separation of the modes with different l values are well-known and useful parameters characterizing solar-type oscillations. The large separation was derived only for a few Delta Scuti stars which are pulsating in the non-asymptotic regime. Theoretical investigations do not predict a high level of regularity of the excited modes. We carried out a search for regularity in a sample of Delta Scuti stars observed by CoRoT (91 stars). Usually the Fourier Transform or the histogram of frequency differences were used. The echelle diagrams represent the regularity when it was found. As a preliminary step we isolated set(s) of frequencies with quasi-equal spacing. Surprisingly not only a single pattern but up to six patterns were found in most of the stars. The patterns are regularly shifted with respect to each other. The echelle diagrams helped to reduce the scatter of the spacing. The derived spacing supported the better interpretation of the FT diagrams. There is no doubt of the existence of regular patterns. The interpretation is questionable: do the Delta Scuti stars behave so regularly, or we are faced with a technical pattern that obscures the real frequency pattern of the low amplitude Delta Scuti pulsation?

  9. Flood frequency analysis with uncertainty estimation and its application for hazard assessment - a case study in the Mekong Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Viet, Dung; Apel, Heiko; Merz, Bruno; Bárdossy, András

    2015-04-01

    In many flood-prone regions on earth, the nature of the floods calls for a multivariate approach as analyzing flood frequency, which provides a basic for a sound flood hazard and risk assessment. That is because the flood severity is determined not only by the peak flood discharge as usually considered but also by other aspects such as the volume and even the hydrograph shape of the flood. However, the multivariate flood frequency analysis taking into account its associated uncertainty sources has rarely been studied. The Mekong Delta is one of the largest and most densely populated deltas on Earth. It witnesses annual large scale inundations which are associated to the SE-Asian monsoons. These floods are the basis for the livelihoods of the population of the Delta, but they are also the major hazard. This hazard has, however, not been studied within the frame of a probabilistic flood hazard analysis. Thus this study focuses on the identification of a suitable statistical model for the estimation of flood frequencies considering two important flood aspects peak Q and volume V and exemplifies its applicability for a sound flood hazard assessment for the case study in the Mekong Delta. A copula-based bivariate statistical model with bootstrapping-based uncertainty estimation is, hence, developed for a flood frequency analysis of peak flow and volume. The analysis reveals that even with the available - in a hydrological context - quite long data series (e.g. 88 years in the Mekong Delta), large uncertainties are associated to the bivariate quantiles (Q, V), even for rather frequent events. The main uncertainty source is the sampling uncertainty, thus a direct consequence of the limited length of the data series. However, we still advocate for applying the proposed bivariate frequency method for flood frequency estimation in the Mekong Delta because a) it reflects the essential aspects of floods in this region, b) the uncertainties are inherent for every multivariate

  10. High frequency burst firing of granule cells ensures transmission at the parallel fiber to purkinje cell synapse at the cost of temporal coding.

    PubMed

    van Beugen, Boeke J; Gao, Zhenyu; Boele, Henk-Jan; Hoebeek, Freek; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cells (GrCs) convey information from mossy fibers (MFs) to Purkinje cells (PCs) via their parallel fibers (PFs). MF to GrC signaling allows transmission of frequencies up to 1 kHz and GrCs themselves can also fire bursts of action potentials with instantaneous frequencies up to 1 kHz. So far, in the scientific literature no evidence has been shown that these high-frequency bursts also exist in awake, behaving animals. More so, it remains to be shown whether such high-frequency bursts can transmit temporally coded information from MFs to PCs and/or whether these patterns of activity contribute to the spatiotemporal filtering properties of the GrC layer. Here, we show that, upon sensory stimulation in both un-anesthetized rabbits and mice, GrCs can show bursts that consist of tens of spikes at instantaneous frequencies over 800 Hz. In vitro recordings from individual GrC-PC pairs following high-frequency stimulation revealed an overall low initial release probability of ~0.17. Nevertheless, high-frequency burst activity induced a short-lived facilitation to ensure signaling within the first few spikes, which was rapidly followed by a reduction in transmitter release. The facilitation rate among individual GrC-PC pairs was heterogeneously distributed and could be classified as either "reluctant" or "responsive" according to their release characteristics. Despite the variety of efficacy at individual connections, grouped activity in GrCs resulted in a linear relationship between PC response and PF burst duration at frequencies up to 300 Hz allowing rate coding to persist at the network level. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that the cerebellar granular layer acts as a spatiotemporal filter between MF input and PC output (D'Angelo and De Zeeuw, 2009). PMID:23734102

  11. Gamma-ray burst constraints on the galactic frequency of extrasolar Oort Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stern, S. Alan

    1995-01-01

    With the strong Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (CGRO/BATSE) evidence that most gamma-ray bursts do not come from galactic neutron stars, models involving the accretion of a comet onto a neutron star (NS) no longer appear to be strong contenders for explaining the majority of bursts. If this is the case, then it is worth asking whether the lack of an observed galactic gamma-ray burst population provides a useful constraint on the number of comets and comet clouds in the galaxy. Owing to the previously unrecognized structural weakness of cometary nuclei, we find the capture cross sections for comet-NS events to be much higher than previously published estimates, with tidal breakup at distances R(sub b) approx. equals 4 x 10(exp 10) cm from the NS. As a result, impacts of comets onto field NSs penetrating the Oort Clouds of other stars are found to dominate all other galactic NS-comet capture rates by a factor of 100. This in turn predicts that if comet clouds are common, there should be a significant population of repeater sources with (1) a galactic distribution, (2) space-correlated repetition, and (3) a wide range of peak luminosities and luminosity time histories. If all main sequence stars have Oort Clouds like our own, we predict approximately 4000 such repeater sources in the Milky Way at any time, each repeating on time scales of months to years. Based on estimates of the sensitivity of the CGRO/BATSE instrument and assuming isotropic gamma-ray beaming from such events, we estimate that a population of approximately 20-200 of these galactic NS-Oort Cloud gamma-ray repeater sources should be detectable by CGRO. In addition, if giant planet formation is common in the galaxy, we estimate that the accretion of isolated comets injected to the interstellar medium by giant planet formation should produce an additional source of galactic, nonrepeating, events. Comparing these estimates to the 3-4 soft gamma-ray repeater sources

  12. Structure of proton centers and associated nonthermal bursts at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enome, S.; Tanaka, H.

    1973-01-01

    A very broad band of electromagnetic radiation is emitted during solar flares, especially at the explosive phase. The existence of a large variety of plasmas with various densities and a wide range of temperatures or energies is proposed as the initiating agent. The manner in which the plasmas are heated and accelerated to subrelativistic and relativistic energies is discussed. Observational evidence on the characteristics of active regions which produced proton flares and on the structure of the associated nonthermal microwave bursts of the sun is presented. The behavior of subrelativistic electrons on the sun is described.

  13. Increase in nitric oxide and cyclic GMP of rat cerebellum by radio frequency burst-type electromagnetic field radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Miura, M; Takayama, K; Okada, J

    1993-01-01

    1. Using rat cerebellum supernatant, the effects of radio frequency (RF) burst-type electromagnetic (EM) field radiation on the production of cyclic GMP were examined under various conditions. The radiation was generated by a generator coil, and set at a 10 MHz radiation frequency, a 50% burst time, a 10 kHz burst rate and a 5 V peak-to-peak generator voltage. 2. When the cerebellum supernatant was incubated with both exogenous L-arginine (nitric oxide (NO) donor) and NADPH, and irradiated by an RF burst-type EM field, the production of cyclic GMP was increased significantly from a level of 21-22 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 to 25-26 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1. By contrast, such an effect was not found when the cerebellum supernatant was irradiated by an RF volley-type EM field. 3. When neither L-arginine nor NADPH were added to the cerebellum supernatant, the production of cyclic GMP was lowered to a level of 6 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 and the radiation effect was not found. When the cerebellum supernatant was chelated with EDTA, the production of cyclic GMP was lowered to a level of 7 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 and the radiation effect was not found. 4. Incubation with Methylene Blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, lowered the production of cyclic GMP to a level of 10-12 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1, and the radiation effect did not occur. On incubation with a NO synthase inhibitor, either NG-methyl-L-arginine or N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the production of cyclic GMP was lowered to a level of 10-12 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 or 5-9 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 respectively, and the radiation effect was not observed. 5. Using electrochemical NO probes, the production of NO in the cerebellum supernatant was detected. The concentration of NO increased gradually after the onset of the EM field radiation. The radiation effect persisted, and reached a maximum after the cessation of the radiation. 6. In an in vivo study, the arterioles of the frog web were dilated by the radiation

  14. GEOTAIL and POLAR Observations of Auroral Kilometric Radiation and Terrestrial Low Frequency Bursts and their Relationship to Energetic Particles, Auroras, and Other Substorm Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R . R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.; Thomsen, Michelle F.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Imhoff, W. L.; Mobilia, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial low frequency (LF) bursts are plasma wave phenomena that appear to be a part of the low frequency end of the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) spectrum and are observed during strong substorms, GEOTAIL and POLAR plasma wave observations from within the magnetosphere show that the AKR increases in intensity and its lower frequency limits decrease when LF bursts are observed. The first is expected as it is shows substorm onset and the latter indicates that the AKR source region is expanding to higher altitudes. Images from the POLAR VIS Earth Camera operating in the far-UV range and the POLAR UVI experiment usually feature an auroral brightening and an expansion of the aurora to higher latitudes at the time of the LF bursts. Enhanced fluxes of X-rays from precipitating electrons have also been observed by POLAR PIXIE. High resolution ground Abstract: magnetometer data from the CANOPUS and IMAGE networks show that the LF bursts occur when the expansive phase onset signatures are most intense. The ground magnetometer data and the CANOPUS meridian scanning photometer data sometimes show that during the LF burst events the expansive phase onset starts at unusually low latitudes and moves poleward. Large injections of energetic protons and electrons have also been detected by the GOES and LANL geosynchronous satellites during LF burst events. While most of the auroral brightenings and energetic particle injections associated with the LF bursts occur near local midnight, several have been observed as early as mid-afternoon. From these various measurements, we are achieving a better understanding of the plasma and particle motions during substorms that are associated with the generation and propagation of terrestrial LF bursts

  15. Time-Frequency Theta and Delta Measures Index Separable Components of Feedback Processing in a Gambling Task

    PubMed Central

    Bernat, Edward M.; Nelson, Lindsay D.; Baskin-Sommers, Arielle R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work using gambling tasks indicate that the feedback negativity (FN) reflects primary or salient stimulus attributes (often gain vs. loss), whereas the feedback-P300 appears sensitive to secondary stimulus information. A recent time-frequency approach has characterized separable theta (3–7 Hz) and delta (0–3 Hz) feedback processes, independently sensitive to primary feedback attributes, specifically loss and gain outcomes respectively (Bernat et al., 2011). The current study extends this time-frequency work to evaluate both primary and secondary (relative outcome and outcome magnitude) feedback attributes. Consistent with previous reports, theta indexed an initial, lower-level response sensitive to the primary (most salient) feedback attributes (specifically losses), while delta was sensitive to both primary attributes (specifically gains) and assessed secondary stimulus features. PMID:25581491

  16. Gamma-ray burst constraints on the galactic frequency of extra-solar Oort clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stern, S. Alan

    1994-01-01

    With the strong CGRO/BATSE evidence that most gamma-ray bursts do not come from galactic neutron stars, models involving the accretion of a comet onto a neutron star (NS) no longer appear to be strong contenders for explaining the majority of bursts. If this is the case, then it is worth asking whether the lack of an observed galactic gamma-ray burst population provides a useful constraint on the number of comets and comet clouds in the galaxy. Owing to the previously unrecognized structural weakness of cometary nuclei, we find the capture cross sections for comet-NS events to be much higher than previously published estimates, with tidal breakup at distances R(sub b) approximately equals to 4 x 10(exp 10) cm from the NS. As a result, impacts of comets onto field NS's penetrating the Oort Clouds of other stars are found to dominate all other galactic NS-comet capture rates by a factor of 100. This in turn predicts that if comet clouds are common, there should be a significant population of repeater sources with (1) a galactic distribution, (2) space-correlated repetition, and (3) a wide range of peak luminosities and luminosity time histories. If all main sequences stars have Oort Clouds like our own, we predict approximately 4000 such repeater sources in the Milky Way at any time, each repeating on timescales of months to years. Based on estimates of the sensitivity of the CGRO/BATSE instrument and assuming isotropic gamma-ray beaming from such events, we estimate that a population of approximately 20-200 of these galactic NS-Oort Cloud gamma-ray repeater sources should be detectable by CGRO. In addition, if giant planet formation is common in the galaxy, we estimate that the accretion of isolated comets injected to the interstellar medium by giant planet formation should produce an additional source of galactic, nonrepeating events. Comparing these estimates to the three to four soft gamma-ray repeater sources detected by BATSE, one is forced to conclude that (1

  17. Frequencies of 32 base pair deletion of the (Delta 32) allele of the CCR5 HIV-1 co-receptor gene in Caucasians: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard

    2002-05-01

    The CCR5 gene encodes for the co-receptor for the major macrophage-tropics strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and a mutant allele of this gene (Delta 32) provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection by HIV. The frequency of the Delta 32 allele was investigated in 40 populations of 8842 non-infected subjects coming from Europe, the Middle-East and North Africa. A clear north-south decreasing gradient was evident for Delta 32 frequencies, with a significant correlation coefficient (r=0.83). The main frequency value of Delta 32 for Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland (0.134) is significantly (chi(2)=63.818, P<0.001) highest than the Delta 32 mean value, indicating that probably the Vikings might have been instrumental in disseminating the Delta 32 allele during the eighth to the tenth centuries during historical times. Possibly variola virus has discriminated the Delta 32 carriers in Europe since the eighth century AD, explaining the high frequency of the Delta 32 allele in Europe today. PMID:12798016

  18. A search for Fermi bursts associated with supernovae and their frequency of occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacevic, M.; Izzo, L.; Wang, Y.; Muccino, M.; Della Valle, M.; Amati, L.; Barbarino, C.; Enderli, M.; Pisani, G. B.; Li, L.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Observations suggest that most long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are connected with broad-line supernovae Ib/c, (SNe-Ibc). The presence of GRB-SNe is revealed by rebrightenings emerging from the optical GRB afterglow 10-15 days, in the rest-frame of the source, after the prompt GRB emission. Aims: Fermi/GBM has a field of view (FoV) about 6.5 times larger than the FoV of Swift, therefore we expect that a number of GRB-SN connections have been missed because of lack of optical and X-ray instruments on board of Fermi, which are essential for revealing SNe associated with GRBs. This has motivated our search in the Fermi catalog for possible GRB-SN events. Methods: The search for possible GRB-SN associations follows two requirements: (1) SNe should fall inside the Fermi/GBM error box of the considered long GRB, and (2) this GRB should occur within 20 days before the SN event. Results: We have found five cases within z< 0.2 fulfilling the above reported requirements. One of them, GRB 130702A-SN 2013dx, was already known to have a GRB-SN association. We have analyzed the remaining four cases and we have concluded that three of them are, very likely, just random coincidences due to the Fermi/GBM large error box associated with each GRB detection. We found one GRB possibly associated with a SN 1998bw-like source, GRB 120121B/SN 2012ba. Conclusions: The very low redshift of GRB 120121B/SN 2012ba (z = 0.017) implies a low isotropic energy of this burst (Eiso = 1.39 × 1048) erg. We then compute the rate of Fermi low-luminosity GRBs connected with SNe to be ρ0,b ≤ 770 Gpc-3 yr-1. We estimate that Fermi/GBM could detect 1-4 GRBs-SNe within z ≤ 0.2 in the next 4 years.

  19. Land subsidence in the Yangtze River Delta, China revealed from multi-frequency SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhong; Motagh, Mahdi; Yu, Jun; Gong, Xulong; Wu, Jianqiang; Zhu, Yefei; Chen, Huogen; Zhang, Dengming; Xu, Yulin

    2014-05-01

    Land subsidence is a major worldwide hazard, and its principal causes are subsurface fluid withdrawal, drainage of organic soils, sinkholes, underground mining, hydrocompaction, thawing permafrost, and natural consolidation. Land subsidence causes many problems including: damage to public facilities such as bridges, roads, railroads, electric power lines, underground pipes; damage to private and public buildings; and in some cases of low-lying land, can increase the risk of coastal flooding from storm surges and rising sea-levels. In China, approximately 48600 km2 of land, an area roughly 30 times of the size of the Greater London, has subsided (nearly 50 cities across 16 provinces), and the annual direct economic loss is estimated to be more than RMB 100 million (~12 million). It is believed that the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region within the Yangtze River Delta is the most severely affected area for subsidence hazards in China. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, Interferometric SAR (InSAR) is revolutionizing our ability to image the Earth's surface and the evolution of its shape over time. In this paper, an advanced InSAR time series technique, InSAR TS + AEM, has been employed to analysed ERS (C-band), Envisat (C-band) and TerraSAR-X (X-band) data collected over the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region during the period from 1992 to 2013. Validation with precise levelling and GPS data suggest: (1) the accuracy of the InSAR-derived mean velocity measurements is 1-3 mm/yr; (2) InSAR-derived displacements agreed with precise levelling with root mean square errors around 5 mm. It is evident that InSAR TS + AEM can be used to image the evolution of deformation patterns in the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region over time: the maximum mean velocity decreased from ~12 cm/yr during the period of 1992-1993 to ~2 cm/yr in 2003-2013. This is believed to be a result of the prohibition of groundwater use carried out by Jiangsu provincial government. The combination

  20. Sawtooth bursts: observations and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Bárta, M.; Klassen, A.; Aurass, H.; Mann, G.

    2002-12-01

    An example of the sawtooth burst observed during the November 3, 1997 flare is shown. Basic parameters of the sawtooth bursts are summarized and compared with those of fibers, fiber chains, zebras, EEL bursts and lace bursts. The sawtooth bursts are found to be most similar to the lace bursts, therefore the lace bursts model is proposed also for them. Then using this model the dynamic spectrum with the sawtooth burst is modelled. The model considers accelerated electrons with an unstable distribution function on the double resonance frequency and quasi-periodic variations of the electron plasma density and/or magnetic field in the radio source.

  1. Attitudes and beliefs affect frequency of eating out in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Attitudes and beliefs reflecting cultural values can have a positive or negative influence on eating behaviors. Eating out may negatively affect diet quality through increased fat intake and larger portion sizes. In a representative sample of the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) consisting of 1601 Af...

