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Sample records for delta-opioid receptor endocytosis

  1. Structure of the [delta]-opioid receptor bound to naltrindole

    SciTech Connect

    Granier, Sébastien; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2012-07-11

    The opioid receptor family comprises three members, the {mu}-, {delta}- and {kappa}-opioid receptors, which respond to classical opioid alkaloids such as morphine and heroin as well as to endogenous peptide ligands like endorphins. They belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, and are excellent therapeutic targets for pain control. The {delta}-opioid receptor ({delta}-OR) has a role in analgesia, as well as in other neurological functions that remain poorly understood. The structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR have recently been solved. Here we report the crystal structure of the mouse {delta}-OR, bound to the subtype-selective antagonist naltrindole. Together with the structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR, the {delta}-OR structure provides insights into conserved elements of opioid ligand recognition while also revealing structural features associated with ligand-subtype selectivity. The binding pocket of opioid receptors can be divided into two distinct regions. Whereas the lower part of this pocket is highly conserved among opioid receptors, the upper part contains divergent residues that confer subtype selectivity. This provides a structural explanation and validation for the 'message-address' model of opioid receptor pharmacology, in which distinct 'message' (efficacy) and 'address' (selectivity) determinants are contained within a single ligand. Comparison of the address region of the {delta}-OR with other GPCRs reveals that this structural organization may be a more general phenomenon, extending to other GPCR families as well.

  2. Effects of imipramine treatment on delta-opioid receptors of the rat brain cortex and striatum.

    PubMed

    Varona, Adolfo; Gil, Javier; Saracibar, Gonzalo; Maza, Jose Luis; Echevarria, Enrique; Irazusta, Jon

    2003-01-01

    Imipramine (CAS 113-52-0) is being utilized widely for the treatment of major depression. In recent years, there has been evidence of the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in major depression and its treatment. There is some evidence indicating that opioid receptors could be involved in the antidepressant mechanism of action. Regarding this topic, mood-related behavior of endogenous enkephalins seems to be mediated by delta-opioid receptors. In this work, the effects of subacute (5 day) and chronic (15 day) treatments of imipramine on the density and the affinity of the delta-receptors in the striatum and in the parietal and frontal cortices of the rat brain are described. Studied parameters (Bmax and Kd) were calculated by a saturation binding assay with the delta-opioid agonists [3H]-DPDPE (tyrosyl-2,6-3H(N)-(2-D-penicillamine-5-D-penicillamine)-enkephalin) as specific ligand and DSLET ([D-serine2]-D-leucine-enkephalin-threonine) as non-radioactive competing ligand. It was found that 15 days treatment significantly decreased the delta-opioid receptor density,without changing the affinity, in the frontal cortex of the rat brain. That decrease was confirmed by delta-opioid receptor immunostaining. These results suggest that delta-opioid receptors could play a role in the chronic action mechanism of imipramine. PMID:12608010

  3. Proteasome involvement in agonist-induced down-regulation of mu and delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, K; Bandari, P; Chinen, N; Howells, R D

    2001-04-13

    This study investigated the mechanism of agonist-induced opioid receptor down-regulation. Incubation of HEK 293 cells expressing FLAG-tagged delta and mu receptors with agonists caused a time-dependent decrease in opioid receptor levels assayed by immunoblotting. Pulse-chase experiments using [(35)S]methionine metabolic labeling indicated that the turnover rate of delta receptors was accelerated 5-fold following agonist stimulation. Inactivation of functional G(i) and G(o) proteins by pertussis toxin-attenuated down-regulation of the mu opioid receptor, while down-regulation of the delta opioid receptor was unaffected. Pretreatment of cells with inhibitors of lysosomal proteases, calpain, and caspases had little effect on mu and delta opioid receptor down-regulation. In marked contrast, pretreatment with proteasome inhibitors attenuated agonist-induced mu and delta receptor down-regulation. In addition, incubation of cells with proteasome inhibitors in the absence of agonists increased steady-state mu and delta opioid receptor levels. Immunoprecipitation of mu and delta opioid receptors followed by immunoblotting with ubiquitin antibodies suggested that preincubation with proteasome inhibitors promoted accumulation of polyubiquitinated receptors. These data provide evidence that the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway plays a role in agonist-induced down-regulation and basal turnover of opioid receptors. PMID:11152677

  4. Interaction of co-expressed mu- and delta-opioid receptors in transfected rat pituitary GH(3) cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, N A; Prather, P L

    2001-04-01

    mu- and delta-Opioid agonists interact in a synergistic manner to produce analgesia in several animal models. Additionally, receptor binding studies using membranes derived from brain tissue indicate that interactions between mu- and delta-opioid receptors might be responsible for the observation of multiple opioid receptor subtypes. To examine potential interactions between mu- and delta-opioid receptors, we examined receptor binding and functional characteristics of mu-, delta-, or both mu- and delta-opioid receptors stably transfected in rat pituitary GH(3) cells (GH(3)MOR, GH(3)DOR, and GH(3)MORDOR, respectively). Saturation and competition binding experiments revealed that coexpression of mu- and delta-opioid receptors resulted in the appearance of multiple affinity states for mu- but not delta-opioid receptors. Additionally, coadministration of selective mu- and delta-opioid agonists in GH(3)MORDOR cells resulted in a synergistic competition with [(3)H][D-Pen(2,5)]enkephalin (DPDPE) for delta-opioid receptors. Finally, when equally effective concentrations of [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly-ol(5)]enkephalin (DAMGO) and two different delta-opioid agonists (DPDPE or 2-methyl-4a alpha-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3,4,4a,5,12,12a alpha-octahydroquinolino-[2,3,3-g]-isoquinoline; TAN67) were coadministered in GH(3)MORDOR cells, a synergistic inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity was observed. These results strongly suggest that cotransfection of mu- and delta-opioid receptors alters the binding and functional characteristics of the receptors. Therefore, we propose that the simultaneous exposure of GH(3)MORDOR cells to selective mu- and delta-opioid agonists produces an interaction between receptors resulting in enhanced receptor binding. This effect is translated into an augmented ability of these agonists to inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity. Similar interactions occurring in neurons that express both mu- and delta-opioid receptors could explain observations of multiple

  5. Delta opioid receptors presynaptically regulate cutaneous mechanosensory neuron input to the spinal cord dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C; Mennicken, Françoise; O'Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Woodbury, C Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I; MacDermott, Amy B; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-03-19

    Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:24583022

  6. Delta Opioid Receptors Presynaptically Regulate Cutaneous Mechanosensory Neuron Input to the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn

    PubMed Central

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L.; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A.; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C.; Mennicken, Françoise; O’Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Woodbury, C. Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I.; MacDermott, Amy B.; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:24583022

  7. Autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid receptors in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, R.P. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic techniques were coupled with selective chemical lesions of the A10 dopamine cells and intrinsic perikarya of the region to delineate the anatomical localization of mu and delta opioid receptors, as well as, neurotensin receptors. Mu opioid receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DAGO. Delta receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DPDPE. Neurotensin receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-NT3. Unilateral lesions of the dopamine perikarya were produced by injections of 6-OHDA administered in the ventral mesencephalon. Unilateral lesions of intrinsic perikarya were induced by injections of quinolinic acid in to the A10 dopamine cell region. Unilateral lesions produced with 6-OHDA resulted in the loss of neurotensin receptors in the A10 region and within the terminal fields. Mu opioid receptors were unaffected by this treatment, but delta opioid receptors increased in the contralateral striatum and nucleus accumbens following 6-OHDA administration. Quinolinic acid produced a reduction of mu opioid receptors within the A10 region with a concomitant reduction in neurotensin receptors in both the cell body region and terminal fields. These results are consistent with a variety of biochemical and behavioral data which suggest the indirect modulation of dopamine transmission by the opioids. In contrast these results strongly indicate a direct modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system by neurotensin.

  8. Delta Opioid Receptors: The Link between Exercise and Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliana P.; Verdoorn, Karine S.; Daliry, Anissa; Powers, Scott K.; Ortenzi, Victor H.; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Lessa, Marcos Adriano

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the role of opioid receptor (OR) subtypes as a mechanism by which endurance exercise promotes cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Wistar rats were randomly divided into one of seven experimental groups: 1) control; 2) exercise-trained; 3) exercise-trained plus a non-selective OR antagonist; 4) control sham; 5) exercise-trained plus a kappa OR antagonist; 6) exercise-trained plus a delta OR antagonist; and 7) exercise-trained plus a mu OR antagonist. The exercised animals underwent 4 consecutive days of treadmill training (60 min/day at ∼70% of maximal oxygen consumption). All groups except the sham group were exposed to an in vivo myocardial IR insult, and the myocardial infarct size (IS) was determined histologically. Myocardial capillary density, OR subtype expression, heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) expression, and antioxidant enzyme activity were measured in the hearts of both the exercised and control groups. Exercise training significantly reduced the myocardial IS by approximately 34%. Pharmacological blockade of the kappa or mu OR subtypes did not blunt exercise-induced cardioprotection against IR-mediated infarction, whereas treatment of animals with a non-selective OR antagonist or a delta OR antagonist abolished exercise-induced cardioprotection. Exercise training enhanced the activities of myocardial superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase but did not increase the left ventricular capillary density or the mRNA levels of HSP72, SOD, and catalase. In addition, exercise significantly reduced the protein expression of kappa and delta ORs in the heart by 44% and 37%, respectively. Together, these results indicate that ORs contribute to the cardioprotection conferred by endurance exercise, with the delta OR subtype playing a key role in this response. PMID:25415192

  9. The pharmacological profile of delta opioid receptor ligands, (+) and (-) TAN-67 on pain modulation.

    PubMed

    Nagase, H; Yajima, Y; Fujii, H; Kawamura, K; Narita, M; Kamei, J; Suzuki, T

    2001-04-01

    We designed the nonpeptidic highly selective delta opioid receptor agonist on the basis of message address concept and the accessory site theory and synthesized (+/-) TAN-67. In spite of highly potent agonistic activity in in vitro assay, (+/-) TAN-67 (racemate) afforded a weak antinociceptive effect in the mouse tail-flick test. This result led us to separate (+/-) TAN-67 to optical pure compounds, (+) and (-) TAN-67. An i.t.-treatment with (-) TAN-67 produced profound antinociceptive effects through specifically acting on delta1 receptors. Unlike (-) TAN-67, i.t.-administered (+) TAN-67 displayed dose-related nociceptive behaviors such as scratching, biting and licking. The effect of (+) TAN-67 was blocked by i.t.-treatment with NTI (delta receptor antagonist) and (-) TAN-67 (delta1 receptor agonist), but not by morphine (mu receptor agonist). The mechanisms involved in spinal pain modulation induced by (+) and (-) TAN-67 were also described. PMID:11358331

  10. Effect of delta opioid receptor activation on spatial cognition and neurogenesis in cerebral ischemic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Yan; Duan, Ya-Le; Zhao, Bing; Wang, Xiang-Rui; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Guang-Ming

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether a selective delta opioid receptor agonist, [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]-Enkephalin (DADLE), regulates neurogenesis in the hippocampus of ischemic rats. Using an intracerebral cannula, rats were subjected to cerebral ischemia using the standard four-vessel occlusion. DADLE (2.5nmol), DADLE (2.5nmol) with naltrindole (NAL) (2.5nmol), or vehicle was administered at the onset of reperfusion. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, 100mg/kg, intraperitoneal) was used to label newly formed cells from days 1 to 7 after ischemia. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate cell proliferation and apoptosis and differentiation 7days 28 days, respectively, after ischemia. Morris water maze test was conducted to test spatial learning and memory 23-27 days after ischemia. We found that DADLE treatment improved performance in the Morris water maze test, promoted proliferation and differentiation of newly formed neurons, and inhibited differentiation into astrocytes in a rat model of cerebral ischemia. Furthermore, the protective effects of DADLE were significantly reversed by co-administration of NAL (P<0.05), a highly potent and selective delta opioid receptor antagonist. Our findings suggest that DADLE promotes spatial cognitive function recovery and regulates neurogenesis after ischemia, which may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for cerebral ischemia. PMID:27016387

  11. Differential desensitization of mu- and delta- opioid receptors in selected neural pathways following chronic morphine treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Noble, F.; Cox, B. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Morphine produces a plethora of pharmacological effects and its chronic administration induces several side-effects. The cellular mechanisms by which opiates induce these side-effects are not fully understood. Several studies suggest that regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by opioids and other transmitters plays an important role in the control of neural function. 2. The aim of this study was to evaluate desensitization of mu- and delta- opioid receptors, defined as a reduced ability of opioid agonists to inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity, in four different brain structures known to be involved in opiate drug actions: caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, thalamus and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Opiate regulation of adenylyl cyclase in these regions has been studied in control and morphine-dependent rats. 3. The chronic morphine treatment used in the present study (subcutaneous administration of 15.4 mg morphine/rat/day for 6 days via osmotic pump) induced significant physical dependence as indicated by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptoms. 4. Basal adenylyl cyclase in the four brain regions was not modified by this chronic morphine treatment. In the PAG and the thalamus, a desensitization of mu- and delta-opioid receptors was observed, characterized by a reduced ability of Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-(NMe)Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO; mu), Tyr-D-Pen-Gly-Phe-D-Pen (DPDPE; delta) and [D-Ala2]-deltorphin-II (DT-II; delta) to inhibit adenylyl cyclase, activity following chronic morphine treatment. 5. The opioid receptor desensitization in PAG and thalamus appeared to be heterologous since the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists, L-AP4 and glutamate, and the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptor agonist, R(+)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT), also showed reduced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity following chronic morphine treatment. 6. In the nucleus accumbens and the caudate putamen, desensitization of delta-opioid receptor

  12. RAPID HETEROLOGOUS DESENSITIZATION OF ANTINOCICEPTIVE ACTIVITY BETWEEN MU OR DELTA OPIOID RECEPTORS AND CHEMOKINE RECEPTORS IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohong; Geller, Ellen B.; Rogers, Thomas J.; Adler, Martin W.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown pretreatment with chemokines CCL5/RANTES (100 ng) or CXCL12/SDF-1alpha (100 ng) injected into the periaqueductal grey (PAG) region of the brain, 30 minutes (min) before the mu opioid agonist DAMGO (400 ng), blocked the antinociception induced by DAMGO in the in vivo cold water tail-flick (CWT) antinociceptive test in rats. In the present experiments, we tested whether the action of other agonists at mu and delta opioid receptors is blocked when CCL5/RANTES or CXCL12/SDF-1alpha is administered into the PAG 30 min before, or co-administered with, opioid agonists in the CWT assay. The results showed that (1) CXCL12/SDF-1alpha (100 ng, PAG) or CCL5/RANTES (100 ng, PAG), given 30 min before the opioid agonist morphine, or selective delta opioid receptor agonist DPDPE, blocked the antinociceptive effect of these drugs; (2) CXCL12/SDF-1alpha (100 ng, PAG) or CCL5/RANTES (100 ng, PAG), injected at the same time as DAMGO or DPDPE, significantly reduced the antinociceptive effect induced by these drugs. These results demonstrate that the heterologous desensitization is rapid between the mu or delta opioid receptors and either CCL5/RANTES receptor CCR5 or CXCL12/SDF-1alpha receptor CXCR4 in vivo, but the effect is greater if the chemokine is administered before the opioid. PMID:17049756

  13. Potent cyclic enkephalin analogues for delta opioid receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, G.; Kao, J.; Hruby, V.; Morelli, M.; Gulya, K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-01

    (/sup 3/H) (D-Pen/sup 2/,D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin ((/sup 3/H)DPDPE) and (/sup 3/H) (D-Pen/sup 2/, L-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin ((/sup 3/H)DPLPE) characterization studies showed high affinity binding of these radioligands to rat brain membranes with dissociation constants of 1.8 and 1.0 nM, respectively, while a similar number of receptor density was found with both radiolabeled ligands (77 fmoles/mg protein). Unlabeled DPDPE inhibited both radioligands with high affinity (IC50 = 7 nM0 while morphine (IC50 = 80 nM), DAGO (IC50 = 250 nM) and PLO17 (no inhibition at 1000 nM) were less effective in inhibiting the binding, thus, illustrating the selective action of these radiolabeled ligands at the delta opioid receptor. A series of conformationally restricted D-penicillamine containing cyclic enkephalin analogues were synthesized using standard solid phase methods and their ability to inhibit (/sup 3/H)DPDPE and (/sup 3/H)DPLPE were examined in rat brain radioreceptor assays. Substitutions in the DPDPE molecule were made in phe/sup 4/. These substitutions were pNO/sub 2/-phe/sup 4/, beta-methyl-phe/sup 4/, pNO/sub 2/-beta-methyl-phe/sub 4/, pNO/sub 2/-beta-methyl-phe/sup 4/ (three isomeric forms: A,B,D). The IC50 values for the above enkephalin analogues were 3.7, 16, 7, 7, 200 nM, respectively. Thus, these potent analogues of DPDPE should be useful in determining the structure activity relationships of the delta opioid receptor in rat brain.

  14. Inhibition of mu and delta opioid receptor ligand binding by the peptide aldehyde protease inhibitor, leupeptin.

    PubMed

    Christoffers, Keith H; Khokhar, Arshia; Chaturvedi, Kirti; Howells, Richard D

    2002-04-15

    We reported recently that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in agonist-induced down regulation of mu and delta opioid receptors [J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001) 12345]. While evaluating the effects of various protease inhibitors on agonist-induced opioid receptor down regulation, we observed that while the peptide aldehyde, leupeptin (acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Arginal), did not affect agonist-induced down regulation, leupeptin at submillimolar concentrations directly inhibited radioligand binding to opioid receptors. In this study, the inhibitory activity of leupeptin on radioligand binding was characterized utilizing human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell lines expressing transfected mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. The rank order of potency for leupeptin inhibition of [3H]bremazocine binding to opioid receptors was mu > delta > kappa. In contrast to the effect of leupeptin, the peptide aldehyde proteasome inhibitor, MG 132 (carbobenzoxy-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucinal), had significantly less effect on bremazocine binding to mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. We propose that leupeptin inhibits ligand binding by reacting reversibly with essential sulfhydryl groups that are necessary for high-affinity ligand/receptor interactions. PMID:11853866

  15. Lack of renal tubular and hemodynamic effects of non-selective and delta-opioid receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Barrett, R J; Turpin, J A; McGuirk, B A; Kau, S T

    1985-01-01

    The renal pharmacological actions of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and the selective delta (delta)-opioid receptor antagonist ICI 154,129 were examined in conscious dogs. Neither naloxone nor ICI 154,129 altered glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, blood pressure, heart rate, or renal excretion of water, Na+, K+, or Cl-. In addition, urine and plasma osmolality and electrolyte concentrations and hematocrit were unchanged, suggesting that neither agent produced physiologically significant alteration in plasma vasopressin levels. These data suggest that (a) naloxone and ICI 154,129 exert no renal pharmacological effects in dogs and (b) under resting physiological conditions, delta-opioid receptors, as well as other opioid receptor subtypes, probably are not involved in the tonic regulation of renal hemodynamics or tubular function. PMID:3983226

  16. Quantitative evaluation of human delta opioid receptor desensitization using the operational model of drug action.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Edita; Waite, Sue; Stropova, Dagmar; Eaton, Miriam C; Alves, Isabel D; Hruby, Victor J; Roeske, William R; Yamamura, Henry I; Varga, Eva V

    2007-05-01

    Agonist-mediated desensitization of the opioid receptors is thought to function as a protective mechanism against sustained opioid signaling and therefore may prevent the development of opioid tolerance. However, the exact molecular mechanism of opioid receptor desensitization remains unresolved because of difficulties in measuring and interpreting receptor desensitization. In the present study, we investigated deltorphin II-mediated rapid desensitization of the human delta opioid receptors (hDOR) by measuring guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)-triphosphate binding and inhibition of cAMP accumulation. We developed a mathematical analysis based on the operational model of agonist action (Black et al., 1985) to calculate the proportion of desensitized receptors. This approach permits a correct analysis of the complex process of functional desensitization by taking into account receptor-effector coupling and the time dependence of agonist pretreatment. Finally, we compared hDOR desensitization with receptor phosphorylation at Ser363, the translocation of beta-arrestin2, and hDOR internalization. We found that in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the hDOR, deltorphin II treatment leads to phosphorylation of Ser363, translocation of beta-arrestin2 to the plasma membrane, receptor internalization, and uncoupling from G proteins. It is noteworthy that mutation of the primary phosphorylation site Ser363 to alanine had virtually no effect on agonist-induced beta-arrestin2 translocation and receptor internalization yet significantly attenuated receptor desensitization. These results strongly indicate that phosphorylation of Ser363 is the primary mechanism of hDOR desensitization. PMID:17322005

  17. Protecting motor networks during perinatal ischemia: the case for delta opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephen M.; Freiberg, Sara M.

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal ischemia is a common clinical problem with few successful therapies to prevent neuronal damage. Delta-opioid receptor (DOR) activation is a versatile, evolutionarily-conserved, endogenous neuroprotective mechanism that blocks several steps in the deleterious cascade of neurological events during ischemia. DOR activation prior to ischemia or severe hypoxia is neuroprotective in spinal motor networks, as well as cortical, cerebellar, and hippocampal neural networks. In addition to providing acute and long-lasting neuroprotection against ischemia, DOR activation appears to provide neuroprotection when given before, during, or following the onset of ischemia. Finally, DORs can be upregulated by several physiological and experimental perturbations. Potential adverse side effects affecting motor control, such as respiratory depression and seizures, are not well established in young mammals and may be mitigated by altering drug choice and method of drug administration. The unique features of DOR-dependent neuroprotection make it an attractive potential therapy that may be given to at-risk pregnant mothers shortly before delivery to provide long-lasting neuroprotection against unpredictable perinatal ischemic events. PMID:20536941

  18. Ethanol Disinhibits Dorsolateral Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons Through Activation of A Presynaptic Delta Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Patton, Mary H; Roberts, Bradley M; Lovinger, David M; Mathur, Brian N

    2016-06-01

    The dorsolateral striatum mediates habit formation, which is expedited by exposure to alcohol. Across species, alcohol exposure disinhibits the DLS by dampening GABAergic transmission onto this structure's principal medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs), providing a potential mechanistic basis for habitual alcohol drinking. However, the molecular and circuit components underlying this disinhibition remain unknown. To examine this, we used a combination of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and optogenetics to demonstrate that ethanol potently depresses both MSN- and fast-spiking interneuron (FSI)-MSN GABAergic synaptic transmission in the DLS. Concentrating on the powerfully inhibitory FSI-MSN synapse, we further show that acute exposure of ethanol (50 mM) to striatal slices activates delta opioid receptors that reside on FSI axon terminals and negatively couple to adenylyl cyclase to induce a long-term depression of GABA release onto both direct and indirect pathway MSNs. These findings elucidate a mechanism through which ethanol may globally disinhibit the DLS. PMID:26758662

  19. delta-Opioid receptors are more efficiently coupled to adenylyl cyclase than to L-type Ca(2+) channels in transfected rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Prather, P L; Song, L; Piros, E T; Law, P Y; Hales, T G

    2000-11-01

    Opioid receptors often couple to multiple effectors within the same cell. To examine potential mechanisms that contribute to the specificity by which delta-receptors couple to distinct intracellular effectors, we stably transfected rat pituitary GH(3) cells with cDNAs encoding for delta-opioid receptors. In cells transfected with a relatively low delta-receptor density of 0.55 pmol/mg of protein (GH(3)DOR), activation of delta-receptors produced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity but was unable to alter L-type Ca(2+) current. In contrast, activation of delta-receptors in a clone that contained a higher density of delta-receptors (2.45 pmol/mg of protein) and was also coexpressed with mu-opioid receptors (GH(3)MORDOR), resulted in not only the expected inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity but also produced inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) current. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether these observations resulted from differences in delta-opioid receptor density between clones or interaction between delta- and mu-opioid receptors to allow the activation of different G proteins and signaling to Ca(2+) channels. Using the delta-opioid receptor alkylating agent SUPERFIT, reduction of available delta-opioid receptors in GH(3)MORDOR cells to a density similar to that of delta-opioid receptors in the GH(3)DOR clone resulted in abolishment of coupling to Ca(2+) channels, but not to adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, although significantly greater amounts of all G proteins were activated by delta-opioid receptors in GH(3)MORDOR cells, delta-opioid receptor activation in GH(3)DOR cells resulted in coupling to the identical pattern of G proteins seen in GH(3)MORDOR cells. These findings suggest that different threshold densities of delta-opioid receptors are required to activate critical amounts of G proteins needed to produce coupling to specific effectors and that delta-opioid receptors couple more efficiently to adenylyl cyclase than to L-type Ca(2

  20. Role of Mu and Delta Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens in Cocaine-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Diana; Self, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that opioid receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but not the nucleus accumbens (NAc), play a role in relapse to drug-seeking behavior. However, environmental stimuli that elicit relapse also release the endogenous opioid β-endorphin in the NAc. Using a within–session extinction/reinstatement paradigm in rats that self-administer cocaine, we found that NAc infusions of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO moderately reinstated responding on the cocaine-paired lever at low doses (1.0–3.0 ng/side), whereas the delta opioid receptor (DOR) agonist DPDPE induced greater responding at higher doses (300–3000 ng/side) that also enhanced inactive lever responding. Using doses of either agonist that induced responding on only the cocaine-paired lever, we found that DAMGO-induced responding was blocked selectively by pretreatment with the MOR antagonist CTAP, while DPDPE-induced responding was selectively blocked by the DOR antagonist naltrindole. Cocaine-primed reinstatement was blocked by intra-NAc CTAP but not naltrindole, indicating a role for endogenous MOR-acting peptides in cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. In this regard, intra-NAc infusions of β-endorphin (100–1000 ng/side) induced marked cocaine-seeking behavior, an effect blocked by intra-NAc pretreatment with the MOR but not DOR antagonist. Conversely, cocaine seeking elicited by the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (1–10 μg/side) was blocked by naltrindole but not CTAP. MOR stimulation in more dorsal caudate-putamen sites was ineffective, while DPDPE infusions induced cocaine seeking. Together, these findings establish distinct roles for MOR and DOR in cocaine relapse, and suggest that NAc MOR could be an important therapeutic target to neutralize the effects of endogenous β-endorphin release on cocaine relapse. PMID:19279569

  1. Delta opioid receptors expressed in forebrain GABAergic neurons are responsible for SNC80-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, Paul CHU SIN; BOEHRER, Annie; STEPHAN, Aline; MATIFAS, Audrey; SCHERRER, Gregory; DARCQ, Emmanuel; BEFORT, Katia; KIEFFER, Brigitte L.

    2014-01-01

    The delta opioid receptor (DOR) has raised much interest for the development of new therapeutic drugs, particularly to treat patients suffering from mood disorders and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the prototypal DOR agonist SNC80 induces mild epileptic seizures in rodents. Although recently developed agonists do not seem to show convulsant properties, mechanisms and neuronal circuits that support DOR-mediated epileptic seizures remain to be clarified. DORs are expressed throughout the nervous system. In this study we tested the hypothesis that SNC80-evoked seizures stem from DOR activity at the level of forebrain GABAergic transmission, whose inhibition is known to facilitate the development of epileptic seizures. We generated a conditional DOR knockout mouse line, targeting the receptor gene specifically in GABAergic neurons of the forebrain (Dlx-DOR). We measured effects of SNC80 (4.5, 9, 13.5 and 32 mg/kg), ARM390 (10, 30 and 60 mg/kg) or ADL5859 (30, 100 and 300 mg/kg) administration on electroencephalograms (EEGs) recorded in Dlx-DOR mice and their control littermates (Ctrl mice). SNC80 produced dose-dependent seizure events in Ctrl mice, but these effects were not detected in Dlx-DOR mice. As expected, ARM390 and ADL5859 did not trigger any detectable change in mice from both genotypes. These results demonstrate for the first time that SNC80-induced DOR activation induces epileptic seizures via direct inhibition of GABAergic forebrain neurons, and supports the notion of differential activities between first and second-generation DOR agonists. PMID:25447299

  2. delta-Opioid receptors exhibit high efficiency when activating trimeric G proteins in membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Bourova, Lenka; Kostrnova, Alexandra; Hejnova, Lucie; Moravcova, Zuzana; Moon, Hyo-Eun; Novotny, Jiri; Milligan, Graeme; Svoboda, Petr

    2003-04-01

    Low-density membrane fragments (domains) were separated from the bulk of plasma membranes of human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells expressing a delta-opioid (DOP) receptor-Gi1alpha fusion protein by drastic homogenization and flotation on equilibrium sucrose density gradients. The functional activity of trimeric G proteins and capacity of the DOP receptor to stimulate both the fusion protein-linked Gi1alpha and endogenous pertussis-toxin sensitive G proteins was measured as d-Ala2, d-Leu5-enkephalin stimulated high-affinity GTPase or guanosine-5'-[gamma-35S]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding. The maximum d-Ala2-d-Leu5 enkephalin (DADLE)-stimulated GTPase was two times higher in low-density membrane fragments than in bulk of plasma membranes; 58 and 27 pmol/mg/min, respectively. The same difference was obtained for [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Contrarily, the low-density domains contained no more than half the DOP receptor binding sites (Bmax = 6.6 pmol/mg versus 13.6 pmol/mg). Thus, when corrected for expression levels of the receptor, low-density domains exhibited four times higher agonist-stimulated GTPase and [35S]GTPgammaS binding than the bulk plasma membranes. The regulator of G protein signaling RGS1, enhanced further the G protein functional activity but did not remove the difference between domain-bound and plasma membrane pools of G protein. The potency of the agonist in functional studies and the affinity of specific [3H]DADLE binding to the receptor were, however, the same in both types of membranes - EC50 = 4.5 +/- 0.1 x 10(-8) and 3.2 +/- 1.4 x 10(-8) m for GTPase; Kd = 1.2 +/- 0.1 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 nm for [3H]DADLE radioligand binding assay. Similar results were obtained when sodium bicarbonate was used for alkaline isolation of membrane domains. By contrast, detergent-insensitive membrane domains isolated following treatment of cells with Triton X100 exhibited no DADLE-stimulated GTPase or GTPgammaS binding. Functional coupling between the DOP receptor

  3. Delta opioid receptors colocalize with corticotropin releasing factor in hippocampal interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tanya J.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampal formation (HF) is an important site at which stress circuits and endogenous opioid systems intersect, likely playing a critical role in the interaction between stress and drug addiction. Prior study findings suggest that the stress-related neuropeptide corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and the delta opioid receptor (DOR) may localize to similar neuronal populations within HF lamina. Here, hippocampal sections of male and cycling female adult Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for immunolabeling using antisera directed against the DOR and CRF peptide, as well as interneuron subtype markers somatostatin or parvalbumin, and analyzed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Both DOR- and CRF-labeling was observed in interneurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate hilus. Males and normal cycling females displayed a similar number of CRF immunoreactive neurons co-labeled with DOR and a similar average number of CRF-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus and stratum oriens of CA1 and CA3. In addition, 70% of DOR/CRF dual-labeled neurons in the hilar region co-labeled with somatostatin, suggesting a role for these interneurons in regulating perforant path input to dentate granule cells. Ultrastructural analysis of CRF-labeled axon terminals within the hilar region revealed that proestrus females have a similar number of CRF-labeled axon terminals that contain DORs compared to males but an increased number of CRF-labeled axon terminals without DORs. Taken together, these findings suggest that while DORs are anatomically positioned to modulate CRF immunoreactive interneuron activity and CRF peptide release, their ability to exert such regulatory activity may be compromised in females when estrogen levels are high. PMID:21277946

  4. Hormonal regulation of delta opioid receptor immunoreactivity in interneurons and pyramidal cells in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tanya J.; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Chapleau, Jeanette D.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that women and men differ in relapse vulnerability to drug-seeking behavior during abstinence periods. As relapse is frequently triggered by exposure of the recovered addict to objects previously associated with drug use and the formation of these associations requires memory systems engaged by the hippocampal formation (HF), studies exploring ovarian hormone modulation of hippocampal function are warranted. Previous studies revealed that ovarian steroids alter endogenous opioid peptide levels and trafficking of mu opioid receptors in the HF, suggesting cooperative interaction between opioids and estrogens in modulating hippocampal excitability. However, whether ovarian steroids affect the levels or trafficking of delta opioid receptors (DORs) in the HF is unknown. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and normal cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for quantitative immunoperoxidase light microscopy and dual label fluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy using antisera directed against the DOR and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Consistent with previous studies in males, DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) localized to select interneurons and principal cells in the female HF. In comparison to males, females, regardless of estrous cycle phase, show reduced DOR-ir in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and proestrus (high estrogen) females, in particular, display reduced DOR-ir in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Ultrastructural analysis of DOR-labeled profiles in CA1 revealed that while females generally show fewer DORs in the distal apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, proestrus females, in particular, exhibit DOR internalization and trafficking towards the soma. Dual label studies revealed that DORs are found in NPY-labeled interneurons in the hilus, CA3, and CA1. While DOR colocalization frequency in NPY-labeled neuron somata was similar between animals in the hilus, proestrus females had fewer NPY-labeled neurons that

  5. Central delta-opioid receptor interactions and the inhibition of reflex urinary bladder contractions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dray, A; Nunan, L; Wire, W

    1985-07-01

    The in vivo effects of a number of opioid agonists and antagonists were studied on the spontaneous reflex contractions of the urinary bladder recorded isometrically in the rat anesthetized with urethane. All substances were administered into the central nervous system by the intracereboventricular (i.c.v.) or spinal intrathecal (i.t.) route. The conformationally restricted enkephalin analogues [2-D-penicillamine, 5-L-cysteine] enkephalin (DPLCE), [2-D-penicillamine, 5-L-penicillamine] enkephalin (DPLPE) and [2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine] enkephalin (DPDPE) produced dose-related inhibition of reflex bladder contractions when administered by the i.c.v. or i.t. route. Both the novel delta-opioid receptor antagonist ICI 154,129 (200-600 micrograms) [N,N-bisallyl-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Psi-(CH2S)-Phe-Leu-OH) and ICI 174,864 (1-3 micrograms) [N,N-dially-Tyr-Aib-Aib-Phe-Leu-OH: Aib = alpha-aminoisobutyric acid] attenuated or abolished the effects of DPLCE, DPLPE and DPDPE when administered by the i.c.v. or i.t. route. The antagonism observed was selective since the equipotent inhibition produced by the mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2, Me-Phe4, Gly(ol)5] enkephalin (DAGO) was unaffected. Overall, ICI 154,129 was considerably weaker than ICI 174,864 and both antagonists inhibited bladder activity at doses higher than those required to demonstrate delta-receptor antagonism. Further studies of the agonistic effect of ICI 174,864 showed that it was insensitive to low doses of naloxone (2 micrograms, i.c.v. or i.t.) but could be abolished by higher (10-15 micrograms) doses of naloxone. These observations suggested that the agonistic effect of ICI 174,864 was not mediated by mu-opioid receptor. beta-Endorphin (0.2-1.0 micrograms, i.c.v.) inhibited bladder contractions but following recovery from this effect, appeared to prevent the expression of delta-receptor antagonism by ICI 174,864. In addition a previously subthreshold dose of ICI 174,864 now exhibited marked agonistic

  6. [Cys(O2NH2)2]enkephalin analogues and dalargin: selectivity for delta-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Bocheva, A; Dimitrov, E; Ivancheva, C; Radomirov, R

    1996-05-23

    To investigate the structure-activity relationships for potent and selective action of enkephalins at the delta-opioid receptors, two newly synthesized analogues, [Cys(O2NH2)2,Leu5]enkephalin and [Cys(O2NH2)2, Met5] enkephalin and the hexapeptide [D-Ala2,Leu5]enkephalyl-Arg (dalargin) were tested and compared with [Leu5]enkephalin and [Met5]enkephalin, for their effectiveness to inhibit electrically evoked contractions of the mouse vas deferens (predominantly enkephalin-selective delta-opioid receptors) and the guinea pig ileum (mu- and kappa-opioid receptors). The mouse vas deferens assays included evaluation of the effects of opioid agonists on the first, purinergic, and the second, adrenergic, components of electrically evoked biphasic responses (10 Hz and 20 Hz) and on ATP- or noradrenaline-evoked, tetrodotoxin-resistant responses. The opioids tested inhibited in a similar manner: (i) the purinergic and the adrenergic components of the electrically evoked contractions; and (ii) the ATP- and noradrenaline-induced postjunctional responses of the mouse vas deferens. Extremely low IC50 values (of 2-5 orders) were found for [Cys(O2NH2)2,Leu5] enkephalin, whose relative potency was between 239 and 1316 times higher than that of [Leu5]enkephalin. The order of potency for the other peptides in this tissue was: [Cys(O2NH2)2,Met5]enkephalin > [Leu5]enkephalin > dalargin > [Met5]enkephalin. The highest IC50 values in the guinea pig ileum assays, indicating the lowest affinity for mu-/kappa-opioid receptors, were obtained for the cysteine sulfonamide analogues, while dalargin showed a potency four times higher than that of [Met5]enkephalin. The order of potency in this tissue was: dalargin > [Met5]enkephalin > [Leu5]enkephalin > [Cys(O2NH2)2,Met5]enkephalin > [Cys(O2NH2)2,Leu5]enkephalin. The ratio, IC50 in guinea pig ileum: IC50 in mouse vas deferens, indicating selectivity of the respective peptide for delta-opioid receptors, was extremely high for [Cys(O2NH2)2,Leu5

  7. Autoradiographic comparison of the distribution of the neutral endopeptidase enkephalinase and of. mu. and delta opioid receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, G.; Hamel, E.; Fournie-Zaluski, M.C.; Roques, B.P.

    1986-03-01

    The neutral endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.11, also designated enkephalinase, has been visualized by in vitro autoradiography using the tritiated inhibitor (/sup 3/H)-N-((2RS)-3-hydroxyaminocarbonyl-2-benzyl-1-oxopropyl)glycine, ((/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly). Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly corresponding to 85% of the total binding to brain slices was inhibited by 1 ..mu..M thiorphan, a selective inhibitor of enkephalinase, but remained unchanged in the presence of captopril, a selective inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme. Very high levels of (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly binding were found in the choroid plexus and the substantia nigra. High levels were present in the caudate putamen, globus pallidus, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and in the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord. The distribution of enkephalinase was compared to that of ..mu.. and delta opioid receptors, selectively labeled with (/sup 3/H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-MePhe-glycinol and (/sup 3/H)Try-D-Thr-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr, respectively. In the caudate putamen, (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly binding overlapped the clustered ..mu.. sites but appeared more closely related to the diffusely distributed delta sites. The association of enkephalinase with delta and ..mu.. opioid receptors in these areas is consistent with the observed role of the enzyme in regulating the effects of opioid peptides in striatal dopamine release and analgesia, respectively. Except for the choroid plexus and the cerebellum, the close similarity observed in numerous rat brain areas between the distribution of enkephalinase and that of ..mu.. and/ or delta opioid binding sites could account for most of the pharmacological effects elicited by enkephalinase inhibitors.

