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Sample records for delta hepatitis molecular

  1. Delta hepatitis: molecular biology and clinical and epidemiological features.

    PubMed Central

    Polish, L B; Gallagher, M; Fields, H A; Hadler, S C

    1993-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus, discovered in 1977, requires the help of hepatitis B virus to replicate in hepatocytes and is an important cause of acute, fulminant, and chronic liver disease in many regions of the world. Because of the helper function of hepatitis delta virus, infection with it occurs either as a coinfection with hepatitis B or as a superinfection of a carrier of hepatitis B surface antigen. Although the mechanisms of transmission are similar to those of hepatitis B virus, the patterns of transmission of delta virus vary widely around the world. In regions of the world in which hepatitis delta virus infection is not endemic, the disease is confined to groups at high risk of acquiring hepatitis B infection and high-risk hepatitis B carriers. Because of the propensity of this viral infection to cause fulminant as well as chronic liver disease, continued incursion of hepatitis delta virus into areas of the world where persistent hepatitis B infection is endemic will have serious implications. Prevention depends on the widespread use of hepatitis B vaccine. This review focuses on the molecular biology and the clinical and epidemiologic features of this important viral infection. PMID:8358704

  2. Delta hepatitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, M; Dimitrakakis, M; Tan, D S

    1986-06-01

    Sera from one hundred and fifty nine Malaysian individuals were screened for the prevalence of delta markers. These included 15 HBsAg positive homosexuals, 16 acute hepatitis B cases, 9 chronic hepatitis B patients, 13 healthy HBsAg carriers and 106 intravenous (i.v.) drug abusers, of whom 27 were positive for HBsAg only and the rest were anti-HBc IgG positive but HBsAg negative. The prevalence of delta markers in the homosexuals was found to be 6.7%, in the HBsAg positive drug abusers 17.8%, in acute hepatitis B cases 12.5%. No evidence of delta infection was detected in healthy HBsAg carriers, chronic hepatitis B cases and HBsAg negative i.v. drug abusers. With reference to i.v. drug abusers, the prevalence of delta markers was higher in Malays (23%) than in Chinese (7%) although the latter had a higher HBsAg carrier rate. Although the HBsAg carrier rate in the homosexuals was high, their delta prevalence rate was low as compared to drug abusers. In Malaysia, as in other non-endemic regions, hepatitis delta virus transmission appeared to occur mainly via the parenteral and sexual routes. This is the first time in Malaysia that a reservoir of delta infection has been demonstrated in certain groups of the population at high risk for hepatitis B. PMID:3787309

  3. Epidemiological and molecular features of hepatitis B and hepatitis delta virus transmission in a remote rural community in central Africa.

    PubMed

    François-Souquière, Sandrine; Makuwa, Maria; Bisvigou, Ulrich; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis delta virus (HDV) occur worldwide and are prevalent in both urban and remote rural communities. In a remote village in Gabon, central Africa, we observed a high prevalence of HBsAg carriage and HDV infection, particularly in children and adolescents. The prevalence of HBsAg differed significantly by gender and age, females being more likely than males to carry the HBsAg during the first 10years of life, while the prevalence was higher among males than females aged 11-20years. We also characterised HBV and HDV strains circulating in the village. The principal HBV strains belonged to genotype HBV-E and subgenotype QS-A3. Complete genome analysis revealed for the first time the presence of the HBV-D genotype in Gabon, in the form of an HBV-D/E recombinant. Molecular analysis of HDV strains and their complete genomic characterisation revealed two distinct groups within the dominant HDV clade 8. Molecular analysis of HBV and HDV strains did not reveal vertical transmission within the families studied but rather horizontal, intrafamilial transmission among children aged 0-10years. Our findings indicate that HBV is transmitted in early childhood by body fluids rather than by sexual contact. Health education adapted to the different age groups might therefore help to reduce HBV transmission. Young children should be vaccinated to control HBV infection in areas of extremely high prevalence. PMID:26747245

  4. Cations and hydration in catalytic RNA: molecular dynamics of the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Krasovska, Maryna V; Sefcikova, Jana; Réblová, Kamila; Schneider, Bohdan; Walter, Nils G; Sponer, Jirí

    2006-07-15

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme is an RNA enzyme from the human pathogenic HDV. Cations play a crucial role in self-cleavage of the HDV ribozyme, by promoting both folding and chemistry. Experimental studies have revealed limited but intriguing details on the location and structural and catalytic functions of metal ions. Here, we analyze a total of approximately 200 ns of explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations to provide a complementary atomistic view of the binding of monovalent and divalent cations as well as water molecules to reaction precursor and product forms of the HDV ribozyme. Our simulations find that an Mg2+ cation binds stably, by both inner- and outer-sphere contacts, to the electronegative catalytic pocket of the reaction precursor, in a position to potentially support chemistry. In contrast, protonation of the catalytically involved C75 in the precursor or artificial placement of this Mg2+ into the product structure result in its swift expulsion from the active site. These findings are consistent with a concerted reaction mechanism in which C75 and hydrated Mg2+ act as general base and acid, respectively. Monovalent cations bind to the active site and elsewhere assisted by structurally bridging long-residency water molecules, but are generally delocalized. PMID:16617077

  5. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis D virus ... Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is found only in people who carry the hepatitis B virus. HDV may make liver ... B virus but who never had symptoms. Hepatitis D infects about 15 million people worldwide. It occurs ...

  6. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B and hepatitis delta viruses circulating in the Western Amazon region, North Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) represent important public health problems in the Western Amazon region with reported cases of fulminant hepatitis. This cross sectional study describes HBV and HDV genotypes circulating in the Brazilian Amazon region. Methods HBsAg positive individuals (n = 224) were recruited in Manaus/Amazonas State (130 blood donors from the Hematology and Hemotherapy Foundation from Amazonas/HEMOAM; 60 subjects from outpatient clinic) and in Eirunepe city (n = 34) from 2003–2009. Most participants (n = 153) lived in Manaus, 63 were from 20 remote isolated municipalities, 8 lived outside Amazonas State. Genotyping was based on PCR products: HBV genotype A-F specific primers, restricted length polymorphism for HDV. HDV isolates were directly sequenced (delta antigen 405 nucleotide fragment) and phylogenetic analysis performed (MEGA; neighbor-joining, Kimura’s two parameter). Results Most participants were young adult males and HBV mono-infection predominated (70.5%, 158/224). Among blood donors, outpatient subjects and individuals from Eirunepe, HBV/A prevailed followed by HBV/D and F (p > 0.05). HBV/A was more frequent in blood donors (p < 0.05). HBV-HDV coinfection rate was 8.5% in blood donors (11/130), 65.0% (39/60) in outpatient subjects and 47.0% (16/34) in individuals from Eirunepe. Compared to blood donors, coinfection was higher in outpatient subjects (65.0% versus 8.5%; RR = 5.0; CI 3.4-7.9; p < 0.0001) and in subjects from Eirunepe (47.0% versus 8.5%; RR = 5.5; CI 3.0-9.9; p < 0.0001). HBV-HDV coinfection rates were higher in patients from highly endemic remote cities. Only HDV genotype 3 was detected, HBV/F-HDV/3 predominated (20/38; 52.7%), followed by HBV/A-HDV/3 (31.6%; 12/38) and HBV/D-HDV/3 (15.8%; 6/38). Conclusions The description of HBV and HDV genotypes circulating in the western Amazon can contribute to a better understanding of their relevance on the

  7. Delta hepatitis: another concern for dentistry.

    PubMed

    Cottone, J A

    1986-01-01

    Delta hepatitis is a defective virus dependent on hepatitis B virus for replication and transmission. Delta hepatitis infection is becoming more prevalent in the United States, especially in parenteral drug abusers; several outbreaks have occurred. Infection control procedures and the hepatitis B vaccine can protect the dental staff from infection and transmission. PMID:3455994

  8. Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Free Energy Simulations of the Self-Cleavage Reaction in the Hepatitis Delta Virus Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme catalyzes a self-cleavage reaction using a combination of nucleobase and metal ion catalysis. Both divalent and monovalent ions can catalyze this reaction, although the rate is slower with monovalent ions alone. Herein, we use quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations to investigate the mechanism of this ribozyme and to elucidate the roles of the catalytic metal ion. With Mg2+ at the catalytic site, the self-cleavage mechanism is observed to be concerted with a phosphorane-like transition state and a free energy barrier of ∼13 kcal/mol, consistent with free energy barrier values extrapolated from experimental studies. With Na+ at the catalytic site, the mechanism is observed to be sequential, passing through a phosphorane intermediate, with free energy barriers of 2–4 kcal/mol for both steps; moreover, proton transfer from the exocyclic amine of protonated C75 to the nonbridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate occurs to stabilize the phosphorane intermediate in the sequential mechanism. To explain the slower rate observed experimentally with monovalent ions, we hypothesize that the activation of the O2′ nucleophile by deprotonation and orientation is less favorable with Na+ ions than with Mg2+ ions. To explore this hypothesis, we experimentally measure the pKa of O2′ by kinetic and NMR methods and find it to be lower in the presence of divalent ions rather than only monovalent ions. The combined theoretical and experimental results indicate that the catalytic Mg2+ ion may play three key roles: assisting in the activation of the O2′ nucleophile, acidifying the general acid C75, and stabilizing the nonbridging oxygen to prevent proton transfer to it. PMID:24383543

  9. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy simulations of the self-cleavage reaction in the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Thaplyal, Pallavi; Rosta, Edina; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-29

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme catalyzes a self-cleavage reaction using a combination of nucleobase and metal ion catalysis. Both divalent and monovalent ions can catalyze this reaction, although the rate is slower with monovalent ions alone. Herein, we use quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations to investigate the mechanism of this ribozyme and to elucidate the roles of the catalytic metal ion. With Mg(2+) at the catalytic site, the self-cleavage mechanism is observed to be concerted with a phosphorane-like transition state and a free energy barrier of ∼13 kcal/mol, consistent with free energy barrier values extrapolated from experimental studies. With Na(+) at the catalytic site, the mechanism is observed to be sequential, passing through a phosphorane intermediate, with free energy barriers of 2-4 kcal/mol for both steps; moreover, proton transfer from the exocyclic amine of protonated C75 to the nonbridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate occurs to stabilize the phosphorane intermediate in the sequential mechanism. To explain the slower rate observed experimentally with monovalent ions, we hypothesize that the activation of the O2' nucleophile by deprotonation and orientation is less favorable with Na(+) ions than with Mg(2+) ions. To explore this hypothesis, we experimentally measure the pKa of O2' by kinetic and NMR methods and find it to be lower in the presence of divalent ions rather than only monovalent ions. The combined theoretical and experimental results indicate that the catalytic Mg(2+) ion may play three key roles: assisting in the activation of the O2' nucleophile, acidifying the general acid C75, and stabilizing the nonbridging oxygen to prevent proton transfer to it. PMID:24383543

  10. [The return of the hepatitis delta virus].

    PubMed

    Zoutendijk, R; de Jonge, P J F; de Man, R A

    2016-01-01

    - There are several regions worldwide with a high prevalence of infection with the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) in hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers.- Chronic HDV infection is occurring with increasing frequency due to increased immigration.- HDV transmission can take place through the same routes as HBV by simultaneous infection with both viruses (co-infection) or infection of an HBV carrier with HDV (superinfection).- Delta hepatitis is considered as the most severe form of viral hepatitis with a high risk of progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.- Chronic delta hepatitis is exclusively observed in patients who are HBV carriers.- Pegylated interferon is currently the only registered therapy for patients with delta hepatitis, but leads to a persistent virological response in only a minority of them, and rarely leads to a complete cure.- New antivirals, such as viral entry blockers, prenylation inhibitors and anti-sense oligonucleotides are promising and currently being investigated in phase 2 trials. PMID:27405575

  11. The hepatitis delta virus and its infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzeto, M.; Gerin, J.L.; Purcell, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 50 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure and Replication of the Genome of Hepatitis Delta Virus; Clinical Significance of HDV RNA in HDV Disease; HBV DNA in Delta Chronic Carriers; Prevalance of HBV-DNA Among Anti-Hd Positive Patients; and Characterization of LKM/sub 1/ and LKM/sub 2/ Antigens.

  12. The hepatitis delta virus: Replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sureau, Camille; Negro, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective virus and a satellite of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Its RNA genome is unique among animal viruses, but it shares common features with some plant viroids, including a replication mechanism that uses a host RNA polymerase. In infected cells, HDV genome replication and formation of a nucleocapsid-like ribonucleoprotein (RNP) are independent of HBV. But the RNP cannot exit, and therefore propagate, in the absence of HBV, as the latter supplies the propagation mechanism, from coating the HDV RNP with the HBV envelope proteins for cell egress to delivery of the HDV virions to the human hepatocyte target. HDV is therefore an obligate satellite of HBV; it infects humans either concomitantly with HBV or after HBV infection. HDV affects an estimated 15 to 20 million individuals worldwide, and the clinical significance of HDV infection is more severe forms of viral hepatitis--acute or chronic--, and a higher risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison to HBV monoinfection. This review covers molecular aspects of HDV replication cycle, including its interaction with the helper HBV and the pathogenesis of infection in humans. PMID:27084031

  13. Assembly of hepatitis delta virus particles.

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, W S; Bayer, M; Taylor, J

    1992-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a subviral satellite of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Since the RNA genome of HDV can replicate in cultured cells in the absence of HBV, it has been suggested that the only helper function of HBV is to supply HBV coat proteins in the assembly process of HDV particles. To examine the factors involved in such virion assembly, we transiently cotransfected cells with various hepadnavirus constructs and cDNAs of HDV and analyzed the particles released into the medium. We report that the HDV genomic RNA and the delta antigen can be packaged by coat proteins of either HBV or the related hepadnavirus woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV). Among the three co-carboxy-terminal coat proteins of WHV, the smallest form was sufficient to package the HDV genome; even in the absence of HDV RNA, the delta antigen could be packaged by this WHV coat protein. Also, of the two co-amino-terminal forms of the delta antigen, only the larger form was essential for packaging. Images PMID:1548764

  14. Ribonucleoprotein complexes of hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, W S; Netter, H J; Bayer, M; Taylor, J

    1993-01-01

    Human hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a subviral satellite agent of hepatitis B virus (HBV). The envelope proteins of HDV are provided by the helper virus, HBV, but very little is known about the internal structure of HDV. The particles contain multiple copies of the delta antigen and an unusual RNA genome that is small, about 1,700 nucleotides in length, single stranded, and circular. By using UV cross-linking, equilibrium density centrifugation, and immunoprecipitation, we obtained evidence consistent with the interpretation that delta antigen and genomic RNA form a stable ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex within the virion. Furthermore, electron-microscopic examination of the purified viral RNP revealed a roughly spherical core-like structure with a diameter of 18.7 +/- 2.5 nm. We also isolated HDV-specific RNP structures from the nuclei of cells undergoing HDV genome replication; both the genome and antigenome (a complement of the genome) of HDV were found to be in such complexes. From the equilibrium density analyses of the viral and nuclear RNPs, we were able to deduce the number of molecules of delta antigen per molecule of HDV RNA. For virions, this number was predominantly ca. 70, which was larger than for the nuclear RNPs, which were more heterogeneous, with an average value of ca. 30. Images PMID:8497052

  15. High prevalence and predominance of hepatitis delta virus genotype 1 infection in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon. PMID:21209162

  16. High Prevalence and Predominance of Hepatitis Delta Virus Genotype 1 Infection in Cameroon▿

    PubMed Central

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon. PMID:21209162

  17. Hepatitis B and hepatitis delta virus infection in South America.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, J R

    1996-01-01

    About 100,000 cases of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occur annually in South America. The overall prevalence of HBV infection in low risk populations ranges from 6.7% to 41%, while hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) rates range from 0.4% to 13%. In high endemicity aboriginal or rural populations, perinatal transmission may play a major part in the spread of HBV. In urban populations, however, horizontal transmission, probably by sexual contact, is the predominant mode of spread, with higher rates of HBV positivity in lower socioeconomic groups. High risk populations such as health care workers and haemodialysis patients show higher rates of HBV infection than comparable populations elsewhere. The risk of posttransfusion hepatitis B remains high in some areas. Concomitant HBV infection may accelerate the chronic liver disease seen in decompensated hepatosplenic schistosomiasis. In the north, the prevalence of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection ranks among the highest in the world. In the south, the problem appears negligible although it is increasing within high risk urban communities. HDV superinfection has been the cause of large outbreaks of fulminant hepatitis. The cost of comprehensive or mass vaccination programmes remains unaffordable for most South American countries. Less expensive alternatives such as low dose intradermal schedules of immunisation have been used with success in selected adult subjects. PMID:8786054

  18. Assessment of metal-assisted nucleophile activation in the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme from molecular simulation and 3D-RISM

    PubMed Central

    Radak, Brian K.; Lee, Tai-Sung; Harris, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus ribozyme is an efficient catalyst of RNA 2′-O-transphosphorylation and has emerged as a key experimental system for identifying and characterizing fundamental features of RNA catalysis. Recent structural and biochemical data have led to a proposed mechanistic model whereby an active site Mg2+ ion facilitates deprotonation of the O2′ nucleophile, and a protonated cytosine residue (C75) acts as an acid to donate a proton to the O5′ leaving group as noted in a previous study. This model assumes that the active site Mg2+ ion forms an inner-sphere coordination with the O2′ nucleophile and a nonbridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate. These contacts, however, are not fully resolved in the crystal structure, and biochemical data are not able to unambiguously exclude other mechanistic models. In order to explore the feasibility of this model, we exhaustively mapped the free energy surfaces with different active site ion occupancies via quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations. We further incorporate a three-dimensional reference interaction site model for the solvated ion atmosphere that allows these calculations to consider not only the rate associated with the chemical steps, but also the probability of observing the system in the presumed active state with the Mg2+ ion bound. The QM/MM results predict that a pathway involving metal-assisted nucleophile activation is feasible based on the rate-controlling transition state barrier departing from the presumed metal-bound active state. However, QM/MM results for a similar pathway in the absence of Mg2+ are not consistent with experimental data, suggesting that a structural model in which the crystallographically determined Mg2+ is simply replaced with Na+ is likely incorrect. It should be emphasized, however, that these results hinge upon the assumption of the validity of the presumed Mg2+-bound starting state, which has not yet been definitively verified experimentally

  19. Hepatitis delta virus: A fascinating and neglected pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Celso; Tavanez, João Paulo; Gudima, Severin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the etiologic agent of the most severe form of virus hepatitis in humans. Sharing some structural and functional properties with plant viroids, the HDV RNA contains a single open reading frame coding for the only virus protein, the Delta antigen. A number of unique features, including ribozyme activity, RNA editing, rolling-circle RNA replication, and redirection for a RNA template of host DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II, make this small pathogen an excellent model to study virus-cell interactions and RNA biology. Treatment options for chronic hepatitis Delta are scarce and ineffective. The disease burden is perhaps largely underestimated making the search for new, specific drugs, targets, and treatment strategies an important public health challenge. In this review we address the main features of virus structure, replication, and interaction with the host. Virus pathogenicity and current treatment options are discussed in the light of recent developments. PMID:26568914

  20. Hepatitis delta virus: A fascinating and neglected pathogen.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Celso; Tavanez, João Paulo; Gudima, Severin

    2015-11-12

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the etiologic agent of the most severe form of virus hepatitis in humans. Sharing some structural and functional properties with plant viroids, the HDV RNA contains a single open reading frame coding for the only virus protein, the Delta antigen. A number of unique features, including ribozyme activity, RNA editing, rolling-circle RNA replication, and redirection for a RNA template of host DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II, make this small pathogen an excellent model to study virus-cell interactions and RNA biology. Treatment options for chronic hepatitis Delta are scarce and ineffective. The disease burden is perhaps largely underestimated making the search for new, specific drugs, targets, and treatment strategies an important public health challenge. In this review we address the main features of virus structure, replication, and interaction with the host. Virus pathogenicity and current treatment options are discussed in the light of recent developments. PMID:26568914

  1. Hepatitis delta virus antigen forms dimers and multimeric complexes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J G; Lemon, S M

    1993-01-01

    Although the hepatitis delta virus genome contains multiple open reading frames, only one of these reading frames is known to be expressed during replication of the virus. This open reading frame encodes two distinct molecular species of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg), p24 delta and p27 delta, depending on the location of the stop codon which terminates translation. We found antibody specific for p27 delta to be capable of precipitating p24 delta in extracts of infected liver, indicating that p27 delta and p24 delta form heterologous complexes in vivo. After cross-linking with 0.05% glutaraldehyde, specific HDAg dimers were detected in antigen prepared from both the liver and serum of an HDV-infected woodchuck carrier of woodchuck hepatitis virus. Guanidine HCl-denatured HDAg extracted from liver and dialyzed against phosphate-buffered saline sedimented in rate-zonal sucrose density gradients as 15S multimeric complexes. These 15S multimers were stable in the presence of 1.2% Nonidet P-40. After RNase digestion, the 15S complex was reduced to a 12S complex without associated RNA, while boiling for 3 min in 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate-0.5% 2-mercaptoethanol further reduced the 15S complex to 3S HDAg monomers. In the absence of glutaraldehyde cross-linking, HDAg extracted from liver migrated as monomer species in reducing and nonreducing gels, suggesting that the conserved cysteine residue present in p27 delta does not play a role in the formation of either dimers or multimers. On the other hand, an amino-terminal chymotrypsin-digested HDAg fragment, with a predicted length of 81 or less amino acids, retained the ability to form dimers, consistent with the hypothesis that a coiled-coil motif present between residues 27 and 58 may play a role in HDAg protein interactions in vivo. Images PMID:7677957

  2. HDVDB: a data warehouse for hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarita; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Nischal, Anuradha; Pant, Kamlesh Kumar; Seth, Prahlad Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) is an RNA virus and causes delta hepatitis in humans. Although a lot of data is available for HDV, but retrieval of information is a complicated task. Current web database 'HDVDB' provides a comprehensive web-resource for HDV. The database is basically concerned with basic information about HDV and disease caused by this virus, genome structure, pathogenesis, epidemiology, symptoms and prevention, etc. Database also supplies sequence data and bibliographic information about HDV. A tool 'siHDV Predict' to design the effective siRNA molecule to control the activity of HDV, is also integrated in database. It is a user friendly information system available at public domain and provides annotated information about HDV for research scholars, scientists, pharma industry people for further study. PMID:25786795

  3. Management of hepatitis delta: Need for novel therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zaigham; Abbas, Minaam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is the smallest single stranded RNA virus infecting humans. The hepatitis B surface antigen envelope protein protects the HDV nucleocapsid antigen and provides a means for the virus to enter and exit the hepatocyte. Hepatitis B and D viruses exploit the human sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), a receptor, for their entry into hepatocytes. Prenylation of the large delta antigen is a critical determinant of HDV particle assembly. Treatment with pegylated interferon results in sustained virological response six months post-treatment in one fourth of the patients. Nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) have been widely tested in hepatitis delta, but they appear to be ineffective. Combination treatment of NAs with interferon also proved to be disappointing so there is a need for novel therapeutic options. The receptor function of NTCP is blocked by Myrcludex B, a synthetic N-acylated preS1 lipopeptide that competes with infectious virions for receptor binding. There are already some approved drugs available, including irbesartan, ezetimibe, and ritonavir and cyclosporin A, with documented inhibitory effects on NTCP’s metabolic function. These drugs may have a role in HDV treatment. Interference with host-mediated post-translational changes of proteins that are crucial to the HDV life cycle, such as prenylation may become an important tool to control HDV infection and prevent replication. Lonafarnib, a prenylation inhibitor significantly reduces virus levels in hepatitis delta patients. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which are complementary to genomic HDV ribozyme self-cleavage site and stem I regions can inhibit genomic HDV ribozyme activity. PMID:26327754

  4. Transmission of the hepatitis B virus-associated delta agent to the eastern woodchuck.

    PubMed Central

    Ponzetto, A; Cote, P J; Popper, H; Hoyer, B H; London, W T; Ford, E C; Bonino, F; Purcell, R H; Gerin, J L

    1984-01-01

    delta agent of human origin was inoculated into four woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV). The animals developed delta infections with serologic patterns similar to those previously observed in human and chimpanzee infections. delta antigen was detected transiently in serum and liver and was followed by seroconversion to anti-delta antibody. Analogous to the chimpanzee model of delta infection, serum and hepatocyte markers of WHV were suppressed in the woodchuck during acute delta infection. The suppression of WHV DNA in serum was evident only during the time of delta-antigen positivity, while the inhibition of other WHV markers was more protracted. The delta antigen in woodchuck sera circulated as an internal component of a particle similar in size to the human delta particle (36-nm diameter) and was encapsidated by the woodchuck hepatitis virus surface antigen; delta antigen from infected woodchuck and chimpanzee livers had similar biophysical properties. Histologic analysis showed that experimental delta infection is associated with a transient acute hepatitis in woodchucks and loss of hepatocytes carrying WHV antigens. The lesions differed from the conspicuous hepatitis associated with reappearance of WHV replication. Hepatitis B-like viruses, therefore, appear to provide the requisite helper functions for delta replication and the woodchuck represents a useful model for study of the virology and pathology of the delta agent. Images PMID:6585793

  5. Pathogenesis by subviral agents: viroids and hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Owens, Robert A; Taylor, John

    2016-04-01

    The viroids of plants are the simplest known infectious genetic elements. They have RNA genomes of up to 400 nucleotides in length and no protein encoding capacity. Hepatitis delta virus (HDV), an infectious agent found only in humans co-infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), is just slightly more complex, with an RNA genome of about 1700 nucleotides, and the ability to express just one small protein. Viroid and HDV RNAs share several features that include circular structure, compact folding, and replication via a rolling-circle mechanism. Both agents were detected because of their obvious pathogenic effects. Their simplicity demands a greater need than conventional RNA or DNA viruses to redirect host components for facilitating their infectious cycle, a need that directly and indirectly incites pathogenic effects. The mechanisms by which these pathogenic effects are produced are the topic of this review. In this context, RNA silencing mediates certain aspects of viroid pathogenesis. PMID:26897654

  6. [Molecular diagnosis of hepatitis C and hepatitis B infection].

    PubMed

    Zidovec Lepej, Snjezana; Dusek, Davorka; Budimir, Jelena; Vince, Adriana

    2009-12-01

    Molecular methods are a well-established part of routine diagnostic work-up in patients infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Confirmation of active viral replication in infected patients is based on detection and/or quantification of viral genome in serum by molecular assays. Diagnostic algorithm for hepatitis C includes detection and/or quantification of HCV RNA in serum of infected patients and HCV genotyping. Diagnostic work-up in patients with hepatitis B includes quantification of HBV DNA in serum, HBV genotyping, and determination of resistance to nucleoside and nucleotide analogues. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the standard recommended molecular method for quantification of HCV RNA and HBV DNA in clinical samples. Due to superior sensitivity, real-time PCR assays can provide both qualitative detection of viral genome and quantification. Molecular diagnosis of HCV and HBV infections in clinical laboratories should be limited to certified standardized assays. PMID:20198893

  7. Transgenic mice support replication of hepatitis delta virus RNA in multiple tissues, particularly in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Polo, J M; Jeng, K S; Lim, B; Govindarajan, S; Hofman, F; Sangiorgi, F; Lai, M M

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is hepatotropic and frequently causes fulminant hepatitis in both human and nonhuman primate hosts. To understand the molecular basis of HDV tissue tropism and the mechanism of pathogenesis, transgenic mice in which replication-competent HDV dimeric RNA is expressed under the control of either liver-specific or universal transcriptional promoters were developed. The expressed RNA replicated efficiently in the liver and several tissues of nonhepatic origin. Surprisingly, maximal replication of HDV RNA occurred in skeletal muscle and was almost 100-fold greater than in the liver. These findings suggest that the hepatotropism of HDV is most likely a receptor-mediated restriction and that muscle-specific factors may facilitate HDV RNA replication. No evidence of cytopathology was apparent in most of the tissues examined, including the liver, supporting the contention that hepatocellular disease is not mediated by direct cytopathological effects associated with HDV RNA replication and gene expression. However, mild muscle atrophy in some of the transgenic mice was noted. Delta antigen was detected in the nuclei of myocytes. Only the small form, not the large form, of delta antigen was detected, suggesting that the RNA editing event which causes the conversion of delta antigen did not occur in transgenic mice. Furthermore, the 0.8-kb antigenomic RNA species, which is postulated to be the mRNA for delta antigen, was not detected in mice. The preferential replication of HDV RNA in skeletal muscle suggests that HDV RNA replication can be facilitated by certain muscle-specific factors. PMID:7609056

  8. Controlling mammalian gene expression by allosteric hepatitis delta virus ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yoko; Zhou, Linlin; Miu, Anh; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2013-12-20

    We engineered small molecule responsive allosteric ribozymes based on the genomic hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme by replacing the P4-L4 stem-loop with an RNA aptamer through a connector stem. When embedded in the 3' untranslated region of a reporter gene mRNA, these RNA devices enabled regulation of cis-gene expression by theophylline and guanine by up to 29.5-fold in mammalian cell culture. Furthermore, a NOR logic gate device was constructed by placing two engineered ribozymes in tandem, demonstrating the modularity of the RNA devices. The significant improvement in the regulatory dynamic range (ON/OFF ratio) of the RNA devices based on the HDV ribozyme should provide new opportunities for practical applications. PMID:23697539

  9. Tissue culture system for infection with human hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sureau, C; Jacob, J R; Eichberg, J W; Lanford, R E

    1991-01-01

    An in vitro culture system was developed for assaying the infectivity of the human hepatitis delta virus (HDV). Hepatocytes were isolated from chimpanzee liver and grown in a serum-free medium. Cells were shown to be infectible by HDV and to remain susceptible to infection for at least 3 weeks in culture, as evidenced by the appearance of RNA species characteristic of HDV replication as early as 6 days postinfection. When repeated experiments were carried out on cells derived from an animal free of hepatitis B virus (HBV), HDV infection occurred in a consistent fashion but there was no indication of infection with the HBV that was present in the inoculum. Despite numerous attempts with different sources of HBV inocula free of HDV, there was no evidence that indicated susceptibility of these cells to HBV infection. This observation may indicate that HBV and HDV use different modes of entry into hepatocytes. When cells derived from an HBV-infected animal were exposed to HDV, synthesis and release of progeny HDV particles were obtained in addition to HBV replication and production of Dane particles. Although not infectible with HBV, primary cultures of chimpanzee hepatocytes are capable of supporting part of the life cycle of HBV and the entire life cycle of HDV. Images PMID:2041075

  10. Alternative Processing of Hepatitis Delta Virus Antigenomic RNA Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xingcao; Chang, Jinhong; Taylor, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Intrinsic to the life cycle of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the fact that its RNAs undergo different forms of posttranscriptional RNA processing. Transcripts of both the genomic RNA and its exact complement, the antigenomic RNA, undergo ribozyme cleavage and RNA ligation. In addition, antigenomic RNA transcripts can undergo 5′ capping, 3′ polyadenylation, and even RNA editing by an adenosine deaminase. This study focused on the processing of antigenomic RNA transcripts. Two approaches were used to study the relationship between the events of polyadenylation, ribozyme cleavage, and RNA ligation. The first represented an examination under more controlled conditions of mutations in the poly(A) signal, AAUAAA, which is essential for this processing. We found that when a separate stable source of δAg-S, the small delta protein, was provided, the replication ability of the mutated RNA was restored. The second approach involved an examination of the processing in transfected cells of specific Pol II DNA-directed transcripts of HDV antigenomic sequences. The DNA constructs used were such that the RNA transcripts were antigenomic and began at the same 5′ site as the mRNA produced during RNA-directed HDV genome replication. A series of such constructs was assembled in order to test the relative abilities of the transcripts to undergo processing by polyadenylation or ribozyme cleavage at sites further 3′ on a multimer of HDV sequences. The findings from the two experimental approaches led to significant modifications in the rolling-circle model of HDV genome replication. PMID:15078932

  11. Pathologic and ultrastructural changes of acute and chronic delta hepatitis in an experimentally infected chimpanzee.

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, S.; Fields, H. A.; Humphrey, C. D.; Margolis, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    A hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) chronic carrier chimpanzee experimentally superinfected with delta virus (DV) developed chronic DV infection. Over a period of 12 months, serologic and biochemical changes were correlated with morphologic abnormalities of the liver. Severe hepatic necrosis and inflammation accompanied the initial acute episode of hepatitis on Day 35 after inoculation, followed by complete resolution of these lesions over the next 3 months. A second episode of hepatitis occurred on Day 145, and severe necrosis and inflammation recurred along with the reappearance of delta antigen in the hepatocytes. Delta antigen persisted in the liver following the second episode of hepatitis and has remained positive throughout the observation period of 1 year. During the initial acute episode, the hepatocytes exhibited foamy cytoplasmic changes resembling microvesicular fat. However, ultrastructural studies of the same cells revealed only vacuolization of the cytoplasm without evidence of fat droplets. The inflammatory infiltrate during both episodes of hepatitis demonstrated a striking predominance of macrophages over lymphocytes. Hepatocyte abnormalities observed by electron microscopy included vacuoles, proliferated endoplasmic reticulum, and tubules similar to those seen in posttransfusion non-A, non-B hepatitis. However, the tubular and reticular abnormalities coincided with delta antigen expression in liver biopsies detected by direct immunoperoxidase staining and abnormal alanine aminotransferase levels in the serum, which suggests a possible causal relationship. Nuclear abnormalities were not seen. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:3511726

  12. Molecular mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a prominent feature of liver diseases. Causative factors such as alcohol, viruses, toxic bile acids, fatty acids, drugs, and immune response, can induce apoptotic cell death via membrane receptors and intracellular stress. Apoptotic signaling network, including membrane death receptor-mediated cascade, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, lysosomal permeabilization, and mitochondrial dysfunction, is intermixed each other, but one mechanism may dominate at a particular stage. Mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis are complicated by multiple signaling pathways. The progression of liver disease is affected by the balance between apoptotic and antiapoptotic capabilities. Therapeutic options of liver injury are impacted by the clear understanding toward mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis. PMID:24434519

  13. A retrospective study of the role of delta agent infection in children with HBsAg-positive chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Maggiore, G; Hadchouel, M; Sessa, F; Vinci, M; Craxì, A; Marzani, M D; De Giacomo, C; Alagille, D

    1985-01-01

    The prevalence of intrahepatic delta antigen and/or anti-delta antibody was retrospectively investigated in 102 children with chronic HBsAg-positive hepatitis who were seen consecutively in three medical institutions between 1974 and 1982. Delta infection markers were found in 13 patients (12.7%) who exhibited high serum titers of anti-delta antibody; intrahepatic delta antigen was detected in ten. Eleven of the 13 children had severe progressive liver disease associated in all but one with absence of hepatitis B virus replication as evaluated by analysis of serum hepatitis B virus DNA. The factors which seem to increase the risk of delta infection in children who are hepatitis B virus carriers are geographic origin, a history of exposure to blood derivatives and age. A further 37 of 102 children had chronic active hepatitis (20 patients) or cirrhosis (17 patients) without evidence of delta infection. These results indicate that delta infection occurs in children with chronic hepatitis. This possibility should be considered in investigation of children with HBsAg-positive chronic liver disease. Although the delta agent is an important cause of progressive liver disease in children who are chronic HBsAg carriers, severe liver injury and especially cirrhosis can occur without evidence of delta infection. PMID:3967866

  14. Diagnostic and prognostic significance of the IgM antibody to the Hepatitis delta virus

    SciTech Connect

    Farci, P.; Gerin, J.L.; Aragona, M.; Lindsey, I.; Crivelli, O.; Balestrieri, A.; Smedile, A.; Thomas, H.C.; Rizzetto, M.

    1986-03-21

    The IgM class antibody to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) was determined in different clinical categories of hepatitis B surface antigen carriers infected by the HDV (positive in the test for total antibody to HDV). The IgM antibody was found at high titers in each 70 patients with inflammatory liver disease and at a low titer in one six patients with inactive cirrhosis; it was not found in eight carriers with normal liver histology. Testing for Igm antibody to HDV distinguishes hepatitis B surface antigen carriers who have underlying inflammatory HDV liver disease from those with past HDV infection and provides prognostic information on the course of chronic HDV hepatitis.

  15. Characterization of hepatitis delta virus in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Andernach, Iris E; Leiss, Lukas V; Tarnagda, Zekiba S; Tahita, Marc C; Otegbayo, Jesse A; Forbi, Joseph C; Omilabu, Sunday; Gouandjika-Vasilache, Ionela; Komas, Narcisse P; Mbah, Okwen P; Muller, Claude P

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is a satellite of hepatitis B virus (HBV), and infection with this virus aggravates acute and chronic liver disease. While HBV seroprevalence is very high across sub-Saharan Africa, much less is known about HDV in the region. In this study, almost 2,300 blood serum samples from Burkina Faso (n=1,131), Nigeria (n=974), Chad (n=50), and the Central African Republic (n = 118) were screened for HBV and HDV. Among 743 HBsAg-positive serum samples, 74 were positive for HDV antibodies and/or HDV RNA, with considerable differences in prevalence, ranging from <2% (pregnant women from Burkina Faso) to 50% (liver patients from Central African Republic). HDV seems to be much more common in chronic liver disease patients in the Central African Republic (CAR) than in similar cohorts in Nigeria. In a large nested mother-child cohort in Burkina Faso, the prevalence of HDV antibodies was 10 times higher in the children than in their mothers, despite similar HBsAg prevalences, excluding vertical transmission as an important route of infection. The genotyping of 16 full-length and 8 partial HDV strains revealed clade 1 (17/24) in three of the four countries, while clades 5 (5/24) and 6 (2/24) were, at least in this study, confined to Central Nigeria. On the amino acid level, almost all our clade 1 strains exhibited a serine at position 202 in the hepatitis D antigen, supporting the hypothesis of an ancient African HDV-1 subgroup. Further studies are required to understand the public health significance of the highly varied HDV prevalences in different cohorts and countries in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24599979

  16. Characterization of Hepatitis Delta Virus in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Andernach, Iris E.; Leiss, Lukas V.; Tarnagda, Zekiba S.; Tahita, Marc C.; Otegbayo, Jesse A.; Forbi, Joseph C.; Omilabu, Sunday; Gouandjika-Vasilache, Ionela; Komas, Narcisse P.; Mbah, Okwen P.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is a satellite of hepatitis B virus (HBV), and infection with this virus aggravates acute and chronic liver disease. While HBV seroprevalence is very high across sub-Saharan Africa, much less is known about HDV in the region. In this study, almost 2,300 blood serum samples from Burkina Faso (n = 1,131), Nigeria (n = 974), Chad (n = 50), and the Central African Republic (n = 118) were screened for HBV and HDV. Among 743 HBsAg-positive serum samples, 74 were positive for HDV antibodies and/or HDV RNA, with considerable differences in prevalence, ranging from <2% (pregnant women from Burkina Faso) to 50% (liver patients from Central African Republic). HDV seems to be much more common in chronic liver disease patients in the Central African Republic (CAR) than in similar cohorts in Nigeria. In a large nested mother-child cohort in Burkina Faso, the prevalence of HDV antibodies was 10 times higher in the children than in their mothers, despite similar HBsAg prevalences, excluding vertical transmission as an important route of infection. The genotyping of 16 full-length and 8 partial HDV strains revealed clade 1 (17/24) in three of the four countries, while clades 5 (5/24) and 6 (2/24) were, at least in this study, confined to Central Nigeria. On the amino acid level, almost all our clade 1 strains exhibited a serine at position 202 in the hepatitis D antigen, supporting the hypothesis of an ancient African HDV-1 subgroup. Further studies are required to understand the public health significance of the highly varied HDV prevalences in different cohorts and countries in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24599979

  17. Replication of hepatitis delta virus RNA in mice after intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Polo, J M; Lim, B; Govindarajan, S; Lai, M M

    1995-01-01

    To establish a readily manipulable small-animal system for the study of human hepatitis delta virus (HDV) replication in vivo, plasmid DNAs containing head-to-tail cDNA dimers of HDV were inoculated intramuscularly into mice. Genomic-sense HDV RNA was detected in the injected muscle within 1 week and increased to substantial levels by week 7 postinjection. The intramuscular accumulation of HDV RNA was determined to be the direct result of viral RNA replication by three lines of evidence: (i) injected tissues also accumulated antigenomic-sense HDV RNA, (ii) plasmid DNA that synthesized primary transcripts of antigenomic sense also led to the accumulation of genomic-sense HDV RNA, and (iii) injection of a cDNA dimer defective in antigenomic RNA cleavage failed to produce detectable HDV RNA in muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis of injected muscle demonstrated the presence and nuclear localization of hepatitis delta antigen in myocytes. Finally, sera from DNA-injected mice contained antibodies specific for delta antigen, indicating the induction of an immunological response to the intracellularly expressed antigen. These findings demonstrated the ability of HDV RNA to replicate in skeletal muscle and provide a useful system for the study of HDV replication, delta antigen processing, and its presentation to the immune system in vivo. Furthermore, this system offers an efficiently replicating RNA as a potential vehicle for in vivo gene transfer. PMID:7609095

  18. Large hepatitis delta antigen is a novel clathrin adaptor-like protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Chang, Shin C; Yu, I-Chen; Tsay, Yeou-Guang; Chang, Ming-Fu

    2007-06-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a common pathway for viral entry, but little is known about the direct association of viral protein with clathrin in the cytoplasm. In this study, a putative clathrin box known to be conserved in clathrin adaptors was identified at the C terminus of the large hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg-L). Similar to clathrin adaptors, HDAg-L directly interacted with the N terminus of the clathrin heavy chain through the clathrin box. HDAg-L is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein important for the assembly of hepatitis delta virus (HDV). Here, we demonstrated that brefeldin A and wortmannin, inhibitors of clathrin-mediated exocytosis and endosomal trafficking, respectively, specifically blocked HDV assembly but had no effect on the assembly of the small surface antigen of hepatitis B virus. In addition, cytoplasm-localized HDAg-L inhibited the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of transferrin and the degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor. These results indicate that HDAg-L is a new clathrin adaptor-like protein, and it may be involved in the maturation and pathogenesis of HDV coinfection or superinfection with hepatitis B virus through interaction with clathrin. PMID:17376909

  19. Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) and woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) nucleic acids in tissues of HDV-infected chronic WHV carrier woodchucks.

    PubMed Central

    Negro, F; Korba, B E; Forzani, B; Baroudy, B M; Brown, T L; Gerin, J L; Ponzetto, A

    1989-01-01

    The molecular forms of genomic and antigenomic hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA and of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) DNA and WHV RNA were studied in nonneoplastic liver (NL) tissues, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, and several extrahepatic tissues of chronic WHV carrier woodchucks acutely (two animals) and chronically (six animals) superinfected with HDV. HDV was shown to replicate in all NL and HCC tissues but not in any of the extrahepatic tissues analyzed, which included spleen, peripheral blood lymphocytes, kidney, ovary, testis, thymus, lung, and stomach. HDV RNA was present as species with molecular weights consistent with those of monomers, dimers, and trimers of both strand polarities, supporting the rolling circle model proposed for HDV RNA replication. WHV DNA levels in NL, HCC, spleens, and serum were 10- to 100-fold lower than the levels typically observed in chronic WHV carrier woodchucks not infected with HDV. WHV DNA replicative intermediates were rarely observed and only at very low levels, representing less than 10% of the total WHV DNA. By contrast, WHV RNA transcription was not significantly depressed and both primary WHV RNA transcripts, 2.3 and 3.6 kilobases, were observed in NL, HCC, spleens, and in one of the kidney tissues. In addition, a 2.6-kilobase WHV RNA transcript was found in the majority of the NL tissues. Images PMID:2926865

  20. Advanced Molecular Surveillance of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Rahal, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important public health problem worldwide. HCV exploits complex molecular mechanisms, which result in a high degree of intrahost genetic heterogeneity. This high degree of variability represents a challenge for the accurate establishment of genetic relatedness between cases and complicates the identification of sources of infection. Tracking HCV infections is crucial for the elucidation of routes of transmission in a variety of settings. Therefore, implementation of HCV advanced molecular surveillance (AMS) is essential for disease control. Accounting for virulence is also important for HCV AMS and both viral and host factors contribute to the disease outcome. Therefore, HCV AMS requires the incorporation of host factors as an integral component of the algorithms used to monitor disease occurrence. Importantly, implementation of comprehensive global databases and data mining are also needed for the proper study of the mechanisms responsible for HCV transmission. Here, we review molecular aspects associated with HCV transmission, as well as the most recent technological advances used for virus and host characterization. Additionally, the cornerstone discoveries that have defined the pathway for viral characterization are presented and the importance of implementing advanced HCV molecular surveillance is highlighted. PMID:25781918

  1. Hepatitis E: Molecular Virology and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Subrat K.; Varma, Satya P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a single, positive-sense, capped and poly A tailed RNA virus classified under the family Hepeviridae. Enteric transmission, acute self-limiting hepatitis, frequent epidemic and sporadic occurrence, high mortality in affected pregnants are hallmarks of hepatitis E infection. Lack of an efficient culture system and resulting reductionist approaches for the study of replication and pathogenesis of HEV made it to be a less understood agent. Early studies on animal models, sub-genomic expression of open reading frames (ORF) and infectious cDNA clones have helped in elucidating the genome organization, important stages in HEV replication and pathogenesis. The genome contains three ORF's and three untranslated regions (UTR). The 5′ distal ORF, ORF1 is translated by host ribosomes in a cap dependent manner to form the non-structural polyprotein including the viral replicase. HEV replicates via a negative-sense RNA intermediate which helps in the formation of the positive-sense genomic RNA and a single bi-cistronic sub-genomic RNA. The 3′ distal ORF's including the major structural protein pORF2 and the multifunctional host interacting protein pORF3 are translated from the sub-genomic RNA. Pathogenesis in HEV infections is not well articulated, and remains a concern due to the many aspects like host dependent and genotype specific variations. Animal HEV, zoonosis, chronicity in immunosuppressed patients, and rapid decompensation in affected chronic liver diseased patients warrants detailed investigation of the underlying pathogenesis. Recent advances about structure, entry, egress and functional characterization of ORF1 domains has furthered our understanding about HEV. This article is an effort to review our present understanding about molecular biology and pathogenesis of HEV. PMID:25755485

  2. Hepatitis Delta Virus RNA Editing Is Highly Specific for the Amber/W Site and Is Suppressed by Hepatitis Delta Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Polson, Andrew G.; Ley, Herbert L.; Bass, Brenda L.; Casey, John L.

    1998-01-01

    RNA editing at adenosine 1012 (amber/W site) in the antigenomic RNA of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) allows two essential forms of the viral protein, hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg), to be synthesized from a single open reading frame. Editing at the amber/W site is thought to be catalyzed by one of the cellular enzymes known as adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs). In vitro, the enzymes ADAR1 and ADAR2 deaminate adenosines within many different sequences of base-paired RNA. Since promiscuous deamination could compromise the viability of HDV, we wondered if additional deamination events occurred within the highly base paired HDV RNA. By sequencing cDNAs derived from HDV RNA from transfected Huh-7 cells, we determined that the RNA was not extensively modified at other adenosines. Approximately 0.16 to 0.32 adenosines were modified per antigenome during 6 to 13 days posttransfection. Interestingly, all observed non-amber/W adenosine modifications, which occurred mostly at positions that are highly conserved among naturally occurring HDV isolates, were found in RNAs that were also modified at the amber/W site. Such coordinate modification likely limits potential deleterious effects of promiscuous editing. Neither viral replication nor HDAg was required for the highly specific editing observed in cells. However, HDAg was found to suppress editing at the amber/W site when expressed at levels similar to those found during HDV replication. These data suggest HDAg may regulate amber/W site editing during virus replication. PMID:9528763

  3. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of the hepatitis delta virus antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Carolina; Freitas, Natalia; Cunha, Celso

    2008-01-05

    The delta antigen (HDAg) is the only protein encoded by the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA genome. The HDAg contains an RNA binding domain, a dimerization domain, and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The nuclear import of HDV RNPs is thought to be one of the first tasks of the HDAg during the HDV replication cycle. Using c-myc-PK fusions with several regions of the HDAg in transfection assays in Huh7 cells, we found that the HDAg NLS consists of a single stretch of 10 amino acids, EGAPPAKRAR, located in positions 66-75. Deletion and mutation analysis of this region showed that both the acidic glutamic acid residue at position 66 and the basic arginine residue at position 75 are essential for promoting nuclear import.

  4. Evidence of an Exponential Decay Pattern of the Hepatitis Delta Virus Evolution Rate and Fluctuations in Quasispecies Complexity in Long-Term Studies of Chronic Delta Infection

    PubMed Central

    Homs, Maria; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Gregori, Josep; Ruiz, Alicia; Reimundo, Pilar; Casillas, Rosario; Tabernero, David; Godoy, Cristina; Barakat, Salma; Quer, Josep; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Roggendorf, Michael; Esteban, Rafael; Buti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic HDV infection can cause a severe form of viral hepatitis for which there is no specific treatment. Characterization of the hepatitis B or C viral quasispecies has provided insight into treatment failure and disease recurrence following liver transplantation, has proven useful to understand hepatitis B e antigen seroconversion, and has helped to predict whether hepatitis C infection will resolve or become chronic. It is likely that characterization of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) quasispecies will ultimately have similar value for the management of this infection. This study sought to determine the RNA evolution rates in serum of chronic hepatitis delta (CHD) treatment-naïve patients, using next-generation sequencing methods. The region selected for study encompassed nucleotide positions 910 to 1270 of the genome and included the amber/W codon. Amber/W is a substrate of the editing process by the ADAR1 host enzyme and is essential for encoding the 2 delta antigens (HDAg). The amber codon encodes the small (unedited) HDAg form and the W codon the large (edited) HDAg form. The evolution rate was analyzed taking into account the time elapsed between samples, the percentage of unedited and edited genomes, and the complexity of the viral population. The longitudinal studies included 29 sequential samples from CHD patients followed up for a mean of 11.5 years. In total, 121,116 sequences were analyzed. The HDV evolution rate ranged from 9.5x10-3 to 1.2x10-3 substitutions/site/year and showed a negative correlation with the time elapsed between samples (p<0.05). An accumulation of transition-type changes was found to be responsible for higher evolution rates. The percentages of unedited and edited genomes and the quasispecies complexity showed no relationships with the evolution rate, but the fluctuations in the percentages of genomes and in complexity suggest continuous adaptation of HDV to the host conditions. PMID:27362848

  5. New antiviral targets for innovative treatment concepts for hepatitis B virus and hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Durantel, David; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Current therapies of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) remain limited to pegylated-interferon-alpha (PegIFN-α) or any of the five approved nucleos(t)ide analogues (NUC) treatments. While viral suppression can be achieved in the majority of patients with the high-barrier-to-resistance new-generation of NUC, i.e. entecavir and tenofovir, HBsAg loss is achieved by PegIFN-α and/or NUC in only 10% of patients, after a 5-year follow-up. Attempts to improve the response by administering two different NUC or a combination of NUC and PegIFN-α have not provided a dramatic increase in the rate of functional cure. Because of this and the need of long-term NUC administration, there is a renewed interest regarding the understanding of various steps of the HBV replication cycle, as well as specific virus-host cell interactions, in order to define new targets and develop new antiviral drugs. This includes a direct inhibition of viral replication with entry inhibitors, drugs targeting cccDNA, siRNA targeting viral transcripts, capsid assembly modulators, and approaches targeting the secretion of viral envelope proteins. Restoration of immune responses is a complementary approach. The restoration of innate immunity against HBV can be achieved, with TLR agonists or specific antiviral cytokine delivery. Restoration of adaptive immunity may be achieved with inhibitors of negative checkpoint regulators, therapeutic vaccines, or autologous transfer of engineered HBV-specific T cells. Novel targets and compounds will readily be evaluated using both relevant and novel in vitro and in vivo models of HBV infection. The addition of one or several new drugs to current therapies should offer the prospect of a markedly improved response to treatments and an increased rate of functional cure. This should lead to a reduced risk of antiviral drug resistance, and to a decreased incidence of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PMID:27084032

  6. Molecular determinants of platelet delta storage pool deficiencies: an update.

    PubMed

    Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Darnige, Luc; Bellucci, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Delta storage pool deficiency (δ-SPD) is a rare heterogeneous group of platelet disorders characterized by a reduction in the number or content of dense granules. δ-SPD causes a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis characterized mainly by mucocutaneous bleeding. Currently, no specific treatment is available and the therapeutic approach is based on prevention of excessive bleeding. However, during the last few years, important insights into the pathophysiology of δ-SPD have been achieved using mouse models and dense granule deficiency-associated congenital diseases, such as Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and Chediak-Higashi syndrome. It thus appears that δ-SPD represents a genetically heterogeneous group of intracellular vesicle biogenesis and/or trafficking disorders. This review summarizes recent data regarding the molecular mechanisms together with clinical features of the different types of δ-SPD. Although the molecular basis of isolated inherited δ-SPD remains currently unknown, next-generation sequencing strategies should enable researchers to identify the causative genes. Identification of those genes should contribute to our understanding of the pathophysiology, represent useful tools for genetic diagnosis, and eventually lead to new specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23025459

  7. Characterization of nuclear targeting signal of hepatitis delta antigen: nuclear transport as a protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Y P; Yeh, C T; Ou, J H; Lai, M M

    1992-01-01

    Hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) is the only protein encoded by hepatitis delta virus (HDV). HDAg has been demonstrated in the nuclei of HDV-infected hepatocytes, and its nuclear transport may be important for the replication of HDV RNA. In this report, we investigated the mechanism of nuclear transport of HDAg. By expressing fusion proteins consisting of the different portions of HDAg and alpha-globin, we have identified a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within the N-terminal one-third of HDAg. It consists of two stretches of basic amino acid domains separated by a short run of nonbasic amino acids. Both of the basic domains are necessary for the efficient nuclear transport of HDAg. The nonbasic spacer amino acids could be removed without affecting the nuclear targeting of HDAg significantly. Thus, the HDAg NLS belongs to a newly identified class of NLS which consists of two discontiguous stretches of basic amino acids. This NLS is separated from a stretch of steroid receptor NLS-like sequence, which is also present but not functioning as an NLS, in HDAg. Furthermore, we have shown that subfragments of HDAg which do not contain the NLS can be passively transported into the nucleus by a trans-acting full-length HDAg, provided that these subfragments contain the region with a leucine zipper sequence. Thus, our results indicate that HDAg forms aggregates in the cytoplasm and that the HDAg oligomerization is probably mediated by the leucine zipper sequence. Therefore, HDAg is likely transported into the nucleus as a protein complex. Images PMID:1731113

  8. The effect of HIV disease on serum markers of hepatitis delta infection in intravenous drug abusers.

    PubMed

    Lake-Bakaar, G; Bhat, K; Govindarajan, S

    1994-10-01

    The prevalence of serum markers of delta hepatitis was determined prospectively in 82 intravenous drug abusers at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Seventeen were HIV negative, 30 were HIV positive without acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and 35 had been diagnosed as having AIDS. Antihepatitis D virus (HDV) in serum was measured by a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and also by solid phase capture radioimmunoassays (RIAs) for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-HDV. HDV antigen and hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA were also measured. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HBs were determined by using a commercially available RIA. Anti-HDV (RIA) was only detected in serum that contained HBsAg. These anti-HDV (RIA) positive samples also tested positive with the commercial anti-HDV electroimmunoassay. In addition, the commercial anti-HDV ELISA detected anti-HDV in some serum samples that were negative for HBsAg; these anti HDV-positive HBsAg-negative samples were frequently lipemic or contained rheumatoid factor. The prevalence of HBsAg and anti-HBs did not differ significantly with the stage of HIV disease. HBsAg was detected in 3 of 13 (23%) HIV-negative, 5 of 29 (17%) HIV-positive, and 4 of 18 (22%) patients with AIDS. IgG and IgM anti-HDV (RIA) was positive in 2 of 3 HIV-negative and 4 of 5 HIV-positive pre-AIDS HBsAg-positive subjects. However, none of 4 AIDS patients had anti-HDV. The difference between AIDS and non-AIDS patients was statistically significant (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.03). HDV antigen was detected in serum from one AIDS patient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7930880

  9. [MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF HEPATITIS B VIRUS AND IMMUNOPATHOGENESIS OF CHRONIC VIRAL HEPATITIS B].

    PubMed

    Balmasova, I P; Sepiashvili, R I; Malova, E S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B belongs to a category of socially significant diseases due to its wide abundance in the world and high frequency of unfavourable outcomes of this disease. Features of interaction of hepatitis B virus with human immune system, accompanying development of mechanisms of escape from immunological control, is the basis of development of chronic hepatitis B. Molecular-biological features of hepatitis B virus are the basis of the indicated mechanisms, and the content of this review is their examination. Herewith, stages of immunopathogenesis of this disease is the basis of characteristics of interaction of viral proteins with cells of immune system, and isolation of those is accepted in contemporary foreign literature. PMID:27228681

  10. Lichen planus induced by pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy in a patient monitored for delta hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Safak; Arslan, Eyup; Baysal, Birol; Baykara, Sule Nergiz; Uzun, Ozlem Ceren; Kaya, Sehmuz

    2015-01-01

    Interferons are used for treatment of chronic hepatitis B. They can induce or exacerbate some skin disorders, such as lichen planus. In this study, as we know, we presented the first case developing lichen planus while receiving interferon treatment due to delta hepatitis. A 31-year-old male patient presented to our outpatient clinic with HBsAg positivity. With his analyses, HBV DNA was negative, anti-delta total was positive, ALT was 72 U/L (upper limit 41 U/L), and platelet was 119 000/mm(3). He was therefore started on subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy at 180 mcg/week for delta hepatitis. At month 4 of therapy, the patient developed diffuse eroded lace-like lesions in oral mucosa, white plaques on lips, and itchy papular lesions in the hands and feet. Lichen planus was considered by the dermatology clinic and topical treatment (mometasone furoate) was given. The lesions persisted at month 5 of therapy and biopsy samples were obtained from oral mucosal lesions and interferon dose was reduced to 135 mcg/week. Biopsy demonstrated nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium; epithelial acanthosis, spongiosis, and apoptotic bodies were observed in the epidermis and therefore lichen planus was considered. At month 6 of therapy, lesions did not improve and even progressed and interferon treatment was therefore discontinued. PMID:25821612

  11. The role of a metastable RNA secondary structure in hepatitis delta virus genotype III RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Linnstaedt, Sarah D.; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Shapiro, Bruce A.; Casey, John L.