  2. Frequency-resolved optical gating for complete reconstruction of attosecond bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairesse, Y.; Quéré, F.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a method for the complete temporal characterization of attosecond extreme ultraviolet (xuv) fields. An electron wave packet is generated in the continuum by photoionizing atoms with the attosecond field, and a low-frequency dressing laser pulse is used as a phase gate for frequency-resolved-optical-gating-like measurements on this wave packet. This method is valid for xuv fields of an arbitrary temporal structure, e.g., trains of nonidentical attosecond pulses. It establishes a direct connection between the main attosecond characterization techniques demonstrated experimentally so far, and considerably extends their scope, thus providing a general perspective on attosecond metrology.

  3. On vortex bursting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, H.

    1984-01-01

    Vortex bursting is studied by means of visualization. The physical behavior of the phenomenon is emphasized, and its similarity with boundary layer separation or wake bursting becomes apparent. The essential influence of an increasing pressure gradient on the initiation, the position and the type of bursting is clearly confirmed. The evolution of the phenomena as a function of several parameters is analyzed in the case of delta wings, alone or installed on aircraft models, and compared with the results of similar wind tunnel or flight tests.

  4. Beyond Word Frequency: Bursts, Lulls, and Scaling in the Temporal Distributions of Words

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Eduardo G.; Pierrehumbert, Janet B.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Zipf's discovery that word frequency distributions obey a power law established parallels between biological and physical processes, and language, laying the groundwork for a complex systems perspective on human communication. More recent research has also identified scaling regularities in the dynamics underlying the successive occurrences of events, suggesting the possibility of similar findings for language as well. Methodology/Principal Findings By considering frequent words in USENET discussion groups and in disparate databases where the language has different levels of formality, here we show that the distributions of distances between successive occurrences of the same word display bursty deviations from a Poisson process and are well characterized by a stretched exponential (Weibull) scaling. The extent of this deviation depends strongly on semantic type – a measure of the logicality of each word – and less strongly on frequency. We develop a generative model of this behavior that fully determines the dynamics of word usage. Conclusions/Significance Recurrence patterns of words are well described by a stretched exponential distribution of recurrence times, an empirical scaling that cannot be anticipated from Zipf's law. Because the use of words provides a uniquely precise and powerful lens on human thought and activity, our findings also have implications for other overt manifestations of collective human dynamics. PMID:19907645

  5. Increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells in cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood of patients with multiple sclerosis: Reactivity, cytotoxicity, and T cell receptor V gene rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Stinissen, P.; Vandevyver, C.; Medaer, R.

    1995-05-01

    Infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells are potentially involved in the central nervous system demyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS). To further study this hypothesis, we analyzed the frequency and functional properties of {gamma}{delta} T cells in peripheral blood (PB) and paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with MS and control subjects, including patients with other neurologic diseases (OND) and healthy individuals. The frequency analysis was performed under limiting dilution condition using rIL-2 and PHA. After PHA stimulation, a significantly increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells was observed in PB and in CSF of MS patients as compared with PB and CSF of patients with OND. The frequency was represented equally in OND patients and normal individuals. Similarly, the IL-2-responsive {gamma}{delta} T cells occurred at a higher frequency in PB of MS than of control subjects. Forty-three percent of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones isolates from PB and CSF of MS patients responded to heat shock protein (HSP70) but not HSP65, whereas only 2 of 30 control {gamma}{delta} T cell clones reacted to the HSP. The majority of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones were able to induce non-MHC-restricted cytolysis of Daudi cells. All clones displayed a substantial reactivity to bacterial superantigens staphylococcal enterotoxin B and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, irrespective of their {gamma}{delta} V gene usage. Furthermore, the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones expressed predominantly TCRDV2 and GV2 genes, whereas the clones derived from CSF of MS patients expressed either DV1 or DV2 genes. The obtained {gamma}{delta} clones, in general, represented rather heterogeneous clonal origins, even though a predominant clonal origin was found in a set of 10 {gamma}{delta} clones derived from one patient with MS. The present study provides new evidence supporting a possible role of {gamma}{delta} T cells in the secondary inflammatory processes in MS. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. A Comparative Study of the Impact of Theta-Burst and High-Frequency Stimulation on Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yating; Wang, Rubin; Wang, Yihong

    2016-01-01

    The transformation of the information stored in the working memory into the system of long-term memory depends on the physiological mechanism, long-term potential (LTP). In a large number of experimental studies, theta-burst stimulation (TBS) and high-frequency stimulation (HFS) are LTP induction protocols. However, they have not been adapted to the model related to memory. In this paper, the improved Camperi–Wang (C–W) model with Ca2+ subsystem-induced bi-stability was adopted, and TBS and HFS were simulated to act as the initial stimuli of this working memory model. Evaluating the influence of stimuli properties (cycle, amplitude, duty ration) on memory mechanism of the model, it is found that both TBS and HFS can be adopted to activate working memory model and produce long-term memory. Moreover, the different impacts of two types of stimuli on the formation of long-term memory were analyzed as well. Thus, the importance of this study lies firstly in describing the link and interaction between working memory and long-term memory from the quantitative view, which provides a theoretical basis for the study of neural dynamics mechanism of long-term memory formation in the future. PMID:26869903

  7. A Comparative Study of the Impact of Theta-Burst and High-Frequency Stimulation on Memory Performance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yating; Wang, Rubin; Wang, Yihong

    2016-01-01

    The transformation of the information stored in the working memory into the system of long-term memory depends on the physiological mechanism, long-term potential (LTP). In a large number of experimental studies, theta-burst stimulation (TBS) and high-frequency stimulation (HFS) are LTP induction protocols. However, they have not been adapted to the model related to memory. In this paper, the improved Camperi-Wang (C-W) model with Ca(2+) subsystem-induced bi-stability was adopted, and TBS and HFS were simulated to act as the initial stimuli of this working memory model. Evaluating the influence of stimuli properties (cycle, amplitude, duty ration) on memory mechanism of the model, it is found that both TBS and HFS can be adopted to activate working memory model and produce long-term memory. Moreover, the different impacts of two types of stimuli on the formation of long-term memory were analyzed as well. Thus, the importance of this study lies firstly in describing the link and interaction between working memory and long-term memory from the quantitative view, which provides a theoretical basis for the study of neural dynamics mechanism of long-term memory formation in the future. PMID:26869903

  8. A Search for Fast Radio Bursts at Low Frequencies with Murchison Widefield Array High Time Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Wayth, R. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Feng, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Murphy, T.; Oberoi, D.; Prabu, T.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of a pilot study search for fast radio bursts (FRBs) using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) at low frequencies (139-170 MHz). We utilized MWA data obtained in a routine imaging mode from observations where the primary target was a field being studied for Epoch of Reionization detection. We formed images with 2 s time resolution and 1.28 MHz frequency resolution for 10.5 hr of observations, over 400 square degrees of the sky. We de-dispersed the dynamic spectrum in each of 372,100 resolution elements of 2 × 2 arcmin2, between dispersion measures of 170 and 675 pc cm-3. Based on the event rate calculations in Trott et al., which assume a standard candle luminosity of 8 × 1037 Js-1, we predict that with this choice of observational parameters, the MWA should detect (˜10, ˜2, ˜0) FRBs with spectral indices corresponding to (-2, -1, 0), based on a 7σ detection threshold. We find no FRB candidates above this threshold from our search, placing an event rate limit of \\lt 700 above 700 Jy ms per day per sky and providing evidence against spectral indices α \\lt -1.2 (S\\propto {ν }α ). We compare our event rate and spectral index limits with others from the literature. We briefly discuss these limits in light of recent suggestions that supergiant pulses from young neutron stars could explain FRBs. We find that such supergiant pulses would have to have much flatter spectra between 150 and 1400 MHz than have been observed from Crab giant pulses to be consistent with the FRB spectral index limit we derive.

  9. An evolutionary approach to the high frequency of the Delta F508 CFTR mutation in European populations.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A; Pérez-Miranda, Ana M; García-Obregón, Susana; Peña, José A

    2010-06-01

    The diffusion of the cattle pastoralism across Europe during the Neolithic period was probably accompanied by the emergence and spread of diverse contagious diseases that were unknown in the Paleolithic and that would have affected the frequency of genes directly or indirectly associated with differential susceptibility and/or resistance to infectious pathogens. We therefore propose that the high frequency of the CFTR gene, and in particular, the common Delta F508 allele mutation in current European and European-derived populations might be a consequence of the impact of selective pressures generated by the transmission of pathogenic agents from domesticated animals, mainly bovine cattle, to the man. Intestinal infectious diseases were probably a major health problem for Neolithic peoples. In such a context, a gene mutation that conferred an increased resistance to the diseases caused by pathogens transmitted by dairy cattle would have constituted a definite selective advantage, particularly in those human groups where cow's milk became an essential component of the diet. This selective advantage would be determined by an increased resistance to Cl(-)-secreting diarrheas of those individuals carrying a single copy of the Delta F508 CFTR mutation (heterozygote resistance). This hypothesis is supported by the strong association between the geography of the diffusion of cattle pastoralism (assessed indirectly by the lactase persistence distribution), the geographic distribution of a sizeable number of HLA alleles (as indicative of potential selective pressures generated by epidemic mortality) and the geographic distribution of the most common mutation causing cystic fibrosis (Delta F508). The systematic interaction of humans with infectious pathogens would have begun in northern Europe, among the carriers of the Funnel Beaker Culture, the first farmers of the North European plain, moving progressively to the south with the dissemination of the cattle pastoralism. This

  10. Energetic Particle Propagation in the Inner Heliosphere as Deduced from Low Frequency (less than 100 kHz) Observations of Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Erickson, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are well-associated with solar flares. It is observed that the delay between the time of the flare and the first-arriving particles at a spacecraft increases with increasing difference between the flare longitude and the footpoint of the field line on which the spacecraft is located. This difference we call the "connection angle" and can be as large as approximately 120 deg. Recently it has been found that all SEP events are preceded by type III radio bursts. These bursts are plasma emission caused by the propagation of 2-50 keV flare electrons through the solar corona and into the solar wind. The drift of these type III radio bursts to lower and lower frequencies enables the propagation of the flare electrons to be traced from the Sun to about 1 AU. We have made an extensive analysis of the type III bursts associated with greater than 20 MeV proton events and find that, in most cases, the radio emission extends to the local plasma frequency when the energetic particles arrive within a few hours of the flare. We conclude that this emission at the lowest possible frequency is generated close to the spacecraft. We then use the time from when the burst started at the Sun to when it reached the local plasma frequency to infer the time it took the radio producing electrons to travel to the spacecraft. We find that these delay times are organized by the connection angle and correlate with the proton delay times. We also find that the differences between the radio delays at Wind and Ulysses are matched by differences in the relative arrival times of the energetic particles at the two spacecraft. The consistent timing between the relative arrival times of energetic electrons and protons and the start of the lowest frequency radio emissions suggests that the first arriving particles of both species are accelerated as part of the flare process and that they propagate to the spacecraft along trajectories similar to those of the lower

  11. The Effect of Contact Angles and Capillary Dimensions on the Burst Frequency of Super Hydrophilic and Hydrophilic Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms, a CFD Study

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh, Amin; Ganesan, Poo; Ibrahim, Fatimah; He, Shuisheng; Madou, Marc J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper employs the volume of fluid (VOF) method to numerically investigate the effect of the width, height, and contact angles on burst frequencies of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic capillary valves in centrifugal microfluidic systems. Existing experimental results in the literature have been used to validate the implementation of the numerical method. The performance of capillary valves in the rectangular and the circular microfluidic structures on super hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms is studied. The numerical results are also compared with the existing theoretical models and the differences are discussed. Our experimental and computed results show a minimum burst frequency occurring at square capillaries and this result is useful for designing and developing more sophisticated networks of capillary valves. It also predicts that in super hydrophilic microfluidics, the fluid leaks consistently from the capillary valve at low pressures which can disrupt the biomedical procedures in centrifugal microfluidic platforms. PMID:24069169

  12. The effect of contact angles and capillary dimensions on the burst frequency of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms, a CFD study.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Amin; Ganesan, Poo; Ibrahim, Fatimah; He, Shuisheng; Madou, Marc J

    2013-01-01

    This paper employs the volume of fluid (VOF) method to numerically investigate the effect of the width, height, and contact angles on burst frequencies of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic capillary valves in centrifugal microfluidic systems. Existing experimental results in the literature have been used to validate the implementation of the numerical method. The performance of capillary valves in the rectangular and the circular microfluidic structures on super hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms is studied. The numerical results are also compared with the existing theoretical models and the differences are discussed. Our experimental and computed results show a minimum burst frequency occurring at square capillaries and this result is useful for designing and developing more sophisticated networks of capillary valves. It also predicts that in super hydrophilic microfluidics, the fluid leaks consistently from the capillary valve at low pressures which can disrupt the biomedical procedures in centrifugal microfluidic platforms. PMID:24069169

  13. High Frequency Time-series of the Dynamic Sedimentation Processes on the Western Shelf of the Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dail, M. B.; Corbett, D. R.; McKee, B.; Duncan, D.

    2004-12-01

    Rivers annually transport billions of tons of organic and inorganic sediment to coastal environments, making them an extremely important part of global biogeochemical cycles. However, the majority of the freshwater and suspended materials are delivered to the coastal ocean by only a few rivers. In these river-dominated ocean margins (RiOMar), sediments are deposited and re-suspended repeatedly before stable deposition. This sediment cycling is poorly understood and is critical to understanding how deltas and continental shelves, considered to be major repositories of organic carbon in marine sediments, manipulate the global carbon cycle and biogeochemical processes affecting coastal environments. During six cruises in the fall of 2003 (October, November, and December) and spring of 2004 (March, April, and May), on the shelf west of the Mississippi River Delta, sediment samples collected from cores were analyzed for particle reactive radionuclides (210Pb, 137Cs, and 234Th) to create a quantitative high frequency time-series of sediment deposition and erosion processes and evaluate the transport and fate of material on the shelf. Based on previous work completed by Corbett et al. (2004), seasonal variations in short-lived tracers could be explained by river flow and weather conditions. Inventories of the tracers collected during the fall cruises suggest increased deposition during the late summer months and that most sediment reworking and export occurs during the winter months, typically a period of low/increasing river discharge and increased weather forcing.

  14. Discovery of Nearly Coherent Oscillations with a Frequency of approximately 567 Hz During Type I X-ray Bursts of the X-ray Transient and Eclipsing Binary X1658-298

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wijnands, Rudy; Strohmayer, Tod; Franco, Lucia M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of nearly coherent oscillations with a frequency of approximately 567 Hz during type I X-ray bursts from the X-ray transient and eclipsing binary X1658-298. If these oscillations are directly related to the neutron star rotation, then the spin period of the neutron star in X1658-298 is approximately 1.8 ms. The oscillations can be present during the rise or decay phase of the bursts. Oscillations during the decay phase of the bursts show an increase in frequency of approximately 0.5-1 Hz. However, in one particular burst the oscillations reappear at the end of the decay phase at about 571.5 Hz. This represents an increase in oscillation frequency of about 5 Hz, which is the largest frequency change seen so far in a burst oscillation. It is unclear if such a large change can be accommodated by present models used to explain the frequency evolution of the oscillations. The oscillations at 571.5 Hz are unusually soft compared to the oscillations found at 567 Hz. We also observed several bursts during which the oscillations are detected at much lower significance or not at all. Most of these bursts happen during periods of X-ray dipping behavior, suggesting that the X-ray dipping might decrease the amplitude of the oscillations (although several complications exist with this simple picture). We discuss our discovery in the framework of the neutron star spin interpretation.

  15. Experimental Determination of Effects of Frequency and Amplitude on the Lateral Stability Derivatives for a Delta, a Swept, and Unswept Wing Oscillating in Yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lewis R

    1958-01-01

    Three wing models were oscillated in yaw about their vertical axes to determine the effects of systematic variations of frequency and amplitude of oscillation on the in-phase and out-of-phase combination lateral stability derivatives resulting from this motion. The tests were made at low speeds for a 60 degree delta wing, a 45 degree swept wing, and an unswept wing; the swept and unswept wings had aspect ratios of 4. The results indicate that large changes in the magnitude of the stability derivatives due to the variation of frequency occur at high angles of attack, particularly for the delta wing. The greatest variations of the derivatives with frequency take place for the lowest frequencies of oscillation; at the higher frequencies, the effects of frequency are smaller and the derivatives become more linear with angle of attack. Effects of amplitude of oscillation on the stability derivatives for delta wings were evident for certain high angles of attack and for the lowest frequencies of oscillation. As the frequency became high, the amplitude effects tended to disappear.

  16. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH FREQUENCIES IN {delta} SCUTI STARS: PHOTOMETRIC KEPLER AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF THE RAPID ROTATOR KIC 8054146

    SciTech Connect

    Breger, M.; Robertson, P.; Fossati, L.; Balona, L.; Kurtz, D. W.; Bohlender, D.; Lenz, P.; Mueller, I.; Lueftinger, Th.; Clarke, Bruce D.

    2012-11-01

    Two years of Kepler data of KIC 8054146 ({delta} Sct/{gamma} Dor hybrid) revealed 349 statistically significant frequencies between 0.54 and 191.36 cycles day{sup -1} (6.3 {mu}Hz to 2.21 mHz). The 117 low frequencies cluster in specific frequency bands, but do not show the equidistant period spacings predicted for gravity modes of successive radial order, n, and reported for at least one other hybrid pulsator. The four dominant low frequencies in the 2.8-3.0 cycles day{sup -1} (32-35 {mu}Hz) range show strong amplitude variability with timescales of months and years. These four low frequencies also determine the spacing of the higher frequencies in and beyond the {delta} Sct pressure-mode frequency domain. In fact, most of the higher frequencies belong to one of three families with spacings linked to a specific dominant low frequency. In the Fourier spectrum, these family regularities show up as triplets, high-frequency sequences with absolutely equidistant frequency spacings, side lobes (amplitude modulations), and other regularities in frequency spacings. Furthermore, within two families the amplitude variations between the low and high frequencies are related. We conclude that the low frequencies (gravity modes, rotation) and observed high frequencies (mostly pressure modes) are physically connected. This unusual behavior may be related to the very rapid rotation of the star: from a combination of high- and low-resolution spectroscopy we determined that KIC 8054146 is a very fast rotator ({upsilon} sin i = 300 {+-} 20 km s{sup -1}) with an effective temperature of 7600 {+-} 200 K and a surface gravity log g of 3.9 {+-} 0.3. Several astrophysical ideas explaining the origin of the relationship between the low and high frequencies are explored.

  17. Coronal loops diagnostics using the parameters of U-burst harmonic pair at frequencies 10-70 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Gridin, A. A.; Shevchuk, N. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Panchenko, M.