  8. Preferential cytoplasmic localization of delta-opioid receptors in rat striatal patches: comparison with plasmalemmal mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Pickel, V M

    2001-05-01

    The activation of delta-opioid receptors (DORs) in the caudate-putamen nucleus (CPN) produces regionally distinct changes in motor functions, many of which are also influenced by opioids active at micro-opioid receptors (MORs). These actions most likely occur in MOR-enriched patch compartments in the CPN. To determine the functional sites for DOR activation and potential interactions involving MOR in these regions, immunoperoxidase and immunogold-silver labeling methods were applied reversibly for the ultrastructural localization of DOR and MOR in single rat brain sections containing patches of the CPN. DOR immunoreactivity was commonly seen within the cytoplasm of spiny and aspiny neurons, many of which also expressed MOR. In dendrites and spines, DOR labeling was preferentially localized to membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and spine apparatus, whereas MOR showed a prominent plasmalemmal distribution. DOR- and/or MOR-labeled spines received asymmetric, excitatory synapses, some of which showed notable perforations, suggesting the involvement of these receptors in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. DORs were more frequently detected than were MORs within axon terminals that formed either asymmetric synapses with spine heads or symmetric synapses with spine necks. Our results suggest that in striatal patches, DORs, often in cooperation with MORs, play a direct modulatory role in controlling the postsynaptic excitability of spines, whereas presynaptic neurotransmitter release onto spines is mainly influenced by DOR activation. In comparison with MOR, the prevalent association of DOR with cytoplasmic organelles that are involved in intracellular trafficking of cell surface proteins suggests major differences in availability of these receptors to extracellular opioids. PMID:11312309

  9. Exploratory synthesis of peptide-alpha-thioester segments spanning the polypeptide sequence of the delta-opioid receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erik C B; Kent, Stephen B H

    2007-01-01

    We have decided to use the delta-opioid receptor (372 residues) as a model system to develop methods for the total chemical synthesis of G protein-coupled receptors. The most important feature of this receptor from a chemical synthesis perspective is the wealth of cysteines spread throughout its sequence, which are required for native chemical ligation. A total of 13 cysteines are located in the the delta-opioid receptor polypetide chain in both loop and putative transmembrane (TM) regions. We envisioned a synthesis of the polypeptide that would make use of peptide-alpha-thioesters ranging from 37 to 63 residues in length. Here, we report data from an exploratory synthesis of such a set of peptide-alpha-thioesters. For all seven peptides, the crude material approximately 30 residues into the synthesis was sufficiently homogeneous to make isolation and purification straightforward. Extension of the peptides to between 40 and 50 residues in length generally produced a significant decrease in the quality of the crude products, although in most cases, we judged that high purity peptides could probably be isolated. By 60 residues, however, the crude peptide product mixtures are probably too heterogeneous to purify to homogeneity by reversed-phase HPLC. In general, delta-opioid receptor peptides with a single predicted TM domain were sufficiently soluble to handle postcleavage and to analyze by reversed-phase HPLC, whereas 1.5 TM domains rendered the peptides too hydrophobic to handle or analyze by standard protocols. Given the challenges of chain assembly, handling, and purification of these peptides, a synthetic strategy that uses approximately 12 or 13 shorter peptide segments of 20-40 residues each is probably a more feasible approach. PMID:17120238

  10. Role of kappa and delta opioid receptors in mediating morphine-induced antinociception in morphine tolerant infant rats

    PubMed Central

    Stoller, Dawn C.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Smith, Forrest L.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously noted that the antinociceptive efficacy of morphine was significantly decreased in rat pups chronically infused with morphine from implanted osmotic minipumps. In this study, morphine was fully efficacious (i.e., 100% maximum possible effect, %MPE) in the 52 ºC tail-immersion test after a 72-h infusion from implanted saline-filled osmotic minipumps. However, administration of up to 1000 mg/kg s.c. morphine failed to elicit greater than a 27% MPE in rats infused with morphine at 2 mg/kg/h. Morphine was more efficacious when the water bath temperature was decreased to 49 ºC. Experiments were conducted to determine the mechanisms whereby chronic morphine administration leads to a decrease in antinociceptive efficacy. The kappa-opioid antagonist nor-binalorphimine completely blocked the antinociceptive effects of morphine in morphine-infused rat pups. The kappa agonist U50,488 elicited antinociception however, the requirement to use higher doses in morphine- than saline-infused rats indicates that kappa cross-tolerance was present. Thus, in tolerant rats the antinociceptive effects of high doses of morphine appear to be mediated through kappa-opioid receptors. The delta-opioid antagonist naltrindole was inactive in both treatment groups. DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPγS and [3H]naloxone binding reveal that the anatomical distribution of the mu-opioid receptor was consistent with that of the adult rat brain. In adult rats, the mu-opioid receptor is desensitized during morphine tolerance. However, desensitization was not evident in P17 rats based on the lack of significant decreases in [35S]GTPγS binding. Furthermore, [3H]naloxone binding indicated a lack of mu receptor downregulation in morphine-tolerant rat pups. PMID:17300766

  11. Delta Opioid activation of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade does not require transphosphorylation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, H Kenneth; Onoprishvili, Irma; Andria, Matthew L; Hanna, Kayane; Sheinkman, Karina; Haddad, Lisa B; Simon, Eric J

    2002-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the mechanism(s) by which delta opioids induce their potent activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERKs) in different cell lines expressing the cloned δ-opioid receptor (δ-OR). While it has been known for some time that OR stimulation leads to the phosphorylation of both ERK isoforms, the exact progression of events has remained elusive. Results Our results indicate that the transphosphorylation of an endogenous epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cell line does not occur when co-expressed δ-ORs are stimulated by the δ-opioid agonist, D-Ser-Leu-enkephalin-Thr (DSLET). Moreover, neither pre-incubation of cultures with the selective EGFR antagonist, AG1478, nor down-regulation of the EGFR to a point where EGF could no longer activate ERKs had an inhibitory effect on ERK activation by DSLET. These results appear to rule out any structural or catalytic role for the EGFR in the δ-opioid-mediated MAPK cascade. To confirm these results, we used C6 glioma cells, a cell line devoid of the EGFR. In δ-OR-expressing C6 glioma cells, opioids produce a robust phosphorylation of ERK 1 and 2, whereas EGF has no stimulatory effect. Furthermore, antagonists to the RTKs that are endogenously expressed in C6 glioma cells (insulin receptor (IR) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)) were unable to reduce opioid-mediated ERK activation. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that the transactivation of resident RTKs does not appear to be required for OR-mediated ERK phosphorylation and that the tyrosine-phosphorylated δ-OR, itself, is likely to act as its own signalling scaffold. PMID:11897012

  12. Activation of peripheral delta opioid receptors eliminates cardiac electrical instability in a rat model of post-infarction cardiosclerosis via mitochondrial ATP-dependent K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Yu B; Solenkova, N V; Gross, G J; Stefano, G B; Tam, S W

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the selective delta-1 (delta(1)) opioid receptor agonist, DPDPE, and the selective delta(2) opioid receptor agonist, DSLET, have been studied on the ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) in rats with an experimental post-infarction cardiosclerosis (CS). It has been found that CS induced a significant decrease in VFT. This CS-induced decrease in VFT was significantly reversed by intravenous administration of DPDPE (0.1 mg/kg) 10 min before VFT measurement. On the contrary, intravenous injection of DSLET (0.5 mg/kg) exacerbated the CS-induced cardiac electrical instability. Pretreatment with the selective delta opioid receptor antagonist, ICI 174,864 (0.5 mg/kg), completely abolished the changes in VFT produced by both DPDPE and DSLET. Previous administration of a nonselective peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide (5 mg/kg) also completely reversed the antifibrillatory action of DPDPE. Naloxone methiodide and ICI 174,864 alone had no effect on VFT. Pretreatment with the nonselective K(ATP) channel blocker, glibenclamide (0.3 mg/kg), or with the mitochondrial selective K(ATP) channel blocker, 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (5-HD, 5 mg/kg), completely abolished the DPDPE-induced increase in cardiac electrical stability. Glibenclamide and 5-HD alone had no effect on VFT. These results demonstrate that the delta opioid receptor plays an important role in the regulation of electrical stability in rats with post-infarction cardiosclerosis. We propose that peripheral delta(1) opioid receptor stimulation reverses CS-induced electrical instability via mitochondrial K(ATP) channels. On the contrary, delta(2) opioid receptor stimulation may exacerbate the CS-induced decrease in VFT. Further studies are necessary to determine the delta opioid receptor subtype which mediates the antifibrillatory effect of DPDPE and pro-fibrillatory effect of DSLET. PMID:12798419

  13. Coincident signalling between the Gi/Go-coupled delta-opioid receptor and the Gq-coupled m3 muscarinic receptor at the level of intracellular free calcium in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Yeo, A; Samways, D S; Fowler, C E; Gunn-Moore, F; Henderson, G

    2001-03-01

    In SH-SY5Y cells, activation of delta-opioid receptors with [D-Pen(2,5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE; 1 microM) did not alter the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i). However, when DPDPE was applied during concomitant Gq-coupled m3 muscarinic receptor stimulation by carbachol or oxotremorine-M, it produced an elevation of [Ca(2+)](i). The DPDPE-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was abolished when the carbachol-sensitive intracellular Ca(2+) store was emptied. There was a marked difference between the concentration-response relationship for the elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) by carbachol (EC(50) 13 microM, Hill slope 1) and the concentration-response relationship for carbachol's permissive action in revealing the delta-opioid receptor-mediated elevation of [Ca(2+)] (EC(50) 0.7 mM; Hill slope 1.8). Sequestration of free G protein beta gamma dimers by transient transfection of cells with a beta gamma binding protein (residues 495-689 of the C terminal tail of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2) reduced the ability of delta opioid receptor activation to elevate [Ca(2+)](i). However, DPDPE did not elevate either basal or oxotremorine-M-evoked inositol phosphate production indicating that delta-opioid receptor activation did not stimulate phospholipase C. Furthermore, delta-opioid receptor activation did not result in the reversal of muscarinic receptor desensitization, membrane hyperpolarization or stimulation of sphingosine kinase. There was no coincident signalling between the delta-opioid receptor and the lysophosphatidic acid receptor which couples to elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) in SH-SY5Y cells by a PLC-independent mechanism. In SH-SY5Y cells the coincident signalling between the endogenously expressed delta-opioid and m3 muscarinic receptors appears to occur in the receptor activation-Ca(2+) release signalling pathway at a step after the activation of phospholipase C. PMID:11259487

  14. Autoradiographic localization of delta opioid receptors within the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system using radioiodinated (2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine)enkephalin ( sup 125 I-DPDPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, R.P.; Kalivas, P.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The enkephalin analog (2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine)enkephalin was radioiodinated (125I-DPDPE) and shown to retain a pharmacological selectivity characteristic of the delta opioid receptor in in vitro binding studies. The distributions of 125I-DPDPE binding, using in vitro autoradiographic techniques, were similar to those previously reported for the delta opioid receptor. The nucleus accumbens, striatum, and medial prefrontal cortex contain dense gradients of 125I-DPDPE binding in regions known to receive dopaminergic afferents emanating from the mesencephalic tegmentum. Selective chemical lesions of the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra were employed to deduce the location of the 125I-DPDPE binding within particular regions of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Unilateral lesions of dopamine perikarya (A9 and A10) within the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra produced by mesencephalic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine resulted in significant (20-30%) increases in 125I-DPDPE binding contralateral to the lesion within the striatum and nucleus accumbens. Lesions of the perikarya (dopaminergic and nondopaminergic) of the ventral tegmental area, induced by quinolinic acid injections, caused increases of less magnitude within these same nuclei. No significant alterations in 125I-DPDPE binding were observed within the mesencephalon as a result of either treatment. The specificity of the lesions was confirmed by immunocytochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase. These results suggest that the enkephalins and opioid agonists acting through delta opioid receptors do not directly modulate dopaminergic afferents but do regulate postsynaptic targets of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system.

  15. Opioid Peptidomimetics: Leads for the Design of Bioavailable Mixed Efficacy Mu Opioid Receptor (MOR) Agonist/Delta Opioid Receptor (DOR) Antagonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mosberg, Henry I.; Yeomans, Larisa; Harland, Aubrie A.; Bender, Aaron M.; Sobczyk-Kojiro, Katarzyna; Anand, Jessica P.; Clark, Mary J.; Jutkiewicz, Emily M.; Traynor, John R.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described opioid peptidomimetic, 1, employing a tetrahydroquinoline scaffold and modeled on a series of cyclic tetrapeptide opioid agonists. We have recently described modifications to these peptides that confer a mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist, delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist profile, which has been shown to reduce the development of tolerance to the analgesic actions of MOR agonists. Several such bifunctional ligands have been reported, but none has been demonstrated to cross the blood brain barrier. Here we describe the transfer of structural features that evoked MOR agonist/DOR antagonist behavior in the cyclic peptides to the tetrahydroquinoline scaffold and show that the resulting peptidomimetics maintain the desired pharmacological profile. Further, the 4R diastereomer of 1 was fully efficacious and approximately equipotent to morphine in the mouse warm water tail withdrawal assay following intraperitoneal administration and thus a promising lead for the development of opioid analgesics with reduced tolerance. PMID:23419026

  16. Quantification of delta-opioid receptors in human brain with N1'-([11C]methyl) naltrindole and positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Smith, J S; Zubieta, J K; Price, J C; Flesher, J E; Madar, I; Lever, J R; Kinter, C M; Dannals, R F; Frost, J J

    1999-09-01

    The regional binding of N1'-([11C]methyl)naltrindole (MeNTI), a selective delta-opioid antagonist, was studied in healthy human subjects with positron emission tomography (PET). After the bolus intravenous administration of high specific activity [11C]MeNTI, PET was performed over 90 minutes. Arterial plasma samples were obtained during the scanning period and assayed for the presence of radiolabeled metabolites. The data were analyzed with various kinetic (two- and three-compartment models, Patlak graphical analysis) and nonkinetic (apparent volume of distribution and activity at a late scanning time) approaches. This tracer showed irreversible binding characteristics during the scanning period used. The results of the analyses also were compared with the density and distribution of delta-opioid receptors in the human brain in vitro. Additionally, computer simulations were performed to assess the effects of changes in receptor binding and tracer transport changes on the perceived binding parameters obtained with the models. A constrained three-compartment kinetic model was demonstrated to be superior to other quantification models for the description of MeNTI kinetics and quantification of delta receptor binding in the human brain with 11C-labeled MeNTI. PMID:10478647

  17. Cellular localization and adaptive changes of the cardiac delta opioid receptor system in an experimental model of heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Treskatsch, Sascha; Feldheiser, Aarne; Shaqura, Mohammed; Dehe, Lukas; Habazettl, Helmut; Röpke, Torsten K; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Schäfer, Michael; Spies, Claudia D; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2016-02-01

    The role of the cardiac opioid system in congestive heart failure (CHF) is not fully understood. Therefore, this project investigated the cellular localization of delta opioid receptors (DOR) in left ventricle (LV) myocardium and adaptive changes in DOR and its endogenous ligand, the precursor peptide proenkephalin (PENK), during CHF. Following IRB approval, DOR localization was determined by radioligand binding using [H(3)]Naltrindole and by double immunofluorescence confocal analysis in the LV of male Wistar rats. Additionally, 28 days following an infrarenal aortocaval fistula (ACF) the extent of CHF and adaptions in left ventricular DOR and PENK expression were examined by hemodynamic measurements, RT-PCR, and Western blot. DOR specific membrane binding sites were identified in LV myocardium. DOR were colocalized with L-type Ca(2+)-channels (Cav1.2) as well as with intracellular ryanodine receptors (RyR) of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum. Following ACF severe congestive heart failure developed in all rats and was accompanied by up-regulation of DOR and PENK on mRNA as well as receptor proteins representing consecutive adaptations. These findings might suggest that the cardiac delta opioid system possesses the ability to play a regulatory role in the cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis, especially in response to heart failure. PMID:25552382

  18. Discrete mapping of brain Mu and delta opioid receptors using selective peptides: Quantitative autoradiography, species differences and comparison with kappa receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, N.A.; Hughes, J. )

    1989-05-01

    The opioid peptides, (3H)DAGO and (3H)DPDPE, bound to rat and guinea pig brain homogenates with a high, nanomolar affinity and to a high density of mu and delta receptors, respectively. (3H)DAGO binding to mu receptors was competitively inhibited by unlabelled opioids with the following rank order of potency: DAGO greater than morphine greater than DADLE greater than naloxone greater than etorphine much greater than U50488 much greater than DPDPE. In contrast, (3H)DPDPE binding to delta receptors was inhibited by compounds with the following rank order of potency: DPDPE greater than DADLE greater than etorphine greater than dynorphin(1-8) greater than naloxone much greater than U50488 much greater than DAGO. These profiles were consistent with specific labelling of the mu and delta opioid receptors, respectively. In vitro autoradiographic techniques coupled with computer-assisted image analyses revealed a discrete but differential anatomical localization of mu and delta receptors in the rat and guinea pig brain. In general, mu and delta receptor density in the rat exceeded that in the guinea pig brain and differed markedly from that of kappa receptors in these species. However, while mu receptors were distributed throughout the brain with hotspots in the fore-, mid- and hindbrain of the two rodents, the delta sites were relatively diffusely distributed, and were mainly concentrated in the forebrain with particularly high levels within the olfactory bulb (OB), n. accumbens and striatum. Notable regions of high density of mu receptors in the rat and guinea pig brain were the accessory olfactory bulb, striatal patches and streaks, amygdaloid nuclei, ventral hippocampal subiculum and dentate gyrus, numerous thalamic nuclei, geniculate bodies, central grey, superior and inferior colliculi, solitary and pontine nuclei and s. nigra.

  19. Activation of delta-opioid receptors inhibits neuronal-like calcium channels and distal steps of Ca(2+)-dependent secretion in human small-cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sher, E; Cesare, P; Codignola, A; Clementi, F; Tarroni, P; Pollo, A; Magnelli, V; Carbone, E

    1996-06-01

    Human small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cells express neuronal-like voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs) and release mitogenic hormones such as serotonin (5-HT). Opioid peptides, on the other hand, have been shown to reduce SCLC cell proliferation by an effective autocrine pathway. Here we show that in GLC8 SCLC cells, only delta-opioid receptor subtype mRNA is expressed. Consistently, the selective delta-opioid agonist [D-Pen2-Pen5]-enkephalin (DPDPE), but not mu and kappa agonists, potently and dose-dependently inhibits high-threshold (HVA) VOCCs in these cells. As in peripheral neurons, this modulation is largely voltage-dependent, mediated by pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G-proteins, cAMP-independent, and mainly affecting N-type VOCCs. With the same potency and selectivity, DPDPE also antagonizes the Ca(2+)-dependent release of [3H]serotonin ([3H]5-HT) from GLC8 cells. However, DPDPE inhibits not only the depolarization-induced release, but also the Ca(2+)-dependent secretion induced by thapsigargin or ionomycin. This suggests that besides inhibiting HVA VOCCs, opioids also exert a direct depressive action on the secretory apparatus in GLC8 cells. This latter effect also is mediated by a PTX-sensitive G-protein but, contrary to VOCC inhibition, it can be reversed by elevations of cAMP levels. These results show for the first time that opioids effectively depress both Ca2+ influx and Ca(2+)-dependent hormone release in SCLC cells by using multiple modulatory pathways. It can be speculated that the two mechanisms may contribute to the opioid antimitogenic action on lung neuroendocrine carcinoma cells. PMID:8642411

  20. {delta}-Opioid receptor-stimulated Akt signaling in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells involves receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated PI3K activation

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, Anika; Ammer, Hermann; Eisinger, Daniela A.

    2009-07-15

    {delta}-Opioid receptor (DOR) agonists possess cytoprotective properties, an effect associated with activation of the 'pro-survival' kinase Akt. Here we delineate the signal transduction pathway by which opioids induce Akt activation in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells. Exposure of the cells to both [D-Pen{sup 2,5}]enkephalin and etorphine resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in Akt activity, as measured by means of an activation-specific antibody recognizing phosphoserine-473. DOR-mediated Akt signaling is blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone and involves inhibitory G{sub i/o} proteins, because pre-treatment with pertussis toxin, but not over-expression of the G{sub q/11} scavengers EBP50 and GRK2-K220R, prevented this effect. Further studies with Wortmannin and LY294002 revealed that phophoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) plays a central role in opioid-induced Akt activation. Opioids stimulate Akt activity through transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), because pre-treatment of the cells with inhibitors for neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinases (AG879) and the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1 (AG1024), but not over-expression of the G{beta}{gamma} scavenger phosducin, abolished this effect. Activated Akt translocates to the nuclear membrane, where it promotes GSK3 phosphorylation and prevents caspase-3 cleavage, two key events mediating inhibition of cell apoptosis and enhancement of cell survival. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in NG108-15 hybrid cells DOR agonists possess cytoprotective properties mediated by activation of the RTK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  1. Control of the efficiency of agonist-induced information transfer and stability of the ternary complex containing the delta opioid receptor and the alpha subunit of G(i1) by mutation of a receptor/G protein contact interface.

    PubMed

    Moon, H E; Bahia, D S; Cavalli, A; Hoffmann, M; Milligan, G

    2001-09-01

    Fusion proteins were constructed between the delta opioid receptor and forms of the alpha subunit of G(i1) in which cysteine(351) was mutated to a range of amino acids. GDP reduced the binding of the agonist [(3)H]DADLE but not the antagonist [(3)H]naltrindole to both the receptor alone and all the delta opioid receptor-Cys(351)XaaG(i1)alpha fusion proteins. For the fusion proteins the pEC(50) for GDP was strongly correlated with the n-octanol/H(2)O partition co-efficient of G protein residue(351). Fusion proteins in which this residue was either isoleucine or glycine had similar observed binding kinetics for [(3)H]DADLE. However, the rate of dissociation of [(3)H]DADLE was substantially greater for the glycine-containing fusion protein than that containing isoleucine, indicating that more hydrophobic residues imbued greater stability to the agonist-receptor-G protein ternary complex. This resulted in a higher affinity of binding of [(3)H]DADLE to the fusion protein containing isoleucine(351). In expectation with the binding data, maximal DADLE-stimulated GTP hydrolysis by the isoleucine(351)-containing fusion protein was two-fold greater and the potency of DADLE seven-fold higher than for the version containing glycine. These results demonstrate that the stability of the ternary complex between delta opioid receptor, G(i1)alpha and an agonist (but not antagonist) ligand is dependent upon the nature of residue(351) of the G protein and that this determines the effectiveness of information flow from the receptor to the G protein. PMID:11522323

  2. Preparation and Evaluation at the Delta Opioid Receptor of a Series of Linear Leu-Enkephalin Analogues Obtained by Systematic Replacement of the Amides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leu-enkephalin analogues, in which the amide bonds were sequentially and systematically replaced either by ester or N-methyl amide bonds, were prepared using classical organic chemistry as well as solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The peptidomimetics were characterized using competition binding, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, receptor internalization, and contractility assays to evaluate their pharmacological profile over the delta opioid receptor (DOPr). The lipophilicity (LogD7.4) and plasma stability of the active analogues were also measured. Our results revealed that the last amide bond can be successfully replaced by either an ester or an N-methyl amide bond without significantly decreasing the biological activity of the corresponding analogues when compared to Leu-enkephalin. The peptidomimetics with an N-methyl amide function between residues Phe and Leu were found to be more lipophilic and more stable than Leu-enkephalin. Findings from the present study further revealed that the hydrogen-bond donor properties of the fourth amide of Leu-enkephalin are not important for its biological activity on DOPr. Our results show that the systematic replacement of amide bonds by isosteric functions represents an efficient way to design and synthesize novel peptide analogues with enhanced stability. Our findings further suggest that such a strategy can also be useful to study the biological roles of amide bonds. PMID:23650868

  3. (D-Pen2,4 prime -125I-Phe4,D-Pen5)enkephalin: A selective high affinity radioligand for delta opioid receptors with exceptional specific activity

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.J.; Sharma, S.D.; Toth, G.; Duong, M.T.; Fang, L.; Bogert, C.L.; Weber, S.J.; Hunt, M.; Davis, T.P.; Wamsley, J.K. )

    1991-09-01

    (D-Pen2,4{prime}-125I-Phe4,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((125I)DPDPE) is a highly selective radioligand for the delta opioid receptor with a specific activity (2200 Ci/mmol) that is over 50-fold greater than that of tritium-labeled DPDPE analogs. (125I)DPDPE binds to a single site in rat brain membranes with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) value of 421 {plus minus} 67 pM and a receptor density (Bmax) value of 36.4 {plus minus} 2.7 fmol/mg protein. The high affinity of this site for delta opioid receptor ligands and its low affinity for mu or kappa receptor-selective ligands are consistent with its being a delta opioid receptor. The distribution of these sites in rat brain, observed by receptor autoradiography, is also consistent with that of delta opioid receptors. Association and dissociation binding kinetics of 1.0 nM (125I) DPDPE are monophasic at 25 degrees C. The association rate (k + 1 = 5.80 {plus minus} 0.88 {times} 10(7) M-1 min-1) is about 20- and 7-fold greater than that measured for 1.0 nM (3H) DPDPE and 0.8 nM (3H) (D-Pen2,4{prime}-Cl-Phe4, D-Pen5)enkephalin, respectively. The dissociation rate of (125I)DPDPE (0.917 {plus minus} 0.117 {times} 10(-2) min-1) measured at 1.0 nM is about 3-fold faster than is observed for either of the other DPDPE analogs. The rapid binding kinetics of (125I)DPDPE is advantageous because binding equilibrium is achieved with much shorter incubation times than are required for other cyclic enkephalin analogs. This, in addition to its much higher specific activity, makes (125I)DPDPE a valuable new radioligand for studies of delta opioid receptors.

  4. Protective effect of delta opioid receptor agonist (D-Ala2, D-Leu5) enkephalin on permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Danyun; Liu, Haitong; Zhu, Hui; Li, Shitong; Yao, Junyan

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effect of delta opioid receptor agonist (D-Ala, D-Leu) enkephalin (DADLE) on the permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Thirty four male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned randomly into three groups: sham group (group Sham, n=10), artificial cerebrospinal fluid group (group ACSF, n=12), and DADLE group (group DADLE, n=12). Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed to induce permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Then, the animals in group DADLE and group ACSF were treated with DADLE or ACSF by an intracerebroventricular injection at 45 min after ischemia. Neurologic deficit scores were assessed according to the Garcia criterion at 24 h after ischemia. Infarct volume was determined using the 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining method. The histological analysis was used to evaluate the extent of cerebral injury. Compared with the control group, the Garcia scores were significantly higher (P=0.000) and the infarct volumes (P=0.018) were significantly smaller in the DADLE treatment group at 24 h after ischemia. These neurologic changes were closely correlated with the outcome of the infarct volumes. In addition, the histological examination showed more intact neurons in rats treated with DADLE than those treated with ACSF at 24 h after ischemia (P=0.000). DADLE by intracerebroventricular administration at 45 min after ischemia can improve neurologic outcome and mitigate cortical neuronal injury induced by permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats. PMID:27232517

  5. Chromosomal localization of the [delta] opioid receptor gene to human 1p34. 3-36. 1 and mouse 4D bands by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Befort, K.; Kieffer, B. ); Mattei, M.G.; Roeckel, N. )

    1994-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the precise localization of this gene in the murine as well as human genome by in situ hybridization. Southern analysis, using the noncoding part of the cDNA as a probe (NotI-BamHI fragment, 1040 bp) under high-stringency conditions, shows the existence of a single-copy gene in the murine genome. In a similar analysis performed on human genomic DNA, the coding part of the cDNA (PstI-NotI fragment, 976 bp) clearly detected a single gene in the human genome (not shown). The authors therefore used these two probes for the chromosomal localization of the murine gene and its human counterpart, respectively. Chromosome spread preparations from concanavalin A (mouse) or phytohemagglutinin (human)-stimulated lymphocytes were hybridized with tritium-labeled cDNAs, exposed for 15 days, and developed, as described previously. For the murine assignment, a total of 100 metaphase cells were examined, and 149 silver grains were found. Forty-two grains were associated with chromosome 4, and 73.8% of them mapped to the D1-D3 region of the chromosome. In the 120 metaphase human cells analyzed, 197 silver grains were found, 25.8% of which were located on chromosome 1. The distribution of grains allowed mapping of the human [delta] opioid receptor gene to the p34.3-p36.1 region of the short arm with a maximum in the p35 band.

  6. Delta-Opioid Receptor (δOR) Targeted Near-Infrared Fluorescent Agent for Imaging of Lung Cancer: Synthesis and Evaluation In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Allison S; Patek, Renata; Enkemann, Steven A; Johnson, Joseph O; Chen, Tingan; Toloza, Eric; Vagner, Josef; Morse, David L

    2016-02-17

    In the United States, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death and ranks second in the number of new cases annually among all types of cancers. Better methods or tools for diagnosing and treating this disease are needed to improve patient outcomes. The delta-opioid receptor (δOR) is reported to be overexpressed in lung cancers and not expressed in normal lung. Thus, we decided to develop a lung cancer-specific imaging agent targeting this receptor. We have previously developed a δOR-targeted fluorescent imaging agent based on a synthetic peptide antagonist (Dmt-Tic) conjugated to a Cy5 fluorescent dye. In this work, we describe the synthesis of Dmt-Tic conjugated to a longer wavelength near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye, Li-cor IR800CW. Binding affinity of Dmt-Tic-IR800 for the δOR was studied using lanthanide time-resolved fluorescence (LTRF) competitive binding assays in cells engineered to overexpress the δOR. In addition, we identified lung cancer cell lines with high and low endogenous expression of the δOR. We confirmed protein expression in these cell lines using confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging and used this technique to estimate the cell-surface receptor number in the endogenously expressing lung cancer cell lines. The selectivity of Dmt-Tic-IR800 for imaging of the δOR in vivo was shown using both engineered cell lines and endogenously expressing lung cancer cells in subcutaneous xenograft models in mice. In conclusion, the δOR-specific fluorescent probe developed in this study displays excellent potential for imaging of lung cancer. PMID:26488422

  7. Opposite role of delta 1- and delta 2-opioid receptors activated by endogenous or exogenous opioid agonists on the endogenous cholecystokinin system: further evidence for delta-opioid receptor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Noble, F; Fournie-Zaluski, M C; Roques, B P

    1996-12-01

    Using the mouse caudate-putamen, where delta-opioid receptor subtypes have been shown to regulate adenylyl cyclase activity, we show in this study that endogenous enkephalins inhibit enzyme activity through activation of delta 1- and delta 2-opioid receptors. Thus, naltriben or 7-benzylidenenaltrexone as well as the delta-selective antagonist naltrindole (mixed delta 1 and delta 2 antagonist) antagonized inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity induced by methionine- or leucine-enkephalin, while the micro-antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP) was without effect. Furthermore, we have previously shown that activation of delta-opioid receptors increases cholecystokinin release in the central nervous system, resulting in a potentiation of micro-opioid antinociceptive responses, and the respective role of delta 1- and delta 2-opioid receptors in this facilitatory effect has now been evaluated. Activation of delta 2-opioid receptors, either by endogenous enkephalins protected from catabolism by the complete enkephalin-degrading enzyme inhibitor N-((R,S)-2-benzyl-3((S)(2-amino-4-methyl-thio) butyldithio)-1-oxopropyl)-L-phenyl-alanine benzyl ester (RB 101), or by the delta 2-selective agonist Tyr-D-Ser(O-tert-butyl)-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr(O-tert-butyl) (BUBU), potentiated micro-opioid antinociceptive responses in the hot-plate test in mice. This effect was antagonized by a selective cholecystokinin-A antagonist. Activation of delta 1-opioid receptors by endogenous opioid peptides decreased the micro-opioid responses. These results suggest that stimulation of delta 2-opioid receptors potentiates micro-opioid analgesia in the hot-plate test in mice through an increase in endogenous cholecystokinin release, while activation of delta 1-opioid receptors could decrease it. Thus, the pre-existing physiological balance between opioid and cholecystokinin systems seems to be modulated in opposite directions depending on whether delta 1- or delta 2-opioid receptors are

  8. Peripheral G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are involved in delta opioid receptor-mediated anti-hyperalgesia in rat masseter muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Man-Kyo; Cho, Yi Sul; Bae, Young Chul; Lee, Jongseok; Zhang, Xia; Ro, Jin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the efficacy of peripherally administered opioid has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies, the underlying mechanisms of its anti-hyperalgesic effects are poorly understood. G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are linked to opioid receptors in the brain. However, the role of peripheral GIRK channels in analgesia induced by peripherally administered opioid, especially in trigeminal system, is not clear. Methods Expression of GIRK subunits in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) was examined with RT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Chemical profiles of GIRK expressing neurons in TG were further characterized. Behavioral and Fos experiments were performed to examine the functional involvement of GIRK channels in delta opioid receptor (DOR)-mediated anti-hyperalgesia under an acute myositis condition. Results TG expressed mRNA and proteins for GIRK1 and GIRK2 subunits. Majority of GIRK1- and GIRK2-expressing neurons were non-peptidergic afferents. Inhibition of peripheral GIRK using Tertiapin-Q (TPQ) attenuated anti-nociceptive effects of peripherally administered DOR agonist, DPDPE, on mechanical hypersensitivity in masseter muscle. Furthermore, TPQ attenuated the suppressive effects of peripheral DPDPE on neuronal activation in the subnucleus caudalis of the trigeminal nucleus (Vc) following masseteric injection of capsaicin. Conclusions Our data indicate that peripheral DOR agonist-induced suppression of mechanical hypersensitivity in the masseter muscle involves the activity of peripheral GIRK channels. These results could provide a rationale for developing a novel therapeutic approach using peripheral GIRK channel openers to mimic or supplement the effects of peripheral opioid agonist. PMID:23740773

  9. Quantitative conformationally sampled pharmacophore for delta opioid ligands: reevaluation of hydrophobic moieties essential for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Denzil; Coop, Andrew; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2007-04-19

    Recent studies have indicated several therapeutic applications for delta opioid agonists and antagonists. To exploit the therapeutic potential of delta opioids developing a structural basis for the activity of ligands at the delta opioid receptor is essential. The conformationally sampled pharmacophore (CSP) method (Bernard et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 3103-3107) is extended here to obtain quantitative models of delta opioid ligand efficacy and affinity. Quantification is performed via overlap integrals of the conformational space sampled by ligands with respect to a reference compound. Iterative refinement of the CSP model identified hydrophobic groups other than the traditional phenylalanine residues as important for efficacy and affinity in DSLET and ICI 174 864. The obtained models for a structurally diverse set of peptidic and nonpeptidic delta opioid ligands offer good predictions with R2 values>0.9, and the predicted efficacy for a set of test compounds was consistent with the experimental values. PMID:17367120

  10. Delta-opioid-receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase is transduced specifically by the guanine-nucleotide-binding protein Gi2.

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, F R; Milligan, G

    1990-01-01

    Mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid cells (NG108-15) express an opioid receptor of the delta subclass which both stimulates high-affinity GTPase activity and inhibits adenylate cyclase by interacting with a pertussis-toxin-sensitive guanine-nucleotide-binding protein(s) (G-protein). Four such G-proteins have now been identified without photoreceptor-containing tissues. We have generated anti-peptide antisera against synthetic peptides which correspond to the C-terminal decapeptides of the alpha-subunit of each of these G-proteins and also to the stimulatory G-protein of the adenylate cyclase cascade (Gs). Using these antisera, we demonstrate the expression of three pertussis-toxin-sensitive G-proteins in these cells, which correspond to the products of the Gi2, Gi3 and Go genes, as well as Gs. Gi1, however, is not expressed in detectable amounts. IgG fractions from each of these antisera and from normal rabbit serum were used to attempt to interfere with the interaction of the opioid receptor with the G-protein system by assessing ligand stimulation of high-affinity GTPase activity, inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and conversion of the receptor to a state which displays reduced affinity for agonists. The IgG fraction from the antiserum (AS7) which specifically identifies Gi2 in these cells attenuated the effects of the opioid receptor. This effect was complete and was not mimicked by any of the other antisera. We conclude that the delta-opioid receptor of these cells interacts directly and specifically with Gi2 to cause inhibition of adenylate cyclase, and that Gi2 represents the true Gi of the adenylate cyclase cascade. The ability to measure alterations in agonist affinity for receptors following the use of specific antisera against a range of G-proteins implies that such techniques should be applicable to investigations of the molecular identity of the G-protein(s) which interacts with any receptor. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID

  11. Cloned delta-opioid receptors in GH(3) cells inhibit spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations and prolactin release through K(IR) channel activation.

    PubMed

    Piros, E T; Charles, R C; Song, L; Evans, C J; Hales, T G

    2000-05-01

    Opioid receptors can couple to K(+) and Ca(2+) channels, adenylyl cyclase, and phosphatidyl inositol turnover. Any of these actions may be important in the regulation of neurotransmitter and hormone release from excitable cells. GH(3) cells exhibit spontaneous oscillations of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and prolactin release. Activation of cloned delta-opioid receptors stably expressed in GH(3) cells inhibits both spontaneous Ca(2+) signaling and basal prolactin release. The objective of this study was to examine a possible role for K(+) channels in these processes using the patch-clamp technique, fluorescence imaging, and a sensitive ELISA for prolactin. The selective delta receptor agonist [D-Pen(2), D-Pen(2)]enkephalin (DPDPE) inhibited [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations in GH(3) cells expressing both mu and delta receptors (GH(3)MORDOR cells) but had no effect on control GH(3) cells or cells expressing mu receptors alone (GH(3)MOR cells). The inhibition of [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations by DPDPE was unaffected by thapsigargin pretreatment, suggesting that this effect is independent of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-sensitive Ca(2+) stores. DPDPE caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of prolactin release from GH(3)MORDOR cells with an IC(50) of 4 nM. DPDPE increased inward K(+) current recorded from GH(3)MORDOR cells but had no significant effect on K(+) currents recorded from control GH(3) cells or GH(3)MOR cells. The mu receptor agonist morphine also had no effect on currents recorded from control cells but activated inward K(+) currents recorded from GH(3)MOR and GH(3)MORDOR cells. Somatostatin activated inward currents recorded from all three cell lines. The DPDPE-sensitive K(+) current was inwardly rectifying and was inhibited by Ba(2+) but not TEA. DPDPE had no effect on delayed rectifier-, Ca(2+)-, and voltage-activated or A-type K(+) currents, recorded from GH(3)MORDOR cells. Ba(2+) attenuated the inhibition of [Ca(2+)](i) and prolactin release

  12. Plasticity of α2-adrenergic spinal antinociception following nerve injury: selective, bidirectional interaction with the delta opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Aira, Zigor; Barrenetxea, Teresa; Buesa, Itsaso; Azkue, Jon Jatsu

    2015-01-12

    Interactions of opioid receptors with other receptor families can be made use of to improve analgesia and reduce adverse effects of opioid analgesics. We investigated interactions of the α2-adrenergic receptor (α2AR) with opioid receptors of the mu (MOR) and delta (DOR) types in the spinal dorsal horn in an animal model of neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve ligation. Nine days after nerve injury, immunoreactivity for the α2AR subtype A (α2AAR) was increased both in tissue homogenates and at pre- and post-synaptic sites in transverse sections. The efficacy of spinally administered α2AAR agonist guanfacine at reducing C-fiber-evoked field potentials was increased in nerve-ligated rats. This reducing effect was impaired by simultaneous administration of DOR antagonist naltrindole, but not MOR antagonist CTOP, suggesting that concurrent DOR activation was required for α2AAR-mediated inhibition. While DOR agonist deltorphin II and MOR agonist DAMGO both effectively depressed C-fiber-evoked spinal field potentials, DOR- but not MOR-mediated depression was enhanced by subclinical guanfacine. In conscious, nerve-ligated rats, chronically administered deltorphin II produced stable thermal and mechanical antinociception over the 9 following days after nerve injury without apparent signs of habituation. Such an effect was dramatically enhanced by co-administration of a low dose of guanfacine, which reversed thermal and mechanical thresholds to levels near those prior to injury. The results suggest that spinal, α2AAR-mediated antinociception is increased after nerve injury and based on DOR co-activation. We demonstrate in vivo that α2AAR/DOR interaction can be exploited to provide effective behavioral antinociception during neuropathic pain. PMID:25446445

  13. Proglumide exhibits delta opioid agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, A; Stokes, K B; Rhoads, D L; Way, E L

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it was reported that proglumide, a cholecystokinin (CCK) antagonist, potentiates the analgetic effects of morphine and endogenous opioid peptides and reverses morphine tolerance by antagonizing the CCK system in the central nervous system of the rat. In order to provide additional insight into the mode of action of this agent, we assessed the effect of proglumide in the isolated guinea pig ileum and the mouse, rat and rabbit vas deferens. Furthermore, we studied the in vitro binding affinity of this substance to mouse brain synaptosomes. Our results show that proglumide inhibits, dose dependently, the electrically stimulated twitches in the mouse vas deferens and guinea pig ileum, but not in the rat or rabbit vas deferens. The inhibitory action of proglumide on the mouse vas deferens, but not on the guinea pig ileum, is antagonized by naloxone and by the selective delta-antagonist, ICI 174,864, in a competitive fashion. Other CCK antagonists were found to be devoid of such activity on the mouse vas deferens. In vitro binding studies showed that proglumide displaces D-ala-D-[leucine]5-enkephalin (DADLE), a delta agonist, but not ethylketocyclazocine (EKC), a preferentially selective kappa agonist. The effect of proglumide appeared to be elicited presynaptically since it did not alter the norepinephrine-induced contractions of the mouse vas deferens. Our results suggest that proglumide might exert its opiate-like effects by activation of delta-opioid receptors. PMID:3030338

  14. ( sup 3 H)(D-PEN sup 2 , D-PEN sup 5 ) enkephalin binding to delta opioid receptors on intact neuroblastoma-glioma (NG 108-15) hybrid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.J.; Yamamura, H.I. )

    1990-01-01

    ({sup 3}H)(D-Pen{sup 2}, D-Pen{sup 5})enkephalin binding to intact NG 108-15 cells has been measured under physiological conditions of temperature and medium. The dissociation constant, receptor density, and Hill slope values measured under these conditions are consistent with values obtained by others using membranes prepared from these cells. Kinetic analysis of the radioligand binding to these cells show biphasic association and monophasic dissociation processes suggesting the presence of different receptor affinity states for the agonist. The data show that the binding affinity of ({sup 3}H)(D-Pen{sup 2}, D-Pen{sup 5})enkephalin under physiological conditions is not substantially different to that measured in 50 mM Tris buffer using cell membrane fractions. Unlike DPDPE, the {mu} opioid agonists morphine, normorphine, PL-17, and DAMGO, have much lower affinity for the {delta} receptor measured under these conditions than is observed by studies using 50 mM Tris buffer. The results described here suggest that this assay may serve as a useful model of {delta} opioid receptor binding in vivo.

  15. Modulation of MDMA-induced behavioral and transcriptional effects by the delta opioid antagonist naltrindole in mice

    PubMed Central

    Belkaï, Emilie; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Noble, Florence; Marie-Claire, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    The delta opioid system is involved in the behavioral effects of various drugs of abuse. However, only few studies have focused on the possible interactions between the opioid system and the effects of MDMA. In order to examine the possible role of the delta opioid system in MDMA-induced behaviors in mice, locomotor activity and conditioned place preference were investigated in the presence of naltrindole, a selective delta opioid antagonist. Moreover, the consequences of acute and chronic MDMA administration on Penk (pro-enkephalin) and Pomc (pro-opioimelanocortin) gene expression were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that, after acute MDMA administration (9mg/kg; i.p.), naltrindole (5mg/kg, s.c.) was able to totally block MDMA-induced hyperlocomotion. Penk expression gene was not modulated by acute MDMA but a decrease of Pomc gene expression was observed that was not antagonized by naltrindole. Administration of the antagonist prevented the acquisition of MDMA-induced conditioned place preference, suggesting an implication of the delta opioid receptors in this behavior. Following chronic MDMA treatment only the level of Pomc was modulated. The observed increase was totally blocked by naltrindole pretreatment. All these results confirm the interactions between the delta opioid system (receptors and peptides) and the effects of MDMA. PMID:19523041

  16. Modulation of MDMA-induced behavioral and transcriptional effects by the delta opioid antagonist naltrindole in mice.