    2006-01-01

    RNA editing plays a critical role in the life cycle of hepatitis delta virus (HDV). The host editing enzyme ADAR1 recognizes specific RNA secondary structure features around the amber/W site in the HDV antigenome and deaminates the amber/W adenosine. A previous report suggested that a branched secondary structure is necessary for editing in HDV genotype III. This branched structure, which is distinct from the characteristic unbranched rod structure required for HDV replication, was only partially characterized, and knowledge concerning its formation and stability was limited. Here, we examine the secondary structures, conformational dynamics, and amber/W site editing of HDV genotype III RNA using a miniaturized HDV genotype III RNA in vitro. Computational analysis of this RNA using the MPGAfold algorithm indicated that the RNA has a tendency to form both metastable and stable unbranched secondary structures. Moreover, native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that this RNA forms both branched and unbranched rod structures when transcribed in vitro. As predicted, the branched structure is a metastable structure that converts readily to the unbranched rod structure. Only branched RNA was edited at the amber/W site by ADAR1 in vitro. The structural heterogeneity of HDV genotype III RNA is significant because not only are both conformations of the RNA functionally important for viral replication, but the ratio of the two forms could modulate editing by determining the amount of substrate RNA available for modification. PMID:16790843

  12. Molecular Biology of Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Christoph; Mason, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the prototype of a family of small DNA viruses that productively infect hepatocytes, the major cell of the liver, and replicate by reverse transcription of a terminally redundant viral RNA, the pregenome. Upon infection, the circular, partially double-stranded virion DNA is converted in the nucleus to a covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) that assembles into a minichromosome, the template for viral mRNA synthesis. Infection of hepatocytes is non-cytopathic. Infection of the liver may be either transient (<6 months) or chronic and life long, depending on the ability of the host immune response to clear the infection. Chronic infections can cause immune mediated liver damage progressing to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The mechanisms of carcinogenesis are unclear. Antiviral therapies with nucleoside analog inhibitors of viral DNA synthesis delay sequelae, but cannot cure HBV infections due to the persistence of cccDNA in hepatocytes. PMID:25759099

  13. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C.; Swift, G.W. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  14. Erythropoietic and hepatic porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Gross, U; Hoffmann, G F; Doss, M O

    2000-11-01

    Porphyrias are divided into erythropoietic and hepatic manifestations. Erythropoietic porphyrias are characterized by cutaneous symptoms and appear in early childhood. Erythropoietic protoporphyria is complicated by cholestatic liver cirrhosis and progressive hepatic failure in 10%, of patients. Acute hepatic porphyrias (delta-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria and variegate porphyria) are characterized by variable extrahepatic gastrointestinal, neurological-psychiatric and cardiovascular manifestations requiring early diagnosis to avoid life-threatening complications. Acute hepatic porphyrias are pharmacogenetic and molecular regulatory diseases (without porphyrin accumulation) mainly induced by drugs, sex hormones, fasting or alcohol. The disease process depends on the derepression of hepatic delta-aminolaevulinic acid synthase following haem depletion. In contrast to the acute porphyrias, nonacute, chronic hepatic porphyrias such as porphyria cutanea tarda are porphyrin accumulation disorders leading to cutaneous symptoms associated with liver disease, especially caused by alcohol or viral hepatitis. Alcohol, oestrogens, haemodialysis, hepatitis C and AIDS are triggering factors. Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common porphyria, followed by acute intermittent porphyria and erythropoietic protoporphyria. The molecular genetics of the porphyrias is very heterogenous. Nearly every family has its own mutation. The mutations identified account for the corresponding enzymatic deficiencies, which may remain clinically silent throughout life. Thus, the recognition of the overt disorder with extrahepatic manifestations depends on the demonstration of biochemical abnormalities due to these primary defects and compensatory hepatic overexpression of hepatic delta-aminolaevulinic acid synthase in the acute porphyrias. Consequently, haem precursors are synthesized in excess. The increased

  15. Hepatitis B (HBV), Hepatitis C (HCV) and Hepatitis Delta (HDV) Viruses in the Colombian Population—How Is the Epidemiological Situation?

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Mora, Mónica Viviana; Gutierrez Fernandez, María Fernanda; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Soares; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral hepatitis B, C and delta still remain a serious problem worldwide. In Colombia, data from 1980s described that HBV and HDV infection are important causes of hepatitis, but little is known about HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine the currently frequency of HBV, HCV and HDV in four different Colombian regions. Methodology/Principal Findings This study was conducted in 697 habitants from 4 Colombian departments: Amazonas, Chocó, Magdalena and San Andres Islands. Epidemiological data were obtained from an interview applied to each individual aiming to evaluate risk factors related to HBV, HCV or HDV infections. All samples were tested for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs and anti-HCV markers. Samples that were positive to HBsAg and/or anti-HBc were tested to anti-HDV. Concerning the geographical origin of the samples, the three HBV markers showed a statistically significant difference: HBsAg (p = 0.033) and anti-HBc (p<0.001) were more frequent in Amazonas and Magdalena departments. Isolated anti-HBs (a marker of previous vaccination) frequencies were: Chocó (53.26%), Amazonas (32.88%), Magdalena (17.0%) and San Andrés (15.33%) - p<0.001. Prevalence of anti-HBc increased with age; HBsAg varied from 1.97 to 8.39% (p = 0.033). Amazonas department showed the highest frequency for anti-HCV marker (5.68%), while the lowest frequency was found in San Andrés Island (0.66%). Anti-HDV was found in 9 (5.20%) out of 173 anti-HBc and/or HBsAg positive samples, 8 of them from the Amazonas region and 1 from them Magdalena department. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, HBV, HCV and HDV infections are detected throughout Colombia in frequency levels that would place some areas as hyperendemic for HBV, especially those found in Amazonas and Magdalena departments. Novel strategies to increase HBV immunization in the rural population and to strengthen HCV surveillance are reinforced by these results. PMID:21559488

  16. [Molecular mechanisms of hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Park, Neung Hwa; Chung, Young Hwa

    2007-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant diseases in the world. The hepatitis B virus (HBV) replicates non-cytopathically in hepatocytes, and most of the liver injury associated with this infection reflects the immune response. Epidemiological studies have clearly demonstrated that a chronic HBV infection is a major etiological factor in the development of HCC. The pathogenesis of HBV-associated HCC has been studied extensively, and the molecular changes during the malignant transformation have been identified. The main carcinogenic mechanism of HBV-associated HCC is related to the long term-inflammatory changes caused by a chronic hepatitis B infection, which might involve the integration of the HBV. Integration of the HBV DNA into the host genome occurs at the early steps of clonal tumorous expansion. The hepatitis B x protein (HBx) is a multifunctional regulatory protein that communicates directly or indirectly with a variety of host targets, and mediates many opposing cellular functions, including its function in cell cycle regulation, transcriptional regulation, signaling, encoding of the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion molecules, as well as oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Continued study of the mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis will refine our current understanding of the molecular and cellular basis for neoplastic transformations in the liver. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the mechanisms involved in HBV-associated hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:17898549

  17. Direct evidence for cytotoxicity associated with expression of hepatitis delta virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Cole, S M; Gowans, E J; Macnaughton, T B; Hall, P D; Burrell, C J

    1991-05-01

    It has been postulated that hepatocyte injury resulting from infection with hepatitis D virus may be caused by a direct virus cytotoxicity in contrast to immune-mediated injury associated with hepatitis B virus. We have transfected HeLa and HepG2 continuous cell lines with a recombinant plasmid containing the hepatitis D antigen gene under the inducible control of the human metallothionein promoter. The addition of zinc to the cell culture medium then led to the expression of hepatitis D antigen associated with, in the short term, a significant reduction in the rate of RNA but not DNA synthesis and, in the longer term, cell death. The necrotic cells had pyknotic nuclei and shrunken eosinophilic cytoplasm; these necrotic cells resembled the apoptotic bodies seen in hepatitis D virus-related hepatitis. The level of hepatitis D antigen in individual cells that produced these changes was similar to the level of hepatitis D antigen in hepatocytes from a chimpanzee with acute hepatitis D virus infection. We conclude that the expression of hepatitis D antigen resulted in significant cytotoxic changes in these cells, providing strong support for the view that hepatitis D antigen may be specifically cytotoxic to infected hepatocytes in vivo. PMID:1709411

  18. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  19. Structure, sequence and expression of the hepatitis delta (δ) viral genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Sheng; Choo, Qui-Lim; Weiner, Amy J.; Ou, Jing-Hsiung; Najarian, Richard C.; Thayer, Richard M.; Mullenbach, Guy T.; Denniston, Katherine J.; Gerin, John L.; Houghton, Michael

    1986-10-01

    Biochemical and electron microscopic data indicate that the human hepatitis δ viral agent contains a covalently closed circular and single-stranded RNA genome that has certain similarities with viroid-like agents from plants. The sequence of the viral genome (1,678 nucleotides) has been determined and an open reading frame within the complementary strand has been shown to encode an antigen that binds specifically to antisera from patients with chronic hepatitis δ viral infections.

  20. The human RNA polymerase II interacts with the terminal stem-loop regions of the hepatitis delta virus RNA genome

    SciTech Connect

    Greco-Stewart, Valerie S.; Miron, Paul; Abrahem, Abrahem; Pelchat, Martin . E-mail: mpelchat@uottawa.ca

    2007-01-05

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is an RNA virus that depends on DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) for its transcription and replication. While it is generally accepted that RNAP II is involved in HDV replication, its interaction with HDV RNA requires confirmation. A monoclonal antibody specific to the carboxy terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNAP II was used to establish the association of RNAP II with both polarities of HDV RNA in HeLa cells. Co-immunoprecipitations using HeLa nuclear extract revealed that RNAP II interacts with HDV-derived RNAs at sites located within the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Analysis of these regions revealed a strong selection to maintain a rod-like conformation and demonstrated several conserved features. These results provide the first direct evidence of an association between human RNAP II and HDV RNA and suggest two transcription start sites on both polarities of HDV RNA.

  1. Selection of the Most Potent Specific On/Off Adaptor-Hepatitis Delta Virus Ribozymes for Use in Gene Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Michel V.; Rouleau, Samuel G.; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) ribozyme, which is well adapted to the environment of the human cell, is an excellent candidate for the future development of gene-inactivation systems. On top of this, a new generation of HDV ribozymes now exists that benefits from the addition of a specific on/off adaptor (specifically the SOFA-HDV ribozymes) which greatly increases both the ribozyme’s specificity and its cleavage activity. Unlike RNAi and hammerhead ribozymes, the designing of SOFA-HDV ribozymes to cleave, in trans, given RNA species has never been the object of a systematic optimization study, even with their recent use for the gene knockdown of various targets. This report aims at both improving and clarifying the design process of SOFA-HDV ribozymes. Both the ribozyme and the targeted RNA substrate were analyzed in order to provide new criteria that are useful in the selection of the most potent SOFA-HDV ribozymes. The crucial features present in both the ribozyme’s biosensor and blocker, as well as at the target site, were identified and characterized. Simple rules were derived and tested using hepatitis C virus NS5B RNA as a model target. Overall, this method should promote the use of the SOFA-HDV ribozymes in a plethora of applications in both functional genomics and gene therapy. PMID:21793786

  2. DOES IRON OR HEME CONTROL RAT HEPATIC DELTA-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid and/or allylisopropylacetamide administration to rat pups did not evoke a premature induction of hepatic d-aminolevulinic acid synthetase. Administration of iron to adult rats did not alter d-aminolevulinic acid synthetase activity and ha...

  3. Photodynamic therapy using intravenous delta-aminolaevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX sensitisation in experimental hepatic tumours in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Svanberg, K.; Liu, D. L.; Wang, I.; Andersson-Engels, S.; Stenram, U.; Svanberg, S.

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using delta-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) sensitisation and laser light at 635 nm was investigated in the treatment of experimental hepatic tumours. The model of liver tumours was induced either by local inoculation or by administration of tumour cells through the portal vein in rats. ALA at a dose of 60 mg kg(-1) b.w. was intravenously administered 60 min before PDT. PpIX accumulation in tumour, normal liver and abdominal wall muscle was detected by means of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) was used to determine changes in the superficial blood flow in connection with PDT. Histopathological examinations were performed to evaluate the PDT effects on the tumour and the surrounding liver tissue, including pathological features in the microvascular system. The accumulation of PpIX, as monitored by LIF, showed high fluorescence intensities at about 635 nm in both the hepatic tumour tissue and normal liver and low values in the abdominal wall. LDI demonstrated that the blood flow in the treated tumour and its surrounding normal liver tissue decreased immediately after the PDT, indicating an effect on the vascular system. A large number of thrombi in the irradiated tumour were found microscopically 3 h after the PDT. The tumour growth rate showed a marked decrease when evaluated 3 and 6 days after the treatment. These results show that the ALA-PDT is effective in the inhibition of growth of experimental hepatic tumours. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 9 PMID:8932330

  4. Molecular basis of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    IJlst, L; Mandel, H; Oostheim, W; Ruiter, J P; Gutman, A; Wanders, R J

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation is important for energy production, which is stressed by the different defects found in this pathway. Most of the enzyme deficiencies causing these defects are well characterized at both the protein and genomic levels. One exception is carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) deficiency, of which until now no mutations have been reported although the defect is enzymatically well characterized. CPT I is the key enzyme in the carnitine-dependent transport across the mitochondrial inner membrane and its deficiency results in a decreased rate of fatty acid beta-oxidation. Here we report the first delineation of the molecular basis of hepatic CPT I deficiency in a new case. cDNA analysis revealed that this patient was homozygous for a missense mutation (D454G). The effect of the identified mutation was investigated by heterologous expression in yeast. The expressed mutant CPT IA displayed only 2% of the activity of the expressed wild-type CPT IA, indicating that the D454G mutation is the disease-causing mutation. Furthermore, in patient's fibroblasts the CPT IA protein was markedly reduced on immunoblot, suggesting that the mutation renders the protein unstable. PMID:9691089

  5. Binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) to the hepatitis delta virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Greco-Stewart, Valerie S.; Thibault, Catherine St-Laurent; Pelchat, Martin . E-mail: mpelchat@uottawa.ca

    2006-12-20

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) has a very limited protein coding capacity and must rely on host proteins for its replication. A ribonucleoprotein complex was detected following UV cross-linking between HeLa nuclear proteins and an RNA corresponding to the right terminal stem-loop domain of HDV genomic RNA. Mass spectrometric analysis of the complex revealed the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) as a novel HDV RNA-interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated the interaction between HDV RNA and PSF both in vitro in HeLa nuclear extract and in vivo within HeLa cells containing both polarities of the HDV genome. Analysis of the binding of various HDV-derived RNAs to purified, recombinant PSF further confirmed the specificity of the interaction and revealed that PSF directly binds to the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Our findings provide evidence of the involvement of a host mRNA processing protein in the HDV life cycle.

  6. Molecular biology of the hepatitis B virus for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Chatterjee, Soumya; Veer, Vijay; Chakravarty, Runu

    2012-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the major global health problems, especially in economically under-developed or developing countries. HBV infection can lead to a number of clinical outcomes including chronic infection, cirrhosis and liver cancer. It ranks among the top 10 causes of death, being responsible for around 1 million deaths every year. Despite the availability of a highly efficient vaccine and potent antiviral agents, HBV infection still remains a significant clinical problem, particularly in those high endemicity areas where vaccination of large populations has not been possible due to economic reasons. Although HBV is among the smallest viruses in terms of virion and genome size, it has numerous unique features that make it completely distinct from other DNA viruses. It has a partially double stranded DNA with highly complex genome organization, life cycle and natural history. Remarkably distinct from other DNA viruses, it uses an RNA intermediate called pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) and reverse transcriptase for its genome replication. Genome replication is accomplished by a complex mechanism of primer shifting facilitated by direct repeat sequences encoded in the genome. Further, the genome has evolved in such a manner that every single nucleotide of the genome is used for either coding viral proteins or used as regulatory regions or both. Moreover, it utilizes internal in-frame translation initiation codons, as well as different reading frames from the same RNA to generate different proteins with diverse functions. HBV also shows considerable genetic variability which has been related with clinical outcomes, replication potential, therapeutic response etc. This review aims at reviewing fundamental events of the viral life cycle including viral replication, transcription and translation, from the molecular standpoint, as well as, highlights the clinical relevance of genetic variability of HBV. PMID:25755457

  7. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool to ... risk for severe disease. Others A variety of viruses can affect the liver Signs and Symptoms Hepatitis ...

  8. Inverse Thio Effects in the Hepatitis Delta Virus Ribozyme Reveal that the Reaction Pathway Is Controlled by Metal Ion Charge Density

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme self-cleaves in the presence of a wide range of monovalent and divalent ions. Prior theoretical studies provided evidence that self-cleavage proceeds via a concerted or stepwise pathway, with the outcome dictated by the valency of the metal ion. In the present study, we measure stereospecific thio effects at the nonbridging oxygens of the scissile phosphate under a wide range of experimental conditions, including varying concentrations of diverse monovalent and divalent ions, and combine these with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations on the stereospecific thio substrates. The RP substrate gives large normal thio effects in the presence of all monovalent ions. The SP substrate also gives normal or no thio effects, but only for smaller monovalent and divalent cations, such as Li+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and Sr2+; in contrast, sizable inverse thio effects are found for larger monovalent and divalent cations, including Na+, K+, NH4+, and Ba2+. Proton inventories are found to be unity in the presence of the larger monovalent and divalent ions, but two in the presence of Mg2+. Additionally, rate–pH profiles are inverted for the low charge density ions, and only imidazole plus ammonium ions rescue an inactive C75Δ variant in the absence of Mg2+. Results from the thio effect experiments, rate–pH profiles, proton inventories, and ammonium/imidazole rescue experiments, combined with QM/MM free energy simulations, support a change in the mechanism of HDV ribozyme self-cleavage from concerted and metal ion-stabilized to stepwise and proton transfer-stabilized as the charge density of the metal ion decreases. PMID:25799319

  9. General Base Catalysis for Cleavage by the Active-Site Cytosine of the Hepatitis Delta Virus Ribozyme: QM/MM Calculations Establish Chemical Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Banáš, Pavel; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Hánošová, Veronika; Svozil, Daniel; Walter, Nils G.

    2008-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme is an RNA motif embedded in human pathogenic HDV RNA. Previous experimental studies have established that the active-site nucleotide C75 is essential for self-cleavage of the ribozyme, although its exact catalytic role in the process remains debated. Structural data from X-ray crystallography generally indicate that C75 acts as the general base that initiates catalysis by deprotonating the 2′-OH nucleophile at the cleavage site, while a hydrated magnesium ion likely protonates the 5′-oxygen leaving group. In contrast, some mechanistic studies support the role of C75 acting as general acid and thus being protonated before the reaction. We report combined quantum chemical/molecular mechanical calculations for the C75 general base pathway, utilizing the available structural data for the wild type HDV genomic ribozyme as a starting point. Several starting configurations differing in magnesium ion placement were considered and both one-dimensional and two-dimensional potential energy surface scans were used to explore plausible reaction paths. Our calculations show that C75 is readily capable of acting as the general base, in concert with the hydrated magnesium ion as the general acid. We identify a most likely position for the magnesium ion, which also suggests it acts as a Lewis acid. The calculated energy barrier of the proposed mechanism, ~20 kcal/mol, would lower the reaction barrier by ~15 kcal/mol compared to the uncatalyzed reaction and is in good agreement with experimental data. PMID:18686993

  10. [Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B virus in Northern Cyprus].

    PubMed

    Arıkan, Ayşe; Şanlıdağ, Tamer; Süer, Kaya; Sayan, Murat; Akçalı, Sinem; Güler, Emrah

    2016-01-01

    Identification of hepatitis B virus (HBV) strains and understanding of molecular epidemiological characteristics are important for the effective surveillance of HBV infections. Genotype D is dominant in studies performed in Turkey but it is known that cases infected with genotypes A, E, G and H also exists. In contrast, there are no data regarding the molecular epidemiologic characteristics of the HBV in Northern Cyprus. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of genotypes and subgenotypes of HBV among the people living, educating and working in Northern Cyprus. A total of 160 cases (1.2%) who were HBsAg seropositive out of 13.892 subjects admitted to Nicosia, Near East University Hospital microbiology laboratory for the routine control and to blood center for donor screening tests between November 2011 to September 2014, were included in the study. HBV-DNA levels in the HBsAg positive cases were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and genotypes/subgenotypes were determined by sequence analysis of the viral pol gene (reverse transcriptase [rt] region, between 80-250. aminoacids). Sixty samples (60/160, 37.5%) were excluded from sequencing analysis due to negative and/or very low (< 30 IU/ml) HBV-DNA levels, so 100 samples were included in sequence analysis. Ninety-six of those cases (13 female, 87 male; mean age: 35.51 ± 12.88 years) were anti-HBc IgG, 95 were anti-HBe and five were HBeAg positive, with a mean HBV-DNA level of 5.36 x 10(6) ± 3.58 x 10(7) IU/ml. As 32 (32%) samples yielded HBV-DNA level below the threshold of 1000 IU/ml, sequence analyses were unsuccesful, eventually 68 (68/160, 42.5%) samples could be phylogenetically analyzed. The distribution of HBV genotypes/subgenotypes were found as follows: 48 were (70.6%) D/D1; four were (5.9%) D/D2; one was (1.5%) D/D3, five were (7.4%) A/A1, two were (2.9%) A/A2 and eight were (11.8%) genotype E. Among the most frequent D1 strains, 60.4% (29/48) cases were from Turkish; single

  11. Comparative Investigation of Normal Modes and Molecular Dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asafi, M. S.; Yildirim, A.; Tekpinar, M.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding dynamics of proteins has many practical implications in terms of finding a cure for many protein related diseases. Normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics methods are widely used physics-based computational methods for investigating dynamics of proteins. In this work, we studied dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B protein with molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Principal components obtained from a 100 nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation show good overlaps with normal modes calculated with a coarse-grained elastic network model. Coarse-grained normal mode analysis takes at least an order of magnitude shorter time. Encouraged by this good overlaps and short computation times, we analyzed further low frequency normal modes of Hepatitis C NS5B. Motion directions and average spatial fluctuations have been analyzed in detail. Finally, biological implications of these motions in drug design efforts against Hepatitis C infections have been elaborated.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a waterborne emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Thus far, an HEV outbreak has not been reported in the U.S., although a swine variant of the virus is common in Midwestern hogs. Because viruses isolated from two ...

  13. Comparative modeling and molecular dynamics studies of the delta, kappa and mu opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Strahs, D; Weinstein, H

    1997-09-01

    Molecular models of the trans-membrane domains of delta, kappa and mu opioid receptors, members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, were developed using techniques of homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Structural elements were predicted from sequence alignments of opioid and related receptors based on (i) the consensus, periodicities and biophysical interpretations of alignment-derived properties, and (ii) tertiary structure homology to rhodopsin. Initial model structures of the three receptors were refined computationally with energy minimization and the result of the first 210 ps of a 2 ns molecular dynamics trajectory at 300K. Average structures from the trajectory obtained for each receptor subtype after release of the initial backbone constraints show small backbone deviations, indicating stability. During the molecular dynamics phase, subtype-differentiated residues of the receptors developed divergent structures within the models, including changes in regions common to the three subtypes and presumed to belong to ligand binding regions. The divergent features developed by the model structures appear to be consistent with the observed ligand binding selectivities of the opioid receptors. The results thus implicate identifiable receptor microenvironments as primary determinants of some of the observed subtype specificities in opiate ligand binding and in functional effects of mutagenesis. Networks of interacting residues observed in the models are common to the opiate receptors and other GPCRs, indicating core interfaces that are potentially responsible for structural integrity and signal transduction. Analysis of extended molecular dynamics trajectories reveals concerted motions of distant parts of ligand-binding regions, suggesting motion-sensitive components of ligand binding. The comparative modeling results from this study help clarify experimental observations of subtype differences and suggest both structural and

  14. Development and molecular composition of the hepatic progenitor cell niche.

    PubMed

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig

    2013-05-01

    End-stage liver diseases represent major health problems that are currently treated by liver transplantation. However, given the world-wide shortage of donor livers novel strategies are needed for therapeutic treatment. Adult stem cells have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into the more specialized cell types of a given organ and are found in tissues throughout the body. These cells, whose progeny are termed progenitor cells in human liver and oval cells in rodents, have the potential to treat patients through the generation of hepatic parenchymal cells, even from the patient's own tissue. Little is known regarding the nature of the hepatic progenitor cells. Though they are suggested to reside in the most distal part of the biliary tree, the canal of Hering, the lack of unique surface markers for these cells has hindered their isolation and characterization. Upon activation, they proliferate and form ductular structures, termed "ductular reactions", which radiate into the hepatic parenchyma. The ductular reactions contain activated progenitor cells that not only acquire a phenotype resembling that observed in developing liver but also display markers of differentiation shared with the cholangiocytic or hepatocytic lineages, the two parenchymal hepatic cell types. Interactions between the putative progenitor cells, the surrounding support cells and the extracellular matrix scaffold, all constituting the progenitor cell niche, are likely to be important for regulating progenitor cell activity and differentiation. Therefore, identifying novel progenitor cell markers and deciphering their microenvironment could facilitate clinical use. The aims of the present PhD thesis were to expand knowledge of the hepatic progenitor cell niche and characterize it both during development and in disease. Several animal models of hepatic injury are known to induce activation of the progenitor cells. In order to identify possible progenitor cell markers and niche components

  15. Molecular and morphological characterization of myxozoan actinospore types from a commercial catfish pond in the Mississippi Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The actinospore diversity of infected Dero digitata was surveyed (May, 2011) from a channel catfish production pond in the Mississippi Delta region for the elucidation of unknown myxozoan life cycles. Only two myxozoan life cycles have been molecularly confirmed in channel catfish (Ictalurus puncta...

  16. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.

  17. Large anomalous Hall resistance of pair {delta}-doped GaAs structures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D. W.; Noh, J. P.; Touhidul Islam, A. Z. M.; Otsuka, N.

    2008-02-15

    Beryllium/silicon pair {delta}-doped GaAs structures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy exhibit a Hall resistance which has a nonlinear dependence on the applied magnetic field and which is strongly correlated to the negative magnetoresistance observed under the applied magnetic field parallel to the {delta}-doped layers. Dependence of the occurrence of the nonlinear Hall resistance on the growth condition is investigated. A significantly large increase in both the magnitude and the nonlinearity of the Hall resistance is observed from samples whose GaAs buffer layers are grown under the condition of a low As/Ga flux ratio. Reflection high energy electron diffraction and electron microscope observations show that a faceted surface develops with the growth and postgrowth annealing of a GaAs buffer layer under the condition of a low As flux. From samples which have only Si {delta}-doped layers and exhibit the n-type conduction, such nonlinear Hall resistance is not observed. The nonlinearity of the Hall resistance of Be/Si pair {delta}-doped structures depends on the single parameter B/T, where B and T are the applied magnetic field and the temperature, respectively. Based on these results, it is suggested that the nonlinear Hall resistance of Be/Si pair {delta}-doped structures is the anomalous Hall effect caused by localized spins in {delta}-doped layers.

  18. Genetic and molecular characterization of a Notch mutation in its Delta- and Serrate-binding domain in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    de Celis, J F; Barrio, R; del Arco, A; García-Bellido, A

    1993-01-01

    The Drosophila Notch gene product is a transmembrane protein that functions as a receptor of intercellular signals in several Drosophila developmental processes. Two other transmembrane proteins, encoded by the genes Delta and Serrate, genetically and molecularly behave as Notch ligands. All these proteins share the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats in their extracellular domain. The Notch protein has 36 EGF-like repeats, 2 of which, numbers 11 and 12, are required for the interaction with the Delta and Serrate ligands. We have isolated and molecularly characterized a Notch mutation in its Delta- and Serrate-binding domain that behaves genetically as both a Notch antimorphic and a loss-of-function mutation. This mutation, NM1, carries a Glu-->Val substitution in the Notch EGF repeat 12. The NM1 allele interacts with other Notch alleles such as Abruptex and split and with mutations in the Notch-ligand genes Delta and Serrate. The basis for the genetic antimorphism of NM1 seems to reside in the titration of Notch wild-type products into NM1/N+ nonfunctional dimers and/or the titration of Delta products into nonfunctional ligand-receptor complexes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8483919

  19. Molecular mechanism of hepatitis B virus-induced hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tarocchi, Mirko; Polvani, Simone; Marroncini, Giada; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global public health problem with approximately 2 billion people that have been exposed to the virus. HBV is a member of a family of small, enveloped DNA viruses called hepadnaviruses, and has a preferential tropism for hepatocytes of mammals and birds. Epidemiological studies have proved a strong correlation between chronic hepatitis B virus infection and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC is the fifth most common malignancy with about 700000 new cases each year, and more than 50% of them arise in HBV carriers. A large number of studies describe the way in which HBV can contribute to HCC development. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed, including the accumulation of genetic damage due to immune-mediated hepatic inflammation and the induction of oxidative stress. There is evidence of the direct effects of the viral proteins HBx and HBs on the cell biology. Integration of HBV-DNA into the human genome is considered an early event in the carcinogenic process and can induce, through insertional mutagenesis, the alteration of gene expression and chromosomal instability. HBV has also epigenetic effects through the modification of the genomic methylation status. Furthermore, the virus plays an important role in the regulation of microRNA expression. This review will summarize the many mechanisms involved in HBV-related liver carcinogenesis. PMID:25206269

  20. Pharmacophore modeling, in silico screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics approaches for potential alpha-delta bungarotoxin-4 inhibitors discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Barani; Suresh, M. Xavier; Priya, B. Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Background: The alpha-delta bungartoxin-4 (α-δ-Bgt-4) is a potent neurotoxin produced by highly venomous snake species, Bungarus caeruleus, mainly targeting neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) and producing adverse biological malfunctions leading to respiratory paralysis and mortality. Objective: In this study, we predicted the three-dimensional structure of α-δ-Bgt-4 using homology modeling and investigated the conformational changes and the key residues responsible for nAchRs inhibiting activity. Materials and Methods: From the selected plants, which are traditionally used for snake bites, the active compounds are taken and performed molecular interaction studies and also used for modern techniques like pharmacophore modeling and mapping and absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicity analysis which may increase the possibility of success. Results: Moreover, 100's of drug-like compounds were retrieved and analyzed through computational virtual screening and allowed for pharmacokinetic profiling, molecular docking and dynamics simulation. Conclusion: Finally the top five drug-like compounds having competing level of inhibition toward α-δ-Bgt-4 toxin were suggested based on their interaction with α-δ-Bgt-4 toxin. PMID:26109766

  1. Hepatitis B Virus HBx Activates Notch Signaling via Delta-Like 4/Notch1 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kongkavitoon, Pornrat; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Palaga, Tanapat

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis virus B (HBV) infection is one of the major causes of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). HBx protein encoded in HBV genome is one of the key viral factors leading to malignant transformation of infected cells. HBx functions by interfering with cellular functions, causing aberration in cellular behaviour and transformation. Notch signalling is a well-conserved pathway involved in cellular differentiation, cell survival and cell death operating in various types of cells. Aberration in the Notch signalling pathways is linked to various tumors, including HCC. The role of HBx on the Notch signalling in HCC, however, is still controversial. In this study, we reported that HBV genome-containing HCC cell line HepG2 (HepG2.2.15) expressed higher Notch1 and Delta-like 4 (Dll4), compared to the control HepG2 without HBV genome. This upregulation coincided with increased appearance of the cleavage of Notch1, indicating constitutively activated Notch signalling. Silencing of HBx specifically reduced the level of Dll4 and cleaved Notch1. The increase in Dll4 level was confirmed in clinical specimens of HCC lesion, in comparison with non-tumor lesions. Using specific signalling pathway inhibitors, we found that MEK1/2, PI3K/AKT and NF-κB pathways are critical for HBx-mediated Dll4 upregulation. Silencing of HBx clearly decreased the level of phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2. Upon silencing of Dll4 in HepG2.2.15, decreased cleaved Notch1, increased apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were observed, suggesting a critical role of HBx-Dll4-Notch1 axis in regulating cell survival in HCC. Furthermore, clonogenic assay confirmed the important role of Dll4 in regulating cell survival of HBV-genome containing HCC cell line. Taken together, we reported a link between HBx and the Notch signalling in HCC that affects cell survival of HCC, which can be a potential target for therapy. PMID:26766040

  2. Molecular surveillance of hepatitis A virus in Argentina: first subgenotype IB detected in a traveler.

    PubMed

    Munné, María S; Altabert, Nancy R; Vladimirsky, Sara N; Arribere, Maria G; Ortali, Sandra F; Sijvarger, Carina; Otegui-Mares, Lucio O; Soto, Sonia S; Brajterman, Leonardo S; González, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    By using molecular surveillance of hepatitis A virus, we characterized for the first time a subgenotype IB imported case in Argentina, a country with universal vaccination since 2005. The case was a crew member of a cruise ship. We consider this a case alert because of its multiple implications. PMID:24756019

  3. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the Trp/amber editing site of hepatitis delta virus (+)RNA: a case of rational design

    SciTech Connect

    MacElrevey, Celeste; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2005-12-01

    Well diffracting decamer crystals of the hepatitis delta virus RNA-editing site were prepared, but exhibited merohedral twinning and base averaging owing to duplex symmetry. A longer asymmetric construct that includes additional flanking RNA sequences has been crystallized that does not appear to exhibit these defects. RNA editing by mammalian ADAR1 (Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA) is required for the life cycle of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV). Editing extends the single viral open reading frame to yield two protein products of alternate length. ADARs are believed to recognize double-stranded RNA substrates via a ‘structure-based’ readout mechanism. Crystals of 10-mer duplexes representing the HDV RNA-editing site diffracted to 1.35 Å resolution, but suffered from merohedral twinning and averaging of the base registry. Expansion of the construct to include two flanking 3 × 1 internal loops yielded crystals in the primitive tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution, revealing a unit cell with parameters a = 62.5, c = 63.5 Å. The crystallization and X-ray analysis of multiple forms of the HDV RNA-editing substrate, encounters with common RNA crystal-growth defects and a strategy to overcome these problems are reported.

  4. Molecular basis of interferon resistance in hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Beach, Nathan M; Sheldon, Julie; Domingo, Esteban

    2014-10-01

    Resistance to interferon (IFN) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) differs from resistance to standard, directly-acting antiviral (DAA) agents in that the virus confronts a multicomponent antiviral state evoked by IFN. This renders unlikely the repeated selection of the same specific mutations that confer an IFN-resistance phenotype. Comparison of amino acid sequences of viral proteins in HCV that replicates in the presence of IFN in vivo or in cell culture (with entire virus or subgenomic replicons) reveals very few common candidate IFN resistance substitutions. Multiple host and viral factors contribute to divergent responses to IFN. The environmental heterogeneity in which exogenous IFN is expected to exert its selective effect may increase as a result of incorporation of new DAAs in therapy. PMID:24968186

  5. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: molecular mechanisms for the hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a central role in the biogenesis of major metabolites including glucose, fatty acids, and cholesterol. Increased incidence of obesity in the modern society promotes insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues in humans, and could cause severe metabolic disorders by inducing accumulation of lipid in the liver, resulting in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD, which is characterized by increased fat depots in the liver, could precede more severe diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. Accumulation of lipid in the liver can be traced by increased uptake of free fatty acids into the liver, impaired fatty acid beta oxidation, or the increased incidence of de novo lipogenesis. In this review, I would like to focus on the roles of individual pathways that contribute to the hepatic steatosis as a precursor for the NAFLD. PMID:24133660

  6. Fundamental studies of molecular depth profiling using organic delta layers as model systems

    PubMed Central

    Lu, C.; Wucher, A.; Winograd, N.

    2012-01-01

    Alternating Langmuir–Blodgett multilayers of barium arachidate (AA) and barium dimyristoyl phosphatidate (DMPA) were used to elucidate the factors that control depth resolution in molecular depth profiling experiments. More specifically, thin (4.4 nm) layers of DMPA were embedded in relatively thick (~50 nm) multilayer stacks of AA, resulting in a well-defined delta-layer model system closely resembling a biological membrane. This system was subjected to a three-dimensional imaging depth profile analysis using a focused buckminsterfullerene (C60) cluster ion beam. The depth response function measured in these experiments exhibits similar features as those determined in inorganic depth profiling: namely, an asymmetric shape with quasi-exponential leading and trailing edges and a central Gaussian peak. The magnitude of the corresponding characteristic rise and decay lengths is found to be 5 and 16 nm, respectively, while the total half width of the response function characterizing the apparent depth resolution was about 29 nm. Ion-induced mixing is proposed to be largely responsible for the broadening, rather than topography, as determined by atomic force microscopy. PMID:24347743

  7. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus in Luanda, Angola.

    PubMed

    Valente, Fatima; Lago, Barbara Vieira do; Castro, Carlos Augusto Velasco de; Almeida, Adilson José de; Gomes, Selma A; Soares, Caroline Cordeiro

    2010-12-01

    An estimated 360 million people are infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) worldwide. Among these, 65 million live in Africa. Despite the high levels of hepatitis B in Africa, HBV epidemiology is still poorly documented in most African countries. In this work, the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of HBV infection were evaluated among the staff, visitors and adult patients (n = 508) of a public hospital in Luanda, Angola. The overall prevalence of hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) and hepatitis B surface antigen was 79.7% and 15.1%, respectively. HBV infection was higher in males and was more prevalent in individuals younger than 50 years old. HBV-DNA was detected in 100% of HBV "e" antigen-positive serum samples and in 49% of anti-hepatitis Be antibody-positive samples. Thirty-five out of the 40 HBV genotypes belonged to genotype E. Circulation of genotypes A (4 samples) and D (1 sample) was also observed. The present study demonstrates that HBV infection is endemic in Luanda, which has a predominance of genotype E. This genotype is only sporadically found outside of Africa and is thought to have emerged in Africa at a time when the trans-Atlantic slave trade had stopped. PMID:21225192

  8. Molecular determinants and dynamics of hepatitis C virus secretion.

    PubMed

    Coller, Kelly E; Heaton, Nicholas S; Berger, Kristi L; Cooper, Jacob D; Saunders, Jessica L; Randall, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    The current model of hepatitis C virus (HCV) production involves the assembly of virions on or near the surface of lipid droplets, envelopment at the ER in association with components of VLDL synthesis, and egress via the secretory pathway. However, the cellular requirements for and a mechanistic understanding of HCV secretion are incomplete at best. We combined an RNA interference (RNAi) analysis of host factors for infectious HCV secretion with the development of live cell imaging of HCV core trafficking to gain a detailed understanding of HCV egress. RNAi studies identified multiple components of the secretory pathway, including ER to Golgi trafficking, lipid and protein kinases that regulate budding from the trans-Golgi network (TGN), VAMP1 vesicles and adaptor proteins, and the recycling endosome. Our results support a model wherein HCV is infectious upon envelopment at the ER and exits the cell via the secretory pathway. We next constructed infectious HCV with a tetracysteine (TC) tag insertion in core (TC-core) to monitor the dynamics of HCV core trafficking in association with its cellular cofactors. In order to isolate core protein movements associated with infectious HCV secretion, only trafficking events that required the essential HCV assembly factor NS2 were quantified. TC-core traffics to the cell periphery along microtubules and this movement can be inhibited by nocodazole. Sub-populations of TC-core localize to the Golgi and co-traffic with components of the recycling endosome. Silencing of the recycling endosome component Rab11a results in the accumulation of HCV core at the Golgi. The majority of dynamic core traffics in association with apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and VAMP1 vesicles. This study identifies many new host cofactors of HCV egress, while presenting dynamic studies of HCV core trafficking in infected cells. PMID:22241992

  9. Delta-like 1 homolog in Capra hircus: molecular characteristics, expression pattern and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiangtao; Zhao, Wei; Zhan, Siyuan; Xiao, Ping; Zhou, Jingxuan; Wang, Linjie; Li, Li; Zhang, Hongping; Niu, Lili; Zhong, Tao

    2016-06-01

    To research the molecular characteristics, expression pattern and phylogeny of the Delta-like 1 homolog gene (Dlk1) in goats. Dlk1 transcripts were identified in the Jianyang Da'er goats by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic trees were constructed by Bayesian inference and neighbor-joining methods. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), western blotting and in situ hybridization were performed to analyze the expression pattern of Dlk1. Five alternatively transcripts were identified in different tissues and designated as Dlk1-AS1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Compared with the normal transcript Dlk1-AS1, Dlk1-AS4 and Dlk1-AS5 retained the identical open reading frame (ORF) and encoded proteins with truncated epidermal-growth-factor like repeats of 121 and 83 amino acids, respectively. Using the Bayesian inference method, the consensus phylogenetic tree indicated that caprine Dlk1 had a closer relationship with bovine Dlk1 than with Dlk1 from pigs, humans and mice. qPCR revealed high expression levels of Dlk1 in the kidney (P < 0.01). However, mRNA and protein levels presented an inconsistent correlation, possibly because of post-transcriptional regulation. RNA in situ hybridization indicated that Dlk1 mRNA was localized in the interlobular bile duct and alongside the hepatocyte nuclei, in the epithelial cells of proximal and distal convoluted tubules and in the connective region between the mesothelium and myocardium in the heart. The Dlk1 gene in goats produces alternatively spliced transcripts, with specific expression and cellular localization patterns. These findings would lay the foundation for further study. PMID:27108112

  10. Quenching of singlet molecular oxygen ( sup 1. Delta. sub g O sub 2 ) in silica gel/cyclohexane heterogeneous systems. A direct time-resolved study

    SciTech Connect

    Iu, Kaikong; Thomas, J.K. )

    1990-04-25

    Direct time-resolved studies of singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) phosphorescence ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup {minus}}O{sub 2} ({nu} = 0) {l arrow} {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} ({nu} = 0); 1,270 nm) in heterogeneous silica gel/cyclohexane systems are presented. Singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) is created through a photosensitization process on silica gel surfaces. The experimental results show that the lifetimes of singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) in both porous and compressed fumed silica/gel cyclohexane systems are significantly less than that in liquid cyclohexane. The shortened singlet molecular oxygen lifetime is due mainly to quenching by adsorbed water and silanol groups on the silica gel surface. In addition, monoamines coadsorbed on the silica gel surface do not quench singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}); however, diamines such as DABCO or piperazine maintain their quenching activity, but the quenching kinetics are not of the Stern-Volmer type. The singlet molecular oxygen lifetime increases on loading the porous silica gel/cyclohexane system with monoamine. Coadsorption of piperazine increases quenching of {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g} O{sub 2} by DABCO.

  11. The canine hepatic progenitor cell niche: molecular characterisation in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kruitwagen, H S; Spee, B; Viebahn, C S; Venema, H B; Penning, L C; Grinwis, G C M; Favier, R P; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Rothuizen, J; Schotanus, B A

    2014-09-01

    Hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) are an adult stem cell compartment in the liver that contributes to liver regeneration when replication of mature hepatocytes is insufficient. In this study, laser microdissection was used to isolate HPC niches from the livers of healthy dogs and dogs with lobular dissecting hepatitis (LDH), in which HPCs are massively activated. Gene expression of HPC, hepatocyte and biliary markers was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Expression and localisation of selected markers were further studied at the protein level by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescent double staining in samples of normal liver and liver from dogs with LDH, acute and chronic hepatitis, and extrahepatic cholestasis. Activated HPC niches had higher gene expression of the hepatic progenitor markers OPN, FN14, CD29, CD44, CD133, LIF, LIFR and BMI1 compared to HPCs from normal liver. There was lower expression of albumin, but activated HPC niches were positive for the biliary markers SOX9, HNF1β and keratin 19 by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Laminin, activated stellate cells and macrophages are abundant extracellular matrix and cellular components of the canine HPC niche. This study demonstrates that the molecular and cellular characteristics of canine HPCs are similar to rodent and human HPCs, and that canine HPCs are distinctively activated in different types of liver disease. PMID:24923752

  12. L-ascorbic acid quenching of singlet delta molecular oxygen in aqueous media: generalized antioxidant property of vitamin C

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.T.; Khan, A.U.

    1983-09-30

    L-ascorbic acid quenches singlet (/sup 1/..delta../sub g/) molecular oxygen in aqueous media (pH 6.8 for (/sup 1/H)H/sub 2/O and pD 7.2 for (/sup 2/H)D/sub 2/O) as measured directly by monitoring (0,0) /sup 1/..delta../sub g/ ..-->.. /sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/ emission at 1.28 micron. Singlet oxygen was generated at room temperature in the solutions via photosensitization of sodium chrysene sulfonate; this sulfonated polycyclic hydrocarbon was synthesized to provide a water soluble chromophore inert to usual dye-ascorbate photobleaching. A marked isotope effect is found; k/sub Q//sup H/sub 2/O/ is 3.3 times faster than k/sub Q//sup D/sub 2/O/, suggesting ascorbic acid is chemically quenching singlet oxygen.

  13. Characterization of Si volume- and delta-doped InGaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoryshyn, Y.; Kaspar, P.; Jaeckel, H.; Beck, M.

    2010-05-15

    Bulk InGaAs layers were grown at 400 deg. C lattice-matched to InP semi-insulating substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Si doping of the layers was performed by applying volume- and delta-doping techniques. The samples were characterized by capacitance-voltage, van der Pauw-Hall, secondary ion mass spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements. Good agreement in terms of dependence of mobility and Burstein-Moss shift shift on doping concentration in samples doped by the two different techniques was obtained. Amphoteric behavior of Si was observed at doping concentrations higher than {approx}2.9x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} in both delta- and volume-doped samples. Degradation of InGaAs crystalline quality occurred in samples with Si concentrations higher than {approx}4x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}.

  14. Paleo-Reconstruction of Carbon Cycling in Large-River Delta-Front Estuaries: Use of Molecular Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    The burial of organic carbon (OC) in river deltas and continental margins worldwide account for approximately 90% of the carbon burial in the ocean. In particular, sediments in large-river delta-front estuaries have been shown to be repositories and integrators of land-use change across expansive watersheds that drain the continents to the ocean. Thus, separating natural and human-driven changes in the transport of terrestrial organic carbon (TOC) to ocean is important in understanding the effects of climate change on TOC fluxes. Molecular biomarkers of TOC (e.g., lignin phenols, fatty acids, sterols) in LDE sediments have been used extensively to reconstruct of carbon cycling changes that are reflective of land-use change in the watersheds. However, due to the highly variable hydrologic regimes across continents, continental margins (e.g., active versus passive), and coastal dynamics in LDEs, the fate and transport of these molecular biomarkers varies considerably. Here I will discuss some of the key molecular biomarkers that have been used to date in such historical reconstruction exercises in LDEs (e.g., Mississippi/Atchafalaya, Yangtze, Yellow, Ganges-Brahmaputra, Colville Rivers), and explore how margin-type, residence time of transport, redox, and molecular stability, to name a few, impact the utility of using different biomarkers in paleo-reconstruction studies.

  15. New structure of three-terminal GaAs p(+)-n(-)-delta(p+)-n(-)-n(+) switching device prepared by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. H.; Yarn, K. F.; Chang, C. Y.; Jame, M. S.

    1987-08-01

    A new three-terminal GaAs p(+)-n(-)-delta(p+)-n(-)-n(+), voltage-controlled switching device grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented. A simple method to contact the third terminal is employed by applying the Au-Zn to the delta(p+) barrier using the B-groove etching technique, in which the delta(p+) barrier height can be directly modulated by the external voltage. The device may be more effective than other voltage-controlled devices due to the direct barrier modulation.

  16. Role of Serologic and Molecular Diagnostic Assays in Identification and Management of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Talal, Andrew; Coller, Kelly; Steinhart, Corklin; Hackett, John; Dawson, George; Rockstroh, Juergen; Feld, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    The drugs available for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have evolved to provide shorter treatment duration and higher rates of sustained virologic response (SVR), and the role of HCV infection diagnostic tests has had to evolve in order to meet changing clinical needs. This review gives an overview on the role of HCV infection diagnostic testing (molecular and serological tools) used in the diagnosis and management of HCV infection. All of this critical information guides physician decisions to optimize patient clinical outcomes. Also discussed is the future direction of diagnostic testing in the context of further advances in drug development. PMID:26659219

  17. Identification of a natural intergenotypic recombinant hepatitis delta virus genotype 1 and 2 in Vietnamese HBsAg-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Sy, B T; Nguyen, H M; Toan, N L; Song, L H; Tong, H V; Wolboldt, C; Binh, V Q; Kremsner, P G; Velavan, T P; Bock, C-T

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection is acquired as a co- /superinfection of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and can modulate the pathophysiology of chronic hepatitis B and related liver diseases including hepatocellular carcinoma. Among the eight distinct HDV genotypes reported, relatively few studies have attempted to investigate the prevalence of HDV mixed genotypes and RNA recombination of HDV. With a recorded prevalence of 10-20% HBV infection in Vietnam, this study investigated the HDV variability, HDV genotypes and HDV recombination among twenty-one HDV isolates in Vietnamese HBsAg-positive patients. HDV subgenomic and full-length genome sequences were obtained using newly established HDV-specific RT-PCR techniques. The nucleotide homology was observed from 74.6% to 99.4% among the investigated full-length genome of the HDV isolates. We observed HDV genotype 1 and HDV genotype 2 in the investigated Vietnamese patients. Although no HDV genotype mixtures were observed, we report here a newly identified recombinant of HDV genotypes (HDV 1 and HDV 2). The identified recombinant HDV isolate C03 revealed sequence homology to both HDV genotype 1 (nt1 to nt907) and HDV genotype 2 (nt908 to nt1675; HDAg coding region) with a breakpoint at nt908. Our findings demonstrate the prevalence of intergenotypic recombination between HDV genotypes 1 and 2 in a Vietnamese HBsAg-positive patient. Extended investigation on the distribution and prevalence of HDV, HDV mixed genotypes and recombinant HDV genotypes in a larger Vietnamese population offers vital insights into understanding of the micro-epidemiology of HDV and subsequent pathophysiology in chronic HBV- /HDV-related liver diseases. PMID:24548489

  18. The gene controlling marijuana psychoactivity: molecular cloning and heterologous expression of Delta1-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase from Cannabis sativa L.

    PubMed

    Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Morimoto, Satoshi; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Ishikawa, Yu; Wada, Yoshiko; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Taura, Futoshi

    2004-09-17

    Delta(1)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase is the enzyme that catalyzes oxidative cyclization of cannabigerolic acid into THCA, the precursor of Delta(1)-tetrahydrocannabinol. We cloned a novel cDNA (GenBank trade mark accession number AB057805) encoding THCA synthase by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions from rapidly expanding leaves of Cannabis sativa. This gene consists of a 1635-nucleotide open reading frame, encoding a 545-amino acid polypeptide of which the first 28 amino acid residues constitute the signal peptide. The predicted molecular weight of the 517-amino acid mature polypeptide is 58,597 Da. Interestingly, the deduced amino acid sequence exhibited high homology to berberine bridge enzyme from Eschscholtzia californica, which is involved in alkaloid biosynthesis. The liquid culture of transgenic tobacco hairy roots harboring the cDNA produced THCA upon feeding of cannabigerolic acid, demonstrating unequivocally that this gene encodes an active THCA synthase. Overexpression of the recombinant THCA synthase was achieved using a baculovirus-insect expression system. The purified recombinant enzyme contained covalently attached FAD cofactor at a molar ratio of FAD to protein of 1:1. The mutant enzyme constructed by changing His-114 of the wild-type enzyme to Ala-114 exhibited neither absorption characteristics of flavoproteins nor THCA synthase activity. Thus, we concluded that the FAD binding residue is His-114 and that the THCA synthase reaction is FAD-dependent. This is the first report on molecular characterization of an enzyme specific to cannabinoid biosynthesis. PMID:15190053

  19. Cloning and molecular characterisation of a Delta8-sphingolipid-desaturase from Nicotiana tabacum closely related to Delta6-acyl-desaturases.

    PubMed

    García-Maroto, Federico; Garrido-Cárdenas, José A; Michaelson, Louise V; Napier, Johnathan A; Alonso, Diego López

    2007-06-01

    Investigation on the absence of Delta(6)-desaturase activity in Nicotiana tabacum has led to the cloning of a new desaturase gene from this organism (NTDXDES) that exhibited unexpected biochemical activity. Cladistic analysis shows clustering of NTDXDES together with functional Delta(6)-acyl-desaturases of near Solanales plants, such as Borago and Echium. This group lies apart from that of previously characterised Delta(8)-sphingolipid-desaturases, which also includes two putative tobacco members identified in this study. Moreover, strong expression of NTDXDES is found in leaves, flowers, fruits and developing seeds of tobacco plants that is highly dependent on the development phase, with transcriptional activity being higher at stages of active tissue growth. This pattern is similar to that showed by Delta(6)-acyl-desaturases characterised in Boraginaceae species. However, functional assays using a yeast expression system revealed that the protein encoded by NTDXDES lacks Delta(6)-desaturase activity, but instead it is able to desaturate sphingolipid substrates by introducing a double bond on the Delta(8)-position. These data indicate that NTDXDES represent a novel desaturase gene placed in a different evolutionary lineage to that of previously characterised Delta(8)-desaturases. PMID:17325828

  20. Molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus in liver disease patients and asymptomatic carriers of the virus in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus is hyperendemic in Sudan. Our aim was to molecularly characterize hepatitis B virus from Sudanese individuals, with and without liver disease, because genotypes play an important role in clinical manifestation and treatment management. Methods Ninety-nine patients - 30 asymptomatic, 42 cirrhotic, 15 with hepatocellular carcinoma, 7 with acute hepatitis and 5 with chronic hepatitis- were enrolled. Sequencing of surface and basic core promoter/precore regions and complete genome were performed. Results The mean ± standard deviation, age was 45.7±14.8 years and the male to female ratio 77:22. The median (interquartile range) of hepatitis B virus DNA and alanine aminotransferase levels were 2.8 (2.2-4.2) log IU/ml and 30 (19–49) IU/L, respectively. Using three genotyping methods, 81/99 (82%) could be genotyped. Forty eight percent of the 99 patients were infected with genotype D and 24% with genotype E, 2% with putative D/E recombinants and 7% with genotype A. Patients infected with genotype E had higher frequency of hepatitis B e antigen-positivity and higher viral loads compared to patients infected with genotype D. Basic core promoter/precore region mutations, including the G1896A in 37% of HBeAg-negative individuals, could account for hepatitis B e antigen-negativity. Pre-S deletion mutants were found in genotypes D and E. Three isolates had the vaccine escape mutant sM133T. Conclusion Sudanese hepatitis B virus carriers were mainly infected with genotypes D or E, with patients infected with genotype E having higher HBeAg-positivity and higher viral loads. This is the first study to molecularly characterize hepatitis B virus from liver disease patients in Sudan. PMID:23865777

  1. Photosensitized production of singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/. delta. /sub g/O/sub 2/) in a solid organic polymer glass: a direct time-resolved study

    SciTech Connect

    Ogilby, P.R.; Iu, K.; Clough, R.L.

    1987-07-22

    The photosensitized production of singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/) has long been a subject of scientific study. Recently, direct evidence for the presence of /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ in thin (10-30 ..mu..m) polymer films was obtained by Byteva et al. who detected /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ phosphorescence (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/ reverse arrow /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/: 1270 nm) in a steady-state photosensitized experiment. In a time-resolved study, /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ has also been observed in a heterogeneous ionomer system (Nafion powders) in which the /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ sensitizer was apparently located at the surface of solvent filled or dessicated cavities. They now report that /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ phosphorescence can be detected in a time-resolved photosensitized experiment from a homogeneous, solid polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) glass. As in the solution phase, they expect this technique will become an indispensable tool in studies of /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ photophysics and photochemistry. In particular, the role of /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ in the photooxidation and photodegradation of solid polymers has been a focus of debate. Since they directly monitor molecular oxygen, this experimental approach also provides a unique method to accurately quantify oxygen diffusion in a polymer.