    2013-09-01

    The results of the first observations of solar sporadic radio emission using one section of the new being currently created Giant Ukrainian Radio Telescope (GURT) are presented. The parameters of inverted U-burst with harmonic structure observed with GURT are considered. The main attention is paid to the time delay between the fundamental and harmonic components. The analytical model explaining the observed time delay is proposed.

  18. Evaluating the surface circulation in the Ebro delta (northeastern Spain) with quality-controlled high-frequency radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, P.; Piedracoba, S.; Soto-Navarro, J.; Alvarez-Fanjul, E.

    2015-11-01

    The Ebro River delta is a relevant marine protected area in the western Mediterranean. In order to promote the conservation of its ecosystem and support operational decision making in this sensitive area, a three-site standard-range (13.5 MHz) CODAR SeaSonde high-frequency (HF) radar was deployed in December 2013. The main goal of this work is to explore basic features of the sea surface circulation in the Ebro deltaic region as derived from reliable HF radar surface current measurements. For this aim, a combined quality control methodology was applied: firstly, 1-year long (2014) real-time web monitoring of nonvelocity-based diagnostic parameters was conducted to infer both radar site status and HF radar system performance. The signal-to-noise ratio at the monopole exhibited a consistent monthly evolution, although some abrupt decreases (below 10 dB), occasionally detected in June for one of the radar sites, impacted negatively on the spatiotemporal coverage of total current vectors. It seemed to be sporadic episodes since radar site overall performance was found to be robust during 2014. Secondly, a validation of HF radar data with independent in situ observations from a moored current meter was attempted for May-October 2014. The accuracy assessment of radial and total vectors revealed a consistently high agreement. The directional accuracy of the HF radar was rated at better than 8°. The correlation coefficient and root mean square error (RMSE) values emerged in the ranges [0.58-0.83] and [4.02-18.31] cm s-1, respectively. The analysis of the monthly averaged current maps for 2014 showed that the HF radar properly represented basic oceanographic features previously reported, namely, the predominant southwestward flow, the coastal clockwise eddy confined south of the Ebro delta mouth, or the Ebro River impulsive-type freshwater discharge. The EOF analysis related the flow response to local wind forcing and confirmed that the surface current field evolved in

  19. Corticostriatal Field Potentials Are Modulated at Delta and Theta Frequencies during Interval-Timing Task in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Emmons, Eric B.; Ruggiero, Rafael N.; Kelley, Ryan M.; Parker, Krystal L.; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.

    2016-01-01

    Organizing movements in time is a critical and highly conserved feature of mammalian behavior. Temporal control of action requires corticostriatal networks. We investigate these networks in rodents using a two-interval timing task while recording LFPs in medial frontal cortex (MFC) or dorsomedial striatum. Consistent with prior work, we found cue-triggered delta (1–4 Hz) and theta activity (4–8 Hz) primarily in rodent MFC. We observed delta activity across temporal intervals in MFC and dorsomedial striatum. Rewarded responses were associated with increased delta activity in MFC. Activity in theta bands in MFC and delta bands in the striatum was linked with the timing of responses. These data suggest both delta and theta activity in frontostriatal networks are modulated during interval timing and that activity in these bands may be involved in the temporal control of action. PMID:27092091

  20. Magnetar Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  1. V(D)J recombination generates a high frequency of nonstandard TCR D[delta]-associated rearrangements in thymocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, A.M.; Slack, J.K.; Mu, Xiaochun )

    1993-03-15

    The standard products of V(D)J recombination are coding junctions, which encode Ag receptor polypeptide, and their commonly excised reciprocal products, signal junctions. Additional nonstandard products also have been detected, mostly in artificial recombination substrate studies. The occurrence of nonstandard products, including pseudonormal, hybrid, and open/shut junctions, indicates significant indeterminacy of the V(D)J recombinase. However, the incidence of nonstandard products of endogenous Ag receptor genes in vivo has not been specifically addressed. The data presented here show that for the TCR-[delta] locus, D element-associated recombination in mouse thymocytes results in a high incidence of nonstandard recombination products. D[delta]1-D[delta]2 rearrangements, both chromosome retained and excised episomal products, were studied by polymerase chain reaction amplification, cloning, and sequence analysis. The proximity of D[delta]1 and D[delta]2 elements, and the fact that both are flanked by 5[prime] and 3[prime] recombination signal sequences with 12-bp and 23-bp spacers, respectively, results in frequent pseudonormal joining. The resulting products are signal junctions retained on the chromosome. Excised episomal products include coding junctions, hybrid junctions formed in apparent violation of the 12/23 spacer rule, and standard signal junctions; some signal junctions show evidence of imprecise cleavage. Evidence for open/shut and/or oligonucleotide capture events was also seen. Similar rearrangements were detectable in thymocytes of mutant scid mice. These findings indicate a high degree of indeterminancy of V(D)J recombinase-mediated D[delta]1-D[delta]2 rearrangement in both wild-type and scid thymocytes. This indeterminacy affects the productive potential of TCR-[delta] loci. 45 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Neuronal Networks during Burst Suppression as Revealed by Source Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reinicke, Christine; Moeller, Friederike; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Pressler, Ronit; Deuschl, Günther; Stephani, Ulrich; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burst-suppression (BS) is an electroencephalography (EEG) pattern consisting of alternant periods of slow waves of high amplitude (burst) and periods of so called flat EEG (suppression). It is generally associated with coma of various etiologies (hypoxia, drug-related intoxication, hypothermia, and childhood encephalopathies, but also anesthesia). Animal studies suggest that both the cortex and the thalamus are involved in the generation of BS. However, very little is known about mechanisms of BS in humans. The aim of this study was to identify the neuronal network underlying both burst and suppression phases using source reconstruction and analysis of functional and effective connectivity in EEG. Material/Methods Dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) was applied to EEG segments of 13 neonates and infants with burst and suppression EEG pattern. The brain area with the strongest power in the analyzed frequency (1–4 Hz) range was defined as the reference region. DICS was used to compute the coherence between this reference region and the entire brain. The renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC) was used to describe the informational flow between the identified sources. Results/Conclusion Delta activity during the burst phases was associated with coherent sources in the thalamus and brainstem as well as bilateral sources in cortical regions mainly frontal and parietal, whereas suppression phases were associated with coherent sources only in cortical regions. Results of the RPDC analyses showed an upwards informational flow from the brainstem towards the thalamus and from the thalamus to cortical regions, which was absent during the suppression phases. These findings may support the theory that a “cortical deafferentiation” between the cortex and sub-cortical structures exists especially in suppression phases compared to burst phases in burst suppression EEGs. Such a deafferentiation may play a role in the poor neurological outcome of

  3. Modelling the increased frequency of extreme sea levels in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta due to sea level rise and other effects of climate change.

    PubMed

    Kay, S; Caesar, J; Wolf, J; Bricheno, L; Nicholls, R J; Saiful Islam, A K M; Haque, A; Pardaens, A; Lowe, J A

    2015-07-01

    Coastal flooding due to storm surge and high tides is a serious risk for inhabitants of the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) delta, as much of the land is close to sea level. Climate change could lead to large areas of land being subject to increased flooding, salinization and ultimate abandonment in West Bengal, India, and Bangladesh. IPCC 5th assessment modelling of sea level rise and estimates of subsidence rates from the EU IMPACT2C project suggest that sea level in the GBM delta region may rise by 0.63 to 0.88 m by 2090, with some studies suggesting this could be up to 0.5 m higher if potential substantial melting of the West Antarctic ice sheet is included. These sea level rise scenarios lead to increased frequency of high water coastal events. Any effect of climate change on the frequency and severity of storms can also have an effect on extreme sea levels. A shelf-sea model of the Bay of Bengal has been used to investigate how the combined effect of sea level rise and changes in other environmental conditions under climate change may alter the frequency of extreme sea level events for the period 1971 to 2099. The model was forced using atmospheric and oceanic boundary conditions derived from climate model projections and the future scenario increase in sea level was applied at its ocean boundary. The model results show an increased likelihood of extreme sea level events through the 21st century, with the frequency of events increasing greatly in the second half of the century: water levels that occurred at decadal time intervals under present-day model conditions occurred in most years by the middle of the 21st century and 3-15 times per year by 2100. The heights of the most extreme events tend to increase more in the first half of the century than the second. The modelled scenarios provide a case study of how sea level rise and other effects of climate change may combine to produce a greatly increased threat to life and property in the GBM delta by the end

  4. X-ray observations of the burst source MXB 1728 - 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basinska, E. M.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Sztajno, M.; Cominsky, L. R.; Marshall, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    Where sufficient information has been obtained, attention is given to the maximum burst flux, integrated burst flux, spectral hardness, rise time, etc., of 96 X-ray bursts observed from March 1976 to March 1979. The integrated burst flux and the burst frequency appear to be correlated; the longer the burst interval, the larger the integrated burst flux, as expected on the basis of simple thermonuclear flash models. The maximum burst flux and the integrated burst flux are strongly correlated; for low flux levels their dependence is approximately linear, while for increasing values of the integrated burst flux, the flux at burst maximum saturates and reaches a plateau.

  5. High-frequency depositional sequences and stratal stacking patterns in lower pliocene coastal deltas, mid-Norwegian continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, S.; Weimer, P.

    1996-12-01

    Extensive deltaic and coastal progradation occurred along the mid-Norwegian continental shelf during the early Pliocene. Thirty-eight well-developed, high-frequency (fourth-order) sequences are identified within the deltaic complex on multifold seismic data. The fourth-order sequences are arranged in four oblique progradational and two sigmoid progradational sequence sets. Deposition of the high-frequency sequences and their stacking patterns probably were in response to high-frequency cycles of relative changes in sea level cycles produced by variable rates of subsidence and uplift, superimposed on ;high-frequency eustatic cycles within a lower frequency eustatic system. The mixed aggrading/prograding sequence sets are interpreted to represent increased space-added accommodation rates and deposition within third-order highstand systems tracts. Conversely, the progradational sequence sets are interpreted to represent decreasing space-added accommodation rates and deposition within the third-order low-stand systems tracts. The recognition of multiple sequence sets likely reflects the effect of long-term relative fall in sea level (tectonic uplift?) super-imposed on high-frequency eustatic cycles.

  6. Nile Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  The Nile River Delta     View Larger Image ... of eastern Africa. At the apex of the fertile Nile River Delta is the Egyptian capital city of Cairo. To the west are the Great Pyramids ...

  7. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir, {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.

  8. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  9. High-Frequency Electrodynamics of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8 +{ital {delta}}}thinsp: Nonlinear Response in the Vortex State

    SciTech Connect

    Mallozzi, R.; Orenstein, J.; Eckstein, J.N.; Bozovic, I.

    1998-08-01

    Coherent terahertz spectroscopy is used to measure the complex conductivity of thin films of Bi{sub 2}Sr {sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} in the vortex state as a function of frequency, temperature, and applied magnetic field. We report an unusual sublinear power law dependence of the high-frequency magnetoconductivity {Delta}{sigma}(H){equivalent_to}{sigma}(H) {minus}{sigma}(0) on magnetic field. Over a broad range of field and temperature, {Delta}{sigma}{sub 2} varies as H{sup {alpha}} , with {alpha}{approx} ( 1) /(2) . We present a model based on the nonlinear London electrodynamics predicted for a d-wave superconductor which quantitatively explains these results using only parameters obtained from zero-field measurements. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Observations of narrow band solar burst structure at decameter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    A high-speed digital solar radio spectrograph was used in the investigation. This instrument made it possible to observe solar bursts with a time and frequency resolution not obtainable with conventional sweep-frequency spectrographs. A type III burst observed at 40 MHz is shown. The rise and the decay of the type III burst is smooth and gradual, with the decay time exceeding the rise time. An isophote diagram of the same burst is also presented along with some other events.

  11. Differential Regulation of Action Potential Shape and Burst-Frequency Firing by BK and Kv2 Channels in Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kimm, Tilia; Khaliq, Zayd M.

    2015-01-01

    pars compacta. Although both channel types participate in action potential repolarization about equally, they have contrasting and partially opposite effects in regulating neuronal firing at frequencies typical of bursting. Our analysis shows that this results from their different kinetic properties, with fast-activating BK channels serving to short-circuit activation of Kv2 channels, which tend to slow firing by producing a deep afterhyperpolarization. The cross-regulation of BK and Kv2 activation illustrates that the functional role of a channel cannot be defined in isolation but depends critically on the context of the other conductances in the cell. PMID:26674866

  12. Herringbone bursts associated with type II solar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed observations of the herringbone (HB) fine structure on type II solar radio bursts are presented. Data from the Culgoora radiospectrograph, radiometer and radioheliograph are analyzed. The characteristic spectral profiles, frequency drift rates and exciter velocities, fluxes, source sizes, brightness temperatures, and polarizations of individual HB bursts are determined. Correlations between individual bursts within the characteristic groups of bursts and the properties of the associated type II bursts are examined. These data are compatible with HB bursts being radiation at multiples of the plasma frequency generated by electron streams accelerated by the type II shock. HB bursts are physically distinct phenomena from type II and type III bursts, differing significantly in emission processes and/or source conditions; this conclusion indicates that many of the presently available theoretical ideas for HB bursts are incorrect.

  13. High-frequency time-series of the dynamic sedimentation processes on the western shelf of the Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reide Corbett, D.; Dail, Michael; McKee, Brent

    2007-06-01

    Multiple box cores were collected on the continental shelf in the Mississippi Deltaic Region adjacent to Southwest Pass and analyzed for particle reactive radionuclides 234Th and 7Be to examine seasonal sediment dynamics associated with variations of river discharge and hydrodynamics. Three stations located along a line west of Southwest Pass were cored and reoccupied in October, November, and December of 2003 and March, April, and May of 2004. High-frequency sampling (˜monthly) comparable to the short half-life of the radiotracers ( 234Th t1/2=24.1 d; 7Be t1/2=53.3) enabled us to isolate the relative influence that various forcing agents (river discharge, waves, currents) had on sediment inventories of 7Be and 234Th. In addition, the primary source of 7Be (fluvial) differs from 234Th (marine), providing further insight into processes affecting sediment transport and supply. Monthly 7Be inventories showed a significant positive relationship to river discharge ( P=0.03) proximal to Southwest Pass. Sites further from Southwest Pass exhibited little to no relationship between 7Be inventories and river flow. At these sites, monthly 7Be inventories demonstrated a significant positive relationship with average wave orbital velocity ( P<0.01). During our sampling period, the transport of 7Be-rich sediments to sites located on the middle to outer shelf were dependent on sea conditions not river discharge. Relatively high wave orbital velocities potentially allow particles to remain in suspension longer and travel further distances before initial deposition. In addition, 234Th inventories showed evidence of sediment focusing during periods of high wave orbital velocities.

  14. Analysis of Q burst waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toshio; Komatsu, Masayuki

    2007-04-01

    The electric field changes in ELF to VLF were observed with a ball antenna in fair weather at Kochi (latitude 33.3°N, longitude 133.4°E) during 2003-2004. Some 376 Q bursts were obtained, seven examples of which are analyzed in the present study. The continuous frequency spectra of the Q bursts and the background noises from 1.0 Hz to 11 kHz are compared, and it was found that the Q bursts prevail over the background in the frequency range from 1 to 300 Hz. The surplus is 20 dB (in amplitude) near the fundamental mode frequency. The "W"-type changes found in the initial portion of the Q burst waveforms are interpreted as the combined electromagnetic waveform of direct and antipodal waves from the causative lightning strokes. From the time intervals between the two waves, the source-receiver distances are estimated as far as 19 Mm. The pulses to excite the Schumann resonances in the Q bursts are clearly identified.

  15. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic strings

    PubMed

    Damour; Vilenkin

    2000-10-30

    Cusps of cosmic strings emit strong beams of high-frequency gravitational waves (GW). As a consequence of these beams, the stochastic ensemble of gravitational waves generated by a cosmological network of oscillating loops is strongly non-Gaussian, and includes occasional sharp bursts that stand above the rms GW background. These bursts might be detectable by the planned GW detectors LIGO/VIRGO and LISA for string tensions as small as G&mgr; approximately 10(-13). The GW bursts discussed here might be accompanied by gamma ray bursts. PMID:11041921

  16. A Neocortical Delta Rhythm Facilitates Reciprocal Interlaminar Interactions via Nested Theta Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Carracedo, Lucy M.; Kjeldsen, Henrik; Cunnington, Leonie; Jenkins, Alastair; Schofield, Ian; Cunningham, Mark O.; Davies, Ceri H.; Traub, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    Delta oscillations (1–4 Hz) associate with deep sleep and are implicated in memory consolidation and replay of cortical responses elicited during wake states. A potent local generator has been characterized in thalamus, and local generators in neocortex have been suggested. Here we demonstrate that isolated rat neocortex generates delta rhythms in conditions mimicking the neuromodulatory state during deep sleep (low cholinergic and dopaminergic tone). The rhythm originated in an NMDA receptor-driven network of intrinsic bursting (IB) neurons in layer 5, activating a source of GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition. In contrast, regular spiking (RS) neurons in layer 5 generated theta-frequency outputs. In layer 2/3 principal cells, outputs from IB cells associated with IPSPs, whereas those from layer 5 RS neurons related to nested bursts of theta-frequency EPSPs. Both interlaminar spike and field correlations revealed a sequence of events whereby sparse spiking in layer 2/3 was partially reflected back from layer 5 on each delta period. We suggest that these reciprocal, interlaminar interactions may represent a “Helmholtz machine”-like process to control synaptic rescaling during deep sleep. PMID:23804097

  17. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 mutation in the Atlantic island populations of Madeira, the Azores, Cabo Verde, and São Tomé e Príncipe.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Tamira; Brehm, António; Fernandes, Ana Teresa

    2006-12-01

    There is evidence that the CCR5-delta32 mutation confers protection against HIV-1 infection to homozygous individuals. It is believed that this mutation spread through Europe with the Vikings and that it has been subjected to positive selection, leading to a high frequency in Europe (approximately 10%). We carried out the present study to determine the 32-bp deletion allele and genotype frequencies of the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) in the Atlantic island populations of Madeira, the Azores, Cabo Verde, and São Tomé e Principe. These Atlantic archipelagos were all colonized by the Portuguese in the 15th and 16th centuries, but the latter two received most of their settlers from the West African coast. The frequency of the CCR5-delta32 mutation varies between 0% in São Tomé e Príncipe and 16.5% in the Azores. The Azores Islands have one of the highest frequencies of homozygotes found in Europe (4.8%). There are significant differences (P < 0.05) between some of these populations, for example, between São Tomé e Príncipe and Cabo Verde, and even within populations (e.g., Portugal, Madeira, and the Azores). PMID:17564248

  18. Man made deltas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, V.; Trincardi, F.

    2014-12-01

    During the last few millennia, southern European fluvio-deltaic systems have evolved in response to changes in the hydrological cycle, mostly driven by high-frequency climate oscillations and increasing anthropic pressure on natural landscapes. The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the bulk of the four largest northern Mediterranean and Black Sea deltas (Ebro, Rhone, Po and Danube) formed during two short and synchronous intervals during which anthropogenic land cover change was the main driver for enhanced sediment production. These two major growth phases occurred under contrasting climatic regimes and were both followed by generalized delta retreat, supporting the hypothesis of human-driven delta progradation. Delta retreat, in particular, was the consequence of reduced soil erosion for renewed afforestation after the fall of the Roman Empire, and of river dams construction that overkilled the still increasing sediment production in catchment basins since the Industrial Era. In this second case, in particular, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding.