    PubMed

    Belkaï, Emilie; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Noble, Florence; Marie-Claire, Cynthia

    2009-07-01

    The delta opioid system is involved in the behavioral effects of various drugs of abuse. However, only a few studies have focused on the possible interactions between the opioid system and the effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). In order to examine the possible role of the delta opioid system in MDMA-induced behaviors in mice, locomotor activity and conditioned place preference (CPP) were investigated in the presence of naltrindole (NTI), a selective delta opioid antagonist. Moreover, the consequences of acute and chronic MDMA administration on pro-enkephalin (Penk) and pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) gene expression were assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). The results showed that, after acute MDMA administration (9 mg/kg; i.p.), NTI (5 mg/kg, s.c.) was able to totally block MDMA-induced hyperlocomotion. Penk gene expression was not modulated by acute MDMA, but a decrease of Pomc gene expression was observed, which was not antagonized by NTI. Administration of the antagonist prevented the acquisition of MDMA-induced CPP, suggesting an implication of the delta opioid receptors in this behavior. Following chronic MDMA treatment, only the level of Pomc was modulated. The observed increase was totally blocked by NTI pre-treatment. All these results confirm the interactions between the delta opioid system (receptors and peptides) and the effects of MDMA. PMID:19523041

  17. Case-control association analysis of polymorphisms in the delta-opioid receptor, OPRD1, with cocaine and opioid addicted populations*

    PubMed Central

    Crist, R.C.; Ambrose-Lanci, L.M.; Vaswani, M.; Clarke, T.K.; Zeng, A.; Yuan, C.; Ferraro, T.N.; Hakonarson, H.; Kampman, K.M.; Dackis, C.A.; Pettinati, H.M.; O’Brien, C.P.; Oslin, D.W.; Doyle, G.A.; Lohoff, F.W.; Berrettini, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Addiction susceptibility and treatment responsiveness are greatly influenced by genetic factors. Sequence variation in genes involved in the mechanisms of drug action have the potential to influence addiction risk and treatment outcome. The opioid receptor system is involved in mediating the rewarding effects of cocaine and opioids. The µ-opioid receptor (MOR) has traditionally been considered the primary target for opioid addiction. The MOR, however, interacts with and is regulated by many known MOR interacting proteins (MORIPs), including the δ-opioid receptor (DOR). METHODS The present study evaluated the contribution of OPRD1, the gene encoding the DOR, to the risk of addiction to opioids and cocaine. The association of OPRD1 polymorphisms with both opioid addiction (OA) and cocaine addiction (CA) was analyzed in African American (OA n=336, CA n=503) and European American (OA n=1007, CA n=336) populations. RESULTS The primary finding of this study is an association of rs678849 with cocaine addiction in African Americans (allelic p=0.0086). For replication purposes, this SNP was analyzed in a larger independent population of cocaine addicted African Americans and controls and the association was confirmed (allelic p=4.53×10−5; n=993). By performing a meta-analysis on the expanded populations, the statistical evidence for an association was substantially increased (allelic p=8.5 × 10 −7) (p-values non-FDR corrected). CONCLUSION The present study suggests that polymorphisms in OPRD1 are relevant for cocaine addiction in the African American population and provides additional support for a broad role for OPRD1 variants in drug dependence. PMID:22795689

  18. Opposite effects of mu and delta opioid receptor agonists on excitatory propagation induced in rat somatosensory and insular cortices by dental pulp stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Eiko; Koyanagi, Yuko; Nakamura, Hiroko; Horinuki, Eri; Oi, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2016-08-15

    The insular cortex (IC) contributes to nociceptive information processing. IC neurons express opioid receptors, including the mu (MOR), kappa (KOR), and delta (DOR) subtypes. Opioidergic agonists suppress excitatory synaptic transmission in the cerebral cortex. In addition, morphine injection into the IC reduces responses to noxious thermal stimuli. However, the mechanisms of the opioid-dependent modulation of cortical excitation at the macroscopic level, which bridge the cellular and behavioral findings, have remained unknown. The present in vivo optical imaging study aimed to examine the effects of the agonists of each subtype on cortical excitatory propagation in the IC and the neighboring cortices, the primary (S1) and secondary somatosensory (S2) areas. To assess the opioidergic effects on the cortical circuits, we applied electrical stimulation to the maxillary 1st molar pulp, which induced excitation in the ventral part of S1 and the S2/insular oral region (IOR). The initial excitatory response was observed 10-14ms after stimulation, and then excitation propagated concentrically. DAMGO (10-100μM), an MOR agonist, suppressed the amplitude of cortical excitation and shrank the maximum excitation areas in S1 and S2/IOR. In contrast, 10-100μM DPDPE, a DOR agonist, increased the amplitude of excitation and expanded the area of maximum excitation. U50488 (10-100μM), a KOR agonist, had little effect on cortical excitation. These results suggest that MOR-induced suppression of excitatory propagation in the IC is an underlying mechanism of the powerful analgesic effects of MOR agonists. In contrast, DOR may play a minor role in suppressing acute pain. PMID:27246300

  19. Endocytosis and Intracellular Trafficking of Human Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Masilamani, Madhan; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the defense against viral infections and tumor development. NK cell function is primarily regulated by the sum of signals from a broad array of activation and inhibitory receptors. Key to generating the input level of either activating or inhibitory signals is the maintenance of receptor expression levels on the cell surface. Although the mechanisms of endocytosis and trafficking for some cell surface receptors, such as transferrin receptor, and certain immune receptors, are very well known, that is not the situation for receptors expressed by NK cells. Recent studies have uncovered that endocytosis and trafficking routes characteristic for specific activation and inhibitory receptors can regulate the functional responses of NK cells. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of receptor endocytosis and trafficking, and integrate this with our current understanding of NK cell receptor trafficking. PMID:19719476

  20. Death-receptor activation halts clathrin-dependent endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Cary D.; Lawrence, David A.; Peden, Andrew A.; Varfolomeev, Eugene E.; Totpal, Klara; De Mazière, Ann M.; Klumperman, Judith; Arnott, David; Pham, Victoria; Scheller, Richard H.; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2006-01-01

    Endocytosis is crucial for various aspects of cell homeostasis. Here, we show that proapoptotic death receptors (DRs) trigger selective destruction of the clathrin-dependent endocytosis machinery. DR stimulation induced rapid, caspase-mediated cleavage of key clathrin-pathway components, halting cellular uptake of the classic cargo protein transferrin. DR-proximal initiator caspases cleaved the clathrin adaptor subunit AP2α between functionally distinct domains, whereas effector caspases processed clathrin’s heavy chain. DR5 underwent ligand-induced, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, suggesting that internalization of DR signaling complexes facilitates clathrin-pathway targeting by caspases. An endocytosis-blocking, temperature-sensitive dynamin-1 mutant attenuated DR internalization, enhanced caspase stimulation downstream of DRs, and increased apoptosis. Thus, DR-triggered caspase activity disrupts clathrin-dependent endocytosis, leading to amplification of programmed cell death. PMID:16801533

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Virus Entry via Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Virus infections are ubiquitous and remain major threats to human health worldwide. Viruses are intracellular parasites and must enter host cells to initiate infection. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the most common entry pathway taken by viruses, the whole process is highly complex and dictated by various events, such as virus motions, membrane deformations, receptor diffusion and ligand-receptor reactions, occurring at multiple length and time scales. We develop a multiscale model for virus entry through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The binding of virus to cell surface is based on a mesoscale three dimensional stochastic adhesion model, the internalization (endocytosis) of virus and cellular membrane deformation is based on the discretization of Helfrich Hamiltonian in a curvilinear space using Monte Carlo method. The multiscale model is based on the combination of these two models. We will implement this model to study the herpes simplex virus entry into B78 cells and compare the model predictions with experimental measurements.

  2. Pyrrolo- and Pyridomorphinans: Non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, V.; Clark, M.J.; Traynor, J.R.; Lewis, J.W.; Husbands, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse. PMID:24973818

  3. Pyrrolo- and pyridomorphinans: non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Clark, M J; Traynor, J R; Lewis, J W; Husbands, S M

    2014-08-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse. PMID:24973818

  4. Crosslinking-Induced Endocytosis of Acetylcholine Receptors by Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lin; Peng, H. Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In a majority of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies target postsynaptic AChR clusters and thus compromise the membrane integrity of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and lead to muscle weakness. Antibody-induced endocytosis of AChRs in the postsynaptic membrane represents the initial step in the pathogenesis of MG; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying AChR endocytosis remain largely unknown. Here, we developed an approach to mimic the pathogenic antibodies for inducing the crosslinking and internalization of AChRs from the postsynaptic membrane. Using biotin-α-bungarotoxin and quantum dot (QD)-streptavidin, cell-surface and internalized AChRs could be readily distinguished by comparing the size, fluorescence intensity, trajectory, and subcellular localization of the QD signals. QD-induced AChR endocytosis was mediated by clathrin-dependent and caveolin-independent mechanisms, and the trafficking of internalized AChRs in the early endosomes required the integrity of microtubule structures. Furthermore, activation of the agrin/MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) signaling pathway strongly suppressed QD-induced internalization of AChRs. Lastly, QD-induced AChR crosslinking potentiated the dispersal of aneural AChR clusters upon synaptic induction. Taken together, our results identify a novel approach to study the mechanisms of AChR trafficking upon receptor crosslinking and endocytosis, and demonstrate that agrin-MuSK signaling pathways protect against crosslinking-induced endocytosis of AChRs. PMID:24587270

  5. Delta opioid modulation of hypothalamic serotonergic neurotransmission in the ovariectomized and steroid-primed rat.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Bayram; Gilmore, Desmond P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We have investigated the modulating effects of DPDPE (a delta opioid agonist) and opioid receptor antagonists on both LH release and indoleamine concentrations in specific hypothalamic regions of the ovx and steroid-primed rat. METHODS: DPDPE was intracerebroventricularly infused alone or with either ICI 154129 (a delta opioid antagonist) or naloxone under ketamine anesthesia. Blood samples were collected at hourly intervals on the afternoon of the anticipated LH surge. The rats were then decapitated and the medial preoptic area (MPOA), suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), median eminence (ME) and arcuate nucleus (ARN) surgically isolated by micropunch. Concentrations of 5-HT and its metabolite (5-HIAA) in these samples were determined by HPLC with ECD. Plasma LH levels were measured by RIA. RESULTS: The delta-agonist significantly reduced 5-HT concentrations in the SCN, ME and ARN, but not in the MPOA. 5-HIAA levels were decreased, but these changes were significant in only the MPOA and ARN compared to the control group. ICI 154129 had no significant effects on 5-HT release and turnover in any of the hypothalamic regions examined. However, co-administration of DPDPE with naloxone resulted in significant increases in 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations in the MPOA, SCN, ME and ARN compared to the DPDPE-treated group. Plasma LH levels were either low or undetectable in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: The present results suggest that delta-opioid receptors are involved in the opioid inhibition of the serotonergic neurotransmission in the hypothalamus. It is thought that the ketamine anesthesia interfered with LH secretory systems. PMID:11455339

  6. Constitutive Endocytosis of VEGFR2 Protects the Receptor against Shedding.

    PubMed

    Basagiannis, Dimitris; Christoforidis, Savvas

    2016-08-01

    VEGFR2 plays a fundamental role in blood vessel formation and in life threatening diseases, such as cancer angiogenesis and cardiovascular disorders. Although inactive growth factor receptors are mainly localized at the plasma membrane, VEGFR2 undergoes constitutive endocytosis (in the absence of ligand) and recycling. Intriguingly, the significance of these futile transport cycles of VEGFR2 remains unclear. Here we found that, unexpectedly, the function of constitutive endocytosis of VEGFR2 is to protect the receptor against plasma membrane cleavage (shedding), thereby preserving the functional state of the receptor until the time of activation by VEGF. Inhibition of constitutive endocytosis of VEGFR2, by interference with the function of clathrin, dynamin, or Rab5, increases dramatically the cleavage/shedding of VEGFR2. Shedding of VEGFR2 produces an N-terminal soluble fragment (100 kDa, s100), which is released in the extracellular space, and a residual C-terminal part (130 kDa, p130) that remains integrated at the plasma membrane. The released soluble fragment (s100) co-immunoprecipitates with VEGF, in line with the topology of the VEGF-binding domain at the N terminus of VEGFR2. Increased shedding of VEGFR2 (via inhibition of constitutive endocytosis) results in reduced response to VEGF, consistently with the loss of the VEGF-binding domain from the membrane remnant of VEGFR2. These data suggest that constitutive internalization of VEGFR2 protects the receptor against shedding and provides evidence for an unprecedented mechanism via which endocytosis can regulate the fate and activity of growth factor receptors. PMID:27298320

  7. Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ockenga, Wymke; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2015-01-01

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles. PMID:25985102

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation by promoting endocytosis in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Ailian; Huang, Shiqian; Zhao, Xiaonan; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Lixun; Ding, Ji; Xu, Congfeng

    2016-01-15

    After binding by acetylcholine released from a motor neuron, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction produces a localized end-plate potential, which leads to muscle contraction. Improper turnover and renewal of acetylcholine receptors contributes to the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. In the present study, we demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation in C2C12 myocytes. We further show that ER stress promotes acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and lysosomal degradation, which was dampened by blocking endocytosis or treating with lysosome inhibitor. Knockdown of ER stress proteins inhibited acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and degradation, while rescue assay restored its endocytosis and degradation, confirming the effects of ER stress on promoting endocytosis-mediated degradation of junction acetylcholine receptors. Thus, our studies identify ER stress as a factor promoting acetylcholine receptor degradation through accelerating endocytosis in muscle cells. Blocking ER stress and/or endocytosis might provide a novel therapeutic approach for myasthenia gravis. PMID:26711579

  9. Targeted gene delivery via N-acetylglucosamine receptor mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijay; Maharjan, Sushila; Kim, You-Kyoung; Jiang, Tai; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kang, Sang-Kee; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2014-11-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a promising approach of gene delivery into the target cells via receptor-ligand interaction. Vimentins at the cell surface are recently known to bind N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residue, therefore, the cell surfaces of vimentin-expressing cells could be targeted by using the GlcNAc residue as a specific ligand for receptor-mediated gene delivery. Here, we have developed polymeric gene delivery vectors, based on poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO) and poly(aspartamide), namely poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO-(GlcNAc)] (PADPG) and poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO] (PADP) to elucidate the efficiency of GlcNAc ligand for gene delivery through receptor mediated endocytosis. To determine the efficiency of these polymeric vectors for specific gene delivery, the DNA condensation ability of PADPG and PADP and the subsequent formation of polymeric nanoparticles were confirmed by gel retardation assay and transmission electron microscopy respectively. Both PADPG and PADP had lower cytotoxicity than polyethylenimine 25 K (PEI 25 K). However, their transfection efficiency was comparatively lower than PEI 25 K due to hydrophilic property of PEO in the vectors. To observe the stability of polymeric nanoparticles, the transfection of PADPG and PADP was carried out in the presence of serum. Favorably, the interfering effect of serum on the transfection efficiency of PADPG and PADP was also very low. Finally, when the cell specificity of these polymeric vectors was investigated, PADPG had high gene transfection in vimentin-expressing cells than vimentin-deficiency cells. The high transfection efficiency of PADPG was attributed to the GlcNAc in the polymeric vector which interact specifically with vimentin in the cells for the receptor-mediated endocytosis. The competitive inhibition assay further proved the receptor-mediated endocytosis of PADPG. Thus, this study demonstrates that conjugation of GlcNAc is an effective and rational

  10. Receptor-mediated endocytosis and brain delivery of therapeutic biologics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guangqing; Gan, Liang-Shang

    2013-01-01

    Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed. PMID:23840214

  11. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Brain Delivery of Therapeutic Biologics

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guangqing

    2013-01-01

    Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed. PMID:23840214

  12. USP17 is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Jakub; de la Vega, Michelle; Fletcher, Sarah J.; McFarlane, Cheryl; Greene, Michelle K.; Smyth, Andrew W.; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra; Johnston, James A.; Scott, Christopher J.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Burrows, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that expression of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP17 is required for cell proliferation and motility. More recently we reported that USP17 deubiquitinates RCE1 isoform 2 and thus regulates the processing of ‘CaaX’ motif proteins. Here we now show that USP17 expression is induced by epidermal growth factor and that USP17 expression is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor. In addition, we show that USP17 is required for the endocytosis of transferrin, an archetypal substrate for clathrin mediated endocytosis, and that USP17 depletion impedes plasma membrane recruitment of the machinery required for clathrin mediated endocytosis. Thus, our data reveal that USP17 is necessary for epidermal growth factor receptor and transferrin endocytosis via clathrin coated pits, indicate this is mediated via the regulation of the recruitment of the components of the endocytosis machinery and suggest USP17 may play a general role in receptor endocytosis. PMID:25026282

  13. The selective non-peptidic delta opioid agonist SNC80 does not facilitate intracranial self-stimulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Carmo, Gail Pereira Do; Folk, John E.; Rice, Kenner C.; Chartoff, Elena; Carlezon, William A.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2009-01-01

    Delta opioid receptor agonists are under development for a variety of clinical applications, and some findings in rats raise the possibility that agents with this mechanism have abuse liability. The present study assessed the effects of the non-peptidic delta opioid agonist SNC80 in an assay of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats. ICSS was examined at multiple stimulation frequencies to permit generation of frequency-response rate curves and evaluation of curve shifts produced by experimental manipulations. Drug-induced leftward shifts in ICSS frequency-rate curves are often interpreted as evidence of abuse liability. However, SNC80 (1.0-10 mg/kg s.c.; 10-56 mg/kg i.p.) failed to alter ICSS frequency-rate curves at doses up to those that produced convulsions in the present study or other effects (e.g. antidepressant effects) in previous studies. For comparison, the monoamine releaser d-amphetamine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and the kappa agonist U69,593 (0.1-0.56 mg/kg, i.p.) produced dose-dependent leftward and rightward shifts, respectively, in ICSS frequency-rate curves, confirming the sensitivity of the procedure to drug effects. ICSS frequency-rate curves were also shifted by two non-pharmacological manipulations (reductions in stimulus intensity and increases in response requirement). Thus, SNC80 failed to facilitate or attenuate ICSS-maintained responding under conditions in which other pharmacological and non-pharmacological manipulations were effective. These results suggest that non-peptidic delta opioid receptor agonists have negligible abuse-related effects in rats. PMID:19133255

  14. The selective delta opioid agonist SNC80 enhances amphetamine-mediated efflux of dopamine from rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Kelly E; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Gnegy, Margaret E; Traynor, John R

    2008-10-01

    The highly selective delta opioid agonist, SNC80, elicits dopamine-related behaviors including locomotor stimulation and conditioned place-preference. In contrast, it has been reported that SNC80 fails to promote dopamine efflux from the striatum of freely moving rats. However, SNC80 does enhance behavioral responses to the stimulants, amphetamine and cocaine, suggesting an interaction between delta opioids and psychostimulants. Since the increase in locomotor activity elicited by amphetamine and related stimulants acting at the dopamine transporter is associated with increases in extracellular concentrations of dopamine within the striatum, we hypothesized that SNC80 enhances this activity by potentiating the overflow of dopamine through the transporter. To test this hypothesis, striatal preparations from Sprague Dawley rats were assayed for dopamine efflux in response to amphetamine challenge. SNC80 was given either in vivo or in vitro directly to rat striatal tissue, prior to in vitro amphetamine challenge. Both in vivo and in vitro administration of SNC80 enhanced amphetamine-mediated dopamine efflux in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, SNC80 in either treatment paradigm produced no stimulation of dopamine efflux in the absence of amphetamine. The effect of SNC80 on amphetamine-mediated dopamine overflow, but not the effect of amphetamine alone, was blocked by the delta selective antagonist, naltrindole and was also observed with other delta agonists. The results of this study demonstrate that even though SNC80 does not stimulate dopamine efflux alone, it is able to augment amphetamine-mediated dopamine efflux through a delta opioid receptor mediated action locally in the striatum. PMID:18602932

  15. A luminescent assay for real-time measurements of receptor endocytosis in living cells.

    PubMed

    Robers, Matthew B; Binkowski, Brock F; Cong, Mei; Zimprich, Chad; Corona, Cesear; McDougall, Mark; Otto, George; Eggers, Christopher T; Hartnett, Jim; Machleidt, Thomas; Fan, Frank; Wood, Keith V

    2015-11-15

    Ligand-mediated endocytosis is a key autoregulatory mechanism governing the duration and intensity of signals emanating from cell surface receptors. Due to the mechanistic complexity of endocytosis and its emerging relevance in disease, simple methods capable of tracking this dynamic process in cells have become increasingly desirable. We have developed a bioluminescent reporter technology for real-time analysis of ligand-mediated receptor endocytosis using genetic fusions of NanoLuc luciferase with various G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This method is compatible with standard microplate formats, which should decrease work flows for high-throughput screens. This article also describes the application of this technology to endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), demonstrating potential applicability of the method beyond GPCRs. PMID:26278171

  16. Kainate receptor activation induces glycine receptor endocytosis through PKC deSUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Lu, Li; Zuo, Yong; Wang, Yan; Jiao, Yingfu; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Huang, Chao; Zhu, Michael X; Zamponi, Gerald W; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Tian-Le; Cheng, Jinke; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Surface expression and regulated endocytosis of glycine receptors (GlyRs) play a critical function in balancing neuronal excitability. SUMOylation (SUMO modification) is of critical importance for maintaining neuronal function in the central nervous system. Here we show that activation of kainate receptors (KARs) causes GlyR endocytosis in a calcium- and protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent manner, leading to reduced GlyR-mediated synaptic activity in cultured spinal cord neurons and the superficial dorsal horn of rat spinal cord slices. This effect requires SUMO1/sentrin-specific peptidase 1 (SENP1)-mediated deSUMOylation of PKC, indicating that the crosstalk between KARs and GlyRs relies on the SUMOylation status of PKC. SENP1-mediated deSUMOylation of PKC is involved in the kainate-induced GlyR endocytosis and thus plays an important role in the anti-homeostatic regulation between excitatory and inhibitory ligand-gated ion channels. Altogether, we have identified a SUMOylation-dependent regulatory pathway for GlyR endocytosis, which may have important physiological implications for proper neuronal excitability. PMID:25236484

  17. [Molecular physiology of receptor mediated endocytosis and its role in overcoming multidrug resistance].

    PubMed

    Severin, E S; Posypanova, G A

    2011-06-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis plays important role in the selective uptake of proteins at the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. Endocytosis regulates many processes of cell signalling by controlling the number of functional receptors on the cell surface. The article reviews the mechanism of clathrin-dependent endocytosis and the possibility of using this phenomenon for the targeted delivery of drugs. Use of certain proteins as targeting component of drug delivery systems can significantly improve the selectivity of this drug, as well as to overcome the multidrug resistance of cells resulting from the activity of the ABC-transporters. PMID:21874867

  18. Size and shape effects on receptor-mediated endocytosis of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinlei

    2012-01-01

    We present a thermodynamic approach to elucidate the effects of the size and shape of nanoparticles (NPs) on endocytosis. It is found that endocytosis needs to surmount a thermodynamic energy barrier and has a minimum radius of NPs for endocytosis. Through referring to the concept of "diffusion length of receptors," we obtain a simple and analytical expression for the optimal size of NPs. Furthermore, a phase diagram has been constructed, which can clarify the interrelated effects of the radius and the aspect ratio of NPs. We can identify from the phase the relation between the geometry of NP and its endocytosis rate. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental observations and reveal physical mechanisms involved in the effects of the size and shape of NPs on endocytosis, which implies that these studies may provide useful guidance to the conscious design of NPs for diagnostic agents and drug delivery applications.

  19. Endocytosis as a Biological Response in Receptor Pharmacology: Evaluation by Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Varela, María J.; de la Rocha, Arlet M. Acanda; Fernandez-Troyano, Juan C.; Barreiro, R. Belén; Lopez-Gimenez, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    The activation of G-protein coupled receptors by agonist compounds results in diverse biological responses in cells, such as the endocytosis process consisting in the translocation of receptors from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm within internalizing vesicles or endosomes. In order to functionally evaluate endocytosis events resulted from pharmacological responses, we have developed an image analysis method –the Q-Endosomes algorithm– that specifically discriminates the fluorescent signal originated at endosomes from that one observed at the plasma membrane in images obtained from living cells by fluorescence microscopy. Mu opioid (MOP) receptor tagged at the carboxy-terminus with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and permanently expressed in HEK293 cells was used as experimental model to validate this methodology. Time-course experiments performed with several agonists resulted in different sigmoid curves depending on the drug used to initiate MOP receptor endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis resulting from the simultaneous activation of co-expressed MOP and serotonin 5-HT2C receptors by morphine plus serotonin was significantly different, in kinetics as well as in maximal response parameters, from the one caused by DAMGO, sufentanyl or methadone. Therefore, this analytical tool permits the pharmacological characterization of receptor endocytosis in living cells with functional and temporal resolution. PMID:25849355

  20. The Ubiquitin-like Protein PLIC-2 Is a Negative Regulator of G Protein-coupled Receptor Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    N'Diaye, Elsa-Noah; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C.; Kajihara, Kimberly K.; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.; Wu, Ping; von Zastrow, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The activity of many signaling receptors is regulated by their endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits (CCPs). For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), recruitment of the adaptor protein arrestin to activated receptors is thought to be sufficient to drive GPCR clustering in CCPs and subsequent endocytosis. We have identified an unprecedented role for the ubiquitin-like protein PLIC-2 as a negative regulator of GPCR endocytosis. Protein Linking IAP to Cytoskeleton (PLIC)-2 overexpression delayed ligand-induced endocytosis of two GPCRs: the V2 vasopressin receptor and β-2 adrenergic receptor, without affecting endocytosis of the transferrin or epidermal growth factor receptor. The closely related isoform PLIC-1 did not affect receptor endocytosis. PLIC-2 specifically inhibited GPCR concentration in CCPs, without affecting membrane recruitment of arrestin-3 to activated receptors or its cellular levels. Depletion of cellular PLIC-2 accelerated GPCR endocytosis, confirming its regulatory function at endogenous levels. The ubiquitin-like domain of PLIC-2, a ligand for ubiquitin-interacting motifs (UIMs), was required for endocytic inhibition. Interestingly, the UIM-containing endocytic adaptors epidermal growth factor receptor protein substrate 15 and Epsin exhibited preferential binding to PLIC-2 over PLIC-1. This differential interaction may underlie PLIC-2 specific effect on GPCR endocytosis. Identification of a negative regulator of GPCR clustering reveals a new function of ubiquitin-like proteins and highlights a cellular requirement for exquisite regulation of receptor dynamics. PMID:18199683

  1. Electroencephalographic and convulsant effects of the delta opioid agonist SNC80 in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Ingela; Gasior, Maciej; Stevenson, Glenn W.; Folk, John E.; Rice, Kenner C.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2007-01-01

    Non-peptidic delta opioid receptor agonists are being evaluated for a wide range of clinical applications; however, the clinical utility of piperazinyl benzamide delta agonists such as SNC80 may be limited by convulsant activity. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the electroencephalographic and convulsant activity produced by a high dose of 10 mg/kg SNC80 IM in rhesus monkeys. EEG and behavioral activity were examined in four adult male rhesus monkeys after IM administration of SNC80. Monkeys were seated in a standard primate restraint chair, and EEG activity was recorded using an array of 16 needle electrodes implanted subcutaneously in the scalp in a bipolar (scalp-to scalp) montage in a longitudinal direction, with bilateral frontal, central, temporal, and occipital leads. Behavior was recorded using video monitoring equipment. Initially, all monkeys were tested with 10 mg/kg SNC80, which is a relatively high dose 3–10 fold greater than doses necessary to produce a variety of other behavioral effects. Behavioral convulsions and EEG seizures were observed in one of the four monkeys. In this monkey, neither behavioral convulsions nor EEG seizures were observed when a lower dose of 3.2 mg/kg was administered nine weeks later or when the same dose of 10 mg/kg SNC80 was administered one year later. These results suggest that IM administration of SNC80 is less potent in producing convulsant effects than in producing other, potentially useful behavioral effects (e.g. antinociception) in rhesus monkeys. PMID:17112570

  2. Scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis by sinusoidal cells in rat bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Endocytosis of serum albumin by sinusoidal endothelial cells in rat bone marrow was investigated initially at the ultrastructural level with subsequent biochemical investigation of the specificity mediating this event. Bovine serum albumin adsorbed to 20nm colloidal gold particles (AuBSA) was chosen as the electron microscopic probe. Morphological data strongly suggested that a receptor was involved in uptake of AuBSA. Confirmation of receptor involvement in the uptake of AuBSA by marrow sinusoidal endothelial cells was achieved utilizing an in situ isolated hind limb perfusion protocol in conjunction with unlabeled, radiolabeled, and radio-/colloidal gold labeled probes. The major findings of competition and saturation experiments were: (1) endocytosis of AuBSA was mediated by a receptor for modified/treated serum albumin; (2) endocytosis of formaldehyde-treated serum albumin was mediated by a binding site which may be the same or closely related to the site responsible for the uptake of AuBSA; and (3) endocytosis of native untreated albumin was not mediated by receptor and probably represents fluid-phase pinocitosis.

  3. AMPA Receptor Endocytosis in Rat Perirhinal Cortex Underlies Retrieval of Object Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cazakoff, Brittany N.; Howland, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms consistent with long-term depression in the perirhinal cortex (PRh) play a fundamental role in object recognition memory; however, whether AMPA receptor endocytosis is involved in distinct phases of recognition memory is not known. To address this question, we used local PRh infusions of the cell membrane-permeable Tat-GluA2[subscript…

  4. Non-Ligand-Induced Dimerization is Sufficient to Initiate the Signalling and Endocytosis of EGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kourouniotis, George; Wang, Yi; Pennock, Steven; Chen, Xinmei; Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    The binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to EGF receptor (EGFR) stimulates cell mitogenesis and survival through various signalling cascades. EGF also stimulates rapid EGFR endocytosis and its eventual degradation in lysosomes. The immediate events induced by ligand binding include receptor dimerization, activation of intrinsic tyrosine kinase and autophosphorylation. However, in spite of intensified efforts, the results regarding the roles of these events in EGFR signalling and internalization is still very controversial. In this study, we constructed a chimeric EGFR by replacing its extracellular domain with leucine zipper (LZ) and tagged a green fluorescent protein (GFP) at its C-terminus. We showed that the chimeric LZ-EGFR-GFP was constitutively dimerized. The LZ-EGFR-GFP dimer autophosphorylated each of its five well-defined C-terminal tyrosine residues as the ligand-induced EGFR dimer does. Phosphorylated LZ-EGFR-GFP was localized to both the plasma membrane and endosomes, suggesting it is capable of endocytosis. We also showed that LZ-EGFR-GFP activated major signalling proteins including Src homology collagen-like (Shc), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt. Moreover, LZ-EGFR-GFP was able to stimulate cell proliferation. These results indicate that non-ligand induced dimerization is sufficient to activate EGFR and initiate cell signalling and EGFR endocytosis. We conclude that receptor dimerization is a critical event in EGF-induced cell signalling and EGFR endocytosis. PMID:27463710

  5. Effects of particle size and ligand density on the kinetics of receptor-mediated endocytosis of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongyan; Zhang, Sulin

    2010-01-01

    We elucidate, from thermodynamic arguments, the governing factors of receptor-mediated endocytosis of nanoparticles (NPs). We show that the endocytic energetics specifies a minimal particle size and a minimal ligand density below which endocytosis is not possible. Due to the entropic penalty involved in ligand-receptor binding, endocytosis may occur with a large fraction of ligands unbound with receptors. Our analyses suggest that the endocytic time depends interrelatedly on the particle size and ligand density. There exists an optimal condition at which the endocytic time minimizes. These findings may provide valuable guidance to the rational designs of NP-based biomarkers and anticancer bioagents.

  6. FUNCTION OF NON-VISUAL ARRESTINS IN SIGNALING AND ENDOCYTOSIS OF THE GASTRIN-RELEASING PEPTIDE RECEPTOR (GRP RECEPTOR)

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Michael; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Mantey, Samuel A.; Howell, Brian; Jensen, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the role of arrestins in gastrointestinal hormone/neurotransmitter receptor endocytosis. With other G protein-coupled receptors, arrestins induce G protein-uncoupling and receptor endocytosis. In this study, we used arrestin wild-type and dominant-negative mutant constructs to analyze the arrestin dependence of endocytosis and desensitization of the gastrin- releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R). Co-expression of the GRP-R with wild-type arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 increased not only GRP-R endocytosis but also GRP-R desensitization in arrestin-overexpressing cells. Co-expression of the dominant-negative mutants V53D-arrestin-2 or V54D-arrestin-3 reduced GRP-R endocytosis. Notably, different trafficking routes for agonist-activated GRPR-arrestin-2 and GRPR-arrestin-3 complexes were found. Arrestin-3 internalizes with GRP-R to intracellular vesicles, arrestin-2 splits from the GRP-R and localizes to the cell membrane. Also, the recycling pathway of the GRP-R was different if co-expressed with arrestin-2 or arrestin-3. Using different GRP-R mutants, the C-terminus and the 2nd intracellular loop of the GRP-R were found to be important for the GRPR-arrestin interaction and for the difference in GRP receptor trafficking with the two arrestin subtypes. Our results show that both non-visual arrestins play an important role in GRP-R internalization and desensitization. PMID:18199425

  7. Endocytosis and Trafficking of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Potential Role of Short Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    The targeted endocytosis and redistribution of transmembrane receptors among membrane-bound subcellular organelles are vital for their correct signaling and physiological functions. Membrane receptors committed for internalization and trafficking pathways are sorted into coated vesicles. Cardiac hormones, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) bind to guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and elicit the generation of intracellular second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which lowers blood pressure and incidence of heart failure. After ligand binding, the receptor is rapidly internalized, sequestrated, and redistributed into intracellular locations. Thus, NPRA is considered a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular locations through its lifetime. The utilization of pharmacologic and molecular perturbants has helped in delineating the pathways of endocytosis, trafficking, down-regulation, and degradation of membrane receptors in intact cells. This review describes the investigation of the mechanisms of internalization, trafficking, and redistribution of NPRA compared with other cell surface receptors from the plasma membrane into the cell interior. The roles of different short-signal peptide sequence motifs in the internalization and trafficking of other membrane receptors have been briefly reviewed and their potential significance in the internalization and trafficking of NPRA is discussed. PMID:26151885

  8. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis selectively attenuates specific insulin receptor signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Ceresa, B P; Kao, A W; Santeler, S R; Pessin, J E

    1998-07-01

    To examine the role of clathrin-dependent insulin receptor internalization in insulin-stimulated signal transduction events, we expressed a dominant-interfering mutant of dynamin (K44A/dynamin) by using a recombinant adenovirus in the H4IIE hepatoma and 3T3L1 adipocyte cell lines. Expression of K44A/dynamin inhibited endocytosis of the insulin receptor as determined by both cell surface radioligand binding and trypsin protection analysis. The inhibition of the insulin receptor endocytosis had no effect on either the extent of insulin receptor autophosphorylation or insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) tyrosine phosphorylation. In contrast, expression of K44A/dynamin partially inhibited insulin-stimulated Shc tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1 and -2. Although there was an approximately 50% decrease in the insulin-stimulated activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase associated with IRS1, insulin-stimulated Akt kinase phosphorylation and activation were unaffected. The expression of K44A/dynamin increased the basal rate of amino acid transport, which was additive with the effect of insulin but had no effect on the basal or insulin-stimulated DNA synthesis. In 3T3L1 adipocytes, expression of K44A/dynamin increased the basal rate of glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, and lipogenesis without any significant effect on insulin stimulation. Together, these data demonstrate that the acute actions of insulin are largely independent of insulin receptor endocytosis and are initiated by activation of the plasma membrane-localized insulin receptor. PMID:9632770

  9. Inhibition of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis Selectively Attenuates Specific Insulin Receptor Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ceresa, Brian P.; Kao, Aimee W.; Santeler, Scott R.; Pessin, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    To examine the role of clathrin-dependent insulin receptor internalization in insulin-stimulated signal transduction events, we expressed a dominant-interfering mutant of dynamin (K44A/dynamin) by using a recombinant adenovirus in the H4IIE hepatoma and 3T3L1 adipocyte cell lines. Expression of K44A/dynamin inhibited endocytosis of the insulin receptor as determined by both cell surface radioligand binding and trypsin protection analysis. The inhibition of the insulin receptor endocytosis had no effect on either the extent of insulin receptor autophosphorylation or insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) tyrosine phosphorylation. In contrast, expression of K44A/dynamin partially inhibited insulin-stimulated Shc tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1 and -2. Although there was an approximately 50% decrease in the insulin-stimulated activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase associated with IRS1, insulin-stimulated Akt kinase phosphorylation and activation were unaffected. The expression of K44A/dynamin increased the basal rate of amino acid transport, which was additive with the effect of insulin but had no effect on the basal or insulin-stimulated DNA synthesis. In 3T3L1 adipocytes, expression of K44A/dynamin increased the basal rate of glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, and lipogenesis without any significant effect on insulin stimulation. Together, these data demonstrate that the acute actions of insulin are largely independent of insulin receptor endocytosis and are initiated by activation of the plasma membrane-localized insulin receptor. PMID:9632770

  10. Effects of mu and delta opioid agonists and antagonists on affective vocal and reflexive pain responses during social stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Vivian, J A; Miczek, K A

    1998-10-01

    The present experiments evaluated the influence of intraventricular mu and delta opioid receptors on affective vocal and reflexive responses to aversive stimuli in socially inexperienced, as well as defensive and submissive responses in defeated, adult male Long-Evans rats. Defeat stress consisted of: (1) an aggressive confrontation in which the experimental intruder rat exhibited escape, defensive and submissive behaviors [i.e., upright, supine postures and ultrasonic vocalizations (USV)], and subsequently, (2) protection from the resident stimulus rat with a wire mesh screen for 10-20 min. Defeat stress was immediately followed by an experimental session with tactile startle (20 psi). The mu opioid receptor agonists morphine (0.1-0.6 microg i.c.v.) and [D-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4-Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO; 0.01-0.3 microg i.c.v.), and the delta opioid receptor agonist [D-Pen2,5]-enkephalin (DPDPE; 10-100 microg i.c.v.) dose-dependently decreased startle-induced USV and increased tail-flick latencies in socially inexperienced and defeated rats. Of greater interest, morphine, DAMGO and DPDPE increased the occurrence of the submissive crouch posture, and defeated rats were more sensitive than socially inexperienced rats to the startle-induced USV-suppressive and antinociceptive effects of morphine and DPDPE. The antinociceptive effects of DAMGO were likewise obtained at lower doses in defeated rats. Finally, the USV-suppressive effects of morphine and DAMGO were reversed with the mu receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.1 mg/kg i.p.), but the USV-suppressive effects produced by DPDPE were not reversed with the delta receptor antagonist naltrindole (1 mg/kg i.p.). These results confirm mu, but not delta opioid receptor activation as significant in affective vocal, passive-submissive behavior, as well as reflexive antinociception. Furthermore, similar to previous studies with restraint and electric shock stress, the facilitation of mu opioid effects on vocal responses and

  11. Expression of folate receptors in nasopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinoma and folate receptor-mediated endocytosis by molecular targeted nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Xie, M; Zhang, H; Xu, Y; Liu, T; Chen, S; Wang, J; Zhang, T

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry and an immunofluorescence technique was used to detect folate receptor expression in tissue samples and cell lines of head and neck squamous carcinoma, including 20 tissue samples of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, 16 tissue samples of laryngeal carcinoma, and HNE-1, HNE-2, CNE-1, CNE-2, SUNE-1, 5–8F, and Hep-2 cell lines. Iron staining, electron microscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging were used to observe endocytosis of folate-conjugated cisplatin-loaded magnetic nanoparticles (CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP) in cultured cells and transplanted tumors. As shown by immunohistochemistry, 83.3% (30/36) of the head and neck squamous carcinomas expressed the folate receptor versus none in the control group (0/24). Only the HNE-1 and Hep-2 cell lines expressed the folate receptor, and the other five cell lines did not. Endocytosis of CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP was seen in HNE-1 and Hep-2 cells by iron staining and electron microscopy. A similar result was seen in transplanted tumors in nude mice. Magnetic resonance imaging showed low signal intensity of HNE-1 cells and HNE-1 transplanted tumors on T2-weighted images after uptake of CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP, and this was not seen in CNE-2 transplanted tumors. In conclusion, head and neck squamous carcinoma cell strongly expressed the folate receptor, while normal tissue did not. The folate receptor can mediate endocytosis of folate-conjugated anticancer nanomedicines, and lays the foundation for molecular targeted treatment of cancer. PMID:23874095

  12. Endocytosis of a Functionally Enhanced GFP-Tagged Transferrin Receptor in CHO Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chong; Jiang, Qing; Zhu, Huifen; He, Yong; Yue, Tingting; Wang, Ruibo; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2015-01-01

    The endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR) has served as a model to study the receptor-targeted cargo delivery system for cancer therapy for many years. To accurately evaluate and optically measure this TfR targeting delivery in vitro, a CHO cell line with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged human TfR was established. A chimera of the hTfR and EGFP was engineered by fusing EGFP to the amino terminus of hTfR. Data were provided to demonstrate that hTfR-EGFP chimera was predominantly localized on the plasma membrane with some intracellular fluorescent structures on CHO cells and the EGFP moiety did not affect the endocytosis property of hTfR. Receptor internalization occurred similarly to that of HepG2 cells expressing wild-type hTfR. The internalization percentage of this chimeric receptor was about 81±3% of wild type. Time-dependent co-localization of hTfR-EGFP and PE-conjugated anti-hTfR mAb in living cells demonstrated the trafficking of mAb-receptor complexes through the endosomes followed by segregation of part of the mAb and receptor at the late stages of endocytosis. The CHO-hTfR cells preferentially took up anti-hTfR mAb conjugated nanoparticles. This CHO-hTfR cell line makes it feasible for accurate evaluation and visualization of intracellular trafficking of therapeutic agents conjugated with transferrin or Abs targeting the hTfRs. PMID:25803700

  13. Target shape dependence in a simple model of receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Richards, David M.; Endres, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis are vitally important particle uptake mechanisms in many cell types, ranging from single-cell organisms to immune cells. In both processes, engulfment by the cell depends critically on both particle shape and orientation. However, most previous theoretical work has focused only on spherical particles and hence disregards the wide-ranging particle shapes occurring in nature, such as those of bacteria. Here, by implementing a simple model in one and two dimensions, we compare and contrast receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis for a range of biologically relevant shapes, including spheres, ellipsoids, capped cylinders, and hourglasses. We find a whole range of different engulfment behaviors with some ellipsoids engulfing faster than spheres, and that phagocytosis is able to engulf a greater range of target shapes than other types of endocytosis. Further, the 2D model can explain why some nonspherical particles engulf fastest (not at all) when presented to the membrane tip-first (lying flat). Our work reveals how some bacteria may avoid being internalized simply because of their shape, and suggests shapes for optimal drug delivery. PMID:27185939

  14. Sustained cyclic AMP production by parathyroid hormone receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrandon, Sébastien; Feinstein, Timothy N; Castro, Marian; Wang, Bin; Bouley, Richard; Potts, John T; Gardella, Thomas J; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Cell signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTHR) is fundamental to bone and kidney physiology. It has been unclear how the two ligand systems—PTH, endocrine and homeostatic, and PTH-related peptide (PTHrP), paracrine—can effectively operate with only one receptor and trigger different durations of the cAMP responses. Here we analyze the ligand response by measuring the kinetics of activation and deactivation for each individual reaction step along the PTHR signaling cascade. We found that during the time frame of G protein coupling and cAMP production, PTHrP1–36 action was restricted to the cell surface, whereas PTH1–34 had moved to internalized compartments where it remained associated with the PTHR and Gαs, potentially as a persistent and active ternary complex. Such marked differences suggest a mechanism by which PTH and PTHrP induce differential responses, and these results indicate that the central tenet that cAMP production originates exclusively at the cell membrane must be revised. PMID:19701185

  15. The effect of vanadate on receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid in rat liver parenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kindberg, G.M.; Gudmundsen, O.; Berg, T. )

    1990-06-05

    Vanadate is a phosphate analogue that inhibits enzymes involved in phosphate release and transfer reactions. Since such reactions may play important roles in endocytosis, we studied the effects of vanadate on various steps in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid labeled with 125I-tyramine-cellobiose (125I-TC-AOM). The labeled degradation products formed from 125I-TC-AOM are trapped in the lysosomes and may therefore serve as lysosomal markers in subcellular fractionation studies. Vanadate reduced the amount of active surface asialoglycoprotein receptors approximately 70%, but had no effect on the rate of internalization and retroendocytosis of ligand. The amount of surface asialoglycoprotein receptors can be reduced by lowering the incubation temperature gradually from 37 to 15 degrees C; vanadate affected only the temperature--sensitive receptors. Vanadate inhibited degradation of 125I-TC-AOM 70-80%. Degradation was much more sensitive to vanadate than binding; half-maximal effects were seen at approximately 1 mM vanadate for binding and approximately 0.1 mM vanadate for degradation. By subcellular fractionation in sucrose and Nycodenz gradients, it was shown that vanadate completely prevented the transfer of 125I-TC-AOM from endosomes to lysosomes. Therefore, the inhibition of degradation by vanadate was indirect; in the presence of vanadate, ligand did not gain access to the lysosomes. The limited degradation in the presence of vanadate took place in a prelysosomal compartment. Vanadate did not affect cell viability and ATP content.