  2. Identification of a Binding Site for ASF/SF2 on an RNA Fragment Derived from the Hepatitis delta Virus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Dorota; Zhang, Dajiang; Bojic, Teodora; Beeharry, Yasnee; Tanara, Ali; Pelchat, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a small (∼1700 nucleotides) RNA pathogen which encodes only one open reading frame. Consequently, HDV is dependent on host proteins to replicate its RNA genome. Recently, we reported that ASF/SF2 binds directly and specifically to an HDV-derived RNA fragment which has RNA polymerase II promoter activity. Here, we localized the binding site of ASF/SF2 on the HDV RNA fragment by performing binding experiments using purified recombinant ASF/SF2 combined with deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis. In addition, we investigated the requirement of ASF/SF2 for HDV RNA replication using RNAi-mediated knock-down of ASF/SF2 in 293 cells replicating HDV RNA. Overall, our results indicate that ASF/SF2 binds to a purine-rich region distant from both the previously published initiation site of HDV mRNA transcription and binding site of RNAP II, and suggest that this protein is not involved in HDV replication in the cellular system used. PMID:23349975

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE EMERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE MERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  5. Primary seronegative but molecularly evident hepadnaviral infection engages liver and induces hepatocarcinoma in the woodchuck model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Mulrooney-Cousins, Patricia M; Chauhan, Ranjit; Churchill, Norma D; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2014-08-01

    Hepadnavirus at very low doses establishes in woodchucks asymptomatic, serologically undetectable but molecularly evident persistent infection. This primary occult infection (POI) preferentially engages the immune system and initiates virus-specific T cell response in the absence of antiviral antibody induction. The current study aimed to determine whether POI with time may culminate in serologically identifiable infection and hepatitis, and what are, if any, its pathological consequences. Juvenile woodchucks were intravenously injected with inocula containing 10 or 100 virions of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) to induce POI and followed for life or up to 5.5 years thereafter. All 10 animals established molecularly detectable infection with virus DNA in serum (<100-200 copies/mL) and in circulating lymphoid cells, but serum WHV surface antigen and antibodies to WHV core antigen remained undetectable for life. By approximately 2.5-3.5 years post-infection, circulating virus transiently increased to 103 copies/mL and virus replication became detectable in the livers, but serological markers of infection and biochemical or histological evidence of hepatitis remained undetectable. Nonetheless, typical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) developed in 2/10 animals. WHV DNA integration into hepatic and lymphatic system genomes was identified in 9/10 animals. Virus recovered from the liver virus-negative or virus-positive phases of POI displayed the wild-type sequence and transmitted infection to healthy woodchucks causing hepatitis and HCC. In summary, for the first time, our data demonstrate that an asymptomatic hepadnaviral persistence initiated by very small amounts of otherwise pathogenic virus, advancing in the absence of traditional serological markers of infection and hepatitis, coincides with virus DNA integration into the host's hepatic and immune system genomes, retains liver pro-oncogenic potency and is capable of transmitting liver pathogenic infection. This

  6. Recent High Incidence of Fulminant Hepatitis in Samara, Russia: Molecular Analysis of Prevailing Hepatitis B and D Virus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Flodgren, Erik; Bengtsson, Susanne; Knutsson, Mikael; Strebkova, Elena A.; Kidd, Alistair H.; Alexeyev, Oleg A.; Kidd-Ljunggren, Karin

    2000-01-01

    Until 1991, the Russian city of Samara was largely isolated from other parts of Russia and the rest of the world. Very recently, Samara has seen an alarming increase in the incidence of hepatitis. The proportion of fulminant cases is unusually high. We wanted to assess the roles of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) in acute viral hepatitis in this region by analyzing the prevailing strains of both and by determining their genotypes and possible origin. Serum samples were screened for different serological markers and by PCR followed by direct sequencing. Of the 94 HBV-positive samples (80% of which were acute infections), 37 (39%) were also HDV positive. Sixty-seven percent of the patients had anti-HCV antibodies. Twenty-five percent of all patients in the study had fulminant hepatitis. Statistically significant sex differences were found among fulminant cases. For HBV, the core promoter sequences of 62 strains were determined and all but one were found to be of genotype D. None of these had any deletions. Only one strain, from a patient with fulminant fatal hepatitis, showed multiple mutations. The pre-S2 region sequences of 31 HBV strains were also compared. Phylogenetically, these fell into two distinct groups within genotype D, suggesting different origins. For HDV, part of the region encoding the δ-antigen was sequenced from four strains. All proved to be of genotype I and were similar to Far Eastern and Eastern European strains. The contribution of intravenous drug use to the sharp increase in viral hepatitis in this unique setting is discussed. PMID:10970376

  7. Molecular docking studies of phytochemicals from Phyllanthus niruri against Hepatitis B DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Mekha; James, Priyanka; Valsalan, Ravisankar; Nazeem, Puthiyaveetil Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause for liver disorders and can lead to hepatocellular carcinoma, cirrhosis and liver damage which in turn can cause death of patients. HBV DNA Polymerase is essential for HBV replication in the host and hence is used as one of the most potent pharmacological target for the inhibition of HBV. Chronic hepatitis B is currently treated with nucleotide analogues that suppress viral reverse transcriptase activity and most of them are reported to have viral resistance. Therefore, it is of interest to model HBV DNA polymerase to dock known phytochemicals. The present study focuses on homology modeling and molecular docking analysis of phytocompounds from the traditional antidote Phyllanthus niruri and other nucleoside analogues against HBV DNA Polymerase using the software Discovery studio 4.0. 3D structure of HBV DNA Polymerase was predicted based on previously reported alignment. Docking studies revealed that a few phytochemicals from Phyllanthus niruri had good interactions with HBV DNA Polymerase. These compounds had acceptable binding properties for further in vitro validation. Thus the study puts forth experimental validation for traditional antidote and these phytocompounds could be further promoted as potential lead molecule. PMID:26527851

  8. Molecular changes in hepatic metabolism and transport in cirrhosis and their functional importance

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Götze, Oliver; Geier, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the common endpoint of many hepatic diseases and represents a relevant risk for liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. The progress of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis is accompanied by deteriorating liver function. This review summarizes the regulatory and functional changes in phase I and phase II metabolic enzymes as well as transport proteins and provides an overview regarding lipid and glucose metabolism in cirrhotic patients. Interestingly, phase I enzymes are generally downregulated transcriptionally, while phase II enzymes are mostly preserved transcriptionally but are reduced in their function. Transport proteins are regulated in a specific way that resembles the molecular changes observed in obstructive cholestasis. Lipid and glucose metabolism are characterized by insulin resistance and catabolism, leading to the disturbance of energy expenditure and wasting. Possible non-invasive tests, especially breath tests, for components of liver metabolism are discussed. The heterogeneity and complexity of changes in hepatic metabolism complicate the assessment of liver function in individual patients. Additionally, studies in humans are rare, and species differences preclude the transferability of data from rodents to humans. In clinical practice, some established global scores or criteria form the basis for the functional evaluation of patients with liver cirrhosis, but difficult treatment decisions such as selection for transplantation or resection require further research regarding the application of existing non-invasive tests and the development of more specific tests. PMID:26755861

  9. Generation of transmissible hepatitis C virions from a molecular clone in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z; Beaudet-Miller, M; Lanford, R E; Guerra, B; Wright-Minogue, J; Skelton, A; Baroudy, B M; Reyes, G R; Lau, J Y

    1999-03-30

    Multiple alignments of hepatitis C virus (HCV) polyproteins from six different genotypes identified a total of 22 nonconsensus mutations in a clone derived from the Hutchinson (H77) isolate. These mutations, collectively, may have contributed to the failure in generating a "functionally correct" or "infectious" clone in earlier attempts. A consensus clone was constructed after systematic repair of these mutations, which yielded infectious virions in a chimpanzee after direct intrahepatic inoculation of in vitro transcribed RNAs. This RNA-infected chimpanzee has developed hepatitis and remained HCV positive for more than 11 months. To further verify this RNA-derived infectivity, a second naive chimpanzee was injected intravenously with serum collected from the first chimpanzee. Infectivity analysis of the second chimpanzee demonstrated that the HCV infection was successfully transmitted, which validated unequivocally the infectivity of our repaired molecular clone. Amino acid sequence comparisons revealed that our repaired infectious clone had 4 mismatches with the isogenic clone reported by Kolykhalov et al. (1997, Science 277, 570-574) and 8 mismatches with that reported by Yanagi et al. (1997, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 8738-8743). At the RNA level, more mismatches (43 and 67, respectively) were identified; most of them were synonymous substitutions. Further comparisons with 16 isolates from different genotypes demonstrated that our repaired clone shares greater consensus than the reported isogenic clones. This approach of generating infectious HCV RNA validates the importance of amino acid sequence consensus in relation to the biology of HCV. PMID:10087224

  10. Molecular Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus among Infected Egyptian and Saudi Arabian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed MS; Sofy, Ahmed R; Mousa, Adel A; Ahmed, Mohamed A; Alganzory, Mohamed R

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a common cause of liver fibrosis that may lead to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV infection and genotyping among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients using different molecular techniques. HCV RNA viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology. For HCV genotyping, RT-PCR hybridization fluorescence-based method and reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA) were used. A total of 40 anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for HCV RNA, genotyping, and different laboratory investigations. In the present study, HCV genotypes 4, mixed 4.1b, and 1 were detected in patients of both countries, while genotype 2 was only detected in Saudi Arabian patients. Genotyping methods for HCV showed no difference in the classification at the genotype level. With regard to HCV subtypes, INNO-LiPA assay was a reliable test in HCV genotyping for the detection of major genotypes and subtypes, while RT-PCR-based assay was a good test at the genotype level only. HCV genotype 4 was found to be the predominant genotype among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. In conclusion, data analysis for detecting and genotyping HCV was an important factor for understanding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of HCV among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. PMID:26512201

  11. The alpha-5 segment of Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin: in vitro activity, ion channel formation and molecular modelling.

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, E; Bach, D; Kerr, I D; Sansom, M S; Chejanovsky, N; Shai, Y

    1994-01-01

    A peptide with a sequence corresponding to the highly conserved alpha-5 segment of the Cry delta-endotoxin family (amino acids 193-215 of Bacillus thuringiensis CryIIIA [Gazit and Shai (1993) Biochemistry 32, 3429-3436]), was investigated with respect to its interaction with insect membranes, cytotoxicity in vitro towards Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) cells, and its propensity to form ion channels in planar lipid membranes (PLMs). Selectively labelled analogues of alpha-5 at either the N-terminal amino acid or the epsilon-amine of its lysine, were used to monitor the interaction of the peptides with insect membranes. The fluorescent emission spectra of the 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole-4-yl (NBD)-labelled alpha-5 peptides displayed a blue shift upon binding to insect (Spodoptera littoralis) mid-gut membranes, reflecting the relocation of the fluorescent probes to an environment of increased apolarity, i.e. within the lipidic constituent of the membrane. Moreover, midgut membrane-bound NBD-labelled alpha-5 peptides were protected from enzymic proteolysis. Functional characterization of alpha-5 has revealed that it is cytotoxic to Sf-9 insect cells, and that it forms ion channels in PLMs with conductances ranging from 30 to 1000 pS. A proline-substituted analogue of alpha-5 is less cytolytic and slightly more exposed to enzymic digestion. Molecular modelling utilizing simulated annealing via molecular dynamics suggests that a transbilayer pore may be formed by alpha-5 monomers that assemble to form a left-handed coiled coil of approximately parallel helices. These findings further support a role for alpha-5 in the toxic mechanism of delta-endotoxins, and assign alpha-5 as one of the transmembrane helices which form the toxic pore. The suggested role is consistent with the recent finding that cleavage of CryIVB delta-endotoxin in a loop between alpha-5 and alpha-6 is highly important for its larvicidal activity [Angsuthanasombat, Crickmore and Ellar (1993) FEMS

  12. [Molecular aspects of the antiviral response against hepatitis C virus implicated in vaccines development].

    PubMed

    Llanes, María Soledad; Palacios, Natalia Soledad; Piccione, Magalí; Ruiz, María Guillermina; Layana, Carla

    2015-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease caused by hepacivirus of the Flaviviridae family. It has a RNA genome, a unique highly variable molecule. It encodes ten proteins which are necessary to infect cells and multiply. Replication occurs only in hepatocytes. Because of its wide genomic variability and the absence of symptoms, it is difficult to make an early diagnosis and successful treatment. In this review we analyze the molecular mechanism by which the virus infects the hepatocytes and causes the disease. We focused the analysis on different therapies, with the possibility of improving treatment with the use of new specific vaccines. We highlight the use of new therapies based on nucleic acids, mainly DNA vectors. In the near future, once this treatment is adequately evaluated in clinical trials, and the costs are calculated, it could be a very beneficial alternative to conventional methods. PMID:24529681

  13. An insight into the molecular characteristics of hepatitis C virus for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lingyao; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) consists of envelope proteins, core proteins, and genome RNA. The structural genes and non-structural genes in the open reading frame of its genome encode functional proteins essential to viral life cycles, ranging from virus attachment to progeny virus secretion. After infection, the host cells suffer damage from virus-induced oxidative stress, steatosis, and activation of proto-oncogenes. Every process during the viral life cycle can be considered as targets for direct acting antivirals. However, protective immunity cannot be easily acquired for the volatility in HCV antigenic epitopes. Understanding its molecular characteristics, especially pathogenesis and targets the drugs act on, not only helps professionals to make optimal therapeutic decisions, but also helps clinicians who do not specialize in infectious diseases/hepatology to provide better management for patients. This review serves to provide an insight for clinicians and this might provide a possible solution for any possible collision. PMID:27146609

  14. Hepatitis C virus molecular evolution: Transmission, disease progression and antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Preciado, Maria Victoria; Valva, Pamela; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Rahal, Paula; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Yamasaki, Lilian; Vazquez-Chacon, Carlos; Martinez-Guarneros, Armando; Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents an important public health problem worldwide. Reduction of HCV morbidity and mortality is a current challenge owned to several viral and host factors. Virus molecular evolution plays an important role in HCV transmission, disease progression and therapy outcome. The high degree of genetic heterogeneity characteristic of HCV is a key element for the rapid adaptation of the intrahost viral population to different selection pressures (e.g., host immune responses and antiviral therapy). HCV molecular evolution is shaped by different mechanisms including a high mutation rate, genetic bottlenecks, genetic drift, recombination, temporal variations and compartmentalization. These evolutionary processes constantly rearrange the composition of the HCV intrahost population in a staging manner. Remarkable advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanism controlling HCV replication have facilitated the development of a plethora of direct-acting antiviral agents against HCV. As a result, superior sustained viral responses have been attained. The rapidly evolving field of anti-HCV therapy is expected to broad its landscape even further with newer, more potent antivirals, bringing us one step closer to the interferon-free era. PMID:25473152

  15. Hepatitis C virus RNA: molecular switches mediated by long-range RNA–RNA interactions?

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumangala; Stefanovic, Snezana; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita

    2013-01-01

    Multiple conserved structural cis-acting regulatory elements have been recognized both in the coding and untranslated regions (UTRs) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome. For example, the cis-element 5BSL3.2 in the HCV-coding region has been predicted to use both its apical and internal loops to interact with the X RNA in the 3′-UTR, with the IIId domain in the 5′-UTR and with the Alt sequence in the coding region. Additionally, the X RNA region uses a palindromic sequence that overlaps the sequence required for the interaction with 5BSL3.2, to dimerize with another HCV genome. The ability of the 5BSL3.2 and X RNA regions to engage in multi-interactions suggests the existence of one or more molecular RNA switches which may regulate different steps of the HCV life cycle. In this study, we used biophysical methods to characterize the essential interactions of these HCV cis-elements at the molecular level. Our results indicate that X RNA interacts with 5BSL3.2 and another X RNA molecule by adopting two different conformations and that 5BSL3.2 engages simultaneously in kissing interactions using its apical and internal loops. Based on these results, we propose a mode of action for possible molecular switches involving the HCV RNA. PMID:23275555

  16. Molecular detection of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in liver biopsies after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Protzer, Ulrike; Böhm, Friederike; Longerich, Thomas; Seebach, Judith; Heidary Navid, Mojdeh; Friemel, Juliane; Marques-Maggio, Ewerton; Bawohl, Marion; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Schirmacher, Peter; Dutkowski, Philipp; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Schemmer, Peter; Schnitzler, Paul; Gotthardt, Daniel; Müllhaupt, Beat; Weber, Achim

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to determine the rate of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, a recently increasingly recognized disease in the Western world, in liver transplant patients by direct molecular testing of liver tissue. A RT-PCR assay was designed for detecting the HEV open reading frame (ORF) 2/3 gene region in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, and applied to all liver biopsies (n=683) taken 4 weeks or later from all patients (n=282) after liver transplantation of two large academic centers. HEV-RNA was detected in ten biopsies from four different patients (rate: 1%). Histology in early HEV infection was variable including cases with only few hepatocellular apoptoses, no or only minute inflammation. Hepatitis lasted for at least 6 months in 3/4 patients. Serologic testing for HEV-RNA in a subcohort (159 patients) was positive in five patients (rate: 3%), resulting in an overall HEV detection rate of 3% (8/282). In case both liver tissue and sera of a patient were available from the same time period, all cases tested positive in one material were also tested positive in the other material, respectively. All patients had de novo autochthonous infection with HEV genotype 3. Our data confirm that HEV infection is a relevant cause of liver injury after liver transplantation. Molecular testing for HEV in routinely processed transplant liver biopsies is powerful for evaluating patients with elevated transaminases of unknown origin. Histology of HEV infection under immunosuppression in the early phase is distinct from HEV infection in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:25412844

  17. Molecular Evolution and Phylodynamics of Acute Hepatitis B Virus in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Serena Y. C.; Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Liu, Hsin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is prevalent worldwide and causes liver diseases, including acute and chronic hepatitis. Ten HBV genotypes (A–J) with distinct geographic distributions have been reported. Cases of acute HBV infection with genotype A have increased in Japan nationwide since the 1990s, mainly through sexual transmission. To investigate the molecular evolution and phylodynamics of HBV genotypes, we collected acute HBV isolates acquired in Japan from 1992–2002. Full genomes were obtained for comprehensive phylogenetic and phylodynamic analysis, with other Japanese HBV sequences from GenBank that were isolated during 1991–2010. HBV genotypes were classified using the maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods. The GMRF Bayesian Skyride was used to estimate the evolution and population dynamics of HBV. Four HBV genotypes (A, B, C, and H) were identified, of which C was the major genotype. The phylodynamic results indicated an exponential growth between the 1960s and early 1990s; this was followed by a population bottleneck after 1995, possibly linked with successful implementation of a nationwide vaccination program. However, HBV/A increased from 1990 to 2003–2004, and then started to decrease. The prevalence of genotype A has increased over the past 10 years. Phylodynamic inference clearly demonstrates a steady population growth compatible with an ongoing subepidemic; this might be due to the loss of immunity to HBV in adolescents and people being born before the vaccination program. This is the first phylodynamic study of HBV infection in Japan and will facilitate understanding the molecular epidemiology and long-term evolutionary dynamics of this virus in Japan. PMID:27280441

  18. Immunogenicity and safety of Advax™, a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin, when formulated with hepatitis B surface antigen; a randomized controlled Phase 1 study

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, David; Kelley, Peter; Heinzel, Susanne; Cooper, Peter; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for additional safe and effective human vaccine adjuvants. Advax is a novel adjuvant produced from semi-crystalline particles of delta inulin. In animal studies Advax enhanced humoral and cellular immunity to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) without inducing local or systemic reactogenicity. This first-in-man Phase 1 clinical trial tested the safety and tolerability of three intramuscular doses of HBsAg formulated with Advax in a group of healthy adult subjects. Advax was well tolerated with injection site pain scores not significantly different to subjects receiving HBsAg alone and no adverse events were reported in subjects that received Advax. Seroprotection and HBsAb geometric mean titers (GMT) after three immunizations were higher in the Advax 5mg (seroprotection 5/6, 83.3%, GMT 40.7, 95% CI 11.9–139.1) and 10mg (seroprotection 4/5, 80%, GMT 51.6, 95% CI 10.0–266.2) groups versus HBsAg alone (seroprotection 1/5, 20%, GMT 4.1, 95% CI 1.3–12.8). Similarly the proportion of subjects with positive CD4 T-cell responses to HBsAg was higher in the Advax 5mg (4/6, 67%) and Advax 10mg (4/5, 80%) groups versus HBsAg alone (1/5, 20%). These results confirm the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of Advax adjuvant observed in preclinical studies. Advax may represent a suitable replacement for alum adjuvants in prophylactic human vaccines subject to confirmation of current results in larger studies. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12607000598482 PMID:25267153

  19. Molecular and crystal structure of bis-quinolizidine immonium salts, II:. delta. /sup 1(6)/-dehydrosparteinium monoperchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Katrusiak, A.; Kaluski, Z.; Pietrzak, P.; Skolik, J.

    1986-04-01

    ..delta../sup 1(6)/-Dehydrosparteinium monoperchlorate, (C/sub 15/H/sub 25/N/sub 2/)/sup +/ x ClO/sub 4//sup -/, is orthorhombic: P2/sub 1/2/sub 11/, a = 12.473(2), b = 24.292(3), c = 10.835(1) A, V/sub c/ = 3353.7(9) A/sup 3/, Z = 8, D/sub x/ = 1.32, D/sub m/ = 1.32 g cm/sup -3/, ..mu..(Cu K..cap alpha..) = 20.7 cm/sup -1/. The final R was 0.097 for 2091 observed counter reflections. A partial disorder of the crystal structure has been observed. The two independent perchlorate anions are orientationally disordered, and the peripheral atoms in the cation skeletons have large temperature factors due both to conformational disorder of rings A and to disordered orientations of the whole cations alike. In rings A, atoms C(3) and C(4), trans-annular to the immonium bond, are disordered to a different extent in each of the two independent cations. Rings B, C, and D have sofa (distorted towards half-chair), chair, and chair conformations, respectively. The quinolizidinium and quinolizidine moieties have planar and cis configurations, respectively. The title compound was obtained from ..delta../sup 5/-dehydrosparteine, the product of mercuric acetate dehydrogenation of sparteine at room temperature. From /sup 13/C NMR measurements in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and in DMSO/sup 2/H/sub 6/ it is evident that, in solution, the molecular geometry with chair/chair cis-ring fusion within the quinolizidine moiety is present, as was in the crystalline state by X-ray analysis.

  20. Molecular and Contextual Markers of Hepatitis C Virus and Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shapshak, Paul; Somboonwit, Charurut; Drumright, Lydia N.; Frost, Simon D.W.; Commins, Deborah; Tellinghuisen, Timothy L.; Scott, William K.; Duncan, Robert; McCoy, Clyde; Page, J. Bryan; Giunta, Brian; Fernandez, Francisco; Singer, Elyse; Levine, Andrew; Minagar, Alireza; Oluwadara, Oluwadayo; Kotila, Taiwo; Chiappelli, Francesco; Sinnott, John T.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection involves a complex interplay of social risks, and molecular factors of both virus and host. Injection drug abuse is the most powerful risk factor for HCV infection, followed by sexual transmission and additional non-injection drug abuse factors such as co-infection with other viruses and barriers to treatment. It is clearly important to understand the wider context in which the factors related to HCV infection occur. This understanding is required for a comprehensive approach leading to the successful prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of HCV. An additional consideration is that current treatments and advanced molecular methods are generally unavailable to socially disadvantaged patients. Thus, the recognition of behavioral/social, viral, and host factors as components of an integrated approach to HCV is important to help this vulnerable group. Equally important, this approach is key to the development of personalized patient treatment – a significant goal in global healthcare. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the impact of drug abuse, epidemiology, social behavior, virology, immunopathology, and genetics on HCV infection and the course of disease. PMID:19650670

  1. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-21

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments. PMID:24952568

  2. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-21

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  3. Phylogeography and molecular epidemiology of hepatitis C virus genotype 2 in Africa.

    PubMed

    Markov, Peter V; Pepin, Jacques; Frost, Eric; Deslandes, Sylvie; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Pybus, Oliver G

    2009-09-01

    Understanding the origin and nature of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genetic diversity is critical for improving treatment and vaccine design, and such diversity is the sole source of information about the virus' epidemic history prior to its identification 20 years ago. In this paper, we study the molecular epidemiology of HCV genotype 2 in its region of endemic origin, west and central Africa. Our analysis includes 56 new and highly diverse HCV isolates sampled from infected individuals in Guinea-Bissau. By combining phylogenetic, geographical and epidemiological information, we find a previously unappreciated geographical structure in the diversity of HCV genotype 2, pointing to a history of eastwards spatial spread from the west African coast to Cameroon that took place over several centuries. Molecular clock analysis dates the common ancestor of HCV in Guinea-Bissau to 1470 (1414-1582). The phylogenetic position of isolates from Madagascar and Martinique suggests a role for the historical slave trade in the global dissemination of HCV and of the epidemic subtypes 2a and 2c. Coalescent-based estimates of epidemic growth indicate a rapid 20th-century spread of HCV genotype 2 in Cameroon that is absent in Guinea-Bissau. We discuss this contrast in the context of possible parenteral HCV exposure during public-health campaigns undertaken during the colonial era. PMID:19474244

  4. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  5. Molecular cloning of the human hepatitis C virus genome from Japanese patients with non-A, non-B hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Nobuyuki; Hijikata, Makoto; Ootsuyama, Yuko; Nakagawa, Masanori; Ohkoshi, Showgo; Sugimura, Takashi; Shimotohno, Kunitada )

    1990-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Japanese type of hepatitis C virus (HCV-J) genome, consisting of 9413 nucleotides, was determined by analyses of cDNA clones from plasma specimens from Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis. HCV-J genome contains a long open reading frame that can encode a sequence of 3010 amino acid residues. Comparison of HCV-J with the American isolate of HCV showed 22.6% difference in nucleotide sequence and 15.1% difference in amino acid sequence. Thus HCV-J and the American isolate of HCV are probably different subtypes of HCV. The relationship of HCV-J with other animal RNA virus families and the putative organization of the HCV-J genome are discussed.

  6. V{delta}1 T cell receptor binds specifically to MHC I chain related A: Molecular and biochemical evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jianqing; Huang Jie; Chen Hui; Cui Lianxian; He Wei . E-mail: heweiimu@public.bta.net.cn

    2006-01-06

    Human MHC class I chain-related A (MICA) is a tumor-associated antigen that can be recognized by V{delta}1 subset of tumor-infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells. We previously reported that immobilized recombinant MICA protein could induce the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating V{delta}1 {gamma}{delta} T cells in vitro. But there has been no direct evidence showing the engagement of {gamma}{delta} T cell receptors (TCR) of the induced cells with MICA. In the current investigation, we show that MICA induces specific cytolytic activity of the expanded {gamma}{delta} T cells. We expressed the coupled V domains from the MICA-induced T cells as a single polypeptide chain V{delta}V{gamma} TCR ({gamma}{delta} scTCR). Such scTCR can specifically bind MICA of HeLa cells. Direct interaction of {gamma}{delta} scTCRs with in vitro expressed MICA was monitored using an IAsys biosensor. We found that the V{delta}1 scTCR can specifically bind to immobilized MICA molecule and MICA{alpha}1{alpha}2 domains are responsible for the binding reaction.

  7. Growth of a delta-doped silicon layer by molecular beam epitaxy on a charge-coupled device for reflection-limited ultraviolet quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Terhune, R. W.; Fattahi, Masoud; Tseng, Hsin-Fu

    1992-01-01

    Low-temperature silicon molecular beam epitaxy is used to grow a delta-doped silicon layer on a fully processed charge-coupled device (CCD). The measured quantum efficiency of the delta-doped backside-thinned CCD is in agreement with the reflection limit for light incident on the back surface in the spectral range of 260-600 nm. The 2.5 nm silicon layer, grown at 450 C, contained a boron delta-layer with surface density of about 2 x 10 exp 14/sq cm. Passivation of the surface was done by steam oxidation of a nominally undoped 1.5 nm Si cap layer. The UV quantum efficiency was found to be uniform and stable with respect to thermal cycling and illumination conditions.

  8. Molecular mechanism of age-specific hepatic lipid accumulation in PPARalpha (+/-):LDLR (+/-) mice, an obese mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yufeng; Sugiyama, Eiko; Yokoyama, Shin; Jiang, Lingling; Tanaka, Naoki; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2008-04-01

    This study aimed to clarify the molecular mechanisms of age-specific hepatic lipid accumulation accompanying hyperinsulinemia in a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) (+/-):low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) (+/-) mouse line. The hepatic fat content, protein amounts, and mRNA levels of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism were analyzed in 25-, 50-, 75- and 100-week-old mice. Severe fatty liver was confirmed only in 50- and 75-week-old mice. The hepatic expression of proteins that function in lipid transport and catabolism did not differ among the groups. In contrast, the mRNA levels and protein amounts of lipogenic enzymes, including acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase-1, fatty acid synthase, and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, enhanced in the mice with fatty liver. Elevated mRNA and protein levels of lipoprotein lipase and fatty acid translocase, which are involved in hepatic lipid uptake, were also detected in mice with fatty liver. Moreover, both protein and mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), a transcription factor regulating lipid synthesis, had age-specific patterns similar to those of the proteins described above. Therefore, the age-specific fatty liver found in the PPARalpha (+/-):LDLR (+/-) mouse line is probably caused by age-specific expression of SREBP-1 and its downstream lipogenic genes, coordinated by the increased uptake of lipids. All of these factors might be affected by age-specific changes in serum insulin concentration. PMID:18335269

  9. Decreased hepatic contents of coenzyme A molecular species in mice after subchronic mild social defeat stress.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshifumi; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Hagiya, Yuki; Chohnan, Shigeru; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    Social stress may precipitate psychiatric disorders such as depression, which is related to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. We have evaluated the effects of social stress on central and peripheral metabolism using a model of depression in mice. In the present study, we focused on coenzyme A (CoA) molecular species [i.e. non-esterified CoA (CoASH), acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA] which play important roles in numerous metabolic pathways, and we analyzed changes in expression of these molecules in the hypothalamus and liver of adult male mice (C57BL/6J) subjected to 10 days of subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) with ICR mice as aggressors. Mice (n = 12) exposed to showed hyperphagia- and polydipsia-like symptoms and increased body weight gain compared with control mice which were not affected by exposure to ICR mice (n = 12). To elucidate the underlying metabolic features in the sCSDS model, acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and CoASH tissue levels were analyzed using the acyl-CoA cycling method. The levels of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, which decreases feeding behavior, were not influenced by sCSDS. However, sCSDS reduced levels of acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and total CoA (sum of the three CoA molecular species) in the liver. Hence, hyperphagia-like symptoms in sCSDS mice evidently occurred independently of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, but might consequently lead to down-regulation of hepatic CoA via altered expression of nudix hydrolase 7. Future studies should investigate the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the down-regulation of liver CoA pools in sCSDS mice. PMID:26864137

  10. Molecular survey of hepatitis C virus in the touristic city of Mar del Plata, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Culasso, Andrés C A; Elizalde, Mercedes; Campos, Rodolfo H; Barbini, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    The global epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) may be roughly described by two groups of genotypes: the worldwide distributed ones (subtypes 1a, 1b, 2a and 3a, among others) and the endemic ones (subtypes 4a, 5a, 6a, among others). Epidemiological and population dynamic studies of the worldwide distributed genotypes have shown that subtypes 1a and 3a are common among intravenous drug users (IDUs) and that they are also in expansion in some countries. The molecular survey of HCV provides some clues about the epidemiological status of the infections in a local scale and the phylogenetic and demographic reconstruction analyses complement this study by inferring whether the infections of certain subtypes are in a steady state or expanding. Here, a molecular survey of the HCV variants that circulate in the touristic city of Mar del Plata (Buenos Aires, Argentina) was performed in samples obtained from 42 patients. The subtypes detected were 1a (32 patients), 3a (8 patients) and 1b (2 patients). The demographic history of subtype 1a inferred using the sequence data showed an exponential growth in the 1990's. The period of viral expansion was delayed compared with that observed for the same genotype in other countries where the transmission was associated with IDUs. Also, the phylogeographic analysis of HCV-1a showed a statistically significant association between the location of the samples and the phylogeny, which may be the result of the local transmission of HCV in the city. The molecular analysis helped in the description of the complex epidemiological context of a touristic city, and pointed out that some sanitary measures should be taken in order to reduce the transmission of HCV (and maybe of HIV) among IDUs. PMID:23028605

  11. The crystal and molecular structure of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid b.

    PubMed

    Rosenqvist, E; Ottersen, T

    1975-01-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of the title compound C-22H-30O-4, has been determined by X-ray methods using 1106 reflections above background level collected by counter methods. The crystals are orthorhombic, space group P2-12-12-1 with cell dimensions a equals 16.514(2) A; b equals 14.324(2) A; c equals 8.744(1) A; there are four molecules per unit cell. The structure was refined to an R of 0.084 (weighted R-w equals 0.068). The cyclohexene and the pyran part of the molecule occurs in the half-chair conformation. The bond distances and angles, and a slight twist of the benzene ring, indicate considerable stains in the aromatic system. Both the phenolic and carboxylic group are significantly out of the plane through the aromatig ring. The angle between this plane and a plane through the cyclohexene ring is 37.7 degrees. The pentyl sidechain occurs in an extended gauche conformation, and the thermal parameters of this part of the molecule are very high. The molecules are held together by van der Waals forces in the c-directions, and hydrogen bonds (2.688 A) from phenolic to carboxylic groups in the a-b plane. There is a short ultra-molecular hydrogen bond (2.490 A) from the carboxylic group to the pyran oxygen. PMID:1138526

  12. Hepatitis D Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John M

    2015-11-01

    This work reviews specific related aspects of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) reproduction, including virion structure, the RNA genome, the mode of genome replication, the delta antigens, and the assembly of HDV using the envelope proteins of its helper virus, hepatitis B virus (HBV). These topics are considered with perspectives ranging from a history of discovery through to still-unsolved problems. HDV evolution, virus entry, and associated pathogenic potential and treatment of infections are considered in other articles in this collection. PMID:26525452

  13. Source Apportionment of Background PAHs in the Peace-Athabasca Delta (Alberta, Canada) Using Molecular Level Radiocarbon Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jautzy, Josué J; Ahad, Jason M E; Hall, Roland I; Wiklund, Johan A; Wolfe, Brent B; Gobeil, Charles; Savard, Martine M

    2015-08-01

    The downstream accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Peace-Athabasca Delta (PAD), an ecologically important landscape, is a key issue of concern given the rapid development of the oil sands industry in Northern Alberta, Canada. In addition to PAHs derived from industrial activity (i.e., oil sands mining) within the Athabasca watershed, however, forest fires and erosion of fossil fuel deposits within both the Athabasca and Peace watersheds are two potentially important natural sources of PAHs delivered to the PAD. Consequently, evaluating the environmental impact of mining activities requires a quantitative understanding of natural, background PAHs. Here, we utilize molecular-level natural-abundance radiocarbon measurements on an amalgamated sediment record from a Peace River flood-susceptible oxbow lake in the northern Peace sector of the PAD to quantitatively discriminate sources of naturally occurring alkylated PAHs (fossil and modern biomass). A radiocarbon mass balance quantified a predominantly natural petrogenic source (93% petrogenic, 7% forest fire) for alkylated PAHs during the past ∼50 years. Additionally, a significant petrogenic component determined for retene, a compound usually considered a biomarker for softwood combustion, suggests that its use as a unique forest fire indicator may not be suitable in PAD sediments receiving Peace watershed-derived fluvial inputs. PMID:26115178

  14. Cellular and molecular functions of hepatic stellate cells in inflammatory responses and liver immunology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a central immunological organ. Liver resident macrophages, Kupffer cells (KC), but also sinusoidal endothelial cells, dendritic cells (DC) and other immune cells are involved in balancing immunity and tolerance against pathogens, commensals or food antigens. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have been primarily characterized as the main effector cells in liver fibrosis, due to their capacity to transdifferentiate into collagen-producing myofibroblasts (MFB). More recent studies elucidated the fundamental role of HSC in liver immunology. HSC are not only the major storage site for dietary vitamin A (Vit A) (retinol, retinoic acid), which is essential for proper function of the immune system. This pericyte further represents a versatile source of many soluble immunological active factors including cytokines [e.g., interleukin 17 (IL-17)] and chemokines [C-C motif chemokine (ligand) 2 (CCL2)], may act as an antigen presenting cell (APC), and has autophagy activity. Additionally, it responds to many immunological triggers via toll-like receptors (TLR) (e.g., TLR4, TLR9) and transduces signals through pathways and mediators traditionally found in immune cells, including the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway or inflammasome activation. Overall, HSC promote rather immune-suppressive responses in homeostasis, like induction of regulatory T cells (Treg), T cell apoptosis (via B7-H1, PDL-1) or inhibition of cytotoxic CD8 T cells. In conditions of liver injury, HSC are important sensors of altered tissue integrity and initiators of innate immune cell activation. Vice versa, several immune cell subtypes interact directly or via soluble mediators with HSC. Such interactions include the mutual activation of HSC (towards MFB) and macrophages or pro-apoptotic signals from natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and gamma-delta T cells (γδ T-cells) on activated HSC. Current directions of research investigate the immune-modulating functions of HSC in the environment of liver

  15. Molecular architecture of the ribosome-bound Hepatitis C Virus internal ribosomal entry site RNA.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Collier, Marianne; Loerke, Justus; Ismer, Jochen; Schmidt, Andrea; Hilal, Tarek; Sprink, Thiemo; Yamamoto, Kaori; Mielke, Thorsten; Bürger, Jörg; Shaikh, Tanvir R; Dabrowski, Marylena; Hildebrand, Peter W; Scheerer, Patrick; Spahn, Christian M T

    2015-12-14

    Internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs) are structured cis-acting RNAs that drive an alternative, cap-independent translation initiation pathway. They are used by many viruses to hijack the translational machinery of the host cell. IRESs facilitate translation initiation by recruiting and actively manipulating the eukaryotic ribosome using only a subset of canonical initiation factor and IRES transacting factors. Here we present cryo-EM reconstructions of the ribosome 80S- and 40S-bound Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) IRES. The presence of four subpopulations for the 80S•HCV IRES complex reveals dynamic conformational modes of the complex. At a global resolution of 3.9 Å for the most stable complex, a derived atomic model reveals a complex fold of the IRES RNA and molecular details of its interaction with the ribosome. The comparison of obtained structures explains how a modular architecture facilitates mRNA loading and tRNA binding to the P-site. This information provides the structural foundation for understanding the mechanism of HCV IRES RNA-driven translation initiation. PMID:26604301

  16. Use of Dried Serum Spots for Serological and Molecular Detection of Hepatitis A Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Desbois, Delphine; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie; Lebraud, Patricia; Dussaix, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the feasibility of using dried serum spots (DSS) for the serological and molecular diagnosis of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. Sixty-eight sera spotted onto filter papers (Whatman International Ltd., United Kingdom) were used for detection of total anti-HAV antibodies, and 64 sera were used for detection of immunoglobulin M antibody to HAV. DSS were stored at 4°C, room temperature, and 37°C for 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Sensitivity and specificity of the serological assays were 100% regardless of temperature and storage duration. To assess the stability of HAV RNA, we performed qualitative and quantitative reverse transcription-PCRs (RT-PCRs) with human plasma spiked with serial dilutions of cultured HAV spotted on Flinders Technology Associates filter paper cards (Whatman International Ltd.). Filter papers were stored at room temperature and processed for RT-PCR assays. No reduction of viral load was observed after 5, 15, and 30 days of storage. The ∼10-fold reduction of sensitivity from DSS was attributable to a smaller sample input in DSS samples. This method was further evaluated using 35 frozen sera. HAV RNA amplification showed 100% specificity and 92.3% sensitivity, and sequence analysis from DSS and sera provided identical results. HAV RNA can be accurately recovered from DSS for molecular epidemiology purposes, and we confirm the reliability of blotted samples in the serological diagnosis of HAV infection. The DSS method facilitates storage and shipment of samples from routine laboratories to reference centers for further investigations and large epidemiological studies. PMID:19321728

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes an infectious form of hepatitis associated with contaminated water. By analyzing the sequence of several HEV isolates, a reverse transciption-polymerase chain reaction method was developed and optimized that should be able to identify all of the kn...

  18. 3D-QSAR and molecular docking studies on designing inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlian; Si, Hongzong; Li, Yang; Ge, Cuizhu; Song, Fucheng; Ma, Xiuting; Duan, Yunbo; Zhai, Honglin

    2016-08-01

    Viral hepatitis C infection is one of the main causes of the hepatitis after blood transfusion and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a global health threat. The HCV NS5B polymerase, an RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and an essential role in the replication of the virus, has no functional equivalent in mammalian cells. So the research and development of efficient NS5B polymerase inhibitors provides a great strategy for antiviral therapy against HCV. A combined three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling was accomplished to profoundly understand the structure-activity correlation of a train of indole-based inhibitors of the HCV NS5B polymerase to against HCV. A comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (COMSIA) model as the foundation of the maximum common substructure alignment was developed. The optimum model exhibited statistically significant results: the cross-validated correlation coefficient q2 was 0.627 and non-cross-validated r2 value was 0.943. In addition, the results of internal validations of bootstrapping and Y-randomization confirmed the rationality and good predictive ability of the model, as well as external validation (the external predictive correlation coefficient rext2 = 0.629). The information obtained from the COMSIA contour maps enables the interpretation of their structure-activity relationship. Furthermore, the molecular docking study of the compounds for 3TYV as the protein target revealed important interactions between active compounds and amino acids, and several new potential inhibitors with higher activity predicted were designed basis on our analyses and supported by the simulation of molecular docking. Meanwhile, the OSIRIS Property Explorer was introduced to help select more satisfactory compounds. The satisfactory results from this study may lay a reliable theoretical base for drug development of hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

  19. Hepatitis D virus infection, replication and cross-talk with the hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chi-Ruei; Lo, Szecheng John

    2014-01-01

    Viral hepatitis remains a worldwide public health problem. The hepatitis D virus (HDV) must either coinfect or superinfect with the hepatitis B virus (HBV). HDV contains a small RNA genome (approximately 1.7 kb) with a single open reading frame (ORF) and requires HBV supplying surface antigens (HBsAgs) to assemble a new HDV virion. During HDV replication, two isoforms of a delta antigen, a small delta antigen (SDAg) and a large delta antigen (LDAg), are produced from the same ORF of the HDV genome. The SDAg is required for HDV replication, whereas the interaction of LDAg with HBsAgs is crucial for packaging of HDV RNA. Various clinical outcomes of HBV/HDV dual infection have been reported, but the molecular interaction between HBV and HDV is poorly understood, especially regarding how HBV and HDV compete with HBsAgs for assembling virions. In this paper, we review the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by HBsAgs and the molecular pathway involved in their promotion of LDAg nuclear export. Because the nuclear sublocalization and export of LDAg is regulated by posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including acetylation, phosphorylation, and isoprenylation, we also summarize the relationship among HBsAg-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling, LDAg PTMs, and nuclear export mechanisms in this review. PMID:25356023

  20. Molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Hundie, Gadissa Bedada; Raj, V Stalin; Michael, Daniel Gebre; Pas, Suzan D; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Koopmans, Marion P; Smits, Saskia L; Haagmans, Bart L

    2016-06-01

    Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is hyperendemic in Ethiopia and constitutes a major public health problem, little is known about its genetic diversity, genotypes, and circulation. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of HBV in Ethiopia, using 391 serum samples collected from HBsAg-positive blood donors living in five different geographic regions. The HBV S/pol gene was amplified, sequenced, and HBV genotypes, subgenotypes, serotypes, and major hydrophilic region (MHR) variants were determined. Phylogenetic analysis of 371 samples (95%) revealed the distribution of genotypes A (78%) and D (22%) in Ethiopia. Further phylogenetic analysis identified one subgenotype (A1) within genotype A, and 4 subgenotypes within genotype D (D1; 1.3%, D2; 55%, D4; 2.5%, and D6; 8.8%). Importantly, 24 isolates (30%) of genotype D formed a novel phylogenetic cluster, distinct from any known D subgenotypes, and two A/D recombinants. Analysis of predicted amino-acid sequences within the HBsAg revealed four serotypes: adw2 (79%), ayw1 (3.1%), ayw2 (7.8%), and ayw3 (11.6%). Subsequent examination of sequences showed that 51 HBV isolates (14%) had mutations in the MHR and 8 isolates (2.2%) in the reverse transcriptase known to confer antiviral resistance. This study provides the first description of HBV genetic diversity in Ethiopia with a predominance of subgenotypes A1 and D2, and also identified HBV isolates that could represent a novel subgenotype. Furthermore, a significant prevalence of HBsAg variants in Ethiopian population is revealed. J. Med. Virol. 88:1035-1043, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26629781

  1. Genotype Distribution and Molecular Epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus in Hubei, Central China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing; Lu, Yanjun; Liu, Weiyong; Zhu, Yaowu; Yan, Xiaoling; Xu, Jingxin; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Yue; Liu, Wei; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the molecular epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Central China. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 570 patients from Hubei Province in central China were enrolled. These patients were tested positive for HCV antibody prior to blood transfusion. Among them, 177 were characterized by partial NS5B and/or Core-E1 sequences and classified into five subtypes: 1b, 83.0% (147/177); 2a, 13.0% (23/177); 3b, 2.3% (4/177); 6a, 1.1% (2/177); 3a, 0.6% (1/177). Analysis of genotype-associated risk factors revealed that paid blood donation and transfusion before 1997 were strongly associated with subtypes 1b and 2a, while some subtype 2a cases were also found in individuals with high risk sexual behaviors; subtypes 3b, 6a, and 3a were detected only in intravenous drug users. Phylogeographic analyses based on the coalescent datasets demonstrated that 1b, 2a, 3b, and 6a were locally epidemic in Hubei Province. Among them, subtype 1b Hubei strains may have served as the origins of this subtype in China, and 2a and 3b Hubei strains may have descended from the northwest and southwest of China, respectively, while 6a Hubei strains may have been imported from the central south and southwest. Conclusion/Significance The results suggest that the migration patterns of HCV in Hubei are complex and variable among different subtypes. Implementation of mandatory HCV screening before donation has significantly decreased the incidence of transfusion-associated HCV infection since 1997. More attention should be paid to intravenous drug use and unsafe sexual contact, which may have become new risk factors for HCV infection in Hubei Province. PMID:26325070

  2. Molecular characteristics of a novel strain of canine minute virus associated with hepatitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Jung, Ji-Youl; Lee, Jae-Il; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2016-08-01

    A 5-year-old female Yorkshire terrier dog died a few days following hernia and ovariohysterectomy surgeries. Necropsy performed on the dog revealed that the surgeries were not the cause of death; however, degenerative viral hepatitis, showing intranuclear inclusion bodies in hepatic cells, was observed in histopathologic examination. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for the cause of disease, and minute virus of canines (MVC) was detected in all parenchymal organs, including the liver. Other pathogens that may cause degenerative viral hepatitis were not found. Infection with MVC was confirmed by in situ hybridization, which revealed the presence of MVC nucleic acid in the liver tissue of the dog. Through sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the nearly complete genome sequence, the strain was found to be distinct from other previously reported MVC strains. These results indicate that this novel MVC strain might be related to degenerative viral hepatitis in dogs. PMID:27251050

  3. Effect of solvent on the rate constant for the radiative deactivation of singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/. delta. /sub g/O/sub 2/)

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R.

    1987-08-13

    Relative rate constants for the radiative deactivation (k/sub r/) of singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 3/Sigma/sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/ reverse arrow /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/) have been determined in 15 solvents. A substantial solvent effect is observed. Changes in the value of k/sub r/ can exceed a factor of 20. A reasonably good correlation exists between the solvent polarizability, defined as a function of the solvent refractive index, and the radiative rate constant. We suggest that our data support a model in which /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ is perturbed through the formation of a discrete oxygen-solvent collision complex.

  4. Nile Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  The Nile River Delta     View Larger Image ... of eastern Africa. At the apex of the fertile Nile River Delta is the Egyptian capital city of Cairo. To the west are the Great Pyramids ...

  5. Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Brazil: molecular characterization of genotype F isolates

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Francisco CA; Souto, Francisco JD; Nabuco, Leticia C; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A; Coelho, Henrique Sergio M; Franz, Helena Cristina F; Saraiva, Joao Carlos P; Virgolino, Helaine A; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Melo, Mabel MM; Martins, Regina MB; Gomes, Selma A

    2007-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates have been classified in eight genotypes, A to H, which exhibit distinct geographical distributions. Genotypes A, D and F are predominant in Brazil, a country formed by a miscegenated population, where the proportion of individuals from Caucasian, Amerindian and African origins varies by region. Genotype F, which is the most divergent, is considered indigenous to the Americas. A systematic molecular characterization of HBV isolates from different parts of the world would be invaluable in establishing HBV evolutionary origins and dispersion patterns. A large-scale study is needed to map the region-by-region distribution of the HBV genotypes in Brazil. Results Genotyping by PCR-RFLP of 303 HBV isolates from HBsAg-positive blood donors showed that at least two of the three genotypes, A, D, and F, co-circulate in each of the five geographic regions of Brazil. No other genotypes were identified. Overall, genotype A was most prevalent (48.5%), and most of these isolates were classified as subgenotype A1 (138/153; 90.2%). Genotype D was the most common genotype in the South (84.2%) and Central (47.6%) regions. The prevalence of genotype F was low (13%) countrywide. Nucleotide sequencing of the S gene and a phylogenetic analysis of 32 HBV genotype F isolates showed that a great majority (28/32; 87.5%) belonged to subgenotype F2, cluster II. The deduced serotype of 31 of 32 F isolates was adw4. The remaining isolate showed a leucine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 127. Conclusion The presence of genotypes A, D and F, and the absence of other genotypes in a large cohort of HBV infected individuals may reflect the ethnic origins of the Brazilian population. The high prevalence of isolates from subgenotype A1 (of African origin) indicates that the African influx during the colonial slavery period had a major impact on the circulation of HBV genotype A currently found in Brazil. Although most genotype F isolates belonged to

  6. Functional and physical molecular size of the chicken hepatic lectin determined by radiation inactivation and sedimentation equilibrium analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steer, C.J.; Osborne, J.C. Jr.; Kempner, E.S. )

    1990-03-05

    Radiation inactivation and sedimentation equilibrium analysis were used to determine the functional and physical size of the chicken hepatic membrane receptor that binds N-acetylglucosamine-terminated glycoproteins. Purified plasma membranes from chicken liver were irradiated with high energy electrons and assayed for 125I-agalactoorosomucoid binding. Increasing the dose of ionizing radiation resulted in a monoexponential decay in binding activity due to a progressive loss of binding sites. The molecular mass of the chicken lectin, determined in situ by target analysis, was 69,000 +/- 9,000 Da. When the same irradiated membranes were solubilized in Brij 58 and assayed, the binding protein exhibited a target size of 62,000 +/- 4,000 Da; in Triton X-100, the functional size of the receptor was 85,000 +/- 10,000 Da. Sedimentation equilibrium measurements of the purified binding protein yielded a lower limit molecular weight of 79,000 +/- 7,000. However, the solubilized lectin was detected as a heterogeneous population of oligomers with molecular weights as high as 450,000. Addition of calcium or calcium plus N-acetylglucosamine decreased the higher molecular weight species, but the lower limit molecular weights remained invariant. Similar results were determined when the chicken lectin was solubilized in Brij 58, C12E9, or 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propane-sulfonic acid (CHAPS). Results from the present study suggest that in the plasma membrane, the functional species of the chicken hepatic lectin exists as a trimer. However, in detergent solution, the purified receptor forms a heterogeneous population of irreversible oligomers that exhibit binding activity proportional to size.

  7. Molecular characterization of a variant virus that caused de novo hepatitis B without elevation of hepatitis B surface antigen after chemotherapy with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Masami; Minami, Masahito; Fujii, Kota; Sendo, Rei; Mori, Kojiro; Shimizu, Daisuke; Nakajima, Tomoaki; Yasui, Kohichiroh; Itoh, Yoshito; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Okanoue, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2008-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative patients following treatment with rituximab has been reported increasingly. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying HBV reactivation in an HBsAg-negative patient. HBV was reactivated in a 75-year-old man following chemotherapy with rituximab, without elevation of HBsAg. The patient's full-length HBV genome was cloned and the entire sequence was determined. Transfection studies were performed in vitro using recombinant wild-type HBV (wild-type), the patient's HBV (patient), and two chimeric HBV constructs, in which the preS/S region of the patient and wild-type virus had been exchanged with one another. Secreted HBsAg and intra- and extra-cellular HBV DNA were measured. The number of amino acid substitutions in HBV from this patient was much higher than in previous reports of HBV mutants, such as occult HBV and vaccine escape HBV mutants. Levels of HBsAg and HBV DNA production in vitro were significantly lower in the patient compared to wild-type transfections. From analyses of the chimeric constructs, the altered preS/S region was responsible mainly for this impairment. These results show that highly mutated HBV can reactivate after chemotherapy with rituximab, despite an unusually large number of mutations, resulting in impaired viral replication in vitro. Severe immune suppression, probably caused by rituximab, may permit reactivation of highly mutated HBV. These findings have important clinical implications for the prevention and management of HBV reactivation and may explain partially the mechanism of recent, unusual cases of HBV reactivation. PMID:19040281

  8. A global transcriptional analysis of Megalobrama amblycephala revealing the molecular determinants of diet-induced hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingdong; Lu, Kangle; Jiang, Guangzhen; Liu, Wenbin; Dong, Zaijie; Tian, Hongyan; Li, Xiangfei

    2015-10-10

    Blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala), a prevalent species in China's intensive polyculture systems, is highly susceptible to hepatic steatosis, resulting in considerable losses to the fish farming industry. Due to a lack of genomic resources, the molecular mechanisms of lipid metabolism in M. amblycephala are poorly understood. Here, a hepatic cDNA library was generated from equal amounts of mRNAs isolated from M. amblycephala fed normal-fat and high-fat diets. Sequencing of this library using the Illumina/Solexa platform produced approximately 51.87 million clean reads, which were assembled into 48,439 unigenes with an average length of 596 bp and an N50 value of 800 bp. These unigenes were searched against the nucleotide (NT), non-redundant (NR), Swiss-Prot, Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome (KEGG) databases using the BLASTn or BLASTx algorithms (E-value ≤ 10(-5)). A total of 8602 unigenes and 22,155 unigenes were functionally classified into 25 COG categories and 259 KEGG pathways, respectively. Furthermore, 22,072 unigenes were grouped into 62 sub-categories belonging to three main Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Using a digital gene expression analysis and the M. amblycephala transcriptome as a reference, 477 genes (134 up-regulated and 343 down-regulated) were identified as differentially expressed in fish fed a high-fat diet versus a normal-fat diet. KEGG and GO functional enrichment analyses of the differentially expressed unigenes were performed and 12 candidate genes related to lipid metabolism were identified. This study provides a global survey of hepatic transcriptome profiles and identifies candidate genes that may be related to lipid metabolism in M. amblycephala. These findings will facilitate further investigations of the mechanisms underlying hepatic steatosis in M. amblycephala. PMID:26074088

  9. New developments in small molecular compounds for anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jing; Wang, You-wei; Lu, Yuan-an

    2012-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects approximately 170 million people worldwide. However, no vaccine or immunoglobulin is currently available for the prevention of HCV infection. The standard of care (SOC) involving pegylated interferon-α (PEG-IFN α) plus ribavirin (RBV) for 48 weeks results in a sustained virologic response in less than 50% of patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1, the most prevalent type of HCV in North America and Europe. Recently, reliable in vitro culture systems have been developed for accelerating antiviral therapy research, and many new specifically targeted antiviral therapies for hepatitis C (STAT-C) and treatment strategies are being evaluated in clinical trials. These new antiviral agents are expected to improve present treatment significantly and may potentially shorten treatment duration. The aim of this review is to summarize the current developments in new anti-HCV drugs. PMID:22205621

  10. REGULATION OF RAT HEPATIC DELTA-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE AND HEME OXYGENASE ACTIVITIES: EVIDENCE FOR CONTROL BY HEME AND AGAINST MEDIATION BY PROSTHETIC IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of in vivo administration of 6 compounds on the activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthetase and heme oxygenase were determined. The order of decreasing potency in reducing ALA synthetase activity was heme, bilirubin, protoporphyrin IX, bilirubin dimethyl es...