  19. Hardness/intensity correlations among BATSE bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conclusions about the nature of gamma-ray bursts derived from the size-frequency distribution may be altered if a significant correlation exists between burst intensity and spectral shape. Moreover, if gamma-ray bursts have a cosmological origin, such a correlation may be expected to result from the expansion of the universe. We have performed a rudimentary search of the BATSE bursts for hardness/intensity correlations. The range of spectral shapes was determined for each burst by computing the ratio of the intensity in the range 100-300 keV to that in 55-300 keV. We find weak evidence for the existence of a correlation, the strongest effect being present when comparing the maximum hardness ratio for each burst with its maximum rate.

  20. The position and polarization of Type III solar bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Suzuki, S.

    1980-01-01

    The position and polarization of Type III solar bursts in the range of 24-220 MHz are studied, with emphasis on the bursts continuing to frequencies lower than 24 MHz. Consideration is given to the statistics of burst polarization, the relation between polarization and source position, and brightness temperature, flux densities, and source sizes.

  1. A Model-based Interpretation of Low-frequency Changes in the Carbon Cycle during the Last 120,000 years and its Implications for the Reconstruction of Atmospheric (delta) 14-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, Peter; Muscheler, Raimund; Fischer, Hubertus

    2006-01-01

    A main caveat in the interpretation of observed changes in atmospheric (Delta)C-l4 during the last 50,000 years is the unknown variability of the carbon cycle, which together with changes in the C-14 production rates determines the C-14 dynamics. A plausible scenario explaining glacial/interglacial dynamics seen in atmospheric CO2 and (delta)C-13 was proposed recently (Kohler et al., 2005a). A similar approach that expands its interpretation to the C-14 cycle is an important step toward a deeper understanding of (Delta)C-14 variability. This approach is based on an ocean/atmosphere/biosphere box model of the global carbon cycle (BICYCLE) to reproduce low-frequency changes in atmospheric CO2 as seen in Antarctic ice cores. The model is forced forward in time by various paleoclimatic records derived from ice and sediment cores. The simulation results of our proposed scenario match a compiled CO2 record from various ice cores during the last 120,000 years with high accuracy (r(sup 2) = 0.89). We analyze scenarios with different C-14 production rates, which are either constant or based on Be-10 measured in Greenland ice cores or the recent high-resolution geomagnetic field reconstruction GLOPIS-75 and compare them with the available (Delta)C-14 data covering the last 50,000 years. Our results suggest that during the last glacial cycle in general less than 110%0o f the increased atmospheric (Delta)C-14 is based on variations in the carbon cycle, while the largest part (5/6) of the variations has to be explained by other factors. Glacial atmospheric (Delta)C-14 larger than 700% cannot not be explained within our framework, neither through carbon cycle-based changes nor through variable C-14 production. Superimposed on these general trends might lie positive anomalies in atmospheric (Delta)C-14 of approx. 50% caused by millennial-scale variability of the northern deep water production during Heinrich events and Dansgaard/Oeschger climate fluctuations. According to our

  2. Low-Speed Investigation of the Effects of Frequency and Amplitude of Oscillation in Sideslip on the Lateral Stability Derivatives of a 60 deg Delta Wing, a 45 deg Sweptback Wing and an Unswept Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, Jacob H.; Williams, James L.

    1961-01-01

    A low-speed investigation has been conducted in the Langley stability tunnel to study the effects of frequency and amplitude of sideslipping motion on the lateral stability derivatives of a 60 deg. delta wing, a 45 deg. sweptback wing, and an unswept wing. The investigation was made for values of the reduced-frequency parameter of 0.066 and 0.218 and for a range of amplitudes from +/- 2 to +/- 6 deg. The results of the investigation indicated that increasing the frequency of the oscillation generally produced an appreciable change in magnitude of the lateral oscillatory stability derivatives in the higher angle-of-attack range. This effect was greatest for the 60 deg. delta wing and smallest for the unswept wing and generally resulted in a more linear variation of these derivatives with angle of attack. For the relatively high frequency at which the amplitude was varied, there appeared to be little effect on the measured derivatives as a result of the change in amplitude of the oscillation.

  3. Gamma and Beta Bursts Underlie Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Mikael; Rose, Jonas; Herman, Pawel; Brincat, Scott L; Buschman, Timothy J; Miller, Earl K

    2016-04-01

    Working memory is thought to result from sustained neuron spiking. However, computational models suggest complex dynamics with discrete oscillatory bursts. We analyzed local field potential (LFP) and spiking from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of monkeys performing a working memory task. There were brief bursts of narrow-band gamma oscillations (45-100 Hz), varied in time and frequency, accompanying encoding and re-activation of sensory information. They appeared at a minority of recording sites associated with spiking reflecting the to-be-remembered items. Beta oscillations (20-35 Hz) also occurred in brief, variable bursts but reflected a default state interrupted by encoding and decoding. Only activity of neurons reflecting encoding/decoding correlated with changes in gamma burst rate. Thus, gamma bursts could gate access to, and prevent sensory interference with, working memory. This supports the hypothesis that working memory is manifested by discrete oscillatory dynamics and spiking, not sustained activity. PMID:26996084

  4. Gamma-ray burst of November 19, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Zenchenko, V.M.; Kuznetsov, A.V.; Mersov, G.A.; Estulin, I.V.; Vedrenne, G.; Niel, M.; Hurley, K.

    1980-03-01

    The ..gamma..-ray burst recorded on November 19, 1978, by the Venera 11 and Venera 12 space probes and the Prognoz 7 satellite is described. The source of this burst is confined to an ellipse measuring 0'.84 x 15'.4, centered at ..cap alpha..=19/sup 0/.064, delta=-28/sup 0/.858 (1950.0). No identification can yet be made between the source and any stellar object.

  5. The transient gamma-ray spectrometer: A new high resolution detector for gamma-ray burst spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, H.; Baker, R.; Cline, T.L.; Gehrels, N.; Jermakian, J.; Nolan, T.; Ramaty, R.; Sheppard, D.A.; Smith, G.; Stilwell, D.E.; Teegarden, B.J.; Trombka, J.; Owens, A.; Cork, C.P.; Landis, D.A.; Luke, P.N.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.; Pehl, R.H.; Yaver, H.; Hurley, K.; Mathias, S.; Post, A.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) to be flown aboard the WIND spacecraft is primarily designed to perform high resolution spectroscopy of transient gamma-ray events, such as cosmic [gamma]-ray bursts and solar flares, over the energy range 20 keV to 10 MeV with an expected spectroscopic resolution of E/[delta]E = 500. The detector itself consists of a 215 cm[sup 3] high purity n-type Ge crystal kept at cryogenic temperatures by a passive radiative cooler. The geometric field of view defined by the cooler is 170[degrees]. To avoid continuous triggers caused by soft solar events, a thin Be/Cu sun-shield around the sides of the cooler has been provided. A passive Mo/Pb occulter, which modulates signals from within [+-]5[degrees] of the ecliptic plane at the spacecraft spin frequency, is used to identify and study solar flares, as well as emission from the galactic plane and center. Thus, in addition to transient event measurements, the instrument will allow the search for possible diffuse background lines and monitor the 511 keV positron annihilation radiation from the galactic center. In order to handle the typically large burst count rates which can be in excess of 100 kHz, burst data are stored directly in an on-board 2.75 Mbit burst memory with an absolute timing accuracy of [+-]1.5 ms after ground processing. This capacity is sufficient to store the entire spectral data set of all but the largest bursts. The experiment is scheduled to be launched on a Delta II launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral in the fall of 1993.

  6. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time.

  7. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.

    1998-04-28

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time. 12 figs.

  8. Burst Oscillations: Watching Neutron Stars Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2010-01-01

    It is now almost 15 years since the first detection of rotationally modulated emission from X-ray bursting neutron stars, "burst oscillations," This phenomenon enables us to see neutron stars spin, as the X-ray burst flux asymmetrically lights up the surface. It has enabled a new way to probe the neutron star spin frequency distribution, as well as to elucidate the multidimensional nature of nuclear burning on neutron stars. I will review our current observational understanding of the phenomenon, with an eye toward highlighting some of the interesting remaining puzzles, of which there is no shortage.

  9. Voyager observations of Jovian millisecond radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy data collected over 30-day intervals centered on the two close encounters with Jupiter were utilized to study the characteristics of millisecond-duration radio bursts (s-bursts) at frequencies between 5 and 15 MHz. In this frequency range, s-bursts are found to occur almost independently of Central Meridian Longitude and to depend entirely on the phase of Io with respect to the observer's planetocentric line of sight. Individual bursts typically cover a total frequency range of about 1.5 to 3 MHz, and they are usually strongly circularly polarized. Most bursts in a particular s-burst storm will exhibit the same polarization sense (either right-hand or left-hand), and there is some evidence for a systematic pattern in which one polarizations sense is preferred over the other as a function of Io phase and Central Meridian Longitude. These data are all suggestive of a radio source that is located along the instantaneous Io flux tube and that extends over a linear dimension of 5000 km along the field lines in both the northern and southern Hemispheres.

  10. UWB multi-burst transmit driver for averaging receivers

    DOEpatents

    Dallum, Gregory E

    2012-11-20

    A multi-burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a sequence of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. There are two oscillators in the transmitter circuit, a gated burst rate oscillator and a gated RF burst or RF power output oscillator. The burst rate oscillator produces a relatively low frequency, i.e., MHz, square wave output for a selected transmit cycle, and drives the RF burst oscillator, which produces RF bursts of much higher frequency, i.e., GHz, during the transmit cycle. The frequency of the burst rate oscillator sets the spacing of the RF burst packets. The first oscillator output passes through a bias driver to the second oscillator. The bias driver conditions, e.g., level shifts, the signal from the first oscillator for input into the second oscillator, and also controls the length of each RF burst. A trigger pulse actuates a timing circuit, formed of a flip-flop and associated reset time delay circuit, that controls the operation of the first oscillator, i.e., how long it oscillates (which defines the transmit cycle).

  11. Characterizing Oscillatory Bursts in Single-Trial EEG Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Oscillatory bursts in numerous bands ranging from low (theta) to high frequencies (e.g., gamma) undoubtedly play an important role in cortical dynamics. Largely because of the inadequacy of existing analytic techniques. however, oscillatory bursts and their role in cortical processing remains poorly understood. To study oscillatory bursts effectively one must be able to isolate them and characterize them in the single trial. We describe a series of straightforward analysis techniques that produce useful indices of burst characteristics. First, stimulus-evoked responses are estimated using Differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA), and are subtracted from the single-trial. The single-trial characteristics of the evoked responses are stored to identify possible correlations with burst activity. Time-frequency (T-F), or wavelet, analyses are then applied to the single trial residuals. While T-F plots have been used in recent studies to identify and isolate bursts, we go further by fitting each burst in the T-F plot with a two-dimensional Gaussian. This provides a set of burst characteristics, such as, center time. burst duration, center frequency. frequency dispersion. and amplitude, all of which contribute to the accurate characterization of the individual burst. The burst phase can also be estimated. Burst characteristics can be quantified with several standard techniques (e.g.. histogramming and clustering), as well as Bayesian techniques (e.g., blocking) to allow a more parametric description analysis of the characteristics of oscillatory bursts, and the relationships of specific parameters to cortical excitability and stimulus integration.

  12. Mechanisms subserving the physiological nocturnal relative hypoprolactinemia of healthy older men: dual decline in prolactin secretory burst mass and basal release with preservation of pulse duration, frequency, and interpulse interval--a General Clinical Research Center study.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, A; Mulligan, T; Veldhuis, J D

    1999-03-01

    Increasing age is accompanied by decrements in randomly obtained, fasting, or frequently sampled serum PRL concentrations. The precise neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying such relative hypoprolactinemia in aging are incompletely understood. In the present study, we sampled blood at 2.5-min intervals overnight in 11 young (aged 21-34 yr) and 8 older (aged 62-72 yr) healthy men for subsequent chemiluminescence-based assay of serum PRL concentrations. The mean (+/- SEM) serum PRL concentration was significantly reduced at 4.3 +/- 0.78 microg/L in older men compared with 9.5 +/- 1.2 microg/L in young volunteers (P = 0.0049). PRL concentrations correlated with serum testosterone (r = 0.473; P = 0.041), dehydroepiandrosteroen sulfate (r = +0.455, P = 0.05), and insulin-like growth factor I (r = 0.494; P = 0.032) levels. Deconvolution analysis was used to evaluate combined pulsatile and basal modes of PRL secretion. In older men, discrete PRL secretory bursts were marked by a significantly (2.4-fold) attenuated mass of hormone secreted per burst (amount of PRL secreted per unit distribution volume), viz. 1.6 +/- 0.23 (older) vs. 3.9 +/- 0.57 microg/L (young; P < 0.01). In contrast, PRL secretory burst frequency, interpulse interval, and pulse duration were invariant of age. Concomitantly, basal PRL secretion was reduced by 2-fold in older subjects, namely to 0.00030 +/- 0.00027 (older) vs. 0.00065 +/- 0.0002 microg/L/min (young; P < 0.01). The amount of total PRL secretion that was pulsatile averaged 82 +/- 5.3% in young and 99 +/- 0.13% in older men (P = 0.012), indicating preferential loss of the basal mode of PRL release in aging. Assuming that basal PRL secretion mirrors functional pituitary lactotroph cell secretory mass, whereas pulsatile PRL release reflects effective (net) intermittent hypothalamic drive to responsive lactotroph cells, then our results suggest both an attrition in lactotroph cell mass and an impoverishment of net positive hypothalamic (agonistic

  13. Percussion drilling of metals using bursts of nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Hendow, Sami T; Romero, Rosa; Shakir, Sami A; Guerreiro, Paulo T

    2011-05-23

    The effect of ns bursting on percussion drilling of metal is investigated experimentally and analytically, and compared with the efficiency and quality of drilling using single ns pulses. Key advantages are demonstrated, correlating well with the results from a thermal theoretical model. The 1064 nm bursts contain up to 14 pulses of various pulse widths and spacing, and at frequencies of tens of MHz within the burst. The individual pulses have pulse widths of 10 to 200 ns, and up to 12 kW peak power. Burst repetition frequency is single shot to 500 kHz. PMID:21643280

  14. Discovery of the Neutron Star Spin Frequency in EXO 0748-676

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, Adam R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a search for burst oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from the low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) EXO 0748-676. With the proportional counter array (PCA) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) we have detected a 45 Hz oscillation in the average power spectrum of 38 thermonuclear X-ray bursts from this source. We computed power spectra with 1 Hz frequency resolution for both the rising and decaying portions of 38 X-ray bursts from the public RXTE archive. We averaged the 1 Hz power spectra and detected a significant signal at 45 Hz in the decaying phases of the bursts. The signal is detected at a significance level of 4 x 10 (exp -8) similar signal was detected in the rising intervals. The oscillation peak is unresolved at 1 Hz frequency resolution, indicating an oscillation quality factor, Q = nu (sub 0)/Delta nu (sub fwhm) greater than 45, and the average signal amplitude is approximately equal to 3% (rms) The detection of 45 Hz burst oscillations from EXO 0748-676 provides compelling evidence that this is the neutron star spin frequency in this system. We use the inferred spin frequency to model the widths of absorption lines from the neutron star surface and show that the widths of the absorption lines from EXO 0748-676 recently reported by Cottam et al. are consistent with a 45 Hz spin frequency as long as the neutron star radius is in the range from about 9.5 - 15 km. With a known spin frequency, precise modelling of the line profiles from EXO 0748-676 holds great promise for constraining the dense matter equation of state.

  15. Similitude relations for buffet and wing rock on delta wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabey, D. G.

    1997-08-01

    Vortex flow phenomena at high angles of incidence are of great interest to the designers of advanced combat aircraft. The steady phenomena (such as steady lift and pitching moments) are understood fairly well, whereas the unsteady phenomena are still uncertain. This paper addresses two important unsteady phenomena on delta wings. With regard to the frequency parameter of the quasi-periodic excitation caused by vortex bursting, a new correlation is established covering a range of sweep back from 60 to 75°. With regard to the much lower frequency parameter of limit-cycle rigid-body wing-rock, a new experiment shows conclusively that although the motion is non-linear, the frequency parameter can be predicted by quasi-steady theory. As a consequence, for a given sweep angle, the frequency parameter is inversely proportional to the square root of the inertia in roll. This is an important observation when attempting to extrapolate from model tests in wind tunnels to predict the wing-rock characteristics of aircraft.

  16. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  17. High-Frequency Gated Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    New gated oscillator generates bursts of high-frequency sine waves, square waves, and triangular waves in response to control signals. Each burst starts at zero phase, with tight tolerances on signal amplitude and frequency. Frequencies in megahertz range are made possible by using high-speed comparators and high-speed flip-flop as fast-response threshold detector.

  18. Analysis of the role of the low threshold currents IT and Ih in intrinsic delta oscillations of thalamocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Amarillo, Yimy; Mato, Germán; Nadal, Marcela S.

    2015-01-01

    Thalamocortical neurons are involved in the generation and maintenance of brain rhythms associated with global functional states. The repetitive burst firing of TC neurons at delta frequencies (1–4 Hz) has been linked to the oscillations recorded during deep sleep and during episodes of absence seizures. To get insight into the biophysical properties that are the basis for intrinsic delta oscillations in these neurons, we performed a bifurcation analysis of a minimal conductance-based thalamocortical neuron model including only the IT channel and the sodium and potassium leak channels. This analysis unveils the dynamics of repetitive burst firing of TC neurons, and describes how the interplay between the amplifying variable mT and the recovering variable hT of the calcium channel IT is sufficient to generate low threshold oscillations in the delta band. We also explored the role of the hyperpolarization activated cationic current Ih in this reduced model and determine that, albeit not required, Ih amplifies and stabilizes the oscillation. PMID:25999847

  19. Axion stars and fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwazaki, Aiichi

    2015-01-01

    We show a possible origin of fast radio bursts. They arise from the collisions between axion stars and neutron stars. The bursts are emitted in atmospheres of the neutron stars. The observed frequencies of the bursts are given by the axion mass ma such as ma/2 π ≃2.4 GHz (ma/10-5 eV ) . By the comparison of the theoretical with observed event rate ˜10-3 per year in a galaxy, we can determine the mass ˜10-12M⊙ of the axion stars. The mass is identical to the one estimated as the masses of axion miniclusters. Using these values, we can explain short durations (˜ms ) and amount of radiation energies (˜1043 GeV ) of the bursts.