  16. CIN85 regulates dopamine receptor endocytosis and governs behaviour in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa, Noriaki; Haglund, Kaisa; Hölter, Sabine M; Grabbe, Caroline; Kirkin, Vladimir; Koibuchi, Noriyuki; Schultz, Christian; Rozman, Jan; Hoeller, Daniela; Qiu, Chun-Hong; Londoño, Marina B; Ikezawa, Jun; Jedlicka, Peter; Stein, Birgit; Schwarzacher, Stephan W; Wolfer, David P; Ehrhardt, Nicole; Heuchel, Rainer; Nezis, Ioannis; Brech, Andreas; Schmidt, Mirko H H; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Klingenspor, Martin; Bogler, Oliver; Wurst, Wolfgang; Deller, Thomas; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Dikic, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Despite extensive investigations of Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa (CIN85) in receptor trafficking and cytoskeletal dynamics, little is known about its functions in vivo. Here, we report the study of a mouse deficient of the two CIN85 isoforms expressed in the central nervous system, exposing a function of CIN85 in dopamine receptor endocytosis. Mice lacking CIN85 exon 2 (CIN85Δex2) show hyperactivity phenotypes, characterized by increased physical activity and exploratory behaviour. Interestingly, CIN85Δex2 animals display abnormally high levels of dopamine and D2 dopamine receptors (D2DRs) in the striatum, an important centre for the coordination of animal behaviour. Importantly, CIN85 localizes to the post-synaptic compartment of striatal neurons in which it co-clusters with D2DRs. Moreover, it interacts with endocytic regulators such as dynamin and endophilins in the striatum. Absence of striatal CIN85 causes insufficient complex formation of endophilins with D2DRs in the striatum and ultimately decreased D2DR endocytosis in striatal neurons in response to dopamine stimulation. These findings indicate an important function of CIN85 in the regulation of dopamine receptor functions and provide a molecular explanation for the hyperactive behaviour of CIN85Δex2 mice. PMID:20551902

  17. Endocytosis of Ligand-Activated Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Mediated by the Clathrin-Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Patrick M; Kang, Yuan-Lin; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is one of five G protein-coupled receptors activated by the lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Stimulation of S1PR1 by binding S1P or the synthetic agonist FTY720P results in rapid desensitization, associated in part with depletion of receptor from the cell surface. We report here combining spinning disc confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to show that rapid internalization of activated S1PR1 relies on a functional clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway. Uptake of activated S1PR1 was strongly inhibited in cells disrupted in their clathrin-mediated endocytosis by depleting clathrin or AP-2 or by treating cells with dynasore-OH. The uptake of activated S1P1R was strongly inhibited in cells lacking both β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2, indicating that activated S1PR1 follows the canonical route of endocytosis for G-protein coupled receptor's (GPCR)'s. PMID:26481905

  18. Endocytosis and the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Reinecke, James; Caplan, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The regulated intracellular transport of nutrient, adhesion, and growth factor receptors is crucial for maintaining cell and tissue homeostasis. Endocytosis, or endocytic membrane trafficking, involves the steps of intracellular transport that include, but are not limited to: internalization from the plasma membrane, sorting in early endosomes, transport to late endosomes/lysosomes followed by degradation, and/or recycling back to the plasma membrane via tubular recycling endosomes. In addition to regulating the localization of transmembrane receptor proteins, the endocytic pathway also controls the localization of non-receptor molecules. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Src (Src), and its closely related family members Yes and Fyn, represent three proteins whose localization and signaling activities are tightly regulated by endocytic trafficking. Here, we provide a brief overview of endocytosis, Src function and its biochemical regulation. We will then concentrate on recent advances in understanding how Src intracellular localization is regulated and how its subcellular localization ultimately dictates downstream functioning. Since Src kinases are hyperactive in many cancers, it is essential to decipher the spatiotemporal regulation of this important family of tyrosine kinases. PMID:25372749

  19. Role of Spinophilin in Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Endocytosis, Signaling, and Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Di Sebastiano, Andrea R; Fahim, Sandra; Dunn, Henry A; Walther, Cornelia; Ribeiro, Fabiola M; Cregan, Sean P; Angers, Stephane; Schmid, Susanne; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2016-08-19

    Activation of Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) activates signaling cascades, resulting in calcium release from intracellular stores, ERK1/2 activation, and long term changes in synaptic activity that are implicated in learning, memory, and neurodegenerative diseases. As such, elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying Group I mGluR signaling is important for understanding physiological responses initiated by the activation of these receptors. In the current study, we identify the multifunctional scaffolding protein spinophilin as a novel Group I mGluR-interacting protein. We demonstrate that spinophilin interacts with the C-terminal tail and second intracellular loop of Group I mGluRs. Furthermore, we show that interaction of spinophilin with Group I mGluRs attenuates receptor endocytosis and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, an effect that is dependent upon the interaction of spinophilin with the C-terminal PDZ binding motif encoded by Group I mGluRs. Spinophilin knock-out results in enhanced mGluR5 endocytosis as well as increased ERK1/2, AKT, and Ca(2+) signaling in primary cortical neurons. In addition, the loss of spinophilin expression results in impaired mGluR5-stimulated LTD. Our results indicate that spinophilin plays an important role in regulating the activity of Group I mGluRs as well as their influence on synaptic activity. PMID:27358397

  20. Macrophage Receptor with Collagenous Structure (MARCO) Is Processed by either Macropinocytosis or Endocytosis-Autophagy Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Seishiro; Kanno, Sanae

    2015-01-01

    The Macrophage Receptor with COllagenous structure (MARCO) protein is a plasma membrane receptor for un-opsonized or environmental particles on phagocytic cells. Here, we show that MARCO was internalized either by ruffling of plasma membrane followed by macropinocytosis or by endocytosis followed by fusion with autophagosome in CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with GFP-MARCO. The macropinocytic process generated large vesicles when the plasma membrane subsided. The endocytosis/autophagosome (amphisome) generated small fluorescent puncta which were visible in the presence of glutamine, chloroquine, bafilomycin, ammonia, and other amines. The small puncta, but not the large vesicles, co-localized with LC3B and lysosomes. The LC3-II/LC3-I ratio increased in the presence of glutamine, ammonia, and chloroquine in various cells. The small puncta trafficked between the peri-nuclear region and the distal ends of cells back and forth at rates of up to 2–3 μm/sec; tubulin, but not actin, regulated the trafficking of the small puncta. Besides phagocytosis MARCO, an adhesive plasma membrane receptor, may play a role in incorporation of various extracellular materials into the cell via both macropinocytic and endocytic pathways. PMID:26545255

  1. Endocytosis via coated pits mediated by glycoprotein receptor in which the cytoplasmic tail is replaced by unrelated sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Verrey, F; Gilbert, T; Mellow, T; Proulx, G; Drickamer, K

    1990-01-01

    Rat 6 fibroblast cell lines expressing wild-type chicken liver glycoprotein receptor (CHL) or chimeric receptors with alternate cytoplasmic tails were produced to study the role of the cytoplasmic tail in mediating receptor localization in coated pits and endocytosis of ligand. Cells expressing CHL or cells expressing a hybrid receptor that contains the cytoplasmic tail of the asialoglycoprotein receptor display high-efficiency endocytosis of N-acetylglucosamine-conjugated bovine serum albumin in experiments designed to measure an initial internalization step, as well as in studies of continuous uptake and degradation. Substitution of the cytoplasmic tail by the equivalent domain of rat Na,K-ATPase beta subunit or by a stretch of Xenopus laevis globin beta chain does not abolish endocytosis but decreases the endocytosis rate constant from 15%-16%/min to 2.4% and 6.5%/min, respectively. Electron microscopy was used to visualize the glycoprotein binding sites at the surface of Rat 6 cells transfected with the various receptors. The percentage of receptors found in coated areas ranged from 32% for CHL to 9% for the Na,K-ATPase hybrid, indicating that clustering in coated pits correlates with efficiency of endocytosis. We concluded that replacement of the CHL cytoplasmic tail with unrelated sequences does not prevent, but decreases to varying extents, coated-pit localization and endocytosis efficiency. The construct with NH2-terminal globin tail lacks a signal for high-efficiency localization in coated pits but nevertheless is directed to the pits by an alternative mechanism. Images PMID:1963794

  2. Understanding magnetic nanoparticle osteoblast receptor-mediated endocytosis using experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nhiem; Webster, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are promising candidates for controlling drug delivery through an external magnetic force to treat a wide range of diseases, including osteoporosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that in the presence of hydroxyapatite coated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, osteoblast (or bone forming cell) proliferation and long-term functions (such as calcium deposition) were significantly enhanced. Hydroxyapatite is the major inorganic component of bone. As a further attempt to understand why, in the current study, the uptake of such nanoparticles into osteoblasts was experimentally investigated and mathematically modeled. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using a co-precipitation method and were coated with hydroxyapatite. A cellular uptake experiment at low temperatures indicated that receptor-mediated endocytosis contributed to the internalization of the magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts. A model was further developed to explain the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts using receptor-mediated endocytosis. This model may explain the internalization of hydroxyapatite into osteoblasts to elevate intracellular calcium levels necessary to promote osteoblast functions to treat a wide range of orthopedic problems, including osteoporosis.

  3. Endocytosis of lutropin by Leydig cells through a pathway distinct from the high-affinity receptor.

    PubMed

    Bozon, V; Pajot-Augy, E; Vignon, X; Salesse, R

    1998-08-25

    In porcine Leydig cells in primary culture, 95% of the internalization of [125I]porcine lutropin ([125I]pLH, which bears sulfated GalNAc) could not be ascribed to the high-affinity LH receptor (LHR). In contrast, >40% of [125I]human choriogonadotropin (hCG, with sialylated sugar chains) uptake was performed by the LHR itself. When the LHR was down-regulated by excess unlabeled hormone, the LHR-independent incorporation of [125I]pLH could be inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion by sulfated polysaccharides such as fucoidan or chondroitin-(4 or 6)-sulfate, but not by other polyanionic compounds, nor by sulfated chondroitin disaccharides. Endocytosis occurred through a clathrin-dependent pathway and was inhibited by low temperature, endocytosis inhibitors, increased ionic strength, or by EDTA and dithiothreitol. Taken together, these results suggest that a Leydig cell membrane protein (possibly a lectin, or a glycosaminoglycan receptor) could perform specific LH clearance in the testis via recognition of its sulfated sugars. PMID:9806348

  4. Administration of pyrene lipids by receptor-mediated endocytosis and their degradation in skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Agmon, V.; Dinur, T.; Cherbu, S.; Dagan, A.; Gatt, S. )

    1991-10-01

    Sphingomyelin and seven glycosphingolipids were labeled with the fluorescent probe pyrene and administered into cultured fibroblasts by receptor-mediated endocytosis. For this purpose pyrene sphingomyelin or mixtures of pyrene glycolipid and unlabeled sphingomyelin were dispersed as small, unilamellar liposomes. Apolipoprotein E was then added and the receptor for this ligand on the cell surface was utilized for uptake of the liposomes and their transport to the lysosomes, where the respective pyrene lipids were degraded. Following incubation with each of the respective pyrene lipids, only the administered compound and the pyrene ceramide were present; intermediate hydrolysis products were not detected. This indicated that, in skin fibroblasts, the lysosomal ceramidase was limiting and controlled the rate of total degradation of the pyrene sphingolipids.

  5. Functional roles of short sequence motifs in the endocytosis of membrane receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2009-01-01

    Internalization and trafficking of cell-surface membrane receptors and proteins into subcellular compartments is mediated by specific short-sequence signal motifs, which are usually located within the cytoplasmic domains of these receptor and protein molecules. The signals usually consist of short linear amino acid sequences, which are recognized by adaptor coat proteins along the endocytic and sorting pathways. The complex arrays of signals and recognition proteins ensure the dynamic movement, accurate trafficking, and designated distribution of transmembrane receptors and ligands into intracellular compartments, particularly to the endosomal-lysosomal system. This review summarizes the new information and concepts, integrating them with the current and established views of endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, and sorting of membrane receptors and proteins. Particular emphasis has been given to the functional roles of short-sequence signal motifs responsible for the itinerary and destination of membrane receptors and proteins moving into the subcellular compartments. The specific characteristics and functions of short-sequence motifs, including various tyrosine-based, dileucine-type, and other short-sequence signals in the trafficking and sorting of membrane receptors and membrane proteins are presented and discussed. PMID:19482617

  6. Distinct CCR7 glycosylation pattern shapes receptor signaling and endocytosis to modulate chemotactic responses.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Mark A; Kindinger, Ilona; Laufer, Julia M; Späte, Anne-Katrin; Bucher, Delia; Vanes, Sarah L; Krueger, Wolfgang A; Wittmann, Valentin; Legler, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 and their common cognate chemokine receptor CCR7 orchestrate immune cell trafficking by eliciting distinct signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that human CCR7 is N-glycosylated on 2 specific residues in the N terminus and the third extracellular loop. Conceptually, CCR7 glycosylation adds steric hindrance to the receptor N terminus and extracellular loop 3, acting as a "swinging door" to regulate receptor sensitivity and cell migration. We found that freshly isolated human B cells, as well as expanded T cells, but not naïve T cells, express highly sialylated CCR7. Moreover, we identified that human dendritic cells imprint T cell migration toward CCR7 ligands by secreting enzymes that deglycosylate CCR7, thereby boosting CCR7 signaling on T cells, permitting enhanced T cell locomotion, while simultaneously decreasing receptor endocytosis. In addition, dendritic cells proteolytically convert immobilized CCL21 to a soluble form that is more potent in triggering chemotactic movement and does not desensitize the receptor. Furthermore, we demonstrate that soluble CCL21 functionally resembles neither the CCL19 nor the CCL21 phenotype but acts as a chemokine with unique features. Thus, we advance the concept of dendritic cell-dependent generation of micromilieus and lymph node conditioning by demonstrating a novel layer of CCR7 regulation through CCR7 sialylation. In summary, we demonstrate that leukocyte subsets express distinct patterns of CCR7 sialylation that contribute to receptor signaling and fine-tuning chemotactic responses. PMID:26819318

  7. Effect of the anti-receptor ligand-blocking 225 monoclonal antibody on EGF receptor endocytosis and sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Jaramillo, Maria L. . E-mail: maria.jaramillo@nrc.ca; Leon, Zully; Grothe, Suzanne; Paul-Roc, Beatrice; Abulrob, Abedelnasser; O'Connor McCourt, Maureen

    2006-09-10

    The anti-receptor antibody, 225 mAb, is known to block binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, the effect of this neutralizing antibody on EGFR endocytosis, trafficking and degradation remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that endocytosis of {sup 125}I-225 mAb occurs, albeit with a slower rate than that of EGF. Using pulse chase assays, we show that internalized {sup 125}I-225 mAb is recycled to the surface much more efficiently than internalized {sup 125}I-EGF. Also, we found that internalization of {sup 125}I-225 mAb, in contrast to that of EGF, is independent of receptor tyrosine kinase activity, as evidenced by its insensitivity to AG1478, a specific EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Analysis of the levels of cell surface and total EGFR showed that treatment with 225 mAb results in a 30-40% decrease in surface EGFR and a relatively slow downregulation of total EGFR. Taken together, these data indicate that 225 mAb induces internalization and downregulation of EGFR via a mechanism distinct from that underlying EGF-induced EGFR internalization and downregulation.

  8. Separation of the convulsions and antidepressant-like effects produced by the delta-opioid agonist SNC80 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jutkiewicz, E. M.; Traynor, J. R.; Woods, J. H.; Rice, K. C.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale Delta-opioid agonists produce a number of behavioral effects, including convulsions, anti-nociception, locomotor stimulation, and antidepressant-like effects. The development of these compounds as treatments for depression is limited by their convulsive effects. Therefore, determining how to separate the convulsive and antidepressant-like characteristics of these compounds is essential for their potential clinical use. Objective The present study tests the hypothesis that the rate of delta-opioid agonist administration greatly contributes to the convulsive properties, but not the anti-depressant-like effects, of delta-opioid agonists. Materials and methods The delta-opioid agonist SNC80 (1, 3.2, and 10 mg kg−1 or vehicle) was administered to Sprague–Dawley rats by intravenous infusion over different durations of time (20 s, 20, or 60 min). Convulsions were measured by observation prior to determining antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test. Results Slowing the rate of SNC80 administration minimized delta agonist-induced convulsions without altering the effects of SNC80 in the forced swim test. Conclusions These data suggest that delta agonist-induced antidepressant properties are independent of convulsive effects, and that it may be possible to eliminate the convulsions produced by delta agonists, further promoting their potential clinical utility. PMID:16163520

  9. Regulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling by Endocytosis and Intracellular Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Patrick; Schooler, Kevin; Wiley, H S.

    2001-06-01

    Ligand activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) leads to its rapid internalization and eventual delivery to lysosomes. This process is thought to be a mechanism to attenuate signaling, but signals could potentially be generated following endocytosis. To directly evaluate EGFR signaling during receptor trafficking, we developed a technique to rapidly and selectively isolate internalized EGFR and associated molecules using reversibly-biotinylated anti-EGFR antibodies. In addition, we developed antibodies specific to tyrosine-phosphorylated EGFR. Using a combination of fluorescence imaging and affinity precipitation approaches, we evaluated the state of EGFR activation and substrate association during trafficking in epithelial cells. We found that following internalization, EGFR remained active in the early endosomes. However, receptors were inactivated prior to degradation, apparently due to ligand removal from endosomes. Adapter molecules, such as Shc, were associated with EGFR both at the cell surface and within endosomes. Some molecules, such as Grb2, were primarily found associated with surface EGFR, while others, such as Eps8, were only found with intracellular receptors. During the inactivation phase, c-Cbl became EGFR-associated, consistent with its postulated role in receptor attenuation. We conclude that the association of the EGFR with different proteins is compartment-specific . In addition, ligand loss is the proximal cause of EGFR inactivation. Thus, regulated trafficking could potentially influence the pattern as well as the duration of signal transduction.

  10. Delivery of liposomes into cultured KB cells via folate receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Low, P S

    1994-02-01

    Folic acid was covalently conjugated to 66-nm liposomes via spacers of various lengths in an attempt to target the liposomes to KB cells expressing folate receptors. Spacers of short and intermediate lengths were unable to mediate association of folate-conjugated liposomes with receptor-bearing cells, however, use of a 250 A polyethyleneglycol spacer (PEG, M(r) approximately 3350) permitted avid uptake of the liposomes at approximately 2.5 x 10(5) sites/cell. The binding of folate-PEG liposomes to KB cells could be competitively inhibited by excess free folate or by antiserum against the folate receptor, demonstrating the interaction is mediated by the cell surface folate-binding protein. Following binding, cell-associated folate-PEG liposomes were internalized by folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C. These folate-PEG liposomes show potential for delivering large quantities of low molecular weight compounds nondestructively into folate receptor-bearing cells. PMID:8106354

  11. Neurokinin1 receptors regulate morphine-induced endocytosis and desensitization of mu opioid receptors in CNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Y. Joy; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Evans, Christopher J.; Williams, John T.; von Zastrow, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Mu opioid receptors (MORs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that mediate the physiological effects of endogenous opioid neuropeptides and opiate drugs such as morphine. MORs are co-expressed with neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1Rs) in several regions of the central nervous system (CNS) that control opioid dependence and reward. NK1R activation affects opioid reward specifically, however, and the cellular basis for this specificity is unknown. We found that ligand-induced activation of NK1Rs produces a cell autonomous and non-reciprocal inhibition of MOR endocytosis induced by diverse opioids. Studies using epitope-tagged receptors expressed in cultured striatal neurons and a neuroblastoma cell model indicated that this heterologous regulation is mediated by NK1R-dependent sequestration of arrestins on endosome membranes. First, endocytic inhibition mediated by wild type NK1Rs was overcome in cells over-expressing β-arrestin2, a major arrestin isoform expressed in striatum. Second, NK1R activation promoted sequestration of β-arrestin2 on endosomes, whereas MOR activation did not. Third, heterologous inhibition of MOR endocytosis was prevented by mutational disruption of β-arrestin2 sequestration by NK1Rs. NK1R-mediated regulation of MOR trafficking was associated with reduced opioid-induced desensitization of adenylyl cyclase signaling in striatal neurons. Further, heterologous regulation of MOR trafficking was observed in both amygdala and locus coeruleus neurons that naturally co-express these receptors. These results identify a cell autonomous mechanism that may underlie the highly specific effects of NK1R on opioid signaling and suggest, more generally, that receptor-specific trafficking of arrestins may represent a fundamental mechanism for coordinating distinct GPCR-mediated signals at the level of individual CNS neurons. PMID:19129399

  12. Effects of chronic ethanol administration on receptor mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid (ASOR) in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have previously shown that acute and chronic ethanol administration decreases hepatic glycoprotein secretion and membrane biogenesis. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of chronic ethanol feeding on receptor-mediated endocytosis using the endocytosis of ASOR as a model system. Rats were fed either rat chow ad lib or pair-fed with Lieber-DeCarli diet (ethanol or isocaloric glucose as 36% of total calories) for 5 to 7 weeks. Binding of /sup 125/I ASOR to isolated hepatocytes was studied at 0-4/sup 0/C. Internalization (cell-associated acid precipitable radioactivity) and degradation (acid soluble radioactivity) were determined at 37/sup 0/C for periods up to 240 min. Results were expressed as pmoles ASOR bound, degraded or internalized/10/sup 6/ cells. In ethanol-fed rats the number of pmoles ASOR bound/10/sup 6/ cells was decreased by 40-50% (p< 0.01) as compared to pair-fed and chow-fed animals. Rates of degradation and internalization of the ligand were also 50-70% lower (p< 0.01) in chronic ethanol-treated animals. No significant differences were observed for either binding or internalization of ASOR between chow-fed and pair-fed animals. These results indicate that chronic ethanol feeding decreases internalization and degradation of ASOR in rat hepatocytes.

  13. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubule cells is regulated by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J; Stuart, J; Tobin, A B; Walls, J; Nahorski, S

    1998-05-15

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin is an important function of the kidney proximal tubule epithelium. We have measured endocytosis of [125I]-albumin in opossum kidney cells and examined the regulation of this process by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). Albumin endocytosis was inhibited by both wortmannin (IC50 6.9 nM) and LY294002 (IC50 6.5 microM) at concentrations that suggested the involvement of PI 3-kinase in its regulation. Recycling rates were unaffected. We transfected OK cells with either a wild-type p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, or a dominant negative form of the p85 subunit (Deltap85) using the LacSwitch expression system. Transfects were screened by immunoblotting with anti-PI 3-kinase antibodies. Under basal conditions, transfects demonstrated no expression of p85 or Deltap85, but expression was briskly induced by treatment of the cells with IPTG (EC50 13.7 microM). Inhibition of PI 3-kinase activity by Deltap85 was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay of anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates from transfected cells stimulated with insulin. Expression of Deltap85 resulted in marked inhibition of albumin endocytosis, predominantly as a result of reduction of the Vmax of the transport process. Expression of p85 had no significant effect on albumin uptake. The results demonstrate that PI 3-kinase regulates an early step in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubular cells. PMID:9593770

  14. Endocytosis and trafficking of BMP receptors: Regulatory mechanisms for fine-tuning the signaling response in different cellular contexts.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2016-02-01

    Signaling by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors is regulated at multiple levels in order to ensure proper interpretation of BMP stimuli in different cellular settings. As with other signaling receptors, regulation of the amount of exposed and signaling-competent BMP receptors at the plasma-membrane is predicted to be a key mechanism in governing their signaling output. Currently, the endocytosis of BMP receptors is thought to resemble that of the structurally related transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) receptors, as BMP receptors are constitutively internalized (independently of ligand binding), with moderate kinetics, and mostly via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Also similar to TGF-β receptors, BMP receptors are able to signal from the plasma membrane, while internalization to endosomes may have a signal modulating effect. When at the plasma membrane, BMP receptors localize to different membrane domains including cholesterol rich domains and caveolae, suggesting a complex interplay between membrane distribution and internalization. An additional layer of complexity stems from the putative regulatory influence on the signaling and trafficking of BMP receptors exerted by ligand traps and/or co-receptors. Furthermore, the trafficking and signaling of BMP receptors are subject to alterations in cellular context. For example, genetic diseases involving changes in the expression of auxiliary factors of endocytic pathways hamper retrograde BMP signals in neurons, and perturb the regulation of synapse formation. This review summarizes current understanding of the trafficking of BMP receptors and discusses the role of trafficking in regulation of BMP signals. PMID:26776724

  15. A simple method to evaluate the optimal size of nanoparticles for endocytosis based on kinetic diffusion of receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinlei; Xing, Da

    2010-10-01

    We have presented an analytic thermodynamic model to elucidate the mechanism of receptor-mediated endocytosis of nanoparticles (NPs) and provided a simple method to evaluate the optimal size of NPs by minimizing the kinetic diffusion time of the free receptors around the bound region toward the contact surface with NPs. It is found that the average density of receptors and chemical energy release upon the binding of a ligand-receptor pair determine the optimal size of NPs if the bending modulus of membranes and the cross-sectional area of the receptor are constants. The optimal radius of NPs can be calculated based on our model.

  16. Endocytosis of pro-inflammatory cytokine receptors and its relevance for signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Hermanns, Heike M; Wohlfahrt, Julia; Mais, Christine; Hergovits, Sabine; Jahn, Daniel; Geier, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are key players of the innate and adaptive immunity. Their activity needs to be tightly controlled to allow the initiation of an appropriate immune response as defense mechanism against pathogens or tissue injury. Excessive or sustained signaling of either of these cytokines leads to severe diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis), steatohepatitis, periodic fevers and even cancer. Studies carried out in the last 30 years have emphasized that an elaborate control system for each of these cytokines exists. Here, we summarize what is currently known about the involvement of receptor endocytosis in the regulation of these pro-inflammatory cytokines' signaling cascades. Particularly in the last few years it was shown that this cellular process is far more than a mere feedback mechanism to clear cytokines from the circulation and to shut off their signal transduction. PMID:27071147

  17. The overexpressed human 46-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor mediates endocytosis and sorting of. beta. -glucuronidase

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, H.; Grubb, J.H.; Sly, W.S. )

    1990-10-01

    The authors studied the function of the human small (46-kDa) mannose 6-phosphate receptor (SMPR) in transfected mouse L cells that do not express the larger insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor. Cells overexpressing human SMPR were studied for enzyme binding to cell surface receptors, for binding to intracellular receptors in permeabilized cells, and for receptor-mediated endocytosis of recombinant human {beta}-glucuronidase. Specific binding to human SMPR in permeabilized cells showed a pH optimum between pH 6.0 and pH 6.5. Binding was significant in the present of EDTA but was enhanced by added divalent cations. Up to 2.3{percent} of the total functional receptor could be detected on the cell surface by enzyme binding. They present experiments showing that at very high levels of overexpression, and at pH 6.5, human SMPR mediated the endocytosis of {beta}-glucuronidase. At pH 7.5, the rate of endocytosis was only 14{percent} the rate seen at pH 6.5. Cells overexpressing human SMPR also showed reduced secretion of newly synthesized {beta}-glucuronidase when compared to cells transfected with vector only, suggesting that overexpressed human SMPR can participate in sorting of newly synthesized {beta}-glucuronidase and partially correct the sorting defect in mouse L cells that do not express the insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor.

  18. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase reduce receptor-mediated endocytosis in opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, James E; Davidson, Robert G; McTaggart, Fergus; Orton, Terry C; Scott, Robert C; Smith, Graham J; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2004-09-01

    Renal proximal tubule cells are responsible for the reabsorption of proteins that are present in the tubular lumen. This occurs by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process that has a requirement for some GTP-binding proteins. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase used for the therapeutic reduction of cholesterol-containing plasma lipoproteins. However, they can also reduce intracellular levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates that are derived from the product of the enzyme, mevalonate, and are required for the prenylation and normal function of GTP-binding proteins. The hypothesis that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase in renal proximal tubule cells could reduce receptor mediated-endocytosis was therefore tested. Five different statins inhibited the uptake of FITC-labeled albumin by the proximal tubule-derived opossum kidney cell line in a dose-dependent manner and in the absence of cytotoxicity. The reduction in albumin uptake was related to the degree of inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. Simvastatin (e.g., statin) inhibited receptor-mediated endocytosis of both FITC-albumin and FITC-beta(2)-microglobulin to similar extents but without altering the binding of albumin to the cell surface. The effect on albumin endocytosis was prevented by mevalonate and by the isoprenoid geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate but not by cholesterol. Finally, evidence that the inhibitory effect of statins on endocytosis of proteins may be caused by reduced prenylation and thereby decreased function of one or more GTP-binding proteins is provided. These data establish the possibility in principle that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by statins in proximal tubule cells may reduce tubular protein reabsorption. PMID:15339975

  19. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of lysozyme in renal proximal tubules of the frog Rana temporaria.

    PubMed

    Seliverstova, E V; Prutskova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of protein reabsorption in the kidney of lower vertebrates remains insufficiently investigated in spite of raising interest to the amphibian and fish kidneys as a useful model for physiological and pathophysiological examinations. In the present study, we examined the renal tubular uptake and the internalization rote of lysozyme after its intravenous injection in the wintering frog Rana temporaria using immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry and specific markers for some endocytic compartments. The distinct expression of megalin and cubilin in the proximal tubule cells of lysozyme-injected frogs was revealed whereas kidney tissue of control animals showed no positive immunoreactivity. Lysozyme was detected in the apical endocytic compartment of the tubular cells and colocalized with clathrin 10 min after injection. After 20 min, lysozyme was located in the subapical compartment negative to clathrin (endosomes), and intracellular trafficking of lysozyme was coincided with the distribution of megalin and cubilin. However, internalized protein was retained in the endosomes and did not reach lysosomes within 30 min after treatment that may indicate the inhibition of intracellular trafficking in hibernating frogs. For the first time, we provided the evidence that lysozyme is filtered through the glomeruli and absorbed by receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis in the frog proximal tubule cells. Thus, the protein uptake in the amphibian mesonephros is mediated by megalin and cubilin that confirms a critical role of endocytic receptors in the renal reabsorption of proteins in amphibians as in mammals. PMID:26150156

  20. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Lysozyme in Renal Proximal Tubules of the Frog Rana Temporaria

    PubMed Central

    Seliverstova, E.V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of protein reabsorption in the kidney of lower vertebrates remains insufficiently investigated in spite of raising interest to the amphibian and fish kidneys as a useful model for physiological and pathophysiological examinations. In the present study, we examined the renal tubular uptake and the internalization rote of lysozyme after its intravenous injection in the wintering frog Rana temporaria using immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry and specific markers for some endocytic compartments. The distinct expression of megalin and cubilin in the proximal tubule cells of lysozyme-injected frogs was revealed whereas kidney tissue of control animals showed no positive immunoreactivity. Lysozyme was detected in the apical endocytic compartment of the tubular cells and colocalized with clathrin 10 min after injection. After 20 min, lysozyme was located in the subapical compartment negative to clathrin (endo-somes), and intracellular trafficking of lysozyme was coincided with the distribution of megalin and cubilin. However, internalized protein was retained in the endosomes and did not reach lysosomes within 30 min after treatment that may indicate the inhibition of intra-cellular trafficking in hibernating frogs. For the first time, we provided the evidence that lysozyme is filtered through the glomeruli and absorbed by receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis in the frog proximal tubule cells. Thus, the protein uptake in the amphibian mesonephros is mediated by megalin and cubilin that confirms a critical role of endocytic receptors in the renal reabsorption of proteins in amphibians as in mammals. PMID:26150156

  1. Endocytosis and degradative sorting of NMDA receptors by conserved membrane-proximal signals.

    PubMed

    Scott, Derek B; Michailidis, Ioannis; Mu, Yuanyue; Logothetis, Diomedes; Ehlers, Michael D

    2004-08-11

    Regulation of the abundance of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) at excitatory synapses is critical during changes in synaptic efficacy underlying learning and memory as well as during synapse formation throughout neural development. However, the molecular signals that govern NMDAR delivery, maintenance, and internalization remain unclear. In this study, we identify a conserved family of membrane-proximal endocytic signals, two within the NMDAR type 1 (NR1) subunit and one within the NR2A and NR2B subunits, necessary and sufficient to drive the internalization of NMDARs. These endocytic motifs reside in the region of NMDAR subunits immediately after the fourth membrane segment, a region implicated in use-dependent rundown and NMDA channel inactivation. Although endocytosis driven by the distal C-terminal domain of NR2B is followed by rapid recycling, internalization mediated by membrane-proximal motifs selectively targets receptors to late endosomes and accelerates degradation. These results define a novel conserved signature of NMDARs regulating internalization and postendocytic trafficking. PMID:15306643

  2. Nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of EGFR involves receptor endocytosis, importin beta1 and CRM1.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hui-Wen; Ali-Seyed, Mohamed; Wu, Yadi; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2006-08-15

    Many receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can be detected in the cell nucleus, such as EGFR, HER-2, HER-3, HER-4, and fibroblast growth factor receptor. EGFR, HER-2 and HER-4 contain transactivational activity and function as transcription co-factors to activate gene promoters. High EGFR in tumor nuclei correlates with increased tumor proliferation and poor survival in cancer patients. However, the mechanism by which cell-surface EGFR translocates into the cell nucleus remains largely unknown. Here, we found that EGFR co-localizes and interacts with importins alpha1/beta1, carriers that are critical for macromolecules nuclear import. EGFR variant mutated at the nuclear localization signal (NLS) is defective in associating with importins and in entering the nuclei indicating that EGFR's NLS is critical for EGFR/importins interaction and EGFR nuclear import. Moreover, disruption of receptor internalization process using chemicals and forced expression of dominant-negative Dynamin II mutant suppressed nuclear entry of EGFR. Additional evidences suggest an involvement of endosomal sorting machinery in EGFR nuclear translocalization. Finally, we found that nuclear export of EGFR may involve CRM1 exportin as we detected EGFR/CRM1 interaction and markedly increased nuclear EGFR following exposure to leptomycin B, a CRM1 inhibitor. Collectively, these data suggest the importance of receptor endocytosis, endosomal sorting machinery, interaction with importins alpha1/beta1, and exportin CRM1 in EGFR nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking. Together, our work sheds light into the nature and regulation of the nuclear EGFR pathway and provides a plausible mechanism by which cells shuttle cell-surface EGFR and potentially other RTKs through the nuclear pore complex and into the nuclear compartment. PMID:16552725

  3. Wnt5a promotes cancer cell invasion and proliferation by receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively

    PubMed Central

    Shojima, Kensaku; Sato, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsujimoto, Ikuko; Nakamura, Masahiro; Hattori, Kazunari; Sato, Yuji; Dohi, Keiji; Hirata, Michinari; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kikuchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Wnt5a activates the Wnt/β-catenin-independent pathway and its overexpression is associated with tumor aggressiveness enhancing invasive activity. For this action, Wnt5a-induced receptor endocytosis with clathrin is required. Wnt5a expression was previously believed to be associated with cancer cell motility but not proliferation. Recently, it was reported that Wnt5a is also implicated in cancer cell proliferation, but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we generated a neutralizing anti-Wnt5a monoclonal antibody (mAb5A16) to investigate the mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates cancer cell proliferation. Wnt5a stimulated both invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells, including HeLaS3 cervical cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells although Wnt5a promoted invasion but not proliferation in other cancer cells such as KKLS gastric cancer cells. mAb5A16 did not affect the binding of Wnt5a to its receptor, but it suppressed Wnt5a-induced receptor-mediated endocytosis. mAb5A16 inhibited invasion but not proliferation of HeLaS3 and A549 cells. Wnt5a activated Src family kinases (SFKs) and Wnt5a-dependent cancer cell proliferation was dependent on SFKs, yet blockade of receptor-mediated endocytosis did not affect cancer cell proliferation and SFK activity. These results suggest that Wnt5a promotes invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:25622531

  4. Initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is unaffected but endocytosis is delayed in mice lacking the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Herz, J; Qiu, S Q; Oesterle, A; DeSilva, H V; Shafi, S; Havel, R J

    1995-01-01

    Two endocytic receptors, the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) and the LDLR-related protein (LRP), are thought to act in concert in the hepatic uptake of partially metabolized dietary lipoproteins, the chylomicron remnants. We have evaluated the role of these two receptors in the hepatic metabolism of chylomicron remnants in normal mice and in LDLR-deficient [LDLR (-/-)] mice. The rate of chylomicron remnant removal by the liver was normal up to 30 min after intravenous injection of chylomicrons into LDLR (-/-) mice and was unaffected by receptor-associated protein (RAP), a potent inhibitor of ligand binding to LRP. In contrast, endocytosis of the remnants by the hepatocytes, measured by their accumulation in the endosomal fraction and by the rate of hydrolysis of component cholesteryl esters, was dramatically reduced in the absence of the LDLR. Coadministration of RAP prevented the continuing hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants in LDL (-/-) mice after 30 min, consistent with blockade of the slow endocytosis by a RAP-sensitive process. Taken together with previous studies, our results are consistent with a model in which the initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is primarily mediated by mechanisms that do not include LDLR or LRP, possibly involving glycosaminoglycan-bound hepatic lipase and apolipoprotein E. After the remnants bind to these alternative sites on the hepatocyte surface, endocytosis is predominantly mediated by the LDLR and also by a slower and less efficient backup process that is RAP sensitive and therefore most likely involves LRP. PMID:7753850

  5. Complex Formation Facilitates Endocytosis of the Varicella-Zoster Virus gE:gI Fc Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Julie K.; Grose, Charles

    1998-01-01

    Open reading frames within the unique short segment of alphaherpesvirus genomes participate in egress and cell-to-cell spread. The case of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is of particular interest not only because the virus is highly cell associated but also because its most prominent cell surface protein, gE, bears semblance to the mammalian Fc receptor FcγRII. A previous study demonstrated that when expressed alone in cells, VZV gE was endocytosed from the cell surface through a tyrosine localization motif in its cytoplasmic tail (J. K. Olson and C. Grose, J. Virol. 71:4042–4054, 1997). Since VZV gE is normally found in association with gI in the infected cell, the present study was directed at defining the trafficking of the VZV gE:gI protein complex. First, VZV gI underwent endocytosis and recycling when it was expressed alone in cells, and interestingly, VZV gI contained a methionine-leucine internalization motif in its cytoplasmic tail. Second, VZV gI was found by confocal microscopy to colocalize with VZV gE during endocytosis and recycling in cells. Third, by a quantitative internalization assay, VZV gE:gI was shown to undergo endocytosis more efficiently (steady state, 55 to 60%) than either gE alone (steady state, ∼32%) or gI alone (steady state, ∼45%). Further, examination of endocytosis-deficient mutant proteins demonstrated that VZV gI exerted a more pronounced effect than gE on internalization of the complex. Most importantly, therefore, these studies suggest that VZV gI behaves as an accessory component by facilitating the endocytosis of the major constituent gE and thereby modulating the trafficking of the entire cell surface gE:gI Fc receptor complex. PMID:9445058

  6. Endocytosis separates EGF receptors from endogenous fluorescently labeled HRas and diminishes receptor signaling to MAP kinases in endosomes.