  11. Dynamical Regulation Analysis Identifies Molecular Mechanisms of Fuzheng-Huayu Formula against Hepatitis B-Caused Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi-Long; Lu, Yi-Yu; Peng, Jing-Hua; Dong, Shu; Wei, Bin; Song, Ya-Nan; Zhou, Qian-Mei; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Ping; Su, Shi-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Fuzheng-Huayu (FZHY) tablet was formulated based on Chinese medicine theory in treating liver fibrosis. A clinical trial has indicated that FZHY can against hepatitis B-caused liver cirrhosis (HBC), but the underlying mechanism of FZHY efficacy is unclear. Here, we report that miRNA expression levels are remarkably changed when FZHY formula was used in HBC patient's treatment as a paradigm of trials. Then, we functionally characterize the significant impact of potential kernel miRNAs by miRNA-target network analysis. Enrichment analysis show that the FZHY formula dramatically effecting the molecular regulated module in HBC. Thus, we infer that FZHY plays a critical function in HBC treatment process and directly regulated many important pathways, including but not limited to cell cycle, p53 signaling pathway, and TGF-β signaling pathway, suggesting a new strategy for investigating the molecular mechanism of FZHY treatment. PMID:26221171

  12. Hepatitis B virus genotypes in southwest Iran: Molecular, serological and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mojiri, Anahita; Behzad-Behbahani, Abbas; Saberifirozi, Mehdei; Ardabili, Maryam; Beheshti, Mahmood; Rahsaz, Marjan; Banihashemi, Mehrdad; Azarpira, Negar; Geramizadeh, Bita; Khadang, Baharak; Moaddeb, Afsaneh; Ghaedi, Mojgan; Heidari, Tahereh; Torab, Ardeshir; Salah, Alireza; Amirzadeh, Saeid; Jowkar, Zahra; Mehrabani, Davood; Amini-Bavil-Olyaee, Samad; Dehyadegari, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the associations of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype with HBeAg and anti-HBe status, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and HBV-DNA detection in different groups of HBV-infected patients in southwest Iran. METHODS: A total of 89 HBsAg-positive serum samples were collected from the same number of patients. All sera were then investigated to determine HBV DNA and serological markers. For all the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive samples, biochemical, histopathological assays and genotyping were also performed. RESULTS: Genotype D was the only type of HBV found in different clinical forms of acute and chronic infections. There was a high prevalence of HBeAg-negative HBV-infected patients with chronic hepatitis (52.7%). Out of 55 patients with chronic hepatitis, seven (12.7%) were diagnosed with cirrhosis. A significant association between the presence of anti-HBe antibody and an increase in ALT level, among either HBeAg-negative (P = 0.01) or HBeAg-positive (P = 0.026) patients, was demonstrated. No significant differences were observed between the clinical outcomes of HBeAg-positive and -negative individuals (P = 0.24). CONCLUSION: Genotype D has been recognized as the only type of HBV found in different clinical forms of HBV infections, including cirrhosis, among the residents of southwest Iran. Anti-HBe possibly plays a role in disease progression in some patients with chronic hepatitis, at least for a period of disease. PMID:18330939

  13. Molecular detection of hepatitis E virus in rivers in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yang, Tingting; Shiota, Tomoyuki; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Yoshida, Hiromu; Saito, Mariko; Imagawa, Toshifumi; Malbas, Fidelino F; Lupisan, Socorro P; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Wakita, Takaji; Ishii, Koji

    2014-04-01

    To understand the hepatitis E virus (HEV)-pollution status in the environment in the Philippines, a total of 12 water samples were collected from rivers in Manila City for detection of HEV RNA. Three of 12 samples were positive for HEV RNA indicating that HEV is circulating in the Philippines. Phylogenetic analysis classified all of the HEV sequences into genotype 3. PMID:24591433

  14. Molecular Mechanism and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis-Related Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tung-Hung; Kao, Jia-Horng; Liu, Chun-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound-healing response to various chronic stimuli, including viral hepatitis B or C infection. Activated myofibroblasts, predominantly derived from the hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), regulate the balance between matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors to maintain extracellular matrix homeostasis. Transforming growth factor-β and platelet-derived growth factor are classic profibrogenic signals that activate HSC proliferation. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines coordinate macrophages, T cells, NK/NKT cells, and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells in complex fibrogenic and regression processes. In addition, fibrogenesis involves angiogenesis, metabolic reprogramming, autophagy, microRNA, and epigenetic regulations. Hepatic inflammation is the driving force behind liver fibrosis; however, host single nucleotide polymorphisms and viral factors, including the genotype, viral load, viral mutation, and viral proteins, have been associated with fibrosis progression. Eliminating the underlying etiology is the most crucial antifibrotic therapy. Growing evidence has indicated that persistent viral suppression with antiviral therapy can result in fibrosis regression, reduced liver disease progression, decreased hepatocellular carcinoma, and improved chances of survival. Preclinical studies and clinical trials are currently examining several investigational agents that target key fibrogenic pathways; the results are promising and shed light on this debilitating illness. PMID:24927147

  15. Delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase deficiency described in identical twins with neonatal hepatitis. A new inborn error in bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Setchell, K D; Suchy, F J; Welsh, M B; Zimmer-Nechemias, L; Heubi, J; Balistreri, W F

    1988-01-01

    A new inborn error in bile acid synthesis, manifest in identical infant twins as severe intrahepatic cholestasis, is described involving the delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase catalyzed conversion of the key intermediates, 7 alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one and 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one for chenodeoxycholic and cholic acid synthesis, to the respective 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 beta (H) products. This defect was detected by fast atom bombardment ionization-mass spectrometry from an elevated excretion and predominance of taurine conjugated unsaturated hydroxy-oxo-bile acids. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed these to be 7 alpha-hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic and 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic acids (75-92% of total). Fasting serum bile acid concentrations were greater than 37 mumol/liter; chenodeoxycholic acid was the major bile acid, but significant amounts of allo(5 alpha-H)-bile acids (approximately 30%) were present. Biliary bile acid concentration was less than 2 mumol/liter and consisted of chenodeoxycholic, allo-chenodeoxycholic, and allo-cholic acids. These biochemical findings, which were identical in both infants, indicate a defect in bile acid synthesis involving the conversion of the delta 4-3-oxo-C27 intermediates into the corresponding 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 beta(H)-structures, a reaction that is catalyzed by a delta 4-3-oxosteroid-5 beta reductase enzyme. This defect resulted in markedly reduced primary bile acid synthesis and concomitant accumulation of delta 4-3-oxo-and allo-bile acids. These findings indicate a pathway in bile acid synthesis whereby side chain oxidation can occur despite incomplete alterations to the steroid nucleus, and lend support for an active delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 alpha-reductase catalyzing the conversion of the delta 4-3-oxosteroid intermediates to the respective 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha(H)-structures. PMID:3198770

  16. Molecular principles behind Boceprevir resistance due to mutations in hepatitis C NS3/4A protease.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Neha; Goyal, Sukriti; Wahi, Divya; Jain, Ritu; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Rana, Preeti; Grover, Abhinav

    2015-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a primary cause of chronic hepatitis which eventually progresses to cirrhosis and in some instances might advance to hepatocellular carcinoma. According to the WHO report, HCV infects 130-150 million people globally and every year 350,000 to 500,000 people die from hepatitis C virus infection. Great achievement has been made in viral treatment evolution, after the development of HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor (Boceprevir). However, efficacy of Boceprevir is compromised by the emergence of drug resistant variants. The molecular principle behind drug resistance of the protease mutants such as (V36M, T54S and R155K) is still poorly understood. Therefore in this study, we employed a series of computational strategies to analyze the binding of antiviral drug, Boceprevir to HCV NS3/4A protease mutants. Our results clearly demonstrate that the point mutations (V36M, T54S and R155K) in protease are associated with lowering of its binding affinity with Boceprevir. Exhaustive analysis of the simulated Boceprevir-bound wild and mutant complexes revealed variations in hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bond occupancy and salt bridge interactions. Also, substrate envelope analysis scrutinized that the studied mutations reside outside the substrate envelope which may affect the Boceprevir affinity towards HCV protease but not the protease enzymatic activity. Furthermore, structural analyses of the binding site volume and flexibility show impairment in flexibility and stability of the binding site residues in mutant structures. In order to combat Boceprevir resistance, renovation of binding interactions between the drug and protease may be valuable. The structural insight from this study reveals the mechanism of the Boceprevir resistance and the results can be valuable for the design of new PIs with improved efficiency. PMID:26055089

  17. Hepatitis B and liver transplantation: molecular and clinical features that influence recurrence and outcome.

    PubMed

    Ghaziani, Tahereh; Sendi, Hossein; Shahraz, Saeid; Zamor, Philippe; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2014-10-21

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is estimated that about 350 million people throughout the world are chronically infected with HBV. Some of these people will develop hepatic cirrhosis with decompensation and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. For such patients, liver transplantation may be the only hope for cure or real improvement in quality and quantity of life. Formerly, due to rapidity of recurrence of HBV infection after liver transplantation, usually rapidly progressive, liver transplantation was considered to be contraindicated. This changed dramatically following the demonstration that hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG), could prevent recurrent HBV infection. HBIG has been the standard of care for the past two decades or so. Recently, with the advent of highly active inhibitors of the ribose nucleic acid polymerase of HBV (entecavir, tenofovir), there has been growing evidence that HBIG needs to be given for shorter lengths of time; indeed, it may no longer be necessary at all. In this review, we describe genetic variants of HBV and past, present, and future prophylaxis of HBV infection during and after liver transplantation. We have reviewed the extant medical literature on the subject of infection with the HBV, placing particular emphasis upon the prevention and treatment of recurrent HBV during and after liver transplantation. For the review, we searched PubMed for all papers on the subject of "hepatitis B virus AND liver transplantation". We describe some of the more clinically relevant and important genetic variations in the HBV. We also describe current practices at our medical centers, provide a summary and analysis of comparative costs for alternative strategies for prevention of recurrent HBV, and pose important still unanswered questions that are in need of answers during the next decade or two. We conclude that it is now rational and cost-effective to decrease and, perhaps, cease altogether

  18. Hepatitis B and liver transplantation: Molecular and clinical features that influence recurrence and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ghaziani, Tahereh; Sendi, Hossein; Shahraz, Saeid; Zamor, Philippe; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is estimated that about 350 million people throughout the world are chronically infected with HBV. Some of these people will develop hepatic cirrhosis with decompensation and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. For such patients, liver transplantation may be the only hope for cure or real improvement in quality and quantity of life. Formerly, due to rapidity of recurrence of HBV infection after liver transplantation, usually rapidly progressive, liver transplantation was considered to be contraindicated. This changed dramatically following the demonstration that hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG), could prevent recurrent HBV infection. HBIG has been the standard of care for the past two decades or so. Recently, with the advent of highly active inhibitors of the ribose nucleic acid polymerase of HBV (entecavir, tenofovir), there has been growing evidence that HBIG needs to be given for shorter lengths of time; indeed, it may no longer be necessary at all. In this review, we describe genetic variants of HBV and past, present, and future prophylaxis of HBV infection during and after liver transplantation. We have reviewed the extant medical literature on the subject of infection with the HBV, placing particular emphasis upon the prevention and treatment of recurrent HBV during and after liver transplantation. For the review, we searched PubMed for all papers on the subject of “hepatitis B virus AND liver transplantation”. We describe some of the more clinically relevant and important genetic variations in the HBV. We also describe current practices at our medical centers, provide a summary and analysis of comparative costs for alternative strategies for prevention of recurrent HBV, and pose important still unanswered questions that are in need of answers during the next decade or two. We conclude that it is now rational and cost-effective to decrease and, perhaps, cease

  19. Hepatitis Delta Virus Detected in Salivary Glands of Sjögren’s Syndrome Patients and Recapitulates a Sjögren’s Syndrome-Like Phenotype in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Melodie L.; Gardener, Matthew R.; Bogus, Zoe C.; Smith, Michael A.; Astorri, Elisa; Michael, Drew G.; Michael, Donald A.; Zheng, Changyu; Burbelo, Peter D.; Lai, Zhennan; Wilson, Paul A.; Swaim, William; Handelman, Beverly; Afione, Sandra A.; Bombardieri, Michele; Chiorini, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-level, chronic viral infections have been suspect in the development of select autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS). Multiple studies have shown stimulation of antiviral response pathways in pSS tissues suggestive of a viral infection. Yet, with this data in hand, a causal link between a viral infection and development of pSS had not been identified. Therefore, a study was designed to further define the viral landscape within pSS-affected salivary gland tissue to identify potential viral-mediated triggers in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. Methods A viral microarray was utilized to measure viral transcripts present in salivary gland tissue from patients diagnosed with pSS compared to healthy controls. Murine models of salivary gland localized HDV antigen expression were developed to evaluate the capacity of a chronic HDV signature to trigger the development of a pSS-like phenotype. Results Through this analysis, two distinct viral profiles were identified, including the increased presence of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) in 50% of pSS patients evaluated. Presence of HDV antigen and sequence were confirmed in minor salivary gland tissue. Patients with elevated HDV levels in salivary gland tissue were negative for detectible hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen and antibodies to HBV or HDV. Expression of HDV antigens in vivo resulted in reduced stimulated saliva flow, increase in focal lymphocytic infiltrates, and development of autoantibodies. Conclusion Identification of HDV in pSS patients and induction of a complete pSS-like phenotype in vivo provides further support of a viral-mediated etiopathology in the development of pSS. PMID:27294212

  20. Molecular Basis of the Behavior of Hepatitis A Virus Exposed to High Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    D'Andrea, Lucía; Pérez-Rodríguez, Francisco J.; Costafreda, M. Isabel; Beguiristain, Nerea; Fuentes, Cristina; Aymerich, Teresa; Guix, Susana; Bosch, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Food-borne hepatitis A outbreaks may be prevented by subjecting foods at risk of virus contamination to moderate treatments of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). A pretreatment promoting hepatitis A virus (HAV) capsid-folding changes enhances the virucidal effect of HHP, indicating that its efficacy depends on capsid conformation. HAV populations enriched in immature capsids (125S provirions) are more resistant to HHP, suggesting that mature capsids (150S virions) are more susceptible to this treatment. In addition, the monoclonal antibody (MAb) K24F2 epitope contained in the immunodominant site is a key factor for the resistance to HHP. Changes in capsid folding inducing a loss of recognition by MAb K24F2 render more susceptible conformations independently of the origin of such changes. Accordingly, codon usage-associated folding changes and changes stimulated by pH-dependent breathings, provided they confer a loss of recognition by MAb K24F2, induce a higher susceptibility to HHP. In conclusion, the resistance of HAV to HHP treatments may be explained by a low proportion of 150S particles combined with a good accessibility of the epitope contained in the immunodominant site close to the 5-fold axis. PMID:25107980

  1. Molecular beam deposition of Dy sub 1 Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta. (001) high-temperature superconductor thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, J.; Seshadri, P.; Choudhary, K.M. )

    1992-03-01

    Epitaxial Dy{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}(001) high-temperature superconductor thin films on LaAlO{sub 3} substrates have been prepared by coevaporation of Dy, BaF{sub 2}, and Cu and postannealing. The vapors in desired ratio were evaporated from effusion cells in a miniature molecular beam deposition system. The films show critical transition temperature ({ital T}{sub {ital c},0}) of 89.5{plus minus}0.5 K. During process development it was found that single phase Dy{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2{minus}x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y}(001) thin films can be grown ({ital x}=0 to 0.3). Their electrical properties were useful in calibration of quartz crystal thin film thickness monitor (FTM) for determination of relationships between the actual vapor arrival rate (flux) and FTM reading.

  2. New role and molecular mechanism of Gadd45a in hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Liang; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xu, Ting-Yan; Wu, Yang-He; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Rong-Quan; Cai, Fu-Jing; Zhou, Qing-Qing; Zhou, Ke; Du, Qing-Wei; Zhang, Dong; Xu, Shuang; Ding, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of Gadd45a in hepatic fibrosis and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad signaling pathway. METHODS: Wild-type male BALB/c mice were treated with CCl4 to induce a model of chronic liver injury. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were isolated from the liver of BALB/c mice and were treated with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting Gadd45a or the pcDNA3.1-Gadd45a recombinant plasmid. Cellular α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), β-actin, type I collagen, phospho-Smad2, phospho-Smad3, Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4 were detected by Western blots. The mRNA levels of α-SMA, β-actin, and type I collagen were determined by quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR analyses. Reactive oxygen species production was monitored by flow cytometry using 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Gadd45a, Gadd45b, anti-Gadd45g, type I collagen, and SMA local expression in liver tissue were measured by histologic and immunohistochemical analyses. RESULTS: Significant downregulation of Gadd45a, but not Gadd45b or Gadd45g, accompanied by activation of the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathways was detected in fibrotic liver tissues of mice and isolated HSCs with chronic liver injury induced by CCl4 treatment. Overexpression of Gadd45a reduced the expression of extracellular matrix proteins and α-SMA in HSCs, whereas transient knockdown of Gadd45a with siRNA reversed this process. Gadd45a inhibited the activity of a plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promoter construct and (CAGA)9 MLP-Luc, an artificial Smad3/4-specific reporter, as well as reduced the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad3. Gadd45a showed protective effects by scavenging reactive oxygen species and upregulating antioxidant enzymes. CONCLUSION: Gadd45a may counteract hepatic fibrosis by regulating the activation of HSCs via the inhibition of TGF-β/Smad signaling. PMID:26973416

  3. Molecular characterization, distribution, and dynamics of hepatitis C virus genotypes in blood donors in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Mora, Mónica Viviana Alvarado; Romano, Camila Malta; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Gutiérrez, Maria Fernanda; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a frequent cause of acute and chronic hepatitis and a leading cause for cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is classified in six major genotypes and more than 70 subtypes. In Colombian blood banks, serum samples were tested for anti-HCV antibodies using a third-generation ELISA. The aim of this study was to characterize the viral sequences in plasma of 184 volunteer blood donors who attended the "Banco Nacional de Sangre de la Cruz Roja Colombiana," Bogotá, Colombia. Three different HCV genomic regions were amplified by nested PCR. The first of these was a segment of 180 bp of the 5'UTR region to confirm the previous diagnosis by ELISA. From those that were positive to the 5'UTR region, two further segments were amplified for genotyping and subtyping by phylogenetic analysis: a segment of 380 bp from the NS5B region; and a segment of 391 bp from the E1 region. The distribution of HCV subtypes was: 1b (82.8%), 1a (5.7%), 2a (5.7%), 2b (2.8%), and 3a (2.8%). By applying Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation, it was estimated that HCV-1b was introduced into Bogotá around 1950. Also, this subtype spread at an exponential rate between about 1970 to about 1990, after which transmission of HCV was reduced by anti-HCV testing of this population. Among Colombian blood donors, HCV genotype 1b is the most frequent genotype, especially in large urban conglomerates such as Bogotá, as is the case in other South American countries. PMID:20872715

  4. Molecular virology of hepatitis B virus, sub-genotype C4 in northern Australian Indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, M; Davies, J; Yuen, L; Edwards, R; Sozzi, T; Jackson, K; Cowie, B; Tong, S; Davis, J; Locarnini, S

    2014-04-01

    Indigenous Australians experience a significant health burden from chronic hepatitis B infection; however, the strain of hepatitis B virus (HBV) found among Indigenous Australians has not been well characterized. Blood samples were collected from 65 Indigenous Australians with chronic HBV infection from across the Top End of Australia's Northern Territory. Phylogenetic analysis of HBV from these samples revealed that 100% of the isolates were genotype C, sub-genotype C4, expressing the serotype ayw3. This strain is a divergent group within the HBV/C genotype, and has only been described in Indigenous Australians. Evidence of recombination was suggested by discordant phylogenetic clustering of the C4 sequences when comparing the full genome to the surface region and confirmed by recombination analysis which showed the surface gene region to be most closely related to genotype J, while the remaining regions of the genome were most similar to genotype C sequences. Mutational analysis revealed the presence of multiple mutations that have been linked with more rapid liver disease progression and an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. These mutations were detected in the majority of sequences examined. Variants associated with vaccine failure were detected as the predominant viral quasi-species in 3/35 samples. In summary, the HBV C4 variant found in this population has a high potential to cause advanced liver disease and to escape vaccination programs. Further in vitro functional and natural history studies are warranted in order to determine the clinical and public health consequences of infection with the HBV C4 variant in these communities. PMID:24497078

  5. Neferine inhibits cultured hepatic stellate cell activation and facilitates apoptosis: A possible molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Shi, Jinghong; Wang, Ying; Guo, Jia; Zhao, Juhui; Dong, Lei

    2011-01-10

    Neferine is a major alkaloid component of "Lian Zi Xin", embryos of the seeds of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertner, Nymphaeaceae. Previous studies have shown that neferine has an inhibitory effect on pulmonary fibrosis through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities and inhibition of cytokines and NF-κB. However, it is unknown whether neferine also has an inhibitory effect on liver fibrosis through inhibition of TGF-β1 and collagen I and facilitation of apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells. This study examined the effects of neferine on cultured hepatic stellate (HSC-T6) cells and explored its possible action mechanisms by means of MTT assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow-cytometric annexin V-PI assay and Hoechst 33258 staining, as well as real-time PCR and western blotting. The results showed that neferine administration (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10μmol/l) significantly decreased the TGF-β1 and collagen I produced in HSC-T6 cells, and increased the HSC-T6 cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Neferine treatment for 48h at concentrations of 6 and 10μmol/l significantly increased Bax and caspase 3 mRNAs and proteins, and reduced Bcl2 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) mRNAs and proteins. Our data indicate that neferine efficiently inhibits cultured HSC-T6 cell activation and induces apoptosis by increasing Bax and caspase 3 expression via the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:20969858

  6. Using Molecular Initiating Events to Develop a Structural Alert Based Screening Workflow for Nuclear Receptor Ligands Associated with Hepatic Steatosis.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Claire L; Steinmetz, Fabian P; Cronin, Mark T D

    2016-02-15

    In silico models are essential for the development of integrated alternative methods to identify organ level toxicity and lead toward the replacement of animal testing. These models include (quantitative) structure-activity relationships ((Q)SARs) and, importantly, the identification of structural alerts associated with defined toxicological end points. Structural alerts are able both to predict toxicity directly and assist in the formation of categories to facilitate read-across. They are particularly important to decipher the myriad mechanisms of action that result in organ level toxicity. The aim of this study was to develop novel structural alerts for nuclear receptor (NR) ligands that are associated with inducing hepatic steatosis and to show the vast number of existing data that are available. Current knowledge on NR agonists was extended with data from the ChEMBL database (12,713 chemicals in total) of bioactive molecules and from studying NR ligand-binding interactions within the protein database (PDB, 624 human NR structure files). A computational structural alert based workflow was developed using KNIME from these data using molecular fragments and other relevant chemical features. In total, 214 structural features were recorded computationally as SMARTS strings, and therefore, they can be used for grouping and screening during drug development and hazard assessment and provide knowledge to anchor adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) via their molecular initiating events (MIEs). PMID:26787004

  7. [Hepatic Resection of Multiple Liver Metastases from Gastric Cancer after Molecular Targeted Chemotherapy(S-1 plus Cisplatin plus Trastuzumab)].

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongkook; Hosoda, Yohei; Nishino, Masaya; Okano, Miho; Kawada, Junji; Yamasaki, Masaru; Nagai, Ken-ichi; Yasui, Masayosi; Okuyama, Masaki; Tsujinaka, Toshimasa

    2015-11-01

    A 62-year-old man was diagnosed with gastric cancer and underwent distal gastrectomy, and D1+b lymph node dissection. He was diagnosed postoperatively with T1b (sm2) N0M0, StageⅠA gastric adenocarcinoma and did not receive any adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery. One year and 6 months after gastrectomy, blood analysis indicated high levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA 262.1 ng/mL) while abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple liver tumors (S7: 15 mm, S7/8: 20 mm). The patient was diagnosed with metachronous multiple liver metastases from gastric cancer. Chemotherapy, combined with molecular targeted therapy (S-1 plus cisplatin [CDDP] plus trastuzumab), was administered because of overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein in the primary tumor as assessed by immunohistochemistry, the CEA levels decreased immediately after 2 cycles of the chemotherapy, and the liver metastases shrank markedly with no evidence of new lesions on abdominal CT. However, after treatment, Grade 3 neutropenia and diarrhea were observed. Chemotherapy was suspended and hepatic resection was performed. After hepatic resection, the liver tumors were histologically evaluated as Grade 2 metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma, and the HER2 expression of remnant carcinoma cells was established. The patient has been in good health and remained free of recurrences in the 2 years and 3 months after the liver resection. Surgery with preoperative chemotherapy (S-1 plus CDDP plus trastuzumab) can be an effective treatment for liver metastasis from HER2-positive gastric cancer. PMID:26805121

  8. Singlet molecular oxygen ( sup 1. Delta. sub g O sub 2 ) formation upon irradiation of an oxygen ( sup 3. Sigma. sub g sup minus O sub 2 )-organic molecule charge-transfer absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R. )

    1989-07-13

    Singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) phosphorescence ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup {minus}}O{sub 2} {l arrow} {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}: 1270 nm) has been observed in a time-resolved experiment subsequent to pulsed UV laser irradiation of the oxygen ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup {minus}}O{sub 2})-organic molecule charge-transfer bands of liquid aromatic hydrocarbons (mesitylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, toluene, benzene), ethers (tetrahydrofuran, 1,4-dioxane, glyme, diglyme, triglyme), alcohols (methanol, propanol), and aliphatic hydrocarbons (cyclohexane, cyclooctane, decahydronaphthalene). Although {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} could originate from a variety of different processes in these oxygenated solvent systems, we have used the results of several independent experiments to indicate that an oxygen-solvent charge-transfer (CT) state is the {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} precursor. Other transient species have also been observed in time-resolved absorption experiments subsequent to pulsed UV irradiation of the oxygen-solvent CT bands. Some of these molecular transients, or species derived from these intermediates, may be responsible for an observed increase in the rate of {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} decay under certain conditions.

  9. Molecular Characterization and Expression Analysis of the Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Delta (PPARδ) Gene before and after Exercise in Horse

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Shin, Sangsu; Park, Jeong-Woong; Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Nam-Young; Lee, Woon-Kyu; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Song, Ki-Duk; Cho, Byung-Wook

    2015-01-01

    While athletic abilities such as speed, endurance and recovery are important in the horse, genes related to these abilities have not been extensively investigated. Here, we characterized the horse peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ) gene and analyzed the expression of PPARδ during exercise. PPARδ is a known regulator of β-oxidation, muscle fiber transformation, and running endurance. Through evolutionary analysis using the synonymous and non-synonymous mutation ratio, it was revealed that positive selection occurred in the horse PPARδ gene. Two important domains related to nuclear hormone receptors, C4 zinc finger and ligand binding domain, were also found to be conserved well in horse PPARδ. Horse PPARδ was expressed ubiquitously in many tissues, but the expression level was various depending on the tissues. In the skeletal muscle, PPARδ increased about 2.5 folds after 30 min of exercise. Unlike in muscle, the increase of PPARδ expression was observed at 60 min but not 30 min of exercise in leukocytes. This finding might be useful for testing the endurance of horse using blood samples. Conclusively, the horse PPARδ gene is evolutionarily conserved well and can be used as a biomarker of endurance in horse. PMID:25924962

  10. Molecular characterization of hepatitis c virus in multi-transfused Colombian patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 170 million persons worldwide and is a public health problem. Considering that HCV is principally transmitted by exposure to infected blood, multi-transfused patients constitute one of the most important risk groups in developing countries. To explore the dynamics of this infection in Colombia, we performed a study to determine the genotypes of HCV in a cohort of multi-transfused patients. Results The serum samples from patients positive for anti-HCV were evaluated for HCV RNA by nested-PCR of the 5’untranslated region (5’UTR). Viral genotype was determined by RFLP and/or automated sequencing. HCV subtype 1b was found in eight cases (66.7%) and subtype 1a in two cases (16.7%); seven isolates of subtype 1b were obtained from patients who had received the first transfusion before 1986. Either genotypes 2b (8.3%) or 3a (8.3%) were found in the remaining positive specimens. Conclusions This is the first HCV genotyping study developed in multi-transfused patients in Colombia where HCV subtype 1b was the most prevalent. The mutation G235A in the 5’UTR of three isolates generated an additional restriction site and an RFLP pattern different from those previously described for genotype 1. PMID:23088845

  11. Single-step PCR in molecular diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Farma, E; Boeri, E; Bettini, P; Repetto, C M; McDermott, J; Lillo, F B; Varnier, O E

    1996-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of two PCR systems and three PCR detection methods for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA was evaluated in serum samples. A nested PCR was considered the reference assay and was compared with two single-step PCR methods: the first is based on the detection of PCR products by liquid hybridization with a 32P-end-labeled probe, and the second is the Roche Amplicor colorimetric assay using microwell plate hybridization with a specific nucleic acid probe. Using the Pelicheck HCV RNA Eurohep genotype 1 proficiency panel, our laboratory achieved medium-high levels of performance with all three methods. The highest sensitivity was, however, observed with the isotopic single-step PCR (ss-PCR) method. The analytical sensitivity of ss-PCR with isotopic detection and ss-PCR with colorimetric detection was identical to that of nested PCR, with a 100% result concordance. Comparison of ss-PCR with enzyme-linked immunosorbent and RIBA assays in the analysis of clinical samples showed a high concordance. ss-PCR methods appear more suitable for diagnostic application. Nevertheless, HCV RNA PCR cannot be considered a screening assay; it should be requested in the presence of reactive serology or specific clinical symptomatology with altered liver parameters, and it is a potential tool for the follow-up of patients with HCV infection. PMID:8940466

  12. Predation on larval suckers in the Williamson River Delta revealed by molecular genetic assays—A pilot study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hereford, Danielle M.; Ostberg, Carl O.; Burdick, Summer M.

    2016-01-01

    Predation of endangered Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) during larval egress to Upper Klamath Lake from the Williamson River is poorly understood but may be an important factor limiting recruitment into adult spawning populations. Native and non-native piscivores are abundant in nursery wetland habitat, but larval predation has not been directly studied for all species. Larvae lack hard body structures and digest rapidly in predator digestive systems. Therefore, traditional visual methods for diet analysis may fail to identify the extent of predation on larvae. The goals of this study were to (1) use quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays developed for Lost River and shortnose suckers to assay predator stomach contents for sucker DNA, and (2) to assess our ability to use this technique to study predation. Predators were captured opportunistically during larval sucker egress. Concurrent feeding trials indicate that most predators—yellow perch (Perca flaverscens), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), blue chub (Gila coerulea), Klamath tui chub (Siphatales bicolor bicolor), Klamath Lake sculpin (Cottus princeps), slender sculpin (Cottus tenuis)—preyed on sucker larvae in the laboratory. However, sucker DNA was not detected in fathead minnow stomachs. Of the stomachs screened from fish captured in the Williamson River Delta, 15.6 percent of yellow perch contained sucker DNA. This study has demonstrated that the application of qPCR and SNP assays is effective for studying predation on larval suckers. We suggest that techniques associated with dissection or detection of sucker DNA from fathead minnow stomachs need improvement.

  13. The Prevalence and Risk Factors of Hepatitis Delta Virus in HIV/HBV Co-Infected Patients in Shiraz, Iran, 2012.

    PubMed

    Motamedifar, Mohammad; Taheri, Mohammad; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Gholami, Mina; Lari, Mahmood Amini; Faramarzi, Hossein; Sarvari, Jamal

    2015-09-01

    Evidence has shown that liver disease caused by hepatitis viruses can be more aggressive and severe in HIV infected subjects. Therefore, the present cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of HDV infection among HIV/HBV co-infected clients in Shiraz, southwest Iran. In this study, 178 patients co-infected with HBV and HIV individuals were enrolled. The diagnosis of HIV infection was documented based on serological assays. The demographic and complementary data were collected by a questionnaire. HBsAg and HDV Ab were detected by commercial quantitative enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kits according to the manufacturer's instructions. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were also measured. The mean age of the participants was 37.4±7.4 years (range 22-63). 175 (98.4 %) patients were male and 3 (1.6 %) were female. Among 178 patients co-infected with HIV/HBV, 35 cases (19.7%, 95% CI: 14%-25%) were anti-HDV‏ positive and 143 (80.3%) were negative for anti-HDV. HDV exposure in HIV/HBV co-infected patients was associated with blood transfusion (P=0.002, OR: 14.3) and prison history (P=0.01, OR: 2.31) but not with age, marital status, unsafe sex contact, and injection drug abuse. Our data showed a relatively high prevalence of HDV infection in HIV infected population in Shiraz, Iran. The high frequency of HDV Ab in patients with blood transfusion and prison history reveals that HDV transmission occurs more frequently in the parental route than sexual contacts; therefore, blood screening for HDV diagnosis in the high-risk group is recommended. PMID:26379352

  14. Detection of antibody against antigen expressed by molecularly cloned hepatitis C virus cDNA: Application to diagnosis and blood screening for posttransfusion hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamura, Tatsuo; Saito, Izumu ); Katayama, Tohru ); Kikuchi, Shu; Tateda, Akira ); Houghton, M.; Choo, Quilim; Kuo, G. )

    1990-02-01

    A cDNA clone has been derived from the plasma of a chimpanzee with chronic non-A, non-B viral hepatits (NANBH). The authors have assayed for antibodies reacting with the encoded antigen in sera from posttransfusion hepatitis patients (643 samples from 23 patients) and their corresponding donors collected during the past 10 years in Japan. The antibody was detected in 15 out of 17 (88.2%) posttransfusion NANBH (PT-NANBH) patients whose sera over time displayed multiple alanine aminotransferase (ALT) peaks. In general, the antibody was detected after several peaks of serum ALT elevations and, once detected, it persisted for years. Of the 15 well-defined cases of PT-NANBH that showed multiple ALT peaks and hepatitis C virus seroconversions, 11 (73.3%) were shown to be transfused with at least one unit of blood positive for the antibody. The retrospective analysis showed that all tested donor blood found to be positive for the antibody had been transfused to recipients who afterwards developed NANBH. These data strongly suggest that the cloned cDNA originated from an etiological agent of NANBH termed the hepatitis C virus. Furthermore, the present study demonstrates that had the screening been done with the anti-hepatitis C virus assay, 11 out of 17 (64.7%) cases of chronic PT-NANBH and 1 out of 6 (16.6%) acute PT-NANBH would have been prevented.

  15. Molecular epidemiology and putative origin of hepatitis C virus in random volunteers from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    del Pino, Noemí; Oubiña, José Raúl; Rodríguez-Frías, Francisco; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Buti, María; Otero, Teresa; Gregori, Josep; García-Cehic, Damir; Camos, Silvia; Cubero, María; Casillas, Rosario; Guàrdia, Jaume; Esteban, Rafael; Quer, Josep

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the subtype prevalence and the phylogenetic relatedness of hepatitis C virus (HCV) sequences obtained from the Argentine general population, a large cohort of individuals was analyzed. METHODS: Healthy Argentinian volunteers (n = 6251) from 12 provinces representing all geographical regions of the country were studied. All parents or legal guardians of individuals younger than 18 years provided informed written consent for participation. The corresponding written permission from all municipal authorities was obtained from each city or town where subjects were to be included. HCV RNA reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction products were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. The 5’ untranslated region (5’UTR) was used for RNA detection and initial genotype classification. The NS5B polymerase region, encompassing nt 8262-8610, was used for subtyping. RESULTS: An unexpectedly low prevalence of HCV infection in the general population (0.32%) was observed. Our data contrasted with previous studies that reported rates ranging from 1.5% to 2.5%, mainly performed in selected populations of blood donors or vulnerable groups. The latter values are in keeping with the prevalence reported by the 2007 Argentinian HCV Consensus (approximately 2%). HCV subtypes were distributed as follows: 1a (25%), 1b (25%), 2c (25%), 3a (5%), and 2j (5%). Two isolates ascribed either to genotype 1 (5%) or to genotype 3 (5%) by 5’UTR phylogenetic analysis could not be subtyped. Subtype 1a sequences comprised a highly homogeneous population and clustered with United States sequences. Genotype 1b sequences represented a heterogeneous population, suggesting that this genotype might have been introduced from different sources. Most subtype 2c sequences clustered close to the 2c reported from Italy and Southern France. CONCLUSION: HCV has a low prevalence of 0.32% in the studied general population of Argentina. The pattern of HCV introduction and transmission in

  16. Molecular characterization of hepatitis C virus core region in moroccan intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Trimbitas, Roxana-Delia; Fayssel, Naouar; Serghini, Fatima-Zahra; Wakrim, Lahcen; Khyatti, Meriem; Essalhi, Mohammed; Bellefquih, Abdelkrim Meziane; Benani, Abdelouaheb

    2016-08-01

    Intravenous drug users (IDUs) represent a highly-infected reservoir for Hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide, harboring some of the most elevated prevalences and majority of the epidemic in developed nations. Studies aimed at sequencing regions of the viral genome uncovered amino acid mutations, some of which have been implicated in resistance to standard of care pegylated interferon/Ribavirin double therapy. Using the nested PCR method on the Core region of HCV strains in Moroccan IDUs living in the Tangier region this study sought to identify genotype-specific amino acid mutations, followed by Phylogenetic methods in order to compare them with international strains so as to identify sequences of highest homology. Genotyping was confirmed and recombination events excluded by line-probe assay. Italy was found most homologous for genotypes 1a and 3a, Iran for genotype 1a and Egypt for genotype 4a. Amino Acid Mutation analysis revealed the following novel genotype 3a-specific mutations: N16I, L36V, T49A, P71S, T75S, and T110N. The outcome of this work describes the HCV genetic heterogeneity in high-risk intravenous drug users, and it gives clues to the global migratory flow of genotypes as they cross geographical boundaries between various IDU populations and identifies "signature" amino acid mutations traceable to HCV genotype 3a. Identification of key amino acid positions in the HCV Core region with higher rates of mutations paves the way for eventual clinical trials seeking to establish a link between these recurrent mutations and response to standard of care Interferon and Ribavirin antiviral therapy. J. Med. Virol. 88:1376-1383, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26754854

  17. Molecular identification of hepatitis B virus genotypes/subgenotypes: Revised classification hurdles and updated resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Pourkarim, Mahmoud Reza; Amini-Bavil-Olyaee, Samad; Kurbanov, Fuat; Van Ranst, Marc; Tacke, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The clinical course of infections with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) substantially varies between individuals, as a consequence of a complex interplay between viral, host, environmental and other factors. Due to the high genetic variability of HBV, the virus can be categorized into different HBV genotypes and subgenotypes, which considerably differ with respect to geographical distribution, transmission routes, disease progression, responses to antiviral therapy or vaccination, and clinical outcome measures such as cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. However, HBV (sub)genotyping has caused some controversies in the past due to misclassifications and incorrect interpretations of different genotyping methods. Thus, an accurate, holistic and dynamic classification system is essential. In this review article, we aimed at highlighting potential pitfalls in genetic and phylogenetic analyses of HBV and suggest novel terms for HBV classification. Analyzing full-length genome sequences when classifying genotypes and subgenotypes is the foremost prerequisite of this classification system. Careful attention must be paid to all aspects of phylogenetic analysis, such as bootstrapping values and meeting the necessary thresholds for (sub)genotyping. Quasi-subgenotype refers to subgenotypes that were incorrectly suggested to be novel. As many of these strains were misclassified due to genetic differences resulting from recombination, we propose the term “recombino-subgenotype”. Moreover, immigration is an important confounding facet of global HBV distribution and substantially changes the geographic pattern of HBV (sub)genotypes. We therefore suggest the term “immigro-subgenotype” to distinguish exotic (sub)genotypes from native ones. We are strongly convinced that applying these two proposed terms in HBV classification will help harmonize this rapidly progressing field and allow for improved prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24966586

  18. Analysis of the Molecular Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Symptomatic Acute Infections in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, María Belén; Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Torres, Carolina; Sevic, Ina; González López Ledesma, María Mora; Perez, Paula Soledad; Bouzas, María Belén; Galdame, Omar; Marciano, Sebastián; Fainboim, Hugo; Flichman, Diego Martín; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a globally distributed human pathogen that leads to both self-limited and chronic infections. At least eight genotypes (A-H) with distinct geographical allocations and phylodynamic behaviors have been described. They differ substantially in many virological and probably some clinical parameters. The aim of this study was to analyze full-length HBV genome sequences from individuals with symptomatic acute HBV infections using phylogenetic and coalescent methods. The phylogenetic analysis resulted in the following subgenotype distribution: F1b (52.7%), A2 (18.2%), F4 (18.2%) and A1, B2, D3 and F2a 1.8% each. These results contrast with those previously reported from chronic infections, where subgenotypes F1b, F4, A2 and genotype D were evenly distributed. This differential distribution might be related to recent internal migrations and/or intrinsic biological features of each viral genotype that could impact on the probability of transmission. The coalescence analysis showed that after a diversification process started in the 80s, the current sequences of subgenotype F1b were grouped in at least four highly supported lineages, whereas subgenotype F4 revealed a more limited diversification pattern with most lineages without offspring in the present. In addition, the genetic characterization of the studied sequences showed that only two of them presented mutations of clinical relevance at S codifyng region and none at the polymerase catalytic domains. Finally, since the acute infections could be an expression of the genotypes currently being transmitted to new hosts, the predominance of subgenotype F1b might have epidemiological, as well as, clinical relevance due to its potential adverse disease outcome among the chronic cases. PMID:27433800

  19. Repeated exposure to trace amounts of woodchuck hepadnavirus induces molecularly evident infection and virus-specific T cell response in the absence of serological infection markers and hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gujar, Shashi A; Mulrooney-Cousins, Patricia M; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to multiple small doses of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a frequent occurrence in high-risk groups, including close relatives of infected individuals, primary care givers, and intravenous drug users. It remains uncertain whether such repeated contact may culminate in a symptomatic infection coinciding with hepatitis in individuals not immunoprotected. In this study, we evaluated consequences of multiple exposures to small, liver-nonpathogenic amounts of infectious hepadnavirus in the woodchuck model of hepatitis B. Virus-naïve animals were intravenously injected with 6 weekly doses of 110 DNase digestion-protected virions of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), injected again with 6 weekly 110-virion doses after 7.5 months, and then challenged or not with a liver-pathogenic dose of 1.1 × 10(6) virions of the same inoculum. The data revealed that two rounds of such repeated exposure did not result in serologically evident infection or hepatitis. However, a low-level WHV DNA-positive infection accompanied by a WHV-specific T cell response in the absence of antiviral antibody reactivity was established. The kinetics of the virus-specific and mitogen-induced (generalized) T cell responses and the inability to induce immunoprotection against challenge with a large, liver-pathogenic virus dose were closely comparable to those previously reported for occult infection initiated by a single liver-nonpathogenic dose of WHV. Thus, repeated exposures to small quantities of hepadnavirus induce molecularly evident but serologically silent infection that does not culminate in hepatitis or generate immune protection. The findings imply that the HBV-specific T cell response encountered in the absence of serological markers of infection likely reflects ongoing occult infection. PMID:23135718

  20. Detection of supercoiled hepatitis B virus DNA and related forms by means of molecular hybridization to an oligonucleotide probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.J.; Chung, H.T.; Lai, C.L.; Leong, S.; Tam, O.S. )

    1989-12-01

    A novel assay for supercoiled and other fully double-stranded forms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in blood is presented that utilizes molecular hybridisation to a radiophosphorous-labeled oligonucleotide probe. The probe (5'-d(ACGTGCAGAGGTGAAGCGA)) is complementary to the S(+)-strand sequence furthest downstream, at the end of the gap. We examined blood specimens from 137 healthy HBsAg-positive individuals, applying the probe to dots representing 2-3.5 ml serum or plasma. We found that supercoiled HBV is present in many HBV DNA-positive blood specimens albeit in small quantities. Of the 104 specimens that were positive for HBV DNA of any form, 53 annealed to the probe. Serial specimens from the same subject taken over a period of months showed that the proportion of supercoil to other HBV DNA forms was variable. The presence of supercoil HBV DNA was not closely correlated with the level of serum HBV DNA polymerase. The supercoil is an HBV DNA form that can persist in the liver in the presence or absence of other replicative intermediates. This assay may enable further characterization of the status of HBV infection.

  1. Two-way molecular ligation for efficient conversion of monomeric hepatitis B virus DNA constructs into tandem dimers.

    PubMed

    Zong, Li; Qin, Yanli; Jia, Haodi; Zhou, Huailiang; Chen, Chaoyang; Qiao, Ke; Zhang, Jiming; Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jisu; Tong, Shuping

    2016-07-01

    Replication of the 3.2-kb hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome is driven by the covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA in the nucleus, from which four classes of co-terminal RNAs are transcribed. Genome replication requires just the 3.5-kb pregenomic RNA, which is terminally redundant. Cloning the full-length HBV genome into a vector disrupts its continuity, thus preventing genome replication at the step of pregenomic RNA transcription. This can be overcome by converting the monomeric construct into a tandem dimer, yet the need to ligate two molecules of the HBV genome with vector DNA makes it inefficient and even unsuccessful. To overcome this problem we partially digested the monomeric construct with the unique restriction enzyme used for cloning, and dephosphorylated the linearized monomer before its ligation with another copy of the HBV genome. Alternatively, the monomer was linearized at another unique restriction site inside the HBV genome, followed by its dephosphorylation and ligation with another copy of the HBV genome linearized at the same site. These approaches of two-way molecular ligation greatly improved the efficiency of dimer formation with about 50% of the bacterial colonies screened harboring tandem dimers. PMID:27025357

  2. Serum haptoglobin as a novel molecular biomarker predicting colorectal cancer hepatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lichao; Hu, Shusheng; Yu, Long; Guo, Chunguang; Sun, Lixin; Yang, Zhihua; Qi, Jun; Ran, Yuliang

    2016-06-01

    Early detection of liver metastasis is important for improving colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival. Our previous studies showed haptoglobin was highly expressed in primary CRC tissues, especially in heterochronous metastatic cases. Here, we assessed the potential of serum haptoglobin (sHP) as a biomarker for early detection of CRC liver metastasis by evaluating the sHP in 475 CRC patients and 152 healthy volunteers. In the training set (250 cases), sHP level in CRC-M1 (1773.18 ± 690.25 ng/mL) were significantly increased as compared to in CRC-M0 (1544.37 ± 1497.65 ng/mL) or healthy (917.76 ± 571.59 ng/mL). And the high sHP level was correlated with poor survival. Logistic regression analysis revealed that sHP, serum carcinoembryonic antigen (sCEA) and serum carbohydrate antigen 19.9 (sCA19.9) level were the significant parameters for detecting liver metastasis. In leave-one-out-cross-validation, these three markers resulted in 89.1% sensitivity and 85.8% specificity for hepatic metastasis detection. In an independent test set (225 cases), receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of sHP in CRC liver metastasis showed an area under the curve of 0.735, with a sensitivity of 87.2% and a specificity of 59.9%. Combination of sHP, sCEA and sCA19.9 improved diagnostic accuracy to 0.880, with a sensitivity of 88.5% and a specificity of 87.8%. Silencing of HP by specific shRNA significantly inhibited the LOVO and SW620 cell invasion, and suppressed xenograft tumor invasive growth. In summary, these results demonstrate that sHP is associated with poor prognosis of CRC patients and that HP promotes colorectal cancer cell invasion. sHP combining with sCA19.9 and sCEA may be used as accurate predictors of CRC liver metastasis. PMID:26756179

  3. Exploring the molecular causes of hepatitis B virus vaccination response: an approach with epigenomic and transcriptomic data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Variable responses to the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) vaccine have recently been reported as strongly dependent on genetic causes. Yet, the details on such mechanisms of action are still unknown. In parallel, altered DNA methylation states have been uncovered as important contributors to a variety of health conditions. However, methodologies for the analysis of such high-throughput data (epigenomic), especially from the computational point of view, still lack of a gold standard, mostly due to the intrinsic statistical distribution of methylomic data i.e. binomial rather than (pseudo-) normal, which characterizes the better known transcriptomic data. We present in this article our contribution to the challenge of epigenomic data analysis with application to the variable response to the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine and its most lethal degeneration: hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods Twenty-five infants were recruited and classified as good and non-/low- responders according to serological test results. Whole genome DNA methylation states were profiled by Illumina HumanMethylation 450 K beadchips. Data were processed through quality and dispersion filtering and with differential methylation analysis based on a combination of average methylation differences and non-parametric statistical tests. Results were finally associated to already published transcriptomics and post-transcriptomics to gain further insight. Results We highlight 2 relevant variations in poor-responders to HBV vaccination: the hypomethylation of RNF39 (Ring Finger Protein 39) and the complex biochemical alteration on SULF2 via hypermethylation, down-regulation and post-transcriptional control. Conclusions Our approach appears to cope with the new challenges implied by methylomic data distribution to warrant a robust ranking of candidates. In particular, being RNF39 within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I region, its altered methylation state fits with an altered

  4. Molecular analysis of the interspousal transmission of hepatitis B virus in two Japanese patients who acquired fulminant hepatitis B after 50 and 49 years of marriage.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Daisuke; Nakayama, Haruo; Ikeda, Tomoyuki; Ikeya, Shinichi; Nagashima, Shigeo; Takahashi, Masaharu; Sugai, Yoshiki; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    A 71-year-old (C1I) and 69-year-old (C2I) Japanese female contracted fulminant hepatitis B after 50 and 49 years of marriage, respectively. Both index cases exhibited high levels of anti-HBc IgM antibodies (24.2 and 31.5 S/CO, respectively), suggestive of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, although they had no discernible risk factors for HBV infection, except for chronically HBV-infected spouses with detectable HBV DNA (3.3 log copies/ml [C1S: 72-year-old] and 7.2 log copies/ml [C2S: 71-year-old]). The HBV genotype/subgenotype was identical in each couple (B/B1 or C/C2). The HBV isolates from the index cases and spouses shared a nucleotide sequence identity of 99.5% and 99.7%, respectively, over the entire genome, and these four isolates had the highest nucleotide sequence identity of only 97% to HBV isolates deposited in DNA databases. Phylogenetic trees confirmed a close relationship of the HBV isolates between C1I and C1S and between C2I and C2S, supported by a high bootstrap value of 100% within each couple, indicating the transfer of HBV infection between spouses. These four isolates shared a precore mutation of G1896A known to be associated with fulminant hepatitis B. Although the history of sexual contact within a reasonable incubation period was obscure for one stable, monogamous couple (C1I and C1S), the other couple had a monogamous sexual relationship within six months prior to disease onset. This study indicates that two elderly Japanese patients with fulminant hepatitis B acquired HBV infection via interspousal (most likely sexual) transmission during long-lasting marriages. PMID:25132075

  5. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  6. Molecular metals based on 1,2,7,8-tetrahydrodicyclopenta[cd:lm]perylene and iodine, (CPP){sub 2}(I{sub 3}){sub 1-{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, J. |; Santos, I.C.; Henriques, R.T.; Almeida, M.; Fourmigue, M.; Matias, P.; Veiros, L.F.; Duarte, M.T.; Alcacer, L.; Calhorda, M.J. |

    1994-12-01

    The synthesis and characterization of molecular metals derived from 1,2,7,8-tetrahydrodicyclopenta[cd:lm]perylene (CPP) by partial oxidation with iodine and with general formula (CPP){sub 2}(I{sub 3}){sub 1-{delta}}, {delta} = 0-0.13, are reported. Single crystals, obtained either by electrocrystallization or by diffusion-controlled iodine oxidation of CPP, present two types of morphologies, elongated diamond or thinner needle-shaped crystals, both with a monoclinic cell, space group P2{sub 1}/a, a = 4.3757(9), b = 19.3681(11), c = 10.0860(11) {angstrom}, {beta} = 98.050(8){degrees}, V = 846.4(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2. The structure of the diamond-shaped crystal was solved by X-ray diffraction to a final R(F) = 0.096, R{sub w}(F) = 0.069. It consists of regular stacks of CPP molecules along a with a 3.41 {angstrom} spacing and uncorrected one-dimensional chains of I{sub 3}{sup {minus}} located in channels between four CPP stacks corresponding to (CPP){sub 2}(I{sub 3}){sub 0.892}. The thin needle crystals have the same unit cell but an unspecified and slightly different iodine content. Band structure calculations in this structure by the extended Hueckel method indicate a one-dimensional conduction band 0.55 eV wide. These thin needle crystals present, at room temperature, an electrical conductivity along the a axis {alpha}{sub a}(RT) = 200 S/cm and thermopower S{sub a}(RT) = 30 {mu}V/K, while for the diamond-shaped crystals {alpha}{sub a}(RT) = 2 S/cm and S{sub a}(RT) = -8 {mu}V/K. These transport coefficients for both types of crystals indicate a metallic behavior from room temperature down to {approx_equal}63 K, where a metal-to-insular (M-I) transition takes place. EPR studies in single crystals show an almost isotropic line at g = 2.0044 and with a width of {approx_equal}6 G in the range 80-300 K and without significant differences between the two types of crystals. 53 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  8. High Diversity of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Panamanian Blood Donors: A Molecular Analysis of New Variants

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Alexander A.; Zaldivar, Yamitzel Y.; De Castillo, Zoila; Ortiz, Alma Y.; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Cristina, Juan; Pascale, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is an infectious agent that causes more than half of the cases of liver disease and cancer in the world. Globally there are around 250 million people chronically infected with this virus. Despite 16% of the cases of liver disease in Central America are caused by HBV, the information regarding its genetic diversity, genotypes and circulation is scarce. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the genetic variability of the HBV genotypes from HBV-DNA positive samples obtained from screening blood donors at the Social Security System of Panama and to estimate its possible origin. From 59,696 blood donors tested for HBV infection during 2010–2012, there were 74 HBV-DNA positive subjects. Analysis of the partial PreS2-S region of 27 sequences shows that 21% of the infections were caused by genotype A, 3% by genotype D and 76% by genotype F. In addition, we were able to confirm circulation of six sub-genotypes A1, A2, A3, D4, F3, F1 and a proposed new sub-genotype denominated F5pan. We found a confinement of sub-genotypes F1 and F5pan to the western area of Panama. The tMRCA analysis suggests a simultaneous circulation of previously described sub-genotypes rather than recent introductions of the Panamanian sub-genotypes in the country. Moreover, these results highlight the need of more intensive research of the HBV strains circulating in the region at the molecular level. In conclusion, Panama has a high HBV genotype diversity that includes a new proposed sub-genotype, an elevated number of PreCore-Core mutations, and confinement of these variants in a specific geographical location. PMID:25093674

  9. High diversity of hepatitis B virus genotypes in Panamanian blood donors: a molecular analysis of new variants.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Alexander A; Zaldivar, Yamitzel Y; De Castillo, Zoila; Ortiz, Alma Y; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Cristina, Juan; Pascale, Juan M

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is an infectious agent that causes more than half of the cases of liver disease and cancer in the world. Globally there are around 250 million people chronically infected with this virus. Despite 16% of the cases of liver disease in Central America are caused by HBV, the information regarding its genetic diversity, genotypes and circulation is scarce. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the genetic variability of the HBV genotypes from HBV-DNA positive samples obtained from screening blood donors at the Social Security System of Panama and to estimate its possible origin. From 59,696 blood donors tested for HBV infection during 2010-2012, there were 74 HBV-DNA positive subjects. Analysis of the partial PreS2-S region of 27 sequences shows that 21% of the infections were caused by genotype A, 3% by genotype D and 76% by genotype F. In addition, we were able to confirm circulation of six sub-genotypes A1, A2, A3, D4, F3, F1 and a proposed new sub-genotype denominated F5pan. We found a confinement of sub-genotypes F1 and F5pan to the western area of Panama. The tMRCA analysis suggests a simultaneous circulation of previously described sub-genotypes rather than recent introductions of the Panamanian sub-genotypes in the country. Moreover, these results highlight the need of more intensive research of the HBV strains circulating in the region at the molecular level. In conclusion, Panama has a high HBV genotype diversity that includes a new proposed sub-genotype, an elevated number of PreCore-Core mutations, and confinement of these variants in a specific geographical location. PMID:25093674

  10. Molecular Characterization of Pre-Core/Core and S Region of Hepatitis B Virus in Hemodialysis Patients With Occult Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rastegarvand, Nasrin; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Samarbafzadeh, Alireza; Rasti, Mojtaba; Neisi, Niloofar; Pouremamali, Amir; Teimoori, Ali; Shabani, Abdolnabi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) is a major public health problem worldwide, which harbors potential risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission through blood transfusion and transplantation. OBI is characterized by the presence of HBV-DNA in the blood or liver tissue without detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in the serum. An important cause of OBI is the occurrence of mutations in the HBV genome, especially in the S region. Objectives: The study aims to analyze mutations in S and pre-core/core regions of HBV-DNA in hemodialysis patients. Patients and Methods: Sera of 216 hemodialysis patients were tested for HBsAg and hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) by ELISA. Sera of patients that tested negative for HBsAg were evaluated by PCR for the detection of HBV-DNA in the S and pre-core/core regions. In total, six PCR products were sequenced, aligned, and compared with the HBV reference sequence. Amino acid deletion and nucleotide substitution were considered mutations in S and pre-core/core regions of HBV-DNA. Results: Among 216 patients, 203 (93.98%) and 175 (81.01%) sera samples tested negative for HBsAg and HBcAb, respectively. Among all HBsAg-negative samples, six (2.9%) tested positive for HBV-DNA, including four (1.97%) for S and two (0.98%) for pre-core regions. All four (1.97%) samples that tested positive for the S region belonged to HBV-subtype awy. The amino acid sequence of all four samples showed the YMDD motif in position 204 (rtM204). There were three amino acid substitutions in the S region (T127P, P153L, and F170S) and one substitution in the RT region (Y135S). Moreover, two (0.98%) pre-core/core positive patients had an unexpected stop codon in position 1896. Conclusions: This study indicates that 2.9% of hemodialysis patients had OBI, which is considered as a major public health problem worldwide. Moreover, we observed three mutations in S region, including T127P, P153L, and F170S, which caused OBI. This study is first to

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Hepatitis B Virus Genotype E: The First Molecular Characterization from an Imported Case in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Fragoso-Fonseca, David Esaú; Arreguín-Porras, Dulce María; Esteban-Valencia, María del Carmen; Corona-Valdespino, Estela; Falcón-Acosta, Jaime Israel; Vázquez-Campuzano, Roberto; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Ortiz-Alcantara, Joanna María; López-Martinez, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is currently a global public health problem. Here, we present the first characterization and complete genome sequence of a strain belonging to genotype E in Mexico, obtained from a foreign carrier with chronic infection. PMID:27034495

  12. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  13. Characterization of new monoclonal antibodies against porcine lymphocytes: molecular characterization of clone 7G3, an antibody reactive with the constant region of the T-cell receptor delta-chains.

    PubMed

    Tang, W-R; Shioya, N; Eguchi, T; Ebata, T; Matsui, J; Takenouchi, H; Honma, D; Yasue, H; Takagaki, Y; Enosawa, S; Itagaki, M; Taguchi, T; Kiyokawa, N; Amemiya, H; Fujimoto, J

    2005-01-10

    A battery of mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) reactive with porcine peripheral blood (PB) leukocytes was generated. Among the mAbs, 6F10 was found to react probably with cluster of differentiation (CD)8 alpha-chain, while 7G3 and 3E12 were found to recognize gammadelta T-cells, as revealed by two-color flow cytometric and immunoprecipitation studies. 7G3 was shown to react with the constant (C) region of the T-cell receptor (TCR) delta-chain by the following facts: (1) 7G3 immunoprecipitated full-length TCR delta-chain protein fused with glutathione S-transferase (GST) produced by Esherichia coli and (2) 7G3 reacted with TCR delta-chain expressing Cos-7 cells transfected with either full-length or N-terminal deleted mutant cDNA, but did not react with Cos-7 cells transfected with C-terminal deleted mutant TCR delta-chain cDNA. All three mAbs produced high-quality immunostaining results on frozen sections, revealing a distinct distribution of gammadelta T-cells and CD8(+) cells. This report precisely characterizes mAbs against porcine TCR for the first time, facilitating molecular biological investigations of the porcine immune system. PMID:15626467

  14. Influence of dietary cholesterol on the relative synthesis of hepatic glycerides and molecular classes of 1,2-diglycerides and phospholipids in the gerbil in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, D.B.; Holub, B.J.

    1985-03-01

    The influence of dietary cholesterol on the relative rates of synthesis of hepatic lipids in the male Mongolian gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus, was studied. The semi-purified starch-based diet used lard as the dietary fat and was fed with or without a 0.5% (by wt.) cholesterol supplement. Each animal received 300 microCi (2-/sup 3/H)-glycerol i.p. after 3 or 7 days on the dietary regimens. Relative rates of (2-/sup 3/H)-glycerol incorporation into the major hepatic glycerides in vivo was not affected significantly by dietary cholesterol (0.5% level), suggesting that alteration in the relative biosynthesis of these lipids could not readily account for the higher triglyceride (TG) to phospholipid (PL) mass ratio in liver with cholesterol feeding. However, there was evidence for an increased formation of 1,2-diglyceride (1,2-DG). The complement of molecular species of hepatic 1,2-DG, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) formed de novo, as measured using isotopic glycerol, was not influenced greatly by dietary cholesterol, although lower mean rates of synthesis of tetraenoic relative to dienoic species of phospholipids were indicated in cholesterol-fed gerbils.

  15. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta teems with sediment deposited by the river as it flows into the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color image captured by MODIS on October 15, 2001. The sediment, which is marked by brown swirls in the Gulf, provides nutrients for the bloom of phytoplankton visible as blue-green swirls off the coastline. In the high-resolution image the city of Memphis can be seen in the southwest corner of Tennessee, which is just to left of center at the top of the image. The brown coloration that encompasses Memphis and either side of the river, as flows north to south along the left side of the image, is the river's flood plain. Also visible, in the upper-right hand corner of the image is the southern end of the Appalachian Mountains.