  20. How long does a burst burst?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S.; Zhang, Bing; Murase, Kohta

    2014-05-20

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (∼hours) in γ-rays than typical long GRBs (∼minutes), and it has recently been proposed that these 'ultra-long GRBs' may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g., blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations suggest that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with X-Ray Telescope observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to determine whether ultra-long GRBs are unusual events. We define burst duration t {sub burst} based on both γ-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using γ-ray observations alone. We find that t {sub burst} can be reliably measured in 343 GRBs. Within this 'good' sample, 21.9% GRBs have t {sub burst} ≳ 10{sup 3} s and 11.5% GRBs have t {sub burst} ≳ 10{sup 4} s. There is an apparent bimodal distribution of t {sub burst} in this sample. However, when we consider an 'undetermined' sample (304 GRBs) with t {sub burst} possibly falling in the gap between GRB duration T {sub 90} and the first X-ray observational time, as well as a selection effect against t {sub burst} falling into the first Swift orbital 'dead zone' due to observation constraints, the intrinsic underlying t {sub burst} distribution is consistent with being a single component distribution. We found that the existing evidence for a separate ultra-long GRB population is inconclusive, and further multi-wavelength observations are needed to draw a firmer conclusion. We also discuss the theoretical implications of our results. In particular, the central engine activity duration of GRBs is generally much longer than the γ-ray T {sub 90} duration and it does not even correlate with T {sub 90}. It would be premature to make a direct connection between T {sub 90} and the size of the progenitor star.

  1. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R. Marc; vonKienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  2. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Kienlin, Andreas von; Lichti, Giselher; Steinle, Helmut; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  3. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290Hz) has, been claimed.

  4. Q-bursts from various distances on the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toshio; Komatsu, Masayuki

    2009-02-01

    The mechanism of the Q-burst is investigated in the time and frequency domains. Electric fields in the ELF (extremely low frequency) to VLF (very low frequency) range have been observed with a ball antenna since 2003 in Kochi City, Japan (latitude 33.3°north, longitude 133.4°east). Source-to-observer distances (SODs) of Q-bursts are estimated by analyzing the waveforms. It is found as a result that the Q-burst is produced by combination of direct and antipodal pulses from a source lightning stroke occurring all over the world.

  5. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta teems with sediment deposited by the river as it flows into the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color image captured by MODIS on October 15, 2001. The sediment, which is marked by brown swirls in the Gulf, provides nutrients for the bloom of phytoplankton visible as blue-green swirls off the coastline. In the high-resolution image the city of Memphis can be seen in the southwest corner of Tennessee, which is just to left of center at the top of the image. The brown coloration that encompasses Memphis and either side of the river, as flows north to south along the left side of the image, is the river's flood plain. Also visible, in the upper-right hand corner of the image is the southern end of the Appalachian Mountains.

  6. 34 First Callisto solar burst spectrometer station in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monstein, Christian

    2016-04-01

    In mid of March 2016 a new long wavelength station in Greenland was set into operation. It is a dual circular polarization, frequency agile solar radio burst spectrometer based on two Callisto spectrometers and the Long Wavelength Array antenna. During the commissioning phase several nice radio burst observations proved that the system works as expected.

  7. Coherent emission in fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2014-05-01

    The fast (ms) radio bursts reported by Lorimer et al. Science 318, 777 (2007) and Thornton et al. Science 341, 53 (2013) have extremely high brightness temperatures if at the inferred cosmological distances. This implies coherent emission by "bunches" of charges. Fast radio bursts, like the giant pulses of the Crab pulsar, display banded spectra that may be harmonics of plasma frequency emission by plasma turbulence and are inconsistent with emission by charge distributions moving relativistically. We model the emission region as a screen of half-wave dipole radiators resonant around the frequencies of observation, the maximally bright emission mechanism of nonrelativistic charges, and calculate the implied charge bunching. From this we infer the minimum electron energy required to overcome electrostatic repulsion. If fast radio bursts are the counterparts of Galactic events, their Galactic counterparts may be detected from any direction above the horizon by radio telescopes in their far sidelobes or by small arrays of dipoles.

  8. Position and polarization of solar drift pair bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, S.; Gary, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the observations of Type I bursts, Type III bursts, and an underlying continuum made with the Culgoora spectropolarimeter, spectrograph, and radioheliograph during a noise storm of February 17/18, 1979. Several hundred RDP bursts, and about fifty FDPs were observed. The results on the polarization of drift pair bursts confirm the results of Sastry (1972) that the two components of drift pairs are polarized in the same sense. However, the observed significant difference in degree of polarization between the two components of a pair has not been previously reported. Data on RDP positional and frequency characteristics are presented, and existing theories concerning RDPs are reviewed.

  9. Burst vortex/boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, P.; Naaseri, M.

    1988-01-01

    Several configurations of delta wing vortex generator and boundary layer test plate were tested, and two final ones selected. Sample measurements and flow visualizations in the candidate configurations, together with more detailed measurements in one of the two final arrangements, which were selected so that a pure vortex bursts repeatably and then interacts, in as simple fashion as possible, with a simple turbulent boundary layer, are included. It is concluded that different intensities of bursting or breakdown, like different strengths of shock wave or hydraulic jump, can be produced by minor changes of configuration. The weaker breakdowns do not produce flow reversal. The initial measurements were done with a fairly weak, but repeatable, breakdown. Basic measurements on the second final arrangement, with a stronger breakdown, are in progress.

  10. Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

  11. Decametric and hectometric Solar Type III bursts at Saturn's orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Sawas, Sami; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Maksimovic, Milan

    2015-04-01

    We report on solar radio bursts observed by RPWS experiment onboard Cassini spacecraft. We consider Type III solar bursts observed in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 16 MHz. Those bursts are probably generated in the solar corona and the interplanetary medium. We show that the Type III burst occurrence is depending on the solar activity. We attempt to localize the regions where the Type III burst is probably emitted. We consider that the electrons at the origin of the Solar Type III bursts follow the interplanetary magnetic field. The trajectory is an Archimedean spiral contained in the ecliptic plane. We discuss our results taking into consideration on the one hand the spacecraft positions with regards to the source location, and on the other hand the temporal and spectral radio beam variation when combining Cassini and Wind observations.

  12. Implications of fast radio bursts for superconducting cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yun-Wei; Cheng, Kwong-Sang; Shiu, Gary; Tye, Henry E-mail: hrspksc@hku.hk E-mail: iastye@ust.hk

    2014-11-01

    Highly beamed, short-duration electromagnetic bursts could be produced by superconducting cosmic string (SCS) loops oscillating in cosmic magnetic fields. We demonstrated that the basic characteristics of SCS bursts such as the electromagnetic frequency and the energy release could be consistently exhibited in the recently discovered fast radio bursts (FRBs). Moreover, it is first showed that the redshift distribution of the FRBs can also be well accounted for by the SCS burst model. Such agreements between the FRBs and SCS bursts suggest that the FRBs could originate from SCS bursts and thus they could provide an effective probe to study SCSs. The obtained values of model parameters indicate that the loops generating the FRBs have a small length scale and they are mostly formed in the radiation-dominated cosmological epoch.

  13. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Dmitriy; Lesovoi, Sergey; Tokhchukova, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4-8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with extreme UV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave drift bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrences, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5 and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to source sizes at other frequencies.

  14. Could FIV zoonosis responsible of the breakdown of the pathocenosis which has reduced the European CCR5-Delta32 allele frequencies?

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background In Europe, the north-south downhill cline frequency of the chemokine receptor CCR5 allele with a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Δ32) raises interesting questions for evolutionary biologists. We had suggested first that, in the past, the European colonizers, principally Romans, might have been instrumental of a progressively decrease of the frequencies southwards. Indeed, statistical analyses suggested strong negative correlations between the allele frequency and historical parameters including the colonization dates by Mediterranean civilisations. The gene flows from colonizers to native populations were extremely low but colonizers are responsible of the spread of several diseases suggesting that the dissemination of parasites in naive populations could have induced a breakdown rupture of the fragile pathocenosis changing the balance among diseases. The new equilibrium state has been reached through a negative selection of the null allele. Results Most of the human diseases are zoonoses and cat might have been instrumental in the decrease of the allele frequency, because its diffusion through Europe was a gradual process, due principally to Romans; and that several cat zoonoses could be transmitted to man. The possible implication of a feline lentivirus (FIV) which does not use CCR5 as co-receptor is discussed. This virus can infect primate cells in vitro and induces clinical signs in macaque. Moreover, most of the historical regions with null or low frequency of CCR5-Δ32 allele coincide with historical range of the wild felid species which harbor species-specific FIVs. Conclusion We proposed the hypothesis that the actual European CCR5 allelic frequencies are the result of a negative selection due to a disease spreading. A cat zoonosis, could be the most plausible hypothesis. Future studies could provide if CCR5 can play an antimicrobial role in FIV pathogenesis. Moreover, studies of ancient DNA could provide more evidences regarding the implications of

  15. Delta III—an evolutionary delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvesen, R. J.; Simpson, J. S.

    1996-03-01

    In order to remain competitive in the future and expand the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace market share, MDA has developed an expendable launch system strategy that devices cost-effective launch systems from the Delta II with a growth vehicle configuration called Delta III. The Delta III evolves from the Delta II launch system through development of a larger payload fairing (4-meter diameter), new cryogenically propelled upper stage, new first stage fuel tank, and larger strap-on solid rocket motors. We are developing the Delta III using Integrated Product Development Teams that capitalize on the experience base that has led us to a world record breaking mission success of 49 consecutive Delta II missions. The Delta III first-launch capability is currently planned for the spring of 1998 in support of our first spacecraft customer, Hughes Space and Communications International.

  16. Solar U- and J- radio bursts at the decameter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Abranin, E. P.; Lecacheux, A.

    2010-01-01

    The results of the first observations of solar U- and J- bursts with the radiotelescope UTR-2 at the decameter wavelengths are reported. During 2003-2004 more than 50 J- bursts and only 7 U- bursts were registered. It is the first case of ground based observations of J- and U- bursts with turning frequencies below 25 MHz. For the first time the harmonic structure of J- bursts in the form of Jb-J pairs was found. The mean harmonic ratio appeared to be 1.8. Also a group of J-bursts with unusual Turning Frequency Drift (TFD) of -2 kHz/s was detected. Such TFD corresponds to the velocity of coronal loop elevation of about 60 km/s. Coronal loops with similar elevation velocities were also detected by SOHO-LASCO coronagraph in white light. The dynamic spectra of unusual U- and J- bursts are shown. Simplified model of the coronal loop in the form of semicircle was created on the base of the U- burst dynamic spectrum and the Newkirk coronal density model. With this loop model the linear velocity of the source along the loop, the height of the Turning Frequency point and the geometrical size of the loop were calculated.

  17. Genesis and Control of bursting activity in a neuronal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cymbalyuk, Gennady

    2005-11-01

    Neurons are observed in one of four fundamental activity modes: silence, sub-threshold oscillations, tonic spiking, and bursting. Neurons exhibit various activity regimes and regime transitions that reflect their complement of ionic channels and modulatory state. The leech presents unique opportunities for experimental and theoretical studies on the dynamics of neuronal activity. The central pattern generator controlling the leech's heartbeat contains identified pairs of mutually inhibitory neurons. Bursting activity of neurons is an oscillatory activity consisting of intervals of repetitive spiking separated by intervals of quiescence. It has been observed in neurons under normal and pathological conditions. Neurons which are capable of generating bursting activity endogenously play an important role in motor control and other brain functions. Burst duration, interburst interval and spike frequency are crucial temporal characteristics of bursting activity and thus have to be regulated. Application of the bifurcation theory of dynamical systems suggests new mechanism of how bursting activity can be generated by neurons and how burst duration can be regulated. Here we describe two mechanisms for the transition between tonic spiking and bursting. First mechanism describes a smooth, continuous and reversible transition from tonic spiking into bursting in a model neuron. The burst duration increases with no bound as 1/(a-a0)^1/2, where a0 is a parameter determining the transition. The characteristic features of this mechanism are that (a) the burst duration can be made arbitrarily long while (b) inter-burst interval does not depend on the parameter. The second mechanism is concerned with bi-stability where simultaneous tonic spiking and bursting activities co-exist in a neuron. The mechanism is based on a saddle-node periodic orbit bifurcation with non-central homoclinic orbits. This bifurcation describes a transition between three qualitatively different types of

  18. Solar longitude dependence of some characteristics of type III radio bursts from metric to hectometric wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    Using the observed data for metric and hectometric type III radio bursts, the dependence of burst characteristics on the solar longitude has been examined over a wide frequency range. It is found that there exists and east-west asymmetry for the extension of metric type III bursts into the hectometric wavelength range. In particular, hectometric bursts are rarely observed for solar flares associated with metric bursts east of 60 E solar longitude. Furthermore, for east longitudes, the low-frequency radio observations show a large dispersion in drift time interval.

  19. INTEGRAL burst alert service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, H.; Jennings, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Teegarden, B.

    1997-01-01

    The detection, accurate positioning, and spectral analysis of cosmic gamma ray bursts is an objective of the International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission. Due to their unpredictable nature, gamma ray bursts can only be observed in serendipity mode. In order to allow and promote multiwavelength follow-up observations of such events, it is desirable to make the information available to the astrophysics community with a minimum delay through the use of Internet. Ideally, the data dissemination should occur within a few seconds of the start of the burst event so that follow up observations can proceed while gamma rays are still being emitted. The technical feasibility of building such a system to disseminate INTEGRAL burst alerts in real time is currently under consideration, the preliminary results of which are presented. It is concluded that such an alert service is technically feasible.

  20. Extragalactic Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailes, Matthew; Johnston, Simon; Bhat, Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Barnes, David; van Straten, Willem

    2008-04-01

    We propose a sky monitoring survey that will piggy-back multibeam observations of other scientific programmes; the intent of our search is to intercept and analyse millisecond-duration, single, impulsive bursts from transient events in the extragalactic sky.

  1. Extragalactic Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Johnston, Simon; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Barnes, David; van Straten, Willem

    2008-10-01

    We propose a sky monitoring survey that will piggy-back multibeam observations of other scientific programmes; the intent of our search is to intercept and analyse millisecond-duration, single, impulsive bursts from transient events in the extragalactic sky.

  2. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  3. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.; Kippen, M.

    2004-09-28

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  4. Burst diaphragm sequence valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisneskie, Bradley D.; Hyman, Sheldon; Hallum, Charles E.

    1991-11-01

    A burst diaphragm sequence valve which effectively combines the structure of a burst diaphragm with that of an ordinary swing check valve, the pivot of the ordinary swing check valve being replaced by an integral flexural hinge. The sequence valve provides a way to sequentially burn solid propellant hot gas generators which exit into a common gas manifold, thereby enabling gas-powered devices to operate for a longer time than the duration of one gas generator burn.

  5. Parameters for burst detection

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum, Douglas J.; Radivojevic, Milos; Frey, Urs; Franke, Felix; Hierlemann, Andreas; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Bursts of action potentials within neurons and throughout networks are believed to serve roles in how neurons handle and store information, both in vivo and in vitro. Accurate detection of burst occurrences and durations are therefore crucial for many studies. A number of algorithms have been proposed to do so, but a standard method has not been adopted. This is due, in part, to many algorithms requiring the adjustment of multiple ad-hoc parameters and further post-hoc criteria in order to produce satisfactory results. Here, we broadly catalog existing approaches and present a new approach requiring the selection of only a single parameter: the number of spikes N comprising the smallest burst to consider. A burst was identified if N spikes occurred in less than T ms, where the threshold T was automatically determined from observing a probability distribution of inter-spike-intervals. Performance was compared vs. different classes of detectors on data gathered from in vitro neuronal networks grown over microelectrode arrays. Our approach offered a number of useful features including: a simple implementation, no need for ad-hoc or post-hoc criteria, and precise assignment of burst boundary time points. Unlike existing approaches, detection was not biased toward larger bursts, allowing identification and analysis of a greater range of neuronal and network dynamics. PMID:24567714

  6. Automatic recognition of type III solar radio bursts: Automated Radio Burst Identification System method and first observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobzin, Vasili V.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, Peter A.; Steward, Graham; Patterson, Garth

    2009-04-01

    Because of the rapidly increasing role of technology, including complicated electronic systems, spacecraft, etc., modern society has become more vulnerable to a set of extraterrestrial influences (space weather) and requires continuous observation and forecasts of space weather. The major space weather events like solar flares and coronal mass ejections are usually accompanied by solar radio bursts, which can be used for a real-time space weather forecast. Coronal type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency and near its harmonic by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. These bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration of the coronal burst being about 1-3 s. This paper presents a new method developed to detect coronal type III bursts automatically and its implementation in a new Automated Radio Burst Identification System. The central idea of the implementation is to use the Radon transform for more objective detection of the bursts as approximately straight lines in dynamic spectra. Preliminary tests of the method with the use of the spectra obtained during 13 days show that the performance of the current implementation is quite high, ˜84%, while no false positives are observed and 23 events not listed previously are found. Prospects for improvements are discussed. The first automatically detected coronal type III radio bursts are presented.

  7. Delta K measurements with synthetic aperture radar data. [micirowavelength difference values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Jackson, P. L.; Klooster, A.

    1985-01-01

    Delta K measurements are obtained from the interference of two electromagnetic waves of different frequencies. Constructive interference occurs when 2pi phase differences between the two frequencies correspond to a surface wavelength. Previous Delta K measurements have used two discrete frequencies for this purpose. Range pulses and Doppler signatures of a synthetic aperture radar system were filtered to obtain a sequence of Delta K values. Those Delta K values which correspond to the wavelengths of known surfaces show maximum constructive interference. SAR data can therefore be used for Delta K measurements, indicating the possibility of selective Delta K filtering during data gathering.