    PubMed

    Pinilla-Macua, Itziar; Watkins, Simon C; Sorkin, Alexander

    2016-02-23

    Signaling from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to extracellular-stimuli-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is proposed to be transduced not only from the cell surface but also from endosomes, although the role of endocytosis in this signaling pathway is controversial. Ras is the only membrane-anchored component in the EGFR-ERK signaling axis, and therefore, its location determines intracellular sites of downstream signaling. Hence, we labeled endogenous H-Ras (HRas) with mVenus fluorescent protein using gene editing in HeLa cells. mVenus-HRas was primarily located at the plasma membrane, and in small amounts in tubular recycling endosomes and associated vesicles. EGF stimulation resulted in fast but transient activation of mVenus-HRas. Although EGF:EGFR complexes were rapidly accumulated in endosomes together with the Grb2 adaptor, very little, if any, mVenus-HRas was detected in these endosomes. Interestingly, the activities of MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 remained high beyond the point of the physical separation of HRas from EGF:EGFR complexes and down-regulation of Ras activity. Paradoxically, this sustained MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation was dependent on the active EGFR kinase. Cell surface biotinylation and selective inactivation of surface EGFRs suggested that a small fraction of active EGFRs remaining in the plasma membrane is responsible for continuous signaling to MEK1/2 and ERK1/2. We propose that, under physiological conditions of cell stimulation, EGFR endocytosis serves to spatially separate EGFR-Grb2 complexes and Ras, thus terminating Ras-mediated signaling. However, sustained minimal activation of Ras by a small pool of active EGFRs in the plasma membrane is sufficient for extending MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activities. PMID:26858456

  7. Avr4 promotes Cf-4 receptor-like protein association with the BAK1/SERK3 receptor-like kinase to initiate receptor endocytosis and plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Postma, Jelle; Liebrand, Thomas W H; Bi, Guozhi; Evrard, Alexandre; Bye, Ruby R; Mbengue, Malick; Kuhn, Hannah; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Robatzek, Silke

    2016-04-01

    The first layer of plant immunity is activated by cell surface receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and proteins (RLPs) that detect infectious pathogens. Constitutive interaction with the SUPPRESSOR OF BIR1 (SOBIR1) RLK contributes to RLP stability and kinase activity. As RLK activation requires transphosphorylation with a second associated RLK, it remains elusive how RLPs initiate downstream signaling. We employed live-cell imaging, gene silencing and coimmunoprecipitation to investigate the requirement of associated kinases for functioning and ligand-induced subcellular trafficking of Cf RLPs that mediate immunity of tomato against Cladosporium fulvum. Our research shows that after elicitation with matching effector ligands Avr4 and Avr9, BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1/SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR KINASE 3 (BAK1/SERK3) associates with Cf-4 and Cf-9. BAK1/SERK3 is required for the effector-triggered hypersensitive response and resistance of tomato against C. fulvum. Furthermore, Cf-4 interacts with SOBIR1 at the plasma membrane and is recruited to late endosomes upon Avr4 trigger, also depending on BAK1/SERK3. These observations indicate that RLP-mediated resistance and endocytosis require ligand-induced recruitment of BAK1/SERK3, reminiscent of BAK1/SERK3 interaction and subcellular fate of the FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) RLK. This reveals that diverse classes of cell surface immune receptors share common requirements for initiation of resistance and endocytosis. PMID:26765243

  8. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism

  9. Dynamin 2-dependent endocytosis sustains T-cell receptor signaling and drives metabolic reprogramming in T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Willinger, Tim; Staron, Matthew; Ferguson, Shawn M.; De Camilli, Pietro; Flavell, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling is required for the proliferation of T lymphocytes. Ligation of the TCR activates signaling, but also causes internalization of the TCR from the cell surface. How TCR signaling is sustained for many hours despite lower surface expression is unknown. Using genetic inhibition of endocytosis, we show here that TCR internalization promotes continued TCR signaling and T-lymphocyte proliferation. T-cell–specific deletion of dynamin 2, an essential component of endocytosis, resulted in reduced TCR signaling strength, impaired homeostatic proliferation, and the inability to undergo clonal expansion in vivo. Blocking endocytosis resulted in a failure to maintain mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity and to stably induce the transcription factor myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-Myc), which led to metabolic stress and a defect in cell growth. Our results support the concept that the TCR can continue to signal after it is internalized from the cell surface, thereby enabling sustained signaling and cell proliferation. PMID:25831514

  10. Syndecan-4 Is a Receptor for Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis of Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yoshimasa; Takeuchi, Toshihide; Kuwata, Keiko; Chiba, Junya; Hatanaka, Yasumaru; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Futaki, Shiroh

    2016-04-20

    Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) such as Tat and oligoarginine peptides have been widely used as carriers for intracellular delivery of bioactive molecules. Despite accumulating evidence for involvement of endocytosis in the cellular uptake of arginine-rich CPPs, the primary cell-surface receptors for these peptide carriers that would initiate endocytic processes leading to intracellular delivery of bioactive cargoes have remained poorly understood. Our previous attempt to identify membrane receptors for octa-arginine (R8) peptide, one of the representative arginine-rich CPPs, using the photo-cross-linking probe bearing a photoreactive diazirine was not successful due to considerable amounts of cellular proteins nonspecifically bound to the affinity beads. To address this issue, here we developed a photo-cross-linking probe in which a cleavable linker of a diazobenzene moiety was employed to allow selective elution of cross-linked proteins by reducing agent-mediated cleavage. We demonstrated that introduction of the diazobenzene moiety into the photoaffinity probe enables efficient purification of cross-linked proteins with significant reduction of nonspecific binding proteins, leading to successful identification of 17 membrane-associated proteins that would interact with R8 peptide. RNAi-mediated knockdown experiments in combination with the pharmacological inhibitors revealed that, among the proteins identified, syndecan-4, one of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans, is an endogenous membrane-associated receptor for the cellular uptake of R8 peptide via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. This syndecan-4-dependent pathway was also involved in the intracellular delivery of bioactive proteins mediated by R8 peptide. These results reveal that syndecan-4 is a primary cell-surface target for R8 peptide that allows intracellular delivery of bioactive cargo molecules via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. PMID:27019270

  11. Zonal differences in ethanol-induced impairments in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoglycoproteins in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J. )

    1991-02-01

    We have shown previously that ethanol-induced defects in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid occurred as early as 1 wk after ethanol feeding. This study was undertaken as an initial attempt to establish a possible role of defective receptor-mediated endocytosis in liver injury by investigating whether differences exist in the effects of ethanol on receptor-mediated endocytosis in hepatocytes isolated from different regions of the liver. Perivenule cells, present in the distal half of the liver, are thought to be more susceptible to ethanol-induced liver injury than are the periportal cells located in the proximal half of the liver acini. For these studies, we fed male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 days with liquid diets containing either ethanol (36% of calories) or isocaloric carbohydrate. Perivenule and periportal hepatocytes were then isolated using a digitonin-collagenase perfusion method. In control animals, cells isolated from the perivenule region bound significantly more ligand than did cells from the periportal region. Amounts of ligand internalized and degraded were also greater in perivenule than in periportal cells in these animals. After ethanol feeding, cells isolated from both the perivenule and periportal regions bound significantly less ligand than their respective controls. This impairment in surface and total binding was more pronounced in perivenule than in periportal cells. Internalization and degradation of the ligand were also more adversely affected in the centrilobular region as shown by decreases of greater than 60% in perivenule cells and by only 20% to 30% in periportal cells of ethanol-fed animals compared with controls.

  12. Adaptor Protein 2 Regulates Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Cyst Formation in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Maria R.; Vranych, Cecilia V.; Bisbal, Mariano; Maletto, Belkys A.; Ropolo, Andrea S.; Touz, Maria C.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The parasite Giardia lamblia possesses peripheral vacuoles (PVs) that function as both endosomes and lysosomes and are implicated in the adaptation, differentiation, and survival of the parasite in different environments. The mechanisms by which Giardia traffics essential proteins to these organelles and regulates their secretion have important implications in the control of parasite dissemination. In this study, we describe the participation of the heterotetrameric clathrin-adaptor protein gAP2 complex in lysosomal protein trafficking. A specific monoclonal antibody against the medium subunit (gμ2) of gAP2 showed localization of this complex to the PVs, cytoplasm, and plasma membrane in the growing trophozoites. gAP2 also colocalized with clathrin in the PVs, suggesting its involvement in endocytosis. Uptake experiments using standard molecules for the study of endocytosis revealed that gAP2 specifically participated in the endocytosis of LDL. Targeted downregulation of the gene encoding gμ2 in growing and encysting trophozoites resulted in a large decrease in the amount of cell growth and cyst wall formation, suggesting a distinct mechanism in which gAP2 is directly involved in both endocytosis and vesicular trafficking. PMID:20199400

  13. Delta opioid receptors: reflexive, defensive and vocal affective responses in female rats.

    PubMed

    Haney, M; Miczek, K A

    1995-09-01

    Ultrasonic vocalizations may be an expression of the affective pain response in laboratory animals. The present experiment compares the effects of morphine to the delta agonist, DPDPE (D-Pen2,D-Pen5 enkephalin) on a range of reflexive, behavioral and affective responses during an aggressive interaction. In experiment 1, naive female Long-Evans rats received morphine (0, 1, 3, 6, 10 micrograms ICV), or DPDPE (0, 30, 60, 100 micrograms ICV). In experiment 2, female rats were treated with naltrindole (1.0 mg/kg IP) 20 min before DPDPE (0, 60, 100 micrograms ICV). The following endpoints were measured: (1) latency to tail flick in response to heat stimuli; (2) high (33-65 kHz) and low (20-32 kHz) frequency ultrasonic and audible vocalizations; (3) defensive behavior; and (4) motoric activity. Following a brief exposure to attack, rats were threatened by the aggressor but protected from further attack by a large, wire mesh cage, thereby allowing for continued behavioral and vocal measurement without the risk of physical injury; video and audio recordings were made during the attack and then during a portion of the protected encounter (2 min). Morphine suppressed pain reactions varying in complexity from a spinal reflex, to an organized escape reaction, to an affective vocal response. The delta agonist, DPDPE, attenuated high frequency ultrasonic calling and tail flick responding. Defensive behaviors were also modulated by DPDPE at doses that had no effect on walking or rearing, indicating behavioral specificity. By contrast, doses of morphine that decreased defensive upright and escape also decreased motor activity. In female rats, morphine and DPDPE share a common profile of effects on a range of functional end-points, but DPDPE appears to modulate more selectively the reactions related to aversiveness without exerting sedative effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8545526

  14. Corticosterone suppresses vasotocin-enhanced clasping behavior in male rough-skinned newts by novel mechanisms interfering with V1a receptor availability and receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Audrey; Abraham, Emily; McEvoy, Erin; Sonnenfeld, Sarah; Lewis, Christine; Hubbard, Catherine S; Dolence, E Kurt; Rose, James D; Coddington, Emma

    2015-03-01

    In rough-skinned newts, Taricha granulosa, exposure to an acute stressor results in the rapid release of corticosterone (CORT), which suppresses the ability of vasotocin (VT) to enhance clasping behavior. CORT also suppresses VT-induced spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness of clasp-controlling neurons in the rostromedial reticular formation (Rf). The cellular mechanisms underlying this interaction remain unclear. We hypothesized that CORT blocks VT-enhanced clasping by interfering with V1a receptor availability and/or VT-induced endocytosis. We administered a physiologically active fluorescent VT conjugated to Oregon Green (VT-OG) to the fourth ventricle 9 min after an intraperitoneal injection of CORT (0, 10, 40 μg/0.1mL amphibian Ringers). The brains were collected 30 min post-VT-OG, fixed, and imaged with confocal microscopy. CORT diminished the number of endocytosed vesicles, percent area containing VT-OG, sum intensity of VT-OG, and the amount of VT-V1a within each vesicle; indicating that CORT was interfering with V1a receptor availability and VT-V1a receptor-mediated endocytosis. CORT actions were brain location-specific and season-dependent in a manner that is consistent with the natural and context-dependent expression of clasping behavior. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the Rf to CORT was much higher in animals during the breeding season, arguing for ethologically appropriate seasonal variation in CORT's ability to prevent VT-induced endocytosis. Our data are consistent with the time course and interaction effects of CORT and VT on clasping behavior and neurophysiology. CORT interference with VT-induced endocytosis may be a common mechanism employed by hormones across taxa for mediating rapid context- and season-specific behavioral responses. PMID:25528549

  15. CPG2 Recruits Endophilin B2 to the Cytoskeleton for Activity-Dependent Endocytosis of Synaptic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Loebrich, Sven; Benoit, Marc Robert; Konopka, Jaclyn Aleksandra; Cottrell, Jeffrey Richard; Gibson, Joanne; Nedivi, Elly

    2016-02-01

    Internalization of glutamate receptors at the postsynaptic membrane via clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is a key mechanism for regulating synaptic strength. A role for the F-actin cytoskeleton in CME is well established, and recently, PKA-dependent association of candidate plasticity gene 2 (CPG2) with the spine-cytoskeleton has been shown to mediate synaptic glutamate receptor internalization. Yet, how the endocytic machinery is physically coupled to the actin cytoskeleton to facilitate glutamate receptor internalization has not been demonstrated. Moreover, there has been no distinction of endocytic-machinery components that are specific to activity-dependent versus constitutive glutamate receptor internalization. Here, we show that CPG2, through a direct physical interaction, recruits endophilin B2 (EndoB2) to F-actin, thus anchoring the endocytic machinery to the spine cytoskeleton and facilitating glutamate receptor internalization. Regulation of CPG2 binding to the actin cytoskeleton by protein kinase A directly impacts recruitment of EndoB2 and clathrin. Specific disruption of EndoB2 or the CPG2-EndoB2 interaction impairs activity-dependent, but not constitutive, internalization of both NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptors. These results demonstrate that, through direct interactions with F-actin and EndoB2, CPG2 physically bridges the spine cytoskeleton and the endocytic machinery, and this tripartite association is critical specifically for activity-dependent CME of synaptic glutamate receptors. PMID:26776730

  16. Kainate Receptor Post-translational Modifications Differentially Regulate Association with 4.1N to Control Activity-dependent Receptor Endocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Copits, Bryan A.; Swanson, Geoffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Kainate receptors exhibit a highly compartmentalized distribution within the brain; however, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that coordinate their expression at neuronal sites of action are poorly characterized. Here we report that the GluK1 and GluK2 kainate receptor subunits interact with the spectrin-actin binding scaffolding protein 4.1N through a membrane-proximal domain in the C-terminal tail. We found that this interaction is important for the forward trafficking of GluK2a receptors, their distribution in the neuronal plasma membrane, and regulation of receptor endocytosis. The association between GluK2a receptors and 4.1N was regulated by both palmitoylation and protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of the receptor subunit. Palmitoylation of the GluK2a subunit promoted 4.1N association, and palmitoylation-deficient receptors exhibited reduced neuronal surface expression and compromised endocytosis. Conversely, PKC activation decreased 4.1N interaction with GluK2/3-containing kainate receptors in acute brain slices, an effect that was reversed after inhibition of PKC. Our data and previous studies therefore demonstrate that these two post-translational modifications have opposing effects on 4.1N association with GluK2 kainate and GluA1 AMPA receptors. The convergence of the signaling pathways regulating 4.1N protein association could thus result in the selective removal of AMPA receptors from the plasma membrane while simultaneously promoting the insertion and stabilization of kainate receptors, which may be important for tuning neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity. PMID:23400781

  17. Kainate receptor post-translational modifications differentially regulate association with 4.1N to control activity-dependent receptor endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Copits, Bryan A; Swanson, Geoffrey T

    2013-03-29

    Kainate receptors exhibit a highly compartmentalized distribution within the brain; however, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that coordinate their expression at neuronal sites of action are poorly characterized. Here we report that the GluK1 and GluK2 kainate receptor subunits interact with the spectrin-actin binding scaffolding protein 4.1N through a membrane-proximal domain in the C-terminal tail. We found that this interaction is important for the forward trafficking of GluK2a receptors, their distribution in the neuronal plasma membrane, and regulation of receptor endocytosis. The association between GluK2a receptors and 4.1N was regulated by both palmitoylation and protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of the receptor subunit. Palmitoylation of the GluK2a subunit promoted 4.1N association, and palmitoylation-deficient receptors exhibited reduced neuronal surface expression and compromised endocytosis. Conversely, PKC activation decreased 4.1N interaction with GluK2/3-containing kainate receptors in acute brain slices, an effect that was reversed after inhibition of PKC. Our data and previous studies therefore demonstrate that these two post-translational modifications have opposing effects on 4.1N association with GluK2 kainate and GluA1 AMPA receptors. The convergence of the signaling pathways regulating 4.1N protein association could thus result in the selective removal of AMPA receptors from the plasma membrane while simultaneously promoting the insertion and stabilization of kainate receptors, which may be important for tuning neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity. PMID:23400781

  18. Towards predicting the lung fibrogenic activity of MWCNT: Key role of endocytosis, kinase receptors and ERK 1/2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Vietti, Giulia; Ibouraadaten, Saloua; Palmai-Pallag, Mihaly; Yakoub, Yousof; Piret, Jean-Pascal; Marbaix, Etienne; Lison, Dominique; van den Brule, Sybille

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been reported to induce lung inflammation and fibrosis in rodents. We investigated the direct and indirect cellular mechanisms mediating the fibrogenic activity of multi-wall (MW) CNT on fibroblasts. We showed that MWCNT indirectly stimulate lung fibroblast (MLg) differentiation, via epithelial cells and macrophages, whereas no direct effect of MWCNT on fibroblast differentiation or collagen production was detected. MWCNT directly stimulated the proliferation of fibroblasts primed with low concentrations of growth factors, such as PDGF, TGF-β or EGF. MWCNT prolonged ERK 1/2 phosphorylation induced by low concentrations of PDGF or TGF-β in fibroblasts. This phenomenon and the proliferative activity of MWCNT on fibroblasts was abrogated by the inhibitors of ERK 1/2, PDGF-, TGF-β- and EGF-receptors. This activity was also reduced by amiloride, an endocytosis inhibitor. Finally, the lung fibrotic response to several MWCNT samples (different in length and diameter) correlated with their in vitro capacity to stimulate the proliferation of fibroblasts and to prolong ERK 1/2 signaling in these cells. Our findings point to a crosstalk between MWCNT, kinase receptors, ERK 1/2 signaling and endocytosis which stimulates the proliferation of fibroblasts. The mechanisms of action identified in this study contribute to predict the fibrogenic potential of MWCNT. PMID:26444902

  19. Restoration of Physiologically Responsive Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis in Genetically Deficient Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Venkat M.; Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Tien, Kevin T.; McKinley, Thomas R.; Bocard, Braden R.; Maijub, John G.; Burchell, Patrick O.; Williams, Stuart K.; Morris, Marvin E.; Hoying, James B.; Wade-Martins, Richard; West, Franklin D.; Boyd, Nolan L.

    2015-01-01

    Acquiring sufficient amounts of high-quality cells remains an impediment to cell-based therapies. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) may be an unparalleled source, but autologous iPSC likely retain deficiencies requiring correction. We present a strategy for restoring physiological function in genetically deficient iPSC utilizing the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficiency Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) as our model. FH fibroblasts were reprogrammed into iPSC using synthetic modified mRNA. FH-iPSC exhibited pluripotency and differentiated toward a hepatic lineage. To restore LDLR endocytosis, FH-iPSC were transfected with a 31 kb plasmid (pEHZ-LDLR-LDLR) containing a wild-type LDLR (FH-iPSC-LDLR) controlled by 10 kb of upstream genomic DNA as well as Epstein-Barr sequences (EBNA1 and oriP) for episomal retention and replication. After six months of selective culture, pEHZ-LDLR-LDLR was recovered from FH-iPSC-LDLR and transfected into Ldlr-deficient CHO-a7 cells, which then exhibited feedback-controlled LDLR-mediated endocytosis. To quantify endocytosis, FH-iPSC ± LDLR were differentiated into mesenchymal cells (MC), pretreated with excess free sterols, Lovastatin, or ethanol (control), and exposed to DiI-LDL. FH-MC-LDLR demonstrated a physiological response, with virtually no DiI-LDL internalization with excess sterols and an ~2-fold increase in DiI-LDL internalization by Lovastatin compared to FH-MC. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of functionalizing genetically deficient iPSC using episomal plasmids to deliver physiologically responsive transgenes. PMID:26307169

  20. Restoration of Physiologically Responsive Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis in Genetically Deficient Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Venkat M; Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Tien, Kevin T; McKinley, Thomas R; Bocard, Braden R; Maijub, John G; Burchell, Patrick O; Williams, Stuart K; Morris, Marvin E; Hoying, James B; Wade-Martins, Richard; West, Franklin D; Boyd, Nolan L

    2015-01-01

    Acquiring sufficient amounts of high-quality cells remains an impediment to cell-based therapies. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) may be an unparalleled source, but autologous iPSC likely retain deficiencies requiring correction. We present a strategy for restoring physiological function in genetically deficient iPSC utilizing the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficiency Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) as our model. FH fibroblasts were reprogrammed into iPSC using synthetic modified mRNA. FH-iPSC exhibited pluripotency and differentiated toward a hepatic lineage. To restore LDLR endocytosis, FH-iPSC were transfected with a 31 kb plasmid (pEHZ-LDLR-LDLR) containing a wild-type LDLR (FH-iPSC-LDLR) controlled by 10 kb of upstream genomic DNA as well as Epstein-Barr sequences (EBNA1 and oriP) for episomal retention and replication. After six months of selective culture, pEHZ-LDLR-LDLR was recovered from FH-iPSC-LDLR and transfected into Ldlr-deficient CHO-a7 cells, which then exhibited feedback-controlled LDLR-mediated endocytosis. To quantify endocytosis, FH-iPSC ± LDLR were differentiated into mesenchymal cells (MC), pretreated with excess free sterols, Lovastatin, or ethanol (control), and exposed to DiI-LDL. FH-MC-LDLR demonstrated a physiological response, with virtually no DiI-LDL internalization with excess sterols and an ~2-fold increase in DiI-LDL internalization by Lovastatin compared to FH-MC. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of functionalizing genetically deficient iPSC using episomal plasmids to deliver physiologically responsive transgenes. PMID:26307169

  1. Adenosine A1 Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of AMPA Receptors Contributes to Impairments in Long-Term Potentiation (LTP) in the Middle-Aged Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhicheng; Stockwell, Jocelyn; Cayabyab, Francisco S

    2016-05-01

    Aging causes multiple changes in the mammalian brain, including changes in synaptic signaling. Previous reports have shown increased extracellular adenosine in the aging brain, and we recently reported that activation of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) induces AMPA receptor (AMPAR) internalization in rat hippocampus. This study investigated whether aging-related changes in the rat hippocampus include altered surface expression of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, and whether these changes correspond to changes in AMPAR surface expression and altered synaptic plasticity. We found reduced A1R surface expression in middle-aged rat hippocampus, and also reduced GluA1 and GluA2 AMPAR subunit surface expression. Using a chemically-induced LTP (cLTP) experimental protocol, we recorded fEPSPs in young (1 month old) and middle-aged (7-12 month old) rat hippocampal slices. There were significant impairments in cLTP in middle-aged slices, suggesting impaired synaptic plasticity. Since we previously showed that the A1R agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) reduced both A1Rs and GluA2/GluA1 AMPARs, we hypothesized that the observed impaired synaptic plasticity in middle-aged brains is regulated by A1R-mediated AMPAR internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Following cLTP, we found a significant increase in GluA1 and GluA2 surface expression in young rats, which was blunted in middle-aged brains or in young brains pretreated with CPA. Blocking A1Rs with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine or AMPAR endocytosis with either Tat-GluA2-3Y peptide or dynasore (dynamin inhibitor) similarly enhanced AMPAR surface expression following cLTP. These data suggest that age-dependent alteration in adenosine receptor expression contributes to increased AMPAR endocytosis and impaired synaptic plasticity in aged brains. PMID:26700433

  2. Clathrin-independent endocytosis used by the IL-2 receptor is regulated by Rac1, Pak1 and Pak2.

    PubMed

    Grassart, Alexandre; Dujeancourt, Annick; Lazarow, Paul B; Dautry-Varsat, Alice; Sauvonnet, Nathalie

    2008-04-01

    There are several endocytic pathways, which are either dependent on or independent of clathrin. This study focuses on a poorly characterized mechanism-clathrin- and caveolae-independent endocytosis-used by the interleukin-2 receptor beta (IL-2R beta). We address the question of its regulation in comparison with the clathrin-dependent pathway. First, we show that Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) is specifically required for IL-2R beta entry, and we identify p21-activated kinases (Paks) as downstream targets. By RNA interference, we show that Pak1 and Pak2 are both necessary for IL-2R beta uptake, in contrast to the clathrin-dependent route. We observe that cortactin, a partner of actin and dynamin-two essential endocytic factors-is required for IL-2R beta uptake. Furthermore, we find that cortactin acts downstream from Paks, suggesting control of its function by these kinases. Thus, we describe a cascade composed of Rac1, Paks and cortactin specifically regulating IL-2R beta internalization. This study indicates Paks as the first specific regulators of the clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. PMID:18344974

  3. Synergistic antidepressant-like effects between a kappa opioid antagonist (LY2444296) and a delta opioid agonist (ADL5859) in the mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Tallarida, Ronald; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-06-15

    Kappa opioid (KOP) receptor antagonists and delta opioid (DOP) receptor agonists have antidepressant-like effects in animal tests and may be useful for treatment-resistant depression in humans. In this study, we examined whether the combination of a KOP receptor antagonist and a DOP receptor agonist would produce a better than additive effect (i.e. synergy). LY2444296 is a short-acting selective nonpeptide KOP receptor antagonist. ADL5859 is a selective nonpeptide DOP receptor agonist which does not produce seizures and EEG disturbances. Each compound and combinations of the two were examined in the forced swim test (FST) one h post injection, a screening test for antidepressant-like effect, in male adult C57BL/6J mice (Jackson Lab). LY2444296 [subcutaneous (s.c.) injection] at 10 and 30mg/kg, but not 3mg/kg, significantly decreased immobility time in a dose-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of ADL5859 also reduced immobility time dose-dependently at doses of 3 and 10mg/kg, but not at 1mg/kg. An analysis was conducted using the method of Tallarida and Raffa (2010), which employed dose equivalence. The relative potency of the drugs was determined to be LY2444296: ADL5859=1:0.28, which was the dose ratio for combination studies. Six combinations of the two compounds were tested in mice at a fixed dose ratio. We found that LY2444296 and ADL5859 yielded significant synergistic effects for the antidepressant-like effect at the combined dose ranging from 3.84mg/kg to 9.0mg/kg. ADL5859 (10mg/kg), LY2444296 (30mg/kg) and their combined dose (3.84mg/kg) had no effects on locomotor activities. Since the two drugs have distinct pharmacological profiles, such a synergism will allow use of lower doses of both drugs to achieve desired antidepressant effects with fewer side effects. PMID:27044434

  4. Differential regulation of translation and endocytosis of alternatively spliced forms of the type II bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor.

    PubMed

    Amsalem, Ayelet R; Marom, Barak; Shapira, Keren E; Hirschhorn, Tal; Preisler, Livia; Paarmann, Pia; Knaus, Petra; Henis, Yoav I; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2016-02-15

    The expression and function of transforming growth factor-β superfamily receptors are regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms. The type II BMP receptor (BMPRII) is expressed as two alternatively spliced forms, a long and a short form (BMPRII-LF and -SF, respectively), which differ by an ∼500 amino acid C-terminal extension, unique among TGF-β superfamily receptors. Whereas this extension was proposed to modulate BMPRII signaling output, its contribution to the regulation of receptor expression was not addressed. To map regulatory determinants of BMPRII expression, we compared synthesis, degradation, distribution, and endocytic trafficking of BMPRII isoforms and mutants. We identified translational regulation of BMPRII expression and the contribution of a 3' terminal coding sequence to this process. BMPRII-LF and -SF differed also in their steady-state levels, kinetics of degradation, intracellular distribution, and internalization rates. A single dileucine signal in the C-terminal extension of BMPRII-LF accounted for its faster clathrin-mediated endocytosis relative to BMPRII-SF, accompanied by mildly faster degradation. Higher expression of BMPRII-SF at the plasma membrane resulted in enhanced activation of Smad signaling, stressing the potential importance of the multilayered regulation of BMPRII expression at the plasma membrane. PMID:26739752

  5. Epidermal growth factor–stimulated Akt phosphorylation requires clathrin or ErbB2 but not receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Garay, Camilo; Judge, Gurjeet; Lucarelli, Stefanie; Bautista, Stephen; Pandey, Rohan; Singh, Tanveer; Antonescu, Costin N.

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding to its receptor (EGFR) activates several signaling intermediates, including Akt, leading to control of cell survival and metabolism. Concomitantly, ligand-bound EGFR is incorporated into clathrin-coated pits—membrane structures containing clathrin and other proteins—eventually leading to receptor internalization. Whether clathrin might regulate EGFR signaling at the plasma membrane before vesicle scission is poorly understood. We compared the effect of clathrin perturbation (preventing formation of, or receptor recruitment to, clathrin structures) to that of dynamin2 (allowing formation of clathrin structures but preventing EGFR internalization) under conditions in which EGFR endocytosis is clathrin dependent. Clathrin perturbation by siRNA gene silencing, with the clathrin inhibitor pitstop2, or knocksideways silencing inhibited EGF-simulated Gab1 and Akt phosphorylation in ARPE-19 cells. In contrast, perturbation of dynamin2 with inhibitors or by siRNA gene silencing did not affect EGF-stimulated Gab1 or Akt phosphorylation. EGF stimulation enriched Gab1 and phospho-Gab1 within clathrin structures. ARPE-19 cells have low ErbB2 expression, and overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that robust ErbB2 expression bypassed the requirement for clathrin for EGF-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Thus clathrin scaffolds may represent unique plasma membrane signaling microdomains required for signaling by certain receptors, a function that can be separated from vesicle formation. PMID:26246598

  6. Differential regulation of translation and endocytosis of alternatively spliced forms of the type II bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor

    PubMed Central

    Amsalem, Ayelet R.; Marom, Barak; Shapira, Keren E.; Hirschhorn, Tal; Preisler, Livia; Paarmann, Pia; Knaus, Petra; Henis, Yoav I.; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The expression and function of transforming growth factor-β superfamily receptors are regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms. The type II BMP receptor (BMPRII) is expressed as two alternatively spliced forms, a long and a short form (BMPRII-LF and –SF, respectively), which differ by an ∼500 amino acid C-terminal extension, unique among TGF-β superfamily receptors. Whereas this extension was proposed to modulate BMPRII signaling output, its contribution to the regulation of receptor expression was not addressed. To map regulatory determinants of BMPRII expression, we compared synthesis, degradation, distribution, and endocytic trafficking of BMPRII isoforms and mutants. We identified translational regulation of BMPRII expression and the contribution of a 3’ terminal coding sequence to this process. BMPRII-LF and -SF differed also in their steady-state levels, kinetics of degradation, intracellular distribution, and internalization rates. A single dileucine signal in the C-terminal extension of BMPRII-LF accounted for its faster clathrin-mediated endocytosis relative to BMPRII-SF, accompanied by mildly faster degradation. Higher expression of BMPRII-SF at the plasma membrane resulted in enhanced activation of Smad signaling, stressing the potential importance of the multilayered regulation of BMPRII expression at the plasma membrane. PMID:26739752

  7. Altered Cortical GABAA Receptor Composition, Physiology, and Endocytosis in a Mouse Model of a Human Genetic Absence Epilepsy Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengwen; Huang, Zhiling; Ding, Li; Deel, M. Elizabeth; Arain, Fazal M.; Murray, Clark R.; Patel, Ronak S.; Flanagan, Christopher D.; Gallagher, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with generalized epilepsy exhibit cerebral cortical disinhibition. Likewise, mutations in the inhibitory ligand-gated ion channels, GABAA receptors (GABAARs), cause generalized epilepsy syndromes in humans. Recently, we demonstrated that heterozygous knock-out (Hetα1KO) of the human epilepsy gene, the GABAAR α1 subunit, produced absence epilepsy in mice. Here, we determined the effects of Hetα1KO on the expression and physiology of GABAARs in the mouse cortex. We found that Hetα1KO caused modest reductions in the total and surface expression of the β2 subunit but did not alter β1 or β3 subunit expression, results consistent with a small reduction of GABAARs. Cortices partially compensated for Hetα1KO by increasing the fraction of residual α1 subunit on the cell surface and by increasing total and surface expression of α3, but not α2, subunits. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Hetα1KO increased the fraction of α1 subunits, and decreased the fraction of α3 subunits, that associated in hybrid α1α3βγ receptors. Patch clamp electrophysiology studies showed that Hetα1KO layer VI cortical neurons exhibited reduced inhibitory postsynaptic current peak amplitudes, prolonged current rise and decay times, and altered responses to benzodiazepine agonists. Finally, application of inhibitors of dynamin-mediated endocytosis revealed that Hetα1KO reduced base-line GABAAR endocytosis, an effect that probably contributes to the observed changes in GABAAR expression. These findings demonstrate that Hetα1KO exerts two principle disinhibitory effects on cortical GABAAR-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission: 1) a modest reduction of GABAAR number and 2) a partial compensation with GABAAR isoforms that possess physiological properties different from those of the otherwise predominant α1βγ GABAARs. PMID:23744069

  8. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials Undergoes Flat Vesiculation and Occurs by Revolution and Self-Rotation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chen, Pengyu; Liang, Junshi; Guo, Ruohai; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and transitional metal dichalcogenide nanosheets, are promising materials for the development of antimicrobial surfaces and the nanocarriers for intracellular therapy. Understanding cell interaction with these emerging materials is an urgently important issue to promoting their wide applications. Experimental studies suggest that two-dimensional nanomaterials enter cells mainly through receptor-mediated endocytosis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and kinetic pathways of such processes remain unknown. Here, we combine computer simulations and theoretical derivation of the energy within the system to show that the receptor-mediated transport of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene nanosheet across model lipid membrane, experiences a flat vesiculation event governed by the receptor density and membrane tension. The graphene nanosheet is found to undergo revolution relative to the membrane and, particularly, unique self-rotation around its normal during membrane wrapping. We derive explicit expressions for the formation of the flat vesiculation, which reveals that the flat vesiculation event can be fundamentally dominated by a dimensionless parameter and a defined relationship determined by complicated energy contributions. The mechanism offers an essential understanding on the cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of the emerging two-dimensional nanomaterials. PMID:26741298

  9. Mannose 6-phosphate receptor-dependent endocytosis of lysosomal enzymes is increased in sulfatide-storing kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Klein, Diana; Yaghootfam, Afshin; Matzner, Ullrich; Koch, Bettina; Braulke, Thomas; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2009-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy is a lysosomal disorder caused by the deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ASA). This leads to the storage of the sphingolipid 3-O-sulfogalactosylceramide (sulfatide) in various cell types, such as renal tubular cells. Examination of mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR300)-dependent endocytosis revealed that uptake of lysosomal enzymes is more than two-fold increased in sulfatide-storing kidney cells. Expression of MPR300 and its internalization rate is increased in these cells, whereas the recycling rate is decreased. Similar alterations can be found for the transferrin receptor, indicating that sulfatide storage leads to a general alteration of the endocytotic pathway. These data allow calculating that the endosomal pool from which receptors can recycle is 1.4- to 2-fold increased in lipid-storing cells. Immunocytochemistry demonstrates that the MPR300 in lipid-storing cells does not co-localize with accumulated sulfatide, suggesting that the kinetics of internalization and recycling appear to be altered indirectly. PMID:19007310

  10. The endocytosis of epidermal growth factor in A431 cells: A pH of microenvironment and the dynamics of receptor complex dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Sorkin, A.D.; Teslenko, L.V.; Nikolsky, N.N. )

    1988-03-01

    The endocytosis and intracellular fate of epidermal growth factor (EGF) were studied in A431 cells. After 15-20 min of internalization at 37{degree}C, rhodomaine-labeled ({sup 125}-I) EGF (EGR-Rh) accumulated into large juxtanuclear compartment consisting of closely related vesicles. This structure was shown to be localized in the para-Golgi region. Fluorescein-labeled transferrin (Tr-FITC) was observed in the same region when added to the cell simultaneously with EGF-Rh. Using microscopy spectrofluorometer, the authors determined that the Tr-FITC-containing para-Golgi structures have a pH of 6.1{plus minus}0.3 while lysosomes containing dextran-fluorescein have a pH of 5.0{plus minus}0.2. To study the dynamics of EGF-receptor dissociation during endocytosis a mild detergent treatment of living cells was used for extraction of an intracellular receptor-unbound EGF. These results suggest that EGF remains associated with receptors during endocytosis in A431 cells until it is transferred to lysosomes where the pH of the EGF microenvironment is dropped to 5. A prolonged presence of EGF-receptor complexes in the para-Golgi region might be of importance in mitotic signaling.