  16. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Distinct Molecular Characteristics of Hepatitis B-Related Hepatocellular Carcinomas from Very Early to Advanced Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Stages

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Kou, Yan-Bo; You, Hong-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Mei; Zheng, Kui-Yang; Tang, Ren-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)is the fifth most common malignancy associated with high mortality. One of the risk factors for HCC is chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The treatment strategy for the disease is dependent on the stage of HCC, and the Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) staging system is used in most HCC cases. However, the molecular characteristics of HBV-related HCC in different BCLC stages are still unknown. Using GSE14520 microarray data from HBV-related HCC cases with BCLC stages from 0 (very early stage) to C (advanced stage) in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database, differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including common DEGs and unique DEGs in different BCLC stages, were identified. These DEGs were located on different chromosomes. The molecular functions and biology pathways of DEGs were identified by gene ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis, and the interactome networks of DEGs were constructed using the NetVenn online tool. The results revealed that both common DEGs and stage-specific DEGs were associated with various molecular functions and were involved in special biological pathways. In addition, several hub genes were found in the interactome networks of DEGs. The identified DEGs and hub genes promote our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of HBV-related HCC through the different BCLC stages, and might be used as staging biomarkers or molecular targets for the treatment of HCC with HBV infection. PMID:27454179

  17. Delta III—an evolutionary delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvesen, R. J.; Simpson, J. S.

    1996-03-01

    In order to remain competitive in the future and expand the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace market share, MDA has developed an expendable launch system strategy that devices cost-effective launch systems from the Delta II with a growth vehicle configuration called Delta III. The Delta III evolves from the Delta II launch system through development of a larger payload fairing (4-meter diameter), new cryogenically propelled upper stage, new first stage fuel tank, and larger strap-on solid rocket motors. We are developing the Delta III using Integrated Product Development Teams that capitalize on the experience base that has led us to a world record breaking mission success of 49 consecutive Delta II missions. The Delta III first-launch capability is currently planned for the spring of 1998 in support of our first spacecraft customer, Hughes Space and Communications International.

  18. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... or past infection, or immunity to hepatitis A Hepatitis B tests: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), you have ...

  19. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis C Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis C What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B . Hepatitis C and HIV About 25% of people living ...

  20. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis B Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis B What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living ...

  1. Hepatitis Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by viruses. They include hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. To diagnose hepatitis, your health care provider will ask you about your medical history and symptoms, do a physical exam, and order blood tests. There are blood tests for each type of ...

  2. Morphology and Molecular Mechanisms of Hepatic Injury in Rats under Simulated Weightlessness and the Protective Effects of Resistance Training.

    PubMed

    Du, Fang; Ding, Ye; Zou, Jun; Li, Zhili; Tian, Jijing; She, Ruiping; Wang, Desheng; Wang, Huijuan; Lv, Dongqiang; Chang, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of long-term simulated weightlessness on liver morphology, enzymes, glycogen, and apoptosis related proteins by using two-month rat-tail suspension model (TS), and liver injury improvement by rat-tail suspension with resistance training model (TS&RT). Microscopically the livers of TS rats showed massive granular degeneration, chronic inflammation, and portal fibrosis. Mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum swelling and loss of membrane integrity were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The similar, but milder, morphological changes were observed in the livers of TS&RT rats. Serum biochemistry analysis revealed that the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were significantly higher (p<0.05) in TS rats than in controls. The levels of ALT and AST in TS&RT rats were slightly lower than in RT rats, but they were insignificantly higher than in controls. However, both TS and TS&RT rats had significantly lower levels (p<0.05) of serum glucose and hepatic glycogen than in controls. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, and active caspase-3 were higher in TS rats than in TS&RT and control rats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) showed that TS rats had higher mRNA levels (P < 0.05) of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and caspase-12 transcription than in control rats; whereas mRNA expressions of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were slightly higher in TS rats. TS&RT rats showed no significant differences of above 4 mRNAs compared with the control group. Our results demonstrated that long-term weightlessness caused hepatic injury, and may trigger hepatic apoptosis. Resistance training slightly improved hepatic damage. PMID:26000905

  3. Morphology and Molecular Mechanisms of Hepatic Injury in Rats under Simulated Weightlessness and the Protective Effects of Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Li, Zhili; Tian, Jijing; She, Ruiping; Wang, Desheng; Wang, Huijuan; Lv, Dongqiang; Chang, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of long-term simulated weightlessness on liver morphology, enzymes, glycogen, and apoptosis related proteins by using two-month rat-tail suspension model (TS), and liver injury improvement by rat-tail suspension with resistance training model (TS&RT). Microscopically the livers of TS rats showed massive granular degeneration, chronic inflammation, and portal fibrosis. Mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum swelling and loss of membrane integrity were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The similar, but milder, morphological changes were observed in the livers of TS&RT rats. Serum biochemistry analysis revealed that the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were significantly higher (p<0.05) in TS rats than in controls. The levels of ALT and AST in TS&RT rats were slightly lower than in RT rats, but they were insignificantly higher than in controls. However, both TS and TS&RT rats had significantly lower levels (p<0.05) of serum glucose and hepatic glycogen than in controls. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, and active caspase-3 were higher in TS rats than in TS&RT and control rats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) showed that TS rats had higher mRNA levels (P < 0.05) of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and caspase-12 transcription than in control rats; whereas mRNA expressions of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were slightly higher in TS rats. TS&RT rats showed no significant differences of above 4 mRNAs compared with the control group. Our results demonstrated that long-term weightlessness caused hepatic injury, and may trigger hepatic apoptosis. Resistance training slightly improved hepatic damage. PMID:26000905

  4. Molecular and Functional Analysis of the Human Prothrombinase Gene (HFGL2) and Its Role in Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Gary A.; Liu, Mingfeng; Ding, Jinwen; Yuwaraj, Shankary; Leibowitz, Julian; Marsden, Philip A.; Ning, Qin; Kovalinka, Ana; Phillips, M. James

    2000-01-01

    In the present studies, we report the cloning and structural characterization of the HFGL2 gene and its functional role in human fulminant hepatitis. The HFGL2 gene is approximately 7 kb in length with 2 exons. The putative promoter contains cis element consensus sequences that strongly suggest the inducibility of its expression. From the nucleotide sequence of the human gene, a 439-amino acid long protein is predicted. The overall identity between the murine fgl2 and hfgl2 coded proteins is over 70%. About 225 amino acids at the carboxyl end of these molecules are almost 90% identical, and correspond to a well-conserved fibrinogen-related domain. Both HFGL2 and FGL2 encode a type II transmembrane protein with a predicted catalytic domain toward the amino terminus of the protein. Transient transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with a full-length cDNA of HFGL2 coding region resulted in high levels of prothrombinase activity. Livers from 8 patients transplanted for fulminant viral hepatitis were examined for extent of necrosis, inflammation, fibrin deposition, and HFGL2 induction. In situ hybridization showed positive staining of macrophages in areas of active hepatocellular necrosis. Fibrin stained positively in these areas and was confirmed by electron microscopy. These studies define a unique prothrombinase gene (HFGL2) and implicate its importance in the pathogenesis of fulminant viral hepatitis. PMID:10751347

  5. A 3-year experience with Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS): our results on 63 patients with hepatic failure and color Doppler US evaluation of cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Gilnardo; Rossi, Massimo; Pretagostini, Renzo; Novelli, Luigi; Poli, Luca; Ferretti, Giancarlo; Iappelli, Massimo; Berloco, Pasquale; Cortesini, Raffaello

    2003-01-01

    In our 3-year experience, we treated 63 patients with Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS). The patients were divided as follows: 10 primary non-function (PNF) 16%, 10 delayed non-function (DNF) 16%, 16 Fulminant hepatitis (FH) 24%, 23 acute decompensation of chronic liver disease (ACLF) 38%, and 4 hepatic resection 6%. All patients who underwent MARS treatment had bilirubin >15 mg/dL, Glasgow Coma Score between 9 and 11, ammonium >160 microg/dL and non-coagulability. The determining factors taken into consideration for the continuation of MARS treatment were: an improvement in Glasgow Coma Score, and a decrease in ammonium and bilirubin. We also monitored hemodynamic parameters, acid-base equilibrium, and blood gas analysis before and after each treatment. In order to determine patients' neurological conditions, we not only took into account the Glasgow Coma Score, which does not give mathematically precise results but also took into account the fact that patients with hepatic coma had lower cerebral mean velocity in the cerebral arteries than patients without encephalopathy. For this reason, in the last 22 patients we monitored cerebral perfusion, determined by mean flow velocity (Vmean) in the middle cerebral artery. Our results were expressed as mean +/- SD and we analyzed the differences between mean values for each variable, before and after treatment by means of Student's t-test. At the end of treatment, we obtained significant P-values for bilirubin, ammonium, Glasgow Coma Score and creatinine. In 16/20 patients, we could demonstrate a clear correlation between the improvement in clinical conditions (especially neurological status) and improvement in cerebral perfusion, measured by color Doppler US. PMID:12950955

  6. Spectroscopic evidence for the formation of singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/. delta. /sub g/O/sub 2/) upon irradiation of a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/Sigma/sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R.

    1988-01-20

    It is well-known that the presence of molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) in a variety of organic solvents causes an often substantial red shift in the solvent absorption spectrum. This extra, broad absorption feature is reversibly removed by purging the solvent with nitrogen gas. Mulliken and Tsubomura assigned the oxygen-dependent absorption band to a transition from a ground state solvent-oxygen complex to a solvent-oxygen charge transfer (CT) state (sol/sup .+/O/sub 2//sup .-/). In addition to the broad Mulliken CT band, there are, often in the same spectral region, distinct singlet-triplet transitions (T/sub 1/ reverse arrow S/sub 0/) which are enhanced by molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/). Since both of these solvent-oxygen cooperative transitions may result in the formation of reactive oxygenating species, singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/) and/or the superoxide ion (O/sub 2//sup .-/), it follows that recent studies have focused on unsaturated hydrocarbon oxygenation subsequent to the irradiation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands in both the solution phase and cryogenic (10 K) glasses. In these particular experiments, oxygenated products characteristic of both /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ and O/sub 2//sub .-/ were obtained, although the systems studied appeared to involve the participation of one intermediate at the exclusion of the other. In this communication, the authors provide, for the first time, direct spectroscopic evidence for the formation of /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ following a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption. They have observed, in a time-resolved experiment, a near-IR luminescence subsequent to laser excitation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands of mesitylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, toluene, and benzene at 355 nm and 1,4-dioxane at 266 nm. They suggest that this signal is due to /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2

  7. Molecular analysis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in an HIV co-infected patient with reactivation of occult HBV infection following discontinuation of lamivudine-including antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) is characterized by HBV DNA persistence even though the pattern of serological markers indicates an otherwise resolved HBV infection. Although OBI is usually clinically silent, immunocompromised patients may experience reactivation of the liver disease. Case presentation We report the case of an individual with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and anti-HBV core antibody positivity, who experienced severe HBV reactivation after discontinuation of lamivudine-including antiretroviral therapy (ART). HBV sequencing analysis showed a hepatitis B surface antigen escape mutant whose presence in an earlier sample excluded reinfection. Molecular sequencing showed some differences between two isolates collected at a 9-year interval, indicating HBV evolution. Resumption of ART containing an emtricitabine/tenofovir combination allowed control of plasma HBV DNA, which fell to undetectable levels. Conclusion This case stresses the ability of HBV to evolve continuously, even during occult infection, and the effectiveness of ART in controlling OBI reactivation in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:22054111

  8. Thermostatted delta f

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.

    2000-01-18

    The delta f simulation method is revisited. Statistical coarse-graining is used to rigorously derive the equation for the fluctuation delta f in the particle distribution. It is argued that completely collisionless simulation is incompatible with the achievement of true statistically steady states with nonzero turbulent fluxes because the variance of the particle weights w grows with time. To ensure such steady states, it is shown that for dynamically collisionless situations a generalized thermostat or W-stat may be used in lieu of a full collision operator to absorb the flow of entropy to unresolved fine scales in velocity space. The simplest W-stat can be implemented as a self-consistently determined, time-dependent damping applied to w. A precise kinematic analogy to thermostatted nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) is pointed out, and the justification of W-stats for simulations of turbulence is discussed. An extrapolation procedure is proposed such that the long-time, steady-state, collisionless flux can be deduced from several short W-statted runs with large effective collisionality, and a numerical demonstration is given.

  9. Direct spectral evidence of the generation of singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/. delta. /sub g/) in the reaction of potassium superoxide with water

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.U.

    1981-10-21

    Results of studies using a highly sensitive spectrometer in the 1.0=1.6 ..mu..m region to obtain a O/sub 2/('..delta../sub g/) emission spectrum for the reaction of H/sub 2/O with KO/sub 2/ particles suspended in CCl/sub 4/ are presented. The data provide incontrovertible evidence of the generation of singlet oxygen. (BLM)

  10. Molecular cloning and stress-dependent expression of a gene encoding Delta(12)-fatty acid desaturase in the Antarctic microalga Chlorella vulgaris NJ-7.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yandu; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Qingli; Li, Zhaoxin; Liu, Shaofang; Gan, Qinhua; Qin, Song

    2009-11-01

    The psychrotrophic Antarctic alga, Chlorella vulgaris NJ-7, grows under an extreme environment of low temperature and high salinity. In an effort to better understand the correlation between fatty acid metabolism and acclimation to Antarctic environment, we analyzed its fatty acid compositions. An extremely high amount of Delta(12) unsaturated fatty acids was identified which prompted us to speculate about the involvement of Delta(12) fatty acid desaturase in the process of acclimation. A full-length cDNA sequence, designated CvFAD2, was isolated from C. vulgaris NJ-7 via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RACE methods. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that the gene was homologous to known microsomal Delta(12)-FADs with the conserved histidine motifs. Heterologous expression in yeast was used to confirm the regioselectivity and the function of CvFAD2. Linoleic acid (18:2), normally not present in wild-type yeast cells, was detected in transformants of CvFAD2. The induction of CvFAD2 at an mRNA level under cold stress and high salinity is detected by real-time PCR. The results showed that both temperature and salinity motivated the upregulation of CvFAD2 expression. The accumulation of CvFAD2 increased 2.2-fold at 15 degrees C and 3.9-fold at 4 degrees C compared to the alga at 25 degrees C. Meanwhile a 1.7- and 8.5-fold increase at 3 and 6% NaCl was detected. These data suggest that CvFAD2 is the enzyme responsible for the Delta(12) fatty acids desaturation involved in the adaption to cold and high salinity for Antarctic C. vugaris NJ-7. PMID:19728010

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Same TCM Syndrome for Different Diseases and Different TCM Syndrome for Same Disease in Chronic Hepatitis B and Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhizhong; Yu, Shuhao; Guan, Yan; Li, Ying-Ya; Lu, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Hui; Su, Shi-Bing

    2012-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment is based on the traditional diagnose method to distinguish the TCM syndrome, not the disease. So there is a phenomenon in the relationship between TCM syndrome and disease, called Same TCM Syndrome for Different Diseases and Different TCM Syndrome for Same Disease. In this study, we demonstrated the molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon using the microarray samples of liver-gallbladder dampness-heat syndrome (LGDHS) and liver depression and spleen deficiency syndrome (LDSDS) in the chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and liver cirrhosis (LC). The results showed that the difference between CHB and LC was gene expression level and the difference between LGDHS and LDSDS was gene coexpression in the G-protein-coupled receptor protein-signaling pathway. Therein genes GPER, PTHR1, GPR173, and SSTR1 were coexpressed in LDSDS, but not in LGDHS. Either CHB or LC was divided into the alternative LGDHS and LDSDS by the gene correlation, which reveals the molecular feature of Different TCM Syndrome for Same Disease. The alternatives LGDHS and LDSDS were divided into either CHB or LC by the gene expression level, which reveals the molecular feature of Same TCM Syndrome for Different Diseases. PMID:22693527

  12. Effects of Hypoxia Exposure on Hepatic Cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) Expression in Atlantic Croaker: Molecular Mechanisms of CYP1A Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Saydur; Thomas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α) and cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) are biomarkers of environmental exposure to hypoxia and organic xenobiotic chemicals that act through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, respectively. Many aquatic environments heavily contaminated with organic chemicals, such as harbors, are also hypoxic. Recently, we and other scientists reported HIF-α genes are upregulated by hypoxia exposure in aquatic organisms, but the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia regulation of CYP1A expression have not been investigated in teleost fishes. As a first step in understanding the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia modulation of CYP1A expression in fish, we characterized CYP1A cDNA from croaker liver. Hypoxia exposure (dissolved oxygen, DO: 1.7 mg/L for 2 to 4 weeks) caused significant decreases in hepatic CYP1A mRNA and protein levels compared to CYP1A levels in fish held in normoxic conditions. In vivo studies showed that the nitric oxide (NO)-donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine, significantly decreased CYP1A expression in croaker livers, whereas the competitive inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS), Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, restored CYP1A mRNA and protein levels in hypoxia-exposed (1.7 mg DO/L for 4 weeks) fish. In vivo hypoxia exposure also markedly increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β, a cytokine), HIF-2α mRNA and endothelial NOS (eNOS) protein levels in croaker livers. Pharmacological treatment with vitamin E, an antioxidant, lowered the IL-1β, HIF-2α mRNA and eNOS protein levels in hypoxia-exposed fish and completely reversed the down-regulation of hepatic CYP1A mRNA and protein levels in response to hypoxia exposure. These results suggest that hypoxia-induced down-regulation of CYP1A is due to alterations of NO and oxidant status, and cellular IL-1β and HIF-α levels. Moreover, the present study provides the first evidence of a role for antioxidants in hepatic eNOS and IL-1β regulation in aquatic vertebrates during hypoxic stress. PMID:22815834

  13. delta-Hexachlorocyclohexane (delta-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    delta - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( delta - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 86 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  14. Human hereditary hepatic porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Nordmann, Yves; Puy, Hervé

    2002-11-01

    The human hereditary hepatic porphyrias are diseases due to marked deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Porphyrias can be classified as either hepatic or erythroid, depending on the major production site of porphyrins or their precursors. The pathogenesis of inherited hepatic porphyrias has now been defined at the molecular level. Some gene carriers are vulnerable to a range of exogenous and endogenous factors, which may trigger neuropsychiatric and/or cutaneous symptoms. Early diagnosis is of prime importance since it makes way for counselling. In this article we present an overview of recent advances on hepatic porphyrias: 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), hereditary coproporphyria (HC), and variegate porphyria (VP). PMID:12367763

  15. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... infected with the hepatitis B virus, can I breastfeed? • If I am infected with the hepatitis B ... infected with the hepatitis C virus, can I breastfeed? • Glossary What are hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  16. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... There are different tests for hepatitis A and B. A positive test is ... may mean: You currently have a hepatitis infection. This may ...

  17. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    MedlinePlus

    HEPATITIS C & INCARCERATION What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation or swelling of the liver. The liver is an important ... viral hepatitis: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. They are all different from each other and ...

  18. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  19. Hepatic ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic ischemia is a condition in which the liver does not get enough blood or oxygen, causing injury to ... pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. Such conditions may include: Abnormal heart rhythms Dehydration ...

  20. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that ... medical care is an important factor in staying as healthy as possible. The American Liver Foundation is ...

  1. Hepatitis D

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the hepatitis B virus is also present. Transmission Hepatitis D can be found in the blood, ... other body fluids of people who are infected. Transmission happens when infected body fluid enters another person’s ...

  2. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  3. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 507 Hepatitis C WHAT IS HEPATITIS C? HOW IS IT DIAGNOSED? ... treatment may be less likely to work. Hep C treatment is less effective for coinfected people. Cure ...

  4. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  5. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000279.htm Hepatitis B To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the ...

  6. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... suggest medicines to help relieve your symptoms. The hepatitis A vaccine can prevent HAV. Good hygiene can also ...

  7. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  8. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Español Hepatitis A Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is hepatitis A? Hepatitis * A is a virus , or infection, ...

  9. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Autoimmune Hepatitis Page Content On this page: What is autoimmune ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ...

  10. Identification of the alpha2-delta-1 subunit of voltage-dependent calcium channels as a molecular target for pain mediating the analgesic actions of pregabalin.

    PubMed

    Field, Mark J; Cox, Peter J; Stott, Emma; Melrose, Heather; Offord, James; Su, Ti-Zhi; Bramwell, Steve; Corradini, Laura; England, Steven; Winks, Joanna; Kinloch, Ross A; Hendrich, Jan; Dolphin, Annette C; Webb, Tony; Williams, Dic

    2006-11-14

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition affecting millions of people around the world and is defined as pain that follows a lesion or dysfunction of the nervous system. This type of pain is difficult to treat, but the novel compounds pregabalin (Lyrica) and gabapentin (Neurontin) have proven clinical efficacy. Unlike traditional analgesics such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs or narcotics, these agents have no frank antiinflammatory actions and no effect on physiological pain. Although extensive preclinical studies have led to a number of suggestions, until recently their mechanism of action has not been clearly defined. Here, we describe studies on the analgesic effects of pregabalin in a mutant mouse containing a single-point mutation within the gene encoding a specific auxiliary subunit protein (alpha2-delta-1) of voltage-dependent calcium channels. The mice demonstrate normal pain phenotypes and typical responses to other analgesic drugs. We show that the mutation leads to a significant reduction in the binding affinity of pregabalin in the brain and spinal cord and the loss of its analgesic efficacy. These studies show conclusively that the analgesic actions of pregabalin are mediated through the alpha2-delta-1 subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels and establish this subunit as a therapeutic target for pain control. PMID:17088553

  11. The Molecular Chaperone GRP78 Contributes to Toll-like Receptor 3-mediated Innate Immune Response to Hepatitis C Virus in Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dahai; Li, Nan L; Zeng, Yanli; Liu, Baoming; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Wang, Tony T; Huo, Dezheng; Ingels, Jesse F; Lu, Lu; Shang, Jia; Li, Kui

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR3) senses double-stranded RNA intermediates produced during hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication, leading to activation of interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF3) and NF-κB and subsequent antiviral and proinflammatory responses. Yet, how this TLR3-dependent pathway operates in hepatocytes is unclear. Upon fractionating cultured hepatocytes into various cellular organelles, we observed that TLR3 predominantly resides in endolysosomes of hepatocytes. To determine the critical regulators of TLR3 signaling in response to HCV infection in human hepatocytes, we isolated endolysosome fractions from mock-infected and HCV-infected hepatoma Huh7.5 cells that had been reconstituted for TLR3 expression, separated these fractions on two-dimensional gels, and identified up-regulated/down-regulated proteins by mass spectrometry. Approximately a dozen of cellular proteins were found to be differentially expressed in endolysosome fractions following HCV infection. Of these, expression of several molecular chaperone proteins was elevated. Knockdown of one of these chaperones, glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78), compromised TLR3-dependent induction of interferon-stimulated genes and chemokines following HCV infection or poly(I:C) stimulation in cultured hepatocytes. Consistent with this finding, GRP78 depletion impaired TLR3-mediated establishment of an antiviral state. Mechanistically, although TLR3 trafficking to endolysosomes was not affected, phosphorylated IRF3 diminished faster following GRP78 knockdown. Remarkably, GRP78 transcript was significantly up-regulated in liver biopsies of chronic hepatitis C patients as compared with normal liver tissues. Moreover, the GRP78 expression level correlated with that of RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) and CXCL10, two inflammatory chemokines most frequently elevated in HCV-infected liver. Altogether, our data suggest that GRP78 contributes to TLR3-mediated, IRF3

  12. Experimental and molecular docking studies on DNA binding interaction of adefovir dipivoxil: Advances toward treatment of hepatitis B virus infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh

    The toxic interaction of adefovir dipivoxil with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove binding mode. The binding constant of UV-visible and the number of binding sites were 3.33 ± 0.2 × 104 L mol-1and 0.99, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drug and CT-DNA is exothermic (ΔH = 34.4 kJ mol-1; ΔS = 184.32 J mol-1 K-1). Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformational change of CT-DNA in the presence of adefovir dipivoxil, which verified the groove binding mode. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity. The molecular modeling results illustrated that adefovir strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -16.83 kJ mol-1. This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the toxic interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with bio macromolecules, which contributes to clarify the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  13. Molecular Characterization of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in Mekong Delta, Vietnam, and Impact of T-Cell Epitope Mutations on HLA Recognition (ANRS 12159)

    PubMed Central

    Bellecave, Pantxika; Guidicelli, Gwenda-Line; Anies, Guerric; Hoang Khanh Thu, Huynh; Pillot Debelleix, Marie; Vray, Muriel; Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Thi Xuan Lien, Truong; Fleury, Herve

    2011-01-01

    Background To date, 11 HIV-1 subtypes and 48 circulating recombinant forms have been described worldwide. The underlying reason why their distribution is so heterogeneous is not clear. Host genetic factors could partly explain this distribution. The aim of this study was to describe HIV-1 strains circulating in an unexplored area of Mekong Delta, Vietnam, and to assess the impact of optimal epitope mutations on HLA binding. Methods We recruited 125 chronically antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected subjects from five cities in the Mekong Delta. We performed high-resolution DNA typing of HLA class I alleles, sequencing of Gag and RT-Prot genes and phylogenetic analysis of the strains. Epitope mutations were analyzed in patients bearing the HLA allele restricting the studied epitope. Optimal wild-type epitopes from the Los Alamos database were used as reference. T-cell epitope recognition was predicted using the immune epitope database tool according to three different scores involved in antigen processing (TAP and proteasome scores) and HLA binding (MHC score). Results All sequences clustered with CRF01_AE. HLA class I genotyping showed the predominance of Asian alleles as A*11:01 and B*46:01 with a Vietnamese specificity held by two different haplotypes. The percentage of homology between Mekong and B consensus HIV-1 sequences was above 85%. Divergent epitopes had TAP and proteasome scores comparable with wild-type epitopes. MHC scores were significantly lower in divergent epitopes with a mean of 2.4 (±0.9) versus 2 (±0.7) in non-divergent ones (p<0.0001). Conclusions Our study confirms the wide predominance of CRF01_AE in the Mekong Delta where patients harbor a specific HLA pattern. Moreover, it demonstrates the lower MHC binding affinity among divergent epitopes. This weak immune pressure combined with a narrow genetic diversity favors immune escape and could explain why CRF01_AE is still predominant in Vietnam, particularly in the Mekong area. PMID:22039450

  14. A photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging apparatus for femtosecond time-resolved molecular dynamics with electron time-of-flight resolution of {sigma}=18 ps and energy resolution {delta}E/E=3.5%

    SciTech Connect

    Vredenborg, Arno; Roeterdink, Wim G.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2008-06-15

    We report on the construction and performance of a novel photoelectron-photoion coincidence machine in our laboratory in Amsterdam to measure the full three-dimensional momentum distribution of correlated electrons and ions in femtosecond time-resolved molecular beam experiments. We implemented sets of open electron and ion lenses to time stretch and velocity map the charged particles. Time switched voltages are operated on the particle lenses to enable optimal electric field strengths for velocity map focusing conditions of electrons and ions separately. The position and time sensitive detectors employ microchannel plates (MCPs) in front of delay line detectors. A special effort was made to obtain the time-of-flight (TOF) of the electrons at high temporal resolution using small pore (5 {mu}m) MCPs and implementing fast timing electronics. We measured the TOF distribution of the electrons under our typical coincidence field strengths with a temporal resolution down to {sigma}=18 ps. We observed that our electron coincidence detector has a timing resolution better than {sigma}=16 ps, which is mainly determined by the residual transit time spread of the MCPs. The typical electron energy resolution appears to be nearly laser bandwidth limited with a relative resolution of {delta}E{sub FWHM}/E=3.5% for electrons with kinetic energy near 2 eV. The mass resolution of the ion detector for ions measured in coincidence with electrons is about {delta}m{sub FWHM}/m=1/4150. The velocity map focusing of our extended source volume of particles, due to the overlap of the molecular beam with the laser beams, results in a parent ion spot on our detector focused down to {sigma}=115 {mu}m.

  15. Molecular characterization of woodchuck IFI16 and AIM2 and their expression in woodchucks infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV)

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qi; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, Qin; Li, Fanghui; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Junzhong; Lu, Yinping; Liu, Jia; Wu, Jun; Zheng, Xin; Lu, Mengji; Wang, Baoju; Yang, Dongliang

    2016-01-01

    IFI16 and AIM2 are important DNA sensors in antiviral immunity. To characterize these two molecules in a woodchuck model, which is widely used to study hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, we cloned and analyzed the complete coding sequences (CDSs) of woodchuck IFI16 and AIM2, and found that AIM2 was highly conserved in mammals, whereas the degree of sequence identity between woodchuck IFI16 and its mammalian orthologues was low. IFI16 and IFN-β were upregulated following VACV ds 70 mer transfection, while AIM2 and IL-1β were upregulated following poly (dA:dT) transfection, both in vitro and in vivo; IFI16-targeted siRNA decreased the transcription of IFI16 and IFN-β stimulated by VACV ds 70 mer, and AIM2 siRNA interference downregulated AIM2 and IL-1β transcripts stimulated by poly (dA:dT), in vitro, suggesting that woodchuck IFI16 and AIM2 may play pivotal roles in the DNA-mediated induction of IFN-β and IL-1β, respectively. IFI16 and AIM2 transcripts were upregulated in the liver and spleen following acute WHV infection, while IFI16 was downregulated in the liver following chronic infection, implying that IFI16 and AIM2 may be involved in WHV infection. These data provide the basis for the study of IFI16- and AIM2-mediated innate immunity using the woodchuck model. PMID:27354260

  16. An Effective Molecular Target Site in Hepatitis B Virus S Gene for Cas9 Cleavage and Mutational Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Sheng, Chunyu; Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Guangze; Du, Xinying; Du, Juan; Zhan, Linsheng; Li, Peng; Yang, Chaojie; Qi, Lihua; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoxia; Jia, Leili; Xie, Jing; Wang, Ligui; Hao, Rongzhang; Xu, Dongping; Tong, Yigang; Zhou, Yusen; Zhou, Jianjun; Sun, Yansong; Li, Qiao; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B infection remains incurable because HBV cccDNA can persist indefinitely in patients recovering from acute HBV infection. Given the incidence of HBV infection and the shortcomings of current therapeutic options, a novel antiviral strategy is urgently needed. To inactivate HBV replication and destroy the HBV genome, we employed genome editing tool CRISPR/Cas9. Specifically, we found a CRISPR/Cas9 system (gRNA-S4) that effectively targeted the HBsAg region and could suppress efficiently viral replication with minimal off-target effects and impact on cell viability. The mutation mediated by CRISPR/Cas9 in HBV DNA both in a stable HBV-producing cell line and in HBV transgenic mice had been confirmed and evaluated using deep sequencing. In addition, we demonstrated the reduction of HBV replication was caused by the mutation of S4 site through three S4 region-mutated monoclonal cells. Besides, the gRNA-S4 system could also reduce serum surface-antigen levels by 99.91 ± 0.05% and lowered serum HBV DNA level below the negative threshold in the HBV hydrodynamics mouse model. Together, these findings indicate that the S4 region may be an ideal target for the development of innovative therapies against HBV infection using CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27570484

  17. An Effective Molecular Target Site in Hepatitis B Virus S Gene for Cas9 Cleavage and Mutational Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Sheng, Chunyu; Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Guangze; Du, Xinying; Du, Juan; Zhan, Linsheng; Li, Peng; Yang, Chaojie; Qi, Lihua; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoxia; Jia, Leili; Xie, Jing; Wang, Ligui; Hao, Rongzhang; Xu, Dongping; Tong, Yigang; Zhou, Yusen; Zhou, Jianjun; Sun, Yansong; Li, Qiao; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B infection remains incurable because HBV cccDNA can persist indefinitely in patients recovering from acute HBV infection. Given the incidence of HBV infection and the shortcomings of current therapeutic options, a novel antiviral strategy is urgently needed. To inactivate HBV replication and destroy the HBV genome, we employed genome editing tool CRISPR/Cas9. Specifically, we found a CRISPR/Cas9 system (gRNA-S4) that effectively targeted the HBsAg region and could suppress efficiently viral replication with minimal off-target effects and impact on cell viability. The mutation mediated by CRISPR/Cas9 in HBV DNA both in a stable HBV-producing cell line and in HBV transgenic mice had been confirmed and evaluated using deep sequencing. In addition, we demonstrated the reduction of HBV replication was caused by the mutation of S4 site through three S4 region-mutated monoclonal cells. Besides, the gRNA-S4 system could also reduce serum surface-antigen levels by 99.91 ± 0.05% and lowered serum HBV DNA level below the negative threshold in the HBV hydrodynamics mouse model. Together, these findings indicate that the S4 region may be an ideal target for the development of innovative therapies against HBV infection using CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27570484

  18. Molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus and a 9-year clinical profile in a patient infected with genotype I.

    PubMed

    Osiowy, Carla; Kaita, Kelly; Solar, Kaarina; Mendoza, Kenneth

    2010-05-01

    An unusual hepatitis B virus (HBV) variant, assigned provisionally to genotype I, was recently reported, characterized by an anomalous genotyping pattern and putative recombination; however, the natural history of this unusual strain is unknown. This study analyzed longitudinal sera collected over a 9-year period from a patient infected with this variant to investigate the clinical profile and intrahost viral evolution over time. The patient, who had immigrated to Canada in 1998 from Vietnam, was treated with lamivudine in 2000. Approximately 4-5 years following the withdrawal of lamivudine therapy, a genomic "shift" occurred coincident with ALT flares and increasing HBV viral load, resulting in numerous stable nucleotide substitutions within the core coding region, suggesting altered immune control that may provide a selective advantage to the virus. Analysis of quasispecies diversity over time demonstrated further this shift, with two sequence clusters associated with time points either prior to or following relapse observed, including increased diversity among quasispecies prior to relapse. In keeping with the complex nature of genotype I strains, majority population genomes had a mean genetic distance from genotype C of 7.6 +/- 0.1%, although large genomic segments lacked significant homology with any HBV genotype. Further study is needed to understand the evolutionary origin and natural history of infection with this unique HBV variant. PMID:20419807

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Viral and Host Cell Substrate Recognition by Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Keith P.; Laine, Jennifer M.; Deveau, Laura M.; Cao, Hong; Massi, Francesca; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2011-08-16

    Hepatitis C NS3/4A protease is a prime therapeutic target that is responsible for cleaving the viral polyprotein at junctions 3-4A, 4A4B, 4B5A, and 5A5B and two host cell adaptor proteins of the innate immune response, TRIF and MAVS. In this study, NS3/4A crystal structures of both host cell cleavage sites were determined and compared to the crystal structures of viral substrates. Two distinct protease conformations were observed and correlated with substrate specificity: (i) 3-4A, 4A4B, 5A5B, and MAVS, which are processed more efficiently by the protease, form extensive electrostatic networks when in complex with the protease, and (ii) TRIF and 4B5A, which contain polyproline motifs in their full-length sequences, do not form electrostatic networks in their crystal complexes. These findings provide mechanistic insights into NS3/4A substrate recognition, which may assist in a more rational approach to inhibitor design in the face of the rapid acquisition of resistance.

  20. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  1. Hepatitis Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  2. Disease surveillance of Atlantic herring: molecular characterization of hepatic coccidiosis and a morphological report of a novel intestinal coccidian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, Sarah E; Lovey, J; Hershberger, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance for pathogens of Atlantic herring, including viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV),Ichthyophonus hoferi, and hepatic and intestinal coccidians, was conducted from 2012 to 2016 in the NW Atlantic Ocean, New Jersey, USA. Neither VHSV nor I. hoferi was detected in any sample. Goussia clupearum was found in the livers of 40 to 78% of adult herring in varying parasite loads; however, associated pathological changes were negligible. Phylogenetic analysis based on small subunit 18S rRNA gene sequences placed G. clupearum most closely with other extraintestinal liver coccidia from the genus Calyptospora, though the G. clupearum isolates had a unique nucleotide insertion between 604 and 729 bp that did not occur in any other coccidian species. G. clupearum oocysts from Atlantic and Pacific herring were morphologically similar, though differences occurred in oocyst dimensions. Comparison of G. clupearum genetic sequences from Atlantic and Pacific herring revealed 4 nucleotide substitutions and 2 gaps in a 1749 bp region, indicating some divergence in the geographically separate populations. Pacific G. clupearum oocysts were not directly infective, suggesting that a heteroxenous life cycle is likely. Intestinal coccidiosis was described for the first time from juvenile and adult Atlantic herring. A novel intestinal coccidian species was detected based on morphological characteristics of exogenously sporulated oocysts. A unique feature in these oocysts was the presence of 3 long (15.1 ± 5.1 µm, mean ±SD) spiny projections on both ends of the oocyst. The novel morphology of this coccidian led us to tentatively name this parasite G. echinata n. sp.

  3. Disease surveillance of Atlantic herring: molecular characterization of hepatic coccidiosis and a morphological report of a novel intestinal coccidian.

    PubMed

    Friend, Sarah E; Lovy, Jan; Hershberger, Paul K

    2016-07-01

    Surveillance for pathogens of Atlantic herring, including viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), Ichthyophonus hoferi, and hepatic and intestinal coccidians, was conducted from 2012 to 2016 in the NW Atlantic Ocean, New Jersey, USA. Neither VHSV nor I. hoferi was detected in any sample. Goussia clupearum was found in the livers of 40 to 78% of adult herring in varying parasite loads; however, associated pathological changes were negligible. Phylogenetic analysis based on small subunit 18S rRNA gene sequences placed G. clupearum most closely with other extraintestinal liver coccidia from the genus Calyptospora, though the G. clupearum isolates had a unique nucleotide insertion between 604 and 729 bp that did not occur in any other coccidian species. G. clupearum oocysts from Atlantic and Pacific herring were morphologically similar, though differences occurred in oocyst dimensions. Comparison of G. clupearum genetic sequences from Atlantic and Pacific herring revealed 4 nucleotide substitutions and 2 gaps in a 1749 bp region, indicating some divergence in the geographically separate populations. Pacific G. clupearum oocysts were not directly infective, suggesting that a heteroxenous life cycle is likely. Intestinal coccidiosis was described for the first time from juvenile and adult Atlantic herring. A novel intestinal coccidian species was detected based on morphological characteristics of exogenously sporulated oocysts. A unique feature in these oocysts was the presence of 3 long (15.1 ± 5.1 µm, mean ±SD) spiny projections on both ends of the oocyst. The novel morphology of this coccidian led us to tentatively name this parasite G. echinata n. sp. PMID:27409233

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Determine the Structure and Dynamics of Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Bound to a Novel Anti-viral Drug.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Go; Sato, Shunsuke; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Umeyama, Hideaki; Hayakawa, Michiyo; Murakami, Yoshiki; Yoneda, Shigetaka

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronically infects millions of people worldwide and is a major cause of serious liver diseases, including liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. In our previous study, in silico screening was used to isolate new anti-viral compounds predicted to bind to the HBV capsid. Four of the isolated compounds have been reported to suppress the cellular multiplication of HBV experimentally. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations of the HBV capsid were performed under rotational symmetry boundary conditions, to clarify how the structure and dynamics of the capsid are affected at the atomic level by the binding of one of the isolated compounds, C13. Two simulations of the free HBV capsid, two further simulations of the capsid-C13 complex, and one simulation of the capsid-AT-130 complex were performed. For statistical confidence, each set of simulations was repeated by five times, changing the simulation conditions. C13 continued to bind at the predicted binding site during the simulations, supporting the hypothesis that C13 is a capsid-binding compound. The structure and dynamics of the HBV capsid were greatly influenced by the binding and release of C13, and these effects were essentially identical to those seen for AT-130, indicating that C13 likely inhibits the function of the HBV capsid. PMID:27581644

  5. Design, synthesis, assessment, and molecular docking of novel pyrrolopyrimidine (7-deazapurine) derivatives as non-nucleoside hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mosaad S; Sayed, Amira I; Khedr, Mohammed A; Soror, Sameh H

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is highly persistent and presents an unmet medical need requiring more effective treatment options. This has spurred intensive efforts to discover novel anti-HCV agents. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), NS5B of HCV, constitutes a selective target for drug discovery due to its absence in human cells; also, it is the centerpiece for viral replication. Here, we synthesized novel pyrrole, pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine and pyrrolo[3,2-e][1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-c]pyrimidine derivatives. The non-toxic doses of these compounds on Huh 7.5 cell line were determined and their antiviral activity against HCVcc genotype 4a was examined. Compounds 7j, 7f, 5c, 12i and 12f showed significant anti HCV activity. The percent of reduction for the non-toxic doses of 7j, 7f, 5c, 12i and 12f were 90%, 76.7±5.8%, 73.3±5.8%, 70% and 63.3±5.8%, respectively. The activity of these compounds was interpreted by molecular docking against HCV NS5B polymerase enzyme. PMID:27052365

  6. The damage-associated molecular pattern HMGB1 is elevated in human alcoholic hepatitis, but does not seem to be a primary driver of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Tea Lund; Støy, Sidsel; Deleuran, Bent; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Grønbaek, Henning; Sandahl, Thomas Damgaard

    2016-09-01

    The role of sterile inflammation caused by release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP) remains unclear in human alcoholic hepatitis (AH). The DAMP, high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) is released by tissue damage and inflammation. We aimed to investigate whether HMGB1 is a primary inflammatory driver in AH by determining HMGB1 serum levels and effects on inflammatory cells from AH patients. We measured serum HMGB1 in 34 AH patients and 10 healthy controls using ELISA. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and CD14 expressions were assessed by flow cytometry on HMGB1-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and ELISA was used to measure TNF-α and IL-1β in the supernatants. We observed 5-fold higher serum levels of HMGB1 in AH patients at the day of diagnosis and day 30, but no associations to clinical outcome. HMGB1 stimulation increased the expression of TLR4 on CD14+-monocytes compared with unstimulated cells in the AH patients. The TNF-α and IL-1β production in response to HMGB1 was diminished in AH patients. In conclusion, AH patients have increased levels of HMGB1 in their blood. This combined with an increased TLR4 expression, but an unaffected cytokine response to HMGB1 suggest that HMGB1 is not the primary driver of inflammation in AH. PMID:27357188

  7. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  8. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in ...

  9. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  10. Isomerization of delta-9-THC to delta-8-THC when tested as trifluoroacetyl-, pentafluoropropionyl-, or heptafluorobutyryl- derivatives.

    PubMed

    Holler, Justin M; Smith, Michael L; Paul, Shom N; Past, Marilyn R; Paul, Buddha D

    2008-05-01

    For GC-MS analysis of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), perfluoroacid anhydrides in combination with perfluoroalcohols are commonly used for derivatization. This reagent mixture is preferred because it allows simultaneous derivatization of delta-9-THC and its acid metabolite, 11-nor-delta-9-THC-9-carboxylic acid present in biological samples. When delta-9-THC was derivatized by trifluoroacetic anhydride/hexafluoroisopropanol (TFAA/HFIPOH) and analyzed by GC-MS using full scan mode (50-550 amu), two peaks (P1 and P2) with an identical molecular mass of 410 amu were observed. On the basis of the total ion chromatogram (TIC), P1 with a shorter retention time (RT) was the major peak (TIC 84%). To identify the peaks, delta-8-THC was also tested under the same conditions. The RT and spectra of the major peak (TIC 95%) were identical with that of P1 for delta-9-THC. A minor peak (5%) present also correlated well with the latter peak (P2) for the delta-9-THC derivative. The fragmentation pathway of P1 was primarily demethylation followed by retro Diels-Alder fragmentation (M - 15-68, base peak 100%) indicating P1 as a delta-8-THC-trifluoroacetyl compound. This indicated that delta-9-THC isomerized to delta-8-THC during derivatization with TFAA/HFIPOH. Similar results were also observed when delta-9-THC was derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride/pentafluoropropanol or heptafluorobutyric anhydride/heptafluorobutanol. No isomerization was observed when chloroform was used in derivatization with TFAA. In this reaction, the peaks of delta-8-THC-TFA and delta-9-THC-TFA had retention times and mass spectra matching with P1 and P2, respectively. Because of isomerization, perfluoroacid anhydrides/perfluoroalcohols are not suitable derivatizing agents for analysis of delta-9-THC; whereas the TFAA in chloroform is suitable for the analysis. PMID:18205240

  11. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. These include: Graves disease Inflammatory bowel disease Rheumatoid arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren syndrome Systemic lupus erythematosus Thyroiditis Type 1 diabetes Ulcerative colitis Autoimmune hepatitis may occur in family ...

  12. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  13. The Inhibitory Effects of Bioactive Compounds of Tomato Juice Binding to Hepatic HMGCR: In Vivo Study and Molecular Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-González, Inmaculada; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Martín-Pozuelo, Gala; García-Alonso, Javier; Periago, Maria Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic effect of tomato juice has been investigated in an intervention study with rats, along with the possible inhibition effect of bioactive tomato compounds binding to the HMGCR enzyme. Two experimental groups (n = 8 Sprague-Dawley rats) were fed ad libitum for five weeks, with water or tomato juice provided to the control and intervention groups, respectively. Total, LDL and HDL cholesterol, and total triglycerides were analysed in plasma, and the lycopene content and the expression and activity of the enzyme HMGCR were determined in liver samples. A computational molecular modelling was carried out to determine the interactions between HMGCR and lycopene, chlorogenic acid and naringenin. Total, LDL and HDL cholesterol were significantly lower in the intervention group after the intake of tomato juice. In addition, a significant reduction in HMGCR activity was observed, although this was not accompanied by changes in gene expression. The molecular modelling showed that components of tomato can bind to the active site of the enzyme and compete with the ligand HMGCoA. Lycopene, from tomato juice, accumulates in the liver and can inhibit the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, HMGCR. PMID:24392102

  14. The inhibitory effects of bioactive compounds of tomato juice binding to hepatic HMGCR: in vivo study and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Navarro-González, Inmaculada; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Martín-Pozuelo, Gala; García-Alonso, Javier; Periago, Maria Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic effect of tomato juice has been investigated in an intervention study with rats, along with the possible inhibition effect of bioactive tomato compounds binding to the HMGCR enzyme. Two experimental groups (n = 8 Sprague-Dawley rats) were fed ad libitum for five weeks, with water or tomato juice provided to the control and intervention groups, respectively. Total, LDL and HDL cholesterol, and total triglycerides were analysed in plasma, and the lycopene content and the expression and activity of the enzyme HMGCR were determined in liver samples. A computational molecular modelling was carried out to determine the interactions between HMGCR and lycopene, chlorogenic acid and naringenin. Total, LDL and HDL cholesterol were significantly lower in the intervention group after the intake of tomato juice. In addition, a significant reduction in HMGCR activity was observed, although this was not accompanied by changes in gene expression. The molecular modelling showed that components of tomato can bind to the active site of the enzyme and compete with the ligand HMGCoA. Lycopene, from tomato juice, accumulates in the liver and can inhibit the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, HMGCR. PMID:24392102

  15. 3D QSAR and molecular docking studies of benzimidazole derivatives as hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pallav D; Patel, Maulik R; Kaushik-Basu, Neerja; Talele, Tanaji T

    2008-01-01

    The urgent need for novel HCV antiviral agents has provided an impetus for understanding the structural requisites of NS5B polymerase inhibitors at the molecular level. Toward this objective, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) of 67 HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors were performed using two methods. First, ligand-based 3D QSAR studies were performed based on the lowest energy conformations employing the atom fit alignment method. Second, receptor-based 3D QSAR models were derived from the predicted binding conformations obtained by docking all NS5B inhibitors at the allosteric binding site of NS5B (PDB ID: 2dxs). Results generated from the ligand-based model were found superior (r2cv values of 0.630 for CoMFA and 0.668 for CoMSIA) to those obtained by the receptor-based model (r2cv values of 0.536 and 0.561 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively). The predictive ability of the models was validated using a structurally diversified test set of 22 compounds that had not been included in a preliminary training set of 45 compounds. The predictive r2 values for the ligand-based CoMFA and CoMSIA models were 0.734 and 0.800, respectively, while the corresponding predictive r2 values for the receptor-based CoMFA and CoMSIA models were 0.538 and 0.639, respectively. The greater potency of the tryptophan derivatives over that of the tyrosine derivatives was interpreted based on CoMFA steric and electrostatic contour maps. The CoMSIA results revealed that for a NS5B inhibitor to have appreciable inhibitory activity it requires hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups at the 5-position of the indole ring and an R substituent at the chiral carbon, respectively. Interpretation of the CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps in context of the topology of the allosteric binding site of NS5B provided insight into NS5B-inhibitor interactions. Taken together, the present 3D QSAR models were found to accurately predict the HCV NS5B

  16. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  17. Gene regulation in hepatic stellate cell.

    PubMed

    Lang, A; Brenner, D A

    1999-03-01

    Hepatic stellate cells are now recognized as the major source of extracellular matrix in hepatic fibrosis. Following liver injury the hepatic stellate cell changes from a quiescent to an activated cell. The activation process includes an increased proliferation rate, a phenotypic change to a myofibroblast-like cell, loss of vitamin A stores, increased extra-cellular matrix protein synthesis and contractility. Furthermore, hepatic stellate cells have been implicated in hepatic inflammation through their ability to secrete cytokines and chemokines. Here, we review the literature on the molecular pathogenesis of hepatic stellate cells activation with emphasis on the most recent findings. The reviewed topics include transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding type I collagen in hepatic stellate cells; the role of the transcription factor nuclear factor Kappa B in the hepatic stellate cell activation; focal adhesion kinase and integrin-mediated signal transduction in hepatic stellate cell, and apoptosis in hepatic stellate cells. New insight into hepatic stellate cell activation and death may lead to the development of novel therapies for hepatic fibrosis. PMID:10363203

  18. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir, {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.

  19. The Delta Clipper dream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furniss, Tim

    1992-04-01

    A conceptual development status evaluation is presented for the SDIO's projected VTOL SSTOV, dubbed the 'Delta Clipper', which is envisioned as an alternative to the slowly developing NASP and the next-generation National Launch System. Delta Clipper program managers believe that the lightweight materials and structures entailed by the requisite empty/gross-weight ratio for an SSTOV are now available, precluding the airbreathing propulsion of such alternatives as HOTOL. The Delta Clipper could operate with a crew of two, or entirely unmanned. The 8-12 LH2/LOX engines employed are derived from the RL-10 engines of the Centaur launcher.

  20. Modeling river delta formation.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-10-23

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  1. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  2. Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Nile Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population of 57 million. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta in the middle of the scene. Across the river from Cairo can be seen the three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  3. Modeling river delta formation

    PubMed Central

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2007-01-01

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  4. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of activated hepatic stellate cells with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide targeting integrin αvβ3 for staging liver fibrosis in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiyuan; Liu, Huanhuan; Cui, Yanfen; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhongyang; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Dengbin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the expression level of integrin αvβ3 on activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) at different stages of liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rat model and the feasibility to stage liver fibrosis by using molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide modified ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (USPIO) specifically targeting integrin αvβ3. Materials and methods All experiments received approval from our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into three groups of 12 subjects each, and intraperitoneally injected with CCl4 for either 3, 6, or 9 weeks. Controls (n=10) received pure olive oil. The change in T2* relaxation rate (ΔR2*) pre- and postintravenous administration of RGD-USPIO or naked USPIO was measured by 3.0T clinical MRI and compared by one-way analysis of variance or the Student’s t-test. The relationship between expression level of integrin αvβ3 and liver fibrotic degree was evaluated by Spearman’s ranked correlation. Results Activated HSCs were confirmed to be the main cell types expressing integrin αvβ3 during liver fibrogenesis. The protein level of integrin αv and β3 subunit expressed on activated HSCs was upregulated and correlated well with the progression of liver fibrosis (r=0.954, P<0.001; r=0.931, P<0.001, respectively). After injection of RGD-USPIO, there is significant difference in ΔR2* among rats treated with 0, 3, 6, and 9 weeks of CCl4 (P<0.001). The accumulation of iron particles in fibrotic liver specimen is significantly greater for RGD-USPIO than naked USPIO after being injected with equal dose of iron. Conclusion Molecular MRI of integrin αvβ3 expressed on activated HSCs by using RGD-USPIO may distinguish different liver fibrotic stages in CCl4 rat model and shows promising to noninvasively monitor the progression of the liver fibrosis and therapeutic response to

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bleibel, Wissam; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis affect hundreds of millions of patients all over the world. The majority of patients with cirrhosis will eventually develop complications related to portal hypertension. One of these recurrent and difficult to treat complications is hepatic encephalopathy. Studies have indicated that overt hepatic encephalopathy affects 30 to 45% of patients with cirrhosis and a higher percentage may be affected by minimal degree of encephalopathy. All of these factors add to the impact of hepatic encephalopathy on the healthcare system and presents a major challenge to the gastroenterologist, hospitalist and primary care physician. PMID:23006457

  6. Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor delta gene in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kanavaros, P; Farcet, J P; Gaulard, P; Haioun, C; Divine, M; Le Couedic, J P; Lefranc, M P; Reyes, F

    1991-01-01

    Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta-chain gene were studied in 37 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) and related to their clinical presentation and the expression of the alpha beta or gamma delta heterodimers as determined by immunostaining of frozen tissue samples. There were 22 cases of alpha beta, 5 cases of gamma delta, and 10 cases of silent TCR expressing neither the alpha beta nor gamma delta TCR. 5 different probes were used to examine the delta locus. The 22 cases of alpha beta PTCL displayed biallelic and monoallelic deletions; a monoallelic V delta 1 J delta 1 rearrangement was observed in 1 case and a monoallelic germ line configuration in 7 cases. The 5 cases of gamma delta PTCL displayed biallelic rearrangements: the productive rearrangements could be ascribed to V delta 1J delta 1 joining in 3 cases and VJ delta 1 joining in 2 cases according to the combined pattern of DNA hybridization with the appropriate probes and of cell reactivity with the TCR delta-1, delta TCS-1, and anti-V delta 2 monoclonal antibodies. In the VJ delta 1 joining, the rearranged V segments were located between V delta 1 and V delta 2. Interestingly, in the third group of 10 cases of silent PTCL, 5 cases were found to have a TCR gene configuration identical to that in the TCR alpha beta PTCL, as demonstrated by biallelic delta gene deletion. These 5 cases were CD3 positive. The 5 remaining cases showed a monoallelic delta gene rearrangement with a monoallelic germ line configuration in 4 and a monoallelic deletion in 1. Four of these cases were CD3 negative, which was consistent with an immature genotype the TCR commitent of which could not be ascertained. Finally, TCR gamma delta PTCL consisted of a distinct clinical morphological and molecular entity whereas TCR alpha beta and silent PTCL had a similar presentation. Images PMID:1991851

  7. Man made deltas.

    PubMed

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding. PMID:23722597

  8. Man made deltas

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding. PMID:23722597

  9. Federal Funding in the Delta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Richard J.; Calhoun, Samuel D.

    2002-01-01

    The Lower Mississippi Delta region, especially the rural Delta, faces many economic challenges. The rural Delta has received much federal aid in basic income support and funding for human resource development, but less for community resource programs, which are important for economic development. Federal aid to the Delta is analyzed in terms of…

  10. Hepatic fatty acid composition differs between chronic hepatitis C patients with and without steatosis.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Bianca M; Mohammed, Saira S; Aghdassi, Elaheh; Prayitno, Nita R; Ma, David W L; Nguyen, Augustin; Guindi, Maha; Sherman, Morris; Heathcote, E Jenny; Allard, Johane P

    2009-04-01

    Hepatic fatty acid (FA) composition may influence steatosis development in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). In a cross-sectional study, we compared the hepatic FA profile in hepatitis C patients with (n = 9) and without (n = 33) steatosis (> or =5% of hepatocytes involved). FA composition of hepatic and RBC total lipids was measured by gas chromatography. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidants in liver and plasma, blood biochemistry, and nutritional status were also assessed. Patients with steatosis had more fibrosis, higher necroinflammatory activity of their hepatitis C infection, were more often infected with genotype 3, and had lower serum cholesterol. Monounsaturated FA in the liver were higher and trans FA were lower in patients with steatosis. Lower stearic acid and higher oleic acid in hepatic total lipids suggested higher Delta9-desaturase activity. alpha-Linolenic acid in the liver was higher and the ratios of long-chain PUFA:essential FA precursors were lower for (n-3) and (n-6) PUFA. Plasma vitamin C was lower in steatosis, but RBC FA composition and other parameters did not differ. We conclude that hepatic FA composition is altered in patients with hepatitis C and steatosis, probably due to modulation of enzymatic elongation and desaturation. Oxidative stress or nutritional status does not seem to play a predominant role for development of steatosis in CHC. PMID:19211827

  11. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Change Plan Wallet card for patients to record their alcohol use over a 4-week period as a way to monitor and reduce their drinking behavior. Glossary Definitions of terms commonly used with viral hepatitis and ...

  12. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med . 2014;161(1):58-66. PMID 24863637 ... Development Conference Statement: Management of hepatitis B. Ann Intern Med . 2009;150:104-10. PMID: 19124811 www. ...

  13. Man made deltas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, V.; Trincardi, F.

    2014-12-01

    During the last few millennia, southern European fluvio-deltaic systems have evolved in response to changes in the hydrological cycle, mostly driven by high-frequency climate oscillations and increasing anthropic pressure on natural landscapes. The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the bulk of the four largest northern Mediterranean and Black Sea deltas (Ebro, Rhone, Po and Danube) formed during two short and synchronous intervals during which anthropogenic land cover change was the main driver for enhanced sediment production. These two major growth phases occurred under contrasting climatic regimes and were both followed by generalized delta retreat, supporting the hypothesis of human-driven delta progradation. Delta retreat, in particular, was the consequence of reduced soil erosion for renewed afforestation after the fall of the Roman Empire, and of river dams construction that overkilled the still increasing sediment production in catchment basins since the Industrial Era. In this second case, in particular, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding.

  14. Hepatitis B Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 10 Other Languages . Resource Video See ...

  15. Hepatitis C - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus (HCV). Other common hepatitis virus infections include hepatitis A and hepatitis B . ... Elisofon SA, Jonas MMF. Viral hepatitis in children. In: Boyer TD, Manns MP, Sanyal AJ, eds. Zakim & Boyer's Hepatology: A Textbook of Liver Disease. 6th ed. ...

  16. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis A FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  17. Hepatitis C FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  18. Hepatitis B FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  19. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  20. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... Stomach ache Nausea Diarrhea No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will ...