  8. Positional characteristics of meter-decameter wavelength bursts associated with hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Gergely, T. E.; Kane, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Isolated and grouped type III bursts have been observed in temporal association with impulsive hard X-ray bursts in the 26-154 keV range, down to frequencies as low as 30 MHz and out to a distance of 3.1 solar radii from the disk center. The bursts occurred in regions whose electron density may have been as much as 20 times higher than that of the Newkirk-Saito model. The present observations indicate that electron acceleration/injection occurs over a region covering a wide range of magnetic field lines. It is noted that, of the two gradual hard X-ray bursts observed in association with type IV bursts, one was accompanied by a type II event, while the other was not, although both exhibited the same characteristics. It is suggested that the gradual burst associated with a type IV only involved electrons which are trapped in the plasmoid which produces the meter-decameter emission, while another fraction of the population is trapped in the low-lying loops which produce the hard X-ray and centimeter radiation.

  9. delta-Hexachlorocyclohexane (delta-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    delta - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( delta - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 86 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  10. Carotenoid Intakes, Assessed by food frequency questionnaires are associated with serum carotenoid concentrations in the Jackson Heart Study: Validation of the Jackson Heart Study Delta NIRI Adult Food Frequency Questionnaire

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Intake and status of carotenoids have been associated with chronic disease. The objectives of this study were to examine the association between carotenoid intakes as measured by two regional food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and their corresponding measures in serum, and to report ...

  11. Properties of X-ray bursts from the X-ray transient 1608-522

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, T.; Inoue, H.; Koyama, K.

    1980-09-15

    The recurrent X-ray transient 1608--522 was observed from the X-ray astronomy satellite Hakucho through the high- and low-luminosity states of its persistent flux. 1608--522 is identified to be a burst source from which 22 X-ray bursts were recorded. The burst peak intensity is found to fluctuate by a factor as large as 7. 1608--522 exhibited two distinctly different burst modes with respect to the burst profile and the peak luminosity distribution. The burst mode seems to have changed in correlation with the persistent flux, whereas the burst frequency as well as the time-averaged burst luminosity were essentially constant despite a large change in the persistent flux.

  12. Coronal type II bursts and interplanetary type II bursts: Distinct shock drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana, G. S.

    2012-02-01

    We study solar radio type II bursts combining with Wind/WAVES type II bursts and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The aim of the present work is to investigate the effectiveness of shocks to cause type II bursts in the solar corona and the interplanetary space. We consider the following findings. The distribution of the cessation heights of type II emission is confined to a rather narrow range of height than the distribution of the heights of start frequencies. This is suggestive of the presence of a gradient for the Alfvén speed from the heliocentric height of ˜1.4 solar radii. The range of the kinetic energy of CMEs associated with coronal type II emission taken together with the suggested computation method and the Alfvén speed gradient, indicates the limit to the height up to which type II emission could be expected. This height is ˜2 solar radii from the center of the Sun. Further, the large time gap between the cessation time and heights of coronal type II emission and the commencement time and heights of most of the IP type II bursts do not account for the difference between the two heights and the average shock speed. Also, there is clear difference in the magnitude of the kinetic energies and the distinct characteristics of the CMEs associated with coronal and IP type II bursts. Hence, we suggest that in most instances the coronal type II bursts and IP type II bursts occur due to distinct shocks. We also address the question of the origin of type II bursts and discuss the possible explanation of observed results.

  13. Kilometric shock-associated events and microwave bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    The peak times of impulsive microwaves bursts are compared with those of shock-associated (SA) kilometric radio events. The first peaks in these two frequency regimes are usually well-correlated in time, but the last peaks of the SA events observed at 1 MHz occur an average of 20 min after the last impulsive microwave peaks. In some cases, the SA events overlap in time with the post-burst increases of microwave bursts; sometimes there is general correspondence in their intensity time profiles. These observations suggest that the earlier components of the SA events are usually caused by electrons accelerated in or near the microwave source region. The possibility that the later components of some SA events could be associated with nonthermal electrons responsible for microwave post-burst increases, although they have traditionally been attributed to electrons accelerated at type II burst producing shocks in the upper corona is discussed.

  14. ARBIS 3: A Software Package for Automated Radio Burst Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobzin, V.; Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, P. A.; Steward, G.; Patterson, G.

    2010-12-01

    The major drivers of space weather are closely related to complicated explosion-like events on the Sun, i.e., solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CME). They are usually accompanied by type II and III solar radio bursts. Both type II and III solar radio bursts are assumed to be generated by fast electrons, the emission being at the local plasma frequency and/or its second harmonic. Type II radio bursts are associated with shock waves moving through the corona and solar wind with a typical speed of ~1000 km/s. These bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency gradually falling with time (~0.25 MHz/s), the duration of the coronal burst being several minutes. The speed of electrons responsible for type III bursts is much higher, ~c/3, where c is the speed of light, and typical duration of coronal type III events is 1-3 s. This paper describes an implementation of ARBIS 3, an extended version of Automated Radio Burst Identification System. ARBIS 3 detects coronal type II and type III radio bursts in near-real-time radio spectra from two observatories: Learmonth and Culgoora. The performance of the current implementation is quite high: ~84% for type III events observed at Learmonth and ~80% for type II bursts for both observatories. The probability of false type II events is reasonably low, 0.004-0.010 false positives per hour. The speeds of shocks associated with detected type II bursts are automatically estimated from radio data. For comparison, ARBIS 3 also shows information about CMEs detected by CACTUS in images from LASCO, as well as X-ray fluxes measured by GOES. Comparison of radio-derived results with information about CMEs and X-ray flares facilitates interpretation of radio data and space weather forecasting. Prospects for further improvements are discussed.

  15. Periodic Bursts of Jovian Non-Io Decametric Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H O.; Farrell, W. M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have Recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period approx. = 1:5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300 deg. and 60 deg. (via 360 deg.). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every approx. 25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  16. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission

    PubMed Central

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H.O.; Farrell, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000–2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period ≈1.5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every ∼25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696

  17. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, M; Rucker, H O; Farrell, W M

    2013-03-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period [Formula: see text] longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every [Formula: see text] days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696

  18. Feasibility of generating an artificial burst in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gad-El-hak, M.

    1986-01-01

    Artificial bursts were generated in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The burst-like events were produced by withdrawing near-wall fluid from two minute holes separated in the spanwise direction or by pitching a miniature delta wing that was flush-mounted to the wall. Either of these actions generated streamwise vorticity and a low-speed streak that resembled a naturally occurring one. The resulting sequence of events occurred at a given location and at controlled times, allowing detailed examination and comparison with natural, random bursts by means of flow visualization and fast-response probe measurement techniques.

  19. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) observatory, scheduled for launch in 2007, comprises the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). spectral changes that are known to occur within GRBs. between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. It consists of an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 10 kev to 25 MeV range. The field of view includes the entire unocculted sky when the observatory is pointing close to the zenith. The GBM will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage into the range of current GRB databases, and will provide a trigger for reorienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM is expected to trigger on about 200 bursts per year, and will provide on-board locations of strong bursts accurate to better than 10 degrees.

  20. Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Short Recurring Bursts of the Soft Gamma Repeater J1550-5418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppenkothen, D.; D'Angelo, C.; Watts, A. L.; Heil, L.; van der Klis, M.; van der Horst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Baring, M. G.; Göğüş, E.; Granot, J.; Kaneko, Y.; Lin, L.; von Kienlin, A.; Younes, G.

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al., we developed a Bayesian method for searching for QPOs in short magnetar bursts, taking into account the effects of the complicated burst structure, and have shown its feasibility on a small sample of bursts. Here we apply the same method to a much larger sample from a burst storm of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418. We report a candidate signal at 260 Hz in a search of the individual bursts, which is fairly broad. We also find two QPOs at ~93 Hz, and one at 127 Hz, when averaging periodograms from a number of bursts in individual triggers, at frequencies close to QPOs previously observed in magnetar giant flares. Finally, for the first time, we explore the overall burst variability in the sample and report a weak anti-correlation between the power-law index of the broadband model characterizing aperiodic burst variability and the burst duration: shorter bursts have steeper power-law indices than longer bursts. This indicates that longer bursts vary over a broader range of timescales and are not simply longer versions of the short bursts.

  1. Quasi-periodic oscillations in short recurring bursts of the soft gamma repeater J1550–5418

    SciTech Connect

    Huppenkothen, D.; D'Angelo, C.; Watts, A. L.; Heil, L.; Van der Klis, M.; Van der Horst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Baring, M. G.; Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Granot, J.; Lin, L.; Von Kienlin, A.; Younes, G.

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al., we developed a Bayesian method for searching for QPOs in short magnetar bursts, taking into account the effects of the complicated burst structure, and have shown its feasibility on a small sample of bursts. Here we apply the same method to a much larger sample from a burst storm of 286 bursts from SGR J1550–5418. We report a candidate signal at 260 Hz in a search of the individual bursts, which is fairly broad. We also find two QPOs at ∼93 Hz, and one at 127 Hz, when averaging periodograms from a number of bursts in individual triggers, at frequencies close to QPOs previously observed in magnetar giant flares. Finally, for the first time, we explore the overall burst variability in the sample and report a weak anti-correlation between the power-law index of the broadband model characterizing aperiodic burst variability and the burst duration: shorter bursts have steeper power-law indices than longer bursts. This indicates that longer bursts vary over a broader range of timescales and are not simply longer versions of the short bursts.

  2. Studies of Space Weather Using Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cane, H. V.; Erickson, W. C.

    2005-12-01

    High quality observations of solar radio bursts in the frequency range 14-1 MHz have been possible since late 1994 with the launch of the Wind spacecraft. However the standard solar patrols typically commence observations above 25 MHz leaving a small, but important, gap in the frequency coverage. This gap is filled by the Bruny Island Radio Spectrometer. In this paper we describe the studies that have been made using this extended frequency range. Our main interest has been the role of radio bursts in diagnosing energetic particle acceleration and propagation in the inner heliosphere.

  3. Static measurements of slender delta wing rolling moment hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Levin, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Slender delta wing planforms are susceptible to self-induced roll oscillations due to aerodynamic hysteresis during the limit cycle roll oscillation. Test results are presented which clearly establish that the static rolling moment hysteresis has a damping character; hysteresis tends to be greater when, due to either wing roll or side slip, the vortex burst moves back and forth over the wing trailing edge. These data are an indirect indication of the damping role of the vortex burst during limit cycle roll oscillations.

  4. Radio Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Gomboc, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1-1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  5. PHYSICAL CONSTRAINTS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter

    2014-04-20

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated, ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 10{sup 3} pc cm{sup –3}. Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at GHz frequencies are easily dismissed. DM from bursts emitted in stellar coronas are limited by free-free absorption and those from H II regions are bounded by the nondetection of associated free-free emission at radio wavelengths. Thus, if astronomical, FRBs are probably extragalactic. FRB 110220 has a scattering tail of ∼5.6 ± 0.1 ms. If the electron density fluctuations arise from a turbulent cascade, the scattering is unlikely to be due to propagation through the diffuse intergalactic plasma. A more plausible explanation is that this burst sits in the central region of its host galaxy. Pulse durations of order ms constrain the sizes of FRB sources implying high brightness temperatures that indicates coherent emission. Electric fields near FRBs at cosmological distances would be so strong that they could accelerate free electrons from rest to relativistic energies in a single wave period.

  6. X-ray Bursts and Oscillations: Prospects with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mahmoodifar, Simin

    2016-04-01

    X-ray bursts (Type I) are produced by thermonuclear flashes in the accreted surface layers of some neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs). High frequency oscillations are observed during some of these bursts. These "burst oscillations" result from rotational modulation of an inhomogeneous temperature distribution on the neutron star surface induced by ignition and subsequent spreading of the thermonuclear flash. They provide a means to measure the spin rates of accreting neutron stars and since the burst emission arises from the neutron star surface, a unique probe of neutron star structure. To date, virtually all observations of such oscillations have been made with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We have developed a burst model employing the Schwarzschild + Doppler approximation for surface emission coupled with realistic flame spreading geometries and burst cooling to compute light curves and oscillation amplitudes for both the rising and cooling phases of X-ray bursts. We use this model to explore the capabilities for the Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) to detect and study burst oscillations, particularly in the energy band below 3 keV. NICER is an International Space Station attached payload (X-ray telescope) with capabilities optimized for fast timing of neutron stars in the 0.2-10 keV band. It has large collecting area (twice that of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn camera), CCD-quality spectral resolution, and high-precision time tagging referenced to UTC through an onboard GPS receiver. NICER will begin its 18-month prime mission around the end of 2016. We will present results of simulated X-ray bursts with NICER that explore its burst oscillation detection capabilities and prospects for inferring neutron star properties from phase-resolved spectra.

  7. EEG delta oscillations index inhibitory control of contextual novelty to both irrelevant distracters and relevant task-switch cues.

    PubMed

    Prada, Laura; Barceló, Francisco; Herrmann, Christoph S; Escera, Carles

    2014-07-01

    Delta oscillations contribute to the human P300 event-related potential evoked by oddball targets, although it is unclear whether they index contextual novelty (event oddballness, novelty P3, nP3), or target-related processes (event targetness, target P3b). To examine this question, the electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded during a cued task-switching version of the Wisconsin card-sorting test. Each target card was announced by a tone cueing either to switch or repeat the task. Novel sound distracters were interspersed among trials. Time-frequency EEG analyses revealed bursts of delta (2-4 Hz) power associated with enhanced nP3 amplitudes to both task-switch cues and novel distracters-but no association with target P3b. These findings indicate that the P300-delta response indexes contextual novelty regardless of whether novelty emanates from endogenous (new task rules) or exogenous (novel distracters) sources of information. PMID:24673586

  8. Oscillatory and burst discharge across electrosensory topographic maps.

    PubMed

    Turner, R W; Plant, J R; Maler, L

    1996-10-01

    1. Three parallel maps of the distribution of tuberous electroreceptor inputs are found in the medullary electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) of weakly electric fish. Pyramidal cells in each map are known to respond differentially to the frequency of amplitude modulations (AMs) of external electric fields in vivo. We used an in vitro ELL slice preparation of Apteronotus leptorhynchus to compare the characteristics of spontaneously active single units across the three tuberous maps. It was our objective to determine whether spontaneous bursting activity of pyramidal cells in each map correlates with the known AM frequency selectivities of pyramidal cells in vivo. 2. Single-unit discharges were recorded from the pyramidal cell layer of the centromedial segment (CMS), centrolateral segment (CLS), and lateral segment (LS) of the ELL. Stochastic analysis of interspike intervals (ISIs) was used to identify bursting and nonbursting unit activity, and to separately analyze intra- and interburst ISIs. Four ISI patterns were identified as 1) bursting, 2) regular spiking, 3) irregular spiking, and 4) highly irregular spiking. This work focuses primarily on the characteristics of bursting units across the ELL segments. 3. Spontaneous bursting discharge was identified in all three maps (68 of 97 units), with several characteristics changing in a gradual manner across the maps. The coefficient of variation (CV) of ISIs and intraburst ISIs decreased significantly from the CMS to the LS, whereas the CV of burst periods increased significantly from the CMS to the LS. Autocorrelations and power spectral density analysis identified units discharging in an oscillatory manner with the following ratio: CMS, 75%; CLS, 4%; LS, 8%. 4. The mean period of spike bursts decreased significantly across the segments (CMS, 2.7 s; CLS, 1.2 s; LS, 1.1 s) primarily because of a shortening of mean burst duration (CMS, 1.0 s; CLS, 0.1 s; LS, 0.05 s). The average number of spikes per burst decreased

  9. [The return of the hepatitis delta virus].

    PubMed

    Zoutendijk, R; de Jonge, P J F; de Man, R A

    2016-01-01

    - There are several regions worldwide with a high prevalence of infection with the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) in hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers.- Chronic HDV infection is occurring with increasing frequency due to increased immigration.- HDV transmission can take place through the same routes as HBV by simultaneous infection with both viruses (co-infection) or infection of an HBV carrier with HDV (superinfection).- Delta hepatitis is considered as the most severe form of viral hepatitis with a high risk of progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.- Chronic delta hepatitis is exclusively observed in patients who are HBV carriers.- Pegylated interferon is currently the only registered therapy for patients with delta hepatitis, but leads to a persistent virological response in only a minority of them, and rarely leads to a complete cure.- New antivirals, such as viral entry blockers, prenylation inhibitors and anti-sense oligonucleotides are promising and currently being investigated in phase 2 trials. PMID:27405575

  10. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  11. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  12. Burst size distributions in the digitized data of the ion chambers t Mt. Norikura and sea level stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusunose, M.; Chuang, L. S.; Wada, M.; Kudo, S.

    1985-01-01

    A practical and simple method for burst rejection is applied to the digitized data of cosmic ray ion chambers at Mt. Norikura, Tokyo and Kochi. As a result of burst rejection, the burst size frequency distributions in the digitized data at mountain altitude and sea level ion chambers is obtained. Results show that there are no significant differences between the digital and analog data processing in burst rejection.

  13. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    . "It was a bit of luck that the survey included some observations of the sky surrounding the clouds," Narkevic said. It was from those "flanking" observations that the mysterious radio burst appeared in the data. The burst of radio waves was strong by astronomical standards, but lasted less than five milliseconds. The signal was spread out, with higher frequencies arriving at the telescope before the lower frequencies. This effect, called dispersion, is caused by the signal passing through ionized gas in interstellar and intergalactic space. The amount of this dispersion, the astronomers said, indicates that the signal likely originated about three billion light-years from Earth. No previously-detected cosmic radio burst has the same set of characteristics. "This burst represents an entirely new astronomical phenomenon," Bailes said. The astronomers estimate on the basis of their results that hundreds of similar events should occur over the sky each day. "Few radio surveys have the necessary sensitivity to such short-duration bursts, which makes them notoriously difficult to detect with current instruments," added Crawford. The next generation of radio telescopes currently under development should be able to detect many of these bursts across the sky. Although the nature of the mysterious new object is unclear, the astronomers have some ideas of what may cause such a burst. One idea is that it may be part of the energy released when a pair of superdense neutron stars collide and merge. Such an event is thought by some scientists to be the cause of one type of gamma-ray burst, but the only radio emission seen so far from these has been from the long-lived "afterglow" that follows the original burst. Another, more exotic, candidate is a burst of energy from an evaporating black hole. Black holes, concentrations of mass so dense that not even light can escape their powerful gravity, can lose mass and energy through a process proposed by famed British physicist Stephen

  14. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P.N.; Briggs, M.S.; Connaughton, V.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Meegan, C.A.; Fishman, G.J.; Wilson, R.B.; Lichti, G.G.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Schoenfelder, V.; Kienlin, A. von; Kippen, R.M.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2004-09-28

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission is a followup to the successful EGRET experiment onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It will provide a high-sensitivity survey of the sky in high-energy {gamma}-rays, and will perform detailed observations of persistent and transient sources. There are two experiments onboard the GLAST - the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM).The primary mission of the GBM instrument is to support the LAT in observing {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs) by providing low-energy measurements with high time resolution and rapid burst locations over a large field-of-view ({>=} 8 sr). The GBM will complement the LAT measurements by observing GRBs in the energy range 10 keV to 30 MeV, the region of the spectral turnover in most GRBs. An important objective of the GBM is to compute the locations of GRB sources on-board the spacecraft and quickly communicate them to the LAT and to the ground to allow rapid followup observations. This information may be used to re-point the LAT towards particularly interesting burst sources that occurred outside its field-of-view. The GBM consists of 14 uncollimated scintillation detectors coupled to phototubes to measure {gamma}-ray energies and time profiles. Two types of detectors are used to obtain spectral information over a wide energy range: 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV), and 2 BGO detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV). The detectors are distributed around the GLAST spacecraft to provide a large, unobstructed field of view. The 12 NaI(Tl) detectors are mounted with different orientations for use in locating GRB sources.