  11. Dynamics of Virus-Receptor Interactions in Virus Binding, Signaling, and Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Boulant, Steeve; Stanifer, Megan; Lozach, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    During viral infection the first challenge that viruses have to overcome is gaining access to the intracellular compartment. The infection process starts when the virus contacts the surface of the host cell. A complex series of events ensues, including diffusion at the host cell membrane surface, binding to receptors, signaling, internalization, and delivery of the genetic information. The focus of this review is on the very initial steps of virus entry, from receptor binding to particle uptake into the host cell. We will discuss how viruses find their receptor, move to sub-membranous regions permissive for entry, and how they hijack the receptor-mediated signaling pathway to promote their internalization. PMID:26043381

  12. Ligand-Mediated Endocytosis and Intracellular Sequestration of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptors: Role of GDAY Motif

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    The guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), also referred to as GC-A, is a single polypeptide molecule having a critical function in blood pressure regulation and cardiovascular homeostasis. GC-A/NPRA, which resides in the plasma membrane, consists of an extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single transmembrane domain, and an intracellular cytoplasmic region containing a protein kinase-like homology domain (KHD) and a guanylyl cyclase (GC) catalytic domain. After binding with atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP), GC-A/NPRA is internalized and sequestered into intracellular compartments. Therefore, GC-A/NPRA is a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular compartments through its lifetime. This review describes the roles of short-signal sequences in the internalization, trafficking, and intracellular redistribution of GC-A/NPRA from cell surface to cell interior. Evidence indicates that, after internalization, the ligand-receptor complexes dissociate inside the cell and a population of GC-A/NPRA recycles back to the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the disassociated ligands are degraded in the lysosomes. However a small percentage of the ligand escapes the lysosomal degradative pathway and is released intact into culture medium. By using pharmacologic and molecular perturbants, emphasis has been placed on the cellular regulation and processing of ligand-bound GC-A/NPRA in terms of receptor trafficking and down-regulation in intact cells. The discussion is concluded by examining the functions of short-signal sequence motifs in the cellular life-cycle of GC-A/NPRA, including endocytosis, trafficking, metabolic processing, inactivation, and/or down-regulation in model cell systems. PMID:19941037

  13. Second-messenger regulation of receptor association with clathrin-coated pits: a novel and selective mechanism in the control of CD4 endocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Foti, M; Carpentier, J L; Aiken, C; Trono, D; Lew, D P; Krause, K H

    1997-01-01

    CD4, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is not only expressed in T4 helper lymphocytes but also in myeloid cells. Receptor-mediated endocytosis plays a crucial role in the regulation of surface expression of adhesion molecules such as CD4. In T lymphocytes p56lck, a CD4-associated tyrosine kinase, prevents CD4 internalization, but in myeloid cells p56lck is not expressed and CD4 is constitutively internalized. In this study, we have investigated the role of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in the regulation of CD4 endocytosis in the myeloid cell line HL-60. Elevations of cellular cAMP were elicited by 1) cholera toxin, 2) pertussis toxin, 3) forskolin and IBMX, 4) NaF, or 5) the physiological receptor agonist prostaglandin E1. All five interventions led to an inhibition of CD4 internalization. Increased cAMP levels did not inhibit endocytosis per se, because internalization of insulin receptors and transferrin receptors and fluid phase endocytosis were either unchanged or slightly enhanced. The mechanism of cAMP inhibition was further analyzed at the ultrastructural level. CD4 internalization, followed either by quantitative electron microscopy autoradiography or by immunogold labeling, showed a rapid and temperature-dependent association of CD4 with clathrin-coated pits in control cells. This association was markedly inhibited in cells with elevated cAMP levels. Thus these findings suggest a second-messenger regulation of CD4 internalization through an inhibition of CD4 association with clathrin-coated pits in p56lck-negative cells. Images PMID:9243514

  14. Archaeosomes varying in lipid composition differ in receptor-mediated endocytosis and differentially adjuvant immune responses to entrapped antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sprott, G. Dennis; Sad, Subash; Fleming, L. Perry; DiCaire, Chantal J.; Patel, Girishchandra B.; Krishnan, Lakshmi

    2003-01-01

    Archaeosomes prepared from total polar lipids extracted from six archaeal species with divergent lipid compositions had the capacity to deliver antigen for presentation via both MHC class I and class II pathways. Lipid extracts from Halobacterium halobium and from Halococcus morrhuae strains 14039 and 16008 contained archaetidylglycerol methylphosphate and sulfated glycolipids rich in mannose residues, and lacked archaetidylserine, whereas the opposite was found in Methanobrevibacter smithii, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanococcus jannaschii. Annexin V labeling revealed a surface orientation of phosphoserine head groups in M. smithii, M. mazei and M. jannaschii archaeosomes. Uptake of rhodamine-labeled M. smithii or M. jannaschii archaeosomes by murine peritoneal macrophages was inhibited by unlabeled liposomes containing phosphatidylserine, by the sulfhydryl inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide, and by ATP depletion using azide plus fluoride, but not by H. halobium archaeosomes. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide failed to inhibit uptake of the four other rhodamine-labeled archaeosome types, and azide plus fluoride did not inhibit uptake of H. halobium or H. morrhuae archaeosomes. These results suggest endocytosis ofarchaeosomes rich in surface-exposed phosphoserine head groups via a phosphatidylserine receptor, and energy-independent surface adsorption of certain other archaeosome composition classes. Lipid composition affected not only the endocytic mechanism, but also served to differentially modulate the activation of dendritic cells. The induction of IL-12 secretion from dendritic cells exposed to H. morrhuae 14039 archaeosomes was striking compared with cells exposed to archaeosomes from 16008. Thus, archaeosome types uniquely modulate antigen delivery and dendritic cell activation. PMID:15803661

  15. Clathrin-independent endocytosis used by the IL-2 receptor is regulated by Rac1, Pak1 and Pak2

    PubMed Central

    Grassart, Alexandre; Dujeancourt, Annick; Lazarow, Paul B; Dautry-Varsat, Alice; Sauvonnet, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    There are several endocytic pathways, which are either dependent on or independent of clathrin. This study focuses on a poorly characterized mechanism—clathrin- and caveolae-independent endocytosis—used by the interleukin-2 receptor β (IL-2Rβ). We address the question of its regulation in comparison with the clathrin-dependent pathway. First, we show that Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) is specifically required for IL-2Rβ entry, and we identify p21-activated kinases (Paks) as downstream targets. By RNA interference, we show that Pak1 and Pak2 are both necessary for IL-2Rβ uptake, in contrast to the clathrin-dependent route. We observe that cortactin, a partner of actin and dynamin—two essential endocytic factors—is required for IL-2Rβ uptake. Furthermore, we find that cortactin acts downstream from Paks, suggesting control of its function by these kinases. Thus, we describe a cascade composed of Rac1, Paks and cortactin specifically regulating IL-2Rβ internalization. This study indicates Paks as the first specific regulators of the clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. PMID:18344974

  16. UBIQUITINATION OF β-ARRESTIN LINKS 7-TRANSMEMBRANE RECEPTOR ENDOCYTOSIS AND ERK ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Sudha K.; Barak, Larry S.; Xiao, Kunhong; Ahn, Seungkirl; Berthouze, Magali; Shukla, Arun K.; Luttrell, Louis M.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    β-arrestin2 and its ubiquitination play crucial roles in both internalization and signaling of seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs). To understand the connection between ubiquitination and β-arrestin’s endocytic and signaling functions, we generated a β-arrestin2 mutant that is defective in ubiquitination (β-arrestin20K), by mutating all the ubiquitin acceptor lysines to arginines and compared its properties with the wild type and a stably ubiquitinated β-arrestin2-Ub chimera. In vitro translated β-arrestin2 and β-arrestin20K displayed equivalent binding to recombinant β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) reconstituted in vesicles, while β-arrestin2-Ub bound approximately four fold more. In cellular coimmunoprecipitation assays, β-arrestin20K bound non-receptor partners such as AP-2 and c-Raf and scaffolded pERK robustly, but displayed weak binding to clathrin. Moreover, β-arrestin20K was recruited only transiently to activated receptors at the membrane, did not enhance receptor internalization and decreased the amount of pERK assimilated into isolated β2AR complexes. While the wild type β-arrestin2 formed ERK signaling complexes with the β2AR at the membrane, a stably ubiquitinated β-arrestin2-Ub chimera, not only stabilized the ERK signalosomes but also led to their endosomal targeting. Interestingly, in cellular fractionation assays the ubiquitination state of β-arrestin2 favors its distribution in membrane fractions suggesting that ubiquitination increases β-arrestin’s propensity for membrane association. Our findings suggest that although β-arrestin ubiquitination is dispensable for β-arrestin’s cytosol to membrane translocation and its ‘constitutive’ interactions with some cytosolic proteins, it nevertheless is a prerequisite both for the formation of tight complexes with 7TMRs in vivo as well as for membrane compartment interactions that are crucial for downstream endocytic and signaling processes. PMID:17666399

  17. Calcium-Sensing Receptor: Trafficking, Endocytosis, Recycling, and Importance of Interacting Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ray, Kausik

    2015-01-01

    The cloning of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) provided a new paradigm in G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in which principal physiological ligand is a cation, namely, extracellular calcium (Ca(o)(2+)). A wealth of information has accumulated in the past two decades about the CaSR's structure and function, its contribution to pathology in disorders of calcium in humans, and CaSR-based therapeutics. The CaSR unlike many other GPCRs must function in the presence of its ligand, thus understanding the mechanisms such as anterograde trafficking and endocytic pathways of this receptor are complex and fallen behind other classical GPCRs. Factors controlling CaSR signaling include various proteins affecting the expression of the CaSR as well as modulation of its trafficking to and from the cell surface. The dimeric cell-surface CaSR links to various heterotrimeric G-proteins (G(q/11), G(i/o), G(12/13), and G(s)) to regulate intracellular second messengers, lipid kinases, various protein kinases, and transcription factors that are part of the machinery enabling the receptor to modulate the functions of the wide variety of cells in which it is expressed. This chapter describes key features of CaSR structure and function and discusses novel mechanisms by which the level of cell-surface receptor expression can be regulated including forward trafficking during biosynthesis, desensitization, internalization and recycling from the cell surface, and degradation. These processes are impacted by its interactions with several proteins in addition to signaling molecules per se (i.e., G-proteins, protein kinases, inositol phosphates, etc.) and include small molecular weight G-proteins (Sar1, Rabs, ARF, P24A, RAMPs, filamin A, 14-3-3 proteins, calmodulin, and caveolin-1). Moreover, CaSR signaling seems compartmentalized in cell-type-specific manner, and caveolin and filamin A likely act as scaffolds that bind signaling components and other key cellular

  18. Acute cross-tolerance to opioids in heroin delta-opioid-responding Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Rady, J J; Fujimoto, J M

    2000-01-01

    It is generally thought that the mu receptor actions of metabolites, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6MAM) and morphine, account for the pharmacological actions of heroin. However, upon intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration in Swiss Webster mice, heroin and 6MAM act on delta receptors while morphine acts on mu receptors. Swiss Webster mice made tolerant to subcutaneous (s.c.) morphine by morphine pellet were not cross-tolerant to s.c. heroin (at 20 min in the tail flick test). Now, opioids were given in combination, s.c. (6.5 h) and i.c.v. (3 h) preceding testing the challenging agonist i.c.v. (at 10 min in the tail flick test). The combination (s.c. + i.c.v.) morphine pretreatment induced tolerance to the mu action of morphine but no cross-tolerance to the delta action of heroin, 6MAM and DPDPE and explained why morphine pelleting did not produce cross-tolerance to s.c. heroin above. Heroin plus heroin produced tolerance to delta agonists but not to mu agonists. Surprisingly, all combinations of morphine with the delta agonists produced tolerance to morphine which now acted through delta receptors (inhibited by i.c.v. naltrindole), an unusual change in receptor selectivity for morphine. PMID:10810246

  19. Knockdown of GnT-Va expression inhibits ligand-induced downregulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and intracellular signaling by inhibiting receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hua-Bei; Johnson, Heather; Randolph, Matthew; Lee, Intaek; Pierce, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the expression of N-glycan branching glycosyltransferases can alter cell surface receptor functions, involving their levels of cell surface retention, rates of internalization into the endosomal compartment, and subsequent intracellular signaling. To study in detail the regulation of signaling of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by GlcNAcβ(1,6)Man branching, we utilized specific siRNA to selectively knockdown GnT-Va expression in the highly invasive human breast carcinoma line MDA-MB231, which resulted in the attenuation of its invasiveness-related phenotypes. Compared to control cells, ligand-induced downregulation of EGFR was significantly inhibited in GnT-Va-suppressed cells. This effect could be reversed by re-expression of GnT-Va, indicating that changes in ligand-induced receptor downregulation were dependent on GnT-Va activity. Knockdown of GnT-Va had no significant effect on c-Cbl mediated receptor ubiquitination and degradation, but did cause the inhibition of receptor internalization, showing that altered signaling and delayed ligand-induced downregulation of EGFR expression resulted from decreased EGFR endocytosis. Similar results were obtained with HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells treated with GnT-Va siRNA. Inhibited receptor internalization caused by the expression of GnT-Va siRNA appeared to be independent of galectin binding since decreased EGFR internalization in the knockdown cells was not affected by the treatment of the cells with lactose, a galectin inhibitor. Our results show that decreased GnT-Va activity due to siRNA expression in human carcinoma cells inhibits ligand-induced EGFR internalization, consequently resulting in delayed downstream signal transduction and inhibition of the EGF-induced, invasiveness-related phenotypes. PMID:19225046

  20. Stat-mediated Signaling Induced by Type I and Type II Interferons (IFNs) Is Differentially Controlled through Lipid Microdomain Association and Clathrin-dependent Endocytosis of IFN Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Marta; Monier, Marie-Noelle; Fradagrada, Alexandre; Mitchell, Keith; Baychelier, Florence; Eid, Pierre; Johannes, Ludger

    2006-01-01

    Type I (α/β) and type II (γ) interferons (IFNs) bind to distinct receptors, although they activate the same signal transducer and activator of transcription, Stat1, raising the question of how signal specificity is maintained. Here, we have characterized the sorting of IFN receptors (IFN-Rs) at the plasma membrane and the role it plays in IFN-dependent signaling and biological activities. We show that both IFN-α and IFN-γ receptors are internalized by a classical clathrin- and dynamin-dependent endocytic pathway. Although inhibition of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked the uptake of IFN-α and IFN-γ receptors, this inhibition only affected IFN-α–induced Stat1 and Stat2 signaling. Furthermore, the antiviral and antiproliferative activities induced by IFN-α but not IFN-γ were also affected. Finally, we show that, unlike IFN-α receptors, activated IFN-γ receptors rapidly become enriched in plasma membrane lipid microdomains. We conclude that IFN-R compartmentalization at the plasma membrane, through clathrin-dependent endocytosis and lipid-based microdomains, plays a critical role in the signaling and biological responses induced by IFNs and contributes to establishing specificity within the Jak/Stat signaling pathway. PMID:16624862

  1. [Reabsorption of yellow fluorescent protein in the Rana temporaria kidney by receptor-mediated endocytosis].

    PubMed

    Seliverstova, E V; Prutskova, N P

    2014-01-01

    The absorption of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and the expression of the endocytic receptors, megalin and cubilin, were investigated in the renal proximal tubules (PT) in frogs Rana temporaria after parenteral YFP injections. The methods of confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used. The dynamics of YFP absorption was analyzed 2 h after injection. The logarithmic time dependence of the accumulation of YFP-containing endocytic vesicles in PT cells and the completion of absorption process 90-120 min after injection were shown. Unlike substantial megalin and cubilin expression 15-30 min after YFP introduction, immunolabeled endocytic receptors were not detected in PT cells after 2 h. The re-injection of YFP led to the appearance of apical endocytic vesicles containing megalin or cubilin colocalized with YFP. At the same time, the decrease of YFP uptake associated with reduction in the number of receptor-containing vesicles was demonstrated, suggesting a failure of megalin and cubilin expression. The decrease of absorption capacity of PT cells after YFP re-injection was similar to that found previously under conditions of the competitive absorption of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and YFP injected in different sequences. The data are the further demonstration of the proposed mechanism limiting the tubular protein absorption in the frog kidney and suggest the involvement of megalin and cubilin in uptake and vesicular transport of YFP. PMID:25782287

  2. Insulin and insulin like growth factor II endocytosis and signaling via insulin receptor B

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) act on tetrameric tyrosine kinase receptors controlling essential functions including growth, metabolism, reproduction and longevity. The insulin receptor (IR) binds insulin and IGFs with different affinities triggering different cell responses. Results We showed that IGF-II induces cell proliferation and gene transcription when IR-B is over-expressed. We combined biotinylated ligands with streptavidin conjugated quantum dots and visible fluorescent proteins to visualize the binding of IGF-II and insulin to IR-B and their ensuing internalization. By confocal microscopy and flow cytometry in living cells, we studied the internalization kinetic through the IR-B of both IGF-II, known to elicit proliferative responses, and insulin, a regulator of metabolism. Conclusions IGF-II promotes a faster internalization of IR-B than insulin. We propose that IGF-II differentially activates mitogenic responses through endosomes, while insulin-activated IR-B remains at the plasma membrane. This fact could facilitate the interaction with key effector molecules involved in metabolism regulation. PMID:23497114

  3. Expression and endocytosis of VEGF and its receptors in human colonic vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfang; Lehman, Richard E; Donner, David B; Matli, Mary R; Warren, Robert S; Welton, Mark L

    2002-06-01

    Normal human colonic microvascular endothelial cells (HUCMEC) have been isolated from surgical specimens by their adherence to Ulex europaeus agglutinin bound to magnetic dynabeads that bind alpha-L-fucosyl residues on the endothelial cell membrane. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated the presence of a range of endothelial-specific markers on HUCMEC, including the von Willebrand factor, Ulex europaeus agglutinin, and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1. The growing cells form monolayers with the characteristic cobblestone morphology of endothelial cells and eventually form tube-like structures. HUCMEC produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and express the receptors, kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR) and fms-like tyrosine kinase, through which VEGF mediates its actions in the endothelium. VEGF induces the tyrosine phosphorylation of KDR and a proliferative response from HUCMEC comparable to that elicited from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). On binding to HUCMEC or HUVEC, (125)I-labeled VEGF internalizes or dissociates to the medium. Once internalized, (125)I-labeled VEGF is degraded and no evidence of ligand recycling was observed. However, significantly less VEGF is internalized, and more is released to the medium from HUCMEC than HUVEC. Angiogenesis results from the proliferation and migration of microvascular, not large-vessel, endothelial cells. The demonstration that microvascular endothelial cells degrade less and release more VEGF to the medium than large-vessel endothelial cells identifies a mechanism permissive of the role of microvascular cells in angiogenesis. PMID:12016135

  4. Light microscopic autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, A.S.; Goodman, R.R.

    1984-05-01

    Much work has been done on opioid systems in the rat CNS. Although the mouse is widely used in pharmacological studies of opioid action, little has been done to characterize opioid systems in this species. In the present study the distribution of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse CNS was examined using a quantitative in vitro autoradiography procedure. Tritiated dihydromorphine was used to visualize mu sites and (3H-d-Ala2-d-Leu5)enkephalin with a low concentration of morphine was used to visualize delta sites. Mu and delta site localizations in the mouse are very similar to those previously described in the rat (Goodman, R.R., S.H. Snyder, M.J. Kuhar, and W.S. Young, 3d (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:6239-6243), with certain exceptions and additions. Mu and delta sites were observed in sensory processing areas, limbic system, extrapyramidal motor system, and cranial parasympathetic system. Differential distributions of mu and delta sites were noted in many areas. Mu sites were prominent in laminae I, IV, and VI of the neocortex, in patches in the striatum, and in the ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens, medial and midline thalamic nuclei, medial habenular nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, and laminae I and II of the spinal cord. In contrast, delta sites were prominent in all laminae of the neocortex, olfactory tubercle, diffusely throughout the striatum, and in the basal, lateral, and cortical nuclei of the amygdala. The determination of the differential distributions of opioid binding sites should prove useful in suggesting anatomical substrates for the actions of opiates and opioids.

  5. Agonist-induced changes in RalA activities allows the prediction of the endocytosis of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mei; Zhang, Xiaohan; Guo, Shuohan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Min, Chengchun; Cheon, Seung Hoon; Oak, Min-Ho; Kim, Young Ran; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2016-01-01

    GTP binding proteins are classified into two families: heterotrimeric large G proteins which are composed of three subunits, and one subunit of small G proteins. Roles of small G proteins in the intracellular trafficking of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) were studied. Among various small G proteins tested, GTP-bound form (G23V) of RalA inhibited the internalization of dopamine D2 receptor independently of the previously reported downstream effectors of RalA, such as Ral-binding protein 1 and PLD. With high affinity for GRK2, active RalA inhibited the GPCR endocytosis by sequestering the GRK2 from receptors. When it was tested for several GPCRs including an endogenous GPCR, lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1, agonist-induced conversion of GTP-bound to GDP-bound RalA, which presumably releases the sequestered GRK2, was observed selectively with the GPCRs which have tendency to undergo endocytosis. Conversion of RalA from active to inactive state occurred by translocation of RGL, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, from the plasma membrane to cytosol as a complex with Gβγ. These results suggest that agonist-induced Gβγ-mediated conversion of RalA from the GTP-bound form to the GDP-bound form could be a mechanism to facilitate agonist-induced internalization of GPCRs. PMID:26477566

  6. Dynamin-dependent endocytosis of Bone Morphogenetic Protein2 (BMP2) and its receptors is dispensable for the initiation of Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Paarmann, Pia; Dörpholz, Gina; Fiebig, Juliane; Amsalem, Ayelet R; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Henis, Yoav I; Müller, Thomas; Knaus, Petra

    2016-07-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signal transduction via the canonical Smad158 pathway has previously been linked to dynamin-dependent endocytosis, since the application of chemical inhibitors of clathrin or dynamin in functional cell culture based assays negatively affects initiation and propagation of the Smad response. More recent studies, however, demonstrated efficient Smad signaling by non-internalizable BMP2. The role of endocytosis in BMP signal transduction thus remained controversial. In our study we aimed to refine cell biological assays and to apply novel tools, including a new site-directed fluorescently labeled BMP2 ligand, to revisit key steps in BMP Smad signaling. We found that dynamin2 function was required for BMP2 uptake but was dispensable for C-terminal phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity of BMP-dependent Smads. Furthermore, we demonstrated a role of dynamin2 in the regulation of steady-state and surface BMP receptor levels, as well as an impact on Smad1 protein level. Thus, dynamin2 allows for modulation of basal and ligand-dependent Smad signaling capacity. High levels of functional dynamin2 enhanced the myogenic differentiation of precursor cells. From our study we conclude that dynamin-dependent endocytosis serves as a regulatory mechanism to fine-tune Smad signaling, but it is not a prerequisite for signal initiation and propagation. Our findings contribute to the understanding of fundamental mechanisms of BMP signaling and thus provide important information for future consideration in the context of therapeutic applications of BMPs. PMID:27113717

  7. Real-time observation of the effect of iron on receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin conjugated with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Li; Li, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Ming-Zhen; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2010-07-01

    The optical properties of antiphotobleaching and the advantage of long-term fluorescence observation of quantum dots are fully adopted to study the effects of iron on the endocytosis of transferrin. Quantum dots are labeled for transferrin and endocytosis of transferrin in HeLa cells is observed under the normal state, iron overloading, and an iron-deficient state. In these three states, the fluorescence undergoes a gradual process of first dark, then light, and finally dark, indicating the endocytosis of transferrin. The fluorescence intensity analysis shows that a platform emerges when fluorescence changes to a certain degree in the three states. Experienced a same period of time after platform, the fluorescence strength of cells in the normal state is 1.2 times the first value, and the iron-deficiency state is 1.4 times, but the iron overloading state was 0.85 times. We also find that the average fluorescence intensity in cells detected by the spectrophotometer in the iron-deficiency state is almost 7 times than that in a high iron state. All this proves that iron overloading would slow the process, but iron deficiency would accelerate endocytosis. We advance a direct observational method that may contribute to further study of the relationship of iron and transferrin.

  8. Phytophthora infestans RXLR-WY Effector AVR3a Associates with Dynamin-Related Protein 2 Required for Endocytosis of the Plant Pattern Recognition Receptor FLS2.

    PubMed

    Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Schwizer, Simon; Sklenar, Jan; Yoshida, Kentaro; Petre, Benjamin; Bos, Jorunn I B; Schornack, Sebastian; Jones, Alexandra M E; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Kamoun, Sophien

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens utilize effectors to suppress basal plant defense known as PTI (Pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity). However, our knowledge of PTI suppression by filamentous plant pathogens, i.e. fungi and oomycetes, remains fragmentary. Previous work revealed that the co-receptor BAK1/SERK3 contributes to basal immunity against the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Moreover BAK1/SERK3 is required for the cell death induced by P. infestans elicitin INF1, a protein with characteristics of PAMPs. The P. infestans host-translocated RXLR-WY effector AVR3a is known to supress INF1-mediated cell death by binding the plant E3 ligase CMPG1. In contrast, AVR3aKI-Y147del, a deletion mutant of the C-terminal tyrosine of AVR3a, fails to bind CMPG1 and does not suppress INF1-mediated cell death. Here, we studied the extent to which AVR3a and its variants perturb additional BAK1/SERK3-dependent PTI responses in N. benthamiana using the elicitor/receptor pair flg22/FLS2 as a model. We found that all tested variants of AVR3a suppress defense responses triggered by flg22 and reduce internalization of activated FLS2. Moreover, we discovered that AVR3a associates with the Dynamin-Related Protein 2 (DRP2), a plant GTPase implicated in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, silencing of DRP2 impaired ligand-induced FLS2 internalization but did not affect internalization of the growth receptor BRI1. Our results suggest that AVR3a associates with a key cellular trafficking and membrane-remodeling complex involved in immune receptor-mediated endocytosis. We conclude that AVR3a is a multifunctional effector that can suppress BAK1/SERK3-mediated immunity through at least two different pathways. PMID:26348328

  9. Phytophthora infestans RXLR-WY Effector AVR3a Associates with Dynamin-Related Protein 2 Required for Endocytosis of the Plant Pattern Recognition Receptor FLS2

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Schwizer, Simon; Sklenar, Jan; Yoshida, Kentaro; Petre, Benjamin; Bos, Jorunn I. B.; Schornack, Sebastian; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens utilize effectors to suppress basal plant defense known as PTI (Pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity). However, our knowledge of PTI suppression by filamentous plant pathogens, i.e. fungi and oomycetes, remains fragmentary. Previous work revealed that the co-receptor BAK1/SERK3 contributes to basal immunity against the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Moreover BAK1/SERK3 is required for the cell death induced by P. infestans elicitin INF1, a protein with characteristics of PAMPs. The P. infestans host-translocated RXLR-WY effector AVR3a is known to supress INF1-mediated cell death by binding the plant E3 ligase CMPG1. In contrast, AVR3aKI-Y147del, a deletion mutant of the C-terminal tyrosine of AVR3a, fails to bind CMPG1 and does not suppress INF1-mediated cell death. Here, we studied the extent to which AVR3a and its variants perturb additional BAK1/SERK3-dependent PTI responses in N. benthamiana using the elicitor/receptor pair flg22/FLS2 as a model. We found that all tested variants of AVR3a suppress defense responses triggered by flg22 and reduce internalization of activated FLS2. Moreover, we discovered that AVR3a associates with the Dynamin-Related Protein 2 (DRP2), a plant GTPase implicated in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, silencing of DRP2 impaired ligand-induced FLS2 internalization but did not affect internalization of the growth receptor BRI1. Our results suggest that AVR3a associates with a key cellular trafficking and membrane-remodeling complex involved in immune receptor-mediated endocytosis. We conclude that AVR3a is a multifunctional effector that can suppress BAK1/SERK3-mediated immunity through at least two different pathways. PMID:26348328

  10. Ethanol-induced impairments in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid in isolated rat hepatocytes: Time course of impairments and recovery after ethanol withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J.

    1989-04-01

    Chronic ethanol administration markedly impairs the process of receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) of a representative asialoglycoprotein, asialoorosomucoid (ASOR), by the liver. In this study, we further characterized these impairments by identifying the time of onset for ethanol-induced changes in RME as well as establishing the time course for recovery to normal endocytotic values after ethanol withdrawal. Ethanol administration for 3 days did not alter any aspect of endocytosis examined in this study. After feeding ethanol to rats for 7 days, however, significant decreases in amounts of ligand bound, internalized, and degraded were apparent. These impairments persisted throughout the 5-week feeding study although the effects were somewhat attenuated with more prolonged ethanol feeding. In addition, an accumulation of intracellular receptors was observed in ethanol-fed animals relative to controls after 7 days of ethanol feeding. In all cases, recovery of endocytotic values to control levels was partially completed after 2 to 3 days of refeeding control diet and was fully completed after 7 days of refeeding. These results indicate that ethanol feeding for as little as 7 days profoundly impairs the process of RME by the liver. These impairments can be reversed after refeeding control diet for 7 days.

  11. Tritiation of delta opioid-receptor selective antagonist dipeptide ligands with extraordinary affinity containing 2', 6'dimethyltyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, I.; Tóth, G.; Balboni, G.; Guerrini, R.; Salvadori, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recently a new class of δ opioid antagonists has been discovered by using Tyr-Tic sequence. The substitution of Tyr1 by Dmt resulted in a new analogue (H-Dmt-Tic-OH) with enhanced affinity and selectivity. Because of its excellent property we chose it for labelling with tritium. At the same time peptides containing Tic at position 2 undergo spontaneous diketopiperazine formation in some solvents, and they lose some of their binding ability. To avoid this unwanted side-reaction we synthetized the N-methylated analogue (N,N(Me)2-Dmt-Tic-OH), and it was more stable under storage condition, but δ affinity declined moderately. On the basis of this information we prepared diiodinated analogues of these dipeptides. Catalytic dehalotritiation of precursors resulted in tritiated peptides. High specific radioactivity, 44.67 Ci/mmol with [3H]Dmt-Tic-OH and 59.88 Ci/mmol with N,N(Me)2-[3H]Dmt-Tic-OH were achieved.

  12. Tritiation of delta opioid-receptor selective antagonist dipeptide ligands with extraordinary affinity containing 2‧, 6‧dimethyltyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, I.; Tóth, G.; Balboni, G.; Guerrini, R.; Salvadori, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recently a new class of δ opioid antagonists has been discovered by using Tyr-Tic sequence. The substitution of Tyr1 by Dmt resulted in a new analogue (H-Dmt-Tic-OH) with enhanced affinity and selectivity. Because of its excellent property we chose it for labelling with tritium. At the same time peptides containing Tic at position 2 undergo spontaneous diketopiperazine formation in some solvents, and they lose some of their binding ability. To avoid this unwanted side-reaction we synthetized the N-methylated analogue (N,N(Me)2-Dmt-Tic-OH), and it was more stable under storage condition, but δ affinity declined moderately. On the basis of this information we prepared diiodinated analogues of these dipeptides. Catalytic dehalotritiation of precursors resulted in tritiated peptides. High specific radioactivity, 44.67 Ci/mmol with [3H]Dmt-Tic-OH and 59.88 Ci/mmol with N,N(Me)2-[3H]Dmt-Tic-OH were achieved.

  13. Role of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 5} integrin receptor in endocytosis of crocidolite and its effect on intracellular glutathione levels in human lung epithelial (A549) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Priyadarshini; Mosleh, Tariq A.; Aust, Ann E. . E-mail: aaust@cc.usu.edu

    2006-01-15

    Crocidolite, containing 27% iron by weight, is the most carcinogenic form of asbestos. Crocidolite fibers are endocytized by {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 5} integrin receptors in rabbit pleural mesothelial cells. We show here that crocidolite fibers are endocytized in human lung epithelial (A549) cells and in primary small airway epithelial (SAEC) cells. Presence of the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 5} blocking antibody, P1F6, significantly reduced the uptake of crocidolite fibers in A549 cells. Thus, the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 5} receptor is involved in endocytosis of crocidolite fibers in A549 cells as well. Previously, it has been observed that asbestos fibers lead to changes in the intracellular redox environment, i.e. a marked decrease in intracellular glutathione concentrations and an increase in the extracellular glutathione in A549 cells. In addition, the decrease in intracellular glutathione was found to be largely independent of iron present on the surface of the fiber. A549 cells were treated with crocidolite in the presence of endocytosis inhibitor cytochalasin D. Our data indicate that, upon preventing endocytosis, we were able to reverse the decrease in total intracellular glutathione. The decrease in total intracellular glutathione could also be prevented in the presence of the monoclonal antibody P1F6. Thus, we observed that endocytosis of crocidolite fibers via integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 5} receptor is linked to the marked decrease in total intracellular glutathione in A549 cells.

  14. Effect of octreotide surface density on receptor-mediated endocytosis in vitro and anticancer efficacy of modified nanocarrier in vivo after optimization.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhigui; Shi, Yongping; Xiao, Yanyu; Sun, Minjie; Ping, Qineng; Zong, Li; Li, Sai; Niu, Jiangxiu; Huang, Aiwen; You, Weiliang; Chen, Yinan; Chen, Xi; Fei, Jia; Tian, Jia

    2013-04-15

    The objective of the present work was to investigate the optimum density of octreotide on the surface of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) loaded with hydroxycamptothencine (HCPT) to enhance receptor-mediated endocytosis and tumor targeting selectivity. Different amounts of octreotide-polyethylene glycol (100) monostearate (OPMS), a ligand for somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), were coupled into NLC. In vitro evaluation of OPMS modified NLCs (O-NLCs) was done by studying the physicochemical properties, drug release, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity. Whereas in vivo evaluation was done by studying the tissue distribution in S180 tumor-bearing mice through ex vivo fluorescence imaging and HCPT quantitative study. The results showed that O-NLCs with an average size of ∼100 nm possessed obvious sustained release. When OPMS was used in the amount of 5 μmol (O₅-NLC) highest cellular uptake, cytotoxicity in SMMC-7721 cell line and remarkable accumulation in S180 tumor were observed. The treatments of O₅-NLC brought about significant tumor inhibition and prolonged the median survival time as compared with HCPT, unmodified NLC and the pegylated NLC (P₅-NLC) groups. It appears that to achieve a more rational approach of receptor mediated tumor targeted drug delivery system the surface density of the targeting moiety on the surface of nanocarriers should be considered. PMID:23396258

  15. A Trypanosoma cruzi Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (TcVps34) Is Involved in Osmoregulation and Receptor-mediated Endocytosis*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Schoijet, Alejandra C.; Miranda, Kildare; Girard-Dias, Wendell; de Souza, Wanderley; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Torres, Héctor N.; Docampo, Roberto; Alonso, Guillermo D.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has the ability to respond to a variety of environmental changes during its life cycle both in the insect vector and in the vertebrate host. Because regulation of transcription initiation seems to be nonfunctional in this parasite, it is important to investigate other regulatory mechanisms of adaptation. Regulatory mechanisms at the level of signal transduction pathways involving phosphoinositides are good candidates for this purpose. Here we report the identification of the first phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in T. cruzi, with similarity with its yeast counterpart, Vps34p. TcVps34 specifically phosphorylates phosphatidylinositol to produce phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, thus confirming that it belongs to class III PI3K family. Overexpression of TcVps34 resulted in morphological and functional alterations related to vesicular trafficking. Although inhibition of TcVps34 with specific PI3K inhibitors, such as wortmannin and LY294,000, resulted in reduced regulatory volume decrease after hyposmotic stress, cells overexpressing this enzyme were resistant to these inhibitors. Furthermore, these cells were able to recover their original volume faster than wild type cells when they were submitted to severe hyposmotic stress. In addition, in TcVps34-overexpressing cells, the activities of vacuolar-H+-ATPase and vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase were altered, suggesting defects in the acidification of intracellular compartments. Furthermore, receptor-mediated endocytosis was partially blocked although fluid phase endocytosis was not affected, confirming a function for TcVps34 in membrane trafficking. Taken together, these results strongly support that TcVps34 plays a prominent role in vital processes for T. cruzi survival such as osmoregulation, acidification, and vesicular trafficking. PMID:18801733

  16. The CD20 homologue MS4A4 directs trafficking of KIT toward clathrin-independent endocytosis pathways and thus regulates receptor signaling and recycling

    PubMed Central

    Cruse, Glenn; Beaven, Michael A.; Music, Stephen C.; Bradding, Peter; Gilfillan, Alasdair M.; Metcalfe, Dean D.

    2015-01-01

    MS4A family members differentially regulate the cell cycle, and aberrant, or loss of, expression of MS4A family proteins has been observed in colon and lung cancer. However, the precise functions of MS4A family proteins and their mechanistic interactions remain unsolved. Here we report that MS4A4 facilitates trafficking of the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT through endocytic recycling rather than degradation pathways by a mechanism that involves recruitment of KIT to caveolin-1–enriched microdomains. Silencing of MS4A4 in human mast cells altered ligand-induced KIT endocytosis pathways and reduced receptor recycling to the cell surface, thus promoting KIT signaling in the endosomes while reducing that in the plasma membrane, as exemplified by Akt and PLCγ1 phosphorylation, respectively. The altered endocytic trafficking of KIT also resulted in an increase in SCF-induced mast cell proliferation and migration, which may reflect altered signaling in these cells. Our data reveal a novel function for MS4A family proteins in regulating trafficking and signaling, which could have implications in both proliferative and immunological diseases. PMID:25717186

  17. The CD20 homologue MS4A4 directs trafficking of KIT toward clathrin-independent endocytosis pathways and thus regulates receptor signaling and recycling.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Glenn; Beaven, Michael A; Music, Stephen C; Bradding, Peter; Gilfillan, Alasdair M; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2015-05-01

    MS4A family members differentially regulate the cell cycle, and aberrant, or loss of, expression of MS4A family proteins has been observed in colon and lung cancer. However, the precise functions of MS4A family proteins and their mechanistic interactions remain unsolved. Here we report that MS4A4 facilitates trafficking of the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT through endocytic recycling rather than degradation pathways by a mechanism that involves recruitment of KIT to caveolin-1-enriched microdomains. Silencing of MS4A4 in human mast cells altered ligand-induced KIT endocytosis pathways and reduced receptor recycling to the cell surface, thus promoting KIT signaling in the endosomes while reducing that in the plasma membrane, as exemplified by Akt and PLCγ1 phosphorylation, respectively. The altered endocytic trafficking of KIT also resulted in an increase in SCF-induced mast cell proliferation and migration, which may reflect altered signaling in these cells. Our data reveal a novel function for MS4A family proteins in regulating trafficking and signaling, which could have implications in both proliferative and immunological diseases. PMID:25717186

  18. 2,8-Diazaspiro[4.5]decan-8-yl)pyrimidin-4-amine potent CCR4 antagonists capable of inducing receptor endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Lena; Ajram, Laura A; Begg, Malcolm; Evans, Brian; Graves, Rebecca H; Hodgson, Simon T; Lynn, Sean M; Miah, Afjal H; Percy, Jonathan M; Procopiou, Panayiotis A; Richards, Stephen A; Slack, Robert J

    2016-06-10

    A number of potent 2,8-diazaspiro[4.5]decan-8-yl)pyrimidin-4-amine CCR4 antagonists binding to the extracellular allosteric site were synthesised. (R)-N-(2,4-Dichlorobenzyl)-2-(2-(pyrrolidin-2-ylmethyl)-2,8-diazaspiro[4.5]decan-8-yl)pyrimidin-4-amine (R)-(18a) has high affinity in both the [(125)I]-TARC binding assay with a pKi of 8.8, and the [(35)S]-GTPγS functional assay with a pIC50 of 8.1, and high activity in the human whole blood actin polymerisation assay (pA2 = 6.7). The most potent antagonists were also investigated for their ability to induce endocytosis of CCR4 and were found to internalise about 60% of the cell surface receptors, a property which is not commonly shared by small molecule antagonists of chemokine receptors. PMID:26991939

  19. Quantum dots implementation as a label for analysis of early stages of EGF receptor endocytosis: a comparative study on cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Salova, Anna V.; Belyaeva, Tatiana N.; Leontieva, Ekaterina A.; Zlobina, Maria V.; Kharchenko, Marianna V.; Kornilova, Elena S.

    2016-01-01

    EGF complexed to fluorescent photostable quantum dots by biotin-streptavidin system (bEGF-savQD) is attractive for both the basic research and therapeutic application such as targeted drug delivery in EGF-receptor (EGFR) expressing cancers. However, compared to native EGF, the large size of QD and its quasi-multivalency can have unpredictable effects on EGFR endocytosis changing the internalization portal and/or endosomal processing tightly bound to EGF signaling. We have found that bEGF-savQDs enter HeLa cells via the temperature-dependent clathrin-mediated EGF-receptor-specific pathway characteristic for native EGF. We also found that EGF-to-QD concentration ratios used for the complex preparation and the level of EGF receptor expression affect the number and integral densities of the formed endosomes. So, at EGF-to-QD ratio from 4:1 to 12:1 (at nanomolar bEGF concentrations) on average 100 bright endosomes per HeLa cell were formed 15 min after the complex addition, while 1:1 ratio resulted in formation of very few dim endosomes. However, in A431 cells overexpressing EGFR 1:1 ratio was effective. Using dynamin inhibition and Na-acidic washout we showed that bEGF-savQDs bind surface receptors and enter clathrin-coated pits slower than the same ligands without QD. Yet, the bEGF-savQD demonstrated similar to native EGF and bEGF-savCy3 co-localization dynamics with tethering protein EEA1 and HRS, the key component of sorting ESCRT0 complex. In conclusion, our comparative study reveals that in respect to entrapment into coated pits, endosomal recruitment, endosome fusions, and the initial steps of endosomal maturation, bEGF-savQD behaves like native EGF and QD implementation does not affect these important events. PMID:26716513

  20. Quantum dots implementation as a label for analysis of early stages of EGF receptor endocytosis: a comparative study on cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Salova, Anna V; Belyaeva, Tatiana N; Leontieva, Ekaterina A; Zlobina, Maria V; Kharchenko, Marianna V; Kornilova, Elena S

    2016-02-01

    EGF complexed to fluorescent photostable quantum dots by biotin-streptavidin system (bEGF-savQD) is attractive for both the basic research and therapeutic application such as targeted drug delivery in EGF-receptor (EGFR) expressing cancers. However, compared to native EGF, the large size of QD and its quasi-multivalency can have unpredictable effects on EGFR endocytosis changing the internalization portal and/or endosomal processing tightly bound to EGF signaling. We have found that bEGF-savQDs enter HeLa cells via the temperature-dependent clathrin-mediated EGF-receptor-specific pathway characteristic for native EGF. We also found that EGF-to-QD concentration ratios used for the complex preparation and the level of EGF receptor expression affect the number and integral densities of the formed endosomes. So, at EGF-to-QD ratio from 4:1 to 12:1 (at nanomolar bEGF concentrations) on average 100 bright endosomes per HeLa cell were formed 15 min after the complex addition, while 1:1 ratio resulted in formation of very few dim endosomes. However, in A431 cells overexpressing EGFR 1:1 ratio was effective. Using dynamin inhibition and Na-acidic washout we showed that bEGF-savQDs bind surface receptors and enter clathrin-coated pits slower than the same ligands without QD. Yet, the bEGF-savQD demonstrated similar to native EGF and bEGF-savCy3 co-localization dynamics with tethering protein EEA1 and HRS, the key component of sorting ESCRT0 complex. In conclusion, our comparative study reveals that in respect to entrapment into coated pits, endosomal recruitment, endosome fusions, and the initial steps of endosomal maturation, bEGF-savQD behaves like native EGF and QD implementation does not affect these important events. PMID:26716513

  1. Low concentrations of primaquine inhibit degradation but not receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid by HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, J.S.; Schwartz, A.L.; Fallon, R.J. )

    1991-02-01

    Asialoorosomucoid (ASOR) is internalized and degraded by HepG2 cells after binding to the asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor, internalization through the coated pit/coated vesicle pathway, and trafficking to lysosomes. Primaquine, an 8-aminoquinoline antimalarial compound, inhibits ASOR degradation at concentrations greater than 0.2 mM by neutralizing intracellular acid compartments. This leads to alterations in surface receptor number, receptor-ligand dissociation, and receptor recycling. We have investigated the effects of primaquine on 125I-ASOR uptake and degradation as a function of primaquine concentration and duration of exposure. Concentrations below those required for neutralization of acidic compartments block 125I-ASOR degradation in HepG2 cells and lead to intracellular ligand accumulation. This effect is maximal at 80 microM primaquine. The intracellular 125I-ASOR is undegraded, dissociated from the ASGP receptor, and contained within vesicular compartments distinct from lysosomes, plasma membrane, or endosomes. In addition, the effect of 80 microM primaquine on 125I-ASOR degradation is very slowly reversible (greater than 6 h), in contrast to primaquine's rapidly reversible effect on receptor recycling and ligand uptake (10 min). Furthermore, the effect is ligand-specific. 125I-asialofetuin, another ASGP receptor ligand, is internalized and degraded in lysosomes at normal rates in HepG2 cells exposed to 80 microM primaquine. These findings indicate that primaquine has multiple effects on the uptake and degradation of ligand occurring in the endosome-lysosome pathway. These effects of primaquine differ in their concentration-dependence, site of action, reversibility, and ligand selectivity.