  1. Extracorporeal detoxification for hepatic failure using molecular adsorbent recirculating system: depurative efficiency and clinical results in a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Donati, Gabriele; La Manna, Gaetano; Cianciolo, Giuseppe; Grandinetti, Valeria; Carretta, Elisa; Cappuccilli, Maria; Panicali, Laura; Iorio, Mario; Piscaglia, Fabio; Bolondi, Luigi; Colì, Luigi; Stefoni, Sergio

    2014-02-01

    Acute liver failure and acute-on-chronic liver failure still show a poor prognosis. The molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) has been extensively used as the most promising detoxifying therapy for patients with these conditions. Sixty-four patients with life-threatening liver failure were selected, and 269 MARS treatments were carried out as a bridge for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) or for liver function recovery. All patients were grouped according to the aim of MARS therapy. Group A consisted of 47 patients treated for liver function recovery (median age 59 years, range 23-82). Group B consisted of 11 patients on the waiting list who underwent OLT (median age 47 years, range 32-62). Group C consisted of 6 patients on the waiting list who did not undergo OLT (median age 45.5 years, range 36-54, P = 0.001). MARS depurative efficiency in terms of liver toxins, cytokines, and growth factors was assessed together with the clinical outcome of the patients during a 1-year follow-up. Total bilirubin reduction rate per session (RRs) for each MARS session was 23% (range 17-29); direct bilirubin RRs was 28% (21-35), and indirect bilirubin RRs was 8% (3-21). Ammonia RRs was 34% (12-86). Conjugated cholic acid RRs was 58% (48-61); chenodeoxycholic acid RRs was 34% (18-48). No differences were found between groups. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) values on starting MARS were 4.1 ng/mL (1.9-7.9) versus 7.9 ng/mL (3.2-14.1) at MARS end (P < 0.01). Cox regression analysis to determine the risk factors predicting patient outcomes showed that age, male gender, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (but not Model for End-stage Liver Disease score) were factors predicting death, whereas the number of MARS sessions and the ΔHGF proved protective factors. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was also used; after 12 months, 21.3% of patients in Group A survived, while 90.9% were alive in Group B and 16.7% in Group C (log rank = 0.002). In

  2. Hepatitis C: Sex and Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Hepatitis » Sex and Sexuality: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... hepatitis C virus through sex. Can you pass hepatitis C to a sex partner? Yes, but it ...

  3. Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Chawla, Sumit; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Following acute infection, 20% of people eliminate the virus over weeks or months and are often asymptomatic. The remaining 80% of people will develop chronic disease, of which approximately 20% will eventually develop liver cirrhosis and 1–5% will develop liver cancer. About 150 million people are chronically infected with HCV, and more than 350 000 people die every year from hepatitis C related liver diseases. The economic cost of hepatitis C is significant both to the individual and to the society. In the United States the average lifetime cost of the disease was estimated at $33 407 USD with the cost of a liver transplant approximately $200 000 USD. PEG-IFN and ribavirin treatment is also expensive and, at an average cost of approximately GB £7000 in the UK for a treatment course, is unaffordable in developing countries. Hepatitis C, not only brings down the quality of the life of individuals but also affect progress of the nation by adding financial burden. If we prevent the disease from occurring or find a perfect cure of the disease, in form of a prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine, it will be a boon to not only to the individual but to the nation as a whole. PMID:24165512

  4. Update on Alcohol and Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gitto, Stefano; Vitale, Giovanni; Villa, Erica; Andreone, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is often associated with viral hepatitis. Although alcohol is known to worsen viral liver disease, the interactions between alcohol and viral hepatitis are not fully understood. Molecular alterations in the liver due to alcohol and viral hepatitis include effects on viral replication, increased oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, and a weakened immune response. Clinically, alcohol enhances disease progression and favors induction of primitive liver neoplasm. The use of new antivirals for hepatitis C and well-established drugs for hepatitis B will determine how viral hepatitis can be controlled in a large percentage of these patients. However, alcohol-related liver disease continues to represent a barrier for access to antivirals, and it remains an unresolved health issue. PMID:26356547

  5. Hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mínguez, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of cirrhosis that is related to the effects of ammonia. Analysis of interorgan ammonia trafficking has identified an important role of skeletal muscle in ammonia removal and has highlighted the importance of the nutritional status. Ammonia causes neurotransmitter abnormalities and induces injury to astrocytes that is partially mediated by oxidative stress. These disturbances lead to astrocyte swelling and brain edema, which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological manifestations. Inflammatory mediators worsen brain disturbances. New methods for assessing hepatic encephalopathy include clinical scales, neuropsychological tests, imaging of portal-systemic circulation, and magnetic resonance of the brain. Reappraisal of current therapy indicates the need for performing placebo-controlled trials and the lack of evidence for administering diets with restricted protein content. Liver transplant should be considered in selected patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Future prospects include new drugs that decrease plasma ammonia, measures to reduce brain edema, and liver-support devices. PMID:18293278

  6. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mur, Rafael Esteban

    2014-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (EH) is a severe complication of hepatic cirrhosis that is characterized by multiple neuropsychiatric manifestations. EH is usually triggered by a precipitating factor and occurs in patients with severely impaired hepatic function. Minimal EH is characterized by minor cognitive impairments that are difficult to specify but represent a risk for the patients. The primary pathophysiological mechanism of EH is considered to be an increase in blood ammonia with an impairment in the patency of the blood-brainbarrier and its metabolism to glutamine in astrocytes. The diagnosis is clinical and neuroimaging techniques can be complementary. The diagnosis of minimal EH requires specific neurocognitive tests. The clinical evaluation should be directed towards identifying the trigger. Nonabsorbable disaccharides and rifaximin constitute the treatment of choice, along with prophylaxis for new episodes. PMID:25087716

  7. Delta II Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Final preparations for lift off of the DELTA II Mars Pathfinder Rocket are shown. Activities include loading the liquid oxygen, completing the construction of the Rover, and placing the Rover into the Lander. After the countdown, important visual events include the launch of the Delta Rocket, burnout and separation of the three Solid Rocket Boosters, and the main engine cutoff. The cutoff of the main engine marks the beginning of the second stage engine. After the completion of the second stage, the third stage engine ignites and then cuts off. Once the third stage engine cuts off spacecraft separation occurs.

  8. Lessons from KIPP Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maranto, Robert; Shuls, James V.

    2011-01-01

    KIPP Delta succeeds at its stated mission, probably because of its careful attention to culture building. What distinguishes this KIPP school is thoughtful work linking the daily processes of schooling to the goals of schooling, in this case success in college. Day to day tactics reflect broader themes: having a clear mission and hiring staff who…

  9. Delta Airlines LOFT training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, J.

    1981-01-01

    A LOFT program was developed as part of the DC-9 training program which serves as a prototype for much of Delta's other aircraft training programs. The LOFT used differs little from the ideology presented in the Advisory Circular. Difficulty and experienced concerns regarding the effectiveness of LOFT as a complete training vehicle are explored.

  10. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  11. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Low-grade fever Nausea and vomiting Pale or clay-colored stools Yellow skin (jaundice) ... The virus does not remain in the body after the infection is gone. Most people with hepatitis A recover within 3 months. Nearly all people get better within 6 months. There ...

  12. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider will closely monitor and manage any side effects that may occur, as high doses of prednisone are often prescribed to treat autoimmune hepatitis. Immune system suppressors. Medications that suppress the immune system prevent the body from making autoantibodies and block the immune reaction ...

  13. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advisory Board Sponsors Sponsorship Opporunities Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician ... Body Hepatitis means “inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There ...

  14. Using delta-front bathymetry to understand river delta progradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. B.; Mohrig, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the delta-front bathymetry of the Wax Lake Delta in Louisiana, USA; a sand rich river delta prograding quickly (~100 m/yr) into a shallow (~2.5 m) basin. The delta-front is the zone separating the bottomset from the topset of the delta. Bottomset sedimentation covers the bed evenly whereas topset sediment transport is focused by flow through distributary channels. The delta front connects these two disparate transport regimes and has a profound effect on channel-network evolution and sedimentary structure of river deltas. Predictions of delta-front topography made by models of delta progradation have rarely been compared to the bathymetry of field-scale deltas. We have mapped 60 km2 of delta front bathymetry immediately seaward of two sub-aerial distributary channels. Subaqueous channels extend up to 2 km seaward of their subaerial portions. These channels lose definition at their distal ends through a combination of channel-bed shoaling and loss of bank relief. Little bathymetric relief is observed at the fronts of the subaqueous channels, calling into question the role of channel-mouth bars in generating the bifurcations observed in this delta-channel network. Near the subaerial to subaqueous transition, steep and eroding sidewalls transition to constructional banks with gentle grades. Grab samples of bed material have been collected throughout the study area in order to detect proximal to distal fining and to constrain the shear stresses connected with delta-front sedimentation. A better understanding of sediment transport in the delta front and its affiliated patterns of erosion and deposition is essential for progress in understanding how river deltas prograde and fill their basins.

  15. The Devil's in the Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.

    2007-01-01

    Students frequently confuse and incorrectly apply the several "deltas" that are used in chemical engineering. The deltas come in three different flavors: "out minus in", "big minus little" and "now versus then." The first applies to a change in a stream property as the stream flows through a process. For example, the "[delta]H" in an energy…

  16. DELTAS: A new Global Delta Sustainability Initiative (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Deltas are economic and environmental hotspots, food baskets for many nations, home to a large part of the world population, and hosts of exceptional biodiversity and rich ecosystems. Deltas, being at the land-water interface, are international, regional, and local transport hubs, thus providing the basis for intense economic activities. Yet, deltas are deteriorating at an alarming rate as 'victims' of human actions (e.g. water and sediment reduction due to upstream basin development), climatic impacts (e.g. sea level rise and flooding from rivers and intense tropical storms), and local exploration (e.g. sand or aggregates, groundwater and hydrocarbon extraction). Although many efforts exist on individual deltas around the world, a comprehensive global delta sustainability initiative that promotes awareness, science integration, data and knowledge sharing, and development of decision support tools for an effective dialogue between scientists, managers and policy makers is lacking. Recently, the international scientific community proposed to establish the International Year of Deltas (IYD) to serve as the beginning of such a Global Delta Sustainability Initiative. The IYD was proposed as a year to: (1) increase awareness and attention to the value and vulnerability of deltas worldwide; (2) promote and enhance international and regional cooperation at the scientific, policy, and stakeholder level; and (3) serve as a launching pad for a 10-year committed effort to understand deltas as complex socio-ecological systems and ensure preparedness in protecting and restoring them in a rapidly changing environment. In this talk, the vision for such an international coordinated effort on delta sustainability will be presented as developed by a large number of international experts and recently funded through the Belmont Forum International Opportunities Fund. Participating countries include: U.S., France, Germany, U.K., India, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Brazil, Bangladesh

  17. [Microbiological diagnosis of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Alonso, Roberto; Aguilera, Antonio; Córdoba, Juan; Fuertes, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Liver inflammation or hepatitis has many different causes, both infectious and non-infectious. Among the former, viral infection is responsible for at least half of all hepatitis worldwide. Different viruses have been described with primary tropism for liver tissue. These microorganisms have been successively named with letters of the alphabet: A, B, C, D, E and G. The aim of this paper is to review this heterogeneous group of viruses in its most basic aspects, including clinical implications, treatment, main control, and prophylactic measures and, of special interest, diagnostic approaches, both serological and molecular, which are used for their detection, quantification and characterization. PMID:25742731

  18. Chronic hepatitis B in hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, N H; Song, I H; Chung, Y-H

    2006-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world, and has a wide geographical variation. Eighty per cent of HCC is attributed to hepatitis B virus (HBV). The predominant carcinogenic mechanism of HBV associated HCC is through the process of liver cirrhosis, but direct oncogenic effects of HBV may also contribute. Prevention of HBV infections as well as effective treatment of chronic hepatitis B is still needed for the global control of HBV associated HCC. Continued investigation of the mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis will refine our current understanding of the molecular and cellular basis for neoplastic transformation in the liver. PMID:16891440

  19. Martian deltas: Morphology and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, J. W., Jr.; Scott, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    Recent detailed mapping has revealed numerous examples of Martian deltas. The location and morphology of these deltas are described. Factors that contribute to delta morphology are river regime, coastal processes, structural stability, and climate. The largest delta systems on Mars are located near the mouths of Maja, Maumee, Vedra, Ma'adim, Kasei, and Brazos Valles. There are also several smaller-scale deltas emplaced near channel mouths situated in Ismenius Lacus, Memnonia, and Arabia. Delta morphology was used to reconstruct type, quantity, and sediment load size transported by the debouching channel systems. Methods initially developed for terrestrial systems were used to gain information on the relationships between Martian delta morphology, river regime, and coastal processes.

  20. Understanding pesticides in California's Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Orlando, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (Delta) is the hub of California’s water system and also an important habitat for imperiled fish and wildlife. Aquatic organisms are exposed to mixtures of pesticides that flow through the maze of Delta water channels from sources including agricultural, landscape, and urban pest-control applications. While we do not know all of the effects pesticides have on the ecosystem, there is evidence that they cause some damage to organisms in the Delta. Decades of USGS research have provided a good understanding of when, where, and how pesticides enter the Delta. However, pesticide use is continually changing. New field studies and methods are needed so that scientists can analyze which pesticides are present in the Delta, and at what concentrations, enabling them to estimate exposure and ultimate effects on organisms. Continuing research will provide resource managers and stakeholders with crucial information to manage the Delta wisely.

  1. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Carrier, Paul; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Sobesky, Rodolphe; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of liver cirrhosis and is an important therapeutic challenge, with a social and economic issue. If, now, the pathophysiology is not totally understood (main role of ammonia, but a better understanding of cerebral mechanisms), the clinical presentation is well-known. Some treatments are useful (disaccharides, treatment of the trigger) but their efficiency is limited. Nevertheless, the emergence of new treatments, such as non-absorbable antibiotics (rifaximin essentially), is an interesting therapeutic tool. PMID:26597584

  2. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  3. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... have the virus and do not practice good hygiene. Other common hepatitis virus infections include hepatitis B ... where diapers are changed to ensure that proper hygiene is followed. If your child gets hepatitis A, ...

  4. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  5. Preventing hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. You can take several steps to ... reduce your risk of spreading or catching the hepatitis A virus: Always wash your hands thoroughly after ...

  6. What Is Hepatitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store What is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2016 Q: What ... Question and answer archives Submit a question World Hepatitis Day Know hepatitis - Act now Event notice Key ...

  7. [Novel treatments for hepatitis C viral infection and the hepatic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Lugo-Baruqui, Alejandro; Bautista López, Carlos Alfredo; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan

    2009-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents a global health problem due to its evolution to hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The viral pathogenesis and infectious processes are not yet fully understood. The development of natural viral resistance towards the host immune system represents a mayor challenge for the design of alternative therapeutic interventions and development of viral vaccines. The molecular mechanisms of hepatic fibrosis are well described. New alternatives for the treatment of patients with HCV infection and hepatic cirrhosis are under intensive research. New drugs such as viral protease inhibitors and assembly inhibitors, as well as immune modulators have been studied in clinical trials. Additional alternatives include antifibrotic drugs, which reverse the hepatic cellular damage caused by HCV infection. This review makes reference to viral infective mechanisms, molecular pathways of liver fibrosis and overviews conventional and new treatments for HCV infection and liver fibrosis. PMID:19543653

  8. Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    As the Mississippi River enters the Gulf of Mexico, it loses energy and dumps its load of sediment that it has carried on its journey through the mid continent. This pile of sediment, or mud, accumulates over the years building up the delta front. As one part of the delta becomes clogged with sediment, the delta front will migrate in search of new areas to grow. The area shown on this image is the currently active delta front of the Mississippi. The migratory nature of the delta forms natural traps for oil. Most of the land in the image consists of mud flats and marsh lands. There is little human settlement in this area due to the instability of the sediments. The main shipping channel of the Mississippi River is the broad stripe running northwest to southeast.

    This image was acquired on May 24, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping

  9. Hepatitis E: latest developments in knowledge.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gracia, M Teresa; Suay-García, Beatriz; García, Mario; Mateos-Lindemann, M Luisa

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis E, caused by Hepatitis E virus (HEV), is a highly prevalent disease in developing countries. In developed nations, autochthonous HEV infections seem to be an emergent disease. Its clinical manifestations and epidemiology are well known for endemic countries. It has been confirmed that hepatitis E is a zoonosis and that parenteral transmission can also occur. The molecular mechanisms of HEV replication are not fully understood, mostly because there are no efficient cell culture systems. HEV can cause chronic hepatitis in organ transplant recipients and immunocompetent patients. Cases with fulminant hepatitis and other extrahepatic manifestations have also been reported. The diagnosis is based on serological studies and detection of HEV RNA in blood and feces. Treatment with ribavirin and/or pegylated-IFN-α have proven to be successful in some cases. The recently approved/marketed vaccine is a good option in order to prevent this infection. PMID:27203841

  10. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, viral hepatitis, and liver cancer make liver disease one of the 10 leading ... disease are decreasing, those for viral hepatitis and liver cancer are on the rise, both in the U.S. ...

  11. Natural processes in delta restoration: application to the Mississippi Delta.

    PubMed

    Paola, Chris; Twilley, Robert R; Edmonds, Douglas A; Kim, Wonsuck; Mohrig, David; Parker, Gary; Viparelli, Enrica; Voller, Vaughan R

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of river deltas involves diverting sediment and water from major channels into adjoining drowned areas, where the sediment can build new land and provide a platform for regenerating wetland ecosystems. Except for local engineered structures at the points of diversion, restoration mainly relies on natural delta-building processes. Present understanding of such processes is sufficient to provide a basis for determining the feasibility of restoration projects through quantitative estimates of land-building rates and sustainable wetland area under different scenarios of sediment supply, subsidence, and sea-level rise. We are not yet to the point of being able to predict the evolution of a restored delta in detail. Predictions of delta evolution are based on field studies of active deltas, deltas in mine-tailings ponds, experimental deltas, and countless natural experiments contained in the stratigraphic record. These studies provide input for a variety of mechanistic delta models, ranging from radially averaged formulations to more detailed models that can resolve channels, topography, and ecosystem processes. Especially exciting areas for future research include understanding the mechanisms by which deltaic channel networks self-organize, grow, and distribute sediment and nutrients over the delta surface and coupling these to ecosystem processes, especially the interplay of topography, network geometry, and ecosystem dynamics. PMID:21329199

  12. Pioneer Launch on Delta Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    NASA launches the last in the series of interplanetary Pioneer spacecraft, Pioneer 10 from Cape Kennedy, Florida. The long-tank Delta launch vehicle placed the spacecraft in a solar orbit along the path of Earth's orbit. The spacecraft then passed inside and outside Earth's orbit, alternately speeding up and slowing down relative to Earth. The Delta launch vehicle family started development in 1959. The Delta was composed of parts from the Thor, an intermediate-range ballistic missile, as its first stage, and the Vanguard as its second. The first Delta was launched from Cape Canaveral on May 13, 1960 and was powerful enough to deliver a 100-pound spacecraft into geostationary transfer orbit. Delta has been used to launch civil, commercial, and military satellites into orbit. For more information about Delta, please see Chapter 3 in Roger Launius and Dennis Jenkins' book To Reach the High Frontier published by The University Press of Kentucky in 2002.

  13. Delta in Eberswalde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This HiRISE image covers a portion of a delta that partially fills Eberswalde crater in Margaritifer Sinus. The delta was first recognized and mapped using MOC images that revealed various features whose presence required sustained flow and deposition into a lake that once occupied the crater. The HiRISE image resolves meter-scale features that record the migration of channels and delta distributaries as the delta grew over time. Differences in grain-size of sediments within the environments on the delta enable differential erosion of the deposits. As a result, coarser channel deposits are slightly more resistant and stand in relief relative to finer-grained over-bank and more easily eroded distal delta deposits. Close examination of the relict channel deposits confirms the presence of some meter-size blocks that were likely too coarse to have been transported by water flowing within the channels. These blocks may be formed of the sand and gravel that more likely moved along the channels that was lithified and eroded. Numerous meter-scale polygonal structures are common on many surfaces, but mostly those associated with more quiescent depositional environments removed from the channels. The polygons could be the result of deposition of fine-grained sediments that were either exposed and desiccated (dried out), rich in clays that shrunk when the water was removed, turned into rock and then fractured and eroded, or some combination of these processes.

    Image PSP_001336_1560 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 8, 2006. The complete image is centered at -23.8 degrees latitude, 326.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 256.3 km (160.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.6 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 77 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was

  14. Tubular Pyloric Gland Adenoma of the Left and Right Hepatic Ducts: Report of a Unique Case With Immunohistochemical and Molecular Studies.

    PubMed

    Hatzibougias, Dimitris I; Fouzas, Ioannis; Bobos, Mattheos; Papanikolaou, Vasileios; Daoudaki, Maria; Kotoula, Vasiliki; Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    Pyloric gland adenomas (PGAs) of the extrahepatic biliary system are rare lesions. We report a case of a tubular PGA that led to biliary obstruction. The tumor was located at the confluence of the right and left hepatic ducts, extending to the left hepatic duct. The tumor cells expressed MUC6 and MUC5AC. MUC1 and CD10 were focally positive. MUC2, p53, and CDX2 were not expressed. The Ki67 positivity was estimated at <15%. None of the KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, EGFR coding regions resulted in clinically relevant amino acid substitutions. SNP rs1050171 (EGFR p.Q787Q, silent mutation) corresponding to c.2361G>A transition in exon 20 was noticed. Awareness of this rare lesion is important for pathologists and clinicians alike, because it may cause significant morphologic and clinical difficulties, especially when presenting as an obstructive mass. Because of the possible risk of evolving malignancy, surgical resection is recommended whenever possible. PMID:26762143

  15. Molecular characterization of the type I IFN receptor in two woodchuck species and detection of its expression in liver samples from woodchucks infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV).

    PubMed

    Fan, Hebin; Zhu, Zhenni; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Lu, Yinping; Tao, Yuanqing; Fan, Wei; Wang, Zhongdong; Wang, Hu; Roggendorf, Micheal; Lu, Mengji; Wang, Baoju; Yang, Dongliang

    2012-10-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) serve as the first line of defense against viral infection and share the same type I IFN receptor (IFNAR) complex, which is composed of IFNAR1 and -2. The Eastern woodchuck (Marmota monax) and Chinese woodchuck (Marmota himalayana) are suitable for studying hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Here, the complete or partial sequences of the IFNARs of both species were obtained and analyzed. Small interference RNAs targeting wIFNAR1 and -2 specifically down-regulated the expression of wIFNAR1 and -2 and the IFN-stimulated gene MxA in a woodchuck cell line, respectively. IFNAR2 was significantly up-regulated in primary woodchuck hepatocytes stimulated with IFN-α or -γ. The expression of woodchuck IFNAR1 and -2 was decreased in woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV). These results are essential for studying type I IFN-related innate immunity and therapy in hepadnaviral infection in the woodchuck model. PMID:22705153

  16. [Molecular Investigation on the Presence of Hepatitis E Virus in Wild Game in Okazaki City, Japan between April 2010 and November 2014].

    PubMed

    Nakane, Kunihiko; Ito, Hiromasa; Isogai, Kenji; Itakura, Yuko; Kasuya, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Cases of hepatitis E have been caused by infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) due to consumption of raw or undercooked game meats and liver of wild boars or deer in various countries. We investigated HEV prevalence in wild boar and deer in Okazaki City and its outskirts, Aichi, Japan, using liver samples (439 boar; 185 deer) collected between April 2010 and November 2014. HEV RNA was detected in 49 (11.2%)of 439 and 0 of 185 samples of wild boar and deer, respectively. The positive rate (13.0%, 28/216) of HEV RNA from the wild boar with estimated body weight of less than 40 kg was significantly higher than that (2.7%, 3/111) in animals with estimated body weight of more than 40 kg. The 49 HEV strains were typed as genotype 4 (G4) by phylogenetic analysis. They clustered with Aichi/Shizuoka strains and 48 of the 49 strains subclustered together (Okazaki strains). PMID:26699273

  17. Hepatitis C testing: interpretation, implications, and counseling.

    PubMed

    Becherer, P R; Bacon, B

    1993-01-01

    New molecular biology techniques recently identified hepatitis C virus (HCV) as the major cause of non-A, non-B hepatitis. Serologic assays for HCV specific antibodies are a significant advance, but they require cautious interpretation due to problems with the tests' sensitivity and specificity. Patients with suspected HCV infection should be thoroughly evaluated to verify the presence of infection, to exclude other forms of chronic liver disease, and to determine the extent of liver damage prior to considering treatment. PMID:8421452

  18. Lift force of delta wings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Ho, Chihming )

    1990-09-01

    On a delta wing, the separation vortices can be stationary due to the balance of the vorticity surface flux and the axial convection along the swept leading edge. These stationary vortices keep the wing from losing lift. A highly swept delta wing reaches the maximum lift at an angle of attack of about 40, which is more than twice as high as that of a two-dimensional airfoil. In this paper, the experimental results of lift forces for delta wings are reviewed from the perspective of fundamental vorticity balance. The effects of different operational and geometrical parameters on the performance of delta wings are surveyed.

  19. Protect Yourself from Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop yellowish eyes and skin. All the hepatitis viruses can cause acute, or short-term, hepatitis. Some can also cause chronic hepatitis, in which the infection lasts a long time, sometimes for your whole life. Chronic hepatitis can eventually lead to scarring of ...

  20. Hepatic osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Angelo; Verardo, Alberto; Di Pascoli, Marco; Giannini, Sandro; Bolognesi, Massimo

    2014-09-01

    Metabolic disturbances of bone are frequent in patients with chronic liver disease. The prevalence of osteoporosis among patients with advanced chronic liver disease is reported between 12% and 55%; it is higher in primary biliary cirrhosis. All patients with advanced liver disease should be screened for osteoporosis with a densitometry, especially if the etiology is cholestatic and in the presence of other risk factors. Clinical relevance of hepatic osteodystrophy increases after liver transplantation. After liver transplant, a rapid loss of bone mineral density can be detected in the first 6 months, followed by stabilization and slight improvement of the values. At the time of transplantation, bone density values are very important prognostic factors. Therapy of hepatic osteodystrophy is based primarily on the control of risk factors: cessation of tobacco and alcohol assumption, reduction of caffeine ingestion, exercise, supplementation of calcium and vitamin D, limitation of drugs such as loop diuretics, corticosteroids, cholestyramine. Bisphosphonates have been proposed for the therapy of osteoporosis in patients with liver disease, particularly after liver transplantation. The possible side effects of oral administration of bisphosphonates, such as the occurrence of esophageal ulcerations, are of particular concern in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension, due to the risk of gastrointestinal hemorrhage from ruptured esophageal varices, although this risk is probably overestimated. PMID:25568651

  1. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Marasco, Giovanni; Ravaioli, Federico; Colecchia, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis and it can manifest with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities of varying severity, acuity and time course with important clinical implications. According to recent guidelines, HE has been classified into different types, depending on the severity of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of porto-systemic shunts and the number of previous episodes or persistent manifestations. From a clinical point of view, HE can be recognized as unimpaired, covert (that deals with minimal and grade 1 according to the grading of mental state), and overt (that is categorized from grade 2 to grade 4). Different and only partially known pathogenic mechanisms have been identified, comprising ammonia, inflammatory cytokines, benzodiazepine-like compounds and manganese deposition. Different therapeutic strategies are available for treating HE, in particular the overt HE, since covert HE needs to be managed case by case. Recognition and treatment of precipitating factors represent fundamental part of the management. The more effective treatments, which can be performed separately or combined, are represented by non-absorbable disaccharides (lactulose and lactitol) and the topic antibiotic rifaximin; other possible therapies, mainly used in patients non responders to previous treatments, are represented by branched chain amino acids and metabolic ammonia scavengers. PMID:27571468

  2. Origins and Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis D Virus.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Margaret; Locarnini, Stephen; Yuen, Lilly

    2016-01-01

    Members of the family Hepadnaviridae fall into two subgroups: mammalian and avian. The detection of endogenous avian hepadnavirus DNA integrated into the genomes of zebra finches has revealed a deep evolutionary origin of hepadnaviruses that was not previously recognized, dating back at least 40 million and possibly >80 million years ago. The nonprimate mammalian members of the Hepadnaviridae include the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), the ground squirrel hepatitis virus, and arctic squirrel hepatitis virus, as well as a number of members of the recently described bat hepatitis virus. The identification of hepatitis B viruses (HBVs) in higher primates, such as chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbons that cluster with the human HBV, as well as a number of recombinant forms between humans and primates, further implies a more complex origin of this virus. We discuss the current theories of the origin and evolution of HBV and propose a model that includes cross-species transmissions and subsequent recombination events on a genetic backbone of genotype C HBV infection. The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective RNA virus requiring the presence of the HBV for the completion of its life cycle. The origins of this virus remain unknown, although some recent studies have suggested an ancient African radiation. The age of the association between HDV and HBV is also unknown. PMID:26729756

  3. Holden Crater Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03694 Holden Crater Delta

    This fan-shaped delta deposit is located in Holden Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -27.3N, Longitude 324.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Shanghai Delta Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.E.; Hoffman, P.F.; Parker, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The upper Eocene Yegua Formation expands dramatically across a regional system of growth faults into an area generally 12-15 km wide, extending at least from the western edge of the Houston sale dome basin to the San Marcos arch. Within this area, the expanded Yegua trend has yielded, since 1982, at least seven noteworthy discoveries: Toro Grande and Lost Bridge fields in Jackson County, and Black Owl, Shanghai, Shanghai East, El Campo, and Phase Four fields in Wharton County. During each of several postulated Yegua sea level drops, this flexure became a focal point for deltaic deposition of excellent reservoir-quality sands. Shanghai, Shanghai East, and El Campo fields are located within what the writers have labeled the ''Shanghai delta complex.'' Integration of seismic and well data in this vicinity shows a marked increase in the expansion indices of growth faults, and moderately thick progradational sand sequences have accumulated immediately downthrow. This structural-stratigraphic pattern, as well as internal bedding characteristics and other lithologic data observed, is believed typical of deltas deposited along the Yegua shelf margin.

  5. Inferring heterogeneity in aquitards using high-resolution deltaD and delta18O profiles.

    PubMed

    Hendry, M Jim; Wassenaar, L I

    2009-01-01

    Vertical depth profiles of pore water isotopes (deltaD and delta18O) in clay-rich aquitards have been used to show that solute transport is dominated by molecular diffusion, to define the timing of geologic events, and to estimate vertical hydraulic conductivity. The interpretation of the isotopic profiles in these studies was based on pore water samples collected from piezometers installed in nests (typically 4 to 15 piezometers) over depths of 10 to 80 m. Data from piezometer nests generally have poor vertical resolution (meters), raising questions about their capacity to reveal the impact of finer scale heterogeneities such as permeable sand bodies or fractured till zones on solute transport. Here, we used high-resolution (30-cm) depth profiles of deltaD and delta18O from two continuously cored boreholes in a till aquitard to provide new insights into the effects of sand bodies on solute transport. High-resolution core-derived profiles indicate that such heterogeneities can cause major deviations from one-dimensional diffusion profiles. Further, comparison of piezometer-measured values with best-fit diffusion trends shows subtle deviations, suggesting the presence of heterogeneities that should not be ignored. High-resolution profiles also more clearly defined the contact between the highly fractured oxidized zone and the underlying unoxidized zone than the piezometers. PMID:19735307

  6. Persistent testicular delta5-isomerase-3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (delta5-3beta-HSD) deficiency in the delta5-3beta-HSD form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, G; Genel, M; Bongiovanni, A M; Goldman, A S; Rosenfield, R L

    1975-01-01

    A partial testicular defect in testosterone secretion has been documented in a pubertal male with a congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to hereditary deficiency of the delta5-isomerase-3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (delta5-3beta-HSD). Diagnosis of the enzymatic defect is based on the clinical picture of ambiguous genitalia and salt-losing crisis in infancy, together with high urinary delta5-pregnenetriol and plasma dehydroepiandrosterone when the patient was taken off replacement corticoid treatment. No hormonal response to ACTH or salt deprivation was demonstrable. In addition, in vivo studies revealed a partial enzymatic defect in the testis. Although plasma testosterone was low-normal (250 ng/100 ml), plasma delta5-androstenediol was markedly elevated and rose to a greater extent than testosterone after human chorionic gonadotropin administration. In vitro testicular incubation studies suggested a testicular delta5-3beta-HSD enzyme defect with less delta4 products formed from delta5 precursors than in a control testis. Histochemical studies of the testis were also consistent with this defect. Testicular biopsy revealed spermatogenic arrest, generally diminished Leydig cells, but with focal areas of Leydig cell hyperplasia as well as benign Leydig cell hyperplasia as well as benign Leudig cell nodules within the spermatic cord. In vivo studies of steroid metabolism suggested intact peripheral or hepatic delta5-3beta-HSD activity. These studies imply that delta5-3beta-HSD activity differs in the gonad, adrenal, and peripheral organs. These findings are compatible with the concept that the enzyme complex consists of subunits and/or that enzymes in these organs are under different genetic control. PMID:164481

  7. Delta Electroproduction in 12-C

    SciTech Connect

    Steven McLauchlan

    2003-01-31

    The Delta-nucleus potential is a crucial element in the understanding of the nuclear system. Previous electroexcitation measurements in the delta region reported a Q2 dependence of the delta mass indicating that this potential is dependent on the momentum of the delta. Such a dependence is not observed for protons and neutrons in the nuclear medium. This thesis presents the experimental study of the electroexcitation of the delta resonance in 12C, performed using the high energy electron beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and the near 4(pie) acceptance detector CLAS that enables the detection of the full reaction final state. Inclusive, semi inclusive, and exclusive cross sections were measured with an incident electron beam energy of 1.162GeV over the Q2 range 0.175-0.475 (GeV/c)2. A Q2 dependence of the delta mass was only observed in the exclusive measurements indicating that the delta-nucleus potential is affected by the momentum of the delta.

  8. "Delta Plots"--A New Way to Visualize Electronic Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Harry; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Presents procedures for obtaining and examples of delta plots (a way of illustrating electron density changes associated with electronic excitation). These plots are pedagogically useful for visualizing simple and complex transitions and provide a way of "seeing" the origin of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-dictated carbonyl…

  9. Colorado River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Colorado River ends its 2330 km journey in the Gulf of Mexico in Baja California. The heavy use of the river as an irrigation source for the Imperial Valley has dessicated the lower course of the river in Mexico such that it no longer consistently reaches the sea. Prior to the mid 20th century, the Colorado River Delta provided a rich estuarine marshland that is now essentially desiccated, but nonetheless is an important ecological resource.

    The image was acquired May 29, 2006, covers an area of 44.3 x 57.5 km, and is located at 32.1 degrees north latitude, 115.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  10. Mackenzie River Delta, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories, Canada, with its headstreams the Peace and Finley, is the longest river in North America at 4241 km, and drains an area of 1,805,000 square km. The large marshy delta provides habitat for migrating Snow Geese, Tundra Swans, Brant, and other waterfowl. The estuary is a calving area for Beluga whales. The Mackenzie (previously the Disappointment River) was named after Alexander Mackenzie who travelled the river while trying to reach the Pacific in 1789.

    The image was acquired on August 4, 2005, covers an area of 55.8 x 55.8 km, and is located at 68.6 degrees north latitude, 134.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  11. Viral hepatitis: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Sandeep; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2016-07-01

    Viral hepatitis is a cause for major health care burden in India and is now equated as a threat comparable to the "big three" communicable diseases - HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus are predominantly enterically transmitted pathogens and are responsible to cause both sporadic infections and epidemics of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus are predominantly spread via parenteral route and are notorious to cause chronic hepatitis which can lead to grave complications including cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Around 400 million people all over the world suffer from chronic hepatitis and the Asia-Pacific region constitutes the epicentre of this epidemic. The present article would aim to cover the basic virologic aspects of these viruses and highlight the present scenario of viral hepatitis in India. PMID:27546957

  12. Thalamic mechanisms underlying alpha-delta sleep with implications for fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Adler, Gail K.; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-delta sleep is the abnormal intrusion of alpha activity (8- to 13-Hz oscillations) into the delta activity (1- to 4-Hz oscillations) that defines slow-wave sleep. Alpha-delta sleep is especially prevalent in fibromyalgia patients, and there is evidence suggesting that the irregularities in the sleep of these patients may cause the muscle and tissue pain that characterizes the disorder. We constructed a biophysically realistic mathematical model of alpha-delta sleep. Imaging studies in fibromyalgia patients suggesting altered levels of activity in the thalamus motivated a thalamic model as the source of alpha activity. Since sodium oxybate helps to alleviate the symptoms of fibromyalgia and reduces the amount of alpha-delta sleep in fibromyalgia patients, we examined how changes in the molecular targets of sodium oxybate affected alpha-delta activity in our circuit. Our model shows how alterations in GABAB currents and two thalamic currents, Ih (a hyperpolarization-activated current) and a potassium leak current, transform a circuit that normally produces delta oscillations into one that produces alpha-delta activity. Our findings suggest that drugs that reduce Ih conductances and/or increase potassium conductances, without necessarily increasing GABAB conductances, might be sufficient to restore delta sleep. Furthermore, they suggest that delta sleep might be restored by drugs that preferentially target these currents in the thalamus; such drugs might have fewer side effects than drugs that act systemically. PMID:26245315

  13. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis B virus. When first infected, a person can develop ...

  14. Hepatitis B Blood Tests: FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working on ... people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 10 Other Languages . Resource Video See More ...

  15. Hepatitis Information for the Public

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis Information for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  16. A nationwide molecular epidemiological study on hepatitis B virus in Indonesia: identification of two novel subgenotypes, B8 and C7.

    PubMed

    Mulyanto; Depamede, Sulaiman Ngongu; Surayah, Kiely; Tsuda, Fumio; Ichiyama, Koji; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Upon phylogenetic analysis of a partial S gene sequence [396 nucleotides (nt)], 928 hepatitis B virus (HBV) strains obtained from 899 viremic subjects in 28 major cities on 15 islands of Indonesia in 1989-2007 segregated into four HBV genotypes. Genotype B was predominant (66%), followed by genotype C (26%), genotype D (7%), and genotype A (0.8%). Comparative and phylogenetic analyses of the 396-nt S gene sequence of 928 HBV isolates and whole genomic sequences of 25 selected HBV isolates revealed a total of 14 subgenotypes within genotypes A-D: two (A1 and A2) in genotype A (HBV/A), five (B2, B3, B5, B7, and a novel subgenotype, tentatively designated B8) in HBV/B, five (C1, C2, C5, C6, and another novel subgenotype, C7) in HBV/C, and two (D1 and D3) in HBV/D. The distribution of HBV genotypes/subgenotypes, including B8 and C7, seems to be associated with ethnological origins in Indonesia. PMID:19499283

  17. Molecular characterization of a novel hepatitis E virus (HEV) strain obtained from a wild boar in Japan that is highly divergent from the previously recognized HEV strains.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masaharu; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Nagashima, Shigeo; Jirintai, Suljid; Kawakami, Manri; Sonoda, Yoshihide; Suzuki, Tadahiro; Yamamoto, Shogo; Shigemoto, Kazuhiro; Ashida, Kozo; Sato, Yukihiro; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2014-02-13

    Although a consensus classification system for hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotypes is currently unavailable, HEV variants (JBOAR135-Shiz09 and wbJOY_06) from wild boars (Sus scrofa leucomystax) have provisionally been classified into two novel genotypes (5 and 6). While performing a survey of HEV infections among 566 wild boars that were captured in Japan between January 2010 and August 2013, we found 24 boars (4.2%) with ongoing HEV infections: 13 had genotype 3 HEV, 10 had genotype 4 HEV and the remaining boar possessed a novel HEV variant (designated wbJNN_13). The entire wbJNN_13 genome comprised 7247 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail, and was highly divergent from known genotype 1 to 4 HEV isolates derived from humans, swine, wild boars, deer, mongoose and rabbits by 22.4-28.2%, JBOAR135-Shiz09 and wbJOY_06 by 19.6-21.9% and rat, ferret, bat and avian HEV isolates by 40.9-46.1% over the entire genome. Phylogenetic trees confirmed that wbJNN_13 is distantly related to all known HEV isolates. A Simplot analysis revealed no significant recombination among the existing HEV strains. These results indicate the presence of at least three genetic lineages of presumably boar-indigenous HEV strains. Further studies to fully understand the extent of the genomic heterogeneity of HEV variants infecting wild boars are warranted. PMID:24370869

  18. Role of delta-Aminolevulinic Acid in the Symptoms of Acute Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Lai, Jennifer C.; Meister, Raymond K.; Blanc, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Attacks of neuropathic pain, usually abdominal, are characteristic of the acute porphyrias and are accompanied by overproduction of heme-precursor molecules, specifically delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The basis for the acute symptoms in these diseases has been speculative. Methods We review genetic acute porphyria, hereditary tyrosinemia, and an acquired condition, lead poisoning. All perturb heme synthesis and present with a very similar pain syndrome. Results While each of these conditions has characteristic urine biochemistry, all exhibit excess delta-aminolevulinic acid. Moreover, in all, treatment with hemin reduces delta-aminolevulinic acid and relieves symptoms. In contrast, use of recombinant porphobilinogen deaminase to knock down porphobilinogen in acute porphyria was ineffective. Conclusion There is now convincing evidence that delta-aminolevulinic acid is the cause of pain in the acute porphyrias. The efficacy of hemin infusion is due mainly, if not entirely, to its inhibition of hepatic delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase-1, the enzyme that catalyzes delta-aminolevulinic acid formation. Delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase-1 is a rational target for additional therapies to control symptoms in acute porphyria. PMID:25446301

  19. Artificial delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikeš, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    A deltaic sedimentary system has a point source; sediment is carried over the delta plain by distributary channels away from the point source and deposited at the delta front by distributary mouth bars. The established methods to describe such a sedimentary system are "bedding analysis", "facies analysis", and "basin analysis". We shall call the ambient conditions "input" and the rock record "output". There exist a number of methods to deduce input from output, e.g. "Sequence stratigraphy" (a.o. Vail et al. 1977, Catuneanu et al. 2009), "Shoreline trajectory" (a.o. Helland-Hansen & Martinsen 1996, Helland-Hansen & Hampson 2009) on the one hand and the complex use of established techniques on the other (a.o. Miall & Miall 2001, Miall & Miall 2002). None of these deductive methods seems to be sufficient. I claim that the common errors in all these attempts are the following: (1) a sedimentary system is four-dimensional (3+1) and a lesser dimensional analysis is insufficient; (2) a sedimentary system is complex and any empirical/deductive analysis is non-unique. The proper approach to the problem is therefore the theoretical/inductive analysis. To that end we performed six scenarios of a scaled version of a passive margin delta in a flume tank. The scenarios have identical stepwise tectonic subsidence and semi-cyclic sealevel, but different supply curves, i.e. supply is: constant, highly-frequent, proportional to sealevel, inversely proportional to sealevel, lagging to sealevel, ahead of sealevel. The preliminary results are indicative. Lobe-switching occurs frequently and hence locally sedimentation occurs shortly and hiatuses are substantial; therefore events in 2D (+1) cross-sections don't correlate temporally. The number of sedimentary cycles disequals the number of sealevel cycles. Lobe-switching and stepwise tectonic subsidence cause onlap/transgression. Erosional unconformities are local diachronous events, whereas maximum flooding surfaces are regional

  20. Delta spots and great flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, Harold; Liggett, Margaret A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of delta spots and the great flares they produce are reviewed based on 18 years of observations. Delta groups are found to develop in three ways: (1) by the eruption of a single complex active region formed below the surface; (2) by the eruption of large satellite spots near a large older spot; and (3) by the collision of spots of opposite polarity from different dipoles. It is shown that the present sample of 21 delta spots never separate once they lock together, and that the driving force for the shear is spot motion. Indicators for the prediction of the occurrence of great flares are identified.

  1. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  2. Hepatic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, S.; Langer, V.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic abscesses are potentially lethal diseases if early diagnosis and treatment are not instituted. They are prevalent all over the globe and pyogenic abscesses are predominant over amoebic. With better control of intra abdominal and systemic infections by a spectrum of antibiotics, aetiology of pyogenic abscesses are secondary to interventions and diseases in the biliary tree to a large extent today. The common organisms isolated are the Gram negative group. Amoebic abscesses continue to plague some regions of the world where hygiene and sanitation are questionable. Over the years, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis have evolved remarkably. Imaging modalities like ultrasonography and CT scan have become the cornerstone of diagnosis. The absence of ionizing radiation makes MRI an attractive alternative in patients who require multiple follow up scans. Serological testing in amoebic abscesses has become more reliable. Though antibiotics have remained the principal modality of management, percutaneous drainage of abscesses have vastly improved the chances of cure and bring down the morbidity drastically in pyogenic abscesses. Amoebic abscesses respond well to medical treatment with nitroimidazoles, and minimally invasive surgical drainage is an option in cases where open surgery is indicated. PMID:24532886

  3. Hepatitis B Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... IgM; anti-HBe; Hepatitis B e Antibody; HBV DNA Formal name: Hepatitis B Virus Testing Related tests: ... produced by the virus, and others detect viral DNA . The main uses for HBV tests include: To ...

  4. Hepatitis Foundation International

    MedlinePlus

    ... partner – it's your best friend. Welcome. The Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) is a 501 (c) 3 non- ... and cures is your participation in the Hepatitis Foundation International Registry. Whether you are affected, a caregiver, ...

  5. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... hepatitis A. Children can get hepatitis A at day care center from other children or from child care ... treatment with immunoglobulin therapy. If your child attends day care: Make sure the children and staff at the ...

  6. Hepatitis C (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C is a virus-caused liver inflammation which may cause jaundice, fever and cirrhosis. Persons who are most at risk for contracting and spreading hepatitis C are those who share needles for injecting drugs ...

  7. Molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates, including identification of a novel recombinant, in patients with acute HBV infection attending an Irish hospital.

    PubMed

    Laoi, Bairbre Ni; Crowley, B

    2008-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is known to show significant genetic diversity. There are eight HBV genotypes (A-H) characterized by distinct geographical distribution. Mutations in the HBV genome, in particular precore (PC) and basal core promoter (BCP) mutations, may be important factors in the pathogenesis of disease. In this study genetic heterogeneity and phylogenetic analysis of HBV isolates from 32 naïve patients with acute HBV infection was investigated. Eleven patients presented with severe infection, while the remaining 21 had self-limiting illness. Only four isolates from patients with severe HBV infection harbored the G1896A stop codon mutation. One isolate (Irish-13), collected from a patient with acute asymptomatic infection, had a G1896A mutation and a 243 bp deletion of the polymerase gene. A triple mutation, T1753C/A1762T/G1764A was identified in only one isolate (Irish-3) associated with severe infection. The latter also had a mutation, A2339G, in the core gene, not previously reported in severe acute infection caused by genotype D. Variations within the S gene were identified in 6 isolates, including Gly145Ala, associated with vaccine immune escape, Asp144Glu, Ser143Leu and Phe134Leu, each associated with failure to detect HBsAg. Phylogenetic analysis was determined using amplicons of the S gene (678 bp) and distal-X/PC region (672 bp). Genotype A was the most common (75%), followed by genotype D (15.6%), and equal proportions of C, E, F, and H. A novel recombinant of genotypes D and E was identified in an isolate originating from West Africa. Genetic heterogeneity of HBV isolates of HBV isolates from patients with acute infection needs further study of its significance. PMID:18649329

  8. Delta-9 desaturase from sharpshooters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic analyses of several leafhoppers identified the first leafhopper delta-9 desaturase. Identification of important gene transcripts within insect pests permits them to be targeted with RNA interference, RNAi, strategies. The glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae; Homalodis...

  9. Treatment methods for the determination of delta2H and delta18O of hair keratin by continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Gabriel J; Chesson, Lesley; Nielson, Kristine; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2005-01-01

    The structural proteins that comprise approximately 90% of animal hair have the potential to record environmentally and physiologically determined variation in delta2H and delta18O values of body water. Broad, systematic, geospatial variation in stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of environmental water and the capacity for rapid, precise measurement via methods such as high-temperature conversion elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TC/EA-IRMS) make these isotope systems particularly well suited for applications requiring the geolocation of hair samples. In order for such applications to be successful, however, methods must exist for the accurate determination of hair delta2H and delta18O values reflecting the primary products of biosynthesis. Here, we present the results of experiments designed to examine two potential inaccuracies affecting delta2H and delta18O measurements of hair: the contribution of non-biologic hydrogen and oxygen to samples in the form of sorbed molecular water, and the exchange of hydroxyl-bound hydrogen between hair keratin and ambient water vapor. We show that rapid sorption of molecular water from the atmosphere can have a substantial effect on measured delta2H and delta18O values of hair (comprising approximately 7.7% of the measured isotopic signal for H and up to approximately 10.6% for O), but that this contribution can be effectively removed through vacuum-drying of samples for 6 days. Hydrogen exchange between hair keratin and ambient vapor is also rapid (reaching equilibrium within 3-4 days), with 9-16% of the total hydrogen available for exchange at room temperature. Based on the results of these experiments, we outline a recommended sample treatment procedure for routine measurement of delta2H and delta18O in mammal hair. PMID:16047316

  10. Supersonic aerodynamics of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Through the empirical correlation of experimental data and theoretical analysis, a set of graphs has been developed which summarize the inviscid aerodynamics of delta wings at supersonic speeds. The various graphs which detail the aerodynamic performance of delta wings at both zero-lift and lifting conditions were then employed to define a preliminary wing design approach in which both the low-lift and high-lift design criteria were combined to define a feasible design space.

  11. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  12. Treating hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Karmen

    2014-10-01

    (1) New treatments for hepatitis C are curing more people than before. (2) Baby boomers make up an estimated 75 percent of all cases of hepatitis C. (3) Medicare and some insurance plans cover screening for hepatitis C as a preventive service without a copayment. PMID:25514812

  13. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  14. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) Print A A A Text Size ... Prevented? How Is It Treated? What Is It? Hepatitis (pronounced: hep-uh-TIE-tiss) is a disease ...

  15. Synthesis of hepatic lipase in liver and extrahepatic tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Doolittle, M.H.; Wong, H.; Davis, R.C.; Schotz, M.C.

    1987-11-01

    Immunoprecipitations of hepatic lipase from pulse-labeled rat liver have demonstrated that hepatic lipase is synthesized in two distinct molecular weight forms, HL-I (Mr = 51,000) and HL-II (Mr = 53,000). Both forms are immunologically related to purified hepatic lipase, but not to lipoprotein lipase. HL-I and HL-II are also kinetically related and represent different stages of intracellular processing. Glycosidase experiments suggest that HL-I is the high mannose microsomal form of the mature, sialylated HL-II enzyme. Hepatic lipase activity was detected in liver and adrenal gland but was absent in brain, heart, kidney, testes, small intestine, lung, and spleen. The adrenal and liver lipase activities were inhibited in a similar dose-dependent manner by hepatic lipase antiserum. Immunoblot analysis of partially purified adrenal lipase showed an immunoreactive band co-migrating with HL-II at 53,000 daltons which was absent in a control blot treated with preimmune serum. Adrenal lipase and authentic hepatic lipase yielded similar peptide maps, confirming the presence of the lipase in adrenal gland. However, incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into immunoprecipitable hepatic lipase was not detected in this tissue. In addition, Northern blot analysis showed the presence of hepatic lipase mRNA in liver but not adrenal gland. The presence of hepatic lipase in adrenal gland in the absence of detectable synthesis or messenger suggests that hepatic lipase originates in liver and is transported to this extrahepatic site.

  16. Hepatitis B virus infection in Haemodialysis Centres from Santa Catarina State, Southern Brazil. Predictive risk factors for infection and molecular epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, Flair J; Moraes, Cleusa R; Pinho, João RR; Mello, Isabel MVGC; Bertolini, Dennis A; Lemos, Marcílio F; Moreira, Regina C; Bassit, Leda C; Cardoso, Rita A; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Gabriela; Da Silva, Luiz C

    2004-01-01

    Background Patients under haemodialysis are considered at high risk to acquire hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Since few data are reported from Brazil, our aim was to assess the frequency and risk factors for HBV infection in haemodialysis patients from 22 Dialysis Centres from Santa Catarina State, south of Brazil. Methods This study includes 813 patients, 149 haemodialysis workers and 772 healthy controls matched by sex and age. Serum samples were assayed for HBV markers and viraemia was detected by nested PCR. HBV was genotyped by partial S gene sequencing. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses with stepwise logistic regression analysis were carried out to analyse the relationship between HBV infection and the characteristics of patients and their Dialysis Units. Results Frequency of HBV infection was 10.0%, 2.7% and 2.7% among patients, haemodialysis workers and controls, respectively. Amidst patients, the most frequent HBV genotypes were A (30.6%), D (57.1%) and F (12.2%). Univariate analysis showed association between HBV infection and total time in haemodialysis, type of dialysis equipment, hygiene and sterilization of equipment, number of times reusing the dialysis lines and filters, number of patients per care-worker and current HCV infection. The logistic regression model showed that total time in haemodialysis, number of times of reusing the dialysis lines and filters, and number of patients per worker were significantly related to HBV infection. Conclusions Frequency of HBV infection among haemodialysis patients at Santa Catarina state is very high. The most frequent HBV genotypes were A, D and F. The risk for a patient to become HBV positive increase 1.47 times each month of haemodialysis; 1.96 times if the dialysis unit reuses the lines and filters ≥ 10 times compared with haemodialysis units which reuse < 10 times; 3.42 times if the number of patients per worker is more than five. Sequence similarity among the HBV S gene from isolates

  17. Hepatitis E: an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gracia, María Teresa; Suay, Beatriz; Mateos-Lindemann, María Luisa

    2014-03-01

    Currently, the infection with the hepatitis E virus represents the most frequent cause for acute hepatitis and jaundice in the world. According to WHO estimations, around two billion people, representing one third of the world's population, live in endemic areas for HEV and, therefore, are at risk of infection. In developed countries, the circulation of the virus in both human and animal (swine, boar, deer) sewage has been confirmed; however, the incidence rate is low compared to that of developing countries where outbreaks of acute hepatitis transmitted via the fecal-oral route are originated, more frequently in the flooding season or after natural disasters, combined with deficient sanitary conditions. There are currently 4 known genotypes of HEV. Genotypes 1 and 2 are isolated in all human epidemic outbreaks in developing countries, while genotypes 3 and 4 are isolated not only in humans but also in animals, in both developing and industrialized countries. These data support genotypes 3 and 4 having zoonotic nature. The diagnosis of this disease is based in the detection of anti-HEV IgG and IgM in blood serum using enzyme-linked immunosorbent methods. However, the method that best confirms the diagnosis is the RT-PCR, which detects HEV RNA in blood serum and also provides the genotype. The clinical course is generally that of an acute hepatitis which in some cases may require hospitalization and that, in transplant patients or HIV infected individuals can become a chronic hepatitis. Furthermore, the virus constitutes an important risk for pregnant women. The hepatitis E can present a wide range of symptoms, from a subclinical case to chronic liver disease with extrahepatic manifestations. For this reason, the diagnostic is challenging if no differential diagnosis is included. There is no specific antiviral drug for hepatitis E, but satisfactory results have been observed in some patients treated with pegylated interferon alfa2a and/or ribavirin. This revision is

  18. The GTP-bound and Sumoylated Form of the rab17 Small Molecular Weight GTPase Selectively Binds Syntaxin 2 in Polarized Hepatic WIF-B Cells.

    PubMed

    Striz, Anneliese C; Tuma, Pamela L

    2016-04-29

    A major focus for our laboratory is identifying the molecules and mechanisms that regulate polarized apical protein sorting in hepatocytes, the major epithelial cells of the liver. These trafficking pathways are regulated, in part, by small molecular weight rab GTPases. We chose to investigate rab17, whose expression is restricted to polarized epithelial cells, is enriched in liver, and has been implicated in regulating basolateral to apical transcytosis. To initiate our studies, we generated three recombinant adenoviruses expressing wild type, constitutively active (GTP bound), or dominant-negative (GDP bound) rab17. Immunoblotting revealed rab17 immunoreactive species at 25 kDa (the predicted rab17 molecular mass) and 40 kDa. We determined that mono-sumoylation of the 25-kDa rab17 is responsible for the shift in molecular mass, and that rab17 prenylation is required for sumoylation. We further determined that sumoylation selectively promotes interactions with syntaxin 2 (but not syntaxins 3 or 4) and that these interactions are nucleotide dependent. Furthermore, a K68R-mutated rab17 led to the redistribution of syntaxin 2 and 5' nucleotidase from the apical membrane to subapical puncta, whereas multidrug resistance protein 2 distributions were not changed. Together these data are consistent with the proposed role of rab17 in vesicle fusion with the apical plasma membrane and further implicate sumoylation as an important mediator of protein-protein interactions. The selectivity in syntaxin binding and apical protein redistribution further suggests that rab17 and syntaxin 2 mediate fusion of transcytotic vesicles at the apical surface. PMID:26957544

  19. Emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Mangano, Katia; Pesce, Antonio; Portale, Teresa Rosanna; Puleo, Stefano; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2016-02-01

    Fibrosis represents a response to chronic injury, aimed at maintaining organ integrity. Hepatic fibrosis is mainly related to chronic viral hepatitis B or C (HBV or HCV), alcoholic and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and biliary diseases. A deep understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying liver fibrosis has enabled the development of 'pathogenetic tailored' therapeutic interventions. However, effective drugs to prevent or revert hepatic fibrosis are still lacking. In this review, we discuss the cellular populations and the molecular pathways involved in liver fibrogenesis as well as the novel approaches currently being tested in clinical trials. PMID:26523773

  20. Ornithine delta-aminotransferase mutations in gyrate atrophy. Allelic heterogeneity and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Brody, L C; Mitchell, G A; Obie, C; Michaud, J; Steel, G; Fontaine, G; Robert, M F; Sipila, I; Kaiser-Kupfer, M; Valle, D

    1992-02-15

    Ornithine delta-aminotransferase is a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial matrix enzyme which catalyzes the reversible interconversion of ornithine and alpha-ketoglutarate to glutamate semialdehyde and glutamate. Inherited deficiency of ornithine delta-aminotransferase results in ornithine accumulation and a characteristic chorioretinal degeneration, gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina. We have surveyed the ornithine delta-aminotransferase genes of gyrate atrophy patients for mutations. Using a variety of techniques, we discovered and molecularly characterized 21 newly recognized ornithine delta-aminotransferase alleles. We determined the consequences of these and three previously described mutations on ornithine delta-aminotransferase mRNA, antigen, and enzyme activity in cultured fibroblasts. The majority (20/24) of these alleles produce normal amounts of normally sized ornithine delta-aminotransferase mRNA. By contrast, only 2/24 had normal amounts of ornithine delta-aminotransferase antigen. Reproducing these mutations by site-directed mutagenesis and expressing the mutant ornithine delta-aminotransferase in Chinese hamster ovary cells confirms that several of these mutations inactivate ornithine delta-aminotransferase and cause gyrate atrophy in these patients. PMID:1737786

  1. High prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus genotype H infection among children with clinical hepatitis in west Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora A; Roman, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the prevalence of infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) among children are scarce in Latin American countries, especially in Mexico. This study was aimed to investigate the prevalence of HBV infection, occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) and HBV genotypes among children with clinical hepatitis. In total, 215 children with clinical hepatitis were evaluated for HBV infection. HBV serological markers and HBV DNA were analysed. OBI diagnosis and HBV genotyping was performed. HBV infection was found in 11.2% of children with clinical hepatitis. Among these HBV DNA positive-infected children, OBI was identified in 87.5% (n = 21/24) of the cases and 12.5% (n = 3/24) were positive for both HBV DNA and hepatitis B surface antigen. OBI was more frequent among children who had not been vaccinated against hepatitis B (p < 0.05) than in those who had been vaccinated. HBV genotype H was prevalent in 71% of the children followed by genotype G (8%) and genotype A (4%). In conclusion, OBI is common among Mexican children with clinical hepatitis and is associated with HBV genotype H. The results show the importance of the molecular diagnosis of HBV infection in Mexican paediatric patients with clinical hepatitis and emphasise the necessity of reinforcing hepatitis B vaccination in children. PMID:25099333

  2. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  3. Hepatitis: protecting BMETs & CEs.