  15. Peak Flux Distributions of Solar Radio Type-i Bursts from Highly Resolved Spectral Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, K.; Masuda, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    Solar radio type-I bursts were observed on 2011 January 26 by high resolution observations with the radio telescope AMATERAS in order to derive their peak flux distributions. We have developed a two-dimensional auto burst detection algorithm that can distinguish each type-I burst element from complex noise storm spectra that include numerous instances of radio frequency interference (RFI). This algorithm removes RFI from the observed radio spectra by applying a moving median filter along the frequency axis. Burst and continuum components are distinguished by a two-dimensional maximum and minimum search of the radio dynamic spectra. The analysis result shows that each type-I burst element has one peak flux without double counts or missed counts. The peak flux distribution of type-I bursts derived using this algorithm follows a power law with a spectral index between 4 and 5.

  16. PEAK FLUX DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR RADIO TYPE-I BURSTS FROM HIGHLY RESOLVED SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, K.; Masuda, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    Solar radio type-I bursts were observed on 2011 January 26 by high resolution observations with the radio telescope AMATERAS in order to derive their peak flux distributions. We have developed a two-dimensional auto burst detection algorithm that can distinguish each type-I burst element from complex noise storm spectra that include numerous instances of radio frequency interference (RFI). This algorithm removes RFI from the observed radio spectra by applying a moving median filter along the frequency axis. Burst and continuum components are distinguished by a two-dimensional maximum and minimum search of the radio dynamic spectra. The analysis result shows that each type-I burst element has one peak flux without double counts or missed counts. The peak flux distribution of type-I bursts derived using this algorithm follows a power law with a spectral index between 4 and 5.

  17. Analysis of variability in the burst oscillations of the accreting millisecond pulsar XTE J1814-338

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Anna L.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Markwardt, Craig B.

    2005-01-01

    The accreting millisecond pulsar XTE J1814-338 exhibits oscillations at the known spin frequency during Type I X-ray bursts. The properties of the burst oscillations reflect the nature of the thermal asymmetry on the stellar surface. We present an analysis of the variability of the burst oscillations of this source, focusing on three characteristics: fractional amplitude, harmonic content and frequency. Fractional amplitude and harmonic content constrain the size, shape and position of the emitting region, whilst variations in frequency indicate motion of the emitting region on the neutron star surface. We examine both long-term variability over the course of the outburst, and short-term variability during the bursts. For most of the bursts, fractional amplitude is consistent with that of the accretion pulsations, implying a low degree of fuel spread. There is however a population of bursts whose fractional amplitudes are substantially lower, implying a higher degree of fuel spread, possibly forced by the explosive burning front of a precursor burst. For the first harmonic, substantial differences between the burst and accretion pulsations suggest that hotspot geometry is not the only mechanism giving rise to harmonic content in the latter. Fractional amplitude variability during the bursts is low; we can only rule out the hypothesis that the fractional amplitude remains constant at the l(sigma) level for bursts that do not exhibit photospheric radius expansion (PRE). There are no significant variations in frequency in any of the bursts except for the one burst that exhibits PRE. This burst exhibits a highly significant but small (= 0.1Hz) drop in frequency in the burst rise. The timescale of the frequency shift is slower than simple burning layer expansion models predict, suggesting that other mechanisms may be at work.

  18. Type 2 and type 3 burst theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. F.

    1973-01-01

    The present state of the theory of type 3 bursts is reviewed by dividing the problem into the exciting agency, radiation source, and propagation of radiation between the source and the observer. In-situ measurements indicate that the excitors are electron streams of energy about 40 keV which are continuously relaxing. An investigation of neutralization of an electron stream indicates that n sub s is much less than 100,000 n sub e, where n sub s is the stream density and n sub e the coronal electron density. In situ observations are consistent with this result. An analysis of propagation of electrons in the current sheets of coronal streamers shows that such propagation at heights greater than 1 solar radius is impossible. The mechanisms for radiation are reviewed; it is shown that fundamental radiation at high frequencies (approximately 100 MHz) is highly beamed in the radial direction and that near the earth second harmonic radiation must be dominant. Because of beaming of the fundamental at high frequencies, it can often be quite weak near the limb so that the second harmonic is dominant. In considering propagation to the observer, the results of scattering of radiation are discussed. The present state of the theory of type 2 bursts is reviewed in the same manner as type 3 bursts.

  19. The position and polarization of Type V solar bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Gary, D. E.; Suzuki, S.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the position and polarization of Type V solar radio bursts and their preceding Type III bursts are presented. The polarization, frequency range, source position, source movement, source size and brightness temperature of the bursts were measured using a 24-220 MHz spectropolarimeter, an 8-8000 MHz spectrograph and a three-frequency radioheliograph. Type V radiation is frequently found to have the opposite sense of circular polarization from that of the preceding Type III burst, with a degree of polarization similar to that of harmonic Type III radiation. A reversal of polarization is not observed when the accompanying Type III burst has no fundamental-harmonic structure, or when the Type V radiation is poorly developed. Possible mechanisms for the reversal are examined, including opposite magnetic field directions in Type III and V bursts, changes in mode coupling and a change in the mode of emission from o-mode for Type III to x-mode for Type V, and conditions needed for the mode change which is considered the most likely mechanism, are determined.

  20. Microwave Type III Pair Bursts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Baolin; Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian; Huang, Guangli; Tan, Chengming

    2016-03-01

    A solar microwave type III pair burst is composed of normal and reverse-sloped (RS) burst branches with oppositely fast frequency drifts. It is the most sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in flares. This work reports 11 microwave type III pair events in 9 flares observed by radio spectrometers in China and the Czech Republic at a frequency of 0.80-7.60 GHz during 1994-2014. These type III pairs occurred in flare impulsive and postflare phases with separate frequencies in the range of 1.08-3.42 GHz and a frequency gap of 10-1700 MHz. The frequency drift increases with the separate frequency (fx), the lifetime of each burst is anti-correlated to fx, while the frequency gap is independent of fx. In most events, the normal branches are drifting obviously faster than the RS branches. The type III pairs occurring in flare impulsive phase have lower separate frequencies, longer lifetimes, wider frequency gaps, and slower frequency drifts than that occurring in postflare phase. Also, the latter always has strong circular polarization. Further analysis indicates that near the flare energy release sites the plasma density is about {10}10{--}{10}11 cm-3 and the temperature is higher than 107 K. These results provide new constraints to the acceleration mechanism in solar flares.

  1. Search for gamma ray bursts with coincident balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    A search was conducted for cosmic gamma ray bursts of small size and of sufficient frequency of occurrence to be detected during a one day observation program. Two similar detectors, successfully balloon-borne from launch sites in South Dakota and Texas, achieved about 20 hours of simultaneous operation at several millibars atmospheric depth, with continuous separation of over 1,500 km. Fluctuations of the counting rates of less than 150 keV photons with temporal structures from microseconds to several minutes were compared in order to detect coincident or associated responses from the two instruments. No coincident gamma-ray burst events were detected. The resulting integral size spectrum of small bursts, from this and from all other searches, remains a spectrum of upper limits, consistent with an extrapolation of the size spectrum of the largest known bursts, fitting a power low of index -1.5.

  2. A Pulse-Burst Laser System for Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, D. J.; Borchardt, M. T.; Yang, Y. M.; Ambuel, J. R.; Holly, D. J.; Mattison, H. E.; Robl, P. E.

    2008-11-01

    A ``pulse-burst'' laser system is being constructed for addition to the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the MST reversed-field pinch. This laser will produce a burst of up to 200 approximately 1 J Q-switched pulses at repetition rates 5--250 kHz. The laser will operate at 1064 nm and is a master oscillator, power amplifier (MOPA) system. Variable pulse-width drive (0.1--20 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by IGBT switching of large electrolytic capacitor banks. In the near term, these flashlamp power supplies will be adapted to drive the flashlamps in the two existing commercial Nd:YAG lasers used for Thomson scattering on the MST RFP. This will enable these lasers to produce a burst of up to 40 pulses at repetition frequencies <= 1 kHz. The burst train of laser pulses will enable the study of Te and ne dynamics in a single MST shot.

  3. Burst Mode ASIC-Based Modem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is sponsoring the Advanced Communication Technology Insertion (ACTION) for Commercial Space Applications program. The goal of the program is to expedite the development of new technology with a clear path towards productization and enhancing the competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers. The industry has made significant investment in developing ASIC-based modem technology for continuous-mode applications and has made investigations into East, reliable acquisition of burst-mode digital communication signals. With rapid advances in analog and digital communications ICs, it is expected that more functions will be integrated onto these parts in the near future. In addition custom ASIC's can also be developed to address the areas not covered by the other IC's. Using the commercial chips and custom ASIC's, lower-cost, compact, reliable, and high-performance modems can be built for demanding satellite communication application. This report outlines a frequency-hop burst modem design based on commercially available chips.

  4. The mechanisms of generation and propagation of synchronized bursting in developing networks of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Maeda, E; Robinson, H P; Kawana, A

    1995-10-01

    The characteristics and mechanisms of synchronized firing in developing networks of cultured cortical neurons were studied using multisite recording through planar electrode arrays (PEAs). With maturation of the network (from 3 to 40 d after plating), the frequency and propagation velocity of bursts increased markedly (approximately from 0.01 to 0.5 Hz and from 5 to 100 mm/sec, respectively), and the sensitivity to extracellular magnesium concentration (0-10 mM) decreased. The source of spontaneous bursts, estimated from the relative delay of onset of activity between electrodes, varied randomly with each burst. Physical separation of synchronously bursting networks into several parts using an ultraviolet laser, divided synchronous bursting into different frequencies and phases in each part. Focal stimulation through the PEA was effective at multiple sites in eliciting bursts, which propagated over the network from the site of stimulation. Stimulated bursts exhibited both an absolute refractory period and a relative refractory period, in which partially propagating bursts could be elicited. Periodic electrical stimulation (at 1 to 30 sec intervals) produced slower propagation velocities and smaller numbers of spikes per burst at shorter stimulation intervals. These results suggest that the generation and propagation of spontaneous synchronous bursts in cultured cortical neurons is governed by the level of spontaneous presynaptic firing, by the degree of connectivity of the network, and by a distributed balance between excitation and recovery processes. PMID:7472441

  5. Self-Organization on Social Media: Endo-Exo Bursts and Baseline Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Mizuki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A salient dynamic property of social media is bursting behavior. In this paper, we study bursting behavior in terms of the temporal relation between a preceding baseline fluctuation and the successive burst response using a frequency time series of 3,000 keywords on Twitter. We found that there is a fluctuation threshold up to which the burst size increases as the fluctuation increases and that above the threshold, there appears a variety of burst sizes. We call this threshold the critical threshold. Investigating this threshold in relation to endogenous bursts and exogenous bursts based on peak ratio and burst size reveals that the bursts below this threshold are endogenously caused and above this threshold, exogenous bursts emerge. Analysis of the 3,000 keywords shows that all the nouns have both endogenous and exogenous origins of bursts and that each keyword has a critical threshold in the baseline fluctuation value to distinguish between the two. Having a threshold for an input value for activating the system implies that Twitter is an excitable medium. These findings are useful for characterizing how excitable a keyword is on Twitter and could be used, for example, to predict the response to particular information on social media. PMID:25329610

  6. A method to measure the strength of multi-unit bursts of action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mulloney, Brian

    2005-07-15

    Both the numbers of neurons that are active during multi-unit bursts of spikes and the frequencies with which individual neurons fire in these bursts can vary in response to changes in excitation. Here is a digital-filtering method that measures the strength of a burst of spikes by calculating the area of a polygon derived from the squared voltages that record the burst, and dividing this area by the burst's duration. The method was developed in the SigmaPlot environment, and makes use of the Fast-Fourier Transform functions provided in the SigmaPlot transform language. To test the method's performance, I constructed multi-unit bursts of spikes with known structure and calculated the strengths of these known bursts. To demonstrate the method's usefulness, I applied it to a train of 23 bursts of spikes in motor axons recorded during a spontaneous bout of patterned motor output. The measured strengths of these bursts varied 30-fold, and were well-correlated with the differences in the original recording. The results demonstrate that the method effectively measures burst strength independent of burst duration. PMID:15935226

  7. Burst Firing is a Neural Code in an Insect Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Eyherabide, Hugo G.; Rokem, Ariel; Herz, Andreas V. M.; Samengo, Inés

    2008-01-01

    Various classes of neurons alternate between high-frequency discharges and silent intervals. This phenomenon is called burst firing. To analyze burst activity in an insect system, grasshopper auditory receptor neurons were recorded in vivo for several distinct stimulus types. The experimental data show that both burst probability and burst characteristics are strongly influenced by temporal modulations of the acoustic stimulus. The tendency to burst, hence, is not only determined by cell-intrinsic processes, but also by their interaction with the stimulus time course. We study this interaction quantitatively and observe that bursts containing a certain number of spikes occur shortly after stimulus deflections of specific intensity and duration. Our findings suggest a sparse neural code where information about the stimulus is represented by the number of spikes per burst, irrespective of the detailed interspike-interval structure within a burst. This compact representation cannot be interpreted as a firing-rate code. An information-theoretical analysis reveals that the number of spikes per burst reliably conveys information about the amplitude and duration of sound transients, whereas their time of occurrence is reflected by the burst onset time. The investigated neurons encode almost half of the total transmitted information in burst activity. PMID:18946533

  8. Automatic Recognition of Coronal Type II Radio Bursts: The Automated Radio Burst Identification System Method and First Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobzin, Vasili V.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, Peter A.; Steward, Graham; Patterson, Garth

    2010-02-01

    Major space weather events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections are usually accompanied by solar radio bursts, which can potentially be used for real-time space weather forecasts. Type II radio bursts are produced near the local plasma frequency and its harmonic by fast electrons accelerated by a shock wave moving through the corona and solar wind with a typical speed of ~1000 km s-1. The coronal bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency gradually falling with time and durations of several minutes. This Letter presents a new method developed to detect type II coronal radio bursts automatically and describes its implementation in an extended Automated Radio Burst Identification System (ARBIS 2). Preliminary tests of the method with spectra obtained in 2002 show that the performance of the current implementation is quite high, ~80%, while the probability of false positives is reasonably low, with one false positive per 100-200 hr for high solar activity and less than one false event per 10000 hr for low solar activity periods. The first automatically detected coronal type II radio burst is also presented.

  9. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  10. EMISSION PATTERNS OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS: STEREOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; Bergamo, M.; MacDowall, R. J. E-mail: mbergamo@umd.edu

    2012-02-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft R{sub j} = I{sub j} /{Sigma}I{sub j} (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of {approx}2 Degree-Sign and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from {approx} - 100 Degree-Sign to {approx}100 Degree-Sign . The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  11. Fine and Superfine Structure of the Decameter-Hectometer Type II Burst on 7 June 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Panchenko, M.; Poedts, S.; Mykhaylov, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    The characteristics of a type II burst with a herringbone structure observed both with ground-based radio telescopes (UTR-2 and URAN-2) and space-borne spectrometers (STEREO-A and B) are discussed. The burst was recorded on 7 June 2011 in the frequency band 3 - 33 MHz. It was characterized by extremely rich fine structure. Statistical analysis of more than 300 herringbone sub-bursts constituting the burst was performed separately for the positively (reverse) and negatively (forward) drifting sub-bursts. The sense and the degree of circular polarization of the herringbone sub-bursts were measured in a wide frequency band (16 - 32 MHz). A second-order fine frequency structure of the herringbone sub-bursts was observed and studied for the first time. Using STEREO/COR1 and SOHO/LASCO-C2 images, we determined the direction and radial speed of the coronal mass ejection responsible for the studied type II burst. The possible location of the type II burst source on the flank of the shock was found.

  12. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    SciTech Connect

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Zumstein, James M.; Vigars, Mark L.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  13. X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1986-01-01

    There are about 100 bright X-ray sources in the Galaxy that are accretion-driven systems composed of a neutron star and a low mass companion that fills its critical Roche lobe. Many of these systems generate recurring X-ray bursts that are the result of thermonuclear flashes in the neutron star's surface layers, and are accompanied by a somewhat delayed optical burst due to X-ray heating of accretion disk. The Rapid Burster discovered in 1976 exhibits an interval between bursts that is strongly correlated with the energy in the preceding burst. There is no optical identification for this object.