  2. Mobility of tethering factor EEA1 on endosomes is decreased upon stimulation of EGF receptor endocytosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Kosheverova, Vera V; Kamentseva, Rimma S; Gonchar, Ilya V; Kharchenko, Marianna V; Kornilova, Elena S

    2016-04-22

    Tethering factor EEA1, mediating homotypic fusion of early endosomes, was shown to be localized in membrane-bound state both in serum-deprived and stimulated for EGF receptor endocytosis cells. However, it is not known whether dynamics behavior of EEA1 is affected by EGF stimulation. We investigated EEA1 cytosol-to-membrane exchange rate in interphase HeLa cells by FRAP analysis. The data obtained fitted two-states binding model, with the bulk of membrane-associated EEA1 protein represented by the mobile fraction both in serum-starved and EGF-stimulated cells. Fast recovery state had similar half-times in the two cases: about 1.6 s and 2.8 s, respectively. However, the recovery half-time of slowly cycled EEA1 fraction significantly increased in EGF-stimulated comparing to serum-starved cells (from 21 to 99 s). We suppose that the retardation of EEA1 fluorescence recovery upon EGF-stimulation may be due to the increase of activated Rab5 on endosomal membranes, the growth of the number of tethering events between EEA1-positive vesicles and their clustering. PMID:26993163

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation regulates the endocytosis and surface expression of GluN3A-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Marco, Sonia; Brooks, Ian M; Zandueta, Aitor; Rao, Yijian; Haucke, Volker; Wesseling, John F; Tavalin, Steven J; Pérez-Otaño, Isabel

    2013-02-27

    Selective control of receptor trafficking provides a mechanism for remodeling the receptor composition of excitatory synapses, and thus supports synaptic transmission, plasticity, and development. GluN3A (formerly NR3A) is a nonconventional member of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunit family, which endows NMDAR channels with low calcium permeability and reduced magnesium sensitivity compared with NMDARs comprising only GluN1 and GluN2 subunits. Because of these special properties, GluN3A subunits act as a molecular brake to limit the plasticity and maturation of excitatory synapses, pointing toward GluN3A removal as a critical step in the development of neuronal circuitry. However, the molecular signals mediating GluN3A endocytic removal remain unclear. Here we define a novel endocytic motif (YWL), which is located within the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of GluN3A and mediates its binding to the clathrin adaptor AP2. Alanine mutations within the GluN3A endocytic motif inhibited clathrin-dependent internalization and led to accumulation of GluN3A-containing NMDARs at the cell surface, whereas mimicking phosphorylation of the tyrosine residue promoted internalization and reduced cell-surface expression as shown by immunocytochemical and electrophysiological approaches in recombinant systems and rat neurons in primary culture. We further demonstrate that the tyrosine residue is phosphorylated by Src family kinases, and that Src-activation limits surface GluN3A expression in neurons. Together, our results identify a new molecular signal for GluN3A internalization that couples the functional surface expression of GluN3A-containing receptors to the phosphorylation state of GluN3A subunits, and provides a molecular framework for the regulation of NMDAR subunit composition with implications for synaptic plasticity and neurodevelopment. PMID:23447623

  4. The Matricellular Receptor LRP1 Forms an Interface for Signaling and Endocytosis in Modulation of the Extracellular Tumor Environment.

    PubMed

    Van Gool, Bart; Dedieu, Stéphane; Emonard, Hervé; Roebroek, Anton J M

    2015-01-01

    The membrane protein low-density lipoprotein receptor related-protein 1 (LRP1) has been attributed a role in cancer. However, its presumably often indirect involvement is far from understood. LRP1 has both endocytic and signaling activities. As a matricellular receptor it is involved in regulation, mostly by clearing, of various extracellular matrix degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, serine proteases, protease inhibitor complexes, and the endoglycosidase heparanase. Furthermore, by binding extracellular ligands including growth factors and subsequent intracellular interaction with scaffolding and adaptor proteins it is involved in regulation of various signaling cascades. LRP1 expression levels are often downregulated in cancer and some studies consider low LRP1 levels a poor prognostic factor. On the contrary, upregulation in brain cancers has been noted and clinical trials explore the use of LRP1 as cargo receptor to deliver cytotoxic agents. This mini-review focuses on LRP1's role in tumor growth and metastasis especially by modulation of the extracellular tumor environment. In relation to this role its diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential will be discussed. PMID:26617523

  5. The Matricellular Receptor LRP1 Forms an Interface for Signaling and Endocytosis in Modulation of the Extracellular Tumor Environment

    PubMed Central

    Van Gool, Bart; Dedieu, Stéphane; Emonard, Hervé; Roebroek, Anton J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane protein low-density lipoprotein receptor related-protein 1 (LRP1) has been attributed a role in cancer. However, its presumably often indirect involvement is far from understood. LRP1 has both endocytic and signaling activities. As a matricellular receptor it is involved in regulation, mostly by clearing, of various extracellular matrix degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, serine proteases, protease inhibitor complexes, and the endoglycosidase heparanase. Furthermore, by binding extracellular ligands including growth factors and subsequent intracellular interaction with scaffolding and adaptor proteins it is involved in regulation of various signaling cascades. LRP1 expression levels are often downregulated in cancer and some studies consider low LRP1 levels a poor prognostic factor. On the contrary, upregulation in brain cancers has been noted and clinical trials explore the use of LRP1 as cargo receptor to deliver cytotoxic agents. This mini-review focuses on LRP1’s role in tumor growth and metastasis especially by modulation of the extracellular tumor environment. In relation to this role its diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential will be discussed. PMID:26617523

  6. Impaired endocytosis in proximal tubule from subchronic exposure to cadmium involves angiotensin II type 1 and cubilin receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to low cadmium (Cd) levels produces urinary excretion of low molecular weight proteins, which is considered the critical effect of Cd exposure. However, the mechanisms involved in Cd-induced proteinuria are not entirely clear. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the possible role of megalin and cubilin (important endocytic receptors in proximal tubule cells) and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor on Cd-induced microalbuminuria. Methods Four groups of female Wistar rats were studied. Control (CT) group, vehicle-treated rats; LOS group, rats treated with losartan (an AT1 antagonist) from weeks 5 to 8 (10 mg/kg/day by gavage); Cd group, rats subchronically exposed to Cd (3 mg/kg/day by gavage) during 8 weeks, and Cd + LOS group, rats treated with Cd for 8 weeks and LOS from weeks 5–8. Kidney Cd content, glomerular function (evaluated by creatinine clearance and plasma creatinine), kidney injury and tubular function (evaluated by Kim-1 expression, urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and glucose, and microalbuminuria), oxidative stress (measured by lipid peroxidation and NAD(P)H oxidase activity), mRNA levels of megalin, expressions of megalin and cubilin (by confocal microscopy) and AT1 receptor (by Western blot), were measured in the different experimental groups. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis test using GraphPad Prism 5 software (Version 5.00). P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Administration of Cd (Cd and Cd + LOS groups) increased renal Cd content. LOS-treatment decreased Cd-induced microalbuminuria without changes in: plasma creatinine, creatinine clearance, urinary NAG and glucose, oxidative stress, mRNA levels of megalin and cubilin, neither protein expression of megalin nor AT1 receptor, in the different experimental groups studied. However, Cd exposure did induce the expression of the tubular injury marker Kim-1 and decreased

  7. [The increase in receptor-mediated endocytosis of drugs in the composition of nanoparticles with the address fragment].

    PubMed

    Kostryukova, L V; Sanzhakov, M A; Ignatov, D V; Prozorovskyi, V N; Druzhilovskaya, O S; Kasatkina, E S; Medvedeva, N V; Ipatova, O M

    2016-03-01

    It is known that disorders in the cell functioning of the organs/tissues is accompanied by increased expression of certain receptors. A modern approach to improve the specificity of the drug accumulation in the affected area is to construct the delivery nanosystems with the address fragments. Active tagged transport may help to reduce the dose of the drug, minimizing the impact on healthy cells and organs (reduced adverse events). This approach is particularly important in oncology because of the high toxicity of the drugs used. In this work we have obtained and characterized the pharmaceutical composition of doxorubicin and chlorine e6 into colloidal nanoparticles with synthesized previously targeted conjugates based on folic acid and biotin. On the cell culture Hep G2 it was shown an increase in the internalization of drugs when they were introduced in the incubation medium in the form of drug compositions with transport nanosystems and targeted fragments. PMID:27420624

  8. Endocytosis via galactose receptors in vivo. Ligand size directs uptake by hepatocytes and/or liver macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Schlepper-Schaefer, J.; Huelsmann, D.; Djovkar, A.; Meyer, H.E.; Herbertz, L.; Kolb, H.; Kolb-Bachofen, V.

    1986-01-01

    The intrahepatic binding and uptake of variously sized ligands with terminal galactosyl residues is rat liver was followed. The ligands were administered to prefixed livers in binding studies and in vivo and in situ (serum-free perfused livers) in uptake studies. Gold sols with different particle diameters were prepared: 5 nm (Au/sub 5/), 17 nm (Au/sub 17/), 50 nm (Au/sub 50/) and coated with galactose exposing glycoproteins (asialofetuin (ASF) or lactosylated BSA (LacBSA)). Electron microscopy of mildly prefixed livers perfused with LacBSA-Au/sub 5/ in serum-free medium showed ligand binding to liver macrophages, hepatocytes and endothelial cells. Ligands bound to prefixed cell surfaces reflect the initial distribution of receptor activity: pre-aggregated clusters of ligands are found on liver macrophages, single particles statistically distributed on hepatocytes and pre-aggregated clusters of particles restricted to coated pits on endothelial cells. Ligand binding is prevented in the presence of 80 mM N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), while N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is without effect. Electron microscopy of livers after ligand injection into the tail vein shows that in vivo uptake of electron-dense galactose particles by liver cells is size-dependent. In vivo uptake by liver macrophages is mediated by galactose-specific recognition as shown by inhibition with GalNAc.

  9. Windpipe Controls Drosophila Intestinal Homeostasis by Regulating JAK/STAT Pathway via Promoting Receptor Endocytosis and Lysosomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Wu, Longfei; Wang, Guolun; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun; You, Jia; Li, Zhouhua; Lin, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    The adult intestinal homeostasis is tightly controlled by proper proliferation and differentiation of intestinal stem cells. The JAK/STAT (Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) signaling pathway is essential for the regulation of adult stem cell activities and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. Currently, it remains largely unknown how JAK/STAT signaling activities are regulated in these processes. Here we have identified windpipe (wdp) as a novel component of the JAK/STAT pathway. We demonstrate that Wdp is positively regulated by JAK/STAT signaling in Drosophila adult intestines. Loss of wdp activity results in the disruption of midgut homeostasis under normal and regenerative conditions. Conversely, ectopic expression of Wdp inhibits JAK/STAT signaling activity. Importantly, we show that Wdp interacts with the receptor Domeless (Dome), and promotes its internalization for subsequent lysosomal degradation. Together, these data led us to propose that Wdp acts as a novel negative feedback regulator of the JAK/STAT pathway in regulating intestinal homeostasis. PMID:25923769

  10. Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Neurons can sustain high rates of synaptic transmission without exhausting their supply of synaptic vesicles. This property relies on a highly efficient local endocytic recycling of synaptic vesicle membranes, which can be reused for hundreds, possibly thousands, of exo-endocytic cycles. Morphological, physiological, molecular, and genetic studies over the last four decades have provided insight into the membrane traffic reactions that govern this recycling and its regulation. These studies have shown that synaptic vesicle endocytosis capitalizes on fundamental and general endocytic mechanisms but also involves neuron-specific adaptations of such mechanisms. Thus, investigations of these processes have advanced not only the field of synaptic transmission but also, more generally, the field of endocytosis. This article summarizes current information on synaptic vesicle endocytosis with an emphasis on the underlying molecular mechanisms and with a special focus on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the predominant pathway of synaptic vesicle protein internalization. PMID:22763746

  11. Apo- and holo-lactoferrin are both internalized by lactoferrin receptor via clathrin-mediated endocytosis but differentially affect ERK-signaling and cell proliferation in Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rulan; Lopez, Veronica; Kelleher, Shannon L.; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is a major iron-binding and multi-functional protein in exocrine fluids such as breast milk and mucosal secretions. The functions of Lf appear dependent upon the iron-saturation of the Lf protein and are postulated to be mediated through Lf internalization by a Lf receptor (LfR). However, mechanisms by which LfR mediates Lf internalization in enterocytes are unknown. We now demonstrate that a LfR previously cloned from the small intestine mediates Lf endocytosis in a human enterocyte model (Caco-2 cells). LfR was detected at the plasma membrane by cell surface biotinylation; both apo-Lf and holo-Lf uptake were significantly inhibited in cells transfected with LfR siRNA. Treatments of hypertonic sucrose and clathrin siRNA and co-immunoprecipitation of LfR with clathrin adaptor AP2 indicate that LfR regulates Lf endocytosis via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Although both iron-free Lf (apo-Lf) and iron-saturated Lf (holo-Lf) enter Caco-2 cells via a similar mechanism and no significant differences were observed in the binding and uptake of apo- and holo-Lf in Caco-2 cells, apo-Lf but not holo-Lf stimulates proliferation of Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, apo-Lf stimulated extracellular signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK) cascade to a significantly greater extent than holo-Lf and the apo-Lf induced proliferation was significantly inhibited by an ERK cascade inhibitor (U0126) and clathrin siRNA. Taken together, our data suggest that LfR is a major pathway through which Lf is taken up by enterocytes, which occurs independently of iron saturation through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The differential effects of apo- and holo-Lf are not due to differences in cellular internalization mechanisms. PMID:21935933

  12. Truncation of the peptide sequence in bifunctional ligands with mu and delta opioid receptor agonist and neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist activities

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Padma; Yamamoto, Takashi; Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Cowell, Scott; Kulkarni, Vinod; Moye, Sharif; Navratilova, Edita; Davis, Peg; Ma, Shou-Wu; Vanderah, Todd W.; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Hruby, Victor J.

    2013-01-01

    The optimization and truncation of our lead peptide-derived ligand TY005 possessing eight amino-acid residues was performed. Among the synthesized derivatives, NP30 (Tyr1-DAla2-Gly3-Phe4-Gly5-Trp6-O-[3′,5′-Bzl(CF3)2]) showed balanced and potent opioid agonist as well as substance P antagonist activities in isolated tissue-based assays, together with significant antinociceptive and antiallodynic activities in vivo. PMID:23899615

  13. Endocytosis of apolipoprotein A-V by members of the low density lipoprotein receptor and the VPS10p domain receptor families.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Stefan K; Christensen, Stine; Raarup, Merete K; Ryan, Robert O; Nielsen, Morten S; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2008-09-19

    Apolipoprotein A-V (apoA-V) is present in low amounts in plasma and has been found to modulate triacylglycerol levels in humans and in animal models. ApoA-V displays affinity for members of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene family, known as the classical lipoprotein receptors, including LRP1 and SorLA/LR11. In addition to LDL-A binding repeats, the mosaic receptor SorLA/LR11 also possesses a Vps10p domain. Here we show that apoA-V also binds to sortilin, a receptor from the Vsp10p domain gene family that lacks LDL-A repeats. Binding of apoA-V to sortilin was competed by neurotensin, a ligand that binds specifically to the Vps10p domain. To investigate the biological fate of receptor-bound apoA-V, binding experiments were conducted with cultured human embryonic kidney cells transfected with either SorLA/LR11 or sortilin. Compared with nontransfected cells, apoA-V binding to SorLA/LR11- and sortilin-expressing cells was markedly enhanced. Internalization experiments, live imaging studies, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses demonstrated that labeled apoA-V was rapidly internalized, co-localized with receptors in early endosomes, and followed the receptors through endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. The observed decrease of fluorescence signal intensity as a function of time during live imaging experiments suggested ligand uncoupling in endosomes with subsequent delivery to lysosomes for degradation. This interpretation was supported by experiments with (125)I-labeled apoA-V, demonstrating clear differences in degradation between transfected and nontransfected cells. We conclude that apoA-V binds to receptors possessing LDL-A repeats and Vsp10p domains and that apoA-V is internalized into cells via these receptors. This could be a mechanism by which apoA-V modulates lipoprotein metabolism in vivo. PMID:18603531

  14. Effects of the delta-opioid agonist SNC80 on the abuse liability of methadone in rhesus monkeys: a behavioral economic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Matthew L.; Roma, Peter G.; Folk, John E.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Delta-opioid agonists enhance the antinociceptive efficacy of methadone and other mu-opioid agonists. However, relatively little is known about the degree to which delta agonists might enhance the abuse-related effects of mu agonists. Objective This study used a behavioral economic approach to examine effects of the delta agonist SNC80 [(+)-4-[(αR)-α-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxy-benzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide] on the reinforcing effects of methadone in a drug self-administration assay. Interactions between SNC80 and cocaine were also examined for comparison. Methods Rhesus monkeys (n=4), surgically implanted with indwelling intravenous catheters, were tested in two phases. In phase 1, drug self-administration dose-effect curves for methadone (0.0032–0.1 mg/kg/injection (inj)) and cocaine (0.0032–0.32 mg/kg/inj) alone were determined under a fixed-ratio 10 (FR 10) schedule of reinforcement. In phase 2, FR values were increased every 3 days (FR 1–FR 1800) during availability of methadone alone (0.032 mg/kg/inj) and in combination with varying proportions of SNC80 (0.1:1, 0.3:1, and 0.9:1 SNC80/methadone) or of cocaine alone (0.032 mg/kg/inj) and in combination with varying proportions of SNC80 (0.33:1, 1:1, and 3:1 SNC80/ cocaine). Demand curves related drug intake to FR price, and measures of reinforcement were derived. Results Methadone and cocaine alone each functioned as a reinforcer. SNC80 did not alter measures of reinforcement for either methadone or cocaine. Conclusions SNC80 at proportions previously shown to enhance methadone-induced antinociception did not enhance the abuse-related effects of methadone. These results support the proposition that delta agonists may selectively enhance mu agonist analgesic effects without enhancing mu agonist abuse liability. PMID:21369752

  15. Endocytosis of Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Gaurav; Alakhova, Daria Y; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2010-01-01

    Novel nanomaterials are being developed to improve diagnosis and therapy of diseases through effective delivery of drugs, biopharmaceutical molecules and imaging agents to target cells in disease sites. Such diagnostic and therapeutic nanomaterials, also termed “nanomedicines”, often require site-specific cellular entry to deliver their payload to subcellular locations hidden beneath cell membranes. Nanomedicines can employ multiple pathways for cellular entry, which are currently insufficiently understood. This review, first, classifies various mechanisms of endocytosis available to nanomedicines including phagocytosis and pinocytosis through clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent pathways. Second, it describes the current experimental tools to study endocytosis of nanomedicines. Third, it provides specific examples from recent literature and our own work on endocytosis of nanomedicines. Finally, these examples are used to ascertain 1) the role of particle size, shape, material composition, surface chemistry and/or charge for utilization of a selected pathway(s); 2) the effect of cell type on the processing of nanomedicines; 3) the effect of nanomaterial-cell interactions on the processes of endocytosis, the fate of the nanomedicines and the resulting cellular responses. This review will be useful to a diverse audience of students and scientists who are interested in understanding endocytosis of nanomedicines. PMID:20226220

  16. Adapting for endocytosis: roles for endocytic sorting adaptors in directing neural development

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Chan Choo; Winckler, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Proper cortical development depends on the orchestrated actions of a multitude of guidance receptors and adhesion molecules and their downstream signaling. The levels of these receptors on the surface and their precise locations can greatly affect guidance outcomes. Trafficking of receptors to a particular surface locale and removal by endocytosis thus feed crucially into the final guidance outcomes. In addition, endocytosis of receptors can affect downstream signaling (both quantitatively and qualitatively) and regulated endocytosis of guidance receptors is thus an important component of ensuring proper neural development. We will discuss the cell biology of regulated endocytosis and the impact on neural development. We focus our discussion on endocytic accessory proteins (EAPs) (such as numb and disabled) and how they regulate endocytosis and subsequent post-endocytic trafficking of their cognate receptors (such as Notch, TrkB, β-APP, VLDLR, and ApoER2). PMID:25904845

  17. Synaptic actions of neuropeptide FF in the rat parabrachial nucleus: interactions with opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zidichouski, J A; Harris, K H; Jhamandas, J H

    2000-08-01

    The pontine parabrachial nucleus (PBN) receives both opioid and Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) projections from the lower brain stem and/or the spinal cord. Because of this anatomical convergence and previous evidence that NPFF displays both pro- and anti-opioid activities, this study examined the synaptic effects of NPFF in the PBN and the mechanisms underlying these effects using an in vitro brain slice preparation and the nystatin-perforated patch-clamp recording technique. Under voltage-clamp conditions, NPFF reversibly reduced the evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was not accompanied by apparent changes in the holding current, the current-voltage relationship or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-induced inward currents in the PBN cells. When a paired-pulse protocol was used, NPFF increased the ratio of these synaptic currents. Analysis of miniature EPSCs showed that NPFF caused a rightward shift in the frequency-distribution curve, whereas the amplitude-distribution curve remained unchanged. Collectively, these experiments indicate that NPFF reduces the evoked EPSCs through a presynaptic mechanism of action. The synaptic effects induced by NPFF (5 microM) could not be blocked by the specific mu-opioid receptor antagonist, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (1 microM), but application of delta-opioid receptor antagonist Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe (5 microM) almost completely prevented effects of NPFF. Moreover, the delta-opioid receptor agonist, Deltorphin (1 microM), mimicked the effects as NPFF and also occluded NPFF's actions on synaptic currents. These results indicate that NPFF modulates excitatory synaptic transmission in the PBN through an interaction with presynaptic delta-opioid receptors. These observations provide a cellular basis for NPFF enhancement of the antinociceptive effects consequent to central activation of delta-opioid receptors. PMID:10938301

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Action of an Antimicrobial Model Peptide That Suppresses the TRIF-Dependent Signaling Pathway via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Endocytosis in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Do-Wan; Heo, Kang-Hyuck; Kim, Young-Kyu; Sim, Eun-Jeong; Kang, Tae-Bong; Choi, Jae-Wan; Sim, Dae-Won; Cheong, Sun-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hong; Bang, Jeong-Kyu; Won, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also called host defense peptides, particularly those with amphipathic helical structures, are emerging as target molecules for therapeutic development due to their immunomodulatory properties. Although the antimicrobial activity of AMPs is known to be exerted primarily by permeation of the bacterial membrane, the mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory activity remains to be elucidated. We report potent anti-inflammatory activity of WALK11.3, an antimicrobial model peptide with an amphipathic helical conformation, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. This peptide inhibited the expression of inflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, INF-β, and TNF-α. Although WALK11.3 did not exert a major effect on all downstream signaling in the MyD88-dependent pathway, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- mediated pro-inflammatory signals were markedly attenuated in the TRIF-dependent pathway due to inhibition of the phosphorylation of STAT1 by attenuation of IRF3 phosphorylation. WALK11.3 specifically inhibited the endocytosis of TLR4, which is essential for triggering TRIF-mediated signaling in macrophage cells. Hence, we suggest that specific interference with TLR4 endocytosis could be one of the major modes of the anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. Our designed WALK11 peptides, which possess both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, may be promising molecules for the development of therapies for infectious inflammation. PMID:26017270

  19. Rapid agonist-induced loss of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin opioid receptor sites in NG108-15, but not SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, R.I.; Lameh, J.; Sadee, W. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have measured {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites on intact SK-N-SH and NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells, respectively, in culture. Use of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin ({beta}E) as a tracer, together with {beta}E(6-31) to block high-affinity non-opioid binding in both cell lines, permitted the measurement of cell surface {mu} and {delta} opioid receptor sites. Labeling was at {delta} sites in NG108-15 cells and predominantly at {mu} sites in SK-N-SH cells. Pretreatment with the {mu} and {delta} agonist, DADLE, caused a rapid loss of cell surface {delta} receptor sites in NG108-15 cells, but failed to reduce significantly {mu} receptor density in SK-N-SH cells.

  20. An immersed boundary method for endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yu-Hau; Huang, Huaxiong

    2014-09-01

    Endocytosis is one of the cellular functions for capturing (engulfing) vesicles or microorganisms. Understanding the biophysical mechanisms of this cellular process is essential from a bioengineering point of view since it will provide guidance for developing effective targeted drug delivery therapies. In this paper, we propose an immersed boundary (IB) method that can be used to simulate the dynamical process of this important biological function. In our model, membranes of the vesicle and the cell are treated as Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian interfaces. The membrane-bound molecules are modeled as insoluble surfactants such that the molecules after binding are regarded as a product of a “chemical” reaction. Our numerical examples show that the immersed boundary method is a useful simulation tool for studying endocytosis, where the roles of interfacial energy, fluid flow and viscous dissipation in the success of the endocytosis process can be investigated in detail. A distinct feature of our IB method is the treatment of the two binding membranes that is different from the merging of fluid-fluid interfaces. Another important feature of our method is the strict conservation of membrane-borne receptors and ligands, which is important for predicting the dynamics of the endocytosis process.

  1. Exploiting Endocytosis for Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    Akinc, Akin; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we briefly review the endocytic pathways used by cells, pointing out their defining characteristics and highlighting physical limitations that may direct the internalization of nanoparticles to a subset of these pathways. A more detailed description of these pathways is presented in the literature. We then focus on the endocytosis of nanomedicines and present how various nanomaterial parameters impact these endocytic processes. This topic is an area of active research, motivated by the recognition that an improved understanding of how nanomaterials interact at the molecular, cellular, and whole-organism level will lead to the design of better nanomedicines in the future. Next, we briefly review some of the important nanomedicines already on the market or in clinical development that serve to exemplify how endocytosis can be exploited for medical benefit. Finally, we present some key unanswered questions and remaining challenges to be addressed by the field. PMID:24186069

  2. Endocytosis in enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; de Laffolie, Jan; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Naim, Hassan Y

    2016-05-01

    Endocytosis is a fundamental cell biological process, which carries out essential functions in a polarized epithelial cell such as enterocytes provided with a huge surface area of the brush border membrane. Major tasks of enterocytes, which are regulated by endocytic signals, are digestion and absorption of nutrients and drugs/pharmacological agents, barrier permeability to microorganism, toxins and antigens, and transcytotic crosstalk between intestinal lumen and lamina propria cells with access to the circulation.Investigations on inflammatory bowel diseases such as food allergy, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis focus on immune processes originating within enterocytes as antigen presenting cells. Thus the initiation of oral tolerance, that is, the binding of food antigens to MHC class II proteins, might be localized within late endosomes of enterocytes. Furthermore, the late endosomal compartment of enterocytes seems to be involved in the processing of luminal antigens during the pathogenesis of celiac disease and inflammatory bowel diseases. Investigations of inherited diseases such as microvillus inclusion disease have revealed a pathogenetic defect in the autophagocytotic and/or recycling pathway of enterocytes.Our progress in the cell and molecular biological understanding of the endocytosis and the methodical opportunities of translational research offer now new therapeutic options for patients suffering from endocytosis-related diseases of enterocytes. PMID:26993488

  3. Endocytosis and Endosomal Trafficking in Plants.

    PubMed

    Paez Valencia, Julio; Goodman, Kaija; Otegui, Marisa S

    2016-04-29

    Endocytosis and endosomal trafficking are essential processes in cells that control the dynamics and turnover of plasma membrane proteins, such as receptors, transporters, and cell wall biosynthetic enzymes. Plasma membrane proteins (cargo) are internalized by endocytosis through clathrin-dependent or clathrin-independent mechanism and delivered to early endosomes. From the endosomes, cargo proteins are recycled back to the plasma membrane via different pathways, which rely on small GTPases and the retromer complex. Proteins that are targeted for degradation through ubiquitination are sorted into endosomal vesicles by the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery for degradation in the vacuole. Endocytic and endosomal trafficking regulates many cellular, developmental, and physiological processes, including cellular polarization, hormone transport, metal ion homeostasis, cytokinesis, pathogen responses, and development. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that mediate the recognition and sorting of endocytic and endosomal cargos, the vesiculation processes that mediate their trafficking, and their connection to cellular and physiological responses in plants. PMID:27128466

  4. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms. PMID:25330347

  5. Activation of G protein by opioid receptors: role of receptor number and G-protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Remmers, A E; Clark, M J; Alt, A; Medzihradsky, F; Woods, J H; Traynor, J R

    2000-05-19

    The collision-coupling model for receptor-G-protein interaction predicts that the rate of G-protein activation is dependent on receptor density, but not G-protein levels. C6 cells expressing mu- or delta-opioid receptors, or SH-SY5Y cells, were treated with beta-funaltrexamine (mu) or naltrindole-5'-isothiocyanate (delta) to decrease receptor number. The time course of full or partial agonist-stimulated ¿35SGTPgammaS binding did not vary in C6 cell membranes containing <1-25 pmol/mg mu-opioid receptor, or 1. 4-4.3 pmol/mg delta-opioid receptor, or in SHSY5Y cells containing 0. 16-0.39 pmol/mg receptor. The association of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding was faster in membranes from C6mu cells than from C6delta cells. A 10-fold reduction in functional G-protein, following pertussis toxin treatment, lowered the maximal level of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding but not the association rate. These data indicate a compartmentalization of opioid receptors and G protein at the cell membrane. PMID:10822058

  6. Catching Up with Ultrafast Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Marisa M; Rosenmund, Christian

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism and speed of endocytosis at central synapses after neurotransmitter release is still under debate. In this issue of Neuron,Delvendahl et al. (2016) propose an ultrafast form of endocytosis after single action potentials (APs) at physiological temperature. PMID:27151632

  7. Myoferlin is critical for endocytosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bernatchez, Pascal N.; Sharma, Arpeeta; Kodaman, Pinar

    2009-01-01

    Myoferlin is a member of the ferlin family of proteins that promotes endomembrane fusion with the plasma membrane in muscle cells and endothelial cells. In addition, myoferlin is necessary for the surface expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 through the formation of a protein complex with dynamin-2 (Dyn-2). Since Dyn-2 is necessary for the fission of endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane, we tested the hypothesis that myoferlin may regulates aspects of receptor-dependent endocytosis. Here we show that myoferlin gene silencing decreases both clathrin and caveolae/raft-dependent endocytosis, whereas ectopic myoferlin expression in COS-7 cells increases endocytosis by up to 125%. Interestingly, we have observed that inhibition of Dyn-2 activity or caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression impairs endocytosis as well as membrane resealing after injury, indicating that Dyn-2 and Cav-1 also participate in both membrane fission and fusion processes. Mechanistically, myoferlin partially colocalizes with Dyn-2 and Cav-1 and forms a protein complex with Cav-1 solubilized from tissue extracts. Together, these data describe a new role for myoferlin in receptor-dependent endocytosis and an overlapping role for myoferlin-Dyn-2-Cav-1 protein complexes in membrane fusion and fission events. PMID:19494235

  8. Actin and Endocytosis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Bruce L.; Eskin, Julian A.; Wendland, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis, the process whereby the plasma membrane invaginates to form vesicles, is essential for bringing many substances into the cell and for membrane turnover. The mechanism driving clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) involves > 50 different protein components assembling at a single location on the plasma membrane in a temporally ordered and hierarchal pathway. These proteins perform precisely choreographed steps that promote receptor recognition and clustering, membrane remodeling, and force-generating actin-filament assembly and turnover to drive membrane invagination and vesicle scission. Many critical aspects of the CME mechanism are conserved from yeast to mammals and were first elucidated in yeast, demonstrating that it is a powerful system for studying endocytosis. In this review, we describe our current mechanistic understanding of each step in the process of yeast CME, and the essential roles played by actin polymerization at these sites, while providing a historical perspective of how the landscape has changed since the preceding version of the YeastBook was published 17 years ago (1997). Finally, we discuss the key unresolved issues and where future studies might be headed. PMID:25657349

  9. Actin-Regulator Feedback Interactions during Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinxin; Galletta, Brian J; Cooper, John A; Carlsson, Anders E

    2016-03-29

    Endocytosis mediated by clathrin, a cellular process by which cells internalize membrane receptors and their extracellular ligands, is an important component of cell signaling regulation. Actin polymerization is involved in endocytosis in varying degrees depending on the cellular context. In yeast, clathrin-mediated endocytosis requires a pulse of polymerized actin and its regulators, which recruit and activate the Arp2/3 complex. In this article, we seek to identify the main protein-protein interactions that 1) cause actin and its regulators to appear in pulses, and 2) determine the effects of key mutations and drug treatments on actin and regulator assembly. We perform a joint modeling/experimental study of actin and regulator dynamics during endocytosis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We treat both a stochastic model that grows an explicit three-dimensional actin network, and a simpler two-variable Fitzhugh-Nagumo type model. The models include a negative-feedback interaction of F-actin onto the Arp2/3 regulators. Both models explain the pulse time courses and the effects of interventions on actin polymerization: the surprising increase in the peak F-actin count caused by reduced regulator branching activity, the increase in F-actin resulting from slowing of actin disassembly, and the increased Arp2/3 regulator lifetime resulting from latrunculin treatment. In addition, they predict that decreases in the regulator branching activity lead to increases in accumulation of regulators, and we confirmed this prediction with experiments on yeast harboring mutations in the Arp2/3 regulators, using quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Our experimental measurements suggest that the regulators act quasi-independently, in the sense that accumulation of a particular regulator is most strongly affected by mutations of that regulator, as opposed to the others. PMID:27028652

  10. Cloning and pharmacological characterization of a rat kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, F; Xie, G X; Thompson, R C; Mansour, A; Goldstein, A; Watson, S J; Akil, H

    1993-01-01

    A full-length cDNA was isolated from a rat striatal library by using low-stringency screening with two PCR fragments, one spanning transmembrane domains 3-6 of the mouse delta opioid receptor and the other unidentified but homologous to the mouse delta receptor from rat brain. The novel cDNA had a long open reading frame encoding a protein of 380 residues with 59% identity to the mouse delta receptor and topography consistent with a seven-helix guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptor. COS-1 cells transfected with the coding region of this clone showed high-affinity binding to kappa opioid receptor-selective ligands such as dynorphin A and U-50,488 and also nonselective opioid ligands such as bremazocine, ethylketocyclazocine, and naloxone. Not bound at all (or bound with low affinity) were dynorphin A-(2-13), enantiomers of naloxone and levophanol [i.e., (+)-naloxone and dextrorphan], and selective mu and delta opioid receptor ligands. Activation of the expressed receptor by kappa receptor agonists led to inhibition of cAMP. Finally, in situ hybridization revealed a mRNA distribution in rat brain that corresponded well to the distribution of binding sites labeled with kappa-selective ligands. These observations indicate that we have cloned a cDNA encoding a rat kappa receptor of the kappa 1 subtype. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8234341

  11. Different subtypes of opioid receptors have different affinities for G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Polastron, J; Jauzac, P

    1994-05-01

    In this work, we have characterized the opioid receptor expressed by the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE and compared its hydrodynamic behaviour with those of well known opioid receptors: mu-opioid receptor of rabbit cerebellum and delta-opioid receptor of the hybrid cell line NG 108-15. Human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE expresses a substantial amount of opioid receptors (200-300 fmoles/mg of protein). Pharmacological characterization suggests an heterogenous population of receptors and the presence of two delta subtypes which are, at least partially, negatively coupled with adenylate cyclase via a Gi protein. These receptors exist under two different molecular forms and, in this respect, strikingly contrast with the archetypic delta receptors of NG 108-15 hybrid cell line which show only a high molecular weight form and appear more tightly coupled with the G protein. Hydrodynamic behaviour of SK-N-BE opioid receptors is reminiscent of the profile observed with the rabbit cerebellum mu-opioid receptor. This observation is consistent with the presence of two delta-opioid receptors subtypes, one of which exhibiting properties close to those of mu opioid receptors. Taken overall, our results suggest that different types and subtypes of opioid receptors, even if they are coupled to the same inhibitory G protein, are more or less tightly coupled with their transduction proteins and that closely related opioid receptors can form allosterically interacting complexes. PMID:7920183

  12. In Vivo Techniques to Investigate the Internalization Profile of Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A.; Tawfik, Vivianne L.; Laboy, Alycia F.; Scherrer, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate a remarkable diversity of biological functions, and are thus often targeted for drug therapies. Receptor internalization is commonly observed following agonist binding and activation. Receptor trafficking events have been well characterized in cell systems, but the in vivo significance of GPCR internalization is still poorly understood. To address this issue, we have developed an innovative knock-in mouse model, where an opioid receptor is directly visible in vivo. These knockin mice express functional fluorescent delta opioid receptors (DOR-eGFP) in place of the endogenous receptor, and these receptors are expressed at physiological levels within their native environment. DOR-eGFP mice have proven to be an extraordinary tool in studying receptor neuroanatomy, real-time receptor trafficking in live neurons, and in vivo receptor internalization. We have used this animal model to determine the relationship between receptor trafficking in neurons and receptor function at a behavioral level. Here, we describe in detail the construction and characterization of this knockin mouse. We also outline how to use these mice to examine the behavioral consequences of agonist-specific trafficking at the delta opioid receptor. These techniques are potentially applicable to any GPCR, and highlight the powerful nature of this imaging tool. PMID:25293318

  13. Notch1 endocytosis is induced by ligand and is required for signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chapman, G; Major, J A; Iyer, K; James, A C; Pursglove, S E; Moreau, J L M; Dunwoodie, S L

    2016-01-01

    The Notch signalling pathway is widely utilised during embryogenesis in situations where cell-cell interactions are important for cell fate specification and differentiation. DSL ligand endocytosis into the ligand-expressing cell is an important aspect of Notch signalling because it is thought to supply the force needed to separate the Notch heterodimer to initiate signal transduction. A functional role for receptor endocytosis during Notch signal transduction is more controversial. Here we have used live-cell imaging to examine trafficking of the Notch1 receptor in response to ligand binding. Contact with cells expressing ligands induced internalisation and intracellular trafficking of Notch1. Notch1 endocytosis was accompanied by transendocytosis of ligand into the Notch1-expressing signal-receiving cell. Ligand caused Notch1 endocytosis into SARA-positive endosomes in a manner dependent on clathrin and dynamin function. Moreover, inhibition of endocytosis in the receptor-expressing cell impaired ligand-induced Notch1 signalling. Our findings resolve conflicting observations from mammalian and Drosophila studies by demonstrating that ligand-dependent activation of Notch1 signalling requires receptor endocytosis. Endocytosis of Notch1 may provide a force on the ligand:receptor complex that is important for potent signal transduction. PMID:26522918

  14. On the modeling of endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Sknepnek, Rastko; Schwarz, Jennifer; Bowick, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Endocytosis is the primary mechanism by which extracellular material enters the cell. During endocytosis, the cell membrane deforms to surround the extracellular material and draw it into the cell, followed by a pinch-off to produce an internal vesicle. Recent experiments on clathrin-mediated endocytosis all agree that the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in the deformation of the cell membrane. The actin cytoskeleton is a crosslinked network of filaments exerting active forces. However, competing ideas remain as to precisely how the actin cytoskeleton organizes itself to help drive the deformation. To begin to resolve this controversy, we mathematically model clathrin-mediated endocytosis using variational methods and Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, we investigate how the deformation of the cell membrane depends on the organization of the actin cytoskeletal network, and its associated active forces, to rule out one or more of the competing ideas.

  15. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other. PMID:25010412

  16. Quantitative Analysis of HER2-mediated Effects on HER2 and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Endocytosis: DISTRIBUTION OF HOMO- AND HETERODIMERS DEPENDS ON RELATIVE HER2 LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Opresko, Lee ); Wiley, H Steven ); Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2003-05-15

    Endocytic trafficking plays an important role in the regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. Many cell types express multiple EGFR family members (including EGFR, HER2, HER3 and/or HER4) that interact to form an array of homo- and hetero-dimers. Differential trafficking of these receptors should strongly affect signaling through this system by changing substrate access and heterodimerization efficiency. Because of the complexity of these dynamic processes we used a quantitative, computational model to understand this system. As a test case, parameters characterizing EGFR and HER2 interactions were derived using experimental data obtained from mammary epithelial cells constructed to express different levels of HER2. With this data we were able to estimate receptor-specific internalization rate constants and dimer uncoupling rate constants. These parameters were not otherwise experimentally accessible due to the complex system interplay. Our models indicated that HER2:EGFR heterodimers traffic as single entities. Direct experiments using EGF and anti-HER2 and anti-EGFR antibodies using independently derived cell lines confirmed many of the predictions of the model. Furthermore, our model could predict the relationship between HER2 expression levels and the transient distribution of EGFR homodimers and heterodimers. Our results suggest that the levels of HER2 found on normal cells are barely at the threshold necessary to drive efficient heterodimerization. Thus, altering local HER2 concentrations in membrane microdomains could serve as an effective mechanism for regulating HER2 heterodimerization and could explain why HER2 overexpression found in some cancers have such a profound effect on cell physiology.

  17. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of insulin in lower vertebrates: internalization and intracellular processing of 125I-insulin in isolated hepatocytes of lamprey and frog.