    PubMed

    Baker, S A

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis is the primary occupational hazard for healthcare workers. Not until the 1970s were hepatitis viruses isolated and identified as types A and B. In the late 1970s, hepatitis D was discovered as a major cause of fulminant hepatitis. Soon, it was evident that another type was also at work. Because testing was only available for types A and B, the new category was referred to as non-A, non-B. In the 1980s, scientists identified two more viruses from this non-A, non-B group, namely hepatitis E and hepatitis C. These five types of hepatitis have different modes of transmission. The fecal-to-oral route is the mode of transmission for hepatitis types A and E. But, types B and D are bloodborne pathogens. With the advent of a safe vaccine for hepatitis B, this category is declining. To date, hepatitis C appears to have multiple routes of transmission, with half the cases being posttransfusion. In the United States, 85,000 people per year develop chronic hepatitis C, which ultimately leads to severe liver damage. This paper addresses each of the five viruses that have been grouped by routes of transmission, prevention techniques for BMETs and CEs, and statistics of reported cases to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP) over the last 20 years. PMID:10139739

  4. Insulin-Inducible SMILE Inhibits Hepatic Gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Min; Seo, Woo-Young; Han, Hye-Sook; Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Don-Kyu; Choi, Seri; Choi, Byeong Hun; Harris, Robert A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The role of a glucagon/cAMP-dependent protein kinase-inducible coactivator PGC-1α signaling pathway is well characterized in hepatic gluconeogenesis. However, an opposing protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt-inducible corepressor signaling pathway is unknown. A previous report has demonstrated that small heterodimer partner-interacting leucine zipper protein (SMILE) regulates the nuclear receptors and transcriptional factors that control hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we show that hepatic SMILE expression was induced by feeding in normal mice but not in db/db and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Interestingly, SMILE expression was induced by insulin in mouse primary hepatocyte and liver. Hepatic SMILE expression was not altered by refeeding in liver-specific insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) or PKB β-deficient (PKBβ(-/-)) mice. At the molecular level, SMILE inhibited hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-mediated transcriptional activity via direct competition with PGC-1α. Moreover, ablation of SMILE augmented gluconeogenesis and increased blood glucose levels in mice. Conversely, overexpression of SMILE reduced hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and ameliorated hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in db/db and HFD-fed mice. Therefore, SMILE is an insulin-inducible corepressor that suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. Small molecules that enhance SMILE expression would have potential for treating hyperglycemia in diabetes. PMID:26340929

  5. High prevalence of chronic hepatitis D virus infection in Eastern Turkey: urbanization of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Suvak, Burak; Gonullu, Edip; Gultepe, Bilge; Aydın, İbrahim; Batur, Abdüssamet; Karadas, Sevdegul; Olmez, Şehmus

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Both hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection play an increasingly important role in liver diseases. The main objective of this study was to investigate the socio-epidemiological, laboratory and radiological aspects of both HBV and HDV infection near the Iranian border of Turkey. Material and methods The study included 3352 patients with HBV and HDV infection. Socioepidemiological, laboratory and radiological aspects of the study subjects were retrospectively examined. Comorbid metabolic diseases were not assessed due to the retrospective design of the study. Results Most of the study subjects were HBe antigen negative. No significant difference in terms of HBV-DNA levels or HBe antigen seropositivity was detected between the city centre and rural areas (p > 0.005). The mean HBV-DNA level in the anti-HDV-positive group was significantly lower than in the anti-HDV-negative group (p < 0.001). The rate of HDV-RNA positivity in women was higher than in their male counterparts (p = 0.017). Anti-HDV-IgG was detected in 18.4% of tested subjects who came from an urban area. In contrast, 12.5% of subjects of the rural group had a positive result for anti-HDV-IgG. Among 134 ultrasonographically evaluated delta hepatitis patients, 37.3% had liver cirrhosis. On the other hand, in 1244 patients with hepatitis B monoinfection, there were 90 patients with liver cirrhosis. Radiologically, the rate of hepatic steatosis in delta hepatitis patients was lower than in those with HBV monoinfection. Conclusions Hepatitis D virus infection was particularly prevalent among the urban population as well as in female subjects. More broadly, the current observations are the first to suggest an inverse correlation between delta hepatitis and ultrasonography-proven hepatic steatosis. PMID:27186189

  6. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  7. Alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Damgaard Sandahl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute inflammatory syndrome causing significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis is strongly dependent on disease severity, as assessed by clinical scoring systems. Reliable epidemiological data as well as knowledge of the clinical course of AH are essential for planning and resource allocation within the health care system. Likewise, individual evaluation of risk is desirable in the clinical handling of patients with AH as it can guide treatment, improve patient information, and serve as strata in clinical trials. The present PhD thesis is based on three studies using a cohort of nearly 2000 patients diagnosed with AH in Denmark from 1999 to 2008 as a cohort, in a population-based study design. The aims of this thesis were as follows. (1) To describe the incidence and short- and long-term mortality, of AH in Denmark (Study I). (2) To validate and compare the ability of the currently available prognostic scores to predict mortality in AH (Study II). (3) To investigate the short- and long-term causes of death of patients with AH (Study III). During the study decade, the annual incidence rate in the Danish population rose from 37 to 46 per 106 for men and from 24 to 34 per 106 for women. Both short- and long-term mortality rose for men and women, and the increase in short-term mortality was attributable to increasing patient age and prevalence of cirrhosis. Our evaluation of the most commonly used prognostic scores for predicting the mortality of patients with AH showed that all scores performed similarly, with Area under the Receiver Operator Characteristics curves giving values between 0.74 and 0.78 for 28-day mortality assessed on admission. Our study on causes of death showed that in the short-term (< 84 days after diagnosis), patients with AH were likely to die from liver-related events and infections. In the long-term (≥ 84 days after diagnosis), those who developed cirrhosis mainly died from liver-related causes, and

  8. Marine mammals from northeast Atlantic: relationship between their trophic status as determined by delta13C and delta15N measurements and their trace metal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Das, K; Beans, C; Holsbeek, L; Mauger, G; Berrow, S D; Rogan, E; Bouquegneau, J M

    2003-09-01

    The relationship between trophic position through delta13C and delta15N and trace metal concentrations (Zn, Cd, Cu and Hg) was investigated in the tissues of six marine mammal species from the Northeast Atlantic: striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba, common dolphin, Delphinus delphis, Atlantic white-sided dolphin Lagenorhynchus acutus, harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena, white beaked-dolphin Lagenorhynchus albirostris, grey seal Halichoerus grypus stranded on French Channel and Irish coasts. White-beaked dolphins, harbour porpoises, white-sided dolphins, common and striped dolphins display the same relative and decreasing trophic position, as measured by delta15N values, along both the Irish and French channel coasts, reflecting conservative trophic habits between these two places. Hepatic and renal Cd concentrations were significantly correlated to muscle delta13C and delta15N values while Hg, Zn and Cu did not. These results suggest that Cd accumulation is partly linked to the diet while other factors such as age or body condition might explain Hg, Zn or Cu variability in marine mammals. Combined stable isotope and trace metal analyses appear to be useful tools for the study of marine mammal ecology. PMID:12738219

  9. Hepatic encephalopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Lizardi-Cervera, Javier; Almeda, Paloma; Guevara, Luis; Uribe, Misael

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complication that presents in as many as 28% of patients with cirrhosis, and reported up to ten years after the diagnosis of cirrhosis. Commonly, it is observed in patients with severe hepatic failure and is characterized by neuropsychiatric manifestations that can range in severity from a mild alteration in mental state to a coma; additionally, some neuromuscular symptoms can be observed. This complication of either acute or chronic hepatic disease is the result of a diminished hepatic reservoir and inability to detoxify some toxins that originate in the bowel. Today, the role of astrocytes, specifically the Alzheimer type II cells, is known to be very important in the pathogenesis of the hepatic encephalopathy, and will be reviewed later. In conclusion, the objectives of this review are: To understand the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, To recognize the precipitating factors, as well as preventive measures for the development of the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the new classification of hepatic encephalopathy and its clinical implications, To recognize the clinical manifestations and stages of the disease, To understand the main diagnostic tests used to detect the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the main therapeutic treatments of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:15115963

  10. Molecular Characterisation and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Novel Isoform of Hepatic Antimicrobial Peptide, Hepcidin (Zc-hepc1), from the Coral Fish Moorish idol, Zanclus cornutus (Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Chaithanya, E R; Philip, Rosamma; Sathyan, Naveen; Anil Kumar, P R; Cubelio, Sherine Sonia; Bright Singh, I S

    2013-09-01

    Hepcidin is a family of short cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) participating in various physiological functions with inevitable role in host immune responses. Present study deals with identification and characterisation of a novel hepcidin isoform from coral fish Zanclus cornutus. The 81 amino acid (aa) preprohepcidin obtained from Z. cornutus consists of a hydrophobic aa rich 22 mer signal peptide, a highly variable proregion of 35 aa and a bioactive mature peptide with 8 conserved cysteine residues which contribute to the disulphide back bone. The mature hepcidin, Zc-hepc1 has a theoretical isoelectric point of 7.46, a predicted molecular weight of 2.43 kDa and a net positive charge of +1. Phylogenetic analysis grouped Z. cornutus hepcidin with HAMP2 group hepcidins confirming the divergent evolution of hepcidin-like peptide in fishes. Zc-hepc1 can attain a β-hairpin-like structure with two antiparallel β-sheets. This is the first report of an AMP from the coral fish Z. cornutus. PMID:26782987

  11. Proteomics Analysis to Identify and Characterize the Molecular Signatures of Hepatic Steatosis in Ovariectomized Rats as a Model of Postmenopausal Status

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chen-Chung; Chiu, Yen-Shuo; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Tung, Yu-Tang; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal women are particularly at increased risk of developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Here we aimed to determine the impact of postmenopausal-induced NAFLD (PM-NAFLD) in an ovariectomized rat model. Sixteen six-week-old Sprague-Dawley female rats were randomly divided into two groups (eight per group), for sham-operation (Sham) or bilateral ovariectomy (Ovx). Four months after surgery, indices of liver damage and liver histomorphometry were measured. Both serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotranferease (ALT) levels were significantly higher in the Ovx than Sham group. We performed quantitative LC-MS/MS-based proteomic profiling of livers from rats with PM-NAFLD to provide baseline knowledge of the PM-NAFLD proteome and to investigate proteins involved in PM-NAFLD by ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA) to provide corroborative evidence for differential regulation of molecular and cellular functions affecting metabolic processes. Of the 586 identified proteins, the levels of 59 (10.0%) and 48 (8.2%) were significantly higher and lower, respectively, in the Ovx group compared to the Sham group. In conclusion, the changes in regulation of proteins implicated in PM-NAFLD may affect other vital biological processes in the body apart from causing postmenopause-mediated liver dysfunction. Our quantitative proteomics analysis may also suggest potential biomarkers and further clinical applications for PM-NAFLD. PMID:26506382

  12. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. From Hollywood's "Walk of Stars" to Main Street, USA, people from all walks ... that includes many well-known names: Legendary television star Larry Hagman was diagnosed with advanced hepatitis C ...

  13. Design of lipid-based delivery systems for improving lymphatic transport and bioavailability of delta-tocopherol and nobiletin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Chunxin

    Lymphatic drug transport can confer bioavailability advantage by avoiding the first-pass metabolism normally observed in the portal vein hepatic route. It was reported that long chain lipid-based delivery systems can stimulate the formation of chylomicron and thus promote the lymphatic transport of drugs. In this study, a novel delta-tocopherol (delta-T) loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticle (SLN) system was developed to investigate its effect on promoting the lymphatic transport of delta-T. The delta-T SLN was prepared with hot melt emulsification method by using glyceryl behenate (compritol RTM888) as the lipid phase and lecithin (PC75) as the emulsifier. Formula configuration, processing condition and loading capacity were carefully optimized. Physicochemical properties (particle size, surface charge, morphology) were also characterized. Moreover, excellent stability of the developed delta-T SLN in the gastrointestinal environment was observed by using an in vitro digestion model. Further investigations of the SLN in stimulating delta-T lymphatic transport were performed on mice without cannulation. Compared with the control group (delta-T corn oil dispersion), much lower delta-T levels in both blood and liver indicated reduced portal vein and hepatic transport of delta-T in the form of SLN. On the other hand, significantly higher concentrations of delta-T were observed in thymus, a major lymphatic tissue, indicating improved lymphatic transport of delta-T with the SLN delivery system. Finally, the far less excreted delta-T level in feces further confirmed improved lymphatic transport and overall bioavailability of delta-T by using SLN system. Nobiletin (NOB), one of most abundant polymethoxyflavones (PMFs) found in Citrus genus, has a low solubility in both water and oil at ambient temperatures. Thus it tends to form crystals when the loading exceeds its saturation level in the carrier system. This character greatly impaired its bioavailability and application. To

  14. DeltaFosB in brain reward circuits mediates resilience to stress and antidepressant responses.

    PubMed

    Vialou, Vincent; Robison, Alfred J; Laplant, Quincey C; Covington, Herbert E; Dietz, David M; Ohnishi, Yoshinori N; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Rush, Augustus J; Watts, Emily L; Wallace, Deanna L; Iñiguez, Sergio D; Ohnishi, Yoko H; Steiner, Michel A; Warren, Brandon L; Krishnan, Vaishnav; Bolaños, Carlos A; Neve, Rachael L; Ghose, Subroto; Berton, Olivier; Tamminga, Carol A; Nestler, Eric J

    2010-06-01

    In contrast with the many studies of stress effects on the brain, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms of resilience, the ability of some individuals to escape the deleterious effects of stress. We found that the transcription factor DeltaFosB mediates an essential mechanism of resilience in mice. Induction of DeltaFosB in the nucleus accumbens, an important brain reward-associated region, in response to chronic social defeat stress was both necessary and sufficient for resilience. DeltaFosB induction was also required for the standard antidepressant fluoxetine to reverse behavioral pathology induced by social defeat. DeltaFosB produced these effects through induction of the GluR2 AMPA glutamate receptor subunit, which decreased the responsiveness of nucleus accumbens neurons to glutamate, and through other synaptic proteins. Together, these findings establish a previously unknown molecular pathway underlying both resilience and antidepressant action. PMID:20473292

  15. Stable isotope deltas: tiny, yet robust signatures in nature.

    PubMed

    Brand, Willi A; Coplen, Tyler B

    2012-09-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including (14)C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. (13)C, (2)H, and (18)O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as-25 per mil can be written as-25 mUr (or-2.5 cUr or-0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg 'units' are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  16. Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as−25 per mil can be written as−25 mUr (or−2.5 cUr or−0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg ‘units’ are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  17. Preventing hepatitis B or C

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000401.htm Preventing hepatitis B or C To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections cause irritation and ...

  18. Hepatitis B in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tram T

    2016-06-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is estimated to affect >350 million people worldwide and represents a significant cause of morbidity and mortality related to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HBV remains an important source of incident cases of HBV. Current barriers to eradication of incident HBV infections via MTCT include underutilization of immunoprophylaxis with hepatitis B vaccination and hepatitis B immune globulin in certain endemic regions as well as failure of immunoprophylaxis. PMID:27190321

  19. Hepatitis C: Information on Testing and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    HEPATITIS C Information on Testing & Diagnosis What is Hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C has been called a silent ...

  20. Delta launch vehicle inertial guidance system (DIGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, K. I.

    1973-01-01

    The Delta inertial guidance system, part of the Delta launch vehicle improvement effort, has been flown on three launches and was found to perform as expected for a variety of mission profiles and vehicle configurations.

  1. Delta Revival: Restoring a California Ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey; California Bay Delta Authority

    2003-01-01

    'Delta Revival: Restoring a California Ecosystem' shows scientists from many disciplines working together to guide the unprecendented restoration of the Sacramento- San Joaquin Delta east of San Francisco Bay.

  2. [Treatment for hepatic osteodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Kaji, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Chronic liver diseases, including liver cirrhosis, are caused by various pathogenesis, such as viral hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis and steatohepatitis. There have not been enough clinical evidence about the treatment of hepatic osteodystrophy at the present time. Several reports suggested that bisphosphonates, such as alendronate, are effective for an increase in bone mineral density in patients with chronic liver disease. Vitamin D treatment might be useful for the frequent prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of hepatic oseodystrophy. The use of estrogens will be limited for the risk of liver dysfunction and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26503875

  3. Cr Atom Alignment in Cr-Delta-Doped GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Emura, S.; Ofuchi, H.; Nakata, Y.; Zhou, Y. K.; Choi, S. W.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hasegawa, S.; Asahi, H.

    2007-02-01

    Structural properties and Cr atom alignments in Cr-delta doped GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy are studied with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. It is found that the environment around Cr atoms in delta-doped samples is dramatically changed under various growth conditions. The XAFS analysis of these synthesized layers suggests that new Cr-related complexes are grown.

  4. Spongeplant Spreading in the Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive, exotic aquatic plants impact a range of important economic and ecological functions in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, and the state now spends over $5 million to control water hyacinth and Brazilian waterweed. In 2007, a new exotic floating plant South American Spongeplan...

  5. Delta-ALA urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased level of urinary delta-ALA may indicate: Lead poisoning Porphyria (several types) A decreased level may occur ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Lead Poisoning Porphyria Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  6. Delta launch vehicle accident investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-03-01

    The text of the testimony given by several witnesses during the House hearings on the Delta launch vehicle accident of May 3, 1986 is given. Pre-launch procedures, failure analysis, the possibility of sabotage, and design and testing are among the topics discussed.

  7. N-{Delta} weak transition

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, Krzysztof M.

    2011-11-23

    A short review of the Rein-Sehgal and isobar models is presented. The attention is focused on the nucleon-{Delta}(1232) weak transition form-factors. The results of the recent re-analyses of the ANL and BNL bubble chamber neutrino-deuteron scattering data are discussed.

  8. Phytoplankton fuels Delta food web

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Muller-Solger, A. B.

    2003-01-01

    Populations of certain fishes and invertebrates in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta have declined in abundance in recent decades and there is evidence that food supply is partly responsible. While many sources of organic matter in the Delta could be supporting fish populations indirectly through the food web (including aquatic vegetation and decaying organic matter from agricultural drainage), a careful accounting shows that phytoplankton is the dominant food source. Phytoplankton, communities of microscopic free-floating algae, are the most important food source on a Delta-wide scale when both food quantity and quality are taken into account. These microscopic algae have declined since the late 1960s. Fertilizer and pesticide runoff do not appear to be playing a direct role in long-term phytoplankton changes; rather, species invasions, increasing water transparency and fluctuations in water transport are responsible. Although the potential toxicity of herbicides and pesticides to plank- ton in the Delta is well documented, the ecological significance remains speculative. Nutrient inputs from agricultural runoff at current levels, in combination with increasing transparency, could result in harmful al- gal blooms. 

  9. Revisiting double Dirac delta potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zafar; Kumar, Sachin; Sharma, Mayank; Sharma, Vibhu

    2016-07-01

    We study a general double Dirac delta potential to show that this is the simplest yet still versatile solvable potential to introduce double wells, avoided crossings, resonances and perfect transmission (T = 1). Perfect transmission energies turn out to be the critical property of symmetric and anti-symmetric cases wherein these discrete energies are found to correspond to the eigenvalues of a Dirac delta potential placed symmetrically between two rigid walls. For well(s) or barrier(s), perfect transmission (or zero reflectivity, R(E)) at energy E=0 is non-intuitive. However, this has been found earlier and called the ‘threshold anomaly’. Here we show that it is a critical phenomenon and we can have 0≤slant R(0)\\lt 1 when the parameters of the double delta potential satisfy an interesting condition. We also invoke a zero-energy and zero curvature eigenstate (\\psi (x)={Ax}+B) of the delta well between two symmetric rigid walls for R(0)=0. We resolve that the resonant energies and the perfect transmission energies are different and they arise differently.

  10. Maintenance of large deltas through channelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giosan, L.; Constatinescu, S.; Filip, F.

    2013-12-01

    A new paradigm for delta restoration is currently taking shape using primarily Mississippi delta examples. Here we propose an alternative for delta maintenance primarily envisioned for wave-influenced deltas based on Danube delta experiences. Over the last half century, while the total sediment load of the Danube dramatically decreased due to dam construction on tributaries and its mainstem, a grand experiment was inadvertently run in the Danube delta: the construction of a dense network of canals, which almost tripled the water discharge toward the interior of the delta plain. We use core-based and chart-based sedimentation rates and patterns to explore the delta transition from the natural to an anthropogenic regime, to understand the effects of far-field damming and near-field channelization, and to construct a conceptual model for delta development as a function sediment partition between the delta plain and the delta coastal fringe. We show that sediment fluxes increased to the delta plain due to channelization, counteracting sea level rise. In turn, the delta coastal fringe was most impacted by the Danube's sediment load collapse. Furthermore, we show that morphodynamic feedbacks at the river mouth are crucial in trapping sediment near the coast and constructing wave-dominated deltas or lobes or delaying their destruction. As a general conclusion, we suggest that increased channelization that mimics and enhances natural processes may provide a simple solution for keeping delta plains above sea level and that abandonment of wave-dominated lobes may be the most long term efficient solution for protecting the internal fluvial regions of deltas and provide new coastal growth downcoast.

  11. [From the national competence network for viral hepatitis (HepNet) emerged the German Liver Foundation (Deutsche Leberstiftung)].

    PubMed

    Hardtke, S; Wiebner, B; Manns, M P

    2016-04-01

    The competence network for viral hepatitis (HepNet) was founded in 2002 with funding from the German government and has influenced the research on viral hepatitis in Germany. HepNet collaborator sites have been involved in numerous national and international investigator-initiated, as well as industry-sponsored, phase 1-3 studies. Within the HepNet Study-House, many groundbreaking investor-initiated trials have been completed and are still ongoing. For example, the acute hepatitis C trials and trials on chronic hepatitis D (delta), which led to therapy optimization. Continuation of the competence network on viral hepatitis has been achieved by the foundation of the German Liver Foundation, which has been an external cooperation partner of the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) for two years. The well-established HepNet Study-House acts here as the clinical trial platform for all DZIF hepatitis trials. PMID:26942931

  12. Triglyceride Metabolism and Hepatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mejia, Emptyyn Y

    2013-09-11

    Triglycerides participate in key metabolic functions such as energy storage, thermal insulation and as deposit for essential and non-essential fatty acids that can be used as precursors for the synthesis of structural and functional phospholipids. The liver is a central organ in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism, and it participates in triglyceride synthesis, export, uptake and oxidation. The metabolic syndrome and associated diseases are among the main concerns of public health worldwide. One of the metabolic syndrome components is impaired triglyceride metabolism. Diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome promote the appearance of hepatic alterations e.g., non-alcoholic steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and cancer. In this article, we review the molecular actions involved in impaired triglyceride metabolism and its association with hepatic diseases. We discuss mechanisms that reconcile the chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and new concepts on the role of intestinal micro-flora permeability and proliferation in fatty liver etiology. We also describe the participation of oxidative stress in the progression of events leading from steatosis to steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Finally, we provide information regarding the mechanisms that link fatty acid accumulation during steatosis with changes in growth factors and cytokines that lead to the development of neoplasticcells. One of the main medical concerns vis-à-vishepatic diseases is the lack of symptoms at the onset of the illness and, as result, its late diagnosis. The understandings of the molecular mechanisms that underlie hepatic diseases could help design strategies towards establishing markers for their accurate and timely diagnosis. PMID:24032513

  13. Assessment of Delta Nitrogen Losses (Delta NL) at the Field Level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We defined a new concept of field-level delta nitrogen (N) losses (Delta NL) as a comparison between management scenarios. We defined delta nitrogen losses (Delta NL) as a function of improved N use efficiencies of field management scenarios that reduce the average N inputs and/or modify other manag...

  14. The calculation of T{sub {delta}} and V{sub {delta}} in austenitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Qixun; Yang Ruzeng

    1997-03-01

    The relation between the {gamma}/{gamma} + {delta} boundary temperature, T{sub {delta}}, of austenitic steels and the equivalent weights, [Cr] and [Ni], has been studied, as has the law of variation of the {delta} phase volume, V{sub {delta}}, with temperature. With the aid of a computer, the following regression expressions have been derived from the experimental results: T{sub {delta}} ({degree}C) =- T{sub 4} {minus} 21.2[Cr] + 15.8[Ni] {minus} 223; V{sub {delta}} (%) = 0.715 exp [0.015(T {minus} T{sub {delta}})]. Satisfactory results have been obtained by using these regression expressions.

  15. Hepatitis B and D viruses replication interference: Influence of hepatitis B genotype

    PubMed Central

    Madejón, Antonio; Romero, Míriam; Hernández, Ángela; García-Sánchez, Araceli; Sánchez-Carrillo, Marta; Olveira, Antonio; García-Samaniego, Javier

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) replication interferences in patients with chronic hepatitis delta infected with different HBV genotypes. METHODS: We conducted a transversal study including 68 chronic hepatitis delta (CHD) (37 HIV-positive) patients and a control group of 49 chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (22 HIV-positive) patients. In addition, a dynamic follow-up was performed in 16 CHD patients. In all the samples, the surface antigen of hepatitis B (HBsAg) serum titers were analyzed with the Monolisa HBsAg Ultra system (Bio-Rad), using as quantification standard a serial dilution curve of an international HBsAg standard. Serum HBV-DNA titers were analyzed using the Roche Cobas TaqMan (Roche, Barcelona, Spain), and the serum HDV-RNA using an in-house real-time qRT-PCR method, with TaqMan probes. HBV genotype was determined with the line immunoassay LiPA HBV genotyping system (Innogenetics, Ghent, Belgium). In those patients negative for LiPA assay, a nested PCR method of complete HBsAg coding region, followed by sequence analysis was applied. RESULTS: No differences in the HBV-DNA levels were found in CHB patients infected with different HBV genotypes. However, in CHD patients the HBV-DNA levels were lower in those infected with HBV-A than in those with HBV-D, both in HIV negative [median (IQR): 1.25 (1.00-1.35) vs 2.95 (2.07-3.93) log10 (copies/mL), P = 0.013] and HIV positive patients [2.63 (1.24-2.69) vs 7.25 (4.61-7.55) log10 (copies/mL), P < 0.001]. This was confirmed in the dynamic study of the HBV/HDV patients. These differences induce an under-estimation of HBV-A incidence in patients with CHD analyzed with LiPA assay. Finally, the HBsAg titers reflected no significant differences in CHD patients infected with HBV-A or D. CONCLUSION: Viral replication interference between HBV and HDV is HBV-genotype dependent, and more evident in patients infected with HBV-genotype A, than with HBV-D or E. PMID:27003993

  16. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... people at risk for contracting hepatitis. But frequent hand washing and good hygiene practices can reduce this risk. All kids in ... to prevent viral hepatitis you should: Follow good hygiene and avoid crowded, ... their hands thoroughly after using the toilet and before eating. ...

  17. Hepatitis and activity

    PubMed Central

    Krikler, Dennis M.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of physical activity during an attack of infectious hepatitis are discussed. There is no evidence that activity during convalescence produces any ill-effects. On the other hand, strenuous physical activity in the acute stage may be dangerous, possibly because hepatic blood-flow is reduced. PMID:5560143

  18. [Update chronic viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Ziegenhagen, D J

    2016-03-01

    More than 500,000 people in Germany have chronic viral hepatitis. The interferon-based treatments formerly used in hepatitis B have been widely replaced by life-long oral medication with nucleoside or nucleotide analogues. Treatment for chronic hepatitis C has been improved substantially by the development of new and very expensive drug combinations. Up to 90% of patients can now be cured with certainty, and one to two years after successful treatment there is no relevant risk of recurrence. These individuals expect to receive insurance cover under appropriate conditions. Vaccination programmes are very efficient at decreasing the incidence of hepatitis B, but no vaccine against hepatitis C is likely to become available in the next decade. PMID:27111951

  19. Update on Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent liver diseases worldwide, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe form of liver injury in patients with alcohol abuse, can present as an acute on chronic liver failure associated with a rapid decline in liver synthetic function, and consequent increase in mortality. Despite therapy, about 30%–50% of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis eventually die. The pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of alcoholic hepatitis are complex and involve oxidative stress, gut dysbiosis, and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system with injury to the parenchymal cells and activation of hepatic stellate cells. As accepted treatment approaches are currently limited, a better understanding of the pathophysiology would be required to generate new approaches that improve outcomes. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis, pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis and novel treatment strategies. PMID:26540078

  20. Hepatitis E in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Lhomme, Sebastien; Izopet, Jacques; Kamar, Nassim

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has a worldwide distribution and is known to cause acute and fulminant hepatitis. However, over the last few years, it has been shown to also cause chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis in immunosuppressed patients, especially solid-organ-transplant patients. In immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients, HEV is also associated with extra-hepatic manifestations, such as neurological symptoms and kidney injury. Unfortunately, a diagnostic assay for HEV infection is still not available in all countries. Reduction of immunosuppression is the first-line therapeutic option for organ-transplant patients with chronic hepatitis. In addition, ribavirin is highly efficient at treating chronic HEV infection. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding HEV diagnosis, its natural history, clinical manifestations, and treatments in patients with a solid-organ transplant. PMID:26838163

  1. Transmission of hepatitis C by intrahepatic inoculation with transcribed RNA.

    PubMed

    Kolykhalov, A A; Agapov, E V; Blight, K J; Mihalik, K; Feinstone, S M; Rice, C M

    1997-07-25

    More than 1% of the world's population is chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV infection can result in acute hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis, which is strongly associated with development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Genetic studies of HCV replication have been hampered by lack of a bona fide infectious molecular clone. Full-length functional clones of HCV complementary DNA were constructed. RNA transcripts from the clones were found to be infectious and to cause disease in chimpanzees after direct intrahepatic inoculation. This work defines the structure of a functional HCV genome RNA and proves that HCV alone is sufficient to cause disease. PMID:9228008

  2. Delta-Doped Back-Illuminated CMOS Imaging Arrays: Progress and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Jones, Todd J.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Greer, Frank; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Blazejewski, Edward; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the latest results on our development of delta-doped, thinned, back-illuminated CMOS imaging arrays. As with charge-coupled devices, thinning and back-illumination are essential to the development of high performance CMOS imaging arrays. Problems with back surface passivation have emerged as critical to the prospects for incorporating CMOS imaging arrays into high performance scientific instruments, just as they did for CCDs over twenty years ago. In the early 1990's, JPL developed delta-doped CCDs, in which low temperature molecular beam epitaxy was used to form an ideal passivation layer on the silicon back surface. Comprising only a few nanometers of highly-doped epitaxial silicon, delta-doping achieves the stability and uniformity that are essential for high performance imaging and spectroscopy. Delta-doped CCDs were shown to have high, stable, and uniform quantum efficiency across the entire spectral range from the extreme ultraviolet through the near infrared. JPL has recently bump-bonded thinned, delta-doped CMOS imaging arrays to a CMOS readout, and demonstrated imaging. Delta-doped CMOS devices exhibit the high quantum efficiency that has become the standard for scientific-grade CCDs. Together with new circuit designs for low-noise readout currently under development, delta-doping expands the potential scientific applications of CMOS imaging arrays, and brings within reach important new capabilities, such as fast, high-sensitivity imaging with parallel readout and real-time signal processing. It remains to demonstrate manufacturability of delta-doped CMOS imaging arrays. To that end, JPL has acquired a new silicon MBE and ancillary equipment for delta-doping wafers up to 200mm in diameter, and is now developing processes for high-throughput, high yield delta-doping of fully-processed wafers with CCD and CMOS imaging devices.

  3. delta. M/sub j/ transitions in homonuclear molecule scattering off corrugated surfaces. Square and rectangular lattice symmetry and purely repulsive interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, T.R.; Kouri, D.J.; Gerber, R.B.

    1984-04-15

    In this paper, we present the first formal and computational studies of ..delta..m/sub j/ transitions occurring in homonuclear molecule-corrugated surface collisions. The model potential is a pairwise additive one which correctly incorporates the fact that ..delta..m/sub j/ transitions occur only for corrugated surfaces (provided the quantization axis is chosen to be the average surface normal). The principal results are: (a) ..delta..m/sub j/ transitions are extremely sensitive to lattice symmetry; (b) strong selection rules obtain for specular scattering; (c) the magnitude of ..delta..m/sub j/ -transition probabilities are strongly sensitive to surface corrugation; (d) the ..delta..m/sub j/ transitions depend strongly on diffraction peak; (e) the ratio of molecular length to lattice dimension (r/a) has a strong influence on the magnitude of ..delta..m/sub j/ -transition probabilities (with the probabilities increasing as (r/a) increases); (f) ..delta..m/sub j/ rainbows are predicted to occur as a function of the (r/a) ratio increases; (g) ..delta..m/sub j/ transitions and the ..delta..m/sub j/ rainbow are expected to accompany ..delta..j-rotational rainbows; (h) such magnetic transition rainbows accompanying ..delta..j rainbows are suggested as an explanation of recent experimental observations of quenching of NO polarization for larger ..delta..j transitions in NO/Ag(111) scattering.

  4. Deformation characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.Y.; Zhang, S.H.; Cheng, M.; Li, Z.X.

    2010-01-15

    The hot working characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy during isothermal compression deformation at temperature of 950 deg. C and strain rate of 0.005 s{sup -1}, were studied by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and quantitative X-ray diffraction technique. The results showed that the dissolution of plate-like {delta} phase and the precipitation of spherical {delta} phase particles coexisted during the deformation, and the content of {delta} phase decreased from 7.05 wt.% to 5.14 wt.%. As a result of deformation breakage and dissolution breakage, the plate-like {delta} phase was spheroidized and transferred to spherical {delta} phase particles. In the center with largest strain, the plate-like {delta} phase disappeared and spherical {delta} phase appeared in the interior of grains and grain boundaries.

  5. The delta (delta) gap: an approach to mixed acid-base disorders.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, K

    1990-11-01

    The anion gap (AG) is a helpful, yet underused, clinical tool. Not only does the presence of a high AG suggest a certain differential, but knowledge of the relationship between the rise in AG (delta AG) and the fall in bicarbonate (delta HCO3) is important in understanding mixed acid-based disorders. Simple arithmetic converts this relationship into a numerical value, the delta gap (delta gap). The delta gap = delta AG - delta HCO3. If the delta gap is significantly positive (greater than +6), a metabolic alkalosis is usually present because the rise in AG is more than the fall in HCO3. Conversely, if the delta gap is significantly negative (less than -6), then a hyperchloremic acidosis is usually present because the rise in AG is less than the fall in HCO3. Familarity with the relationship between the changes in AG and HCO3 can be useful in unmasking occult metabolic disorders. PMID:2240729

  6. Hepatitis C virus. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, E.

    1991-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus has been shown to be responsible for most cases of posttransfusion hepatitis, as well as for sporadic non-A, non-B viral hepatitis. Hepatitis C virus has also been implicated in the development of primary hepatocellular carcinoma, autoimmune hepatitis, and fulminant viral hepatitis. Although the role of the parenteral transmission of hepatitis C virus is well established, its route of transmission in cases of sporadic infection remains unclear. Sexual transmission is suspected but not confirmed. Recent work regarding treatment has shown interferon alfa to be effective, but the discontinuation of therapy is associated with a 50% relapse rate. PMID:1656611

  7. Hepatitis with special reference to dogs. A review on the pathogenesis and infectious etiologies, including unpublished results of recent own studies.

    PubMed

    Boomkens, S Y; Penning, L C; Egberink, H F; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Rothuizen, J

    2004-09-01

    The causes of hepatitis in dogs are mostly unknown. Known causes of canine hepatitis are infectious (CAV-1), toxic (e.g. aflatoxin), and metabolic (copper accumulation). In order to understand the unknown causes, research in this field is necessary. Despite the marked progress in the knowledge on viral causes for human hepatitis, the involvement of infectious agents in the pathogenesis of hepatitis in the dog is still largely unknown. It is, like in human hepatitis, very likely that more than one causative infectious agent may cause hepatitis in the dog. This review presents the various forms of hepatitis in the dog, the known infectious and non-infectious causes of canine hepatitis, the infectious causes of hepatitis in man and other animals, and finally our recent infection and molecular studies to investigate possible infectious causes of canine hepatitis. PMID:15559391

  8. Human placental DNA polymerase delta: identification of a 170-kilodalton polypeptide by activity staining and immunoblotting

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.Y.W.T.; Toomey, N.L.

    1987-02-24

    DNA polymerase delta was isolated from human placenta and identified as such on the basis of its association with a 3'- to 5'-exonuclease activity. The association of the polymerase and exonuclease activities was maintained throughout purification and attempted separations by physical or electrophoretic methods. Moreover, ratios of the two activities remained constant during the purification steps, and both activities were inhibited by aphidicolin, oxidized glutathione, and n-ethylmaleimide. The purified enzyme had an estimated molecular weight of 172,000, on the basis of a Stokes radius of 53.6 A and a sedimentation coefficient of 7.8 S. On sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis, polymerase delta preparations contained a band of ca. 170 kilodaltons (kDa) as well as several smaller polypeptides. The 170-kDa polypeptide was identified as the largest polypeptides component in the preparation possessing DNA polymerase activity by an activity staining procedure following gel electrophoresis in the presence of SDS. Western blotting of DNA polymerase delta with polyclonal antisera also revealed a single 170-kDa immunoreactive polypeptide. Monoclonal antibodies to KB cell polymerase ..cap alpha.. inhibited placental polymerase ..cap alpha.. but did not inhibit DNA polymerase delta, while the murine polyclonal antisera to polymerase delta inhibited delta but not ..cap alpha... These findings establish the existence of DNA polymerase delta in a human tissue and support the view that both its polymerase and its exonuclease activities may be associated with a single protein.

  9. Acute Hepatitis as a Manifestation of Parvovirus B19 Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hatakka, Aleisha; Klein, Julianne; He, Runtao; Piper, Jessica; Tam, Edward; Walkty, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    There are few reports in the literature of hepatitis as a manifestation of parvovirus B19 infection. We describe a case of parvovirus B19-associated acute hepatitis diagnosed based on a positive serologic test (IgM) and molecular detection of parvovirus B19 DNA in a liver biopsy specimen. Parvovirus B19 infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute hepatitis. PMID:21734024

  10. Future Deltas Utrecht University research focus area: towards sustainable management of sinking deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stouthamer, E.; van Asselen, S.

    2015-11-01

    Deltas are increasingly under pressure from human impact and climate change. To deal with these pressures that threat future delta functioning, we need to understand interactions between physical, biological, chemical and social processes in deltas. This requires an integrated approach, in which knowledge on natural system functioning is combined with knowledge on spatial planning, land and water governance and legislative frameworks. In the research focus area Future Deltas of Utrecht University an interdisciplinary team from different research groups therefore works together. This allows developing integrated sustainable and resilient delta management strategies, which is urgently needed to prevent loss of vital delta services.

  11. Update on Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), a liver disorder affecting both children and adults, is characterized by inflammatory liver histology, elevated transaminase levels, circulating nonorganspecific autoantibodies, and increased levels of immunoglobulin G, in the absence of a known etiology. Two types of AIH are recognized according to seropositivity: smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody define AIH type 1 and antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 and/or liver cytosol type 1 define AIH type 2. AIH type 1 affects both adults and children, while AIH type 2 is mainly a paediatric disease, though it does occasionally affects young adults. AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any patient with increased liver enzyme levels. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone with or without azathioprine, with symptom free long-term survival for the majority of patients. For those who do not respond to standard treatment, or who are difficult-to-treat, mycophenolate mofetil and, in the absence of a response, calcineurin inhibitors should be tried in addition to steroids. The pathogenesis of AIH is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4 T-cells, although recent studies support the involvement of diverse populations, including Th17 cells. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AIH is likely to contribute to the development of novel treatments, such as the adoptive transfer of autologous expanded antigenspecific regulatory T-cells, which ultimately aim at restoring tolerance to liver-derived antigens. PMID:26357634

  12. Feature Hepatitis: The Dangers of Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of Contents For ... condition is called chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis A and E do not cause chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis viruses B, ...

  13. Entropy and complexity analysis of Dirac-delta-like quantum potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvrie, P. A.; Angulo, J. C.; Dehesa, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    The Dirac-delta-like quantum-mechanical potentials are frequently used to describe and interpret numerous phenomena in many scientific fields including atomic and molecular physics, condensed matter and quantum computation. The entropy and complexity properties of potentials with one and two Dirac-delta functions are here analytically calculated and numerically discussed in both position and momentum spaces. We have studied the information-theoretic lengths of Fisher, Rényi and Shannon types as well as the Cramér-Rao, Fisher-Shannon and LMC shape complexities of the lowest-lying stationary states of one-delta and twin-delta. They allow us to grasp and quantify different facets of the spreading of the charge and momentum of the system far beyond the celebrated standard deviation.

  14. Formation of delta 22-bile acids in rats is not gender specific and occurs in the peroxisome.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, C M; Kren, B T; Steer, C J; Setchell, K D

    1996-03-01

    We recently demonstrated that the formation of delta 22-bile acids is a quantitatively major pathway for normal bile acid synthesis in the adult male Sprague-Dawley rat. This pathway is specific for 7 beta-hydroxy bile acids and, when ursodeoxycholic acid is administered, delta 22-ursodeoxycholic acid appears as a major metabolite in the liver tissue, bile, intestinal contents, and plasma. The aims of this study were, therefore, to determine whether this metabolic pathway was gender specific, and to establish that the peroxisome is a site of formation of delta 22-bile acids. Bile acids were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in liver tissue, jejunum, and plasma of adult female rats and in animals fed a diet containing 0.4% and 1% ursodeoxycholic acid. Bile acid metabolism in female rats was found to be similar to that of male rats, and delta 22-beta-muricholic acid, rather than beta-muricholate, was likewise confirmed as the major muricholic acid synthesized. Ursodeoxycholic acid administration resulted in the appearance of delta 22-ursodeoxycholic acid as a major metabolite. When adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with clofibrate, a drug that induces peroxisomal proliferation, liver weight increased 40-60% and total bile acid synthesis decreased markedly, but the relative composition of individual bile acids was unchanged. When ursodeoxycholic acid was added to the diet, the proportion of delta 22-bile acids relative to the corresponding saturated analogues increased significantly compared with untreated rats, indicating that clofibrate had "amplified" the pathway for formation of delta 22-bile acids. When UDCA was incubated in vitro with a peroxisomal-enriched fraction from normal adult male rat liver, delta 22-ursodeoxycholic acid was formed in proportions comparable to that observed in vivo when this bile acid was given orally. These studies establish that the pathway for the formation of delta 22-bile acids is not gender specific and

  15. Viral hepatitis and hepatitis B antigen: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Krugman, Saul

    1974-01-01

    Recent advances in hepatitis research have shed new light on the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and prevention of type B hepatitis infection. The so-called ‘Dane’ particle is probably the complete hepatitis B virion; its outer coat is the hepatitis B (Australia) antigen (HB Ag) and its inner core is an immunologically distinct particle. Subtypes of HB Ag (a, d, y, w and r) are useful indices for epidemiological surveys. Concepts of epidemiology have changed: type B hepatitis is transmissible by contact as well as by inoculation. The presence of HB Ag in blood is indicative of the presence of hepatitis B virus. Tests to detect antigen and use of voluntary blood donors have played a major role in the decreased incidence of post transfusion hepatitis. A special hepatitis B gammaglobulin preparation and a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine have proved to be effective in preliminary studies. PMID:4219230

  16. COMMD1 regulates the delta epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) through trafficking and ubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tina; Ke, Ying; Ly, Kevin; McDonald, Fiona J.

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} The COMM domain of COMMD1 mediates binding to {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 reduces the cell surface population of {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 increases the population of {delta}ENaC-ubiquitin. {yields} Both endogenous and transfected {delta}ENaC localize with COMMD1 and transferrin suggesting they are located in early/recycling endosomes. -- Abstract: The delta subunit of the epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) is a member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels. {delta}ENaC is distinct from the related {alpha}-, {beta}- and {gamma}ENaC subunits, known for their role in sodium homeostasis and blood pressure control, as {delta}ENaC is expressed in brain neurons and activated by external protons. COMMD1 (copper metabolism Murr1 domain 1) was previously found to associate with and downregulate {delta}ENaC activity. Here, we show that COMMD1 interacts with {delta}ENaC through its COMM domain. Co-expression of {delta}ENaC with COMMD1 significantly reduced {delta}ENaC surface expression, and led to an increase in {delta}ENaC ubiquitination. Immunocytochemical and confocal microscopy studies show that COMMD1 promoted localization of {delta}ENaC to the early/recycling endosomal pool where the two proteins were localized together. These results suggest that COMMD1 downregulates {delta}ENaC activity by reducing {delta}ENaC surface expression through promoting internalization of surface {delta}ENaC to an intracellular recycling pool, possibly via enhanced ubiquitination.

  17. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are a common cause of liver inflammation. These ... problem. However, if you took high doses of acetaminophen , treatment should be started as soon as possible ...

  18. Hepatitis C and sex.

    PubMed

    Page, Emma E; Nelson, Mark

    2016-04-01

    An outbreak of acute hepatitis C among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in the last decade has been shown to be sexually transmitted. Initially recreational drug use, in particular drug injection, was not prevalent among those becoming infected with hepatitis C. However more recently chemsex (the use of drugs to enhance sexual experience) and its associated drugs, which are not uncommonly injected, have become more frequently reported among those diagnosed with hepatitis C. It is hoped that the widespread -introduction of direct-acting antivirals and upscaling of numbers treated may have a positive impact on this epidemic. However their introduction may negatively impact on the perceived risk of acquiring hepatitis C and in conjunction with the introduction of HIV transmission prevention strategies may result in increased transmissions and spread to the HIV-negative MSM population. PMID:27037392

  19. Hepatitis C - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 358. Jhaveri R. Hepatitis C virus. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ, eds. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  20. Hepatitis Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... About the Division of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  1. [Patient education of hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Boyer, Dominique; Faillebin, Françoise; de la Brière, Aice

    2013-11-01

    The therapeutic education of patients with hepatitis C helps to improve their health and quality of life. The aim is to encourage compliance with the treatment and the fight against side effects, through to the patient's recovery. PMID:24409616

  2. Hepatitis B - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... kissing, coughing, or sneezing. Breast-feeding by a mother with hepatitis B is safe if the child is treated properly at the time of birth. Teenagers who are not vaccinated can get HBV during unprotected sex or drug use.

  3. Hepatitis B - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests detect liver damage and the risk for liver cancer from chronic hepatitis B: Albumin level Liver function tests Prothrombin time Liver biopsy Abdominal ultrasound Liver cancer tumor markers such as alpha fetoprotein The provider ...

  4. HIV and Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevalent among blacks as among whites. Viral Hepatitis Transmission People can be infected with the three most ... risk for HAV. • • New data suggest that sexual transmission of HCV among MSM with HIV occurs more ...

  5. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... 185°F (85°C), kill the virus, although freezing temperatures do not. Symptoms Does Hepatitis A cause ... food, such as drinking beverages (with or without ice) of unknown purity, eating uncooked shellfish, and eating ...

  6. Chemoembolization of hepatic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Carin F; Brown, Daniel B

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of primary and secondary hepatic malignancies with transarterial chemoembolization represents an essential component of interventional oncology. This article discusses patient selection, procedure technique, results, and complications associated with transarterial chemoembolization. PMID:18668189

  7. Imaging of hepatic infections.

    PubMed

    Doyle, D J; Hanbidge, A E; O'Malley, M E

    2006-09-01

    Imaging plays a significant role in the detection, characterization and treatment of hepatic infections. Infectious diseases of the liver include pyogenic and amoebic abscesses and parasitic, fungal, viral and granulomatous infections. With increases in worldwide travel, immunosuppression and changing population demographics, identification of cases of hepatic infection is becoming more common in daily practice. Knowledge of the imaging features seen with hepatic infections can assist in early diagnosis and timely initiation of appropriate therapy. This review presents the imaging appearances of hepatic infections, emphasizing specific features that may contribute to the diagnosis. Examples of the imaging findings seen with pyogenic and amoebic abscesses, infection with Echinococcus granulosus (Hydatid), schistosomiasis, candidiasis and tuberculosis (TB) are presented. PMID:16905380

  8. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants. PMID:25962882

  9. Navigational Use of Cassini Delta V Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Duane C.; Antreasian, Peter G.; Ardalan, Shadan M.; Criddle, Kevin E.; Goodson, Troy; Ionasescu, Rodica; Jones, Jeremy B.; Parcher, Daniel W.; Pelletier, Frederic J.; Thompson, Paul F.; Vaughan, Andrew T.

    2008-01-01

    Telemetry data are used to improve navigation of the Saturn orbiting Cassini spacecraft. Thrust induced delta V's are computed on-board the spacecraft, recorded in telemetry, and downlinked to Earth. This paper discusses how and why the Cassini Navigation team utilizes spacecraft delta V telemetry. Operational changes making this information attractive to the Navigation Team will be briefly discussed, as will spacecraft hardware and software algorithms responsible for the on-board computation. An analysis of past delta V telemetry, providing calibrations and accuracies that can be applied to the estimation of future delta V activity, is described.

  10. From Natural to Design River Deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    Productive and biologically diverse, deltaic lowlands attracted humans since prehistory and may have spurred the emergence of the first urban civilizations. Deltas continued to be an important nexus for economic development across the world and are currently home for over half a billion people. But recently, under the double whammy of sea level rise and inland sediment capture behind dams, they have become the most threatened coastal landscape. Here I will address several deceptively simple questions to sketch some unexpected answers using example deltas from across the world from the Arctic to the Tropics, from the Danube to the Indus, Mississippi to Godavari and Krishna, Mackenzie to Yukon. What is a river delta? What is natural and what is not in a river delta? Are the geological and human histories of a delta important for its current management? Is maintaining a delta the same to building a new one? Can we design better deltas than Nature? These answers help us see clearly that survival of deltas in the next century depends on human intervention and is neither assured nor simple to address or universally applicable. Empirical observations on the hydrology, geology, biology and biochemistry of deltas are significantly lagging behind modeling capabilities endangering the applicability of numerical-based reconstruction solutions and need to be ramped up significantly and rapidly across the world.

  11. Comments on the slip factor and the relation Delta phi = -h Delta theta

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    The definition of the slip factor can be obtained from the phase equation. However, a derivation using the relation {Delta}{phi} = -h{Delta}{theta} leads to a different slip-factor definition. This apparent paradox is examined in detail and resolved. Here {Delta}{phi} is the rf phase difference and {Delta}{theta} is the azimuthal phase difference around the accelerator ring between an off-momentum particle and the synchronous particle, while h is the rf harmonic.

  12. Hepatitis B virus infection in immigrant populations

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Alessio, Loredana; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Macera, Margherita; Sagnelli, Caterina; Zampino, Rosa; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common cause of hepatitis worldwide, with nearly 350 million people chronically infected and 600000 deaths per year due to acute liver failure occurring during acute hepatitis or, more frequently, in HBV-related liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Ongoing immigration from countries with a high HBV endemicity to those with a low HBV endemicity warrants particular attention to prevent the spread of HBV infection to the native population. This review article analyzes the epidemiology and virological and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in immigrant populations and in their host countries, and suggests prophylactic measures to prevent the spread of this infection. Among the immigrants from different geographical areas, those from South East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa show the highest prevalences of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers, in accordance with the high endemicity of the countries of origin. The molecular characteristics of HBV infection in immigrants reflect those of the geographical areas of origin: HBV genotype A and D predominate in immigrants from Eastern Europe, B and C in those from Asia and genotype E in those from Africa. The literature data on the clinical course and treatment of HBsAg-positive immigrants are scanty. The management of HBV infection in immigrant populations is difficult and requires expert personnel and dedicated structures for their assistance. The social services, voluntary operators and cultural mediators are essential to achieve optimized psychological and clinical intervention. PMID:26730274

  13. Experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy: ISHEN guidelines.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F; Norenberg, Michael D; Felipo, Vicente; Ferenci, Peter; Albrecht, Jan; Blei, Andres T

    2009-07-01

    Objectives of the International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen Metabolism Commission were to identify well-characterized animal models of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and to highlight areas of animal modelling of the disorder that are in need of development. Features essential to HE modelling were identified. The best-characterized animal models of HE in acute liver failure, the so-called Type A HE, were found to be the hepatic devascularized rat and the rat with thioacetamide-induced toxic liver injury. In case of chronic liver failure, surgical models in the rat involving end-to-side portacaval anastomosis or bile duct ligation were considered to best model minimal/mild (Type B) HE. Unfortunately, at this time, there are no satisfactory animal models of Type C HE resulting from end-stage alcoholic liver disease or viral hepatitis, the most common aetiologies encountered in patients. The commission highlighted the urgent need for such models and of improved models of HE in chronic liver failure in general as well as a need for models of post-transplant neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of HE pathophysiology at the cellular and molecular level continue to benefit from in vitro and or ex vivo models involving brain slices or exposure of cultured cells (principally cultured astrocytes) to toxins such as ammonia, manganese and pro-inflammatory cytokines. More attention could be paid in the future to in vitro models involving the neurovascular unit, microglia and neuronal co-cultures in relation to HE pathogenesis. PMID:19638106

  14. Role of Hepatic Drug Transporters in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Houfu; Sahi, Jasminder

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic drug transporters can play an important role in pharmacokinetics and the disposition of therapeutic drugs and endogenous substances. Altered function of hepatic drug transporters due to drug-drug interactions (DDIs), genetic polymorphisms, and disease states can often result in a change in systemic and/or tissue exposure and subsequent pharmacological/toxicological effects of their substrates. Regulatory agencies including the US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and Japan Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency have issued guidance for industry on drug interaction studies, which contain comprehensive recommendations on in vitro and in vivo study tools and cutoff values to evaluate the DDI potential of new molecular entities mediated by hepatic drug transporters. In this report we summarize the latest regulatory and scientific progress of hepatic drug transporters in clinical DDIs, pharmacogenetics, drug-induced liver injury (DILI), as well as methods for predicting transporter-mediated pharmacokinetics and DDIs. PMID:27385168

  15. CASSCF/CI calculations for first row transition metal hydrides - The TiH(4-phi), VH(5-delta), CrH(6-sigma-plus), MnH(7-sigma-plus), FeH(4,6-delta) and NiH(2-delta) states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations are performed for the predicted ground states of TiH(4-phi), VH(5-delta), CrH(6-sigma-plus), MnH(7-sigma-plus), Fett(4,6-delta) and NiH(2-delta). For FeH both the 6-delta and 4-delta states are studied, since both are likely candidates for the ground state. The ground state symmetries are predicted based on a combination of atomic coupling arguments and coupling of 4s(2)3d(n) and 4s(1)3d(n+1) terms in the molecular system. Electron correlation is included by a CASSCF/CI (SD) treatment. The CASSCF includes near-degeneracy effects, while correlation of the 3d electrons in included at the CI level.

  16. Delta-ray production in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.E.; Toburen, L.H.

    1980-07-01

    The stochastic energy concentrations randomly deposited in submicron volumes in and near the paths of charged particles is needed. Computational methods, especially Monte Carlo methods, required a comprehensive set of basic interaction cross sections for the primary and all secondary radiation products. Of particular importance for high LET radiations are the cross sections for the production of energetic secondary electrons, delta-rays, in primary ionizing events. In this paper, we review the present state of available data on the production of delta-rays by fast positive ions in collision with targets of biological interest. The systematics in the cross sections for proton ionization of molecular targets are discussed, indicating what scaling is possible and summarizing what can be concluded regarding the dependence of the mean delta-ray energies on the chemical makeup of the medium. A comparison of typical data is made with the binary-encounter approximation to illustrate the limitations of this theoretical treatment of the ionization process. A bibliography of relevant published works on this topic is included.

  17. Synthesis of delta-aminolaevulinate synthase by isolated liver polyribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, M J

    1976-01-01

    1. Postmitochondrial supernatants were prepared from the livers of chick embryos and were incubated under conditions that supported protein synthesis. delta-Aminolaevulinate synthase (EC 2.3.1.37) was synthesized by supernatants from livers treated with the porphyrinogenic drugs 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide and/or 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine, but synthesis by supernatants from normal livers could not be detected. Synthesis of enzyme released from polyribosomes was measured by immunoprecipitation with specific antibody to the mitochondrial enzyme, and the specificity of the reaction was established by electrophoresis of dissociated immunoprecipitates on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gels. 2. The relative synthesis of delta-aminolaevulinate synthase in vitro was comparable with that previously measured in vivo, and was correlated with the enzyme activity of the liver. 3. Enzyme synthesis in vitro occurred predominantly on free rather than membrane-bound polyribosomes. 4. The mol.wt. of the product synthesized in vitro was 7000 +/- 7000 by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. However, pulse-labelling of the enzyme in vivo confirmed its mol.wt. to be 49000 +/- 5000 when isolated from the mitochondrion. A small amount of immunoprecipitable enzyme of mol.wt. 70000 was detected in the cytosol in vivo. In chick embryo liver, delta-aminolaevulinate synthase therefore appears to be synthesized on cytoplasmic polyribosomes as a polypeptide of mol.wt. 70000, which in vivo is rapidly incorporated into the mitochondrion, and is then extracted as a lower-molecular-weight form. 5. Haemin added to the postmitochondrial supernatant-containing incubation mixture at concentrations up to 10 muM had no effect on general protein synthesis or the synthesis of delta-aminolaevulinate synthase. On the other hand, haemin treatment of induced chick embryo livers in vivo for 3h markedly decreased the relative synthesis of delta

  18. BAY DELTA CROSS CHANNEL OPERATIONAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Delta Cross Channel was constructed in 1953 to deliver low-salinity water from the Sacramento River in Northern California to the South Delta where it is pumped to the San Francisco Bay Area and other parts of the State for public consumption and to the San Joaquin Valley for...