  14. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    . "It was a bit of luck that the survey included some observations of the sky surrounding the clouds," Narkevic said. It was from those "flanking" observations that the mysterious radio burst appeared in the data. The burst of radio waves was strong by astronomical standards, but lasted less than five milliseconds. The signal was spread out, with higher frequencies arriving at the telescope before the lower frequencies. This effect, called dispersion, is caused by the signal passing through ionized gas in interstellar and intergalactic space. The amount of this dispersion, the astronomers said, indicates that the signal likely originated about three billion light-years from Earth. No previously-detected cosmic radio burst has the same set of characteristics. "This burst represents an entirely new astronomical phenomenon," Bailes said. The astronomers estimate on the basis of their results that hundreds of similar events should occur over the sky each day. "Few radio surveys have the necessary sensitivity to such short-duration bursts, which makes them notoriously difficult to detect with current instruments," added Crawford. The next generation of radio telescopes currently under development should be able to detect many of these bursts across the sky. Although the nature of the mysterious new object is unclear, the astronomers have some ideas of what may cause such a burst. One idea is that it may be part of the energy released when a pair of superdense neutron stars collide and merge. Such an event is thought by some scientists to be the cause of one type of gamma-ray burst, but the only radio emission seen so far from these has been from the long-lived "afterglow" that follows the original burst. Another, more exotic, candidate is a burst of energy from an evaporating black hole. Black holes, concentrations of mass so dense that not even light can escape their powerful gravity, can lose mass and energy through a process proposed by famed British physicist Stephen

  15. Gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow. PMID:22923573

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  17. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  18. FRAGMENTATION OF URINARY CALCULI IN VITRO BY BURST WAVE LITHOTRIPSY

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Hsi, Ryan S.; Harper, Jonathan D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sorensen, Mathew D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have developed a new method of lithotripsy that uses short, broadly focused bursts of ultrasound rather than shock waves to fragment stones. This study investigated the characteristics of stone comminution by burst wave lithotripsy in vitro. Materials and Methods Artificial and natural stones (mean 8.2±3.0 mm, range 5–15 mm) were treated with ultrasound bursts using a focused transducer in a water bath. Stones were exposed to bursts with focal pressure amplitude ≤6.5 MPa at 200 Hz burst repetition rate until completely fragmented. Ultrasound frequencies of 170 kHz, 285 kHz, and 800 kHz were applied using 3 different transducers. The time to achieve fragmentation for each stone type was recorded, and fragment size distribution was measured by sieving. Results Stones exposed to ultrasound bursts were fragmented at focal pressure amplitudes ≥2.8 MPa at 170 kHz. Fractures appeared along the stone surface, resulting in fragments separating at the surface nearest to the transducer until the stone was disintegrated. All natural and artificial stones were fragmented at the highest focal pressure of 6.5 MPa with treatment durations between a mean of 36 seconds for uric acid to 14.7 minutes for cystine stones. At a frequency of 170 kHz, the largest artificial stone fragments were <4 mm. Exposures at 285 kHz produced only fragments <2 mm, and 800 kHz produced only fragments <1 mm. Conclusions Stone comminution with burst wave lithotripsy is feasible as a potential noninvasive treatment method for nephrolithiasis. Adjusting the fundamental ultrasound frequency allows control of stone fragment size. PMID:25111910

  19. Delta hepatitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, M; Dimitrakakis, M; Tan, D S

    1986-06-01

    Sera from one hundred and fifty nine Malaysian individuals were screened for the prevalence of delta markers. These included 15 HBsAg positive homosexuals, 16 acute hepatitis B cases, 9 chronic hepatitis B patients, 13 healthy HBsAg carriers and 106 intravenous (i.v.) drug abusers, of whom 27 were positive for HBsAg only and the rest were anti-HBc IgG positive but HBsAg negative. The prevalence of delta markers in the homosexuals was found to be 6.7%, in the HBsAg positive drug abusers 17.8%, in acute hepatitis B cases 12.5%. No evidence of delta infection was detected in healthy HBsAg carriers, chronic hepatitis B cases and HBsAg negative i.v. drug abusers. With reference to i.v. drug abusers, the prevalence of delta markers was higher in Malays (23%) than in Chinese (7%) although the latter had a higher HBsAg carrier rate. Although the HBsAg carrier rate in the homosexuals was high, their delta prevalence rate was low as compared to drug abusers. In Malaysia, as in other non-endemic regions, hepatitis delta virus transmission appeared to occur mainly via the parenteral and sexual routes. This is the first time in Malaysia that a reservoir of delta infection has been demonstrated in certain groups of the population at high risk for hepatitis B. PMID:3787309

  20. The Delta Clipper dream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furniss, Tim

    1992-04-01

    A conceptual development status evaluation is presented for the SDIO's projected VTOL SSTOV, dubbed the 'Delta Clipper', which is envisioned as an alternative to the slowly developing NASP and the next-generation National Launch System. Delta Clipper program managers believe that the lightweight materials and structures entailed by the requisite empty/gross-weight ratio for an SSTOV are now available, precluding the airbreathing propulsion of such alternatives as HOTOL. The Delta Clipper could operate with a crew of two, or entirely unmanned. The 8-12 LH2/LOX engines employed are derived from the RL-10 engines of the Centaur launcher.

  1. Modeling river delta formation.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-10-23

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  2. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  3. Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Nile Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population of 57 million. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta in the middle of the scene. Across the river from Cairo can be seen the three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  4. Modeling river delta formation

    PubMed Central

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2007-01-01

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  5. Swift's 500th Gamma Ray Burst

    NASA Video Gallery

    On April 13, 2010, NASA's Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer satellite discovered its 500th burst. Swift's main job is to quickly localize each gamma-ray burst (GRB), report its position so that others...

  6. All optical binary delta-sigma modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeh, Mohammad R.; Siahmakoun, Azad

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes a novel A/D converter called "Binary Delta-Sigma Modulator" (BDSM) which operates only with nonnegative signal with positive feedback and binary threshold. This important modification to the conventional delta-sigma modulator makes the high-speed (>100GHz) all-optical implementation possible. It has also the capability to modify its own sampling frequency as well as its input dynamic range. This adaptive feature helps designers to optimize the system performance under highly noisy environment and also manage the power consumption of the A/D converters.

  7. Source location of the narrowbanded radio bursts at Uranus - Evidence of a cusp source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Kurth, W. S.

    1990-03-01

    While Voyager 2 was inbound to Uranus, radio bursts of narrow bandwidth (less than 5 kHz) were detected between 17-116 kHz. These R-X mode bursts, designated n-bursts, were of short duration, tended to occur when the north magnetic pole tipped toward the spacecraft, and increased in occurrence with increasing solar wind density. An explicit determination of the burst source location is presented, based upon fitting the region of detection at high and low frequencies to field-aligned, symmetric cones. The region of good fits was located between the north magnetic pole and the rotational pole, corresponding approximately to the northern polar cusp.

  8. Burst propagation in Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, F. A. C.; Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We present investigations of extreme events (bursts) propagating in the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias. In the experiments analyzed, a large grid of Langmuir probes measuring ion saturation current fluctuations is used to study the burst propagation and its dependence on the applied bias voltage. We confirm previous results reported on the turbulence intermittency in the Texas Helimak, extending them to a larger radial interval with a density ranging from a uniform decay to an almost uniform value. For our analysis, we introduce an improved procedure, based on a multiprobe bidimensional conditional averaging method, to assure precise determination of burst statistical properties and their spatial profiles. We verify that intermittent bursts have properties that vary in the radial direction. The number of bursts depends on the radial position and on the applied bias voltage. On the other hand, the burst characteristic time and size do not depend on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage modifies the vertical and radial burst velocity profiles differently. The burst velocity is smaller than the turbulence phase velocity in almost all the analyzed region.

  9. Meteor burst communications improvement study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David

    1993-07-01

    Two identical Meteor Burst Radio Terminals were developed, fabricated, and delivered to the Air Force. Each is controlled by a PC computer in a menu driven manner. The mode of operation is full duplex. The RF frequency range is 40 to 60 MHz with tuning increments of 25 KHz. Data rates are 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, and 512 kbps. Modulation is coherent Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) and incoherent Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK). Protocol includes Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) with source and destination addressing, message number, start of message, and end of message. Messages are packetized, and Reed Solomon (R-S) coding is an option. The ARQ is under the control of a Cyclic Redundancy Check Code (CRCC) which detects binary errors within each packet. The terminal is intended to increase meteor trail availability and data throughput by several orders of magnitude--by operating with new antennas that provide much higher gains without sacrificing meteor trail acquisition performance.

  10. Man made deltas

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding. PMID:23722597

  11. Man made deltas.

    PubMed

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding. PMID:23722597

  12. Federal Funding in the Delta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Richard J.; Calhoun, Samuel D.

    2002-01-01

    The Lower Mississippi Delta region, especially the rural Delta, faces many economic challenges. The rural Delta has received much federal aid in basic income support and funding for human resource development, but less for community resource programs, which are important for economic development. Federal aid to the Delta is analyzed in terms of…

  13. Phase-locked cluster oscillations in periodically forced integrate-and-fire-or-burst neuronal populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, Angela J.; Breakspear, Michael; Coombes, Stephen

    2012-12-01

    The minimal integrate-and-fire-or-burst neuron model succinctly describes both tonic firing and postinhibitory rebound bursting of thalamocortical cells in the sensory relay. Networks of integrate-and-fire-or-burst (IFB) neurons with slow inhibitory synaptic interactions have been shown to support stable rhythmic states, including globally synchronous and cluster oscillations, in which network-mediated inhibition cyclically generates bursting in coherent subgroups of neurons. In this paper, we introduce a reduced IFB neuronal population model to study synchronization of inhibition-mediated oscillatory bursting states to periodic excitatory input. Using numeric methods, we demonstrate the existence and stability of 1:1 phase-locked bursting oscillations in the sinusoidally forced IFB neuronal population model. Phase locking is shown to arise when periodic excitation is sufficient to pace the onset of bursting in an IFB cluster without counteracting the inhibitory interactions necessary for burst generation. Phase-locked bursting states are thus found to destabilize when periodic excitation increases in strength or frequency. Further study of the IFB neuronal population model with pulse-like periodic excitatory input illustrates that this synchronization mechanism generalizes to a broad range of n:m phase-locked bursting states across both globally synchronous and clustered oscillatory regimes.

  14. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  15. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  16. Identifying Crucial Parameter Correlations Maintaining Bursting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons) allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO) model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron) and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency) similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, Leak; a persistent K current, K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, P) that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of Leak, K2, and P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained. PMID:24945358

  17. GRB 090727 AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH EARLY-TIME OPTICAL EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kopac, D.; Gomboc, A.; Japelj, J.; Kobayashi, S.; Mundell, C. G.; Bersier, D.; Cano, Z.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I. A.; Virgili, F. J.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.

    2013-07-20

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 090727, for which optical emission was detected during the prompt gamma-ray emission by the 2 m autonomous robotic Liverpool Telescope and subsequently monitored for a further two days with the Liverpool and Faulkes Telescopes. Within the context of the standard fireball model, we rule out a reverse shock origin for the early-time optical emission in GRB 090727 and instead conclude that the early-time optical flash likely corresponds to emission from an internal dissipation process. Putting GRB 090727 into a broader observational and theoretical context, we build a sample of 36 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with contemporaneous early-time optical and gamma-ray detections. From these GRBs, we extract a sub-sample of 18 GRBs, which show optical peaks during prompt gamma-ray emission, and perform detailed temporal and spectral analysis in gamma-ray, X-ray, and optical bands. We find that in most cases early-time optical emission shows sharp and steep behavior, and notice a rich diversity of spectral properties. Using a simple internal shock dissipation model, we show that the emission during prompt GRB phase can occur at very different frequencies via synchrotron radiation. Based on the results obtained from observations and simulation, we conclude that the standard external shock interpretation for early-time optical emission is disfavored in most cases due to sharp peaks ({Delta}t/t < 1) and steep rise/decay indices, and that internal dissipation can explain the properties of GRBs with optical peaks during gamma-ray emission.

  18. Thermodynamic order parameters and statistical-mechanical measures for characterization of the burst and spike synchronizations of bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2015-11-01

    We are interested in characterization of population synchronization of bursting neurons which exhibit both the slow bursting and the fast spiking timescales, in contrast to spiking neurons. Population synchronization may be well visualized in the raster plot of neural spikes which can be obtained in experiments. The instantaneous population firing rate (IPFR) R(t) , which may be directly obtained from the raster plot of spikes, is often used as a realistic collective quantity describing population behaviors in both the computational and the experimental neuroscience. For the case of spiking neurons, realistic thermodynamic order parameter and statistical-mechanical spiking measure, based on R(t) , were introduced in our recent work to make practical characterization of spike synchronization. Here, we separate the slow bursting and the fast spiking timescales via frequency filtering, and extend the thermodynamic order parameter and the statistical-mechanical measure to the case of bursting neurons. Consequently, it is shown in explicit examples that both the order parameters and the statistical-mechanical measures may be effectively used to characterize the burst and spike synchronizations of bursting neurons.

  19. Comets, X-ray bursts, and gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1986-01-01

    The proposal, revived by Tremaine and Zytkow (1985), that accretion of comets by neutron stars may be the origin of gamma-ray bursts is considered. This mechanism has difficulty accounting for the observed gamma-ray spectrum and optical counterparts of the bursts. The survival of comets near supernovae is investigated. Ablation rates and the thermal structure of an ablating surface layer are calculated. In some circumstances, mechanical disruption will erode a comet more rapidly than evaporation. The accretion of comets by neutron stars may produce a class of X-ray burst sources with novel properties.

  20. Burst Oscillation Probes of Neutron Stars and Nuclear Burning with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2012-01-01

    X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts--burst oscillations--have provided a new probe of neutron star spins as well as of the dependent nuclear burning processes. The frequency drift and amplitude evolution of the oscillations observed during bursts can in principle place constraints on the physics of thermonuclear flame spreading and the dynamics of the burning atmosphere. I use simulations appropriate to LOFT to explore the precision with which the time dependence of the oscillation frequency can be inferred. This can test, for example, different models for the frequency drift, such as up-lift versus geostrophic drift. I also explore the precision with which asymptotic frequencies can be constrained in order to estimate the capability for LOFT to detect the Doppler shifts induced by orbital motion of the neutron star from a sample of bursts at different orbital phases.

  1. Gamma-ray burst populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgili, Francisco Javier

    Over the last fifty years the field of gamma-ray bursts has shown incredible growth, but the amassing of data has also left observers and theorists alike wondering about some of the basic questions surrounding these phenomena. Additionally, these events show remarkable individuality and extrema, ranging in redshift throughout the observable universe and over ten orders of magnitude in energy. This work focuses on analyzing groups of bursts that are different from the general trend and trying to understand whether these bursts are from different intrinsic populations and if so, what can be said about their progenitors. This is achieved through numerical Monte Carlo simulations and statistical inference in conjunction with current GRB observations. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction of gamma-ray burst theory and observations in a semi-historical context. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to the theory and practical issues surrounding the numerical simulations and statistics. Chapters 3--5 are each dedicated to a specific problem relating to a different type of GRB population: high-luminosity v. low-luminosity bursts, constraints from high-redshift bursts, and Type I v. Type II bursts. Chapter 6 follows with concluding remarks.

  2. Cosmological gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    The distribution in angle and flux of gamma-ray bursts indicates that the majority of gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances, i.e., at z of about 1. The rate is then about 10 exp -8/yr in a galaxy like the Milky Way, i.e., orders of magnitude lower than the estimated rate for collisions between neutron stars in close binary systems. The energy per burst is about 10 exp 51 ergs, assuming isotropic emission. The events appear to be less energetic and more frequent if their emission is strongly beamed. Some tests for the distance scale are discussed: a correlation between the burst's strength and its spectrum; the absorption by the Galactic gas below about 2 keV; the X-ray tails caused by forward scattering by the Galactic dust; about 1 month recurrence of some bursts caused by gravitational lensing by foreground galaxies; and a search for gamma-ray bursts in M31. The bursts appear to be a manifestation of something exotic, but conventional compact objects can provide an explanation. The best possibility is offered by a decay of a bindary composed of a spinning-stellar-mass black-hole primary and a neutron or a strange-quark star secondary. In the final phase the secondary is tidally disrupted, forms an accretion disk, and up to 10 exp 54 ergs are released. A very small fraction of this energy powers the gamma-ray burst.

  3. Transcriptional Bursting Explains the Noise Versus Mean Relationship in mRNA and Protein Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Dr. Roy; Shaffer, S; Singh, A; Razooky, B; Simpson, Michael L; Raj, A; Weinberger, Dr. Leor

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis demonstrates that the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (HIV LTR) promoter exhibits a range of possible transcriptional burst sizes and frequencies for any mean-expression level. However, these results have also been interpreted as demonstrating that cell-tocell expression variability (noise) and mean are uncorrelated, a significant deviation from previous results. Here, we re-examine the available mRNA and protein abundance data for the HIV LTR and find that noise in mRNA and protein expression scales inversely with the mean along analytically predicted transcriptional burst-size manifolds. We then experimentally perturb transcriptional activity to test a prediction of the multiple burst-size model: that increasing burst frequency will cause mRNA noise to decrease along given burst-size lines as mRNA levels increase. The data show that mRNA and protein noise decrease as mean expression increases, supporting the canonical inverse correlation between noise and mean.

  4. What Can Be Interesting in the Analysis of Crowded Solar Bursts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Koval, A. A.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Zarka, Ph.; Rucker, H. O.

    2015-03-01

    At decameter wavelengths the radio astronomy observations reveal a wide variety of solar bursts. They are associated with solar activity manifestations such as movements of electron beams and shock waves in solar corona, flare- related events, coronal mass ejections and others. The analysis of burst features allows one to use them as probing signals which comprise useful information about solar corona parameters and their changes over time. By frequency-time measurements of different types of solar bursts occurred about the same time one can provide a comparative study of their properties, complementing the missing pieces in the complex mosaic of solar events. In this purpose we discuss features of their signal processing by the gradient filtration, as applied to quasi-periodic bursts like a zebra pattern related to Bernstein modes. The measured frequency periodicity of the bursts gives a chance to determine the magnetic field strength in upper corona around the protracted solar minimum of solar activity.

  5. Evidence of Transformation Bursts During Thermal Cycling of a Pu-Ga Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Blobaum, K M; Krenn, C R; Mitchell, J N; Haslam, J J; Wall, M A; Massalski, T B; Schwartz, A J

    2005-02-09

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the fcc (delta) to monoclinic (alpha-prime) phase transformation and its reversion in a plutonium-gallium alloy have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, resistometry, and dilatometry. Under ambient conditions, the delta phase is metastable in a Pu-2.0 at% Ga alloy. Thermal cycling to below the ambient temperature results in a partial transformation to the alpha-prime phase; this transformation is composition-invariant and exhibits martensitic behavior. Because this transformation results in an unusually invariant large 25% volume contraction that cannot be fully accommodated by purely elastic adjustments, the transformation mode is expected to involve burst formation of individual alpha-prime particles. However, upon cooling, these individual bursts were not resolved by the above techniques, although signals corresponding to the overall accumulation of many alpha-prime particles were observed. On the other hand, upon heating, signals from differential scanning calorimetry, resistometry, and dilatometry showed a series of discrete changes occurring in periodic increments beginning at approximately 32 C. These features correspond to the cooperative reversion of many alpha-prime particles to the delta phase; they appear to be the result of an interplay between the autocatalytically driven reversion of a cascade of individual martensite units, and self-quenching caused by small changes of temperature and/or stress accompanying each individual transformation burst. The heat of the delta/alpha-prime transformation is estimated to be about + 4 kJ/mole.

  6. A U-type solar radio burst originating in the outer corona.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1971-01-01

    The observation of a U-type solar radio burst with a reversing frequency of approximately 0.7 MHz suggests the presence of a magnetic bottle extending out to about 35 solar radii. A possible model of this loop structure is developed from the data. The occurrence of low-frequency U-bursts seems to be extremely rare although magnetic bottles may develop frequently during solar maximum.

  7. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  8. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  9. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  10. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...