    PubMed

    Lappova, Y L; Leibush, B N

    1995-10-01

    The binding of 125I-insulin to cellular insulin receptors and the internalization of insulin-receptor complexes have been studied in isolated hepatocytes of frog and lamprey. Two classes of binding sites (Kd 10(-9) and 10(-8) M) were found in cells of both species. The molecular weight of the insulin receptor alpha-subunit was 130 kDa in both species. Internalization of bound 125I-insulin in both species was found in the temperature range 0 to 20 degrees. Cells "loaded" with 125I-insulin were used to estimate the fate of the internalized ligand. Release of internalized ligand from frog cells increased at temperatures ranging from 0 to 20 degrees. At 0 degrees the degraded 125I-insulin was 5%, at 5 degrees 7%, and at 20 degrees 17% of total radioactivity accumulated in the medium. In lamprey hepatocytes there was neither radioactivity accumulation in the incubation medium nor release from cells at all temperatures studied. The intracellular degradation of internalized 125I-insulin in frog hepatocytes was much lower than that in lamprey cells. In frog hepatocytes the specific binding of 125I-insulin was increased twofold in the presence of the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine. In contrast no increase was found in lamprey hepatocytes. In conclusion, the processing pathways of internalized insulin in the cells of ectothermal and endothermal vertebrates are generally similar but in ectothermal animals all events take place at lower temperatures and at lower rates. The peculiarities of insulin processing in lamprey hepatocytes most likely result from the transformation of hepatocytes during the nonfeeding prespawning period. PMID:8575649

  18. Nexus of signaling and endocytosis in oncogenesis driven by non-small cell lung cancer-associated epidermal growth factor receptor mutants.

    PubMed

    Chung, Byung Min; Tom, Eric; Zutshi, Neha; Bielecki, Timothy Alan; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2014-12-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) controls a wide range of cellular processes, and aberrant EGFR signaling as a result of receptor overexpression and/or mutation occurs in many types of cancer. Tumor cells in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients that harbor EGFR kinase domain mutations exhibit oncogene addiction to mutant EGFR, which confers high sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). As patients invariably develop resistance to TKIs, it is important to delineate the cell biological basis of mutant EGFR-induced cellular transformation since components of these pathways can serve as alternate therapeutic targets to preempt or overcome resistance. NSCLC-associated EGFR mutants are constitutively-active and induce ligand-independent transformation in nonmalignant cell lines. Emerging data suggest that a number of factors are critical for the mutant EGFR-dependent tumorigenicity, and bypassing the effects of TKIs on these pathways promotes drug resistance. For example, activation of downstream pathways such as Akt, Erk, STAT3 and Src is critical for mutant EGFR-mediated biological processes. It is now well-established that the potency and spatiotemporal features of cellular signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases such as EGFR, as well as the specific pathways activated, is determined by the nature of endocytic traffic pathways through which the active receptors traverse. Recent evidence indicates that NSCLC-associated mutant EGFRs exhibit altered endocytic trafficking and they exhibit reduced Cbl ubiquitin ligase-mediated lysosomal downregulation. More recent work has shown that mutant EGFRs undergo ligand-independent traffic into the endocytic recycling compartment, a behavior that plays a key role in Src pathway activation and oncogenesis. These studies are beginning to delineate the close nexus between signaling and endocytic traffic of EGFR mutants as a key driver of oncogenic processes. Therefore, in this review, we will discuss the links

  19. Cell adhesion defines the topology of endocytosis and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grossier, Jean-Philippe; Xouri, Georgia; Goud, Bruno; Schauer, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Preferred sites of endocytosis have been observed in various cell types, but whether they occur randomly or are linked to cellular cues is debated. Here, we quantified the sites of endocytosis of transferrin (Tfn) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cells whose adhesion geometry was defined by micropatterns. 3D probabilistic density maps revealed that Tfn was enriched in adhesive sites during uptake, whereas EGF endocytosis was restricted to the dorsal cellular surface. This spatial separation was not due to distributions of corresponding receptors but was regulated by uptake mechanisms. Asymmetric uptake of Tfn resulted from the enrichment of clathrin and adaptor protein 2 at adhesive areas. Asymmetry in EGF uptake was strongly dependent on the actin cytoskeleton and led to asymmetry in EGF receptor activation. Mild alteration of actin dynamics abolished asymmetry in EGF uptake and decreased EGF-induced downstream signaling, suggesting that cellular adhesion cues influence signal propagation. We propose that restriction of endocytosis at distinct sites allows cells to sense their environment in an “outside-in” mechanism. PMID:24366944

  20. Analgesic effect of interferon-alpha via mu opioid receptor in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jiang, C L; Son, L X; Lu, C L; You, Z D; Wang, Y X; Sun, L Y; Cui, R Y; Liu, X Y

    2000-03-01

    Using the tail-flick induced by electro-stimulation as a pain marker, it was found that pain threshold (PT) was significantly increased after injecting interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) into the lateral ventricle of rats. This effect was dosage-dependent and abolished by monoclonal antibody (McAb) to IFN alpha. Naloxone could inhibit the analgesic effect of IFN alpha, suggesting that the analgesic effect of IFN alpha be related to the opioid receptors. Beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA), the mu specific receptor antagonist could completely block the analgesic effect of IFN alpha. The selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist, ICI174,864 and the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-BNI both failed to prevent the analgesic effect of IFN alpha. IFN alpha could significantly inhibit the production of the cAMP stimulated by forskolin in SK-N-SH cells expressing the mu-opioid receptor, not in NG108-15 cells expressing the delta-opioid receptor uniformly. The results obtained provide further evidence for opioid activity of IFN alpha and suggest that this effect is mediated by central opioid receptors of the mu subtype. The evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that multiple actions of cytokines, such as immunoregulatory and neuroregulatory effects, might be mediated by distinct domains of cytokines interacting with different receptors. PMID:10676852

  1. The mother of all endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Massive endocytosis is initiated by a series of steps that involve a sudden influx of calcium ions, changes in mitochondria, and modification of surface proteins by lipids. A better understanding of this process could lead to new approaches to reducing the tissue damage that is caused by heart attacks. PMID:24282238

  2. The mechanosensitive APJ internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis: A new molecular mechanism of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    He, Lu; Chen, Linxi; Li, Lanfang

    2016-05-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor APJ elicits cellular response to diverse extracellular stimulus. Accumulating evidence reveals that APJ receptor plays a prominent role in the cardiomyocyte adapting to hypertrophic stimulation. At present, it remains obscure that the regulatory mechanism of APJ receptor in myocardial hypertrophy. The natural endogenous ligands apelin and Elabela as well as agonists maintain high affinity for the APJ receptor and drive its internalization. Ligand-activated receptor internalization is mainly performed by clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway. Simultaneously, clathrin-mediated endocytosis takes participate in the occurrence and development of cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, we hypothesize that natural ligands and agonists induce the mechanosensitive APJ internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. APJ internalization may contribute to the development of cardiac hypertrophy. The mechanosensitive APJ internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis may be a new molecular mechanism of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27063076

  3. Clathrin- and Dynamin-Independent Endocytosis of FGFR3 – Implications for Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Haugsten, Ellen Margrethe; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Brech, Andreas; Pust, Sascha; Olsnes, Sjur; Sandvig, Kirsten; Wesche, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    Endocytosis of tyrosine kinase receptors can influence both the duration and the specificity of the signal emitted. We have investigated the mechanisms of internalization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and compared it to that of FGFR1 which is internalized predominantly through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, we observed that FGFR3 was internalized at a slower rate than FGFR1 indicating that it may use a different endocytic mechanism than FGFR1. Indeed, after depletion of cells for clathrin, internalization of FGFR3 was only partly inhibited while endocytosis of FGFR1 was almost completely abolished. Similarly, expression of dominant negative mutants of dynamin resulted in partial inhibition of the endocytosis of FGFR3 whereas internalization of FGFR1 was blocked. Interfering with proposed regulators of clathrin-independent endocytosis such as Arf6, flotillin 1 and 2 and Cdc42 did not affect the endocytosis of FGFR1 or FGFR3. Furthermore, depletion of clathrin decreased the degradation of FGFR1 resulting in sustained signalling. In the case of FGFR3, both the degradation and the signalling were only slightly affected by clathrin depletion. The data indicate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is required for efficient internalization and downregulation of FGFR1 while FGFR3, however, is internalized by both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent mechanisms. PMID:21779335

  4. Systematic analysis of endocytosis by cellular perturbations.

    PubMed

    Kühling, Lena; Schelhaas, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Endocytosis is an essential process of eukaryotic cells that facilitates numerous cellular and organismal functions. The formation of vesicles from the plasma membrane serves the internalization of ligands and receptors and leads to their degradation or recycling. A number of distinct mechanisms have been described over the years, several of which are only partially characterized in terms of mechanism and function. These are often referred to as novel endocytic pathways. The pathways differ in their mode of uptake and in their intracellular destination. Here, an overview of the set of cellular proteins that facilitate the different pathways is provided. Further, the approaches to distinguish between the pathways by different modes of perturbation are critically discussed, emphasizing the use of genetic tools such as dominant negative mutant proteins. PMID:24947372

  5. ALG-2 interacting protein-X (Alix) is essential for clathrin-independent endocytosis and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Vincent; Laporte, Marine H.; Destaing, Olivier; Blot, Béatrice; Blouin, Cédric M.; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Chatellard, Christine; Saoudi, Yasmina; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Lamaze, Christophe; Fraboulet, Sandrine; Petiot, Anne; Sadoul, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms and the biological functions of clathrin independent endocytosis (CIE) remain largely elusive. Alix (ALG-2 interacting protein X), has been assigned roles in membrane deformation and fission both in endosomes and at the plasma membrane. Using Alix ko cells, we show for the first time that Alix regulates fluid phase endocytosis and internalization of cargoes entering cells via CIE, but has no apparent effect on clathrin mediated endocytosis or downstream endosomal trafficking. We show that Alix acts with endophilin-A to promote CIE of cholera toxin and to regulate cell migration. We also found that Alix is required for fast endocytosis and downstream signaling of the interleukin-2 receptor giving a first indication that CIE is necessary for activation of at least some surface receptors. In addition to characterizing a new function for Alix, our results highlight Alix ko cells as a unique tool to unravel the biological consequences of CIE. PMID:27244115

  6. ALG-2 interacting protein-X (Alix) is essential for clathrin-independent endocytosis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Vincent; Laporte, Marine H; Destaing, Olivier; Blot, Béatrice; Blouin, Cédric M; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Chatellard, Christine; Saoudi, Yasmina; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Lamaze, Christophe; Fraboulet, Sandrine; Petiot, Anne; Sadoul, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms and the biological functions of clathrin independent endocytosis (CIE) remain largely elusive. Alix (ALG-2 interacting protein X), has been assigned roles in membrane deformation and fission both in endosomes and at the plasma membrane. Using Alix ko cells, we show for the first time that Alix regulates fluid phase endocytosis and internalization of cargoes entering cells via CIE, but has no apparent effect on clathrin mediated endocytosis or downstream endosomal trafficking. We show that Alix acts with endophilin-A to promote CIE of cholera toxin and to regulate cell migration. We also found that Alix is required for fast endocytosis and downstream signaling of the interleukin-2 receptor giving a first indication that CIE is necessary for activation of at least some surface receptors. In addition to characterizing a new function for Alix, our results highlight Alix ko cells as a unique tool to unravel the biological consequences of CIE. PMID:27244115

  7. High-density lipoprotein endocytosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Pavelka, Margit; Bittman, Robert; Kovacs, Werner J; Walter, Katharina M; Röhrl, Clemens; Stangl, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To describe the way stations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) uptake and its lipid exchange in endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: A combination of fluorescence microscopy using novel fluorescent cholesterol surrogates and electron microscopy was used to analyze HDL endocytosis in great detail in primary human endothelial cells. Further, HDL uptake was quantified using radio-labeled HDL particles. To validate the in vitro findings mice were injected with fluorescently labeled HDL and particle uptake in the liver was analyzed using fluorescence microscopy. RESULTS: HDL uptake occurred via clathrin-coated pits, tubular endosomes and multivesicular bodies in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. During uptake and resecretion, HDL-derived cholesterol was exchanged at a faster rate than cholesteryl oleate, resembling the HDL particle pathway seen in hepatic cells. In addition, lysosomes were not involved in this process and thus HDL degradation was not detectable. In vivo, we found HDL mainly localized in mouse hepatic endothelial cells. HDL was not detected in parenchymal liver cells, indicating that lipid transfer from HDL to hepatocytes occurs primarily via scavenger receptor, class B, type I mediated selective uptake without concomitant HDL endocytosis. CONCLUSION: HDL endocytosis occurs via clathrin-coated pits, tubular endosomes and multivesicular bodies in human endothelial cells. Mouse endothelial cells showed a similar HDL uptake pattern in vivo indicating that the endothelium is one major site of HDL endocytosis and transcytosis. PMID:24340136

  8. Human podocytes perform polarized, caveolae-dependent albumin endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Okamura, Kayo; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Doctor, R. Brian

    2014-01-01

    The renal glomerulus forms a selective filtration barrier that allows the passage of water, ions, and small solutes into the urinary space while restricting the passage of cells and macromolecules. The three layers of the glomerular filtration barrier include the vascular endothelium, glomerular basement membrane (GBM), and podocyte epithelium. Podocytes are capable of internalizing albumin and are hypothesized to clear proteins that traverse the GBM. The present study followed the fate of FITC-labeled albumin to establish the mechanisms of albumin endocytosis and processing by podocytes. Confocal imaging and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of immortalized human podocytes showed FITC-albumin endocytosis occurred preferentially across the basal membrane. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis demonstrated that the majority of FITC-albumin entered podocytes through caveolae. Once internalized, FITC-albumin colocalized with EEA1 and LAMP1, endocytic markers, and with the neonatal Fc receptor, a marker for transcytosis. After preloading podocytes with FITC-albumin, the majority of loaded FITC-albumin was lost over the subsequent 60 min of incubation. A portion of the loss of albumin occurred via lysosomal degradation as pretreatment with leupeptin, a lysosomal protease inhibitor, partially inhibited the loss of FITC-albumin. Consistent with transcytosis of albumin, preloaded podocytes also progressively released FITC-albumin into the extracellular media. These studies confirm the ability of podocytes to endocytose albumin and provide mechanistic insight into cellular mechanisms and fates of albumin handling in podocytes. PMID:24573386

  9. Ultrasound Microbubble Treatment Enhances Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis and Fluid-Phase Uptake through Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fekri, Farnaz; Delos Santos, Ralph Christian; Karshafian, Raffi

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to tumors is limited by several factors, including drug permeability of the target cell plasma membrane. Ultrasound in combination with microbubbles (USMB) is a promising strategy to overcome these limitations. USMB treatment elicits enhanced cellular uptake of materials such as drugs, in part as a result of sheer stress and formation of transient membrane pores. Pores formed upon USMB treatment are rapidly resealed, suggesting that other processes such as enhanced endocytosis may contribute to the enhanced material uptake by cells upon USMB treatment. How USMB regulates endocytic processes remains incompletely understood. Cells constitutively utilize several distinct mechanisms of endocytosis, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) for the internalization of receptor-bound macromolecules such as Transferrin Receptor (TfR), and distinct mechanism(s) that mediate the majority of fluid-phase endocytosis. Tracking the abundance of TfR on the cell surface and the internalization of its ligand transferrin revealed that USMB acutely enhances the rate of CME. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy experiments revealed that USMB treatment altered the assembly of clathrin-coated pits, the basic structural units of CME. In addition, the rate of fluid-phase endocytosis was enhanced, but with delayed onset upon USMB treatment relative to the enhancement of CME, suggesting that the two processes are distinctly regulated by USMB. Indeed, vacuolin-1 or desipramine treatment prevented the enhancement of CME but not of fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB, suggesting that lysosome exocytosis and acid sphingomyelinase, respectively, are required for the regulation of CME but not fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB treatment. These results indicate that USMB enhances both CME and fluid phase endocytosis through distinct signaling mechanisms, and suggest that strategies for potentiating the enhancement of endocytosis upon USMB treatment may improve targeted

  10. Ultrasound Microbubble Treatment Enhances Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis and Fluid-Phase Uptake through Distinct Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fekri, Farnaz; Delos Santos, Ralph Christian; Karshafian, Raffi; Antonescu, Costin N

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to tumors is limited by several factors, including drug permeability of the target cell plasma membrane. Ultrasound in combination with microbubbles (USMB) is a promising strategy to overcome these limitations. USMB treatment elicits enhanced cellular uptake of materials such as drugs, in part as a result of sheer stress and formation of transient membrane pores. Pores formed upon USMB treatment are rapidly resealed, suggesting that other processes such as enhanced endocytosis may contribute to the enhanced material uptake by cells upon USMB treatment. How USMB regulates endocytic processes remains incompletely understood. Cells constitutively utilize several distinct mechanisms of endocytosis, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) for the internalization of receptor-bound macromolecules such as Transferrin Receptor (TfR), and distinct mechanism(s) that mediate the majority of fluid-phase endocytosis. Tracking the abundance of TfR on the cell surface and the internalization of its ligand transferrin revealed that USMB acutely enhances the rate of CME. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy experiments revealed that USMB treatment altered the assembly of clathrin-coated pits, the basic structural units of CME. In addition, the rate of fluid-phase endocytosis was enhanced, but with delayed onset upon USMB treatment relative to the enhancement of CME, suggesting that the two processes are distinctly regulated by USMB. Indeed, vacuolin-1 or desipramine treatment prevented the enhancement of CME but not of fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB, suggesting that lysosome exocytosis and acid sphingomyelinase, respectively, are required for the regulation of CME but not fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB treatment. These results indicate that USMB enhances both CME and fluid phase endocytosis through distinct signaling mechanisms, and suggest that strategies for potentiating the enhancement of endocytosis upon USMB treatment may improve targeted

  11. Endocytosis of Viruses and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cossart, Pascale; Helenius, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Of the many pathogens that infect humans and animals, a large number use cells of the host organism as protected sites for replication. To reach the relevant intracellular compartments, they take advantage of the endocytosis machinery and exploit the network of endocytic organelles for penetration into the cytosol or as sites of replication. In this review, we discuss the endocytic entry processes used by viruses and bacteria and compare the strategies used by these dissimilar classes of pathogens. PMID:25085912

  12. Numb: "Adapting" notch for endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Jafar-Nejad, Hamed; Norga, Koenraad; Bellen, Hugo

    2002-08-01

    During sensory organ precursor divisions in Drosophila, the numb gene product segregates asymmetrically into one of the two daughter cells, to which it confers a specific fate by inhibiting Notch signaling. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Berdnik et al. show that Numb recruits alpha-Adaptin and that this physical interaction plays a role in downregulating Notch, presumably by stimulating endocytosis of Notch. PMID:12194846

  13. The multiple facets of opioid receptor function: implications for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is characterized by altered reward processing, disrupted emotional responses and poor decision-making. Beyond a central role in drug reward, increasing evidence indicate that opioid receptors are more generally involved in all these processes. Recent studies establish the mu opioid receptor as a main player in social reward, which attracts increasing attention in psychiatric research. There is growing interest in blocking the kappa opioid receptor to prevent relapse, and alleviate the negative affect of withdrawal. The delta opioid receptor emerges as a potent mood enhancer, whose involvement in addiction is less clear. All three opioid receptors are likely implicated in addiction-depression comorbidity, and understanding of their roles in cognitive deficits associated to drug abuse is only beginning. PMID:23453713

  14. Endocytosis of Seven-Transmembrane RGS Protein Activates G- protein Coupled Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Daisuke; Phan, Nguyen; Jones, Janice C.; Yang, Jing; Huang, Jirong; Grigston, Jeffrey; Taylor, J. Philip; Jones, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Signal transduction typically begins by ligand-dependent activation of a concomitant partner which is otherwise in its resting state. However, in cases where signal activation is constitutive by default, the mechanism of regulation is unknown. The Arabidopsis thaliana heterotrimeric Gα protein self-activates without accessory proteins, and is kept in its resting state by the negative regulator, AtRGS1 (Regulator of G protein Signaling 1), which is the prototype of a seven transmembrane receptor fused with an RGS domain. Endocytosis of AtRGS1 by ligand-dependent endocytosis physically uncouples the GTPase accelerating activity of AtRGS1 from the Gα protein, permitting sustained activation. Phosphorylation of AtRGS1 by AtWNK8 kinase causes AtRGS1 endocytosis, required both for G protein-mediated sugar signaling and cell proliferation. In animals, receptor endocytosis results in signal desensitization, whereas in plants, endocytosis results in signal activation. These findings reveal how different organisms rearrange a regulatory system to result in opposite outcomes using similar phosphorylation-dependent endocytosis. PMID:22940907

  15. Synthetic and Receptor Signaling Explorations of the Mitragyna Alkaloids: Mitragynine as an Atypical Molecular Framework for Opioid Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    Kruegel, Andrew C; Gassaway, Madalee M; Kapoor, Abhijeet; Váradi, András; Majumdar, Susruta; Filizola, Marta; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sames, Dalibor

    2016-06-01

    Mu-opioid receptor agonists represent mainstays of pain management. However, the therapeutic use of these agents is associated with serious side effects, including potentially lethal respiratory depression. Accordingly, there is a longstanding interest in the development of new opioid analgesics with improved therapeutic profiles. The alkaloids of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa, represented by the prototypical member mitragynine, are an unusual class of opioid receptor modulators with distinct pharmacological properties. Here we describe the first receptor-level functional characterization of mitragynine and related natural alkaloids at the human mu-, kappa-, and delta-opioid receptors. These results show that mitragynine and the oxidized analogue 7-hydroxymitragynine, are partial agonists of the human mu-opioid receptor and competitive antagonists at the kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. We also show that mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine are G-protein-biased agonists of the mu-opioid receptor, which do not recruit β-arrestin following receptor activation. Therefore, the Mitragyna alkaloid scaffold represents a novel framework for the development of functionally biased opioid modulators, which may exhibit improved therapeutic profiles. Also presented is an enantioselective total synthesis of both (-)-mitragynine and its unnatural enantiomer, (+)-mitragynine, employing a proline-catalyzed Mannich-Michael reaction sequence as the key transformation. Pharmacological evaluation of (+)-mitragynine revealed its much weaker opioid activity. Likewise, the intermediates and chemical transformations developed in the total synthesis allowed the elucidation of previously unexplored structure-activity relationships (SAR) within the Mitragyna scaffold. Molecular docking studies, in combination with the observed chemical SAR, suggest that Mitragyna alkaloids adopt a binding pose at the mu-opioid receptor that is distinct from that of classical opioids. PMID

  16. Endocytosis of the Anthrax Toxin Is Mediated by Clathrin, Actin and Unconventional Adaptors

    PubMed Central

    Abrami, Laurence; Bischofberger, Mirko; Kunz, Béatrice; Groux, Romain; van der Goot, F. Gisou

    2010-01-01

    The anthrax toxin is a tripartite toxin, where the two enzymatic subunits require the third subunit, the protective antigen (PA), to interact with cells and be escorted to their cytoplasmic targets. PA binds to cells via one of two receptors, TEM8 and CMG2. Interestingly, the toxin times and triggers its own endocytosis, in particular through the heptamerization of PA. Here we show that PA triggers the ubiquitination of its receptors in a β-arrestin-dependent manner and that this step is required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In addition, we find that endocytosis is dependent on the heterotetrameric adaptor AP-1 but not the more conventional AP-2. Finally, we show that endocytosis of PA is strongly dependent on actin. Unexpectedly, actin was also found to be essential for efficient heptamerization of PA, but only when bound to one of its 2 receptors, TEM8, due to the active organization of TEM8 into actin-dependent domains. Endocytic pathways are highly modular systems. Here we identify some of the key players that allow efficient heptamerization of PA and subsequent ubiquitin-dependent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the anthrax toxin. PMID:20221438

  17. The Coiled-Coil Domain of EHD2 Mediates Inhibition of LeEix2 Endocytosis and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Maya; Sharfman, Miya; Schuster, Silvia; Avni, Adi

    2009-01-01

    Endocytosis has been suggested to be crucial for the induction of plant immunity in several cases. We have previously shown that two Arabidopsis proteins, AtEHD1 and AtEHD2, are involved in endocytosis in plant systems. AtEHD2 has an inhibitory effect on endocytosis of transferrin, FM-4-64, and LeEix2. There are many works in mammalian systems detailing the importance of the various domains in EHDs but, to date, the domains of plant EHD2 that are required for its inhibitory activity on endocytosis remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that the coiled-coil domain of EHD2 is crucial for the ability of EHD2 to inhibit endocytosis in plants, as mutant EHD2 forms lacking the coiled-coil lost the ability to inhibit endocytosis and signaling of LeEix2. The coiled-coil was also required for binding of EHD2 to the LeEix2 receptor. It is therefore probable that binding of EHD2 to the LeEix2 receptor is required for inhibition of LeEix2 internalization. We also show herein that the P-loop of EHD2 is important for EHD2 to function properly. The EH domain of AtEHD2 does not appear to be involved in inhibition of endocytosis. Moreover, AtEHD2 influences actin organization and may exert its inhibitory effect on endocytosis through actin re-distribution. The coiled-coil domain of EHD2 functions in inhibition of endocytosis, while the EH domain does not appear to be involved in inhibition of endocytosis. PMID:19936242

  18. The coiled-coil domain of EHD2 mediates inhibition of LeEix2 endocytosis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Bar, Maya; Sharfman, Miya; Schuster, Silvia; Avni, Adi

    2009-01-01

    Endocytosis has been suggested to be crucial for the induction of plant immunity in several cases. We have previously shown that two Arabidopsis proteins, AtEHD1 and AtEHD2, are involved in endocytosis in plant systems. AtEHD2 has an inhibitory effect on endocytosis of transferrin, FM-4-64, and LeEix2. There are many works in mammalian systems detailing the importance of the various domains in EHDs but, to date, the domains of plant EHD2 that are required for its inhibitory activity on endocytosis remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that the coiled-coil domain of EHD2 is crucial for the ability of EHD2 to inhibit endocytosis in plants, as mutant EHD2 forms lacking the coiled-coil lost the ability to inhibit endocytosis and signaling of LeEix2. The coiled-coil was also required for binding of EHD2 to the LeEix2 receptor. It is therefore probable that binding of EHD2 to the LeEix2 receptor is required for inhibition of LeEix2 internalization. We also show herein that the P-loop of EHD2 is important for EHD2 to function properly. The EH domain of AtEHD2 does not appear to be involved in inhibition of endocytosis. Moreover, AtEHD2 influences actin organization and may exert its inhibitory effect on endocytosis through actin re-distribution. The coiled-coil domain of EHD2 functions in inhibition of endocytosis, while the EH domain does not appear to be involved in inhibition of endocytosis. PMID:19936242

  19. The architectural relationship of components controlling mast cell endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cleyrat, Cédric; Darehshouri, Anza; Anderson, Karen L.; Page, Christopher; Lidke, Diane S.; Volkmann, Niels; Hanein, Dorit; Wilson, Bridget S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic cells use multiple routes for receptor internalization. Here, we examine the topographical relationships of clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent endocytic structures on the plasma membranes of leukemia-derived mast cells. The high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) utilizes both pathways, whereas transferrin receptor serves as a marker for the classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Both receptors were tracked by live-cell imaging in the presence or absence of inhibitors that established their differential dependence on specific endocytic adaptor proteins. The topology of antigen-bound FcεRI, clathrin, dynamin, Arf6 and Eps15-positive structures were analyzed by 2D and 3D immunoelectron microscopy techniques, revealing their remarkable spatial relationships and unique geometry. We conclude that the mast cell plasma membrane has multiple specialized domains for endocytosis. Their close proximity might reflect shared components, such as lipids and adaptor proteins, that facilitate inward membrane curvature. Intersections between these specialized domains might represent sorting stations that direct cargo to specific endocytic pathways. PMID:23986485

  20. Transferrin: Endocytosis and Cell Signaling in Parasitic Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Reyes-López, Magda; Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Serrano-Luna, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element on Earth and the most abundant metal in the human body. This element is crucial for life because almost all organisms need iron for several biological activities. This is the case with pathogenic organisms, which are at the vanguard in the battle with the human host for iron. The latest regulates Fe concentration through several iron-containing proteins, such as transferrin. The transferrin receptor transports iron to each cell that needs it and maintains it away from pathogens. Parasites have developed several strategies to obtain iron as the expression of specific transferrin receptors localized on plasma membrane, internalized through endocytosis. Signal transduction pathways related to the activation of the receptor have functional importance in proliferation. The study of transferrin receptors and other proteins with action in the signaling networks is important because these proteins could be used as therapeutic targets due to their specificity or to differences with the human counterpart. In this work, we describe proteins that participate in signal transduction processes, especially those that involve transferrin endocytosis, and we compare these processes with those found in T. brucei, T. cruzi, Leishmania spp., and E. histolytica parasites. PMID:26090431

  1. Transferrin: Endocytosis and Cell Signaling in Parasitic Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Luna, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element on Earth and the most abundant metal in the human body. This element is crucial for life because almost all organisms need iron for several biological activities. This is the case with pathogenic organisms, which are at the vanguard in the battle with the human host for iron. The latest regulates Fe concentration through several iron-containing proteins, such as transferrin. The transferrin receptor transports iron to each cell that needs it and maintains it away from pathogens. Parasites have developed several strategies to obtain iron as the expression of specific transferrin receptors localized on plasma membrane, internalized through endocytosis. Signal transduction pathways related to the activation of the receptor have functional importance in proliferation. The study of transferrin receptors and other proteins with action in the signaling networks is important because these proteins could be used as therapeutic targets due to their specificity or to differences with the human counterpart. In this work, we describe proteins that participate in signal transduction processes, especially those that involve transferrin endocytosis, and we compare these processes with those found in T. brucei, T. cruzi, Leishmania spp., and E. histolytica parasites. PMID:26090431

  2. Nodal-mediated epigenesis requires dynamin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ertl, Robin P.; Robertson, Anthony J.; Saunders, Diane; Coffman, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Nodal proteins are diffusible morphogens that drive pattern formation via short-range feedback activation coupled to long-range Lefty-mediated inhibition. In the sea urchin embryo, specification of the secondary (oral-aboral) axis occurs via zygotic expression of nodal, which is localized to the prospective oral ectoderm at early blastula stage. In mid-blastula stage embryos treated with low micromolar nickel or zinc, nodal expression expands progressively beyond the confines of this localized domain to encompass the entire equatorial circumference of the embryo, producing radialized embryos lacking an oral-aboral axis. RNAseq analysis of embryos treated with nickel, zinc or cadmium (which does not radialize embryos) showed that several genes involved in endocytosis were similarly perturbed by nickel and zinc but not cadmium. Inhibiting dynamin, a GTPase required for receptor-mediated endocytosis, phenocopies the effects of nickel and zinc, suggesting that dynamin-mediated endocytosis is required as a sink to limit the range of Nodal signaling. PMID:21337468

  3. Opioid receptors and legal highs: Salvia divinorum and Kratom.

    PubMed

    Babu, Kavita M; McCurdy, Christopher R; Boyer, Edward W

    2008-02-01

    Salvia divinorum and Mitragyna speciosa ("Kratom"), two unscheduled dietary supplements whose active agents are opioid receptor agonists, have discrete psychoactive effects that have contributed to their increasing popularity. Salvia divinorum contains the highly selective kappa- opioid receptor agonist salvinorin A; this compound produces visual hallucinations and synesthesia. Mitragynine, the major alkaloid identified from Kratom, has been reported as a partial opioid agonist producing similar effects to morphine. An interesting minor alkaloid of Kratom, 7-hydroxymitragynine, has been reported to be more potent than morphine. Both Kratom alkaloids are reported to activate supraspinal mu- and delta- opioid receptors, explaining their use by chronic narcotics users to ameliorate opioid withdrawal symptoms. Despite their widespread Internet availability, use of Salvia divinorum and Kratom represents an emerging trend that escapes traditional methods of toxicologic monitoring. The purpose of this article is to familiarize toxicologists and poison control specialists with these emerging psychoactive dietary supplements. PMID:18259963

  4. The function of EHD2 in endocytosis and defense signaling is affected by SUMO.

    PubMed

    Bar, Maya; Schuster, Silvia; Leibman, Meirav; Ezer, Ran; Avni, Adi

    2014-03-01

    Post-translational modification of target proteins by the small ubiquitin-like modifier protein (SUMO) regulates many cellular processes. SUMOylation has been shown to regulate cellular localization and function of a variety of proteins, in some cases affecting nuclear import or export. We have previously characterized two EHDs (EH domain containing proteins) in Arabidospis and showed their involvement in plant endocytosis. AtEHD2 has an inhibitory effect on endocytosis of transferrin, FM-4-64, and the leucine rich repeat receptor like protein LeEix2, an effect that requires and intact coiled-coil domain. Inhibition of endocytosis of LeEix2 by EHD2 is effective in inhibiting defense responses mediated by the LeEix2 receptor in response to its ligand EIX. In the present work we demonstrate that SUMOylation of EHD2 appears to be required for EHD2-induced inhibition of LeEix2 endocytosis. Indeed, we found that a mutant form of EHD2, possessing a defective SUMOylation site, has an increased nuclear abundance, can no longer be SUMOylated and is no longer effective in inhibiting LeEix2 endocytosis or defense signaling in response to EIX. PMID:24154852

  5. Biotinylated human. beta. -endorphins as probes for the opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hochhaus, G.; Gibson, B.W.; Sadee, W.

    1988-01-05

    The reaction of human ..beta..-endorphin and biotinyl N-hydroxysuccinimide with or without spacer arm, afforded a series of products that were separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry of the biotinylated products and their tryptic digests produced abundant protonated molecular ions (MH/sup +/), which specified the number and location of biotinylation. Between 1 and 4 biotinyl residues were incorporated per human ..beta..-endorphin molecule, at Lys-9, -19, -24, -28, and -29, but not at the amino-terminal Try-1. Three HPLC fractions were isolated for receptor binding studies monobiotinylation of Lys-9, Lys-19, and a mixture of Lys-24, Lys-28, and Lys-29 derivatives. IC/sub 50/ values for binding to ..mu.. and delta opioid receptor sites were 3-8 times higher for monobiotinylated derivatives than for the parent human ..beta..-endorphin. Association with avidin decreased opioid receptor affinities for the C/sub 6/ spacer derivative biotinylated at position Lys-9, which is close to the (1-5) enkephalin receptor region. In contrast, avidin did not affect or even increased apparent affinities to ..mu.. and delta sites for derivatives biotinylated at the ..cap alpha..-helical part of the molecule (Lys-19, -24, -28, and -29). Biotinylated human ..beta..-endorphins also bound to low affinity nonopioid binding sites on NG-108-15 cells; however, affinities to these sites were considerably reduced when derivatives were bound to avidin. The ability of biotinylated human ..beta..-endorphin to cross-link the ..mu.. and delta opioid receptors to avidin allows application of the biotin-avidin system as a molecular probe of the opioid receptor.

  6. Ca2+ and calmodulin initiate all forms of endocytosis during depolarization at a nerve terminal

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianhua; Fan, Junmei; Xue, Lei; Melicoff, Ernestina; Adachi, Roberto; Bai, Li; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although endocytosis maintains synaptic transmission, how endocytosis is initiated is unclear. We found that calcium influx initiated all forms of endocytosis at a single nerve terminal in rodents, including clathrin-dependent slow endocytosis, bulk endocytosis, rapid endocytosis and endocytosis overshoot (excess endocytosis), with each being evoked with a correspondingly higher calcium threshold. As calcium influx increased, endocytosis gradually switched from very slow endocytosis to slow endocytosis to bulk endocytosis to rapid endocytosis and to endocytosis overshoot. The calcium-induced endocytosis rate increase was a result of the speeding up of membrane invagination and fission. Pharmacological experiments suggested that the calcium sensor mediating these forms of endocytosis is calmodulin. In addition to its role in recycling vesicles, calcium/calmodulin-initiated endocytosis facilitated vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool, probably by clearing fused vesicle membrane at release sites. Our findings provide a unifying mechanism for the initiation of various forms of endocytosis that are critical in maintaining exocytosis. PMID:19633667

  7. Rab5 Isoforms Specifically Regulate Different Modes of Endocytosis in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Ruchir; Verma, Jitender Kumar; Kapoor, Anjali; Langsley, Gordon; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-07-01

    Differential functions of Rab5 isoforms in endocytosis are not well characterized. Here, we cloned, expressed, and characterized Rab5a and Rab5b from Leishmania and found that both of them are localized in the early endosome. To understand the role of LdRab5 isoforms in different modes of endocytosis in Leishmania, we generated transgenic parasites overexpressing LdRab5a, LdRab5b, or their dominant-positive (LdRab5a:Q93L and LdRab5b:Q80L) or dominant-negative mutants (LdRab5a:N146I and LdRab5b:N133I). Using LdRab5a or its mutants overexpressing parasites, we found that LdRab5a specifically regulates the fluid-phase endocytosis of horseradish peroxidase and also specifically induced the transport of dextran-Texas Red to the lysosomes. In contrast, cells overexpressing LdRab5b or its mutants showed that LdRab5b explicitly controls receptor-mediated endocytosis of hemoglobin, and overexpression of LdRab5b:WT enhanced the transport of internalized Hb to the lysosomes in comparison with control cells. To unequivocally demonstrate the role of Rab5 isoforms in endocytosis in Leishmania, we tried to generate null-mutants of LdRab5a and LdRab5b parasites, but both were lethal indicating their essential functions in parasites. Therefore, we used heterozygous LdRab5a(+/-) and LdRab5b(+/-) cells. LdRab5a(+/-) Leishmania showed 50% inhibition of HRP uptake, but hemoglobin endocytosis was uninterrupted. In contrast, about 50% inhibition of Hb endocytosis was observed in LdRab5b(+/-) cells without any significant effect on HRP uptake. Finally, we tried to identify putative LdRab5a and LdRab5b effectors. We found that LdRab5b interacts with clathrin heavy chain and hemoglobin receptor. However, LdRab5a failed to interact with the clathrin heavy chain, and interaction with hemoglobin receptor was significantly less. Thus, our results showed that LdRab5a and LdRab5b differentially regulate fluid phase and receptor-mediated endocytosis in Leishmania. PMID:27226564

  8. Effects of Endosomal Photodamage on Membrane Recycling and Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, David; Santiago, Ann Marie; Andrzejak, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The flux of receptor-independent endocytosis can be estimated by addition of wortmannin to cell cultures. Membrane influx is unaffected but traffic out of late endosomes is impaired, resulting in a substantial enlargement of these organelles. Using the 1c1c7 murine hepatoma, we investigated the effect of endosomal photodamage on this endocytic pathway. We previously reported that photodamage catalyzed by the lysosomal photosensitizer NPe6 prevented wortmannin-induced endosomal swelling, indicating an earlier block in the process. In this study, we show that endosomal photodamage, initiated by photodamage from an asymmetrically-substituted porphine or a phthalocyanine, also prevents wortmannin-induced endosomal swelling, even when the PDT dose is insufficient to cause endosomal disruption. As the PDT dose is increased, endosomal breakage occurs, as does apoptosis and cell death. Very high PDT doses result in necrosis. We propose that photodamage to endosomes results in alterations in the endosomal structure such that influx of new material is inhibited and receptor-independent endocytosis is prevented. In an additional series of studies, we found that the swollen late endosomes induced by wortmannin are unable to retain previously accumulated fluorescent probes or photosensitizers. PMID:21208213

  9. 3D modeling, ligand binding and activation studies of the cloned mouse delta, mu; and kappa opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Filizola, M; Laakkonen, L; Loew, G H

    1999-11-01

    Refined 3D models of the transmembrane domains of the cloned delta, mu and kappa opioid receptors belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) were constructed from a multiple sequence alignment using the alpha carbon template of rhodopsin recently reported. Other key steps in the procedure were relaxation of the 3D helix bundle by unconstrained energy optimization and assessment of the stability of the structure by performing unconstrained molecular dynamics simulations of the energy optimized structure. The results were stable ligand-free models of the TM domains of the three opioid receptors. The ligand-free delta receptor was then used to develop a systematic and reliable procedure to identify and assess putative binding sites that would be suitable for similar investigation of the other two receptors and GPCRs in general. To this end, a non-selective, 'universal' antagonist, naltrexone, and agonist, etorphine, were used as probes. These ligands were first docked in all sites of the model delta opioid receptor which were sterically accessible and to which the protonated amine of the ligands could be anchored to a complementary proton-accepting residue. Using these criteria, nine ligand-receptor complexes with different binding pockets were identified and refined by energy minimization. The properties of all these possible ligand-substrate complexes were then examined for consistency with known experimental results of mutations in both opioid and other GPCRs. Using this procedure, the lowest energy agonist-receptor and antagonist-receptor complexes consistent with these experimental results were identified. These complexes were then used to probe the mechanism of receptor activation by identifying differences in receptor conformation between the agonist and the antagonist complex during unconstrained dynamics simulation. The results lent support to a possible activation mechanism of the mouse delta opioid receptor similar to that recently

  10. Clathrin light chains' role in selective endocytosis influences antibody isotype switching.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Majeed, Sophia R; Evans, Timothy M; Camus, Marine D; Wong, Nicole M L; Schollmeier, Yvette; Park, Minjong; Muppidi, Jagan R; Reboldi, Andrea; Parham, Peter; Cyster, Jason G; Brodsky, Frances M

    2016-08-30

    Clathrin, a cytosolic protein composed of heavy and light chain subunits, assembles into a vesicle coat, controlling receptor-mediated endocytosis. To establish clathrin light chain (CLC) function in vivo, we engineered mice lacking CLCa, the major CLC isoform in B lymphocytes, generating animals with CLC-deficient B cells. In CLCa-null mice, the germinal centers have fewer B cells, and they are enriched for IgA-producing cells. This enhanced switch to IgA production in the absence of CLCa was attributable to increased transforming growth factor β receptor 2 (TGFβR2) signaling resulting from defective endocytosis. Internalization of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), but not CXCR5, was affected in CLCa-null B cells, and CLC depletion from cell lines affected endocytosis of the δ-opioid receptor, but not the β2-adrenergic receptor, defining a role for CLCs in the uptake of a subset of signaling receptors. This instance of clathrin subunit deletion in vertebrates demonstrates that CLCs contribute to clathrin's role in vivo by influencing cargo selectivity, a function previously assigned exclusively to adaptor molecules. PMID:27540116