  19. Electromagnetic excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen; Shin Nan Yang

    2006-09-05

    We review the description of the lowest-energy nucleon excitation--the Delta(1232)-resonance. Much of the recent effort has been focused on the precision measurements of the nucleon to Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes. We review the results of those measurements and confront them with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, and QCD-inspired models. Some of the theoretical approaches are reviewed in detail. In particular, we describe the chiral EFT of QCD in the energy domain of the Delta-resonance, and its applications to the electromagnetic nucleon-to-Delta transition (gamma N Delta). We also describe the recent dynamical and unitary-isobar models of pion electroproduction which are extensively used in the extraction of the gamma* N Delta form factors from experiment. Furthermore, we discuss the link of the gamma* N Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), as well as the predictions of perturbative QCD for these transition form factors. The present status of understanding the Delta-resonance properties and the nature of its excitation is summarized.

  20. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96 Section 9.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.96 Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of...

  1. Delta Blues Scholarship and Imperialist Nostalgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, William P.

    When Delta blues are considered to be "folk music," the genre is inextricably tied to the neocolonial, sharecropping system of cotton production characteristic of the Mississippi Delta region between the Civil War and World War II. "Imperialist nostalgia," then, arises in accounts which pay primary and positive tribute to blues performances…

  2. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. While all three types of ... new Hepatitis A cases and 20% of new Hepatitis B cases occur in gay or bisexual men. Gay ...

  3. Pregnancy with autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Braga, António Costa; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Braga, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to review our experience with gestations in autoimmune hepatitis patients. Background: There are only limited data describing pregnancy in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of pregnancies with autoimmune hepatitis followed in Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Portugal in the last ten years. Results: We reported nine pregnancies in seven patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Two patients had documented liver cirrhosis prior to the pregnancy. In this study, 66.7% of patients were treated with azathioprine and 88.9% with prednisolone. Clinical improvements were observed in 11.1% of pregnancies and 22.2% exacerbations were diagnosed. There were six live births and two preterm deliveries (preterm delivery rate of 33%). We also report three first trimester miscarriages (early gestation miscarriage rate of 33%). There were no neonatal or maternal deaths. Conclusion: The favorable obstetric outcome is a realistic expectation in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Tight monitoring and control of asymptomatic and unpredictable exacerbations, which are unrelated to the severity of the underlying disease, are essential to the prognosis of the current pregnancy. PMID:27458515

  4. Hepatic hemangioma -review-

    PubMed Central

    Bajenaru, N; Balaban, V; Săvulescu, F; Campeanu, I; Patrascu, T

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic hemangiomas are benign tumors of the liver consisting of clusters of blood-filled cavities, lined by endothelial cells, fed by the hepatic artery. The vast majority of HH are asymptomatic, most often being discovered incidentally during imaging investigations for various unrelated pathologies. Typical hemangiomas, the so-called capillary hemangiomas, range from a few mm to 3 cm, do not increase in size over time and therefore are unlikely to generate future symptomatology. Small (mm-3 cm) and medium (3 cm-10 cm) hemangiomas are well-defined lesions, requiring no active treatment beside regular follow-ups. However, the so-called giant liver hemangiomas, of up to 10 cm (most commonly) and even 20+ cm in size (according to occasional reports) can, and usually will develop symptoms and complications that require prompt surgical intervention or other kind of therapy. HH belong to the class of hepatic “incidentalomas”, so-called because they are diagnosed incidentally, on imaging studies performed as routine examinations or for other reasons than the evaluation of a possible liver mass. Less than half of HH present with overt clinical symptoms, consisting, most often, of upper abdominal pain (this is usually the case for large lesions, which cause the distension of Glisson’s capsule). Hepatic hemangiomas require a careful diagnosis to differentiate from other focal hepatic lesions, co-occurring diagnoses are also possible. PMID:26361504

  5. Primary hepatic angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, P; Bhadana, U; Singh, R A K; Ahuja, A

    2015-09-01

    Primary hepatic angiosarcoma is a rare, aggressive tumor; composed of spindle or pleomorphic cells that line, or grow into, the lumina of pre-existing vascular spaces like sinusoids and terminal hepatic venules; with only about 200 cases diagnosed annually worldwide but it is the most common primary malignant mesenchymal tumor of the liver in adults and accounts for 2% of all primary hepatic malignancies. HAS occurs in association with known chemical carcinogens, but 75% of the tumors have no known etiology. Patients present with vague symptoms like abdominal pain, weight loss, fatigue or an abdominal mass. Hepatic angiosarcoma is usually multicentric and involves both lobes, entire liver may also found to be involved. CD31 is the most reliable marker. These tumors lack specific features on imaging, so, pathological diagnosis is necessary. There are no established treatment guidelines because of low frequency and aggressive nature of tumor, chemotherapy is only palliative, liver resection is indicated for solitary mass and liver transplant is contraindicated. The aim of this article is to comprehensively review all the available literature and to present detailed information and an update on primary hepatic angiosarcoma. PMID:26008857

  6. Acute hepatic failure in children.

    PubMed Central

    Riely, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Many diseases may present as acute hepatic failure in the pediatric age group, including viral hepatitis A and B, adverse drug reactions, both toxic and "hepatitic," and inherited metabolic disorders such as tyrosinemia, alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency, and Wilson's disease. Management is primarily supportive, with care taken to anticipate the known complications of hepatic failure. Few "curative" therapies are known, although attempts at stimulating hepatic regeneration may be helpful. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:6433587

  7. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Ott, G.W. Jr.

    1998-01-20

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 36 figs.

  8. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Peng, Fang Zheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Ott, Jr., George W.

    1998-01-01

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  9. Transitioning from Idiopathic to Explainable Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis lacks an identifiable cause, and its diagnosis requires the exclusion of etiologically defined diseases that resemble it. Insights into its pathogenesis are moving autoimmune hepatitis from an idiopathic to explainable disease, and the goal of this review is to describe the insights that are hastening this transition. Two types of autoimmune hepatitis are justified by serological markers, but they also have distinctive genetic associations (DRB1 and DQB1 genes) and autoantigens. DRB1 alleles are the principal susceptibility factors in white adults, and a six amino acid sequence encoded in the antigen-binding groove of class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex can influence the selection of autoantigens. Polymorphisms, including variants of SH2B3 and CARD10 genes, may affect immune reactivity and disease severity. The cytochrome mono-oxygenase, CYP2D6, is the autoantigen associated with type 2 autoimmune hepatitis, and it shares homologies with multiple viruses that might promote self-intolerance by molecular mimicry. Chemokines, especially CXCL9 and CXCL10, orchestrate the migration of effector cells to sites of injury and are associated with disease severity. Cells of the innate and adaptive immune responses promote tissue damage, and possible deficiencies in the number and function of regulatory T cells may facilitate the injurious process. Receptor-mediated apoptosis is the principal mechanism of hepatocyte loss, and cell-mediated and antibody-dependent mechanisms of cytotoxicity also contribute. Insights that explain autoimmune hepatitis will allow triggering exogenous antigens to be characterized, risk management to be improved, prognostic indices to be refined, and site-specific therapeutic interventions to emerge. PMID:25999246

  10. Preventing hepatitis B or C

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections cause irritation and swelling of the liver. You should take steps to ... All children should get the hepatitis B vaccine. Babies should get a ... B vaccine at birth. They should have all three shots in ...

  11. 78 FR 53127 - Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. Date change. SUMMARY: The Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory...

  12. Hepatic diseases related to triglyceride metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aguilera-Méndez, Asdrubal; Álvarez-Delgado, Carolina; Hernández-Godinez, Daniel; Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2013-10-01

    Triglycerides participate in key metabolic functions such as energy storage, thermal insulation and as deposit for essential and non-essential fatty acids that can be used as precursors for the synthesis of structural and functional phospholipids. The liver is a central organ in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism, and it participates in triglyceride synthesis, export, uptake and oxidation. The metabolic syndrome and associated diseases are among the main concerns of public health worldwide. One of the metabolic syndrome components is impaired triglyceride metabolism. Diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome promote the appearance of hepatic alterations e.g., non-alcoholic steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and cancer. In this article, we review the molecular actions involved in impaired triglyceride metabolism and its association with hepatic diseases. We discuss mechanisms that reconcile the chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and new concepts on the role of intestinal micro-flora permeability and proliferation in fatty liver etiology. We also describe the participation of oxidative stress in the progression of events leading from steatosis to steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Finally, we provide information regarding the mechanisms that link fatty acid accumulation during steatosis with changes in growth factors and cytokines that lead to the development of neoplastic cells. One of the main medical concerns vis-a-vis hepatic diseases is the lack of symptoms at the onset of the illness and, as result, its late diagnosis. The understandings of the molecular mechanisms that underlie hepatic diseases could help design strategies towards establishing markers for their accurate and timely diagnosis. PMID:24059726

  13. Influence of different organic fertilizers on quality parameters and the delta(15)N, delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O values of orange fruit (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck).

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Paolo; Camin, Federica; Fabroni, Simona; Perini, Matteo; Torrisi, Biagio; Intrigliolo, Francesco

    2010-03-24

    To investigate the influence of different types of fertilizers on quality parameters, N-containing compounds, and the delta(15)N, delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta (34)S, and delta(18)O values of citrus fruit, a study was performed on the orange fruit cv. 'Valencia late' (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck), which was harvested in four plots (three organic and one conventional) located on the same farm. The results demonstrated that different types of organic fertilizers containing the same amount of nitrogen did not effect important changes in orange fruit quality parameters. The levels of total N and N-containing compounds such as synephrine in fruit juice were not statistically different among the different treatments. The delta(15)N values of orange fruit grown under fertilizer derived from animal origin as well as from vegetable compost were statistically higher than those grown with mineral fertilizer. Therefore, delta(15)N values can be used as an indicator of citrus fertilization management (organic or conventional), because even when applied organic fertilizers are of different origins, the natural abundance of (15)N in organic citrus fruit remains higher than in conventional ones. These treatments also did not effect differences in the delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O values of fruit. PMID:20184327

  14. Early predictive efficacy of core antigen on antiviral outcomes in genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infected patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Yang, Rui-Feng; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Luo, Bi-Fen; Kong, Fan-Yun; Rao, Hui-Ying; Jin, Qian; Cong, Xu; Wei, Lai

    2015-01-01

    Response-guided therapy is of limited use in developing countries because hepatitis C virus RNA detection by sensitive molecular methods is time- and labor-consuming and expensive. We evaluated early predictive efficacy of serum hepatitis C virus core antigen kinetics on sustained virologic response in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus during pegylated interferon plus ribavirin treatment. For 478 patients recruited, hepatitis C virus RNAs were detected at baseline, and at weeks 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 using Cobas TaqMan. Architect hepatitis C virus core antigen was performed at baseline, and weeks 4 and 12. Predictive values of hepatitis C virus core antigen on sustained virologic response were compared to hepatitis C virus RNA. In the first 12 weeks after treatment initiation the dynamic patterns of serum hepatitis C virus core antigen and hepatitis C virus RNA levels were similar in sustained virologic response, relapse, and null response patients groups. Although areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves of hepatitis C virus core antigen were lower than those of hepatitis C virus RNA at the same time points, modeling analysis showed that undetectable hepatitis C virus core antigen (rapid virological response based on hepatitis C virus core antigen) had similar positive predictive value on sustained virologic response to hepatitis C virus RNA at week 4 (90.4% vs 93.3%), and hepatitis C virus core antigen decrease greater than 1log10IU/mL (early virological response based on hepatitis C virus core antigen) had similar negative predictive value to hepatitis C virus RNA at week 12 (94.1% vs 95.2%). Analysis on the validation group demonstrated a positive predictive value of 97.5% in rapid virological response based on hepatitis C virus core antigen and a negative predictive value of 100% in early virological response based on hepatitis C virus core antigen. In conclusion, hepatitis C virus core antigen is comparable to hepatitis C virus RNA in

  15. New Hepatitis E Virus Genotype in Camels, the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K.P.; Teng, Jade L.L.; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Joseph, Marina; Wong, Emily Y.M.; Tang, Ying; Sivakumar, Saritha; Xie, Jun; Bai, Ru; Wernery, Renate; Wernery, Ulrich; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    In a molecular epidemiology study of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in dromedaries in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, HEV was detected in fecal samples from 3 camels. Complete genome sequencing of 2 strains showed >20% overall nucleotide difference to known HEVs. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed a previously unrecognized HEV genotype. PMID:24856611

  16. Online high-precision delta(2)H and delta(18)O analysis in water by pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Feng H

    2009-10-01

    A method for online simultaneous delta(2)H and delta(18)O analysis in water by high-temperature conversion is presented. Water is injected by using a syringe into a high-temperature carbon reactor and converted into H(2) and CO, which are separated by gas chromatography (GC) and carried by helium to the isotope ratio mass spectrometer for hydrogen and oxygen isotope analysis. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate several issues such as sample size, temperature and memory effects. The delta(2)H and delta(18)O values in multiple water standards changed consistently as the reactor temperature increased from 1150 to 1480 degrees C. The delta(18)O in water can be measured at a lower temperature (e.g. 1150 degrees C) although the precision was relatively poor at temperatures <1300 degrees C. Memory effects exist for delta(2)H and delta(18)O between two waters, and can be reduced (to <1%) with proper measures. The injection of different amounts of water may affect the isotope ratio results. For example, in contrast to small injections (100 nL or less) from small syringes (e.g. 1.2 microL), large injections (1 microL or more) from larger syringes (e.g. 10 microL) with dilution produced asymmetric peaks and shifts of isotope ratios, e.g. 4 per thousand for delta(2)H and 0.4 per thousand for delta(18)O, probably resulting from isotope fractionation during dilution via the ConFlo interface. This method can be used to analyze nanoliter samples of water (e.g. 30 nL) with good precision of 0.5 per thousand for delta(2)H and 0.1 per thousand for delta(18)O. This is important for geosciences; for instance, fluid inclusions in ancient minerals may be analyzed for delta(2)H and delta(18)O to help understand the formation environments. PMID:19714707

  17. Identifying hazards associated with lava deltas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.

    2014-01-01

    Lava deltas, formed where lava enters the ocean and builds a shelf of new land extending from the coastline, represent a significant local hazard, especially on populated ocean island volcanoes. Such structures are unstable and prone to collapse—events that are often accompanied by small explosions that can deposit boulders and cobbles hundreds of meters inland. Explosions that coincide with collapses of the East Lae ‘Apuki lava delta at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, during 2005–2007 followed an evolutionary progression mirroring that of the delta itself. A collapse that occurred when the lava–ocean entry was active was associated with a blast of lithic blocks and dispersal of spatter and fine, glassy tephra. Shortly after delta growth ceased, a collapse exposed hot rock to cold ocean water, resulting in an explosion composed entirely of lithic blocks and lapilli. Further collapse of the delta after several months of inactivity, by which time it had cooled significantly, resulted in no recognizable explosion deposit. Seaward displacement and subsidence of the coastline immediately inland of the delta was measured by both satellite and ground-based sensors and occurred at rates of several centimeters per month even after the lava–ocean entry had ceased. The anomalous deformation ended only after complete collapse of the delta. Monitoring of ground deformation may therefore provide an indication of the potential for delta collapse, while the hazard associated with collapse can be inferred from the level of activity, or the time since the last activity, on the delta.

  18. Identifying hazards associated with lava deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.

    2014-12-01

    Lava deltas, formed where lava enters the ocean and builds a shelf of new land extending from the coastline, represent a significant local hazard, especially on populated ocean island volcanoes. Such structures are unstable and prone to collapse—events that are often accompanied by small explosions that can deposit boulders and cobbles hundreds of meters inland. Explosions that coincide with collapses of the East Lae `Apuki lava delta at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i, during 2005-2007 followed an evolutionary progression mirroring that of the delta itself. A collapse that occurred when the lava-ocean entry was active was associated with a blast of lithic blocks and dispersal of spatter and fine, glassy tephra. Shortly after delta growth ceased, a collapse exposed hot rock to cold ocean water, resulting in an explosion composed entirely of lithic blocks and lapilli. Further collapse of the delta after several months of inactivity, by which time it had cooled significantly, resulted in no recognizable explosion deposit. Seaward displacement and subsidence of the coastline immediately inland of the delta was measured by both satellite and ground-based sensors and occurred at rates of several centimeters per month even after the lava-ocean entry had ceased. The anomalous deformation ended only after complete collapse of the delta. Monitoring of ground deformation may therefore provide an indication of the potential for delta collapse, while the hazard associated with collapse can be inferred from the level of activity, or the time since the last activity, on the delta.

  19. Diagnostic criteria of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R; Longhi, Maria Serena; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic immune-mediated liver disorder characterised by female preponderance, elevated transaminase and immunoglobulin G levels, seropositivity for autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Presentation is highly variable, therefore AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any increase in liver enzyme levels. A set of inclusion and exclusion criteria for the diagnosis of AIH have been established by the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG). There are two main types of AIH: type 1, positive for anti-nuclear (ANA) and/or anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMAs) and type 2, defined by the presence of anti-liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM-1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC-1) autoantibodies. The central role of autoantibodies in the diagnosis of AIH has led the IAIHG to produce a consensus statement detailing appropriate and effective methods for their detection. Autoantibodies should be tested by indirect immunofluorescence at an initial dilution of 1/40 in adults and 1/10 in children on a freshly prepared rodent substrate that includes kidney, liver and stomach sections to allow for the simultaneous detection of all reactivities relevant to AIH. Anti-LKM-1 is often confused with anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) if rodent kidney is used as the sole immunofluorescence substrate. The identification of the molecular targets of anti-LKM-1 and AMA has led to the establishment of immuno-assays based on the use of the recombinant or purified autoantigens. Perinuclear anti-nuclear neutrophil antibody (p-ANNA) is an additional marker of AIH-1; anti soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies are specific for autoimmune liver disease, can be present in AIH-1 and AIH-2 and are associated with a more severe clinical course. Anti-SLA are detectable by ELISA or radio-immuno-assays, but not by immunofluorescence. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to

  20. N and. delta. resonances: an experimental review

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.L.

    1980-07-01

    Experimental progress in N and ..delta.. resonances since the Oxford baryon conference is reviewed. The review concentrates on hadronic channels, and on developments of the last one or two years. The topics reviewed include the antiproton lifetime; the ..delta../sup + +/ magnetic moment; measurements of ..pi..N elastic and charge-exchange scattering in the ..delta.. region, the eta n threshold region, and the high-mass region; partial wave analyses of ..pi..N ..-->.. ..pi..N; measurements of two-body inelastic ..pi..N scattering; and isobar analyses of ..pi..N ..-->.. ..pi pi..N. 75 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Occupational hepatic disorders in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Ryoul; Kim, Tae Woo

    2010-12-01

    Occupational hepatic disorders are classified into toxic hepatitis, viral hepatitis, and chemical-induced malignancy in Korea. Toxic hepatitis cases were reported in workers who were exposed to dimethylformamide, dimethylacetamide, or trichloroethylene. Pre-placement medical examination and regular follow-up are necessary to prevent the development of toxic hepatitis. Viral hepatitis was chiefly reported among health care workers such as doctors, nurses and clinical pathology technicians who could easily be exposed to blood. Preventive measures for these groups therefore include vaccination and serum monitoring programs. Hepatic angiosarcoma caused by vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) exposure is a very well known occupational disease and it has not been officially reported in Korea yet. Some cases of hepatocellular carcinoma were legally approved for compensation as an occupational disease largely by overwork and stress, but not supported by enough scientific evidence. Effort to find the evidence of its causal relationship is needed. PMID:21258588

  2. Classical and Modern Approaches Used for Viral Hepatitis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Heiat, Mohammad; Ranjbar, Reza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2014-01-01

    Context: Viral hepatitis diagnosis is an important issue in the treatment procedure of this infection. Late diagnosis and delayed treatment of viral hepatitis infections can lead to irreversible liver damages and occurrence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. A variety of laboratory methods including old and new technologies are being applied to detect hepatitis viruses. Here we have tried to review, categorize, compare and illustrate the classical and modern approaches used for diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Evidence Acquisition: In order to achieve a comprehensive aspect in viral hepatitis detection methods, an extensive search using related keywords was done in major medical library and data were collected, categorized and summarized in different sections. Results: Analyzing of collected data resulted in the wrapping up the hepatitis virus detection methods in separate sections including 1) immunological methods such as enzyme immunoassay (EIA), radio-immunoassay (RIA) immuno-chromatographic assay (ICA), and immuno-chemiluminescence 2) molecular approaches including non-amplification and amplification based methods, and finally 3) advanced biosensors such as mass-sensitive, electrical, electrochemical and optical based biosensors and also new generation of detection methods. Conclusions: Detection procedures in the clinical laboratories possess a large diversity; each has their individual advantages and facilities' differences. PMID:24829586

  3. Metabolomic biomarkers correlating with hepatic lipidosis in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatic lipidosis or fatty liver disease is a major metabolic disorder of high-producing dairy cows that compromises animal performance and, hence, causes heavy economic losses worldwide. This syndrome, occurring during the critical transition from gestation to early lactation, leads to an impaired health status, decreased milk yield, reduced fertility and shortened lifetime. Because the prevailing clinical chemistry parameters indicate advanced liver damage independently of the underlying disease, currently, hepatic lipidosis can only be ascertained by liver biopsy. We hypothesized that the condition of fatty liver disease may be accompanied by an altered profile of endogenous metabolites in the blood of affected animals. Results To identify potential small-molecule biomarkers as a novel diagnostic alternative, the serum samples of diseased dairy cows were subjected to a targeted metabolomics screen by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. A subsequent multivariate test involving principal component and linear discriminant analyses yielded 29 metabolites (amino acids, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelines) that, in conjunction, were able to distinguish between dairy cows with no hepatic lipidosis and those displaying different stages of the disorder. Conclusions This proof-of-concept study indicates that metabolomic profiles, including both amino acids and lipids, distinguish hepatic lipidosis from other peripartal disorders and, hence, provide a promising new tool for the diagnosis of hepatic lipidosis. By generating insights into the molecular pathogenesis of hepatic lipidosis, metabolomics studies may also facilitate the prevention of this syndrome. PMID:24888604

  4. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... The hepatitis B vaccination is a non-infectious, vaccine prepared from recombinant yeast cultures, rather than human blood or plasma. There is no risk of contamination from other bloodborne pathogens nor is there any ... from the vaccine. The vaccine must be administered according to the ...

  5. Purification and Properties of Staphylococcal Delta Hemolysin

    PubMed Central

    Kreger, Arnold S.; Kim, Kwang-Shin; Zaboretzky, Frank; Bernheimer, Alan W.

    1971-01-01

    Large amounts (200 mg per liter of culture supernatant fluid) of highly purified staphylococcal soluble delta hemolysin were obtained by adsorption to and selective elution from hydroxyapatite followed by exhaustive dialysis against water, concentration by polyvinylpyrrolidone or polyethylene glycol 20,000 dialysis, and a final water dialysis. No carbohydrate, phosphorus, or inactive 280-nm absorbing material was detected in the preparation; however, analysis by density gradient centrifugation, gel filtration, analytical ultracentrifugation, carboxymethyl cellulose chromatography, polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and electron microscopy revealed that the lysin was molecularly heterogeneous. The preparation contained an acidic fibrous lysin (S20,w of 11.9) and a basic lysin component composed of a population of granular aggregates of various sizes, with a maximum S20,w of approximately 4.9. No other staphylococcal products were detected in the preparation. The lysin was active against erythrocytes from many animal species and acted synergistically with staphylococcal beta hemolysin against sheep erythrocytes. It was soluble in chloroform-methanol (2:1), was inactivated by various phospholipids, normal sera, and proteolytic enzymes, but was partially resistant to heat inactivation. Activity was not affected by Ca2+, Mg2+, citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, or cysteine. The lysin preparation also disrupted bacterial protoplasts and spheroplasts, erythrocyte membranes, lysosomes, and lipid spherules, was growth-inhibitory for certain bacteria, and clarified egg yolk-agar. Large amounts produced dermonecrosis in rabbits and guinea pigs. The minimum lethal intravenous dose for mice and guinea pigs was approximately 110 and 30 mg/kg, respectively. Images PMID:16557995

  6. Experimental models for hepatitis C virus (HCV): new opportunities for combating hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Murillo, Karina del Carmen; Garza-Rodríguez, María del Lourdes; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco; Ramos-Jiménez, Javier; Rivas-Estilla, Ana María

    2004-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global public health issue. More than 200 million people in the world are infected with HCV. Hepatitis C is considered one of the main causes of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver transplantation. The identification of the viral genome quickly allowed delineation of genomic organization, and the structure and biochemical characterization of the proteins of HCV. However, it has been difficult to study its life cycle, as well as the development of antiviral agents due to the lack of a system of permissible culture. Numerous attempts have been reported to establish an in vitro system for the study of HCV. Recently, a system of efficient culture was established that allows replication of subgenomic molecules of HCV in a cell line of human hepatoma. In this revision, after a brief description of the molecular biology, means of transmission and clinical characteristics of hepatitis C, some of the experimental models are described that have been developed to date, focusing mainly on the subgenomic replicon system and their use in the development of new antiviral treatments. PMID:15257247

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-14 mediates formation of bile ducts and hepatic maturation of fetal hepatic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Otani, Satoshi; Kakinuma, Sei; Kamiya, Akihide; Goto, Fumio; Kaneko, Shun; Miyoshi, Masato; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Asano, Yu; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Nitta, Sayuri; Nakata, Toru; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Mina; Azuma, Seishin; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Koshikawa, Naohiko; Seiki, Motoharu; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-22

    Fetal hepatic stem/progenitor cells, called hepatoblasts, play central roles in liver development; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating the phenotype of these cells have not been completely elucidated. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14 is a type I transmembrane proteinase regulating pericellular proteolysis of the extracellular matrix and is essential for the activation of several MMPs and cytokines. However, the physiological functions of MMP-14 in liver development are unknown. Here we describe a functional role for MMP-14 in hepatic and biliary differentiation of mouse hepatoblasts. MMP-14 was upregulated in cells around the portal vein in perinatal stage liver. Formation of bile duct-like structures in MMP-14-deficient livers was significantly delayed compared with wild-type livers in vivo. In vitro biliary differentiation assays showed that formation of cholangiocytic cysts derived from MMP-14-deficient hepatoblasts was completely impaired, and that overexpression of MMP-14 in hepatoblasts promoted the formation of bile duct-like cysts. In contrast, the expression of molecules associated with metabolic functions in hepatocytes, including hepatic nuclear factor 4α and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, were significantly increased in MMP-14-deficient livers. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly upregulated in MMP-14-deficient livers. We demonstrate that MMP-14-mediated signaling in fetal hepatic progenitor cells promotes biliary luminal formation around the portal vein and negatively controls the maturation of hepatocytes. PMID:26724533

  8. The renal and hepatic distribution of Bence Jones proteins depends on glycosylation: a scintigraphic study in rats.

    PubMed

    Prado, M J; Nicastri, A L; Costa, P L; Rockman, T; Tersariol, I L; Nader, H B; Barros, R T; Prado, E B

    1997-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate renal and liver distribution of two monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains. The chains were purified individually from the urine of patients with multiple myeloma and characterized as lambda light chains with a molecular mass of 28 kDa. They were named BJg (high amount of galactose residues exposed) and BJs (sialic acid residues exposed) on the basis of carbohydrate content. A scintigraphic study was performed on male Wistar rats weighing 250 g for 60 min after i.v. administration of 1 mg of each protein (7.4 MBq), as the intact proteins and also after carbohydrate oxidation. Images were obtained with a Siemens gamma camera with a high-resolution collimator and processed with a MicroDelta system. Hepatic and renal distribution were established and are reported as percent of injected dose. Liver uptake of BJg was significantly higher than liver uptake of BJs (94.3 vs 81.4%) (P < 0.05). This contributed to its greater removal from the intravascular compartment, and consequently lower kidney accumulation of BJg in comparison to BJs (5.7 vs 18.6%) (P < 0.05). After carbohydrate oxidation, there was a decrease in hepatic accumulation of both proteins and consequently a higher renal overload. The tissue distribution of periodate-treated BJg was similar to that of native BJs: 82.7 vs 81.4% in the liver and 17.3 vs 18.6% in the kidneys. These observations indicate the important role of sugar residues of Bence Jones proteins for their recognition by specific membrane receptors, which leads to differential tissue accumulation and possible toxicity. PMID:9361711

  9. Niger Delta play types, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Akinpelu, A.O.

    1995-08-01

    Exploration databases can be more valuable when sorted by play type. Play specific databases provide a system to organize E & P data used in evaluating the range of values of parameters for reserve estimation and risk assessment. It is important both in focusing the knowledge base and in orienting research effort. A play in this context is any unique combination of trap, reservoir and source properties with the right dynamics of migration and preservation that results in hydrocarbon accumulation. This definitions helps us to discriminate the subtle differences found with these accumulation settings. About 20 play types were identified around the Niger Delta oil province in Nigeria. These are grouped into three parts: (1) The proven plays-constituting the bulk of exploration prospects in Nigeria today. (2) The unproven or semi-proven plays usually with some successes recorded in a few tries but where knowledge is still inadequate. (3) The unproven or analogous play concept. These are untested but geologically sound ideas which may or may not have been tried elsewhere. With classification and sub grouping of these play types into specific databases, intrinsic attributes and uniqueness of each of them with respect to the four major risk elements and the eight parameters for reserve estimation can be better understood.

  10. A Recombinant Multiepitope Protein for Hepatitis B Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Marilen Queiroz; Galdino, Alexsandro Sobreira; dos Santos, José Carlos; Soares, Marcus Vinicius; de Nóbrega, Yanna C.; Álvares, Alice da Cunha Morales; de Freitas, Sonia Maria; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves; Felipe, Maria Sueli Soares

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B is a liver inflammation caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and can be diagnosed in clinical stage by hepatitis B core antibody from IgM class (anti-HBcIgM). Hepatitis B core antibody from IgG class (Anti-HBcIgG) appears quickly after IgM, reaching high titers in chronic hepatitis, and remains even after cure. Since hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) is the first antibody identified and sometimes the only marker detected during the course of infection, it can be used both to indicate HBV acute infection (anti-HBc-IgM) and to identify individuals who have come into contact with the virus (anti-HBc-IgG). In this work we propose a recombinant hepatitis B core multiepitope antigen (rMEHB) to be used for diagnosis of hepatitis B. For this purpose, a synthetic gene coding for rMEHB was designed and cloned into vector pET21a with a 6xHis tag at the C-terminal. Time course induction in E. coli showed an induced protein with an apparent molecular mass of ~21 kDa. Protein purification was performed by a single step with affinity chromatography Ni-NTA. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated rMEHB as a thermal stable protein at pH 7.0 and 8.0. In these conditions rMEHB was successfully used to perform an enzyme linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) with positive and negative sera. PMID:24294596

  11. Hepatic Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury and Trauma: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Siempis, Thomas; Theodorakou, Eleni; Tsoulfas, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Context Ischemia-reperfusion injury is a fascinating topic which has drawn a lot of interest in the last several years. Hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury may occur in a variety of clinical situations. These include transplantation, liver resection, trauma, and vascular surgery. Evidence Acquisition The purpose of this review was to outline the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatic I/R injury and present the latest approaches, both surgical and pharmacological, regarding the prevention of it. A comprehensive electronic literature search in MEDLINE/PubMed was performed to identify relative articles published within the last 2 years. Results The basic mechanism of hepatic ischemia – reperfusion injury is one of blood deprivation during ischemia, followed by the return of flow during reperfusion. It involves a complex series of events, such as mitochondrial deenergization, adenosine-5'-triphosphate depletion, alterations of electrolyte homeostasis, as well as Kupffer cell activation, oxidative stress changes and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokine signaling. The great number of variable pathways, with several mediators interacting with each other, leads to a high number of candidates for potential therapeutic intervention. As far as surgical approaches are concerned, the modification of existing clamping techniques and the ischemic preconditioning are the most promising techniques till recently. In the search for novel techniques of protecting against hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury, many different strategies have been used in experimental models. The biggest part of this research lies around antioxidant therapy, but other potential solutions have been explored as well. Conclusions The management of hepatic trauma, in spite of the fact that it has become increasingly nonoperative, there still remains the possibility of hepatic resection in the hepatic trauma setting, especially in severe injuries. Hence, clinicians should be familiar with the concept of

  12. Upper Wilcox Rosita delta system of south Texas: growth-faulted shelf-edge deltas

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    The Rosita delta system, a heretofore unrecognized, major depositional system preserved in the deep upper Wilcox of south Texas, was delineated by detailed correlation of approximately 500 well logs. The Rosita delta system comprises at least three delta complexes, each of which can be traced up to tens of miles along strike and up to approximately 15 mi (24 km) downdip. Basinward, across the growth-fault zone, each delta complex thickens from about 600 ft (180 m) to more than 3000 ft (900 m). The growth faults were activated by progradation of deltas over unstable prodelta-slope muds at the contemporary shelf margin. The three upper Wilcox delta complexes studied in detail are, from oldest to youngest, the Duval, Zapata, and Live Oak deltas, named for the counties in which they are centered. Each complex consists of several lobes, some of which can be traced across the deep zones where the thickness increases by as much as tenfold owing to progradation over active growth faults. Characteristic coarsening-upward progradational units are interpreted from electric log patterns to include prodelta shales, delta-front sandstones, distributary channel and channel-mouth bar sandstones, and interdistributary shales and sandstones. Appreciable variability in sandstone distribution in the deltas may reflect changing importance of fluvial versus marine currents in distributing sediment along the delta front. However, all of the deltas prograded abruptly toward the shelf margin. The gulfward extent of these delta complexes is unknown, and it is concluded that appreciable quantities of sandstone remain to be explored in the deep subsurface of the trend.

  13. Damped Oscillator with Delta-Kicked Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1996-01-01

    Exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation for quantum damped oscillator subject to frequency delta-kick describing squeezed states are obtained. The cases of strong, intermediate, and weak damping are investigated.

  14. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  15. Delta XTE Launch Activities (Scrub #2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center video presents Delta XTE (X-Ray Timing Explorer) launch activities on 12/11/95. The launch was rescheduled for next weekend due to out of limit upper level wind conditions.

  16. Migration in Vulnerable Deltas: A Research Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, C.; Nicholls, R. J.; Allan, A.

    2015-12-01

    C. Hutton1, & R. J. Nicholls1, , 1 University of Southampton, University Road, Southampton, Hampshire, United Kingdom, SO17 1BJ. cwh@geodata. soton.ac.ukAbstractGlobally, deltas contain 500 million people and with rising sea levels often linked to large number of forced migrants are expected in the coming century. However, migration is already a major process in deltas, such as the growth of major cities such as Dhaka and Kolkata. Climate and environmental change interacts with a range of catchment and delta level drivers, which encompass a nexus of sea-level rise, storms, freshwater and sediment supply from the catchment, land degradation, subsidence, agricultural loss and socio-economic stresses. DECCMA (Deltas, Vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration and Adaptation/CARRIA) is investigating migration in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM), Mahanadi and Volta Deltas, including the influence of climate change. The research will explore migration from a range of perspectives including governance and stakeholder analysis, demographic analysis, household surveys of sending and receiving areas, macro-economic analysis, and hazards and hotspot analysis both historically and into the future. Migration under climate change will depend on other adaptation in the deltas and this will be examined. Collectively, integrated analysis will be developed to examine migration, other adaptation and development pathways with a particular focus on the implications for the poorest. This will require the development of input scenarios, including expert-derived exogenous scenarios (e.g., climate change) and endogenous scenarios of the delta developed in a participatory manner. This applied research will facilitate decision support methods for the development of deltas under climate change, with a focus on migration and other adaptation strategies.

  17. Beteigeuze (Alpha Orionis) und Mintaka (Delta Orionis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmann, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    Magnitude measures transformed to Johnson V of Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse) and Delta Orionis with a wide-angle lens and DSLR are presented and discussed. Alpha Orionis light changes are shown clearly. The primary and secondary eclipses of Delta Orionis with amplitudes of 0.12 and 0.05 mag respectively are clearly recorded. They occur near phase 0.00 and 0.50 respectively of current elements from VSX (2).

  18. Dengue causing fulminant hepatitis in a hepatitis B virus carrier.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, M P; Giri, S; Sharma, V; Roy, U; Gharsangi, K

    2011-01-01

    Dengue is an acute febrile illness resulting from infection by a flavivirus transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. It is characterized by bleeding manifestations and a plasma leak syndrome. Hepatic involvement in the form of elevation in transaminases is common. However, acute hepatic failure is uncommon. It is not known how the presence of an underlying chronic hepatitis or liver disease affects the likelihood of severity of hepatitis from dengue. The present report is of a 33-year-old man, a carrier of hepatitis B virus, who presented with fever, altered sensorium, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathy. He was diagnosed to have developed acute hepatic failure due to dengue. The patient improved with supportive measures. PMID:21422600

  19. Preparing Nimbus E on Delta Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Nimbus E, the sixth spacecraft in the Nimbus series, is shown preparing for launch on December 12, 1972 from the Western Test Range (WTR), Space Launch Complex SLC-2, West, by the Thrust- Augmented Delta vehicle. The satellite was placed in an 1100-kilometer run-synchronous nearly circular polar orbit. The spacecraft was designated Nimbus 5 upon confirmation that it had achieved successful orbit. The Delta launch vehicle family started development in 1959. The Delta is composed of parts from the Thor, an intermediate-range ballistic missile, as its first stage, and the Vanguard as its second. The first Delta was launched from Cape Canaveral on May 13, 1960 and was powerful enough to deliver a 100-pound spacecraft into geostationary transfer orbit. Delta has been used to launch civil, commercial, and military satellites into orbit. For more information about Delta, please see Chapter 3 in Roger Launius and Dennis Jenkins' book To Reach the High Frontier published by The University Press of Kentucky in 2002.

  20. Lena River delta formation during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshiyanov, D.; Makarov, A.; Savelieva, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Lena River delta, the largest delta of the Arctic Ocean, differs from other deltas because it consists mainly of organomineral sediments, commonly called peat, that contain a huge organic carbon reservoir. The analysis of delta sediment radiocarbon ages showed that they could not have formed as peat during floodplain bogging; rather, they accumulated when Laptev Sea water level was high and green mosses and sedges grew and were deposited on the surface of flooded marshes. The Lena River delta formed as organomineral masses and layered sediments accumulated during transgressive phases when sea level rose. In regressive phases, the islands composed of these sediments and other, more ancient islands were eroded. Each new sea transgression led to further accumulation of layered sediments. As a result of alternating transgressive and regressive phases, the first alluvial-marine terrace formed, consisting of geological bodies of different ages. Determining the formation age of different areas of the first terrace and other marine terraces on the coast allowed the periods of increasing (8000-6000 BP (years before present), 4500-4000, 2500-1500, and 400-200 BP) and decreasing (5000, 3000, and 500 BP) Laptev Sea levels to be distinguished in the Lena Delta area.

  1. Lena River Delta formation during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshiyanov, D.; Makarov, A.; Savelieva, L.

    2014-03-01

    The Lena River Delta, the largest delta of the Arctic Ocean, differs from other deltas because it consists mainly of organomineral sediments, commonly called peat, that contain a huge organic carbon reservoir. The analysis of Delta sediment radiocarbon ages showed that they could not have formed as peat during floodplain bogging, but accumulated when Laptev Sea water level was high and green mosses and sedges grew and were deposited on the surface of flooded marshes. The Lena River Delta formed as organomineral masses and layered sediments accumulated during transgressive phases when sea level rose. In regressive phases, the islands composed of these sediments and other, more ancient islands were eroded. Each new sea transgression led to further accumulation of layered sediments. As a result of alternating transgressive and regressive phases the first alluvial-marine terrace formed, consisting of geological bodies of different ages. Determining the formation age of different areas of the first terrace and other marine terraces on the coast allowed the periods of increasing (8-6 Ka, 4.5-4 Ka, 2.5-1.5 Ka, 0.4-0.2 Ka) and decreasing (5 Ka, 3 Ka, 0.5 Ka) Laptev Sea levels to be distinguished in the Lena Delta area.

  2. Delta's role in reaching the fourth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, D. W.; Ganoung, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    The Delta launch vehicle has played a significant role in spaceand airborne studies since its first launch in 1960, and a high volume period of service is planned for the 1980s. The historical role played by Delta in launching satellites from 1960 to the present is discussed, and vehicle modifications made during this period are summarized. It is shown that out of 154 launches, 143 proved successful for an overall reliability of 93%. The forecasted launch schedule through 1985 is also presented. Various modifications are now under way to provide spacecraft interchangeability with the Shuttle: a Payload Assist Module (PAM) is proposed to provide an orderly transition from the Delta expendable vehicle to the Shuttle reusable vehicle; the new Delta 3920 Improved Second Stage is the result of a need for improved Delta performance to meet 3910 payload capabilities; the firing sequence of the solid rocket motors was altered from five at liftoff and four during ascent to a sequence of six and three, thereby increasing spacecraft weight in geosynchronous transfer orbit. Potential future improvements discussed include the Delta 4920, 9-ft-diam fairing, booster engine performance, PAM solid motor performance, a universal second stage, a hydrogen-oxygen second stage, and large strap-on solids.

  3. River deltas: channelizing sandpiles with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerolmack, Douglas; Reitz, Meredith

    2013-03-01

    River deltas are wedges of sediment that are built via the lateral migration of self-channelizing rivers, but the timescale of this process is prohibitively long to observe in nature. Here we present laboratory results that allow us to examine how channels form and fill space to create a delta. Flow collapses into a single channel whose dimensions adjust to threshold transport conditions for the imposed sediment load. This channelization causes localized shoreline growth until the slope drops below a threshold value for sediment transport. This leads to deposition within the channel, with an upstream-migrating step akin to a stopping front in granular flows, which causes widespread flooding and the selection of a new (steeper) channel path. This cycle is remarkably periodic; delta slope oscillates between two thresholds - entrainment and distrainment - analogous to static and dynamic angles of repose. Selection of a new flow path is inherently stochastic, but previously abandoned channels act as significant attractors for the flow. Once a critical density of flow paths has been established, the flow oscillates among the same 3-5 channels indefinitely. These dynamics result in self-similar (quasi-)radial growth of delta lobes, which can be described using a simple geometric model. Despite its simplicity, the experimental system agrees well with what can be measured from natural deltas Thus, temporal and spatial patterns of deltas appear to be a robust result of mass conservation and transport thresholds.

  4. Hepatitis B virus burden in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Zampino, Rosa; Boemio, Adriana; Sagnelli, Caterina; Alessio, Loredana; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio; Sagnelli, Evangelista; Coppola, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has shown an intermediate or high endemicity level in low-income countries over the last five decades. In recent years, however, the incidence of acute hepatitis B and the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen chronic carriers have decreased in several countries because of the HBV universal vaccination programs started in the nineties. Some countries, however, are still unable to implement these programs, particularly in their hyperendemic rural areas. The diffusion of HBV infection is still wide in several low-income countries where the prevention, management and treatment of HBV infection are a heavy burden for the governments and healthcare authorities. Of note, the information on the HBV epidemiology is scanty in numerous eastern European and Latin-American countries. The studies on molecular epidemiology performed in some countries provide an important contribution for a more comprehensive knowledge of HBV epidemiology, and phylogenetic studies provide information on the impact of recent and older migratory flows. PMID:26576083

  5. An overview of triple infection with hepatitis B, C and D viruses.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Mehwish; Idrees, Muhamad; Kanwal, Hifza; Kabir, Firoz

    2011-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is one of the major health problems worldwide, particularly in South East Asian countries including Pakistan where hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are highly endemic. Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is also not uncommon world-wide. HCV, HBV, and HDV share parallel routes of transmission due to which dual or triple viral infection can occur in a proportion of patients at the same time. HBV and HCV are important factors in the development of liver cirrhosis (LC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In addition to LC and HCC, chronic HDV infection also plays an important role in liver damage with oncogenic potential.The current article reviews the available literature about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, transmission, symptoms, diagnosis, replication, disease outcome, treatment and preventive measures of triple hepatitis infection by using key words; epidemiology of triple infection, risk factors, awareness status, treatment and replication cycle in PubMed, PakMediNet, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and Google Scholar. Total data from 74 different studies published from 1983 to 2010 on triple hepatitis infections were reviewed and included in this study. The present article briefly describes triple infection with HCV, HBV and HDV. PMID:21791115

  6. Hepatitis E in India.

    PubMed

    Tomar, B S

    1998-01-01

    Institute of Pediatric Gastroenterology is superspecialised referral institute for all Pediatric Gastroenterological diseases from all over the country and for adjoining countries. We have our data and experience on 10,500 cases of proven Hepatitis E (HEV) in Pediatric population. HEV is non-enveloped 27-30 nm diameter RNA virus, prototype for alpha-like supergroup of positive stranded RNA virus. Indian HEV strain has 97% nucleotide and 98% amino acid sequence identity with Chinese strains but much diversity with Mexican strain. More than 70% acute hepatitis occurring in Pediatric population in this subcontinent are caused by HEV and 80% of these are sporadic. 90% cases were enterically transmitted, spread primarily by fecally contaminated drinking water (70%) and by food (20%), in 9.5% case spread probably was because of person to person and household contact. We could demonstrate HEV in urine, respiratory secretions. Interestingly we found HEV in insects like Flies, Cockroaches, and also in engorged Bedbugs and in Mosquitoes, apart from briefly boiled Mussels, and partially cooked cockles. Maternal-neonatal transmission could be seen if mother had HEV infection in third trimester of pregnancy. In 5 cases we could demonstrate HEV in breast milk. By studying on 10 volunteers, 40% have anicteric form only accompanied by anorexia, epigastric pain. HEV appeared in serum before the icteric phase. Shedding of virus in stool starts before the icteric phase and continued during the high levels of abnormal ALT. Hepatitis IgG anti-HEV persist up to 4 years. In 5 cases we could establish Transfusion associated Hepatitis (TAH). No chronicity could be documented. 5% cases had fulminant viral Hepatitis (FVH)/Sub fulminant viral Hepatitis (SVH), alpha-interferon (IFN) has been proved beneficial in these cases, further use of intravenous PGEl could also be beneficial. Inadequate chlorination of drinking water was an important additional factor for causing epidemics. A free

  7. [Hepatitis C in Spain].

    PubMed

    Bruguera, Miguel; Forns, Xavier

    2006-06-17

    Spain has a medium endemicity of hepatitic C infection among central Europe countries and Italy. Prevalence of anti-HCV varies among regions and it ranges from 1.6 to 2.6%, which means that there may be between 480,000 and 760,000 people infected with hepatitis C virus in Spain. The prevalence is very low in people under 20 years of age and it increases from age 30 years. Prisoners and drug addicts have the highest infectious rates, between 40 and 98%. Some populations of immigrants also have a high prevalence of HCV infection, especially people from Asia and sub-Saharan countries, whereas people from Latin America have rates lower than those in the autochtones population. Spanish people with chronic hepatitis C were mainly infected via blood transfusions, IV drug use, or during some medical and surgical hospitalization. The reduction in the use of IV drugs and the programs of needle sharing, as well as the eradication of post-transfusional hepatitis, have led to a progressive reduction in the incidence of new infections (from 6.8 per 100,000 in-habitants in 1997 to 2.3 in 2003). Preliminary data suggest that an important rate of new hepatitis C cases owe to nosocomial transmission. Transmission is almost exclusively vertical in children. In spite of a two-third reduction of incident cases of hepatitis C in Spain in last few years, it is foreseeable that the number of patients with advanced HCV liver disease attended in the health-care system will increase in forthcoming years. This is due to the fact that many, still undiagnosed patients will be likely recognized for the first time as a result of some complication of the disease. All efforts to increase the screening of hidden cases of hepatitis C in primary health-care centers, allowing a prompt treatment before an advanced stage, will have a beneficial impact both in economic and social terms. PMID:16828003

  8. Hepatic Differentiation from Human Ips Cells Using M15 Cells.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kahoko; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a procedure of human iPS cells differentiation into the definitive endoderm, further into albumin-expressing and albumin-secreting hepatocyte, using M15, a mesonephros- derived cell line. Approximately 90 % of human iPS cells differentiated into SOX17-positive definitive endoderm then approximately 50 % of cells became albumin-positive cells, and secreted ALB protein. This M15 feeder system for endoderm and hepatic differentiation is a simple and efficient method, and useful for elucidating molecular mechanisms for hepatic fate decision, and could represent an attractive approach for a surrogate cell source for pharmaceutical studies. PMID:25417065

  9. [Clinical aspects and diagnosis of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Vince, Adriana

    2003-01-01

    public health problem worldwide. In classical infectology, four clinical stages of the disease have been described: incubation or preclinical stage characterized by intensive virus replication; prodromal or preicteric stage with pronounced general symptoms of infection; icteric stage; and stage of recovery. The stages may show great interindividual variation in length and severity. The development of molecular technologies over the last decade has greatly contributed to better understanding of the pathogenesis of viral hepatitides and allowed for appropriate monitoring of the effect of antiviral therapy. However, major disadvantage of these tests is their high cost. The basic clinical characteristics of and diagnostic options for particular types of viral hepatitis are described, with special reference to the latest important concepts on the disease pathogenesis. PMID:14582462

  10. A novel mouse PKC{delta} splice variant, PKC{delta}IX, inhibits etoposide-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung D.; Seo, Kwang W.; Lee, Eun A.; Quang, Nguyen N.; Cho, Hong R.; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} A novel PKC{delta} isoform, named PKC{delta}IX, that lacks the C1 domain and the ATP-binding site is ubiquitously expressed. {yields} PKC{delta}IX inhibits etoposide-induced apoptosis. {yields} PKC{delta}IX may function as an endogenous dominant negative isoform for PKC{delta}. -- Abstract: Protein kinase C (PKC) {delta} plays an important role in cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The catalytic fragment of PKC{delta} generated by caspase-dependent cleavage is essential for the initiation of etoposide-induced apoptosis. In this study, we identified a novel mouse PKC{delta} isoform named PKC{delta}IX (Genebank Accession No. (HQ840432)). PKC{delta}IX is generated by alternative splicing and is ubiquitously expressed, as seen in its full-length PKC{delta}. PKC{delta}IX lacks the C1 domain, the caspase 3 cleavage site, and the ATP binding site but preserves an almost intact c-terminal catalytic domain and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The structural characteristics of PKC{delta}IX provided a possibility that this PKC{delta} isozyme functions as a novel dominant-negative form for PKC{delta} due to its lack of the ATP-binding domain that is required for the kinase activity of PKC{delta}. Indeed, overexpression of PKC{delta}IX significantly inhibited etoposide-induced apoptosis in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, an in vitro kinase assay showed that recombinant PKC{delta}IX protein could competitively inhibit the kinase activity of PKC{delta}. We conclude that PKC{delta}IX can function as a natural dominant-negative inhibitor of PKC{delta}in vivo.

  11. Growth behavior of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta. and NdBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta. thin films observed by electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T.; Nonaka, H.; Arai, K. )

    1991-07-29

    Growth behavior of thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} and NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} has been observed in reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) during coevaporation of constituent metal atoms with a NO{sub 2} supersonic molecular beam. The intensity oscillations of RHEED specular beam have been observed during deposition. The nucleation behavior of NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} is found to be different from that of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} in RHEED observation.

  12. Regulation of hepatic PPAR{gamma}2 and lipogenic gene expression by melanocortin

    SciTech Connect

    Poritsanos, Nicole J.; Wong, Davie; Vrontakis, Maria E.; Mizuno, Tooru M.

    2008-11-14

    The central melanocortin system regulates hepatic lipid metabolism. Hepatic lipogenic gene expression is regulated by transcription factors including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2). However, it is unclear if central melanocortin signaling regulates hepatic lipogenic gene expression through the activation of these transcription factors. To delineate the molecular mechanisms by which the melanocortin system regulates hepatic lipid metabolism, we examined the effect of intracerebroventricular injection of SHU9119, a melanocortin receptor antagonist, on hepatic expression levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism in mice. SHU9119 treatment increased hepatic triglyceride content and mRNA levels of lipogenic genes, SREBP-1c, and PPAR{gamma}2, whereas it did not cause any changes in hepatic ChREBP mRNA levels. These findings suggest that reduced central melanocortin signaling increases hepatic lipid deposition by stimulating hepatic lipogenic gene expression at least partly through the activation of SREBP-1c and PPAR{gamma}2.

  13. The Okavango: Whose Delta is it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magole, Lapologang; Magole, Lefatshe Innocent

    The Okavango Delta is amongst the largest Ramsar sites ( http://www.ramsar.org/sitelist.pdf) in the world and an important wetland for community livelihoods, conservation and tourism in Botswana. Over the years, the utilization of the delta has shifted from communal use to state control, with an increased use for conservation and tourism. This increased use for conservation and tourism has manifested in the physical expansion of the conservation area - Moremi Game Reserve and the formation of Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) around the reserve, whose primary land use is wildlife utilization. The expansion of the conservation area has translated into several practical matters, including expansion of the area for non-hunting activities or photographic areas. The livelihoods of local communities of the Okavango delta who depended on fishing, hunter-gathering, livestock rearing, rain-fed agriculture and flood recession farming have been negatively affected by the expansion of conservation and tourism in the delta. The livelihoods alternatives in the form of Community Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) and tourism have not provided substitutes for the people as the communities are still reliant on the same old livelihood sources as in the past, albeit within smaller and restricted areas. This paper explores the ownership of the natural resources within the Okavango Delta. It asks and attempts to answer the following questions: Who owns and controls the use of the land? Who has access to other resources there in? Who makes the decisions on how the delta resources should be managed and used? Who benefits from the delta resources? We argue firstly that ownership of the delta as defined by legal parameters and demonstrated in natural resource management practice is vested on government. Secondly, government, after assuming ownership of the delta continues to sell its stake to the international community, at the expense of local ownership and access to resources. We

  14. Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy in the Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Leise, Michael D.; Poterucha, John J.; Kamath, Patrick S.; Kim, W. Ray

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) develops in about 50% of patients with cirrhosis and is one of the features of decompensated cirrhosis. The inpatient incidence of HE is approximately 23,000/year and management of these patients is common for internists and subspecialists. Treatment of the hospitalized patient with HE has changed in recent years. Treatment entails two phases, induction and maintenance of remission. Most cases of significant hepatic encephalopathy are precipitated by infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, medications or other culprits. All patients should be evaluated for secondary triggers of HE and treatment should be initiated with a non-absorbable disaccharide (i.e. lactulose) in most cases. Rifaximin (off-label) can be added in patients not responding to lactulose. Neomycin is a less preferable alternative to rifaximin, due to its side effect profile. Other therapies including zinc, LOLA, and branch chain amino acids can be considered for patients not responding to a disaccharide and non-absorbable antibiotic. Large portosystemic shunts may be embolized in patients with medically refractory recurrent or severe HE with otherwise well compensated cirrhosis. Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System is now available for patients with severe hepatic encephalopathy who do not respond to medical therapy. It is critically important that patients hospitalized with significant hepatic encephalopathy continue a maintenance medication(s) at the time of dismissal to prevent further episodes. Patients with a 1st time episode of HE can be placed on lactulose and careful instruction should be provided to patient and caregiver about titration of dose to achieve 3 bowel movements per day. Patients with recurrent HE episodes despite lactulose benefit from the addition of rifaximin which decreases the frequency of recurrent HE episodes and related hospitalizations. Lastly, patients and their families should be counselled about the risk of motor vehicle accidents which

  15. Intradermal Hepatitis B Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ruddock, David G.S.; Dickson, Annie

    1992-01-01

    Intramuscular administration of hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is safe and efficacious, but its cost has limited its availability. In this pilot study, 49 of 56 participants who received 2 μg of intradermal (ID) HB vaccine (one tenth the intramuscular dose) at the beginning of administration, at 1 month, and at 6 months developed protective levels of antibody to HB surface antigen. Although questions remain, the cost savings of this technique make it worth considering. PMID:21229118

  16. Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Arthur

    2016-09-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of hepatitis C virus, focusing on transmission, prevention, screening, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:27595226

  17. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions congenital hepatic fibrosis congenital hepatic fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a disease of the liver that is ...

  18. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    MedlinePlus

    Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is inflammation of the liver caused ...

  19. Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Harry R.; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. An improved understanding of the natural history of HEV infection has been achieved within the last decade. Several reservoirs and transmission modes have been identified. Hepatitis E is an underdiagnosed disease, in part due to the use of serological assays with low sensitivity. However, diagnostic tools, including nucleic acid-based tests, have been improved. The epidemiology and clinical features of hepatitis E differ between developing and developed countries. HEV infection is usually an acute self-limiting disease, but in developed countries it causes chronic infection with rapidly progressive cirrhosis in organ transplant recipients, patients with hematological malignancy requiring chemotherapy, and individuals with HIV. HEV also causes extrahepatic manifestations, including a number of neurological syndromes and renal injury. Acute infection usually requires no treatment, but chronic infection should be treated by reducing immunosuppression in transplant patients and/or the use of antiviral therapy. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge about the virus itself, as well as the epidemiology, diagnostics, natural history, and management of HEV infection in developing and developed countries. PMID:24396139

  20. A model for the Delta(1600) resonance and gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ramalho, K. Tsushima

    2010-10-01

    A covariant spectator constituent quark model is applied to study the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition. Two processes are important in the transition: a photon couples to the individual quarks of the Delta(1600) core (quark core), and a photon couples to the intermediate pion-baryon states (pion cloud). While the quark core contributions are estimated assuming Delta(1600) as the first radial excitation of Delta(1232), the pion cloud contributions are estimated based on an analogy with the gamma N -> Delta(1232) transition. To estimate the pion cloud contributions in the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition, we include the relevant intermediate states, pi-N, pi-Delta, pi-N(1440) and pi-Delta(1600). Dependence on the four-momentum transfer squared, Q2, is predicted for the magnetic dipole transition form factor, GM*(Q2), as well as the helicity amplitudes, A_1/2(Q2) and A_3/2(Q2). The results at Q2=0 are compared with the existing data.